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Sample records for allodynia mechanical hyperalgesia

  1. Differential regulation of peripheral IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min J; Lee, Sang Y; Yang, Kui Y; Nam, Soon H; Kim, Hyun J; Kim, Young J; Bae, Yong C; Ahn, Dong K

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the differential mechanisms of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after injection of interleukin (IL) 1β into the orofacial area of male Sprague-Dawley rats. The subcutaneous administration of IL-1β produced both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Although a pretreatment with iodoresiniferatoxin (IRTX), a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist, did not affect IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia, it significantly abolished IL-1β-induced thermal hyperalgesia. On the other hand, a pretreatment with D-AP5, an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, and NBQX, an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, blocked IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia. Pretreatment with H89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, blocked IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia but not thermal hyperalgesia. In contrast, pretreatment with chelerythrine, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, inhibited IL-1β-induced thermal hyperalgesia. Subcutaneous injections of 2% lidocaine, a local anesthetic agent, blocked IL-1β-induced thermal hyperalgesia but not IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia. In the resiniferatoxin (RTX)-pretreated rats, a subcutaneous injection of IL-1β did not produce thermal hyperalgesia due to the depletion of TRPV1 in the primary afferent fibers. Double immunofluorescence revealed the colocalization of PKA with neurofilament 200 (NF200) and of PKC with the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the trigeminal ganglion. Furthermore, NMDA receptor 1 (NR1) and TRPV1 predominantly colocalize with PKA and PKC, respectively, in the trigeminal ganglion. These results suggest that IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia is mediated by sensitized peripheral NMDA/AMPA receptors through PKA-mediated signaling in the large-diameter primary afferent nerve fibers, whereas IL-1β-induced thermal hyperalgesia is mediated by sensitized peripheral TRPV1 receptors through PKC

  2. Swim therapy reduces mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia induced by chronic constriction nerve injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jun; Fox, Lyle E.; Cheng, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neuropathic pain is common and often difficult to treat because it generally does not respond well to the currently available pain medications or nerve blocks. Recent studies in both humans and animals have suggested that exercise may induce a transient analgesia and reduce acute pain in normal healthy individuals. We examined whether swim therapy could alleviate neuropathic pain in rats. Design Rats were trained to swim over a two week period in warm water. After the rats were trained, neuropathic pain was induced by constricting the right sciatic nerve and regular swimming was resumed. The sensitivity of each hind paw was monitored using the Hargreaves test and von Frey test to evaluate the withdrawal response thresholds to heat and touch. Results The paw ipsilateral to the nerve ligation expressed pain-like behaviors including thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Regular swim therapy sessions significantly reduced the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Swim therapy had little effect on the withdrawal thresholds for the contralateral paw. In addition, swim therapy alone did not alter the thermal or mechanical thresholds of normal rats. Conclusions The results suggest that regular exercise, including swim therapy, may be an effective treatment for neuropathic pain caused by nerve injuries. This study, showing that swim therapy reduces neuropathic pain behavior in rats, provides a scientific rationale for clinicians to test the efficacy of exercise in the management of neuropathic pain. It may prove to be a safe and cost-effective therapy in a variety of neuropathic pain states. PMID:23438327

  3. Bilateral mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia after chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Gui; Kong, Wei-Wei; Ge, Da-Long; Luo, Ceng; Hu, San-Jue

    2011-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Low back pain is one of the most inextricable problems encountered in clinics. Animal models that imitate symptoms in humans are valuable tools for investigating low back pain mechanisms and the possible therapeutic applications. With the development of genetic technology in pain field, the possibility of mutating specific genes in mice has provided a potent tool for investigating the specific mechanisms of pain. The aim of the present study was to develop a mouse model of chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion (CCD), in which gene mutation can be applied to facilitate the studies of chronic pain. METHODS Chronic compression of L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia was conducted in mice by inserting fine stainless steel rods into the intervertebral foramina, one at L4 and the other at L5. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were examined with von Frey filaments and radiating heat stimulator, respectively. RESULTS The CCD mice displayed dramatic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia as well as tactile allodynia in the hindpaw ipsilateral to CCD. In addition, this mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia as well as tactile allodynia was also found to spread to the contralateral hindpaw. CONCLUSION This model, combined with the possible genetic modification, will strengthen our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of low back pain. It also favors the development of new treatment strategies for pain and hyperalgesia after spinal injury and other disorders which affect the dorsal root ganglion in humans. PMID:21788994

  4. Tetrodotoxin suppresses thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in a rat full thickness thermal injury pain model.

    PubMed

    Salas, Margaux M; McIntyre, Matthew K; Petz, Lawrence N; Korz, Walter; Wong, Donald; Clifford, John L

    2015-10-21

    Burn injuries have been identified as the primary cause of injury in 5% of U.S. military personnel evacuated from Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Severe burn-associated pain is typically treated with opioids such as fentanyl, morphine, and methadone. Side effects of opioids include respiratory depression, cardiac depression, decrease in motor and cognitive function, as well as the development of hyperalgesia, tolerance and dependence. These effects have led us to search for novel analgesics for the treatment of burn-associated pain in wounded combat service members. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocker currently in clinical trials as an analgesic. A phase 3 clinical trial for cancer-related pain has been completed and phase 3 clinical trials on chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain are planned. It has also been shown in mice to inhibit the development of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. TTX was originally identified as a neurotoxin in marine animals but has now been shown to be safe in humans at therapeutic doses. The antinociceptive effects of TTX are thought to be due to inhibition of Na(+) ion influx required for initiation and conduction of nociceptive impulses. One TTX sensitive sodium channel, Nav1.7, has been shown to be essential in lowering the heat pain threshold after burn injuries. To date, the analgesic effect of TTX has not been tested in burn-associated pain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a full thickness thermal injury on the right hind paw. TTX (8 μg/kg) was administered once a day systemically by subcutaneous injection beginning 3 days post thermal injury and continued through 7 days post thermal injury. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were assessed 60 and 120 min post injection on each day of TTX treatment. TTX significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia at all days tested and had a less robust, but statistically significant suppressive effect on mechanical

  5. Inhibition of endogenous NGF degradation induces mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously shown a sprouting of sympathetic fibers into the upper dermis of the skin following subcutaneous injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the hindpaw. This sprouting correlated with an increase in pain-related sensitivity. We hypothesized that this sprouting and pain-related behavior were caused by an increase in nerve growth factor (NGF) levels. In this study, we investigated whether the inhibition of mature NGF degradation, using a matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 (MMP-2/9) inhibitor, was sufficient to reproduce a similar phenotype. Results Behavioral tests performed on male Sprague–Dawley rats at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after intra-plantar MMP-2/9 inhibitor administration demonstrated that acute and chronic injections of the MMP-2/9 inhibitor induced sensitization, in a dose dependent manner, to mechanical, hot and cold stimuli as measured by von Frey filaments, Hargreaves and acetone tests, respectively. Moreover, the protein levels of mature NGF (mNGF) were increased, whereas the levels and enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 were reduced in the glabrous skin of the hind paw. MMP-2/9 inhibition also led to a robust sprouting of sympathetic fibers into the upper dermis but there were no changes in the density of peptidergic nociceptive afferents. Conclusions These findings indicate that localized MMP-2/9 inhibition provokes a pattern of sensitization and fiber sprouting comparable to that previously obtained following CFA injection. Accordingly, the modulation of endogenous NGF levels should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for the management of inflammatory pain associated with arthritis. PMID:23889761

  6. Complications of sodium hydroxide chemical matrixectomy: nail dystrophy, allodynia, hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bostancı, Seher; Koçyiğit, Pelin; Güngör, Hilayda Karakök; Parlak, Nehir

    2014-11-01

    Ingrown toenails are seen most commonly in young adults, and they can seriously affect daily life. Partial nail avulsion with chemical matrixectomy, generally by using either sodium hydroxide or phenol, is one of the most effective treatment methods. Known complications of phenol matrixectomy are unpredictable tissue damage, prolonged postoperative drainage, increased secondary infection rates, periostitis, and poor cosmetic results. To our knowledge, there have been no reports about the complications related to sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. Herein, we describe three patients who developed nail dystrophy, allodynia, and hyperalgesia after sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. PMID:25514278

  7. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Dustin; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen; Hargreaves, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids . Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain. PMID:27411353

  8. Thermal hyperalgesia and light touch allodynia after intradermal Mycobacterium butyricum administration in rat.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, Maria Isabel; Escribano, Elvira; Calpena, Ana; Domenech, Josep; Queralt, Josep

    2003-10-01

    We examined the time course (7 weeks) of thermal hyperalgesia and light touch allodynia in rats after intradermal administration of Mycobacterium butyricum. Nociceptive thresholds to heat and light touch were assessed. Paw edema and temperature, motor function, body weight, and propioception were also tested. Some rats developed arthritis (named AA rats) but others did not (named non-AA rats). Both groups were compared with healthy animals. Persistent hyperalgesia was found in both groups; in AA rats it appeared before clinical evidence of arthritis. Transient allodynia ocurred only after edema development and fell when edema decreased. Motor function was impaired only in AA rats. The results of this study demonstrate that hyperalgesia, but not allodynia, appeared after Mycobacterium butyricum in both groups, suggesting that changes in sensitivity were not merely the result of local hypersensitivity of the inflamed tissue, but may also be due to alterations in nociception in the central nervous system. PMID:14635786

  9. Role of peripheral and spinal 5-HT(3) receptors in development and maintenance of formalin-induced long-term secondary allodynia and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Hernández, Mariana; Cervantes-Durán, Claudia; Pineda-Farias, Jorge Baruch; Barragán-Iglesias, Paulino; López-Sánchez, Pedro; Granados-Soto, Vinicio

    2012-04-01

    The role of peripheral and spinal 5-HT(3) receptors in formalin-induced secondary allodynia and hyperalgesia in rats was assessed. Formalin produced acute nociceptive behaviors (flinching and licking/lifting) followed by long-term secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in both paws. In experiments where the test drug was anticipated to augment or antagonize the response, 0.5 or 1% formalin, respectively, was used for injection. Peripheral ipsilateral, but not contralateral, pre-treatment (-10 min) with serotonin (5-HT, 10-100 nmol/paw) and the selective 5-HT(3) receptor agonist 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (m-CPBG, 10-300 nmol/paw) increased 0.5% formalin-induced secondary allodynia and hyperalgesia in both paws. Moreover, spinal pre-treatment with m-CPBG (10-300 nmol/rat) increased 0.5% formalin-induced secondary hyperalgesia but not allodynia in both paws. Accordingly, peripheral ipsilateral (30-300 nmol/paw), but not contralateral (300 nmol/paw), and spinal (10-100 nmol) pre-treatment with the selective 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist ondansetron prevented 1% formalin-induced secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in both paws. The peripheral pronociceptive effects of 5-HT (100 nmol/paw) and m-CPBG (300 nmol/paw) as well as the spinal effect of m-CPBG (300 nmol/rat) were completely prevented by the peripheral (10 nmol/paw) and spinal (1 nmol/rat) injection, respectively, of ondansetron. At these doses, ondansetron did not modify per se formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors. Spinal (30-300 nmol/rat), but not peripheral (300 nmol/paw), post-treatment (on day 6) with ondansetron reversed established formalin-induced secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in both paws. Results suggest that a barrage of afferent input induced by 5-HT at peripheral 5-HT(3) receptors participates in the development of formalin-induced long-term secondary allodynia and hyperalgesia in the rat. In addition, our data suggest that spinal 5-HT(3) receptors play an

  10. siRNA-mediated downregulation of GluN2B in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex attenuates mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat model of pain associated with bone cancer

    PubMed Central

    XU, YONGGUANG; WANG, GONGMING; ZOU, XULI; YANG, ZAIQI; WANG, QIN; FENG, HAO; ZHANG, MENGYUAN

    2016-01-01

    It has previously been suggested that the upregulation of GluN2B-containing N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (GluN2B) within the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) may contribute to the development of chronic pain. The present study used a rat model of bone cancer pain in order to investigate whether lentiviral-mediated delivery of small interfering RNAs targeting GluN2B (LV-GluN2B) could attenuate pain associated with bone cancer, by selectively decreasing GluN2B expression within the rACC. Sprague Dawley rats were inoculated with osteosarcoma cells into the intramedullary space of the right tibia in order to induce persistent bone cancer-associated pain. Intra-rACC administration of the lentiviral siRNA was performed in the tumor bearing rats; and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were performed in order to detect the expression levels of GluN2B. Pain behavior changes were evaluated via paw withdrawal threshold and latency determinations. Marked and region-selective decreases in the mRNA and protein expression levels of GluN2B were detected in the rACC following the intra-rACC administration of LV-GluN2B. Furthermore, the rats also exhibited pain behavior changes corresponding to the decreased levels of GluN2B. By post-operative day 14, inoculation of osteosarcoma cells had significantly enhanced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in the rats, which were subsequently attenuated by the intra-rACC administration of LV-GluN2B. Notably, the paw withdrawal threshold and latency of the tumor-bearing rats had recovered to normal levels, by day 14 post-administration. The results of the present study suggest that GluN2B within the rACC may be a potential target for RNA interference therapy for the treatment of pain associated with bone cancer. Furthermore, the lentiviral vector delivery strategy may be a promising novel approach for the treatment of bone cancer pain. PMID:26889244

  11. Chronic restraint stress induces mechanical and cold allodynia, and enhances inflammatory pain in rat: Relevance to human stress-associated painful pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bardin, L; Malfetes, N; Newman-Tancredi, A; Depoortère, R

    2009-12-28

    Whereas acute stress often results in analgesia, chronic stress can trigger hyperalgesia/allodynia. This influence of long-term stress on nociception is relevant to numerous painful pathologies, such as fibromyalgia (FM), characterized by diffuse muscular pain (hyperalgesia) and/or tenderness (allodynia). Hence, there is a need for pre-clinical models integrating a chronic-stress dimension to the study of pain. Here, we assessed the effects of protracted/intermittent stress produced by daily, 1h restraint periods in cylinders, 4 days/week over 5 weeks, on eight models of hyperalgesia and allodynia in rats. This type of stress potentiated chemical hyperalgesia in the formalin model (160 and 76% increase of pain score above controls, during the early and late phases, respectively). It also produced thermal allodynia in response to cold (paw acetone test: 200% increase of allodynia score during week 3-5) and heat (42 degrees C tail immersion test: 15% decrease of withdrawal threshold, from week 2 onward). This stress also resulted in mechanical allodynia in the von Frey filaments model (60% decrease in threshold during week 2-5). However, such a stress regimen had no influence in the Randall-Selitto test of mechanical hyperalgesia, and in the tail immersion models of cold (4 degrees C) or hot (48 degrees C) thermal hyperalgesia, as well as cold (15 degrees C) allodynia. This model of prolonged/intermittent restraint stress may be useful in investigating the mechanisms linking stress and pain, and provide an assay to assess the potential therapeutic efficacy of drugs targeted against painful pathologies with a strong stress component, including but not restricted to FM. PMID:19616033

  12. Dynamic and static components of mechanical hyperalgesia in human hairy skin.

    PubMed

    Koltzenburg, M; Lundberg, L E; Torebjörk, H E

    1992-11-01

    The principle finding of the present study is that there are two types of mechanical hyperalgesia developing in human hairy skin following injurious stimuli. Mechanical hyperalgesia comprises a dynamic component (brush-evoked pain, allodynia) signalled by large myelinated afferents and a static component (hyperalgesia to pressure stimuli) signalled by unmyelinated afferents. While the static component is only found in the injured area, the dynamic component also extends into a halo of undamaged tissue surrounding the injury. The irritant chemicals, mustard oil or capsaicin, were applied transdermally in 20 subjects to a patch (2 x 2 cm) of hairy skin. Both substances evoked burning pain and hyperalgesia to mechanical stimuli. While stroking normal skin with a cotton bud was perceived only as touch prior to chemical stimulation, there was a distinctly unpleasant sensation afterwards. This component of mechanical hyperalgesia persisted for at least 30 min and was present in the skin exposed to the irritants (primary hyperalgesia) as well as in a zone of untreated skin surrounding the injury (secondary hyperalgesia) measuring 38 +/- 4 cm2 after capsaicin. Pressure pain thresholds dropped to 55 +/- 8% of baseline level after mustard oil and to 46 +/- 9% after capsaicin. However, this drop of thresholds was short-lived, lasting 5 min following mustard oil but persisting more than 30 min following capsaicin treatment. The reduction of pressure pain thresholds was only observed for treated skin areas, but not in the surrounding undamaged tissue from where brush-evoked pain could be evoked. When pressure pain thresholds were lowered, the pain had a burning quality which differed distinctly from the quality of brush-evoked pain. On-going burning pain and both types of mechanical hyperalgesia were critically temperature dependent. Mildly cooling the skin provided instant relief from on-going pain, abolished brush-evoked pain and normalized pressure pain thresholds. Rewarming

  13. The Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation on Allodynia and Hyperalgesia in Neuropathic Animals: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Aziznejad, Heidar; Nasirinezhad, Farinaz

    2015-09-01

    Stem cell transplantation has been considered a possible therapeutic method for neuropathic pain. However, no quantitative data synthesis of stem cell therapy for neuropathic pain exists. Therefore, the present systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the efficacy of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMMSC) transplantation on alleviating pain symptoms in animal models of neuropathic pain. In the present meta-analysis, controlled animal studies assessing the effect of administrating BMMSC on neuropathic pain were included through an extensive literature search of online databases. After collecting data, effect sizes were computed and the standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was entered in all analyses. Random-effects models were used for data analysis. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses were performed to investigate expected or measured heterogeneity. Finally, 14 study were included. The analyses showed that BMMSC transplantation lead to significant improvement on allodynia (SMD = 2.06; 95% CI, 1.09 to 3.03; I(2) = 99.7%; P < .001). The type of neuropathy (P = .036), time between injury and intervention (P = .02), and the number of transplanted cells (P = .023) influence the improvement of allodynia after BMMSC transplantation. BMMSC transplantation has no effect on hyperalgesia (SMD = .3; 95% CI, -1.09 to 1.68; I(2) = 100%; P < .001) unless it occurs during the first 4 days after injury (P = .02). The present systematic review with meta-analysis suggests that BMMSC transplantation improves allodynia but does not have any significant effect on hyperalgesia unless it is given during the first 4 days after injury. PMID:25985918

  14. Burn injury-induced mechanical allodynia is maintained by Rac1-regulated dendritic spine dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Samad, Omar A; Liu, Shujun; Bandaru, Samira; Zhao, Peng; Waxman, Stephen G

    2013-10-01

    Although nearly 11 million individuals yearly require medical treatment due to burn injuries and develop clinically intractable pain, burn injury-induced pain is poorly understood, with relatively few studies in preclinical models. To elucidate mechanisms of burn injury-induced chronic pain, we utilized a second-degree burn model, which produces a persistent neuropathic pain phenotype. Rats with burn injury exhibited reduced mechanical pain thresholds ipsilateral to the burn injury. Ipsilateral WDR neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn exhibited hyperexcitability in response to a range of stimuli applied to their hindpaw receptive fields. Because dendritic spine morphology is strongly associated with synaptic function and transmission, we profiled dendritic spine shape, density, and distribution of WDR neurons. Dendritic spine dysgenesis was observed on ipsilateral WDR neurons in burn-injured animals exhibiting behavioral and electrophysiological evidence of neuropathic pain. Heat hyperalgesia testing produced variable results, as expected from previous studies of this model of second-degree burn injury in rats. Administration of Rac1-inhibitor, NSC23766, attenuated dendritic spine dysgenesis, decreased mechanical allodynia and electrophysiological signs of burn-induced neuropathic pain. These results support two related implications: that the presence of abnormal dendritic spines contributes to the maintenance of neuropathic pain, and that therapeutic targeting of Rac1 signaling merits further investigation as a novel strategy for pain management after burn injury. PMID:23933578

  15. Milnacipran inhibits oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia through spinal action in mice.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kitamura, Ryo; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether milnacipran, a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, would have therapeutic effect on oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg) induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection and almost completely subsided by day 20. Ten days post-oxaliplatin injection, the intraperitoneal administration of milnacipran (3-30 mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the established mechanical allodynia. Intrathecal injections of milnacipran (2.1-21 µg/site) also significantly and dose-dependently inhibited mechanical allodynia, but intracisternal and intracereboventricular injections at the same doses did not. The present results suggest that milnacipran is effective against oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and that the antiallodynic effect is mainly mediated by actions on the spinal cord. PMID:25744472

  16. Dynamic mechanical allodynia in humans is not mediated by a central presynaptic interaction of A beta-mechanoreceptive and nociceptive C-afferents.

    PubMed

    Wasner, G; Baron, R; Jänig, W

    1999-02-01

    Recently, Cervero and Laird (NeuroReport, 7 (1996) 526-528; Pain, 68 (1996) 13-23) proposed a new pathophysiological mechanism of dynamic mechanical allodynia in skin. Using the capsaicin pain model in humans, they showed that light mechanical stimulation within an area of secondary mechanical allodynia induces vasodilatation measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry. They suggested that the low-threshold A beta-mechanoreceptive fibres depolarize the central terminals of nociceptive primary afferent neurons via interneurons. Consequently, the vasodilatation is produced by impulses conducted antidromically in nociceptive C-axons. The allodynia was proposed to result from depolarization of central terminals of primary afferent neurons with C-fibres with activation of nociceptive dorsal horn neurons. In order to extend these findings, we used the same experimental approach but additionally stimulated the A beta-fibres electrically to evoke secondary allodynia during simultaneous monitoring skin blood flow. Twenty microlitres of a 0.5% capsaicin solution was injected intradermally into the dorsal forearm. Skin sites that demonstrated dynamic mechanical allodynia but were not located within the area of primary hyperalgesia and flare were investigated. Ten mm away from a laser-Doppler probe, dynamic mechanical allodynia was induced for 1 min (1) by moving a cotton swab and (2) by electrically stimulating the afferent nerve endings transdermally. Increasing stimulus intensities were applied (0.3-4 mA, 40 Hz, pulse duration 0.2 ms). After intracutaneous injection of capsaicin, light mechanical stimulation elicited a burning painful sensation (numeric analogue scale (NAS) 1.5-3) and concomitant movement artefacts at the laser signal. Antidromic vasodilatation was never observed. In this area of dynamic allodynia, electrical stimulation at stimulus intensities that were not painful before capsaicin injection (A beta-stimulation) was now able to elicit a burning painful sensation

  17. The Major Brain Endocannabinoid 2-AG Controls Neuropathic Pain and Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica

    PubMed Central

    Pellkofer, Hannah L.; Havla, Joachim; Hauer, Daniela; Schelling, Gustav; Azad, Shahnaz C.; Kuempfel, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent myelitis is one of the predominant characteristics in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO). While paresis, visual loss, sensory deficits, and bladder dysfunction are well known symptoms in NMO patients, pain has been recognized only recently as another key symptom of the disease. Although spinal cord inflammation is a defining aspect of neuromyelitis, there is an almost complete lack of data on altered somatosensory function, including pain. Therefore, eleven consecutive patients with NMO were investigated regarding the presence and clinical characteristics of pain. All patients were examined clinically as well as by Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) following the protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS). Additionally, plasma endocannabinoid levels and signs of chronic stress and depression were determined. Almost all patients (10/11) suffered from NMO-associated neuropathic pain for the last three months, and 8 out of 11 patients indicated relevant pain at the time of examination. Symptoms of neuropathic pain were reported in the vast majority of patients with NMO. Psychological testing revealed signs of marked depression. Compared to age and gender-matched healthy controls, QST revealed pronounced mechanical and thermal sensory loss, strongly correlated to ongoing pain suggesting the presence of deafferentation-induced neuropathic pain. Thermal hyperalgesia correlated to MRI-verified signs of spinal cord lesion. Heat hyperalgesia was highly correlated to the time since last relapse of NMO. Patients with NMO exhibited significant mechanical and thermal dysesthesia, namely dynamic mechanical allodynia and paradoxical heat sensation. Moreover, they presented frequently with either abnormal mechanical hypoalgesia or hyperalgesia, which depended significantly on plasma levels of the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerole (2-AG). These data emphasize the high prevalence of neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia in patients

  18. Peripheral Receptor Mechanisms Underlying Orofacial Muscle Pain and Hyperalgesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloman, Jami L.

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders (TMD) are severely debilitating and affect approximately 12% of the population. Identifying peripheral nociceptive mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia, a prominent feature of persistent muscle pain, could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. This study provides evidence of functional interactions between ligand-gated channels, P2X3 and TRPV1/TRPA1, in trigeminal sensory neurons, and proposes that these interactions underlie the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. In the masseter muscle, direct P2X3 activation, via the selective agonist αβmeATP, induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, or the TRPA1 antagonist, AP18. P2X3 was co-expressed with both TRPV1 and TRPA1 in masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Moreover, in a subpopulation of P2X3 /TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca2+ transients were significantly potentiated following P2X3 activation. Inhibition of Ca2+-dependent kinases, PKC and CaMKII, prevented P2X3-mechanical hyperalgesia whereas blockade of Ca2+-independent PKA did not. Finally, activation of P2X3 induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 minutes, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Similar data were obtained regarding another nonselective cation channel, the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Our data propose P2X3 and NMDARs interact with TRPV1 in a facilitatory manner, which could contribute to the peripheral sensitization underlying masseter hyperalgesia. This study offers novel mechanisms by which individual pro-nociceptive ligand

  19. Sex differences in mechanical allodynia: how can it be preclinically quantified and analyzed?

    PubMed

    Nicotra, Lauren; Tuke, Jonathan; Grace, Peter M; Rolan, Paul E; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Translating promising preclinical drug discoveries to successful clinical trials remains a significant hurdle in pain research. Although animal models have significantly contributed to understanding chronic pain pathophysiology, the majority of research has focused on male rodents using testing procedures that produce sex difference data that do not align well with comparable clinical experiences. Additionally, the use of animal pain models presents ongoing ethical challenges demanding continuing refinement of preclinical methods. To this end, this study sought to test a quantitative allodynia assessment technique and associated statistical analysis in a modified graded nerve injury pain model with the aim to further examine sex differences in allodynia. Graded allodynia was established in male and female Sprague Dawley rats by altering the number of sutures placed around the sciatic nerve and quantified by the von Frey test. Linear mixed effects modeling regressed response on each fixed effect (sex, oestrus cycle, pain treatment). On comparison with other common von Frey assessment techniques, utilizing lower threshold filaments than those ordinarily tested, at 1 s intervals, appropriately and successfully investigated female mechanical allodynia, revealing significant sex and oestrus cycle difference across the graded allodynia that other common behavioral methods were unable to detect. Utilizing this different von Frey approach and graded allodynia model, a single suture inflicting less allodynia was sufficient to demonstrate exaggerated female mechanical allodynia throughout the phases of dioestrus and pro-oestrus. Refining the von Frey testing method, statistical analysis technique and the use of a graded model of chronic pain, allowed for examination of the influences on female mechanical nociception that other von Frey methods cannot provide. PMID:24592221

  20. Dynamic Mechanical Allodynia-One Clinical Sign, Several Mechanisms: Five Illustrative Cases.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, Michelangelo; Demartini, Laura; Aloisi, Anna Maria; Bonezzi, Cesare

    2016-03-01

    Pain evoked by tangential movement across the skin is usually defined as dynamic mechanical allodynia (DMA). Some patients complain of DMA as troublesome as spontaneous pain and refer a marked interfering with activities of daily living and sleep. Pathophysiology of DMA is complex and can be related to several mechanisms, both nociceptive and neuropathic. Five exemplificative clinical cases of DMA are presented, each associated to a possible specific mechanism: injured skin DMA, peri-injured skin DMA, far injury DMA, nerve-confined DMA and fear DMA (pseudo allodynia). The identification of these subcategories of DMA can stimulate further studies aimed at evaluating the usefulness of a mechanism-based therapy for the different clinical forms of DMA. PMID:26879154

  1. Effects of Adjuvant Analgesics on Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Mechanical Allodynia.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Wataru; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain (CPSP), a potential sequela of stroke, is classified as neuropathic pain. Although we recently established a CPSP-like model in mice, the effects of adjuvant analgesics as therapeutic drugs for neuropathic pain in this model are unknown. Hence, the aim of the present study was to assess the usefulness of our model by evaluating the effects of adjuvant analgesics used for treating neuropathic pain in this mouse model of CPSP. Male ddY mice were subjected to 30 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). The development of hind paw mechanical allodynia was measured after BCAO using the von Frey test. The mechanical allodynia was significantly increased on day 3 after BCAO compared with that during the pre-BCAO assessment. BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by intraperitoneal injections of imipramine (a tricyclic antidepressant), mexiletine (an antiarrhythmic), gabapentin (an antiepileptic), or a subcutaneous injection of morphine (an opioid receptor agonist) compared with that following vehicle treatment in BCAO-mice. By contrast, milnacipran (a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor), paroxetine (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), carbamazepine (antiepileptic), and indomethacin (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) did not affect the BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia. Our results show that BCAO in mice may be useful as an animal model of CPSP. In addition, BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia may be suppressed by some adjuvant analgesics used to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:27150152

  2. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and ectopic neuronal discharge after chronic compression of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Song, X J; Hu, S J; Greenquist, K W; Zhang, J M; LaMotte, R H

    1999-12-01

    Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) was produced in adult rats by implanting a stainless steel rod unilaterally into the intervertebral foramen, one rod at L(4) and another at L(5). Two additional groups of rats received either a sham surgery or an acute injury consisting of a transient compression of the ganglion. Withdrawal of the hindpaw was used as evidence of a nocifensive response to mechanical and thermal stimulation of the plantar surface. In addition, extracellular electrophysiological recordings of spontaneous discharges were obtained from dorsal root fibers of formerly compressed ganglia using an in vitro nerve-DRG-dorsal root preparation. The mean threshold force of punctate indentation and the mean threshold temperature of heating required to elicit a 50% incidence of foot withdrawal ipsilateral to the CCD were significantly lower than preoperative values throughout the 35 days of postoperative testing. The number of foot withdrawals ipsilateral to the CCD during a 20-min contact with a temperature-controlled floor was significantly increased over preoperative values throughout postoperative testing when the floor was 4 degrees C (hyperalgesia) and, to a lesser extent, when it was 30 degrees C (spontaneous pain). Stroking the foot with a cotton wisp never elicited a reflex withdrawal before surgery but did so in most rats tested ipsilateral to the CCD during the first 2 postoperative weeks. In contrast, the CCD produced no changes in responses to mechanical or thermal stimuli on the contralateral foot. The sham operation and acute injury produced no change in behavior other than slight, mechanical hyperalgesia for approximately 1 day, ipsilateral to the acute injury. Ectopic spontaneous discharges generated within the chronically compressed ganglion and, occurring in the absence of blood-borne chemicals and without an intact sympathetic nervous system, were recorded from neurons with intact, conducting, myelinated or unmyelinated

  3. Berberine Ameliorates Cold and Mechanical Allodynia in a Rat Model of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si Oh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the antiallodynic properties of berberine on cold and mechanical allodynia after streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes using a rat model. Diabetic neuropathy was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of STZ. To measure cold and mechanical allodynia, a 4°C plate and von Frey filament were used, respectively. Cold and mechanical allodynia induced by diabetes were significantly decreased by single and repeated intraperitoneal treatment of amitriptyline at 10 mg/kg, and berberine at 10 and 20 mg/kg. The hepatic malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly increased in diabetic rats as compared with those in intact rats; however, in amitriptyline- and berberine-treated rats, they were significantly decreased as compared to the STZ control. The overall effects of berberine 20 mg/kg on cold and mechanical allodynia were quite similar to those of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg, and berberine exhibited similar antioxidant effects as the same dosage of amitriptyline. In conclusion, berberine (10 and 20 mg/kg) was observed to have antiallodynic effects against diabetes, which are presumed to be associated with antioxidative effects. It can be considered that the anti-inflammatory or antidepressant capacity of berberine could contribute to the antiallonynic effects shown in this study. PMID:23734996

  4. Soluble epoxide hydrolase limits mechanical hyperalgesia during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytochrome-P450 (CYP450) epoxygenases metabolise arachidonic acid (AA) into four different biologically active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) regioisomers. Three of the EETs (i.e., 8,9-, 11,12- and 14,15-EET) are rapidly hydrolysed by the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Here, we investigated the role of sEH in nociceptive processing during peripheral inflammation. Results In dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we found that sEH is expressed in medium and large diameter neurofilament 200-positive neurons. Isolated DRG-neurons from sEH-/- mice showed higher EET and lower DHET levels. Upon AA stimulation, the largest changes in EET levels occurred in culture media, indicating both that cell associated EET concentrations quickly reach saturation and EET-hydrolyzing activity mostly effects extracellular EET signaling. In vivo, DRGs from sEH-deficient mice exhibited elevated 8,9-, 11,12- and 14,15-EET-levels. Interestingly, EET levels did not increase at the site of zymosan-induced inflammation. Cellular imaging experiments revealed direct calcium flux responses to 8,9-EET in a subpopulation of nociceptors. In addition, 8,9-EET sensitized AITC-induced calcium increases in DRG neurons and AITC-induced calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sciatic nerve axons, indicating that 8,9-EET sensitizes TRPA1-expressing neurons, which are known to contribute to mechanical hyperalgesia. Supporting this, sEH-/- mice showed increased nociceptive responses to mechanical stimulation during zymosan-induced inflammation and 8,9-EET injection reduced mechanical thresholds in naive mice. Conclusion Our results show that the sEH can regulate mechanical hyperalgesia during inflammation by inactivating 8,9-EET, which sensitizes TRPA1-expressing nociceptors. Therefore we suggest that influencing the CYP450 pathway, which is actually highly considered to treat cardiovascular diseases, may cause pain side effects. PMID:21970373

  5. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents. PMID:26804251

  6. Persistent at-level thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia accompany chronic neuronal and astrocyte activation in superficial dorsal horn following mouse cervical contusion spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jaime L; Hala, Tamara J; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Sannie, Daniel; Lepore, Angelo C

    2014-01-01

    In humans, sensory abnormalities, including neuropathic pain, often result from traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI can induce cellular changes in the CNS, termed central sensitization, that alter excitability of spinal cord neurons, including those in the dorsal horn involved in pain transmission. Persistently elevated levels of neuronal activity, glial activation, and glutamatergic transmission are thought to contribute to the hyperexcitability of these dorsal horn neurons, which can lead to maladaptive circuitry, aberrant pain processing and, ultimately, chronic neuropathic pain. Here we present a mouse model of SCI-induced neuropathic pain that exhibits a persistent pain phenotype accompanied by chronic neuronal hyperexcitability and glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. We generated a unilateral cervical contusion injury at the C5 or C6 level of the adult mouse spinal cord. Following injury, an increase in the number of neurons expressing ΔFosB (a marker of chronic neuronal activation), persistent astrocyte activation and proliferation (as measured by GFAP and Ki67 expression), and a decrease in the expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter GLT1 are observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn of cervical spinal cord. These changes have previously been associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to altered pain transmission and chronic neuropathic pain. In our model, they are accompanied by robust at-level hyperaglesia in the ipsilateral forepaw and allodynia in both forepaws that are evident within two weeks following injury and persist for at least six weeks. Furthermore, the pain phenotype occurs in the absence of alterations in forelimb grip strength, suggesting that it represents sensory and not motor abnormalities. Given the importance of transgenic mouse technology, this clinically-relevant model provides a resource that can be used to study the molecular mechanisms contributing to neuropathic pain

  7. Peripherally injected linalool and bergamot essential oil attenuate mechanical allodynia via inhibiting spinal ERK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kuwahata, Hikari; Komatsu, Takaaki; Katsuyama, Soh; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Shinobu; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Takahama, Kazuo

    2013-02-01

    Bergamot essential oil (BEO) is one of the most common essential oil containing linalool and linalyl acetate as major volatile components. This study investigated the effect of intraplantar (i.pl.) bergamot essential oil (BEO) or linalool on neuropathic hypersensitivity induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) in mice. The i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool into the ipsilateral hindpaw to PSNL reduced PSNL-induced mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. Peripheral (i.pl.) injection of BEO or linalool into the contralateral hindpaw did not yield anti-allodynic effects, suggesting a local anti-mechanical allodynic effect of BEO or linalool in PSNL mice. Anti-mechanical hypersensitivity of morphine was enhanced by the combined injection of BEO or linalool at an ineffective dose when injected alone. We also examined the possible involvement of spinal extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) in BEO or linalool-induced anti-mechanical allodynia. In western blotting analysis, i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool resulted in a significant blockade of spinal ERK activation induced by PSNL. These results suggest that i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool may reduce PSNL-induced mechanical allodynia followed by decreasing spinal ERK activation. PMID:23159543

  8. Effect of acute topical application of +-pentazocine on the mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Hayashi, Shun-suke; Kamei, Junzo

    2010-09-01

    Mechanical allodynia is a major complication in diabetic mellitus. Peripheral sigma(1) receptors were shown to be involved in nociceptive perception. We therefore investigated the effect of sigma(1) receptor ligand (+)-pentazocine injected into the dorsal surface of the hindpaw on mechanical allodynia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Injection of (+)-pentazocine (30 microg) into the dorsal surface of the hindpaw did not affect the mechanical threshold and hindpaw NO contents in non-diabetic mice, whereas the mechanical allodynia and hindpaw contents of NO metabolites in diabetic mice were normalized by (+)-pentazocine. These effects of (+)-pentazocine in diabetic mice were inhibited by pretreatment with an sigma receptor antagonist BD1047 into the same area, but not by systemic pretreatment with a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. These results suggest that (+)-pentazocine injected into the dorsal surface of the hindpaw increases the lowered mechanical threshold in diabetic mice through the activation of peripheral sigma(1) receptors. This attenuation may be, in part, due to the normalization of increased peripheral NO contents in the hindpaw of diabetic mice. PMID:20546721

  9. Inhibition of mechanical allodynia in neuropathic pain by TLR5-mediated A-fiber blockade

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Kim, Yong Ho; Bang, Sangsu; Zhang, Yi; Berta, Temugin; Wang, Fan; Oh, Seog Bae; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Mechanical allodynia, induced by normally innocuous low-threshold mechanical stimulation, represents a cardinal feature of neuropathic pain. Blockade or ablation of high-threshold small-diameter unmyelinated C-fibers has limited effects on mechanical allodynia1–4. While large myelinated A-fibers, in particular Aβ-fibers, have previously been implicated in mechanical allodynia5–7, an A-fiber-selective pharmacological blocker is still lacking. Here we report a new method for targeted silencing of A-fibers in neuropathic pain. We found that Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) is co-expressed with neurofilament-200 in large-diameter A-fiber neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Activation of TLR5 with its ligand flagellin results in neuronal entry of the membrane impermeable lidocaine derivative QX-314, leading to TLR5-dependent blockade of sodium currents predominantly in A-fiber neurons of mouse DRGs. Intraplantar co-application of flagellin and QX-314 (flagellin/QX-314) dose-dependently suppressed mechanical allodynia following chemotherapy, nerve injury, and diabetic neuropathy, but this blockade is abrogated in Tlr5-deficient mice. In vivo electrophysiology demonstrated that flagellin/QX-314 co-application selectively suppressed Aβ-fiber conduction in naive and chemotherapy-treated mice. TLR5-mediated Aβ blockade but not capsaicin-mediated C-fiber blockade also reduced chemotherapy-induced ongoing pain without impairing motor function. Finally, flagellin/QX-314 co-application suppressed sodium currents in large-diameter human DRG neurons. Thus, our findings provide a new tool for targeted silencing of Aβ-fibers and neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:26479925

  10. Thalamic neuronal activity in rats with mechanical allodynia following contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gerke, M B; Duggan, A W; Xu, L; Siddall, P J

    2003-01-01

    Pain and allodynia following spinal cord injury are poorly understood and difficult to treat. Since there is evidence that supraspinal mechanisms are important in such pain, we have studied the role of the thalamus in an experimental model of spinal injury. Extracellular recordings were obtained from neurones of the thalamic nucleus ventralis postero-lateralis (VPL) in normal rats and those which had sustained a contusive spinal cord injury to the thoraco-lumbar junction 7 days previously. Behavioural testing with von Frey hairs established that 11 spinally injured rats showed exaggerated vocal responses to normally innocuous mechanical stimulation (allodynia) whereas eight were non-allodynic. Thalamic VPL neurones in spinally injured rats (both allodynic and non-allodynic) exhibited a dysrhythmia in that a significantly higher proportion fired spontaneously in an oscillatory mode when compared with neurones in uninjured rats. Thus this dysrhythmia was linked to spinal injury, not to allodynia. The evoked responses of VPL thalamic neurones to brushing the skin, however, were significantly elevated in allodynic rats when compared with those in uninjured rats and neuronal afterdischarges to these stimuli (which were absent in uninjured rats) were more common in allodynic than in non-allodynic rats. We have previously reported that a proportion of spinal neurones in allodynic spinally injured rats show increased evoked responses and afterdischarges following brushing the skin and hence the enhanced thalamic responses may reflect a greater spinal input. In view of the increasing evidence that thalamo-cortical rhythmical firing is linked to sensorimotor and cognitive brain functions, we propose that pain following brushing the skin results from an exaggerated spinal input being processed by a dysrhythmic thalamus. Thus both spinal and thalamic mechanisms may be important in the genesis of pain and allodynia following spinal cord injury. PMID:12617975

  11. Unique action mechanisms of tramadol in global cerebral ischemia-induced mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Wataru; Kageyama, Erika; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-06-15

    Central poststroke pain is associated with specific somatosensory abnormalities, such as neuropathic pain syndrome. Although central poststroke pain is a serious condition, details pertaining to underlying mechanisms are not well established, making current standard treatments only partially effective. Here, we assessed the effects of tramadol, an analgesic drug mediated by opioid receptors, using a mouse model of global cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion (30 min) in male ddY mice. Development of hind-paw mechanical allodynia was measured 3 days after bilateral carotid artery occlusion using the von Frey test. Mechanical allodynia was significantly and dose dependently suppressed by intraperitoneal tramadol (10 or 20 mg/kg). These effects, which peaked at 10 min and continued for at least 60 min, were inhibited by naloxone (nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Tramadol antinociception was significantly negated by β-funaltrexamine (selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist, 20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), but not naltrindole (selective δ-opioid receptor antagonist, 5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) or nor-binaltorphimine (selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) after 5 min, by β-funaltrexamine and nor-binaltorphimine but not naltrindole after 10 min, and by all selective opioid receptor antagonists at 15 and 30 min after tramadol treatment. These results suggested that antinociception induced by tramadol through various opioid receptors was time dependent. Furthermore, it is possible that the opioid receptors involved in tramadol-induced antinociception change over time with the metabolism of this drug. PMID:27171031

  12. Evaluation of milnacipran, in comparison with amitriptyline, on cold and mechanical allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Berrocoso, Esther; Mico, Juan-Antonio; Vitton, Olivier; Ladure, Philippe; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Depoortère, Ronan; Bardin, Laurent

    2011-03-25

    Milnacipran, a serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), has shown efficacy against several chronic pain conditions, including fibromyalgia. Here, we evaluated, in rats, its anti-allodynic effects following acute or sub-chronic treatment in a model of neuropathic pain (chronic constriction injury, CCI, of the sciatic nerve). Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant active pre-clinically and clinically against neuropathic pains, was added as a comparison compound. Upon acute i.p. administration, milnacipran was potently efficacious in the CCI model. It significantly reduced thermal allodynia in the cold (4°C) plate test (MED=2.5mg/kg), and attenuated mechanical allodynia in the von Frey filaments test (MED=10mg/kg). Given sub-chronically (7day, b.i.d.), milnacipran was effective at 10mg/kgi.p. in both tests. Acute amitriptyline (10mg/kgi.p.) was efficacious against mechanical, but less so against cold allodynia; under sub-chronic conditions, it was only active against mechanical allodynia. These data show that milnacipran is as efficacious as the reference compound amitriptyline in a pre-clinical model of injury-induced neuropathy, and demonstrate for the first time that it is active acutely and sub-chronically against cold allodynia. They also suggest that milnacipran has the potential to alleviate allodynia associated with nerve compression-induced neuropathic pain in the clinic (for example following discal hernia, avulsion or cancer-induced tissue damage). PMID:21277295

  13. Mechanisms mediating nitroglycerin-induced delayed-onset hyperalgesia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Levine, J D; Green, P G

    2016-03-11

    Nitroglycerin (glycerol trinitrate, GTN) induces headache in migraineurs, an effect that has been used both diagnostically and in the study of the pathophysiology of this neurovascular pain syndrome. An important feature of this headache is a delay from the administration of GTN to headache onset that, because of GTN's very rapid metabolism, cannot be due to its pharmacokinetic profile. It has recently been suggested that activation of perivascular mast cells, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine, may contribute to this delay. We reported that hyperalgesia induced by intradermal GTN has a delay to onset of ∼ 30 min in male and ∼ 45 min in female rats. This hyperalgesia was greater in females, was prevented by pretreatment with the anti-migraine drug, sumatriptan, as well as by chronic pretreatment with the mast cell degranulator, compound 48/80. The acute administration of GTN and compound 48/80 both induced hyperalgesia that was prevented by pretreatment with octoxynol-9, which attenuates endothelial function, suggesting that GTN and mast cell-mediated hyperalgesia are endothelial cell-dependent. Furthermore, A-317491, a P2X3 antagonist, which inhibits endothelial cell-dependent hyperalgesia, also prevents GTN and mast cell-mediated hyperalgesia. We conclude that delayed-onset mechanical hyperalgesia induced by GTN is mediated by activation of mast cells, which in turn release mediators that stimulate endothelial cells to release ATP, to act on P2X3, a ligand-gated ion channel, in perivascular nociceptors. A role of the mast and endothelial cell in GTN-induced hyperalgesia suggests potential novel risk factors and targets for the treatment of migraine. PMID:26779834

  14. Huperzine A Alleviates Mechanical Allodynia but Not Spontaneous Pain via Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhen-Xing; Wang, Yong-Jie; Liu, Li; Wang, Yiner; Mei, Shu-Hao; Feng, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Maode; Li, Xiang-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a major health issue and most patients suffer from spontaneous pain. Previous studies suggest that Huperzine A (Hup A), an alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herb Huperzia serrata, is a potent analgesic with few side effects. However, whether it alleviates spontaneous pain is unclear. We evaluated the effects of Hup A on spontaneous pain in mice using the conditioned place preference (CPP) behavioral assay and found that application of Hup A attenuated the mechanical allodynia induced by peripheral nerve injury or inflammation. This effect was blocked by atropine. However, clonidine but not Hup A induced preference for the drug-paired chamber in CPP. The same effects occurred when Hup A was infused into the anterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, ambenonium chloride, a competitive inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, also increased the paw-withdrawal threshold but failed to induce place preference in CPP. Therefore, our data suggest that acetylcholinesterase in both the peripheral and central nervous systems is involved in the regulation of mechanical allodynia but not the spontaneous pain. PMID:26697233

  15. Huperzine A Alleviates Mechanical Allodynia but Not Spontaneous Pain via Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zhen-Xing; Wang, Yong-Jie; Liu, Li; Wang, Yiner; Mei, Shu-Hao; Feng, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Maode; Li, Xiang-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a major health issue and most patients suffer from spontaneous pain. Previous studies suggest that Huperzine A (Hup A), an alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herb Huperzia serrata, is a potent analgesic with few side effects. However, whether it alleviates spontaneous pain is unclear. We evaluated the effects of Hup A on spontaneous pain in mice using the conditioned place preference (CPP) behavioral assay and found that application of Hup A attenuated the mechanical allodynia induced by peripheral nerve injury or inflammation. This effect was blocked by atropine. However, clonidine but not Hup A induced preference for the drug-paired chamber in CPP. The same effects occurred when Hup A was infused into the anterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, ambenonium chloride, a competitive inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, also increased the paw-withdrawal threshold but failed to induce place preference in CPP. Therefore, our data suggest that acetylcholinesterase in both the peripheral and central nervous systems is involved in the regulation of mechanical allodynia but not the spontaneous pain. PMID:26697233

  16. Yokukansan Improves Mechanical Allodynia through the Regulation of Interleukin-6 Expression in the Spinal Cord in Mice with Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ebisawa, Shigeru; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by nerve injury. Yokukansan (Yi-Gan San), a traditional Japanese (Kampo) medicine, has been widely used for neuropathic pain control. However, the analgesic mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the analgesic mechanisms of yokukansan in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL) induced mechanical allodynia in mice. Repetitive oral administration of the extracts of yokukansan and the constituent herbal medicine Atractylodis Lanceae Rhizoma, but not Glycyrrhizae Radix, relieved mechanical allodynia in the PSL mice and inhibited the PSL-induced expression of interleukin- (IL-) 6 mRNA in the spinal cord. Yokukansan did not attenuate intrathecal IL-6-induced mechanical allodynia. IL-6 immunoreactivity was detected in microglia and astrocytes in the spinal dorsal horn. These results suggest that yokukansan relieves mechanical allodynia in PSL mice by regulating the expression of IL-6 in astrocytes and/or microglia in the spinal cord. In addition, the components of Atractylodis Lanceae Rhizoma, one of the constituent herbal medicines in yokukansan, may play an important role in the regulation of IL-6 expression and neuropathic pain control. PMID:25866544

  17. Serotonin Receptor 2B Mediates Mechanical Hyperalgesia by Regulating Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Su, Yeu-Shiuan; Chiu, Yuan-Yi; Lin, Shih-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2016-05-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)], an inflammatory mediator, contributes to inflammatory pain. The presence of multiple 5-HT subtype receptors on peripheral and central nociceptors complicates the role of 5-HT in pain. Previously, we found that 5-HT2B/2C antagonist could block 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. However, the types of neurons or circuits underlying this effect remained unsolved. Here, we demonstrate that the Gq/11-phospholipase Cβ-protein kinase Cε (PKCε) pathway mediated by 5-HT2B is involved in 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Administration of a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist inhibited the 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. 5-HT injection enhanced 5-HT- and capsaicin-evoked calcium signals specifically in isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative neurons; signals were inhibited by a 5-HT2B/2C antagonist and PKCε blocker. Thus, 5-HT2B mediates 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia by regulating TRPV1 function. PMID:26635025

  18. Electroacupuncture suppresses capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia through an endogenous spinal opioid mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Young; Wang, Jigong; Lee, Inhyung; Kim, Hee Kee; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2009-01-01

    Central sensitization, caused either by tissue inflammation or peripheral nerve injury, plays an important role in persistent pain. An animal model of capsaicin-induced pain has well-defined peripheral and central sensitization components, thus is useful for studying the analgesic effect on two separate components. The focus of this study is to examine the analgesic effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia, which represents central sensitization. Capsaicin (0.5%, 10 μl) was injected into the plantar side of the left hind paw, and foot withdrawal thresholds in response to von Frey stimuli (mechanical sensitivity) were determined for both primary and secondary hyperalgesia in rats. EA (2 Hz, 3 mA) was applied to various pairs of acupoints, GB30-GB34, BL40-BL60, GV2-GV6, LI3-LI6 and SI3-TE8, for 30 min under isofluraine anesthesia and then the effect of EA on mechanical sensitivity of paw was determined. EA applied to the ipsilateral SI3-TE8, but none the other acupoints, significantly reduced capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia but not primary hyperalgesia. EA analgesic effect was inhibited by a systemic non-specific opioid receptor (OR) antagonist or an intrathecal μ- or δ-OR antagonist. EA analgesic effect was not affected by an intrathecal κ-OR antagonist or systemic adrenergic receptor antagonist. This study demonstrates that EA produces a stimulation point specific analgesic effect on capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia (central sensitization), mediated by activating endogenous spinal μ and δ opioid receptors. PMID:19646817

  19. Dynamic mechanical assessment of muscle hyperalgesia in humans: The dynamic algometer

    PubMed Central

    Finocchietti, Sara; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is often associated with a nonhomogeneous distribution of mechanical hyperalgesia. Consequently, new methods able to detect this distribution are needed. OBJECTIVE: To develop and test a new method for assessing muscle hyperalgesia with high temporal and spatial resolution that provides complementary information compared with information obtained by traditional static pressure algometry. METHODS: The dynamic pressure algometer was tested bilaterally on the tibialis anterior muscle in 15 healthy subjects and compared with static pressure algometry. The device consisted of a wheel that was rolled over the muscle tissue with a fixed velocity and different predefined forces. The pain threshold force was determined and pain intensity to a fixed-force stimulation was continuously rated on a visual analogue scale while the wheel was rolling over the muscle. The pressure pain sensitivity was evaluated before, during, and after muscle pain and hyperalgesia induced unilaterally by either injection of hypertonic saline (0.5 mL, 6%) into the tibialis anterior or eccentric exercise evoking delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). RESULTS: The intraclass correlation coefficient was >0.88 for the dynamic thresholds; thus, the method was reliable. Compared with baseline, both techniques detected hyperalgesia at the saline injection site and during DOMS (P<0.05). The dynamic algometer also detected the widespread, patchy distribution of sensitive loci during DOMS, which was difficult to evaluate using static pressure algometry. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The present study showed that dynamic pressure algometry is a reliable tool for evaluating muscle hyperalgesia (threshold and pain rating) with high temporal and spatial resolution. It can be applied as a simple clinical bed-side test and as a quantitative tool in pharmacological profiling studies. PMID:25664539

  20. ATP release mechanisms of endothelial cell-mediated stimulus-dependent hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Elizabeth K.; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin-1 acts on endothelial cells to enhance mechanical stimulation-induced release of ATP, which in turn can act on sensory neurons innervating blood vessels to contribute to vascular pain, a phenomenon we have referred to as stimulus-dependent hyperalgesia (SDH). In the present study we evaluated the role of the major classes of ATP release mechanisms to SDH: vesicular exocytosis, plasma membrane associated ATP synthase, ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters, and ion channels. Inhibitors of vesicular exocytosis (i.e., monensin, brefeldin A and bafilomycin), plasma membrane associated ATPase (i.e., oligomycin and pigment epithelium-derived factor-derived peptide 34-mer) and connexin ion channels (carbenoxolone and flufenamic acid), but not ABC transporters (i.e., dipyridamole, nicardipine or CFTRinh-172) attenuated stimulus-dependent hyperalgesia. These studies support a role of ATP in SDH, and suggest novel targets for the treatment of vascular pain syndromes. PMID:24793242

  1. Oxidative stress in the spinal cord is an important contributor in capsaicin-induced mechanical secondary hyperalgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Erica S; Lee, Inhyung; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2008-09-15

    Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critically involved in persistent pain primarily through spinal mechanisms, thus suggesting ROS involvement in central sensitization. To investigate ROS involvement in central sensitization, the effects of ROS scavengers and donors on pain behaviors were examined in mice. Capsaicin- induced hyperalgesia was used as a pain model since it has 2 distinctive pain components, primary and secondary hyperalgesia representing peripheral and central sensitization, respectively. Capsaicin (25 microg/5 microl) was injected intradermally into the left hind foot. Foot withdrawal frequencies in response to von Frey filament stimuli were measured and used as an indicator of mechanical hyperalgesia. The production of ROS was examined by using a ROS sensitive dye, MitoSox. Mice developed primary and secondary mechanical hyperalgesia after capsaicin injection. A systemic or intrathecal post-treatment with either phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) or 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1 oxyl (TEMPOL), ROS scavengers, significantly reduced secondary hyperalgesia, but not primary hyperalgesia, in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with ROS scavengers also significantly reduced the magnitude and duration of capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia. On the other hand, intrathecal injection of tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH, 5 microl), a ROS donor, produced a transient hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner. The number of MitoSox positive dorsal horn neurons was increased significantly after capsaicin treatment. This study suggests that ROS mediates the development and maintenance of capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia in mice, mainly through central sensitization and that the elevation of spinal ROS is most likely due to increased production of mitochondrial superoxides in the dorsal horn neurons. PMID:18375065

  2. Upregulation of EMMPRIN (OX47) in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to the Development of Mechanical Allodynia after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Sun, Yanyuan; Ren, Yingna; Gao, Yandong; Tian, Li; Liu, Yang; Pu, Yanan; Gou, Xingchun; Chen, Yanke; Lu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are widely implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling associated with various neurodegenerative diseases and play an important role in nociception and allodynia. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) plays a key regulatory role for MMP activities. However, the role of EMMPRIN in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Western blotting, real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and immunofluorescence were performed to determine the changes of messenger RNA and protein of EMMPRIN/OX47 and their cellular localization in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after nerve injury. Paw withdrawal threshold test was examined to evaluate the pain behavior in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. The lentivirus containing OX47 shRNA was injected into the DRG one day before SNL. The expression level of both mRNA and protein of OX47 was markedly upregulated in ipsilateral DRG after SNL. OX47 was mainly expressed in the extracellular matrix of DRG. Administration of shRNA targeted against OX47 in vivo remarkably attenuated mechanical allodynia induced by SNL. In conclusion, peripheral nerve injury induced upregulation of OX47 in the extracellular matrix of DRG. RNA interference against OX47 significantly suppressed the expression of OX47 mRNA and the development of mechanical allodynia. The altered expression of OX47 may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain after nerve injury. PMID:26697232

  3. σ1 receptors activate astrocytes via p38 MAPK phosphorylation leading to the development of mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, J Y; Roh, D H; Yoon, S Y; Choi, S R; Kwon, S G; Choi, H S; Kang, S Y; Han, H J; Beitz, A J; Oh, S B; Lee, J H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spinal astrocytes have emerged as important mechanistic contributors to the genesis of mechanical allodynia (MA) in neuropathic pain. We recently demonstrated that the spinal sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (σ1 receptor) modulates p38 MAPK phosphorylation (p-p38), which plays a critical role in the induction of MA in neuropathic rats. However, the histological and physiological relationships among σ1, p-p38 and astrocyte activation is unclear. Experimental Approach We investigated: (i) the precise location of σ1 receptors and p-p38 in spinal dorsal horn; (ii) whether the inhibition of σ1 receptors or p38 modulates chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced astrocyte activation; and (iii) whether this modulation of astrocyte activity is associated with MA development in CCI mice. Key Results The expression of σ1 receptors was significantly increased in astrocytes on day 3 following CCI surgery. Sustained intrathecal treatment with the σ1 antagonist, BD-1047, attenuated CCI-induced increase in GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes, and the treatment combined with fluorocitrate, an astrocyte metabolic inhibitor, synergistically reduced the development of MA, but not thermal hyperalgesia. The number of p-p38-ir astrocytes and neurons, but not microglia was significantly increased. Interestingly, intrathecal BD-1047 attenuated the expression of p-p38 selectively in astrocytes but not in neurons. Moreover, intrathecal treatment with a p38 inhibitor attenuated the GFAP expression, and this treatment combined with fluorocitrate synergistically blocked the induction of MA. Conclusions and Implications Spinal σ1 receptors are localized in astrocytes and blockade of σ1 receptors inhibits the pathological activation of astrocytes via modulation of p-p38, which ultimately prevents the development of MA in neuropathic mice. PMID:25158784

  4. Effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid treatment over mechanical allodynia and depressive-like behavior associated with experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Redivo, Daiany D B; Schreiber, Anne K; Adami, Eliana R; Ribeiro, Deidiane E; Joca, Samia R L; Zanoveli, Janaína M; Cunha, Joice M

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain and depression are very common comorbidities in diabetic patients. As the pathophysiological mechanisms are very complex and multifactorial, current treatments are only symptomatic and often worsen the glucose control. Thus, the search for more effective treatments are extremely urgent. In this way, we aimed to investigate the effect of chronic treatment with fish oil (FO), a source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, over the mechanical allodynia and in depressive-like behaviors in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. It was observed that the diabetic (DBT) animals, when compared to normoglycemic (NGL) animals, developed a significant mechanical allodynia since the second week after diabetes induction, peaking at fourth week which is completely prevented by FO treatment (0.5, 1 or 3g/kg). Moreover, DBT animals showed an increase of immobility frequency and a decrease of swimming and climbing frequencies in modified forced swimming test (MFST) since the second week after diabetes injection, lasting up at the 4th week. FO treatment (only at a dose of 3g/kg) significantly decreased the immobility frequency and increased the swimming frequency, but did not induce significant changes in the climbing frequency in DBT rats. Moreover, it was observed that DBT animals had significantly lower levels of BDNF in both hippocampus and pre frontal cortex when compared to NGL rats, which is completely prevented by FO treatment. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that FO treatment was able to prevent the mechanical allodynia and the depressive-like behaviors in DBT rats, which seems to be related to its capacity of BDNF level restoration. PMID:26546881

  5. TRPC1 and TRPC6 channels cooperate with TRPV4 to mediate mechanical hyperalgesia and nociceptor sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Alessandri-Haber, Nicole; Dina, Olayinka A.; Chen, Xiaoje; Levine, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) contributes to mechanical hyperalgesia of diverse etiologies, presumably as part of a mechanoreceptor signaling complex (Alessandri-Haber et al., 2008). To investigate the hypothesis that a functional interaction between TRPV4 and stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) is involved in this mechanical transduction mechanism, we used a selective SACs inhibitor, GsMTx-4. Intradermal injection of GsMTx-4 in the rat hind paw reversed the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by intradermal injection of inflammatory mediators. In vivo single fiber recordings showed that GsMTx-4 reversed inflammatory mediator-induced decrease in mechanical threshold in half of sensitized C-fibers. Furthermore, GsMTx-4 reduced hyperalgesia to both mechanical and hypotonic stimuli in different models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain while it had no effect on baseline mechanical nociceptive thresholds. TRPC1 and TRPC6, two GsMTx-4-sensitive SACs are expressed in dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG). Single-cell RT-PCR showed that messenger RNAs for TRPV4, TRPC1 and TRPC6 are frequently co-expressed in DRG neurons. Spinal intrathecal administration of oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to TRPC1 and TRPC6, like that to TRPV4, reversed the hyperalgesia to mechanical and hypotonic stimuli induced by inflammatory mediators without affecting baseline mechanical nociceptive threshold. However, antisense to TRPC6, but not to TRPC1, reversed the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by a thermal injury or the TRPV4 selective agonist 4α-PDD. We conclude that TRPC1 and TRPC6 channels cooperate with TRPV4 channels to mediate mechanical hyperalgesia and primary afferent nociceptor sensitization although they may have distinctive roles. PMID:19439599

  6. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Wei; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Ren, Ning; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Li, Yong-Qi

    2010-05-14

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1{beta} was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1{beta} was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1{beta}. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1{beta} expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  7. Responses of spinal neurones to cutaneous and dorsal root stimuli in rats with mechanical allodynia after contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Drew, G M; Siddall, P J; Duggan, A W

    2001-03-01

    The firing of neurones in spinal segments adjacent to a contusive T13 spinal cord injury was characterised in anaesthetised rats. Three groups of rats were examined: (1) allodynic spinally injured, (2) non-allodynic spinally injured and (3) normal, uninjured. Spinal cord field potentials evoked by electrical dorsal root stimulation and the responses of 207 dorsal horn neurones to mechanical stimuli applied to the skin were studied. Within the lesioned spinal segment few active neurones were encountered and field potentials were absent. Depolarising field potentials recorded rostral to the lesion were reduced in both allodynic and non-allodynic animals compared to uninjured controls, while those recorded in caudal segments were enhanced in allodynic animals. Neuronal recordings revealed that allodynia was associated with exaggerated responses, including afterdischarges, to innocuous and noxious mechanical stimuli in a proportion of wide dynamic range, but not low threshold, neurones. These changes were observed both rostral and caudal to the site of injury. The results suggest that an increased responsiveness of some dorsal horn neurones in segments neighbouring a contusive spinal cord injury may contribute to the expression of mechanical allodynia. It is proposed that a relative lack of inhibition underlies altered cell responses. PMID:11222993

  8. FXYD2, a γ subunit of Na+,K+-ATPase, maintains persistent mechanical allodynia induced by inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Cai, Bing; Li, Kai-Cheng; Hu, Xu-Ye; Lu, Ying-Jin; Wang, Qiong; Bao, Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA) is required to generate the resting membrane potential in neurons. Nociceptive afferent neurons express not only the α and β subunits of NKA but also the γ subunit FXYD2. However, the neural function of FXYD2 is unknown. The present study shows that FXYD2 in nociceptive neurons is necessary for maintaining the mechanical allodynia induced by peripheral inflammation. FXYD2 interacted with α1NKA and negatively regulated the NKA activity, depolarizing the membrane potential of nociceptive neurons. Mechanical allodynia initiated in FXYD2-deficient mice was abolished 4 days after inflammation, whereas it persisted for at least 3 weeks in wild-type mice. Importantly, the FXYD2/α1NKA interaction gradually increased after inflammation and peaked on day 4 post inflammation, resulting in reduction of NKA activity, depolarization of neuron membrane and facilitation of excitatory afferent neurotransmission. Thus, the increased FXYD2 activity may be a fundamental mechanism underlying the persistent hypersensitivity to pain induced by inflammation. PMID:25633594

  9. Glycemia-dependent Nuclear Factor κB Activation Contributes to Mechanical Allodynia in Rats with Chronic Postischemia Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Huot, Marie-Christine; Laferrière, André; Khorashadi, Mina; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemia-reperfusion injury causes chronic postischemia pain (CPIP), and rats with higher glycemia during ischemia-reperfusion injury exhibit increased allodynia. Glycemia-induced elevation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB) may contribute to increased allodynia. Methods Glycemia during a 3 h ischemia-reperfusion injury was manipulated by: normal feeding; or normal feeding with administration of insulin; dextrose; or insulin/dextrose. In these groups, NFκB was measured in ipsilateral hind paw muscle and spinal dorsal horn by ELISA, and SN50, an NFκB inhibitor, was administered to determine its differential anti-allodynic effects depending on glycemia. Results CPIP fed/insulin rats (12.03 ± 4.9, N = 6) had less allodynia than fed, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed/dextrose rats (6.29 ± 3.37 N = 7, 4.57 ± 3.03 g, N = 6, 2.95 ± 1.10, N = 9), respectively. Compared to fed rats (0.209 ± 0.022, N = 7), NFκB in ipsilateral plantar muscles was significantly lower for fed/insulin rats and significantly higher for fed/dextrose rats (0.152 ± 0.053, N = 6; 0.240 ± 0.057, N = 7, respectively). Furthermore, NFκB in the dorsal horn of fed, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed/dextrose rats (0.293 ± 0.049, N = 6) was significantly higher than in fed/insulin animals (0.267 ± 0.037, N = 6). The anti-allodynic SN50 dose-response curves of CPIP rats in the fed/insulin/dextrose, fed/dextrose and fed conditions exhibited a rightward shift compared to the fed/insulin group. The threshold SN50 dose of CPIP fed/dextrose, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed rats (328.94 ± 92.4, 77.80 ± 44.50 and 24.89 ± 17.20, respectively) was higher than that for fed/insulin rats (4.06 ± 7.04). Conclusions NFκB was activated in a glycemia-dependent manner in CPIP rats. Hypoglycemic rats were more sensitive to SN50 than rats with higher glycemia. The finding that SN50 reduces mechanical allodynia suggests that NFκB inhibitors might be useful for treating postischemia pain. PMID:23695173

  10. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice display cold allodynia, but enhanced recovery from spared-nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Piskoun, Boris; Russo, Lori; Norcini, Monica; Blanck, Thomas; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Background The function of the Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Mounting evidence suggest that CB1R expression and activation may contribute to pain. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice (CB1R−/−) generated on a C57Bl/6 background exhibit hypoalgesia in the hotplate assay and formalin test. These findings suggest that Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression mediates the responses to at least some types of painful stimuli. By using this mouse line, we sought to determine if the lack of Cannabinoid 1 receptor unveils a general hypoalgesic phenotype, including protection against the development of neuropathic pain. The acetone test was used to measure cold sensitivity, the electronic von Frey was used to measure mechanical thresholds before and after spared-nerve injury, and analysis of footprint patterns was conducted to determine if motor function is differentially affected after nerve-injury in mice with varying levels of Cannabinoid 1 receptor. Results At baseline, CB1R−/− mice were hypersensitive in the acetone test, and this phenotype was maintained after spared-nerve injury. Using calcium imaging of lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, a higher percentage of neurons isolated from CB1R−/− mice were menthol sensitive relative to DRG isolated from wild-type (CB1R+/+) mice. Baseline mechanical thresholds did not differ among genotypes, and mechanical hypersensitivity developed similarly in the first two weeks following spared-nerve injury (SNI). At two weeks post-SNI, CB1R−/− mice recovered significantly from mechanical hypersensitivity, while the CB1R+/+ mice did not. Heterozygous knockouts (CB1R+/−) transiently developed cold allodynia only after injury, but recovered mechanical thresholds to a similar extent as the CB1R−/− mice. Sciatic functional indices, which reflect overall nerve health, and alternation coefficients, which indicate uniformity of strides, were not significantly different

  11. Clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist relieves mechanical allodynia in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic mice; potentiation by spinal p38 MAPK inhibition without motor dysfunction and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Ji-Hee; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kim, Sol-Ji; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern; Beitz, Alvin J; Roh, Dae-Hyun

    2016-05-15

    Cancer chemotherapy with platinum-based antineoplastic agents including oxaliplatin frequently results in a debilitating and painful peripheral neuropathy. We evaluated the antinociceptive effects of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. Specifically, we determined if (i) the intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of clonidine reduces mechanical allodynia in mice with an oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and (ii) concurrent inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 enhances clonidine's antiallodynic effect. Clonidine (0.01-0.1 mg kg(-1), i.p.), with or without SB203580(1-10 nmol, intrathecal) was administered two weeks after oxaliplatin injection(10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) to mice. Mechanical withdrawal threshold, motor coordination and blood pressure were measured. Postmortem expression of p38 MAPK and ERK as well as their phosphorylated forms(p-p38 and p-ERK) were quantified 30 min or 4 hr after drug injection in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated and control mice. Clonidine dose-dependently reduced oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and spinal p-p38 MAPK expression, but not p-ERK. At 0.1 mg kg(-1), clonidine also impaired motor coordination and decreased blood pressure. A 10 nmol dose of SB203580 alone significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and p-p38 MAPK expression, while a subeffective dose(3 nmol) potentiated the antiallodynic effect of 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine and reduced the increased p-p38 MAPK. Coadministration of SB203580 and 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine decreased allodynia similar to that of 0.10 mg kg(-1) clonidine, but without significant motor or vascular effects. These findings demonstrate that clonidine treatment reduces oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. The concurrent administration of SB203580 reduces the dosage requirements for clonidine, thereby alleviating allodynia without producing undesirable motor or cardiovascular effects. PMID

  12. Neonatal handling (resilience) attenuates water-avoidance stress induced enhancement of chronic mechanical hyperalgesia in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Levine, Jon D.; Green, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is well known to exacerbate pain. We tested the hypothesis that neonatal handling, which induces resilience to the negative impact of stress by increasing the quality and quantity of maternal care, attenuates the mechanical hyperalgesia produced by water-avoidance stress in the adult rat. Neonatal male rats underwent the handling protocol on postnatal days 2–9, weaned at 21 days and tested for muscle mechanical nociceptive threshold at postnatal days 50–75. Decrease in mechanical nociceptive threshold in skeletal muscle in adult rats, produced by exposure to water-avoidance stress, was significantly attenuated by neonatal handling. Neonatal handling also attenuated the mechanical hyperalgesia produced by intramuscular administration of the pronociceptive inflammatory mediator, prostaglandin E2 in rats exposed as adults to water-avoidance stress. Neonatal handling, which induces a smaller corticosterone response in adult rats exposed to a stressor as well as changes in central nervous system neurotransmitter systems, attenuates mechanical hyperalgesia produced by water-avoidance stress and enhanced prostaglandin hyperalgesia in adult animals. PMID:25637700

  13. Intraarticular injection of hyaluronan prevents cartilage erosion, periarticular fibrosis and mechanical allodynia and normalizes stance time in murine knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Intraarticular hyaluronan (HA) is used clinically for symptomatic relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA); however, the mechanism of action is unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of a single injection of HA on joint tissue pathology, mechanical allodynia and gait changes (measured by stride times) in a murine model of OA. Methods OA was induced in the right knee joint (stifle) of 12-week-old male C57BL/6 mice by transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) injection and treadmill running for 14 days. Gait parameters were quantified by using TreadScan, mechanical allodynia was evaluated with von Frey filaments, and joint pathology was evaluated by scoring of macroscopic images for both cartilage erosion and periarticular fibrosis. HA or saline control was injected 1 day after TGFβ1 injection but before the start of treadmill running. Results OA development in this model was accompanied by significant (P < 0.01) enhancement of the stance and propulsion times of affected legs. HA injection (but not saline injection) blocked all gait changes and also protected joints from femoral cartilage erosion as well as tibial and femoral tissue fibrosis. Both HA injection and saline injection attenuated acute allodynia, but the HA effect was more pronounced and prolonged than the saline injection. Conclusions We conclude that videographic gait analysis is an objective, sensitive and reproducible means of monitoring joint pathology in experimental murine OA, since stance time appears to correlate directly with OA severity. A single injection of HA prevents acute and prolonged gait changes and ameliorates the cartilage erosion and periarticular fibrosis normally seen in this model. We speculate that the capacity of HA to prevent cartilage erosion results from its normalization of joint biomechanics and its inhibitory effects on periarticular cells, which are involved in tissue hyperplasia and fibrosis. This effect of exogenous HA appears to mimic the

  14. Sex-dependent roles of prolactin and prolactin receptor in postoperative pain and hyperalgesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mayur J.; Green, Dustin P.; Henry, Michael A.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2016-01-01

    Although surgical trauma activates the anterior pituitary gland and elicits an increase in prolactin (PRL) serum levels that can modulate nociceptive responses, the role of PRL and the PRL-receptor (PRL-R) in thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in postoperative pain is unknown. Acute postoperative pain condition was generated with the use of the hindpaw plantar incision model. Results showed endogenous PRL levels were significantly increased in serum, operated hindpaw and spinal cords of male and female rats 24 hours after incision. These alterations were especially pronounced in females. We then examined the role of the PRL system in thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in male and female mice 3-168 hours after plantar incision with the use of knock-out (KO) mice with PRL or PRL-R gene ablations and in wild-type (WT) mice. WT mice showed postoperative cold hyperalgesia in a sex-dependent manner (only in females), but with no effect on heat hyperalgesia or mechanical allodynia in either sex. Studies in KO mice showed no effect of PRL and PRL-R gene ablation on heat and cold hyperalgesia in male mice, while heat hyperlgesia were reduced 3-72 hours post-surgery in female PRL and PRL-R KO mice. In contrast, PRL and PRL-R ablations significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia 3-72 hours post-surgery in both male and female mice. Overall, we found elevated PRL levels in serum, hindpaws and spinal cords after incision, and identify a contributory role for the PRL system in postoperative pain responses to thermal stimuli in females and to mechanical stimuli in both males and females. PMID:23994182

  15. Spinal astrocytic activation contributes to both induction and maintenance of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor-induced long-lasting mechanical allodynia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokai, Masafumi; Miyata, Atsuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia, suggesting an important role of PACAP–PACAP receptors signaling system in the modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission. We have previously reported that a single intrathecal injection of PACAP or a PACAP specific (PAC1) receptor selective agonist, maxadilan, in mice induced dose-dependent aversive behaviors, which lasted more than 30 min, and suggested that the maintenance of the nociceptive behaviors was associated with the spinal astrocytic activation. Results We found that a single intrathecal administration of PACAP or maxadilan also produced long-lasting hind paw mechanical allodynia, which persisted at least 84 days without affecting thermal nociceptive threshold. In contrast, intrathecal application of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide did not change mechanical threshold, and substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or N-methyl-D-aspartate induced only transient mechanical allodynia, which disappeared within 21 days. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses with an astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein, revealed that the spinal PAC1 receptor stimulation caused sustained astrocytic activation, which also lasted more than 84 days. Intrathecal co-administration of L-α-aminoadipate, an astroglial toxin, with PACAP or maxadilan almost completely prevented the induction of the mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, intrathecal treatment of L-α-aminoadipate at 84 days after the PAC1 stimulation transiently reversed the mechanical allodynia accompanied by the reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression level. Conclusion Our data suggest that spinal astrocytic activation triggered by the PAC1 receptor stimulation contributes to both induction and maintenance of the long-term mechanical allodynia. PMID:27175011

  16. The role of reactive oxygen species in capsaicin-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and in the activities of dorsal horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inhyung; Kim, Hee Kee; Kim, Jae Hyo; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2007-12-15

    Previous findings that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in neuropathic pain, mainly through spinal mechanisms, suggest that ROS may be involved in central sensitization. To investigate the possible role of ROS in central sensitization, we examined in rats the effects of ROS scavengers on capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia, which is known to be mediated by central sensitization. We used two different ROS scavengers: phenyl N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) and 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPOL). Intradermal capsaicin injection (20 microg in 20 microl olive oil) into the hind paw produced primary and secondary hyperalgesia. A systemic administration of PBN (100mg/kg, i.p.) or TEMPOL (200mg/kg, i.p.) alleviated capsaicin-induced secondary, but not primary, hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of PBN (1mg inof veterinary Surgery/anesthesiology, College of veterinary Medic 50 microl saline) greatly reduced hyperalgesia, whereas intracerebroventricular or intradermal injection of PBN produced only a minor analgesic effect, suggesting that PBN takes effect mainly through the spinal cord. Electrophysiological recordings from wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in the dorsal horn showed that intradermal capsaicin enhanced the evoked responses to peripheral stimuli; systemic PBN or TEMPOL restored the responses to normal levels. Removal of ROS thus restored the responsiveness of spinal WDR neurons to normal levels, suggesting that ROS is involved in central sensitization, at least in part by sensitizing WDR neurons. PMID:17379413

  17. Auraptenol attenuates vincristine-induced mechanical hyperalgesia through serotonin 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfei; Cao, Shu-e; Tian, Jianmin; Liu, Guozhe; Zhang, Xiaoran; Li, Pingfa

    2013-01-01

    Common chemotherapeutic agents such as vincristine often cause neuropathic pain during cancer treatment in patients. Such neuropathic pain is refractory to common analgesics and represents a challenging clinical issue. Angelicae dahuricae radix is an old traditional Chinese medicine with demonstrated analgesic efficacy in humans. However, the active component(s) that attribute to the analgesic action have not been identified. This work described the anti-hyperalgesic effect of one coumarin component, auraptenol, in a mouse model of chemotherapeutic agent vincristine-induced neuropathic pain. We reported that auraptenol dose-dependently reverted the mechanical hyperalgesia in mice within the dose range of 0.05-0.8 mg/kg. In addition, the anti-hyperalgesic effect of auraptenol was significantly blocked by a selective serotonin 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 (1 mg/kg). Within the dose range studied, auraptenol did not significantly alter the general locomotor activity in mice. Taken together, this study for the first time identified an active component from the herbal medicine angelicae dahuricae radix that possesses robust analgesic efficacy in mice. These data support further studies to assess the potential of auraptenol as a novel analgesic for the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:24287473

  18. L-Tetrahydropalmatine alleviates mechanical hyperalgesia in models of chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Hui; Wu, Dan-Lian; Gao, Li-Yan; Fang, Yun; Ge, Wei-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pain is categorized as inflammatory and neuropathic, and there are common mechanisms underlying the generation of each pain state. Such pain is difficult to treat and the treatment at present is inadequate. Corydalis yanhusuo is a traditional Chinese medicine with demonstrated analgesic efficacy in humans. The potential antihyperalgesic effect of its active component is L-tetrahydropalmatine (L-THP). L-THP has been used for the treatment of headache and other mild pain. However, little is known about its analgesic effect on chronic pain and its mechanism. Here, we report that L-THP exerts remarkable antihyperalgesic effects on neuropathic and inflammatory pain in animal models. Neuropathic hypersensitivity was induced by segmental spinal nerve ligation and inflammatory hypersensitivity was induced by an intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. To determine the receptor mechanism underlying the antihyperalgesic actions of L-THP, we used SCH23390, an antagonist of a dopamine D1 receptor, in an attempt to block the antihyperalgesic effects of L-THP. We found that L-THP (1-4 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a dose-dependent antihyperalgesic effect in spinal nerve ligation and complete Freund's adjuvant models. The antihyperalgesic effects of L-THP were abolished by a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0.02 mg/kg). Furthermore, L-THP (4 mg/kg, i.p.) did not influence motor function. These findings suggest that L-THP may ameliorate mechanical hyperalgesia by enhancing dopamine D1 receptor-mediated dopaminergic transmission. PMID:26981712

  19. Assessment of morphine-induced hyperalgesia and analgesic tolerance in mice using thermal and mechanical nociceptive modalities.

    PubMed

    Elhabazi, Khadija; Ayachi, Safia; Ilien, Brigitte; Simonin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance severely impact the clinical efficacy of opiates as pain relievers in animals and humans. The molecular mechanisms underlying both phenomena are not well understood and their elucidation should benefit from the study of animal models and from the design of appropriate experimental protocols. We describe here a methodological approach for inducing, recording and quantifying morphine-induced hyperalgesia as well as for evidencing analgesic tolerance, using the tail-immersion and tail pressure tests in wild-type mice. As shown in the video, the protocol is divided into five sequential steps. Handling and habituation phases allow a safe determination of the basal nociceptive response of the animals. Chronic morphine administration induces significant hyperalgesia as shown by an increase in both thermal and mechanical sensitivity, whereas the comparison of analgesia time-courses after acute or repeated morphine treatment clearly indicates the development of tolerance manifested by a decline in analgesic response amplitude. This protocol may be similarly adapted to genetically modified mice in order to evaluate the role of individual genes in the modulation of nociception and morphine analgesia. It also provides a model system to investigate the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents to improve opiate analgesic efficacy. PMID:25145878

  20. Assessment of Morphine-induced Hyperalgesia and Analgesic Tolerance in Mice Using Thermal and Mechanical Nociceptive Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Elhabazi, Khadija; Ayachi, Safia; Ilien, Brigitte; Simonin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance severely impact the clinical efficacy of opiates as pain relievers in animals and humans. The molecular mechanisms underlying both phenomena are not well understood and their elucidation should benefit from the study of animal models and from the design of appropriate experimental protocols. We describe here a methodological approach for inducing, recording and quantifying morphine-induced hyperalgesia as well as for evidencing analgesic tolerance, using the tail-immersion and tail pressure tests in wild-type mice. As shown in the video, the protocol is divided into five sequential steps. Handling and habituation phases allow a safe determination of the basal nociceptive response of the animals. Chronic morphine administration induces significant hyperalgesia as shown by an increase in both thermal and mechanical sensitivity, whereas the comparison of analgesia time-courses after acute or repeated morphine treatment clearly indicates the development of tolerance manifested by a decline in analgesic response amplitude. This protocol may be similarly adapted to genetically modified mice in order to evaluate the role of individual genes in the modulation of nociception and morphine analgesia. It also provides a model system to investigate the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents to improve opiate analgesic efficacy. PMID:25145878

  1. The involvement of the transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) in the maintenance of mechanical and cold hyperalgesia in persistent inflammation.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Diogo Santos M; Meotti, Flavia Carla; Andrade, Edinéia Lemos; Leal, Paulo César; Motta, Emerson Marcelo; Calixto, João B

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the role of TRPA1 in the development and maintenance of mechanical and cold hyperalgesia in persistent inflammation induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in mice. The intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of CFA induced a long lasting (28 days) hyperalgesia for both mechanical and thermal (cold) stimuli. The intraperitoneal (i.p., 30-300 mg/kg), intraplantar (i.pl., 100 microg/site) or intrathecal (i.t., 10 microg/site) injection of the TRPA1 selective antagonist HC-030031 significantly reduced the mechanical hyperalgesia evaluated by the von Frey hair test. The effect of HC-030031 was evidenced on the day after CFA injection and was kept throughout the test. However, the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v., 10 microg/site) injection of HC-030031 did not interfere with CFA-induced hyperalgesia. Treatment with HC-030031 (300 mg/kg, i.p.) completely inhibited the noxious cold hyperalgesia induced by tetrafluoroethane in mice that received CFA. The pre-treatment with the TRPA1 oligonucleotide antisense (AS-ODN, i.t.) consistently prevented both mechanical and cold hyperalgesia. Interestingly, both TRPA1 protein expression and mRNA were over-expressed in spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of mice treated with CFA, an effect that was fully prevented by the pre-treatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Collectively, the present results showed that TRPA1 present at either peripheral or spinal sites play a relevant role in the development and maintenance of both mechanical and cold hyperalgesia during CFA-induced inflammation. Thus, TRPA1 selective antagonists represent promising candidates to treat hyperalgesia in persistent inflammatory states. PMID:20056530

  2. Effect of superoxide on the development and maintenance of mechanical allodynia in a rat model of chronic post-ischemia pain

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang Gyu; Han, Jae Kyung; Park, Ki Bum; Kwak, Kyung Hwa; Park, Sung Sik

    2012-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species and inflammatory responses contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Superoxide serves to mediate cell signaling processes and tissue injury during inflammation. We examined the effects of superoxide on the development and maintenance of mechanical allodynia, as well as its contribution to central sensitization in a superoxide-rich animal model of neuropathic pain. Methods Chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP) was induced via the left hindpaw ischemia for 3 h, followed by reperfusion. Superoxide dismutase (4,000 U/kg, i.p.) was administered either 5 min before ischemia (BI), 5 min before reperfusion (BR), or 3 days after reperfusion (3AR). Withdrawal thresholds of the four paws were measured to assess the mechanical allodynia and the effects of circulating xanthine oxidase (XO)-mediated superoxide production. In addition, we measured the levels of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 phosphorylation (p-NR1) in the ipsilateral and contralateral spinal cord (L4-6), by Western blotting, to examine the superoxide-mediated central sensitization. Superoxide production was assessed by allopurinol-sensitive, XO-mediated lipid peroxidation of the spinal cord and gastrocnemius muscles. Results Withdrawal thresholds of forepaws did not vary across the 7 days of testing. In the hindpaws, both ipsilateral and contralateral mechanical allodynia was most attenuated in the BR group, followed by the BI and 3AR groups. The degree of NR1 activation was in contrast to the changes in the withdrawal thresholds. Conclusions These data suggest that superoxide is involved in the development and maintenance of mechanical allodynia, particularly via central sensitization in the spinal cord. PMID:22949983

  3. The evolution of primary hyperalgesia in orthopedic surgery: quantitative sensory testing and clinical evaluation before and after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Valéria; Fletcher, Dominique; Bouhassira, Didier; Sessler, Daniel I.; Chauvin, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Background Quantitative sensory testing (QST), which allows a better characterization of sensory deficits and painful symptoms, may offer additional information on the pathophysiology of postoperative pain. Methodology Twenty patients scheduled for total knee anthroplasty were evaluated clinically and with QST before surgery, at one and four days, and at one and four months after surgery. Clinical evaluation included preoperative pain and inflammation of operative knee, postoperative assessment of pain at rest and during movement (Visual Analog Scale score), cumulative morphine consumption, and circumference and temperature of both knees. QST included thermal and mechanical (pressure) pain threshold measurements and assessment of responses to suprathreshold stimuli. Brush-evoked allodynia was also evaluated. Measurements were taken on the operative knee, contra lateral knee, and on the hand as a control site. Results All patients had prolonged and severe pain before surgery and inflammation of operative knee. Preoperative OST provided evidence of heat hyperalgesia in the inflammatory area on the operative knee, but absence of punctate or brush-evoked allodynia in the adjacent non inflamed area. Patients had intense postoperative pain, mostly induced by movement. Primary heat hyperalgesia was present on the operative knee on the first and fourth days after surgery, and was associated with punctate mechanical allodynia in the inflammatory area, but not in the adjacent non inflamed area. Postoperative morphine consumption was correlated with preoperative heat hyperalgesia (r=0.63; P=0.01). QST was normalyzed at the 4-month evaluation and only 4 patients had moderate knee pain induced by movement at that time. Conclusion Heat hyperalgesia was the predominant OST symptom associated with perioperative pain after total knee arthroplastv and was predictive of postoperative morphine consumption PMID:17717244

  4. Spinal cord stimulation reduces mechanical hyperalgesia and glial cell activation in animals with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Karina L.; Johanek, Lisa M.; Sanada, Luciana S.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is used to manage chronic intractable neuropathic pain. We examined parameters of SCS in rats with spared nerve injury by modulating frequency (4Hz vs. 60Hz), duration (30m vs. 6h), or intensity (50%, 75%, or 90% MT). To elucidate potential mechanisms modulated by SCS, we examined immunoreactivity glial markers in the spinal cord after SCS). An epidural SCS lead was implanted in the upper lumbar spinal cord. Animals were tested for mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) of the paw before and 2 weeks after SNI, before and after SCS daily for 4 days, and for 9 days after SCS. Seperate groups of animals were tested for glial immunoreactivity after 4 days of 6h SCS. All rats showed a decrease in MWT 2 weeks after nerve injury and an increase in glial activation. For frequency, 4Hz or 60Hz SCS reversed the MWT when compared to sham SCS. For duration, 6h of SCS showed a greater reduction in MWT when compared to 30 min. For intensity, 90% MT was greater than 75% MT and both were greater than 50% MT or sham SCS. SCS decreased glial activation (GFAP, MCP-1 and OX-42) in the spinal cord dorsal horn when compared to sham. In conclusion, 4Hz and 60Hz SCS for a 6h at 90% MT were the most effective parameters for reducing hyperalgesia, suggesting parameters of stimulation are important for effectiveness of SCS. SCS reduced glial activation at the level of the spinal cord suggesting reduction in central excitability. PMID:24361846

  5. Human Adipose Stem Cells Improve Mechanical Allodynia and Enhance Functional Recovery in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Yeong; Lee, Hye-Lan; Yun, Yeomin; Kim, Jin-Su; Ha, Yoon; Yoon, Do Heum; Lee, Soo-Hong; Shin, Dong Ah

    2015-07-01

    Stem cells are a promising source of tissue engineering due to their differentiation potential. Today, direct transplantation of stem cells for cell therapy is commonly performed. However, in cases of nerve injury, direct transplantation of cells could lead to secondary nerve damage. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: the phosphate-buffered saline epineural transplantation (PBS-ENT) group, the PBS intraneural transplantation (PBS-INT) group, the human adipose-derived stem cells epineural transplantation (hASCs-ENT) group, and human adipose-derived stem cells intraneural transplantation (hASCs-INT) group. Transplantation was conducted 1 week later after inflicting a crush injury with subsequent observation for 5 weeks. To evaluate pain, each group was examined with regard to paw withdrawal latency and evoked potentials. The sciatic functional index (SFI) was calculated to estimate functional recovery. The sciatic nerve was also examined histologically. The hASCs-ENT group showed a more rapid paw withdrawal threshold and SFI recovery than the other groups (p<0.05). The hASCs-ENT group also showed shorter initial latencies in both somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) and motor evoked potential (MEP) than the PBS-INT group (p<0.05). In addition, the N1 latency of the MEP and the N1 and P1 latencies of the SSEP were significantly shorter than those of the PBS-INT group (p<0.05). Histological examination revealed that the transplanted groups showed better neural recovery and remyelination than the groups injected with PBS. These results show that the transplantation of hASCs into the injured sciatic nerve improved mechanical allodynia and functional recovery as determined by the paw withdrawal test, SFI analysis, and electrophysiological studies. ENT is superior to INT in terms of invasiveness and better outcomes. PMID:25857679

  6. The relationship of bone-tumor-induced spinal cord astrocyte activation and aromatase expression to mechanical hyperalgesia and cold hypersensitivity in intact female and ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Smeester, B A; O'Brien, E E; Michlitsch, K S; Lee, J-H; Beitz, A J

    2016-06-01

    Recently, our group established a relationship between tumor-induced spinal cord astrocyte activation and aromatase expression and the development of bone tumor nociception in male mice. As an extension of this work, we now report on the association of tumor-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and cold hypersensitivity to changes in spinal cord dorsal horn GFAP and aromatase expression in intact (INT) female mice and the effect of ovariectomy on these parameters. Implantation of fibrosarcoma cells produced robust mechanical hyperalgesia in INT animals, while ovariectomized (OVX) females had significantly less mechanical hyperalgesia. Cold hypersensitivity was apparent by post-implantation day 7 in INT and OVX females compared to their saline-injected controls and increased throughout the experiment. The decrease in mechanical hyperalgesia in OVX females was mirrored by significant decreases in spinal astrocyte activity in laminae I-II, III-IV, V-VI and X and aromatase expression in laminae V-VI and X in the dorsal horn of tumor-bearing animals. Administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole reduced tumor-induced hyperalgesia in INT females only suggesting that the tumor-induced increase in aromatase expression and its associated increase in spinal estrogen play a role in the development of bone tumor-induced hyperalgesia. Finally, intrathecal (i.t.) administration of 17β-estradiol caused a significant increase in tumor-induced hyperalgesia in INT tumor-bearing females. Since i.t. 17β-estradiol increases tumor pain and ovariectomy significantly decreases tumor pain, as well as spinal aromatase, estrogen may play a critical role in the spinal cord response to the changing tumor environment and the development of tumor-induced nociception. PMID:26995084

  7. The spinal antinociceptive mechanism determined by systemic administration of BD1047 in zymosan-induced hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young Chan; Son, Ji Seon; Kwon, Young Bae

    2015-10-01

    Although sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) antagonists have a potential antinociceptive effect in inflammatory diseases, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. The present study was aimed to elucidate the role of spinal neurons and microglia in the anti-nociceptive mechanism of BD1047 (a prototypical Sig-1R antagonist) using an inflammatory pain model based on intraplantar injection of zymosan. Oral pretreatment with BD1047 dose-dependently reduced zymosan-induced thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia as well as spinal neuronal activation including increased immunoreactivity of Fos, protein kinase C (PKC) and 'PKC-dependent phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor subunit 1' (pNR1). Zymosan also led to increased CD11b immunoreactivity (a marker of microglia) accompanied by 'phosphorylated p38 mitogen activated protein kinase' (p-p38MAPK) and interleukin-1βimmunoreactivity in the spinal dorsal horn. Intrathecal injection of a microglia modulator (minocycline), p38MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) or interleukin-1βneutralizing antibody significantly attenuated zymosan-induced hyperalgesia. Specifically, oral pretreatment with BD1047 reduced the immunoreactivity of CD11b, p-p38MAPK and interleukin-1β. In the spinal cord section, Sig-1R immunoreactivity was exclusively distributed in both spinal dorsal horn neurons and central endings of unmyelinated primary afferent fibers but not in glia. Intrathecal injection of BD1047 alleviated zymosan-induced hyperalgesia up to the level of oral administration. Taken together, our data imply that antinociceptive effect induced by oral treatment with BD1047 may be mediated, at least in part, by the inhibition of neuronal and microglial activation in the spinal cord triggered by inflammatory conditions. PMID:26434709

  8. Central or peripheral delivery of an adenosine A1 receptor agonist improves mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Katz, N K; Ryals, J M; Wright, D E

    2015-01-29

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, and a significant proportion of individuals suffer debilitating pain that significantly affects their quality of life. Unfortunately, symptomatic treatment options have limited efficacy, and often carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. Activation of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) by the analgesic small molecule adenosine has been shown to have antinociceptive benefits in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The current study used a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy to determine the effect of diabetes on endogenous adenosine production, and if central or peripheral delivery of adenosine receptor agonists could alleviate signs of mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced using streptozocin in male A/J mice. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured weekly to characterize neuropathy phenotype. Hydrolysis of AMP into adenosine by ectonucleotidases was determined in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at 8 weeks post-induction of diabetes. AMP, adenosine and the specific A1R agonist, N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), were administered both centrally (intrathecal) and peripherally (intraplantar) to determine the effect of activation of adenosine receptors on mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Eight weeks post-induction, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased hydrolysis of extracellular AMP in the DRG; at this same time, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal thresholds compared to nondiabetic controls. Central delivery AMP, adenosine and CPA significantly improved mechanical withdrawal thresholds in diabetic mice. Surprisingly, peripheral delivery of CPA also improved mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. This study provides new evidence that diabetes significantly affects endogenous AMP hydrolysis, suggesting that altered adenosine production could contribute to the development of

  9. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical and thermal allodynia after burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Green, Dustin P; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids. Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain. PMID:27411353

  10. Intradermal injection of Botulinum toxin type A alleviates infraorbital nerve constriction-induced thermal hyperalgesia in an operant assay.

    PubMed

    Kumada, A; Matsuka, Y; Spigelman, I; Maruhama, K; Yamamoto, Y; Neubert, J K; Nolan, T A; Watanabe, K; Maekawa, K; Kamioka, H; Yamashiro, T; Kuboki, T; Oguma, K

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that infraorbital nerve constriction (IoNC)-induced mechanical allodynia has been attenuated by administration of highly purified 150-kDa Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). Here, we extend these studies to determine whether BoNT/A could attenuate IoNC-induced symptoms of thermal hyperalgesia. Instead of testing head withdrawal thresholds, a thermal operant assay was used to evaluate cortical processing of sensory input following IoNC. In this assay, a fasted rat's desire to obtain a food reward (sweetened condensed milk) is coupled to its ability to tolerate facial contact with a warm (45 °C) thermode. Bilateral IoNC decreased the ratio of thermode contact duration/event, which is an indicative of thermal hyperalgesia. BoNT/A injection intradermally in the area of infraorbital nerve (IoN) innervation 7 days after IoNC resulted in decreased number of facial contacts and increased the ratio of contact duration/event (measured at 14 days after IoNC). The BoNT/A (2-200 pg) effects were dose dependent and statistically significant at 100 and 200 pg (P < 0·05). Complete reversal of thermal hyperalgesia symptoms was obtained with a 200-pg dose, without affecting sham rat behaviour. Off-site (neck) injection of BoNT/A did not relieve thermal hyperalgesia, while co-injection of BoNT/A with a neutralising antibody in the area of IoN innervation prevented relief of thermal hyperalgesia. Neither IoNC nor BoNT/A injection affected operant assay parameters with a 24 °C thermode, indicating selectivity of thermal hyperalgesia measurements. These results strongly suggest that intradermal injection of BoNT/A in the area of IoN innervation alleviates IoNC-induced thermal hyperalgesia in an operant assay. PMID:21793870

  11. Peripheral gene expression profile of mechanical hyperalgesia induced by repeated cold stress in SHRSP5/Dmcr rats.

    PubMed

    Kozaki, Yasuko; Umetsu, Rena; Mizukami, Yukako; Yamamura, Aya; Kitamori, Kazuya; Tsuchikura, Satoru; Ikeda, Katsumi; Yamori, Yukio

    2015-09-01

    Repeated cold stress (RCS) is known to transiently induce functional disorders associated with hypotension and hyperalgesia. In this study, we investigated the effects of RCS (24 and 4 °C alternately at 30-min intervals during the day and 4 °C at night for 2 days, followed by 4 °C on the next 2 consecutive nights) on the thresholds for cutaneous mechanical pain responses and on peripheral expression of "pain-related genes" in SHRSP5/Dmcr rats, which are derived from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats. To define genes peripherally regulated by RCS, we detected changes in the expression of pain-related genes in dorsal root ganglion cells by PCR-based cDNA subtraction analysis or DNA microarray analysis, and confirmed the changes by RT-PCR. We found significantly changed expression in eight pain-related genes (upregulated: Fyn, St8sia1, and Tac 1; downregulated: Ctsb, Fstl1, Itpr1, Npy, S100a10). At least some of these genes may play key roles in hyperalgesia induced by RCS. PMID:25972297

  12. CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels in peripheral sensory neurons are important for mibefradil-induced reversal of hyperalgesia and allodynia in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Aleksandar Lj; Hwang, Sung Mi; Scarpa, Joseph; Hong, Sung Jun; Todorovic, Slobodan M; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that streptozotocin (STZ) injections in rats lead to the development of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN) accompanied by enhancement of CaV3.2 T-type calcium currents (T-currents) and hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Here we used the classical peripherally acting T-channel blocker mibefradil to examine the role of CaV3.2 T-channels as pharmacological targets for treatment of painful PDN. When administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), at clinically relevant doses, mibefradil effectively alleviated heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivities in STZ-treated diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that CaV3.2 antisense (AS)-treated diabetic rats exhibit a significant decrease in painful PDN compared with mismatch antisense (MIS)-treated diabetic rats. Co-treatment with mibefradil (9 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in reversal of heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivity in MIS-treated but not in AS-treated diabetic rats, suggesting that mibefradil and CaV3.2 AS share the same cellular target. Using patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated DRG neurons, we demonstrated that mibefradil similarly blocked T-currents in diabetic and healthy rats in a voltage-dependent manner by stabilizing inactive states of T-channels. We conclude that antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mibefradil in PDN are at least partly mediated by inhibition of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nociceptors. Hence, peripherally acting voltage-dependent T-channel blockers could be very useful in the treatment of painful symptoms of PDN. PMID:24705276

  13. Spinal 5-HT1A, not the 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors, mediates descending serotonergic inhibition for late-phase mechanical allodynia of carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Min; Jeong, Seong Wook; Yang, Jihoon; Lee, Seong Heon; Kim, Woon Mo; Jeong, Seongtae; Bae, Hong Beom; Yoon, Myung Ha; Choi, Jeong Il

    2015-07-23

    Previous electrophysiological studies demonstrated a limited role of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor (5-HT3R), but facilitatory role of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in spinal nociceptive processing of carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. The release of spinal 5-HT was shown to peak in early-phase and return to baseline in late-phase of carrageenan inflammation. We examined the role of the descending serotonergic projections involving 5-HT1AR, 5-HT1BR, and 5-HT3R in mechanical allodynia of early- (first 4h) and late-phase (24h after) carrageenan-induced inflammation. Intrathecal administration of 5-HT produced a significant anti-allodynic effect in late-phase, but not in early-phase. Similarly, intrathecal 5-HT1AR agonist (8-OH-DPAT) attenuated the intensity of late-phase allodynia in a dose dependent fashion which was antagonized by 5-HT1AR antagonist (WAY-100635), but produced no effect on the early-phase allodynia. However, other agonists or antagonists of 5-HT1BR (CP-93129, SB-224289) and 5-HT3R (m-CPBG, ondansetron) did not produce any anti- or pro-allodynic effect in both early- and late- phase allodynia. These results suggest that spinal 5-HT1A, but not 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors mediate descending serotonergic inhibition on nociceptive processing of late-phase mechanical allodynia in carrageenan-induced inflammation. PMID:26037417

  14. Spinal sigma-1 receptor activation increases the production of D-serine in astrocytes which contributes to the development of mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Beitz, Alvin J; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2015-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated that activation of the spinal sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) plays an important role in the development of mechanical allodynia (MA) via secondary activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Sig-1Rs have been shown to localize to astrocytes, and blockade of Sig-1Rs inhibits the pathologic activation of astrocytes in neuropathic mice. However, the mechanism by which Sig-1R activation in astrocytes modulates NMDA receptors in neurons is currently unknown. d-serine, synthesized from l-serine by serine racemase (Srr) in astrocytes, is an endogenous co-agonist for the NMDA receptor glycine site and can control NMDA receptor activity. Here, we investigated the role of d-serine in the development of MA induced by spinal Sig-1R activation in chronic constriction injury (CCI) mice. The production of d-serine and Srr expression were both significantly increased in the spinal cord dorsal horn post-CCI surgery. Srr and d-serine were only localized to astrocytes in the superficial dorsal horn, while d-serine was also localized to neurons in the deep dorsal horn. Moreover, we found that Srr exists in astrocytes that express Sig-1Rs. The CCI-induced increase in the levels of d-serine and Srr was attenuated by sustained intrathecal treatment with the Sig-1R antagonist, BD-1047 during the induction phase of neuropathic pain. In behavioral experiments, degradation of endogenous d-serine with DAAO, or selective blockade of Srr by LSOS, effectively reduced the development of MA, but not thermal hyperalgesia in CCI mice. Finally, BD-1047 administration inhibited the development of MA and this inhibition was reversed by intrathecal treatment with exogenous d-serine. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the activation of Sig-1Rs increases the expression of Srr and d-serine in astrocytes. The increased production of d-serine induced by CCI ultimately affects dorsal horn neurons that are involved in the development of MA in neuropathic

  15. Transient Heat Hyperalgesia During Resolution of Ropivacaine Sciatic Nerve Block in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Kolarczyk, Lavinia M.; Williams, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Preliminary studies using perineural sciatic ropivacaine in rat demonstrated unexpected heat hyperalgesia after block resolution. To better characterize the time course relative to mechanical anesthesia-analgesia, we tested the hypothesis that ropivacaine 0.5% leads to transient heat hyperalgesia in rat independent of mechanical nociception. We also evaluated functional toxicity (e.g., long-term hyperalgesia and/or tactile allodynia 2 weeks post-injection). Methods Under surgical exposure, left sciatic nerve block was performed in 2 groups of adult male rats – ropivacaine (200 μL, 5 mg/mL, n=14) versus vehicle (n=11). The efficacy and duration of block was assessed with serial heat, mechanical (Randall-Selitto testing), and tactile (von Frey-like monofilaments) tests; motor-proprioceptive (rotarod) and sedation tests were employed 1 hr and 7 hr post-injection. The presence of nerve injury was assessed by repeating the heat, tactile, and motor tests 12–14 days post-injection. Results Ropivacaine-induced anesthesia was fully manifest at 1 hr post-injection. At 3 hr post-injection, heat hypersensitivity was present in the setting of resolved mechanical analgesia. All behavioral measures returned to baseline by 2 wk post-injection. There was no evidence of (i) behavioral sedation, (ii) persistent changes in heat or mechanical sensitivity, or (iii) persistent changes in proprioceptive-motor function at 12–14 days post-injection. Conclusions Ropivacaine 0.5% induces transient heat hyperalgesia in the setting of resolved mechanical analgesia, further suggestive of modality and/or nociceptive fiber specificity. Whether this finding partially translates to “rebound pain” after patients’ nerve blocks wear off requires further study. PMID:21451438

  16. SPINAL CORD MECHANISMS MEDIATING BEHAVIORAL HYPERALGESIA INDUCED BY NEUROKININ-1 TACHYKININ RECEPTOR ACTIVATION IN THE ROSTRAL VENTROMEDIAL MEDULLA

    PubMed Central

    Lagraize, S. C.; Guo, W.; Yang, K.; Wei, F.; Ren, K.; Dubner, R.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperalgesia in animal injury models is linked to activation of descending raphespinal modulatory circuits originating in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). A neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist microinjected into the RVM before or after inflammation produced by complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) resulted in an attenuation of thermal hyperalgesia. A transient (acute) or a continuous infusion of Substance P (SP) microinjected into the RVM of non-inflamed animals led to similar pain hypersensitivity. Intrathecal pretreatment or post-treatment of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (Y-25130 or ondansetron) blocked the SP-induced hyperalgesia. The SP-induced hyperalgesia was both GABAA and NMDA receptor-dependent after pre- and post-treatment with selective antagonists at the spinal level. A microinjection of SP into the RVM also led to increased NMDA NR1 receptor subunit phosphorylation in spinal cord tissue. The GABAA receptor-mediated hyperalgesia involved a shift in the anionic gradient in dorsal horn nociceptive neurons and an increase in phosphorylated NKCC1 protein (isoform of the Na-K-Cl cotransporter). Following a low dose of SP infused into the RVM, intrathecal muscimol (GABAA agonist) increased SP-induced thermal hyperalgesia, phosphorylated NKCC1 protein expression, and NMDA NR1 subunit phosphorylation in the spinal cord. The thermal hyperalgesia was blocked by intrathecal gabazine, the GABAA receptor antagonist, and MK-801, the NMDA receptor channel blocker. These findings indicate that NK-1 receptors in the RVM are involved in SP-induced thermal hyperalgesia, this hyperalgesia is 5-HT3-receptor dependent at the spinal level, and involves the functional interaction of spinal GABAA and NMDA receptors. PMID:20888891

  17. Morphine and gabapentin decrease mechanical hyperalgesia and escape/avoidance behavior in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    LaBuda, C J; Fuchs, P N

    2000-08-25

    A behavioral test paradigm that measures the aversive quality of stimulus-evoked pain in an animal model of neuropathic pain (L5 ligation) was tested for sensitivity to (1) different forces (476 and 202 mN) and frequencies (once every 15 or 30 s) of mechanical stimulation to the hyperalgesic paw and (2) different doses of the common antinociceptive compounds morphine (1 and 10 mg/kg) and gabapentin (30 and 90 mg/kg). Compared to non-ligated controls, the greater force (476 mN) and frequency (every 15 s) of mechanical stimulation of the hyperalgesic paw was associated with the greatest degree of escape/avoidance behavior. There was not a significant degree of escape/avoidance behavior at the lowest force (202 mN) and frequency (every 30 s) of mechanical stimulation. Compared to ligated vehicle treated controls, morphine (1 mg/kg) and gabapentin (90 mg/kg) decreased mechanical hyperalgesia and also attenuated the escape/avoidance behavior. The antinociceptive and antiaversive effects were found at doses that did not produce evidence of decreased motor activity. It is concluded that the behavioral test paradigm used to measure the aversiveness of stimulus-evoked nociceptive behavior is sensitive to different degrees of evoked pain and traditional analgesic compounds. PMID:10936696

  18. Reactive Oxygen Species Donors Increase the Responsiveness of Dorsal Horn Neurons and Induce Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Young; Lee, Inhyung; Chun, Sang Woo; Kim, Hee Kee

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers have analgesic effect on neuropathic pain through spinal mechanisms in the rat. The studies suggest that superoxide in spinal cord is one of important mediators of persistent pain. To test the hypothesis that increase of superoxide-derived intermediates leads to central sensitization and pain, the effects of an intrathecal injection of chemical ROS donors releasing either OH∙, OCl−, or H2O2 were examined on pain behaviors. Following treatment with t-BOOH (OH∙ donor), dorsal horn neuron responses to mechanical stimuli in normal rats and the changes of neuronal excitability were explored on substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons using whole-cell patch clamping recordings. Intrathecal administration of t-BOOH or NaOCl (OCl− donor), but not H2O2, significantly decreased mechanical thresholds of hind paws. The responses of wide dynamic range neurons to mechanical stimuli increased after a local application of t-BOOH. The t-BOOH increased the frequency and the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials, depolarized membrane potential in SG neurons, and increased the frequency of action potentials evoked by depolarizing current pulses. These results suggest that elevated ROS, especially OH∙, in the spinal cord sensitized dorsal horn neurons and produced hyperalgesia in normal rats. PMID:26457204

  19. NSAIDs attenuate hyperalgesia induced by TRP channel activation.

    PubMed

    Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz; Tsagareli, Merab G

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels have been extensively investigated as targets for analgesic drug discovery. Because some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are structural analogs of prostaglandins (mediators of inflammation) and NSAIDs attenuate heat nociception and mechanical allodynia in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, we examined three widely used NSAIDs (diclofenac, ketorolac, and xefocam) on the activation of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels using thermal paw withdrawal (Hargreaves) test and mechanical paw withdrawal (von Frey) test in male rats. Thermal withdrawal latencies and mechanical thresholds for both hind paws were obtained with 5, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min intraplantar post-injection of TRPA1 agonizts, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) (a natural compound of mustard oil) and cinnamaldehyde (CA), and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin or vehicle. Twenty minutes prior to the start of the experiment with TRP agonizts, diclofenac, ketorolac or xefocam were pre-injected in the same hindpaw and animals were examined by these two tests. After pretreatment of all three NSAIDs in the ipsilateral (injected) hindpaw that produced strong antinociceptive effects, AITC, CA, and capsaicin caused significant decreases in latency of the thermal withdrawal reflex compared with vehicle or the contralateral hindpaw. The same findings were observed for the paw withdrawal threshold. In approximately 30 min the effects of CA, AITC, and capsaicin returned to baseline. The data are different from our previous evidence, where TRPA1 agonizts AITC and CA and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin produced hyperalgesia for nearly 2 h and resulted in facilitation of these withdrawal reflexes (Tsagareli et al., 2010, 2013). Thus, our data showing that NSAIDs suppress thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia following TRP activation could presumably due to inactivation or desensitization of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels by NSAIDs. PMID:26909384

  20. NSAIDs attenuate hyperalgesia induced by TRP channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz; Tsagareli, Merab G.

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels have been extensively investigated as targets for analgesic drug discovery. Because some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are structural analogs of prostaglandins (mediators of inflammation) and NSAIDs attenuate heat nociception and mechanical allodynia in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, we examined three widely used NSAIDs (diclofenac, ketorolac, and xefocam) on the activation of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels using thermal paw withdrawal (Hargreaves) test and mechanical paw withdrawal (von Frey) test in male rats. Thermal withdrawal latencies and mechanical thresholds for both hind paws were obtained with 5, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min intraplantar post-injection of TRPA1 agonizts, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) (a natural compound of mustard oil) and cinnamaldehyde (CA), and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin or vehicle. Twenty minutes prior to the start of the experiment with TRP agonizts, diclofenac, ketorolac or xefocam were pre-injected in the same hindpaw and animals were examined by these two tests. After pretreatment of all three NSAIDs in the ipsilateral (injected) hindpaw that produced strong antinociceptive effects, AITC, CA, and capsaicin caused significant decreases in latency of the thermal withdrawal reflex compared with vehicle or the contralateral hindpaw. The same findings were observed for the paw withdrawal threshold. In approximately 30 min the effects of CA, AITC, and capsaicin returned to baseline. The data are different from our previous evidence, where TRPA1 agonizts AITC and CA and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin produced hyperalgesia for nearly 2 h and resulted in facilitation of these withdrawal reflexes (Tsagareli et al., 2010, 2013). Thus, our data showing that NSAIDs suppress thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia following TRP activation could presumably due to inactivation or desensitization of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels by NSAIDs. PMID:26909384

  1. Downregulation of Cdh1 signalling in spinal dorsal horn contributes to the maintenance of mechanical allodynia after nerve injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rong; Li, Li; Li, Dajia; Tan, Wei; Wan, Li; Zhu, Chang; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Chuanhan

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and its co-activator Cdh1 are important ubiquitin-ligases in proliferating cells and terminally differentiated neurons. In recent years, APC/C-Cdh1 has been reported as an important complex contributing to synaptic development and transmission. Interestingly, cortical APC/C-Cdh1 is found to play a critical role in the maintenance of neuropathic pain, but it is not clear whether APC/C-Cdh1 in spinal dorsal cord is involved in molecular mechanisms of neuropathic pain conditions. Results Immunostaining showed that Cdh1 was mainly distributed in dorsal horn neurons of the spinal cord in rats. Its expression was downregulated in the ipsilateral dorsal horn at 14 days after spared nerve injury. Rescued expression of Cdh1 in spinal cord by intrathecal administration of recombinant lentivirus encoding Cdh1 (Lenti-Cdh1-GFP) significantly attenuated spared nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, rescued expression of spinal Cdh1 significantly reduced surface membrane expression of GluR1, but increased the expression of GluR1-related erythropoietin-producing human hepatocellular receptor A4 and its ligand EphrinA1 in dorsal horn of spared nerve injury-treated animals. Conclusions This study indicates that a downregulation of Cdh1 expression in spinal dorsal horn is involved in molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of neuropathic pain. Upregulation of spinal Cdh1 may be a promising approach to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:27184142

  2. AMG2850, a potent and selective TRPM8 antagonist, is not effective in rat models of inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity and neuropathic tactile allodynia.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Sonya G; Weyer, Andy D; Zhang, Maosheng; Youngblood, Beth D; Wang, Judy; Wang, Weiya; Kerstein, Patrick C; Davis, Carl; Wild, Kenneth D; Stucky, Cheryl L; Gavva, Narender R

    2015-04-01

    TRPM8 has been implicated in pain and migraine based on dorsal root- and trigeminal ganglion-enriched expression, upregulation in preclinical models of pain, knockout mouse studies, and human genetics. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential in pain of AMG2850 ((R)-8-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-N-((S)-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-yl)-5,6-dihydro-1,7-naphthyridine-7(8H)-carboxamide), a small molecule antagonist of TRPM8 by in vitro and in vivo characterization. AMG2850 is potent in vitro at rat TRPM8 (IC90 against icilin activation of 204 ± 28 nM), highly selective (>100-fold IC90 over TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels), and orally bioavailable (F po > 40 %). When tested in a skin-nerve preparation, AMG2850 blocked menthol-induced action potentials but not mechanical activation in C fibers. AMG2850 exhibited significant target coverage in vivo in a TRPM8-mediated icilin-induced wet-dog shake (WDS) model in rats (at 10 mg/kg p.o.). However, AMG2850 did not produce a significant therapeutic effect in rat models of inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity or neuropathic tactile allodynia at doses up to 100 mg/kg. The lack of efficacy suggests that either TRPM8 does not play a role in mediating pain in these models or that a higher level of target coverage is required. The potential of TRPM8 antagonists as migraine therapeutics is yet to be determined. PMID:25662185

  3. Mechanical allodynia following contusion injury of the rat spinal cord is associated with loss of GABAergic inhibition in the dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Drew, Geoffrey M; Siddall, Philip J; Duggan, Arthur W

    2004-06-01

    The present study investigated whether mechanical allodynia following contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) of the thoracic segments 12 and 13 of the rat was associated with a reduction in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic inhibition adjacent to the site of injury. Five to 7 days following SCI, extracellular recordings were obtained from dorsal horn neurones located 1-2 segments caudal to the injury, in non-allodynic and allodynic halothane anaesthetised rats and from comparable neurones in normal rats. To assess spinal GABAergic inhibition in the three groups of animals, spontaneous and evoked cell firing rates were recorded before, during and after microiontophoretic application of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. Administration of bicuculline to normal animals resulted in significant and reversible increases in the receptive field size, spontaneous firing rate, response to brushing and pinching the skin and afterdischarge activity of dorsal horn neurones, as well as decreasing paired-pulse depression of responses evoked by transcutaneous electrical stimulation. In non-allodynic SCI animals, bicuculline ejection led to significant changes in receptive field size, paired-pulse depression and responses to brush and pinch stimulation that were comparable to those observed in normal animals. By contrast, in allodynic SCI animals, bicuculline ejection had little or no effect on dorsal horn neurone responses to mechanical skin stimuli and paired-pulse depression despite reliably blocking the inhibition of cell firing produced by similarly applied GABA. The demonstration of reduced GABAergic inhibition predominantly in the allodynic SCI rats suggests that such a deficiency contributed to this pain-related behaviour acutely following SCI. PMID:15157699

  4. Comparison of Mechanical Allodynia and Recovery of Locomotion and Bladder Function by Different Parameters of Low Thoracic Spinal Contusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michael W.; Johnson, Kathia M.; Lee, Jun Yeon; Hulsebosch, Claire E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study was designed to examine the functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) by adjusting the parameters of impact force and dwell-time using the Infinite Horizon (IH) impactor device. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (225–240 g) were divided into eight injury groups based on force of injury (Kdyn) and dwell time (seconds), indicated as Force-Dwell time: 150-4, 150-3, 150-2, 150-1, 150-0, 200-0, 90-2 and sham controls, respectively. Results After T10 SCI, higher injury force produced greater spinal cord displacement (P < 0.05) and showed a significant correlation (r = 0.813) between the displacement and the force (P < 0.05). In neuropathic pain-like behavior, the percent of paw withdrawals scores in the hindpaw for the 150-4, 150-3, 150-2, 150-1 and the 200-0 injury groups were significantly lowered compared with sham controls (P < 0.05). The recovery of locomotion had a significant within-subjects effect of time (P < 0.05) and the 150-0 group had increased recovery compared to other groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the 200-0 and the 90-2 recovered significantly better than all the 150 kdyn impact groups that included a dwell-time (P < 0.05). In recovery of spontaneous bladder function, the 150-4 injury group took significantly longer recovery time whereas the 150-0 and the 90-2 groups had the shortest recovery times. Conclusions The present study demonstrates SCI parameters optimize development of mechanical allodynia and other pathological outcomes. PMID:27103963

  5. Heat-rekindling in UVB-irradiated skin above NGF-sensitized muscle: experimental models of prolonged mechanical hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Silvia Lo; Finocchietti, Sara; Gazerani, Parisa; Petersen, Lars J; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Experimental models of prolonged pain hypersensitivity in humans are desirable for screening novel analgesic compounds. In this study, heat stimuli were applied in ultraviolet-B (UVB)-irradiated skin and in the UVB-irradiated skin combined with nerve growth factor (NGF)-injected muscle to investigate 1) whether the evoked mechanical hypersensitivity by UVB irradiation would be prolonged or enhanced following heat rekindling, and 2) whether the combination between cutaneous and muscle hypersensitivity may influence the rekindling effects. Skin sensitization was induced in 25 volunteers by UVB irradiation in areas above the upper-trapezius muscle, low-back or forearm. Muscle sensitization was induced in the low back by bilateral injections of NGF. The area of cutaneous hyperalgesia was evaluated 3 days after the irradiation by mechanical pin-prick stimulation whereas the areas of allodynia were evaluated 1, 2 and 3 days after irradiation by von Frey hair assessments. Cutaneous heat stimulation (40°C for 5 min) was performed on the 3(rd) day to investigate its effect on the areas of cutaneous allodynia and hyperalgesia. Findings revealed that 1) allodynia and hyperalgesia developed following UVB irradiation, 2) heat stimulation of the UVB-irradiated skin enlarged both hyperalgesic and allodynic areas (P < 0.01), and 3) muscle sensitization did not influence the effect of UVB on allodynia or the response to heat rekindling. These data suggest that heat rekindling applied to an UVB-sensitized skin can maintain or facilitate allodynia and hyperalgesia for a longer period offering a suitable model for testing analgesic compounds when sufficient duration of time is needed for investigation of drug efficacy. PMID:25349637

  6. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1 receptors prevents the induction of thermal hyperalgesia via modulation of TRPV1 expression in carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain rats: involvement of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in DRGs.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Gu; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2014-04-01

    Although previous reports have suggested that P2Y1 receptors (P2Y1Rs) are involved in cutaneous nociceptive signaling, it remains unclear how P2Y1Rs contribute to peripheral sensitization. The current study was designed to delineate the role of peripheral P2Y1Rs in pain and to investigate potential linkages to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in DRGs and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) expression in a rodent inflammatory pain model. Following injection of 2% carrageenan into the hind paw, expressions of P2Y1 and TRPV1 and the phosphorylation rates of both p38 MAPK and ERK but not JNK were increased and peaked at day 2 post-injection. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1Rs by the P2Y1R antagonist, MRS2500 injection (i.pl, D0 to D2) significantly reduced the induction of thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Simultaneously, MRS2500 injections suppressed upregulated TRPV1 expression and DRG p38 phosphorylation, while pERK signaling was not affected. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 activation in the DRGs by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor, i.t, D0 to D2) prevented the upregulation of TRPV1 and a single i.t injection of SB203580 reversed the established thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Lastly, to identify the mechanism of action of P2Y1Rs, we repeatedly injected the P2Y1 agonist, MRS2365 into the naïve rat's hind paw and observed a dose-dependent increase in TRPV1 expression and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These data demonstrate a sequential role for P2Y1R, p38 MAPK and TRPV1 in inflammation-induced thermal hyperalgesia; thus, peripheral P2Y1Rs activation modulates p38 MAPK signaling and TRPV1 expression, which ultimately leads to the induction of thermal hyperalgesia. PMID:24333674

  7. Eccentric Muscle Contraction and Stretching Evoke Mechanical Hyperalgesia and Modulate CGRP and P2X3 Expression in a Functionally Relevant Manner

    PubMed Central

    Dessem, Dean; Ambalavanar, Ranjinidevi; Evancho, Melena; Moutanni, Aicha; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Bai, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive, movement-based models were used to investigate muscle pain. In rats, the masseter muscle was rapidly stretched or electrically stimulated during forced lengthening to produce eccentric muscle contractions (EC). Both EC and stretching disrupted scattered myofibers and produced intramuscular plasma extravasation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were elevated in the masseter 24h following EC. At 48h, neutrophils increased and ED1 macrophages infiltrated myofibers while ED2 macrophages were abundant at 4d. Mechanical hyperalgesia was evident in the ipsilateral head 4h-4d after a single bout of EC and for 7d following multiple bouts (1 bout/d for 4d). Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA increased in the trigeminal ganglion 24h following EC while immunoreactive CGRP decreased. By 2d, CGRP-muscle afferent numbers equaled naive numbers implying that CGRP is released following EC and replenished within 2d. EC elevated P2X3 mRNA and increased P2X3-muscle afferent neuron number for 12d while electrical stimulation without muscle contraction altered neither CGRP nor P2X3 mRNA levels. Muscle stretching produced hyperalgesia for 2d whereas contraction alone produced no hyperalgesia. Stretching increased CGRP mRNA at 24h but not CGRP-muscle afferent number at 2–12d. In contrast, stretching significantly increased the number of P2X3-muscle afferent neurons for 12d. The sustained, elevated P2X3 expression evoked by EC and stretching may enhance nociceptor responsiveness to ATP released during subsequent myofiber damage. Movement-based actions such as EC and muscle stretching produce unique tissue responses and modulate neuropeptide and nociceptive receptor expression in a manner particularly relevant to repeated muscle damage. PMID:20207080

  8. Topical application of L-menthol induces heat analgesia, mechanical allodynia, and a biphasic effect on cold sensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Klein, Amanda H; Sawyer, Carolyn M; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Tsagareli, Merab G; Tsiklauri, Nana; Carstens, E

    2010-10-15

    Menthol is used in analgesic balms and also in foods and oral hygiene products for its fresh cooling sensation. Menthol enhances cooling by interacting with the cold-sensitive thermoTRP channel TRPM8, but its effect on pain is less well understood. We presently used behavioral methods to investigate effects of topical menthol on thermal (hot and cold) pain and innocuous cold and mechanical sensitivity in rats. Menthol dose-dependently increased the latency for noxious heat-evoked withdrawal of the treated hindpaw with a weak mirror-image effect, indicating antinociception. Menthol at the highest concentration (40%) reduced mechanical withdrawal thresholds, with no effect at lower concentrations. Menthol had a biphasic effect on cold avoidance. At high concentrations (10% and 40%) menthol reduced avoidance of colder temperatures (15 degrees C and 20 degrees C) compared to 30 degrees C, while at lower concentrations (0.01-1%) menthol enhanced cold avoidance. In a -5 degrees C cold plate test, 40% menthol significantly increased the nocifensive response latency (cold hypoalgesia) while lower concentrations were not different from vehicle controls. These results are generally consistent with neurophysiological and human psychophysical data and support TRPM8 as a potential peripheral target of pain modulation. PMID:20398704

  9. Go-sha-jinki-Gan (GJG) ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of TNF-α expression in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Miho; Nakae, Aya; Kishida, Yuki; Baba, Kousuke; Sakashita, Noriko; Shibata, Masahiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternative medicine is noted for its clinical effect and minimal invasiveness in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Go-sha-jinki-Gan, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, has been used for meralgia and numbness in elderly patients. However, the exact mechanism of GJG is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of the analgesic effect of GJG in a chronic constriction injury model. Results GJG significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia from the early phase (von Frey test, p < 0.0001; cold-plate test, p < 0.0001; hot-plate test p = 0.011; two-way repeated measures ANOVA). Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed that GJG decreased the expression of Iba1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord. Double staining immunohistochemistry showed that most of the tumor necrosis factor-α was co-expressed in Iba1-positive cells at day 3 post-operation. GJG decreased the phosphorylation of p38 in the ipsilateral dorsal horn. Moreover, intrathecal injection of tumor necrosis factor-α opposed the anti-allodynic effect of GJG in the cold-plate test. Conclusions Our data suggest that GJG ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α expression derived from activated microglia. GJG is a promising drug for the treatment of neuropathic pain induced by neuro-inflammation. PMID:27296622

  10. Berberine Ameliorates Allodynia Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury of the Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether berberine could ameliorate allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After inducement of CCI, significant increases in the number of paw lifts from a cold plate test (cold allodynia) and decreased paw withdrawal threshold in the von Frey hair stimulation test (mechanical allodynia) were observed. However, these cold and mechanical allodynia were markedly alleviated by berberine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Sciatic nerve myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities were also attenuated by berberine administration. Continuous injection for 7 days induced no development of tolerance. The antiallodynic effect of 20 mg/kg berberine was comparable to that of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that berberine could mitigate allodynia induced by CCI, a neuropathic pain model, and it suggested that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of berberine contributed to the antiallodynic effect in the CCI model. PMID:25674823

  11. Contact lenses, migraine, and allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Timucin, Ozgur Bulent; Karadag, Mehmet Fatih; Mehmet, Baykara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials and electrophysiologic studies demonstrated increased perceptual sensitivity in patients suffering from migraines. At least, one triggering factor is described in 85% of migraine patients. The aim of this report was to investigate the relationship between contact lens (CL) usage and migraine attacks in two cases. Two patients who were diagnosed with migraine reported that the frequency of migraine attacks increased after they switched to using CL with different base curves (BCs). These two patients, who began using CL with different BCs experienced discomfort and dryness of the eye. The ocular complaints were followed by migraine attacks. CL intolerance was also developed during migraine attack in one of the cases. The frequency of migraine attacks decreased and allodynia relieved significantly when flatter BCs were selected. CL related stimulus could have triggered the migraine attack. CLs should be well fitted in migraine patients with allodynia. PMID:27433037

  12. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion. The 30 animals were divided into experimental groups according to the drug used. The drugs were administered for two weeks after the surgical procedure to induce hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated using the paw pressure test, von Frey electronic test and Hargreaves test, over a seven-week period. Results: The greatest reduction of hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals treated with morphine, followed by dexamethasone, indomethacin and atenolol. Reductions in hyperalgesia were observed after drug administration ceased, except for the group of animals treated with morphine, in which there was an increase in hyperalgesia after discontinuation of the treatment. Conclusion: Hyperalgesia induced by NP contact with the DRG can be reduced through administration of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs, but a greater reduction was observed with the administration of dexamethasone. PMID:27026966

  13. Inhibition of CaMKIIα in the Central Nucleus of Amygdala Attenuates Fentanyl-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Li, Chenhong; Yin, Pingping; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Luo, Fang

    2016-10-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is a less-studied phenomenon that has been reported in both preclinical and clinical studies. Although the underlying cause is not entirely understood, OIH is a real-life problem that affects millions of patients on a daily basis. Research has implicated the important contribution of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) to OIH at the level of spinal nociceptors. To expand our understanding of the entire brain circuitry driving OIH, in this study we investigated the role of CaMKIIα in the laterocapcular division of the central amygdala (CeLC), the conjunctive point between the spinal cord and rostro-ventral medulla. OIH was produced by repeated fentanyl administration in the rat. Correlating with the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, CaMKIIα activity was significantly elevated in the CeLC in OIH. In addition, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in CeLC neurons were significantly increased in OIH. 2-[N-(2-hidroxyethyl)-N-(4-methoxy-benzenesulfonyl)]-amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine, a CaMKIIα inhibitor, dose dependently reversed sensory hypersensitivity, activation of CeLC CaMKIIα, and mEPSCs in OIH. Taken together, our data for the first time implicate a critical role of CeLC CaMKIIα in OIH. PMID:27451410

  14. Secondary hyperalgesia in the rat first degree burn model is independent of spinal cyclooxygenase and nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Linda S; Doom, Carmen M; Maruyama, Karly P; Nanigian, Danielle B

    2008-06-10

    Various animal models of pain are dependent on activation of different glutamate receptor subtypes. First degree burn of the paw elicits a secondary hyperalgesia that is dependent on Ca2+ permeable alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), but not N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. The present study takes advantage of that specificity by examining the effects of spinal pretreatments of agents on this secondary hyperalgesia. Rats with indwelling intrathecal catheters were pretreated with agents prior to paw injury. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured before, and for three h after the injury. Spinal pretreatment with cyclooxygenase (10 and 30 microg (S)-(+)-ibuprofen; and 3 and 30 microg ketorolac) and nitric oxide synthase (33 and 100 microg N(G) Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) and 10 microg thiocitrulline) inhibitors resulted in no specific anti-allodynia. In contrast, ziconotide (0.3, 1.0 and 3 microg), the N-type voltage gated calcium channel antagonist was very effective in blocking burn-induced sensitivity at all doses used. l-type (Diltiazam 230 microg) and P-type (Agatoxin IVA 0.3 microg) calcium channel blockers produced intermediate effects. Thus, cyclooxygenase and nitric oxide synthase are assumed not to be downstream of Ca2+ permeable AMPA receptors. Voltage gated calcium channels blockers could exert their effects either pre- or post-synaptically. PMID:18440503

  15. Suckling and sucrose ingestion suppress persistent hyperalgesia and spinal Fos expression after forepaw inflammation in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, K; Blass, E M; Zhou, Q; Dubner, R

    1997-02-18

    Sweet taste and nonnutritive suckling produce analgesia to transient noxious stimuli in infant rats and humans. The present study evaluated the pain-modulating effects of sucrose and suckling in a rat model of persistent pain and hyperalgesia that mimics the response to tissue injury in humans. Fore- and hindpaw withdrawal latencies from a 30 degrees or 48 degrees C brass stylus were determined in 10-day-old rats following paw inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA; 1:1 injected s.c. in a 0.01 ml volume). CFA markedly decreased escape latencies to both 48 degrees and 30 degrees C stimulation, thereby demonstrating thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. The combination of nonnutritive suckling and sucrose (7.5%, 0.01-0.06 ml/min) infusion markedly increased escape latencies to forepaw stimulation in both CFA-treated and control rats. In contrast, intraoral sucrose and suckling did not increase hindpaw withdrawal latencies in either control or CFA-inflamed rats. The effect was specific to sweet taste because neither water nor isotonic saline infusion affected forepaw escape latencies. Parallel findings were obtained for CFA-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI), a marker of neuronal activation. Fos-LI was selectively induced in cervical and lumbar regions ipsilateral to forepaw and hindpaw inflammation, respectively. Suckling-sucrose treatment significantly reduced Fos-LI at the cervical but not at the lumbar regions. These findings demonstrate: (i) the development of persistent pain and hyperalgesia in 10-day-old rats that can be attenuated by endogenous pain-modulating systems activated by taste and nonnutritive suckling; (ii) the mediation of the sucrose-suckling analgesia and antihyperalgesia at the spinal level; and (iii) a differential rostrocaudal maturation of descending pain-modulating systems to the spinal cord of 10-day-old rats. These findings may provide new clinical approaches for engaging endogenous analgesic mechanisms in

  16. Pain Modulation by Lignans (Phyllanthin and Hypophyllanthin) and Tannin (Corilagin) Rich Extracts of Phyllanthus amarus in Carrageenan-induced Thermal and Mechanical Chronic Muscle Hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Chopade, Atul R; Sayyad, F J

    2015-08-01

    The current study was aimed at evaluating the antihyperalgesic effects of lignans (phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin) and tannin (corilagin) rich three standardized extracts of Phyllanthus amarus in a model of chronic musculoskeletal inflammatory pain. Three percent carrageenan injected in the gastrocnemius muscle produced hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimuli ipsilaterally, which spreads to the contralateral side within 7 to 9 days. To investigate the effects on chronic thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity, three extracts of P. amarus in three doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) were administered to animals intraperitoneally from 14th day to 22nd day after intramuscular injection of carrageenan. It was observed that intraperitoneal administrations of Phyllanthus extracts showed antihyperalgesic activity, as they elevated thermal and mechanical threshold, which was supported by histopathological observations along with reduction in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration. In conclusion, we strongly suggest that the observed antihyperalgesic and antiinflammatory effects of P. amarus in current pain model are mediated via spinal or supraspinal neuronal mechanisms, mainly by inhibition of PGE2. Modulation of chronic muscular inflammation may be due to presence of phytoconstituents like phyllanthin, hypophyllanthin, and corilagin, which offers a promising means for treatment of chronic muscle pain. PMID:25974715

  17. Allodynia-like effects in rat after ischaemic spinal cord injury photochemically induced by laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hao, J X; Xu, X J; Aldskogius, H; Seiger, A; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z

    1991-05-01

    We report behaviours suggesting the presence of allodynia elicited by non-noxious brushing and mechanical pressure following photochemically induced ischaemic spinal cord injury in the rat. Female rats were intravenously injected with Erythrosin B and the T10 vertebra was irradiated with a laser beam for 1, 5 or 10 min. These procedures initiated an intravascular photochemical reaction, resulting in ischaemic spinal cord injury. After irradiation a clear allodynia was observed in most rats. The animals vocalized intensely to light touch during gentle handling and were clearly agitated to light brushing of the flanks. The vocalization threshold in response to the mechanical pressure measured with von Frey hairs was markedly decreased during this period. In some animals the existence of spontaneous pain was suggested by spontaneous vocalization. The duration of the allodynia varied among animals from several hours to several days. The severity and duration of allodynia seemed not to be related to the duration of irradiation. In sham-operated rats a slight, transient allodynia was also noted around the wound within a few hours after surgery, which was effectively relieved by systemic morphine (2 mg/kg, i.p.). Morphine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) also partially relieved the allodynia in spinally injured rats 4 h after irradiation. However, morphine, even at a higher dose (5 mg/kg, i.p.), failed to alleviate the allodynia in spinally injured rats 24-48 h after the injury. Systemic injection of the GABAB agonist baclofen (0.01-0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), but not the GABAA agonist muscimol (1 mg/kg, i.p.), effectively relieved allodynia during this period. Pretreatment with guanethidine 24 h and just prior to the irradiation (20 mg/kg, s.c.) did not prevent the occurrence of allodynia in spinal cord injured rats. The present observation is the first to show that ischaemic spinal cord injury could result in cutaneous mechanical allodynia. This phenomenon is resistant to morphine and may not

  18. Intraarticular slow-release triamcinolone acetate reduces allodynia in an experimental mouse knee osteoarthritis model.

    PubMed

    Kroin, Jeffrey S; Kc, Ranjan; Li, Xin; Hamilton, John L; Das, Vaskar; van Wijnen, Andre J; Dall, Ole M; Shelly, Daniel A; Kenworth, Todd; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2016-10-10

    Intraarticular steroid injection has been the mainstay of short-term treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain. However, the duration of therapeutic effect from a single injection is not as long as desired. In this study we use a viscous formulation of triamcinolone acetate (TCA) in hyaluronic acid to prolong the anti-allodynia effect of that steroid. OA was induced in mice by a partial medial meniscectomy. Over time the animals' developed a mechanical allodynia in the injected leg. Mice were then given a single intraarticular injection of TCA in a short-acting DMSO formulation, or a standard commercial suspension, or the drug formulated in 5% hyaluronic acid for slow-release. Control injections in OA mice were PBS or 5% hyaluronic acid vehicle. Mechanical allodynia was then monitored over the therapeutic period. Organotypic spinal cord slices and DRG culture were performed to assess whether TCA attenuates expressions of pain mediators induced by interleukin 1β. TCA 40μg in a fast-releasing DMSO formulation produced relief from mechanical allodynia for a few days compared to PBS control injections (P=0.007). Similarly, the commercial suspension of TCA 40μg also produced relief from mechanical allodynia for a few days compared to PBS control injections (P=0.001). However, TCA 100μg in 5% hyaluronic acid produced relief from mechanical allodynia for at least 28days compared to PBS control or 5% hyaluronic acid vehicle injections (P=0.0005). Furthermore, TCA significantly suppressed expression of pain mediators induced by interleukin 1β in spinal cord and DRG organotypic culture. Intraarticular TCA in a sustained release formulation of viscous 5% hyaluronic acid will produce a long-term attenuation of mechanical allodynia in the OA knees of mice. PMID:27356303

  19. Selective T-Type Calcium Channel Blockade Alleviates Hyperalgesia in ob/ob Mice

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Janelle R.; Pathirathna, Sriyani; Jagodic, Miljen M.; Joo Choe, Won; Levin, Michaela E.; Nelson, Michael T.; Yong Lee, Woo; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Covey, Douglas F.; Todorovic, Slobodan M.; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Morbid obesity may be accompanied by diabetes and painful diabetic neuropathy, a poorly understood condition that is manifested by mechanical or thermal allodynia and hyperalgesia. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of T-type calcium channels (T-channels) in peripheral nociception; therefore, our goal was to examine the function of these channels in the pathophysiology and development of painful diabetic neuropathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In vivo testing of mechanical and thermal sensation, morphometric peripheral nerve studies, and electrophysiological and biochemical measurements were used to characterize the role of T-channels and the development of painful diabetic neuropathy in leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice. RESULTS We found that ob/ob mice developed significant mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity early in life that coincided with hyperglycemia and was readily reversed with insulin therapy. These disturbances were accompanied by significant biophysical and biochemical modulation of T-channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons as measured by a large increase in the amplitude of T-currents and the expression of mRNA. The most prevalent subtype, α1H (Cav3.2), was most strongly affected. Moreover, (3β,5α,17β)-17-hydroxyestrane-3-carbonitrile (ECN), a novel neuroactive steroid and selective T-channel antagonist, provided dose-dependent alleviation of neuropathic thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity in diabetic ob/ob mice. CONCLUSIONS Our results indicate that pharmacological antagonism of T-channels is potentially an important novel therapeutic approach for the management of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:19651818

  20. Patterns of hyperalgesia in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sieweke, N; Birklein, F; Riedl, B; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1999-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is characterized by a triad of sensory, motor and autonomic dysfunctions, with long-standing pain and temperature differences of the affected and contralateral limb as predominant symptoms. The pathogenesis of the disorder still remains unclear. Among the main hypotheses of an underlying pathophysiology we find inflammatory processes and dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system. Whether the main site of dysfunction is found centrally or peripherally is not known. With psychophysical methods we studied patterns of hyperalgesia to obtain a better understanding of the neuropathic pain component in CRPS. Forty patients in an acute phase of CRPS and a median duration of the disease of 10 weeks, were included in the study. Hyperalgesia to heat was tested with a thermode providing feedback-controlled temperature increases. Two forms of mechanical hyperalgesia were examined: phasic mechanical stimuli by using a custom-made impact stimulator for the determination of individual pain thresholds, tonic mechanical stimuli were applied using a pinch-device. Additionally a 'wind-up' paradigm was used to study a pain phenomenon of presumed central origin: a defined impact stimulus was given once and five times in repetition. A subpopulation of patients was reevaluated for mechanical hyperalgesia after i.v. injection of 500 mg acetyl-salicylic acid. Hyperalgesia to heat was insignificant. We found, however, a marked mechanical hyperalgesia to phasic impact stimuli (P < 0.005), whereas, static stimulation (squeezing skin folds) results were insignificant again. Wind-up related pain was also significantly enhanced in the affected limb (P < 0.02). The anti-inflammatory agent had no effect. These results indicate a non-inflammatory pathogenesis in CRPS presumably central in origin. PMID:10204729

  1. Microglial interleukin-1β in the ipsilateral dorsal horn inhibits the development of mirror-image contralateral mechanical allodynia through astrocyte activation in a rat model of inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoon-Seong; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Beitz, Alvin J; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2015-06-01

    Damage on one side of the body can also result in pain on the contralateral unaffected side, called mirror-image pain (MIP). Currently, the mechanisms responsible for the development of MIP are unknown. In this study, we investigated the involvement of spinal microglia and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the development of MIP using a peripheral inflammatory pain model. After unilateral carrageenan injection, mechanical allodynia (MA) in both hind paws and the expression levels of spinal Iba-1, IL-1β, and GFAP were evaluated. Ipsilateral MA was induced beginning at 3 hours after carrageenan injection, whereas contralateral MA showed a delayed onset occurring 5 days after injection. A single intrathecal (i.t.) injection of minocycline, a tetracycline derivative that displays selective inhibition of microglial activation, or an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) on the day of carrageenan injection caused an early temporary induction of contralateral MA, whereas repeated i.t. treatment with these drugs from days 0 to 3 resulted in a long-lasting contralateral MA, which was evident in its advanced development. We further showed that IL-1β was localized to microglia and that minocycline inhibited the carrageenan-induced increases in spinal Iba-1 and IL-1β expression. Conversely, minocycline or IL-1ra pretreatment increased GFAP expression as compared with that of control rats. However, i.t. pretreatment with fluorocitrate, an astrocyte inhibitor, restored minocycline- or IL-1ra-induced contralateral MA. These results suggest that spinal IL-1β derived from activated microglia temporarily suppresses astrocyte activation, which can ultimately prevent the development of contralateral MA under inflammatory conditions. These findings imply that microglial IL-1β plays an important role in regulating the induction of inflammatory MIP. PMID:25749305

  2. [Pathophysiology of neuropathic pain: review of experimental models and proposed mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Magnin, Michel

    2008-02-01

    Neuropathic pain can be conceptualized as the result of an "aberrant learning" process, associated with maladaptive plasticity of the nervous system. A number of modifications of the peripheral nervous system have been described in animal models of neuropathic pain, but their relation with different symptoms in humans is far from fully understood. We note in particular ectopic discharges in damaged myelinated fibers, abnormal activity in undamaged fibers, overexpression of calcium channels increasing the release of excitatory neurotransmitters, and sympathetic sprouting towards the spinal ganglia. Spinal mechanisms involve central sensitization, kindling and potentiation phenomena. Underlying these phenomena may be connectivity changes--still controversial--of non-nociceptive terminals and variations in the sensitivity of postsynaptic receptors. Also contributing to these pathophysiologic modifications are attenuation of spinal inhibition by selective neuronal loss and the development of inflammatory phenomena, including cytokine secretion by macrophages and glial cells. Changes in the dorsal horn modify the activity of projections towards the brainstem and increase spinal hyperactivity still further by feedback loops. These effects are delayed, suggesting that maintenance of spinal sensitization requires the involvement of mechanisms of descending facilitation involving the brainstem. These phenomena induce changes in the activity of thalamocortical networks, which develop autonomous processes that maintain the pain. The cortical representation of body areas change after nervous lesions, and these changes may correlate with the emergence of pain. Neuropathic allodynia and hyperalgesia are supported by cortical modifications that experimental models reproduce very incompletely. Experimental allodynia and neuropathic allodynia share the activation of the cortical pain matrix as well as the bilateralization of insular activity. However, although experimental

  3. The kinin B1 receptor antagonist SSR240612 reverses tactile and cold allodynia in an experimental rat model of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dias, J P; Ismael, M A; Pilon, M; de Champlain, J; Ferrari, B; Carayon, P; Couture, R

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Diabetes causes sensory polyneuropathy with associated pain in the form of tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia which are often intractable and resistant to current therapy. This study tested the beneficial effects of the non-peptide and orally active kinin B1 receptor antagonist SSR240612 against tactile and cold allodynia in a rat model of insulin resistance. Experimental approach: Rats were fed with 10% D-glucose for 12 weeks and effects of orally administered SSR240612 (0.3–30 mg kg−1) were determined on the development of tactile and cold allodynia. Possible interference of SSR240612 with vascular oxidative stress and pancreatic function was also addressed. Key results: Glucose-fed rats exhibited tactile and cold allodynia, increases in systolic blood pressure and higher plasma levels of insulin and glucose, at 12 weeks. SSR240612 blocked tactile and cold allodynia at 3 h (ID50=5.5 and 7.1 mg kg−1, respectively) in glucose-fed rats but had no effect in control rats. The antagonist (10 mg kg−1) had no effect on plasma glucose and insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA index) and aortic superoxide anion production in glucose-fed rats. Conclusions and implications: We provide the first evidence that the B1 receptors are involved in allodynia in an experimental rat model of insulin resistance. Allodynia was alleviated by SSR240612 most likely through a direct inhibition of B1 receptors affecting spinal cord and/or sensory nerve excitation. Thus, orally active non-peptide B1 receptor antagonists should have clinical therapeutic potential in the treatment of sensory polyneuropathy. PMID:17618300

  4. m-Trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide, a multi-target selenium compound, prevented mechanical allodynia and depressive-like behavior in a mouse comorbid pain and depression model.

    PubMed

    Brüning, César Augusto; Martini, Franciele; Soares, Suelen Mendonça; Sampaio, Tuane Bazanella; Gai, Bibiana Mozzaquatro; Duarte, Marta M M F; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pain and depression are two complex states that often coexist in the clinical setting and traditional antidepressants and analgesics have shown limited clinical efficacy. There is an intricate communication between the immune system and the central nervous system and inflammation has been considered a common mediator of pain-depression comorbidity. This study evaluated the effect of m-trifluoromethyl diphenyl diselenide [(m-CF3-PhSe)2], an organoselenium compound that has been reported to have both antinociceptive and antidepressant-like actions, in the comorbidity of chronic pain and depression induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) in an inflammatory approach. Mice were submitted to PSNL during 4weeks and treated with (m-CF3-PhSe)2 acutely (0.1-10mg/kg, i.g.) or subchronically (0.1mg/kg, i.g., once a day during the 3rd and 4th weeks). Both treatments prevented PSNL-increased pain sensitivity and depressive-like behavior observed in Von-Frey hair (VFH) and forced swimming (FST) tests, respectively. These effects could be mainly associated with an anti-inflammatory action of (m-CF3-PhSe)2 which reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, NF-κB and COX-2, and p38 MAPK activation that were increased by PSNL. (m-CF3-PhSe)2 also increased the BDNF levels and reduced glutamate release and 5-HT uptake altered by PSNL. Although acute and subchronic treatments with (m-CF3-PhSe)2 prevented these alterations induced by PSNL, the best results were found when (m-CF3-PhSe)2 was subchronically administered to mice. Considering the potential common mechanisms involved in the comorbidity of inflammation-induced depression and chronic pain, the results found in this study indicate that (m-CF3-PhSe)2 could become an interesting molecule to treat long-lasting pathological pain associated with depression. PMID:26025319

  5. Spinal activity of interleukin 6 mediates myelin basic protein-induced allodynia.

    PubMed

    Ko, Justin S; Eddinger, Kelly A; Angert, Mila; Chernov, Andrei V; Dolkas, Jennifer; Strongin, Alex Y; Yaksh, Tony L; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2016-08-01

    Mechanosensory fibers are enveloped by myelin, a unique multilamellar membrane permitting saltatory neuronal conduction. Damage to myelin is thought to contribute to severe pain evoked by innocuous tactile stimulation (i.e., mechanical allodynia). Our earlier (Liu et al., 2012) and present data demonstrate that a single injection of a myelin basic protein-derived peptide (MBP84-104) into an intact sciatic nerve produces a robust and long-lasting (>30days) mechanical allodynia in female rats. The MBP84-104 peptide represents the immunodominant epitope and requires T cells to maintain allodynia. Surprisingly, only systemic gabapentin (a ligand of voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ1), but not ketorolac (COX inhibitor), lidocaine (sodium channel blocker) or MK801 (NMDA antagonist) reverse allodynia induced by the intrasciatic MBP84-104. The genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the sciatic nerve followed by the bioinformatics analyses of the expression changes identified interleukin (IL)-6 as the major cytokine induced by MBP84-104 in both the control and athymic T cell-deficient nude rats. The intrasciatic MBP84-104 injection resulted in both unilateral allodynia and unilateral IL-6 increase the segmental spinal cord (neurons and astrocytes). An intrathecal delivery of a function-blocking IL-6 antibody reduced the allodynia in part by the transcriptional effects in large-diameter primary afferents in DRG. Our data suggest that MBP regulates IL-6 expression in the nervous system and that the spinal IL-6 activity mediates nociceptive processing stimulated by the MBP epitopes released after damage or disease of the somatosensory nervous system. PMID:26970355

  6. ASIC3 Is Required for Development of Fatigue-Induced Hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Nicholas S; Brito, Renan G; Fusaro, Maria Cláudia G Oliveira; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2016-03-01

    An acute bout of exercise can exacerbate pain, hindering participation in regular exercise and daily activities. The mechanisms underlying pain in response to acute exercise are poorly understood. We hypothesized that proton accumulation during muscle fatigue activates acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) on muscle nociceptors to produce hyperalgesia. We investigated the role of ASIC3 using genetic and pharmacological approaches in a model of fatigue-enhanced hyperalgesia. This model uses two injections of pH 5.0 saline into muscle in combination with an electrically induced fatigue of the same muscle just prior to the second injection of acid to induce mechanical hyperalgesia. We show a significant decrease in muscle force and decrease in muscle pH after 6 min of electrical stimulation. Genetic deletion of ASIC3 using knockout mice and pharmacological blockade of ASIC3 with APETx2 in muscle prevents the fatigue-enhanced hyperalgesia. However, ASIC3(-/-) mice and APETx2 have no effect on the fatigue response. Genetic deletion of ASIC3 in primary afferents innervating muscle using an HSV-1 expressing microRNA (miRNA) to ASIC3 surprisingly had no effect on the development of the hyperalgesia. Muscle fatigue increased the number of macrophages in muscle, and removal of macrophages from muscle with clodronate liposomes prevented the development of fatigue-enhanced hyperalgesia. Thus, these data suggest that fatigue reduces pH in muscle that subsequently activates ASIC3 on macrophages to enhance hyperalgesia to muscle insult. PMID:25577172

  7. Inflammatory and neuropathic cold allodynia are selectively mediated by the neurotrophic factor receptor GFRα3.

    PubMed

    Lippoldt, Erika K; Ongun, Serra; Kusaka, Geoffrey K; McKemy, David D

    2016-04-19

    Tissue injury prompts the release of a number of proalgesic molecules that induce acute and chronic pain by sensitizing pain-sensing neurons (nociceptors) to heat and mechanical stimuli. In contrast, many proalgesics have no effect on cold sensitivity or can inhibit cold-sensitive neurons and diminish cooling-mediated pain relief (analgesia). Nonetheless, cold pain (allodynia) is prevalent in many inflammatory and neuropathic pain settings, with little known of the mechanisms promoting pain vs. those dampening analgesia. Here, we show that cold allodynia induced by inflammation, nerve injury, and chemotherapeutics is abolished in mice lacking the neurotrophic factor receptor glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family of receptors-α3 (GFRα3). Furthermore, established cold allodynia is blocked in animals treated with neutralizing antibodies against the GFRα3 ligand, artemin. In contrast, heat and mechanical pain are unchanged, and results show that, in striking contrast to the redundant mechanisms sensitizing other modalities after an insult, cold allodynia is mediated exclusively by a single molecular pathway, suggesting that artemin-GFRα3 signaling can be targeted to selectively treat cold pain. PMID:27051069

  8. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia: when pain killers make pain worse.

    PubMed

    Kaneria, Anshuni

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman had a temporal glioma and was admitted to the hospice with pain that was not controlled despite escalating opioids. Her pain levels rose after every dose increase resulting now in continuous pain, making her very low in mood. Her short-term memory had also declined in a stepwise fashion with each increase in opioids. Additionally, her poor health had had a detrimental effect on family life. Physical examination was difficult due to allodynia but no major abnormality was found. The team suspected opioid-induced hyperalgesia and decided to cut the patient's opioids by one-third initially. This immediately improved the overall pain. The opioids continued to be decreased incrementally every 1-2 days until the pain had disappeared completely. She was stabilised on a dose almost one-seventh of her original regime. Mood and memory also improved as opioids decreased and she was discharged home after 8 days. PMID:24899014

  9. Dose response of tramadol and its combination with paracetamol in UVB induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ortner, C M; Steiner, I; Margeta, K; Schulz, M; Gustorff, B

    2012-04-01

    Combining tramadol with paracetamol is an established analgesic treatment strategy. However, dosing and differential effects on peripheral and central hyperalgesia are still to be determined. After Ethics Committee approval, 32 volunteers have been included in this 2 phased, double blinded, placebo controlled, cross-over study. A defined small skin area was irradiated with a UVB source inducing hyperalgesia. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, heat pain-, cold pain threshold (HPPT, CPPT), mechanical pain sensitivity to pin prick (MPS) in the area of pin prick hyperalgesia (AsH) and MPS in the sunburn were determined. In phase I, measurements have been repeated 30 min after receiving cumulative 0.3, 0.6 and 1 mg/kg of intravenous (i.v.) tramadol or active placebo. Only at 1 mg/kg tramadol and solely for MPS in the sunburn a reduction to placebo could be demonstrated (p = 0.024). Accordingly in phase II, the trial has been repeated using 1 mg/kg tramadol and paracetamol or placebo in a cumulative i.v. dose of 330, 660 and 990 mg. Now the addition of 330 mg paracetamol to tramadol reduced thermal hyperalgesia by 1.15 °C (CI 0.55; 1.76). This effect, however, did not increase with higher doses. Tramadol showed week anti-hyperalgesia reducing CPPT, MPS and AsH compared to baseline measurements (p < 0.05). Paracetamol also reduced secondary hyperalgesia, but no combination effect with tramadol could be shown. We conclude, in inflammatory hyperalgesia tramadol alone exerts only weak anti-hyperalgesia. Even adding a small dose paracetamol enhances thermal anti-hyperalgesia. PMID:22396084

  10. An animal model of oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia reveals a crucial role for Nav1.6 in peripheral pain pathways

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Zimmermann, Katharina; Romanovsky, Andrej A; Possani, Lourival D; Cabot, Peter J; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Cold allodynia, pain in response to cooling, occurs during or within hours of oxaliplatin infusion and is thought to arise from a direct effect of oxaliplatin on peripheral sensory neurons. To characterize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying acute oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia, we established a new intraplantar oxaliplatin mouse model that rapidly developed long-lasting cold allodynia mediated entirely through tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav pathways. Using selective inhibitors and knockout animals, we found that Nav1.6 was the key isoform involved, while thermosensitive transient receptor potential channels were not involved. Consistent with a crucial role for delayed-rectifier potassium channels in excitability in response to cold, intraplantar administration of the K+-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine mimicked oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia and was also inhibited by Navl.6 blockers. Intraplantar injection of the Nav1.6-activator Cn2 elicited spontaneous pain, mechanical allodynia and enhanced 4-aminopyridine-induced cold allodynia. These findings provide behavioural evidence for a crucial role of Nav1.6 in multiple peripheral pain pathways including cold allodynia. PMID:23711479

  11. Dexamethasone as Adjuvant to Bupivacaine Prolongs the Duration of Thermal Antinociception and Prevents Bupivacaine-Induced Rebound Hyperalgesia via Regional Mechanism in a Mouse Sciatic Nerve Block Model

    PubMed Central

    An, Ke; Elkassabany, Nabil M.; Liu, Jiabin

    2015-01-01

    Background Dexamethasone has been studied as an effective adjuvant to prolong the analgesia duration of local anesthetics in peripheral nerve block. However, the route of action for dexamethasone and its potential neurotoxicity are still unclear. Methods A mouse sciatic nerve block model was used. The sciatic nerve was injected with 60ul of combinations of various medications, including dexamethasone and/or bupivacaine. Neurobehavioral changes were observed for 2 days prior to injection, and then continuously for up to 7 days after injection. In addition, the sciatic nerves were harvested at either 2 days or 7 days after injection. Toluidine blue dyeing and immunohistochemistry test were performed to study the short-term and long-term histopathological changes of the sciatic nerves. There were six study groups: normal saline control, bupivacaine (10mg/kg) only, dexamethasone (0.5mg/kg) only, bupivacaine (10mg/kg) combined with low-dose (0.14mg/kg) dexamethasone, bupivacaine (10mg/kg) combined with high-dose (0.5mg/kg) dexamethasone, and bupivacaine (10mg/kg) combined with intramuscular dexamethasone (0.5mg/kg). Results High-dose perineural dexamethasone, but not systemic dexamethasone, combined with bupivacaine prolonged the duration of both sensory and motor block of mouse sciatic nerve. There was no significant difference on the onset time of the sciatic nerve block. There was “rebound hyperalgesia” to thermal stimulus after the resolution of plain bupivacaine sciatic nerve block. Interestingly, both low and high dose perineural dexamethasone prevented bupivacaine-induced hyperalgesia. There was an early phase of axon degeneration and Schwann cell response as represented by S-100 expression as well as the percentage of demyelinated axon and nucleus in the plain bupivacaine group compared with the bupivacaine plus dexamethasone groups on post-injection day 2, which resolved on post-injection day 7. Furthermore, we demonstrated that perineural dexamethasone

  12. Mu Opioid Splice Variant MOR-1K Contributes to the Development of Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Oladosu, Folabomi A.; Conrad, Matthew S.; O’Buckley, Sandra C.; Rashid, Naim U.; Slade, Gary D.; Nackley, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Background A subset of the population receiving opioids for the treatment of acute and chronic clinical pain develops a paradoxical increase in pain sensitivity known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Given that opioid analgesics are one of few treatments available against clinical pain, it is critical to determine the key molecular mechanisms that drive opioid-induced hyperalgesia in order to reduce its prevalence. Recent evidence implicates a splice variant of the mu opioid receptor known as MOR-1K in the emergence of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Results from human genetic association and cell signaling studies demonstrate that MOR-1K contributes to decreased opioid analgesic responses and produces increased cellular activity via Gs signaling. Here, we conducted the first study to directly test the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Methods and Results In order to examine the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia, we first assessed pain responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli prior to, during, and following chronic morphine administration. Results show that genetically diverse mouse strains (C57BL/6J, 129S6, and CXB7/ByJ) exhibited different morphine response profiles with corresponding changes in MOR-1K gene expression patterns. The 129S6 mice exhibited an analgesic response correlating to a measured decrease in MOR-1K gene expression levels, while CXB7/ByJ mice exhibited a hyperalgesic response correlating to a measured increase in MOR-1K gene expression levels. Furthermore, knockdown of MOR-1K in CXB7/ByJ mice via chronic intrathecal siRNA administration not only prevented the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia, but also unmasked morphine analgesia. Conclusions These findings suggest that MOR-1K is likely a necessary contributor to the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. With further research, MOR-1K could be exploited as a target for antagonists that reduce or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:26270813

  13. Antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mianserin on diabetic neuropathic pain: a study on mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Üçel, Umut İrfan; Can, Özgür Devrim; Demir Özkay, Ümide; Öztürk, Yusuf

    2015-06-01

    This study used various experimental pain methods to investigate the effects of subacute mianserin administration on diabetes-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The effect of mianserin on hyperalgesia occurring in connection with peripheral diabetic neuropathy was examined using the Randall-Selitto (mechanical nociceptive stimulus), Hargreaves (thermal nociceptive stimulus), and cold-plate (4°C, thermal nociceptive stimulus) tests. The dynamic plantar aesthesiometer, which measures the threshold values for mechanical stimuli, was used for allodynia studies. Thermal allodynia was evaluated with the warm-plate (38°C) test. At 30 and 45 mg/kg, mianserin effectively improved mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia occurring in connection with diabetic neuropathy. Subacute administration of mianserin also reduced diabetes-associated mechanical and thermal allodynia. The ability of mianserin to reduce diabetic neuropathic pain was comparable to that of pregabalin (10mg/kg). The antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mianserin were reversed with α-methyl-para-tyrosine methyl ester (AMPT, an inhibitor of catecholamine synthesis), phentolamine (a non-selective α-adrenoceptor antagonist), propranolol (a non-selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist), and naloxone (a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist) administrations. The same effects were not reversed, however, by para-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (PCPA; an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis). These results suggest that the beneficial effect of mianserin on diabetic neuropathic pain is mediated through an increase in catecholamine levels in the synaptic cleft as well as through interactions with both subtypes of adrenoceptors and opioid receptors. Considering that mianserin exhibits simultaneous antidepressant and antinociceptive effects, this drug could provide a good alternative for treating the pain associated with diabetic neuropathy and the mood disorders caused directly by diabetes. PMID:25771454

  14. Acidosis Mediates the Switching of Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε Dependence in Prolonged Hyperalgesia Induced by Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Yu; Dai, Shih-Ping; Chang, Yan-Ching; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory pain, when not effectively treated, is a costly health problem and has a harmful effect on all aspects of health-related quality of life. Previous studies suggested that in male Sprague Dawley rats, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-induced short-term hyperalgesia depends on protein kinase A (PKA) activity, whereas long-lasting hyperalgesia induced by PGE2 with carrageenan pre-injection, requires protein kinase Cε (PKCε). However, the mechanism underlying the kinase switch with short- to long-term hyperalgesia remains unclear. In this study, we used the inflammatory agents carrageenan or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to induce long-term hyperalgesia, and examined PKA and PKCε dependence and switching time. Hyperalgesia induced by both agents depended on PKA/PKCε and Gs/Gi-proteins, and the switching time from PKA to PKCε and from Gs to Gi was about 3 to 4 h after inflammation induction. Among the single inflammatory mediators tested, PGE2 and 5-HT induced transient hyperalgesia, which depended on PKA and PKCε, respectively. Only acidic solution-induced hyperalgesia required Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε, and the switch time for kinase dependency matched inflammatory hyperalgesia, in approximately 2 to 4 h. Thus, acidosis in inflamed tissues may be a decisive factor to regulate switching of PKA and PKCε dependence via proton-sensing G-protein–coupled receptors. PMID:25933021

  15. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  16. Spinal changes of a newly isolated neuropeptide endomorphin-2 concomitant with vincristine-induced allodynia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Lin, Guo-An; Xie, He-Qiu; Pan, Hai-Tao; Huang, Ben-Qing; Liu, Ji-Dong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Nan; Li, Li; Chen, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain (CNP) is the major dose-limiting factor in cancer chemotherapy. However, the neural mechanisms underlying CNP remain unclear. There is increasing evidence implicating the involvement of spinal endomorphin-2 (EM2) in neuropathic pain. In this study, we used a vincristine-evoked rat CNP model displaying mechanical allodynia and central sensitization, and observed a significant decrease in the expression of spinal EM2 in CNP. Also, while intrathecal administration of exogenous EM2 attenuated allodynia and central sensitization, the mu-opioid receptor antagonist β-funaltrexamine facilitated these events. We found that the reduction in spinal EM2 was mediated by increased activity of dipeptidylpeptidase IV, possibly as a consequence of chemotherapy-induced oxidative stress. Taken together, our findings suggest that a decrease in spinal EM2 expression causes the loss of endogenous analgesia and leads to enhanced pain sensation in CNP. PMID:24586889

  17. Spinal Changes of a Newly Isolated Neuropeptide Endomorphin-2 Concomitant with Vincristine-Induced Allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ben-Qing; Liu, Ji-Dong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Nan; Li, Li; Chen, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain (CNP) is the major dose-limiting factor in cancer chemotherapy. However, the neural mechanisms underlying CNP remain unclear. There is increasing evidence implicating the involvement of spinal endomorphin-2 (EM2) in neuropathic pain. In this study, we used a vincristine-evoked rat CNP model displaying mechanical allodynia and central sensitization, and observed a significant decrease in the expression of spinal EM2 in CNP. Also, while intrathecal administration of exogenous EM2 attenuated allodynia and central sensitization, the mu-opioid receptor antagonist β-funaltrexamine facilitated these events. We found that the reduction in spinal EM2 was mediated by increased activity of dipeptidylpeptidase IV, possibly as a consequence of chemotherapy-induced oxidative stress. Taken together, our findings suggest that a decrease in spinal EM2 expression causes the loss of endogenous analgesia and leads to enhanced pain sensation in CNP. PMID:24586889

  18. Spatial and temporal aspects of muscle hyperalgesia induced by nerve growth factor in humans.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Svensson, Peter; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Intramuscular injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) has been shown to induce long-term sensitisation and time-dependent hyperalgesia indicating potential involvement of both central and peripheral pain mechanisms. This double-blind placebo-controlled study was designed to describe the spatial distribution of muscle hyperalgesia over time (immediately after, 3 h, 1, 4, 7 and 21 days) after injecting NGF (5 mug) into the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle, to explore possibly involved central pain mechanisms and to investigate the effect of gender on development of hyperalgesia. Totally 20 healthy volunteers (10 men and 10 women) participated in the study. An isotonic saline injection into the contralateral TA muscle served as a control condition for the NGF injection. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were used to test for muscle hyperalgesia along the TA (seven sites) muscle at the extensor digitorum longus and at the web between 1st and 2nd metatarsal (central involvement). One day after the NGF/control injections, hypertonic saline (0.5 ml, 5.8%) was injected into the left and right TA to study the pain response to chemical stimulation of the hyperalgesic muscle tissue. Scores on a modified Likert scale were used to assess soreness during muscle function. An area of hyperalgesia was observed locally at the injected site 3 h after injection of NGF, which expanded both proximally and distally on day 1; this effect subsided on day 4. Decreased PPT was also found between 1st and 2nd metatarsal on day 1. Hypertonic saline evoked more pain in men when injected in the NGF treated TA compared to the control leg. Injection of NGF increased muscle soreness during muscle activity for 7 days. In this material there was no gender effect of NGF-induced muscle hyperalgesia. The expansion of muscle hyperalgesia to distant areas indicates that central mechanisms are involved. PMID:18813917

  19. Allodynia: When Touch Hurts But Shouldn't

    MedlinePlus

    ... allodynia occurs more often in migraine than in tension headaches among headaches without a secondary cause. In ... below the waist. Like chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache, scientists believe central sensitization also causes ...

  20. A novel method for modeling facial allodynia associated with migraine in awake and freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Wieseler, Julie; Ellis, Amanda; Sprunger, David; Brown, Kim; McFadden, Andrew; Mahoney, John; Rezvani, Niloofar; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2009-01-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder that induces debilitating headaches associated with multiple symptoms including facial allodynia, characterized by heightened responsivity to normally innocuous mechanical stimuli. It is now well accepted that immune activation and immune-derived inflammatory mediators enhance pain responsivity, including in the trigeminal system. Nociceptive (“pain” responsive) trigeminal nerves densely innervate the cranial meninges. We have recently proposed that the meninges may serve as a previously unidentified, key interface between the peripheral immune system and the CNS with potential implications for understanding underlying migraine mechanisms. Our focus here is the development of a model for facial allodynia associated with migraine. We developed a model wherein an indwelling catheter is placed between the skull and dura, allowing immunogenic stimuli to be administered over the dura in awake and freely moving rats. Since the catheter does not contact the brain itself, any proinflammatory cytokines induced following manipulation derive from resident or recruited meningeal immune cells. While surgery alone does not alter immune activation markers, TNF or IL6 mRNA and/or protein, it does decrease gene expression and increase protein expression of IL-1 at 4 days after surgery. Using this model we show the induction of facial allodynia in response to supradural administration of either the HIV glycoprotein gp120 or inflammatory soup (bradykinin, histamine, serotonin, and prostaglandin E2), and the induction of hindpaw allodynia in our model after inflammatory soup. This model allows time and dose dependent assessment of the relationship between changes in meningeal inflammation and corresponding exaggerated pain behaviors. PMID:19837113

  1. Nerve growth factor induces facial heat hyperalgesia and plays a role in trigeminal neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, Renata C; Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Nones, Carina F M; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2016-09-01

    There is preclinical evidence that nerve growth factor (NGF) contributes toward inflammatory hyperalgesia in the orofacial region, but the mechanisms underlying its hyperalgesic effect as well as its role in trigeminal neuropathic pain require further investigation. This study investigated the ability of NGF to induce facial heat hyperalgesia and the involvement of tyrosine kinase receptor A, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, and mast cells in NGF pronociceptive effects. In addition, the role of NGF in heat hyperalgesia in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain was evaluated. NGF injection into the upper lip of naive rats induced long-lasting heat hyperalgesia. Pretreatment with an antibody anti-NGF, antagonists of tyrosine kinase receptor A, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors or compound 48/80, to induce mast-cell degranulation, all attenuated NGF-induced hyperalgesia. In a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain, local treatment with anti-NGF significantly reduced heat hyperalgesia. In addition, increased NGF levels were detected in the ipsilateral infraorbital nerve branch at the time point that represents the peak of heat hyperalgesia. The results suggest that NGF is a prominent hyperalgesic mediator in the trigeminal system and it may represent a potential therapeutic target for the management of painful orofacial conditions, including trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:27392124

  2. Acid-sensing ion channel 3 mediates peripheral anti-hyperalgesia effects of acupuncture in mice inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Peripheral tissue inflammation initiates hyperalgesia accompanied by tissue acidosis, nociceptor activation, and inflammation mediators. Recent studies have suggested a significantly increased expression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in both carrageenan- and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation. This study tested the hypothesis that acupuncture is curative for mechanical hyperalgesia induced by peripheral inflammation. Methods Here we used mechanical stimuli to assess behavioral responses in paw and muscle inflammation induced by carrageenan or CFA. We also used immunohistochemistry staining and western blot methodology to evaluate the expression of ASIC3 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Results In comparison with the control, the inflammation group showed significant mechanical hyperalgesia with both intraplantar carrageenan and CFA-induced inflammation. Interestingly, both carrageenan- and CFA-induced hyperalgesia were accompanied by ASIC3 up-regulation in DRG neurons. Furthermore, electroacupuncture (EA) at the ST36 rescued mechanical hyperalgesia through down-regulation of ASIC3 overexpression in both carrageenan- and CFA-induced inflammation. Conclusions In addition, electrical stimulation at the ST36 acupoint can relieve mechanical hyperalgesia by attenuating ASIC3 overexpression. PMID:22070775

  3. Rifaximin Alters Intestinal Bacteria and Prevents Stress-Induced Gut Inflammation and Visceral Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dabo; Gao, Jun; Gillilland, Merritt; Wu, Xiaoyin; Song, Il; Kao, John Y.; Owyang, Chung

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Rifaximin is used to treat patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders, but little is known about its therapeutic mechanism. We propose that rifaximin modulates the ileal bacterial community, reduces subclinical inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, and improves gut barrier function to reduce visceral hypersensitivity. Methods We induced visceral hyperalgesia in rats, via chronic water avoidance or repeat restraint stressors, and investigated whether rifaximin altered the gut microbiota, prevented intestinal inflammation, and improved gut barrier function. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and 454 pyrosequencing were used to analyze bacterial 16S rRNA in ileal contents from the rats. Reverse transcription, immunoblot, and histologic analyses were used to evaluate levels of cytokines, the tight junction protein occludin, and mucosal inflammation, respectively. Intestinal permeability and rectal sensitivity were measured. Results Water avoidance and repeat restraint stress each led to visceral hyperalgesia, accompanied by mucosal inflammation and impaired mucosal barrier function. Oral rifaximin altered the composition of bacterial communities in the ileum (Lactobacillus species became the most abundant) and prevented mucosal inflammation, impairment to intestinal barrier function, and visceral hyperalgesia in response to chronic stress. Neomycin also changed the composition of the ileal bacterial community (Proteobacteria became the most abundant species). Neomycin did not prevent intestinal inflammation or induction of visceral hyperalgesia induced by water avoidance stress. Conclusions Rifaximin alters the bacterial population in the ileum of rats, leading to a relative abundance of Lactobacillus. These changes prevent intestinal abnormalities and visceral hyperalgesia in response to chronic psychological stress. PMID:24161699

  4. The nitroxyl donor, Angeli’s salt, inhibits inflammatory hyperalgesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zarpelon, Ana C.; Souza, Guilherme R.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Schivo, Ieda R.S.; Marchesi, Mario; Casagrande, Rubia; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Miranda, Katrina M.; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide modulates pain development. However, there is no evidence on the effect of nitroxyl (HNO/NO−) in nociception. Therefore, we addressed whether nitroxyl inhibits inflammatory hyperalgesia and its mechanism using the nitroxyl donor Angeli’s salt (AS; Na2N2O3). Mechanical hyperalgesia was evaluated using a modified Randall and Selitto method in rats, cytokine production by ELISA and nitroxyl was determined by confocal microscopy in DAF (a cell permeable reagent that is converted into a fluorescent molecule by nitrogen oxides)-treated dorsal root ganglia neurons in culture. Local pre-treatment with AS (17– 450 µg/paw, 30 min) inhibited the carrageenin-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in a dose- and time-dependent manner with maximum inhibition of 97%. AS also inhibited carrageenin-induced cytokine production. AS inhibited the hyperalgesia induced by other inflammatory stimuli including lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and prostaglandin E2. Furthermore, the analgesic effect of AS was prevented by treatment with ODQ (a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor), KT5823 (a protein kinase G [PKG] inhibitor) or glybenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker), but not with naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist). AS induced concentration-dependent increase in fluorescence intensity of DAF-treated neurons in a L-cysteine (nitroxyl scavenger) sensitive manner. L-cysteine did not affect the NO+ donor S-Nitroso-N-acetyl-DL- penicillamine (SNAP)-induced anti-hyperalgesia or fluorescence of DAF-treated neurons. This is the first study to demonstrate that nitroxyl inhibits inflammatory hyperalgesia by reducing cytokine production and activating the cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive K+ channel signaling pathway in vivo. PMID:23541720

  5. Two-week cast immobilization induced chronic widespread hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohmichi, Y; Sato, J; Ohmichi, M; Sakurai, H; Yoshimoto, T; Morimoto, A; Hashimoto, T; Eguchi, K; Nishihara, M; Arai, Y-C P; Ohishi, H; Asamoto, K; Ushida, T; Nakano, T; Kumazawa, T

    2012-03-01

    It has been postulated that physical immobilization is an essential factor in developing chronic pain after trauma or surgery in an extremity. However, the mechanisms of sustained immobilization-induced chronic pain remain poorly understood. The present study, therefore, aimed to develop a rat model for chronic post-cast pain (CPCP) and to clarify the mechanism(s) underlying CPCP. To investigate the effects of cast immobilization on pain behaviours in rats, one hindlimb was immobilized for 2 weeks with a cast and remobilization was conducted for 10 weeks. Cast immobilization induced muscle atrophy and inflammatory changes in the immobilized hindlimb that began 2 h after cast removal and continued for 1 week. Spontaneous pain-related behaviours (licking and reduction in weight bearing) in the immobilized hindlimb were observed for 2 weeks, and widespread mechanical hyperalgesia in bilateral calves, hindpaws and tail all continued for 5-10 weeks after cast removal. A sciatic nerve block with lidocaine 24 h after cast removal transitorily abolished bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia in CPCP rats, suggesting that sensory inputs originating in the immobilized hindlimb contribute to the mechanism of both ipsilateral and contralateral hyperalgesia. Intraperitoneal injection of the free radical scavengers 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperydine-1-oxy1 or N-acetylcysteine 24 h after cast removal clearly inhibited mechanical hyperalgesia in bilateral calves and hindpaws in CPCP rats. These results suggest that cast immobilization induces ischaemia/reperfusion injury in the hindlimb and consequent production of oxygen free radicals, which may be involved in the mechanism of widespread hyperalgesia in CPCP rats. PMID:22337282

  6. Motor Cortex Stimulation Reduces Hyperalgesia in an Animal Model of Central Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Jessica M; Ji, Yadong; Masri, Radi

    2011-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the primary motor cortex has been used since 1991 to treat chronic neuropathic pain. Since its inception, motor cortex stimulation (MCS) treatment has had varied clinical outcomes. Until this point, there has not been a systematic study of the stimulation parameters that most effectively treat chronic pain, or of the mechanisms by which MCS relieves pain. Here, using a rodent model of central pain, we perform a systematic study of stimulation parameters used for MCS and investigate the mechanisms by which MCS reduces hyperalgesia. Specifically, we study the role of the inhibitory nucleus zona incerta (ZI) in mediating the analgesic effects of MCS. In animals with mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, we find that stimulation at 50 µA, 50 Hz, and 300 µs square pulses, for 30 minutes is sufficient to reverse mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. We also find that stimulation of the ZI mimics the effects of MCS and that reversible inactivation of ZI blocks the effects of MCS. These findings suggest that the reduction of hyperalgesia maybe due to MCS effects on ZI. PMID:21396776

  7. Ligation of mouse L4 and L5 spinal nerves produces robust allodynia without major motor function deficit.

    PubMed

    Ye, Gui-Lan; Savelieva, Katerina V; Vogel, Peter; Baker, Kevin B; Mason, Sara; Lanthorn, Thomas H; Rajan, Indrani

    2015-01-01

    Spinal nerve L5/L6 ligation (SNL) in rats has become the standard for mechanistic studies of peripheral neuropathy and screening for novel analgesics. Conventional SNL in our hybrid mice resulted in a wide range of allodynia. Anatomical evaluation indicated that a variable number of lumbar vertebrae existed, resulting in L4/L5 or L5/L6 being ligated. Surprisingly, L4/L5 ligation did not result in ipsilateral hind limb paralysis and produced robust allodynia. Following a recent report that the mouse L4 neural segment is homologous with rat L5 we generated L4, L5 or both L4 and L5 (L4/L5) ligations in C57 mice after establishing a modified set of surgical landmarks. In contrast to rats, L4 ligation in these mice did not result in hind limb paralysis. Robust allodynia was observed in all three ligation groups. Nerve degeneration confirmed that L4 and L5, respectively, are primary contributors to the tibial and sural branches of the sciatic nerve in mice. A larger von Frey sensitive area reflected the wider distribution of Wallerian degeneration in the hindlimb of L4- compared to L5-ligated mice. Ligation of mouse L4 and L5 spinal nerves produces consistent, robust neuropathic pain behaviors and is suitable as a model for investigating mechanisms of neuropathic pain and for testing of novel analgesics. Gabapentin, used as a validation drug in neuropathic pain models and as a reference compound for novel analgesics, significantly reduced allodynia in the mice tested (L4/L5 ligations). Given the ease of surgery, robust allodynia, and larger von Frey sensitive area, we conclude that combined ligation of spinal nerves L4 and L5 optimizes the SNL model in mice. PMID:24786331

  8. Analgesic treatment of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Katharina; Deuis, Jennifer R; Inserra, Marco C; Collins, Lindon S; Namer, Barbara; Cabot, Peter J; Reeh, Peter W; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2013-10-01

    Ciguatera, the most common form of nonbacterial ichthyosarcotoxism, is caused by consumption of fish that have bioaccumulated the polyether sodium channel activator ciguatoxin. The neurological symptoms of ciguatera include distressing, often persistent sensory disturbances such as paraesthesias and the pathognomonic symptom of cold allodynia. We show that intracutaneous administration of ciguatoxin in humans elicits a pronounced axon-reflex flare and replicates cold allodynia. To identify compounds able to inhibit ciguatoxin-induced Nav responses, we developed a novel in vitro ciguatoxin assay using the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Pharmacological characterisation of this assay demonstrated a major contribution of Nav1.2 and Nav1.3, but not Nav1.7, to ciguatoxin-induced Ca2+ responses. Clinically available Nav inhibitors, as well as the Kv7 agonist flupirtine, inhibited tetrodotoxin-sensitive ciguatoxin-evoked responses. To establish their in vivo efficacy, we used a novel animal model of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia. However, differences in the efficacy of these compounds to reverse ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia did not correlate with their potency to inhibit ciguatoxin-induced responses in SH-SY5Y cells or at heterologously expressed Nav1.3, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, or Nav1.8, indicating cold allodynia might be more complex than simple activation of Nav channels. These findings highlight the need for suitable animal models to guide the empiric choice of analgesics, and suggest that lamotrigine and flupirtine could be potentially useful for the treatment of ciguatera. PMID:23778293

  9. ASICs Do Not Play a Role in Maintaining Hyperalgesia Induced by Repeated Intramuscular Acid Injections

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Mamta; Benson, Christopher J.; Ranier, Jon D.; Light, Alan R.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Repeated intramuscular acid injections produce long-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia that depends on activation of ASICs. The present study investigated if pH-activated currents in sensory neurons innervating muscle were altered in response to repeated acid injections, and if blockade of ASICs reverses existing hyperalgesia. In muscle sensory neurons, the mean acid-evoked current amplitudes and the biophysical properties of the ASIC-like currents were unchanged following acidic saline injections when compared to neutral pH saline injections or uninjected controls. Moreover, increased mechanical sensitivity of the muscle and paw after the second acid injection was unaffected by local blockade of ASICs (A-317567) in the muscle. As a control, electron microscopic analysis showed that the tibial nerve was undamaged after acid injections. Our previous studies demonstrated that ASICs are important in the development of hyperalgesia to repeated acid injections. However, the current data suggest that ASICs are not involved in maintaining hyperalgesia to repeated intramuscular acid injections. PMID:22191025

  10. Hyperalgesia in an immobilized rat hindlimb: effect of treadmill exercise using non-immobilized limbs.

    PubMed

    Chuganji, Sayaka; Nakano, Jiro; Sekino, Yuki; Hamaue, Yohei; Sakamoto, Junya; Okita, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Cast immobilization of limbs causes hyperalgesia, which is a decline of the threshold of mechanical and thermal mechanical stimuli. The immobilization-induced hyperalgesia (IIH) can disturb rehabilitation and activities of daily living in patients with orthopedic disorders. However, it is unclear what therapeutic and preventive approaches can be used to alleviate IIH. Exercise that activates the descending pain modulatory system may be effective for IIH. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise during the immobilization period, using the non-immobilized limbs, on IIH. Thirty-six 8-week-old Wistar rats were randomly divided into (1) control, (2) immobilization (Im), and (3) immobilization and treadmill exercise (Im+Ex) groups. In the Im and Im+Ex groups, the right ankle joints of each rat were immobilized in full plantar flexion with a plaster cast for an 8-week period. In the Im+Ex group, treadmill exercise (15 m/min, 30 min/day, 5 days/week) was administered during the immobilization period while the right hindlimb was kept immobilized. Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured using von Frey filaments every week. To investigate possible activation of the descending pain modulatory system, beta-endorphin expression levels in hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray were analyzed. Although IIH clearly occurred in the Im group, the hyperalgesia was partially but significantly reduced in the Im+Ex group. Beta-endorphin, which is one of the endogenous opioids, was selectively increased in the hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray of the Im+Ex group. Our data suggest that treadmill running using the non-immobilized limbs reduces the amount of hyperalgesia induced in the immobilized limb even if it is not freed. This ameliorating effect might be due to the descending pain modulatory system being activated by upregulation of beta-endorphin in the brain. PMID:25304541

  11. EVALUATION OF HYPERALGESIA AND HISTOLOGICAL CHANGES OF DORSAL ROOT GANGLION INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Grava, André Luiz de Souza; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the hyperalgesia and histological abnormalities induced by contact between the dorsal root ganglion and the nucleus pulposus. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats were used, divided into two experimental groups. In one of the groups, a fragment of autologous nucleus pulposus was removed from the sacrococcygeal region and deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. In the other group (control), a fragment of adipose tissue was deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated on the third day and the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation. A L5 dorsal root ganglion was removed in the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation for histological study using HE staining and histochemical study using specific labeling for iNOS. Results: Higher intensity of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion. In this group, the histological study showed abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue, characterized by an inflammatory process and axonal degeneration. The histopathological abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue presented increasing intensity with increasing length of observation, and there was a correlation with maintenance of the hyperalgesia observed in the behavioral assessment. Immunohistochemistry using specific labeling for iNOS in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion showed higher expression of this enzyme in the nuclei of the inflammatory cells (glial cells) surrounding the neurons. Conclusion: Contact between the nucleus pulposus and the dorsal root ganglion induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and caused histological abnormalities in the dorsal root ganglion components. These abnormalities were characterized by an inflammatory and degenerative process in the structures of the dorsal root

  12. A possible correlation between oxytocin-induced and angiotensin IV-induced anti-hyperalgesia at the spinal level in rats.

    PubMed

    Chow, Lok-Hi; Tao, Pao-Luh; Chen, Jin-Chung; Liao, Ruey-Ming; Chang, En-Pei; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung

    2013-01-01

    In our previous study, we showed that intrathecal (i.t.) administration of angiotensin IV (Ang IV), an insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) inhibitor, attenuated inflammatory hyperalgesia in rats. Using the plantar test in rats with carrageenan-induced paw inflammation, we investigated the possible mechanism(s) of this effect. Because i.t. oxytocin was reported to produce a dose-dependent anti-hyperalgesia in rats with inflammation, we speculate that there is a possible correlation between oxytocin-induced and Ang IV-induced anti-hyperalgesia. Using i.t. co-administered atosiban (oxytocin receptor antagonist), the anti-hyperalgesia by Ang IV was completely abolished. This indicated that oxytocin could be the major IRAP substrate responsible for the anti-hyperalgesia by Ang IV. When Ang IV was co-administered with a low dose of oxytocin, there was a significant enhancing effect of Ang IV on oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia. In recent reports, electrical stimulation on the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN) was proved to increase oxytocin release at the spinal cord. Our results also showed that Ang IV could prolong the anti-hyperalgesia induced by PVN stimulation. This suggests a possible protective effect of Ang IV on endogenous oxytocin degradation/dysfunctioning. Moreover, we examined the local effect of intraplantarly injected Ang IV in the same model. Our results showed no effect of local Ang IV on hyperalgesia and paw edema, indicating that Ang IV may not regulate the peripheral inflammatory process. Overall, our study suggests that Ang IV may act through the inhibition of the activity of IRAP to reduce the degradation of oxytocin at the spinal cord, thereby leading to anti-hyperalgesia in rats with inflammation. PMID:23142109

  13. Fear of pain potentiates nocebo hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Aslaksen, Per M; Lyby, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Nocebo hyperalgesia has received sparse experimental attention compared to placebo analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits and fear of pain could predict experimental nocebo hyperalgesia. One hundred and eleven healthy volunteers (76 females) participated in an experimental study in which personality traits and fear of pain were measured prior to induction of thermal heat pain. Personality traits were measured by the Big-Five Inventory-10. Fear of pain was measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode. Pain was measured by a computerized visual analog scale. Stress levels during the experiment were measured by numerical rating scales. The participants were randomized to a Nocebo group or to a no-treatment Natural History group. The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment. Mediation analysis showed that higher levels of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III factor "fear of medical pain" significantly increased stress levels after nocebo treatment and that higher stress levels were associated with increased nocebo hyperalgesic responses. There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect. The results from the present study suggest that dispositional fear of pain might be a useful predictor for nocebo hyperalgesia and emotional states concomitant with expectations of increased pain. Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality. PMID:26491370

  14. Fear of pain potentiates nocebo hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Aslaksen, Per M; Lyby, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Nocebo hyperalgesia has received sparse experimental attention compared to placebo analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits and fear of pain could predict experimental nocebo hyperalgesia. One hundred and eleven healthy volunteers (76 females) participated in an experimental study in which personality traits and fear of pain were measured prior to induction of thermal heat pain. Personality traits were measured by the Big-Five Inventory-10. Fear of pain was measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode. Pain was measured by a computerized visual analog scale. Stress levels during the experiment were measured by numerical rating scales. The participants were randomized to a Nocebo group or to a no-treatment Natural History group. The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment. Mediation analysis showed that higher levels of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III factor “fear of medical pain” significantly increased stress levels after nocebo treatment and that higher stress levels were associated with increased nocebo hyperalgesic responses. There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect. The results from the present study suggest that dispositional fear of pain might be a useful predictor for nocebo hyperalgesia and emotional states concomitant with expectations of increased pain. Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality. PMID:26491370

  15. Intrathecal rapamycin attenuates morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ji-Tian; Sun, Linlin; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Repeated and long-term administration of opioids is often accompanied by the initiation of opioid-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients. Our previous studies showed that repeated intrathecal morphine injection activated the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in spinal dorsal horn neurons and that blocking this activation prevented the initiation of morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in healthy rats. However, whether spinal mTORC1 is required for morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia under neuropathic pain conditions remains elusive. We here observed the effect of intrathecal infusion of rapamycin, a specific mTORC1 inhibitor, on morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in a neuropathic pain model in rats induced by the fifth lumbar spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Continuous intrathecal infusion of morphine for one week starting on day 8 post-SNL led to morphine tolerance demonstrated by morphine-induced reduction in maximal possible analgesic effect (MPAE) to tail heat stimuli and ipsilateral paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli in SNL rats. Such reduction was attenuated by co-infusion of rapamycin. Co-infusion of rapamycin also blocked morphine tolerance demonstrated by attenuation of morphine-induced reduction in MPAE in sham rats and morphine-induced hyperalgesia demonstrated by the reverse of morphine-induced reduction in PWT on both sides of sham rats and on the contralateral side of SNL rats. The results suggest that mTORC1 inhibitors could serve as promising medications for use as adjuvants with opioids in clinical neuropathic pain management. PMID:26339682

  16. Effect of intraperitoneal administered ginseng total saponins on hyperalgesia induced by repeated intramuscular injection of acidic saline in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Joong; Kang, Hyun; Kim, Jung Eun; Choi, Geun Joo; Shin, Hwa Yong; Baek, Chong Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Choel; Kim, Su Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hyuk

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the antinociceptive activity of ginseng total saponins (GTS) on hyperalgesia induced by repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline in rats and to examine the mechanisms involved. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with a 0.9% saline vehicle or various doses of GTS after the development of hyperalgesia. Rats were then injected with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or naloxone 10 min before GTS injection. The mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) was assessed with von Frey filaments. The MWT was significantly increased after intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of GTS when compared with the MWT after the development of hyperalgesia. Injection of GTS with NMDA showed a significant decrease in the MWT when compared with GTS injection. GTS showed an antinociceptive activity against chronic muscle-induced pain, and the effect of GTS may be mediated by NMDA. PMID:24853193

  17. Role of TNF in sickness behavior and allodynia during the acute phase of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Angulo, H; Thomas, L E; Castillo, E; Cárdenas, E; Mogollón, F; Mijares, A

    2013-08-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is associated with inflammation, discomfort and pain during the acute phase. The influence of TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor) in this disease outcome is controversial. In this way, the aim of this work was to determine the role of the TNF-α blocker etanercept in the pain, discomfort, and survival during the Chagas' acute phase of mice experimentally infected with a wild virulent strain of T. cruzi. The infection with this wild strain was responsible for a severe visceral inflammation and said parasite showed a tropism in peritoneal fluid cells. Etanercept was able to restore spontaneous vertical and horizontal activities during the second week after infection and to abolish mechanical allodynia during the first week after infection. Finally, etanercept delayed the mortality without any effect on the parasitemia rates. This is the first report that correlates sickness behavior and allodynia with TNF-α and suggests that this cytokine may play an important role in the physiopathology of the acute phase. PMID:23684908

  18. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and burn pain.

    PubMed

    Holtman, Joseph R; Jellish, W Scott

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of pain produced during the management of burn injury has been an ongoing problem for physicians caring for these patients. The main therapeutic option for analgesia has been the repeated and prolonged use of opioids. The adverse effects of opioids are well known but the long term use of opioids which produces tolerance with accompanying dose escalation and dependence is most problematic. Another potentially important consequence of opioid exposure that sometimes masks as tolerance is that of opioid induced hyperalgesia. This syndrome is manifest as enhanced pain, sensitivity and loss of analgesic efficacy in patients treated with opioids who actually become sensitized to painful stimuli. This article focuses on the treatment of burn pain and how current analgesic therapies with opioids may cause hyperalgesia and affect the adequacy of treatment for burn pain. This article also provides possible modalities to help therapeutically manage these patients and considers future analgesic strategies which may help to improve pain management in this complicated patient population. PMID:23143613

  19. Homocysteine-induced attenuation of vascular endothelium-dependent hyperalgesia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Joseph, E K; Green, P G; Ferrari, L F; Levine, J D

    2015-01-22

    We have recently demonstrated a role of the vascular endothelium in peripheral pain mechanism by disrupting endothelial cell function using intravascular administration of octoxynol-9, a non-selective membrane active agent. As an independent test of the role of endothelial cells in pain mechanisms, we evaluated the effect of homocysteine, an agent that damages endothelial cell function. Mechanical stimulus-induced enhancement of endothelin-1 hyperalgesia in the gastrocnemius muscle of the rat was first prevented then enhanced by intravenous administration of homocysteine, but was only inhibited by its precursor, methionine. Both homocysteine and methionine significantly attenuated mechanical hyperalgesia in two models of ergonomic muscle pain, induced by exposure to vibration, and by eccentric exercise, and cutaneous mechanical hyperalgesia in an ischemia-reperfusion injury model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I, all previously shown responsive to octoxynol-9. This study provides independent support for a role of the endothelial cell in pain syndromes thought to have a vascular basis, and suggests that substances that are endothelial cell toxins can enhance vascular pain. PMID:25451284

  20. Chronic CRF1 receptor blockade reduces heroin intake escalation and dependence-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Park, Paula E; Schlosburg, Joel E; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schulteis, Gery; Edwards, Scott; Koob, George F

    2015-03-01

    Opioids represent effective drugs for the relief of pain, yet chronic opioid use often leads to a state of increased sensitivity to pain that is exacerbated during withdrawal. A sensitization of pain-related negative affect has been hypothesized to closely interact with addiction mechanisms. Neuro-adaptive changes occur as a consequence of excessive opioid exposure, including a recruitment of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and norepinephrine (NE) brain stress systems. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the transition to dependence, we determined the effects of functional antagonism within these two systems on hyperalgesia-like behavior during heroin withdrawal utilizing models of both acute and chronic dependence. We found that passive or self-administered heroin produced a significant mechanical hypersensitivity. During acute opioid dependence, systemic administration of the CRF1 receptor antagonist MPZP (20 mg/kg) alleviated withdrawal-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In contrast, several functional adrenergic system antagonists (clonidine, prazosin, propranolol) failed to alter mechanical hypersensitivity in this state. We then determined the effects of chronic MPZP or clonidine treatment on extended access heroin self-administration and found that MPZP, but not clonidine, attenuated escalation of heroin intake, whereas both drugs alleviated chronic dependence-associated hyperalgesia. These findings suggest that an early potentiation of CRF signaling occurs following opioid exposure that begins to drive both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and eventually intake escalation. PMID:24330252

  1. Antagonism of the Prokineticin System Prevents and Reverses Allodynia and Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Mara; Amodeo, Giada; Negri, Lucia; Lattanzi, Roberta; Maftei, Daniela; Gotti, Cecilia; Pistillo, Francesco; Onnis, Valentina; Congu, Cenzo; Panerai, Alberto E.; Sacerdote, Paola; Franchi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a severe diabetes complication and its treatment is not satisfactory. It is associated with neuroinflammation-related events that participate in pain generation and chronicization. Prokineticins are a new family of chemokines that has emerged as critical players in immune system, inflammation and pain. We investigated the role of prokineticins and their receptors as modulators of neuropathic pain and inflammatory responses in experimental diabetes. In streptozotocin-induced-diabetes in mice, the time course expression of prokineticin and its receptors was evaluated in spinal cord and sciatic nerves, and correlated with mechanical allodynia. Spinal cord and sciatic nerve pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were measured as protein and mRNA, and spinal cord GluR subunits expression studied. The effect of preventive and therapeutic treatment with the prokineticin receptor antagonist PC1 on behavioural and biochemical parameters was evaluated. Peripheral immune activation was assessed measuring macrophage and T-helper cytokine production. An up-regulation of the Prokineticin system was present in spinal cord and nerves of diabetic mice, and correlated with allodynia. Therapeutic PC1 reversed allodynia while preventive treatment blocked its development. PC1 normalized prokineticin levels and prevented the up-regulation of GluN2B subunits in the spinal cord. The antagonist restored the pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance altered in spinal cord and nerves and also reduced peripheral immune system activation in diabetic mice, decreasing macrophage proinflammatory cytokines and the T-helper 1 phenotype. The prokineticin system contributes to altered sensitivity in diabetic neuropathy and its inhibition blocked both allodynia and inflammatory events underlying disease. PMID:26730729

  2. PLGA-Curcumin Attenuates Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia and Inhibits Spinal CaMKIIα

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Tian, Xuebi; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2016-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is one of the major problems associated with prolonged use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain. Effective treatment for OIH is lacking. In this study, we examined the efficacy and preliminary mechanism of curcumin in attenuating OIH. We employed a newly developed PLGA-curcumin nanoformulation (PLGA-curcumin) in order to improve the solubility of curcumin, which has been a major obstacle in properly characterizing curcumin’s mechanism of action and efficacy. We found that curcumin administered intrathecally or orally significantly attenuated hyperalgesia in mice with morphine-induced OIH. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effects of curcumin on OIH correlated with the suppression of chronic morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the superficial laminae of the spinal dorsal horn. These data suggest that PLGA-curcumin may reverse OIH possibly by inhibiting CaMKIIα and its downstream signaling. PMID:26744842

  3. PLGA-Curcumin Attenuates Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia and Inhibits Spinal CaMKIIα.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Tian, Xuebi; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2016-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is one of the major problems associated with prolonged use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain. Effective treatment for OIH is lacking. In this study, we examined the efficacy and preliminary mechanism of curcumin in attenuating OIH. We employed a newly developed PLGA-curcumin nanoformulation (PLGA-curcumin) in order to improve the solubility of curcumin, which has been a major obstacle in properly characterizing curcumin's mechanism of action and efficacy. We found that curcumin administered intrathecally or orally significantly attenuated hyperalgesia in mice with morphine-induced OIH. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effects of curcumin on OIH correlated with the suppression of chronic morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the superficial laminae of the spinal dorsal horn. These data suggest that PLGA-curcumin may reverse OIH possibly by inhibiting CaMKIIα and its downstream signaling. PMID:26744842

  4. Chronic intermittent voluntary alcohol drinking induces hyperalgesia in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Rao; Gregor, Danielle; Peng, Zengliu; Li, Jing; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jianghong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of hyperalgesia in alcoholics are not completely clear, and the development of animal models would therefore be necessary in investigating the underlying changes. Several studies including our own have demonstrated that the intermittent access to 20% ethanol two-bottle choice procedure (IA2BC) promotes escalation of drinking, and induces physical dependence in the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat, one of the strains most commonly used in preclinical alcohol research. In this study, we investigated whether the IA2BC procedure could produce hyperalgesia in SD rats. We show here that, the SD rats in the IA2BC procedure significantly escalated their drinking within 8 weeks, which is consistent with other studies. Starting from 8 weeks of repeated chronic drinking, the mechanical and thermal sensitivity was significantly increased. During withdrawal, there were noticeable physical dependence signs, including tail stiffness and lower limb flexion, which started at 4 hours and lasted for more than 3 days after ethanol removal. Importantly, during withdrawal, the mechanical and thermal sensitivity was further increased, which started at 12 hours and lasted for more than seven days after ethanol removal. These results suggest that utilizing the SD rat under the IA2BC procedure could be a useful animal model with heuristic value for exploring the mechanisms underlying hyperalgesia induced by chronic alcohol abuse. PMID:26823962

  5. Oral administration of stavudine induces hyperalgesia without affecting activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Weber, Juliane; Mitchell, Duncan; Kamerman, Peter R

    2007-12-01

    We have investigated whether long-term oral administration of the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) stavudine affects nociception in Sprague-Dawley rats, and whether any changes of nociception are accompanied by deterioration in activity and appetite. Stavudine (50 mg kg(-1)) was administered to rats orally once daily for six weeks in gelatine cubes. Mechanical hyperalgesia of the tail was assessed using a bar algometer, and thermal hyperalgesia by tail immersion in 49 degrees C water. Withdrawal latencies were compared to those of rats receiving placebo gelatine cubes. Withdrawal latencies to the noxious thermal challenge were not affected by stavudine, but those to the mechanical challenge were significantly decreased in rats receiving stavudine, compared to rats receiving placebo, from week three to week six of drug administration (P<0.05, ANCOVA with Newman Keuls post-hoc comparisons). The overall condition of the rats was assessed by recording daily voluntary wheel running distance and maximum running speed, food intake and body mass. Daily stavudine administration did not adversely affect voluntary running activity, appetite or growth. We have shown that long-term daily oral administration of the NRTI stavudine results in mechanical hyperalgesia in rats within three weeks without affecting appetite, growth and physical activity. PMID:17632188

  6. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients and the mitigating effects of gabapentin

    PubMed Central

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Russell, Daric; Weidner, Greg; Durda, Michael; Joseph, Nicholas C.; Yu, Jeffrey; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain patients receiving opioid drugs are at risk for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), wherein opioid pain medication leads to a paradoxical pain state. OIH involves central sensitization of primary and secondary afferent neurons in the dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion, similar to neuropathic pain. Gabapentin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog anticonvulsant used to treat neuropathic pain, has been shown in animal models to reduce fentanyl hyperalgesia without compromising analgesic effect. Chronic pain patients have also exhibited lower opioid consumption and improved pain response when given gabapentin. However, few human studies investigating gabapentin use in OIH have been performed in recent years. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie OIH and provide a critical overview of interventional therapeutic strategies, especially the clinically-successful drug gabapentin, which may reduce OIH. PMID:26074817

  7. I - Prostaglandin hyperalgesia, a cAMP/Ca2+ dependent process.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, S H; Nakamura, M

    1979-08-01

    Prostaglandins stimulate cAMP increase in several biological systems including CNS. The possible participation of a cAMP/Ca2+ related mechanism in prostaglandin induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw, as measured by a modification of the Randall-Selitto method was investigated. A serie of agents was administered in the paw in an attempt to change either Ca2+ or cyclic AMP concentration at the nociceptive terminations. PGE2, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, isoprenaline, noradrenaline, adrenaline, Ca2+ionophore (A23187), BaCl2 caused a dose dependent hyperalgesia. The hyperalgesic effect of these substances was enhanced by methyl-xanthines. Cyclic GMP as well as agents which interfere with Ca2+ influx (verapamil and lanthanum) were local analgesics in normal and hyperalgesic paws. PMID:230542

  8. Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis Exhibit Widespread Hyperalgesia to Pressure and Cold.

    PubMed

    Moss, Penny; Knight, Emma; Wright, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Hyperalgesia to mechanical and thermal stimuli are characteristics of a range of disorders such as tennis elbow, whiplash and fibromyalgia. This study evaluated the presence of local and widespread mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, compared to healthy control subjects. Twenty-three subjects with knee osteoarthritis and 23 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and body mass index, were recruited for the study. Volunteers with any additional chronic pain conditions were excluded. Pain thresholds to pressure, cold and heat were tested at the knee, ipsilateral heel and ipsilateral elbow, in randomized order, using standardised methodology. Significant between-groups differences for pressure pain and cold pain thresholds were found with osteoarthritic subjects demonstrating significantly increased sensitivity to both pressure (p = .018) and cold (p = .003) stimuli, compared with controls. A similar pattern of results extended to the pain-free ipsilateral ankle and elbow indicating widespread pressure and cold hyperalgesia. No significant differences were found between groups for heat pain threshold, although correlations showed that subjects with greater sensitivity to pressure pain were also likely to be more sensitive to both cold pain and heat pain. This study found widespread elevated pain thresholds in subjects with painful knee osteoarthritis, suggesting that altered nociceptive system processing may play a role in ongoing arthritic pain for some patients. PMID:26809009

  9. Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis Exhibit Widespread Hyperalgesia to Pressure and Cold

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Penny; Knight, Emma; Wright, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Hyperalgesia to mechanical and thermal stimuli are characteristics of a range of disorders such as tennis elbow, whiplash and fibromyalgia. This study evaluated the presence of local and widespread mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, compared to healthy control subjects. Twenty-three subjects with knee osteoarthritis and 23 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and body mass index, were recruited for the study. Volunteers with any additional chronic pain conditions were excluded. Pain thresholds to pressure, cold and heat were tested at the knee, ipsilateral heel and ipsilateral elbow, in randomized order, using standardised methodology. Significant between-groups differences for pressure pain and cold pain thresholds were found with osteoarthritic subjects demonstrating significantly increased sensitivity to both pressure (p = .018) and cold (p = .003) stimuli, compared with controls. A similar pattern of results extended to the pain-free ipsilateral ankle and elbow indicating widespread pressure and cold hyperalgesia. No significant differences were found between groups for heat pain threshold, although correlations showed that subjects with greater sensitivity to pressure pain were also likely to be more sensitive to both cold pain and heat pain. This study found widespread elevated pain thresholds in subjects with painful knee osteoarthritis, suggesting that altered nociceptive system processing may play a role in ongoing arthritic pain for some patients. PMID:26809009

  10. Demonstration of Cutaneous Allodynia in Association with Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jarrell, John

    2009-01-01

    Pelvic pain is a common condition that is associated with dysmenorrhea and endometriosis. In some women the severe episodes of cyclic pain change and the resultant pain becomes continuous and this condition becomes known as Chronic Pelvic Pain. This state can be present even after the appropriate medical or surgical therapy has been instituted. It can be associated with pain and tenderness in the muscles of the abdomen wall and intra-pelvic muscles leading to severe dyspareunia. Additional symptoms of irritable bowel and interstitial cystitis are common. A common sign of the development of this state is the emergence of cutaneous allodynia which emerges from the so-called viscero-somatic reflex. A simple bedside test for the presence of cutaneous allodynia is presented that does not require excessive time or special equipment. This test builds on previous work associated with changes in sensation related to gall bladder function and the viscera-somatic reflex(1;2). The test is undertaken with the subject s permission after an explanation of how the test will be performed. Allodynia refers to a condition in which a stimulus that is not normally painful is interpreted by the subject as painful. In this instance the light touch associated with a cotton-tipped applicator would not be expected to be painful. A positive test is however noted by the woman as suddenly painful or suddenly sharp. The patterns of this sensation are usually in a discrete pattern of a dermatome of the nerves that innervate the pelvis. The underlying pathology is now interpreted as evidence of neuroplasticity as a consequence of severe and repeating pain with changes in the functions of the dorsal horns of the spinal cord that results in altered function of visceral tissues and resultant somatic symptoms(3). The importance of recognizing the condition lies in an awareness that this process may present coincidentally with the initiating condition or after it has been treated. It also permits the

  11. The degree of acute descending control of spinal nociception in an area of primary hyperalgesia is dependent on the peripheral domain of afferent input

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Robert A R; Hulse, Richard P; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-01-01

    Descending controls of spinal nociceptive processing play a critical role in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Acute peripheral nociceptor sensitization drives spinal sensitization and activates spino–supraspinal–spinal loops leading to descending inhibitory and facilitatory controls of spinal neuronal activity that further modify the extent and degree of the pain state. The afferent inputs from hairy and glabrous skin are distinct with respect to both the profile of primary afferent classes and the degree of their peripheral sensitization. It is not known whether these differences in afferent input differentially engage descending control systems to different extents or in different ways. Injection of complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in inflammation and swelling of hairy hind foot skin in rats, a transient thermal hyperalgesia lasting <2 h, and longlasting primary mechanical hyperalgesia (≥7 days). Much longer lasting thermal hyperalgesia was apparent in glabrous skin (1 h to >72 h). In hairy skin, transient hyperalgesia was associated with sensitization of withdrawal reflexes to thermal activation of either A- or C-nociceptors. The transience of the hyperalgesia was attributable to a rapidly engaged descending inhibitory noradrenergic mechanism, which affected withdrawal responses to both A- and C-nociceptor activation and this could be reversed by intrathecal administration of yohimbine (α-2-adrenoceptor antagonist). In glabrous skin, yohimbine had no effect on an equivalent thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. We conclude that acute inflammation and peripheral nociceptor sensitization in hind foot hairy skin, but not glabrous skin, rapidly activates a descending inhibitory noradrenergic system. This may result from differences in the engagement of descending control systems following sensitization of different primary afferent classes that innervate glabrous and hairy skin. PMID:24879873

  12. Phosphorylation of TRPV1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 promotes TRPV1 surface localization, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Du, Junxie; Yang, Yanrui; Wang, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an important serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in many physiological processes. Recently, Cdk5 has been reported to phosphorylate TRPV1 at threonine 407 (Thr-407) in humans (Thr-406 in rats), which enhances the function of TRPV1 channel and promotes thermal hyperalgesia in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain rats. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates TRPV1 at Threonine 406 and promotes the surface localization of TRPV1, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. The mutation of Thr-406 of TRPV1 to alanine reduced the interaction of TRPV1 with the cytoskeletal elements and decreased the binding of TRPV1 with the motor protein KIF13B, which led to reduced surface distribution of TRPV1. Disrupting the phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 dramatically reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in HEK 293 cells after transient expression and the channel function in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Notably, intrathecal administration of the interfering peptide against the phosphorylation of Thr-406 alleviated heat hyperalgesia and reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in inflammatory pain rats. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 increases the surface level and the function of TRPV1, while the TAT-T406 peptide can effectively attenuate thermal hyperalgesia. Our studies provide a potential therapy for inflammatory pain. PMID:26376215

  13. Nocebo hyperalgesia induced by social observational learning.

    PubMed

    Vögtle, Elisabeth; Barke, Antonia; Kröner-Herwig, Birgit

    2013-08-01

    Nocebo effects can be acquired by verbal suggestion, but it is unknown whether they can be induced through observational learning and whether they are influenced by factors known to influence pain perception, such as pain anxiety or pain catastrophizing. Eighty-five female students (aged 22.5 ± 4.4 years) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Participants in the control condition (CC) received information that an ointment had no effect on pain perception. Participants in the verbal suggestion condition (VSC) received information that it increased pain sensitivity. Participants in the social observational learning condition (OLC) watched a video in which a model displayed more pain when ointment was applied. Subsequently, all participants received three pressure pain stimuli (60 seconds) on each hand. On one hand, the ointment was applied prior to the stimulation. Numerical pain ratings were collected at 20-second intervals during pain stimulation. The participants filled in questionnaires regarding pain-related attitudes (Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Somatosensory Amplification Scale). Participants in the OLC showed higher pain ratings with than without ointment. Pain ratings within the CC and the VSC were at the same level with and without ointment. In the VSC, the pain ratings were higher than in the CC with and without ointment. The nocebo response correlated with pain catastrophizing but not with pain anxiety or somatosensory amplification. A nocebo response to pressure pain was induced by observational learning but not by verbal suggestion. This finding highlights the importance of investigating the influence of observational learning on nocebo hyperalgesia. PMID:23707275

  14. Spinal nociceptive transmission by mechanical stimulation of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Takemi; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Kawamata, Mikito

    2016-01-01

    Background Since bone marrow receives innervation from A-delta and C-fibers and since an increase in intramedullary pressure in bone marrow may induce acute pain in orthopedic patients during surgery and chronic pain in patients with bone marrow edema, skeletal pain may partly originate from bone marrow. Intraosseous lesions, such as osteomyelitis and bone cancer, are also known to produce cutaneous hypersensitivity, which might be referred pain from bone. However, little is known about pain perception in bone marrow and referred pain induced by bone disease. Thus, we carried out an in vivo electrophysiological study and behavioral study to determine whether increased intraosseous pressure of the femur induces acute pain and whether increased intraosseous pressure induces referred pain in the corresponding receptive fields of the skin. Results Intraosseous balloon inflation caused spontaneous pain-related behavior and mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in the lumbosacral region. Single neuronal activities of spinal dorsal horn neurons were extracellularly isolated, and then evoked responses to non-noxious and noxious cutaneous stimuli and intraosseous balloon inflation were recorded. Ninety-four spinal dorsal horn neurons, which had somatic receptive fields at the lower back and thigh, were obtained. Sixty-two percent of the wide-dynamic-range neurons (24/39) and 86% of the high-threshold neurons (12/14) responded to intraosseous balloon inflation, while none of the low-threshold neurons (0/41) responded to intraosseous balloon inflation. Spinally administered morphine (1 µg) abolished balloon inflation-induced spontaneous pain-related behavior and mechanical hyperalgesia in awake rats and also suppressed evoked activities of wide-dynamic-range neurons to noxious cutaneous stimulation and intraosseous balloon inflation. Conclusions The results suggest that mechanical stimulation to bone marrow produces nociception, concomitantly producing its referred pain

  15. Sustained Suppression of Hyperalgesia during Latent Sensitization by μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors and α2A Adrenergic Receptors: Role of Constitutive Activity

    PubMed Central

    Walwyn, Wendy M.; Chen, Wenling; Kim, Hyeyoung; Minasyan, Ani; Ennes, Helena S.; McRoberts, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Many chronic pain disorders alternate between bouts of pain and periods of remission. The latent sensitization model reproduces this in rodents by showing that the apparent recovery (“remission”) from inflammatory or neuropathic pain can be reversed by opioid antagonists. Therefore, this remission represents an opioid receptor-mediated suppression of a sustained hyperalgesic state. To identify the receptors involved, we induced latent sensitization in mice and rats by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the hindpaw. In WT mice, responses to mechanical stimulation returned to baseline 3 weeks after CFA. In μ-opioid receptor (MOR) knock-out (KO) mice, responses did not return to baseline but partially recovered from peak hyperalgesia. Antagonists of α2A-adrenergic and δ-opioid receptors reinstated hyperalgesia in WT mice and abolished the partial recovery from hyperalgesia in MOR KO mice. In rats, antagonists of α2A adrenergic and μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors reinstated hyperalgesia during remission from CFA-induced hyperalgesia. Therefore, these four receptors suppress hyperalgesia in latent sensitization. We further demonstrated that suppression of hyperalgesia by MORs was due to their constitutive activity because of the following: (1) CFA-induced hyperalgesia was reinstated by the MOR inverse agonist naltrexone (NTX), but not by its neutral antagonist 6β-naltrexol; (2) pro-enkephalin, pro-opiomelanocortin, and pro-dynorphin KO mice showed recovery from hyperalgesia and reinstatement by NTX; (3) there was no MOR internalization during remission; (4) MORs immunoprecipitated from the spinal cord during remission had increased Ser375 phosphorylation; and (5) electrophysiology recordings from dorsal root ganglion neurons collected during remission showed constitutive MOR inhibition of calcium channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic pain causes extreme suffering to millions of people, but its mechanisms remain to be unraveled. Latent

  16. Spinal Cord Transection-Induced Allodynia in Rats – Behavioral, Physiopathological and Pharmacological Characterization

    PubMed Central

    M'Dahoma, Saïd; Bourgoin, Sylvie; Kayser, Valérie; Barthélémy, Sandrine; Chevarin, Caroline; Chali, Farah; Orsal, Didier; Hamon, Michel

    2014-01-01

    In humans, spinal cord lesions induce not only major motor and neurovegetative deficits but also severe neuropathic pain which is mostly resistant to classical analgesics. Better treatments can be expected from precise characterization of underlying physiopathological mechanisms. This led us to thoroughly investigate (i) mechanical and thermal sensory alterations, (ii) responses to acute treatments with drugs having patent or potential anti-allodynic properties and (iii) the spinal/ganglion expression of transcripts encoding markers of neuronal injury, microglia and astrocyte activation in rats that underwent complete spinal cord transection (SCT). SCT was performed at thoracic T8–T9 level under deep isoflurane anaesthesia, and SCT rats were examined for up to two months post surgery. SCT induced a marked hyper-reflexia at hindpaws and strong mechanical and cold allodynia in a limited (6 cm2) cutaneous territory just rostral to the lesion site. At this level, pressure threshold value to trigger nocifensive reactions to locally applied von Frey filaments was 100-fold lower in SCT- versus sham-operated rats. A marked up-regulation of mRNAs encoding ATF3 (neuronal injury) and glial activation markers (OX-42, GFAP, P2×4, P2×7, TLR4) was observed in spinal cord and/or dorsal root ganglia at T6-T11 levels from day 2 up to day 60 post surgery. Transcripts encoding the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were also markedly but differentially up-regulated at T6–T11 levels in SCT rats. Acute treatment with ketamine (50 mg/kg i.p.), morphine (3–10 mg/kg s.c.) and tapentadol (10–20 mg/kg i.p.) significantly increased pressure threshold to trigger nocifensive reaction in the von Frey filaments test, whereas amitriptyline, pregabalin, gabapentin and clonazepam were ineffective. Because all SCT rats developed long lasting, reproducible and stable allodynia, which could be alleviated by drugs effective in humans, thoracic cord transection might be a

  17. Effects of systemic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on nociception during tail ischaemia and on reperfusion hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gelgor, L.; Butkow, N.; Mitchell, D.

    1992-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effects of five non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on nociception during ischaemia and on reperfusion hyperalgesia in rats. 2. We induced tail ischaemia in conscious rats by applying a tourniquet at the base of the tail until the rats exhibited co-ordinated escape behaviour when we released the tourniquet. 3. We assessed hyperalgesia by measuring the tail flick latency following tail immersion in water at 49 degrees C, before applying and immediately after releasing the tourniquet, and then at 30 min intervals for 2 h. 4. Intraperitoneal injection of NSAIDs prior to applying the tourniquet had no effect on the co-ordinated escape behaviour during ischaemia, nor on tail flick latency in the absence of prior ischaemia. However all the drugs attenuated reperfusion hyperalgesia in a log dose-dependent manner. Doses required to abolish hyperalgesia, were indomethacin 5 mg kg-1, diclofenac sodium 42 mg kg-1, ibuprofen 54 mg kg-1, dipyrone 168 mg kg-1 and paracetamol 170 mg kg-1. 5. We conclude that the mechanisms underlying nociception during ischaemia are not the same as those underlying reperfusion hyperalgesia. Moreover our procedure provides a rapid and more humane method for measuring the antinociceptive potency of NSAIDs. PMID:1559131

  18. Melatonin relieves neuropathic allodynia through spinal MT2-enhanced PP2Ac and downstream HDAC4 shuttling-dependent epigenetic modification of hmgb1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzer-Bin; Hsieh, Ming-Chun; Lai, Cheng-Yuan; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Wang, Hsueh-Hsiao; Chau, Yat-Pang; Chen, Gin-Den; Peng, Hsien-Yu

    2016-04-01

    Melatonin (MLT; N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) exhibits analgesic properties in chronic pain conditions. While researches linking MLT to epigenetic mechanisms have grown exponentially over recent years, very few studies have investigated the contribution of MLT-associated epigenetic modification to pain states. Here, we report that together with behavioral allodynia, spinal nerve ligation (SNL) induced a decrease in the expression of catalytic subunit of phosphatase 2A (PP2Ac) and enhanced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation and cytoplasmic accumulation, which epigenetically alleviated HDAC4-suppressed hmgb1 gene transcription, resulting in increased high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) expression selectively in the ipsilateral dorsal horn of rats. Focal knock-down of spinal PP2Ac expression also resulted in behavioral allodynia in association with similar protein expression as observed with SNL. Notably, intrathecal administration with MLT increased PP2Ac expression, HDAC4 dephosphorylation and nuclear accumulation, restored HDAC4-mediated hmgb1 suppression and relieved SNL-sensitized behavioral pain; these effects were all inhibited by spinal injection of 4P-PDOT (a MT2 receptor antagonist, 30 minutes before MLT) and okadaic acid (OA, a PP2A inhibitor, 3 hr after MLT). Our findings demonstrate a novel mechanism by which MLT ameliorates neuropathic allodynia via epigenetic modification. This MLT-exhibited anti-allodynia is mediated by MT2-enhanced PP2Ac expression that couples PP2Ac with HDAC4 to induce HDAC4 dephosphorylation and nuclear import, herein increases HDAC4 binding to the promoter of hmgb1 gene and upregulates HMGB1 expression in dorsal horn neurons. PMID:26732138

  19. Pain referral and regional deep tissue hyperalgesia in experimental human hip pain models.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masashi; Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Hip disorder patients typically present with extensive pain referral and hyperalgesia. To better understand underlying mechanisms, an experimental hip pain model was established in which pain referrals and hyperalgesia could be studied under standardized conditions. In 16 healthy subjects, pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection into the gluteus medius tendon (GMT), adductor longus tendon (ALT), or gluteus medius muscle (GMM). Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects mapped the pain distribution. Before, during, and after injections, passive hip joint pain provocation tests were completed, together with quantitative sensory testing as follows: pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cuff algometry pain thresholds (cuff PPTs), cutaneous pin-prick sensitivity, and thermal pain thresholds. Hypertonic saline injected into the GMT resulted in higher VAS scores than hypertonic injections into the ALT and GMM (P<.05). Referred pain areas spread to larger parts of the leg after GMT and GMM injections compared with more regionalized pain pattern after ALT injections (P<.05). PPTs at the injection site were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into GMT and GMM compared with baseline, ALT injections, and isotonic saline. Cuff PPTs from the thigh were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into the ALT compared with baseline, GMT injections, and isotonic saline (P<.05). More subjects had positive joint pain provocation tests after hypertonic compared with isotonic saline injections (P<.05), indicating that this provocation test also assessed hyperalgesia in extra-articular soft tissues. The experimental models may open for better understanding of pain mechanisms associated with painful hip disorders. PMID:24447510

  20. A tarantula spider toxin, GsMTx4, reduces mechanical and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Pyo; Kim, Byung Moon; Koo, Jae Yeon; Cho, Hawon; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Misook; Na, Heung Sik; Oh, Uhtaek

    2008-07-01

    Mechanosensitive channels mediate various physiological functions including somatic sensation or pain. One of the peptide toxins isolated from the venom of the Chilean rose tarantula spider (Grammostola spatulata), mechanotoxin 4 (GsMTx4) is known to block stretch-activated cation channels. Since mechanosensitive channels in sensory neurons are thought to be molecular sensors for mechanotransduction, i.e., for touch, pressure, proprioception, and pain, we considered that the venom might block some types of mechanical pain. In order to prepare sufficiently large amounts of GsMTx4 for in vivo nociceptive behavioral tests, we constructed recombinant peptide of GsMTx4. Because the amino-acid sequence of the toxin, but not the nucleotide sequence, is known, we back-translated its amino-acid sequence to nucleotide sequence of yeast codons, constructed a template DNA, subcloned this into a Pichia pastoris expression vector, and purified the recombinant peptide. Intraperitoneal injection of the recombinant GsMTx4 to rats significantly increased the mechanical threshold for paw withdrawal in Randall Sellito test, eliciting significant analgesic responses to inflammation-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. GsMTx4 also reduced mechanical allodynia induced by inflammation and by sciatic nerve injury in Von Frey test. However, the venom was ineffective at changing withdrawal latency in hot plate and tail-flick tests. These results suggest that GsMTx4 selectively alleviates mechanical hyperalgesia, which it presumably achieves by blocking mechanosensitive channels. Because the peptide venom induces analgesia for some forms of mechanical pain, GsMTx4 appears to have potential clinical use as a pain treatment. PMID:18359568

  1. Hyperalgesia due to nerve injury: role of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Perkins, N M; Tracey, D J

    2000-01-01

    The hypothesis that the early inflammatory cell, the neutrophil, contributes to the hyperalgesia resulting from peripheral nerve injury was tested in rats in which the sciatic nerve was partially transected on one side. The extent and time-course of neutrophilic infiltration of the sciatic nerve and innervated paw skin after partial nerve damage was characterized using immunocytochemistry. The number of endoneurial neutrophils was significantly elevated in sections of operated nerve compared to sections of sham-operated nerve for the entire period studied, i.e. up to seven days post-surgery. This considerable elevation in endoneurial neutrophil numbers was only observed at the site of nerve injury. Depletion of circulating neutrophils at the time of nerve injury significantly attenuated the induction of hyperalgesia. However, depletion of circulating neutrophils at day 8 post-injury did not alleviate hyperalgesia after its normal induction. It is concluded that endoneurial accumulation of neutrophils at the site of peripheral nerve injury is important in the early genesis of the resultant hyperalgesia. The findings support the notion that a neuroimmune interaction occurs as a result of peripheral nerve injury and is important in the subsequent development of neuropathic pain. PMID:11113323

  2. Intraganglionar resiniferatoxin prevents orofacial inflammatory and neuropathic hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Lizane S; Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2014-04-01

    Trigeminal ganglion C-fiber neurons bearing transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channels are selectively destroyed by resiniferatoxin (RTX), a potent capsaicin analogue. The current study assessed the effect of an RTX injection (200 ng/4 μl) into the trigeminal ganglion in inflammatory and neuropathic rat models of orofacial thermal hyperalgesia. Intraganglionar RTX injection resulted in trigeminal ganglion C-fiber deletion, which was confirmed by the capsaicin eye wipes test, performed 6 days after the injection. The nociceptive responses induced by 2.5% formalin injected into the orofacial region were unchanged by a previous intraganglionar RTX injection. However, orofacial heat and cold hyperalgesia, induced by carrageenan injected into the upper lip (50 µg/50 μl), was abolished by previous intraganglionar RTX treatment. In addition, the development of orofacial heat and cold hyperalgesia after constriction of the infraorbital nerve was prevented by previous RTX treatment. Thus, trigeminal ganglion neurons expressing TRPV1 are crucial for the development of orofacial inflammatory and neuropathic thermal hyperalgesia. PMID:24557321

  3. Resveratrol attenuates inflammation-induced hyperexcitability of trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis neurons associated with hyperalgesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Kenta; Takehana, Shiori; Shibuya, Eri; Matsuzawa, Nichiwa; Hidaka, Shiori; Kanai, Yurie; Inoue, Maki; Kubota, Yoshiko; Shimazu, Yoshihito

    2016-01-01

    Background Resveratrol, a component of red wine, has been reported to decrease prostaglandin E2 production by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase-2 cascade and to modulate various voltage-dependent ion channels, suggesting that resveratrol could attenuate inflammatory hyperalgesia. However, the effects of resveratrol on inflammation-induced hyperexcitability of nociceptive neurons in vivo remain to be determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine whether daily systemic administration of resveratrol to rats attenuates the inflammation-induced hyperexcitability of spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis wide-dynamic range neurons associated with hyperalgesia. Results Inflammation was induced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into the whisker pad. The threshold of escape from mechanical stimulation applied to whisker pad in inflamed rats was significantly lower than in control rats. The decreased mechanical threshold in inflamed rats was restored to control levels by daily systemic administration of resveratrol (2 mg/kg, i.p.). The mean discharge frequency of spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis wide-dynamic range neurons to both nonnoxious and noxious mechanical stimuli in inflamed rats was significantly decreased after resveratrol administration. In addition, the increased mean spontaneous discharge of spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis wide-dynamic range neurons in inflamed rats was significantly decreased after resveratrol administration. Similarly, resveratrol significantly diminished noxious pinch-evoked mean after discharge frequency and occurrence in inflamed rats. Finally, resveratrol restored the expanded mean size of the receptive field in inflamed rats to control levels. Conclusion These results suggest that chronic administration of resveratrol attenuates inflammation-induced mechanical inflammatory hyperalgesia and that this effect is due primarily to the suppression of spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis wide dynamic range neuron

  4. Pathological mechanism of musculoskeletal manifestations associated with CRPS type II: an animal study.

    PubMed

    Ota, Hideyuki; Arai, Tetsuya; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Urano, Hideki; Kurahashi, Toshikazu; Kato, Shuichi; Yamamoto, Michiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2014-10-01

    Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) often complain of abnormal sensations beyond the affected body part, but causes of this spread of musculoskeletal manifestations into contiguous areas remain unclear. In addition, immobilization can predispose to the development of CRPS. We examined functional, biochemical, and histological alterations in affected parts, including contiguous zones, using an animal model. Ten-week-old male Wistar rats were assigned to 5 groups: a normal group receiving no treatment, a sham operation group with surgical exploration, an immobilization group with surgical exploration plus internal knee joint immobilization, a surgical neuropathy group prepared by spinal nerve ligation (SNL) of the left L5 nerve root, and a surgical neuropathy+immobilization group with simultaneous SNL and knee joint immobilization. Mechanical allodynia and knee contracture were compared between groups, and tissues were harvested for histological assessments and gene and protein expression analyses. Neither surgical procedures nor immobilization induced detectable mechanical sensitivity. However, the addition of nerve injury resulted in detectable mechanical allodynia, and immobilization not only accelerated hyperalgesia, but also resulted in muscle fibrosis. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and other mediators of neurogenic inflammation were highly expressed not only in denervated muscles, but also in innervated muscles in contiguous areas, suggesting the spread of NGF production beyond the myotome of the injured nerve. Transforming growth factor β was involved in the development of contracture in CRPS. These findings imply that neuroinflammatory components play major roles in the progression and dispersion of both sensory pathologies and pathologies that are exacerbated by immobilization. PMID:25016218

  5. Kv1.1 channels act as mechanical brake in the senses of touch and pain.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jizhe; Padilla, Françoise; Dandonneau, Mathieu; Lavebratt, Catharina; Lesage, Florian; Noël, Jacques; Delmas, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    Molecular determinants of threshold sensitivity of mammalian mechanoreceptors are unknown. Here, we identify a mechanosensitive (MS) K(+) current (IKmech) that governs mechanical threshold and adaptation of distinct populations of mechanoreceptors. Toxin profiling and transgenic mouse studies indicate that IKmech is carried by Kv1.1-Kv1.2 heteromers. Mechanosensitivity is attributed to Kv1.1 subunits, through facilitation of voltage-dependent open probability. IKmech is expressed in high-threshold C-mechano-nociceptors (C-HTMRs) and Aβ-mechanoreceptors, but not in low-threshold C-mechanoreceptors. IKmech opposes depolarization induced by slow/ultraslow MS cation currents in C-HTMRs, thereby shifting mechanical threshold for firing to higher values. However, due to kinetics mismatch with rapidly-adapting MS cation currents, IKmech tunes firing adaptation but not mechanical threshold in Aβ-mechanoreceptors. Expression of Kv1.1 dominant negative or inhibition of Kv1.1/IKmech caused severe mechanical allodynia but not heat hyperalgesia. By balancing the activity of excitatory mechanotransducers, Kv1.1 acts as a mechanosensitive brake that regulates mechanical sensitivity of fibers associated with mechanical perception. PMID:23473320

  6. The role of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) on hyperalgesia caused by peripheral nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Manjavachi, Marianne Neves; Costa, Robson; Quintão, Nara Lins; Calixto, João B

    2014-04-01

    Chemokines are associated with both inflammatory and immune responses and play an important role in the pathophysiological process associated with neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. Here, we investigated the involvement of peripheral keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain induced by the partial ligation of the sciatic nerve (PLSN) in mice. PLSN increased KC levels and its mRNA in both the sciatic nerve and spinal cord when compared with sham-operated mice. In addition, PLSN-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was prevented by systemic (i.v.) treatment with anti-KC antibody either at the time of surgery or on the 4th day after surgery. Also, intrathecal (i.t.) injection of anti-KC antibody prevented mechanical hyperalgesia induced by PLSN when administered at the time of surgery or on the 4th day after surgery. Importantly, the intraneural (i.n.) injection of KC in the mouse sciatic nerve elicited long-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia, which was prevented by the selective CXCR2 antagonist SB225002. The established mechanical hyperalgesia induced by KC was expressively reduced by the treatment with gabapentin, a drug widely used to treat chronic pain in humans. Intraneural KC injection also caused neutrophil migration into the mouse sciatic nerve and the depletion of neutrophils, by pre-treating animals with vinblastine, significantly reduced KC-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Similar results were obtained for the pre-treatment with indomethacin, a non-selective COX inhibitor. We also demonstrated an increased level of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and MCP-1, but not TNF-α) after i.n. injection of KC in the mouse sciatic nerve. Together, these findings suggest a role for KC in the development of neuropathic pain in mice by attracting neutrophils to the injured site and increasing the production of proinflammatory mediators. Therefore, strategies to inhibit the action or the release of this chemokine could

  7. Minocycline, a microglial inhibitor, blocks spinal CCL2-induced heat hyperalgesia and augmentation of glutamatergic transmission in substantia gelatinosa neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence suggest that CCL2 could initiate the hyperalgesia of neuropathic pain by causing central sensitization of spinal dorsal horn neurons and facilitating nociceptive transmission in the spinal dorsal horn. The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which CCL2 enhances spinal pain transmission and causes hyperalgesia remain unknown. The substantia gelatinosa (lamina II) of the spinal dorsal horn plays a critical role in nociceptive transmission. An activated spinal microglia, which is believed to release pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, plays an important role in the development of neuropathic pain, and CCL2 is a key mediator for spinal microglia activation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that spinal CCL2 causes the central sensitization of substantia gelatinosa neurons and enhances spinal nociceptive transmission by activating the spinal microglia and augmenting glutamatergic transmission in lamina II neurons. Methods CCL2 was intrathecally administered to 2-month-old male rats. An intrathecal injection of CCL2 induced heat hyperalgesia, which was assessed using the hot plate test. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings substantia gelatinosa neurons in spinal cord slices were performed to record glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). Results The hot plate test showed that 1 day after the intrathecal injection of CCL2 (1 μg), the latency of hind-paw withdrawal caused by a heat stimulus was significantly reduced in rats. One day after the intrathecal administration of CCL2, the amplitude of the evoked glutamatergic EPSCs and the frequency of spontaneous glutamatergic miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) were significantly increased in outer lamina II neurons. Intrathecal co-injection of minocycline, a specific inhibitor of microglial activation, and CCL2 blocked the CCL2-induced reduction in the latency of hind-paw withdrawal and thermal hyperalgesia

  8. Further Evidence of Emotional Allodynia in Unmedicated Young Adults with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ushinsky, Alexander; Reinhardt, Lindsay E.; Simmons, Alan N.; Strigo, Irina A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that sensitivity to the emotional sequela of experimental thermal pain(measured by emotional unpleasantness) is heightened in individuals with major depressive disorder(MDD), a phenomenon we termed “emotional allodynia”. The aim of this study was to examine whether acute happy and sad mood induction alters emotional allodynia in MDD. We hypothesized that emotional allodynia will be a robust characteristic of individuals with MDD compared to healthy controls. Thus, it would remain following acute mood induction, independent of valence. Methods Twenty-one subjects with current MDD and 21 well-matched healthy subjects(HC) received graded brief temperature stimuli following happy and sad mood inductions procedures(MIP). All subjects rated the intensity and affect(pleasantness/unpleasantness) of each stimulus. Sensory(pain intensity) and affective(pain unpleasantness) thresholds were determined by methods of constant stimuli. Results The MIPs reliably induced happy and sad mood and the resulting induced mood and subjective arousal were not different between the groups at the time of temperature stimulation. Compared to HC, MDD individuals demonstrated emotional allodynia. We found significantly decreased affective pain thresholds whereby significantly lower temperatures became unpleasant in the MDD compared to the HC group. This was not observed for the sensory pain thresholds. Within the MDD, the affective pain thresholds were significantly lower than the corresponding pain intensity thresholds, whereby non-painful temperatures were already unpleasant for the MDD irrespective of the induced mood. This was not observed for the HC groups where the affective and pain intensity thresholds were comparable. Conclusions These findings suggest that emotional allodynia may be a chronic characteristic of current MDD. Future studies should determine if emotional allodynia persists after psychological or pharmacological interventions

  9. Intrathecal cannabinoid-1 receptor agonist prevents referred hyperalgesia in acute acrolein-induced cystitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Marsha Ritter; Wang, Zun-Yi; Bjorling, Dale E

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the capacity of intrathecal arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) agonist, to inhibit referred hyperalgesia and increased bladder contractility resulting from acute acrolein-induced cystitis in rats. 24 female rats were divided into 4 groups: 1) intrathecal vehicle/intravesical saline; 2) intrathecal vehicle/intravesical acrolein; 3) intrathecal ACEA/intravesical saline; and 4) intrathecal ACEA/intravesical acrolein. Bladder catheters were placed 4-6 days prior to the experiment. On the day of the experiment, rats were briefly anesthetized with isoflurane to recover the external end of the cystostomy catheter. After recovery from anesthesia, pre-treatment cystometry was performed, and mechanical sensitivity of the hindpaws was determined. Rats were again briefly anesthetized with isoflurane to inject ACEA or vehicle into the intrathecal space between L5-L6. Beginning 10 minutes after intrathecal injection, saline or acrolein was infused into the bladder for 30 minutes. Post-treatment cystometry and mechanical sensitivity testing were performed. Rats were euthanized, and bladders were collected, weighed, and fixed for histology. The intrathecal vehicle/intravesical acrolein group developed mechanical hyperalgesia with post-treatment mechanical sensitivity of 6 ± 0.3 g compared to pretreatment of 14 ± 0.4 g (p < 0.01). Pre- and post-treatment hind paw mechanical sensitivity was statistically similar in rats that received intrathecal ACEA prior to intravesical infusion of acrolein (15 ± 0.2 g and 14 ± 0.4 g, respectively). Acrolein treatment increased basal bladder pressure and maximal voiding pressure and decreased intercontraction interval and voided volume. However, intrathecal ACEA was ineffective in improving acrolein-related urodynamic changes. In addition, bladder histology demonstrated submucosal and muscularis edema that was similar for all acrolein-treated groups, irrespective of ACEA treatment

  10. Epac-protein kinase C alpha signaling in purinergic P2X3R-mediated hyperalgesia after inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yanping; Li, Guangwen; Chen, Yong; Huang, Li-Yen Mae

    2016-07-01

    Sensitization of purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) is a major mechanism contributing to injury-induced exaggerated pain responses. We showed in a previous study that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (Epac1) in rat sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) is upregulated after inflammatory injury, and it plays a critical role in P2X3R sensitization by activating protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) inside the cells. protein kinase C epsilon has been established as the major PKC isoform mediating injury-induced hyperalgesic responses. On the other hand, the role of PKCα in receptor sensitization was seldom considered. Here, we studied the participation of PKCα in Epac signaling in P2X3R-mediated hyperalgesia. The expression of both Epac1 and Epac2 and the level of cAMP in DRGs are greatly enhanced after complete Freund adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation. The expression of phosphorylated PKCα is also upregulated. Complete Freund adjuvant (CFA)-induced P2X3R-mediated hyperalgesia is not only blocked by Epac antagonists but also by the classical PKC isoform inhibitors, Go6976, and PKCα-siRNA. These CFA effects are mimicked by the application of the Epac agonist, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2 -O-methyl-cAMP (CPT), in control rats, further confirming the involvement of Epacs. Because the application of Go6976 prior to CPT still reduces CPT-induced hyperalgesia, PKCα is downstream of Epacs to mediate the enhancement of P2X3R responses in DRGs. The pattern of translocation of PKCα inside DRG neurons in response to CPT or CFA stimulation is distinct from that of PKCε. Thus, in contrast to prevalent view, PKCα also plays an essential role in producing complex inflammation-induced receptor-mediated hyperalgesia. PMID:26963850

  11. Epac–protein kinase C alpha signaling in purinergic P2X3R-mediated hyperalgesia after inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yanping; Li, Guangwen; Chen, Yong; Huang, Li-Yen Mae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sensitization of purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) is a major mechanism contributing to injury-induced exaggerated pain responses. We showed in a previous study that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)–dependent guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (Epac1) in rat sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) is upregulated after inflammatory injury, and it plays a critical role in P2X3R sensitization by activating protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) inside the cells. protein kinase C epsilon has been established as the major PKC isoform mediating injury-induced hyperalgesic responses. On the other hand, the role of PKCα in receptor sensitization was seldom considered. Here, we studied the participation of PKCα in Epac signaling in P2X3R-mediated hyperalgesia. The expression of both Epac1 and Epac2 and the level of cAMP in DRGs are greatly enhanced after complete Freund adjuvant (CFA)–induced inflammation. The expression of phosphorylated PKCα is also upregulated. Complete Freund adjuvant (CFA)–induced P2X3R-mediated hyperalgesia is not only blocked by Epac antagonists but also by the classical PKC isoform inhibitors, Go6976, and PKCα-siRNA. These CFA effects are mimicked by the application of the Epac agonist, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2 -O-methyl-cAMP (CPT), in control rats, further confirming the involvement of Epacs. Because the application of Go6976 prior to CPT still reduces CPT-induced hyperalgesia, PKCα is downstream of Epacs to mediate the enhancement of P2X3R responses in DRGs. The pattern of translocation of PKCα inside DRG neurons in response to CPT or CFA stimulation is distinct from that of PKCε. Thus, in contrast to prevalent view, PKCα also plays an essential role in producing complex inflammation-induced receptor-mediated hyperalgesia. PMID:26963850

  12. Morphine hyperalgesia gated through microglia-mediated disruption of neuronal Cl− homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrini, Francesco; Trang, Tuan; Mattioli, Theresa-Alexandra M.; Laffray, Sophie; Del’Guidice, Thomas; Lorenzo, Louis-Etienne; Castonguay, Annie; Doyon, Nicolas; Zhang, Wenbo; Godin, Antoine G.; Mohr, Daniela; Beggs, Simon; Vandal, Karen; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Cahill, Catherine; Salter, Michael W.; De Koninck, Yves

    2016-01-01

    A major unresolved issue in treating pain is the paradoxical hyperalgesia produced by the gold-standard analgesic morphine and other opiates. We show here that hyperalgesia-inducing treatment with morphine causes downregulation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2, impairing Cl− homeostasis in spinal lamina l neurons. Restoring Eanion reversed the morphine-induced hyperalgesia without affecting tolerance. The hyperalgesia was also reversed by ablating spinal microglia. Morphine hyperalgesia, but not tolerance, required μ opioid receptor-dependent expression of P2X4 receptors (P2X4Rs) in microglia and μ-independent gating of the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) by P2X4Rs. Blocking BDNF-TrkB signalling preserved Cl− homeostasis and reversed the hyperalgesia. Gene-targeted mice in which BDNF was deleted from microglia did not develop hyperalgesia to morphine. Yet, neither morphine antinociception nor tolerance was affected in these animals. Our findings dissociate morphine-induced hyperalgesia from tolerance and unveil the microglia-to-neuron P2X4-BDNF-KCC2 pathway as a therapeutic target to prevent hyperalgesia without affecting morphine analgesia. PMID:23292683

  13. Cultured human chromaffin cells grafted in spinal subarachnoid space relieves allodynia in a pain rat model

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younghoon; Baek, Woon Yi; Chung, Seung Hyun; Shin, Nari; Kim, Hye Rim

    2011-01-01

    Background Implantation of xenogenic chromaffin cells into the spinal subarachnoid space can produce analgesia in neuropathic pain models. However, transplantation of xenogeneic chromaffin cell has a potential risk of viral or bacterial infections from animals to humans including encephalopathy due to prion transmission. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of developing a homogeneic source of therapeutic chromaffin cells. Methods Anti-allodynic effects of human chromaffin cells (HCCs) were evaluated in a neuropathic pain model in rats induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. HCCs encapsulated with alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate were intrathecally implanted into rats (n = 10), while empty capsules were intrathecally implanted as a control (n = 8). Levels of norepinephrine from encapsulated HCCs before and after nicotinic stimulation were measured. We then perfomed a behavior test (cold allodynia) with acetone. In addition, to assess the potential contribution to pain reduction of opioid peptides released from the HCCs, all animals were injected with naloxone. Results The concentration of norepinephrine after nicotine stimulation was significantly increased compared to basal levels. Intrathecal implantation of encapsulated HCCs, significantly reduced cold allodynia as compared to rats receiving empty capsules (P < 0.05). Fifteen minutes after the injection of naloxone, cold allodynia significantly decreased in rats with HCCs (P < 0.05), while the degree of cold allodynia in control animals was unaltered. Conclusions From these results, it appears that HCCs have a possibility as an analgesic source for transplants delivering pain-reducing neuroactive substances. PMID:21716909

  14. Intracolonical administration of protease-activated receptor-2 agonists produced visceral hyperalgesia by up-regulating serotonin in the colon of rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Hong-xi; Sung, Joseph J Y; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2009-03-15

    This study aimed to investigate the underlying mechanism of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) agonist-induced visceral hyperalgesia. Male Sprague-Dawley rat pups were submitted to colonic injection of PAR-2 agonist for 6 consecutive days. The visceral sensitivity to colorectal distention was evaluated by electromyography. The enterochromaffin (EC) cell number, 5-HT content and tryrptophan hydroxylase (TPH) protein expression were detected with immunohistochemistry, fluorescent measurement and Western blot analysis. PAR-2 agonist induced a significant increase of visceral nociceptive response to colorectal distention and a series of neurochemical changes in rat colon, including proliferation of EC cells, increased 5-HT content and enhanced TPH expression. Expression of PAR-2 in EC cells was reported for the first time. Further, selective 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist alosteron significantly inhibited PAR-2-induced visceral hyperalgesia. The enhanced 5-HT signaling is likely responsible for the visceral hyperalgesia induced by PAR-2 agonist. Interruption of this pathway is a possible target for the treatment of visceral hyperalgesia in gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:19374846

  15. Pregabalin in Neuropathic Pain: Evidences and Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Singh, Nirmal; Singh Jaggi, Amteshwar

    2014-01-01

    Pregabalin is an antagonist of voltage gated Ca2+ channels and specifically binds to alpha-2-delta subunit to produce antiepileptic and analgesic actions. It successfully alleviates the symptoms of various types of neuropathic pain and presents itself as a first line therapeutic agent with remarkable safety and efficacy. Preclinical studies in various animal models of neuropathic pain have shown its effectiveness in treating the symptoms like allodynia and hyperalgesia. Clinical studies in different age groups and in different types of neuropathic pain (peripheral diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, post-herpetic neuralgia, cancer chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain) have projected it as the most effective agent either as monotherapy or in combined regimens in terms of cost effectiveness, tolerability and overall improvement in neuropathic pain states. Preclinical studies employing pregabalin in different neuropathic pain models have explored various molecular targets and the signaling systems including Ca2+ channel-mediated neurotransmitter release, activation of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), potassium channels and inhibition of pathways involving inflammatory mediators. The present review summarizes the important aspects of pregabalin as analgesic in preclinical and clinical studies as well as focuses on the possible mechanisms. PMID:24533015

  16. Selective targeting of ASIC3 using artificial miRNAs inhibits primary and secondary hyperalgesia after muscle inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Walder, Roxanne Y.; Gautam, Mamta; Wilson, Steven P.; Benson, Christopher J.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are activated by acidic pH and may play a significant role in the development of hyperalgesia. Earlier studies show ASIC3 is important for induction of hyperalgesia after muscle insult using ASIC3−/− mice. ASIC3−/− mice lack ASIC3 throughout the body, and the distribution and composition of ASICs could be different from wild-type mice. We therefore tested whether knockdown of ASIC3 in primary afferents innervating muscle of adult wild-type mice prevented development of hyper-algesia to muscle inflammation. We cloned and characterized artificial miRNAs (miR-ASIC3) directed against mouse ASIC3 (mASIC3) to downregulate ASIC3 expression in vitro and in vivo. In CHO-K1 cells transfected with mASIC3 cDNA in culture, the miR-ASIC3 constructs inhibited protein expression of mASIC3 and acidic pH-evoked currents and had no effect on protein expression or acidic pH-evoked currents of ASIC1a. When miR-ASIC3 was used in vivo, delivered into the muscle of mice using a herpes simplex viral vector, both muscle and paw mechanical hyperalgesia were reduced after carrageenan-induced muscle inflammation. ASIC3 mRNA in DRG and protein levels in muscle were decreased in vivo by miRASIC3. In CHO-K1 cells co-transfected with ASIC1a and ASIC3, miR-ASIC3 reduced the amplitude of acidic pH-evoked currents, suggesting an overall inhibition in the surface expression of heteromeric ASIC3-containing channels. Our results show, for the first time, that reducing ASIC3 in vivo in primary afferent fibers innervating muscle prevents the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia in wild-type mice, and thus, may have applications in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain in humans. PMID:21843914

  17. Vitamin B complex attenuated heat hyperalgesia following infraorbital nerve constriction in rats and reduced capsaicin in vivo and in vitro effects.

    PubMed

    Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Reis, Renata C; Bressan, Elisangela; Reeh, Peter W; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2015-09-01

    Vitamins of the B complex attenuate some neuropathic pain sensory aspects in various animal models and in patients, but the mechanisms underlying their effects remain to be elucidated. Herein it was investigated if the treatment with a vitamin B complex (VBC) reduces heat hyperalgesia in rats submitted to infraorbital nerve constriction and the possibility that TRPV1 receptors represent a target for B vitamins. In the present study, the VBC refers to a combination of vitamins B1, B6 and B12 at low- (18, 18 and 1.8mg/kg, respectively) or high- (180, 180 and 18mg/kg, respectively) doses. Acute treatment of rats with either the low- or the high-doses combination reduced heat hyperalgesia after nerve injury, but the high-doses combination resulted in a long-lasting effect. Repeated treatment with the low-dose combination reduced heat hyperalgesia on day four after nerve injury and showed a synergist effect with a single injection of carbamazepine (3 or 10mg/kg), which per se failed to modify the heat threshold. In naïve rats, acute treatment with the high-dose of VBC or B1 and B12 vitamins independently reduced heat hyperalgesia evoked by capsaicin (3µg into the upper lip). Moreover, the VBC, as well as, each one of the B vitamins independently reduced the capsaicin-induced calcium responses in HEK 293 cells transiently transfected with the human TRPV1 channels. Altogether, these results indicate that B vitamins can be useful to control heat hyperalgesia associated with trigeminal neuropathic pain and that modulation of TRPV1 receptors may contribute to their anti-hyperalgesic effects. PMID:26048309

  18. Diffuse traumatic brain injury induces prolonged immune dysregulation and potentiates hyperalgesia following a peripheral immune challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K; Ellis, Gavin I; Harrison, Jordan L; Bachstetter, Adam D; Corder, Gregory F; Van Eldik, Linda J; Taylor, Bradley K; Marti, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Background Nociceptive and neuropathic pain occurs as part of the disease process after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. Central and peripheral inflammation, a major secondary injury process initiated by the traumatic brain injury event, has been implicated in the potentiation of peripheral nociceptive pain. We hypothesized that the inflammatory response to diffuse traumatic brain injury potentiates persistent pain through prolonged immune dysregulation. Results To test this, adult, male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to midline fluid percussion brain injury or to sham procedure. One cohort of mice was analyzed for inflammation-related cytokine levels in cortical biopsies and serum along an acute time course. In a second cohort, peripheral inflammation was induced seven days after surgery/injury with an intraplantar injection of carrageenan. This was followed by measurement of mechanical hyperalgesia, glial fibrillary acidic protein and Iba1 immunohistochemical analysis of neuroinflammation in the brain, and flow cytometric analysis of T-cell differentiation in mucosal lymph. Traumatic brain injury increased interleukin-6 and chemokine ligand 1 levels in the cortex and serum that peaked within 1–9 h and then resolved. Intraplantar carrageenan produced mechanical hyperalgesia that was potentiated by traumatic brain injury. Further, mucosal T cells from brain-injured mice showed a distinct deficiency in the ability to differentiate into inflammation-suppressing regulatory T cells (Tregs). Conclusions We conclude that traumatic brain injury increased the inflammatory pain associated with cutaneous inflammation by contributing to systemic immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells are immune suppressors and failure of T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells leads to unregulated cytokine production which may contribute to the potentiation of peripheral pain through the excitation of peripheral sensory neurons. In addition, regulatory T cells are

  19. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia) after acute foot trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wienemann, Tobias; Chantelau, Ernst A.; Koller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and objective Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic) neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy). Design and methods A case–control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture). Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects) with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT) and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT) were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II®). Results In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT) at the injured foot was reduced by about 15–25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15–20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal) versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group); CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Conclusion Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic) neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to ‘pull away’ from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking. PMID:25397867

  20. δ-Opioid receptor agonists inhibit migraine-related hyperalgesia, aversive state and cortical spreading depression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A; Smith, Monique L; Zyuzin, Jekaterina; Charles, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine is an extraordinarily common brain disorder for which treatment options continue to be limited. Agonists that activate the δ-opioid receptor may be promising for the treatment of migraine as they are highly effective for the treatment of chronic rather than acute pain, do not induce hyperalgesia, have low abuse potential and have anxiolytic and antidepressant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of δ-opioid receptor agonists for migraine by characterizing their effects in mouse migraine models. Experimental Approach Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed in mice treated with acute and chronic doses of nitroglycerin (NTG), a known human migraine trigger. Conditioned place aversion to NTG was also measured as a model of migraine-associated negative affect. In addition, we assessed evoked cortical spreading depression (CSD), an established model of migraine aura, in a thinned skull preparation. Key Results NTG evoked acute and chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice, as well as conditioned place aversion. Three different δ-opioid receptor agonists, SNC80, ARM390 and JNJ20788560, significantly reduced NTG-evoked hyperalgesia. SNC80 also abolished NTG-induced conditioned place aversion, suggesting that δ-opioid receptor activation may also alleviate the negative emotional state associated with migraine. We also found that SNC80 significantly attenuated CSD, a model that is considered predictive of migraine preventive therapies. Conclusions and Implications These data show that δ-opioid receptor agonists modulate multiple basic mechanisms associated with migraine, indicating that δ-opioid receptors are a promising therapeutic target for this disorder. PMID:24467301

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome: a test of the colonic hyperalgesia hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Latimer, P; Campbell, D; Latimer, M; Sarna, S; Daniel, E; Waterfall, W

    1979-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that, patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), there is a primary hyperalgesia of the colon. Previous work, which examined these patients and normals, has not included subjects who provide a control for relevant psychological characteristics. We compared ratings of pain, following varying degrees of distension of the sigmoid colon, in normals, patients with IBS, and patients who were psychologically disturbed but without bowel symptoms. Psychological characteristics were assessed by a psychiatric interview and psychometric inventories; response to distension was tested by placing a tube in the rectosigmoid colon and successively inflating a nd deflating a balloon at its tip at 10 cm3 increments up to 50 cm3. Ratings of pain were recorded at each volume. The results indicated that the two patient groups were psychologically similar and both were more disturbed than normals. A linear relation was found between reports of pain and volume of distension in all three groups. There were no significant differences between the proportions of subjects experiencing pain in each group or the average of the ratings. There were no significant associations between the pain ratings and measures of anxiety, depression, neuroticism, and extraversion. The data do not support the hypothesis that colonic hyperalgesia is an important contributory factor in the etiology of the irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:537039

  2. Electroacupuncture suppresses hyperalgesia and spinal Fos expression by activating the descending inhibitory system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aihui; Wang, Yi; Xin, Giagia; Lao, Lixing; Ren, Ke; Berman, Brian M.; Zhang, Rui-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Although electroacupuncture (EA) is widely used to treat pain, its mechanisms have not been completely understood. The present study investigated the descending inhibitory system involvement in EA action. Inflammatory pain was induced by injecting complete Freund’s adjuvant subcutaneously into one hind paw of rats with dorsolateral funiculus lesions and sham-operated rats. EA treatment, 10 Hz at 3 mA, was given twice for 20 min each, once immediately post- and again 2 h post-Freund’s adjuvant at GB 30, at the junction of the lateral 1/3 and medial 2/3 of the distance between the greater trochanter and sacral hiatus. For sham EA control, acupuncture needles were inserted bilaterally into GB 30 without electrical or manual stimulation. Paw withdrawal latency to a noxious thermal stimulus was measured at baseline and 20 min after EA treatment. Compared to sham EA, EA significantly (P<0.05, n=9) increased withdrawal latency of the inflamed hind paws in the sham-operated rats but not in those with dorsolateral funiculus lesions, indicating that lesioning blocked EA-produced anti-hyperalgesia. EA, compared to sham EA, also significantly inhibited Fos expression in laminae I-II of the spinal cord in the sham-operated rats (58.4 ± 6.5 vs 35.2 ± 5.4 per section) but not in those with dorsolateral funiculus lesions. Further, EA activated serotonin- and catecholamine-containing neurons in the nucleus raphe magnus and locus coeruleus that project to the spinal cord. The results demonstrate that EA inhibits transmission of noxious messages and hyperalgesia by activating supraspinal neurons that project to the spinal cord. PMID:18001697

  3. TRPA1 receptor stimulation by hydrogen peroxide is critical to trigger hyperalgesia and inflammation in a model of acute gout.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Gabriela; Hoffmeister, Carin; Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Silva, Mariane Arnoldi; Silva, Cássia Regina; Fusi, Camilla; Tonello, Raquel; Minocci, Daiana; Guerra, Gustavo Petri; Materazzi, Serena; Nassini, Romina; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Ferreira, Juliano

    2014-07-01

    Acute gout attacks produce severe joint pain and inflammation associated with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals leading to oxidative stress production. The transient potential receptor ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is expressed by a subpopulation of peptidergic nociceptors and, via its activation by endogenous reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), contributes to pain and neurogenic inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of TRPA1 in hyperalgesia and inflammation in a model of acute gout attack in rodents. Inflammatory parameters and mechanical hyperalgesia were measured in male Wistar rats and in wild-type (Trpa1(+/+)) or TRPA1-deficient (Trpa1(-/-)) male mice. Animals received intra-articular (ia, ankle) injection of MSU. The role of TRPA1 was assessed by receptor antagonism, gene deletion or expression, sensory fiber defunctionalization, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release. We found that nociceptor defunctionalization, TRPA1 antagonist treatment (via ia or oral administration), and Trpa1 gene ablation abated hyperalgesia and inflammatory responses (edema, H2O2 generation, interleukin-1β release, and neutrophil infiltration) induced by ia MSU injection. In addition, we showed that MSU evoked generation of H2O2 in synovial tissue, which stimulated TRPA1 producing CGRP release and plasma protein extravasation. The MSU-elicited responses were also reduced by the H2O2-detoxifying enzyme catalase and the reducing agent dithiothreitol. TRPA1 activation by MSU challenge-generated H2O2 mediates the entire inflammatory response in an acute gout attack rodent model, thus strengthening the role of the TRPA1 receptor and H2O2 production as potential targets for treatment of acute gout attacks. PMID:24780252

  4. Analgesic effect of electroacupuncture on paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain via spinal opioidergic and adrenergic mechanisms in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Wan; Kang, Suk-Yun; Choi, Jae-Gyun; Kang, Dong-Wook; Kim, Soo-Jin; Lee, Sang Do; Park, Jin Bong; Ryu, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the antinociceptive effect and related neuronal mechanism of electroacupuncture (EA) on paclitaxel (PTX)-induced neuropathic pain in mice. PTX (4 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered once a day for 5 consecutive days to induce neuropathic pain. EA stimulation (2 mA, 2 Hz, 30 min) was applied at the ST36 acupoint bilaterally once in every 2 days. Repeated EA stimulation significantly attenuated PTX-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. In a separate set of experiment, the antinociceptive effect of a single EA stimulation 8 days after PTX treatment was reduced by intrathecal pretreatment with naloxone (opioid receptor antagonist), idazoxan (alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist) or propranolol (beta-adrenoceptor antagonist), but not prazosin (alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist). Moreover, EA remarkably suppressed the PTX-enhanced phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit in the spinal dorsal horn, and intrathecal pretreatment of naloxone, idazoxan (IDA) or propranolol blocked the effect of EA. In conclusion, EA stimulation at the ST36 acupoint significantly diminished PTX-induced neuropathic pain in mice via the mediation of spinal opioid receptor, alpha2- and beta-adrenoceptors. PMID:25640847

  5. CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND PAIN: CONDITIONED ANALGESIA AND HYPERALGESIA

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity. PMID:24269884

  6. The effects of menthol on cold allodynia and wind-up-like pain in upper limb amputees with different levels of phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Svensson, Peter; Nikolajsen, Lone; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2013-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying phantom limb pain are not fully known, but hypersensitivity appears to be a central element. Menthol has previously been suggested as a model for hypersensitivity, but it has not yet been investigated if different levels of neuropathic pain may influence the effects of menthol or if topical application of menthol may act as a model for hypersensitivity in patients with phantom limb pain. In the present study, menthol (l-menthol 40%) was applied to the affected and non-affected sides in 24 upper-limb amputees with different levels of phantom limb pain to test if menthol could induce cold allodynia and exacerbate wind-up-like pain. The average level of phantom limb pain was significantly related to cold allodynia (P=0.044). Prior to application of menthol, the level of phantom limb pain was significantly related to the level of wind-up-like pain following both brush (P=0.040) and pinprick (P=0.033) stimulation. After application of menthol, the level of phantom limb pain was only related to wind-up-like pain following brush (P=0.011) but not pinprick stimulation (P=0.233). This study indicates that menthol does influence hypersensitivity in phantom limb pain patients, and it is the first study to show that menthol may exacerbate wind-up-like pain in this group of neuropathic pain patients. The findings suggest that menthol may act as a model for studying sensitization in phantom limb patients. PMID:23266475

  7. Increased Anandamide Uptake by Sensory Neurons Contributes to Hyperalgesia in a Model of Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Khasabova, Iryna A.; Holman, Michelle; Morse, Tim; Burlakova, Natalya; Coicou, Lia; Harding-Rose, Catherine; Simone, Don A.; Seybold, Virginia S.

    2013-01-01

    mechanical hyperalgesia through a CB1R-dependent mechanism and also reduced a spontaneous nocifensive behavior. The same dose reduced withdrawal responses evoked by suprathreshold mechanical stimuli in naive mice. These data support the conclusion that OMDM-1 inhibits AEA uptake by a mechanism that is independent of inhibition of FAAH and provide a rationale for the development of peripherally restricted drugs that decrease AEA uptake for the management of cancer pain. PMID:23644187

  8. Stimulation of peripheral Kappa opioid receptors inhibits inflammatory hyperalgesia via activation of the PI3Kγ/AKT/nNOS/NO signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In addition to their central effects, opioids cause peripheral analgesia. There is evidence showing that peripheral activation of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) inhibits inflammatory pain. Moreover, peripheral μ-opioid receptor (MOR) activation are able to direct block PGE2-induced ongoing hyperalgesia However, this effect was not tested for KOR selective activation. In the present study, the effect of the peripheral activation of KORs on PGE2-induced ongoing hyperalgesia was investigated. The mechanisms involved were also evaluated. Results Local (paw) administration of U50488 (a selective KOR agonist) directly blocked, PGE2-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in both rats and mice. This effect was reversed by treating animals with L-NMMA or N-propyl-L-arginine (a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nNOS), suggesting involvement of the nNOS/NO pathway. U50488 peripheral effect was also dependent on stimulation of PI3Kγ/AKT because inhibitors of these kinases also reduced peripheral antinociception induced by U50488. Furthermore, U50488 lost its peripheral analgesic effect in PI3Kγ null mice. Observations made in vivo were confirmed after incubation of dorsal root ganglion cultured neurons with U50488 produced an increase in the activation of AKT as evaluated by western blot analyses of its phosphorylated form. Finally, immunofluorescence of DRG neurons revealed that KOR-expressing neurons also express PI3Kγ (≅ 43%). Conclusions The present study indicates that activation of peripheral KORs directly blocks inflammatory hyperalgesia through stimulation of the nNOS/NO signaling pathway which is probably stimulated by PI3Kγ/AKT signaling. This study extends a previously study of our group suggesting that PI3Kγ/AKT/nNOS/NO is an important analgesic pathway in primary nociceptive neurons. PMID:22316281

  9. Discovery of tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Deekshith, Vanamala; Semwal, Arvind; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2014-02-01

    A series of tetrahydropyridopyrimidine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for neurotoxicity and peripheral analgesic activity followed by assessment of antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic potential in two peripheral neuropathic pain models, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) and partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). Compounds (4b and 4d) exhibiting promising efficacies in four behavioral assays of allodynia and hyperalgesia (spontaneous pain, tactile allodynia, cold allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia) were quantified for their ED50 values (15.12-65.10mg/kg). Studies carried out to assess the underlying mechanism revealed that the compounds suppressed the inflammatory component of the neuropathic pain and prevented oxidative and nitrosative stress. PMID:24368171

  10. Hyperalgesia after volar wrist tattoo: a case of complex regional pain syndrome?

    PubMed

    Morte, Paul D; Magee, Larry M

    2011-03-01

    Hyperalgesia after a volar wrist tattoo with features consistent with complex regional pain syndrome and a brief literature review is presented. This is the first case of disseminated hyperalgesia reported from a tattoo. It could be related to the increased pain associated with wrist tattooing and the proximity to the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve. The response to prednisone was robust. Further cases may appear considering popularization of wrist tattoos by celebrities. PMID:21321489

  11. Acute and chronic fentanyl administration causes hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Amanda R; Arout, Caroline; Caldwell, Megan; Dahan, Albert; Kest, Benjamin

    2009-10-01

    Although mu-receptor opioids are clinically important analgesics, they can also paradoxically cause hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity, presumably via the action of neuroexcitatory glucoronide metabolites. However, it is unknown whether the commonly used mu-receptor opioid analgesic fentanyl, which is not subject to glucuronidation, can also induce hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity. Thus, here we examined whether fentanyl increases nociception on the tail-withdrawal test in CD-1 mice concurrently treated with the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone or in opioid receptor triple knock-out mice lacking mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. For both groups, an acute fentanyl bolus dose (0.25mg/kg, s.c.) and continuous fentanyl infusion (cumulative daily dose: 10mg/kg) did not cause analgesia at any time. Instead, fentanyl significantly decreased withdrawal latencies relative to pre-drug values for the next 15-60 min and for six days, respectively. MK-801 blocked and reversed hyperalgesia caused by the acute injection and continuous infusion of fentanyl, respectively, in naltrexone-treated CD-1 mice, indicating the contribution of NMDA receptors to fentanyl hyperalgesia. These data show that the synthetic opioid fentanyl causes hyperalgesia independently of prior or concurrent opioid receptor activity or analgesia. Since the biotransformation of fentanyl does not yield any known pronociceptive metabolites, these data challenge assumptions regarding the role of neuroexcitatory metabolites in opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:19559072

  12. Exploring the Neuroimmunopharmacology of Opioids: An Integrative Review of Mechanisms of Central Immune Signaling and Their Implications for Opioid Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Shavit, Yehuda; Grace, Peter M.; Rice, Kenner C.; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2011-01-01

    Vastly stimulated by the discovery of opioid receptors in the early 1970s, preclinical and clinical research was directed at the study of stereoselective neuronal actions of opioids, especially those played in their crucial analgesic role. However, during the past decade, a new appreciation of the non-neuronal actions of opioids has emerged from preclinical research, with specific appreciation for the nonclassic and nonstereoselective sites of action. Opioid activity at Toll-like receptors, newly recognized innate immune pattern recognition receptors, adds substantially to this unfolding story. It is now apparent from molecular and rodent data that these newly identified signaling events significantly modify the pharmacodynamics of opioids by eliciting proinflammatory reactivity from glia, the immunocompetent cells of the central nervous system. These central immune signaling events, including the release of cytokines and chemokines and the associated disruption of glutamate homeostasis, cause elevated neuronal excitability, which subsequently decreases opioid analgesic efficacy and leads to heightened pain states. This review will examine the current preclinical literature of opioid-induced central immune signaling mediated by classic and nonclassic opioid receptors. A unification of the preclinical pharmacology, neuroscience, and immunology of opioids now provides new insights into common mechanisms of chronic pain, naive tolerance, analgesic tolerance, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and allodynia. Novel pharmacological targets for future drug development are discussed in the hope that disease-modifying chronic pain treatments arising from the appreciation of opioid-induced central immune signaling may become practical. PMID:21752874

  13. Is the Volume of the Caudate Nuclei Associated With Area of Secondary Hyperalgesia? – Protocol for a 3-Tesla MRI Study of Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Johan Mårtensson, Johan; Becerra, Lino; Christensen, Anders; Nybing, Janus Damm; Havsteen, Inger; Boesen, Mikael; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience and development of pain may be influenced by a number of physiological, psychological, and psychosocial factors. In a previous study we found differences in neuronal activation to noxious stimulation, and microstructural neuroanatomical differences, when comparing healthy volunteers with differences in size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following a standardized burn injury. Objective We aim to investigate the degree of association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization. Methods The study consists of one experimental day, in which whole-brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans will be conducted including T1-weighed three-dimensional anatomy scan, diffusion tensor imaging, and resting state functional MRI. Before the experimental day, all included participants will undergo experimental pain testing in a parallel study (Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02527395). Results from this experimental pain testing, as well as the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia from the included participants, will be extracted from this parallel study. Results The association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the area of secondary hyperalgesia will be investigated by linear regression of the estimated best linear unbiased predictors on the individual volumes of the pain relevant brain structures. Conclusions We plan to investigate the association between experimental pain testing parameters and the volume, connectivity, and resting state activity of pain-relevant structures in the brain. These results may improve our knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for the development of acute and chronic pain. ClinicalTrial Danish Research Ethics Committee (identifier: H-15010473). Danish Data Protection Agency (identifier: RH-2015-149). Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02567318; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02567318

  14. Anti-GD(2) with an FC point mutation reduces complement fixation and decreases antibody-induced allodynia.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Linda S; Otto, Mario; Baldwin, William M; Vail, Emily; Gillies, Stephen D; Handgretinger, Rupert; Barfield, Raymond C; Ming Yu, Hui; Yu, Alice L

    2010-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against GD(2) ganglioside, such as ch14.18, the human-mouse chimeric antibody, have been shown to be effective for the treatment of neuroblastoma. However, treatment is associated with generalized, relatively opiate-resistant pain. We investigated if a point mutation in ch14.18 antibody (hu14.18K332A) to limit complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) would ameliorate the pain behavior, while preserving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro, CDC and ADCC were measured using europium-TDA assay. In vivo, allodynia was evaluated by measuring thresholds to von Frey filaments applied to the hindpaws after injection of either ch14.18 or hu14.18K332 into wild type rats or rats with deficient complement factor 6. Other rats were pretreated with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist and tested following ch14.18 injection. The mutation reduces the antibody's ability to activate complement, while maintaining its ADCC capabilities. Injection of hu14.18K322 (1 or 3mg/kg) produced faster resolving allodynia than that engendered by ch14.18 (1mg/kg). Injection of ch14.18 (1mg/kg) into rats with C6 complement deficiency further reduced antibody-induced allodynia, while pre-treatment with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist completely abolished ch14.18-induced allodynia. These findings showed that mutant hu14.18 K322 elicited less allodynia than ch14.18 and that ch14.18-elicited allodynia is due to activation of the complement cascade: in part, to formation of membrane attack complex, but more importantly to release of complement factor C5a. Development of immunotherapeutic agents with decreased complement-dependent lysis while maintaining cellular cytotoxicity may offer treatment options with reduced adverse side effects, thereby allowing dose escalation of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:20171010

  15. Acid-induced hyperalgesia and anxio-depressive comorbidity in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Shao, Yen-Wen; Yen, Chen-Tung; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-05-28

    Fibromyalgia is a prevalent disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain (CWP) and complex comorbid symptoms. A CWP model is developed through repeated unilateral intramuscular injections of acid saline resulting in bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia in rats. The present study aims to evaluate whether both anxious and depressive comorbidities exist in this acid-induced pain model, similarly to patients with CWP syndromes. The anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated using the open field and elevated plus maze tests, and depression-like behaviors were measured by the forced swimming, sucrose consumption, and sucrose preference tests. The pain group receiving acidic saline displayed significantly lower paw withdrawal thresholds for 4weeks than animals in the vehicle group after repetitive intramuscular injections. The pain group showed a significantly shorter duration of exploring the central zone of the open field and the open arms of the elevated plus maze compared to the vehicle group. The pain group had a significantly lower preference for and consumption of the hedonic sucrose. Moreover, rats with chronic pain showed significantly longer immobility than the vehicle group in the forced swimming test. The results indicate that psychiatric behaviors are exacerbated in the CWP model. This study provides evidence for the validity of the acid-induced pain model analogous to patients with CWP syndromes. PMID:24726391

  16. Effects of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy on referred hyperalgesia from renal/ureteral calculosis.

    PubMed

    Giamberardino, M A; de Bigontina, P; Martegiani, C; Vecchiet, L

    1994-01-01

    In patients suffering from colics due to calculosis of one upper urinary tract the evolution in time of referred parietal hyperalgesia after stone fragment elimination promoted by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was studied. Before ESWL, all patients presented clinical evidence (positivity to dermographism and Head's procedure, pinch palpation, digital pressure and Giordano's manoeuver) and instrumental signs (significant lowering of pain threshold to electrical tissue stimulation) of cutaneous, subcutaneous and muscular tissue hyperalgesia in the lumbar region of the affected side. After ESWL, hyperalgesia decreased in the three tissues, as shown by progressive change in the clinical tests and an increase in pain threshold to electrical stimulation in relation to the extent of stone fragment expulsion. In the stone-free condition, hyperalgesia had disappeared in the skin but remained to a mild and moderate extent in the subcutaneous tissue and muscle respectively. It is concluded that the persistence in time of referred hyperalgesia is only in part linked to the continuing presence and activity of the stone in the urinary tract. To a certain extent, the phenomenon seems to become independent of the primary focus, possibly as a result of plastic neuronal changes in the central nervous system which, triggered by afferent visceral inputs, are maintained even after their removal. PMID:8159443

  17. Mapping the Binding Site of TRPV1 on AKAP79: Implications for Inflammatory Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Stott, Katherine; McNaughton, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation causes hyperalgesia, an enhanced sensitivity to noxious stimuli. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a thermo-TRP ion channel activated by painful levels of heat, is an important contributor because hyperalgesia is reduced when TRPV1 is either genetically deleted or pharmacologically blocked. Inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin-E2 or bradykinin cause hyperalgesia by activating cellular kinases that phosphorylate TRPV1, a process that has recently been shown to rely on a scaffolding protein, AKAP79, to target the kinases to TRPV1. Here we use Förster resonance energy transfer, immunoprecipitation, and TRPV1 membrane trafficking experiments to identify a key region on AKAP79, between amino acids 326–336, which is responsible for its interaction with TRPV1. A peptide identical to this domain inhibited sensitization of TRPV1 in vitro, and when covalently linked to a TAT peptide to promote uptake across the cell membrane the peptide inhibited in vivo inflammatory hyperalgesia in mice. Critically, it did so without affecting pain thresholds in the absence of inflammation. These results suggest that antagonizing the TRPV1–AKAP79 interaction will be a useful strategy for inhibiting inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:23699529

  18. Combined action of vasoactive amines and bradykinin mediates allergen-evoked thermal hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lavich, Tatiana R; Cordeiro, Renato S B; Calixto, João B; e Silva, Patrícia M R; Martins, Marco A

    2003-02-21

    The ability of allergens to induce hyperalgesia in immunoglobulin E (IgE)-sensitized rats was investigated. The left hind paws of Wistar rats were sensitized with intraplantar injections of IgE anti-dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin monoclonal antibody, and challenged with dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin 24 h later. Allergen challenge yielded rapid thermal hyperalgesia and oedema formation in the ipsilateral paws, both reaching a plateau from 15 min to 3 h, and both diminishing thereafter. Allergen-evoked hyperalgesia was inhibited by intraperitoneal treatment with meclizine or methysergide, histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonists. There was also sensitivity to local treatment with either bradykinin B(1) or B(2) receptor antagonists, des-Arg(9)-[Leu(8)]-bradykinin or D-arginyl-[Hyp3, Thi5, D-Tic7, Oic8]-bradykinin (Hoe 140). Anaphylactic hyperalgesia was mimicked by the combined administration of histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and bradykinin at doses which were ineffective when injected alone. This synergistic effect was abolished by treatment with either meclizine, methysergide, Hoe 140 or des-Arg(9)-[Leu(8)]-bradykinin. Our findings show that local thermal hyperalgesia is a feature of allergen-evoked inflammation, and that a synergistic interaction among bradykinin, 5-hydroxytryptamine and histamine plays a critical role in this phenomenon. PMID:12591112

  19. Expression and Regulation of Cav3.2 T-Type Calcium Channels during Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaya; Ueda, Takashi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Kumamoto, Natsuko; Shimada, Shoichi; Ugawa, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The Cav3.2 isoform of the T-type calcium channel is expressed in primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and these channels contribute to nociceptive and neuropathic pain in rats. However, there are conflicting reports on the roles of these channels in pain processing in rats and mice. In addition, the function of T-type channels in persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia is poorly understood. We performed behavioral and comprehensive histochemical analyses to characterize Cav3.2-expressing DRG neurons and examined the regulation of T-type channels in DRGs from C57BL/6 mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. We show that approximately 20% of mouse DRG neurons express Cav3.2 mRNA and protein. The size of the majority of Cav3.2-positive DRG neurons (69 ± 8%) ranged from 300 to 700 μm2 in cross-sectional area and 20 to 30 μm in estimated diameter. These channels co-localized with either neurofilament-H (NF-H) or peripherin. The peripherin-positive cells also overlapped with neurons that were positive for isolectin B4 (IB4) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) but were distinct from transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-positive neurons during normal mouse states. In mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia, Cav3.2 channels, but not Cav3.1 or Cav3.3 channels, were upregulated in ipsilateral DRG neurons during the sub-acute phase. The increased Cav3.2 expression partially resulted from an increased number of Cav3.2-immunoreactive neurons; this increase in number was particularly significant for TRPV1-positive neurons. Finally, preceding and periodic intraplantar treatment with the T-type calcium channel blockers mibefradil and NNC 55-0396 markedly reduced and reversed mechanical hyperalgesia during the acute and sub-acute phases, respectively, in mice. These data suggest that Cav3.2 T-type channels participate in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia, and this channel might play an even greater

  20. Vinpocetine Reduces Carrageenan-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mice by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress, Cytokine Production and NF-κB Activation in the Paw and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Miyazawa, Kenji W.; Zarpelon, Ana C.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Pavão-de-Souza, Gabriela F.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2015-01-01

    Vinpocetine is a safe nootropic agent used for neurological and cerebrovascular diseases. The anti-inflammatory activity of vinpocetine has been shown in cell based assays and animal models, leading to suggestions as to its utility in analgesia. However, the mechanisms regarding its efficacy in inflammatory pain treatment are still not completely understood. Herein, the analgesic effect of vinpocetine and its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms were addressed in murine inflammatory pain models. Firstly, we investigated the protective effects of vinpocetine in overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone (PBQ) and formalin. The intraplantar injection of carrageenan was then used to induce inflammatory hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated using the electronic von Frey and the hot plate tests, respectively, with neutrophil recruitment to the paw assessed by a myeloperoxidase activity assay. A number of factors were assessed, both peripherally and in the spinal cord, including: antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, superoxide anion, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) levels, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Vinpocetine inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, PBQ and formalin (at both phases), as well as the carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and associated neutrophil recruitment. Both peripherally and in the spinal cord, vinpocetine also inhibited: antioxidant capacity and GSH depletion; increased superoxide anion; IL-1β and TNF-α levels; and NF-κB activation. As such, vinpocetine significantly reduces inflammatory pain by targeting oxidative stress, cytokine production and NF-κB activation at both peripheral and spinal cord levels. PMID:25822523

  1. Vinpocetine reduces carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia in mice by inhibiting oxidative stress, cytokine production and NF-κB activation in the paw and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Miyazawa, Kenji W; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Pavão-de-Souza, Gabriela F; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-01-01

    Vinpocetine is a safe nootropic agent used for neurological and cerebrovascular diseases. The anti-inflammatory activity of vinpocetine has been shown in cell based assays and animal models, leading to suggestions as to its utility in analgesia. However, the mechanisms regarding its efficacy in inflammatory pain treatment are still not completely understood. Herein, the analgesic effect of vinpocetine and its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms were addressed in murine inflammatory pain models. Firstly, we investigated the protective effects of vinpocetine in overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone (PBQ) and formalin. The intraplantar injection of carrageenan was then used to induce inflammatory hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated using the electronic von Frey and the hot plate tests, respectively, with neutrophil recruitment to the paw assessed by a myeloperoxidase activity assay. A number of factors were assessed, both peripherally and in the spinal cord, including: antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, superoxide anion, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) levels, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Vinpocetine inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, PBQ and formalin (at both phases), as well as the carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and associated neutrophil recruitment. Both peripherally and in the spinal cord, vinpocetine also inhibited: antioxidant capacity and GSH depletion; increased superoxide anion; IL-1β and TNF-α levels; and NF-κB activation. As such, vinpocetine significantly reduces inflammatory pain by targeting oxidative stress, cytokine production and NF-κB activation at both peripheral and spinal cord levels. PMID:25822523

  2. Evaluation of heat hyperalgesia and anxiety like-behaviors in a rat model of orofacial cancer.

    PubMed

    Gambeta, Eder; Kopruszinski, Caroline Machado; Dos Reis, Renata Cristiane; Zanoveli, Janaina Menezes; Chichorro, Juliana Geremias

    2016-04-21

    Pain and anxiety are commonly experienced by cancer patients and both significantly impair their quality of life. Some authors claim that there is a relationship between pain and anxiety, while others suggest that there is not a direct association. In any case, there is indeed a consensus that anxiety impairs the pain condition beyond be under diagnosed and undertreated in cancer pain patients. Herein we investigated if rats presenting heat hyperalgesia induced by orofacial cancer cell inoculation would display anxiety-like behaviors. In addition, we evaluated if pain blockade would result in alleviation of anxiety behaviors, as well as, if blockade of anxiety would result in pain relief. Orofacial cancer was induced in male Wistar rats by inoculation of Walker-256 cells into the right vibrissal pad. Heat facial hyperalgesia was assessed on day 6 after the inoculation, and on this time point rats were submitted to the elevated plus maze and the light-dark transition tests. The influence of lidocaine and midazolam on heat hyperalgesia and anxiety-like behaviors was assessed. The peak of facial heat hyperalgesia was detected 6 days after cancer cells inoculation, and at this time point, rats exhibited increased anxiety-like behaviors. Local treatment with lidocaine (2%/50μL) caused a marked reduction of heat hyperalgesia, but failed to affect the anxiety-like behaviors, while midazolam (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) treatment failed to change the heat threshold, but induced an anxiolytic-like effect. Altogether, our data demonstrated that rats with orofacial cancer present pain- and anxiety-like behaviors, but brief heat hyperalgesia relief does not affect the anxiety-like behaviors, and vice-versa, in our experimental conditions. PMID:26952973

  3. The pattern and time course of somatosensory changes in the human UVB sunburn model reveal the presence of peripheral and central sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gustorff, Burkhard; Sycha, Thomas; Lieba-Samal, Doris; Rolke, Roman; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Magerl, Walter

    2013-04-01

    The ultraviolet B (UVB) sunburn model was characterized with a comprehensive battery of quantitative sensory testing (QST). Primary hyperalgesia in UVB-irradiated skin and secondary hyperalgesia in adjacent nonirradiated skin were studied in 22 healthy subjects 24h after irradiation with UVB at 3-fold minimal erythema dose of a skin area 5 cm in diameter at the thigh and compared to mirror-image contralateral control areas. The time course of hyperalgesia over 96 h was studied in a subgroup of 12 subjects. Within the sunburn area, cold hyperesthesia (P=.01), profound generalized hyperalgesia to heat (P<.001), cold (P<.05), pinprick and pressure (P<.001), and mild dynamic mechanical allodynia (P<.001) were present. The finding of cold hyperalgesia and cold hyperesthesia is new in this model. The sunburn was surrounded by large areas of pinprick hyperalgesia (mean±SEM, 218±32 cm(2)) and a small rim of dynamic mechanical allodynia but no other sensory changes. Although of smaller magnitude, secondary hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia adjacent to the UVB-irradiated area were statistically highly significant. Primary and secondary hyperalgesia developed in parallel within hours, peaked after 24-32 h, and lasted for more than 96 h. These data reveal that the UVB sunburn model activates a broad spectrum of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms and hence is a useful human surrogate model to be used as a screening tool for target engagement in phases 1 and 2a of drug development. PMID:23419598

  4. Effects of the bisphosphonate ibandronate on hyperalgesia, substance P, and cytokine levels in a rat model of persistent inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Mauro; Franchi, Silvia; Ferrario, Paolo; Sotgiu, Maria Luisa; Sacerdote, Paola

    2008-04-01

    The anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of different bisphosphonates have been demonstrated in both animal and human studies. Ibandronate is a third-generation bisphosphonate effective in managing different types of bone pain. In this study we investigated its effects in a standard pre-clinical model of inflammatory pain. We evaluated the effects of a single injection of different doses (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg i.p.) of ibandronate on inflammatory oedema and cutaneous hyperalgesia produced by the intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the rat hind-paw. In addition, we measured the effects of this drug (1.0 mg/kg i.p.) on hind-paw levels of different pro-inflammatory mediators (PGE-2, SP, TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta). We also measured the levels of SP protein and of its mRNA in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Ibandronate proved able to reduce the inflammatory oedema, the hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation, and the levels of SP in the inflamed tissue as measured 3 and 7 days following CFA-injection. This drug significantly reduced the levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta only on day 7. On the other hand, the levels of PGE-2 in the inflamed hind-paw were unaffected by the administration of this bisphosphonate. Finally, ibandronate blocked the overexpression of SP mRNA in DRG induced by CFA-injection in the hind-paw. These data help to complete the pharmacodynamic profile of ibandronate, while also suggesting an involvement of several inflammatory mediators, with special reference to substance P, in the analgesic action of this bisphosphonate. PMID:17664076

  5. Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion Enhances Mechanically Evoked Pain Behavior and the Activity of Cutaneous Nociceptors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Hurwitz, Olivia; Shimada, Steven G.; Qu, Lintao; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Pu; Ma, Chao; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Radicular pain in humans is usually caused by intraforaminal stenosis and other diseases affecting the spinal nerve, root, or dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Previous studies discovered that a chronic compression of the DRG (CCD) induced mechanical allodynia in rats and mice, with enhanced excitability of DRG neurons. We investigated whether CCD altered the pain-like behavior and also the responses of cutaneous nociceptors with unmyelinated axons (C-fibers) to a normally aversive punctate mechanical stimulus delivered to the hairy skin of the hind limb of the mouse. The incidence of a foot shaking evoked by indentation of the dorsum of foot with an aversive von Frey filament (tip diameter 200 μm, bending force 20 mN) was significantly higher in the foot ipsilateral to the CCD surgery as compared to the contralateral side on post-operative days 2 to 8. Mechanically-evoked action potentials were electrophysiologically recorded from the L3 DRG, in vivo, from cell bodies visually identified as expressing a transgenically labeled fluorescent marker (neurons expressing either the receptor MrgprA3 or MrgprD). After CCD, 26.7% of MrgprA3+ and 32.1% MrgprD+ neurons exhibited spontaneous activity (SA), while none of the unoperated control neurons had SA. MrgprA3+ and MrgprD+ neurons in the compressed DRG exhibited, in comparison with neurons from unoperated control mice, an increased response to the punctate mechanical stimuli for each force applied (6, 20, 40, and 80 mN). We conclude that CCD produced both a behavioral hyperalgesia and an enhanced response of cutaneous C-nociceptors to aversive punctate mechanical stimuli. PMID:26356638

  6. Traumatic Stress Promotes Hyperalgesia via Corticotropin-Releasing Factor-1 Receptor (CRFR1) Signaling in Central Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Itoga, Christy A; Roltsch Hellard, Emily A; Whitaker, Annie M; Lu, Yi-Ling; Schreiber, Allyson L; Baynes, Brittni B; Baiamonte, Brandon A; Richardson, Heather N; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2016-09-01

    Hyperalgesia is an exaggerated response to noxious stimuli produced by peripheral or central plasticity. Stress modifies nociception, and humans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibit co-morbid chronic pain and amygdala dysregulation. Predator odor stress produces hyperalgesia in rodents. Systemic blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) type 1 receptors (CRFR1s) reduces stress-induced thermal hyperalgesia. We hypothesized that CRF-CRFR1 signaling in central amygdala (CeA) mediates stress-induced hyperalgesia in rats with high stress reactivity. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to predator odor stress in a conditioned place avoidance paradigm and indexed for high (Avoiders) and low (Non-Avoiders) avoidance of predator odor-paired context, or were unstressed Controls. Rats were tested for the latency to withdraw hindpaws from thermal stimuli (Hargreaves test). We used pharmacological, molecular, and immunohistochemical techniques to assess the role of CRF-CRFR1 signaling in CeA in stress-induced hyperalgesia. Avoiders exhibited higher CRF peptide levels in CeA that did not appear to be locally synthesized. Intra-CeA CRF infusion mimicked stress-induced hyperalgesia. Avoiders exhibited thermal hyperalgesia that was reversed by systemic or intra-CeA injection of a CRFR1 antagonist. Finally, intra-CeA infusion of tetrodotoxin produced thermal hyperalgesia in unstressed rats and blocked the anti-hyperalgesic effect of systemic CRFR1 antagonist in stressed rats. These data suggest that rats with high stress reactivity exhibit hyperalgesia that is mediated by CRF-CRFR1 signaling in CeA. PMID:27013358

  7. Evaluation of Dynamic Weight Bearing for Measuring Nonevoked Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen, Mari A.; Dernetz, Valerie H.; Yang, Gee Su; Griffith, Kathleen A.; Dorsey, Susan G.; Renn, Cynthia L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Animal models in pain research have suggested that inclusion of both evoked and nonevoked behavioral measures are needed to better reflect the human pain experience. Individuals with chronic pain are known to experience spontaneous pain, in addition to pain, following exposure to an external stimulus. Recently, the Dynamic Weight Bearing (DWB) apparatus was developed to assess for nonevoked hyperalgesia by capturing weight bearing and surface distribution in the paws of mice following acute inflammation. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the DWB test as a measure of nonevoked hyperalgesia. Method The experimental group received an intraplantar injection to the left hind paw of the inflammatory agent—Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)—while the vehicle control group received a saline injection, and the naïve control group had no treatment. Caliper and plethysmometer were used to verify inflammation, and the hot-plate test was used as a measure for stimulus evoked hyperalgesia. Data were collected at baseline, three hours, one, three, and seven days after injection. Results Mice injected with CFA showed a statistically significant higher mean paw thickness and volume displacement compared to vehicle and naïve control groups. In the hot-plate testing, CFA-treated mice showed lower response temperature at seven days compared to other groups. On the DWB test, CFA-treated mice showed a reduction in the ipsilateral paw load and surface area compared to the contralateral paw load at Day 1, Day 3 and Day 7. Discussion Mice with inflammation demonstrated alterations in weight bearing, as well as increased thermal hyperalgesia in comparison to controls groups. These findings support the use of the DWB test as a tool for measuring nonevoked inflammatory hyperalgesia in a mouse model. PMID:25738619

  8. Shugan-decoction relieves visceral hyperalgesia and reduces TRPV1 and SP colon expression

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing-Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ye; Xu, Hui; Tang, Rong-Zhu; Dong, Yue-Bin; Xie, Jian-Qun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of Shugan-decoction (SGD) on visceral hyperalgesia and colon gene expressions using a rat model. METHODS: Ninety-six adult male Wistar rats were randomized into six equal groups for assessment of SGD effects on psychological stress-induced changes using the classic water avoidance stress (WAS) test. Untreated model rats were exposed to chronic (1 h/d for 10 d consecutive) WAS conditions; experimental treatment model rats were administered with intragastric SGD at 1 h before WAS on consecutive days 4-10 (low-dose: 0.1 g/mL; mid-dose: 0.2 g/mL; high-dose: 0.4 g/mL); control treatment model rats were similarly administered with the irritable bowel syndrome drug, dicetel (0.0042 g/mL); untreated normal control rats received no drug and were not subjected to the WAS test. At the end of the 10-d WAS testing period, a semi-quantitative measurement of visceral sensitivity was made by assessing the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) to colorectal balloon-induced distension (at 5 mmHg increments) to determine the pain pressure threshold (PPT, evidenced by pain behavior). Subsequently, the animals were sacrificed and colonic tissues collected for assessment of changes in expressions of proteins related to visceral hypersensitivity (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, TRPV1) and sustained visceral hyperalgesia (substance P, SP) by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Inter-group differences were assessed by paired t test or repeated measures analysis of variance. RESULTS: The WAS test successfully induced visceral hypersensitivity, as evidenced by a significantly reduced AWR pressure in the untreated model group as compared to the untreated normal control group (190.4 ± 3.48 mmHg vs 224.0 ± 4.99 mmHg, P < 0.001). SGD treatments at mid-dose and high-dose and the dicetel treatment significantly increased the WAS-reduced PPT (212.5 ± 2.54, 216.5 ± 3.50 and 217.7 ± 2.83 mmHg respectively, all P < 0

  9. The impact of allodynia on the efficacy of almotriptan when given early in migraine: data from the "Act when mild" study.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Insa, S; Goadsby, P J; Zanchin, G; Fortea, J; Falqués, M; Vila, C

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of allodynia on treatment outcomes in the patients with acute migraine treated in the "Act when Mild" (AwM) study. AwM, a randomized placebo-controlled trial, studied almotriptan 12.5 mg in the early treatment (within 1 hr) of acute migraine when the pain was still mild, and investigated clinical outcomes in the presence or absence of allodynia, which was prospectively recorded using patient questionnaires. Of the total population, 39% (n = 404) reported allodynia that did not alter the efficacy of almotriptan administered for early/mild pain in terms of 2-hr pain-free rates (53.9% for allodynic patients vs. 52.5% for nonallodynic patients). Similarly, sustained pain-free rates were 47.2% versus 45.5%, and migraine duration 1.40 versus 1.54 hr, respectively. However, allodynia impaired the effectiveness of almotriptan in the patients with moderate/severe pain in terms of longer migraine duration, fewer patients achieving pain-free status, and more requiring rescue medication. In conclusion, the lack of effect of allodynia on the efficacy of almotriptan given for early/mild migraine pain might help explain the improved outcomes associated with the early-treatment strategy in AwM. Moreover, the data suggest that pain intensity is the main driver of triptan response, and not the presence or absence of allodynia. PMID:21777163

  10. Sativex successfully treats neuropathic pain characterised by allodynia: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Nurmikko, Turo J; Serpell, Mick G; Hoggart, Barbara; Toomey, Peter J; Morlion, Bart J; Haines, Derek

    2007-12-15

    Cannabinoids are known to have analgesic properties. We evaluated the effect of oro-mucosal sativex, (THC: CBD), an endocannabinoid system modulator, on pain and allodynia, in 125 patients with neuropathic pain of peripheral origin in a five-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial. Patients remained on their existing stable analgesia. A self-titrating regimen was used to optimise drug administration. Sixty-three patients were randomised to receive sativex and 62 placebo. The mean reduction in pain intensity scores (primary outcome measure) was greater in patients receiving sativex than placebo (mean adjusted scores -1.48 points vs. -0.52 points on a 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (p=0.004; 95% CI: -1.59, -0.32). Improvements in Neuropathic Pain Scale composite score (p=0.007), sleep NRS (p=0.001), dynamic allodynia (p=0.042), punctate allodynia (p=0.021), Pain Disability Index (p=0.003) and Patient's Global Impression of Change (p<0.001) were similarly greater on sativex vs. placebo. Sedative and gastrointestinal side effects were reported more commonly by patients on active medication. Of all participants, 18% on sativex and 3% on placebo withdrew during the study. An open-label extension study showed that the initial pain relief was maintained without dose escalation or toxicity for 52 weeks. PMID:17997224

  11. Exercise preconditioning reduces neonatal incision surgery-induced enhanced hyperalgesia via inhibition of P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and IL-1β, TNF-α release.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingrui; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Mazhong

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal surgery leads to enhanced hyperalgesia to noxious stimulation in adulthood via a mechanism caused by enhanced phosphorylated (p)-p38 expression in microglia. We tested the effect of exercise on reducing enhanced hypersensitivity primed by neonatal incision surgery. Adult female Wistar rats, with or without neonatal incision surgery at postnatal day (P) 3, received right hind paw plantar incision surgery under anesthesia at P44. The rats performed wheel-running exercise from P22 to P41. Paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) and paw withdrawal latency (PWL) were measured and ipsilateral spinal cords were collected for protein quantification. For PWT and PWL, exercise reduced the pain index after incision surgery at P44 in rats with neonatal surgery (P<0.01). Western blots showed that exercise suppressed P-p38 expression relative to adult rats without neonatal surgery (P<0.05). Results of ELISA showed that exercise reduced IL-1β and TNF-α (P<0.05) concentration in the ipsilateral spinal cord. Exercise preconditioning is an effective approach to reducing enhanced adult hyperalgesia primed by neonatal surgery. The mechanism may be explained by exercise-induced inhibition of P-p38 activation and IL-1β, TNF-α release. PMID:27235543

  12. The effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on mechanical and thermal thresholds in 6OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Gee, Lucy E; Chen, Nita; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Shin, Damian S; Pilitsis, Julie G

    2015-08-01

    Chronic pain is a major complaint for up to 85% of Parkinson's disease patients; however, it often not identified as a symptom of Parkinson's disease. Adequate treatment of motor symptoms often provides analgesic effects in Parkinson's patients but how this occurs remains unclear. Studies have shown both Parkinson's patients and 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats exhibit decreased sensory thresholds. In humans, some show improvements in these deficits after subthalamic deep brain stimulation, while others report no change. Differing methods of testing and response criteria may explain these varying results. We examined this effect in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were unilaterally implanted with subthalamic stimulating electrodes in the lesioned right hemisphere and sensory thresholds were tested using von Frey, tail-flick and hot-plate tests. Tests were done during and off subthalamic stimulation at 50 and 150 Hz to assess its effects on sensory thresholds. The 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals exhibited lower mechanical (left paw, P < 0.01) and thermal thresholds than shams (hot plate, P < 0.05). Both 50 and 150 Hz increased mechanical (left paw; P < 0.01) and thermal thresholds in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats (hot-plate test: 150 Hz, P < 0.05, 50 Hz, P < 0.01). Interestingly, during von Frey testing, low-frequency stimulation provided a more robust improvement in some 6OHDA lesioned rats, while in others, the magnitude of improvement on high-frequency stimulation was greater. This study shows that subthalamic deep brain stimulation improves mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned animals at both high and low frequencies. Furthermore, we suggest considering using low-frequency stimulation when treating Parkinson's patients where pain remains the predominant complaint. PMID:26082992

  13. Neural correlates of hyperalgesia in the monosodium iodoacetate model of osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Abaei, Maryam; Sagar, Devi R; Stockley, Elizabeth G; Spicer, Clare H; Prior, Malcolm; Auer, Dorothee P

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanisms driving osteoarthritic pain remain poorly understood, but there is increasing evidence for a role of the central nervous system in the chronification of pain. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the influence of a model of unilateral knee osteoarthritis on nociceptive processing. Results Four to five weeks post intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 1 mg) into the left knee, Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to characterize the neural response to a noxious stimulus (intra-articular capsaicin injection). In a two-arm cross-over design, 5 µM/50 µl capsaicin was injected into either the left knee (n = 8, CAPS-MIA) or right control knee (n = 8, CAPS-CON), preceded by contralateral vehicle (SAL) injection. To assess neural correlates of mechanical hyperalgesia, hindpaws were stimulated with von Frey hairs (8 g: MIA; 15 g: control knee, based on behavioral withdrawal responses). The CAPS-MIA group exhibited significant activation of the periaqueductal gray, unilateral thalamus and bilateral mensencephalon, superior-colliculus, and hippocampus, with no significant activation in the other groups/conditions. Capsaicin injection increased functional connectivity in the mid-brain network and mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, hippocampus, and globus pallidus, which was significantly stronger in CAPS-MIA compared to CAPS-CON groups. Mechanical stimulation of the hyperalgesic (ipsilateral to MIA knee) and normalgesic (contralateral) hindpaws evoked qualitatively different brain activation with more widespread brainstem and anterior cingulate (ACC) activation when stimulating the hyperalgesic paw, and clearer frontal sensory activation from the normalgesic paw. Conclusions We provide evidence for modulation of nociceptive processing in a chronic knee osteoarthritis pain model with stronger brain activation and alteration of brain networks

  14. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Araldi, D; Bogen, O; Levine, J D

    2016-06-01

    We propose that the extracellular matrix (ECM) signals CD44, a hyaluronan receptor, to increase the responsiveness to mechanical stimulation in the rat hind paw. We report that intradermal injection of hyaluronidase induces mechanical hyperalgesia, that is inhibited by co-administration of a CD44 receptor antagonist, A5G27. The intradermal injection of low (LMWH) but not high (HMWH) molecular weight hyaluronan also induces mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect that was attenuated by pretreatment with HMWH or A5G27. Pretreatment with HMWH also attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by hyaluronidase. Similarly, intradermal injection of A6, a CD44 receptor agonist, produced hyperalgesia that was inhibited by HMWH and A5G27. Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and Src, but not protein kinase C (PKC), significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by both A6 and LMWH. Finally, to determine if CD44 receptor signaling is involved in a preclinical model of inflammatory pain, we evaluated the effect of A5G27 and HMWH on the mechanical hyperalgesia associated with the inflammation induced by carrageenan. Both A5G27 and HMWH attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, while LMWH acts at its cognate receptor, CD44, to induce mechanical hyperalgesia, HMWH acts at the same receptor as an antagonist. That the local administration of HMWH or A5G27 inhibits carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia supports the suggestion that carrageenan produces changes in the ECM that contributes to inflammatory pain. These studies define a clinically relevant role for signaling by the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, in increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. PMID:26996509

  15. The Area of Secondary Hyperalgesia following Heat Stimulation in Healthy Male Volunteers: Inter- and Intra-Individual Variance and Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Morten Sejer; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Østervig, Rebecca; Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical pain models can be applied when investigating basic physiologic pain responses in healthy volunteers. Several pain models exist; however, only few have been adequately validated. Our primary aim with this prospective study was to investigate the intra- and inter-individual variation in secondary hyperalgesia elicited by brief thermal sensitization (45°C for 3 min) in healthy volunteers. Material and Methods Fifty healthy volunteers were included. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization were investigated by 2 observers on 4 experimental days, with a minimum interval of 7 days. Additionally, heat pain detection threshold and pain during thermal stimulation (45°C for 1 min.), and the psychological tests Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score were applied. Results For areas of secondary hyperalgesia, an intra-observer intra-person correlation of 0.85, 95% CI [0.78, 0.90], an intra-observer inter-person correlation of 0.03, 95% CI [0.00, 0.16], and a coefficient of variation of 0.17, 95% CI [0.14, 0.21] was demonstrated. Four percent of the study population had areas of secondary hyperalgesia both below the 1st and above the 3rd quartile considering all included participants. Heat pain detection threshold predicted area of secondary hyperalgesia with an adjusted R2 of 0.20 (P = 0.0006). Conclusions We have demonstrated a low intra-individual, and a high inter-individual variation in thermally induced secondary hyperalgesia. We conclude that brief thermal sensitization produce secondary hyperalgesia with a high level of reproducibility, which can be applied to investigate different phenotypes related to secondary hyperalgesia in healthy volunteers. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT02166164 PMID:27167119

  16. Quantitative test of responses to thermal stimulation in spinally injured rats using a Peltier thermode: a new approach to study cold allodynia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tianle; Hao, Jing-Xia; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Xu, Xiao-Jun

    2013-01-30

    In this work, we described a method of testing of responses of spinally injured rats to thermal stimulation (heating and cooling) to the flank area using a Peltier thermode. With a baseline holding temperature at 32°C and the temperature change rate of 0.5°C/s, we measured vocalization thresholds of rats to thermal stimulation in the flank area. While normal rats did not vocalize to temperatures changes ranging from 6°C to 50°C, the spinally injured rats exhibited significantly increased response to cooling with average response temperature above 15°C through the 70 day observation period after spinal cord injury. The response temperature to cooling in spinally injured rats is correlated with the magnitude of responses to cold stimulation scored after ethyl chloride spray and with the response threshold to mechanical stimulation. In contrast, we did not observe an increase in response to warm/heat stimuli. The results showed that ischemic spinal cord injury produced cold, but not heat, allodynia in rats. Furthermore, we showed that it is possible to quantitatively measure response of rats to thermal stimulation on the body using temperature as end points which may aid further studies on mechanisms and treatments of thermal stimulation, particularly cold, evoked pain. PMID:23183015

  17. Mast cell degranulation mediates compound 48/80-induced hyperalgesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjea, Devavani; Wetzel, Abigail; Mack, Madison; Engblom, Camilla; Allen, Juliann; Mora-Solano, Carolina; Paredes, Luisa; Balsells, Evelyn; Martinov, Tijana

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells mediate allergies, hypersensitivities, host defense, and venom neutralization. An area of recent interest is the contribution of mast cells to inflammatory pain. Here we found that specific, local activation of mast cells produced plantar hyperalgesia in mice. Basic secretagogue compound 48/80 induced plantar mast cell degranulation accompanied by thermal hyperalgesia, tissue edema, and neutrophil influx in the hindpaws of ND4 Swiss mice. Blocking mast cell degranulation, neutrophil extravasation, and histamine signaling abrogated these responses. Compound 48/80 also produced edema, pain, and neutrophil influx in WT C57BL/6 but not in genetically mast cell-deficient C57BL/6-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These responses were restored following plantar reconstitution with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells. PMID:22828511

  18. Almotriptan and its combination with aceclofenac for migraine attacks: a study of efficacy and the influence of auto-evaluated brush allodynia.

    PubMed

    Schoenen, J; De Klippel, N; Giurgea, S; Herroelen, L; Jacquy, J; Louis, P; Monseu, G; Vandenheede, M

    2008-10-01

    Early treatment and combining a triptan with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) are thought to improve outcome during migraine attacks, possibly by counteracting the negative influence of cutaneous allodynia. The aim of this multicentre, double-blind pilot study was to evaluate the prevalence of brush allodynia and its relative influence on the efficacy of a triptan-NSAID combination compared with headache intensity at the time of treatment. In a randomized, cross-over design, 112 migraineurs treated two moderate or severe attacks with almotriptan 12.5 mg combined with either aceclofenac 100 mg or placebo. Patients used a 2-cm brush to assess cutaneous allodynia. Allodynia was reported in 34.4% of attacks. The almotriptan-aceclofenac combination was numerically superior to triptan-placebo on 2-24-h sustained pain-free (P = 0.07), 2-h pain-free (P = 0.07) and headache recurrence (P = 0.05) rates, but not on 1-h headache relief. Allodynia numerically reduced treatment success overall, but this effect was not significant for the primary outcome measures. Headache intensity had a significant negative influence on 1-h relief in both attacks (P = 0.0001 and 0.0008, chi(2)) and on 2-24-h sustained pain-free rates in triptan-placebo-treated attacks (P = 0.013). Multivariate logistic regression analysis confirmed that headache intensity at treatment intake, rather than allodynia, significantly influenced most outcome measures, predominantly so in attacks treated with almotriptan and aceclofenac. In the latter, severe compared with moderate headache intensity reduced the likelihood of achieving the primary efficacy end-points [odds ratios (OR) 0.12 and 0.33], whereas allodynia was not a significant explanatory variable (OR 0.76 and 0.65). The results apply to the protocol used here and need to be confirmed in larger studies using quantitative sensory testing. PMID:18644036

  19. Phenoxybenzamine in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Potential Role and Novel Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Inchiosa, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a relatively long history of the use of the α-adrenergic antagonist, phenoxybenzamine, for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). One form of this syndrome, CRPS I, was originally termed reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) because of an apparent dysregulation of the sympathetic nervous system in the region of an extremity that had been subjected to an injury or surgical procedure. The syndrome develops in the absence of any apparent continuation of the inciting trauma. Hallmarks of the condition are allodynia (pain perceived from a nonpainful stimulus) and hyperalgesia (exaggerated pain response to a painful stimulus). In addition to severe, unremitting burning pain, the affected limb is typically warm and edematous in the early weeks after trauma but then progresses to a primarily cold, dry limb in later weeks and months. The later stages are frequently characterized by changes to skin texture and nail deformities, hypertrichosis, muscle atrophy, and bone demineralization. Earlier treatments of CRPS syndromes were primarily focused on blocking sympathetic outflow to an affected extremity. The use of an α-adrenergic antagonist such as phenoxybenzamine followed from this perspective. However, the current consensus on the etiology of CRPS favors an interpretation of the symptomatology as an evidence of decreased sympathetic activity to the injured limb and a resulting upregulation of adrenergic sensitivity. The clinical use of phenoxybenzamine for the treatment of CRPS is reviewed, and mechanisms of action that include potential immunomodulatory/anti-inflammatory effects are presented. Also, a recent study identified phenoxybenzamine as a potential intervention for pain mediation from its effects on gene expression in human cell lines; on this basis, it was tested and found to be capable of reducing pain behavior in a classical animal model of chronic pain. PMID:24454356

  20. Influence of trimebutine on inflammation- and stress-induced hyperalgesia to rectal distension in rats.

    PubMed

    Lacheze, C; Coelho, A M; Fioramonti, J; Buéno, L

    1998-08-01

    The effects of trimebutine and its major metabolite, N-desmethyltrimebutine on inflammation- and stress-induced rectal hyperalgesia have been evaluated in rats fitted with electrodes implanted in the longitudinal striated muscle of the abdomen. Intermittent rectal distension was performed before and 3 days after induction of rectal inflammation by local infusion of trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (in ethanol). Stress consisted of 2h partial restraint and rectal distension was performed before and 30min after the end of the partial restraint session. The animals were treated intraperitoneally with trimebutine or desmethyltrimebutine (5, 10 or 20mgkg(-1)) or vehicle 15min before rectal distension. Naloxone (1mgkg(-1)) or saline was injected subcutaneously before trimebutine and desmethyltrimebutine. Before treatment trimebutine at the highest dose (20mgkg(-1)) reduced the abdominal response to rectal distension for the highest volume of distension (1.6mL) whereas desmethyltrimebutine was inactive. After rectocolitis the abdominal response to rectal distension was enhanced and trimebutine at 5mgkg(-1) reduced and at 10 mgkg(-1) suppressed inflammation-induced hyperalgesia, an effect reversed by naloxone. Desmethyltrimebutine was inactive. Stress-induced hypersensitivity was attenuated or suppressed, or both, by trimebutine and desmethyltrimebutine at doses of 5, 10 or 20mgkg(-l); greater efficacy was observed for desmethyltrimebutine and the effects were not reversed by naloxone. It was concluded that trimebutine and desmethyltrimebutine are active against inflammation- and stress-induced rectal hyperalgesia but act differently. The effect of trimebutine on inflammation-induced hyperalgesia is mediated through opioid receptors. PMID:9751458

  1. Movement-evoked hyperalgesia induced by lipopolysaccharides is not suppressed by glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Katalin J.; Papic, Jonathan C.; Larson, Alice A.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) produces a variety of effects, including movement-evoked hyperalgesia that can be measured using the grip force assay in mice. Because both lethality and enhanced sensitivity to cutaneous pain following exposure to endotoxins have each been attributed to inflammatory mediators, we explored the possibility that LPS-induced movement-evoked hyperalgesia is also sensitive to manipulations of glucocorticoids that regulate these other LPS responses. We found that the hyperalgesic effect of LPS (5 mg/kg s.c.) in mice that were adrenalectomized did not differ from that in control mice that were sham-operated, even though mortality after LPS was potentiated by adrenalectomy. The development of tolerance to the movement-evoked hyperalgesic effect of LPS also did not differ between adrenalectomized and sham-operated control mice. In addition, mifepristone (25 mg/kg s.c.), a glucocorticoid antagonist, did not attenuate the hyperalgesic effect of LPS (2 mg/kg s.c.), yet this dose of mifepristone was sufficient to enhance the incidence of lethality induced by LPS. Enhancement of glucocorticoid activity by two injections of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg s.c.) had no effect on the degree of hyperalgesia in mice injected with LPS (5 mg/kg s.c.), yet this dose of dexamethasone was sufficient to attenuate the incidence of mortality induced by LPS in adrenalectomized mice. Finally, morphine (10 mg/kg i.p.) reversed the decrease in grip force caused by LPS (5 mg/kg i.p.), supporting the interpretation that decreases in grip force produced by LPS reflect muscle hyperalgesia that is not sensitive to glucocorticoids. PMID:17686584

  2. Hyperalgesia in Heroin Dependent Patients and the Effects of Opioid Substitution Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Peggy; Canamar, Catherine P.; Hillhouse, Maureen; Ling, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests that patients on opiate maintenance therapy for the treatment of addiction present with opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). This study compared the experimental (cold-pressor, electrical stimulation) pain responses of 82 treatment-seeking heroin-dependent adults randomized to methadone (METH, n = 11) or buprenorphine (BUP, n = 64) therapy, with matched drug free controls (n = 21). Heroin-dependent participants were evaluated at baseline (treatment entry), medication (METH or BUP) stabilization (4-8 weeks), and chronic administration (12-18 weeks), at trough (just prior to dosing) and peak (3 hours after dosing) plasma levels. Collection of the control group’s pain responses occurred twice during a single session, three hours apart. Baseline comparisons indicate that heroin-dependent individuals demonstrate significantly shorter latencies to threshold and tolerance for cold-pressor pain than the control group. Across pain stimuli and time points, little change in pain responses were found over time, the exception being cold pressor pain tolerance, for which hyperalgesia significantly increased at trough METH/BUP levels in both groups as they stabilized in treatment. We conclude that heroin-dependent individuals are hyperalgesic, and that once stabilized in treatment, are not different in pain responses regardless of treatment agent. The effects of non-pharmacologic therapy and previous heroin use may explain increased hyperalgesia found with treatment. Perspective To better understand the clinical phenomenon of OIH, this article describes experimental pain responses of heroin-dependent participants both prior to and over the course of maintenance therapy with methadone or buprenorphine. Hyperalgesia is present with illicit and treatment opioid use, and does not appear to appreciably improve over the course of treatment. PMID:22424799

  3. Reduction of spinal PGE2 concentrations prevents swim stress-induced thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Coram; Fernandez, Ana Cristina; Cardenas, Ricardo; Suarez-Roca, Heberto

    2015-03-30

    We evaluated the association between spinal PGE2 and thermal hyperalgesia following repeated stress. Thermal nociception was determined in male Sprague-Dawley rats using the hot-plate test, before and after forced-swimming; non-conditioned rats served as controls. Animals were pretreated with ketoprofen or meloxicam, preferential COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors, respectively. After the second hot-plate test, we measured serum corticosterone (stress marker), and lumbar spinal PGE2 (neuroinflammation marker) under peripheral inflammation (1% formalin plantar injection). Stressed rats displayed response latencies 40% shorter and inflammatory spinal PGE2 levels 95% higher than controls. Pretreatment with ketoprofen or meloxicam prevented hyperalgesia and elevation of spinal PGE2, increasing the escape behavior time during forced swimming 95% respect to saline-treated rats. Corticosterone levels in stressed rats were 97% higher than controls; COX inhibitors reduced them by 84%. PGE2 could participate in stress-induced hyperalgesia, learned helplessness, and corticosterone production, supporting the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for persistent pain associated with chronic stress and depression. PMID:25703222

  4. Toxoplasma gondii Infection Promotes Neuroinflammation Through Cytokine Networks and Induced Hyperalgesia in BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Ziaali, Naser; Ghazvini, Hamed; Shojaee, Saeideh; Keshavarz, Hossein; Esmaeilpour, Khadijeh; Sheibani, Vahid

    2016-02-01

    We hypothesized that in Toxoplasma gondii infection, communication among immune cells promotes neuroinflammation through cytokine networks and induces pain sensitivity under conditions of neuropathic pain. The animal model of Toxoplasma infection was established by the intraperitoneal inoculation of 20-25 tissue cysts from Tehran strain of T. gondii to BALB/c mice. Amitriptyline (20 mg/kg, i.p., 1/day) administrated to animals for 7 days before behavioral tests. Pain behavioral tests including tail flick, hot plate, and formalin test were evaluated in all the groups. The mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 were examined by real-time PCR. Results revealed that T. gondii induce hyperalgesia in the infected mice, whereas amitriptyline showed a promising effect against the hyperalgesia induced by Toxoplasma infection. The mRNA levels of the aforementioned cytokines significantly (P < 0.05) increased in the infected mice compared to the uninfected ones. Obtained findings suggested that T. gondii infection could promote neuroinflammation through cytokine networks and induced hyperalgesia in BALB/c mice, whereas amitriptyline as an analgesic drug reverses them. PMID:26490968

  5. Interaction of Hyperalgesia and Sensory Loss in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I (CRPS I)

    PubMed Central

    Huge, Volker; Lauchart, Meike; Förderreuther, Stefanie; Kaufhold, Wibke; Valet, Michael; Azad, Shahnaz Christina; Beyer, Antje; Magerl, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Background Sensory abnormalities are a key feature of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). In order to characterise these changes in patients suffering from acute or chronic CRPS I, we used Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) in comparison to an age and gender matched control group. Methods 61 patients presenting with CRPS I of the upper extremity and 56 healthy subjects were prospectively assessed using QST. The patients' warm and cold detection thresholds (WDT; CDT), the heat and cold pain thresholds (HPT; CPT) and the occurrence of paradoxical heat sensation (PHS) were observed. Results In acute CRPS I, patients showed warm and cold hyperalgesia, indicated by significant changes in HPT and CPT. WDT and CDT were significantly increased as well, indicating warm and cold hypoaesthesia. In chronic CRPS, thermal hyperalgesia declined, but CDT as well as WDT further deteriorated. Solely patients with acute CRPS displayed PHS. To a minor degree, all QST changes were also present on the contralateral limb. Conclusions We propose three pathomechanisms of CRPS I, which follow a distinct time course: Thermal hyperalgesia, observed in acute CRPS, indicates an ongoing aseptic peripheral inflammation. Thermal hypoaesthesia, as detected in acute and chronic CRPS, signals a degeneration of A-delta and C-fibres, which further deteriorates in chronic CRPS. PHS in acute CRPS I indicates that both inflammation and degeneration are present, whilst in chronic CRPS I, the pathomechanism of degeneration dominates, signalled by the absence of PHS. The contralateral changes observed strongly suggest the involvement of the central nervous system. PMID:18648647

  6. Global gene expression analysis in the mouse brainstem after hyperalgesia induced by facial carrageenan injection--evidence for a form of neurovascular coupling?

    PubMed

    Poh, Kay-Wee; Lutfun, Nahar; Manikandan, Jayapal; Ong, Wei-Yi; Yeo, Jin-Fei

    2009-03-01

    The present study was carried out to examine global gene expression in the brainstem, in a mouse facial carrageenan injection model of orofacial pain. Mice that received facial carrageenan injection showed increased mechanical allodynia, demonstrated by increased responses to von Frey hair stimulation of the face. The brainstem was harvested at 3 days post-injection, corresponding to the time of peak responses, and analyzed by Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 microarrays. We sought to identify common genes that are changed in the respective sides of the brainstem after either right- or left-sided facial carrageenan injection. The result is a relatively small list of genes (22 genes), which were then classified using DAVID software. Many of them fell into the categories of "response to stress", "defence response", "response to biotic stimulus", "cell adhesion" and "leukocyte adhesion". Of these, increased expression of P-selectin, ICAM-1 and CCL12 after carrageenan injection could be verified by real-time RT-PCR on both the right and left sides, and increased in P-selectin and ICAM-1 further verified by Western blot analysis. P-selectin and ICAM-1 were immunolocalized to endothelial cells, and were double labelled with von Willebrand factor. Intraperitoneal injection of the P-selectin inhibitor KF38789 significantly reduced mechanical allodynia in the facial carrageenan-injected mice. P-selectin mediates the capturing of leukocytes from the bloodstream and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelial surface. We hypothesize that increased nociceptive input to the brainstem could attract circulating macrophages into the brain, resulting in neuroinflammation and pain. PMID:19167818

  7. Trigeminal neuroplasticity underlies allodynia in a preclinical model of mild closed head traumatic brain injury (cTBI).

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Golam; Hou, Jiamei; Tsuda, Shigeharu; Nelson, Rachel; Sinharoy, Ankita; Wilkie, Zachary; Pandey, Rahul; Caudle, Robert M; Neubert, John K; Thompson, Floyd J; Bose, Prodip

    2016-08-01

    Post-traumatic headache (PTH) following TBI is a common and often persisting pain disability. PTH is often associated with a multimodal central pain sensitization on the skin surface described as allodynia. However, the particular neurobiology underlying cTBI-induced pain disorders are not known. These studies were performed to assess trigeminal sensory sensitization and to determine if sensitization measured behaviorally correlated with detectable changes in portions of the trigeminal sensory system (TSS), particularly trigeminal nucleus, thalamus, and sensory cortex. Thermal stimulation is particularly well suited to evaluate sensitization and was used in these studies. Recent advances in the use of reward/conflict paradigms permit use of operant measures of behavior, versus reflex-driven response behaviors, for thermal sensitization studies. Thus, to quantitate facial thermal sensitization (allodynia) in the setting of acute TBI, the current study utilized an operant orofacial pain reward/conflict testing paradigm to assess facial thermal sensitivity in uninjured control animals compared with those two weeks after cTBI in a rodent model. Significant reductions in facial contact/lick behaviors were observed in the TBI animals using either cool or warm challenge temperatures compared with behaviors in the normal animals. These facial thermal sensitizations correlated with detectable changes in multiple levels of the TSS. The immunohistochemical (IHC) studies revealed significant alterations in the expression of the serotonin (5-HT), neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R), norepinephrine (NE), and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the caudal trigeminal nucleus, thalamic VPL/VPM nucleus, and sensory cortex of the orofacial pain pathways. There was a strong correlation between increased expression of certain IHC markers and increased behavioral markers for facial sensitization. The authors conclude that TBI-induced changes observed in the TSS are consistent with the expression

  8. Behavioral characteristics of a mouse model of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bae Hwan; Seong, Jinsil; Kim, Un Jeng; Won, Ran; Kim, Jiyoung

    2005-04-30

    Pain is a major symptom in cancer patients, and most cancer patients with advanced or terminal cancers suffer from chronic pain related to treatment failure and/or tumor progression. In the present study, we examined the development of cancer pain in mice. Murine hepatocarcinoma cells, HCa-1, were inoculated unilaterally into the thigh or the dorsum of the foot of male C3H/HeJ mice. Four weeks after inoculation, behavioral signs were observed for mechanical allodynia, cold allodynia, and hyperalgesia using a von Frey filament, acetone, and radiant heat, respectively. Bone invasion by the tumor commenced from 7 days after inoculation of tumor cells and was evident from 14 days after inoculation. Cold allodynia but neither mechanical allodynia nor hyperalgesia was observed in mice that received an inoculation into the thigh. On the contrary, mechanical allodynia and cold allodynia, but not hyperalgesia, were developed in mice with an inoculation into the foot. Sometimes, mirror-image pain was developed in these animals. These results suggest that carcinoma cells injected into the foot of mice may develop severe chronic pain related to cancer. This animal model of pain would be useful to elucidate the mechanisms of cancer pain in humans. PMID:15861499

  9. Activation of Cannabinoid CB2 receptors Reduces Hyperalgesia in an Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Weisi; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials investigating the analgesic efficacy of cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis have yielded mixed results, possibly due to psychotropic side effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. We hypothesized that a CB2-specific agonist (JWH-133) would decrease hyperalgesia in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of multiple sclerosis. 4 weeks after induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we found that intrathecal administration of JWH-133 (10–100 μg) dose-dependently reduced both mechanical and cold hypersensitivity without producing signs of sedation or ataxia. The anti-hyperalgesic effects of JWH-133 could be dose-dependently prevented by intrathecal co-administration of the CB2 antagonist, AM-630 (1–3 μg). Our results suggest that JWH-133 acts at CB2 receptors, most likely within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, to suppress the hypersensitivity associated with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These are the first pre-clinical studies to directly promote CB2 as a promising target for the treatment of central pain in an animal model of multiple sclerosis. PMID:25849525

  10. Effects of intrathecal strychnine and bicuculline on nerve compression-induced thermal hyperalgesia and selective antagonism by MK-801.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Yaksh, T L

    1993-07-01

    We studied the effects of intrathecally administered strychnine (STR; glycine antagonist; 10 or 30 micrograms) and bicuculline (BIC; GABAA antagonist 1 or 3 micrograms) on the thermal hyperalgesia which occurs following sciatic nerve constriction injury in rats. Following unilateral application of loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve, all rats typically displayed an ipsilateral thermal hyperalgesia on day 7. Intrathecal STR or BIC administered just after the nerve lesion and on days 1 and 2 after the nerve lesion significantly enhanced in a dose-dependent fashion the magnitude of the thermal hyperalgesia normally observed on day 7, as compared to intrathecal saline (for STR: 30 micrograms > 10 micrograms > or = saline; for BIC: 30 micrograms > 10 micrograms > or = saline, p < 0.05). Intrathecal MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, was without effect upon the response latency of the normal or sham operated paw, but selectively reversed the hyperalgesia. These results suggest that the loss of a spinal STR- and BIC-sensitive inhibition augments development of the hyperalgesia induced by chronic nerve compression. PMID:8378105

  11. ABT-627, an endothelin ET(A) receptor-selective antagonist, attenuates tactile allodynia in a diabetic rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, M F; Wessale, J L; Zhu, C Z; Lynch, J J; Dayton, B D; Calzadilla, S V; Padley, R J; Opgenorth, T J; Kowaluk, E A

    2000-01-24

    Tactile allodynia, the enhanced perception of pain in response to normally non-painful stimulation, represents a common complication of diabetic neuropathy. The activation of endothelin ET(A) receptors has been implicated in diabetes-induced reductions in peripheral neurovascularization and concomitant endoneurial hypoxia. Endothelin receptor activation has also been shown to alter the peripheral and central processing of nociceptive information. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of the novel endothelin ET(A) receptor-selective antagonist, 2R-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4S-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-1-(N, N-di(n-butyl)aminocarbonyl-methyl)-pyrrolidine-3R-carboxylic acid (ABT-627), in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model of neuropathic pain. Rats were injected with 75 mg/kg streptozotocin (i. p.), and drug effects were assessed 8-12 weeks following streptozotocin treatment to allow for stabilization of blood glucose levels (>/=240 mg/dl) and tactile allodynia thresholds (allodynia thresholds. A significant antinociceptive effect (40-50% increase in tactile allodynia thresholds, P<0.05) was observed at the dose of 10 mg/kg, i.p., within 0.5-2-h post-dosing. The antinociceptive effects of ABT-627 (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1), p.o.) were maintained following chronic administration of the antagonist in drinking water for 7 days. In comparison, morphine administered acutely at a dose of 8 mg/kg, i.p., produced a significant 90% increase in streptozotocin-induced tactile allodynia thresholds. The endothelin ET(B) receptor-selective antagonist, 2R-(4-propoxyphenyl)-4S-(1, 3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-1-(N-(2, 6-diethylphenyl)aminocarbonyl-methyl)-pyrrolidine-3R-carboxy lic acid (A-192621; 20 mg/kg, i.p.), did not significantly alter tactile allodynia thresholds in streptozotocin-treated rats. Although combined i.p. administration

  12. (+)-Borneol attenuates oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic hyperalgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Hui; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Qi-Gang; Fang, Yun; Ge, Wei-Hong

    2016-02-10

    Common chemotherapeutic agents such as oxaliplatin often cause neuropathic pain during cancer treatment in patients. Such neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and responds poorly to common analgesics, which represents a clinical challenge. (+)-Borneol, a bicyclic monoterpene present in the essential oil of plants, is used for analgesia and anesthesia in traditional Chinese medicine. Although borneol has an antinociceptive effect on acute pain models, little is known about its effect on chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain and its mechanism. We found that (+)-borneol exerted remarkable antihyperalgesic effects in a mouse model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. In addition, (+)-borneol blocked the action of the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 agonist in mechanical and cold stimulus tests. Repeated treatment with (+)-borneol did not lead to the development of antinociceptive tolerance and did not affect body weight and locomotor activity. (+)-Borneol showed robust analgesic efficacy in mice with neuropathic pain by blocking transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 in the spinal cord and may be a useful analgesic in the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:26730517

  13. Nucleus accumbens dopaminergic neurotransmission switches its modulatory action in chronification of inflammatory hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Dias, Elayne Vieira; Sartori, César Renato; Marião, Paula Ramos; Vieira, André Schwambach; Camargo, Lilian Calili; Athie, Maria Carolina Pedro; Pagliusi, Marco Oreste; Tambeli, Claudia Herrera; Parada, Carlos Amilcar

    2015-10-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens, a central component of the mesolimbic system, has been associated with acute pain modulation. As there is a transition from acute to chronic pain ('chronification'), modulatory structures may be involved in chronic pain development. Thus, this study aimed to elucidate the role of nucleus accumbens dopaminergic neurotransmission in chronification of pain. We used a rat model in which daily subcutaneous injection of prostaglandin E2 in the hindpaw for 14 days induces a long-lasting state of nociceptor sensitization that lasts for at least 30 days following the end of the treatment. Our findings demonstrated that the increase of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens by local administration of GBR12909 (0.5 nmol/0.25 μL), a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, blocked prostaglandin E2 -induced acute hyperalgesia. This blockade was prevented by a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (raclopride, 10 nmol/0.25 μL) but not changed by a D1 receptor antagonist (SCH23390, 0.5, 3 or 10 nmol/0.25 μL), both co-administered with GBR12909 in the nucleus accumbens. In contrast, the induction of persistent hyperalgesia was facilitated by continuous infusion of GBR12909 in the nucleus accumbens (0.021 nmol/0.5 μL/h) over 7 days of prostaglandin E2 treatment. The development of persistent hyperalgesia was impaired by SCH23390 (0.125 nmol/0.5 μL/h) and raclopride (0.416 nmol/0.5 μL/h), both administered continuously in the nucleus accumbens over 7 days. Taken together, our data suggest that the chronification of pain involves the plasticity of dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens, which switches its modulatory role from antinociceptive to pronociceptive. PMID:26173870

  14. Role of C-fibers in pain and morphine induced analgesia/hyperalgesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Zahra; Behnam-Rassouli, Morteza; Hosseini, Shirin

    2014-01-01

    Background Usual dosage of morphine (10 mg/kg) induces analgesia and ultra-low dose (ULD) of morphine (1 µg/kg); hyperalgesia, and C-fibers are also bearing µ-opioid receptors; here the importance of C-fibers on pain and morphine induced analgesia/hyperalgesia is questioned and investigated using pain evaluation methods and infant capsaicin treating for C-fibers lesioning. Methods Wistar male rats (200-250 grams) were assigned to three categories i.e. control, sham (receiving neonatal capsaicin vehicle) and c-lesion (receiving neonatal capsaicin), each one with three groups (n=7). They were injected intraperitoneally with single dosage of saline, 10 mg/kg or 1 µg/kg morphine, respectively. Thermal pain threshold was evaluated using the tail flick test before and 30 minutes after the injections. Chemical pain was assessed using the formalin test (FT) 30 minutes after the administrations. Results Results indicated that thermal (P < 0.001) and chemical pains in both neurogenic and inflammatory phases of FT (P < 0.05) were reduced in C-lesion animals. In the C-normal and C-lesion animals, 10 mg/kg morphine exerted analgesia both in thermal (P < 0.001) and two phases of FT (P < 0.01), but it was more potent in C-lesion animals (P < 0.05). Although ULD of morphine in C-normal animals produced hyperalgesic effect in thermal and chemical pains (P < 0.001), in C-lesion animals, it produced analgesia (P < 0.05) at the neurogenic phase of FT. Conclusion Results can raise the C-fibers involvement for a significant portion of nociceptive transmission, because C-lesioning potentiated morphine induced analgesia and eliminated ULD of morphine induced hyperalgesia. Therefore C and Aδ fibers can be involved in morphine analgesia; while, just C-fibers are possibly responsible for only presynaptically hyperalgesic/excitatory action of ULD in morphine. PMID:24800043

  15. [PROPHYLAXIS OF POSTOPERATIVE HYPERALGESIA, BASED ON MORPHOLOGICAL SUBSTANTIATION OF THE ANALGESIA METHOD].

    PubMed

    Dmytriyev, D V; Konoplytskyi, V S

    2016-03-01

    The investigation was conducted in 20 children, operated on for abdominal oncological diseases in a 2010-2015 yrs period, using various methods of analgesia. While application of a constant infusion of high doses of phentanyl--1-4 MKr/(kg x h) in perioperative period the occurrence of the opiate-induced hyperalgesia is possible with the accompanied morphological changes in intestinal wall; in anesthesia of a transverse abdominal muscle (a TAP-blockade) and combined spinal epidural analgesia such changes were not observed. PMID:27514091

  16. Blockade of hyperalgesia and neurogenic oedema by topical application of nitroglycerin.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, S H; Lorenzetti, B B; Faccioli, L H

    1992-07-01

    Surprisingly, a single topical application of a nitroglycerin (NTG) gel in humans has been shown to cause analgesia and to reduce oedema in thrombophlebitis. In the present investigation, we showed that the NTG gel reduces prostaglandin E2-induced hyperalgesia and blocks neurogenic inflammation induced in rat skin by antidromic electrical stimulation of the saphenous nerve. These results offer an explanation for the effects of topical application of NTG observed in thrombophlebitis, which may be common to other cutaneous pathologies. The data also support the development of nitrates the effects of which are restricted to the site of application. PMID:1425939

  17. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Leandro F. S.; Godin, Adriana M.; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C. S.; Machado, Renes R.; Maier, Steven F.; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P.; Fiebich, Bernd L.; Watkins, Linda R.; Coelho, Márcio M.; Moraes, Márcio F. D.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline’s positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline’s antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca2+; Mg2+) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100 mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75, 47.50 or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca2+ chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca2+ chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines. PMID:23523650

  18. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Godin, Adriana M; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C S; Machado, Renes R; Maier, Steven F; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P; Fiebich, Bernd L; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2013-05-24

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline's positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline's antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca(2+); Mg(2+)) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75 mg/kg, 47.50mg/kg or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca(2+) chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca(2+) chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines. PMID:23523650

  19. Effect of resiniferatoxin on the noxious heat threshold temperature in the rat: a novel heat allodynia model sensitive to analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Almási, Róbert; Pethö, Gábor; Bölcskei, Kata; Szolcsányi, János

    2003-01-01

    An increasing-temperature hot plate (ITHP) was introduced to measure the noxious heat threshold (45.3±0.3°C) of unrestrained rats, which was reproducible upon repeated determinations at intervals of 5 or 30 min or 1 day. Morphine, diclofenac and paracetamol caused an elevation of the noxious heat threshold following i.p. pretreatment, the minimum effective doses being 3, 10 and 200 mg kg−1, respectively. Unilateral intraplantar injection of the VR1 receptor agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX, 0.048 nmol) induced a profound drop of heat threshold to the innocuous range with a maximal effect (8–10°C drop) 5 min after RTX administration. This heat allodynia was inhibited by pretreatment with morphine, diclofenac and paracetamol, the minimum effective doses being 1, 1 and 100 mg kg−1 i.p., respectively. The long-term sensory desensitizing effect of RTX was examined by bilateral intraplantar injection (0.048 nmol per paw) which produced, after an initial threshold drop, an elevation (up to 2.9±0.5°C) of heat threshold lasting for 5 days. The VR1 receptor antagonist iodo-resiniferatoxin (I-RTX, 0.05 nmol intraplantarly) inhibited by 51% the heat threshold-lowering effect of intraplantar RTX but not α,β-methylene-ATP (0.3 μmol per paw). I-RTX (0.1 or 1 nmol per paw) failed to alter the heat threshold either acutely (5–60 min) or on the long-term (5 days). The heat threshold of VR1 receptor knockout mice was not different from that of wild-type animals (45.6±0.5 vs 45.2±0.4°C). In conclusion, the RTX-induced drop of heat threshold measured by the ITHP is a novel heat allodynia model exhibiting a high sensitivity to analgesics. PMID:12746222

  20. Trigeminal Pain Molecules, Allodynia, and Photosensitivity Are Pharmacologically and Genetically Modulated in a Model of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Daiutolo, Brittany V; Tyburski, Ashley; Clark, Shannon W; Elliott, Melanie B

    2016-04-15

    The pain-signaling molecules, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), are implicated in the pathophysiology of post-traumatic headache (PTH) as they are for migraine. This study assessed the changes of inducible NOS (iNOS) and its cellular source in the trigeminal pain circuit, as well as the relationship between iNOS and CGRP after controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury in mice. The effects of a CGRP antagonist (MK8825) and sumatriptan on iNOS messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were compared to vehicle at 2 weeks postinjury. Changes in CGRP levels in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) in iNOS knockouts with CCI were compared to wild-type (WT) mice at 3 days and 2 weeks post injury. Trigeminal allodynia and photosensitivity were measured. MK8825 and sumatriptan increased allodynic thresholds in CCI groups compared to vehicle (p < 0.01), whereas iNOS knockouts were not different from WT. Photosensitivity was attenuated in MK8825 mice and iNOS knockouts compared to WT (p < 0.05). MK8825 and sumatriptan reduced levels of iNOS mRNA and iNOS immunoreactivity in the TNC and ganglia (p < 0.01). Differences in iNOS cellular localization were found between the trigeminal ganglia and TNC. Although the knockout of iNOS attenuated CGRP at 3 days (p < 0.05), it did not reduce CGRP at 2 weeks. CGRP immunoreactivity was found in the meningeal layers post-CCI, while negligible in controls. Findings support the importance of interactions between CGRP and iNOS in mediating allodynia, as well as the individual roles in photosensitivity. Mitigating prolonged increases in CGRP may be a promising intervention for treating acute PTH. PMID:26472135

  1. MKK3, an upstream activator of p38, contributes to formalin phase 2 and late allodynia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Linda S; Boyle, David; Hammaker, Deepa; Herman, David; Vail, Emily; Firestein, Gary S

    2009-01-01

    Spinal p38 MAP kinase plays a key role in chronic pain behavior. However, clinical development of p38 inhibitors has been hindered by significant toxicity. To evaluate alternative strategies of p38 regulation, we determined if known upstream activators of p38 (MKK3 and MKK6), are involved in development and maintenance of pain and spinal p38 phosphorylation. Acute pain behaviors were not altered in MKK3 or MKK6 deficient mice. The phase 2 formalin response was delayed in MKK3−/− mice, but unchanged in magnitude, while the response remained normal in MKK6−/− mice. More striking, late formalin allodynia (3 to 18 days post-injection) was prominent in wild type and MKK6−/− mice, but was delayed for several days in MKK3−/− mice. In wild type, but not MKK3−/− mice, intraplantar formalin elicited increases in ipsilateral spinal MKK3/6 phosphorylation acutely and again at 9 days post injection. Phosphorylation of MKK3/6 correlated with phase 2 formalin behavior. Wild type and MKK3−/− mice both expressed increases in spinal phosphorylated p38, however in WT mice this response began several days earlier, and was of higher magnitude and duration than in MKK3−/− mice. This phosphorylation correlated with the late allodynia. Phosphorylated MKK3/6 was detected only in astrocytes, given that P-p38 is usually not seen in astrocytes this argues for astrocytic release of soluble mediators that affect p38 phosphorylation in microglia. Taking these data together, MKK3, but not MKK6, is necessary for normal development of chronic pain behavior and phosphorylation of spinal p38. PMID:19427893

  2. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Mutant and Null Mice Retain Morphine-Induced Tolerance, Hyperalgesia, and Physical Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Theresa Alexandra; Leduc-Pessah, Heather; Skelhorne-Gross, Graham; Nicol, Christopher J. B.; Milne, Brian; Trang, Tuan; Cahill, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system modulates opioid-induced effects within the central nervous system and one target that has received considerable attention is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, we examined the contribution of TLR4 in the development of morphine tolerance, hyperalgesia, and physical dependence in two inbred mouse strains: C3H/HeJ mice which have a dominant negative point mutation in the Tlr4 gene rendering the receptor non-functional, and B10ScNJ mice which are TLR4 null mutants. We found that neither acute antinociceptive response to a single dose of morphine, nor the development of analgesic tolerance to repeated morphine treatment, was affected by TLR4 genotype. Likewise, opioid induced hyperalgesia and opioid physical dependence (assessed by naloxone precipitated withdrawal) were not altered in TLR4 mutant or null mice. We also examined the behavioural consequence of two stereoisomers of naloxone: (−) naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, and (+) naloxone, a purported antagonist of TLR4. Both stereoisomers of naloxone suppressed opioid induced hyperalgesia in wild-type control, TLR4 mutant, and TLR4 null mice. Collectively, our data suggest that TLR4 is not required for opioid-induced analgesic tolerance, hyperalgesia, or physical dependence. PMID:24824631

  3. Sex Difference in Oxytocin-Induced Anti-Hyperalgesia at the Spinal Level in Rats with Intraplantar Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chow, Lok-Hi; Chen, Yuan-Hao; Wu, Wan-Chuan; Chang, En-Pei; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated intrathecal administration of oxytocin strongly induced anti-hyperalgesia in male rats. By using an oxytocin-receptor antagonist (atosiban), the descending oxytocinergic pathway was found to regulate inflammatory hyperalgesia in our previous study using male rats. The activity of this neural pathway is elevated during hyperalgesia, but whether this effect differs in a sex-dependent manner remains unknown. We conducted plantar tests on adult male and female virgin rats in which paw inflammation was induced using carrageenan. Exogenous (i.t.) application of oxytocin exerted no anti-hyperalgesic effect in female rats, except at an extremely high dose. Female rats exhibited similar extent of hyperalgesia to male rats did when the animals received the same dose of carrageenan. When atosiban was administered alone, the severity of hyperalgesia was not increased in female rats. Moreover, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) was expressed at higher levels in the spinal cords of female rats compared with those of male rats. Oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia exhibits a sex-dependent difference in rats. This difference can partially result from the higher expression of IRAP in the spinal cords of female rats, because IRAP functions as an enzyme that degrades oxytocin. Our study confirms the existence of a sex difference in oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia at the spinal level in rats. PMID:27606886

  4. Goshajinkigan reduces oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy without affecting anti-tumour efficacy in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Soichiro; Egashira, Nobuaki; Sada, Hikaru; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Shirahama, Masafumi; Masuguchi, Ken; Oishi, Ryozo

    2012-06-01

    Oxaliplatin is a key drug in the treatment of colorectal cancer, but it causes acute and chronic neuropathies in patients. Goshajinkigan (GJG) is a Kampo medicine that is used for the treatments of several neurological symptoms including pain and numbness. More recently, GJG has been reported to prevent the oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in clinical studies. No experimental study, however, has been conducted to date to determine the effect of GJG on pain behaviour in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Moreover, the impact on the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin remains unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of GJG on the peripheral neuropathy and anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin in rodents. Repeated administration of oxaliplatin caused cold hyperalgesia from days 3 to 37 and mechanical allodynia from days 21 to 28. Repeated administration of GJG prevented the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia and axonal degeneration in rat sciatic nerve. Single administration of GJG reduced both cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after the development of neuropathy. In addition, GJG did not affect the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin in the tumour cells or tumour cells-implanted mice. These results suggest that GJG relieves the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia without affecting anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin, and, therefore, may be useful for the oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in clinical practice. PMID:21907570

  5. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH): a real clinical problem or just an experimental phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; Suzan, Erica; Pud, Dorit

    2015-03-01

    Although opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is mentioned as a potential cause of opioid dose escalation without adequate analgesia, true evidence in support of this notion is relatively limited. Most studies conducted in the context of acute and experimental pain, which seemingly demonstrated evidence for OIH, actually might have measured other phenomena such as acute opioid withdrawal or tolerance. OIH studies in patients with chronic pain have used various experimental pain models (such as cold pain tolerance or heat pain intensity). Therefore, the fact that they have yielded inconsistent results is hard to interpret. Thus far, with the exception of a few clinical case reports on OIH in patients with cancer pain and one prospective study in patients with chronic neuropathic pain, evidence for OIH in patients with chronic or cancer-related pain is lacking. Whether experimental pain models are necessary for establishing the clinical diagnosis of OIH, and which specific model is preferred, are yet to be determined. PMID:25128284

  6. BK channels in microglia are required for morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Zhang, Jing; Satoh, Yasushi; Meredith, Andrea L; Nakata, Takahiro; Wu, Zhou; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Although morphine is a gold standard medication, long-term opioid use is associated with serious side effects, such as morphine-induced hyperalgesia (MIH) and anti-nociceptive tolerance. Microglia-to-neuron signalling is critically involved in pain hypersensitivity. However, molecules that control microglial cellular state under chronic morphine treatment remain unknown. Here we show that the microglia-specific subtype of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel is responsible for generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance. We find that, after chronic morphine administration, an increase in arachidonic acid levels through the μ-opioid receptors leads to the sole activation of microglial BK channels in the spinal cord. Silencing BK channel auxiliary β3 subunit significantly attenuates the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance, and increases neurotransmission after chronic morphine administration. Therefore, microglia-specific BK channels contribute to the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance. PMID:27241733

  7. BK channels in microglia are required for morphine-induced hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Zhang, Jing; Satoh, Yasushi; Meredith, Andrea L.; Nakata, Takahiro; Wu, Zhou; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Although morphine is a gold standard medication, long-term opioid use is associated with serious side effects, such as morphine-induced hyperalgesia (MIH) and anti-nociceptive tolerance. Microglia-to-neuron signalling is critically involved in pain hypersensitivity. However, molecules that control microglial cellular state under chronic morphine treatment remain unknown. Here we show that the microglia-specific subtype of Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is responsible for generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance. We find that, after chronic morphine administration, an increase in arachidonic acid levels through the μ-opioid receptors leads to the sole activation of microglial BK channels in the spinal cord. Silencing BK channel auxiliary β3 subunit significantly attenuates the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance, and increases neurotransmission after chronic morphine administration. Therefore, microglia-specific BK channels contribute to the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance. PMID:27241733

  8. Neonatal stress from limited bedding elicits visceral hyperalgesia in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yumei; Wang, Zhuo; Mayer, Emeran A; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2015-01-01

    Early life stress is a risk factor for developing functional pain disorders. The 'limited bedding' (LB) model elicits psychological stress in the dam and her pups by providing minimal nesting material following delivery. Little is known about the effects of LB on visceral pain. Rats (female, male) were exposed to LB on postnatal days 2-9. Electromyographic visceromotor responses were recorded at the age of 11-12 weeks during titrated colorectal distension. LB exposure resulted in significant visceral hyperalgesia in both sexes. Sex differences were demonstrated only in nonstressed controls, with females showing a greater visceromotor response. Our results prepare the way for use of the LB model in studying the development of visceral pain in adults with functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25426824

  9. Nocebo hyperalgesia: contributions of social observation and body-related cognitive styles

    PubMed Central

    Vögtle, Elisabeth; Kröner-Herwig, Birgit; Barke, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recently, it has been shown that nocebo hyperalgesia can be acquired through observational learning. The aim of this study was to investigate socially induced nocebo hyperalgesia and its relationship with pain catastrophizing, somatic complaints, hypochondriacal concerns, and empathy. Participants and methods Ninety-seven women (43.1±15.5 years) were randomly assigned to one of the two conditions. Participants in the nocebo condition (NC) watched a video in which a female model displayed more pain when an ointment was applied and less pain when no ointment was applied. In the control condition (CC), the model demonstrated low pain with and without the ointment. Subsequently, all participants received three pressure pain stimuli (60 seconds) on each hand. On one hand, the ointment was applied prior to the stimulation. The order of the stimulation of the fingers (middle, index, or ring finger), the side of ointment application (left or right hand), and the side with which the stimulation began were randomized within each group and balanced across the groups. Depending on the randomization, the pressure pain application started with or without ointment and on the left or right hand. Pain ratings on a numerical rating scale (0–10) were collected. In addition, the participants completed questionnaires regarding body-related cognitive styles and empathy. Results There was a significant difference in the pain ratings between the CC and the NC. The effect of ointment application was also significant, but no interaction between condition and ointment application was found. Only in the CC did the nocebo response correlate with hypochondriacal concerns and somatic complaints. Conclusion Application of an ointment as well as the observation of a model demonstrating more pain after a treatment produced elevated pain ratings. Cognitive styles were not related to the socially induced nocebo response, but were related to the nocebo response in the CC. PMID:27175092

  10. Increased VGLUT3 involved in visceral hyperalgesia in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Qing; Duan, Li-Ping; Qiao, Pei-Tang; Zhao, Li; Guo, Li-Li

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the activity of vesicular glutamate transporter-3 (VGLUT3) in a visceral hyperalgesia rat model of irritable bowel syndrome, and the role of mast cells (MCs). METHODS: Transient intestinal infection was induced by oral administration of Trichinella spiralis larvae in rats. On the 100th day post-infection (PI), the rats were divided into an acute cold restraint stress (ACRS) group and a non-stressed group. Age-matched untreated rats served as controls. The abdominal withdrawal reflex was used to measure the visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD). The expression levels of VGLUT3 in peripheral and central neurons were analyzed by immunofluorescence and western blotting. RESULTS: VGLUT3 expression in the L6S1 dorsal root ganglion cells was significantly higher in the PI group than in the control group (0.32 ± 0.009 vs 0.22 ± 0.008, P < 0.01), and there was no significant difference in the expression of VGLUT3 between MC-deficient rats and their normal wild-type littermates. Immunofluorescence showed that the expression levels of VGLUT3 in PI + ACRS rats were enhanced in the prefrontal cortex of the brain compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: VGLUT3 is involved in the pathogenesis of visceral hyperalgesia. Coexpression of c-fos, 5-hydroxytryptamine and VGLUT3 after CRD was observed in associated neuronal pathways. Increased VGLUT3 induced by transient intestinal infection was found in peripheral nerves, and was independent of MCs. Moreover, the expression of VGLUT3 was enhanced in the prefrontal cortex in rats with induced infection and stress. PMID:25780293

  11. Effects of symptomatic treatments on cutaneous hyperalgesia and laser evoked potentials during migraine attack.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Losito, L; Libro, G; Guido, M; Di Fruscolo, O; Sardaro, M; Sciruicchio, V; Lamberti, P; Livrea, P

    2005-05-01

    Previously an amplitude enhancement of laser evoked potentials (LEPs) was detected during migraine attack: we further examined pain threshold to CO2 laser stimuli and LEPs during attacks, evaluating the effect of almotriptan, lysine-acetylsalicylate and placebo treatment on cutaneous hyperalgesia to thermal stimuli delivered by CO2 laser and on LEP components. Eighteen patients suffering from migraine without aura were analysed. They were divided into three groups of six patients each, randomly assigned to lysine acetyl-salicylate, almotriptan or placebo treatments. The supraorbital zones and the dorsum of the hand were stimulated on both the symptomatic and not symptomatic side in all patients. The LEPs were recorded by 25 scalp electrodes. During attacks, the P2 wave was significantly enhanced; the amplitude of the P2 component obtained by the stimulation of the supraorbital zone during the attack on the side of the headache was significantly correlated with the intensity of pain and the frequency of headache. Both almotriptan and lysine acetyl-salicylate significantly reduced the P2 amplitude but they showed no effects on hyperalgesia to laser stimulation; headache relief following therapy was correlated with the reduction of the P2 amplitude. The cortical elaboration of laser-induced experimental pain seemed increased during migraine attack, and the severity of headache was mainly related to the increase of the later LEPs components expressing the attentive and emotive compounds of suffering. Reversion of this process appeared to be primarily responsible for the efficacy of drugs in treating migraine, though both almotriptan and lysine-acetil salicilate seemed to have no effect in reducing sensitization at second and third order nociceptive neurons. PMID:15839851

  12. Molecular Hydrogen Attenuates Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Masanori; Satoh, Yasushi; Otsubo, Yukiko; Kazama, Tomiei

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains intractable and the development of new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Accumulating evidence indicates that overproduction of oxidative stress is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, repeated intra-peritoneal or intrathecal injections of antioxidants are unsuitable for continuous use in therapy. Here we show a novel therapeutic method against neuropathic pain: drinking water containing molecular hydrogen (H2) as antioxidant. The effect of hydrogen on neuropathic pain was investigated using a partial sciatic nerve ligation model in mice. As indicators of neuropathic pain, temporal aspects of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were analysed for 3 weeks after ligation. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured using the von Frey test and the plantar test, respectively. When mice were allowed to drink water containing hydrogen at a saturated level ad libitum after ligation, both allodynia and hyperalgesia were alleviated. These symptoms were also alleviated when hydrogen was administered only for the induction phase (from day 0 to 4 after ligation). When hydrogen was administered only for the maintenance phase (from day 4 to 21 after ligation), hyperalgesia but not allodynia was alleviated. Immunohistochemical staining for the oxidative stress marker, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, showed that hydrogen administration suppressed oxidative stress induced by ligation in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion, oral administration of hydrogen water may be useful for alleviating neuropathic pain in a clinical setting. PMID:24941001

  13. Distinct TRPV1- and TRPA1-based mechanisms underlying enhancement of oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain by 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kiichiro; Ono, Kentaro; Hitomi, Suzuro; Ito, Misa; Nodai, Tomotaka; Goto, Tetsuya; Harano, Nozomu; Watanabe, Seiji; Inoue, Hiromasa; Miyano, Kanako; Uezono, Yasuhito; Matoba, Motohiro; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2016-05-01

    In many patients with cancer, chemotherapy-induced severe oral ulcerative mucositis causes intractable pain, leading to delays and interruptions in therapy. However, the pain mechanism in oral ulcerative mucositis after chemotherapy has not been extensively studied. In this study, we investigated spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia in a preclinical model of oral ulcerative mucositis after systemic administration of the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil, using our proprietary pain assay system for conscious rats. 5-Fluorouracil caused leukopenia but did not induce pain-related behaviors. After 5-fluorouracil administration, oral ulcers were developed with topical acetic acid treatment. Compared with saline-treated rats, 5-fluorouracil-exposed rats showed more severe mucositis with excessive bacterial loading due to a lack of leukocyte infiltration, as well as enhancements of spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia. Antibacterial drugs, the lipid A inhibitor polymyxin B and the TRPV1/TRPA1 channel pore-passing anesthetic QX-314, suppressed both the spontaneous pain and the mechanical allodynia. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin and the TRPV1 antagonist SB-366791 inhibited the spontaneous pain, but not the mechanical allodynia. In contrast, the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 and the N-formylmethionine receptor FPR1 antagonist Boc MLF primarily suppressed the mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that 5-fluorouracil-associated leukopenia allows excessive oral bacterial infection in the oral ulcerative region, resulting in the enhancement of spontaneous pain through continuous TRPV1 activation and cyclooxygenase pathway, and mechanical allodynia through mechanical sensitization of TRPA1 caused by neuronal effects of bacterial toxins. These distinct pain mechanisms explain the difficulties encountered with general treatments for oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain in patients with cancer and suggest more effective approaches. PMID:26808144

  14. MDA7: a novel selective agonist for CB2 receptors that prevents allodynia in rat neuropathic pain models

    PubMed Central

    Naguib, M; Diaz, P; Xu, J J; Astruc-Diaz, F; Craig, S; Vivas-Mejia, P; Brown, D L

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is growing interest in using cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor agonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain. In this report, we describe the pharmacological characteristics of MDA7 (1-[(3-benzyl-3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1-benzofuran-6-yl)carbonyl]piperidine), a novel CB2 receptor agonist. Experimental approach: We characterized the pharmacological profile of MDA7 by using radioligand-binding assays and in vitro functional assays at human cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors. In vitro functional assays were performed at rat CB1 and CB2 receptors. The effects of MDA7 in reversing neuropathic pain were assessed in spinal nerve ligation and paclitaxel-induced neuropathy models in rats. Key results: MDA7 exhibited selectivity and agonist affinity at human and rat CB2 receptors. MDA7 treatment attenuated tactile allodynia produced by spinal nerve ligation or by paclitaxel in a dose-related manner. These effects were selectively antagonized by a CB2 receptor antagonist but not by CB1 or opioid receptor antagonists. MDA7 did not affect rat locomotor activity. Conclusion and implications: MDA7, a novel selective CB2 agonist, was effective in suppressing neuropathic nociception in two rat models without affecting locomotor behaviour. These results confirm the potential for CB2 agonists in the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:18846037

  15. Persistent changes in spinal cord gene expression after recovery from inflammatory hyperalgesia: A preliminary study on pain memory

    PubMed Central

    Yukhananov, Rustam; Kissin, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous studies found that rats subjected to carrageenan injection develop hyperalgesia, and despite complete recovery in several days, they continue to have an enhanced hyperalgesic response to a new noxious challenge for more than 28d. The study's aim was to identify candidate genes that have a role in the formation of the long-term hyperalgesia-related imprint in the spinal cord. This objective was undertaken with the understanding that the long-lasting imprint of acute pain in the central nervous system may contribute to the transition of acute pain to chronicity. Results To analyze changes in gene expression when carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia has disappeared but propensity for the enhanced hyperalgesic response is still present, we determined the gene expression profile using oligo microarray in the lumbar part of the spinal cord in three groups of rats: 28d after carrageenan injection, 24h after injection (the peak of inflammation), and with no injection (control group). Out of 17,000 annotated genes, 356 were found to be differentially expressed compared with the control group at 28d, and 329 at 24h after carrageenan injection (both groups at p < 0.01). Among differentially expressed genes, 67 (39 in 28d group) were identified as being part of pain-related pathways, altered in different models of pain, or interacting with proteins involved in pain-related pathways. Using gene ontology (GO) classification, we have identified 3 functional classes deserving attention for possible association with pain memory: They are related to cell-to-cell interaction, synaptogenesis, and neurogenesis. Conclusion Despite recovery from inflammatory hyperalgesia, persistent changes in spinal cord gene expression may underlie the propensity for the enhanced hyperalgesic response. We suggest that lasting changes in expression of genes involved in the formation of new synapses and neurogenesis may contribute to the transition of acute pain to chronicity. PMID

  16. Chronic pain in patients with the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: evidence for generalized hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Rombaut, Lies; Scheper, Mark; De Wandele, Inge; De Vries, Janneke; Meeus, Mira; Malfait, Fransiska; Engelbert, Raoul; Calders, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Chronic widespread pain is highly present in patients with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT), but up to now, evidence for generalized hyperalgesia is lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate whether pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at both symptomatic and asymptomatic body areas differ in EDS-HT patients compared to healthy subjects. Twenty-three women with EDS-HT and 23 gender- and age-matched healthy controls participated. All subjects marked on Margolis Pain Diagram where they felt pain lasting longer than 24 h in the past 4 weeks. Then, they completed several questionnaires assessing pain cognitions, fatigue, disability, and general health status, in order to take the possible influence of these factors on PPTs into account. Patients also completed a form concerning the type of pain they experienced. Thereupon, a blinded researcher assessed PPTs at 14 body locations on the trunk and extremities. PPTs were compared for the two complete groups. In addition, PPTs of patients and controls who did not report pain in a respective zone were compared. PPTs of the patients were significantly lower compared to those of the control group, also when pain-free samples per zone were compared. The mean (SD) PPT was 2.9 (1.62) kg/cm(2) in the EDS-HT patients and 5.2 (1.88) kg/cm(2) in the controls (P < 0.001). No confounding factors responsible for the observed differences could be revealed. In half of the patient group, a predominantly neuropathic pain component was likely present. This study provides evidence for the existence of hyperalgesia even in asymptomatic areas (generalized secondary hyperalgesia). The generalized hyperalgesia may represent the involvement of a sensitized central nervous system, which inquires an adapted pain management for this patient group. PMID:24487572

  17. A novel p38 MAPK docking groove-targeted compound is a potent inhibitor of inflammatory hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Willemen, Hanneke L.D.M.; Campos, Pedro M.; Lucas, Elisa; Morreale, Antonio; Gil-Redondo, Rubén; Agut, Juan; González, Florenci V.; Ramos, Paula; Heijnen, Cobi; Mayor, Federico; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Murga, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 is an important mediator of inflammation and of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We recently described that docking-groove dependent interactions are important for p38 MAPK-mediated signal transduction. Thus, virtual screening was performed to identify putative docking groove-targeted p38 MAPK inhibitors. Several compounds of the benzooxadiazol family were identified with low micromolar inhibitory activity both in a p38 MAPK activity assay, and in THP-1 human monocytes acting as inhibitors of LPS-induced TNFα secretion. Positions 2 and 5 in the phenyl ring are essential for the described inhibitory activity with a chloride in position 5 and a methyl-group in position 2 yielding the best results with an IC50 of 1.8 μM (FGA-19 compound). Notably, FGA-19 exerted a potent and long-lasting analgesic effect in vivo when tested in a mouse model of inflammatory hyperalgesia. A single intrathecal injection of FGA-19 completely resolved hyperalgesia, being ten times as potent and displaying longer lasting effects than the established p38 MAPK inhibitor SB239063. FGA-19 also reversed persistent pain in a model of post-inflammatory hyperalgesia (in LysM-GRK2+/− mice). These potent in vivo effects put forward p38 MAPK docking-site targeted inhibitors as a potential novel strategy for the treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:24517375

  18. Coadministration of indomethacin and minocycline attenuates established paclitaxel-induced neuropathic thermal hyperalgesia: Involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Parvathy, Subramanian S.; Masocha, Willias

    2015-01-01

    Taxanes such as paclitaxel, which are chemotherapeutic drugs, cause dose-dependent painful neuropathy in some patients. We investigated whether coadministration of minocycline and indomethacin produces antinociceptive effects in mice with paclitaxel-induced neuropathic thermal hyperalgesia and if the cannabinoid system is involved. Previously, we reported that coadministration of these two drugs results in antinociception against inflammatory pain at doses where either drug alone lack significant activity. In the current study, we observed that treatment of female mice with indomethacin or minocycline alone did not affect established paclitaxel-induced thermal hyperalgesia, whereas coadministration of the two drugs attenuated it. In male mice indomethacin had some antihyperalgesic activity, whilst minocycline did not. Coadministration of the two drugs had supraadditive antihyperalgesic activity in male mice. Administration of a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM 251 blocked the antihyperalgesic effects of the combination of minocycline and indomethacin in both male and female mice. In conclusion our results indicate that coadministration of minocycline and indomethacin abrogates established paclitaxel-induced neuropathic thermal hyperalgesia in mice, and the potentiation of the antinociceptive effects of this combination involves the cannabinoid system. PMID:26085115

  19. Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Resveratrol During Inflammatory Hyperalgesia via Differential Regulation of pro-Inflammatory Mediators.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajeet Kumar; Vinayak, Manjula

    2016-07-01

    Sensitization of nociceptive neurons by inflammatory mediators leads to hypersensitivity for normal painful stimuli which is termed hyperalgesia. Oxidative stress is an essential factor in pathological pain; therefore, antioxidants qualify as potential anti-hyperalgesic agents. The present study examines the efficacy of the natural antioxidant resveratrol in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced hyperalgesic rats. Thermal hyperalgesia was measured at different time points by paw withdrawal latency test and confirmed by c-Fos expression in spinal dorsal horn. The impact of resveratrol treatment on inflammatory mediators at peripheral (paw skin) and central (spinal cord) sites was determined during early (6 h) as well as late phase (48 h) of hyperalgesia. Intraplanter injection of CFA increased the level of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 as well as inflammatory enzymes COX-2 and iNOS in paw skin in both phases. In case of spinal cord, the level of COX-2 was found to be elevated in both phases, whereas iNOS could not be detected. The cytokines were found to be elevated only in late phase in spinal cord. Administration of resveratrol (20 mg/kg) shifted the level of all inflammatory mediators towards normal, except cytokines in paw skin. The present study suggests that the anti-nociceptive effect of resveratrol is implicated at both peripheral and central sites in a tissue specific manner. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27060370

  20. Coadministration of indomethacin and minocycline attenuates established paclitaxel-induced neuropathic thermal hyperalgesia: Involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Parvathy, Subramanian S; Masocha, Willias

    2015-01-01

    Taxanes such as paclitaxel, which are chemotherapeutic drugs, cause dose-dependent painful neuropathy in some patients. We investigated whether coadministration of minocycline and indomethacin produces antinociceptive effects in mice with paclitaxel-induced neuropathic thermal hyperalgesia and if the cannabinoid system is involved. Previously, we reported that coadministration of these two drugs results in antinociception against inflammatory pain at doses where either drug alone lack significant activity. In the current study, we observed that treatment of female mice with indomethacin or minocycline alone did not affect established paclitaxel-induced thermal hyperalgesia, whereas coadministration of the two drugs attenuated it. In male mice indomethacin had some antihyperalgesic activity, whilst minocycline did not. Coadministration of the two drugs had supraadditive antihyperalgesic activity in male mice. Administration of a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM 251 blocked the antihyperalgesic effects of the combination of minocycline and indomethacin in both male and female mice. In conclusion our results indicate that coadministration of minocycline and indomethacin abrogates established paclitaxel-induced neuropathic thermal hyperalgesia in mice, and the potentiation of the antinociceptive effects of this combination involves the cannabinoid system. PMID:26085115

  1. Contribution of mast cells and snake venom metalloproteinases to the hyperalgesia induced by Bothrops jararaca venom in rats.

    PubMed

    Bonavita, André Gustavo C; da Costa, Aline S; Pires, Ana Lucia A; Neves-Ferreira, Ana G C; Perales, Jonas; Cordeiro, Renato S B; Martins, Marco A; e Silva, Patrícia M R

    2006-06-15

    Bothrops jararaca venom (Bjv) is known to induce local inflammation and severe pain. Since, mast cells are able to secrete mediators involved in algesic processes, in this study we examined the putative role of these cells in the hyperalgesia triggered by Bjv in the rat paw. We noted that treatment with mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglicate as well as with histamine and 5-hydroxytriptamine receptor antagonists meclizine and methysergide, respectively, inhibited the Bjv-induced hyperalgesia. In addition, we showed that stimulation of isolated rat peritoneal mast cells with Bjv in vitro resulted in the release of stored and neo-generated inflammatory mediators such as histamine and leukotriene C(4), respectively. Bjv-induced histamine secretion was clearly sensitive to treatment with sodium cromoglicate and sodium nedocromil. We further observed that metalloproteinase inhibitors 1,10-phenantroline and DM43 inhibited mast cell degranulation in vitro, under conditions where inhibitors of phospholipase A(2) as well as of serine- and cysteine-proteinases were inactive. Altogether, our findings indicate that mast cells seem to contribute to the hyperalgesia caused by Bjv in the rat paw, and also provide evidence that this response might be dependent on the ability of the Bjv to activate directly mast cells. PMID:16730041

  2. Experimental tooth clenching. A model for studying mechanisms of muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    ) participated in two sessions at a minimum interval of 1 wk. Microdialysis was done to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to measure masseter muscle blood flow. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth clenching task (50% of MVCF) or a control session (no clenching). Pain intensity was measured throughout the experiment. Substance levels and blood flow were unaltered at all time points between sessions, and between genders in each session. Pain intensity was significantly higher after clenching in the clenching session compared to the same time point in the control session. In (IV), 15 patients with M-TMD and 15 healthy controls participated in one session and the methodology described above was used. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT and significantly lower blood flows than healthy controls. No significant differences for any substance at any time point were observed between groups. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity. Qu-ATEBS, the 7-item evidence-based quality assessment tool, is reliable, exhibits face-validity, and has excellent discriminative validity. Tooth clenching was associated with pain, fatigue, and short-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia, but not with proprioceptive allodynia. It seems that tooth clenching is not directly related to delayed onset muscle soreness. In healthy subjects and in patients with M-TMD, levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate were unaltered after tooth clenching. But 5-HT levels were significantly higher and blood flows significantly lower in M-TMD patients than in healthy controls at all time points. These two factors may facilitate the release, and enhance the effects, of other algesic substances that may cause pain. PMID:23631112

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reversed Morphine Tolerance and Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhen; Liu, LiPing; Shen, Jun; Cheng, Katherine; Liu, Aijun; Yang, Jing; Wang, Lina; Qu, Tingyu; Yang, HongNa; Li, Yan; Wu, Haiyan; Narouze, John; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    More than 240 million opioid prescriptions are dispensed annually to treat pain in the US. The use of opioids is commonly associated with opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which limit efficacy and compromise safety. The dearth of effective way to prevent or treat OT and OIH is a major medical challenge. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate OT and OIH in rats and mice based on the understanding that MSCs possess remarkable anti-inflammatory properties and that both OT and chronic pain are associated with neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. We found that the development of OT and OIH was effectively prevented by either intravenous or intrathecal MSC transplantation (MSC-TP), which was performed before morphine treatment. Remarkably, established OT and OIH were significantly reversed by either intravenous or intrathecal MSCs when cells were transplanted after repeated morphine injections. The animals did not show any abnormality in vital organs or functions. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the treatments significantly reduced activation level of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord. We have thus demonstrated that MSC-TP promises to be a potentially safe and effective way to prevent and reverse two of the major problems of opioid therapy. PMID:27554341

  4. Hyperalgesia, anxiety, and decreased hypoxic neuroprotection in mice lacking the adenosine A1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B; Halldner, L; Dunwiddie, T V; Masino, S A; Poelchen, W; Giménez-Llort, L; Escorihuela, R M; Fernández-Teruel, A; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z; Xu, X J; Hårdemark, A; Betsholtz, C; Herlenius, E; Fredholm, B B

    2001-07-31

    Caffeine is believed to act by blocking adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors (A(1)R, A(2A)R), indicating that some A(1) receptors are tonically activated. We generated mice with a targeted disruption of the second coding exon of the A(1)R (A(1)R(-/-)). These animals bred and gained weight normally and had a normal heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature. In most behavioral tests they were similar to A(1)R(+/+) mice, but A(1)R(-/-) mice showed signs of increased anxiety. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices revealed that both adenosine-mediated inhibition and theophylline-mediated augmentation of excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission were abolished in A(1)R(-/-) mice. In A(1)R(+/-) mice the potency of adenosine was halved, as was the number of A(1)R. In A(1)R(-/-) mice, the analgesic effect of intrathecal adenosine was lost, and thermal hyperalgesia was observed, but the analgesic effect of morphine was intact. The decrease in neuronal activity upon hypoxia was reduced both in hippocampal slices and in brainstem, and functional recovery after hypoxia was attenuated. Thus A(1)Rs do not play an essential role during development, and although they significantly influence synaptic activity, they play a nonessential role in normal physiology. However, under pathophysiological conditions, including noxious stimulation and oxygen deficiency, they are important. PMID:11470917

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reversed Morphine Tolerance and Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zhen; Liu, LiPing; Shen, Jun; Cheng, Katherine; Liu, Aijun; Yang, Jing; Wang, Lina; Qu, Tingyu; Yang, HongNa; Li, Yan; Wu, Haiyan; Narouze, John; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    More than 240 million opioid prescriptions are dispensed annually to treat pain in the US. The use of opioids is commonly associated with opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which limit efficacy and compromise safety. The dearth of effective way to prevent or treat OT and OIH is a major medical challenge. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate OT and OIH in rats and mice based on the understanding that MSCs possess remarkable anti-inflammatory properties and that both OT and chronic pain are associated with neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. We found that the development of OT and OIH was effectively prevented by either intravenous or intrathecal MSC transplantation (MSC-TP), which was performed before morphine treatment. Remarkably, established OT and OIH were significantly reversed by either intravenous or intrathecal MSCs when cells were transplanted after repeated morphine injections. The animals did not show any abnormality in vital organs or functions. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the treatments significantly reduced activation level of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord. We have thus demonstrated that MSC-TP promises to be a potentially safe and effective way to prevent and reverse two of the major problems of opioid therapy. PMID:27554341

  6. Cav3.2-expressing low-threshold C fibres in human hairy skin contribute to cold allodynia--a non-TRPV1- and non-TRPM8-dependent phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Samour, Mohamad S; Nagi, Saad S; Mahns, David A

    2015-08-01

    It is generally agreed that cold allodynia is a consequence of impaired (Aδ-fibre-mediated) central inhibition of C-nociceptive inputs. However, it is also known that C polymodal nociceptors are not activated at innocuous low temperatures. Recently, we demonstrated the contribution of C-tactile fibres to tactile allodynia. In this study, we investigated whether this, or a related, C-fibre class contributes to cold allodynia. In 30 healthy and 3 chronic pain subjects, a series of normally innocuous localised thermal stimuli were applied to the skin overlying a painful tibialis anterior muscle (induced by infusion of hypertonic saline). The effects of thermal stimulation on muscle pain were observed before and after compression blockade of myelinated fibres. Furthermore, intradermal capsaicin, menthol and TTA-A2 were used for desensitisation of TRPV1, TRPM8, and T-type calcium (Cav3.2) channels, respectively. Before muscle pain, all thermal stimuli were reported as nonpainful regardless of whether myelinated fibres were conducting or not. During muscle pain, dynamic skin cooling (32°C → 20°C) evoked significant and reproducible increases in the overall pain intensity (allodynia). This increase was short lived and locked to the dynamic phase of cooling with pain levels returning to baseline during sustained cooling. Dynamic warming (32°C → 39°C) had no effect on pain levels. Cold allodynia persisted after nerve compression and TRPV1 and TRPM8 desensitisation but was abolished by localised Cav3.2 blockade. In clinical subjects, C-fibre-mediated allodynia was observed without the need for experimental pain-producing manipulations. In conclusion, cold allodynia represents a non-TRPV1- and non-TRPM8-dependent phenomenon, which is mediated by low-threshold Cav3.2-expressing C fibres. PMID:25932689

  7. Bradyzide, a potent non-peptide B2 bradykinin receptor antagonist with long-lasting oral activity in animal models of inflammatory hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Gillian M; Perkins, Martin N; Rang, Humphrey P; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Brown, Michael C; McIntyre, Peter; Urban, Laszlo; Dziadulewicz, Edward K; Ritchie, Timothy J; Hallett, Allan; Snell, Christopher R; Wrigglesworth, Roger; Lee, Wai; Davis, Clare; Phagoo, Steve B; Davis, Andrew J; Phillips, Elsa; Drake, Gillian S; Hughes, Glyn A; Dunstan, Andrew; Bloomfield, Graham C

    2000-01-01

    Bradyzide is from a novel class of rodent-selective non-peptide B2 bradykinin antagonists (1-(2-Nitrophenyl)thiosemicarbazides). Bradyzide has high affinity for the rodent B2 receptor, displacing [3H]-bradykinin binding in NG108-15 cells and in Cos-7 cells expressing the rat receptor with KI values of 0.51±0.18 nM (n=3) and 0.89±0.27 nM (n=3), respectively. Bradyzide is a competitive antagonist, inhibiting B2 receptor-induced 45Ca efflux from NG108-15 cells with a pKB of 8.0±0.16 (n=5) and a Schild slope of 1.05. In the rat spinal cord and tail preparation, bradyzide inhibits bradykinin-induced ventral root depolarizations (IC50 value; 1.6±0.05 nM (n=3)). Bradyzide is much less potent at the human than at the rodent B2 receptor, displacing [3H]-bradykinin binding in human fibroblasts and in Cos-7 cells expressing the human B2 receptor with KI values of 393±90 nM (n=3) and 772±144 nM (n=3), respectively. Bradyzide inhibits bradykinin-induced [3H]-inositol trisphosphate (IP3) formation with IC50 values of 11.6±1.4 nM (n=3) at the rat and 2.4±0.3 μM (n=3) at the human receptor. Bradyzide does not interact with a range of other receptors, including human and rat B1 bradykinin receptors. Bradyzide is orally available and blocks bradykinin-induced hypotension and plasma extravasation. Bradyzide shows long-lasting oral activity in rodent models of inflammatory hyperalgesia, reversing Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in the rat knee joint (ED50, 0.84 μmol kg−1; duration of action >4 h). It is equipotent with morphine and diclofenac, and 1000 times more potent than paracetamol, its maximal effect exceeding that of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Bradyzide does not exhibit tolerance when administered over 6 days. In summary, bradyzide is a potent, orally active, antagonist of the B2 bradykinin receptor, with selectivity for the rodent over the human receptor. PMID:10694205

  8. Atenolol Reduces Leishmania major-Induced Hyperalgesia and TNF-α Without Affecting IL-1β or Keratinocyte Derived Chemokines (KC).

    PubMed

    Karam, Marc C; Merckbawi, Rana; Salman, Sara; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Infection with a high dose of the intracellular parasitic protozoan Leishmania major induces a sustained hyperalgesia in susceptible BALB/c mice accompanied by up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6. Interleukin-13 (IL-13) has been shown to reduce this hyperalgesia (despite increased levels of IL-6) and the levels of IL-1β during and after the treatment period. These findings favor the cytokine cascade leading to the production of sympathetic amines (involving TNF-α and KC) over prostaglandins (involving IL-lβ and IL-6) as the final mediators of hyperalgesia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of daily treatment with the β-blockers atenolol on L. major-induced inflammation in mice with respect to hyperalgesia as well as the levels of TNF-α and KC (the analog of IL-8 in mice). Our data demonstrates that atenolol is able to reduce the L. major induced sustained peripheral hyperalgesia, which does not seem to involve a direct role for neither IL-lβ nor KC. Moreover, our results show that TNF-α may play a pivotal and direct role in sensitizing the peripheral nerve endings (nociceptors) since its level was reduced during the period of atenolol treatment, which correlates well with the reduction of the observed peripheral, but not central, hyperalgesia. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the cytokine cascade leading to hyperalgesia and may lead to the development of new and more efficient medications for many types of pain. PMID:26913003

  9. Atenolol Reduces Leishmania major-Induced Hyperalgesia and TNF-α Without Affecting IL-1β or Keratinocyte Derived Chemokines (KC)

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Marc C.; Merckbawi, Rana; Salman, Sara; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Infection with a high dose of the intracellular parasitic protozoan Leishmania major induces a sustained hyperalgesia in susceptible BALB/c mice accompanied by up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6. Interleukin-13 (IL-13) has been shown to reduce this hyperalgesia (despite increased levels of IL-6) and the levels of IL-1β during and after the treatment period. These findings favor the cytokine cascade leading to the production of sympathetic amines (involving TNF-α and KC) over prostaglandins (involving IL-lβ and IL-6) as the final mediators of hyperalgesia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of daily treatment with the β-blockers atenolol on L. major-induced inflammation in mice with respect to hyperalgesia as well as the levels of TNF-α and KC (the analog of IL-8 in mice). Our data demonstrates that atenolol is able to reduce the L. major induced sustained peripheral hyperalgesia, which does not seem to involve a direct role for neither IL-lβ nor KC. Moreover, our results show that TNF-α may play a pivotal and direct role in sensitizing the peripheral nerve endings (nociceptors) since its level was reduced during the period of atenolol treatment, which correlates well with the reduction of the observed peripheral, but not central, hyperalgesia. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the cytokine cascade leading to hyperalgesia and may lead to the development of new and more efficient medications for many types of pain. PMID:26913003

  10. Botulinum Toxin Type A for Cephalic Cutaneous Allodynia in Chronic Migraine: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hollanda, Luciano; Monteiro, Larissa; Melo, Ailton

    2014-01-01

    Cephalic allodynia (CA) can be observed in 50-70% of patients with chronic migraine (CM). The aim of this trial was to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (Botx-A) in the treatment of CA associated with CM. In this placebo-controlled trial, patients were randomized either into Botx-A or 0.9% saline injections and efficacy measures were assessed every 4 weeks for 3 months. Efficacy endpoints were number of migraine episodes associated with CA, changes from baseline in visual analogical scale scores for pain (VAS) and frequency of common analgesics use for migraine. A total of 38 subjects were randomized to saline (n=18) or Botx-A (n=20). There were no significant differences in baseline between active intervention or placebo groups regarding mean age, number of headache episodes [mean 12.1 (9.22) and 17.00 (9.69) respectively; P=0.12], pain severity as measured by the VAS or frequency of analgesic use for headache episodes. Efficacy analysis showed that Botx-A injections led to an important decrease from baseline in the mean migraine episodes associated with CA after 12 weeks (5.20 versus 11.17; P=0.01). Also, VAS scores and frequency of analgesics use for headache were significantly reduced in the Botx-A group. This study suggests that Botx-A injections are superior to saline in the treatment of CA associated with CM, with mild self limited side effects. PMID:25568735

  11. JCM-16021, a Chinese Herbal Formula, Attenuated Visceral Hyperalgesia in TNBS-Induced Postinflammatory Irritable Bowel Syndrome through Reducing Colonic EC Cell Hyperplasia and Serotonin Availability in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Hong-Yan; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Leung, Fung-Ping; Yang, Zhi-Jun; Wu, Justin C. Y.; Sung, Joseph J. Y.; Xu, Hong-Xi; Tong, Xu-Dong; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the analgesic effect of JCM-16021, a revised traditional Chinese herbal formula, on postinflammatory irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) in rats. The trinitrobenzene sulfonic (TNBS) acid-induced PI-IBS model rats were orally administrated with different doses of JCM-16021 (1.2, 2.4, and 4.8 g/kg/d) for 14 consecutive days. The results showed that JCM-16021 treatment dose-dependently attenuated visceral hyperalgesia in PI-IBS rats. Further, the colonic enterochromaffin (EC) cell number, serotonin (5-HT) content, tryptophan hydroxylase expression, and mechanical-stimuli-induced 5-HT release were significantly ameliorated. Moreover, the decreased levels of mucosal cytokines in PI-IBS, especially the helper T-cell type 1- (Th1-) related cytokine TNF-α, were also elevated after JCM-16021 treatment. These data demonstrate that the analgesic effect of JCM-16021 on TNBS-induced PI-IBS rats may be medicated via reducing colonic EC cell hyperplasia and 5-HT availability. PMID:22719782

  12. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with N(W)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It's effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  13. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with NW-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It’s effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  14. Pressure and Activity-Related Allodynia in Delayed-Onset Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Dannecker, Erin A.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Muscle pain from different activities was tested with the muscle pain expected to vary in ways that may clarify mechanisms of activity-induced exacerbation of myofascial pain. Methods Participants (N = 20; 45% women; 23 years old (SD = 2.09)) consented to participate in a six session protocol. Bilateral muscle pain ratings and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were collected before and for 4 days after lengthening (i.e., eccentric) muscle contractions were completed with the non-dominant elbow flexors to induce delayed-onset muscle pain. The muscle pain ratings were collected with the arms in several conditions (e.g., resting, moving, contracting in a static position) and PPTs were collected with the arms. Results In the ipsilateral arm, muscle pain ratings at rest and during activity significantly increased while PPTs significantly decreased after the eccentrics (η 2s = .17 – .54). The greatest increases in pain occurred during arm extension without applied load, in which there was more stretching but less force than isometrics. In the contralateral arm, neither muscle pain nor PPTs changed from baseline. Discussion These results resemble previous electrophysiology studies showing differential sensitization across stimuli and support that increased depth of information about aggravating activities from clinical patients is needed. PMID:20842023

  15. Animal models and pharmacology of herpetic and postherpetic pain.

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Yasushi; Sasaki, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella upon primary infection and subsequently becomes latent in the sensory ganglia. Reactivation of latent VZV in the sensory ganglion results in herpes zoster, which usually begins with pain and dysesthesia. Pain that persists long after healing of the rash is termed postherpetic neuralgia. VZV inoculation into rats induces mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia without causing herpes zoster. As with VZV, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) is an alphaherpesvirus. HSV1 also becomes latent in the sensory ganglia after primary infection, and reactivation of latent HSV1 in the sensory ganglion results in herpes simplex. HSV1 inoculation into mice causes zoster-like skin lesions together with mechanical allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia. A marked difference between the two rodent models is whether the herpes virus proliferates in the nervous system after inoculation. VZV-inoculated rats are useful for investigating mechanical allodynia induced by latent infection with herpes virus. HSV1-inoculated mice are useful for investigating mechanical allodynia induced by the proliferation of herpes virus in sensory neurons and for assessing the effects of acute herpetic pain on the incidence of postherpetic allodynia. PMID:24496651

  16. Fibronectin Inhibits Chronic Pain Development after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Shang; Lin, Vernon W.; Silver, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI) is a highly prevalent clinical condition that is difficult to treat. Using both von Frey filaments and radiant infrared heat to assess mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, respectively, we have demonstrated that a one-time injection of fibronectin (50 μg/mL) into the spinal dorsal column (1 μL/min each injection for a total of 5 μL) immediately after SCI inhibits the development of mechanical allodynia (but not thermal hyperalgesia) over an 8-month observation period following spinal cord dorsal column crush (DCC). DCC will only induce mechanical Allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia or overt motor deficits. By applying various fibronectin fragments as well as competitive inhibitors, these effects were shown to be dependent on the connecting segment-1 (CS-1) motif of fibronectin. Furthermore, we found that acute fibronectin treatment diminished inflammation and blood–spinal cord barrier permeability, which in turn leads to enhanced fiber sparing and sprouting. In particular, the reduction of serotonin (5-HT) in the superficial dorsal horn, an important descending brainstem system in the modulation of pain, was blocked with fibronectin treatment. We conclude that treatment of SCI with fibronectin preserves sensory regulation and prevents the development of chronic allodynia, providing a potential therapeutic intervention to treat chronic pain following SCI. PMID:22022865

  17. Galanin-Mediated Behavioural Hyperalgesia from the Dorsomedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Involves Two Independent Descending Pronociceptive Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Diana; Viisanen, Hanna; Wei, Hong; Almeida, Armando; Pertovaara, Antti; Pinto-Ribeiro, Filipa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) by galanin (GAL) induces behavioural hyperalgesia. Since DMH neurones do not project directly to the spinal cord, we hypothesized that the medullary dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt), a pronociceptive region projecting to the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) and/or the serotoninergic raphe-spinal pathway acting on the spinal 5-HT3 receptor (5HT3R) could relay descending nociceptive facilitation induced by GAL in the DMH. Heat-evoked paw-withdrawal latency (PWL) and activity of SDH neurones were assessed in monoarthritic (ARTH) and control (SHAM) animals after pharmacological manipulations of the DMH, DRt and spinal cord. The results showed that GAL in the DMH and glutamate in the DRt lead to behavioural hyperalgesia in both SHAM and ARTH animals, which is accompanied particularly by an increase in heat-evoked responses of wide-dynamic range neurons, a group of nociceptive SDH neurones. Facilitation of pain behaviour induced by GAL in the DMH was reversed by lidocaine in the DRt and by ondansetron, a 5HT3R antagonist, in the spinal cord. However, the hyperalgesia induced by glutamate in the DRt was not blocked by spinal ondansetron. In addition, in ARTH but not SHAM animals PWL was increased after lidocaine in the DRt and ondansetron in the spinal cord. Our data demonstrate that GAL in the DMH activates two independent descending facilitatory pathways: (i) one relays in the DRt and (ii) the other one involves 5-HT neurones acting on spinal 5HT3Rs. In experimental ARTH, the tonic pain-facilitatory action is increased in both of these descending pathways. PMID:26565961

  18. GABAergic transmission in rat pontine reticular formation regulates the induction phase of anesthesia and modulates hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Nemanis, Kriste; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-07-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) contributes to the regulation of sleep, anesthesia and pain. The role of PnO γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in modulating these states remains incompletely understood. The present study used time to loss and time to resumption of righting response (LoRR and RoRR) as surrogate measures of loss and resumption of consciousness. This study tested three hypotheses: (i) pharmacologically manipulating GABA levels in rat PnO alters LoRR, RoRR and nociception; (ii) propofol decreases GABA levels in the PnO; and (iii) inhibiting GABA synthesis in the PnO blocks hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. Administering a GABA synthesis inhibitor [3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA)] or a GABA uptake inhibitor [nipecotic acid (NPA)] into rat PnO significantly altered LoRR caused by propofol. 3-MPA significantly decreased LoRR for propofol (-18%). NPA significantly increased LoRR during administration of propofol (36%). Neither 3-MPA nor NPA altered RoRR following cessation of propofol or isoflurane delivery. The finding that LoRR was decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA is consistent with measures showing that extracellular GABA levels in the PnO were decreased (41%) by propofol. Thermal nociception was significantly decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA, and 3-MPA blocked the hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. The results demonstrate that GABA levels in the PnO regulate the time for loss of consciousness caused by propofol, extend the concept that anesthetic induction and emergence are not inverse processes, and suggest that GABAergic transmission in the PnO mediates hyperalgesia caused by sleep loss. PMID:24674578

  19. Peripheral G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are involved in delta opioid receptor-mediated anti-hyperalgesia in rat masseter muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Man-Kyo; Cho, Yi Sul; Bae, Young Chul; Lee, Jongseok; Zhang, Xia; Ro, Jin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the efficacy of peripherally administered opioid has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies, the underlying mechanisms of its anti-hyperalgesic effects are poorly understood. G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are linked to opioid receptors in the brain. However, the role of peripheral GIRK channels in analgesia induced by peripherally administered opioid, especially in trigeminal system, is not clear. Methods Expression of GIRK subunits in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) was examined with RT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Chemical profiles of GIRK expressing neurons in TG were further characterized. Behavioral and Fos experiments were performed to examine the functional involvement of GIRK channels in delta opioid receptor (DOR)-mediated anti-hyperalgesia under an acute myositis condition. Results TG expressed mRNA and proteins for GIRK1 and GIRK2 subunits. Majority of GIRK1- and GIRK2-expressing neurons were non-peptidergic afferents. Inhibition of peripheral GIRK using Tertiapin-Q (TPQ) attenuated anti-nociceptive effects of peripherally administered DOR agonist, DPDPE, on mechanical hypersensitivity in masseter muscle. Furthermore, TPQ attenuated the suppressive effects of peripheral DPDPE on neuronal activation in the subnucleus caudalis of the trigeminal nucleus (Vc) following masseteric injection of capsaicin. Conclusions Our data indicate that peripheral DOR agonist-induced suppression of mechanical hypersensitivity in the masseter muscle involves the activity of peripheral GIRK channels. These results could provide a rationale for developing a novel therapeutic approach using peripheral GIRK channel openers to mimic or supplement the effects of peripheral opioid agonist. PMID:23740773

  20. Ursolic acid prevents augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in high-fat diet-induced obese rats by restoring downregulated spinal PPARα.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanan; Song, Chengwei; Li, Haiou; Hou, Jingdong; Li, Dongliang

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for several pain syndromes and is associated with increased pain sensitivity. Evidence suggests that obesity causes the downregulation of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor (PPAR)α in the spinal cord, contributing to augmented peripheral edema and inflammatory hyperalgesia. Ursolic acid (UA), a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid carboxylic acid, has been shown to upregulate PPARα in the peripheral tissues of obese animals. The present study hypothesized that UA prevents augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in obesity by restoring downregulated spinal PPARα. The present study demonstrated that Sprague‑Dawley rats fed a high‑fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks developed obesity and metabolic disorder. Following carrageenan injection, the HFD rats exhibited increased thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema, compared with the rats fed a low‑fat diet. Molecular investigations revealed that the HFD rats exhibited decreased PPARα activity, and exaggerated expression of inflammatory mediators and nuclear factor‑kB activity in the spinal cord in response to carrageenan. Oral administration of UA ameliorated obesity and metabolic disorder, and prevented increased thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema in the HFD rats. Additionally, UA normalized PPARα activity and inhibited the exaggerated spinal cord inflammatory response to carrageenan. Although the knockdown of spinal PPARα with small interfering RNA following the administration of UA did not alter obesity or metabolic parameters, it eradicated the beneficial effects of UA on thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema, and reversed the spinal cord inflammatory response. These results suggested that the systemic administration of UA inhibited the exaggerated spinal cord inflammatory response to peripheral inflammatory stimulation in HFD‑induced obesity by restoring downregulated spinal PPARα, preventing peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia. UA may be a

  1. Early life stress elicits visceral hyperalgesia and functional reorganization of pain circuits in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Holschneider, D.P.; Guo, Y.; Mayer, E.A.; Wang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for developing functional gastrointestinal disorders, and has been proposed to be related to a central amplification of sensory input and resultant visceral hyperalgesia. We sought to characterize ELS-related changes in functional brain responses during acute noxious visceral stimulation. Neonatal rats (males/females) were exposed to limited bedding (ELS) or standard bedding (controls) on postnatal days 2–9. Age 10–11 weeks, animals were implanted with venous cannulas and transmitters for abdominal electromyography (EMG). Cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was mapped during colorectal distension (CRD) using [14C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography, and analyzed in three-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping and functional connectivity. EMG responses to CRD were increased after ELS, with no evidence of a sex difference. ELS rats compared to controls showed a greater significant positive correlation of EMG with amygdalar rCBF. Factorial analysis revealed a significant main effect of ‘ELS’ on functional activation of nodes within the pain pathway (somatosensory, insular, cingulate and prefrontal cortices, locus coeruleus/lateral parabrachial n. [LC/LPB], periaqueductal gray, sensory thalamus), as well as in the amygdala, hippocampus and hypothalamus. In addition, ELS resulted in an increase in the number of significant functional connections (i.e. degree centrality) between regions within the pain circuit, including the amygdala, LC/LPB, insula, anterior ventral cingulate, posterior cingulate (retrosplenium), and stria terminalis, with decreases noted in the sensory thalamus and the hippocampus. Sex differences in rCBF were less broadly expressed, with significant differences noted at the level of the cortex, amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, raphe, sensory thalamus, and caudate-putamen. ELS showed a sexually dimorphic effect (‘Sex x ELS’ interaction) at the LC/LPB complex, globus pallidus

  2. Nociception and inflammatory hyperalgesia evaluated in rodents using infrared laser stimulation after Trpv1 gene knockout or resiniferatoxin lesion.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kendall; Lebovitz, Evan E; Keller, Jason M; Mannes, Andrew J; Nemenov, Michael I; Iadarola, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    TRPV1 is expressed in a subpopulation of myelinated Aδ and unmyelinated C-fibers. TRPV1+ fibers are essential for the transmission of nociceptive thermal stimuli and for the establishment and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia. We have previously shown that high-power, short-duration pulses from an infrared diode laser are capable of predominantly activating cutaneous TRPV1+ Aδ-fibers. Here we show that stimulating either subtype of TRPV1+ fiber in the paw during carrageenan-induced inflammation or following hind-paw incision elicits pronounced hyperalgesic responses, including prolonged paw guarding. The ultrapotent TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX) dose-dependently deactivates TRPV1+ fibers and blocks thermal nociceptive responses in baseline or inflamed conditions. Injecting sufficient doses of RTX peripherally renders animals unresponsive to laser stimulation even at the point of acute thermal skin damage. In contrast, Trpv1-/- mice, which are generally unresponsive to noxious thermal stimuli at lower power settings, exhibit withdrawal responses and inflammation-induced sensitization using high-power, short duration Aδ stimuli. In rats, systemic morphine suppresses paw withdrawal, inflammatory guarding, and hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent fashion using the same Aδ stimuli. The qualitative intensity of Aδ responses, the leftward shift of the stimulus-response curve, the increased guarding behaviors during carrageenan inflammation or after incision, and the reduction of Aδ responses with morphine suggest multiple roles for TRPV1+ Aδ fibers in nociceptive processes and their modulation of pathological pain conditions. PMID:24434730

  3. Analgesic Efficacy of Firocoxib, a Selective Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase 2, in a Mouse Model of Incisional Pain

    PubMed Central

    Reddyjarugu, Balagangadharreddy; Pavek, Todd; Southard, Teresa; Barry, Jason; Singh, Bhupinder

    2015-01-01

    Pain management in laboratory animals is generally accomplished by using opioids and NSAIDs. However, opioid use is hindered by controlled substance requirements and a relatively short duration of action. In this study, we compared the analgesic efficacy of firocoxib (a cyclooxygenase-2-selective NSAID) with that of buprenorphine in the mouse model of plantar incisional pain by objective measurement of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia using von Frey and Hargreaves equipment, respectively. Our experimental design included 5 treatment groups: firocoxib at 10 mg/kg IP every 24 h (F10 group); firocoxib at 20 mg/kg IP every 24 h (F20); buprenorphine at 0.2 mg/kg SC every 8 h; intraperitoneal normal saline every 24 h; and sham group (anesthesia, no incision) treated with firocoxib at 20 mg/kg IP every 24 h (sham+F20). All mice underwent nociceptive assays at 24 h before and 4, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. Buprenorphine alleviated allodynia at all time points after incision. The F10 treatment alleviated allodynia at 4, 24, and 48 h, whereas F20 alleviated allodynia at 24, 48, and 72 h. None of the treatments alleviated thermal hyperalgesia at 4h. Except for F10 and buprenorphine at 24 h, all treatments alleviated thermal hyperalgesia at 24, 48, and 72 h. No significant differences were noted between the 2 doses of firocoxib and buprenorphine regarding mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at all time points. In conclusion, the analgesic efficacy of firocoxib is comparable to that of buprenorphine in this mouse pain model. PMID:26224441

  4. Bidirectional effects of serum TNF alpha level and spinal p38MAPK phosphorylation on hyperalgesia variation during CFA-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akhtari, Zeinab; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Eidi, Akram; Manaheji, Homa; Tekieh, Elaheh

    2012-01-01

    Regarding the role of TNFα in the induction of hyperalgesia, the dual suggested roles of the Pp38 MAPK intracellular pathway in the emergence of symptomatic inflammation, we aimed to investigate the bidirectional effects of serum TNFα level and p38 MAPK phosphorylation on hyperalgesia variation during different stages of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Hyperalgesia and edema were assessed at 0, 3, 7, 14, and 21 days of study after arthritis induction by CFA. Anti-TNFα and Pp38 inhibitor were administered during the 21 days of study. Receptor and intra-cellular enzyme expression were detected by western blotting. Anti-TNFα administration in the AA group decreased paw volume and hyperalgesia until the 14th day of study; on the 21st day, those symptoms increased. Daily administration of anti-TNFα antibody caused significant decrease in spinal mOR protein and Pp38/p38 MAPK enzyme level expression on the 14th and 21st days compared to the AA control group. Our data suggested that phosphorylation of spinal p38 MAPK enzyme played an important role in bidirectional effects of serum TNFα on inflammatory symptoms via spinal mOR expression variation.

  5. Selective regulation of 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons: a possible mechanism to cope with peripheral nerve injury-induced chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Patte-Mensah, Christine; Meyer, Laurence; Schaeffer, Véronique; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe G

    2010-09-01

    The enzyme 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase (3alpha-HSOR) catalyzes the synthesis and bioavailability of 3alpha,5alpha-neurosteroids as allopregnanolone (3alpha,5alpha-THP) which activates GABA(A) receptors and blocks T-type calcium channels involved in pain mechanisms. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to demonstrate that 3alpha-HSOR is a cellular target the modulation of which in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) may contribute to suppress pain resulting from peripheral nerve injury. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscope analyses showed 3alpha-HSOR-immunostaining in naive rat DRG sensory neurons and glial cells. Pulse-chase, high performance liquid chromatography and Flo/One characterization of neurosteroids demonstrated 3alpha,5alpha-THP production in DRG. Behavioral methods allowed identification of pain symptoms (thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and/or allodynia) in rats subjected to sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI). Reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that 3alpha-HSOR mRNA concentration in CCI-rat ipsilateral DRG, 5-fold higher than in contralateral DRG, was also 4- to 6-fold elevated than that in sham-operated or naive rat DRG. Consistently, Western blotting confirmed increased 3alpha-HSOR protein levels in CCI-rat ipsilateral DRG and double immunolabeling showed that 3alpha-HSOR overexpression occurred in DRG neurons but not in glia. Functional plasticity of 3alpha-HSOR leading to increased 3alpha,5alpha-THP production was evidenced in CCI-rat DRG. Interestingly, behavioral and molecular time-course investigations revealed that 3alpha-HSOR gene upregulation was correlated to pain symptom development. Most importantly, in vivo knockdown of 3alpha-HSOR expression in healthy rat DRG using 6-carboxyfluorescein-3alpha-HSOR-siRNA exacerbated thermal and mechanical pain perceptions. This paper is the first to show that siRNA-induced knockdown of a key neurosteroid-synthesizing enzyme directly

  6. Extended access to nicotine leads to a CRF1 receptor dependent increase in anxiety-like behavior and hyperalgesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ami; Treweek, Jennifer; Edwards, Scott; Leão, Rodrigo Molini; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F.; George, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Background Tobacco dependence is associated with the emergence of negative emotional states during withdrawal, including anxiety and nociceptive hypersensitivity. However, the current animal models of nicotine dependence have focused on the mechanisms that mediate the acute reinforcing effects of nicotine and failed to link increased anxiety and pain during abstinence with excessive nicotine self-administration. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the activation of corticotropin-releasing factor-1 (CRF1) receptors and emergence of the affective and motivational effects of nicotine abstinence only occur in rats with long access (> 21 h/day, LgA) and not short (1 h/day, ShA) access to nicotine self-administration. Methods ShA and LgA rats were tested for anxiety-like behavior, nociceptive thresholds, somatic signs of withdrawal, and nicotine intake after 3 days of abstinence. The role of CRF1 receptors during abstinence was tested using systemic or intracerebral infusion of MPZP, a CRF1 receptor antagonist, in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Results LgA but not ShA rats exhibited abstinence-induced increases in anxiety-like behavior and nociceptive hypersensitivity, which both predicted subsequent excessive nicotine intake and were prevented by systemic administration of MPZP. Intra-CeA MPZP infusion prevented abstinence-induced increases in nicotine intake and nociceptive hypersensitivity. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that the model of short access to nicotine self-administration has limited validity for tobacco dependence, highlight the translational relevance of the model of extended-intermittent access to nicotine self-administration for tobacco dependence, and demonstrate that activation of CRF1 receptors is required for the emergence of abstinence-induced anxiety-like behavior, hyperalgesia, and excessive nicotine intake. PMID:23869743

  7. Orofacial cold hyperalgesia due to infraorbital nerve constriction injury in rats: reversal by endothelin receptor antagonists but not non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Chichorro, Juliana Geremias; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Souza, Gloria Emilia Petto; Rae, Giles Alexander

    2006-07-01

    The susceptibility of changes in responsiveness to noxious cold stimulation of rats submitted to chronic constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CION) or carrageenan to drug inhibition was compared. Nocifensive responses were measured as total time rats engaged in bilateral facial grooming with both forepaws over the first 2 min following tetrafluoroethane spray application to the snout. Carrageenan (50 microg, s.c. into upper lip) caused short-lived ipsilateral cold hyperalgesia (peak at 3 h: vehicle 8.4+/-1.3, carrageenan 21.2+/-3.0 s) which was markedly suppressed by i.p. indomethacin (4 mg/kg), celecoxib (10mg/kg) or s.c. dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg), endothelin ET(A) or ET(B) receptor antagonists (BQ-123 and BQ-788, respectively; 10 nmol/lip). CION caused ipsilateral cold hyperalgesia between Days 2 and 12, which peaked on Days 4 (sham 15.3+/-1.8, CION 32.4+/-5.3s) to 6. Established peak CION-induced cold hyperalgesia was unaffected by indomethacin and celecoxib, whereas dexamethasone, BQ-123, BQ-788, and i.v. injections of selective antagonists of ET(A) (atrasentan, 3-10 mg/kg) or ET(B) (A-192621, 5-20 mg/kg) receptors caused significant inhibitions lasting 1-2.5h (peaks approximately 65-90%). Bosentan (dual ET(A)/ET(B) receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.v.) abolished CION-induced cold hyperalgesia for up to 6h. Thus, once established, CION-induced orofacial hyperalgesia to cold stimuli appears to lack an inflammatory component, but is alleviated by endothelin ET(A) and/or ET(B) receptor antagonists. If this CION injury model bears predictive value to trigeminal neuralgia (i.e., paroxysmal orofacial pain triggered by various stimuli), endothelin receptors might constitute new targets for treatment of this disorder. PMID:16563629

  8. Involvement of nitric oxide in the inhibition of bone cancer-induced hyperalgesia through the activation of peripheral opioid receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Luis; Juárez, Lucía; García, Verónica; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana

    2007-07-01

    Experiments were designed to elucidate the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the antihyperalgesic effect induced by the activation of peripheral mu-opioid receptors on osteosarcoma-induced thermal hyperalgesia in mice. Since this pathway has previously been shown to be involved in the antihyperalgesic effect induced by some drugs--including opiates--on inflammatory pain, experiments were also performed in inflamed mice. The intraplantar administration of loperamide (15 microg) abolishes the thermal hyperalgesia that appears 4 weeks after the intratibial inoculation of NCTC 2472 cells in C3H/HeJ mice. The blockade of this effect by coadministering a peripheral opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone methiodide), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (L-NMMA), a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ), a PKG inhibitor (KT-5823) or a K(+)(ATP)-channel blocker (glibenclamide) shows the involvement of a NO/cGMP/K(+)(ATP)-channel pathway. Accordingly the administration of loperamide produced, in osteosarcoma-bearing mice, an increase in the concentrations of NO metabolites, nitrites and nitrates, extracted from paws. The selective inhibitor of eNOS L-NIO, but not the inhibitors of nNOS (N-omega-propyl-L-arginine) or iNOS (1400w), blocked the effect of loperamide on osteosarcoma-induced hyperalgesia and also the endogenous opioid peripheral hypoalgesia that appears during the initial stages of the development of this osteosarcoma. Although this pathway also participates in the inhibitory effect of loperamide on the thermal hyperalgesia induced by administration of complete Freund's adjuvant, only selective inhibitors of nNOS or iNOS antagonized this effect. Our results demonstrate that the activation of a NO/cGMP/K(+)(ATP)-channel triggered by eNOS participates in the peripheral antihyperalgesic of loperamide on osteosarcoma-induced thermal hyperalgesia. PMID:17543351

  9. Possible Loss of GABAergic Inhibition in Mice With Induced Adenomyosis and Treatment With Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Attenuates the Loss With Improved Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yumei; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Hongping; Ding, Ding; Liu, Xishi

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that induction of adenomyosis in mice results in progressive hyperalgesia, uterine hyperactivity, and elevated plasma corticosterone levels and that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) treatment dose dependently suppressed myometrial infiltration and improved generalized hyperalgesia. In this study, we examined whether adenomyosis induced in mice results in the loss of GABAergic inhibition as manifested by the diminished glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 65-expressing neurons in the brainstem nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) that could correlate with heightened hyperalgesia. We also evaluated whether EGCG treatment would reverse these changes and also improve the expression of some proteins known to be involved in adenomyosis. Adenomyosis was induced in 28 female ICR mice and additional 12 were used as blank controls, as reported previously. At the 16th week, all mice with induced adenomyosis received low- or high-dose EGCG treatment or untreated. Mice without adenomyosis received no treatment. After 3 weeks of treatment, their uterine horns and brains were harvested. The right uterine horn was used for immunohistochemistry analysis and for counting the number of macrophages infiltrating into the ectopic endometrium. The brainstem NRM sections were subjected to immunofluorescence staining for GAD65. We found that mice with induced adenomyosis had significantly diminished GAD65-expressing neurons, concomitant with heightened hyperalgesia. Treatment with EGCG increased these neurons in conjunction with improved hyperalgesia, reduced the expression of p-p65, cycloxygenase 2, oxytocin receptor, collagen I and IV, and transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 in ectopic endometrium or myometrium, reduced the number of macrophages infiltrating into the ectopic endometrium while elevated the expression of progesterone receptor isoform B. Thus, adenomyosis-induced pain resembles neuropathic pain in that there is a remarkable central plasticity. PMID

  10. Exploring the potential effect of Ocimum sanctum in vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum and its saponin rich fraction in vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathic pain in rats. Peripheral neuropathy was induced in rats by administration of vincristine sulfate (50 μg/kg i.p.) for 10 consecutive days. The mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, paw heat hyperalgesia and cold tail hyperalgesia were assessed by performing the pinprick, acetone, hot plate and cold tail immersion tests, respectively. Biochemically, the tissue thio-barbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), super-oxide anion content (markers of oxidative stress) and total calcium levels were measured. Vincristine administration was associated with the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat and cold hyperalgesia. Furthermore, vincristine administration was also associated with an increase in oxidative stress and calcium levels. However, administration of Ocimum sanctum (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) and its saponin rich fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) for 14 days significantly attenuated vincristine-induced neuropathic pain along with decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels. It may be concluded that Ocimum sanctum has ameliorative potential in attenuating chemotherapy induced-painful neuropathic state, which may be attributed to decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels. Furthermore, saponin rich fraction of Ocimum sanctum may be responsible for its noted beneficial effect in neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:20181005

  11. Ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar S

    2015-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum and its saponin rich fraction in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The chronic constriction injury was induced by placing four loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve, proximal to its trifurcation. The mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, paw heat hyperalgesia and cold tail hyperalgesia were assessed by performing the pinprick, acetone, hot plate and cold tail immersion tests, respectively. Biochemically, the tissue thio-barbituric acid reactive species, super-oxide anion content (markers of oxidative stress) and total calcium levels were measured. Chronic constriction injury was associated with the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat and cold hyperalgesia along with an increase in oxidative stress and calcium levels. However, administration of Ocimum sanctum (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) and its saponin rich fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) for 14 days significantly attenuated chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain as well as decrease the oxidative stress and calcium levels. It may be concluded that saponin rich fraction of Ocimum sanctum has ameliorative potential in attenuating painful neuropathic state, which may be attributed to a decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels. PMID:25673470

  12. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α inhibition produced anti-allodynia effect and suppressed inflammatory cytokine production in early stage of mouse complex regional pain syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hung-Tsung; Lin, Ya-Chi; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Tsai, Yu-Chuan; Liu, Yen-Chin

    2016-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is related to microcirculation impairment associated with tissue hypoxia and peripheral cytokine overproduction in the affected limb. Previous studies suggest that the pathogenesis involves hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and exaggerated regional inflammatory response. 1-methylpropyl 2-imidazolyl disulfide (PX-12) acts as the thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) inhibitor and decreases the level of HIF-1α, and can rapidly be metabolized for Trx-1 redox inactivation. This study hypothesized that PX-12 can decrease the cytokine production for nociceptive sensitization in the hypoxia-induced pain model. CD1 mice weighing around 30 g were used. The animal CRPS model was developed via the chronic post-ischaemic pain (CPIP) model. The model was induced by using O-rings on the ankles of the mice hind limbs to produce 3-h ischaemia-reperfusion injury on the paw. PX-12 (25 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg) was given through tail vein injection immediately after ischaemia. Animal behaviour was tested using the von Frey method for 7 days. Local paw skin tissue was harvest from three groups (control, 5 mg/kg, 25 mg/kg) 2 h after injection of PX-12. The protein expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and HIF-1α was analysed with the Western blotting method. Mice significantly present an anti-allodynia effect in a dose-related manner after the PX-12 administration. Furthermore, PX-12 not only decreased the expression of HIF-1α but also decreased the expression of IL-1β over the injured palm. This study, therefore, shows the first evidence of the anti-allodynia effect of PX-12 in a CPIP animal model for pain behaviour. The study concluded that inhibition of HIF-1α may produce an analgesic effect and the associated suppression of inflammatory cytokine IL-1β in a CPIP model. PMID:26711019

  13. Pioglitazone rapidly reduces neuropathic pain through astrocyte and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Ryan B.; Donahue, Renee R.; Morgenweck, Jenny; Grace, Peter M.; Sutton, Amanda; Watkins, Linda R.; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated administration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists reduces neuropathic pain-like behavior and associated changes in glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. As PPARγ is a nuclear receptor, sustained changes in gene expression are widely believed to be the mechanism of pain reduction. However, we recently reported that a single intrathecal injection of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, reduced hyperalgesia within 30 minutes, a time frame that is typically less than that required for genomic mechanisms. To determine the very rapid anti-hyperalgesic actions of PPARγ activation we administered pioglitazone to rats with spared nerve injury (SNI) and evaluated hyperalgesia. Pioglitazone inhibited hyperalgesia within 5 min of injection, consistent with a non-genomic mechanism. Systemic or intrathecal administration of GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist, inhibited the anti-hyperalgesic actions of intraperitoneal or intrathecal pioglitazone, suggesting a spinal PPARγ-dependent mechanism. To further address the contribution of non-genomic mechanisms, we blocked new protein synthesis in the spinal cord with anisomycin. When co-administered intrathecally, anisomycin did not change pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia at an early 7.5 min timepoint, further supporting a rapid non-genomic mechanism. At later timepoints anisomycin reduced pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia, suggesting a delayed recruitment of genomic mechanisms. Pioglitazone reduction of SNI-induced increases in GFAP expression occurred more rapidly than expected, within 60 min. We are the first to show that activation of spinal PPARγ rapidly reduces neuropathic pain independent from canonical genomic activity. We conclude that acute pioglitazone inhibits neuropathic pain in part by reducing astrocyte activation, and via both genomic and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms. PMID:25599238

  14. Possible involvement of the HMGB1/RAGE signaling mechanism in the induction of central post-stroke pain induced by acute global cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinichi; Matsuura, Wataru; Liu, Keyue; Nishibori, Masahiro; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-09-01

    Central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is one of the most under-recognized consequences of cerebral stroke, but the development of an effective treatment strategy is urgent. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, one of the receptors of HMGB1) have recently been shown to be critical in the modulation of nociceptive transduction following peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study was to determine the interactions between CPSP and HMGB1/RAGE signaling. Male ddY mice were subjected to 30min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). The development of hind paw mechanical allodynia was measured after BCAO using the von Frey test. Neuronal damage was estimated by histological analysis on day 3 after BCAO. The expression levels of the HMGB1 protein in the spinal cord and the sciatic nerve were significantly increased on day 3 after BCAO, although no effects of BCAO were noted on RAGE protein expression. BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by the intravenous and intrathecal administration of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody. The BCAO-induced increase of phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was canceled by the administration of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody. In addition, BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by intrathecal administration of U0126, an inhibitor of ERK. The results showed that BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia can be regulated by the activation of HMGB1/RAGE signaling. PMID:27335313

  15. Bromoenol Lactone, an Inhibitor of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2, Suppresses Carrageenan-Induced Prostaglandin Production and Hyperalgesia in Rat Hind Paw

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, Keiichiro; Ibuki, Takae; Matsumura, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2 and PGI2 are essential to hyperalgesia in inflammatory tissues. These prostaglandins are produced from arachidonic acid, which is cleaved from membrane phospholipids by the action of phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Which isozyme of PLA2 is responsible for the cleavage of arachidonic acid and the production of prostaglandins essential to inflammation-induced hyperalgesia is not clear. In this study, we examined the effects of two PLA2 isozyme-specific inhibitors on carrageenan-induced production of PGE2 and PGI2 in rat hind paw and behavioral nociceptive response to radiant heat. Local administration of bromoenol lactone (BEL), an inhibitor of calcium-independent PLA2 (iPLA2), significantly reduced carrageenan-induced elevation of prostaglandins in the inflamed foot pad 3 h after injection. It also ameliorated the hyperalgesic response between 1 h and 3 h after carrageenan injection. On the other hand, AACOCF3, an inhibitor of cytosolic PLA2, suppressed neither prostaglandin production nor the hyperalgesic response. BEL did not suppress the mRNA levels of iPLA2β, iPLA2γ, cyclooxygenase-2, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase, prostaglandin I synthase, or proinflammatory cytokines in the inflamed foot pad, indicating that BEL did not suppress inflammation itself. These results suggest that iPLA2 is involved in the production of prostaglandins and hyperalgesia at the inflammatory loci. PMID:26063975

  16. ATP in human skin elicits a dose-related pain response which is potentiated under conditions of hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, S G; Warburton, J; Bhattacharjee, A; Ward, J; McMahon, S B

    2000-06-01

    Despite the considerable interest in the possibility that ATP may function as a peripheral pain mediator, there has been little quantitative study of the pain-producing effects of ATP in humans. Here we have used iontophoresis to deliver ATP to the forearm skin of volunteers who rated the magnitude of the evoked pain on a visual analogue scale. ATP consistently produced a modest burning pain, which began within 20 s of starting iontophoresis and was maintained for several minutes. Persistent iontophoresis of ATP led to desensitization within 12 min but recovery from this was almost complete 1 h later. Different doses of ATP were delivered using different iontophoretic driving currents. Iontophoresis of ATP produced a higher pain rating than saline, indicating that the pain was specifically caused by ATP. The average pain rating for ATP, but not saline, increased with increasing current. Using an 0.8 mA current, subjects reported pain averaging 27.7 +/- 2.8 (maximum possible = 100). Iontophoresis of ATP caused an increase in blood flow, as assessed using a laser Doppler flow meter. The increase in blood flow was significantly greater using ATP than saline in both the iontophoresed skin (P < 0.01) and in the surrounding skin, 3 mm outside the iontophoresed area (P < 0.05). The pain produced by ATP was dependent on capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons, since in skin treated repeatedly with topical capsaicin pain was reduced to less than 25% of that elicited on normal skin (2.1 +/- 0.4 compared with 9.3 +/- 1.5 on normal skin). Conversely, the pain-producing effects of ATP were greatly potentiated in several models of hyperalgesia. Thus, with acute capsaicin treatment when subjects exhibited touch-evoked hyperalgesia but no ongoing pain, there was a threefold increase in the average pain rating during ATP iontophoresis (22.7 +/- 3.1) compared with pre-capsaicin treatment (7.8 +/- 2.6). Moreover, ATP iontophoresed into skin 24 h after solar simulated radiation (2 x

  17. Virus-Mediated Knockdown of Nav1.3 in Dorsal Root Ganglia of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Alleviates Tactile Allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Andrew M; Samad, Omar A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain affects a substantial number of people and represents a major public health problem. Available clinical treatments for diabetic neuropathic pain remain only partially effective and many of these treatments carry the burden of side effects or the risk of dependence. The misexpression of sodium channels within nociceptive neurons contributes to abnormal electrical activity associated with neuropathic pain. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.3 produces tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents with rapid repriming kinetics and has been shown to contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability and ectopic firing in injured neurons. Suppression of Nav1.3 activity can attenuate neuropathic pain induced by peripheral nerve injury. Previous studies have shown that expression of Nav1.3 is upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of diabetic rats that exhibit neuropathic pain. Here, we hypothesized that viral-mediated knockdown of Nav1.3 in painful diabetic neuropathy would reduce neuropathic pain. We used a validated recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-shRNA-Nav1.3 vector to knockdown expression of Nav1.3, via a clinically applicable intrathecal injection method. Three weeks following vector administration, we observed a significant rate of transduction in DRGs of diabetic rats that concomitantly reduced neuronal excitability of dorsal horn neurons and reduced behavioral evidence of tactile allodynia. Taken together, these findings offer a novel gene therapy approach for addressing chronic diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:26101954

  18. Virus-Mediated Knockdown of Nav1.3 in Dorsal Root Ganglia of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Alleviates Tactile Allodynia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Samad, Omar A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain affects a substantial number of people and represents a major public health problem. Available clinical treatments for diabetic neuropathic pain remain only partially effective and many of these treatments carry the burden of side effects or the risk of dependence. The misexpression of sodium channels within nociceptive neurons contributes to abnormal electrical activity associated with neuropathic pain. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.3 produces tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents with rapid repriming kinetics and has been shown to contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability and ectopic firing in injured neurons. Suppression of Nav1.3 activity can attenuate neuropathic pain induced by peripheral nerve injury. Previous studies have shown that expression of Nav1.3 is upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of diabetic rats that exhibit neuropathic pain. Here, we hypothesized that viral-mediated knockdown of Nav1.3 in painful diabetic neuropathy would reduce neuropathic pain. We used a validated recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-shRNA-Nav1.3 vector to knockdown expression of Nav1.3, via a clinically applicable intrathecal injection method. Three weeks following vector administration, we observed a significant rate of transduction in DRGs of diabetic rats that concomitantly reduced neuronal excitability of dorsal horn neurons and reduced behavioral evidence of tactile allodynia. Taken together, these findings offer a novel gene therapy approach for addressing chronic diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:26101954

  19. Simultaneous Inhibition of PGE2 and PGI2 Signals Is Necessary to Suppress Hyperalgesia in Rat Inflammatory Pain Models.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Ryusuke; Kuwabara, Harumi; Kubota, Kazufumi; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Kiho, Toshihiro; Tengeiji, Atsushi; Kawakami, Katsuhiro; Shimada, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is well known as a mediator of inflammatory symptoms such as fever, arthritis, and inflammatory pain. In the present study, we evaluated the analgesic effect of our selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound I, 2-methyl-2-[cis-4-([1-(6-methyl-3-phenylquinolin-2-yl)piperidin-4-yl]carbonyl amino)cyclohexyl] propanoic acid, in rat yeast-induced acute and adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain models. Although this compound suppressed the synthesis of PGE2 selectively, no analgesic effect was shown in both inflammatory pain models. Prostacyclin (PGI2) also plays crucial roles in inflammatory pain, so we evaluated the involvement of PGI2 signaling in rat inflammatory pain models using prostacyclin receptor (IP) antagonist, RO3244019. RO3244019 showed no analgesic effect in inflammatory pain models, but concomitant administration of compound I and RO3244019 showed analgesic effects comparable to celecoxib, a specific cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 inhibitor. Furthermore, coadministration of PGE2 receptor 4 (EP4) antagonist, CJ-023423, and RO3244019 also showed an analgesic effect. These findings suggest that both PGE2 signaling, especially through the EP4 receptor, and PGI2 signaling play critical roles in inflammatory pain and concurrent inhibition of both signals is important for suppression of inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:27478311

  20. Simultaneous Inhibition of PGE2 and PGI2 Signals Is Necessary to Suppress Hyperalgesia in Rat Inflammatory Pain Models

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Harumi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is well known as a mediator of inflammatory symptoms such as fever, arthritis, and inflammatory pain. In the present study, we evaluated the analgesic effect of our selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound I, 2-methyl-2-[cis-4-([1-(6-methyl-3-phenylquinolin-2-yl)piperidin-4-yl]carbonyl amino)cyclohexyl] propanoic acid, in rat yeast-induced acute and adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain models. Although this compound suppressed the synthesis of PGE2 selectively, no analgesic effect was shown in both inflammatory pain models. Prostacyclin (PGI2) also plays crucial roles in inflammatory pain, so we evaluated the involvement of PGI2 signaling in rat inflammatory pain models using prostacyclin receptor (IP) antagonist, RO3244019. RO3244019 showed no analgesic effect in inflammatory pain models, but concomitant administration of compound I and RO3244019 showed analgesic effects comparable to celecoxib, a specific cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 inhibitor. Furthermore, coadministration of PGE2 receptor 4 (EP4) antagonist, CJ-023423, and RO3244019 also showed an analgesic effect. These findings suggest that both PGE2 signaling, especially through the EP4 receptor, and PGI2 signaling play critical roles in inflammatory pain and concurrent inhibition of both signals is important for suppression of inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:27478311

  1. Chronic At- and Below-Level Pain after Moderate Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Rodel E.; Houlé, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Chronic neuropathic pain is a significant consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI) that is associated with evoked pain, including allodynia and/or hyperalgesia. Allodynia is defined as a painful response to normally innocuous stimuli, and hyperalgesia occurs when there is an amplified pain response to normally noxious stimuli. We describe a model of a unilateral cervical level (C5) contusion injury where sensory recovery was assessed weekly for 6 weeks in 32 adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Bilateral thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia are detectable in the fore- and hindpaws as early as 7 days post-injury (dpi) and persist for at least 42 days. Paw withdrawal latency in response to a noxious thermal stimulus significantly intra-animal pre-operative values. Change in paw withdrawal latency plateaued at 21 dpi. Interestingly, bilateral forepaw allodynia develops in fewer than 40% of rats as measured by von Frey monofilament testing. Similar results occur in the hindpaws, where bilateral allodynia occurs in 46% of rats with SCI. The contralesional forepaw and both hindpaws of rats showed a slight increase in paw withdrawal threshold to tactile stimuli acutely after SCI, corresponding to ipsilesional forelimb motor deficits that resolve over time. That there is no difference among allodynic and non-allodynic groups in overall spared tissue or specifically of the dorsal column or ventrolateral white matter where ascending sensory tracts reside suggests that SCI-induced pain does not depend solely on the size or extent of the lesion, but that other mechanisms are in play. These observations provide a valid model system for future testing of therapeutic interventions to prevent the onset or to reduce the debilitating effects of chronic neuropathic pain after SCI. PMID:23216008

  2. Peripheral mechanisms of neuropathic pain – involvement of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in pain research provide a clear picture for the molecular mechanisms of acute pain; substantial information concerning plasticity that occurs during neuropathic pain has also become available. The peripheral mechanisms responsible for neuropathic pain are found in the altered gene/protein expression of primary sensory neurons. With damage to peripheral sensory fibers, a variety of changes in pain-related gene expression take place in dorsal root ganglion neurons. These changes, or plasticity, might underlie unique neuropathic pain-specific phenotype modifications – decreased unmyelinated-fiber functions, but increased myelinated A-fiber functions. Another characteristic change is observed in allodynia, the functional change of tactile to nociceptive perception. Throughout a series of studies, using novel nociceptive tests to characterize sensory-fiber or pain modality-specific nociceptive behaviors, it was demonstrated that communication between innocuous and noxious sensory fibers might play a role in allodynia mechanisms. Because neuropathic pain in peripheral and central demyelinating diseases develops as a result of aberrant myelination in experimental animals, demyelination seems to be a key mechanism of plasticity in neuropathic pain. More recently, we discovered that lysophosphatidic acid receptor activation initiates neuropathic pain, as well as possible peripheral mechanims of demyelination after nerve injury. These results lead to further hypotheses of physical communication between innocuous Aβ- and noxious C- or Aδ-fibers to influence the molecular mechanisms of allodynia. PMID:18377664

  3. Pharmacogenomic study of the role of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor and opioid receptors in diabetic hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Kris; Tzschentke, Thomas M; Koch, Thomas; Schiene, Klaus; Christoph, Thomas

    2014-10-15

    Targeting functionally independent receptors may provide synergistic analgesic effects in neuropathic pain. To examine the interdependency between different opioid receptors (µ-opioid peptide [MOP], δ-opioid peptide [DOP] and κ-opioid peptide [KOP]) and the nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic polyneuropathy, nocifensive activity was measured using a hot plate test in wild-type and NOP, MOP, DOP and KOP receptor knockout mice in response to the selective receptor agonists Ro65-6570, morphine, SNC-80 and U50488H, or vehicle. Nocifensive activity was similar in non-diabetic wild-type and knockout mice at baseline, before agonist or vehicle administration. STZ-induced diabetes significantly increased heat sensitivity in all mouse strains, but MOP, DOP and KOP receptor knockouts showed a smaller degree of hyperalgesia than wild-type mice and NOP receptor knockouts. For each agonist, a significant antihyperalgesic effect was observed in wild-type diabetic mice (all P<0.05 versus vehicle); the effect was markedly attenuated in diabetic mice lacking the cognate receptor compared with wild-type diabetic mice. Morphine was the only agonist that demonstrated near-full antihyperalgesic efficacy across all non-cognate receptor knockouts. Partial or near-complete reductions in efficacy were observed with Ro65-6570 in DOP and KOP receptor knockouts, with SNC-80 in NOP, MOP and KOP receptor knockouts, and with U50488H in NOP and DOP receptor knockouts. There was no evidence of NOP and MOP receptor interdependency in response to selective agonists for these receptors. These findings suggest that concurrent activation of NOP and MOP receptors, which showed functional independence, may yield an effective and favorable therapeutic analgesic profile. PMID:25169429

  4. Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide reduces viscerovisceral hyperalgesia in a rat model of endometriosis plus ureteral calculosis: role of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Iuvone, Teresa; Affaitati, Giannapia; De Filippis, Daniele; Lopopolo, Mariangela; Grassia, Gianluca; Lapenna, Domenico; Negro, Luana; Costantini, Raffaele; Vaia, Massimo; Cipollone, Francesco; Ialenti, Armando; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    The effects of ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide were evaluated on pain behaviours and markers of mast cell (MC) activity in a rat model of endometriosis plus ureteral calculosis (ENDO+STONE)-induced viscerovisceral hyperalgesia (VVH). Female Sprague-Dawley rats that underwent surgical induction of endometriosis were randomly assigned to receive active (ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide 10 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), orally) or placebo treatment for 25 days. At day 21, they underwent ureteral stone formation and were video-recorded till day 25 to evaluate ureteral and uterine pain behaviours. At autopsy (day 25), ureteral condition and number and diameter of endometrial cysts were evaluated. The following were then measured: number and percentage of degranulating MCs, number of vessels, chymase, nerve growth factor (NGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Flk-1 (VEGF receptor) in cysts, and NGF in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide-treated vs placebo-treated rats showed significantly lower number, duration and complexity of ureteral crises, shorter duration of uterine pain, and smaller cyst diameter (0.0001 < P < 0.004); a significantly higher percentage of expelled stones (P < 0.0001); significantly lower MC number (P < 0.01), vessel number (P < 0.01), chymase (P < 0.05), NGF (P < 0.05), VEGF (P < 0.01), and Flk-1 (P < 0.01) expression in cysts and NGF expression in DRG (P < 0.01). In all animals, the global duration of ureteral crises correlated linearly and directly with cyst diameter, MC number and chymase in cysts, and NGF in cysts and DRG (0.02 < P < 0.0002). Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide significantly reduces VVH from ENDO+STONE, probably by modulating MC expression/activity in cysts, thus reducing central sensitization due to noxious signals from endometriotic lesions. The results suggest potential utility of the compound for VVH in clinics. PMID:25974242

  5. Telmisartan inhibits hyperalgesia and inflammatory progression in a diabetic neuropathic pain model of Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rejaie, Salim S.; Abuohashish, Hatem M.; Ahmed, Mohammed M.; Arrejaie, Aws S.; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M.; AlSharari, Shakir D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the potential therapeutic value of telmisartan (TMT) against diabetic neuropathy (DN) and associated pain in Wistar rats. Methods: Peripheral DN was induced by a single intraperitoneal streptozotocin injection (55 mg/kg), and 3 weeks later TMT treatment was started (5 and 10 mg/kg/day), and continued for 4 weeks. Mechanical nociceptive threshold, motor coordination, and thermal nociceptive threshold tests were performed before and after TMT treatment. In serum, glucose, pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 were assessed. Nerve growth factor (NGF) levels and histopathological changes were estimated in the sciatic nerve. This study was conducted at the Experimental Animal Care Center, Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2013 and May 2014. Results: We observed a significant reduction in mechanical nociceptive threshold, motor coordination, and thermal nociceptive threshold in diabetic animals. The TMT treatment significantly enhanced the reduced mechanical nociceptive threshold. The untreated diabetic animals revealed a significant decrease in sciatic NGF, which was markedly attenuated by TMT. The elevated serum levels of cytokines in diabetic animals were inhibited by the TMT treatments. Histopathological evaluation showed obvious nerve degeneration in the diabetic group that was eliminated in the TMT treated diabetic groups. Conclusion: Telmisartan has a potential neuro-protective effect on peripheral DN; this is mediated through its anti-inflammatory effects and its dual properties as an angiotensin receptor blocker, and a partial peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-g ligand. PMID:25864063

  6. Hyperalgesia and increased neuropathic pain-like response in mice lacking galanin receptor 1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, K H; Hao, J-X; Xu, X-J; Jacoby, A S; Shine, J; Crawley, J N; Iismaa, T; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z

    2003-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin may have a role in modulation of nociception, particularly after peripheral nerve injury. The effect of galanin is mediated by at least three subtypes of receptors. In the present study, we assessed the nociceptive sensitivity in mice lacking the galanin receptor 1 gene (Galr1) and the development of neuropathic pain-like behaviours after photochemically induced partial sciatic nerve ischaemic injury. Under basal condition, Galr1 knock-out (Galr1(-/-)) mice had shortened response latency on the hot plate, but not tail flick and paw radiant heat, tests. The mechanical sensitivity was not different between Galr1(-/-) and wild type (Galr1(+/+)) mice, whereas the cold response was moderately enhanced in Galr1(-/-) mice. Both Galr1(-/-) mice and Galr1(+/+) controls developed mechanical and heat hypersensitivity after partial sciatic nerve injury. The duration of such pain-like behaviours was significantly increased in Galr1(-/-). The Galr1(-/-) mice and Galr1(+/+) mice did not differ in their recovery from deficits in toe-spread after sciatic nerve crush. The results provide some evidence for an inhibitory function for the neuropeptide galanin acting on galanin receptor 1 (GALR1) in nociception and neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury in mice. PMID:12605908

  7. The antinociceptive effect of systemic gabapentin is related to the type of sensitization-induced hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Curros-Criado, M Mar; Herrero, Juan F

    2007-01-01

    Background Gabapentin is a structural analogue of gamma-aminobutyric acid with strong anticonvulsant and analgesic activities. Important discrepancies are observed on the effectiveness and potency of gabapentin in acute nociception and sensitization due to inflammation and neuropathy. There is also some controversy in the literature on whether gabapentin is only active in central areas of the nervous system or is also effective in the periphery. This is probably due to the use of different experimental models, routes of administration and types of sensitization. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the spinal cord sensitization on the antinociceptive activity of gabapentin in the absence and in the presence of monoarthritis and neuropathy, using the same experimental protocol of stimulation and the same technique of evaluation of antinociception. Methods We studied the antinociceptive effects of iv. gabapentin in spinal cord neuronal responses from adult male Wistar rats using the recording of single motor units technique. Gabapentin was studied in the absence and in the presence of sensitization due to arthritis and neuropathy, combining noxious mechanical and repetitive electrical stimulation (wind-up). Results The experiments showed that gabapentin was effective in arthritic (max. effect of 41 ± 15% of control and ID50 of 1,145 ± 14 micromol/kg; 200 mg/kg) and neuropathic rats (max. effect of 20 ± 8% of control and ID50 of 414 ± 27 micromol/kg; 73 mg/kg) but not in normal rats. The phenomenon of wind-up was dose-dependently reduced by gabapentin in neuropathy but not in normal and arthritic rats. Conclusion We conclude that systemic gabapentin is a potent and effective antinociceptive agent in sensitization caused by arthritis and neuropathy but not in the absence of sensitization. The potency of the antinociception was directly related to the intensity of sensitization in the present experimental conditions. The effect is mainly

  8. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Gallbladder Calculosis in Fibromyalgia Patients: Impact on Musculoskeletal Pain, Somatic Hyperalgesia and Central Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Raffaele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Massimini, Francesca; Tana, Claudio; Innocenti, Paolo; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia, a chronic syndrome of diffuse musculoskeletal pain and somatic hyperalgesia from central sensitization, is very often comorbid with visceral pain conditions. In fibromyalgia patients with gallbladder calculosis, this study assessed the short and long-term impact of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on fibromyalgia pain symptoms. Fibromyalgia pain (VAS scale) and pain thresholds in tender points and control areas (skin, subcutis and muscle) were evaluated 1week before (basis) and 1week, 1,3,6 and 12months after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in fibromyalgia patients with symptomatic calculosis (n = 31) vs calculosis patients without fibromyalgia (n. 26) and at comparable time points in fibromyalgia patients not undergoing cholecystectomy, with symptomatic (n = 27) and asymptomatic (n = 28) calculosis, and no calculosis (n = 30). At basis, fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis patients presented a significant linear correlation between the number of previously experienced biliary colics and fibromyalgia pain (direct) and muscle thresholds (inverse)(p<0.0001). After cholecystectomy, fibromyalgia pain significantly increased and all thresholds significantly decreased at 1week and 1month (1-way ANOVA, p<0.01-p<0.001), the decrease in muscle thresholds correlating linearly with the peak postoperative pain at surgery site (p<0.003-p<0.0001). Fibromyalgia pain and thresholds returned to preoperative values at 3months, then pain significantly decreased and thresholds significantly increased at 6 and 12months (p<0.05-p<0.0001). Over the same 12-month period: in non-fibromyalgia patients undergoing cholecystectomy thresholds did not change; in all other fibromyalgia groups not undergoing cholecystectomy fibromyalgia pain and thresholds remained stable, except in fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis at 12months when pain significantly increased and muscle thresholds significantly decreased (p<0.05-p<0.0001). The results of the study show that biliary colics from

  9. Chronic at-level thermal hyperalgesia following rat cervical contusion spinal cord injury is accompanied by neuronal and astrocyte activation and loss of the astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT1, in superficial dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Putatunda, Rajarshi; Hala, Tamara J; Chin, Jeannie; Lepore, Angelo C

    2014-09-18

    Neuropathic pain is a form of pathological nociception that occurs in a significant portion of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, resulting in debilitating and often long-term physical and psychological burdens. While many peripheral and central mechanisms have been implicated in neuropathic pain, central sensitization of dorsal horn spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons is a major underlying substrate. Furthermore, dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis and chronic astrocyte activation play important underlying roles in persistent hyperexcitability of these superficial dorsal horn neurons. To date, central sensitization and astrocyte changes have not been characterized in cervical SCI-induced neuropathic pain models, despite the fact that a major portion of SCI patients suffer contusion trauma to cervical spinal cord. In this study, we have characterized 2 rat models of unilateral cervical contusion SCI that behaviorally result in chronic persistence of thermal hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral forepaw. In addition, we find that STT neurons are chronically activated in both models when compared to laminectomy-only uninjured rats. Finally, persistent astrocyte activation and significantly reduced expression of the major CNS glutamate transporter, GLT1, in superficial dorsal horn astrocytes are associated with both excitability changes in STT neurons and the neuropathic pain behavioral phenotype. In conclusion, we have characterized clinically-relevant rodent models of cervical contusion-induced neuropathic pain that result in chronic activation of both STT neurons and astrocytes, as well as compromise in astrocyte glutamate transporter expression. These models can be used as important tools to further study mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain post-SCI and to test potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:24833066

  10. Delayed Administration of a Bio-Engineered Zinc-Finger VEGF-A Gene Therapy Is Neuroprotective and Attenuates Allodynia Following Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Figley, Sarah A.; Liu, Yang; Karadimas, Spyridon K.; Satkunendrarajah, Kajana; Fettes, Peter; Spratt, S. Kaye; Lee, Gary; Ando, Dale; Surosky, Richard; Giedlin, Martin; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI) there are drastic changes that occur in the spinal microvasculature, including ischemia, hemorrhage, endothelial cell death and blood-spinal cord barrier disruption. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is a pleiotropic factor recognized for its pro-angiogenic properties; however, VEGF has recently been shown to provide neuroprotection. We hypothesized that delivery of AdV-ZFP-VEGF – an adenovirally delivered bio-engineered zinc-finger transcription factor that promotes endogenous VEGF-A expression – would result in angiogenesis, neuroprotection and functional recovery following SCI. This novel VEGF gene therapy induces the endogenous production of multiple VEGF-A isoforms; a critical factor for proper vascular development and repair. Briefly, female Wistar rats – under cyclosporin immunosuppression – received a 35 g clip-compression injury and were administered AdV-ZFP-VEGF or AdV-eGFP at 24 hours post-SCI. qRT-PCR and Western Blot analysis of VEGF-A mRNA and protein, showed significant increases in VEGF-A expression in AdV-ZFP-VEGF treated animals (p<0.001 and p<0.05, respectively). Analysis of NF200, TUNEL, and RECA-1 indicated that AdV-ZFP-VEGF increased axonal preservation (p<0.05), reduced cell death (p<0.01), and increased blood vessels (p<0.01), respectively. Moreover, AdV-ZFP-VEGF resulted in a 10% increase in blood vessel proliferation (p<0.001). Catwalk™ analysis showed AdV-ZFP-VEGF treatment dramatically improves hindlimb weight support (p<0.05) and increases hindlimb swing speed (p<0.02) when compared to control animals. Finally, AdV-ZFP-VEGF administration provided a significant reduction in allodynia (p<0.01). Overall, the results of this study indicate that AdV-ZFP-VEGF administration can be delivered in a clinically relevant time-window following SCI (24 hours) and provide significant molecular and functional benefits. PMID:24846143

  11. Bilateral central pain sensitization in rats following a unilateral thalamic lesion may be treated with high doses of ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic pain condition caused by a vascular lesion, of either ischemic or hemorrhagic origin, in the central nervous system and more precisely involving the spinothalamocortical pathway responsible for the transmission of painful sensations. Few animal models have been developed to study this problem. The objectives of this study were to evaluate different modalities of pain in a central neuropathic pain rat model and to assess the effects of ketamine administered at different doses. Animals were evaluated on the rotarod, Hargreaves, Von Frey and acetone tests. A very small hemorrhage was created by injecting a collagenase solution in the right ventral posterolateral thalamic nucleus. Following the establishment of the neuropathy, ketamine was evaluated as a therapeutic drug for this condition. Results Histopathological observations showed a well localized lesion with neuronal necrosis and astrocytosis following the collagenase injection that was localized within the VPL. No significant change in motor coordination was observed following surgery in either the saline or collagensae groups. In the collagenase group, a significant decrease in mechanical allodynia threshold was observed. A sporadic and transient cold allodynia was also noted. No thermal hyperalgesia was seen following the collagenase injection. Ketamine was then tested as a potential therapeutic drug. A significant decrease in motor coordination was seen only following the administration of 25 mg/kg of ketamine in both groups. An alleviation of mechanical allodynia was achieved only with the high ketamine dose. The minimal effective ketamine serum concentration (150 ng/mL) was only achieved in animals that received 25 mg/kg. Conclusions An intrathalamic hemorrhage induced a bilateral mechanical allodynia in rats. Cold hyperalgesia was observed in 60% of these animals. Mechanical allodynia was alleviated with high doses of ketamine which corresponded

  12. Cold and L-menthol-induced sensitization in healthy volunteers--a cold hypersensitivity analogue to the heat/capsaicin model.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Hjalte H; Poulsen, Jeppe N; Uchida, Yugo; Nikbakht, Anahita; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-05-01

    Topical high-concentration L-menthol is the only established human experimental pain model to study mechanisms underlying cold hyperalgesia. We aimed at investigating the combinatorial effect of cold stimuli and topical L-menthol on cold pain and secondary mechanical hyperalgesia. Analogue to the heat-capsaicin model on skin sensitization, we proposed that cold/menthol enhances or prolong L-menthol-evoked sensitization. Topical 40% L-menthol or vehicle was applied (20 minutes) on the volar forearms of 20 healthy females and males (age, 28.7 ± 0.6 years). Cold stimulation of 5°C for 5 minutes was then applied to the treated area 3 times with 40-minute intervals. Cold detection threshold and pain, mechanical hyperalgesia (pinprick), static and dynamic mechanical allodynia (von Frey and brush), skin blood flow (laser speckle), and temperature (thermocamera) were assessed. Cold detection threshold and cold pain threshold (CPT) increased after L-menthol and remained high after the cold rekindling cycles (P < 0.001). L-menthol evoked secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick (P < 0.001) particularly in females (P < 0.05) and also induced secondary allodynia to von Frey and brush (P < 0.001). Application of cold stimuli kept these areas enlarged with a higher response in females to brush after the third cold cycle (P < 0.05). Skin blood flow increased after L-menthol (P < 0.001) and stayed stable after cold cycles. Repeated application of cold on skin treated by L-menthol facilitated and prolonged L-menthol-induced cold pain and hyperalgesia. This model may prove beneficial for testing analgesic compounds when a sufficient duration of time is needed to see drug effects on CPT or mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:25719613

  13. Thrombospondin-4 and excitatory synaptogenesis promote spinal sensitization after painful mechanical joint injury.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Nathan D; Zaucke, Frank; Kras, Jeffrey V; Dong, Ling; Luo, Z David; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2015-02-01

    Facet joint injury induces persistent pain that may be maintained by structural plasticity in the spinal cord. Astrocyte-derived thrombospondins, especially thrombospondin-4 (TSP4), have been implicated in synaptogenesis and spinal sensitization in neuropathic pain, but the TSP4 response and its relationship to synaptic changes in the spinal cord have not been investigated for painful joint injury. This study investigates the role of TSP4 in the development and maintenance of persistent pain following injurious facet joint distraction in rats and tests the hypothesis that excitatory synaptogenesis contributes to such pain. Painful facet joint loading induces dorsal horn excitatory synaptogenesis along with decreased TSP4 in the DRG and increased astrocytic release of TSP4 in the spinal cord, all of which parallel the time course of sustained tactile allodynia. Blocking injury-induced spinal TSP4 expression with antisense oligonucleotides or reducing TSP4 activity at its neuronal receptor in the spinal cord with gabapentin treatment both attenuate the allodynia and dorsal horn synaptogenesis that develop after painful facet joint loading. Increased spinal TSP4 also facilitates the development of allodynia and spinal hyperexcitability, even after non-painful physiological loading of the facet joint. These results suggest that spinal TSP4 plays an important role in the development and maintenance of persistent joint-mediated pain by inducing excitatory synaptogenesis and facilitating the transduction of mechanical loading of the facet joint that leads to spinal hyperexcitability. PMID:25483397

  14. TRPV1 function is modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation: insights into the molecular mechanism of nociception

    PubMed Central

    Jendryke, Thomas; Prochazkova, Michaela; Hall, Bradford E.; Nordmann, Grégory C.; Schladt, Moritz; Milenkovic, Vladimir M.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Wetzel, Christian H.

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 is a polymodally activated cation channel acting as key receptor in nociceptive neurons. Its function is strongly affected by kinase-mediated phosphorylation leading to hyperalgesia and allodynia. We present behavioral and molecular data indicating that TRPV1 is strongly modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation at position threonine-407(mouse)/T406(rat). Increasing or decreasing Cdk5 activity in genetically engineered mice has severe consequences on TRPV1-mediated pain perception leading to altered capsaicin consumption and sensitivity to heat. To understand the molecular and structural/functional consequences of TRPV1 phosphorylation, we generated various rTRPV1T406 receptor variants to mimic phosphorylated or dephosphorylated receptor protein. We performed detailed functional characterization by means of electrophysiological whole-cell and single-channel recordings as well as Ca2+-imaging and challenged recombinant rTRPV1 receptors with capsaicin, low pH, or heat. We found that position T406 is critical for the function of TRPV1 by modulating ligand-sensitivity, activation, and desensitization kinetics as well as voltage-dependence. Based on high resolution structures of TRPV1, we discuss T406 being involved in the molecular transition pathway, its phosphorylation leading to a conformational change and influencing the gating of the receptor. Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of T406 can be regarded as an important molecular switch modulating TRPV1-related behavior and pain sensitivity. PMID:26902776

  15. TRPV1 function is modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation: insights into the molecular mechanism of nociception.

    PubMed

    Jendryke, Thomas; Prochazkova, Michaela; Hall, Bradford E; Nordmann, Grégory C; Schladt, Moritz; Milenkovic, Vladimir M; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Wetzel, Christian H

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 is a polymodally activated cation channel acting as key receptor in nociceptive neurons. Its function is strongly affected by kinase-mediated phosphorylation leading to hyperalgesia and allodynia. We present behavioral and molecular data indicating that TRPV1 is strongly modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation at position threonine-407(mouse)/T406(rat). Increasing or decreasing Cdk5 activity in genetically engineered mice has severe consequences on TRPV1-mediated pain perception leading to altered capsaicin consumption and sensitivity to heat. To understand the molecular and structural/functional consequences of TRPV1 phosphorylation, we generated various rTRPV1T406 receptor variants to mimic phosphorylated or dephosphorylated receptor protein. We performed detailed functional characterization by means of electrophysiological whole-cell and single-channel recordings as well as Ca(2+)-imaging and challenged recombinant rTRPV1 receptors with capsaicin, low pH, or heat. We found that position T406 is critical for the function of TRPV1 by modulating ligand-sensitivity, activation, and desensitization kinetics as well as voltage-dependence. Based on high resolution structures of TRPV1, we discuss T406 being involved in the molecular transition pathway, its phosphorylation leading to a conformational change and influencing the gating of the receptor. Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of T406 can be regarded as an important molecular switch modulating TRPV1-related behavior and pain sensitivity. PMID:26902776

  16. Mechanisms of PDGF siRNA-mediated inhibition of bone cancer pain in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Jia; He, Mu; Liu, Ran; Belegu, Visar; Dai, Ping; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Shang, Fei-Fei; Luo, Chao-Zhi; Zhou, Xue; Liu, Su; McDonald, JohnW; Liu, Jin; Zuo, Yun-Xia; Liu, Fei; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Patients with tumors that metastasize to bone frequently suffer from debilitating pain, and effective therapies for treating bone cancer are lacking. This study employed a novel strategy in which herpes simplex virus (HSV) carrying a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was used to alleviate bone cancer pain. HSV carrying PDGF siRNA was established and intrathecally injected into the cavum subarachnoidale of animals suffering from bone cancer pain and animals in the negative group. Sensory function was assessed by measuring thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. The mechanism by which PDGF regulates pain was also investigated by comparing the differential expression of pPDGFRα/β and phosphorylated ERK and AKT. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia developed in the rats with bone cancer pain, and these effects were accompanied by bone destruction in the tibia. Intrathecal injection of PDGF siRNA and morphine reversed thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with bone cancer pain. In addition, we observed attenuated astrocyte hypertrophy, down-regulated pPDGFRα/β levels, reduced levels of the neurochemical SP, a reduction in CGRP fibers and changes in pERK/ERK and pAKT/AKT ratios. These results demonstrate that PDGF siRNA can effectively treat pain induced by bone cancer by blocking the AKT-ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27282805

  17. Mechanisms of PDGF siRNA-mediated inhibition of bone cancer pain in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Jia; He, Mu; Liu, Ran; Belegu, Visar; Dai, Ping; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Shang, Fei-Fei; Luo, Chao-Zhi; Zhou, Xue; Liu, Su; McDonald, JohnW.; Liu, Jin; Zuo, Yun-Xia; Liu, Fei; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Patients with tumors that metastasize to bone frequently suffer from debilitating pain, and effective therapies for treating bone cancer are lacking. This study employed a novel strategy in which herpes simplex virus (HSV) carrying a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was used to alleviate bone cancer pain. HSV carrying PDGF siRNA was established and intrathecally injected into the cavum subarachnoidale of animals suffering from bone cancer pain and animals in the negative group. Sensory function was assessed by measuring thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. The mechanism by which PDGF regulates pain was also investigated by comparing the differential expression of pPDGFRα/β and phosphorylated ERK and AKT. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia developed in the rats with bone cancer pain, and these effects were accompanied by bone destruction in the tibia. Intrathecal injection of PDGF siRNA and morphine reversed thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with bone cancer pain. In addition, we observed attenuated astrocyte hypertrophy, down-regulated pPDGFRα/β levels, reduced levels of the neurochemical SP, a reduction in CGRP fibers and changes in pERK/ERK and pAKT/AKT ratios. These results demonstrate that PDGF siRNA can effectively treat pain induced by bone cancer by blocking the AKT-ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27282805

  18. A potential anti-allodynic mechanism of GDNF following L5 spinal nerve ligation; Mitigation of NPY up-regulation in the touch sense pathway.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, T; Noguchi, K

    2015-09-24

    Intrathecal delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) reverses mechanical allodynia after 5th lumbar (L5) spinal nerve ligation (SNL). However, the molecular mechanism behind this process is not fully understood. Following sciatic nerve injury, primary afferent neurons in the injured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) begin to express neuropeptide Y (NPY) that is absent in normal DRG. The aim of the current study was to determine the relationship of this de novo expression of NPY and the anti-allodynic effect of GDNF. Following L5 SNL, 73% of neurons began to express NPY mRNA in the ipsilateral L5 DRG and robust NPY-immunoreactive fibers appeared in the ipsilateral GN where the touch-sense mediating A-fiber primary afferents from the hindpaw terminate. Seven-daylong intrathecal infusion of GDNF at the L5 DRG level, starting on day three when mechanical allodynia had fully developed, reversed once-established these changes. The GN neurons normally expressed NPY Y1 receptor, but not Y2, Y4, or Y5 receptors, and L5 SNL did not change the expression pattern. Bolus intracisternal injection of BIBP3226, a Y1 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently reversed mechanical allodynia. We demonstrated that GDNF reversed once-established mechanical allodynia as well as NPY induction in the touch-sense processing pathway. NPY could facilitate touch-sense processing by Y1 receptor in the gracile nucleus after peripheral nerve injury. GDNF may exert anti-allodynic effects through mitigation of this NPY up-regulation. The effectiveness of delayed treatment further indicates the therapeutic potential of GDNF on neuropathic pain. PMID:26215916

  19. Antinociceptive effects of maprotiline in a rat model of peripheral neuropathic pain: possible involvement of opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Banafshe, Hamid Reza; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Mesdaghinia, Azam; Abed, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuropathic pain remains a clinical problem and is poorly relieved by conventional analgesics. This study was designed to determine whether maprotiline administration was effective in alleviating symptoms of neuropathic pain and whether the antinociceptive effect of maprotiline mediated through the opioid system. Materials and Methods: Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats, which resulted in thermal hyperalgesia, and mechanical and cold allodynia. Maprotiline (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, IP) was administered on the 7th and 14th days after surgery. To study the role of the opioid system in the antinociceptive effects of maprotiline, maprotiline (20 mg/kg, IP) was administered in combination with naloxone (1 mg/kg, SC) on the 7th post-surgery day. Behavioral tests were done at 45 min after drug injections on the 7th and 14th days after surgery. Results: Systemic administration of maprotiline blocked heat hyperalgesia, cold allodynia and reduced mechanical allodynia. Also antihyperalgesic effect of maprotiline was reversed by pretreatment with naloxone. Conclusion: Our results suggest that maprotiline can be considered a potential therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain, and the opioid system may be involved in the antihyperalgesic effects of maprotiline. PMID:26557963

  20. Curcumin attenuates diabetic neuropathic pain by downregulating TNF-α in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Yong; Liu, De-bao; Liu, Hai-ying; Hou, Wu-gang; Dong, Yu-shu

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in diabetic neuropathic pain are complex and involve peripheral and central pathophysiological phenomena. Proinflammatory tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and TNF-α receptor 1, which are markers of inflammation, contribute to neuropathic pain. The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of curcumin on diabetic pain in rats. We tested 24 rats with diabetes induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin and 24 healthy control rats. Twelve rats in each group received 60 mg/kg oral curcumin daily for 28 days, and the other 12 received vehicle. On days 7, 14, 21, and 28, we tested mechanical allodynia with von Frey hairs and thermal hyperalgesia with radiant heat. Markers of inflammation in the spinal cord dorsal horn on day 28 were estimated with a commercial assay and Western blot analysis. Compared to control rats, diabetic rats exhibited increased mean plasma glucose concentration, decreased mean body weight, and significant pain hypersensitivity, as evidenced by decreased paw withdrawal threshold to von Frey hairs and decreased paw withdrawal latency to heat. Curcumin significantly attenuated the diabetes-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia and reduced the expression of both TNF-α and TNF-α receptor 1. Curcumin seems to relieve diabetic hyperalgesia, possibly through an inhibitory action on TNF-α and TNF-α receptor 1. PMID:23471081

  1. Early dexamethasone relieves trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Han, S R; Yeo, S P; Lee, M K; Bae, Y C; Ahn, D K

    2010-09-01

    The analgesic effects of dexamethasone on neuropathic pain have been controversial. The present study investigated the effects of dexamethasone on mechanical allodynia in rats with mal-positioned dental implants. Under anesthesia, the left mandibular second molar was extracted and replaced by a miniature dental implant to injure the inferior alveolar nerve. Nociceptive behavior was examined on each designated day after surgery. Mal-positioned dental implants significantly decreased air-puff thresholds both ipsilateral and contralateral to the injury site. Distinct mechanical hyperalgesia and cold and thermal hypersensitivity were also observed bilaterally. Daily administration of dexamethasone produced prolonged anti-allodynic effects (25 or 50 mg/kg, i.p.), but failed to reduce mechanical allodynia when it had already been established. Therefore, our findings provide that early treatment with dexamethasone is important in the treatment of nociceptive behavior suggestive of trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:20581355

  2. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms in childhood irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large number of children throughout the world. The symptom expression of IBS is heterogeneous, and several factors which may be interrelated within the IBS biopsychosocial model play a role. These factors include visceral hyperalgesia, intestinal permeability, gut microbiota, psychosocial distress, gut inflammation, bile acids, food intolerance, colonic bacterial fermentation, and genetics. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these factors are being actively investigated. In this mini-review, we present updates of these mechanisms and, where possible, relate the findings to childhood IBS. Mechanistic elucidation may lead to the identification of biomarkers as well as personalized childhood IBS therapies. PMID:26883355

  3. Effects of serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists on stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea in rats: a comparative study with opioid receptor agonists, a muscarinic receptor antagonist and a synthetic polymer.

    PubMed

    Hirata, T; Keto, Y; Nakata, M; Takeuchi, A; Funatsu, T; Akuzawa, S; Sasamata, M; Miyata, K

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of serotonin (5-HT)3 receptor antagonists (5-HT3RAs) including ramosetron, alosetron, and cilansetron on colonic nociceptive threshold in rats. Furthermore, we established a restraint stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia model in rats, and compared the inhibitory effects of 5-HT3RAs on restraint stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea with those of loperamide, trimebutine, tiquizium and polycarbophil. The colonic nociceptive threshold was measured as the balloon pressure at the time the rat showed a nociceptive response during colonic distension by an intrarectally inserted balloon. Oral administration of ramosetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)), alosetron (30-300 microg kg(-1)), or cilansetron (30-300 microg kg(-1)) increased the colonic nociceptive threshold in a dose-dependent manner in non-stressed rats. Restraint stress for 1 h significantly decreased the colonic nociceptive threshold, but ramosetron (0.3-3 microg kg(-1)), alosetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)), cilansetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)) and trimebutine (100-1000 mg kg(-1)) significantly inhibited the decrease in the threshold. Loperamide (3-30 mg kg(-1)), tiquizium (100-1000 mg kg(-1)) and polycarbophil (1000 mg kg(-1)) did not affect the restraint stress-induced decrease in the colonic nociceptive threshold. All drugs tested in this study showed dose-dependent inhibition of restraint stress-induced diarrhoea in rats. These results indicate that, unlike existing antidiarrhoeal and spasmolytic agents, 5-HT3RAs have inhibitory effects on colonic nociception, and prevented restraint stress-induced both diarrhoea and hyperalgesia at almost the same doses in rats. This suggests that the 5-HT3RAs may be useful in ameliorating both colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:18221252

  4. Intrathecal AAV serotype 9-mediated delivery of shRNA against TRPV1 attenuates thermal hyperalgesia in a mouse model of peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takashi; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Kaburagi, Hidetoshi; Sotome, Shinichi; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Ukegawa, Madoka; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yamamoto, Mariko; Tajiri, Mio; Miyata, Haruka; Hirai, Yukihiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Okawa, Atsushi; Yokota, Takanori

    2014-02-01

    Gene therapy for neuropathic pain requires efficient gene delivery to both central and peripheral nervous systems. We previously showed that an adenoassociated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vector expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) could suppress target molecule expression in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord upon intrathecal injection. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of this approach, we constructed an AAV9 vector encoding shRNA against vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1), which is an important target gene for acute pain, but its role in chronic neuropathic pain remains unclear. We intrathecally injected it into the subarachnoid space at the upper lumbar spine of mice 3 weeks after spared nerve injury (SNI). Delivered shTRPV1 effectively suppressed mRNA and protein expression of TRPV1 in the DRG and spinal cord, and it attenuated nerve injury-induced thermal allodynia 10-28 days after treatment. Our study provides important evidence for the contribution of TRPV1 to thermal hypersensitivity in neuropathic pain and thus establishes intrathecal AAV9-mediated gene delivery as an investigative and potentially therapeutic platform for the nervous system. PMID:24322332

  5. Anti-nociceptive effect of IL-12p40 in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Fang; Khan, Junad; Noma, Noboru; Hadlaq, Emad; Teich, Sorin; Benoliel, Rafael; Eliav, Eli

    2013-06-01

    IL-12p70 is a proinflammatory cytokine secreted by dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages. It plays a crucial role in cell-mediated immunity by inducing proliferation of T cell and natural killer cells, and enhancing their cytotoxic activity. In adaptive immune response, it acts on naive T cells to differentiate into Th1-type cells. It is composed of two subunits, p35 and p40. The latter can be secreted in the form of monodimer or heterodimer, which is also referred as IL-12p80. Recently IL-12p70 has been proven to locally provoke nociceptive effect in naïve rats. This study investigated pain response following systemic administration of IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 homodimer in chronic neuropathic pain model, induced by chronic constriction injury. The doses tested were IL-12p40 homodimer or IL12p70 at 15, 150 and 1500ng/kg, respectively. Pain was assessed at 1, 4, 7 and 24h after injection, in the form of tactile allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia. The side effect of sensory motor disability was measured by rotarod performance. By all behavioral measures, IL-12p70 of any dosage, at any time point, had no significant effect on tactile allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia. A high dose of IL-12p40 homodimer induced significant analgesic effect by the measure of hind paw tactile allodynia from 1h to 4h after injection. Medium and low doses of IL-12p40 homodimer exerted their analgesic effect 4h post injection. Mechanical hyperalgesia, following high and medium doses of IL-12p40 administration, was significantly reduced at 4h after application. Also, no significant sensory motor dysfunction was detected for all dosage for both homodimers. These findings suggest that systemic application of IL-12p40 homodimer induces time-dependent analgesia to mechanical stimulation in rats exposed to neuropathic pain. PMID:23597590

  6. Attenuating effect of standardized fruit extract of punica granatum L in rat model of tibial and sural nerve transection induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Injury to a nerve is the most common reason of acquired peripheral neuropathy. Therefore, searching for effective substance to recover of nerve after injury is need of present era. The current study investigates the protective potential of Standardized Fruit Extract of Punica granatum L (PFE) [Ellagic acid (41.6%), Punicalagins (10%), Granatin (5.1%)] in Tibial & Sural Nerve Transection (TST) induced neuropathic pain in rats. Methods TST was performed by sectioning tibial and sural nerve portions of the sciatic nerve and leaving the common peroneal nerve intact. Acetone drop, pin-prick, hot plate, paint brush & Walking Track tests were performed to assess cold allodynia; mechanical heat, hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia & tibial functional index respectively. The levels of TNF-α, TBARS, GSH and Nitrite were measured in the sciatic nerve as an index of inflammation & oxidative stress. Results TST led to significant development of cold allodynia; mechanical and heat hyperalgesia; dynamic mechanical allodynia; functional deficit in walking along with rise in the levels of TBARS, TNF-α, GSH and Nitrite. Administrations of PFE (100 & 300 mg/kg oral), significantly attenuate TST induced behavioral & biochemical changes. Pretreatments of BADGE (120 mg/kg IP) a PPAR-γ antagonist and nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (100 mg/kg IP) abolished the protective effect of PFE. Whereas, pretreatment of L-NAME (5 mg/kg IP) a NOS inhibitor significantly potentiated PFE’s protective effect of PFE. Conclusion PFE shown to have attenuating effect in TST induced neuropathic pain which may be attributed to potential PPAR-gamma agonistic activity, nitric oxide inhibitory, anti-inflammatory and anti oxidative actions. PMID:24499201

  7. Activation of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in rat dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord contributes toward induction and maintenance of bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gui-Qin; Liu, Su; He, Duan-Duan; Liu, Yue-Peng; Song, Xue-Jun

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) signaling in the development of bone cancer pain in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (N=48) were divided randomly into four groups: sham (n=8), tumor cell implantation (TCI) (n=16), TCI+saline (n=8), and TCI+PKA inhibitor (n=16). Bone cancer-induced pain behaviors - thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia - were tested at postoperative days -3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14. A PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMPS (1 mmol/l/20 μl), was injected intrathecally on postoperative days 3, 4, and 5 (early phase) or 7, 8, and 9 postoperative days (late phase). The expression of PKA mRNA in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was detected by reverse transcription-PCR. The concentration of cAMP and activity of PKA in DRG and spinal cord were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TCI treatment induced significant pain behaviors, manifested as thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Spinal administration of the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMPS during the early phase and late phase significantly delayed or reversed, respectively, TCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. TCI treatment also led to obvious tumor growth and bone destruction. The level of PKA mRNA in the DRG, as well as the concentration of cAMP and the activity of PKA, in both the DRG and spinal cord were significantly increased after TCI treatment (P<0.01). We conclude that the inhibition of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway may reduce bone cancer pain. PMID:24978483

  8. Role of spinal cord glia in the central processing of peripheral pain perception

    PubMed Central

    Bradesi, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Background The discovery that glial activation plays a critical role in the modulation of neuronal functions and affects the spinal processing of nociceptive signalling has brought new understanding on the mechanisms underlying central sensitization involved in chronic pain facilitation. Spinal glial activation is now considered an important component in the development and maintenance of allodynia and hyperalgesia in various models of chronic pain, including neuropathic pain and pain associated with peripheral inflammation. In addition, spinal glial activation is also involved in some forms of visceral hyperalgesia. Purpose We discuss the signalling pathways engaged in central glial activation, including stress pathways, and the neuron-glia bidirectional relationships involved in the modulation of synaptic activity and pain facilitation. In this expanding field of research, the characterization of the mechanisms by which glia affect spinal neuro-transmission will increase our understanding of central pain facilitation, and has the potential for the development of new therapeutic agents for common chronic pain conditions. PMID:20236247

  9. Opioid-induced redistribution of 6TM and 7TM μ opioid receptors: A hypothesized mechanistic facilitator model of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Xiaoju; Liu, Yusheng; Xu, Shiqin; Lei, Liming; Shen, Xiaofeng; Guo, Xirong; Xia, Xiaoqiong; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-08-01

    Opioids are still the most popular form of pain treatment, but many unavoidable side effects make opioids a big challenge in effective pain management. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), a paradoxical phenomenon, portrays an increased sensitivity to harmful stimuli caused by opioid exposure. Changes in the neural modulation are considered a major contributor to the development of OIH. Activation of opioid receptors (ORs) and corresponding downstream molecules are the vital composition of functional performance of opioids. Increasing interests were proposed of the interaction between ORs and other neural transmitter systems such as glutamatergic, GABAergic and adrenergic ones to the genesis of OIH. G protein coupled μ-opioid receptor (MOR) was studied comprehensively on its role in the development of OIH. In addition to the relationship between MOR and other neurotransmitter receptors, a new intracellular MOR that has six transmembrane (6TM) domains was identified, and found to perform a pro-nociceptive task in contrast to the counterpart 7TM isoform. A mechanistic model of OIH in which both 6TM and 7TM MORs undergoing membrane redistribution upon opioid exposure is proposed which eventually facilitates the neurons more sensitive to nociceptive stimulation than that of the preceding opioid exposure. PMID:27116700

  10. [Pain in humans: experimental facts and hypotheses].

    PubMed

    Cesaro, P

    1994-09-15

    The description of painful phenomena in humans has to take into account its different components: sensory component (relevant to nociception), affective and emotional components. Nociceptor's (physiology is best understood with electrophysiological and neurochemical methods allowing a clear description of hyperalgesia, with its peripheral and spinal mechanisms. A functional model is partly available to explain allodynia, spontaneous burning pain and lightning pain, the three main consequences following deafferentation. At the thalamo-cortical level, one can describe nociceptive pathways and other pathways or neuronal networks involved in the affective and emotional components of pain. PMID:7939277

  11. Chronic resveratrol treatment exerts antihyperalgesic effect and corrects co-morbid depressive like behaviors in mice with mononeuropathy: involvement of serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Yu, Chao; Wang, Chuang; Zhang, Jun-Fang; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Cui, Wu-Geng; Ye, Feng; Xu, Ying

    2014-10-01

    Patients suffering from chronic neuropathic pain are at high risk of co-morbid depression, which burdens healthcare. This work aimed to investigate the effects of resveratrol, a phenolic monomer enriched in red wine and grapes, on pain-related and depressive-like behaviors in mice with mononeuropathy, and explored the mechanism(s). Mice received chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerves, and sequentially developed pain-related and depressive-like behaviors, as evidenced by sensory hypersensitivity (thermal hyperalgesia in Hargreaves test and mechanical allodynia in von Frey test) and behavioral despair (prolonged immobility time in forced swim test). Chronic treatment of neuropathic mice with resveratrol (30 mg/kg, p.o., twice per day for three weeks) normalized their thermal hyperalgesia (but not mechanical allodynia) and depressive-like behaviors, and these actions were abolished by chemical depletion of central serotonin (5-HT) but potentiated by co-treatment with 5-HTP, a precursor of 5-HT. The anti-hyperalgesia and anti-depression exerted by resveratrol may be pharmacologically segregated, since intrathecal (i.t.) and intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of methysergide, a non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist, separately abrogated the two actions. Furthermore, the antihyperalgesic action of resveratrol was preferentially counteracted by co-administration of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-258719, while the anti-depression was abrogated by 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. These results confirm that chronic resveratrol administration exerts curative-like effects on thermal hyperalgesia and co-morbid depressive-like behaviors in mice with mononeuropathy. Spinal and supraspinal serotonergic systems (coupled with 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors, respectively) are differentially responsible for the antihyperalgesic and antidepressant-like properties of resveratrol. PMID:24835468

  12. Involvement of subtype 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors in apoptosis and caspase-7 over-expression in spinal cord of neuropathic rats

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalco, Dario; Giordano, Catia; Fuccio, Carlo; Luongo, Livio; Ferraraccio, Franca; Rossi, Francesca; de Novellis, Vito; Roth, Kevin A.; Maione, Sabatino

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the non-selective, 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA), and selective (3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrano[2,3-b]quinolin-7-yl)-(cis-4- methoxycyclohexyl) methanone (JNJ16259685), metabotropic glutamate subtype 1 (mGlu1) receptor antagonists, on rat sciatic nerve chronic constrictive injury (CCI)- induced hyperalgesia, allodynia, spinal dorsal horn apoptosis, and gliosis was examined at 3 and 7 days post-injury. RT-PCR analysis showed increased expression of bax, apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 (apaf-1), nestin, GFAP, and caspase-7 mRNA in the dorsal horn spinal cord by 3 days post-CCI. At 7 days post-CCI, only over-expression of bcl-2, nestin and GFAP mRNA was observed. Administration of AIDA reduced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia at 3 and 7 days post-CCI; administration of JNJ16259685 reduced thermal hyperalgesia at 3 and 7 days post-CCI, but not mechanical allodynia. AIDA decreased the mRNA levels of bax, apaf-1, GFAP and caspase-7 genes. JNJ16259685 increased the mRNA levels of bcl- 2 and GFAP gene, and decreased APAF-1 and caspases-7 genes. Inhibiting mGlu1 receptors also reduced TUNEL-positive profiles and immunohistochemical reactivity for caspase-7. We report here that despite inhibiting CCI-induced over-expression of pro-apoptotic genes in the spinal cord dorsal horn, the selective mGlu1 receptor antagonist JNJ16259685 exerted only a slight and transient allodynic effect. Moreover, JNJ16259685, but not the non-selective AIDA, increased astrogliosis which may account for its decreased analgesic efficacy. This study provides evidence that the contemporary and partial blockade of group I and likely ionotropic glutamate receptors may be a more suitable therapy than selective blockade of mGlu1 subtype receptors condition to decrease neuropathic pain symptoms. PMID:18325779

  13. Intrathecal SRT1720, a SIRT1 agonist, exerts anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects on chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Chen; Hu, Hong-Yi; Zhao, Li; Zheng, Hui; Luo, Xian-Zhe; Zhang, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by lesion or inflammation of the nervous system and characterized by the symptoms of allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain. SIRT1 (Sir2) is a NAD-dependent deacetylase and is reported to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes including inflammation, aging and lifespan extension. Nevertheless, the role of SIRT1 in neuropathic pain is not fully understood. The present study was intended to detect the effect of intrathecal SRT1720, a SIRT1 agonist, using quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis over time in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI) or sham surgery. In addition, the effect of intrathecal injection of SRT1720 on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia was evaluated in CCI rats. It was found that daily intrathecal injection of SRT1720 before and 1, 3, 5, 7 days after CCI surgery produced a transient inhibitory effect on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in CCI rats. In addition, an intrathecal injection of STR1-siRNA before SRT1720 administration reversed the anti-nociceptive effect of SRT1720. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of SRT1720 significantly down-regulated the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mROT), NF-κB and inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA. These data indicate that intrathecal SRT1720 may be an alternative strategy for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our findings suggest that intrathecal SRT1720, a SIRT1 agonist, exerts antihyperalgesic and antiinflammatory effects on CCI-induced neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:26221253

  14. Activation of NMDA receptors in the brainstem, RVM and NGC, mediates mechanical hyperalgesia produced by repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline in rats

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, LFS; DeSantana, JM; Sluka, KA

    2010-01-01

    Repeated injections of acidic saline into the gastrocnemius muscle induced both muscle and cutaneous hypersensitivity. We have previously shown that microinjection of local anesthetic into either the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) or the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NGC) reverses this muscle and cutaneous hypersensitivity. Although prior studies show that NMDA receptors in the RVM play a clear role in mediating visceral and inflammatory hypersensitivity, the role of NMDA receptors in the NGC, or in non-inflammatory muscle pain is unclear. Therefore, the present study evaluated involvement of the NMDA receptors in the RVM and NGC in muscle and cutaneous hypersensitivity induced by repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline. Repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline, 5 days apart, resulted in a bilateral decrease in the withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle in all groups 24 h after the second injection. Microinjection of NMDA receptor antagonists into the RVM reversed both the muscle and cutaneous hypersensitivity. However, microinjection of NMDA receptor antagonists into the NGC only reversed cutaneous, but not muscle hypersensitivity. These results suggest that NMDA receptors in the RVM mediate both muscle and cutaneous hypersensitivity, but those in the NGC mediated only cutaneous hypersensitivity after muscle insult. PMID:19853525

  15. Nitric oxide is involved in ibuprofen preemptive analgesic effect in the plantar incisional model of postsurgical pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sherin S T; Hamza, May; Bahr, Mohamed H; Masoud, Somaia I

    2016-02-12

    Control of postoperative pain is far from satisfactory. Yet, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain an important choice. The production of nitric oxide (NO), which plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia, is inhibited by NSAIDs. Monoamines also play a key role in the modulation of nociception. The aim of the present work is to study the involvement of NO and monoamines in the antinociceptive mechanism of ibuprofen in postsurgical pain in mice. Surgical incision resulted in mechanical allodynia and increased spinal NO levels. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NAME (50mg/kg), administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), 30min before the incision decreased the development of postsurgical mechanical allodynia and reduced spinal NO levels. Ibuprofen (100 and 300mg/kg, i.p.), administered 30min before the incision, dose-dependently decreased both spinal NO levels and the development of mechanical allodynia. Administration of ibuprofen (100mg/kg i.p.), 20min following surgery, did not significantly reduce spinal NO level and resulted in a smaller antiallodynic effect. l-Arginine (600mg/kg i.p.), administered 20min before ibuprofen administration, restored both spinal NO level and mechanical allodynia in ibuprofen-treated mice. The selective alpha-2 adrenoceptor blocker yohimbine (4mg/kg i.p.), administered 30min before ibuprofen, also blocked ibuprofen effect on both mechanical allodynia and spinal NO level. These results suggest that inhibition of NO synthesis is involved in the analgesic activity of ibuprofen in post-surgical pain. Alpha-2 adrenoceptors are also involved in the analgesic activity of ibuprofen and NO may be involved in this mechanism. PMID:26718443

  16. Acute and chronic nociceptive phases observed in a rat hind paw ischemia/reperfusion model depend on different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Klafke, J Z; da Silva, M A; Rossato, M F; de Prá, S Dal Toé; Rigo, F K; Walker, C I B; Bochi, G V; Moresco, R N; Ferreira, J; Trevisan, G

    2016-02-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) may be evoked by ischemia/reperfusion, eliciting acute and chronic pain that is difficult to treat. Despite this, the underlying mechanism of CRPS1 has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the goal of this study is to evaluate the involvement of inflammation, oxidative stress, and the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel, a chemosensor of inflammation and oxidative substances, in an animal model of chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP). Male Wistar rats were subjected to 3 h hind paw ischemia/reperfusion (CPIP model). Different parameters of nociception, inflammation, ischemia, and oxidative stress were evaluated at 1 (acute) and 14 (chronic) days after CPIP. The effect of a TRPA1 antagonist and the TRPA1 immunoreactivity were also observed after CPIP. In the CPIP acute phase, we observed mechanical and cold allodynia; increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (hind paw), ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) (serum), protein carbonyl (hind paw and spinal cord), lactate (serum), and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, hind paw and spinal cord); and higher myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) activities (hind paw). In the CPIP chronic phase, we detected mechanical and cold allodynia and increased levels of IMA (serum), protein carbonyl (hind paw and spinal cord), and 4-HNE (hind paw and spinal cord). TRPA1 antagonism reduced mechanical and cold allodynia 1 and 14 days after CPIP, but no change in TRPA1 immunoreactivity was observed. Different mechanisms underlie acute (inflammation and oxidative stress) and chronic (oxidative stress) phases of CPIP. TRPA1 activation may be relevant for CRPS1/CPIP-induced acute and chronic pain. PMID:26490459

  17. Peripheral neurobiologic mechanisms of antiallodynic effect of warm water immersion therapy on persistent inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Martins, Daniel F; Brito, Rômulo N; Stramosk, Juliana; Batisti, Ana P; Madeira, Fernanda; Turnes, Bruna L; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Santos, Adair R S; Piovezan, Anna P

    2015-01-01

    Water immersion is widely used in physiotherapy and might relieve pain, probably by activating several distinct somatosensory modalities, including tactile, pressure, and thermal sensations. However, the endogenous mechanisms behind this effect remain poorly understood. This study examined whether warm water immersion therapy (WWIT) produces an antiallodynic effect in a model of localized inflammation and whether peripheral opioid, cannabinoid, and adenosine receptors are involved in this effect. Mice were injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA; intraplantar; i.pl.). The withdrawal frequency to mechanical stimuli (von Frey test) was used to determine 1) the effect of WWIT against CFA-induced allodynia and 2) the effect of i.pl. preadministration of naloxone (a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist; 5 µg/paw), caffeine (a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist; 150 nmol/paw), 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX; a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist; 10 nmol/paw), and AM630 (a selective cannabinoid receptor type 2 antagonist; 4 µg/paw) on the antiallodynic effect of WWIT against CFA-induced allodynia. Moreover, the influence of WWIT on paw inflammatory edema was measured with a digital micrometer. WWIT produced a significant time-dependent reduction of paw inflammatory allodynia but did not influence paw edema induced by CFA. Naloxone, caffeine, DPCPX, and AM630 injected in the right, but not in the left, hind paw significantly reversed the antiallodynic effect of WWIT. This is the first study to demonstrate the involvement of peripheral receptors in the antiallodynic effect of WWIT in a murine model of persistent inflammatory pain. PMID:25079058

  18. Oral opioid use alters DNIC but not cold pain perception in patients with chronic pain - new perspective of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ram, Kerstin Carlin; Eisenberg, Elon; Haddad, May; Pud, Dorit

    2008-10-15

    Opioids can elicit unexpected changes in pain sensitivity, known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The aim of this study was to explore whether OIH exists in patients with chronic pain treated with oral opioids (OP) versus non-opioid (NOP) analgesics. The sensitivity to cold pain and the magnitude of diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC) were evaluated in 73 OP and 37 NOP treated patients. Pain threshold, intensity and tolerance in response to the cold pressor (1 degrees C) were measured. DNIC was tested by co-administrating conditioned heat stimulation (47 degrees C) to the left forearm and a conditioning stimulation of 12 degrees C for 30s to the right hand. The results showed no differences between the two groups in any of the cold pain measures. In contrast, the magnitude of DNIC was significantly larger in the NOP than in the OP treated patients (p=0.003). A gender based analysis showed a significant difference in DNIC between OP and NOP treated men only. However, a mixed model ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of treatment (OP versus NOP) (F=5.928, p=0.017) rather than gender on DNIC. A regression analysis showed that opioid dosage and treatment duration had a significant negative effect on the magnitude of DNIC in OP treated men (beta=-2.175, p=0.036 and beta=-2.061, p=0.047, respectively). In conclusion, oral opioids usage for the treatment of chronic pain does not result in abnormal sensitivity to cold pain, but seems to alter pain modulation. The use of 'advanced' psychophysics tests such as evaluation of DNIC can help understanding the phenomenon of OIH. PMID:18583047

  19. Test-retest reliability of a new technique with pressure algometry applied to teeth in healthy Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ran; Gu, Xinyu; Zhang, Jinglu; Yu, Linfeng; Chen, Wenjing; Wang, Kelun; Svensson, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) have been shown to be useful measures of mechanical pain sensitivity in deep tissues. However, clinical methods for measuring mechanical allodynia or hyperalgesia in teeth have not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of PPTs in periodontal ligament of healthy Chinese participants. Twenty healthy young adults participated. Pressure pain thresholds were measured at six teeth and in two directions. The tests included three consecutive trials, in two separate sessions, which were performed on the first day by one examiner. After 1-3 wk, an identical protocol was carried out by two examiners, also in two separate sessions. There were no significant differences between repeated measures for all teeth. The PPTs had excellent reliability with high intraclass coefficients (ICCs) across different sessions (ICC: 0.871-0.956), days (ICC: 0.879-0.951), and examiners (ICC: 0.845-0.950). Pressure pain thresholds applied to the teeth have excellent intra- and inter-examiner agreement in healthy participants. This method may be proposed as an easy and reliable technique to assess mechanical pain sensitivity (e.g. mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia) in the periodontal ligament, which is associated with endodontic or periodontal conditions. PMID:27017942

  20. Analgesic effects evoked by a CCR2 antagonist or an anti-CCL2 antibody in inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Llorián-Salvador, María; Pevida, Marta; González-Rodríguez, Sara; Lastra, Ana; Fernández-García, María-Teresa; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana; Menéndez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine CCL2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), is a molecule that in addition to its well-established role in chemotaxis can also act as nociceptor sensitizer. The upregulation of this chemokine in inflamed tissues could suggest its involvement in inflammatory hypernociception. Thus, we have measured CCL2 levels in mice with acute or chronic inflammation due to the intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), respectively, and we have studied whether inflammatory hyperalgesia or allodynia could be attenuated by blocking CCR2 receptors or neutralizing CCL2 with an anti-CCL2 antibody. A remarkable increase in CCL2 concentration was detected by ELISA in paw homogenates coming from carrageenan- or CFA-inflamed mice, being its expression mainly localized in macrophages, as shown by immunohistochemical assays. The s.c. (0.3-3 mg/kg) or i.pl. (0.3-3 μg) administration of the CCR2 antagonist, RS 504393, dose dependently inhibited thermal hyperalgesia measured in acutely or chronically inflamed mice, whereas s.c. administration of this drug did not reduce inflammatory mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, the inhibition of inflammatory hyperalgesia after the administration of an anti-CCL2 antibody (0.1-1 μg; i.pl.) suggests that CCL2 could be the endogenous chemokine responsible for CCR2-mediated hyperalgesic effects. Besides, the acute administration of the highest antihyperalgesic dose of RS 504393 assayed did not reduce paw tumefaction or modify the presence of inflammatory cells. These results indicate that the blockade of the CCL2/CCR2 system can counteract inflammatory hyperalgesia, being this antinociceptive effect unrelated to a decrease in the inflammatory reaction. PMID:26820818

  1. The profile of FR140423, a novel anti-inflammatory compound, in yeast-induced rat hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ochi, T; Fujii, T; Motoyama, Y; Goto, T

    1999-09-01

    The mechanism of action of FR140423 (3-(difluoromethyl)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-[4-(methylsulfinyl)phenyl]pyra zole), a novel anti-inflammatory compound, in a rat yeast-induced hyperalgesic model was investigated and compared with those of indomethacin and morphine. We tested the inhibitory effects of FR140423 on the formation of arachidonic acid metabolites, prostaglandin (PG) E2, thromboxane (TX) B2 and leukotriene (LT) B4, in yeast-injected inflamed paws and the effect of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone on FR140423-induced anti-hyperalgesic effect and inhibition of the formation of arachidonic acid metabolites. Oral administration of FR140423 showed a dose-dependent anti-hyperalgesic effect. This effect was fourfold more potent than that of indomethacin but less potent than that of morphine. Unlike morphine, FR140423 suppressed the levels of PGE2 and TXB2 but not LTB4 in inflamed paws. FR140423 did not inhibit yeast-induced paw edema. The anti-hyperalgesic effect of FR140423 in yeast-injected rat paws was partially blocked by naloxone. However, the inhibitory effects of FR140423 on the formation of PGE2 and TXB2 in yeast-injected rat paws were not antagonized by naloxone. These results suggest that FR140423 shows a potent anti-hyperalgesic effect mediated by inhibition of PGs in inflamed tissue and by activation of opioid receptors. PMID:10580376

  2. Capsaicin-Induced Thermal Hyperalgesia and Sensitization in the Human Trigeminal Nociceptive Pathway: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Eric; Pendse, Gautam; Morris, Susie; Strassman, Andrew; Aiello-Lammens, Matthew; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to differentiate the processing of nociceptive information, matched for pain intensity, from capsaicin-induced hyperalgesic vs. control skin at multiple levels in the trigeminal nociceptive pathway. Using an event-related fMRI approach, 12 male subjects underwent three functional scans beginning 1 hour after topical application of capsaicin to a defined location on the maxillary skin, when pain from capsaicin application had completely subsided. Brush and two levels of painful heat (low - Thermal-1 and high - Thermal-2) were applied to the site of capsaicin application and to the mirror image region on the opposite side. Temperatures for each side were set to evoke perceptually-matched pain (mean temperatures [capsaicin/control]: Thermal-1=38.4/42.8°C; Thermal-2=44.9/47.8°C). We found differences in activation patterns following stimuli to treated and untreated sides in sensory circuits across all stimulus conditions. Across the trigeminal nociceptive pathway, Thermal-2 stimulation of hyperalgesic skin evoked greater activation in trigeminal ganglion and nucleus, thalamus, and somatosensory cortex than the control side. Thus, trigeminal nociceptive regions showed increased activation in the context of perceptually equal pain levels. Beyond these regions, contrast analyses of capsaicin vs. control skin stimulation indicated significant changes in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and amygdala. The involvement of these emotion-related regions suggests that they may be highly sensitive to context, such as prior experience (application of capsaicin) and the specific pain mechanism (hyperalgesic vs. normal skin). PMID:17407825

  3. Enhancement of antinociception by coadminstration of minocycline and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin in naïve mice and murine models of LPS-induced thermal hyperalgesia and monoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Minocycline and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin, have anti-inflammatory activities and are both used in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. However, there are no reports on whether coadministration of these drugs could potentiate each other's activities in alleviating pain and weight bearing deficits during arthritis. Methods LPS was injected to BALB/c mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) to induce thermal hyperalgesia. The hot plate test was used to study thermal nociception in naïve BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice with LPS-induced thermal hyperalgesia and to evaluate antinociceptive effects of drugs administered i.p. Monoarthritis was induced by injection of LPS intra-articularly into the right hind (RH) limb ankle joint of C57BL/6 mice. Weight bearing changes and the effect of i.p. drug administration were analyzed in freely moving mice using the video-based CatWalk gait analysis system. Results In naïve mice indomethacin (5 to 50 mg/kg) had no significant activity, minocycline (25 to 100 mg/kg) produced hyperalgesia to thermal nociception, however, coadministration of minocycline 50 mg/kg with indomethacin 5 or 10 mg/kg produced significant antinociceptive effects in the hot plate test. A selective inhibitor of COX-1, FR122047 (10 mg/kg) and a selective COX-2 inhibitor, CAY10404 (10 mg/kg) had no significant antinociceptive activities to thermal nociception in naïve mice, however, coadministration of minocycline, with CAY10404 but not FR122047 produced significant antinociceptive effects. In mice with LPS-induced hyperalgesia vehicle, indomethacin (10 mg/kg) or minocycline (50 mg/kg) did not produce significant changes, however, coadministration of minocycline plus indomethacin resulted in antinociceptive activity. LPS-induced RH limb monoarthritis resulted in weight bearing (RH/left hind (LH) limb paw pressure ratios) and RH/LH print area ratios deficits. Treatment with indomethacin (1 mg/kg) or minocycline (50 mg

  4. Natural history of sensory function after herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin L; Rowbotham, Michael C

    2010-07-01

    The natural history of sensory function in the first 6months after herpes zoster (HZ) was determined in a cohort of 94 subjects at elevated risk for developing post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). All four visits included ratings of pain and sensory symptoms, mapping areas of altered sensation and allodynia, and quantitative thermal and mechanical sensory testing. The last three visits included the capsaicin response test. Sensory thresholds in distant control skin were stable. Mirror-image skin was persistently hyperesthetic to warming and mechanical stimuli and hyperalgesic to heat compared to distant control skin. HZ skin showed deficits in all thermal modalities. Sensory recovery was limited and selective. Allodynia area and severity, hyperalgesia to von Frey hair, and cold detection threshold improved, but deficits to warmth and heat pain did not. Capsaicin on HZ skin significantly aggravated pain and allodynia in the majority of subjects at 6-8weeks after HZ onset. At study entry, eventual PHN subjects had significantly more impairment in detecting warmth and cold, a larger area of altered sensation, a larger area of allodynia, and more severe allodynia. The results support the study hypothesis that severity of initial injury predicts PHN, especially impaired cold sensation in HZ skin. The hypothesis that PHN develops because of a failure to recover normal neural function was not supported. Sensory recovery proceeded at the same rate in eventual pain-free and eventual PHN subjects and is not a requirement for pain resolution. Early interventions that reduce neural injury or enhance recovery should be of benefit. PMID:20452122

  5. Osthole, a herbal compound, alleviates nucleus pulposus-evoked nociceptive responses through the suppression of overexpression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in rat dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiu-Lan; Chen, Yuling; Qin, Jian; Mo, Sui-Lin; Wei, Ming; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Li, Mei-Na; Zou, Xue-Nong; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Sun, Lai-Bao

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Osthole (Ost), a natural coumarin derivative, has been shown to inhibit many pro-inflammatory mediators and block voltage-gated Na+ channels. During inflammation, acidosis is an important pain inducer which activates nociceptors by gating depolarizing cationic channels, such as acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3). The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Ost on nucleus pulposus-evoked nociceptive responses and ASIC3 over-expression in the rat dorsal root ganglion, and to investigate the possible mechanism. Material/Methods Radicular pain was generated with application of nucleus pulposus (NP) to nerve root. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated using von Frey filaments with logarithmically incremental rigidity to calculate the 50% probability thresholds for mechanical paw withdrawal. ASIC3 protein expression in dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) was assessed with Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Membrane potential (MP) shift of DRG neurons induced by ASIC3-sensitive acid (pH6.5) was determined by DiBAC4 (3) fluorescence intensity (F.I.). Results The NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia model showed allodynia for 3 weeks, and ASIC3 expression was up-regulated in DRG neurons, reaching peak on Day 7. Epidural administration of Ost induced a remarkable and prolonged antinociceptive effect, accompanied by an inhibition of over-expressed ASIC3 protein and of abnormal shift of MP. Amiloride (Ami), an antagonist of ASIC3, strengthened the antinociceptive effect of Ost. Conclusions Up-regulation of ASIC3 expression may be associated with NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia. A single epidural injection of Ost decreased ASIC3 expression in DGR neurons and the pain in the NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia model. Osthole may be of great benefit for preventing chronic pain status often seen in lumbar disc herniation (LDH). PMID:22648244

  6. A rat model of bone cancer pain induced by intra-tibia inoculation of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mao-Ying, Q.-L.; Zhao Jun; Dong Zhiqiang; Wang Jun; Yu Jin; Yan Minfen; Zhang Yuqiu; Wu Gencheng; Wang Yanqing . E-mail: wangyanqing@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-07-14

    This study described a modified rat model of bone cancer pain. Syngeneic Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells were injected into the tibia medullary cavity via intercondylar eminence. Series of tests were carried out including bone radiology, bone histology, ambulatory pain, thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, weight bearing ability, and electrophysiological recording from primary afferent fibers. The rats inoculated with carcinoma cells showed significant ambulatory pain, mechanical allodynia, and reduction in weight bearing, as well as increased incidence of spontaneous activity in A{beta} fibers in affected limb, whereas PBS (vehicle) or heat-killed cells (sham) injected rats showed no significant difference in comparison to normal rats. The pain hypersensitive behaviors were aggravated with time and destruction of bone. Interestingly, mechanical allodynia was also observed in the contralateral limb, indicating the involvement of 'mirror image' pain in bone cancer pain. In summary, the present study provided a useful and easily established rat model of bone cancer pain which will contribute to further study of the mechanisms underlying cancer pain.

  7. Analysis of nociception, sex and peripheral nerve innervation in the TMEV animal model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jessica L.; Gallus, Nathan J.; Ericson, Marna E.; Beitz, Alvin J.

    2009-01-01

    Although pain was previously not considered an important element of multiple sclerosis (MS), recent evidence indicates that over 50% of MS patients suffer from chronic pain. In the present study, we utilized the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) model of MS to examine whether changes in nociception occur during disease progression and to investigate whether sex influences the development of nociception or disease-associated neurological symptoms. Using the rotarod assay, TMEV infected male mice displayed increased neurological deficits when compared to TMEV infected female mice, which mimics what is observed in human MS. While both male and female TMEV infected mice exhibited thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, female mice developed mechanical allodynia at a faster rate and displayed significantly more mechanical allodynia than male mice. Since neuropathic symptoms have been described in MS patients, we quantified sensory nerve fibers in the epidermis of TMEV-infected and non-infected mice to determine if there were alterations in epidermal nerve density. There was a significantly higher density of PGP9.5 and CGRP immunoreactive axons in the epidermis of TMEV-infected mice versus controls. Collectively these results indicate that the TMEV model is well suited to study the mechanisms of MS-induced nociception and suggest that alterations in peripheral nerve innervation may contribute to MS pain. PMID:17766043

  8. Radiotherapy Suppresses Bone Cancer Pain through Inhibiting Activation of cAMP Signaling in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guiqin; Dong, Yanbin; He, Xueming; Zhao, Ping; Yang, Aixing; Zhou, Rubing; Ma, Jianhua; Xie, Zhong; Song, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the major clinical approaches for treatment of bone cancer pain. Activation of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway plays important roles in bone cancer pain. Here, we examined the effects of radiotherapy on bone cancer pain and accompanying abnormal activation of cAMP-PKA signaling. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used and received tumor cell implantation (TCI) in rat tibia (TCI cancer pain model). Some of the rats that previously received TCI treatment were treated with X-ray radiation (radiotherapy). Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were measured and used for evaluating level of pain caused by TCI treatment. PKA mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was detected by RT-PCR. Concentrations of cAMP, IL-1β, and TNF-α as well as PKA activity in DRG and the spinal cord were measured by ELISA. The results showed that radiotherapy significantly suppressed TCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. The level of PKA mRNA in DRG, cAMP concentration and PKA activity in DRG and in the spinal cord, and concentrations of IL-1β and TNF-α in the spinal cord were significantly reduced by radiotherapy. In addition, radiotherapy also reduced TCI-induced bone loss. These findings suggest that radiotherapy may suppress bone cancer pain through inhibition of activation of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in DRG and the spinal cord. PMID:26989332

  9. Chloride Regulation in the Pain Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J; Cervero, Fernando; Gold, Michael S; Hammond, Donna L; Prescott, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Melzack and Wall’s Gate Control Theory of Pain laid the theoretical groundwork for a role of spinal inhibition in endogenous pain control. While the Gate Control Theory was based on the notion that spinal inhibition is dynamically regulated, mechanisms underlying the regulation of inhibition have turned out to be far more complex than Melzack and Wall could have ever imagined. Recent evidence indicates that an exquisitely sensitive form of regulation involves changes in anion equilibrium potential (Eanion), which subsequently impacts fast synaptic inhibition mediated GABAA, and to a lesser extent, glycine receptor activation, the prototypic ligand gated anion channels. The cation-chloride co-transporters (in particular NKCC1 and KCC2) have emerged as proteins that play a critical role in the dynamic regulation of Eanion which in turn appears to play a critical role in hyperalgesia and allodynia following peripheral inflammation or nerve injury. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge in this area with particular attention to how such findings relate to endogenous mechanisms of hyperalgesia and allodynia and potential applications for therapeutics based on modulation of intracellular Cl− gradients or pharmacological interventions targeting GABAA receptors PMID:19167425

  10. Levo-Tetrahydropalmatine Attenuates Bone Cancer Pain by Inhibiting Microglial Cells Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mao-yin; Liu, Yue-peng; Zhang, Lian-yi; Yue, Dong-mei; Qi, Dun-yi; Liu, Gong-jian; Liu, Su

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The present study is to investigate the analgesic roles of L-THP in rats with bone cancer pain caused by tumor cell implantation (TCI). Methods. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were measured at different time points before and after operation. L-THP (20, 40, and 60 mg/kg) were administrated intragastrically at early phase of postoperation (before pain appearance) and later phase of postoperation (after pain appearance), respectively. The concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-18 in spinal cord were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot was used to test the activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in spinal cord after TCI treatment. Results. TCI treatment induced significant thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Administration of L-THP at high doses significantly prevented and/or reversed bone cancer-related pain behaviors. Besides, TCI-induced activation of microglial cells and the increased levels of TNF-α and IL-18 were inhibited by L-THP administration. However, L-THP failed to affect TCI-induced astrocytes activation and IL-1β increase. Conclusion. This study suggests the possible clinical utility of L-THP in the treatment of bone cancer pain. The analgesic effects of L-THP on bone cancer pain maybe underlying the inhibition of microglial cells activation and proinflammatory cytokines increase. PMID:26819501

  11. 5'-Chloro-5'-deoxy-(±)-ENBA, a potent and selective adenosine A(1) receptor agonist, alleviates neuropathic pain in mice through functional glial and microglial changes without affecting motor or cardiovascular functions.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Livio; Petrelli, Riccardo; Gatta, Luisa; Giordano, Catia; Guida, Francesca; Vita, Patrizia; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Grifantini, Mario; de Novellis, Vito; Cappellacci, Loredana; Maione, Sabatino

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to investigate the effect of chronic treatment with 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA, a potent and highly selective agonist of human adenosine A(1) receptor, on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain, the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) of the sciatic nerve. Chronic systemic administration of 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia 3 and 7 days post-SNI, in a way prevented by DPCPX (3 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective A(1) adenosine receptor antagonist, without exerting any significant change on the motor coordination or arterial blood pressure. In addition, a single intraperitoneal injection of 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 7 days post-SNI also reduced both symptoms for at least two hours. SNI was associated with spinal changes in microglial activation ipsilaterally to the nerve injury. Activated, hypertrophic microglia were significantly reduced by 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA chronic treatment. Our results demonstrated an involvement of adenosine A(1) receptor in the amplified nociceptive thresholds and in spinal glial and microglial changes occurred in neuropathic pain, without affecting motor coordination or blood pressure. Our data suggest a possible use of adenosine A(1) receptor agonist in neuropathic pain symptoms. PMID:23174891

  12. Effects of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) Stigma Extract and its Active Constituent Crocin on Neuropathic Pain Responses in a Rat Model of Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Safakhah, Hossein Ali; Taghavi, Tahereh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sokhanvar, Mina; Mohebbi, Narges; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its main constituent crocin on neuropathic pain behavioral responses induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 250 g) were randomly assigned into 5 groups: Sham + saline, CCI + saline, CCI+ saffron (30 mg/kg), CCI + crocin (15 mg/kg) and CCI + crocin (30 mg/kg). CCI was induced by applying 4 loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve. Two weeks after nerve lesion, injections of saline, saffron or crocin were started and continued until 26(th) day post-surgery. Pain behavioral responses including mechanical allodynia (von Frey filament testing) and thermal hyperalgesia were measured in 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, and 40(th) days after CCI. CCI significantly increased pain behavioral responses. Saffron and crocin (30 mg/kg) decreased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia on day 26, and this effect continued until the day 40. Crocin at lower dose (15 mg/kg) was ineffective. These findings indicate that treatment of saffron and crocin after CCI may have a therapeutic effect against neuropathic pain, suggesting that these substances may offer new strategies for the treatment of this highly debilitating condition. PMID:27610166

  13. Effects of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) Stigma Extract and its Active Constituent Crocin on Neuropathic Pain Responses in a Rat Model of Chronic Constriction Injury

    PubMed Central

    Safakhah, Hossein Ali; Taghavi, Tahereh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sokhanvar, Mina; Mohebbi, Narges; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its main constituent crocin on neuropathic pain behavioral responses induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 250 g) were randomly assigned into 5 groups: Sham + saline, CCI + saline, CCI+ saffron (30 mg/kg), CCI + crocin (15 mg/kg) and CCI + crocin (30 mg/kg). CCI was induced by applying 4 loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve. Two weeks after nerve lesion, injections of saline, saffron or crocin were started and continued until 26th day post-surgery. Pain behavioral responses including mechanical allodynia (von Frey filament testing) and thermal hyperalgesia were measured in 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, and 40th days after CCI. CCI significantly increased pain behavioral responses. Saffron and crocin (30 mg/kg) decreased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia on day 26, and this effect continued until the day 40. Crocin at lower dose (15 mg/kg) was ineffective. These findings indicate that treatment of saffron and crocin after CCI may have a therapeutic effect against neuropathic pain, suggesting that these substances may offer new strategies for the treatment of this highly debilitating condition. PMID:27610166

  14. Expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the rat trigeminal ganglion during the development of temporomandibular joint inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, G.C.; Rizzi, E.; Gerlach, R.F.; Leite-Panissi, C.R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial pain is a prevalent symptom in modern society. Some musculoskeletal orofacial pain is caused by temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). This condition has a multi-factorial etiology, including emotional factors and alteration of the masticator muscle and temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMJ inflammation is considered to be a cause of pain in patients with TMD. Extracellular proteolytic enzymes, specifically the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), have been shown to modulate inflammation and pain. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the expression and level of gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the trigeminal ganglion are altered during different stages of temporomandibular inflammation, as determined by gelatin zymography. This study also evaluated whether mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia, induced by the injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the TMJ capsule, were altered by an MMP inhibitor (doxycycline, DOX). TMJ inflammation was measured by plasma extravasation in the periarticular tissue (Evans blue test) and infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils into the synovial fluid (myeloperoxidase enzyme quantification). MMP expression in the trigeminal ganglion was shown to vary during the phases of the inflammatory process. MMP-9 regulated the early phase and MMP-2 participated in the late phase of this process. Furthermore, increases in plasma extravasation in periarticular tissue and myeloperoxidase activity in the joint tissue, which occurred throughout the inflammation process, were diminished by treatment with DOX, a nonspecific MMP inhibitor. Additionally, the increases of mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia were attenuated by the same treatment. PMID:24270905

  15. Calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein upregulation in dorsal spinal cord mediates spinal cord injury induced neuropathic pain states

    PubMed Central

    Boroujerdi, Amin; Zeng, Jun; Sharp, Kelli; Kim, Donghyun; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z. David

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly results in the development of neuropathic pain, which can dramatically impair the quality of life for SCI patients. SCI induced neuropathic pain can be manifested as both tactile allodynia (a painful sensation to a non-noxious stimulus) and or hyperalgesia (an enhanced sensation to a painful stimulus). The mechanisms underlying these pain states are poorly understood. Clinical studies have shown that gabapentin, a drug that binds to the voltage gated calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit (Cavα2δ-1) proteins is effective in the management of SCI induced neuropathic pain. Accordingly, we hypothesized that tactile allodynia post SCI is mediated by an upregulation of Cavα2δ-1 in dorsal spinal cord (DSC). To test this hypothesis, we examined if SCI-induced dysregulation of spinal Cavα2δ-1 plays a contributory role in below-level allodynia development in a rat spinal T9 contusion injury model. We found that Cavα2δ-1 expression levels were significantly increased in L4-6 dorsal, but not ventral, spinal cord of SCI rats that correlated with tactile allodynia development in the hindpaw plantar surface. Furthermore, both intrathecal gabapentin treatment and blocking SCI induced Cavα2δ-1 protein upregulation by intrathecal Cavα2δ-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides could reverse tactile allodynia in SCI rats. These findings support that SCI induced Cavα2δ-1 upregulation in spinal dorsal horn is a key component in mediating below-level neuropathic pain development and selectively targeting this pathway may provide effective pain relief for SCI patients. PMID:21239111

  16. Central pain mechanisms following combined acid and capsaicin perfusion of the human oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Brock, Christina; Andresen, Trine; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gale, Jeremy; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2010-03-01

    Visceral afferents originating from different gut-segments converge at the spinal level. We hypothesized that chemically-induced hyperalgesia in the oesophagus could provoke widespread visceral hypersensitivity and also influence descending modulatory pain pathways. Fifteen healthy volunteers were studied at baseline, 30, 60 and 90 min after randomized perfusion of the distal oesophagus with either saline or 180 ml 0.1M HCl+2mg capsaicin. Electro-stimulation of the oesophagus, 8 cm proximal to the perfusion site, rectosigmoid electrical stimulation and rectal mechanical and heat stimulations were used. Evoked brain potentials were recorded after electrical stimulations before and after oesophageal perfusion. After the perfusion, rectal hyperalgesia to heat (P<0.01, 37%) and mechanical (P=0.01, 11%) stimulations were demonstrated. In contrast, hypoalgesia to electro-stimulation was observed in both the oesophagus (P<0.03, 23%) and the sigmoid colon (P<0.001, 18%). Referred pain areas to electro-stimulation in oesophagus were reduced by 13% after perfusion (P=0.01). Evoked brain potentials to rectosigmoid stimulations showed decreased latencies and amplitudes of P1, N1 and P2 (P<0.05), whereas oesophagus-evoked brain potentials were unaffected after perfusion. In conclusion, modality-specific hyperalgesia was demonstrated in the lower gut following chemical sensitization of the oesophagus, reflecting widespread central hyperexcitability. Conversely, hypoalgesia to electrical stimulation, decreases in referred pain and latencies of evoked brain potentials was seen. This outcome may reflect a counterbalancing activation of descending inhibitory pathways. As these findings are also seen in the clinical setting, the model may be usable for future basic and pharmacological studies. PMID:19541517

  17. Pain modality and spinal glia expression by streptozotocin induced diabetic peripheral neuropathy in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sok Ho; Kwon, Jung Kee

    2012-01-01

    Pain symptoms are a common complication of diabetic peripheral neuropathy or an inflammatory condition. In the most experiments, only one or two evident pain modalities are observed at diabetic peripheral neuropathy according to experimental conditions. Following diabetic peripheral neuropathy or inflammation, spinal glial activation may be considered as an important mediator in the development of pain. For this reason, the present study was aimed to address the induction of pain modalities and spinal glial expression after streptozotocin injection as compared with that of zymosan inflammation in the rat. Evaluation of pain behavior by either thermal or mechanical stimuli was performed at 3 weeks or 5 hours after either intravenous streptozotocin or zymosan. Degrees of pain were divided into 4 groups: severe, moderate, mild, and non-pain induction. On the mechanical allodynia test, zymosan evoked predominantly a severe type of pain, whereas streptozotocin induced a weak degree of pain (severe+moderate: 57.1%). Although zymosan did not evoke cold allodynia, streptozotocin evoked stronger pain behavior, compared with zymosan (severe+moderate: 50.0%). On the other hand, the high incidence of thermal hyperalgesia (severe+moderate: 90.0%) and mechanical hyperalgesia (severe+moderate: 85.7%) by streptozotocin was observed, as similar to that of zymosan. In the spinal cord, the increase of microglia and astrocyte was evident by streptozotocin, only microglia was activated by zymosan. Therefore, it is recommended that the selection of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia is suitable for the evaluation of streptozotocin induced diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Moreover, spinal glial activation may be considered an important factor. PMID:22787487

  18. Selective inhibition of JNK with a peptide inhibitor attenuates pain hypersensitivity and tumor growth in a mouse skin cancer pain model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Jing; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Zeng, Qing; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Decosterd, Isabelle; Xu, Xiaoyin; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2009-09-01

    Cancer pain significantly affects the quality of cancer patients, and current treatments for this pain are limited. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been implicated in tumor growth and neuropathic pain sensitization. We investigated the role of JNK in cancer pain and tumor growth in a skin cancer pain model. Injection of luciferase-transfected B16-Fluc melanoma cells into a hindpaw of mouse induced robust tumor growth, as indicated by increase in paw volume and fluorescence intensity. Pain hypersensitivity in this model developed rapidly (<5 days) and reached a peak in 2 weeks, and was characterized by mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. Tumor growth was associated with JNK activation in tumor mass, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and spinal cord and a peripheral neuropathy, such as loss of nerve fibers in the hindpaw skin and induction of ATF-3 expression in DRG neurons. Repeated systemic injections of D-JNKI-1 (6 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective and cell-permeable peptide inhibitor of JNK, produced an accumulative inhibition of mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. A bolus spinal injection of D-JNKI-1 also inhibited mechanical allodynia. Further, JNK inhibition suppressed tumor growth in vivo and melanoma cell proliferation in vitro. In contrast, repeated injections of morphine (5 mg/kg), a commonly used analgesic for terminal cancer, produced analgesic tolerance after 1 day and did not inhibit tumor growth. Our data reveal a marked peripheral neuropathy in this skin cancer model and important roles of the JNK pathway in cancer pain development and tumor growth. JNK inhibitors such as D-JNKI-1 may be used to treat cancer pain. PMID:19445931

  19. Nocistatin: milestone of one decade of research.

    PubMed

    Okuda-Ashitaka, Emiko; Ito, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    A neuropeptide nociceptin or orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) is an endogenous ligand for the orphan opioid receptor-like receptor. During studies on the analysis of the precursor of N/OFQ, we identified a novel neuropeptide produced from the same precursor and named it "nocistatin (NST)". Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of N/OFQ induces pain responses including touch-evoked allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, and simultaneous administration of NST blocks the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by N/OFQ. In the years since these discoveries, N/OFQ has been shown to be involved in a wide range of pharmacological activities, such as relaying pain perception in peripheral tissues, to the central nervous system, and NST was shown to have opposite effects on various central functions evoked by N/OFQ. Pharmacological characterization using various neurotransmitter agents, agonists, antagonists and knockout mice in vivo; electrophysiological and immunohistological analysis ex vivo; and molecular cloning using affinity chromatography of high-performance affinity nanobeads; and protein processing measurement using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in vitro have generated new insights into pain transmission regulated by NST and N/OFQ. This review focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of pain transmission regulated by NST. PMID:25345611

  20. Tetrahydrocurcumin exerts protective effect on vincristine induced neuropathy: Behavioral, biochemical, neurophysiological and histological evidence.

    PubMed

    Greeshma, N; Prasanth, K G; Balaji, Bhaskar

    2015-08-01

    Hyperalgesia, allodynia, delayed motor nerve conduction velocity, oxidative stress and axonal damage are signs and symptoms of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Present treatment/preventive strategies of CIPN are futile and the neuropathy may even lead to discontinuation of chemotherapy. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) 40 and 80mg/kg in experimental vincristine induced neuropathy in rats. Hyperalgesia was assessed by hot plate (thermal), Randall-Selitto (mechanical) test, allodynia was assessed by cold plate (thermal) test, functional loss was measured by sciatic function index, nociception was evaluated by formalin test. Neurophysiological recordings were carried out to assess motor nerve conduction velocity. Total calcium levels, oxidative stress and TNF-α was measured in sciatic nerve tissue homogenate to assess neuropathy. Histopathological changes was observed on sciatic nerve to assess the protective effect of THC against the vincristine. Pregabalin was used as a standard in this study. Rats administered with THC at 80mg/kg significantly attenuated the vincristine induced neuropathic pain manifestations which may be due to its multiple actions including anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, calcium inhibitory and antioxidant effect. This study delineates that THC can be a promising candidate for the prevention of CIPN by chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26102012

  1. Ionic mechanisms of spinal neuronal cold hypersensitivity in ciguatera.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ryan; Brice, Nicola L; Lewis, Richard J; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-12-01

    Cold hypersensitivity is evident in a range of neuropathies and can evoke sensations of paradoxical burning cold pain. Ciguatoxin poisoning is known to induce a pain syndrome caused by consumption of contaminated tropical fish that can persist for months and include pruritus and cold allodynia; at present no suitable treatment is available. This study examined, for the first time, the neural substrates and molecular components of Pacific ciguatoxin-2-induced cold hypersensitivity. Electrophysiological recordings of dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurones were made in non-sentient rats. Subcutaneous injection of 10 nm ciguatoxin-2 into the receptive field increased neuronal responses to innocuous and noxious cooling. In addition, neuronal responses to low-threshold but not noxious punctate mechanical stimuli were also elevated. The resultant cold hypersensitivity was not reversed by 6-({2-[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-methylpropyl}carbamoyl)pyridine-3-carboxylic acid, an antagonist of transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8). Both mechanical and cold hypersensitivity were completely prevented by co-injection with the Nav 1.8 antagonist A803467, whereas the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) antagonist A967079 only prevented hypersensitivity to innocuous cooling and partially prevented hypersensitivity to noxious cooling. In naive rats, neither innocuous nor noxious cold-evoked neuronal responses were inhibited by antagonists of Nav 1.8, TRPA1 or TRPM8 alone. Ciguatoxins may confer cold sensitivity to a subpopulation of cold-insensitive Nav 1.8/TRPA1-positive primary afferents, which could underlie the cold allodynia reported in ciguatera. These data expand the understanding of central spinal cold sensitivity under normal conditions and the role of these ion channels in this translational rat model of ciguatoxin-induced hypersensitivity. PMID:26454262

  2. Regulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 expression in trigeminal ganglion neurons via methyl-CpG binding protein 2 signaling contributes tongue heat sensitivity and inflammatory hyperalgesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Azumi; Honda, Kuniya; Shirakawa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain hypoalgesia has been reported in Rett syndrome patients, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder which can be attributed to mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Here, we examined the role of MeCP2 signaling in tongue heat sensitivity in the normal and inflamed state using Mecp2 heterozygous (Mecp2+/−) mice. Results Heat hypoalgesia of the tongue occurred in Mecp2+/− mice and submucosal injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into the tongue produced a long-lasting heat hyperalgesia at the inflamed site in wild-type mice but not in Mecp2+/− mice. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 was expressed in a large number of MeCP2-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue in both wild-type and Mecp2+/− mice (70.9% in wild type; 72.1% in Mecp2+/−). The number of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue was smaller in Mecp2+/− mice relative to wild-type mice (30.5% in wild type; 20.2% in Mecp2+/−). Following complete Freund’s adjuvant injection, the number of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1- and MeCP2-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue, as well as MeCP2 protein expression in trigeminal ganglion, was significantly increased in wild-type mice but not in Mecp2+/− mice. Additionally, tongue heat hyperalgesia following complete Freund’s adjuvant injection was completely suppressed by the administration of SB366791, a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist, in the tongue. Conclusions These findings indicate that tongue heat sensitivity and hypersensitivity are dependent on the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 which is regulated via MeCP2 signaling in trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue. PMID:27030715

  3. Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase Regulates Interleukin-1β Expression and Glial Glutamate Transporter Function in Rodents with Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Maixner, Dylan W.; Yan, Xisheng; Gao, Mei; Yadav, Ruchi; Weng, Han-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroinflammation and dysfunctional glial glutamate transporters (GTs) in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) are implicated in the genesis of neuropathic pain. We determined if adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the SDH regulates these processes in rodents with neuropathic pain. Methods Hind paw withdrawal responses to radiant heat and mechanical stimuli were used to assess nociceptive behaviors. Spinal markers related to neuroinflammation and glial GTs were determined by Western blotting. AMPK activities were manipulated pharmacologically and genetically. Regulation of glial GTs was determined by measuring protein expression and activities of glial GTs. Results AMPK activities were reduced in the SDH of rats (n = 5) with thermal hyperalgesia induced by nerve injury, which were accompanied with the activation of astrocytes, increased production of interleukin-1beta and activities of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, and suppressed protein expression of glial glutamate transporter-1. Thermal hyperalgesia was reversed by spinal activation of AMPK in neuropathic rats (n = 10), and induced by inhibiting spinal AMPK in naïve rats (n = 7 to 8). Spinal AMPKα knockdown (n = 6) and AMPKα1 conditional knockout (n = 6) induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. These genetic alterations mimicked the changes of molecular markers induced by nerve injury. Pharmacological activation of AMPK enhanced glial GT activity in mice with neuropathic pain (n = 8) and attenuated glial glutamate transporter-1 internalization induced by interleukin-1β (n = 4). Conclusion These findings suggest enhancing spinal AMPK activities could be an effective approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:25710409

  4. Antinociceptive effects of the N-acylethanolamine acid amidase inhibitor ARN077 in rodent pain models.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Oscar; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Martucci, Cataldo; Realini, Natalia; Dionisi, Mauro; Mengatto, Luisa; Duranti, Andrea; Tarozzo, Glauco; Tarzia, Giorgio; Mor, Marco; Bertorelli, Rosalia; Reggiani, Angelo; Piomelli, Daniele

    2013-03-01

    Fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs), which include palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA), are endogenous agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) and important regulators of the inflammatory response. They are degraded in macrophages by the lysosomal cysteine amidase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA). Previous studies have shown that pharmacological inhibition of NAAA activity suppresses macrophage activation in vitro and causes marked anti-inflammatory effects in vivo, which is suggestive of a role for NAAA in the control of inflammation. It is still unknown, however, whether NAAA-mediated FAE deactivation might regulate pain signaling. The present study examined the effects of ARN077, a potent and selective NAAA inhibitor recently disclosed by our group, in rodent models of hyperalgesia and allodynia caused by inflammation or nerve damage. Topical administration of ARN077 attenuated, in a dose-dependent manner, heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia elicited in mice by carrageenan injection or sciatic nerve ligation. The antinociceptive effects of ARN077 were prevented by the selective PPAR-α antagonist GW6471 and did not occur in PPAR-α-deficient mice. Furthermore, topical ARN077 reversed the allodynia caused by ultraviolet B radiation in rats, and this effect was blocked by pretreatment with GW6471. Sciatic nerve ligation or application of the proinflammatory phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate decreased FAE levels in sciatic nerve and skin tissue, respectively. ARN077 reversed these biochemical effects. The results identify ARN077 as a potent inhibitor of intracellular NAAA activity, which is active in vivo by topical administration. The findings further suggest that NAAA regulates peripheral pain initiation by interrupting endogenous FAE signaling at PPAR-α. PMID:23218523

  5. ANTINOCICEPTIVE EFFECTS OF THE N-ACYLETHANOLAMINE ACID AMIDASE INHIBITOR ARN077 IN RODENT PAIN MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Oscar; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Martucci, Cataldo; Realini, Natalia; Dionisi, Mauro; Mengatto, Luisa; Duranti, Andrea; Tarozzo, Glauco; Tarzia, Giorgio; Mor, Marco; Bertorelli, Rosalia; Reggiani, Angelo; Piomelli, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs), which include palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA), are endogenous agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) and important regulators of the inflammatory response. They are degraded in macrophages by the lysosomal cysteine amidase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA). Previous studies have shown that pharmacological inhibition of NAAA activity suppresses macrophage activation in vitro and causes marked anti-inflammatory effects in vivo, which is suggestive of a role for NAAA in the control of inflammation. It is still unknown, however, whether NAAA-mediated FAE deactivation might regulate pain signaling. In the present study, we examined the effects of ARN077, a potent and selective NAAA inhibitor recently disclosed by our group, in rodent models of hyperalgesia and allodynia caused by inflammation or nerve damage. Topical administration of ARN077 attenuated, in a dose-dependent manner, heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia elicited in mice by carrageenan injection or sciatic nerve ligation. The anti-nociceptive effects of ARN077 were prevented by the selective PPAR-α antagonist GW6471 and did not occur in PPAR-α-deficient mice. Furthermore, topical ARN077 reversed the allodynia caused by ultraviolet B-radiation in rats, and this effect was blocked by pretreatment with GW6471. Sciatic nerve ligation or application of the pro-inflammatory phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) decreased FAE levels in sciatic nerve and skin tissue, respectively. ARN077 reversed these biochemical effects. The results identify ARN077 as a potent inhibitor of intracellular NAAA activity, which is active in vivo by topical administration. The findings further suggest that NAAA regulates peripheral pain initiation by interrupting endogenous FAE signaling at PPAR-α. PMID:23218523

  6. Self-injurious behavior in neurodevelopmental disorders: relevance of nociceptive and immune mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Symons, Frank J

    2011-04-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) among individuals with intellectual and related neurodevelopmental disorders (IDD) is a clinical challenge and scientific puzzle. The physiological mechanisms regulating the sensory components of SIB remain a mystery with no clear understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. The central dogma regarding sensory processing in general and pain in particular among individuals with IDD and chronic SIB is that sensory processing is reduced and pain is absent or blunted. In this paper, recent findings challenging some of the conventional wisdom regarding pain and sensory function among individuals with IDD and SIB are reviewed. It seems that at least a subgroup of individuals with IDD and chronic SIB may be in a physiological state similar to neuropathic pain in which hyperalgesia is mediated by plasticity mechanisms regulating inflammatory, immune, and nociceptive systems. In response to repeated tissue damage associated with chronic self-injury, innate immune cells may be producing pro-inflammatory and pro-nociceptive cytokines that act on the brain to cause sickness-like behavior and sensitize primary sensory nerve afferents contributing to pain hypersensitivity (i.e., hyperalgesia). PMID:21237197

  7. Trigeminal neuropathic pain alters responses in CNS circuits to mechanical (brush) and thermal (cold and heat) stimuli.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Lino; Morris, Susie; Bazes, Shelly; Gostic, Richard; Sherman, Seth; Gostic, Julie; Pendse, Gautam; Moulton, Eric; Scrivani, Steven; Keith, David; Chizh, Boris; Borsook, David

    2006-10-18

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to study patients with chronic neuropathic pain involving the maxillary region (V2) of the trigeminal nerve in patients with spontaneous pain and evoked pain to brush (allodynia). Patients underwent two functional scans (2-3 months apart) with mechanical and thermal stimuli applied to the affected region of V2 and to the mirror site in the unaffected contralateral V2 region, as well as bilaterally to the mandibular (V3) division. Patients were stimulated with brush, noxious cold, and noxious heat. Significant changes were observed in regions within and outside the primary trigeminal sensory pathway. Stimulation to the affected (neuropathic) side resulted in predominantly frontal region and basal ganglia activation compared with the control side. The differences were consistent with the allodynia to brush and cold. A region of interest-based analysis of the trigeminal sensory pathway revealed patterns of activation that differentiated between the affected and unaffected sides and that were particular to each stimulus. Activation in the spinal trigeminal nucleus was constant in location for all pain stimuli. Activation in other brainstem nuclei also showed differences in the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal for the affected versus the unaffected side. Thus, sensory processing in patients with trigeminal neuropathic pain is associated with distinct activation patterns consistent with sensitization within and outside of the primary sensory pathway. PMID:17050704

  8. Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced hyperalgesia and the release of TNF-α and IL-1β in the mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cunjin; Song, Siyuan; Zhang, Yang; Ge, Yali; Fang, Xiangzhi; Huang, Tianfeng; Du, Jin; Gao, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by various routes produces profound inflammatory pain hypersensitivity. However, the molecular events that induce this response remain largely uncharacterized. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the role of the Rho/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway in the release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) following injection of LPS into the mouse paw, which is associated with nociceptive behavior. The spinal cord of LPS-treated mice showed increased active GTP-bound RhoA and upregulation of ROCK2 and c-fos compared to the normal saline group. Furthermore, the inflammation-related cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β were markedly increased in the spinal dorsal horn after intraplantar injection of LPS. However, the latter effects were prevented by prophylactic intrathecal administration of the Rho inhibitor (C3 exoenzyme) or the ROCK inhibitor (Y27632). Collectively, our results suggest that the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway plays a critical role in LPS-induced inflammatory pain and that this pathway is coincident with the release of the pro-nociceptive cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, which produces hyperalgesia. PMID:26416580

  9. Respective pharmacological features of neuropathic-like pain evoked by intrathecal BDNF versus sciatic nerve ligation in rats.

    PubMed

    M'Dahoma, Saïd; Barthélemy, Sandrine; Tromilin, Claire; Jeanson, Tiffany; Viguier, Florent; Michot, Benoit; Pezet, Sophie; Hamon, Michel; Bourgoin, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Numerous reported data support the idea that Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is critically involved in both depression and comorbid pain. The possible direct effect of BDNF on pain mechanisms was assessed here and compared with behavioral/neurobiological features of neuropathic pain caused by chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve (CCI-SN). Sprague-Dawley male rats were either injected intrathecally with BDNF (3.0 ng i.t.) or subjected to unilateral CCI-SN. Their respective responses to anti-hyperalgesic drugs were assessed using the Randall-Selitto test and both immunohistochemical and RT-qPCR approaches were used to investigate molecular/cellular mechanisms underlying hyperalgesia in both models. Long lasting hyperalgesia and allodynia were induced by i.t. BDNF in intact healthy rats like those found after CCI-SN. Acute treatment with the BDNF-TrkB receptor antagonist cyclotraxin B completely prevented i.t. BDNF-induced hyperalgesia and partially reversed this symptom in both BDNF-pretreated and CCI-SN lesioned rats. Acute administration of the anticonvulsant pregabalin, the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, the opioid analgesics morphine and tapentadol or the antidepressant agomelatine also transiently reversed hyperalgesia in both i.t. BDNF injected- and CCI-SN lesioned-rats. Marked induction of microglia activation markers (OX42, Iba1, P-p38), proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, NMDA receptor subunit NR2B and BDNF was found in spinal cord and/or dorsal root ganglia of CCI-SN rats. A long lasting spinal BDNF overexpression was also observed in BDNF i.t. rats, indicating an autocrine self-induction, with downstream long lasting TrkB-mediated neuropathic-like pain. Accordingly, TrkB blockade appeared as a relevant approach to alleviate not only i.t. BDNF- but also nerve lesion-evoked neuropathic pain. PMID:26343858

  10. Interleukin-6: an emerging regulator of pathological pain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ya-Qun; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Chen, Shu-Ping; Li, Man; Shahveranov, Allahverdi; Ye, Da-Wei; Tian, Yu-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 is an inflammatory cytokine with wide-ranging biological effects. It has been widely demonstrated that neuroinflammation plays a critical role in the development of pathological pain. Recently, various pathological pain models have shown elevated expression levels of interleukin-6 and its receptor in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. Additionally, the administration of interleukin-6 could cause mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, and an intrathecal injection of anti-interleukin-6 neutralizing antibody alleviated these pain-related behaviors. These studies indicated a pivotal role of interleukin-6 in pathological pain. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in understanding the roles and mechanisms of interleukin-6 in mediating pathological pain associated with bone cancer, peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, complete Freund's adjuvant injection, and carrageenan injection. Understanding and regulating interleukin-6 could be an interesting lead to novel therapeutic strategies for pathological pain. PMID:27267059

  11. Pediatric complex regional pain syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Rotem; Uziel, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic, intensified localized pain condition that can affect children and adolescents as well as adults, but is more common among adolescent girls. Symptoms include limb pain; allodynia; hyperalgesia; swelling and/or changes in skin color of the affected limb; dry, mottled skin; hyperhidrosis and trophic changes of the nails and hair. The exact mechanism of CRPS is unknown, although several different mechanisms have been suggested. The diagnosis is clinical, with the aid of the adult criteria for CRPS. Standard care consists of a multidisciplinary approach with the implementation of intensive physical therapy in conjunction with psychological counseling. Pharmacological treatments may aid in reducing pain in order to allow the patient to participate fully in intensive physiotherapy. The prognosis in pediatric CRPS is favorable. PMID:27130211

  12. Importance of CRF Receptor-Mediated Mechanisms of the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis in the Processing of Anxiety and Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Lee; Schulkin, Jay; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2014-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-mediated mechanisms in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) have a pivotal role in stress-induced anxiety and hyperalgesia. Although CRF is known to activate two receptor subtypes, CRF1 and CRF2, attempts to delineate the specific role of each subtype in modulating anxiety and nociception have been inconsistent. Here we test the hypothesis that CRF1 and CRF2 receptor activation in the anteriolateral BNST (BNSTAL) facilitates divergent mechanisms modulating comorbid anxiety and hyperalgesia. Microinfusions of the specific antagonists CP376395 and Astressin2B into the BNSTAL were used to investigate CRF1 and CRF2 receptor functions, respectively. We found that CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the BNSTAL had opposing effects on exploratory behavior in the elevated plus-maze, somatic mechanical threshold, and the autonomic and endocrine response to stress. However, CRF1 or CRF2 receptor antagonism in the BNSTAL revealed complementary roles in facilitating the acoustic startle and visceromotor reflexes. Our results suggest that the net effect of CRF1 and CRF2 receptor activation in the BNSTAL is pathway-dependent and provides important insight into the CRF receptor-associated circuitry that likely underpins stress-induced pathologies. PMID:24853772

  13. Visceral Pain: The Neurophysiological Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Jyoti N.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of visceral pain is still less understood compared with that of somatic pain. This is primarily due to the diverse nature of visceral pain compounded by multiple factors such as sexual dimorphism, psychological stress, genetic trait, and the nature of predisposed disease. Due to multiple contributing factors there is an enormous challenge to develop animal models that ideally mimic the exact disease condition. In spite of that, it is well recognized that visceral hypersensitivity can occur due to (1) sensitization of primary sensory afferents innervating the viscera, (2) hyperexcitability of spinal ascending neurons (central sensitization) receiving synaptic input from the viscera, and (3) dysregulation of descending pathways that modulate spinal nociceptive transmission. Depending on the type of stimulus condition, different neural pathways are involved in chronic pain. In early-life psychological stress such as maternal separation, chronic pain occurs later in life due to dysregulation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and significant increase in corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) secretion. In contrast, in early-life inflammatory conditions such as colitis and cystitis, there is dysregulation of the descending opioidergic system that results excessive pain perception (i.e., visceral hyperalgesia). Functional bowel disorders and chronic pelvic pain represent unexplained pain that is not associated with identifiable organic diseases. Often pain overlaps between two organs and approximately 35% of patients with chronic pelvic pain showed significant improvement when treated for functional bowel disorders. Animal studies have documented that two main components such as (1) dichotomy of primary afferent fibers innervating two pelvic organs and (2) common convergence of two afferent fibers onto a spinal dorsal horn are contributing factors for organ-to-organ pain overlap. With reports emerging about the varieties of peptide molecules

  14. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition.

    PubMed

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A; Lombroso, Paul J; Azkue, Jon J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-02-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP(61) inactivation and increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception. PMID:26270590

  15. The antinociceptive effects of ferulic acid on neuropathic pain: involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Lin, Dan; Yu, Xuefeng; Xie, Xupei; Wang, Liqun; Lian, Lejing; Fei, Ning; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Naping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Xianfeng; Pan, Jianchun

    2016-04-12

    Neuropathic pain can be considered as a form of chronic stress that may share common neuropathological mechanism between pain and stress-related depression and respond to similar treatment. Ferulic acid (FA) is a major active component of angelica sinensis and has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects; however, it remains unknown whether FA ameliorate chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and the involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors. Chronic treatment with FA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) ameliorated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey hair and hot plate tasks, accompanied by increasing spinal noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels. Subsequent study suggested that treatment of CCI animals with 40 and 80 mg/kg FA also inhibited spinal MAO-A levels. FA's effects on mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesiawas blocked by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) via pharmacological depletion of spinal noradrenaline or serotonin. Moreover, the anti-allodynic action of FA on mechanical stimuli was prevented by pre-treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551, or by the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. While the anti-hyperalgesia on thermal stimuli induced by FA was blocked by pre-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, or with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. These results suggest that the effect of FA on neuropathic pain is potentially mediated via amelioration of the descending monoaminergic system that coupled with spinal beta2- and 5-HT1A receptors and the downstream delta- and mu-opioid receptors differentially. PMID:26967251

  16. Transient Receptor Potential Channel and Interleukin-17A Involvement in LTTL Gel Inhibition of Bone Cancer Pain in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juyong; Zhang, Ruixin; Dong, Changsheng; Jiao, Lijing; Xu, Ling; Liu, Jiyong; Wang, Zhengtao; Lao, Lixing

    2015-07-01

    Cancer pain management is a challenge for which Chinese herbal medicine might be useful. To study the spinal mechanisms of the Chinese medicated gel Long-Teng-Tong-Luo (LTTL), a 7-herb compound, on bone cancer pain, a bone cancer pain model was made by inoculating the tibias of female rats with Walker 256 cells. LTTL gel or inert gel, 0.5 g/cm(2)/d, was applied to the skin of tumor-bearing tibias for 21 days beginning a day after the inoculation. Mechanical threshold and paw withdrawal latency to thermal stimulation was measured. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were immunostained and counted, and lumbar spinal cord interleukin-17A (IL-17A) was measured with real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TRP antagonists and interleukin (IL)-17A antibodies were intrathecally administered to determine their effects on bone cancer pain. The gel significantly (P < .05) alleviated cancer-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and inhibited cancer-enhanced expression of IL-17A in spinal astrocytes and the TRP subfamily members V1, A1, and V4 in lumbar DRG. Intrathecal TRP antagonists at 10 µg significantly (P < .05) attenuated mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, and IL-17A expression, indicating that TRP channels facilitate spinal IL-17 expression and cancer pain. IL-17A antibodies inhibited cancer pain, suggesting that IL-17A promotes such pain. The data show that LTTL gel inhibits cancer pain, and this might be accounted for by the decrease in expression of DRG TRP channels and spinal astrocyte IL-17A. PMID:26100378

  17. The antinociceptive effects of ferulic acid on neuropathic pain: involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Lin, Dan; Yu, Xuefeng; Xie, Xupei; Wang, Liqun; Lian, Lejing; Fei, Ning; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Naping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Xianfeng; Pan, Jianchun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can be considered as a form of chronic stress that may share common neuropathological mechanism between pain and stress-related depression and respond to similar treatment. Ferulic acid (FA) is a major active component of angelica sinensis and has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects; however, it remains unknown whether FA ameliorate chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and the involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors. Chronic treatment with FA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) ameliorated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey hair and hot plate tasks, accompanied by increasing spinal noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels. Subsequent study suggested that treatment of CCI animals with 40 and 80 mg/kg FA also inhibited spinal MAO-A levels. FA's effects on mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesiawas blocked by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) via pharmacological depletion of spinal noradrenaline or serotonin. Moreover, the anti-allodynic action of FA on mechanical stimuli was prevented by pre-treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551, or by the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. While the anti-hyperalgesia on thermal stimuli induced by FA was blocked by pre-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, or with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. These results suggest that the effect of FA on neuropathic pain is potentially mediated via amelioration of the descending monoaminergic system that coupled with spinal beta2- and 5-HT1A receptors and the downstream delta- and mu-opioid receptors differentially. PMID:26967251

  18. Peripheral indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase1 is required for comorbid depression-like behavior but does not contribute to neuropathic pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenjun; Dantzer, Robert; Budac, David P.; Walker, Adam K.; Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang; Lee, Anna W.; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Kavelaars, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain frequently co-occurs with major depressive disorder but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the contribution of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), a rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of tryptophan to neurotoxic metabolites to this comorbidity using the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in mice. SNI resulted in unilateral mechanical allodynia, reduced social interaction, and increased immobility in the forced swim test without changes in locomotor activity. These findings indicate SNI-induced pain and comorbid depression-like behavior. These behavioral responses were accompanied by increases in plasma kynurenine/tryptophan ratios and increased expression of Ido1 and Il1b mRNA in the liver. Interestingly, SNI did not induce detectable changes in spinal cord or brain Ido1 mRNA levels after SNI. SNI was associated with spinal cord inflammatory activity as evidenced by increased Il1b mRNA expression. The SNI-induced increase of liver Ido1and Il1b mRNA was abrogated by intrathecal administration of the IL-1 inhibitor IL-1RA. Intrathecal IL-1RA also inhibited both mechanical allodynia and depression-like behavior. We also show that Ido1 is required for the development of depression-like behavior because Ido1-/- mice do not develop increased immobility in the forced swim test or decreased social exploration in response to SNI. Mechanical allodynia was similar in WT and Ido1-/- mice. In conclusion, our findings show for the first time that neuropathic pain is associated with an increase of Ido1 in liver, but not brain, downstream of spinal cord IL-1β signaling and that Ido1 mediates co-morbid depression. Moreover, comorbidity of neuropathic pain and depression are only partially mediated by a common mechanism because mechanical hyperalgesia develops independently of Ido1. PMID:25637485

  19. The selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist E-52862 attenuates neuropathic pain of different aetiology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gris, Georgia; Portillo-Salido, Enrique; Aubel, Bertrand; Darbaky, Yassine; Deseure, Kristof; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    E-52862 is a selective σ1R antagonist currently undergoing phase II clinical trials for neuropathic pain and represents a potential first-in-class analgesic. Here, we investigated the effect of single and repeated administration of E-52862 on different pain-related behaviours in several neuropathic pain models in rats: mechanical allodynia in cephalic (trigeminal) neuropathic pain following chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (IoN), mechanical hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic polyneuropathy, and cold allodynia in oxaliplatin (OX)-induced polyneuropathy. Mechanical hypersensitivity induced after IoN surgery or STZ administration was reduced by acute treatment with E-52862 and morphine, but not by pregabalin. In the OX model, single administration of E-52862 reversed the hypersensitivity to cold stimuli similarly to 100 mg/kg of gabapentin. Interestingly, repeated E-52862 administration twice daily over 7 days did not induce pharmacodynamic tolerance but an increased antinociceptive effect in all three models. Additionally, as shown in the STZ and OX models, repeated daily treatment with E-52862 attenuated baseline pain behaviours, which supports a sustained modifying effect on underlying pain-generating mechanisms. These preclinical findings support a role for σ1R in neuropathic pain and extend the potential for the use of selective σ1R antagonists (e.g., E-52862) to the chronic treatment of cephalic and extra-cephalic neuropathic pain. PMID:27087602

  20. ACTIVATION OF TRPA1 ON DURAL AFFERENTS: A POTENTIAL MECHANISM OF HEADACHE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Edelmayer, Rebecca M.; Le, Larry N.; Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Preti, Delia; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Dodick, David W.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Porreca, Frank; Dussor, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) on meningeal nerve endings has been suggested to contribute to environmental irritant-induced headache but this channel may also contribute to other forms of headache such as migraine. The preclinical studies described here examined functional expression of TRPA1 on dural afferents and investigated whether activation of TRPA1 contributes to headache-like behaviors. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in vitro using two TRPA1 agonists, mustard oil (MO) and the environmental irritant umbellulone (UMB), on dural-projecting trigeminal ganglion neurons. Application of MO and UMB to dural afferents produced TRPA1-like currents in approximately 42% and 38% of cells, respectively. Using an established in vivo behavioral model of migraine-related allodynia, dural application of MO and UMB produced robust time-related tactile facial and hindpaw allodynia that was attenuated by pretreatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Additionally, MO or UMB were applied to the dura and exploratory activity was monitored for 30 minutes using an automated open-field activity chamber. Dural MO and UMB decreased the number of vertical rearing episodes and the time spent rearing in comparison to vehicle treated animals. This change in activity was prevented in rats pretreated with HC-030031 as well as sumatriptan, a clinically effective anti-migraine agent. These data indicate that TRPA1 is expressed on a substantial fraction of dural afferents and activation of meningeal TRPA1 produces behaviors consistent with those seen in patients during migraine attacks. Further, they suggest that activation of meningeal TRPA1 via endogenous or exogenous mechanisms can lead to afferent signaling and headache. PMID:22809691

  1. Characterisation of sensory abnormalities observed in an animal model of multiple sclerosis: a behavioural and pharmacological study.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Pezet, Sophie

    2011-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease, associated, in 50-80% of patients, with persistent pain. While the type of pain that affects these patients is being more documented, the mechanisms underlying this pathology are still poorly understood and animal models of such chronic pain associated with MS are required. The aim of our study was to characterize the sensory abnormalities and in particular the clinical signs linked to persistent pain in two models of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the rat. This behavioural characterization tested several sensory modalities such as mechanical and thermal (heat/cold) hyperalgesia or allodynia and explored some of these modalities on two different extremities: the hindpaws and the tail. Our study showed that while one of the model produced more robust motor impairment, animals of both models suffer from mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal allodynia to cold, both at the level of the tail and the hindpaws. While the time-course changes of some of these modalities are shifted in the time between the two models, they represent good models of the sensory abnormalities experienced by MS patients. The second part of our study aimed at characterizing from a pharmacological point of view the most robust model ("EAE+Cyclosporine") and showed that Gabapentin, Duloxetine and Tramadol partially relieved some of the clinical signs. Our results suggest that the model "EAE+Cyclosporine" in the rat is a good model of chronic sensory abnormalities observed in MS patients both from a behavioural and pharmacological point of view. PMID:20829083

  2. Egg white hydrolysate promotes neuroprotection for neuropathic disorders induced by chronic exposure to low concentrations of mercury.

    PubMed

    Rizzetti, Danize Aparecida; Fernandez, Francisca; Moreno, Silvia; Uranga Ocio, José Antonio; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vera, Gema; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Castro, Marta Miguel; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to investigate whether the egg white hydrolysate (EWH) acts on the neuropathic disorders associated with long-term Mercury (Hg) exposure in rats. 8- week-old male Wistar rats were treated for 60 days with: a) Control - saline solution (i.m.); b) Mercury - HgCl2 (1st dose 4.6μg/kg, subsequent doses 0.07μg/kg/day, i.m.); c) Hydrolysate - EWH (1g/kg/day, gavage); d) Mercury and Hydrolysate. Mechanical allodynia was assessed using Von Frey Hairs test; heat hyperalgesia by the plantar test; catalepsy by a modification of the "ring test" and spontaneous locomotor activity by a photocell activity chambers. Analyses were performed at 0, 30 and 60 days of treatment. Brain and plasma MDA, plasma NPSH and TNF-α determination and skin immunohistochemistry were performed at 60 days. Hg induced a reduction in mechanical sensitivity threshold at 30 and 60 days and in thermal sensitivity threshold at 60 days. At the end of treatment catalepsy was developed, but there was not significant alteration in spontaneous locomotor activity. Hg also increased brain and plasma MDA, plasma NPSH and TNF-α levels and the number of Merkel cell-neurite complex in the skin. EWH prevented the development of mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia and catalepsy induced by Hg and the increase in MDA concentration in brain and plasma and in the number of Merkel cell-neurite complex in the skin. In conclusion, EWH promotes neuroprotection against the toxic effects caused by Hg, demonstrating a beneficial therapeutic potential. PMID:27350078

  3. Increased expression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 within dorsal root ganglia in a rat model of bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fang; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Yuan, Weixiu; Mi, Weidong

    2014-08-20

    In an attempt to investigate the underlying mechanisms of cancer-induced bone pain, we investigated the presence of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in an animal model of bone cancer pain. Forty-five female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups: sham-operation group (sham), cancer-bearing animals killed after 7 days (C7), and cancer-bearing animals killed after 14 days (C14). After establishment of the bone cancer pain model, pain-related behavioral tests were performed to determine the paw withdrawal threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Reverse transcription-PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence were used to determine mRNA and protein expression of ASIC3 in ipsilateral and contralateral lumbar 4-5 DRG neurons. Compared with the sham group, paw withdrawal threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in the C14 group showed a significant decrease (P<0.01) from postoperation day 7 to the termination of the experiment. Compared with the sham group, the ipsilateral but not contralateral mRNA of ASIC3 was upregulated in the C14 group. Meanwhile, the ipsilateral protein expression of ASIC3 was increased in the C7 and C14 group compared with the sham group. Double-labeled immunofluorescence showed that ASIC3 and isolectin-B4 (IB4)-colocalized small DRG neurons in the C14 group were more than that in the sham group. Furthermore, we also found that there were more ASIC3 and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-colocalized DRG neurons in the C14 group than in the sham group. The upregulation of mRNA and protein levels of ASIC3 suggested its potential involvement in the development and maintenance of cancer-induced bone pain. PMID:25006846

  4. Remote Astrocytic and Microglial Activation Modulate Neuronal Hyperexcitability and Below-Level Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Young Seob; Hulsebosch, Claire E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated whether astrocytic and microglial activation mediates below-level neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury. Male Sprague-Dawley (225–250 g) rats were given low thoracic (T13) spinal transverse hemisection and behavioral, electrophysiological and immunohistochemical methods were used to examine the development and maintenance of below-level neuropathic pain. On post operation day 28, both hindlimbs showed significantly decreased paw withdrawal thresholds and thermal latencies as well as hyperexcitability of lumbar (L4-5) spinal wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons on both sides of spinal dorsal horn compared to sham controls (*p<0.05). Intrathecal treatment with propentofylline (PPF, 10 mM) for 7 consecutive days immediately after spinal injury attenuated the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in both hindlimbs in a dose related reduction compared to vehicle treatments (*p<0.05). Intrathecal treatment with single injections of PPF at 28 days after spinal injury, attenuated the existing mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in both hindlimbs in a dose related reduction (*p<0.05). In electrophysiological studies, topical treatment of 10 mM PPF onto the spinal surface attenuated the neuronal hyperexcitability in response to mechanical stimuli. In immunohistochemical studies, astrocytes and microglia in rats with spinal hemisection showed significantly increased GFAP and OX-42 expression in both superficial and deep dorsal horns in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn compared to sham controls (*p<0.05) that was prevented in a dose related manner by PPF. In conclusion, our present data support astrocytic and microglial activation that contributes to below-level central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury. PMID:19332108

  5. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides ‘proof of principle’ for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. PMID:26703965

  6. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides 'proof of principle' for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. PMID:26703965

  7. Kv7.2 regulates the function of peripheral sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    King, Chih H.; Lancaster, Eric; Salomon, Daniela; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) family of voltage-gated K+ channels regulates cellular excitability. The functional role of Kv7.2 has been hampered by the lack of a viable Kcnq2-null animal model. In this study, we generated homozygous Kcnq2-null sensory neurons using the Cre-Lox system; in these mice, Kv7.2 expression is absent in the peripheral sensory neurons, whereas the expression of other molecular components of nodes (including Kv7.3), paranodes, and juxtaparanodes is not altered. The conditional Kcnq2-null animals exhibit normal motor performance, but have increased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Whole cell patch recording technique demonstrates that Kcnq2-null sensory neurons have increased excitability and reduced spike frequency adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of Kv7.2 activity increases the excitability of primary sensory neurons. PMID:24687876

  8. Algodystrophy: recent insight into the pathogenic framework

    PubMed Central

    Varenna, Massimo; Zucchi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Summary Algodystrophy, nowadays called CRPS I, is a painful syndrome characterized by sensory and vasomotor disturbance, edema and functional impairment. Significant progress in knowledge about the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease have been recently achieved, but they are not yet fully understood and some clinical aspects are still lacking of a whole pathogenetic comprehension. The local release of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides and some cytokines may be the event that triggers and maintains the disease, causing hyperalgesia and allodynia. In the following phases, the impaired capillary permeability, the interstitial edema and the consequent hypoxia and local acidosis have been proposed as possible pathophysiological pathways. The local hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system supposed in the past has not be confirmed and the hypothesis of an altered nociceptive processing at CNS level has limited evidences in acute phases of the disease. The steady bone involvement could be confirmed by the efficacy of bisphosphonates in the treatment of early disease. PMID:26136792

  9. Targeting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors for treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Yi; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains a major clinical problem and a therapeutic challenge because existing analgesics are often ineffective and can cause serious side effects. Increased N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity contributes to central sensitization in certain types of neuropathic pain. NMDAR antagonists can reduce hyperalgesia and allodynia in animal models of neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury and diabetic neuropathy. Clinically used NMDAR antagonists, such as ketamine and dextromethorphan, are generally effective in patients with neuropathic pain, such as complex regional pain syndrome and painful diabetic neuropathy. However, patients with postherpetic neuralgia respond poorly to NMDAR antagonists. Recent studies on identifying NMDAR-interacting proteins and molecular mechanisms of increased NMDAR activity in neuropathic pain could facilitate the development of new drugs to attenuate abnormal NMDAR activity with minimal impairment of the physiological function of NMDARs. Combining NMDAR antagonists with other analgesics could also lead to better management of neuropathic pain without causing serious side effects. PMID:21686074

  10. Microglia and monocytes synergistically promote the transition from acute to chronic pain after nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiyun; Gu, Nan; Zhou, Lijun; B Eyo, Ukpong; Murugan, Madhuvika; Gan, Wen-Biao; Wu, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microglia and peripheral monocytes contribute to hypersensitivity in rodent models of neuropathic pain. However, the precise respective function of microglia and peripheral monocytes has not been investigated in these models. To address this question, here we combined transgenic mice and pharmacological tools to specifically and temporally control the depletion of microglia and monocytes in a mouse model of spinal nerve transection (SNT). We found that although microglia and monocytes are required during the initiation of mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesia, these cells may not be as important for the maintenance of hypersensitivity. Moreover, we demonstrated that either resident microglia or peripheral monocytes are sufficient in gating neuropathic pain after SNT. We propose that resident microglia and peripheral monocytes act synergistically to initiate hypersensitivity and promote the transition from acute to chronic pain after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:27349690

  11. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of the Marine-Derived Compound Excavatolide B Isolated from the Culture-Type Formosan Gorgonian Briareum excavatum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-You; Lin, Sung-Chun; Feng, Chien-Wei; Chen, Pei-Chin; Su, Yin-Di; Li, Chi-Min; Yang, San-Nan; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Duh, Chang-Yih; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, several marine-derived compounds have been clinically evaluated. Diterpenes are secondary metabolites from soft coral that exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and cytotoxic activities. In the present study, we isolated a natural diterpene product, excavatolide B, from cultured Formosan gorgonian Briareum excavatum and investigated its anti-inflammatory activities. We found that excavatolide B significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of the proinflammatory mediators, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine macrophages (RAW 264.7). We also examined the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of excavatolide B on intraplantar carrageenan-induced inflammatory responses. Excavatolide B was found to significantly attenuate carrageenan-induced nociceptive behaviors, mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, weight bearing deficits and paw edema. In addition, excavatolide B inhibited iNOS, as well as the infiltration of immune cells in carrageenan-induced inflammatory paw tissue. PMID:25923315

  12. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of the Marine-Derived Compound Excavatolide B Isolated from the Culture-Type Formosan Gorgonian Briareum excavatum

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-You; Lin, Sung-Chun; Feng, Chien-Wei; Chen, Pei-Chin; Su, Yin-Di; Li, Chi-Min; Yang, San-Nan; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Duh, Chang-Yih; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several marine-derived compounds have been clinically evaluated. Diterpenes are secondary metabolites from soft coral that exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and cytotoxic activities. In the present study, we isolated a natural diterpene product, excavatolide B, from cultured Formosan gorgonian Briareum excavatum and investigated its anti-inflammatory activities. We found that excavatolide B significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of the proinflammatory mediators, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine macrophages (RAW 264.7). We also examined the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of excavatolide B on intraplantar carrageenan-induced inflammatory responses. Excavatolide B was found to significantly attenuate carrageenan-induced nociceptive behaviors, mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, weight bearing deficits and paw edema. In addition, excavatolide B inhibited iNOS, as well as the infiltration of immune cells in carrageenan-induced inflammatory paw tissue. PMID:25923315

  13. Both expression of cytokines and posterior annulus fibrosus rupture are essential for pain behavior changes induced by degenerative intervertebral disc: An experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zemin; Liu, Hui; Yang, Hao; Wang, Jianru; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Kuibo; Ding, Wenbin; Zheng, Zhaomin

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between intervertebral disc degeneration and low back pain (LBP). Rat L4/5 disc degeneration model was established by annular puncture using a 0.4 mm needle anteriorly or posteriorly. In both anterior and posterior puncture models, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analyses revealed marked disc degeneration 2 weeks after puncture. Cytokine expression was up-regulated in different level in nucleus pulposus (NP) from 3 days after puncture. Pain behavioral tests indicated that the anterior disc puncture did not induce pain behavior changes, whereas the posterior disc puncture resulted in mechanical allodynia from 1 day to 21 days after injury. Besides, cytokine expression was significantly increased in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) at 1 and 2 weeks after posterior puncture, but not after the anterior puncture. These findings indicate the NP of the degenerative disc expresses different levels of inflammatory cytokines, and posterior disc puncture produced mechanical allodynia. The expression phase of cytokines in the NP was accordance with mechanical hyperalgesia in the posterior disc puncture model. Both expression of cytokines and posterior annulus fibrosus (AF) rupture in degenerative intervertebral disc are essential for pain behavior changes. PMID:24115280

  14. Mechanism of Chronic Pain in Rodent Brain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pei-Ching

    Chronic pain is a significant health problem that greatly impacts the quality of life of individuals and imparts high costs to society. Despite intense research effort in understanding of the mechanism of pain, chronic pain remains a clinical problem that has few effective therapies. The advent of human brain imaging research in recent years has changed the way that chronic pain is viewed. To further extend the use of human brain imaging techniques for better therapies, the adoption of imaging technique onto the animal pain models is essential, in which underlying brain mechanisms can be systematically studied using various combination of imaging and invasive techniques. The general goal of this thesis is to addresses how brain develops and maintains chronic pain in an animal model using fMRI. We demonstrate that nucleus accumbens, the central component of mesolimbic circuitry, is essential in development of chronic pain. To advance our imaging technique, we develop an innovative methodology to carry out fMRI in awake, conscious rat. Using this cutting-edge technique, we show that allodynia is assoicated with shift brain response toward neural circuits associated nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex that regulate affective and cognitive component of pain. Taken together, this thesis provides a deeper understanding of how brain mediates pain. It builds on the existing body of knowledge through maximizing the depth of insight into brain imaging of chronic pain.

  15. Factors affecting mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Janczak, Andrew M; Ranheim, Birgit; Fosse, Torunn K; Hild, Sophie; Nordgreen, Janicke; Moe, Randi O; Zanella, Adroaldo J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the stability and repeatability of measures of mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets and to examine potentially confounding factors when using a hand held algometer. Study design Descriptive, prospective cohort. Animals Forty-four piglets from four litters, weighing 4.6 ± 1.0 kg (mean ± SD) at 2 weeks of age. Methods Mechanical thresholds were measured twice on each of 2 days during the first and second week of life. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures design to test the effects of behavior prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, and repetition within day. The effect of body weight and the interaction between piglet weight and behaviour were also tested. Piglet was entered into the model as a random effect as an additional test of repeatability. The effect of repeated testing was used to test the stability of measures. Pearson correlations between repeated measures were used to test the repeatability of measures. Variance component analysis was used to describe the variability in the data. Results Variance component analysis indicated that piglet explained only 17% of the variance in the data. All variables in the model (behaviour prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, repetition within day, body weight, the interaction between body weight and behaviour, piglet identity) except sex had a significant effect (p < 0.04 for all). Correlations between repeated measures increased from the first to the second week. Conclusions and Clinical relevance Repeatability was acceptable only during the second week of testing and measures changed with repeated testing and increased with increasing piglet weight, indicating that time (age) and animal body weight should be taken into account when measuring mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets. Mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds can be used both for testing the efficacy of anaesthetics and analgesics, and for assessing hyperalgesia in chronic pain states in research and

  16. Bulleyaconitine A depresses neuropathic pain and potentiation at C-fiber synapses in spinal dorsal horn induced by paclitaxel in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, He-Quan; Xu, Jing; Shen, Kai-Feng; Pang, Rui-Ping; Wei, Xu-Hong; Liu, Xian-Guo

    2015-11-01

    Paclitaxel, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, often induces painful peripheral neuropathy and at present no effective drug is available for treatment of the serious side effect. Here, we tested if intragastrical application of bulleyaconitine A (BLA), which has been approved for clinical treatment of chronic pain in China since 1985, could relieve the paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. A single dose of BLA attenuated the mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia induced by paclitaxel dose-dependently. Repetitive administration of the drug (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg, t.i.d. for 7 d) during or after paclitaxel treatment produced a long-lasting inhibitory effect on thermal hyperalgesia, but not on mechanical allodynia. In consistency with the behavioral results, in vivo electrophysiological experiments revealed that spinal synaptic transmission mediated by C-fiber but not A fiber was potentiated, and the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) at C-fiber synapses induced by the same high frequency stimulation was ~50% higher in paclitaxel-treated rats, compared to the naïve rats. Spinal or intravenous application of BLA depressed the spinal LTP, dose-dependently. Furthermore, patch clamp recordings in spinal cord slices revealed that the frequency but not amplitude of both spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSCs) and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in lamina II neurons was increased in paclitaxel-treated rats, and the superfusion of BLA reduced the frequency of sEPSCs and mEPSCs in paclitaxel-treated rats but not in naïve ones. Taken together, we provide novel evidence that BLA attenuates paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain and that depression of spinal LTP at C-fiber synapses via inhibiting presynaptic transmitter release may contribute to the effect. PMID:26376216

  17. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Reduces Synovial Inflammation and Pain in Experimental Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Gustavo P.; Lopes, Alberto Jorge O.; Costa Junior, Livio M.; Lima, Francisco das Chagas A.; Silva, Lucilene A.; Pereira, Wanderson S.; do Amaral, Flávia M. M.; Garcia, João Batista S.; Cartágenes, Maria do Socorro de S.; Nascimento, Flávia R. F.

    2015-01-01

    The chronicity of osteoarthritis (OA), characterized by pain and inflammation in the joints, is linked to a glutamate receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The use of plant species such as Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (Amaranthaceae) as NMDA antagonists offers a promising perspective. This work aims to analyze the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (HCE) of C. ambrosioides leaves in an experimental OA model. Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 24): clean (C), negative control (CTL-), positive control (CTL+), HCE0.5, HCE5 and HCE50. The first group received no intervention. The other groups received an intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA) (8 mg/kg) on day 0. After six hours, they were orally treated with saline, Maxicam plus (meloxicam + chondroitin sulfate) and HCE at doses of 0.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively. After three, seven and ten days, clinical evaluations were performed (knee diameter, mechanical allodynia, mechanical hyperalgesia and motor activity). On the tenth day, after euthanasia, synovial fluid and draining lymph node were collected for cellular quantification, and cartilage was collected for histopathological analysis. Finally, molecular docking was performed to evaluate the compatibility of ascaridole, a monoterpene found in HCE, with the NMDA receptor. After the third day, HCE reduced knee edema. HCE5 showed less cellular infiltrate in the cartilage and synovium and lower intensities of allodynia from the third day and of hyperalgesia from the seventh day up to the last treatment day. The HCE5 and HCE50 groups improved in forced walking. In relation to molecular docking, ascaridole showed NMDA receptor binding affinity. C. ambrosioides HCE was effective in the treatment of OA because it reduced synovial inflammation and behavioral changes due to pain. This effect may be related to the antagonistic effect of ascaridole on the NMDA receptor. PMID:26524084

  18. Suppression of microRNA-155 attenuates neuropathic pain by regulating SOCS1 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Yang, Jun; Xiang, Kai; Tan, Qindong; Guo, Qulian

    2015-03-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is an unfavourable pathological pain characterised by allodynia and hyperalgesia which has brought considerable trouble to people's physical and mental health, but effective therapeutics are still lacking. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely studied in the development of neuropathic pain and neuronal inflammation. Among various miRNAs, miR-155 has been widely studied. It is intensively involved in regulating inflammation-associated diseases. However, the role of miR-155 in regulating neuropathic pain development is poorly understood. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether miR-155 is associated with neuropathic pain and delineate the underlying mechanism. Using a neuropathic pain model of chronic constriction injury (CCI), miR-155 expression levels were markedly increased in the spinal cord. Inhibition of miR-155 significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia and proinflammatory cytokine expression. We also demonstrated that miR-155 directly bound with the 3'-untranslated region of the suppressor of cytokine signalling 1 (SOCS1). The expression of SOCS1 significantly decreased in the CCI rat model, but this effect could be reversed by miR-155 inhibition. Furthermore, knockdown of SOCS1 abrogated the inhibitory effects of miR-155 inhibition on neuropathic development and neuronal inflammation. Finally, we demonstrated that inhibition of miR-155 resulted in the suppression of nuclear factor-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by mediating SOCS1. Our data demonstrate the critical role of miR-155 in regulating neuropathic pain through SOCS1, and suggest that miR-155 may be an important and potential target in preventing neuropathic pain development. PMID:25488154

  19. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Reduces Synovial Inflammation and Pain in Experimental Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Calado, Gustavo P; Lopes, Alberto Jorge O; Costa Junior, Livio M; Lima, Francisco das Chagas A; Silva, Lucilene A; Pereira, Wanderson S; Amaral, Flávia M M do; Garcia, João Batista S; Cartágenes, Maria do Socorro de S; Nascimento, Flávia R F

    2015-01-01

    The chronicity of osteoarthritis (OA), characterized by pain and inflammation in the joints, is linked to a glutamate receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The use of plant species such as Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (Amaranthaceae) as NMDA antagonists offers a promising perspective. This work aims to analyze the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (HCE) of C. ambrosioides leaves in an experimental OA model. Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 24): clean (C), negative control (CTL-), positive control (CTL+), HCE0.5, HCE5 and HCE50. The first group received no intervention. The other groups received an intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA) (8 mg/kg) on day 0. After six hours, they were orally treated with saline, Maxicam plus (meloxicam + chondroitin sulfate) and HCE at doses of 0.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively. After three, seven and ten days, clinical evaluations were performed (knee diameter, mechanical allodynia, mechanical hyperalgesia and motor activity). On the tenth day, after euthanasia, synovial fluid and draining lymph node were collected for cellular quantification, and cartilage was collected for histopathological analysis. Finally, molecular docking was performed to evaluate the compatibility of ascaridole, a monoterpene found in HCE, with the NMDA receptor. After the third day, HCE reduced knee edema. HCE5 showed less cellular infiltrate in the cartilage and synovium and lower intensities of allodynia from the third day and of hyperalgesia from the seventh day up to the last treatment day. The HCE5 and HCE50 groups improved in forced walking. In relation to molecular docking, ascaridole showed NMDA receptor binding affinity. C. ambrosioides HCE was effective in the treatment of OA because it reduced synovial inflammation and behavioral changes due to pain. This effect may be related to the antagonistic effect of ascaridole on the NMDA receptor. PMID:26524084

  20. Methylcobalamin ameliorates neuropathic pain induced by vincristine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Wei; Zhong, Xiong-Xiong; Feng, Yi-Wei; Liu, Xian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background Vincristine, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, often induces painful peripheral neuropathy and there are currently no effective drugs to prevent or treat this side effect. Previous studies have shown that methylcobalamin has potential analgesic effect in diabetic and chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion model; however, whether methylcobalamin has effect on vincristine-induced painful peripheral neuropathy is still unknown. Results We found that vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, accompanied by a significant loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers in the plantar hind paw skin and an increase in the incidence of atypical mitochondria in the sciatic nerve. Moreover, in the spinal dorsal horn, the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and the protein expression of p-p65 as well as tumor necrosis factor α was increased, whereas the protein expression of IL-10 was decreased following vincristine treatment. Furthermore, intraperitoneal injection of methylcobalamin could dose dependently attenuate vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, which was associated with intraepidermal nerve fibers rescue, and atypical mitochondria prevalence decrease in the sciatic nerve. Moreover, methylcobalamin inhibited the activation of NADPH oxidase and the downstream NF-κB pathway. Production of tumor necrosis factor α was also decreased and production of IL-10 was increased in the spinal dorsal horn following methylcobalamin treatment. Intrathecal injection of Phorbol-12-Myristate-13-Acetate, a NADPH oxidase activator, could completely block the analgesic effect of methylcobalamin. Conclusions Methylcobalamin attenuated vincrinstine-induced neuropathic pain, which was accompanied by inhibition of intraepidermal nerve fibers loss and mitochondria impairment. Inhibiting the activation of NADPH oxidase and the downstream NF-κB pathway, resulting in the rebalancing of

  1. Identification of Spinal Cord MicroRNA and Gene Signatures in a Model of Chronic Stress-Induced Visceral Hyperalgesia in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bradesi, Sylvie; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Joshi, Swapna Mahurkar; Koukos, Georgios; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    visceral sensitivity was confirmed in vivo. Conclusion Using an integrative high throughput approach, our findings suggest a link between miR-17-5p increased expression and gp130/STAT3 activation providing new insight into the possible mechanisms mediating the effect of chronic stress on neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. PMID:26222740

  2. PKC-Dependent Signaling Pathways within PAG and Thalamus Contribute to the Nitric Oxide-Induced Nociceptive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule involved in nociceptive processing in the central nervous system. The release of NO within the spinal cord has long been implicated in the mechanisms underlying exaggerated pain sensitivity, and administration of NO donors can induce hyperalgesia. To elucidate the supraspinal mechanism responsible for NO-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity, we investigated the modulation of protein kinase C (PKC) and downstream effectors following treatment with the NO donors nitroglycerin and sodium nitroprusside. Both compounds induced a prolonged cold allodynia and heat hyperalgesia, increased levels of c-Fos and IL-1β, and activated NF-κB within periaqueductal grey matter and thalamus. Simultaneously, an increased expression and phosphorylation of PKC γ and ε were detected. To clarify the cellular mechanism involved in the NO-induced hypernociception, we examined the expression of transcription factors that act as PKC downstream effectors. A dramatic hyperphosphorylation of CREB and STAT1 was observed. The i.c.v. administration of the PKC blocker calphostin C prevented the NO-induced hypernociception, the hyperphosphorylation of CREB and STAT1, and partially reduced NF-κB activation. Conversely, the increase of IL-1β was unmodified by calphostin C. These results suggest the relevance of cerebral PKC-mediated CREB and STAT1 activation in the NO donor-induced nociceptive behavior. PMID:27335876

  3. Decreased voltage-gated potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons after chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Wu, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2016-01-20

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) regulate pain transmission by controlling neuronal excitability. Changes in KV expression patterns may thus contribute toward hyperalgesia following nerve injury. The aim of this study was to characterize KV current density in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the right sciatic nerve, a robust model of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. The study examined changes in small-diameter potassium ion currents (<30 µm) in neurons in the L4-L6 DRG following CCI by whole-cell patch-clamping and the association with post-CCI mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Compared with the control group, 7 days after CCI, the mechanical force and temperature required to elicit ipsilateral foot withdrawal decreased significantly, indicating tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Post-CCI neurons had a significantly lower rheobase current and depolarized resting membrane potential than controls, suggesting KV current downregulation. Some ipsilateral DRG neurons also had spontaneous action potentials and repetitive firing. There was a 55% reduction in the total KV current density caused by a 55% decrease in the sustained delayed rectifier potassium ion current (IK) density and a 17% decrease in the transient A-type potassium ion current (IA) density. These results indicated that changes in DRG neuron IK and IA current density and concomitant afferent hyperexcitability may contribute toward neuropathic pain following injury. The rat CCI model may prove valuable for examining pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapies, such as KV channel modulators. PMID:26671526

  4. Prior stress exposure increases pain behaviors in a rat model of full thickness thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Nyland, Jennifer E; McLean, Samuel A; Averitt, Dayna L

    2015-12-01

    Thermal burns among individuals working in highly stressful environments, such as firefighters and military Service Members, are common. Evidence suggests that pre-injury stress may exaggerate pain following thermal injury; however current animal models of burn have not evaluated the potential influence of pre-burn stress. This sham-controlled study evaluated the influence of prior stress exposure on post-burn thermal and mechanical sensitivity in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were exposed to 20 min of inescapable swim stress or sham stress once per day for three days. Exposure to inescapable swim stress (1) increased the intensity and duration of thermal hyperalgesia after subsequent burn and (2) accelerated the onset of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after subsequent burn. This stress-induced exacerbation of pain sensitivity was reversed by pretreatment and concurrent treatment with the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine. These data suggest a better understanding of mechanisms by which prior stress augments pain after thermal burn may lead to improved pain treatments for burn survivors. PMID:26432505

  5. Characterisation and mechanisms of bradykinin-evoked pain in man using iontophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Kathryn J.; Zambreanu, Laura; Bennett, David L.H.; McMahon, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is an inflammatory mediator that can evoke oedema and vasodilatation, and is a potent algogen signalling via the B1 and B2 G-protein coupled receptors. In naïve skin, BK is effective via constitutively expressed B2 receptors (B2R), while B1 receptors (B1R) are purported to be upregulated by inflammation. The aim of this investigation was to optimise BK delivery to investigate the algesic effects of BK and how these are modulated by inflammation. BK iontophoresis evoked dose- and temperature-dependent pain and neurogenic erythema, as well as thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia (P < 0.001 vs saline control). To differentiate the direct effects of BK from indirect effects mediated by histamine released from mast cells (MCs), skin was pretreated with compound 4880 to degranulate the MCs prior to BK challenge. The early phase of BK-evoked pain was reduced in degranulated skin (P < 0.001), while thermal and mechanical sensitisation, wheal, and flare were still evident. In contrast to BK, the B1R selective agonist des-Arg9-BK failed to induce pain or sensitise naïve skin. However, following skin inflammation induced by ultraviolet B irradiation, this compound produced a robust pain response. We have optimised a versatile experimental model by which BK and its analogues can be administered to human skin. We have found that there is an early phase of BK-induced pain which partly depends on the release of inflammatory mediators by MCs; however, subsequent hyperalgesia is not dependent on MC degranulation. In naïve skin, B2R signaling predominates, however, cutaneous inflammation results in enhanced B1R responses. PMID:23422725

  6. Accounting for the Delay in the Transition from Acute to Chronic Pain: Axonal and Nuclear Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Luiz F.; Bogen, Oliver; Reichling, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute insults produce hyperalgesic priming, a neuroplastic change in nociceptors that markedly prolongs inflammatory mediator-induced hyperalgesia. After an acute initiating insult, there is a 72 h delay to the onset of priming, for which the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that the delay is due to the time required for a signal to travel from the peripheral terminal to the cell body followed by a return signal to the peripheral terminal. We report that when an inducer of hyperalgesic priming (monocyte chemotactic protein 1) is administered at the spinal cord of Sprague Dawley rats, priming is detected at the peripheral terminal with a delay significantly shorter than when applied peripherally. Spinally induced priming is detected not only when prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is presented to the peripheral nociceptor terminals, but also when it is presented intrathecally to the central terminals in the spinal cord. Furthermore, when an inducer of priming is administered in the paw, priming can be detected in spinal cord (as prolonged hyperalgesia induced by intrathecal PGE2), but only when the mechanical stimulus is presented to the paw on the side where the priming inducer was administered. Both spinally and peripherally induced priming is prevented by intrathecal oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to the nuclear transcription factor CREB mRNA. Finally, the inhibitor of protein translation reversed hyperalgesic priming only when injected at the site where PGE2 was administered, suggesting that the signal transmitted from the cell body to the peripheral terminal is not a newly translated protein, but possibly a newly expressed mRNA. PMID:25589745

  7. Antineuropathic effect of 7-hydroxy-3,4-dihydrocadalin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Painful neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in hyperalgesia and allodynia. Hyperglycemia clearly plays a key role in the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy. Current therapeutic approaches are only partially successful and they are only thought to reduce the pain associated with peripheral neuropathy. Some natural products offer combined antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties that may help to treat in a more integrative manner this condition. In this regard, the purpose of this study was to investigate the antineuropathic effect of 7-hydroxy-3,4-dihydrocadalin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and mice without glucose control as well as the possible mechanism of action involved in this effect. Methods Rats and mice were injected with 50 or 200 mg/kg streptozotocin, respectively, to produce hyperglycemia. The formalin test and von Frey filaments were used to assess the nociceptive activity. Rota-rod was utilized to measure motor activity and malondialdehyde assay to determine anti-oxidative properties. Results After 3 weeks of diabetes induction, chemical hyperalgesia was observed in streptozotocin-injected rats. Oral acute administration of 7-hydroxy-3,4-dihydrocadalin (0.3–30 mg/kg) decreased in a dose-dependent manner formalin-evoked hyperalgesia in diabetic rats. In addition, methiothepin (non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and ODQ (guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, 2 mg/kg, i.p.), but not naltrexone (opioid receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, s.c.), prevented 7-hydroxy-3,4-dihydrocadalin-induced antihyperalgesic effect. The anti-hyperalgesic effect of 7-hydroxy-3,4-dihydrocadalin was similar to that produced by pregabalin (10 mg/kg, p.o.). Furthermore, oral acute administration of 7-hydroxy-3,4-dihydrocadalin (30 mg/kg) reduced streptozotocin-induced changes in malondialdehyde concentration from plasma samples. Unlike pregabalin, 7-hydroxy-3

  8. Bilateral Neuropathy of Primary Sensory Neurons by the Chronic Compression of Multiple Unilateral DRGs.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ya-Bin; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Ying; Song, Kai; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Fan-Cheng; Yang, Yu-Jie; He, Yang-Song; Kuang, Fang; You, Si-Wei; You, Hao-Jun; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To mimic multilevel nerve root compression and intervertebral foramina stenosis in human, we established a new animal model of the chronic compression of unilateral multiple lumbar DRGs (mCCD) in the rat. A higher occurrence of signs of spontaneous pain behaviors, such as wet-dog shaking and spontaneous hind paw shrinking behaviors, was firstly observed from day 1 onward. In the meantime, the unilateral mCCD rat exhibited significant bilateral hind paw mechanical and cold allodynia and hyperalgesia, as well as a thermal preference to 30°C plate between 30 and 35°C. The expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) was significantly increased in the ipsilateral and contralateral all-sized DRG neurons after the mCCD. And the expression of CGRP was significantly increased in the ipsilateral and contralateral large- and medium-sized DRG neurons. ATF3 and CGRP expressions correlated to evoked pain hypersensitivities such as mechanical and cold allodynia on postoperative day 1. The results suggested that bilateral neuropathy of primary sensory neurons might contribute to bilateral hypersensitivity in the mCCD rat. PMID:26819761

  9. Bilateral Neuropathy of Primary Sensory Neurons by the Chronic Compression of Multiple Unilateral DRGs

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ya-Bin; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Ying; Song, Kai; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Fan-Cheng; Yang, Yu-Jie; He, Yang-Song; Kuang, Fang; You, Si-Wei; You, Hao-Jun; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To mimic multilevel nerve root compression and intervertebral foramina stenosis in human, we established a new animal model of the chronic compression of unilateral multiple lumbar DRGs (mCCD) in the rat. A higher occurrence of signs of spontaneous pain behaviors, such as wet-dog shaking and spontaneous hind paw shrinking behaviors, was firstly observed from day 1 onward. In the meantime, the unilateral mCCD rat exhibited significant bilateral hind paw mechanical and cold allodynia and hyperalgesia, as well as a thermal preference to 30°C plate between 30 and 35°C. The expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) was significantly increased in the ipsilateral and contralateral all-sized DRG neurons after the mCCD. And the expression of CGRP was significantly increased in the ipsilateral and contralateral large- and medium-sized DRG neurons. ATF3 and CGRP expressions correlated to evoked pain hypersensitivities such as mechanical and cold allodynia on postoperative day 1. The results suggested that bilateral neuropathy of primary sensory neurons might contribute to bilateral hypersensitivity in the mCCD rat. PMID:26819761

  10. Modification of rat model of sciatica induced by lumber disc herniation and the anti-inflammatory effect of osthole given by epidural catheterization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ming; Mo, Sui-Lin; Nabar, Neel R; Chen, Yuling; Zhang, Jin-Jun; He, Qiu-Lan; Zou, Xue-Nong; Liu, Xian-Guo; Sun, Lai-Bao; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2012-01-01

    One of the most treatable causes of lower back pain and associated sciatica is lumbar disc herniation (LDH), which is characterized by rupture of the hard outer wall (annulus fibrosis) in a lumbar intervertebral disc. In the current study, we aimed to: (1) develop and characterize a rat model of sciatica induced by LDH, while introducing a novel method of epidural catheterization; (2) use this model to evaluate the effect of osthole on pain due to LDH, and (3) gain insight into the mechanisms through which osthole affects sciatica induced by LDH. The results indicate that our newly developed rat model maintained mechanical allodynia for 28 days without reduction. Moreover, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) were overexpressed in the associated inflammatory response, which is consistent with clinical manifestations of the disease. We then used this model to study the effect and mechanisms through which osthole affected pain due to LDH. Our study suggests that osthole is capable of reversing hyperalgesia due to LDH, potentially through modulation of activity of COX-2 and NOS, two important proteins for the exacerbation of pain due to LDH. Finally, a molecular modeling simulation showed that osthole has unique binding capabilities to both NOS and COX-2. As the model-induced mechanical hyperalgesia response was consistent, and the position of the catheter tip and the extension/spreading of the drug in the epidural space were reliable, this study developed an improved model to study remedies for sciatic pain. Moreover, our studies demonstrate that osthole may be a feasible treatment for the reduction of pain due to hyperalgesia. PMID:23018204

  11. The time-course and RNA interference of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β expression on neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve transection in rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung Moon; Lee, Soo Han; An, Sang Mee; Park, Do Yang; Lee, Gwan Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the time-course of the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β after L5 spinal nerve transection (SNT), and to determine the effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting these cytokines on neuropathic pain. Methods Rats received control siRNA (CON group, n = 80) or a cocktail of siRNAs targeting these cytokines (COCK group, n = 70). The siRNAs were given via intrathecal catheter 1 d prior to SNT, on the operation day, and 1, 2 and 3 d postoperatively. Behavioral tests and levels of the cytokine mRNAs and proteins as well as glial cell activity were following the L5 SNT. Results In the CON group, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels increased immediately after SNT and remained high for 6 d, while IL-6 transcripts only began to increase after 12 h. TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels in the COCK group were lower than in the CON group at all time points (P < 0.05). In the behavioral tests, allodynia and hyperalgesia were significantly lower in the COCK group from 2 d after SNT (P < 0.05). Conclusions The time courses of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expression after L5 SNT differ. RNA interference may be a method of reducing the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in response to nerve injury. PMID:25844135

  12. Systemic morphine treatment induces changes in firing patterns and responses of nociceptive afferent fibers in mouse glabrous skin.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Dale; Baker, Alyssa L; Morón, Jose A; Carlton, Susan M

    2013-11-01

    Patients receiving opioids for pain may experience decreased effectiveness of the drug and even abnormal pain sensitivity-hyperalgesia and/or allodynia. We hypothesized that peripheral nociceptor hyperexcitability contributes to opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tested this using an in vitro mouse glabrous skin-nerve preparation. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with escalating doses of morphine (5, 8, 10, 15 mg/kg) or saline every 12 hours for 48 hours and killed approximately 12 hours after the last injection. Receptive fields of nociceptors were tested for mechanical, heat, and cold sensitivity. Activity was also measured during an initial 2-minute period and during 5-minute periods between stimuli. Aberrant activity was common in fibers from morphine-treated mice but rare in saline-treated mice. Resting background activity was elevated in C-fibers from morphine-treated mice. Both C- and Aδ-fibers had afterdischarge in response to mechanical, heat, and/or cold stimulation of the skin as well as spontaneous, unevoked activity. Compared to saline, morphine treatment increased the proportion of fibers displaying polymodal rather than mechanical-only responses. A significant increase in Aδ-mechanoreceptive fibers responding to cold accounted for most of this change. In agreement with this, morphine-treated mice showed increased sensitivity in the cold tail flick test. In morphine-treated mice, aberrant activity and hyperexcitability of nociceptors could contribute to increased pain sensitivity. Importantly, this activity is likely driving central sensitization, a phenomenon contributing to abnormal sensory processing and chronic pain. If similar changes occur in human patients, aberrant nociceptor activity is likely to be interpreted as pain and could contribute to opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:23711478

  13. Psychophysical properties of female genital sensation.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Melissa A; Maykut, Caroline A; Huberman, Jackie S; Huang, Lejian; Khalifé, Samir; Binik, Yitzchak M; Apkarian, A Vania; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is characterized by the presence of vulvar touch and pain hypersensitivity. Pain with vaginal distension, which motivates treatment seeking and perpetuates distress, is frequently reported with PVD. However, the concordance between the perception of vulvar and vaginal sensation (ie, somatic and visceral genital sensations, respectively) remains unstudied in healthy women, as well as in clinical populations such as PVD. To evaluate the static and dynamic (time-varying) properties of somatic and visceral genital sensation, women with PVD (n=14) and age- and contraceptive-matched healthy controls (n=10) rated varying degrees of nonpainful and painful genital stimulation. Somatic (vulvar) mechanical sensitivity to nonpainul and painful degrees of force were compared to visceral (vaginal) sensitivity to nonpainful and painful distension volumes. Results indicated that healthy women showed substantial individual variation in and high discrimination of vulvar and vaginal sensation. In contrast, PVD was associated with vulvar allodynia and hyperalgesia, as well as vaginal allodynia. Modeling of dynamic perception revealed novel properties of abnormal PVD genital sensation, including temporal delays in vulvar touch perception and reduced perceptual thresholds for vaginal distension. The temporal properties and magnitude of PVD distension pain were indistinguishable from vaginal fullness in healthy controls. These results constitute the first empirical comparison of somatic and visceral genital sensation in healthy women. Findings provide novel insights into the sensory abnormalities that characterize PVD, including an experimental demonstration of visceral allodynia. This investigation challenges the prevailing diagnostic assessment of PVD and reconceptualizes PVD as a chronic somatic and visceral pain condition. PMID:23707679

  14. Involvement of inhibition of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling in simvastatin-induced amelioration of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Ishikura, Kei-Ichiro; Mutoh, Junpei; Hisa, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    Small molecular G-protein plays a key role in several diseases. This study was designed to reveal the role of RhoA signaling in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain in mice. Partial sciatic nerve injury caused thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, and increased plasma membrane translocation of RhoA in the lumber spinal cord. GFAP-immunoreactivity (ir), Iba-1-ir, and Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2-ir) was also increased in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn of nerve-ligated mice. Moreover, partial nerve ligation increased the expression of phosphorylated myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (MARCKS)-ir in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn. Daily intrathecal administration of simvastatin, beginning 3days before nerve injury, completely blocked all these changes in nerve-ligated mice. Pharmacological inhibition of ROCK also attenuated the increased expression of GFAP-ir and phosphorylated MARCKS-ir. Together, it is suggested that astrogliosis initiated by the activation of RhoA/ROCK signaling results in MARCKS phosphorylation in nerve terminals, which leads to hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain. Furthermore, simvastatin exerts antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects through the inhibition of spinal RhoA activation. PMID:27457035

  15. Pathological C-fibres in patients with a chronic painful condition.

    PubMed

    Ørstavik, Kristin; Weidner, Christian; Schmidt, Roland; Schmelz, Martin; Hilliges, Marita; Jørum, Ellen; Handwerker, Herman; Torebjörk, Erik

    2003-03-01

    Little is known about the contribution of C-afferent fibres to chronic painful conditions in humans. We sought to investigate the role of C-fibres in the pathophysiology of pain and hyperalgesia in erythromelalgia as a model disease for chronic pain. Erythromelalgia is a condition characterized by painful, red and hot extremities, and patients often report tenderness on walking. We made microneurographic recordings from single C-fibres in cutaneous fascicles of the peroneal nerve in patients suffering from this disease. All patients had had a pain attack recently and psychophysical signs of allodynia and punctate hyperalgesia were found. We obtained recordings from a total of 103 C-fibres and found significantly lower conduction velocities and increased activity-dependent slowing of the conduction velocity of afferent C-fibres in the patients compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, several units with biophysical properties of mechano-insensitive fibres were pathological, being spontaneously active or sensitized to mechanical stimuli. Since these fibres also mediate the axon reflex flare, their hyperexcitability might account not only for ongoing pain and tenderness but also for redness and warming in this pain syndrome. The changes in conductive properties found in the C-fibres of these patients could be the first signs of a small-fibre neuropathy. This is the first systematic study of single C-fibres in patients and it shows an active contribution of mechano-insensitive fibres to chronic pain. PMID:12566278

  16. Gender and the behavioral manifestations of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tall, J M; Stuesse, S L; Cruce, W L; Crisp, T

    2001-01-01

    A model of peripheral nerve injury was used to study gender differences in the development and progression of chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia in male and female Fischer 344 FBNF1 hybrid rats. Rats were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment groups: (1) gonadally intact unligated males (male); (2) gonadally intact ligated males (male (CCI)); (3) castrated ligated males (male (CAS/CCI)); (4) gonadally intact unligated females (female); (5) gonadally intact ligated females (female (CCI)); and (6) ovariectomized ligated females (female (OVX/CCI)). A plantar analgesia meter and calibrated von Frey pressure filaments were used as the analgesiometric assays. In the absence of nerve injury, gonadally intact males responded significantly faster than females to a thermal nociceptive stimulus. The onset of the behavioral manifestations of unilateral ligation of the sciatic nerve did not differ as a function of sex or hormonal status (e.g., gonadally intact and gonadectomized male and female rats developed thermal hyperalgesia within 14 days post-CCI). Paw withdrawal latency (PWL) values of gonadally intact males returned to baseline control values after postligation day 14, whereas gonadally intact females, ovariectomized females and castrated males continued to elicit robust thermal hyperalgesic symptoms throughout the 35-day duration of the experiment. Allodynic responses to peripheral nerve injury were less variable across genders. These data suggest that the mechanisms underlying chronic nociceptive processing differ as a function of gender and gonadal hormone status. PMID:11274714

  17. Supraspinal peroxynitrite modulates pain signaling by suppressing the endogenous opioid pathway.

    PubMed

    Little, Joshua W; Chen, Zhoumou; Doyle, Timothy; Porreca, Frank; Ghaffari, Mahsa; Bryant, Leesa; Neumann, William L; Salvemini, Daniela

    2012-08-01

    Peroxynitrite (PN, ONOO(-)) is a potent oxidant and nitrating agent that contributes to pain through peripheral and spinal mechanisms, but its supraspinal role is unknown. We present evidence here that PN in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) is essential for descending nociceptive modulation in rats during inflammatory and neuropathic pain through PN-mediated suppression of opioid signaling. Carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia was associated with increased 3-nitrotyrosine (NT), a PN biomarker, in the RVM. Furthermore, intra-RVM microinjections of the PN decomposition catalyst Fe(III)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl)porphyrin (FeTMPyP(5+)) dose-dependently reversed this thermal hyperalgesia. These effects of FeTMPyP(5+) were abrogated by intra-RVM naloxone, implicating potential interplay between PN and opioids. In support, we identified NT colocalization with the endogenous opioid enkephalin (ENK) in the RVM during thermal hyperalgesia, suggesting potential in situ interactions. To address the functional significance of such interactions, we exposed methionine-enkephalin (MENK) to PN and identified the major metabolite, 3-nitrotyrosine-methionine-sulfoxide (NSO)-MENK, using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Next, we isolated, purified, and tested NSO-MENK for opioid receptor binding affinity and analgesic effects. Compared to MENK, this NSO-MENK metabolite lacked appreciable binding affinity for δ, μ, and κ opioid receptors. Intrathecal injection of NSO-MENK in rats did not evoke antinociception, suggesting that PN-mediated chemical modifications of ENK suppress opioid signaling. When extended to chronic pain, intra-RVM FeTMPyP(5+) produced naloxone-sensitive reversal of mechanical allodynia in rats following chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. Collectively, our data reveal the central role of PN in RVM descending facilitation during inflammatory and neuropathic pain potentially through anti-opioid activity. PMID

  18. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide receptor antagonist JTC-801 reverses pain and anxiety symptoms in a rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Simpson-Durand, C D; Standifer, K M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Single-prolonged stress (SPS), a rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), also induces long-lasting hyperalgesia associated with hypocortisolism and elevated nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) levels in serum and CSF. Here, we determined the effect of JTC-801 (N-(4-amino-2-methylquinolin-6-yl)-2-(4-ethylphenoxymethyl) benzamide monohydrochloride), a nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor antagonist, on symptoms of pain and anxiety in rats after SPS exposure, and examined N/OFQ-NOP receptor system changes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Male Sprague Dawley rats received JTC-801 (6 mg kg−1 i.p., once daily) during days 7–21 of SPS. The ability of JTC-801 to inhibit N/OFQ-stimulated [35S]-GTPγS binding was confirmed in rat brain membranes. Anxiety-like behaviour and pain sensitivity were monitored by changes in elevated plus maze performance and withdrawal responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli. Serum corticosterone and N/OFQ content in CSF, serum and brain tissues were determined by radioimmunoassay; NOP receptor protein and gene expression in amygdala, hippocampus and periaqueductal grey (PAG) were examined by immunoblotting and real-time PCR respectively. KEY RESULTS JTC-801 treatment reversed SPS-induced mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, anxiety-like behaviour and hypocortisolism. Elevated N/OFQ levels in serum, CSF, PAG and hippocampus at day 21 of SPS were blocked by JTC-801; daily JTC-801 treatment also reversed NOP receptor protein and mRNA up-regulation in amygdala and PAG. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS JTC-801 reversed SPS-induced anxiety- and pain-like behaviours, and NOP receptor system up-regulation. These findings suggest that N/OFQ plays an important role in hyperalgesia and allodynia maintenance after SPS. NOP receptor antagonists may provide effective treatment for co-morbid PTSD and pain. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view

  19. Role of ketamine for analgesia in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Schermer, Erika; Kodumudi, Vijay; Belani, Kumar; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocking agent and a dissociative anesthetic with neurostimulatory side effects. In recent years, multiple research trials as well as systematic reviews and meta-analyses suggest the usefulness of ketamine as a strong analgesic used in subanesthetic intravenous doses, and also as a sedative. In addition, ketamine was noted to possess properties of anti-tolerance, anti-hyperalgesia and anti-allodynia most likely secondary to inhibition of the NMDA receptors. Tolerance, hyperalgesia and allodynia phenomena are the main components of opioid resistance, and pathological pain is often seen in the clinical conditions involving neuropathic pain, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and central sensitization with allodynia or hyperalgesia. All these conditions are challenging to treat. In low doses, ketamine does not have major adverse dysphoric effects and also has the favorable effects of reduced incidence of opioid-induced nausea and vomiting. Therefore, ketamine can be a useful adjunct for pain control after surgery. Additional studies are required to determine the role of ketamine in the immediate postoperative period after surgical interventions known to produce severe pain and in the prevention and treatment of chronic pain. PMID:27625475

  20. Allodynia: When Touch Hurts But Shouldn't

    MedlinePlus

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  1. Use of a new finger-mounted device to compare mechanical nociceptive thresholds in cats given pethidine or no medication after castration.

    PubMed

    Slingsby, L S; Jones, A; Waterman-Pearson, A E

    2001-06-01

    Mechanical nociceptive thresholds are regularly used to determine the efficacy of analgesic agents both experimentally and clinically in a variety of species. The 'pressure of palpation device' (PPD) was developed for use in cats and is a small battery operated device with a finger-mounted force sensing resistor (FSR, Interlink Electronics, Northumberland. UK). The PPD was used in a study assessing the analgesic efficacy of pethidine after castration in cats. Pethidine was demonstrated to prevent the development of post-operative scrotal hypersensitivity for up to 2 hours after castration, whereas cats given no analgesics showed marked hyperalgesia immediately after surgery. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain scores after castration showed a similar analgesic effect of pethidine. These results suggest that the PPD could become a useful research tool to assess the effectiveness of analgesic agents in the cat. PMID:11676621

  2. Puzzling Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Deventer, M. Oskar

    2009-01-01

    The basis of a good mechanical puzzle is often a puzzling mechanism. This article will introduce some new puzzling mechanisms, like two knots that engage like gears, a chain whose links can be interchanged, and flat gears that do not come apart. It illustrates how puzzling mechanisms can be transformed into real mechanical puzzles, e.g., by…

  3. New advances in the mechanisms and etiology of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    de-la-Llave-Rincón, Ana I; Puentedura, Emilio J; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2012-05-01

    In recent years, knowledge about the etiological mechanisms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has evolved significantly, allowing for a better understanding of this pain syndrome. Some studies have demonstrated that patients with CTS exhibit sensory symptoms not only within the areas innervated by the median nerve but also in extra-median regions, i.e., forearm or shoulder. It has also been demonstrated that patients with CTS may exhibit wi