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Sample records for allodynia mechanical hyperalgesia

  1. Behavioral evidence of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia induced by intradermal cinnamaldehyde in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tsagareli, Merab G.; Tsiklauri, Nana; Zanotto, Karen L.; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Klein, Amanda H.; Sawyer, Carolyn M.; Gurtskaia, Gulnazi; Abzianidze, Elene; Carstens, E.

    2010-01-01

    TRPA1 agonists cinnamaldehyde (CA) and mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate= AITC) induce heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in human skin, and sensitize responses of spinal and trigeminal dorsal horn neurons to noxious skin heating in rats. TRPA1 is also implicated in cold nociception. We presently used behavioral methods to investigate if CA affects sensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli in rats. Unilateral intraplantar injection of CA (5-20%) induced a significant, concentration-dependent reduction in latency for ipsilateral paw withdrawal from a noxious heat stimulus, peaking (61.7% of pre-injection baseline) by 30 min with partial recovery at 120 min. The highest dose of CA also significantly reduced the contralateral paw withdrawal latency. CA significantly reduced mechanical withdrawal thresholds of the injected paw that peaked sooner (3 min) and was more profound (44.4% of baseline), with no effect contralaterally. Bilateral intraplantar injections of CA resulted in a significant cold hyperalgesia (cold-plate test) and a weak enhancement of innocuous cold avoidance (thermal preference test). The data are consistent with roles for TRPA1 in thermal (hot and cold) hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. PMID:20219630

  2. Tetrodotoxin suppresses thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in a rat full thickness thermal injury pain model.

    PubMed

    Salas, Margaux M; McIntyre, Matthew K; Petz, Lawrence N; Korz, Walter; Wong, Donald; Clifford, John L

    2015-10-21

    Burn injuries have been identified as the primary cause of injury in 5% of U.S. military personnel evacuated from Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Severe burn-associated pain is typically treated with opioids such as fentanyl, morphine, and methadone. Side effects of opioids include respiratory depression, cardiac depression, decrease in motor and cognitive function, as well as the development of hyperalgesia, tolerance and dependence. These effects have led us to search for novel analgesics for the treatment of burn-associated pain in wounded combat service members. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocker currently in clinical trials as an analgesic. A phase 3 clinical trial for cancer-related pain has been completed and phase 3 clinical trials on chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain are planned. It has also been shown in mice to inhibit the development of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. TTX was originally identified as a neurotoxin in marine animals but has now been shown to be safe in humans at therapeutic doses. The antinociceptive effects of TTX are thought to be due to inhibition of Na(+) ion influx required for initiation and conduction of nociceptive impulses. One TTX sensitive sodium channel, Nav1.7, has been shown to be essential in lowering the heat pain threshold after burn injuries. To date, the analgesic effect of TTX has not been tested in burn-associated pain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a full thickness thermal injury on the right hind paw. TTX (8 μg/kg) was administered once a day systemically by subcutaneous injection beginning 3 days post thermal injury and continued through 7 days post thermal injury. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were assessed 60 and 120 min post injection on each day of TTX treatment. TTX significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia at all days tested and had a less robust, but statistically significant suppressive effect on mechanical

  3. Involvement of spinal glutamate transporter-1 in the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia associated with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jinshan; Jiang, Ke; Li, Zhaoduan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of the development of type 2 diabetes on glutamate homeostasis in the spinal cord. Therefore, we quantified the extracellular levels of glutamate in the spinal cord of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats using in vivo microdialysis. In addition, protein levels of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were measured using Western blot. Finally, the effects of repeated intrathecal injections of ceftriaxone, which was previously shown to enhance GLT-1 expression, on the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia as well as on basal extracellular level of glutamate and the expression of GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were evaluated. It was found that ZDF rats developed mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia, which were associated with increased basal extracellular levels of glutamate and attenuated levels of GLT-1 expression in the spinal cord, particularly in the dorsal horn. Furthermore, repeated intrathecal administrations of ceftriaxone dose-dependently prevented the development of mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in ZDF rats, which were correlated with enhanced GLT-1 expression without altering the basal glutamate levels in the spinal cord of ZDF rats. Overall, the results suggested that impaired glutamate reuptake in the spinal cord may contribute to the development of neuropathic pains in type 2 diabetes. PMID:27932896

  4. Activation of the cAMP transduction cascade contributes to the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Sluka, K A

    1997-11-01

    1. The spinal role of the cAMP transduction cascade in nociceptive processing was investigated in awake behaving rats (male, Sprague-Dawley) by activating or inhibiting this pathway spinally. Microdialysis fibres were implanted into the dorsal horn to infuse drugs directly to the spinal cord. 2. Animals, without peripheral tissue injury, were tested for responses to repeated applications (10 trials) of von Frey filaments and threshold to mechanical stimulation before and after infusion of 8-bromo-cAMP. In this group of animals treated spinally with 8-br-cAMP (1-10 mM) a dose-dependent hyperalgesia and allodynia were produced. This was manifested as an increased number of responses to 10 trials of von Frey filaments (10, 50, 150, 250 mN) and a decrease in mechanical threshold. 3. A second series of experiments studied the manipulation of the cAMP pathway spinally in a model of tissue injury induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin. Animals were either pre- or post-treated spinally with the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, tetrahydrofuryl adenine (THFA) or the protein kinase A inhibitor, myrosilated protein kinase (14-22) amide (PKI). Injection of capsaicin resulted in an increased number of responses to repeated applications of von Frey filaments and a decrease in threshold to mechanical stimuli outside the site of injection, secondary mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia. 4. Pre-treatment with either THFA (1 mM) or PKI (5 mM) had no effect on the capsaicin-evoked secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia. 5. In contrast, post-treatment spinally with THFA (0.01-1 mM) or PKI (0.05-50 mM) dose-dependently reduced the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia produced by capsaicin injection. Furthermore, the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia blocked by the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, THFA (1 mM), was reversed by infusion of 8-bromo-cAMP (0.01-10 mM) in a dose-dependent manner. 6. Thus, this study demonstrates that activation of the cAMP transduction cascade at the spinal

  5. Characterization of nociceptin hyperalgesia and allodynia in conscious mice

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Naoki; Minami, Toshiaki; Okuda-Ashitaka, Emiko; Sugimoto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Masato; Onaka, Masahiko; Mori, Hidemaro; Imanishi, Toshihiro; Shingu, Koh; Ito, Seiji

    1997-01-01

    demonstrate that, whereas the mechanisms of the nociceptin-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia are evidently distinct, they involve a common neurochemical event beginning with the disinhibition of the inhibitory glycinergic response. Morphine may induce allodynia through a pathway common to nociceptin, but the nociceptin receptor does not mediate the action of high doses of morphine. PMID:9179380

  6. Nuclear factor-kappa B decoy suppresses nerve injury and improves mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat lumbar disc herniation model

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Munetaka; Inoue, Gen; Gemba, Takefumi; Watanabe, Tomoko; Ito, Toshinori; Koshi, Takana; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Yamashita, Masaomi; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is a gene transcriptional regulator of inflammatory cytokines. We investigated the transduction efficiency of NF-κB decoy to dorsal root ganglion (DRG), as well as the decrease in nerve injury, mechanical allodynia, and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat lumbar disc herniation model. Forty rats were used in this study. NF-κB decoy–fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was injected intrathecally at the L5 level in five rats, and its transduction efficiency into DRG measured. In another 30 rats, mechanical pressure was placed on the DRG at the L5 level and nucleus pulposus harvested from the rat coccygeal disc was transplanted on the DRG. Rats were classified into three groups of ten animals each: a herniation + decoy group, a herniation + oligo group, and a herniation only group. For behavioral testing, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated. In 15 of the herniation rats, their left L5 DRGs were resected, and the expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF-3) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was evaluated immunohistochemically compared to five controls. The total transduction efficiency of NF-κB decoy–FITC in DRG neurons was 10.8% in vivo. The expression of CGRP and ATF-3 was significantly lower in the herniation + decoy group than in the other herniation groups. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were significantly suppressed in the herniation + decoy group. NF-κB decoy was transduced into DRGs in vivo. NF-κB decoy may be useful as a target for clarifying the mechanism of sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation. PMID:19308465

  7. Nuclear factor-kappa B decoy suppresses nerve injury and improves mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat lumbar disc herniation model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Munetaka; Inoue, Gen; Gemba, Takefumi; Watanabe, Tomoko; Ito, Toshinori; Koshi, Takana; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Yamashita, Masaomi; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is a gene transcriptional regulator of inflammatory cytokines. We investigated the transduction efficiency of NF-kappaB decoy to dorsal root ganglion (DRG), as well as the decrease in nerve injury, mechanical allodynia, and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat lumbar disc herniation model. Forty rats were used in this study. NF-kappaB decoy-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was injected intrathecally at the L5 level in five rats, and its transduction efficiency into DRG measured. In another 30 rats, mechanical pressure was placed on the DRG at the L5 level and nucleus pulposus harvested from the rat coccygeal disc was transplanted on the DRG. Rats were classified into three groups of ten animals each: a herniation + decoy group, a herniation + oligo group, and a herniation only group. For behavioral testing, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated. In 15 of the herniation rats, their left L5 DRGs were resected, and the expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF-3) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was evaluated immunohistochemically compared to five controls. The total transduction efficiency of NF-kappaB decoy-FITC in DRG neurons was 10.8% in vivo. The expression of CGRP and ATF-3 was significantly lower in the herniation + decoy group than in the other herniation groups. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were significantly suppressed in the herniation + decoy group. NF-kappaB decoy was transduced into DRGs in vivo. NF-kappaB decoy may be useful as a target for clarifying the mechanism of sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation.

  8. Inhibition of endogenous NGF degradation induces mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously shown a sprouting of sympathetic fibers into the upper dermis of the skin following subcutaneous injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the hindpaw. This sprouting correlated with an increase in pain-related sensitivity. We hypothesized that this sprouting and pain-related behavior were caused by an increase in nerve growth factor (NGF) levels. In this study, we investigated whether the inhibition of mature NGF degradation, using a matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 (MMP-2/9) inhibitor, was sufficient to reproduce a similar phenotype. Results Behavioral tests performed on male Sprague–Dawley rats at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after intra-plantar MMP-2/9 inhibitor administration demonstrated that acute and chronic injections of the MMP-2/9 inhibitor induced sensitization, in a dose dependent manner, to mechanical, hot and cold stimuli as measured by von Frey filaments, Hargreaves and acetone tests, respectively. Moreover, the protein levels of mature NGF (mNGF) were increased, whereas the levels and enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 were reduced in the glabrous skin of the hind paw. MMP-2/9 inhibition also led to a robust sprouting of sympathetic fibers into the upper dermis but there were no changes in the density of peptidergic nociceptive afferents. Conclusions These findings indicate that localized MMP-2/9 inhibition provokes a pattern of sensitization and fiber sprouting comparable to that previously obtained following CFA injection. Accordingly, the modulation of endogenous NGF levels should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for the management of inflammatory pain associated with arthritis. PMID:23889761

  9. Metformin attenuates hyperalgesia and allodynia in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy induced by streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxiong; Yu, Hailong; Liu, Jun; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qi; Xiang, Liangbi

    2015-10-05

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, which often makes the patients suffer from severe hyperalgesia and allodynia. Thus far, the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy remains unsatisfactory. Metformin, which is the first-line drug for type-2 diabetes, has been proved to attenuate hyperexcitability in sensory neurons linked to chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain, highlighting its potential in alleviating pain related with painful diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the potential beneficial effect of metformin on hyperalgesia and allodynia in diabetic rats. The mechanical sensitivity, heat nociception, and cold allodynia were examined. The levels of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and advanced glycation end-products in the blood were measured. The expression of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and AMPK target genes were examined in the sciatic nerves of the animals. It was found that metformin was capable of attenuating diabetes-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. In addition, metformin was capable of decreasing malondialdehyde and glycation end-products levels in blood, as well as increasing superoxide dismutas activity, indicating the inhibitory effect of metformin against diabetes-induced oxidative stress. Further studies showed that metformin could activate AMPK and increase the AMPK target genes in sciatic nerves in diabetic rats. In conclusion, metformin is able to attenuate diabetes-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia, which might be associated its anti-oxidative effect through AMPK pathway. Metformin might be used as an effective drug, especially with fewer side effects, for abnormal sensation in painful diabetic neuropathy.

  10. Intraneural dexamethasone applied simultaneously to rat sciatic nerve constriction delays the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Medeiros, Daniel C; Vieira, Rafael P; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2012-02-21

    Although neuroimmune interactions associated with the development of pain sensitization in models of neuropathic pain have been widely studied, there are some aspects that require further investigation. Thus, we aimed to evaluate whether the local intraneural or perineural injections of dexamethasone, an efficacious anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drug, delays the development of both thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in an experimental model of neuropathic pain in rats. Hargreaves and electronic von Frey tests were applied. The chronic constriction injury (CCI) of right sciatic nerve was performed. Single intraneural dexamethasone administration at the moment of constriction delayed the development of sensitization for thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. However, perineural administration of dexamethasone, at the highest dose, did not delay experimental pain development. These results show that inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is an essential trigger for the pathological changes that lead to both hyperalgesia and allodynia. In conclusion, this approach opens new opportunities to study cellular and molecular neuroimmune interactions associated with the development of pain derived from peripheral neuropathies.

  11. Lycopene ameliorates thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia in STZ-induced diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Kuhad, Anurag; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2008-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the common complications of diabetes mellitus. It is frequently associated with debilitating pain. The present study was designed to investigate effect of Lycopene, a carotenoid found in tomatoes, on hyperalgesia and cold allodynia in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. After 4-weeks of STZ injection, diabetic mice exhibited a significant thermal hyperalgesia cold allodynia, hyperglycemia and loss of body weights as compared with control rats. Chronic treatment of lycopene for 4 weeks significantly attenuated the cold allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. The results emphasize the role of antioxidant such as lycopene as an adjuvant therapy in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  12. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Dustin; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen; Hargreaves, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids . Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain.

  13. IL-1beta in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis contributes to extra-territorial allodynia/hyperalgesia following a trigeminal nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kouji; Watanabe, Mineo; Suekawa, Yohei; Ito, Goshi; Inubushi, Toshihiro; Hirose, Naoto; Murasaki, Kyoko; Hiyama, Shinji; Uchida, Takashi; Tanne, Kazuo

    2011-05-01

    It has been reported that the whisker pad (WP) area, which is innervated by the second branch of the trigeminal nerve, shows allodynia/hyperalgesia following transection of the mental nerve (MN: the third branch of the trigeminal nerve). However, the mechanisms of this extra-territorial pain induction still remain unclear. Glia and cytokines are known to facilitate perception of noxious input, raising a possibility that these non-neuronal elements are involved in the induction and spread of allodynia/hyperalgesia at non-injured skin territory. One day after MN transection, tactile allodynia/hyperalgesia developed on the ipsilateral WP area, which is in the non-injured skin territory. The tactile allodynia/hyperalgesia lasted for more than 56 days. In response to MN transection, astrocytes and microglia appeared to be in an activated state, and interleukin (IL)-1beta was up-regulated in astrocytes in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc). Allodynia/hyperalgesia at WP area induced by MN transection was attenuated dose-dependently by IL-1 receptor antagonist IL-1ra (i.t., 0.05, 0.5, and 5 pg/rat). Fos-like immunoreactive (Fos-Li) neurons were observed in the Vc after non-noxious mechanical stimulation of the WP area in the rats with MN transection. Administration of IL-1ra also attenuated the number of Fos-Li neurons dose-dependently. Administration of a noncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors MK-801 (i.t., 5 μg/rat) reversed allodynia/hyperalgesia. IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) was localized in Fos- and phospho NR1-immunoreactive neurons. These results suggest that IL-1beta in the Vc plays an important role in the development of extra-territorial tactile allodynia/hyperalgesia after MN transection.

  14. Cold allodynia and hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain: the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine--a double-blind, cross-over comparison with alfentanil and placebo.

    PubMed

    Jørum, E; Warncke, T; Stubhaug, A

    2003-02-01

    Cold allodynia and hyperalgesia are frequent clinical findings in patients with neuropathic pain. While there have been several clinical studies showing the involvement of central sensitization mechanisms and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation in mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia and ongoing pain, the mechanisms of thermal allodynia and hyperalgesia have received less attention. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of the NMDA-receptor antagonist ketamine on thermal allodynia/hyperalgesia, ongoing pain and mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia in patients with neuropathic pain (11 patients with post-traumatic neuralgia and one patient with post-herpetic neuralgia). All the patients were known to suffer from severe cold allodynia (cold pain detection threshold (CPDT): 23.8 degrees C, median value). The mu-opioid agonist alfentanil was used as an active control. The study design was double-blind and placebo-controlled and the drugs were administered i.v. (bolus dose and infusion). CPDT in the asymptomatic contralateral area was found to be significantly decreased (cold allodynia) compared to CPDT in site- and age-matched normal controls. Heat pain detection thresholds were found to be normal and no consistent heat hyperalgesia occurred. Alfentanil significantly reduced cold allodynia (by increasing CPDT) in symptomatic area (P=0.0076). Ketamine did not significantly increase the threshold. Significant and marked reductions of hyperalgesia to cold (visual analogue score at threshold value) were seen following both alfentanil (4.5 before, 1.4 after, median value) and ketamine (6.8 before, 0.4 after, median value). Alfentanil and ketamine also significantly reduced ongoing pain and mechanical hyperalgesia. It is concluded that NMDA-receptor mediated central sensitization is involved in cold hyperalgesia, but since CPDT remained unaltered, it is likely that other mechanisms are present.

  15. The effects of opioid receptor antagonists on electroacupuncture-produced anti-allodynia/hyperalgesia in rats with paclitaxel-evoked peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianze; Zhang, Yu; Li, Aihui; Xin, Jiajia; Lao, Lixing; Ren, Ke; Berman, Brian M.; Tan, Ming; Zhang, Rui-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Research supports the effectiveness of acupuncture for conditions such as chronic low back and knee pain. In a five-patient pilot study the modality also improved the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. Using an established rat model of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy, we evaluated the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on paclitaxel-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia that has not been studied in an animal model. We hypothesize that EA would relieve the paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia, which was assessed 30 minutes after EA using von Frey filaments. Beginning on day 13, the response frequency to von Frey filaments (4-15 g) was significantly increased in paclitaxel-injected rats compared to those injected with vehicle. EA at 10Hz significantly (p<0.05) decreased response frequency at 4-15 g compared to sham EA; EA at 100Hz only decreased response frequency at 15 g stimulation. Compared to sham EA plus vehicle, EA at 10Hz plus either a μ, δ, or κ opioid receptor antagonist did not significantly decrease mechanical response frequency, indicating that all three antagonists blocked EA inhibition of allodynia and hyperalgesia. Since we previously demonstrated that μ and δ but not κ opioid receptors affect EA anti-hyperalgesia in an inflammatory pain model, these data show that EA inhibits pain through different opioid receptors under varying conditions. Our data indicate that EA at 10Hz inhibits mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia more potently than does EA at 100Hz. Thus, EA significantly inhibits paclitaxel-induced allodynia/hyperalgesia through spinal opioid receptors, and EA may be a useful complementary treatment for neuropathic pain patients. PMID:21872220

  16. Fucoidan attenuates the existing allodynia and hyperalgesia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuanyin; Zhang, Guoping; Zhao, Yun-Tao

    2014-06-13

    Fucoidan is an active constituent found in brown seaweeds, which have potential neuroprotection. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of fucoidan on the maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) and the underlying mechanism related to the spinal neuroimmune responses. Animals were randomized into 5 groups: sham-operation with vehicle and SNL with vehicle or fucoidan (15, 50, and 100mg/kg). Different doses of fucoidan or vehicle were administered intrathecally once daily from postoperative day (POD) 11-20. Mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) was measured on 1 day before operation and days 10, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 after operation. Glial activation markers such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and macrophage antigen complex-1 (mac-1), inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 activation, and extracellular signalregulated protein kinase (ERK) activation in the lumbar spinal cord were determined on day 30 after operation. The results showed that fucoidan caused dose-dependently attenuation of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Furthermore, fucoidan could markedly inhibit neuroimmune activation characterized by glial activation, production of cytokines as well as ERK activation. The analgesic effect of intrathecal fucoidan in rats receiving SNL might partly attribute to the inhibition of neuroimmune activation associated with the maintenance of neuropathic pain.

  17. Spinal administration of a delta opioid receptor agonist attenuates hyperalgesia and allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Holdridge, Sarah V; Cahill, Catherine M

    2007-08-01

    Neuropathic (NP) pain is a debilitating chronic pain disorder considered by some to be inherently resistant to therapy with traditional analgesics. Indeed, micro opioid receptor (OR) agonists show reduced therapeutic benefit and their long term use is hindered by the high incidence of adverse effects. However, pharmacological and physiological evidence increasingly suggests a role for deltaOR agonists in modulating NP pain symptoms. In this study, we examined the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of the spinally administered deltaOR agonist, d-[Ala(2), Glu(4)]deltorphin II (deltorphin II), as well as the changes in deltaOR expression, in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Rats with CCI exhibited cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia over a 14-day testing period. Intrathecal administration of deltorphin II reversed cold hyperalgesia on day 14 and dose-dependently attenuated mechanical allodynia. The effects of deltorphin II were mediated via activation of the deltaOR as the effect was antagonized by co-treatment with the delta-selective antagonist, naltrindole. Western blotting experiments revealed no changes in deltaOR protein in the dorsal spinal cord following CCI. Taken together, these data demonstrate the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effectiveness of a spinally administered deltaOR agonist following peripheral nerve injury and support further investigation of deltaORs as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of NP pain.

  18. Codeine-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia: investigating the role of glial activation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J L; Rolan, P E; Johnson, M E; Bobrovskaya, L; Williams, D B; Johnson, K; Tuke, J; Hutchinson, M R

    2014-01-01

    Chronic morphine therapy has been associated with paradoxically increased pain. Codeine is a widely used opioid, which is metabolized to morphine to elicit analgesia. Prolonged morphine exposure exacerbates pain by activating the innate immune toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) in the central nervous system. In silico docking simulations indicate codeine also docks to MD2, an accessory protein for TLR4, suggesting potential to induce TLR4-dependent pain facilitation. We hypothesized codeine would cause TLR4-dependent hyperalgesia/allodynia that is disparate from its opioid receptor-dependent analgesic rank potency. Hyperalgesia and allodynia were assessed using hotplate and von Frey tests at days 0, 3 and 5 in mice receiving intraperitoneal equimolar codeine (21 mg kg−1), morphine (20 mg kg−1) or saline, twice daily. This experiment was repeated in animals with prior partial nerve injury and in TLR4 null mutant mice. Interventions with interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) and glial-attenuating drug ibudilast were assessed. Analyses of glial activation markers (glial fibrillary acid protein and CD11b) in neuronal tissue were conducted at the completion of behavioural testing. Despite providing less acute analgesia (P=0.006), codeine induced similar hotplate hyperalgesia to equimolar morphine vs saline (−9.5 s, P<0.01 and −7.3 s, P<0.01, respectively), suggesting codeine does not rely upon conversion to morphine to increase pain sensitivity. This highlights the potential non-opioid receptor-dependent nature of codeine-enhanced pain sensitivity—although the involvement of other codeine metabolites cannot be ruled out. IL-1RA reversed codeine-induced hyperalgesia (P<0.001) and allodynia (P<0.001), and TLR4 knock-out protected against codeine-induced changes in pain sensitivity. Glial attenuation with ibudilast reversed codeine-induced allodynia (P<0.001), and thus could be investigated further as potential treatment for codeine-induced pain

  19. Mechanical Stimulation Enhances Endothelin-1 Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Elizabeth K.; Gear, Robert W.; Levine, Jon D.

    2011-01-01

    When comparing a cumulative dose-response curve for endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced mechanical hyperalgesia to the effect of individual doses (1 ng, 10 ng, 100 ng and 1 µg) administered in separate groups of rats, a marked difference was observed in the peak magnitude of hyperalgesia. Hyperalgesia was measured as decrease in the threshold for mechanically-induced withdrawal of the hind paw. The cumulative dosing protocol produced markedly greater maximum hyperalgesia. To determine whether this was due to the cumulative dosing protocol or to the repeated exposure to the mechanical test stimulus, we evaluated the impact of repeated testing on ET-1-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. While ET-1-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was dose- and time-dependent, repeated testing of nociceptive threshold, at 5 minute intervals, following a single dose of ET-1, produced further decrease in nociceptive threshold. This mechanical stimulation-induced enhancement of ET-1 hyperalgesia lasted only 3–4 hrs, while the hyperalgesia lasted in excess of 5 days. The stimulation-enhanced hyperalgesia also occurred after a second injection of ET-1, administered 24 hours after the initial dose. That this phenomenon is unique to ET-1 is suggested by the observation that while five additional, direct-acting hyperalgesic agents — PGE2, NGF, GDNF, IL-6 and TNFα — induced robust mechanical hyperalgesia, none produced mechanical stimulation-enhanced hyperalgesia. PMID:21277948

  20. Gastrodin Inhibits Allodynia and Hyperalgesia in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy Rats by Decreasing Excitability of Nociceptive Primary Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Han, Wen-Juan; Wang, Wen-Ting; Luo, Ceng; Hu, San-Jue

    2012-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and adversely affects the patients’ quality of life. Evidence has accumulated that PDN is associated with hyperexcitability of peripheral nociceptive primary sensory neurons. However, the precise cellular mechanism underlying PDN remains elusive. This may result in the lacking of effective therapies for the treatment of PDN. The phenolic glucoside, gastrodin, which is a main constituent of the Chinese herbal medicine Gastrodia elata Blume, has been widely used as an anticonvulsant, sedative, and analgesic since ancient times. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying its analgesic actions are not well understood. By utilizing a combination of behavioral surveys and electrophysiological recordings, the present study investigated the role of gastrodin in an experimental rat model of STZ-induced PDN and to further explore the underlying cellular mechanisms. Intraperitoneal administration of gastrodin effectively attenuated both the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia induced by STZ injection. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from nociceptive, capsaicin-sensitive small diameter neurons of the intact dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Recordings from diabetic rats revealed that the abnormal hyperexcitability of neurons was greatly abolished by application of GAS. To determine which currents were involved in the antinociceptive action of gastrodin, we examined the effects of gastrodin on transient sodium currents (INaT) and potassium currents in diabetic small DRG neurons. Diabetes caused a prominent enhancement of INaT and a decrease of potassium currents, especially slowly inactivating potassium currents (IAS); these effects were completely reversed by GAS in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, changes in activation and inactivation kinetics of INaT and total potassium current as well as IAS currents induced by STZ were normalized by GAS. This study provides a clear

  1. Participation of central GABAA receptors in the trigeminal processing of mechanical allodynia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ji; Park, Young Hong; Yang, Kui Ye; Ju, Jin Sook; Bae, Yong Chul

    2017-01-01

    Here we investigated the central processing mechanisms of mechanical allodynia and found a direct excitatory link with low-threshold input to nociceptive neurons. Experiments were performed on male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 230-280 g. Subcutaneous injection of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) (1 ng/10 µL) was used to produce mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Intracisternal administration of bicuculline, a gamma aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor antagonist, produced mechanical allodynia in the orofacial area under normal conditions. However, intracisternal administration of bicuculline (50 ng) produced a paradoxical anti-allodynic effect under inflammatory pain conditions. Pretreatment with resiniferatoxin (RTX), which depletes capsaicin receptor protein in primary afferent fibers, did not alter the paradoxical anti-allodynic effects produced by the intracisternal injection of bicuculline. Intracisternal injection of bumetanide, an Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC 1) inhibitor, reversed the IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia. In the control group, application of GABA (100 µM) or muscimol (3 µM) led to membrane hyperpolarization in gramicidin perforated current clamp mode. However, in some neurons, application of GABA or muscimol led to membrane depolarization in the IL-1β-treated rats. These results suggest that some large myelinated Aβ fibers gain access to the nociceptive system and elicit pain sensation via GABAA receptors under inflammatory pain conditions. PMID:28066142

  2. Minocycline reduces mechanical allodynia and depressive-like behaviour in type-1 diabetes mellitus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Diana; Puga, Sónia; Bragança, Rui; Braga, António; Pertovaara, Antti; Almeida, Armando; Pinto-Ribeiro, Filipa

    2017-03-08

    A common and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus is painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) that can be accompanied by emotional disorders such as depression. A few studies have suggested that minocycline that inhibits microglia may attenuate pain hypersensitivity in PDN. Moreover, a recent study reported that minocycline has an acute antidepressive-like effect in diabetic animals. Here we studied whether (i) prolonged minocycline treatment suppresses pain behaviour in PDN, (ii) the minocycline effect varies with submodality of pain, and (iii) the suppression of pain behaviour by prolonged minocycline treatment is associated with antidepressive-like effect. The experiments were performed in streptozotocin-induced rat model of type-1 diabetes. Pain behaviour was evoked by innocuous (monofilaments) and noxious (paw pressure) mechanical stimulation, innocuous cold (acetone drops) and noxious heat (radiant heat). Depression-like behaviour was assessed using forced swimming test. Minocycline treatment (daily 80mg/kg per os) of three-week duration started four weeks after induction of diabetes. Diabetes induced mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat hypoalgesia, and depression-like behaviour. Minocycline treatment significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia and depression-like behaviour, while it failed to produce significant changes in mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia or heat hypoalgesia. The results indicate that prolonged per oral treatment with minocycline has a sustained mechanical antiallodynic and antidepressive-like effect in PDN. These results support the proposal that minocycline might provide a treatment option for attenuating sensory and comorbid emotional symptoms in chronic PDN.

  3. EXACERBATED MECHANICAL ALLODYNIA IN RATS WITH DEPRESSION-LIKE BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qing; Wang, Shuxing; Lim, Grewo; Yang, Liling; Mao, Ji; Sung, Backil; Chang, Yang; Lim, Jeong-Ae; Guo, Gongshe; Mao, Jianren

    2008-01-01

    Although a clinical connection between pain and depression has long been recognized, how these two conditions interact remains unclear. Here we report that both mechanical allodynia and depression-like behavior were significantly exacerbated after peripheral nerve injury in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a genetic variation of Wistar rats with demonstrable depression-like behavior. Administration of melatonin into the anterior cingular cortex contralateral to peripheral nerve injury prevented the exacerbation of mechanical allodynia with a concurrent improvement of depression-like behavior in WKY rats. Moreover, there was a lower plasma melatonin concentration and a lower melatonin receptor expression in the anterior cingular cortex in WKY rats than in Wistar rats. These results suggest that there exists a reciprocal relationship between mechanical allodynia and depression-like behavior and the melotoninergic system in the anterior cingular cortex might play an important role in the interaction between pain and depression. PMID:18289511

  4. The incidence of mechanical allodynia in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Owatz, Christopher B; Khan, Asma A; Schindler, William G; Schwartz, Scott A; Keiser, Karl; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2007-05-01

    The mechanisms of odontogenic pain are complex and incompletely understood. Cases of irreversible pulpitis are thought to represent a localized inflammatory response to bacterial challenge in dental pulp tissue. The presenting symptoms are classically defined by exaggerated painful episodes to thermal stimuli that may linger after cessation of the stimulus. However, the associated incidence of mechanical allodynia, defined as reduced mechanical pain threshold to masticatory forces, has not been characterized. This study evaluated pain intensity ratings and the presence of mechanical allodynia reported by 993 consecutive dental patients presenting for tooth extraction in a community health center. After clinical and radiographic examinations, the pulpal/periradicular diagnostic categories were normal pulp/normal periradicular (n=792 patients), irreversible pulpitis/normal periradicular (n=86), or irreversible pulpitis/acute periradicular periodontitis (n=115). The rank order for the mean values of pain intensity ratings was irreversible pulpitis/acute periradicular periodontitis > irreversible pulpitis/normal periradicular > normal/normal (p<0.05 for all comparisons). The incidence of mechanical allodynia in patients presenting with irreversible pulpitis was 57.2%, indicating that periradicular mechanical allodynia contributes to early stages of odontogenic pain because of inflammation of vital pulpal tissue.

  5. Stimulation of deep somatic tissue with capsaicin produces long-lasting mechanical allodynia and heat hypoalgesia that depends on early activation of the cAMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Sluka, K A

    2002-07-01

    Pain and hyperalgesia from deep somatic tissue (i.e., muscle and joint) are processed differently from that from skin. This study examined differences between deep and cutaneous tissue allodynia and the role of cAMP in associated behavioral changes. Capsaicin was injected into the plantar aspect of the skin, plantar muscles of the paw, or ankle joint, and responses to mechanical and heat stimuli were assessed until allodynia resolved. Capsaicin injected into skin resulted in a secondary mechanical allodynia and heat hypoalgesia lasting approximately 3 hr. In contrast, capsaicin injection into muscle or joint resulted in a long-lasting bilateral (1-4 weeks) mechanical allodynia with a simultaneous unilateral heat hypoalgesia. The pattern and degree of inflammation were similar when capsaicin was injected into skin, muscle, or joint, with peak increases 24 hr after injection. Heat hypoalgesia that occurs after injection into deep tissue was reversed by spinal blockade of adenylate cyclase or protein kinase A (PKA). Interestingly, mechanical allodynia was reversed if adenylate cyclase or PKA inhibitors were administered spinally 24 hr, but not 1 week, after injection of capsaicin. Spinally administered 8-bromo-cAMP resulted in a similar pattern, with heat hypoalgesia and mechanical allodynia occurring simultaneously. Thus, injection of capsaicin into deep tissues results in a longer-lasting mechanical allodynia and heat hypoalgesia compared with injection of capsaicin into skin. The mechanical allodynia depends on early activation of the cAMP pathway during the first 24 hr but is independent of the cAMP pathway by 1 week after injection of capsaicin.

  6. Glutamate receptor ligands attenuate allodynia and hyperalgesia and potentiate morphine effects in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Osikowicz, Maria; Mika, Joanna; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2008-09-30

    Recent studies have indicated that metabotropic glutamate receptors mGluR5, mGluR2/3 and mGluR7 are present in the regions of central nervous system important for nociceptive transmission, but their involvement in neuropathic pain has not been well established. We demonstrated that acute and chronic administration of MPEP (mGluR5 antagonist), LY379268 (mGluR2/3 agonist), and AMN082 (mGluR7 agonist) attenuated allodynia (von Frey test) and hyperalgesia (cold plate test) as measured in Swiss albino mice on day seven after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. Moreover, single administration of MPEP (30 mg/kg; i.p.) or LY379268 (10mg/kg; i.p.) injected 30 min before morphine potentiated morphine's effects (20mg/kg; i.p.) in the mouse CCI model, as measured by both the tests mentioned above. However, a single administration of AMN082 (3mg/kg; i.p.) potentiated the effects of a single morphine injection (20mg/kg; i.p.) in the von Frey test only. Chronic administration (7 days) of low doses of MPEP, LY379268 or AMN082 (all drugs at 3mg/kg; i.p.) potentiated the effects of single doses of morphine (3, 10, and 20mg/kg; i.p.) administered on day seven; however, AMN082 only potentiated the effect in the cold plate test. Additionally, the same doses of MPEP and LY379268 (but not AMN082) chronically co-administered with morphine (40 mg/kg; i.p.) attenuated the development of morphine tolerance in CCI-exposed mice. Our data suggest that mGluR5, mGluR2/3, and mGluR7 are involved in injury-induced plastic changes in nociceptive pathways and that the mGluR5 and mGluR2/3 ligands enhanced morphine's effectiveness in neuropathy, which could have therapeutic implications.

  7. Evaluation of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of saffron, Crocus sativus L., and its constituents, safranal and crocin in allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Amin, Bahareh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2012-07-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate therapeutic potential of systemically administered ethanolic and aqueous extracts of saffron as well as its bioactive ingredients, safranal and crocin, in chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The von Frey filaments, acetone drop, and radiant heat test were performed to assess the degree of mechanical allodynia, thermal allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia respectively, at different time intervals, i.e., one day before surgery and 3, 5, 7 and 10 days post surgery. The ambulatory behavior was evaluated using the open field test. A 7-day treatment with the ethanolic and aqueous extracts (50,100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) and safranal (0.025, 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), attenuated the behavioral symptoms of neuropathic pain in a dose dependent manner. Crocin even at the high dose (50 mg/kg) failed to produce any protective role. However, gabapentine (100 mg/kg) as a reference drug significantly alleviated all behavioral manifestations of neuropathic pain compared to control group. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that ethanolic and aqueous extracts of saffron as well as safranal could be useful in treatment of different kinds of neuropathic pains and as an adjuvant to conventional medicines.

  8. Milnacipran inhibits oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia through spinal action in mice.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kitamura, Ryo; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether milnacipran, a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, would have therapeutic effect on oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg) induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection and almost completely subsided by day 20. Ten days post-oxaliplatin injection, the intraperitoneal administration of milnacipran (3-30 mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the established mechanical allodynia. Intrathecal injections of milnacipran (2.1-21 µg/site) also significantly and dose-dependently inhibited mechanical allodynia, but intracisternal and intracereboventricular injections at the same doses did not. The present results suggest that milnacipran is effective against oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and that the antiallodynic effect is mainly mediated by actions on the spinal cord.

  9. Gabapentin reduces allodynia and hyperalgesia in painful diabetic neuropathy rats by decreasing expression level of Nav1.7 and p-ERK1/2 in DRG neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-Long; Yang, Jan-Ping; Zhang, Ji-Ru; Li, Rui-Qin; Wang, Jing; Jan, Jin-Jin; Zhuang, Qing

    2013-02-01

    It has been confirmed that gabapentin (GBP) induced a inhibition of the voltage-gated persistent sodium current in chronically compressed dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The persistent sodium current is found in excitable DRG neurons of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) rats where it is mediated by tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive sodium channels. Recently, many groups have used models of neurological disorder to explore the mechanism of GBP in neuropathic pain. There is no evidence, however, to explain the particular mechanism of GBP, including its analgesic actions in PDN rats. These issues were addressed in the present study. Using behavioral testing, we found that diabetes leads to mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and these effects were reversed by a continuous GBP injection. To investigate the mechanism of GBP's reduction in neural excitability, we systematically analyzed the expression of Nav1.7 and p-ERK1/2 and tested the effect of GBP on these proteins. Diabetes significantly increased the excitability of DRG neurons and the expression of Nav1.7 and p-ERK1/2, and GBP significantly inhibited these changes. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of GBP on the expression of Nav1.7 and p-ERK1/2 might be one of the analgesic mechanisms of action of GBP. This may partially explain the antinociceptive action of GBP in the PDN rats.

  10. Prokineticin 2 facilitates mechanical allodynia induced by α,β-methylene ATP in rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Gan, Xiong; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Rao, Zhiguo; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-11-15

    Prokineticin 2 (PK2), a new chemokine, causes mechanical hypersensitivity in the rat hind paw, but little is known about the molecular mechanism. Here, we have found that ionotropic P2X receptor is essential to mechanical allodynia induced by PK2. First, intraplantar injection of high dose (3 or 10 pmol) of PK2 significantly increased paw withdrawal response frequency (%) to innocuous mechanical stimuli (mechanical allodynia). And the mechanical allodynia induced by PK2 was prevented by co-administration of TNP-ATP, a selective P2X receptor antagonist. Second, although low dose (0.3 or 1 pmol) of PK2 itself did not produce an allodynic response, it significantly facilitated the mechanical allodynia evoked by intraplantar injection of α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP). Third, PK2 concentration-dependently potentiated α,β-meATP-activated currents in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Finally, PK2 receptors and intracellular signal transduction were involved in PK2 potentiation of α,β-meATP-induced mechanical allodynia and α,β-meATP-activated currents, since the potentiation were blocked by PK2 receptor antagonist PKRA and selective PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. These results suggested that PK2 facilitated mechanical allodynia induced by α,β-meATP through a mechanism involved in sensitization of cutaneous P2X receptors expressed by nociceptive nerve endings.

  11. Colocalization of aromatase in spinal cord astrocytes: Differences in expression and relationship to mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in murine models of a painful and a non-painful bone tumor

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Elaine E; Smeester, Branden A; Michlitsch, Kyle S; Lee, Jang-Hern; Beitz, Alvin J

    2015-01-01

    While spinal cord astrocytes play a key role in the generation of cancer pain, there have been no studies that have examined the relationship of tumor-induced astrocyte activation and aromatase expression during the development of cancer pain. Here, we examined tumor-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and cold allodynia, and changes in GFAP and aromatase expression in murine models of painful and non-painful bone cancer. We demonstrate that implantation of fibrosarcoma cells, but not melanoma cells, produces robust mechanical hyperalgesia and cold allodynia in tumor-bearing mice compared to saline-injected controls. Secondly, this increase in mechanical hyperalgesia and cold allodynia is mirrored by significant increases in both spinal astrocyte activity and aromatase expression in the dorsal horn of fibrosarcoma-bearing mice. Importantly, we show that aromatase is only found within a subset of astrocytes and not in neurons in the lumbar spinal cord. Finally, administration of an aromatase inhibitor reduced tumor-induced hyperalgesia in fibrosarcoma-bearing animals. We conclude that a painful fibrosarcoma tumor induces a significant increase in spinal astrocyte activation and aromatase expression and that the up-regulation of aromatase plays a role in the development of bone tumor-induced hyperalgesia. Since spinal aromatase is also upregulated, but to a lesser extent, in non-painful melanoma bone tumors, it may also be neuroprotective and responsive to the changing tumor environment. PMID:26071956

  12. Comparison of dynamic (brush) and static (pressure) mechanical allodynia in migraine.

    PubMed

    LoPinto, C; Young, W B; Ashkenazi, A

    2006-07-01

    Allodynia has been described in migraine but has not been fully investigated for the different sensory modalities. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of dynamic (brush) and static (pressure) mechanical allodynia in migraine patients and to suggest a practical method of testing them in a clinical setting. Patients with International Headache Society-defined episodic migraine (EM) or with transformed migraine (TM) as defined by Silberstein and Lipton were prospectively recruited from the Jefferson Headache Center out-patient clinic. A questionnaire of migraine features and symptoms of allodynia was administered. Brush allodynia (BA) was tested by cutaneous stimulation with a gauze pad and pressure allodynia (PA) was tested using von Frey hairs (VFH). The prevalence of BA and PA in all patients and in the different subgroups was calculated and correlated with migraine features. We recruited 55 migraine patients. Twenty-five had EM and 30 had TM. BA was present in 18 (32.7%) patients and PA in 18-24 (32.7-43.6%). Allodynia to both brush and pressure was found in 13-17 (23.6-30.9%) patients. If a patient had allodynia to one modality only, it was more likely to be PA than BA. Both BA and PA were more common in patients with TM compared with those with EM [BA 46.7% vs. 16.0%; PA (differences significant for the medium and thick VFHs) 50% vs. 20% and 50% vs. 12%, respectively]. Both types of allodynia were also more common in patients with migraine with aura compared with those with migraine without aura (BA 57.1% vs. 17.6%; PA 57.1-61.9% vs. 17.6-32.7%). There was a positive correlation between allodynia score (as obtained by examination) and allodynia index (as obtained by history) for both BA and PA. The incomplete, although considerable, overlap between BA and PA suggests that allodynia to different sensory modalities is associated with sensitization of different neuronal populations. Because PA was more common than BA, it may be a more sensitive

  13. Sex differences in mechanical allodynia: how can it be preclinically quantified and analyzed?

    PubMed Central

    Nicotra, Lauren; Tuke, Jonathan; Grace, Peter M.; Rolan, Paul E.; Hutchinson, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Translating promising preclinical drug discoveries to successful clinical trials remains a significant hurdle in pain research. Although animal models have significantly contributed to understanding chronic pain pathophysiology, the majority of research has focused on male rodents using testing procedures that produce sex difference data that do not align well with comparable clinical experiences. Additionally, the use of animal pain models presents ongoing ethical challenges demanding continuing refinement of preclinical methods. To this end, this study sought to test a quantitative allodynia assessment technique and associated statistical analysis in a modified graded nerve injury pain model with the aim to further examine sex differences in allodynia. Graded allodynia was established in male and female Sprague Dawley rats by altering the number of sutures placed around the sciatic nerve and quantified by the von Frey test. Linear mixed effects modeling regressed response on each fixed effect (sex, oestrus cycle, pain treatment). On comparison with other common von Frey assessment techniques, utilizing lower threshold filaments than those ordinarily tested, at 1 s intervals, appropriately and successfully investigated female mechanical allodynia, revealing significant sex and oestrus cycle difference across the graded allodynia that other common behavioral methods were unable to detect. Utilizing this different von Frey approach and graded allodynia model, a single suture inflicting less allodynia was sufficient to demonstrate exaggerated female mechanical allodynia throughout the phases of dioestrus and pro-oestrus. Refining the von Frey testing method, statistical analysis technique and the use of a graded model of chronic pain, allowed for examination of the influences on female mechanical nociception that other von Frey methods cannot provide. PMID:24592221

  14. Peripheral Receptor Mechanisms Underlying Orofacial Muscle Pain and Hyperalgesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloman, Jami L.

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders (TMD) are severely debilitating and affect approximately 12% of the population. Identifying peripheral nociceptive mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia, a prominent feature of persistent muscle pain, could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. This study provides evidence of functional interactions between ligand-gated channels, P2X3 and TRPV1/TRPA1, in trigeminal sensory neurons, and proposes that these interactions underlie the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. In the masseter muscle, direct P2X3 activation, via the selective agonist αβmeATP, induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, or the TRPA1 antagonist, AP18. P2X3 was co-expressed with both TRPV1 and TRPA1 in masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Moreover, in a subpopulation of P2X3 /TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca2+ transients were significantly potentiated following P2X3 activation. Inhibition of Ca2+-dependent kinases, PKC and CaMKII, prevented P2X3-mechanical hyperalgesia whereas blockade of Ca2+-independent PKA did not. Finally, activation of P2X3 induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 minutes, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Similar data were obtained regarding another nonselective cation channel, the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Our data propose P2X3 and NMDARs interact with TRPV1 in a facilitatory manner, which could contribute to the peripheral sensitization underlying masseter hyperalgesia. This study offers novel mechanisms by which individual pro-nociceptive ligand

  15. The effect of intrathecal gabapentin on mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in neuropathic rats induced by spinal nerve ligation.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Sung; Kim, Myung Hee; Choi, Duck Hwan; Lee, Jung Il; Gwak, Mi Sook; Hahm, Tae Soo

    2002-01-01

    Gabapentin decreases the level of glutamate and elevates that of alpha-amino-butyric acid in the central nervous system. Gabapentin was shown to have antinociceptive effects in several facilitated pain models. Intrathecal gabapentin was also known to be effective in reducing mechanical allodynia in animals with neuropathic pain. In this study, we investigated to see whether intrathecal gabapentin produces antihyperalgesic effects on thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in neuropathic rats and whether its effects are associated with motor impairment. To induce neuropathic pain in Sprague-Dawley rats, left L5 and L6 spinal nerves were ligated. After a week, lumbar catheterization into subarachnoid space was performed. Then, paw withdrawal times to thermal stimuli and vocalization thresholds to paw pressure were determined before and up to 2 hr after intrathecal injection of gabapentin. Also, motor functions including performance times on rota-rod were determined. Intrathecal gabapentin attenuated significantly thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in neuropathic rats, but did not block thermal and mechanical nociception in sham-operated rats. Intrathecal gabapentin of antihyperalgesic doses inhibited motor coordination performance without evident ambulatory dysfunction. This study demonstrates that intrathecal gabapentin is effective against thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia, in spite of moderate impairment of motor coordination. PMID:11961308

  16. Effects of Adjuvant Analgesics on Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Mechanical Allodynia.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Wataru; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain (CPSP), a potential sequela of stroke, is classified as neuropathic pain. Although we recently established a CPSP-like model in mice, the effects of adjuvant analgesics as therapeutic drugs for neuropathic pain in this model are unknown. Hence, the aim of the present study was to assess the usefulness of our model by evaluating the effects of adjuvant analgesics used for treating neuropathic pain in this mouse model of CPSP. Male ddY mice were subjected to 30 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). The development of hind paw mechanical allodynia was measured after BCAO using the von Frey test. The mechanical allodynia was significantly increased on day 3 after BCAO compared with that during the pre-BCAO assessment. BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by intraperitoneal injections of imipramine (a tricyclic antidepressant), mexiletine (an antiarrhythmic), gabapentin (an antiepileptic), or a subcutaneous injection of morphine (an opioid receptor agonist) compared with that following vehicle treatment in BCAO-mice. By contrast, milnacipran (a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor), paroxetine (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), carbamazepine (antiepileptic), and indomethacin (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) did not affect the BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia. Our results show that BCAO in mice may be useful as an animal model of CPSP. In addition, BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia may be suppressed by some adjuvant analgesics used to treat neuropathic pain.

  17. Salmon calcitonin reduces oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in rats.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Manahito; Mori, Asami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is commonly used anti-cancer drugs, but it frequently causes peripheral neuropathic pain. Recently, we reported that elcatonin, a synthetic analog of eel calcitonin, attenuated the oxaliplatin- and paclitaxel-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in rats. In the present study, we determined whether salmon calcitonin also had anti-allodynic effects on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in rats. The rats were treated with a single dose of oxaliplatin (6 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)). Oxaliplatin resulted in cold and mechanical allodynia. We assessed the anti-allodynic effects of subcutaneously administered salmon calcitonin (20 U/kg/d) by cold stimulation (8°C) directly to the hind paw of the rats and by using the von Frey test. Salmon calcitonin almost completely reversed the effects of both cold and mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that salmon calcitonin is also useful for treatment of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy clinically.

  18. Analgesic Effect of Photobiomodulation on Bothrops Moojeni Venom-Induced Hyperalgesia: A Mechanism Dependent on Neuronal Inhibition, Cytokines and Kinin Receptors Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Victoria Regina da Silva; Toniolo, Elaine Flamia; Feliciano, Regiane dos Santos; da Silva Jr., José Antonio; Zamuner, Stella Regina

    2016-01-01

    Background Envenoming induced by Bothrops snakebites is characterized by drastic local tissue damage that involves an intense inflammatory reaction and local hyperalgesia which are not neutralized by conventional antivenom treatment. Herein, the effectiveness of photobiomodulation to reduce inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by Bothrops moojeni venom (Bmv), as well as the mechanisms involved was investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Bmv (1 μg) was injected through the intraplantar route in the right hind paw of mice. Mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia were evaluated by von Frey filaments at different time points after venom injection. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) was applied at the site of Bmv injection at wavelength of red 685 nm with energy density of 2.2 J/cm2 at 30 min and 3 h after venom inoculation. Neuronal activation in the dorsal horn spinal cord was determined by immunohistochemistry of Fos protein and the mRNA expression of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, B1 and B2 kinin receptors were evaluated by Real time-PCR 6 h after venom injection. Photobiomodulation reversed Bmv-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia and decreased Fos expression, induced by Bmv as well as the mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-α and B1 and B2 kinin receptors. Finally, an increase on IL-10, was observed following LLLT. Conclusion/Significance These data demonstrate that LLLT interferes with mechanisms involved in nociception and hyperalgesia and modulates Bmv-induced nociceptive signal. The use of photobiomodulation in reducing local pain induced by Bothropic venoms should be considered as a novel therapeutic tool for the treatment of local symptoms induced after bothropic snakebites. PMID:27749899

  19. HCN2 channels account for mechanical (but not heat) hyperalgesia during long-standing inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, Sabine; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Kistner, Katrin; Rajab, Hamsa; Käßer, Johannes; Hess, Andreas; Reeh, Peter; Ludwig, Andreas; Herrmann, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    There is emerging evidence that hyperpolarization-activated cation (HCN) channels are involved in the development of pathological pain, including allodynia and hyperalgesia. Mice lacking the HCN isoform 2 display reduced heat but unchanged mechanical pain behavior, as recently shown in preclinical models of acute inflammatory pain. However, the impact of HCN2 to chronic pain conditions is less clear and has not been examined so far. In this report, we study the role of HCN2 in the complete Freund's adjuvant inflammation model reflecting chronic pain conditions. We used sensory neuron-specific as well as inducible global HCN2 mutants analyzing pain behavior in persistent inflammation and complemented this by region-specific administration of an HCN channel blocker. Our results demonstrate that the absence of HCN2 in primary sensory neurons reduces tactile hypersensitivity in chronic inflammatory conditions but leaves heat hypersensitivity unaffected. This result is in remarkable contrast to the recently described role of HCN2 in acute inflammatory conditions. We show that chronic inflammation results in an increased expression of HCN2 and causes sensitization in peripheral and spinal terminals of the pain transduction pathway. The contribution of HCN2 to peripheral sensitization mechanisms was further supported by single-fiber recordings from isolated skin-nerve preparations and by conduction velocity measurements of saphenous nerve preparations. Global HCN2 mutants revealed that heat hypersensitivity-unaffected in peripheral HCN2 mutants-was diminished by the additional disruption of central HCN2 channels, suggesting that thermal hyperalgesia under chronic inflammatory conditions is mediated by HCN2 channels beyond primary sensory afferents.

  20. A role for Piezo2 in EPAC1-dependent mechanical allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Eijkelkamp, N; Linley, J.E.; Torres, J.M.; Bee, L.; Dickenson, A.H.; Gringhuis, M.; Minett, M.S.; Hong, G.S.; Lee, E.; Oh, U.; Ishikawa, Y.; Zwartkuis, F.J.; Cox, J.J.; Wood, J.N.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant mechanosensation has an important role in different pain states. Here we show that Epac1 (cyclic AMP sensor) potentiation of Piezo2-mediated mechanotransduction contributes to mechanical allodynia. Dorsal root ganglia Epac1 mRNA levels increase during neuropathic pain, and nerve damage-induced allodynia is reduced in Epac1−/− mice. The Epac-selective cAMP analogue 8-pCPT sensitizes mechanically evoked currents in sensory neurons. Human Piezo2 produces large mechanically gated currents that are enhanced by the activation of the cAMP-sensor Epac1 or cytosolic calcium but are unaffected by protein kinase C or protein kinase A and depend on the integrity of the cytoskeleton. In vivo, 8-pCPT induces long-lasting allodynia that is prevented by the knockdown of Epac1 and attenuated by mouse Piezo2 knockdown. Piezo2 knockdown also enhanced thresholds for light touch. Finally, 8-pCPT sensitizes responses to innocuous mechanical stimuli without changing the electrical excitability of sensory fibres. These data indicate that the Epac1–Piezo2 axis has a role in the development of mechanical allodynia during neuropathic pain. PMID:23575686

  1. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and ectopic neuronal discharge after chronic compression of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Song, X J; Hu, S J; Greenquist, K W; Zhang, J M; LaMotte, R H

    1999-12-01

    Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) was produced in adult rats by implanting a stainless steel rod unilaterally into the intervertebral foramen, one rod at L(4) and another at L(5). Two additional groups of rats received either a sham surgery or an acute injury consisting of a transient compression of the ganglion. Withdrawal of the hindpaw was used as evidence of a nocifensive response to mechanical and thermal stimulation of the plantar surface. In addition, extracellular electrophysiological recordings of spontaneous discharges were obtained from dorsal root fibers of formerly compressed ganglia using an in vitro nerve-DRG-dorsal root preparation. The mean threshold force of punctate indentation and the mean threshold temperature of heating required to elicit a 50% incidence of foot withdrawal ipsilateral to the CCD were significantly lower than preoperative values throughout the 35 days of postoperative testing. The number of foot withdrawals ipsilateral to the CCD during a 20-min contact with a temperature-controlled floor was significantly increased over preoperative values throughout postoperative testing when the floor was 4 degrees C (hyperalgesia) and, to a lesser extent, when it was 30 degrees C (spontaneous pain). Stroking the foot with a cotton wisp never elicited a reflex withdrawal before surgery but did so in most rats tested ipsilateral to the CCD during the first 2 postoperative weeks. In contrast, the CCD produced no changes in responses to mechanical or thermal stimuli on the contralateral foot. The sham operation and acute injury produced no change in behavior other than slight, mechanical hyperalgesia for approximately 1 day, ipsilateral to the acute injury. Ectopic spontaneous discharges generated within the chronically compressed ganglion and, occurring in the absence of blood-borne chemicals and without an intact sympathetic nervous system, were recorded from neurons with intact, conducting, myelinated or unmyelinated

  2. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents.

  3. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 2-expressing primary afferents stimulates synaptic transmission in the deep dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord and elicits mechanical hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, Hugues; Hugel, Sylvain; Barthas, Florent; Bohren, Yohann; Barrot, Michel; Yalcin, Ipek; Schlichter, Rémy

    2014-10-01

    Probenecid, an agonist of transient receptor vanilloid (TRPV) type 2, was used to evaluate the effects of TRPV2 activation on excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn (DH) of the rat spinal cord and on nociceptive reflexes induced by thermal heat and mechanical stimuli. The effects of probenecid were compared with those of capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist. Calcium imaging experiments on rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and DH cultures indicated that functional TRPV2 and TRPV1 were expressed by essentially non-overlapping subpopulations of DRG neurons, but were absent from DH neurons and DH and DRG glial cells. Pretreatment of DRG cultures with small interfering RNAs against TRPV2 suppressed the responses to probenecid. Patch-clamp recordings from spinal cord slices showed that probenecid and capsaicin increased the frequencies of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subset of laminae III-V neurons. In contrast to capsaicin, probenecid failed to stimulate synaptic transmission in lamina II. Intrathecal or intraplantar injections of probenecid induced mechanical hyperalgesia/allodynia without affecting nociceptive heat responses. Capsaicin induced both mechanical hyperalgesia/allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. Activation of TRPV1 or TRPV2 in distinct sets of primary afferents increased the sEPSC frequencies in a largely common population of DH neurons in laminae III-V, and might underlie the development of mechanical hypersensitivity following probenecid or capsaicin treatment. However, only TRPV1-expressing afferents facilitated excitatory and/or inhibitory transmission in a subpopulation of lamina II neurons, and this phenomenon might be correlated with the induction of thermal heat hyperalgesia.

  4. Herbal Medicine Goshajinkigan Prevents Paclitaxel-Induced Mechanical Allodynia without Impairing Antitumor Activity of Paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Muh Akbar; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Ogura, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Saiki, Ikuo; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a major dose-limiting side effect of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. However, there are no effective strategies to treat the neuropathy. We examined whether Goshajinkigan, a herbal medicine, would prevent paclitaxel-induced allodynia without affecting the anticancer action in mice. Murine breast cancer 4T1 cells were inoculated into the mammary fat pad. Paclitaxel (10 and 20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, alternate day from day 7 postinoculation) inhibited the tumor growth, and Goshajinkigan (1 g/kg, oral, daily from day 2 postinoculation) did not affect the antitumor action of paclitaxel. Mechanical allodynia developed in the inoculated region due to tumor growth and in the hind paw due to paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Paclitaxel-induced allodynia was markedly prevented by Goshajinkigan, although tumor-associated allodynia was not inhibited by Goshajinkigan. These results suggest that Goshajinkigan prevents paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy without interfering with the anti-cancer action of paclitaxel.

  5. Effects of repeated milnacipran and fluvoxamine treatment on mechanical allodynia in a mouse paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain model.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Soh; Sato, Kazuma; Yagi, Tomomi; Kishikawa, Yukinaga; Nakamura, Hitoshi

    2013-04-01

    Paclitaxel is widely used in cancer chemotherapy for the treatment of solid tumors, but it frequently causes peripheral neuropathy. Milnacipran, a serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor and fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, have shown efficacy against several chronic pain syndromes. In this study, we investigated the attenuation of paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia in mice by milnacipran and fluvoxamine. Paclitaxel was administered once per day (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) for 5 days to mice. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated by measuring the withdrawal response to stimulation with a von Frey filament. In paclitaxel-treated mice, mechanical allodynia was observed on days 3-15 of paclitaxel administration. A single administration of milnacipran (20 mg/kg, i.p.) or fluvoxamine (40 mg/kg, i.p.) had no effect on paclitaxel- induced mechanical allodynia. However, repeated administration of milnacipran (10, 20 mg/kg, once per day, i.p.) for 5 days significantly reduced paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. In contrast, repeated fluvoxamine administration (40 mg/kg, once per day, i.p.) for 5 days resulted in a weak attenuation of paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that chronic paclitaxel administration induces mechanical allodynia, and that repeated milnacipran administration may be an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain caused by paclitaxel treatment for cancer.

  6. Cerebrolysin reduces mechanical allodynia in a rodent model of peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Morales-Medina, Julio Cesar; Griffiths, Natalie H; Flores, Gonzalo; Mastranzo, Virginia M; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2017-03-06

    Cerebrolysin (Cbl) is a neuropeptide preparation of cerebroproteins that crosses the blood brain barrier displaying neuroprotective properties and promoting neurogenesis. Limited evidence exists on the efficacy of Cbl for the treatment of pain, with many studies focusing on neuropathic pain associated to diabetes. Therefore, we designed a study to test the hypothesis that Cbl would reduce mechanical allodynia in a rat model of peripheral inflammation induced by administration of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the hind paw. We found that acute administration of Cbl was effective in reducing mechanical allodynia but not peripheral inflammation in the CFA model of inflammatory pain. Our investigation supports further investigation into the therapeutic applications and mechanisms underlying the anti-allodynic effects of Cbl in inflammatory pain.

  7. Peripherally injected linalool and bergamot essential oil attenuate mechanical allodynia via inhibiting spinal ERK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kuwahata, Hikari; Komatsu, Takaaki; Katsuyama, Soh; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Shinobu; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Takahama, Kazuo

    2013-02-01

    Bergamot essential oil (BEO) is one of the most common essential oil containing linalool and linalyl acetate as major volatile components. This study investigated the effect of intraplantar (i.pl.) bergamot essential oil (BEO) or linalool on neuropathic hypersensitivity induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) in mice. The i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool into the ipsilateral hindpaw to PSNL reduced PSNL-induced mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. Peripheral (i.pl.) injection of BEO or linalool into the contralateral hindpaw did not yield anti-allodynic effects, suggesting a local anti-mechanical allodynic effect of BEO or linalool in PSNL mice. Anti-mechanical hypersensitivity of morphine was enhanced by the combined injection of BEO or linalool at an ineffective dose when injected alone. We also examined the possible involvement of spinal extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) in BEO or linalool-induced anti-mechanical allodynia. In western blotting analysis, i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool resulted in a significant blockade of spinal ERK activation induced by PSNL. These results suggest that i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool may reduce PSNL-induced mechanical allodynia followed by decreasing spinal ERK activation.

  8. Soluble epoxide hydrolase limits mechanical hyperalgesia during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytochrome-P450 (CYP450) epoxygenases metabolise arachidonic acid (AA) into four different biologically active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) regioisomers. Three of the EETs (i.e., 8,9-, 11,12- and 14,15-EET) are rapidly hydrolysed by the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Here, we investigated the role of sEH in nociceptive processing during peripheral inflammation. Results In dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we found that sEH is expressed in medium and large diameter neurofilament 200-positive neurons. Isolated DRG-neurons from sEH-/- mice showed higher EET and lower DHET levels. Upon AA stimulation, the largest changes in EET levels occurred in culture media, indicating both that cell associated EET concentrations quickly reach saturation and EET-hydrolyzing activity mostly effects extracellular EET signaling. In vivo, DRGs from sEH-deficient mice exhibited elevated 8,9-, 11,12- and 14,15-EET-levels. Interestingly, EET levels did not increase at the site of zymosan-induced inflammation. Cellular imaging experiments revealed direct calcium flux responses to 8,9-EET in a subpopulation of nociceptors. In addition, 8,9-EET sensitized AITC-induced calcium increases in DRG neurons and AITC-induced calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sciatic nerve axons, indicating that 8,9-EET sensitizes TRPA1-expressing neurons, which are known to contribute to mechanical hyperalgesia. Supporting this, sEH-/- mice showed increased nociceptive responses to mechanical stimulation during zymosan-induced inflammation and 8,9-EET injection reduced mechanical thresholds in naive mice. Conclusion Our results show that the sEH can regulate mechanical hyperalgesia during inflammation by inactivating 8,9-EET, which sensitizes TRPA1-expressing nociceptors. Therefore we suggest that influencing the CYP450 pathway, which is actually highly considered to treat cardiovascular diseases, may cause pain side effects. PMID:21970373

  9. Cannabidiol prevents the development of cold and mechanical allodynia in paclitaxel-treated female C57Bl6 mice.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sara Jane; Ramirez, Michael David; Neelakantan, Harshini; Walker, Ellen Ann

    2011-10-01

    The taxane chemotherapeutic paclitaxel frequently produces peripheral neuropathy in humans. Rodent models to investigate mechanisms and treatments are largely restricted to male rats, whereas female mouse studies are lacking. We characterized a range of paclitaxel doses on cold and mechanical allodynia in male and female C57Bl/6 mice. Because the nonpsychoactive phytocannabinoid cannabidiol attenuates other forms of neuropathic pain, we assessed its effect on paclitaxel-induced allodynia. Paclitaxel produced allodynia that was largely dose independent and more robust in female mice, and this effect was prevented by treatment with cannabidiol. Our preliminary findings therefore indicate that cannabidiol may prevent the development of paclitaxel-induced allodynia in mice and therefore be effective at preventing dose-limiting paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy in humans.

  10. Evaluation of milnacipran, in comparison with amitriptyline, on cold and mechanical allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Berrocoso, Esther; Mico, Juan-Antonio; Vitton, Olivier; Ladure, Philippe; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Depoortère, Ronan; Bardin, Laurent

    2011-03-25

    Milnacipran, a serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), has shown efficacy against several chronic pain conditions, including fibromyalgia. Here, we evaluated, in rats, its anti-allodynic effects following acute or sub-chronic treatment in a model of neuropathic pain (chronic constriction injury, CCI, of the sciatic nerve). Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant active pre-clinically and clinically against neuropathic pains, was added as a comparison compound. Upon acute i.p. administration, milnacipran was potently efficacious in the CCI model. It significantly reduced thermal allodynia in the cold (4°C) plate test (MED=2.5mg/kg), and attenuated mechanical allodynia in the von Frey filaments test (MED=10mg/kg). Given sub-chronically (7day, b.i.d.), milnacipran was effective at 10mg/kgi.p. in both tests. Acute amitriptyline (10mg/kgi.p.) was efficacious against mechanical, but less so against cold allodynia; under sub-chronic conditions, it was only active against mechanical allodynia. These data show that milnacipran is as efficacious as the reference compound amitriptyline in a pre-clinical model of injury-induced neuropathy, and demonstrate for the first time that it is active acutely and sub-chronically against cold allodynia. They also suggest that milnacipran has the potential to alleviate allodynia associated with nerve compression-induced neuropathic pain in the clinic (for example following discal hernia, avulsion or cancer-induced tissue damage).

  11. GRK2 in sensory neurons regulates epinephrine-induced signalling and duration of mechanical hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijing; Heijnen, Cobi J; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Garza Carbajal, Anibal; Schedlowski, Manfred; Kelley, Keith W; Dantzer, Robert; Kavelaars, Annemieke

    2011-07-01

    Epinephrine (EPI) contributes to hyperalgesia in inflammatory and stress conditions. EPI signals via adrenoceptors, which are regulated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). We previously reported that GRK2 is decreased in nociceptors during chronic inflammation. Herein, we investigated whether GRK2 modulates EPI-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia by using GRK2(+/-) mice, which express 50% of the GRK2 protein. We demonstrate for the first time that EPI-induced mechanical as well as thermal hyperalgesia is prolonged to approximately 21 days in GRK2(+/-) mice, whereas it lasts only 3 to 4 days in wild-type mice. Using cell- specific GRK2-deficient mice, we further show that a low level of GRK2 in primary sensory neurons is critical for this prolongation of EPI-induced hyperalgesia. Low GRK2 in microglia had only a small effect on EPI-induced hyperalgesia. Low GRK2 in astrocytes did not alter EPI-induced hyperalgesia. EPI-induced hyperalgesia was prolonged similarly in mice with tamoxifen-induced homozygous or heterozygous deletion of GRK2. In terms of EPI signalling pathways, the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 inhibited EPI-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in wild-type mice, whereas H-89 had no effect in mice with low GRK2 in sensory neurons (SNS-GRK2(+/-) mice). Conversely, intraplantar injection of the protein kinase Cε PKCε inhibitor TAT-PKC(εv1-2) inhibited hyperalgesia in sensory neuron specific (SNS)-GRK2(+/-) mice and not in wild-type mice. These results indicate that low GRK2 in primary sensory neurons switches EPI-induced signalling from a protein kinase A-dependent toward a PKCε-dependent pathway that ultimately mediates prolonged EPI-induced hyperalgesia.

  12. Spinal astrocytic activation contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bolong; Su, Minzhi; Tang, ShaoJun; Zhan, Hailun; Yang, Fei; Li, Wenbiao; Li, Tengcheng; Xie, Juncong

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that glial cells play an important role in the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Activated glial cells produce numerous mediators such as proinflammatory cytokines that facilitate neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity. Similarly, bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis shares many characteristics of neuropathic pain. However, related report on the involvement of spinal glia in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis-associated pathological pain and the underlying mechanisms are still lacking. The present study investigated spinal glial activation and underlying molecular mechanisms in a rat model of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Results A rat model of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis was established via systemic injection with cyclophosphamide. Mechanical allodynia was tested with von Frey monofilaments and up-down method. Moreover, Western blots and double immunofluorescence were used to detect the expression and location of glial fibrillary acidic protein, OX42/Iba1, P-P38, NeuN, interleukin (IL)-1β, phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 (P-NR1), and IL-1 receptor I (IL-1RI) in the L6-S1 spinal cord. We found that glial fibrillary acidic protein rather than OX42/Iba1 or P-P38 was significantly increased in the spinal cord of cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. L-alpha-aminoadipate but not minocycline markedly attenuated the allodynia. Furthermore, we found that spinal IL-1β was dramatically increased in cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis, and activated astrocytes were the only source of IL-1β release, which contributed to allodynia in cystitis rats. Besides, spinal P-NR1 was statistically increased in cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis and only localized in IL-1RI positive neurons in spinal dorsal horn. Additionally, NR antagonist significantly attenuated the cystitis-induced pain. Interestingly, the time course of the P-NR1 expression paralleled to that

  13. Robust spinal neuroinflammation mediates mechanical allodynia in Walker 256 induced bone cancer rats.

    PubMed

    Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Chang-Jiang; Li, Xiu; Mi, Wen-Li; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2012-05-20

    It has been reported that remarkable and sustained activation of astrocytes and/or microglia occurs in cancer induced pain (CIP), which is different from neuropathic and inflammatory pain. The present study was designed to investigate the role of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) induced glial neuroinflammation in cancer induced pain using a modified rat model of bone cancer. The rat model of CIP consisted of unilateral intra-tibial injection with Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma. Nine days after Walker 256 inoculation, a robust activation of both astrocytes and microglia in bilateral spinal dorsal horn was observed together with significant bilateral mechanical allodynia. This neuroinflammation was characterized by enhanced immunostaining of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, astrocyte marker) and OX-42 (microglia marker), and an elevated level of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA. I.t. administration of fluorocitrate (an inhibitor of glial metabolism, 1 nmol) or minocycline (an inhibitor of microglia, 100 μg) has significant anti-allodynic effects on day 12 after Walker 256 inoculation. Naloxone (a nonstereoselective TLR4 signaling blocker, 60 μg, i.t.) also significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia and simultaneously blocked the increased inflammatory cytokine mRNA. The results suggested that spinal TLR4 might play an important role in the sustained glial activation that critically contributed to the robust and sustained spinal neuroinflammation in CIP. This result could potentially help clinicians and researchers to better understand the mechanism of complicated cancer pain.

  14. Ethnocultural allodynia.

    PubMed

    Comas-Díaz, L; Jacobsen, F M

    2001-01-01

    The authors introduce and define ethnocultural allodynia as an abnormally increased sensitivity to relatively innocuous or neutral stimuli resulting from previous exposure to painful culturally based situations. Ethnocultural, gender-specific, and cognitive-behavioral techniques are used in clinical vignettes to illustrate the pervasive ethnic, racial, and gender effects of ethnocultural allodynia in the lives of people of color. Therapy components for the treatment of ethnocultural allodynia are described, including psychoeducation regarding racism and its sequelae, racial socialization, inoculation, and racial stress management.

  15. Ethnocultural Allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Comas-Díaz, Lillian; Jacobsen, Frederick M.

    2001-01-01

    The authors introduce and define ethnocultural allodynia as an abnormally increased sensitivity to relatively innocuous or neutral stimuli resulting from previous exposure to painful culturally based situations. Ethnocultural, gender-specific, and cognitive-behavioral techniques are used in clinical vignettes to illustrate the pervasive ethnic, racial, and gender effects of ethnocultural allodynia in the lives of people of color. Therapy components for the treatment of ethnocultural allodynia are described, including psychoeducation regarding racism and its sequelae, racial socialization, inoculation, and racial stress management. PMID:11696651

  16. Prophylactic treatment with sulphonated immunoglobulin G attenuates development of mechanical allodynia-like response in mice with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, Wataru; ITANO, Yasuhiro; KOBAYASHI, Tsunefumi; MIURA, Daishiro; KASAHARA, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentrates are immune-modulating, anti-inflammatory plasma-derived products. Clinical studies in recent years have suggested that IgG attenuates neuropathic pain. In this study, effects of sulphonated IgG on the development and maintenance of a mechanical allodynia-like response were examined in mice with neuropathic pain induced by a partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL). When sulphonated IgG (400 or 1,000 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was administered for 5 days, from 1 day before surgery to post-operative day (POD) 3, the development of a mechanical allodynia-like response was attenuated. On the other hand, sulphonated IgG had little effect on the maintenance of a mechanical allodynia-like response when administered for 5 days, from POD 11 to POD 15, at which time a mechanical allodynia-like response had already been developed. To explore the mechanism of sulphonated IgG, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines was evaluated in the injured sciatic nerve. Sulphonated IgG (1,000 mg/kg/day, i.p.) that was administered for 3 days, from 1 day before surgery to POD 1, significantly attenuated the up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 mRNAs on POD 1. These results suggest that prophylactic treatment with sulphonated IgG attenuates the development of mechanical allodynia-like response by inhibition of inflammatory cytokine expression in mice with PSL. PMID:26321444

  17. Activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 leads to muscle nociception and mechanical hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ro, Jin Y; Lee, Jong-Seok; Zhang, Youping

    2009-08-01

    The involvement of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in mediating craniofacial muscle nociception and mechanical hyperalgesia was investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. First, we confirmed the expression of TRPV1 in masseter afferents in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG), and provided new data that TRPA1 is also expressed in primary afferents innervating masticatory muscles in double-labeling immunohistochemistry experiments. We then examined whether the activation of each TRP channel in the masseter muscle evokes acute nocifensive responses and leads to the development of masseter hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation using the behavioral models that have been specifically designed and validated for the craniofacial system. Intramuscular injections with specific agonists for TRPV1 and TRPA1, capsaicin and mustard oil (MO), respectively, produced immediate nocifensive hindpaw responses followed by prolonged mechanical hyperalgesia in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, effectively attenuated the capsaicin-induced muscle nociception and mechanical hyperalgesia. Similarly, pretreatment of the muscle with a selective TRPA1 antagonist, AP18, significantly blocked the MO-induced muscle nociception and mechanical hyperalgesia. We confirmed these data with another set of selective antagonist for TRPV1 and TRPA1, AMG9810 and HC030031, respectively. Collectively, these results provide compelling evidence that TRPV1 and TRPA1 can functionally contribute to muscle nociception and hyperalgesia, and suggest that TRP channels expressed in muscle afferents can engage in the development of pathologic muscle pain conditions.

  18. Sigma-1 Receptor Agonism Promotes Mechanical Allodynia After Priming the Nociceptive System with Capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Entrena, J M; Sánchez-Fernández, C; Nieto, F R; González-Cano, R; Yeste, S; Cobos, E J; Baeyens, J M

    2016-11-25

    Sigma-1 receptor antagonists promote antinociception in several models of pain, but the effects of sigma-1 agonists on nociception (particularly when the nociceptive system is primed) are not so well characterized; therefore we evaluated the effects of sigma-1 agonists on pain under different experimental conditions. The systemic administration of the selective sigma-1 agonists (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084, as well as the nonselective sigma-1 agonist carbetapentane (used clinically as an antitussive drug), did not alter sensitivity to mechanical stimulation under baseline conditions. However, they greatly promoted secondary mechanical allodynia after priming the nociceptive system with capsaicin. These effects of sigma-1 agonists were consistent in terms potency with the affinities of these drugs for sigma-1 receptors, were reversed by sigma-1 antagonists, and were not observed in sigma-1 knockout mice, indicating that they are sigma-1-mediated. Repeated systemic treatment with PRE-084 induced proallodynic effects even 24 h after treatment completion, but only after the nociceptive system was primed. However, neither the presence of this drug in the organism nor changes in sigma-1 receptor expression in areas involved in pain processing explains its long-term effects, suggesting that sustained sigma-1 agonism induces plastic changes in the nociceptive system that promote nociception.

  19. Sigma-1 Receptor Agonism Promotes Mechanical Allodynia After Priming the Nociceptive System with Capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Entrena, J. M.; Sánchez-Fernández, C.; Nieto, F. R.; González-Cano, R.; Yeste, S.; Cobos, E. J.; Baeyens, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor antagonists promote antinociception in several models of pain, but the effects of sigma-1 agonists on nociception (particularly when the nociceptive system is primed) are not so well characterized; therefore we evaluated the effects of sigma-1 agonists on pain under different experimental conditions. The systemic administration of the selective sigma-1 agonists (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084, as well as the nonselective sigma-1 agonist carbetapentane (used clinically as an antitussive drug), did not alter sensitivity to mechanical stimulation under baseline conditions. However, they greatly promoted secondary mechanical allodynia after priming the nociceptive system with capsaicin. These effects of sigma-1 agonists were consistent in terms potency with the affinities of these drugs for sigma-1 receptors, were reversed by sigma-1 antagonists, and were not observed in sigma-1 knockout mice, indicating that they are sigma-1-mediated. Repeated systemic treatment with PRE-084 induced proallodynic effects even 24 h after treatment completion, but only after the nociceptive system was primed. However, neither the presence of this drug in the organism nor changes in sigma-1 receptor expression in areas involved in pain processing explains its long-term effects, suggesting that sustained sigma-1 agonism induces plastic changes in the nociceptive system that promote nociception. PMID:27886264

  20. Effects of tianeptine on the development and maintenance of mechanical allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Heo, Bong Ha; Shin, Jae Yun; Park, Keun Suk; Lee, Hyung Gon; Choi, Jeong Il; Yoon, Myung Ha; Kim, Woong Mo

    2016-10-28

    We validate the analgesic efficacy of tianeptine by different administration routes and timing in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was induced by ligating the L5 and L6 spinal nerves in male Sprague-Dawley rats, and mechanical allodynia was assessed using von Frey filaments. The effects of orally administered tianeptine and pretreatment with tianeptine (intrathecally or intraperitoneally) on mechanical allodynia were assessed. Oral and preemptive intrathecal administration of tianeptine significantly increased the paw withdrawal threshold but preemptive intraperitoneal administration did not. Nevertheless, intraperitoneal pretreatment of tianeptine potentiated the antiallodynic effects of subsequently administered tianeptine. These findings suggest that tianeptine may be effective for preventing and treating neuropathic pain and that it can be used more widely in clinical pain practice.

  1. Sustained Morphine Administration Induces TRPM8-Dependent Cold Hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kerui; Jasmin, Luc

    2017-02-01

    It is not uncommon for patients chronically treated with opioids to exhibit opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and this has been widely reported clinically and experimentally. The molecular substrate for this hyperalgesia is multifaceted, and associated with a complex neural reorganization even in the periphery. For instance, we have recently shown that chronic morphine-induced heat hyperalgesia is associated with an increased expression of GluN2B containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, as well as of the neuronal excitatory amino acid transporter 3/excitatory amino acid carrier 1, in small-diameter primary sensory neurons only. Cold allodynia is also a common complaint of patients chronically treated with opioids, yet its molecular mechanisms remain to be understood. Here we present evidence that the cold sensor TRPM8 channel is involved in opioid-induced hyperalgesia. After 7 days of morphine administration, we observed an upregulation of TRPM8 channels using patch clamp recording on sensory neurons and Western blot analysis on dorsal root ganglia. The selective TRPM8 antagonist RQ-00203078 blocked cold hyperalgesia in morphine-treated rats. Also, TRPM8 knockout mice failed to develop cold hyperalgesia after chronic administration of morphine. Our results show that chronic morphine upregulates TRPM8 channels, which is in contrast with the previous finding that acute morphine triggers TRPM8 internalization.

  2. Upregulation of EMMPRIN (OX47) in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to the Development of Mechanical Allodynia after Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun; Sun, Yanyuan; Ren, Yingna; Gao, Yandong; Tian, Li; Liu, Yang; Pu, Yanan; Gou, Xingchun; Chen, Yanke; Lu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are widely implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling associated with various neurodegenerative diseases and play an important role in nociception and allodynia. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) plays a key regulatory role for MMP activities. However, the role of EMMPRIN in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Western blotting, real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and immunofluorescence were performed to determine the changes of messenger RNA and protein of EMMPRIN/OX47 and their cellular localization in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after nerve injury. Paw withdrawal threshold test was examined to evaluate the pain behavior in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. The lentivirus containing OX47 shRNA was injected into the DRG one day before SNL. The expression level of both mRNA and protein of OX47 was markedly upregulated in ipsilateral DRG after SNL. OX47 was mainly expressed in the extracellular matrix of DRG. Administration of shRNA targeted against OX47 in vivo remarkably attenuated mechanical allodynia induced by SNL. In conclusion, peripheral nerve injury induced upregulation of OX47 in the extracellular matrix of DRG. RNA interference against OX47 significantly suppressed the expression of OX47 mRNA and the development of mechanical allodynia. The altered expression of OX47 may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain after nerve injury.

  3. Electroacupuncture suppresses capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia through an endogenous spinal opioid mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Young; Wang, Jigong; Lee, Inhyung; Kim, Hee Kee; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2009-01-01

    Central sensitization, caused either by tissue inflammation or peripheral nerve injury, plays an important role in persistent pain. An animal model of capsaicin-induced pain has well-defined peripheral and central sensitization components, thus is useful for studying the analgesic effect on two separate components. The focus of this study is to examine the analgesic effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia, which represents central sensitization. Capsaicin (0.5%, 10 μl) was injected into the plantar side of the left hind paw, and foot withdrawal thresholds in response to von Frey stimuli (mechanical sensitivity) were determined for both primary and secondary hyperalgesia in rats. EA (2 Hz, 3 mA) was applied to various pairs of acupoints, GB30-GB34, BL40-BL60, GV2-GV6, LI3-LI6 and SI3-TE8, for 30 min under isofluraine anesthesia and then the effect of EA on mechanical sensitivity of paw was determined. EA applied to the ipsilateral SI3-TE8, but none the other acupoints, significantly reduced capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia but not primary hyperalgesia. EA analgesic effect was inhibited by a systemic non-specific opioid receptor (OR) antagonist or an intrathecal μ- or δ-OR antagonist. EA analgesic effect was not affected by an intrathecal κ-OR antagonist or systemic adrenergic receptor antagonist. This study demonstrates that EA produces a stimulation point specific analgesic effect on capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia (central sensitization), mediated by activating endogenous spinal μ and δ opioid receptors. PMID:19646817

  4. Spinal fMRI Reveals Decreased Descending Inhibition during Secondary Mechanical Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Torge; Wolff, Stephan; Riedel, Christian; Baron, Ralf; Stroman, Patrick W.; Jansen, Olav; Gierthmühlen, Janne

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical hyperalgesia is one distressing symptom of neuropathic pain which is explained by central sensitization of the nociceptive system. This sensitization can be induced experimentally with the heat/capsaicin sensitization model. The aim was to investigate and compare spinal and supraspinal activation patterns of identical mechanical stimulation before and after sensitization using functional spinal magnetic resonance imaging (spinal fMRI). Sixteen healthy subjects (6 female, 10 male, mean age 27.2±4.0 years) were investigated with mechanical stimulation of the C6 dermatome of the right forearm during spinal fMRI. Testing was always performed in the area outside of capsaicin application (i.e. area of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia). During slightly noxious mechanical stimulation before sensitization, activity was observed in ipsilateral dorsolateral pontine tegmentum (DLPT) which correlated with activity in ipsilateral spinal cord dorsal gray matter (dGM) suggesting activation of descending nociceptive inhibition. During secondary mechanical hyperalgesia, decreased activity was observed in bilateral DLPT, ipsilateral/midline rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), and contralateral subnucleus reticularis dorsalis, which correlated with activity in ipsilateral dGM. Comparison of voxel-based activation patterns during mechanical stimulation before/after sensitization showed deactivations in RVM and activations in superficial ipsilateral dGM. This study revealed increased spinal activity and decreased activity in supraspinal centers involved in pain modulation (SRD, RVM, DLPT) during secondary mechanical hyperalgesia suggesting facilitation of nociception via decreased endogenous inhibition. Results should help prioritize approaches for further in vivo studies on pain processing and modulation in humans. PMID:25372292

  5. Activation of medullary dorsal horn γ isoform of protein kinase C interneurons is essential to the development of both static and dynamic facial mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Pham-Dang, Nathalie; Descheemaeker, Amélie; Dallel, Radhouane; Artola, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The γ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCγ), which is concentrated in a specific class of interneurons within inner lamina II (IIi ) of the spinal dorsal horn and medullary dorsal horn (MDH), is known to be involved in the development of mechanical allodynia, a widespread and intractable symptom of inflammatory or neuropathic pain. However, although genetic and pharmacological impairment of PKCγ were shown to prevent mechanical allodynia in animal models of pain, after nerve injury or reduced inhibition, the functional consequences of PKCγ activation alone on mechanical sensitivity are still unknown. Using behavioural and anatomical approaches in the rat MDH, we tested whether PKCγ activation in naive animals is sufficient for the establishment of mechanical allodynia. Intracisternal injection of the phorbol ester, 12,13-dibutyrate concomitantly induced static as well as dynamic facial mechanical allodynia. Monitoring neuronal activity within the MDH with phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 immunoreactivity revealed that activation of both lamina I-outer lamina II and IIi -outer lamina III neurons, including lamina IIi PKCγ-expressing interneurons, was associated with the manifestation of mechanical allodynia. Phorbol ester, 12,13-dibutyrate-induced mechanical allodynia and associated neuronal activations were all prevented by inhibiting selectively segmental PKCγ with KIG31-1. Our findings suggest that PKCγ activation, without any other experimental manipulation, is sufficient for the development of static and dynamic mechanical allodynia. Lamina IIi PKCγ interneurons have been shown to be directly activated by low-threshold mechanical inputs carried by myelinated afferents. Thus, the level of PKCγ activation within PKCγ interneurons might gate the transmission of innocuous mechanical inputs to lamina I, nociceptive output neurons, thus turning touch into pain.

  6. Dynamic mechanical assessment of muscle hyperalgesia in humans: The dynamic algometer

    PubMed Central

    Finocchietti, Sara; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is often associated with a nonhomogeneous distribution of mechanical hyperalgesia. Consequently, new methods able to detect this distribution are needed. OBJECTIVE: To develop and test a new method for assessing muscle hyperalgesia with high temporal and spatial resolution that provides complementary information compared with information obtained by traditional static pressure algometry. METHODS: The dynamic pressure algometer was tested bilaterally on the tibialis anterior muscle in 15 healthy subjects and compared with static pressure algometry. The device consisted of a wheel that was rolled over the muscle tissue with a fixed velocity and different predefined forces. The pain threshold force was determined and pain intensity to a fixed-force stimulation was continuously rated on a visual analogue scale while the wheel was rolling over the muscle. The pressure pain sensitivity was evaluated before, during, and after muscle pain and hyperalgesia induced unilaterally by either injection of hypertonic saline (0.5 mL, 6%) into the tibialis anterior or eccentric exercise evoking delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). RESULTS: The intraclass correlation coefficient was >0.88 for the dynamic thresholds; thus, the method was reliable. Compared with baseline, both techniques detected hyperalgesia at the saline injection site and during DOMS (P<0.05). The dynamic algometer also detected the widespread, patchy distribution of sensitive loci during DOMS, which was difficult to evaluate using static pressure algometry. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The present study showed that dynamic pressure algometry is a reliable tool for evaluating muscle hyperalgesia (threshold and pain rating) with high temporal and spatial resolution. It can be applied as a simple clinical bed-side test and as a quantitative tool in pharmacological profiling studies. PMID:25664539

  7. Effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid treatment over mechanical allodynia and depressive-like behavior associated with experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Redivo, Daiany D B; Schreiber, Anne K; Adami, Eliana R; Ribeiro, Deidiane E; Joca, Samia R L; Zanoveli, Janaína M; Cunha, Joice M

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain and depression are very common comorbidities in diabetic patients. As the pathophysiological mechanisms are very complex and multifactorial, current treatments are only symptomatic and often worsen the glucose control. Thus, the search for more effective treatments are extremely urgent. In this way, we aimed to investigate the effect of chronic treatment with fish oil (FO), a source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, over the mechanical allodynia and in depressive-like behaviors in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. It was observed that the diabetic (DBT) animals, when compared to normoglycemic (NGL) animals, developed a significant mechanical allodynia since the second week after diabetes induction, peaking at fourth week which is completely prevented by FO treatment (0.5, 1 or 3g/kg). Moreover, DBT animals showed an increase of immobility frequency and a decrease of swimming and climbing frequencies in modified forced swimming test (MFST) since the second week after diabetes injection, lasting up at the 4th week. FO treatment (only at a dose of 3g/kg) significantly decreased the immobility frequency and increased the swimming frequency, but did not induce significant changes in the climbing frequency in DBT rats. Moreover, it was observed that DBT animals had significantly lower levels of BDNF in both hippocampus and pre frontal cortex when compared to NGL rats, which is completely prevented by FO treatment. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that FO treatment was able to prevent the mechanical allodynia and the depressive-like behaviors in DBT rats, which seems to be related to its capacity of BDNF level restoration.

  8. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Wei; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Ren, Ning; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Li, Yong-Qi

    2010-05-14

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1{beta} was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1{beta} was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1{beta}. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1{beta} expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  9. Melatonin Alters the Mechanical and Thermal Hyperalgesia Induced by Orofacial Pain Model in Rats.

    PubMed

    Scarabelot, Vanessa Leal; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; de Oliveira, Carla; Adachi, Lauren Naomi Spezia; de Macedo, Isabel Cristina; Cioato, Stefania Giotti; de Freitas, Joice S; de Souza, Andressa; Quevedo, Alexandre; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is a neuroendocrine hormone that presents a wide range of physiological functions including regulating circadian rhythms and sleep, enhancing immune function, sleep improvement, and antioxidant effects. In addition, melatonin has received special attention in pain treatment since it is effective and presents few adverse effects. In this study, we evaluated the effect of acute dose of melatonin upon hyperalgesia induced by complete Freund's adjuvant in a chronic orofacial pain model in Sprague-Dawley rats. Nociceptive behavior was assessed by facial Von Frey and the hot plate tests at baseline and thereafter 30, 60, and 120 min, 24 h, and 7 days after melatonin treatment. We demonstrated that acute melatonin administration alters mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by an orofacial pain model (TMD), highlighting that the melatonin effect upon mechanical hyperalgesia remained until 7 days after its administration. Besides, we observed specific tissue profiles of neuroimmunomodulators linked to pain conditions and/or melatonin effect (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, and interleukins 6 and 10) in the brainstem levels, and its effects were state-dependent of the baseline of these animals.

  10. FXYD2, a γ subunit of Na+,K+-ATPase, maintains persistent mechanical allodynia induced by inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Cai, Bing; Li, Kai-Cheng; Hu, Xu-Ye; Lu, Ying-Jin; Wang, Qiong; Bao, Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA) is required to generate the resting membrane potential in neurons. Nociceptive afferent neurons express not only the α and β subunits of NKA but also the γ subunit FXYD2. However, the neural function of FXYD2 is unknown. The present study shows that FXYD2 in nociceptive neurons is necessary for maintaining the mechanical allodynia induced by peripheral inflammation. FXYD2 interacted with α1NKA and negatively regulated the NKA activity, depolarizing the membrane potential of nociceptive neurons. Mechanical allodynia initiated in FXYD2-deficient mice was abolished 4 days after inflammation, whereas it persisted for at least 3 weeks in wild-type mice. Importantly, the FXYD2/α1NKA interaction gradually increased after inflammation and peaked on day 4 post inflammation, resulting in reduction of NKA activity, depolarization of neuron membrane and facilitation of excitatory afferent neurotransmission. Thus, the increased FXYD2 activity may be a fundamental mechanism underlying the persistent hypersensitivity to pain induced by inflammation. PMID:25633594

  11. Glycemia-dependent Nuclear Factor κB Activation Contributes to Mechanical Allodynia in Rats with Chronic Postischemia Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Huot, Marie-Christine; Laferrière, André; Khorashadi, Mina; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemia-reperfusion injury causes chronic postischemia pain (CPIP), and rats with higher glycemia during ischemia-reperfusion injury exhibit increased allodynia. Glycemia-induced elevation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB) may contribute to increased allodynia. Methods Glycemia during a 3 h ischemia-reperfusion injury was manipulated by: normal feeding; or normal feeding with administration of insulin; dextrose; or insulin/dextrose. In these groups, NFκB was measured in ipsilateral hind paw muscle and spinal dorsal horn by ELISA, and SN50, an NFκB inhibitor, was administered to determine its differential anti-allodynic effects depending on glycemia. Results CPIP fed/insulin rats (12.03 ± 4.9, N = 6) had less allodynia than fed, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed/dextrose rats (6.29 ± 3.37 N = 7, 4.57 ± 3.03 g, N = 6, 2.95 ± 1.10, N = 9), respectively. Compared to fed rats (0.209 ± 0.022, N = 7), NFκB in ipsilateral plantar muscles was significantly lower for fed/insulin rats and significantly higher for fed/dextrose rats (0.152 ± 0.053, N = 6; 0.240 ± 0.057, N = 7, respectively). Furthermore, NFκB in the dorsal horn of fed, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed/dextrose rats (0.293 ± 0.049, N = 6) was significantly higher than in fed/insulin animals (0.267 ± 0.037, N = 6). The anti-allodynic SN50 dose-response curves of CPIP rats in the fed/insulin/dextrose, fed/dextrose and fed conditions exhibited a rightward shift compared to the fed/insulin group. The threshold SN50 dose of CPIP fed/dextrose, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed rats (328.94 ± 92.4, 77.80 ± 44.50 and 24.89 ± 17.20, respectively) was higher than that for fed/insulin rats (4.06 ± 7.04). Conclusions NFκB was activated in a glycemia-dependent manner in CPIP rats. Hypoglycemic rats were more sensitive to SN50 than rats with higher glycemia. The finding that SN50 reduces mechanical allodynia suggests that NFκB inhibitors might be useful for treating postischemia pain. PMID:23695173

  12. A Rat Model of Full Thickness Thermal Injury Characterized by Thermal Hyperalgesia, Mechanical Allodynia, Pronociceptive Peptide Release and Tramadol Analgesia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Zhang L, Ma Y, Chen L, Tian Y, Mao J, et al. Nociceptive behavior following hindpaw burn injury in young rats: response to systemic morphine. Pain ...18 system in need of optimal pain control, reduced incidence of chronic pain and reduced risk of tolerance and addiction [4]. Opioid based narcotics...are the most prevalent therapeutics for the management of severe pain in civilian and military inpatient settings [5]. Because traumatic injuries

  13. Thiamine, pyridoxine, cyanocobalamin and their combination inhibit thermal, but not mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with primary sensory neuron injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Bei; Gan, Qiang; Rupert, Ronald L; Zeng, Yin-Ming; Song, Xue-Jun

    2005-03-01

    Neuropathic pain after nerve injury is severe and intractable, and current drugs and nondrug therapies offer substantial pain relief to no more than half of affected patients. The present study investigated the analgesic roles of the B vitamins thiamine (B1), pyridoxine (B6) and cyanocobalamin (B12) in rats with neuropathic pain caused by spinal ganglia compression (CCD) or loose ligation of the sciatic nerve (CCI). Thermal hyperalgesia was determined by a significantly shortened latency of foot withdrawal to radiant heat, and mechanical hyperalgesia was determined by a significantly decreased threshold of foot withdrawal to von Frey filaments stimulation of the plantar surface of hindpaw. Results showed that (1) intraperitoneal injection of B1 (5, 10, 33 and 100 mg/kg), B6 (33 and 100 mg/kg) or B12 (0.5 and 2 mg/kg) significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia; (2) the combination of B1, B6 and B12 synergistically inhibited thermal hyperalgesia; (3) repetitive administration of vitamin B complex (containing B1/B6/B12 33/33/0.5 mg/kg, for 1 and 2 wk) produced long-term inhibition of thermal hyperalgesia; and (4) B vitamins did not affect mechanical hyperalgesia or normal pain sensation, and exhibited similar effects on CCD and CCI induced-hyperalgesia. The present studies demonstrate effects of B vitamins on pain and hyperalgesia following primary sensory neurons injury, and suggest the possible clinical utility of B vitamins in the treatment of neuropathic painful conditions following injury, inflammation, degeneration or other disorders in the nervous systems in human beings.

  14. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice display cold allodynia, but enhanced recovery from spared-nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Piskoun, Boris; Russo, Lori; Norcini, Monica; Blanck, Thomas; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Background The function of the Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Mounting evidence suggest that CB1R expression and activation may contribute to pain. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice (CB1R−/−) generated on a C57Bl/6 background exhibit hypoalgesia in the hotplate assay and formalin test. These findings suggest that Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression mediates the responses to at least some types of painful stimuli. By using this mouse line, we sought to determine if the lack of Cannabinoid 1 receptor unveils a general hypoalgesic phenotype, including protection against the development of neuropathic pain. The acetone test was used to measure cold sensitivity, the electronic von Frey was used to measure mechanical thresholds before and after spared-nerve injury, and analysis of footprint patterns was conducted to determine if motor function is differentially affected after nerve-injury in mice with varying levels of Cannabinoid 1 receptor. Results At baseline, CB1R−/− mice were hypersensitive in the acetone test, and this phenotype was maintained after spared-nerve injury. Using calcium imaging of lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, a higher percentage of neurons isolated from CB1R−/− mice were menthol sensitive relative to DRG isolated from wild-type (CB1R+/+) mice. Baseline mechanical thresholds did not differ among genotypes, and mechanical hypersensitivity developed similarly in the first two weeks following spared-nerve injury (SNI). At two weeks post-SNI, CB1R−/− mice recovered significantly from mechanical hypersensitivity, while the CB1R+/+ mice did not. Heterozygous knockouts (CB1R+/−) transiently developed cold allodynia only after injury, but recovered mechanical thresholds to a similar extent as the CB1R−/− mice. Sciatic functional indices, which reflect overall nerve health, and alternation coefficients, which indicate uniformity of strides, were not significantly different

  15. Tempol Ameliorates and Prevents Mechanical Hyperalgesia in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Kee; Hwang, Seon-Hee; Abdi, Salahadin

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and prevent. Tempol decreases cellular superoxide radical levels and oxidative stress. The aims of our study were to investigate the analgesic and preventive effects of tempol on paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in rats and to identify the associated mechanisms of action. Neuropathic pain was induced with intraperitoneally injected paclitaxel on four alternate days in male Sprague–Dawley rats. Tempol was administered systemically as a single injection and a continuous infusion before or after the injection of paclitaxel. The mechanical threshold for allodynia, protein levels, and free radical levels were measured using von Frey filaments, Western blotting, and live cell imaging, respectively. After the rats developed neuropathic pain behavior, a single intraperitoneal injection and continuous infusion of tempol ameliorated paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. Systemic infusion of tempol in the early phase of the development of pain behavior prevented the development of paclitaxel-induced pain behavior. Paclitaxel increased the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C, phosphorylated nuclear factor κB, phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D), IL-1β, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia; however, tempol decreased these levels. Paclitaxel also increased superoxide levels in a culture of primary dorsal root ganglion cells and tempol decreased these levels. In conclusion, tempol alleviates and prevents chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain in rats by reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokines and free radicals in dorsal root ganglia. PMID:28138318

  16. Clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist relieves mechanical allodynia in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic mice; potentiation by spinal p38 MAPK inhibition without motor dysfunction and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Ji-Hee; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kim, Sol-Ji; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern; Beitz, Alvin J; Roh, Dae-Hyun

    2016-05-15

    Cancer chemotherapy with platinum-based antineoplastic agents including oxaliplatin frequently results in a debilitating and painful peripheral neuropathy. We evaluated the antinociceptive effects of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. Specifically, we determined if (i) the intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of clonidine reduces mechanical allodynia in mice with an oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and (ii) concurrent inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 enhances clonidine's antiallodynic effect. Clonidine (0.01-0.1 mg kg(-1), i.p.), with or without SB203580(1-10 nmol, intrathecal) was administered two weeks after oxaliplatin injection(10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) to mice. Mechanical withdrawal threshold, motor coordination and blood pressure were measured. Postmortem expression of p38 MAPK and ERK as well as their phosphorylated forms(p-p38 and p-ERK) were quantified 30 min or 4 hr after drug injection in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated and control mice. Clonidine dose-dependently reduced oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and spinal p-p38 MAPK expression, but not p-ERK. At 0.1 mg kg(-1), clonidine also impaired motor coordination and decreased blood pressure. A 10 nmol dose of SB203580 alone significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and p-p38 MAPK expression, while a subeffective dose(3 nmol) potentiated the antiallodynic effect of 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine and reduced the increased p-p38 MAPK. Coadministration of SB203580 and 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine decreased allodynia similar to that of 0.10 mg kg(-1) clonidine, but without significant motor or vascular effects. These findings demonstrate that clonidine treatment reduces oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. The concurrent administration of SB203580 reduces the dosage requirements for clonidine, thereby alleviating allodynia without producing undesirable motor or cardiovascular effects.

  17. A streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathic pain model for static or dynamic mechanical allodynia and vulvodynia: validation using topical and systemic gabapentin.

    PubMed

    Ali, Gowhar; Subhan, Fazal; Abbas, Muzaffar; Zeb, Jehan; Shahid, Muhammad; Sewell, Robert D E

    2015-11-01

    Neuropathic vulvodynia is a state of vulval discomfort characterized by a burning sensation, diffuse pain, pruritus or rawness with an acute or chronic onset. Diabetes mellitus may cause this type of vulvar pain in several ways, so this study was conducted to evaluate streptozotocin-induced diabetes as a neuropathic pain model for vulvodynia in female rats. The presence of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg i.p.)-induced diabetes was initially verified by disclosure of pancreatic tissue degeneration, blood glucose elevation and body weight loss 5-29 days after a single treatment. Dynamic (shortened paw withdrawal latency to light brushing) and static (diminished von Frey filament threshold pressure) mechanical allodynia was then confirmed on the plantar foot surface. Subsequently, both static and dynamic vulvodynia was detected by application of the paradigm to the vulval region. Systemic gabapentin (75 mg/kg, i.p.) and topical gabapentin (10 % gel) were finally tested against allodynia and vulvodynia. Topical gabapentin and the control gel vehicle significantly increased paw withdrawal threshold in the case of the static allodynia model and also paw withdrawal latency in the model for dynamic allodynia when compared with the streptozotocin-pretreated group. Likewise, in the case of static and dynamic vulvodynia, there was a significant antivulvodynia effect of systemic and topical gabapentin treatment. These outcomes substantiate the value of this model not only for allodynia but also for vulvodynia, and this was corroborated by the findings not only with systemic but also with topical gabapentin.

  18. Intraarticular injection of hyaluronan prevents cartilage erosion, periarticular fibrosis and mechanical allodynia and normalizes stance time in murine knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Intraarticular hyaluronan (HA) is used clinically for symptomatic relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA); however, the mechanism of action is unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of a single injection of HA on joint tissue pathology, mechanical allodynia and gait changes (measured by stride times) in a murine model of OA. Methods OA was induced in the right knee joint (stifle) of 12-week-old male C57BL/6 mice by transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) injection and treadmill running for 14 days. Gait parameters were quantified by using TreadScan, mechanical allodynia was evaluated with von Frey filaments, and joint pathology was evaluated by scoring of macroscopic images for both cartilage erosion and periarticular fibrosis. HA or saline control was injected 1 day after TGFβ1 injection but before the start of treadmill running. Results OA development in this model was accompanied by significant (P < 0.01) enhancement of the stance and propulsion times of affected legs. HA injection (but not saline injection) blocked all gait changes and also protected joints from femoral cartilage erosion as well as tibial and femoral tissue fibrosis. Both HA injection and saline injection attenuated acute allodynia, but the HA effect was more pronounced and prolonged than the saline injection. Conclusions We conclude that videographic gait analysis is an objective, sensitive and reproducible means of monitoring joint pathology in experimental murine OA, since stance time appears to correlate directly with OA severity. A single injection of HA prevents acute and prolonged gait changes and ameliorates the cartilage erosion and periarticular fibrosis normally seen in this model. We speculate that the capacity of HA to prevent cartilage erosion results from its normalization of joint biomechanics and its inhibitory effects on periarticular cells, which are involved in tissue hyperplasia and fibrosis. This effect of exogenous HA appears to mimic the

  19. Gabapentin enhances anti-nociceptive effects of morphine on heat, cold, and mechanical hyperalgesia in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Gholam Ali; Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Abed, Alireza; Mesdaghinia, Azam; Mahlooji, Mohadeseh; Banafshe, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuropathic pain is caused by lesions or diseases affecting the somatosensory system and often responds poorly to typical medications. In this study, we evaluated anti-nociceptive effects of morphine, gabapentin and their combination on heat hyperalgesia, cold and mechanical allodynia in chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain in rats. Materials and Methods: Morphine (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) and gabapentin (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) were administered either alone or in combination (morphine 2 mg/kg and gabapentin 5 mg/kg). Results: Our results showed that morphine and gabapentin alone produce anti-nociceptive effects at higher doses (morphine 4 and 8 mg/kg and gabapentin 10 and 20 mg/kg) whereas their combination resulted in better analgesia at lower doses as compared to other treatment groups (morphine 2 mg/kg or gabapentin 5 mg/kg). Conclusion: These findings suggest that gabapentin potentiates the analgesic effects of morphine in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain and combination of these drugs may be considered as a beneficial treatment for neuropathic pain. PMID:25729543

  20. Sigma-1 receptor-mediated increase in spinal p38 MAPK phosphorylation leads to the induction of mechanical allodynia in mice and neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Young; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kang, Suk-Yun; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2013-09-01

    The direct activation of the spinal sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) produces mechanical allodynia (MA) and thermal hyperalgesia (TH) in mice. In addition, the blockade of the spinal Sig-1R prevents the induction of MA, but not TH in chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic rats. The present study was designed to investigate whether the increase in spinal p38 MAPK phosphorylation (p-p38 MAPK) mediates Sig-1R-induced MA or TH in mice and the induction of MA in neuropathic rats. MA and TH were evaluated using von Frey filaments and a hot-plate apparatus, respectively. Neuropathic pain was produced by CCI of the right sciatic nerve in rats. Western blot assay and immunohistochemistry were performed to determine the changes of p-p38 MAPK expression in the spinal cord. Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of PRE084, a selective Sig-1R agonist, into naïve mice time-dependently increased the expression of p-p38 MAPK, which was blocked by pretreatment with BD1047, a Sig-1R antagonist. I.t. pretreatment with SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor also dose-dependently inhibited PRE084-induced MA, whereas TH induction was not affected. In CCI rats, i.t. injection of BD1047 during the induction phase (postoperative days 0 to 5) reduced the CCI-induced increase in p-p38 MAPK. In addition, i.t. SB203580 treatment during the induction phase also suppressed the development of CCI-induced MA, but not TH. Conversely, i.t. SB203580 treatment during the maintenance phase (postoperative days 15 to 20) had no effect on CCI-induced MA or TH. These results demonstrate that the increase in spinal p-p38 MAPK is closely associated with the induction of Sig-1R mediated MA, but not TH. Sigma-1 receptor modulation of p-p38 MAPK also plays an important role in the induction, but not the maintenance, of MA in neuropathic pain.

  1. Spinal astrocytic activation contributes to both induction and maintenance of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor-induced long-lasting mechanical allodynia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokai, Masafumi; Miyata, Atsuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia, suggesting an important role of PACAP–PACAP receptors signaling system in the modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission. We have previously reported that a single intrathecal injection of PACAP or a PACAP specific (PAC1) receptor selective agonist, maxadilan, in mice induced dose-dependent aversive behaviors, which lasted more than 30 min, and suggested that the maintenance of the nociceptive behaviors was associated with the spinal astrocytic activation. Results We found that a single intrathecal administration of PACAP or maxadilan also produced long-lasting hind paw mechanical allodynia, which persisted at least 84 days without affecting thermal nociceptive threshold. In contrast, intrathecal application of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide did not change mechanical threshold, and substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or N-methyl-D-aspartate induced only transient mechanical allodynia, which disappeared within 21 days. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses with an astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein, revealed that the spinal PAC1 receptor stimulation caused sustained astrocytic activation, which also lasted more than 84 days. Intrathecal co-administration of L-α-aminoadipate, an astroglial toxin, with PACAP or maxadilan almost completely prevented the induction of the mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, intrathecal treatment of L-α-aminoadipate at 84 days after the PAC1 stimulation transiently reversed the mechanical allodynia accompanied by the reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression level. Conclusion Our data suggest that spinal astrocytic activation triggered by the PAC1 receptor stimulation contributes to both induction and maintenance of the long-term mechanical allodynia. PMID:27175011

  2. Involvement of the chemokine CCL3 and the purinoceptor P2X7 in the spinal cord in paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel is an effective chemotherapeutic agent widely used for the treatment of solid tumors. The major dose-limiting toxicity of paclitaxel is peripheral neuropathy. The mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy are still unclear, and there are no currently established effective treatments. Accumulating evidence in models of neuropathic pain in which peripheral nerves are lesioned has implicated spinal microglia and chemokines in pain hypersensitivity, but little is know about their roles in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, we investigated the role of CC-chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3) in the spinal cord in the development and maintenance of mechanical allodynia using a rat model of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Findings Repeated intravenous administration of paclitaxel induced a marked decrease in paw withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation (mechanical allodynia). In these rats, the number of microglia in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) was significantly increased. Paclitaxel-treated rats showed a significant increase in the expression of mRNAs for CCL3 and its receptor CCR5 in the SDH. Intrathecal administration of a CCL3-neutralizing antibody not only attenuated the development of paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia but also reversed its maintenance. Paclitaxel also upregulated expression of purinoceptor P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs), which have been implicated in the release of CCL3 from microglia, in the SDH. The selective P2X7R antagonist A438079 had preventive and reversal effects on paclitaxel-induced allodynia. Conclusions Our findings suggest a contribution of CCL3 and P2X7Rs in the SDH to paclitaxel-induced allodynia and may provide new therapeutic targets for paclitaxel-induced painful neuropathy. PMID:25127716

  3. Dexmedetomidine alleviates rat post-ischemia induced allodynia through GRK2 upregulation in superior cervical ganglia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Yang, Li; Tang, Jun; Zheng, Jijian

    2015-01-01

    A transient decrease in G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in nociceptors can produce long-lasting neuroplastic changes in nociceptor function, eventually enhancing and prolonging inflammatory hyperalgesia. Here, we investigated the effects of selective α2-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine (DMED) on GRK2 expression in superior cervical ganglion (SCG) in a rat model of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I). The ipsilateral 50% paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) to mechanical stimuli decreased significantly starting from 24 h after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, and lasted for over 3 weeks; the ipsilateral cold allodynia scores, GRK2 protein and mRNA levels in SCGs all increased significantly. No significant differences were found in the contralateral side except GRK2 mRNA reduced significantly after 48 h I/R injury, but still higher than those in the ipsilateral side. Following daily injection of 10 μg/kg of DMED for a maximum of 7 days, the ipsilateral PWTs on days 1, 2, 7, 14, and 21 after DMED administration were significantly higher than those in control group; the GRK2 protein and mRNA expressions in the ipsilateral SCGs were also significantly upregulated; the ipsilateral cold allodynia scores were significantly reduced. No significant differences were found in the contralateral 50%PWTs, cold allodynia scores, and GRK2 protein level except GRK2 mRNA levels increased significantly on days 1 to 7 after DMED administration. Therefore, a transient decrease of GRK2 expression in SCG neurons might be involved in the development and maintenance of allodynia in CRPS-I and DMED might alleviate this allodynia through GRK2 upregulation in SCG neurons.

  4. Hyperalgesia and functional sensory loss in restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Pfau, Doreen B; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Magerl, Walter

    2013-08-01

    Pain and other sensory signs in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) are still poorly understood, as most investigations focus on motor system dysfunctions. This study aimed to investigate somatosensory changes in patients with primary RLS and the restoration of somatosensory function by guideline-based treatment. Forty previously untreated RLS patients were investigated unilaterally over hand and foot using quantitative sensory testing (QST) and were compared with 40 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. The predominant finding in RLS patients was 3- to 4-fold increase of sensitivity to pinprick stimuli in both extremities (hand: P<.05; foot: P<.001), a sensory pathway involved in withdrawal reflexes. Pinprick hyperalgesia was not paralleled by dynamic mechanical allodynia. Additional significant sensory changes were tactile hypoesthesia in both extremities (hand: P<.05; foot P<.01) and dysesthesia to non-noxious cold stimuli (paradoxical heat sensation), which was present in the foot in an unusually high proportion (14 of 40 patients; P<.01). In 8 patients, follow-up QST 2 to 20 months after treatment with l-DOPA (L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) revealed a significant reduction of pinprick hyperalgesia (-60%, P<.001), improved tactile detection (+50%, P<.05), and disappearance of paradoxical heat sensation in half of the patients. QST suggested a type of spinal or supraspinal central sensitization differing from neuropathic pain or human experimental models of central sensitization by the absence of dynamic mechanical allodynia. Reversal of pinprick hyperalgesia by l-DOPA may be explained by impaired descending inhibitory dopaminergic control on spinal nociceptive neurons. Restoration of tactile sensitivity and paradoxical heat sensations suggest that they were functional disturbances resulting from central disinhibition.

  5. Kinin Receptors Sensitize TRPV4 Channel and Induce Mechanical Hyperalgesia: Relevance to Paclitaxel-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Robson; Bicca, Maíra A; Manjavachi, Marianne N; Segat, Gabriela C; Dias, Fabiana Chaves; Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Calixto, João B

    2017-03-10

    Kinin B1 (B1R) and B2 receptors (B2R) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channel are known to play a critical role in the peripheral neuropathy induced by paclitaxel (PTX) in rodents. However, the downstream pathways activated by kinin receptors as well as the sensitizers of the TRPV4 channel involved in this process remain unknown. Herein, we investigated whether kinins sensitize TRPV4 channels in order to maintain PTX-induced peripheral neuropathy in mice. The mechanical hyperalgesia induced by bradykinin (BK, a B2R agonist) or des-Arg(9)-BK (DABK, a B1R agonist) was inhibited by the selective TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047. Additionally, BK was able to sensitize TRPV4, thus contributing to mechanical hyperalgesia. This response was dependent on phospholipase C/protein kinase C (PKC) activation. The selective kinin B1R (des-Arg(9)-[Leu(8)]-bradykinin) and B2R (HOE 140) antagonists reduced the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by PTX, with efficacies and time response profiles similar to those observed for the TRPV4 antagonist (HC-067047). Additionally, both kinin receptor antagonists inhibited the overt nociception induced by hypotonic solution in PTX-injected animals. The same animals presented lower PKCε levels in skin and dorsal root ganglion samples. The selective PKCε inhibitor (εV1-2) reduced the hypotonicity-induced overt nociception in PTX-treated mice with the same magnitude observed for the kinin receptor antagonists. These findings suggest that B1R or B2R agonists sensitize TRPV4 channels to induce mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. This mechanism of interaction may contribute to PTX-induced peripheral neuropathy through the activation of PKCε. We suggest these targets represent new opportunities for the development of effective analgesics to treat chronic pain.

  6. The transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 mediates mechanical hyperalgesia induced by the activation of B1 receptor in mice.

    PubMed

    Meotti, Flavia Carla; Figueiredo, Cláudia Pinto; Manjavachi, Marianne; Calixto, João B

    2017-02-01

    The kinin receptor B1 and the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) work as initiators and gatekeepers of nociception and inflammation. This study reports that the nociceptive transmission induced by activation of B1 receptor is dependent on TRPA1 ion channel. The mechanical hyperalgesia was induced by intrathecal (i.t.) injection of B1 agonist des-Arginine(9)-bradykinin (DABK) or TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde and was evaluated by the withdrawal response after von Frey Hair application in the hind paw. After behavioral experiments, lumbar spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were harvested to assess protein expression and mRNA by immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR, respectively. The pharmacological antagonism (HC030031) or the down-regulation of TRPA1 greatly inhibited the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by DABK. Intrathecal injection of DABK up regulated the ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule (Iba-1) in lumbar spinal cord (L5-L6); TRPA1 protein and mRNA in lumbar spinal cord; and B1 receptor mRNA in both lumbar spinal cord and DRG. The knockdown of TRPA1 prevented microglia activation induced by DABK. Furthermore, the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by either DABK or by cinnamaldehyde was significantly reduced by inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), protein kinase C (PKC) or phospholipase C (PLC). In summary, this study revealed that TRPA1 positively modulates the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by B1 receptor activation in the spinal cord and that the classical GPCR downstream molecules PLC, diacylglycerol (DAG), 3,4,5-inositide phosphate (IP3) and PKC are involved in the nociceptive transmission triggered by these two receptors.

  7. Glucocorticoid regulation of ATP release from spinal astrocytes underlies diurnal exacerbation of neuropathic mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Satoru; Kusunose, Naoki; Taniguchi, Marie; Akamine, Takahiro; Kanado, Yuki; Ozono, Yui; Masuda, Takahiro; Kohro, Yuta; Matsunaga, Naoya; Tsuda, Makoto; Salter, Michael W; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-10-14

    Diurnal variations in pain hypersensitivity are common in chronic pain disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are enigmatic. Here, we report that mechanical pain hypersensitivity in sciatic nerve-injured mice shows pronounced diurnal alterations, which critically depend on diurnal variations in glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. Diurnal enhancement of pain hypersensitivity is mediated by glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of the extracellular release of ATP in the spinal cord, which stimulates purinergic receptors on microglia in the dorsal horn. We identify serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1) as the key molecule responsible for the glucocorticoid-enhanced release of ATP from astrocytes. SGK-1 protein levels in spinal astrocytes are increased in response to glucocorticoid stimuli and enhanced ATP release by opening the pannexin-1 hemichannels. Our findings reveal an unappreciated circadian machinery affecting pain hypersensitivity caused by peripheral nerve injury, thus opening up novel approaches to the management of chronic pain.

  8. Glucocorticoid regulation of ATP release from spinal astrocytes underlies diurnal exacerbation of neuropathic mechanical allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Satoru; Kusunose, Naoki; Taniguchi, Marie; Akamine, Takahiro; Kanado, Yuki; Ozono, Yui; Masuda, Takahiro; Kohro, Yuta; Matsunaga, Naoya; Tsuda, Makoto; Salter, Michael W.; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal variations in pain hypersensitivity are common in chronic pain disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are enigmatic. Here, we report that mechanical pain hypersensitivity in sciatic nerve-injured mice shows pronounced diurnal alterations, which critically depend on diurnal variations in glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. Diurnal enhancement of pain hypersensitivity is mediated by glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of the extracellular release of ATP in the spinal cord, which stimulates purinergic receptors on microglia in the dorsal horn. We identify serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1) as the key molecule responsible for the glucocorticoid-enhanced release of ATP from astrocytes. SGK-1 protein levels in spinal astrocytes are increased in response to glucocorticoid stimuli and enhanced ATP release by opening the pannexin-1 hemichannels. Our findings reveal an unappreciated circadian machinery affecting pain hypersensitivity caused by peripheral nerve injury, thus opening up novel approaches to the management of chronic pain. PMID:27739425

  9. Enhanced cytokine-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in skeletal muscle produced by a novel mechanism in rats exposed to unpredictable sound stress.

    PubMed

    Dina, Olayinka A; Levine, Jon D; Green, Paul G

    2011-09-01

    Stress exacerbates both experimental and clinical pain, most well-characterized in irritable bowel and fibromyalgia syndromes. Since it has been hypothesized that cytokines play an etiopathogenic role in fibromyalgia and other chronic widespread pain conditions, we investigated the relationship between stress and cytokines in a model of stress-induced chronic somatic pain. A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the impact of stress on the hyperalgesia-induced by endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and the role of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis α (TNFα). Fourteen days after exposure to a 4-day protocol of unpredictable sound stress, the ability of systemic LPS (100 μg/kg, i.p) to elicit cytokine-mediated mechanical hyperalgesia was measured in gastrocnemius muscle. LPS-induced hyperalgesia was significantly greater in stressed rats, but when rats were treated intrathecally with antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), to decrease either the gp130 subunit of the IL-6 receptor or the TNFα receptor, in nociceptors, skeletal muscle hyperalgesia in sound stressed, but not control, rats was prevented. These data suggest that chronic stress alters signaling in the primary afferent nociceptor for the hyperalgesia induced by endogenously produced pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  10. Central or peripheral delivery of an adenosine A1 receptor agonist improves mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Katz, N K; Ryals, J M; Wright, D E

    2015-01-29

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, and a significant proportion of individuals suffer debilitating pain that significantly affects their quality of life. Unfortunately, symptomatic treatment options have limited efficacy, and often carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. Activation of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) by the analgesic small molecule adenosine has been shown to have antinociceptive benefits in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The current study used a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy to determine the effect of diabetes on endogenous adenosine production, and if central or peripheral delivery of adenosine receptor agonists could alleviate signs of mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced using streptozocin in male A/J mice. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured weekly to characterize neuropathy phenotype. Hydrolysis of AMP into adenosine by ectonucleotidases was determined in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at 8 weeks post-induction of diabetes. AMP, adenosine and the specific A1R agonist, N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), were administered both centrally (intrathecal) and peripherally (intraplantar) to determine the effect of activation of adenosine receptors on mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Eight weeks post-induction, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased hydrolysis of extracellular AMP in the DRG; at this same time, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal thresholds compared to nondiabetic controls. Central delivery AMP, adenosine and CPA significantly improved mechanical withdrawal thresholds in diabetic mice. Surprisingly, peripheral delivery of CPA also improved mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. This study provides new evidence that diabetes significantly affects endogenous AMP hydrolysis, suggesting that altered adenosine production could contribute to the development of

  11. Spinal D-Serine Increases PKC-Dependent GluN1 Phosphorylation Contributing to the Sigma-1 Receptor-Induced Development of Mechanical Allodynia in a Mouse Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sheu-Ran; Moon, Ji-Young; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2017-04-01

    We have recently shown that spinal sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) activation facilitates nociception via an increase in phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor GluN1 subunit (pGluN1). The present study was designed to examine whether the Sig-1R-induced facilitative effect on NMDA-induced nociception is mediated by D-serine, and whether D-serine modulates spinal pGluN1 expression and the development of neuropathic pain after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Intrathecal administration of the D-serine degrading enzyme, D-amino acid oxidase attenuated the facilitation of NMDA-induced nociception induced by the Sig-1R agonist, 2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexane carboxylate. Exogenous D-serine increased protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent (Ser896) pGluN1 expression and facilitated NMDA-induced nociception, which was attenuated by preteatment with the PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine. In CCI mice, administration of the serine racemase inhibitor, L-serine O-sulfate potassium salt or D-amino acid oxidase on postoperative days 0 to 3 suppressed CCI-induced mechanical allodynia (MA) and pGluN1 expression on day 3 after CCI surgery. Intrathecal administration of D-serine restored MA as well as the GluN1 phosphorylation on day 3 after surgery that was suppressed by the Sig-1R antagonist, N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino)ethylamine dihydrobromide or the astrocyte inhibitor, fluorocitrate. In contrast, D-serine had no effect on CCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia or GluN1 expression. These results indicate that spinal D-serine: 1) mediates the facilitative effect of Sig-1R on NMDA-induced nociception, 2) modulates PKC-dependent pGluN1 expression, and 3) ultimately contributes to the induction of MA after peripheral nerve injury.

  12. Allodynia in Cluster Headache.

    PubMed

    Wilbrink, Leopoldine A; Louter, Mark A; Teernstra, Onno Pm; van Zwet, Erik W; Huygen, Frank Jpm; Haan, Joost; Ferrari, Michel D; Terwindt, Gisela M

    2017-03-04

    Cutaneous allodynia is an established marker for central sensitization in migraine. There is debate whether cutaneous allodynia may also occur in cluster headache, another episodic headache disorder. Here we examined the presence and severity of allodynia in a large well-defined nation-wide population of people with cluster headache.Using validated questionnaires we assessed, cross-sectionally, ictal allodynia and comorbid depression and migraine in the nation-wide "Leiden University Cluster headache neuro-Analysis" (LUCA) study. Participants with cluster headache were diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria. Multivariate regression models were used, with correction for demographic factors and cluster headache subtype (chronic vs. episodic; recent attacks < 1 month vs. no recent attacks).In total 606/798 (75.9%) participants with cluster headache responded of whom 218/606 (36%) had allodynia during attacks. Female gender (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.28-3.29), low age at onset (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96- 0.99), lifetime depression (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.06-2.50), comorbid migraine (OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.02-3.79), and having recent attacks (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.13-2.86), but not duration of attacks and chronic cluster headache, were independent risk factors for allodynia.The high prevalence of cutaneous allodynia with similar risk factors for allodynia as found for migraine suggests that central sensitization, like in migraine, also occurs in cluster headache. In clinical practice, awareness that people with cluster headache may suffer from allodynia can in the future be an important feature in treatment options.

  13. Assessment of Morphine-induced Hyperalgesia and Analgesic Tolerance in Mice Using Thermal and Mechanical Nociceptive Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Elhabazi, Khadija; Ayachi, Safia; Ilien, Brigitte; Simonin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance severely impact the clinical efficacy of opiates as pain relievers in animals and humans. The molecular mechanisms underlying both phenomena are not well understood and their elucidation should benefit from the study of animal models and from the design of appropriate experimental protocols. We describe here a methodological approach for inducing, recording and quantifying morphine-induced hyperalgesia as well as for evidencing analgesic tolerance, using the tail-immersion and tail pressure tests in wild-type mice. As shown in the video, the protocol is divided into five sequential steps. Handling and habituation phases allow a safe determination of the basal nociceptive response of the animals. Chronic morphine administration induces significant hyperalgesia as shown by an increase in both thermal and mechanical sensitivity, whereas the comparison of analgesia time-courses after acute or repeated morphine treatment clearly indicates the development of tolerance manifested by a decline in analgesic response amplitude. This protocol may be similarly adapted to genetically modified mice in order to evaluate the role of individual genes in the modulation of nociception and morphine analgesia. It also provides a model system to investigate the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents to improve opiate analgesic efficacy. PMID:25145878

  14. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical and thermal allodynia after burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Green, Dustin P; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids. Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain. PMID:27411353

  15. Nerve growth factor and associated nerve sprouting contribute to local mechanical hyperalgesia in a rat model of bone injury.

    PubMed

    Yasui, M; Shiraishi, Y; Ozaki, N; Hayashi, K; Hori, K; Ichiyanagi, M; Sugiura, Y

    2012-08-01

    To clarify the mechanism of tenderness after bone injury, we investigated changes in the withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli, nerve distribution and nerve growth factor (NGF)-expression in a rat model of bone injury without immobilization for bone injury healing. Rats were divided into three groups as follows: (1) rats incised in the skin and periosteum, followed by drilling a hole in the tibia [bone lesion group (BLG)]; (2) those incised in the skin and periosteum without bone drilling [periosteum lesion group (PLG)]; and (3) those incised in the skin [skin lesion group (SLG)]. Mechanical hyperalgesia continued for 28 days at a lesion in the BLG, 21 days in PLG and 5 days in SLG after treatments, respectively. Endochondral ossification was observed on days 5-28 in BLG and on days 5-21 in PLG. Nerve growth appeared in deep connective tissue (DCT) at day 28 in BLG. Nerve fibres increased in both cutaneous tissue and DCT at day 7 in PLG, but they were not found at day 28. Mechanical hyperalgesia accompanied with endochondral ossification and nerve fibres increasing at the lesion in both BLG and PLG. NGF was expressed in bone-regenerating cells during the bone injury healing. Anti-NGF and trk inhibitor K252a inhibited hyperalgesia in the different time course. This study shows that localized tenderness coincides with the bone healing and involves NGF expression and nerve sprouting after bone injury. The findings present underlying mechanisms and provide pathophysiological relevance of local tenderness to determination of bone fracture and its healing.

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor 2B subunit in spinal cord contributes to remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia: the preventive effect of ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Experimental and clinical studies showed that intraoperative infusionof remifentanil has been associated with postoperative hyperalgesia. Previous reports suggested that spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors may contribute to the development and maintenance of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. In the present study, we used a rat model of postoperative pain to investigate the role of tyrosine phosphorylation of NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) subunit in spinal cord in the postoperative hyperalgesia induced by remifentanil and the intervention of pretreatment with ketamine. Results Intraoperative infusion of remifentanil (0.04 mg/kg, subcutaneous) significantly enhanced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia induced by the plantar incision during the postoperative period (each lasting between 2 h and 48 h), which was attenuated by pretreatment with ketamine (10 mg/kg, subcutaneous). Correlated with the pain behavior changes, immunocytochemical and western blotting experiments in our study revealed that there was a marked increase in NR2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472 in the superficial dorsal horn after intraoperative infusion of remifentanil, which was attenuated by pretreatment with ketamine. Conclusions This study provides direct evidence that tyrosine phosphorylation of the NR2B at Tyr1472 in spinal dosal horn contributes to postoperative hyperalgesia induced by remifentanil and supports the potential therapeutic value of ketamine for improving postoperative hyperalgesia induced by remifentanil. PMID:20042082

  17. The relationship of bone-tumor-induced spinal cord astrocyte activation and aromatase expression to mechanical hyperalgesia and cold hypersensitivity in intact female and ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Smeester, B A; O'Brien, E E; Michlitsch, K S; Lee, J-H; Beitz, A J

    2016-06-02

    Recently, our group established a relationship between tumor-induced spinal cord astrocyte activation and aromatase expression and the development of bone tumor nociception in male mice. As an extension of this work, we now report on the association of tumor-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and cold hypersensitivity to changes in spinal cord dorsal horn GFAP and aromatase expression in intact (INT) female mice and the effect of ovariectomy on these parameters. Implantation of fibrosarcoma cells produced robust mechanical hyperalgesia in INT animals, while ovariectomized (OVX) females had significantly less mechanical hyperalgesia. Cold hypersensitivity was apparent by post-implantation day 7 in INT and OVX females compared to their saline-injected controls and increased throughout the experiment. The decrease in mechanical hyperalgesia in OVX females was mirrored by significant decreases in spinal astrocyte activity in laminae I-II, III-IV, V-VI and X and aromatase expression in laminae V-VI and X in the dorsal horn of tumor-bearing animals. Administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole reduced tumor-induced hyperalgesia in INT females only suggesting that the tumor-induced increase in aromatase expression and its associated increase in spinal estrogen play a role in the development of bone tumor-induced hyperalgesia. Finally, intrathecal (i.t.) administration of 17β-estradiol caused a significant increase in tumor-induced hyperalgesia in INT tumor-bearing females. Since i.t. 17β-estradiol increases tumor pain and ovariectomy significantly decreases tumor pain, as well as spinal aromatase, estrogen may play a critical role in the spinal cord response to the changing tumor environment and the development of tumor-induced nociception.

  18. Paroxetine alleviates rat limb post-ischemia induced allodynia through GRK2 upregulation in superior cervical ganglia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Dong, Jing; Yang, Li; Gao, Lingqi; Zheng, Jijian

    2015-01-01

    Long-lasting neuroplastic changes induced by transient decrease in G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in nociceptors enhances and prolongs inflammatory hyperalgesia. Here, we investigated the effects of paroxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and GRK2 inhibitor) on GRK2 expression in superior cervical ganglion (SCG) in a rat model of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I). After ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, the ipsilateral 50% paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) to mechanical stimuli and the expression levels of GRK2 protein and mRNA in the ipsilateral SCGs all decreased significantly; the ipsilateral cold allodynia scores increased significantly. No significant differences were found in the contralateral side except GRK2 mRNA reduced significantly at day 2-day 9 after I/R injury, but still higher than those in ipsilateral SCGs. After paroxetine administration, the ipsilateral 50% PWTs at day 2, 7, 14, and 21 were significantly higher than those in control group; The GRK2 protein and mRNA levels in ipsilateral SCGs were also significantly up-regulated after day1; The ipsilateral cold allodynia scores were significantly reduced after day7. No significant differences were found in the contralateral 50% PWTs, cold allodynia scores, and GRK2 protein level except GRK2 mRNA levels increased significantly at day1-day7 after paroxetine administration. Therefore, a transient decrease of GRK2 expression in SCG neurons might be involved in the development and maintenance of allodynia in CRPS-I and paroxetine might alleviate this allodynia through GRK2 protein upregulation in SCGs.

  19. Paroxetine alleviates rat limb post-ischemia induced allodynia through GRK2 upregulation in superior cervical ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Dong, Jing; Yang, Li; Gao, Lingqi; Zheng, Jijian

    2015-01-01

    Long-lasting neuroplastic changes induced by transient decrease in G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in nociceptors enhances and prolongs inflammatory hyperalgesia. Here, we investigated the effects of paroxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and GRK2 inhibitor) on GRK2 expression in superior cervical ganglion (SCG) in a rat model of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I). After ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, the ipsilateral 50% paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) to mechanical stimuli and the expression levels of GRK2 protein and mRNA in the ipsilateral SCGs all decreased significantly; the ipsilateral cold allodynia scores increased significantly. No significant differences were found in the contralateral side except GRK2 mRNA reduced significantly at day 2-day 9 after I/R injury, but still higher than those in ipsilateral SCGs. After paroxetine administration, the ipsilateral 50% PWTs at day 2, 7, 14, and 21 were significantly higher than those in control group; The GRK2 protein and mRNA levels in ipsilateral SCGs were also significantly up-regulated after day1; The ipsilateral cold allodynia scores were significantly reduced after day7. No significant differences were found in the contralateral 50% PWTs, cold allodynia scores, and GRK2 protein level except GRK2 mRNA levels increased significantly at day1-day7 after paroxetine administration. Therefore, a transient decrease of GRK2 expression in SCG neurons might be involved in the development and maintenance of allodynia in CRPS-I and paroxetine might alleviate this allodynia through GRK2 protein upregulation in SCGs. PMID:25932137

  20. Venlafaxine Attenuates Heat Hyperalgesia Independent of Adenosine or Opioid System in a Rat Model of Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Alireza; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Banafshe, Hamid Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Mesdaghinia, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Primarily opioidergic and adenosine mechanisms are considered to be involved in the antinociceptive effects of antidepressants. This study was designed to determine the efficacy of acute venlafaxine administration in alleviating symptoms of neuropathic pain and the role of endogenous adenosine and opioid systems in this effect of venlafaxine. We have evaluated the effect of caffeine, a non-selective adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonist and naloxone as an antagonist of opioid receptors on the antinociceptive effects of venlafaxine. Chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve resulted in thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical and cold allodynia in the rats. Animals were received on the 7th day after surgery, when the model had been fully established, venlafaxine (20 and 40 mg/Kg i.p.), or venlafaxine (40 mg/Kg) in combination with caffeine (5 mg/Kg i.p.) or naloxone (1 mg/Kg s.c.). Rats were tested for thermal reaction latencies, mechanical and cold allodynia 45 min after drug injection. Acute venlafaxine (40 mg/Kg i.p.) administration consistently decreased the thermal hyperalgesia and this effect was not blocked by concomitant caffeine or naloxone administration. There was no effect by either drug or the drug combination on the tactile and cold allodynia. The results of this study indicate that venlafaxine (40 mg/Kg i.p.) is effective in alleviating thermal hyperalgesia and this effect is independent through manipulation of adenosine or opioid system. This observation demonstrates that venlafaxine, which is a mixed inhibitor of norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake, differs from the other antidepressants in the mechanism of its antinociception action. PMID:26330872

  1. Spinal 5-HT1A, not the 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors, mediates descending serotonergic inhibition for late-phase mechanical allodynia of carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Min; Jeong, Seong Wook; Yang, Jihoon; Lee, Seong Heon; Kim, Woon Mo; Jeong, Seongtae; Bae, Hong Beom; Yoon, Myung Ha; Choi, Jeong Il

    2015-07-23

    Previous electrophysiological studies demonstrated a limited role of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor (5-HT3R), but facilitatory role of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in spinal nociceptive processing of carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. The release of spinal 5-HT was shown to peak in early-phase and return to baseline in late-phase of carrageenan inflammation. We examined the role of the descending serotonergic projections involving 5-HT1AR, 5-HT1BR, and 5-HT3R in mechanical allodynia of early- (first 4h) and late-phase (24h after) carrageenan-induced inflammation. Intrathecal administration of 5-HT produced a significant anti-allodynic effect in late-phase, but not in early-phase. Similarly, intrathecal 5-HT1AR agonist (8-OH-DPAT) attenuated the intensity of late-phase allodynia in a dose dependent fashion which was antagonized by 5-HT1AR antagonist (WAY-100635), but produced no effect on the early-phase allodynia. However, other agonists or antagonists of 5-HT1BR (CP-93129, SB-224289) and 5-HT3R (m-CPBG, ondansetron) did not produce any anti- or pro-allodynic effect in both early- and late- phase allodynia. These results suggest that spinal 5-HT1A, but not 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors mediate descending serotonergic inhibition on nociceptive processing of late-phase mechanical allodynia in carrageenan-induced inflammation.

  2. Spinal sigma-1 receptor activation increases the production of D-serine in astrocytes which contributes to the development of mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Beitz, Alvin J; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2015-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated that activation of the spinal sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) plays an important role in the development of mechanical allodynia (MA) via secondary activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Sig-1Rs have been shown to localize to astrocytes, and blockade of Sig-1Rs inhibits the pathologic activation of astrocytes in neuropathic mice. However, the mechanism by which Sig-1R activation in astrocytes modulates NMDA receptors in neurons is currently unknown. d-serine, synthesized from l-serine by serine racemase (Srr) in astrocytes, is an endogenous co-agonist for the NMDA receptor glycine site and can control NMDA receptor activity. Here, we investigated the role of d-serine in the development of MA induced by spinal Sig-1R activation in chronic constriction injury (CCI) mice. The production of d-serine and Srr expression were both significantly increased in the spinal cord dorsal horn post-CCI surgery. Srr and d-serine were only localized to astrocytes in the superficial dorsal horn, while d-serine was also localized to neurons in the deep dorsal horn. Moreover, we found that Srr exists in astrocytes that express Sig-1Rs. The CCI-induced increase in the levels of d-serine and Srr was attenuated by sustained intrathecal treatment with the Sig-1R antagonist, BD-1047 during the induction phase of neuropathic pain. In behavioral experiments, degradation of endogenous d-serine with DAAO, or selective blockade of Srr by LSOS, effectively reduced the development of MA, but not thermal hyperalgesia in CCI mice. Finally, BD-1047 administration inhibited the development of MA and this inhibition was reversed by intrathecal treatment with exogenous d-serine. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the activation of Sig-1Rs increases the expression of Srr and d-serine in astrocytes. The increased production of d-serine induced by CCI ultimately affects dorsal horn neurons that are involved in the development of MA in neuropathic

  3. Vascular Endothelial Cells Mediate Mechanical Stimulation-Induced Enhancement of Endothelin Hyperalgesia via Activation of P2X2/3 Receptors on Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Elizabeth K.; Green, Paul G.; Bogen, Oliver; Alvarez, Pedro; Levine, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is unique amongst a broad range of hyperalgesic agents in that it induces hyperalgesia in rats that is markedly enhanced by repeated mechanical stimulation at the site of administration. Antagonists to the ET-1 receptors, ETA and ETB, attenuated both initial as well as stimulation-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia (SIEH) by endothelin. However, administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to attenuate ETA receptor expression on nociceptors attenuated ET-1 hyperalgesia, but had no effect on SIEH suggesting that this is mediated via a non-neuronal cell. Since vascular endothelial cells are both stretch-sensitive and express ETA and ETB receptors, we tested the hypothesis that SIEH is dependent on endothelial cells by impairing vascular endothelial function with octoxynol-9 administration; this procedure eliminated SIEH without attenuating ET-1 hyperalgesia. A role for protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), a second messenger implicated in the induction and maintenance of chronic pain, was explored. Intrathecal antisense for PKCε did not inhibit either ET-1 hyperalgesia or SIEH, suggesting no role for neuronal PKCε; however, administration of a PKCε inhibitor at the site of testing selectively attenuated SIEH. Compatible with endothelial cells releasing ATP in response to mechanical stimulation, P2X2/3 receptor antagonists eliminated SIEH. The endothelium also appears to contribute to hyperalgesia in two ergonomic pain models (eccentric exercise and hind limb vibration) and in model of endometriosis. We propose that SIEH is produced by an effect of ET-1 on vascular endothelial cells, sensitizing its release of ATP in response to mechanical stimulation; ATP in turn acts at the nociceptor P2X2/3 receptor. PMID:23407944

  4. Cutaneous tactile allodynia associated with microvascular dysfunction in muscle

    PubMed Central

    Laferrière, Andre; Millecamps, Magali; Xanthos, Dimitris N; Xiao, Wen Hua; Siau, Chiang; de Mos, Marissa; Sachot, Christelle; Ragavendran, J Vaigunda; Huygen, Frank JPM; Bennett, Gary J; Coderre, Terence J

    2008-01-01

    Background Cutaneous tactile allodynia, or painful hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the skin, is typically associated with neuropathic pain, although also present in chronic pain patients who do not have evidence of nerve injury. We examine whether deep tissue microvascular dysfunction, a feature common in chronic non-neuropathic pain, contributes to allodynia. Results Persistent cutaneous allodynia is produced in rats following a hind paw ischemia-reperfusion injury that induces microvascular dysfunction, including arterial vasospasms and capillary slow flow/no-reflow, in muscle. Microvascular dysfunction leads to persistent muscle ischemia, a reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, and allodynia correlated with muscle ischemia, but not with skin nerve loss. The affected hind paw muscle shows lipid peroxidation, an upregulation of nuclear factor kappa B, and enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokines, while allodynia is relieved by agents that inhibit these alterations. Allodynia is increased, along with hind paw muscle lactate, when these rats exercise, and is reduced by an acid sensing ion channel antagonist. Conclusion Our results demonstrate how microvascular dysfunction and ischemia in muscle can play a critical role in the development of cutaneous allodynia, and encourage the study of how these mechanisms contribute to chronic pain. We anticipate that focus on the pain mechanisms associated with microvascular dysfunction in muscle will provide new effective treatments for chronic pain patients with cutaneous tactile allodynia. PMID:18957097

  5. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    White, Stephanie; Marquez de Prado, Blanca; Russo, Andrew F; Hammond, Donna L

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether mice with a deficiency of neurofibromin, a Ras GTPase activating protein, exhibit a nociceptive phenotype and probed a possible contribution by calcitonin gene-related peptide. In the absence of inflammation, Nf1+/- mice (B6.129S6 Nf1/J) and wild type littermates responded comparably to heat or mechanical stimuli, except for a subtle enhanced mechanical sensitivity in female Nf1+/- mice. Nociceptive phenotype was also examined after inflammation induced by capsaicin and formalin, which release endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide. Intraplantar injection of capsaicin evoked comparable heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in Nf1+/- and wild type mice of both genders. Formalin injection caused a similar duration of licking in male Nf1+/- and wild type mice. Female Nf1+/- mice licked less than wild type mice, but displayed other nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, intraplantar injection of CGRP caused greater heat hyperalgesia in Nf1+/- mice of both genders compared to wild type mice. Male Nf1+/- mice also exhibited greater mechanical hypersensitivity; however, female Nf1+/- mice exhibited less mechanical hypersensitivity than their wild type littermates. Transcripts for calcitonin gene-related peptide were similar in the dorsal root ganglia of both genotypes and genders. Transcripts for receptor activity-modifying protein-1, which is rate-limiting for the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, in the spinal cord were comparable for both genotypes and genders. The increased responsiveness to intraplantar calcitonin gene-related peptide suggests that the peripheral actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide are enhanced as a result of the neurofibromin deficit. The analgesic efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists may therefore merit investigation in neurofibromatosis patients.

  6. CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels in peripheral sensory neurons are important for mibefradil-induced reversal of hyperalgesia and allodynia in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Aleksandar Lj; Hwang, Sung Mi; Scarpa, Joseph; Hong, Sung Jun; Todorovic, Slobodan M; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that streptozotocin (STZ) injections in rats lead to the development of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN) accompanied by enhancement of CaV3.2 T-type calcium currents (T-currents) and hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Here we used the classical peripherally acting T-channel blocker mibefradil to examine the role of CaV3.2 T-channels as pharmacological targets for treatment of painful PDN. When administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), at clinically relevant doses, mibefradil effectively alleviated heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivities in STZ-treated diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that CaV3.2 antisense (AS)-treated diabetic rats exhibit a significant decrease in painful PDN compared with mismatch antisense (MIS)-treated diabetic rats. Co-treatment with mibefradil (9 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in reversal of heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivity in MIS-treated but not in AS-treated diabetic rats, suggesting that mibefradil and CaV3.2 AS share the same cellular target. Using patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated DRG neurons, we demonstrated that mibefradil similarly blocked T-currents in diabetic and healthy rats in a voltage-dependent manner by stabilizing inactive states of T-channels. We conclude that antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mibefradil in PDN are at least partly mediated by inhibition of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nociceptors. Hence, peripherally acting voltage-dependent T-channel blockers could be very useful in the treatment of painful symptoms of PDN.

  7. CaV3.2 T-Type Calcium Channels in Peripheral Sensory Neurons Are Important for Mibefradil-Induced Reversal of Hyperalgesia and Allodynia in Rats with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Obradovic, Aleksandar Lj.; Hwang, Sung Mi; Scarpa, Joseph; Hong, Sung Jun; Todorovic, Slobodan M.; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that streptozotocin (STZ) injections in rats lead to the development of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN) accompanied by enhancement of CaV3.2 T-type calcium currents (T-currents) and hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Here we used the classical peripherally acting T-channel blocker mibefradil to examine the role of CaV3.2 T-channels as pharmacological targets for treatment of painful PDN. When administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), at clinically relevant doses, mibefradil effectively alleviated heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivities in STZ-treated diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that CaV3.2 antisense (AS)-treated diabetic rats exhibit a significant decrease in painful PDN compared with mismatch antisense (MIS)-treated diabetic rats. Co-treatment with mibefradil (9 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in reversal of heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivity in MIS-treated but not in AS-treated diabetic rats, suggesting that mibefradil and CaV3.2 AS share the same cellular target. Using patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated DRG neurons, we demonstrated that mibefradil similarly blocked T-currents in diabetic and healthy rats in a voltage-dependent manner by stabilizing inactive states of T-channels. We conclude that antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mibefradil in PDN are at least partly mediated by inhibition of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nociceptors. Hence, peripherally acting voltage-dependent T-channel blockers could be very useful in the treatment of painful symptoms of PDN. PMID:24705276

  8. Phosphorylation of CREB and mechanical hyperalgesia is reversed by blockade of the cAMP pathway in a time-dependent manner after repeated intramuscular acid injections.

    PubMed

    Hoeger-Bement, Marie K; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2003-07-02

    Spinal activation of the cAMP pathway produces mechanical hyperalgesia, sensitizes nociceptive spinal neurons, and phosphorylates the transcription factor cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), which initiates gene transcription. This study examined the role of the cAMP pathway in a model of chronic muscle pain by assessing associated behavioral changes and phosphorylation of CREB. Bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia of the paw was induced by administering two injections of acidic saline, 5 d apart, into the gastrocnemius muscle of male Sprague Dawley rats. Interestingly, the increases in immunoreactivity for CREB and phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) in the spinal dorsal horn occur 24 hr, but not 1 week, after the second injection of acidic saline compared with pH 7.2 intramuscular injections. Spinal blockade of adenylate cyclase prevents the expected increase in p-CREB that occurs after intramuscular acid injection. The reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia by adenylate cyclase or protein kinase A inhibitors spinally follows a similar pattern with reversal at 24 hr, but not 1 week, compared with the vehicle controls. The p-CREB immunoreactivity in the superficial dorsal horn correlates with the mechanical withdrawal threshold such that increases in p-CREB are associated with decreases in threshold. Therefore, activation of the cAMP pathway in the spinal cord phosphorylates CREB and produces mechanical hyperalgesia associated with intramuscular acid injections. The mechanical hyperalgesia and phosphorylation of CREB depend on early activation of the cAMP pathway during the first 24 hr but are independent of the cAMP pathway by 1 week after intramuscular injection of acid.

  9. Crosstalk between Activated Microglia and Neurons in the Spinal Dorsal Horn Contributes to Stress-induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jian; Chen, Chen; Meng, Qing-Xi; Wu, Yan; Wu, Haitao; Zhao, Ting-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Stress has been shown to enhance pain sensitivity resulting in stress-induced hyperalgesia. However, the underlying mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. Using single-prolonged stress combined with Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection model, we explored the reciprocal regulatory relationship between neurons and microglia, which is critical for the maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-induced hyperalgesia. In our assay, significant mechanical allodynia was observed. Additionally, activated neurons in spinal dorsal horn were observed by analysis of Fos expression. And, microglia were also significantly activated with the presence of increased Iba-1 expression. Intrathecal administration of c-fos antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASO) or minocycline (a specific microglia inhibitor) attenuated mechanical allodynia. Moreover, intrathecal administration of c-fos ASO significantly suppressed the activation of neurons and microglia. Interestingly, inhibition of microglia activation by minocycline significantly suppressed the activation of both neurons and microglia in spinal dorsal horn. P38 inhibitor SB203580 suppressed IL-6 production, and inhibition of IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) activation by tocilizumab suppressed Fos expression. Together, our data suggest that the presence of a “crosstalk” between activated microglia and neurons in the spinal dorsal horn, which might contribute to the stress-induced hyperactivated state, leading to an increased pain sensitivity. PMID:27995982

  10. SPINAL CORD MECHANISMS MEDIATING BEHAVIORAL HYPERALGESIA INDUCED BY NEUROKININ-1 TACHYKININ RECEPTOR ACTIVATION IN THE ROSTRAL VENTROMEDIAL MEDULLA

    PubMed Central

    Lagraize, S. C.; Guo, W.; Yang, K.; Wei, F.; Ren, K.; Dubner, R.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperalgesia in animal injury models is linked to activation of descending raphespinal modulatory circuits originating in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). A neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist microinjected into the RVM before or after inflammation produced by complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) resulted in an attenuation of thermal hyperalgesia. A transient (acute) or a continuous infusion of Substance P (SP) microinjected into the RVM of non-inflamed animals led to similar pain hypersensitivity. Intrathecal pretreatment or post-treatment of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (Y-25130 or ondansetron) blocked the SP-induced hyperalgesia. The SP-induced hyperalgesia was both GABAA and NMDA receptor-dependent after pre- and post-treatment with selective antagonists at the spinal level. A microinjection of SP into the RVM also led to increased NMDA NR1 receptor subunit phosphorylation in spinal cord tissue. The GABAA receptor-mediated hyperalgesia involved a shift in the anionic gradient in dorsal horn nociceptive neurons and an increase in phosphorylated NKCC1 protein (isoform of the Na-K-Cl cotransporter). Following a low dose of SP infused into the RVM, intrathecal muscimol (GABAA agonist) increased SP-induced thermal hyperalgesia, phosphorylated NKCC1 protein expression, and NMDA NR1 subunit phosphorylation in the spinal cord. The thermal hyperalgesia was blocked by intrathecal gabazine, the GABAA receptor antagonist, and MK-801, the NMDA receptor channel blocker. These findings indicate that NK-1 receptors in the RVM are involved in SP-induced thermal hyperalgesia, this hyperalgesia is 5-HT3-receptor dependent at the spinal level, and involves the functional interaction of spinal GABAA and NMDA receptors. PMID:20888891

  11. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the hyperalgesia to noxious mechanical stimulation induced by the application of a tourniquet to a forelimb of sheep.

    PubMed

    Welsh, E M; Nolan, A M

    1994-11-01

    A tourniquet was used in conjunction with a mechanical threshold testing device to investigate the suitability of the technique for the investigation of analgesic drugs in sheep. The changes to the mechanical thresholds to noxious stimulation during and after the inflation of a pneumatic tourniquet on a limb were recorded, and the influence of pre-treatment with two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was studied. Fentanyl, an opioid agonist with known analgesic properties in sheep, was used as a positive control. The tourniquet significantly reduced the mechanical thresholds on the ipsi- but not the contralateral limb. Pretreatment with either flunixin meglumine or carprofen attenuated the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, and fentanyl initially caused a significant anti-nociceptive effect. The time to aversion was not significantly different between the treatments. These results suggest that hyperalgesia induced by a tourniquet may be a useful technique for the investigation of the anti-nociceptive effects of analgesic drugs in sheep.

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species Donors Increase the Responsiveness of Dorsal Horn Neurons and Induce Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Young; Lee, Inhyung; Chun, Sang Woo; Kim, Hee Kee

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers have analgesic effect on neuropathic pain through spinal mechanisms in the rat. The studies suggest that superoxide in spinal cord is one of important mediators of persistent pain. To test the hypothesis that increase of superoxide-derived intermediates leads to central sensitization and pain, the effects of an intrathecal injection of chemical ROS donors releasing either OH∙, OCl−, or H2O2 were examined on pain behaviors. Following treatment with t-BOOH (OH∙ donor), dorsal horn neuron responses to mechanical stimuli in normal rats and the changes of neuronal excitability were explored on substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons using whole-cell patch clamping recordings. Intrathecal administration of t-BOOH or NaOCl (OCl− donor), but not H2O2, significantly decreased mechanical thresholds of hind paws. The responses of wide dynamic range neurons to mechanical stimuli increased after a local application of t-BOOH. The t-BOOH increased the frequency and the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials, depolarized membrane potential in SG neurons, and increased the frequency of action potentials evoked by depolarizing current pulses. These results suggest that elevated ROS, especially OH∙, in the spinal cord sensitized dorsal horn neurons and produced hyperalgesia in normal rats. PMID:26457204

  13. Sigma-1 Receptor Antagonist BD1047 Reduces Mechanical Allodynia in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain through the Inhibition of Spinal NR1 Phosphorylation and Microglia Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Chenchen; Han, Yuan; Song, Chao; Hu, Xueming; Liu, Yannan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sigma-1 receptor plays important roles in the induction phase of rodent neuropathic pain; however, whether it is involved in bone cancer pain (BCP) and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The aim of this study was to examine the potential role of the spinal sigma-1 receptor in the development of bone cancer pain. Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats to induce ongoing bone cancer-related pain behaviors; our findings indicated that, on days 7, 10, 14, and 21 after operation, the expression of sigma-1 receptor in the spinal cord was higher in BCP rats compared to the sham rats. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of 120 nmol of sigma-1 receptor antagonist BD1047 on days 5, 6, and 7 after operation attenuated mechanical allodynia as well as the associated induction of c-Fos and activation of microglial cells, NR1, and the subsequent Ca2+-dependent signals of BCP rats. These results suggest that sigma-1 receptor is involved in the development of bone cancer pain and that targeting sigma-1 receptor may be a new strategy for the treatment of bone cancer pain. PMID:26696751

  14. Sigma-1 Receptor Antagonist BD1047 Reduces Mechanical Allodynia in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain through the Inhibition of Spinal NR1 Phosphorylation and Microglia Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Chenchen; Han, Yuan; Song, Chao; Hu, Xueming; Liu, Yannan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sigma-1 receptor plays important roles in the induction phase of rodent neuropathic pain; however, whether it is involved in bone cancer pain (BCP) and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The aim of this study was to examine the potential role of the spinal sigma-1 receptor in the development of bone cancer pain. Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats to induce ongoing bone cancer-related pain behaviors; our findings indicated that, on days 7, 10, 14, and 21 after operation, the expression of sigma-1 receptor in the spinal cord was higher in BCP rats compared to the sham rats. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of 120 nmol of sigma-1 receptor antagonist BD1047 on days 5, 6, and 7 after operation attenuated mechanical allodynia as well as the associated induction of c-Fos and activation of microglial cells, NR1, and the subsequent Ca(2+)-dependent signals of BCP rats. These results suggest that sigma-1 receptor is involved in the development of bone cancer pain and that targeting sigma-1 receptor may be a new strategy for the treatment of bone cancer pain.

  15. TRPA1, NMDA receptors and nitric oxide mediate mechanical hyperalgesia induced by local injection of magnesium sulfate into the rat hind paw.

    PubMed

    Srebro, Dragana P; Vučković, Sonja M; Savić Vujović, Katarina R; Prostran, Milica Š

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that while magnesium, an antagonist of the glutamate subtype of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, possesses analgesic properties, it can induce writhing in rodents. The aim of this study was to determine the effect and mechanism of action of local (intraplantar) administration of magnesium sulfate (MS) on the paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli. The PWT was evaluated by the electronic von Frey test in male Wistar rats. Tested drugs were either co-administered intraplantarly (i.pl.) with MS or given into the contralateral paw to exclude systemic effects. MS at doses of 0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6.2 mg/paw (i.pl.) induced a statistically significant (as compared to 0.9% NaCl) and dose-dependent mechanical hyperalgesia. Only isotonic MS (250 mmol/l or 6.2% or 6.2 mg/paw) induced mechanical hyperalgesia that lasted at least six hours. Isotonic MS-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by co-injection of camphor, a non-selective TRPA1 antagonist (0.3, 1 and 2.5 μg/paw), MK-801, a NMDA receptor antagonist (0.001, 0.025 and 0.1 μg/paw), L-NAME, a non-selective nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor (20, 50 and 100 μg/paw), ARL 17477, a selective neuronal NOS inhibitor (5.7 and 17 μg/paw), SMT, a selective inducible NOS inhibitor (1 and 2.78 μg/paw), and methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor (5, 20 and 125 μg/paw). Drugs injected into the contralateral hind paw did not produce significant effects. These results suggest that an i.pl. injection of MS produces local peripheral mechanical hyperalgesia via activation of peripheral TRPA1 and NMDA receptors and peripheral production of NO.

  16. Pulsed radiofrequency reduced complete Freund's adjuvant-induced mechanical hyperalgesia via the spinal c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Hung; Yang, Chien-Hui; Juang, Sin-Ei; Huang, Hui-Wen; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Sheen-Chen, Shyr-Ming; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Lin, Chung-Ren

    2014-03-01

    Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment involves the pulsed application of a radiofrequency electric field to a nerve. The technology offers pain relief for patients suffering from chronic pain who do not respond well to conventional treatments. We tested whether PRF treatment attenuated complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced inflammatory pain. The profile of spinal c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) phosphorylation was evaluated to elucidate the potential mechanism. Injection of CFA into the unilateral hind paw of rats induced mechanical hyperalgesia in both the ipsilateral and contralateral hind paws. We administered 500-kHz PRF treatment in 20-ms pulses, at a rate of 2 Hz (2 pulses per second) either to the sciatic nerve in the mid-thigh, or to the L4 anterior primary ramus just distal to the intervertebral foramen in both the CFA group and no-PRF group rats. Tissue samples were examined at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days following PRF treatments. Behavioral studies showed that PRF applied close to the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) significantly attenuated CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia compared to no-PRF group (P < .05). And western blotting revealed significant attenuation of the activation of JNK in the spinal dorsal horn compared to no-PRF group animals (P < .05). Application of PRF close to DRG provides an effective treatment for CFA-induced persistent mechanical hyperalgesia by attenuating JNK activation in the spinal dorsal horn.

  17. Effects of Distal Nerve Injuries on Dorsal-Horn Neurons and Glia: Relationships Between Lesion Size and Mechanical Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. W.; Siegel, S. M.; Oaklander, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    Penetrating limb injuries are common and usually heal without long-lasting effects, even when nerves are cut. However, rare nerve-injury patients develop prolonged and disabling chronic pain (neuralgia). When pain severity is disproportionate to severity of the inciting injury, physicians and insurers may suspect exaggeration and limit care or benefits, although the nature of the relationship between lesion-size and the development and persistence of neuralgia remains largely unknown. We compared cellular changes in the spinal dorsal-horn (the initial CNS pain-processing area) after partial or total tibial-nerve axotomies in male Sprague–Dawley rats to determine if these changes are proportional to the numbers of peripheral axons cut. Unoperated rats provided controls. Plantar hind-paw responses to touch, pin, and cold were quantitated bilaterally to identify hyperalgesic rats. We also compared data from nerve-injured rats with or without hyperalgesic responses to mechanical hind-paw stimulation to evaluate concordance between pain behaviors and dorsal-horn cellular changes. Hyperalgesia was no less prevalent or severe after partial than after total axotomy. L5 spinal-cord sections from rats killed 7 days postoperatively were labeled for markers of primary afferents (substance P calcitonin gene-related peptide isolectin B4, gamma aminobutyric acid, and glial fibrillary acidic protein), then labeled cells were stereologically quantitated in somatotopically defined dorsal-horn regions. Total axotomy reduced markers of primary afferents more than partial axotomy. In contrast, GABA-immunoreactive profiles were similarly reduced after both lesions, and in rats with sensory loss versus hyperalgesia. Numbers of GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes increased independently of lesion size and pain status. Small nerve injuries can thus have magnified and disproportionate effects on dorsal-horn neurons and glia, perhaps providing a biological correlate for the disproportionate

  18. Depletion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells increases severity of mechanical allodynia and significantly alters systemic cytokine levels following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Duffy, Samuel S; Perera, Chamini J; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2015-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition caused by damage to the somatosensory nervous system, such as peripheral nerve injury. The immune system, and in particular the adaptive T cell response, plays a key role in mediating such pain. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are a small subpopulation of inhibitory T cells that prevent autoimmunity, limit immunopathology and maintain immune homeostasis. Here, we investigated the effects of conditional depletion of Treg cells on mechanical allodynia and serum cytokines in mice with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, an animal model of neuropathic pain. We demonstrate that CCI induced the infiltration of small numbers of Treg cells within effected neuronal tissue. Utilising the transgenic DEREG (DEpletion of REGulatory T cells) mice, we confirmed effective depletion of Foxp3+ Treg cells by diphtheria toxin injections. Following CCI we observed a transient, though significant, increase in pain hypersensitivity for Treg-depleted DEREG mice compared to non-Treg-depleted mice. Analysis of systemic cytokine levels demonstrated significant changes in serum cytokine expression profiles. In particular, we observed significant increases in systemic concentration of RANTES, IL-2 and IL-5, and significant decreases in IL-12 and IFN-γ in nerve-injured Treg-depleted DEREG mice. Further analysis indicated a substantial increase in the serum concentration of IL-12p40 as a direct result of Treg cell depletion. These results suggest that depletion of Foxp3+ Treg cells promote nerve injury-induced pain hypersensitivity, partially by inducing altered systemic concentrations of cytokines, which may act to regulate neuropathic pain.

  19. Tissue plasminogen activator contributes to morphine tolerance and induces mechanical allodynia via astrocytic IL-1β and ERK signaling in the spinal cord of mice.

    PubMed

    Berta, T; Liu, Y-C; Xu, Z-Z; Ji, R-R

    2013-09-05

    Accumulating evidence indicates that activation of spinal cord astrocytes contributes importantly to nerve injury and inflammation-induced persistent pain and chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and induction of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in spinal astrocytes have been implicated in astrocytes-mediated pain. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been extensively used to treat stroke. We examined the potential involvement of tPA in chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance and activation of spinal astrocytes using tPA knockout (tPA(-/-)) mice and astrocyte cultures. tPA(-/-) mice exhibited unaltered nociceptive pain and morphine-induced acute analgesia. However, the antinociceptive tolerance, induced by chronic morphine (10mg/kg/day, s.c.), is abrogated in tPA(-/-) mice. Chronic morphine induces tPA expression in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing spinal cord astrocytes. Chronic morphine also increases IL-1β expression in GFAP-expressing astrocytes, which is abolished in tPA-deficient mice. In cultured astrocytes, morphine treatment increases tPA, IL-1β, and pERK expression, and the increased IL-1β and pERK expression is abolished in tPA-deficient astrocytes. tPA is also sufficient to induce IL-1β and pERK expression in astrocyte cultures. Intrathecal injection of tPA results in up-regulation of GFAP and pERK in spinal astrocytes but not up-regulation of ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 in spinal microglia. Finally, intrathecal tPA elicits persistent mechanical allodynia, which is inhibited by the astroglial toxin alpha-amino adipate and the MEK (ERK kinase) inhibitor U0126. Collectively, these data suggest an important role of tPA in regulating astrocytic signaling, pain hypersensitivity, and morphine tolerance.

  20. Comparison of Mechanical Allodynia and Recovery of Locomotion and Bladder Function by Different Parameters of Low Thoracic Spinal Contusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michael W.; Johnson, Kathia M.; Lee, Jun Yeon; Hulsebosch, Claire E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study was designed to examine the functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) by adjusting the parameters of impact force and dwell-time using the Infinite Horizon (IH) impactor device. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (225–240 g) were divided into eight injury groups based on force of injury (Kdyn) and dwell time (seconds), indicated as Force-Dwell time: 150-4, 150-3, 150-2, 150-1, 150-0, 200-0, 90-2 and sham controls, respectively. Results After T10 SCI, higher injury force produced greater spinal cord displacement (P < 0.05) and showed a significant correlation (r = 0.813) between the displacement and the force (P < 0.05). In neuropathic pain-like behavior, the percent of paw withdrawals scores in the hindpaw for the 150-4, 150-3, 150-2, 150-1 and the 200-0 injury groups were significantly lowered compared with sham controls (P < 0.05). The recovery of locomotion had a significant within-subjects effect of time (P < 0.05) and the 150-0 group had increased recovery compared to other groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the 200-0 and the 90-2 recovered significantly better than all the 150 kdyn impact groups that included a dwell-time (P < 0.05). In recovery of spontaneous bladder function, the 150-4 injury group took significantly longer recovery time whereas the 150-0 and the 90-2 groups had the shortest recovery times. Conclusions The present study demonstrates SCI parameters optimize development of mechanical allodynia and other pathological outcomes. PMID:27103963

  1. Tissue plasminogen activator contributes to morphine tolerance and induces mechanical allodynia via astrocytic IL-1β and ERK signaling in the spinal cord of mice

    PubMed Central

    Berta, Temugin; Liu, Yen-Chin; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that activation of spinal cord astrocytes contributes importantly to nerve injury and inflammation-induced persistent pain and chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and induction of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in spinal astrocytes have been implicated in astrocytes-mediated pain. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been extensively used to treat stroke. We examined the potential involvement of tPA in chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance and activation of spinal astrocytes using tPA knockout (tPA−/−) mice and astrocyte cultures. tPA−/− mice exhibited unaltered nociceptive pain and morphine-induced acute analgesia. However, the antinociceptive tolerance, induced by chronic morphine (10 mg/kg/day, s.c.), is abrogated in tPA−/− mice. Chronic morphine induces tPA expression in GFAP-expressing spinal cord astrocytes. Chronic morphine also increases IL-1β expression in GFAP-expressing astrocytes, which is abolished in tPA-deficient mice. In cultured astrocytes, morphine treatment increases tPA, IL-1β, and pERK expression, and the increased IL-1β and pERK expression is abolished in tPA-deficient astrocytes. tPA is also sufficient to induce IL-1β and pERK expression in astrocyte cultures. Intrathecal injection of tPA results in up-regulation of GFAP and pERK in spinal astrocytes but not up-regulation of IBA-1 in spinal microglia. Finally, intrathecal tPA elicits persistent mechanical allodynia, which is inhibited by the astroglial toxin alpha-amino adipate and the MEK (ERK kinase) inhibitor U0126. Collectively, these data suggest an important role of tPA in regulating astrocytic signaling, pain hypersensitivity, and morphine tolerance. PMID:23707980

  2. The critical role of leukotriene B4 in antigen-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in immunised rats

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Joice Maria; Sachs, Daniela; Canetti, Claudio Azevedo; Poole, Stephen; Ferreira, Sérgio Henrique; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the mediators responsible for mechanical hypersensitivity induced by antigen challenge in rats immunised with ovalbumin (OVA). Challenge with OVA (12.5–100 μg, intraplantar) caused a dose- and time-dependent mechanical hypersensitivity, which peaked 3 h after, decreased thereafter and reached control levels 24 h later. Levels of TNFα, IL-1β and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (CINC-1) were increased in paw skin after antigen challenge. OVA-evoked hypersensitivity was partially inhibited (about 51%) by pretreatment with anti-TNFα , IL-1β and IL-8 sera or with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), but not anti-NGF serum. Pretreatment with thalidomide (45 mg kg−1) or pentoxifylline (100 mg kg−1) also partially inhibited the hypersensitivity at 1–3 h after challenge. Pretreatment with indomethacin (5 mg kg−1) or atenolol (1 mg kg−1) reduced the OVA-induced hypersensitivity at 1 and 3 h, but not at 5 h after challenge, while the combination of B1 and B2 bradykinin receptor antagonists was ineffective over the same times. Pretreatment with MK886 (5-lipoxygenase-activating protein inhibitor, 3 mg kg−1), CP 105696 (LTB4 receptor antagonist; 3 mg kg−1) or dexamethasone (0.5 mg kg−1) inhibited the hypersensitivity from 1 to 5 h. Furthermore, LTB4 levels were increased in the paw skin of challenged rats. In conclusion, our results suggest that the TNFα-, IL-1β- and CINC-1-driven release of prostaglandins, sympathetic amines and LTB4 mediates the first 3 h of mechanical hypersensitivity induced by antigen challenge in rats. At 5 h after OVA administration, although TNFα has some role, LTB4 is the critical nociceptive mediator. PMID:12871832

  3. Reduction in mechanical allodynia in complex regional pain syndrome patients with ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the superficial peroneal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Won Soek; Kim, Sang Hyun; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lee, Mi Sun

    2016-01-01

    The superficial peroneal nerve is vulnerable to damage from ankle sprain injuries and fractures as well as surgery to this region. And it is also one of the most commonly involved nerves in complex regional pain syndrome type II in the foot and ankle region. We report two cases of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of superficial peroneal nerve for reduction of allodynia in CRPS patients. PMID:27738506

  4. Eccentric Muscle Contraction and Stretching Evoke Mechanical Hyperalgesia and Modulate CGRP and P2X3 Expression in a Functionally Relevant Manner

    PubMed Central

    Dessem, Dean; Ambalavanar, Ranjinidevi; Evancho, Melena; Moutanni, Aicha; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Bai, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive, movement-based models were used to investigate muscle pain. In rats, the masseter muscle was rapidly stretched or electrically stimulated during forced lengthening to produce eccentric muscle contractions (EC). Both EC and stretching disrupted scattered myofibers and produced intramuscular plasma extravasation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were elevated in the masseter 24h following EC. At 48h, neutrophils increased and ED1 macrophages infiltrated myofibers while ED2 macrophages were abundant at 4d. Mechanical hyperalgesia was evident in the ipsilateral head 4h-4d after a single bout of EC and for 7d following multiple bouts (1 bout/d for 4d). Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA increased in the trigeminal ganglion 24h following EC while immunoreactive CGRP decreased. By 2d, CGRP-muscle afferent numbers equaled naive numbers implying that CGRP is released following EC and replenished within 2d. EC elevated P2X3 mRNA and increased P2X3-muscle afferent neuron number for 12d while electrical stimulation without muscle contraction altered neither CGRP nor P2X3 mRNA levels. Muscle stretching produced hyperalgesia for 2d whereas contraction alone produced no hyperalgesia. Stretching increased CGRP mRNA at 24h but not CGRP-muscle afferent number at 2–12d. In contrast, stretching significantly increased the number of P2X3-muscle afferent neurons for 12d. The sustained, elevated P2X3 expression evoked by EC and stretching may enhance nociceptor responsiveness to ATP released during subsequent myofiber damage. Movement-based actions such as EC and muscle stretching produce unique tissue responses and modulate neuropeptide and nociceptive receptor expression in a manner particularly relevant to repeated muscle damage. PMID:20207080

  5. The Relationship between Mechanical Hyperalgesia Assessed by Manual Tender Point Examination and Disease Severity in Patients with Chronic Widespread Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Amris, Kirstine; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen; Jespersen, Anders; Stockmarr, Anders; Bennett, Robert; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2014-01-01

    The clinical utility of tender point (TP) examination in patients reporting chronic widespread pain (CWP) is the subject of contemporary debate. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between mechanical hyperalgesia assessed by manual TP examination and clinical disease severity. 271 women with CWP were recruited from a clinical setting. Data collection included patient-reported symptoms, health-related quality of life variables, and observation-based measures of functional ability, muscle strength, 6-minute walk, and pressure pain thresholds measured by cuff algometry. TP examination was conducted according to ACR-guidelines. Relationships between disease variables and TP count (TPC) were analyzed with logistic regression in a continuum model, allowing the TPC to depend on the included disease variables and two regression models carried out for a TPC threshold level, varying between 1 and 17. The threshold analyses indicated a TPC threshold at 8, above which a large number of disease variables became consistently significant explanatory factors, whereas none of the disease variables reached a significance level in the continuum model. These results support the premise that the presence of mechanical hyperalgesia influences symptomatology in CWP and that the severity of clinical expression is related to a threshold of TPs, rather than being part of a continuum.

  6. Go-sha-jinki-Gan (GJG) ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of TNF-α expression in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Miho; Nakae, Aya; Kishida, Yuki; Baba, Kousuke; Sakashita, Noriko; Shibata, Masahiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternative medicine is noted for its clinical effect and minimal invasiveness in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Go-sha-jinki-Gan, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, has been used for meralgia and numbness in elderly patients. However, the exact mechanism of GJG is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of the analgesic effect of GJG in a chronic constriction injury model. Results GJG significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia from the early phase (von Frey test, p < 0.0001; cold-plate test, p < 0.0001; hot-plate test p = 0.011; two-way repeated measures ANOVA). Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed that GJG decreased the expression of Iba1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord. Double staining immunohistochemistry showed that most of the tumor necrosis factor-α was co-expressed in Iba1-positive cells at day 3 post-operation. GJG decreased the phosphorylation of p38 in the ipsilateral dorsal horn. Moreover, intrathecal injection of tumor necrosis factor-α opposed the anti-allodynic effect of GJG in the cold-plate test. Conclusions Our data suggest that GJG ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α expression derived from activated microglia. GJG is a promising drug for the treatment of neuropathic pain induced by neuro-inflammation. PMID:27296622

  7. Berberine Ameliorates Allodynia Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury of the Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether berberine could ameliorate allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After inducement of CCI, significant increases in the number of paw lifts from a cold plate test (cold allodynia) and decreased paw withdrawal threshold in the von Frey hair stimulation test (mechanical allodynia) were observed. However, these cold and mechanical allodynia were markedly alleviated by berberine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Sciatic nerve myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities were also attenuated by berberine administration. Continuous injection for 7 days induced no development of tolerance. The antiallodynic effect of 20 mg/kg berberine was comparable to that of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that berberine could mitigate allodynia induced by CCI, a neuropathic pain model, and it suggested that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of berberine contributed to the antiallodynic effect in the CCI model.

  8. The maintenance of cisplatin- and paclitaxel-induced mechanical and cold allodynia is suppressed by cannabinoid CB2 receptor activation and independent of CXCR4 signaling in models of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemotherapeutic agents produce dose-limiting peripheral neuropathy through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We previously showed that AM1710, a cannabilactone CB2 agonist, produces antinociception without producing central nervous system (CNS)-associated side effects. The present study was conducted to examine the antinociceptive effect of AM1710 in rodent models of neuropathic pain evoked by diverse chemotherapeutic agents (cisplatin and paclitaxel). A secondary objective was to investigate the potential contribution of alpha-chemokine receptor (CXCR4) signaling to both chemotherapy-induced neuropathy and CB2 agonist efficacy. Results AM1710 (0.1, 1 or 5 mg/kg i.p.) suppressed the maintenance of mechanical and cold allodynia in the cisplatin and paclitaxel models. Anti-allodynic effects of AM1710 were blocked by the CB2 antagonist AM630 (3 mg/kg i.p.), but not the CB1 antagonist AM251 (3 mg/kg i.p.), consistent with a CB2-mediated effect. By contrast, blockade of CXCR4 signaling with its receptor antagonist AMD3100 (10 mg/kg i.p.) failed to attenuate mechanical or cold hypersensitivity induced by either cisplatin or paclitaxel. Moreover, blockade of CXCR4 signaling failed to alter the anti-allodynic effects of AM1710 in the paclitaxel model, further suggesting distinct mechanisms of action. Conclusions Our results indicate that activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptors by AM1710 suppresses both mechanical and cold allodynia in two distinct models of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. By contrast, CXCR4 signaling does not contribute to the maintenance of chemotherapy-induced established neuropathy or efficacy of AM1710. Our studies suggest that CB2 receptors represent a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of toxic neuropathies produced by cisplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22998838

  9. Pre-injury administration of morphine prevents development of neuropathic hyperalgesia through activation of descending monoaminergic mechanisms in the spinal cord in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Md Harunor; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined whether pre-injury administration of morphine can prevent partial sciatic nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain in mice. We observed that pre-injury administration of subcutaneous (s.c.) and intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) morphine dose-dependently prevented the development of both thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia at 7 days following nerve injury in mice. The pre-injury morphine (s.c.)-induced analgesia was significantly blocked by pretreatment with naloxone injected s.c. or i.c.v., but not i.t., suggesting that systemic morphine produced the pre-emptying effects mainly by acting at the supra-spinal sites. Since it is believed that activation of descending monoaminergic mechanisms in spinal cord largely contributes to the supra-spinal analgesic effects of morphine, we investigated the involvement of serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms in spinal cord in the pre-injury morphine-induced analgesic effects. We found that pre-injury s.c. morphine-induced analgesic effect was significantly blocked by i.t. pretreatment with serotonergic antagonist, methysergide and noradrenergic antagonist, phentolamine. In addition, pre-injury i.t. injection of serotonin uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine and α2-adrenergic agonist, clonidine significantly prevented the neuropathic hyperalgesia. We next examined whether pre-injury morphine prevented the expression of neuronal hyperactivity markers such as c-Fos and protein kinase C γ (PKCγ) in the spinal dorsal horn. We found that pre-injury administration of s.c. morphine prevented increased expressions of both c-Fos and PKCγ observed following nerve injury. Similar results were obtained with i.t. fluoxetine and clonidine. Altogether these results suggest that pre-injury administration of morphine might prevent the development of neuropathic pain through activation of descending monoaminergic pain inhibitory pathways. PMID:15932652

  10. Suckling and sucrose ingestion suppress persistent hyperalgesia and spinal Fos expression after forepaw inflammation in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, K; Blass, E M; Zhou, Q; Dubner, R

    1997-02-18

    Sweet taste and nonnutritive suckling produce analgesia to transient noxious stimuli in infant rats and humans. The present study evaluated the pain-modulating effects of sucrose and suckling in a rat model of persistent pain and hyperalgesia that mimics the response to tissue injury in humans. Fore- and hindpaw withdrawal latencies from a 30 degrees or 48 degrees C brass stylus were determined in 10-day-old rats following paw inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA; 1:1 injected s.c. in a 0.01 ml volume). CFA markedly decreased escape latencies to both 48 degrees and 30 degrees C stimulation, thereby demonstrating thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. The combination of nonnutritive suckling and sucrose (7.5%, 0.01-0.06 ml/min) infusion markedly increased escape latencies to forepaw stimulation in both CFA-treated and control rats. In contrast, intraoral sucrose and suckling did not increase hindpaw withdrawal latencies in either control or CFA-inflamed rats. The effect was specific to sweet taste because neither water nor isotonic saline infusion affected forepaw escape latencies. Parallel findings were obtained for CFA-induced Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI), a marker of neuronal activation. Fos-LI was selectively induced in cervical and lumbar regions ipsilateral to forepaw and hindpaw inflammation, respectively. Suckling-sucrose treatment significantly reduced Fos-LI at the cervical but not at the lumbar regions. These findings demonstrate: (i) the development of persistent pain and hyperalgesia in 10-day-old rats that can be attenuated by endogenous pain-modulating systems activated by taste and nonnutritive suckling; (ii) the mediation of the sucrose-suckling analgesia and antihyperalgesia at the spinal level; and (iii) a differential rostrocaudal maturation of descending pain-modulating systems to the spinal cord of 10-day-old rats. These findings may provide new clinical approaches for engaging endogenous analgesic mechanisms in

  11. Supradural inflammatory soup in awake and freely moving rats induces facial allodynia that is blocked by putative immune modulators.

    PubMed

    Wieseler, Julie; Ellis, Amanda; McFadden, Andrew; Stone, Kendra; Brown, Kimberley; Cady, Sara; Bastos, Leandro F; Sprunger, David; Rezvani, Niloofar; Johnson, Kirk; Rice, Kenner C; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2017-03-16

    Facial allodynia is a migraine symptom that is generally considered to represent a pivotal point in migraine progression. Treatment before development of facial allodynia tends to be more successful than treatment afterwards. As such, understanding the underlying mechanisms of facial allodynia may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying migraine. Migraine facial allodynia is modeled by applying inflammatory soup (histamine, bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E2) over the dura. Whether glial and/or immune activation contributes to such pain is unknown. Here we tested if trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Sp5C) glial and/or immune cells are activated following supradural inflammatory soup, and if putative glial/immune inhibitors suppress the consequent facial allodynia. Inflammatory soup was administered via bilateral indwelling supradural catheters in freely moving rats, inducing robust and reliable facial allodynia. Gene expression for microglial/macrophage activation markers, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α increased following inflammatory soup along with robust expression of facial allodynia. This provided the basis for pursuing studies of the behavioral effects of 3 diverse immunomodulatory drugs on facial allodynia. Pretreatment with either of two compounds broadly used as putative glial/immune inhibitors (minocycline, ibudilast) prevented the development of facial allodynia, as did treatment after supradural inflammatory soup but prior to the expression of facial allodynia. Lastly, the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist (+)-naltrexone likewise blocked development of facial allodynia after supradural inflammatory soup. Taken together, these exploratory data support that activated glia and/or immune cells may drive the development of facial allodynia in response to supradural inflammatory soup in unanesthetized male rats.

  12. Vasodilatation in hyperalgesic rat skin evoked by stimulation of afferent A beta-fibers: further evidence for a role of dorsal root reflexes in allodynia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Nicas, E; Laird, J M; Cervero, F

    2001-12-01

    In areas of secondary hyperalgesia, innocuous mechanical stimuli evoke pain (allodynia). We have proposed that this is produced by a central pre-synaptic interaction whereby A beta-fibers evoke spike activity (dorsal root reflexes) in nociceptive afferents (Pain, 68 (1996) 13). This activity should conduct centrally, evoking allodynia, and peripherally, evoking neurogenic vasodilatation. Here we tested this hypothesis by examining the effects of electrical stimulation of A beta-fibers on cutaneous blood flow before and after producing secondary hyperalgesia in anesthetized rats. Cutaneous blood flow was recorded in the hind paw skin innervated by the sural nerve using a laser Doppler flowmeter. The sural nerve was prepared for electrical stimulation, and the evoked activity was recorded from the sciatic nerve in continuity. Electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 4 x 0.2 ms pulses, 20 s) was applied to the sural nerve at 2T (A beta-fibers only) and 4T and 6T (A beta + A delta-fibers). Flux was recorded at baseline and after capsaicin or mustard oil application outside the sural nerve territory. The effects of intravenous administration of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, alpha-CGRP(8-37), or of section of the sciatic nerve or of the L4-L6 dorsal roots were examined. Selective activation of the sural nerve A beta-fibers reliably evoked increases in cutaneous blood flow close to areas of chemical irritation or skin damage. A beta-fiber-evoked vasodilatation was abolished by sciatic nerve or dorsal root section and had a spatial arrangement and optimal stimulation pattern suggesting a central synaptic interaction similar to that responsible for dorsal root reflexes. The flux increases were dose-dependently and reversibly inhibited by alpha-CGRP(8-37), indicating that the A beta-fiber-evoked vasodilatation resulted from the antidromic activation of nociceptive cutaneous afferent fibers. These results support our hypothesis by showing activation of

  13. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion. The 30 animals were divided into experimental groups according to the drug used. The drugs were administered for two weeks after the surgical procedure to induce hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated using the paw pressure test, von Frey electronic test and Hargreaves test, over a seven-week period. Results: The greatest reduction of hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals treated with morphine, followed by dexamethasone, indomethacin and atenolol. Reductions in hyperalgesia were observed after drug administration ceased, except for the group of animals treated with morphine, in which there was an increase in hyperalgesia after discontinuation of the treatment. Conclusion: Hyperalgesia induced by NP contact with the DRG can be reduced through administration of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs, but a greater reduction was observed with the administration of dexamethasone. PMID:27026966

  14. A comparison of hyperalgesia and neurogenic inflammation induced by melittin and capsaicin in humans.

    PubMed

    Sumikura, H; Andersen, O K; Drewes, A M; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2003-02-13

    Melittin (a main compound of bee venom) and capsaicin were injected intradermally in healthy human volunteers: (1) to study secondary mechanical hyperalgesia (static hyperalgesia and dynamic hyperalgesia) around the injection site; and (2) to correlate the sensory changes to the neurogenic inflammation assessed by laser-doppler blood flowmetry. Melittin 50 microg and capsaicin 10 microg induced comparable spontaneous pain and increased blood flow (neurogenic inflammation). Intradermal injection of melittin induced regions of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia around the injection site, however, they were not as large as the hyperalgesia induced by capsaicin. This is the first report studying mechanical hyperalgesia induced by melittin in humans, and the results were in agreement with the previous observations in rats. Melittin seems to be a valuable model to study a possible contribution of neurogenic inflammation to hyperalgesia in humans.

  15. A comprehensive review of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Marion; Silverman, Sanford M; Hansen, Hans; Patel, Vikram B; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2011-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is defined as a state of nociceptive sensitization caused by exposure to opioids. The condition is characterized by a paradoxical response whereby a patient receiving opioids for the treatment of pain could actually become more sensitive to certain painful stimuli. The type of pain experienced might be the same as the underlying pain or might be different from the original underlying pain. OIH appears to be a distinct, definable, and characteristic phenomenon that could explain loss of opioid efficacy in some patients. Findings of the clinical prevalence of OIH are not available. However, several observational, cross-sectional, and prospective controlled trials have examined the expression and potential clinical significance of OIH in humans. Most studies have been conducted using several distinct cohorts and methodologies utilizing former opioid addicts on methadone maintenance therapy, perioperative exposure to opioids in patients undergoing surgery, and healthy human volunteers after acute opioid exposure using human experimental pain testing. The precise molecular mechanism of OIH, while not yet understood, varies substantially in the basic science literature, as well as clinical medicine. It is generally thought to result from neuroplastic changes in the peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) that lead to sensitization of pronociceptive pathways. While there are many proposed mechanisms for OIH, 5 mechanisms involving the central glutaminergic system, spinal dynorphins, descending facilitation, genetic mechanisms, and decreased reuptake and enhanced nociceptive response have been described as the important mechanisms. Of these, the central glutaminergic system is considered the most common possibility. Another is the hypothesis that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in OIH include activation, inhibition of the glutamate transporter system, facilitation of calcium regulated intracellular protein kinase C, and cross

  16. Brain dynamics for perception of tactile allodynia (touch-induced pain) in postherpetic neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Geha, P. Y.; Baliki, M. N.; Wang, X.; Harden, R. N.; Paice, J. A.; Apkarian, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a debilitating chronic pain condition often accompanied by a sensation of pain when the affected region is touched (tactile allodynia). Here we identify brain regions involved in stimulus-induced touch-evoked pain (dynamical mechanical allodynia, DMA), compare brain activity between DMA and spontaneous pain (described earlier for the same patients in [28], delineate regions that specifically code the magnitude of perceived allodynia, and show the transformation of allodynia-related information in the brain as a time-evolving network. Eleven PHN patients were studied for DMA and its modulation with Lidoderm therapy (patches of 5% lidocaine applied to the PHN affected body part). Continuous ratings of pain while the affected body part was brushed during fMRI were contrasted with non-painful touch when brushing was applied to an equivalent opposite body site, and with fluctuations of a bar observed during scanning, at three sessions relative to Lidoderm treatment. Lidoderm treatment did not decrease DMA ratings but did decrease spontaneous pain. Multiple brain areas showed preferential activity for allodynia. However, mainly responses in the bilateral putamen and left medial temporal gyrus were related to the magnitude of allodynia. Both DMA and spontaneous pain perceptions were best represented within the same sub-cortical structures but with minimal overlap, implying that PHN pain modulates behavioral learning and hedonics. These results have important clinical implications regarding adequate therapy. PMID:18384958

  17. Activation of GRs-Akt-nNOs-NR2B signaling pathway by second dose GR agonist contributes to exacerbated hyperalgesia in a rat model of radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Yu'e; Liu, Yue; Song, Lihua; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2014-06-01

    Central Akt, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) play key roles in the development of neuropathic pain. Here we investigate the effects of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) on the expression and activation of spinal Akt, nNOS and NR2B after chronic compression of dorsal root ganglia (CCD). Thermal hyperalgesia test and mechanical allodynia test were used to measure rats after intrathecal injection of GR antagonist mifepristone or GR agonist dexamethasone for 21 days postoperatively. Expression of spinal Akt, nNOS, NR2B and their phosphorylation state after CCD was examined by western blot. The effects of intrathecal treatment with dexamethasone or mifepristone on nociceptive behaviors and the corresponding expression of Akt, nNOS and NR2B in spinal cord were also investigated. Intrathecal injection of mifepristone or dexamethasone inhibited PWMT and PWTL in CCD rats. However, hyperalgesia was induced by intrathecal injection of dexamethasone on days 12 to 14 after surgery. Treatment of dexamethasone increased the expression and phosphorylation levels of spinal Akt, nNOS, GR and NR2B time dependently, whereas administration of mifepristone downregulated the expression of these proteins significantly. GRs activated spinal Akt-nNOS/NR2B pathway play important roles in the development of neuropathic pain in a time-dependent manner.

  18. The Glt1 glutamate receptor mediates the establishment and perpetuation of chronic visceral pain in an animal model of stress-induced bladder hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, A Lenore; Jellison, Forrest C; Lee, Una J; Bradesi, Sylvie; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2016-04-01

    Psychological stress exacerbates interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), a lower urinary tract pain disorder characterized by increased urinary frequency and bladder pain. Glutamate (Glu) is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter modulating nociceptive networks. Glt1, an astrocytic transporter responsible for Glu clearance, is critical in pain signaling termination. We sought to examine the role of Glt1 in stress-induced bladder hyperalgesia and urinary frequency. In a model of stress-induced bladder hyperalgesia with high construct validity to human IC/BPS, female Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were subjected to 10-day water avoidance stress (WAS). Referred hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia were assessed after WAS with von Frey filaments. After behavioral testing, we assessed Glt1 expression in the spinal cord by immunoblotting. We also examined the influence of dihydrokainate (DHK) and ceftriaxone (CTX), which downregulate and upregulate Glt1, respectively, on pain development. Rats exposed to WAS demonstrated increased voiding frequency, increased colonic motility, anxiety-like behaviors, and enhanced visceral hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia. This behavioral phenotype correlated with decreases in spinal Glt1 expression. Exogenous Glt1 downregulation by DHK resulted in hyperalgesia similar to that following WAS. Exogenous Glt1 upregulation via intraperitoneal CTX injection inhibited the development of and reversed preexisting pain and voiding dysfunction induced by WAS. Repeated psychological stress results in voiding dysfunction and hyperalgesia that correlate with altered central nervous system glutamate processing. Manipulation of Glu handling altered the allodynia developing after psychological stress, implicating Glu neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of bladder hyperalgesia in the WAS model of IC/BPS.

  19. One night of total sleep deprivation promotes a state of generalized hyperalgesia: a surrogate pain model to study the relationship of insomnia and pain.

    PubMed

    Schuh-Hofer, Sigrid; Wodarski, Rachel; Pfau, Doreen B; Caspani, Ombretta; Magerl, Walter; Kennedy, Jeffrey D; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2013-09-01

    Sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in chronic pain patients. Understanding their relationship has become an important research topic since poor sleep and pain are assumed to closely interact. To date, human experimental studies exploring the impact of sleep disruption/deprivation on pain perception have yielded conflicting results. This inconsistency may be due to the large heterogeneity of study populations and study protocols previously used. In addition, none of the previous studies investigated the entire spectrum of nociceptive modalities. To address these shortcomings, a standardized comprehensive quantitative sensory protocol was used in order to compare the somatosensory profile of 14 healthy subjects (6 female, 8 male, 23.5 ± 4.1 year; mean ± SD) after a night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) and a night of habitual sleep in a cross-over design. One night of TSD significantly increased the level of sleepiness (P<0.001) and resulted in higher scores of the State Anxiety Inventory (P<0.01). In addition to previously reported hyperalgesia to heat (P<0.05) and blunt pressure (P<0.05), study participants developed hyperalgesia to cold (P<0.01) and increased mechanical pain sensitivity to pinprick stimuli (P<0.05) but no changes in temporal summation. Paradoxical heat sensations or dynamic mechanical allodynia were absent. TSD selectively modulated nociception, since detection thresholds of non-nociceptive modalities remained unchanged. Our findings show that a single night of TSD is able to induce generalized hyperalgesia and to increase State Anxiety scores. In the future, TSD may serve as a translational pain model to elucidate the pathomechanisms underlying the hyperalgesic effect of sleep disturbances.

  20. Differential coding of hyperalgesia in the human brain: a functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Maihöfner, Christian; Handwerker, Hermann O

    2005-12-01

    Neuropathic pain can be both ongoing or stimulus-induced. Stimulus-induced pain, also known as hyperalgesia, can be differentiated into primary and secondary hyperalgesia. The former results from sensitization of peripheral nociceptive structures, the latter involves sensitization processes within the central nervous system (CNS). Hypersensitivity towards heat stimuli, i.e. thermal hyperalgesia, is a key feature of primary hyperalgesia, whereas secondary hyperalgesia is characterized by hypersensitivity towards mechanical (e.g. pin-prick) stimulation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated if brain activation patterns associated with primary and secondary hyperalgesia might differ. Thermal and pin-prick hyperalgesia were induced on the left forearm in 12 healthy subjects by topical capsaicin (2.5%, 30 min) application. Equal pain intensities of both hyperalgesia types were applied during fMRI experiments, based on previous quantitative sensory testing. Simultaneously, subjects had to rate the unpleasantness of stimulus-related pain. Pin-prick hyperalgesia (i.e. subtraction of brain activations during pin-prick stimulation before and after capsaicin exposure) led to activations of primary and secondary somatosensory cortices (S1 and S2), associative-somatosensory cortices, insula and superior and inferior frontal cortices (SFC, IFC). Brain areas activated during thermal hyperalgesia (i.e. subtraction of brain activations during thermal stimulation before and after capsaicin exposure) were S1 and S2, insula, associative-somatosensory cortices, cingulate cortex (GC), SFC, middle frontal cortex (MFC) and IFC. When compared to pin-prick hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia led to an increased activation of bilateral anterior insular cortices, MFC, GC (Brodmann area 24' and 32') and contralateral SFC and IFC, despite equal pain intensities. Interestingly, stronger activations of GC, contralateral MFC and anterior insula significantly correlated

  1. Evaluation of the analgesic efficacy and psychoactive effects of AZD1940, a novel peripherally acting cannabinoid agonist, in human capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, Jarkko; Annas, Peter; Huizar, Karin; Clarke, Cyril; Zettergren, Annika; Karlsten, Rolf; Segerdahl, Märta

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of AZD1940, a novel peripherally acting cannabinoid CB(1) /CB(2) receptor agonist, on capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia, as well as on biomarkers of cannabinoid central nervous system (CNS) effects. The present study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-sequence, two-period, cross-over study in 44 male healthy volunteers aged 20-45 years. The effects of two single oral doses of AZD1940 (400 and 800 μg) were compared with placebo. Pain intensity after intradermal capsaicin injections in the forearm was assessed on a continuous visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-100 mm). Primary and secondary hyperalgesia induced by application of capsaicin cream on the calf were assessed by measuring heat pain thresholds and the area of mechanical allodynia, respectively. The CNS effects were assessed at baseline and up to 24 h after dosing using a visual analogue mood scales (VAMS) for feeling 'stimulated', 'high', 'anxious', 'sedated' or 'down'. AZD1940 did not significantly attenuate ongoing pain or primary or secondary hyperalgesia compared with placebo. Mild CNS effects for AZD1940were observed on the VAMS for 'high' and 'sedated'. Dose-dependent mild-to-moderate CNS-related and gastrointestinal adverse events were reported following treatment with AZD1940. No evidence of analgesic efficacy was found for a peripherally acting CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist in the human capsaicin pain model. The emergence of mild dose-dependent CNS effects suggests that the dose range predicted from preclinical data had been attained.

  2. Brain activity for tactile allodynia: a longitudinal awake rat functional magnetic resonance imaging study tracking emergence of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Procissi, Daniel; Baria, Alex; Apkarian, A Vania

    2017-03-01

    Tactile allodynia, a condition in which innocuous mechanical stimuli are perceived as painful, is a common feature of chronic pain. However, how the brain reorganizes in relation to the emergence of tactile allodynia is still largely unknown. This may stem from the fact that experiments in humans are cross-sectional in nature, whereas animal brain imaging studies typically require anaesthesia rendering the brain incapable of consciously sensing or responding to pain. In this longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study in awake rats, we tracked brain activity with the development of tactile allodynia. Before injury, innocuous air-puff stimuli evoked a distributed sensory network of activations, including contralateral somatosensory cortices, thalamus, insula, and cingulate cortex. Moreover, the primary somatosensory cortex displayed a graded response tracking air-puff stimulus intensities. After neuropathic injury, and for stimuli in which the intensity exceeded the paw withdrawal threshold (evoking tactile allodynia), the blood oxygenation level-dependent response in the primary somatosensory cortex was equivalent to that evoked by the identical stimulus before injury. In contrast, nucleus accumbens and prefrontal brain areas displayed abnormal activity to normally innocuous stimuli when such stimuli induced tactile allodynia at 28 days after peripheral nerve injury, which had not been the case at 5 days after injury. Our data indicate that tactile allodynia-related nociceptive inputs are not observable in the primary somatosensory cortex BOLD response. Instead, our data suggest that, in time, tactile allodynia differentially engages neural circuits that regulate the affective and motivational components of pain.

  3. Peripheral neuropathic pain: a mechanism-related organizing principle based on sensory profiles.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Attal, Nadine; Binder, Andreas; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Finnerup, Nanna B; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Hüllemann, Philipp; Jensen, Troels S; Freynhagen, Rainer; Kennedy, Jeffrey D; Magerl, Walter; Mainka, Tina; Reimer, Maren; Rice, Andrew S C; Segerdahl, Märta; Serra, Jordi; Sindrup, Sören; Sommer, Claudia; Tölle, Thomas; Vollert, Jan; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2017-02-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain are heterogeneous in etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical appearance. They exhibit a variety of pain-related sensory symptoms and signs (sensory profile). Different sensory profiles might indicate different classes of neurobiological mechanisms, and hence subgroups with different sensory profiles might respond differently to treatment. The aim of the investigation was to identify subgroups in a large sample of patients with neuropathic pain using hypothesis-free statistical methods on the database of 3 large multinational research networks (German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS), IMI-Europain, and Neuropain). Standardized quantitative sensory testing was used in 902 (test cohort) and 233 (validation cohort) patients with peripheral neuropathic pain of different etiologies. For subgrouping, we performed a cluster analysis using 13 quantitative sensory testing parameters. Three distinct subgroups with characteristic sensory profiles were identified and replicated. Cluster 1 (sensory loss, 42%) showed a loss of small and large fiber function in combination with paradoxical heat sensations. Cluster 2 (thermal hyperalgesia, 33%) was characterized by preserved sensory functions in combination with heat and cold hyperalgesia and mild dynamic mechanical allodynia. Cluster 3 (mechanical hyperalgesia, 24%) was characterized by a loss of small fiber function in combination with pinprick hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia. All clusters occurred across etiologies but frequencies differed. We present a new approach of subgrouping patients with peripheral neuropathic pain of different etiologies according to intrinsic sensory profiles. These 3 profiles may be related to pathophysiological mechanisms and may be useful in clinical trial design to enrich the study population for treatment responders.

  4. Peripheral neuropathic pain: a mechanism-related organizing principle based on sensory profiles

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Attal, Nadine; Binder, Andreas; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Hüllemann, Philipp; Jensen, Troels S.; Freynhagen, Rainer; Kennedy, Jeffrey D.; Magerl, Walter; Mainka, Tina; Reimer, Maren; Rice, Andrew S.C.; Segerdahl, Märta; Serra, Jordi; Sindrup, Sören; Sommer, Claudia; Tölle, Thomas; Vollert, Jan; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with neuropathic pain are heterogeneous in etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical appearance. They exhibit a variety of pain-related sensory symptoms and signs (sensory profile). Different sensory profiles might indicate different classes of neurobiological mechanisms, and hence subgroups with different sensory profiles might respond differently to treatment. The aim of the investigation was to identify subgroups in a large sample of patients with neuropathic pain using hypothesis-free statistical methods on the database of 3 large multinational research networks (German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS), IMI-Europain, and Neuropain). Standardized quantitative sensory testing was used in 902 (test cohort) and 233 (validation cohort) patients with peripheral neuropathic pain of different etiologies. For subgrouping, we performed a cluster analysis using 13 quantitative sensory testing parameters. Three distinct subgroups with characteristic sensory profiles were identified and replicated. Cluster 1 (sensory loss, 42%) showed a loss of small and large fiber function in combination with paradoxical heat sensations. Cluster 2 (thermal hyperalgesia, 33%) was characterized by preserved sensory functions in combination with heat and cold hyperalgesia and mild dynamic mechanical allodynia. Cluster 3 (mechanical hyperalgesia, 24%) was characterized by a loss of small fiber function in combination with pinprick hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia. All clusters occurred across etiologies but frequencies differed. We present a new approach of subgrouping patients with peripheral neuropathic pain of different etiologies according to intrinsic sensory profiles. These 3 profiles may be related to pathophysiological mechanisms and may be useful in clinical trial design to enrich the study population for treatment responders. PMID:27893485

  5. Antinociceptive effects of fisetin against diabetic neuropathic pain in mice: Engagement of antioxidant mechanisms and spinal GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Li, Xin-Lin; Liu, Xin; Wang, Chuang; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Hu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral painful neuropathy is one of the most common complications in diabetes and necessitates improved treatment. Fisetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effect in previous studies. As antidepressant drugs are employed clinically to treat neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate whether fisetin possess beneficial effect on diabetic neuropathic pain and explore the mechanism(s). We subjected mice to diabetes by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (200mg/kg), and von Frey test or Hargreaves test was used to assess mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Chronic treatment of diabetic mice with fisetin not only ameliorated the established symptoms of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but also arrested the development of neuropathic pain when given at low doses. Although chronic fisetin administration did not impact on the symptom of hyperglycemia in diabetic mice, it reduced exacerbated oxidative stress in tissues of spinal cord, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and sciatic verve. Furthermore, the analgesic actions of fisetin were abolished by repetitive co-treatment with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) donor tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), but potentiated by the ROS scavenger phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN). Finally, acute blockade of spinal GABAA receptors by bicuculline totally counteracted such fisetin analgesia. These findings indicate that chronic fisetin treatment can delay or correct neuropathic hyperalgesia and allodynia in mice with type 1 diabetes. Mechanistically, the present fisetin analgesia may be associated with its antioxidant activity, and spinal GABAA receptors are likely rendered as downstream targets.

  6. Glatiramer acetate attenuates neuropathic allodynia through modulation of adaptive immune cells.

    PubMed

    Leger, Tanya; Grist, John; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Clark, Anna K; Malcangio, Marzia

    2011-05-01

    Immune-neuronal interactions contribute to neuropathic pain. Thus, immune-competent cells such as microglia may provide targets for pain relief, as may infiltrating lymphocytes. We evaluated the nature of the lymphocyte response in the spinal cord in association with the maintenance of neuropathic allodynia. We assessed T cell contribution to pain processing by targeting these cells with Glatiramer acetate (GA) which when administered systemically reversed neuropathic allodynia, inhibited microglia response and increased IL-10 and IL-4 expressing T cells in neuropathic dorsal horns. These studies advance understanding of lymphocyte contribution to chronic pain and reveal a new mechanism of T cell intervention.

  7. Activation of spinal microglia in a murine model of peripheral inflammation-induced, long-lasting contralateral allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Kristin L.; Beitz, Alvin J.; Wilcox, George L.

    2008-01-01

    Increased sensitivity contralateral to an injury has been described in humans and in various models of neuropathic pain in rats. The mechanism underlying contralateral hypersensitivity is as yet unclear, although previous studies have implicated involvement of both spinal neurons and glia. We describe the development of a temporally delayed, robust and long-lasting contralateral allodynia in mice after hindpaw injection with 4% carrageenan. Both ipsilateral and contralateral allodynia could be inhibited temporarily by intrathecally administered morphine, clonidine, or neostigmine. The delayed development of contralateral allodynia correlated with an increase in OX-42, but not GFAP immunoreactivity in the contralateral dorsal horn. Furthermore, intrathecal treatment with minocycline inhibited the development of contralateral allodynia, suggesting that microglial activation plays a key role in contralateralization, and may be a potential target for clinical intervention after injury or inflammation has occurred, to eliminate the subsequent development of extraterritorial pain. PMID:18541374

  8. Inflammatory and neuropathic cold allodynia are selectively mediated by the neurotrophic factor receptor GFRα3

    PubMed Central

    Lippoldt, Erika K.; Ongun, Serra; Kusaka, Geoffrey K.; McKemy, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue injury prompts the release of a number of proalgesic molecules that induce acute and chronic pain by sensitizing pain-sensing neurons (nociceptors) to heat and mechanical stimuli. In contrast, many proalgesics have no effect on cold sensitivity or can inhibit cold-sensitive neurons and diminish cooling-mediated pain relief (analgesia). Nonetheless, cold pain (allodynia) is prevalent in many inflammatory and neuropathic pain settings, with little known of the mechanisms promoting pain vs. those dampening analgesia. Here, we show that cold allodynia induced by inflammation, nerve injury, and chemotherapeutics is abolished in mice lacking the neurotrophic factor receptor glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family of receptors-α3 (GFRα3). Furthermore, established cold allodynia is blocked in animals treated with neutralizing antibodies against the GFRα3 ligand, artemin. In contrast, heat and mechanical pain are unchanged, and results show that, in striking contrast to the redundant mechanisms sensitizing other modalities after an insult, cold allodynia is mediated exclusively by a single molecular pathway, suggesting that artemin–GFRα3 signaling can be targeted to selectively treat cold pain. PMID:27051069

  9. Synthesis of Lipid Mediators during UVB-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Angioni, Carlo; Ferreiros, Nerea; Schuh, Claus-Dieter; Suo, Jing; Schreiber, Yannick; Dawes, John M.; Antunes-Martins, Ana; Bennett, David L. H.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral sensitization during inflammatory pain is mediated by a variety of endogenous proalgesic mediators including a number of oxidized lipids, some of which serve endogenous modulators of sensory TRP-channels. These lipids are eicosanoids of the arachidonic acid and linoleic acid pathway, as well as lysophophatidic acids (LPAs). However, their regulation pattern during inflammatory pain and their contribution to peripheral sensitization is still unclear. Here, we used the UVB-model for inflammatory pain to investigate alterations of lipid concentrations at the site of inflammation, the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) as well as the spinal dorsal horn and quantified 21 lipid species from five different lipid families at the peak of inflammation 48 hours post irradiation. We found that known proinflammatory lipids as well as lipids with unknown roles in inflammatory pain to be strongly increased in the skin, whereas surprisingly little changes of lipid levels were seen in DRGs or the dorsal horn. Importantly, although there are profound differences between the number of cytochrome (CYP) genes between mice and rats, CYP-derived lipids were regulated similarly in both species. Since TRPV1 agonists such as LPA 18∶1, 9- and 13-HODE, 5- and 12-HETE were elevated in the skin, they may contribute to thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia during UVB-induced inflammatory pain. These results may explain why some studies show relatively weak analgesic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors in UVB-induced skin inflammation, as they do not inhibit synthesis of other proalgesic lipids such as LPA 18∶1, 9-and 13-HODE and HETEs. PMID:24349046

  10. Descending facilitatory pathways from the RVM initiate and maintain bilateral hyperalgesia after muscle insult

    PubMed Central

    Tillu, DV; Gebhart, GF; Sluka, KA

    2008-01-01

    The rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) is involved in facilitation of spinal nociceptive processing and generation of hyperalgesia in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. We hypothesized that the bilateral hyperalgesia that develops after repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline is initiated and maintained by activation of descending facilitatory pathways from the RVM. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with intracerebral guide cannulae into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) or the nucleus gigantocellularis (Gi). Two injections of acidic saline into one gastrocnemius muscle 5 days apart leads to robust hyperalgesia after the second injection. Either ropivacaine (local anesthetic) or vehicle (control) was microinjected into the RVM prior to the first intramuscular acid injection, prior to the second injection, or 24h after the second injection. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds of the paw (von Frey filaments) and the muscle (tweezer) were measured before and 24h after induction of hyperalgesia. The withdrawal thresholds for both the paw (cutaneous secondary hyperalgesia) and muscle (primary hyperalgesia) were decreased 24h after the second intramuscular acid injection in the vehicle control groups. Administration of ropivacaine prior to the first intramuscular acid injection had no effect on development of either cutaneous or muscle hyperalgesia that develops after the second injection. However, neither cutaneous nor muscle hyperalgesia developed in the group treated with ropivacaine prior to the second intramuscular injection. Ropivacaine also significantly reversed the hyperalgesia in the group treated 24h after the second intramuscular acid injection. Thus, the RVM is critical for both the development and maintenance of hyperalgesia after muscle insult. PMID:17764841

  11. Non-Invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulation as Treatment for Trigeminal Allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Oshinsky, Michael L.; Murphy, Angela L.; Hekierski, Hugh; Cooper, Marnie; Simon, Bruce J.

    2014-01-01

    Implanted vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been used to treat seizures and depression. In this study, we explore the mechanism of action of non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) for the treatment of trigeminal allodynia. Rats were repeatedly infused with inflammatory mediators directly onto the dura, which leads to chronic trigeminal allodynia. nVNS for 2min decreases periorbital sensitivity in rats with periorbital trigeminal allodynia for up to 3.5hr after stimulation. Using microdialysis, we quantified levels of extracellular neurotransmitters in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Allodynic rats showed a 7.7±0.9 fold increase in extracellular glutamate in the TNC following i.p. administration of the chemical headache trigger, glyceryl trinitrate (GTN; 0.1mg/kg). Allodynic rats, which received nVNS, had only a 2.3±0.4 fold increase in extracellular glutamate following GTN similar to the response in control naive rats. When nVNS was delayed until 120min after GTN treatment, the high levels of glutamate in the TNC were reversed following nVNS. The nVNS stimulation parameters used in this study did not produce significant changes in blood pressure or heart rate. These data suggest that nVNS may be used to treat trigeminal allodynia. PMID:24530613

  12. Controlling the activation of the Bv8/prokineticin system reduces neuroinflammation and abolishes thermal and tactile hyperalgesia in neuropathic animals

    PubMed Central

    Maftei, D; Marconi, V; Florenzano, F; Giancotti, L A; Castelli, M; Moretti, S; Borsani, E; Rodella, L F; Balboni, G; Luongo, L; Maione, S; Sacerdote, P; Negri, L; Lattanzi, R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chemokines are involved in neuroinflammation and contribute to chronic pain processing. The new chemokine prokineticin 2 (PROK2) and its receptors (PKR1 and PKR2) have a role in inflammatory pain and immunomodulation. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of PROK2 and its receptors in neuropathic pain. Experimental Approach Effects of single, intrathecal, perineural and s.c. injections of the PKR antagonist PC1, or of 1 week s.c. treatment, on thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia was evaluated in mice with chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve (CCI). Expression and localization of PROK2 and of its receptors at peripheral and central level was evaluated 10 days after CCI, following treatment for 1 week with saline or PC1. IL-1β and IL-10 levels, along with glia activation, were evaluated. Key Results Subcutaneous, intrathecal and perineural PC1 acutely abolished the CCI-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia. At 10 days after CCI, PROK2 and its receptor PKR2 were up-regulated in nociceptors, in Schwann cells and in activated astrocytes of the spinal cord. Therapeutic treatment with PC1 (s.c., 1 week) alleviated established thermal hyperalgesia and allodynia, reduced the injury-induced overexpression of PROK2, significantly blunted nerve injury-induced microgliosis and astrocyte activation in the spinal cord and restored the physiological levels of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in periphery and in spinal cord. Conclusion and Implications The prokineticin system contributes to pain modulation via neuron–glia interaction. Sustained inhibition of the prokineticin system, at peripheral or central levels, blocked both pain symptoms and some events underlying disease progression. PMID:24902717

  13. An animal model of oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia reveals a crucial role for Nav1.6 in peripheral pain pathways.

    PubMed

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Zimmermann, Katharina; Romanovsky, Andrej A; Possani, Lourival D; Cabot, Peter J; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2013-09-01

    Cold allodynia, pain in response to cooling, occurs during or within hours of oxaliplatin infusion and is thought to arise from a direct effect of oxaliplatin on peripheral sensory neurons. To characterize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying acute oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia, we established a new intraplantar oxaliplatin mouse model that rapidly developed long-lasting cold allodynia mediated entirely through tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav pathways. Using selective inhibitors and knockout animals, we found that Nav1.6 was the key isoform involved, while thermosensitive transient receptor potential channels were not involved. Consistent with a crucial role for delayed-rectifier potassium channels in excitability in response to cold, intraplantar administration of the K(+)-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine mimicked oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia and was also inhibited by Nav1.6 blockers. Intraplantar injection of the Nav1.6 activator Cn2 elicited spontaneous pain, mechanical allodynia, and enhanced 4-aminopyridine-induced cold allodynia. These findings provide behavioural evidence for a crucial role of Nav1.6 in multiple peripheral pain pathways including cold allodynia.

  14. Persistent Nociception Triggered by Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) Is Mediated by TRPV1 and Oxidative Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Eskander, Michael A; Ruparel, Shivani; Green, Dustin P; Chen, Paul B; Por, Elaine D; Jeske, Nathaniel A; Gao, Xiaoli; Flores, Eric R; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2015-06-03

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is elevated in certain chronic pain conditions and is a sufficient stimulus to cause lasting pain in humans, but the actual mechanisms underlying the persistent effects of NGF remain incompletely understood. We developed a rat model of NGF-induced persistent thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia to determine the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and oxidative mechanisms in the persistent effects of NGF. Persistent thermal hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia require de novo protein translation and are mediated by TRPV1 and oxidative mechanisms. By comparing effects after systemic (subcutaneous), spinal (intrathecal) or hindpaw (intraplantar) injections of test compounds, we determined that TRPV1 and oxidation mediate persistent thermal hypersensitivity via peripheral and spinal sites of action and mechanical allodynia via only a spinal site of action. Therefore, NGF-evoked thermal and mechanical allodynia are mediated by spatially distinct mechanisms. NGF treatment evoked sustained increases in peripheral and central TRPV1 activity, as demonstrated by increased capsaicin-evoked nocifensive responses, increased calcitonin gene-related peptide release from hindpaw skin biopsies, and increased capsaicin-evoked inward current and membrane expression of TRPV1 protein in dorsal root ganglia neurons. Finally, we showed that NGF treatment increased concentrations of linoleic and arachidonic-acid-derived oxidized TRPV1 agonists in spinal cord and skin biopsies. Furthermore, increases in oxidized TRPV1-active lipids were reduced by peripheral and spinal injections of compounds that completely blocked persistent nociception. Collectively, these data indicate that NGF evokes a persistent nociceptive state mediated by increased TRPV1 activity and oxidative mechanisms, including increased production of oxidized lipid TRPV1 agonists.

  15. ASIC3 is required for development of fatigue-induced hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Nicholas S.; Brito, Renan G.; Oliveira Fusaro, Maria Cláudia G; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    An acute bout of exercise can exacerbate pain, hindering participation in regular exercise and daily activities. The mechanisms underlying pain in response to acute exercise are poorly understood. We hypothesized that proton accumulation during muscle fatigue activates ASIC3 on muscle nociceptors to produce hyperalgesia. We investigated the role of ASIC3 using genetic and pharmacological approaches in a model of fatigue-enhanced hyperalgesia. This model uses two injections of pH 5.0 saline into muscle in combination with an electrically-induced fatigue of the same muscle just prior to the second injection of acid to induce mechanical hyperalgesia. We show a significant decrease in muscle force and decrease in muscle pH after 6 minutes of electrical stimulation. Genetic deletion of ASIC3 using knockout mice and pharmacological blockade of ASIC3 with APETx2 in muscle prevents the fatigue-enhanced hyperalgesia. However, ASIC3−/− mice and APETx2 have no effect on the fatigue response. Genetic deletion of ASIC3 in primary afferents innervating muscle using an HSV-1 expressing miRNA to ASIC3 surprisingly had no effect on the development of the hyperalgesia. Muscle fatigue increased the number of macrophages in muscle, and removal of macrophages from muscle with clodronate liposomes prevented the development of fatigue-enhanced hyperalgesia. Thus, these data suggest that fatigue reduces pH in muscle that subsequently activates ASIC3 on macrophages to enhance hyperalgesia to muscle insult. PMID:25577172

  16. Fibromyalgia--from syndrome to disease. Overview of pathogenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Karl G

    2003-05-01

    According to the classification criteria proposed by the American College of Rheumatology, fibromyalgia is a long-standing multifocal pain condition combined with generalised allodynia/hyperalgesia. It is the generalised allodynia/hyperalgesia that distinguishes fibromyalgia from other conditions with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Central sensitisation of nociceptive neurons in the dorsal horn due to activation of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors and disinhibition of pain due to deficient function of the descending inhibitory system are probable pathogenic factors for allodynia/hyperalgesia. Furthermore, chronic pain is a chronic emotional and physical stressor. Chronic stress and chronic sleep disturbance are not specific for fibromyalgia but could be the causes of symptoms like fatigue, cognitive difficulties and other stress-related symptoms. They may also cause neuroendocrinological and immunological aberrations.

  17. Spinal 12-lipoxygenase-derived hepoxilin A3 contributes to inflammatory hyperalgesia via activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Gregus, Ann M; Doolen, Suzanne; Dumlao, Darren S; Buczynski, Matthew W; Takasusuki, Toshifumi; Fitzsimmons, Bethany L; Hua, Xiao-Ying; Taylor, Bradley K; Dennis, Edward A; Yaksh, Tony L

    2012-04-24

    Peripheral inflammation initiates changes in spinal nociceptive processing leading to hyperalgesia. Previously, we demonstrated that among 102 lipid species detected by LC-MS/MS analysis in rat spinal cord, the most notable increases that occur after intraplantar carrageenan are metabolites of 12-lipoxygenases (12-LOX), particularly hepoxilins (HXA(3) and HXB(3)). Thus, we examined involvement of spinal LOX enzymes in inflammatory hyperalgesia. In the current work, we found that intrathecal (IT) delivery of the LOX inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid prevented the carrageenan-evoked increase in spinal HXB(3) at doses that attenuated the associated hyperalgesia. Furthermore, IT delivery of inhibitors targeting 12-LOX (CDC, Baicalein), but not 5-LOX (Zileuton) dose-dependently attenuated tactile allodynia. Similarly, IT delivery of 12-LOX metabolites of arachidonic acid 12(S)-HpETE, 12(S)-HETE, HXA(3), or HXB(3) evoked profound, persistent tactile allodynia, but 12(S)-HpETE and HXA(3) produced relatively modest, transient heat hyperalgesia. The pronociceptive effect of HXA(3) correlated with enhanced release of Substance P from primary sensory afferents. Importantly, HXA(3) triggered sustained mobilization of calcium in cells stably overexpressing TRPV1 or TRPA1 receptors and in acutely dissociated rodent sensory neurons. Constitutive deletion or antagonists of TRPV1 (AMG9810) or TRPA1 (HC030031) attenuated this action. Furthermore, pretreatment with antihyperalgesic doses of AMG9810 or HC030031 reduced spinal HXA(3)-evoked allodynia. These data indicate that spinal HXA(3) is increased by peripheral inflammation and promotes initiation of facilitated nociceptive processing through direct activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 at central terminals.

  18. Spinal 12-lipoxygenase-derived hepoxilin A3 contributes to inflammatory hyperalgesia via activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gregus, Ann M.; Doolen, Suzanne; Dumlao, Darren S.; Buczynski, Matthew W.; Takasusuki, Toshifumi; Fitzsimmons, Bethany L.; Hua, Xiao-Ying; Taylor, Bradley K.; Dennis, Edward A.; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation initiates changes in spinal nociceptive processing leading to hyperalgesia. Previously, we demonstrated that among 102 lipid species detected by LC-MS/MS analysis in rat spinal cord, the most notable increases that occur after intraplantar carrageenan are metabolites of 12-lipoxygenases (12-LOX), particularly hepoxilins (HXA3 and HXB3). Thus, we examined involvement of spinal LOX enzymes in inflammatory hyperalgesia. In the current work, we found that intrathecal (IT) delivery of the LOX inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid prevented the carrageenan-evoked increase in spinal HXB3 at doses that attenuated the associated hyperalgesia. Furthermore, IT delivery of inhibitors targeting 12-LOX (CDC, Baicalein), but not 5-LOX (Zileuton) dose-dependently attenuated tactile allodynia. Similarly, IT delivery of 12-LOX metabolites of arachidonic acid 12(S)-HpETE, 12(S)-HETE, HXA3, or HXB3 evoked profound, persistent tactile allodynia, but 12(S)-HpETE and HXA3 produced relatively modest, transient heat hyperalgesia. The pronociceptive effect of HXA3 correlated with enhanced release of Substance P from primary sensory afferents. Importantly, HXA3 triggered sustained mobilization of calcium in cells stably overexpressing TRPV1 or TRPA1 receptors and in acutely dissociated rodent sensory neurons. Constitutive deletion or antagonists of TRPV1 (AMG9810) or TRPA1 (HC030031) attenuated this action. Furthermore, pretreatment with antihyperalgesic doses of AMG9810 or HC030031 reduced spinal HXA3-evoked allodynia. These data indicate that spinal HXA3 is increased by peripheral inflammation and promotes initiation of facilitated nociceptive processing through direct activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 at central terminals. PMID:22493235

  19. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  20. Opioid induced hyperalgesia in anesthetic settings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Pain is difficult to investigate and difficult to treat, in part, because of problems in quantification and assessment. The use of opioids, combined with classic anesthetics to maintain hemodynamic stability by controlling responses to intraoperative painful events has gained significant popularity in the anesthetic field. However, several side effects profiles concerning perioperative use of opioid have been published. Over the past two decades, many concerns have arisen with respect to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which is the paradoxical effect wherein opioid usage may decrease pain thresholds and increase atypical pain unrelated to the original, preexisting pain. This brief review focuses on the evidence, mechanisms, and modulatory and pharmacologic management of OIH in order to elaborate on the clinical implication of OIH. PMID:25473457

  1. Spinal Changes of a Newly Isolated Neuropeptide Endomorphin-2 Concomitant with Vincristine-Induced Allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ben-Qing; Liu, Ji-Dong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Nan; Li, Li; Chen, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain (CNP) is the major dose-limiting factor in cancer chemotherapy. However, the neural mechanisms underlying CNP remain unclear. There is increasing evidence implicating the involvement of spinal endomorphin-2 (EM2) in neuropathic pain. In this study, we used a vincristine-evoked rat CNP model displaying mechanical allodynia and central sensitization, and observed a significant decrease in the expression of spinal EM2 in CNP. Also, while intrathecal administration of exogenous EM2 attenuated allodynia and central sensitization, the mu-opioid receptor antagonist β-funaltrexamine facilitated these events. We found that the reduction in spinal EM2 was mediated by increased activity of dipeptidylpeptidase IV, possibly as a consequence of chemotherapy-induced oxidative stress. Taken together, our findings suggest that a decrease in spinal EM2 expression causes the loss of endogenous analgesia and leads to enhanced pain sensation in CNP. PMID:24586889

  2. Inflammation mobilizes local resources to control hyperalgesia: the role of endogenous opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Alves, Daniela P; da Motta, Patrícia G; Lima, Patrícia P; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Caliari, Marcelo V; Pacheco, Daniela F; Pacheco, Cinthia F; Francischi, Janetti N; Duarte, Igor D G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the endogenous control of nociception at a peripheral level during inflammation. Using a pharmacological approach and the rat paw pressure test, we assessed the effect of an intraplantar injection of naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, and bestatin, an aminopeptidase inhibitor, on hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan, which mimics an inflammatory process, or prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), which directly sensitizes nociceptors. Naloxone induced a significant and dose-dependent (25, 50 or 100 μg) increase in carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia, but not PGE(2)-induced hyperalgesia. Bestatin (400 μg/paw) significantly counteracted carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia, inducing an increase in the nociceptive threshold compared to control, but it did not modify hyperalgesia induced by PGE(2) injection into the rat paw. Positive β-endorphin immunoreactivity was increased in paw inflammation induced by carrageenan in comparison with the control group. However, PGE(2) did not significantly alter the immunostained area. These results provide evidence for activation of the endogenous opioidergic system during inflammation and indicate that this system regulates hyperalgesia through a negative feedback mechanism, modulating it at a peripheral level.

  3. Effect of systemic and intrathecal gabapentin on allodynia in a new rat model of postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2005-04-25

    Patients with postherpetic neuralgia often have an increased sensitivity to a tactile stimulus but impaired thermal sensitivity in the same affected dermatomes. We recently found that depletion of capsaicin-sensitive afferents by systemic treatment with a potent TRPV1 agonist, resiniferotoxin, in adult rats produces long-lasting paradoxical changes in mechanical and thermal sensitivities, which resemble the unique clinical features of postherpetic neuralgia. The anticonvulsant gabapentin is effective in reducing the subjective pain score in patients with postherpetic neuralgia. In this study, we quantified the potential effect of systemic and intrathecal gabapentin on tactile allodynia induced by resiniferotoxin in rats. Intraperitoneal injection of 200 microg/kg resiniferotoxin produced a rapid and sustained increase in the paw withdrawal latency to a radiant heat stimulus. Profound tactile allodynia developed in all the resiniferotoxin-treated rats within 3 weeks. Intraperitoneal injection of 30-60 mg/kg of gabapentin in resiniferotoxin-treated rats significantly increased the withdrawal threshold in response to von Frey filaments. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of 10-30 microg of gabapentin also produced a significant effect on the mechanical withdrawal threshold in all resiniferotoxin-treated rats. These data provide complementary new information that gabapentin administered systemically and spinally can effectively relieve tactile allodynia in this animal model of postherpetic neuralgia.

  4. A novel method for modeling facial allodynia associated with migraine in awake and freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Wieseler, Julie; Ellis, Amanda; Sprunger, David; Brown, Kim; McFadden, Andrew; Mahoney, John; Rezvani, Niloofar; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2009-01-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder that induces debilitating headaches associated with multiple symptoms including facial allodynia, characterized by heightened responsivity to normally innocuous mechanical stimuli. It is now well accepted that immune activation and immune-derived inflammatory mediators enhance pain responsivity, including in the trigeminal system. Nociceptive (“pain” responsive) trigeminal nerves densely innervate the cranial meninges. We have recently proposed that the meninges may serve as a previously unidentified, key interface between the peripheral immune system and the CNS with potential implications for understanding underlying migraine mechanisms. Our focus here is the development of a model for facial allodynia associated with migraine. We developed a model wherein an indwelling catheter is placed between the skull and dura, allowing immunogenic stimuli to be administered over the dura in awake and freely moving rats. Since the catheter does not contact the brain itself, any proinflammatory cytokines induced following manipulation derive from resident or recruited meningeal immune cells. While surgery alone does not alter immune activation markers, TNF or IL6 mRNA and/or protein, it does decrease gene expression and increase protein expression of IL-1 at 4 days after surgery. Using this model we show the induction of facial allodynia in response to supradural administration of either the HIV glycoprotein gp120 or inflammatory soup (bradykinin, histamine, serotonin, and prostaglandin E2), and the induction of hindpaw allodynia in our model after inflammatory soup. This model allows time and dose dependent assessment of the relationship between changes in meningeal inflammation and corresponding exaggerated pain behaviors. PMID:19837113

  5. Histamine-induced itch converts into pain in neuropathic hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Baron, R; Schwarz, K; Kleinert, A; Schattschneider, J; Wasner, G

    2001-11-16

    Physiologically, itch and pain are transmitted in separate specific peripheral C-units and central afferent pathways. Some neuropathic pain patients with intact but sensitized (irritable) primary C-nociceptors have spontaneous pain, heat hyperalgesia, static and dynamic mechanical hyperalgesia. The question was whether cutaneous histamine application induces pain in these patients. For comparison histamine was applied into normal skin experimentally sensitized by capsaicin. Histamine application in the capsaicin-induced primary or secondary hyperalgesic skin did not change the intensity and quality of capsaicin pain. Itch was profoundly inhibited. Conversely, histamine application in neuropathic skin induced severe increase in spontaneous burning pain but no itch. In neuropathies irritable nociceptors may express histamine receptors or induce central sensitization to histaminergic stimuli so that itch converts into pain.

  6. Carbamazepine Withdrawal-induced Hyperalgesia in Chronic Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhenyu; Yang, Bing; Yang, Bin; Shi, Le; Sun, Qing-Li; Sun, A-Ping; Lu, Lin; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Rongsheng; Zhai, Suodi

    2015-11-01

    Combined pharmacological treatments are the most used approach for neuropathic pain. Carbamazepine, an antiepileptic agent, is generally used as a third-line treatment for neuropathic pain and can be considered an option only when patients have not responded to the first- and second-line medications. In the case presented herein, a patient with neuropathic pain was treated using a combined pharmacological regimen. The patient's pain deteriorated, despite increasing the doses of opioids, when carbamazepine was discontinued, potentially because carbamazepine withdrawal disrupted the balance that was achieved by the multifaceted pharmacological regimen, thus inducing hyperalgesia. Interestingly, when carbamazepine was prescribed again, the patient's pain was successfully managed. Animal research has reported that carbamazepine can potentiate the analgesic effectiveness of morphine in rodent models of neuropathic pain and postoperative pain. This clinical case demonstrates that carbamazepine may have a synergistic effect on the analgesic effectiveness of morphine and may inhibit or postpone opioid-induced hyperalgesia. We postulate that a probable mechanism of action of carbamazepine may involve -aminobutyric acid-ergic potentiation and the interruption of glutamatergic function via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Further research is warranted to clarify the analgesic action of carbamazepine and its potential use for the prevention of opioid-induced hyperalgesia in chronic neuropathic pain patients.

  7. Pharmacological modulation of secondary mediator systems--cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP--on inflammatory hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Cunha, F Q; Teixeira, M M; Ferreira, S H

    1999-06-01

    1. The objective of the present paper was to evaluate the relevance of neuronal balance of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP concentration for functional regulation of nociceptor sensitivity during inflammation. 2. Injection of PGE2 (10-100 ng paw-1) evoked a dose-dependent hyperalgesic effect which was mediated via a cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase (PKA) inasmuch as hyperalgesia was blocked by the PKA inhibitor H89. 3. The PDE4 inhibitor rolipram and RP73401, but not PDE3 and PDE5 inhibitors potentiated the hyperalgesic effects of PGE2. The hyperalgesic effect of dopamine was also enhanced by rolipram. Moreover, rolipram significantly potentiated hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan, bradykinin, TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-8. This suggests that neuronal cyclic AMP mediates the prostanoid and sympathetic components of mechanical hyperalgesia. Moreover, in the neuron cyclic AMP is mainly metabolized by PDE4. 4. To examine the role of the NO/cyclic GMP pathway in modulating mechanical hyperalgesia, we tested the effects of the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ. This substance counteracts the inhibitory effects of the NO donor, SNAP, on the hyperalgesia induced by PGE2. 5. The ODQ potentiated hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan, bradykinin, TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-8. In contrast, ODQ had no significant effect on the hyperalgesia induced by PGE2 and dopamine. This indicates that the hyperalgesic cytokines may activate soluble guanylate cyclase, which down-regulate the ability of these substances to cause hyperalgesia. This event appears not to be mediated by prostaglandin or dopamine. 6. In conclusion, the results presented in this paper confirm an association between (i) hyperalgesia and elevated levels of cyclic AMP as well as (ii) antinociception and elevated levels of cyclic GMP. The intracellular levels of cyclic AMP that enhance hyperalgesia are controlled by the PDE4 isoform and appear to result in activation of protein kinase A whereas the

  8. Motor cortex stimulation reduces hyperalgesia in an animal model of central pain.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Jessica M; Ji, Yadong; Masri, Radi

    2011-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of the primary motor cortex has been used since 1991 to treat chronic neuropathic pain. Since its inception, motor cortex stimulation (MCS) treatment has had varied clinical outcomes. Until this point, there has not been a systematic study of the stimulation parameters that most effectively treat chronic pain, or of the mechanisms by which MCS relieves pain. Here, using a rodent model of central pain, we perform a systematic study of stimulation parameters used for MCS and investigate the mechanisms by which MCS reduces hyperalgesia. Specifically, we study the role of the inhibitory nucleus zona incerta (ZI) in mediating the analgesic effects of MCS. In animals with mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, we find that stimulation at 50 μA, 50 Hz, and 300 μs square pulses for 30 minutes is sufficient to reverse mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. We also find that stimulation of the ZI mimics the effects of MCS and that reversible inactivation of ZI blocks the effects of MCS. These findings suggest that the reduction of hyperalgesia may be due to MCS effects on ZI. In an animal model of central pain syndrome, motor cortex stimulation reduces hyperalgesia by activating zona incerta and therefore restoring inhibition in the thalamus.

  9. Analgesic efficacy of tramadol, pregabalin and ibuprofen in menthol-evoked cold hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Altis, Kosta; Schmidtko, Achim; Angioni, Carlo; Kuczka, Karina; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Lötsch, Jörn; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2009-12-15

    We investigated the analgesic efficacy of single doses of ibuprofen, tramadol and pregabalin in menthol-evoked cold pain in a randomized, placebo-controlled four-way cross-over study in 20 healthy volunteers. Tramadol 100mg significantly reduced menthol-evoked cold hyperalgesia. Effects of ibuprofen 600mg and pregabalin 100mg were not significant. Analgesic effects of tramadol were associated with minor side effects, particularly fatigue and nausea. Minor side effects also accompanied analgesic effects of pregabalin and ibuprofen in subjects responding to these drugs, mostly fatigue, dizziness and difficulties to concentrate for pregabalin and gastric upset for ibuprofen. Five out of 18 subjects had a 50% reduction of cold hyperalgesia with tramadol, three of these additionally responded to pregabalin, and two with all three drugs. The numbers needed to treat (NNT >or= 50% for tramadol 4.5, for pregabalin 9) largely agree with the reported efficacy of tramadol and of moderate dosages of pregabalin in patients with peripheral or central neuropathic pain suggesting that menthol-evoked cold pain hypersensitivity may represent a valid model for neuropathic pain, particularly cold allodynia.

  10. Red nucleus glutamate facilitates neuropathic allodynia induced by spared nerve injury through non-NMDA and metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Ding, Cui-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Tao; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Jun-Yang

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that glutamate plays an important role in the development of pathological pain. This study investigates the expression changes of glutamate and the roles of different types of glutamate receptors in the red nucleus (RN) in the development of neuropathic allodynia induced by spared nerve injury (SNI). Immunohistochemistry indicated that glutamate was constitutively expressed in the RN of normal rats. After SNI, the expression levels of glutamate were significantly increased in the RN at 1 week and reached the highest level at 2 weeks postinjury compared with sham-operated and normal rats. The RN glutamate was colocalized with neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes but not microglia under physiological and neuropathic pain conditions. To elucidate further the roles of the RN glutamate and different types of glutamate receptors in the development of neuropathic allodynia, antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), non-NMDA, or metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) were microinjected into the RN contralateral to the nerve-injury side of rats with SNI, and the paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) was dynamically assessed with von Frey filaments. Microinjection of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 into the RN did not show any effect on SNI-induced mechanical allodynia. However, microinjection of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3(1H,4H)-dione or the mGluR antagonist (±)-α-methyl-(4-carboxyphenyl) glycine into the RN significantly increased the PWT and alleviated SNI-induced mechanical allodynia. These findings suggest that RN glutamate is involved in regulating neuropathic pain and facilitates the development of SNI-induced neuropathic allodynia. The algesic effect of glutamate is transmitted by the non-NMDA glutamate receptor and mGluRs.

  11. Elite swimmers with and without unilateral shoulder pain: mechanical hyperalgesia and active/latent muscle trigger points in neck-shoulder muscles.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Lozano, A; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, C; Calderón-Soto, C; Domingo-Camara, A; Madeleine, P; Arroyo-Morales, M

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate the presence of mechanical hypersensitivity and active trigger points (TrPs) in the neck-shoulder muscles in elite swimmers with/without unilateral shoulder pain. Seventeen elite swimmers with shoulder pain; 18 swimmers without shoulder pain; and 15 elite athletes matched controls were recruited. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed over the levator scapulae, sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius, infraspinatus, scalene, subscapularis and tibialis anterior muscles. TrPs in the levator scapulae, upper trapezius, infraspinatus, scalene, sternocleidomastoid and subscapularis muscles were also explored. Swimmers with shoulder pain showed significant lower PPT in all muscles compared with controls (P<0.01). No differences in PPT were found between swimmers with and without shoulder pain, underlining widespread mechanical hypersensitivity. The mean number of TrPs for elite swimmer with and without shoulder pain was, respectively, 4.7 ± 1 (2.1 ± 1.5 active; 2.6 ± 1.4 latent) and 4.7 ± 1.3 (1.3 ± 1.3 active; 3.4 ± 1.5 latent), whereas healthy athletes only showed latent TrPs (2.4 ± 1.2). Elite swimmers with shoulder pain showed higher number of active TrPs than swimmers without pain, whereas it was the opposite for the number of latent muscle TrP (P<0.05). The reported mechanical hypersensitivity suggests that active TrPs play a role in the development of shoulder pain in elite swimmers.

  12. Inflammation enhances Y1 receptor signaling, neuropeptide Y-mediated inhibition of hyperalgesia, and substance P release from primary afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K.; Fu, Weisi; Kuphal, Karen E.; Stiller, Carl-Olav; Winter, Michelle K.; Chen, Wenling; Corder, Gregory F.; Urban, Janice H.; McCarson, Kenneth E.; Marvizon, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is present in the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn and inhibits spinal nociceptive processing, but the mechanisms underlying its anti-hyperalgesic actions are unclear. We hypothesized that NPY acts at neuropeptide Y1 receptors in dorsal horn to decrease nociception by inhibiting substance P (SP) release, and that these effects are enhanced by inflammation. To evaluate SP release, we used microdialysis and neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization in rat. NPY decreased capsaicin-evoked SP-like immunoreactivity in microdialysate of the dorsal horn. NPY also decreased non-noxious stimulus (paw brush)-evoked NK1R internalization (as well as mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical and cold allodynia) after intraplantar injection of carrageenan. Similarly, in rat spinal cord slices with dorsal root attached, [Leu31, Pro34]-NPY inhibited dorsal root stimulus-evoked NK1R internalization. In rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, Y1 receptors colocalized extensively with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). In dorsal horn neurons, Y1 receptors were extensively expressed and this may have masked detection of terminal co-localization with CGRP or SP. To determine whether the pain inhibitory actions of Y1 receptors are enhanced by inflammation, we administered [Leu31, Pro34]-NPY after intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in rat. We found that [Leu31, Pro34]-NPY reduced paw clamp-induced NK1R internalization in CFA rats but not uninjured controls. To determine the contribution of increased Y1 receptor-G protein coupling, we measured [35S]GTPγS binding simulated by [Leu31, Pro34]-NPY in mouse dorsal horn. CFA inflammation increased the affinity of Y1 receptor G-protein coupling. We conclude that Y1 receptors contribute to the anti-hyperalgesic effects of NPY by mediating inhibition of SP release, and that Y1 receptor signaling in the dorsal horn is enhanced during inflammatory nociception. PMID:24184981

  13. Ligation of mouse L4 and L5 spinal nerves produces robust allodynia without major motor function deficit.

    PubMed

    Ye, Gui-Lan; Savelieva, Katerina V; Vogel, Peter; Baker, Kevin B; Mason, Sara; Lanthorn, Thomas H; Rajan, Indrani

    2015-01-01

    Spinal nerve L5/L6 ligation (SNL) in rats has become the standard for mechanistic studies of peripheral neuropathy and screening for novel analgesics. Conventional SNL in our hybrid mice resulted in a wide range of allodynia. Anatomical evaluation indicated that a variable number of lumbar vertebrae existed, resulting in L4/L5 or L5/L6 being ligated. Surprisingly, L4/L5 ligation did not result in ipsilateral hind limb paralysis and produced robust allodynia. Following a recent report that the mouse L4 neural segment is homologous with rat L5 we generated L4, L5 or both L4 and L5 (L4/L5) ligations in C57 mice after establishing a modified set of surgical landmarks. In contrast to rats, L4 ligation in these mice did not result in hind limb paralysis. Robust allodynia was observed in all three ligation groups. Nerve degeneration confirmed that L4 and L5, respectively, are primary contributors to the tibial and sural branches of the sciatic nerve in mice. A larger von Frey sensitive area reflected the wider distribution of Wallerian degeneration in the hindlimb of L4- compared to L5-ligated mice. Ligation of mouse L4 and L5 spinal nerves produces consistent, robust neuropathic pain behaviors and is suitable as a model for investigating mechanisms of neuropathic pain and for testing of novel analgesics. Gabapentin, used as a validation drug in neuropathic pain models and as a reference compound for novel analgesics, significantly reduced allodynia in the mice tested (L4/L5 ligations). Given the ease of surgery, robust allodynia, and larger von Frey sensitive area, we conclude that combined ligation of spinal nerves L4 and L5 optimizes the SNL model in mice.

  14. Altered C-tactile processing in human dynamic tactile allodynia.

    PubMed

    Liljencrantz, Jaquette; Björnsdotter, Malin; Morrison, India; Bergstrand, Simon; Ceko, Marta; Seminowicz, David A; Cole, Jonathan; Bushnell, M Catherine; Olausson, Håkan

    2013-02-01

    Human unmyelinated (C) tactile afferents signal the pleasantness of gentle skin stroking on hairy (nonglabrous) skin. After neuronal injury, that same type of touch can elicit unpleasant sensations: tactile allodynia. The prevailing pathophysiological explanation is a spinal cord sensitization, triggered by nerve injury, which enables Aβ afferents to access pain pathways. However, a recent mouse knockout study demonstrates that C-tactile afferents are necessary for allodynia to develop, suggesting a role for not only Aβ but also C-tactile afferent signaling. To examine the contribution of C-tactile afferents to the allodynic condition in humans, we applied the heat/capsaicin model of tactile allodynia in 43 healthy subjects and in 2 sensory neuronopathy patients lacking Aβ afferents. Healthy subjects reported tactile-evoked pain, whereas the patients did not. Instead, patients reported their C-touch percept (faint sensation of pleasant touch) to be significantly weaker in the allodynic zone compared to untreated skin. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in 18 healthy subjects and in 1 scanned patient indicated that stroking in the allodynic and control zones evoked different responses in the primary cortical receiving area for thin fiber signaling, the posterior insular cortex. In addition, reduced activation in the medial prefrontal cortices, key areas for C-tactile hedonic processing, was identified. These findings suggest that dynamic tactile allodynia is associated with reduced C-tactile mediated hedonic touch processing. Nevertheless, because the patients did not develop allodynic pain, this seems dependent on Aβ signaling, at least under these experimental conditions.

  15. Spontaneous trigeminal allodynia in rats: a model of primary headache.

    PubMed

    Oshinsky, Michael L; Sanghvi, Menka M; Maxwell, Christina R; Gonzalez, Dorian; Spangenberg, Rebecca J; Cooper, Marnie; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2012-10-01

    Animal models are essential for studying the pathophysiology of headache disorders and as a screening tool for new therapies. Most animal models modify a normal animal in an attempt to mimic migraine symptoms. They require manipulation to activate the trigeminal nerve or dural nociceptors. At best, they are models of secondary headache. No existing model can address the fundamental question: How is a primary headache spontaneously initiated? In the process of obtaining baseline periorbital von Frey thresholds in a wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat, we discovered a rat with spontaneous episodic trigeminal allodynia (manifested by episodically changing periorbital pain threshold). Subsequent mating showed that the trait is inherited. Animals with spontaneous trigeminal allodynia allow us to study the pathophysiology of primary recurrent headache disorders. To validate this as a model for migraine, we tested the effects of clinically proven acute and preventive migraine treatments on spontaneous changes in rat periorbital sensitivity. Sumatriptan, ketorolac, and dihydroergotamine temporarily reversed the low periorbital pain thresholds. Thirty days of chronic valproic acid treatment prevented spontaneous changes in trigeminal allodynia. After discontinuation, the rats returned to their baseline of spontaneous episodic threshold changes. We also tested the effects of known chemical human migraine triggers. On days when the rats did not have allodynia and showed normal periorbital von Frey thresholds, glycerol trinitrate and calcitonin gene related peptide induced significant decreases in the periorbital pain threshold. This model can be used as a predictive model for drug development and for studies of putative biomarkers for headache diagnosis and treatment.

  16. TRPA1 contributes to capsaicin-induced facial cold hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kuniya; Shinoda, Masamichi; Furukawa, Akihiko; Kita, Kozue; Noma, Noboru; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-12-01

    Orofacial cold hyperalgesia is known to cause severe persistent pain in the face following trigeminal nerve injury or inflammation, and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankylin 1 (TRPA1) are thought to be involved in cold hyperalgesia. However, how these two receptors are involved in cold hyperalgesia is not fully understood. To clarify the mechanisms underlying facial cold hyperalgesia, nocifensive behaviors to cold stimulation, the expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons, and TG neuronal excitability to cold stimulation following facial capsaicin injection were examined in rats. The head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWRT) to cold stimulation of the lateral facial skin was significantly decreased following facial capsaicin injection. This reduction of HWRT was significantly recovered following local injection of TRPV1 antagonist as well as TRPA1 antagonist. Approximately 30% of TG neurons innervating the lateral facial skin expressed both TRPV1 and TRPA1, and about 64% of TRPA1-positive neurons also expressed TRPV1. The TG neuronal excitability to noxious cold stimulation was significantly increased following facial capsaicin injection and this increase was recovered by pretreatment with TRPA1 antagonist. These findings suggest that TRPA1 sensitization via TRPV1 signaling in TG neurons is involved in cold hyperalgesia following facial skin capsaicin injection.

  17. Rifaximin Alters Intestinal Bacteria and Prevents Stress-Induced Gut Inflammation and Visceral Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dabo; Gao, Jun; Gillilland, Merritt; Wu, Xiaoyin; Song, Il; Kao, John Y.; Owyang, Chung

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Rifaximin is used to treat patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders, but little is known about its therapeutic mechanism. We propose that rifaximin modulates the ileal bacterial community, reduces subclinical inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, and improves gut barrier function to reduce visceral hypersensitivity. Methods We induced visceral hyperalgesia in rats, via chronic water avoidance or repeat restraint stressors, and investigated whether rifaximin altered the gut microbiota, prevented intestinal inflammation, and improved gut barrier function. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and 454 pyrosequencing were used to analyze bacterial 16S rRNA in ileal contents from the rats. Reverse transcription, immunoblot, and histologic analyses were used to evaluate levels of cytokines, the tight junction protein occludin, and mucosal inflammation, respectively. Intestinal permeability and rectal sensitivity were measured. Results Water avoidance and repeat restraint stress each led to visceral hyperalgesia, accompanied by mucosal inflammation and impaired mucosal barrier function. Oral rifaximin altered the composition of bacterial communities in the ileum (Lactobacillus species became the most abundant) and prevented mucosal inflammation, impairment to intestinal barrier function, and visceral hyperalgesia in response to chronic stress. Neomycin also changed the composition of the ileal bacterial community (Proteobacteria became the most abundant species). Neomycin did not prevent intestinal inflammation or induction of visceral hyperalgesia induced by water avoidance stress. Conclusions Rifaximin alters the bacterial population in the ileum of rats, leading to a relative abundance of Lactobacillus. These changes prevent intestinal abnormalities and visceral hyperalgesia in response to chronic psychological stress. PMID:24161699

  18. Nerve growth factor induced hyperalgesia in the rat hind paw is dependent on circulating neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bennett, G; al-Rashed, S; Hoult, J R; Brain, S D

    1998-09-01

    The mechanisms by which nerve growth factor (NGF) induces thermal hyperalgesia and neutrophil accumulation have been investigated in the rat. Thermal nociceptive thresholds in rat hind paw were measured as the time taken for paw withdrawal from a heat source and neutrophil accumulation was measured in hind paw and dorsal skin samples using a myeloperoxidase assay. NGF (23-80 pmol intraplantar (i.pl.) injection) induced a significant (P < 0.05, n = 6-16) thermal hyperalgesia at 5 h after injection and significant neutrophil accumulation (P < 0.05, n = 6) was observed with NGF (40 pmol). In dorsal skin, where multiple samples can be assessed, intradermal (i.d.) NGF was 10-30 times less potent than interleukin-1beta in inducing neutrophil accumulation. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor ZM230487 (10 nmol co-injected with NGF) significantly attenuated neutrophil accumulation and hyperalgesia induced by NGF; unlike the histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonists (mepyramine and methysergide) which were without effect at the times measured. Furthermore, depletion of circulating neutrophils (using a rabbit anti-rat neutrophil antibody) abolished NGF induced hyperalgesia. These results indicate that neutrophils, which accumulate in response to a 5-lipoxygenase product, play a crucial role in NGF-induced hyperalgesia.

  19. Persistent visceral allodynia in rats exposed to colorectal irradiation is reversed by mesenchymal stromal cell treatment.

    PubMed

    Durand, Christelle; Pezet, Sophie; Eutamène, Hélène; Demarquay, Christelle; Mathieu, Noëlle; Moussa, Lara; Daudin, Rachel; Holler, Valérie; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien; François, Agnès; Theodorou, Vassilia; Tamarat, Radia; Benderitter, Marc; Sémont, Alexandra

    2015-08-01

    Each year, millions of people worldwide are treated for primary or recurrent pelvic malignancies, involving radiotherapy in almost 50% of cases. Delayed development of visceral complications after radiotherapy is recognized in cancer survivors. Therapeutic doses of radiation may lead to the damage of healthy tissue around the tumor and abdominal pain. Because of the lack of experimental models, the underlying mechanisms of radiation-induced long-lasting visceral pain are still unknown. This makes managing radiation-induced pain difficult, and the therapeutic strategies proposed are mostly inefficient. The aim of our study was to develop an animal model of radiation-induced visceral hypersensitivity to (1) analyze some cellular and molecular mechanisms involved and (2) to test a therapeutic strategy using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Using a single 27-Grays colorectal irradiation in rats, we showed that such exposure induces a persistent visceral allodynia that is associated with an increased spinal sensitization (enhanced p-ERK neurons), colonic neuroplasticity (as increased density of substance P nerve fibers), and colonic mast cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy. Mast cell stabilization by ketotifen provided evidence of their functional involvement in radiation-induced allodynia. Finally, intravenous injection of 1.5 million MSCs, 4 weeks after irradiation, induced a time-dependent reversion of the visceral allodynia and a reduction of the number of anatomical interactions between mast cells and PGP9.5+ nerve fibers. Moreover, unlike ketotifen, MSC treatment has the key advantage to limit radiation-induced colonic ulceration. This work provides new insights into the potential use of MSCs as cellular therapy in the treatment of pelvic radiation disease.

  20. Secondary Hyperalgesia Phenotypes Exhibit Differences in Brain Activation during Noxious Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Mads Utke; Mårtensson, Johan; Larsson, Henrik B. W.; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2015-01-01

    Noxious stimulation of the skin with either chemical, electrical or heat stimuli leads to the development of primary hyperalgesia at the site of injury, and to secondary hyperalgesia in normal skin surrounding the injury. Secondary hyperalgesia is inducible in most individuals and is attributed to central neuronal sensitization. Some individuals develop large areas of secondary hyperalgesia (high-sensitization responders), while others develop small areas (low-sensitization responders). The magnitude of each area is reproducible within individuals, and can be regarded as a phenotypic characteristic. To study differences in the propensity to develop central sensitization we examined differences in brain activity and anatomy according to individual phenotypical expression of secondary hyperalgesia by magnetic resonance imaging. Forty healthy volunteers received a first-degree burn-injury (47°C, 7 min, 9 cm2) on the non-dominant lower-leg. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia were assessed 100 min after the injury. We measured neuronal activation by recording blood-oxygen-level-dependent-signals (BOLD-signals) during mechanical noxious stimulation before burn injury and in both primary and secondary hyperalgesia areas after burn-injury. In addition, T1-weighted images were used to measure differences in gray-matter density in cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. We found significant differences in neuronal activity between high- and low-sensitization responders at baseline (before application of the burn-injury) (p < 0.05). After the burn-injury, we found significant differences between responders during noxious stimulation of both primary (p < 0.01) and secondary hyperalgesia (p ≤ 0.04) skin areas. A decreased volume of the right (p = 0.001) and left caudate nucleus (p = 0.01) was detected in high-sensitization responders in comparison to low-sensitization responders. These findings suggest that brain-structure and neuronal activation to noxious stimulation

  1. Secondary hyperalgesia phenotypes exhibit differences in brain activation during noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Pereira, Manuel Pedro; Werner, Mads Utke; Mårtensson, Johan; Larsson, Henrik B W; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2015-01-01

    Noxious stimulation of the skin with either chemical, electrical or heat stimuli leads to the development of primary hyperalgesia at the site of injury, and to secondary hyperalgesia in normal skin surrounding the injury. Secondary hyperalgesia is inducible in most individuals and is attributed to central neuronal sensitization. Some individuals develop large areas of secondary hyperalgesia (high-sensitization responders), while others develop small areas (low-sensitization responders). The magnitude of each area is reproducible within individuals, and can be regarded as a phenotypic characteristic. To study differences in the propensity to develop central sensitization we examined differences in brain activity and anatomy according to individual phenotypical expression of secondary hyperalgesia by magnetic resonance imaging. Forty healthy volunteers received a first-degree burn-injury (47 °C, 7 min, 9 cm(2)) on the non-dominant lower-leg. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia were assessed 100 min after the injury. We measured neuronal activation by recording blood-oxygen-level-dependent-signals (BOLD-signals) during mechanical noxious stimulation before burn injury and in both primary and secondary hyperalgesia areas after burn-injury. In addition, T1-weighted images were used to measure differences in gray-matter density in cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. We found significant differences in neuronal activity between high- and low-sensitization responders at baseline (before application of the burn-injury) (p < 0.05). After the burn-injury, we found significant differences between responders during noxious stimulation of both primary (p < 0.01) and secondary hyperalgesia (p ≤ 0.04) skin areas. A decreased volume of the right (p = 0.001) and left caudate nucleus (p = 0.01) was detected in high-sensitization responders in comparison to low-sensitization responders. These findings suggest that brain-structure and neuronal activation to noxious

  2. Melatonin reduces formalin-induced nociception and tactile allodynia in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Espino, Rosaura; Urquiza-Marín, Héctor; Ambriz-Tututi, Mónica; Araiza-Saldaña, Claudia Ivonne; Caram-Salas, Nadia L; Rocha-González, Héctor I; Mixcoatl-Zecuatl, Teresa; Granados-Soto, Vinicio

    2007-12-22

    The purpose of this study was to assess the antinociceptive and antiallodynic effect of melatonin as well as its possible mechanism of action in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin (50 mg/kg) injection caused hyperglycemia within 1 week. Formalin-evoked flinching was increased in diabetic rats as compared to non-diabetic rats. Oral administration of melatonin (10-300 mg/kg) dose-dependently reduced flinching behavior in diabetic rats. In addition, K-185 (a melatonin MT(2) receptor antagonist, 0.2-2 mg/kg, s.c.) completely blocked the melatonin-induced antinociception in diabetic rats, whereas that naltrexone (a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, s.c.) and naltrindole (a selective delta opioid receptor antagonist, 0.5 mg/kg, s.c.), but not 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (a selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, s.c.), partially reduced the antinociceptive effect of melatonin. Given alone K-185, naltrexone, naltrindole or 5'-guanidinonaltrindole did not modify formalin-induced nociception in diabetic rats. Four to 8 weeks after diabetes induction, tactile allodynia was observed in the streptozotocin-injected rats. On this condition, oral administration of melatonin (75-300 mg/kg) dose-dependently reduced tactile allodynia in diabetic rats. Both antinociceptive and antiallodynic effects were not related to motor changes as melatonin did not modify number of falls in the rotarod test. Results indicate that melatonin is able to reduce formalin-induced nociception and tactile allodynia in streptozotocin-injected rats. In addition, data suggest that melatonin MT(2) and delta opioid receptors may play an important role in these effects.

  3. Pioglitazone inhibits the development of hyperalgesia and sensitization of spinal nociresponsive neurons in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Ryan B.; Donahue, Renee R.; Adkins, Braxton G.; Anderson, Katie L.; Thibault, Olivier; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Thiazolidinedione drugs (TZDs) such as pioglitazone are FDA-approved for the treatment of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. However, whether TZDs reduce painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) remains unknown. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that chronic administration of pioglitazone would reduce PDN in Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDFfa/fa) rats. Compared to Zucker Lean (ZLfa/+) controls, ZDF developed: (1) elevated blood glucose, HbA1c, methylglyoxal and insulin; (2) mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia at the hindpaw; (3) increased avoidance of noxious mechanical probes in a mechanical conflict avoidance behavioral assay, the first report of a measure of affective-motivational pain-like behavior in ZDF; and (4) exaggerated lumbar dorsal horn immunohistochemical expression of pressure-evoked phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK). Seven weeks of pioglitazone (30 mg · kg−1 · d−1 in food) reduced blood glucose, HbA1c, hyperalgesia, and pERK expression in ZDF. This is the first report to reveal hyperalgesia and spinal sensitization in the same ZDF animals, both evoked by a noxious mechanical stimulus that reflects pressure pain frequently associated with clinical PDN. As pioglitazone provides the combined benefit of reducing hyperglycemia, hyperalgesia, and central sensitization, we suggest that TZDs represent an attractive pharmacotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes-associated pain. PMID:26687453

  4. Spontaneous Trigeminal Allodynia in Rats: A Model of Primary Headache

    PubMed Central

    Oshinsky, Michael L.; Sanghvi, Menka M.; Maxwell, Christina R.; Gonzalez, Dorian; Spangenberg, Rebecca J.; Cooper, Marnie; Silberstein, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Animal models are essential for studying the pathophysiology of headache disorders and as a screening tool for new therapies. Most animal models modify a normal animal in an attempt to mimic migraine symptoms. They require manipulation to activate the trigeminal nerve or dural nociceptors. At best, they are models of secondary headache. No existing model can address the fundamental question: How is a primary headache spontaneously initiated? In the process of obtaining baseline periorbital von Frey thresholds in a wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat, we discovered a rat with spontaneous episodic trigeminal allodynia (manifested by episodically changing periorbital pain threshold). Subsequent mating showed that the trait is inherited. Animals with spontaneous trigeminal allodynia allow us to study the pathophysiology of primary recurrent headache disorders. To validate this as a model for migraine, we tested the effects of clinically proven acute and preventive migraine treatments on spontaneous changes in rat periorbital sensitivity. Sumatriptan, ketorolac, and dihydroergotamine temporarily reversed the low periorbital pain thresholds. Thirty days of chronic valproic acid treatment prevented spontaneous changes in trigeminal allodynia. After discontinuation, the rats returned to their baseline of spontaneous episodic threshold changes. We also tested the effects of known chemical human migraine triggers. On days when the rats did not have allodynia and showed normal periorbital von Frey thresholds, glycerol trinitrate and calcitonin gene related peptide induced significant decreases in the periorbital pain threshold. This model can be used as a predictive model for drug development and for studies of putative biomarkers for headache diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22963523

  5. Effect of subcutaneous administration of calcium channel blockers on nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    White, D M; Cousins, M J

    1998-08-10

    Recent studies suggest that calcium contributes to peripheral neural mechanisms of hyperalgesia associated with nerve damage. In this animal behavioural study, we examined further the contribution of calcium in neuropathic pain by testing whether subcutaneous administration of either a calcium chelating agent or voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers attenuate nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation. Studies were carried out in animals with partially ligated sciatic nerves, an established animal model of neuropathic pain. The nociceptive flexion reflex was quantified using an Ugo Basile Analgesymeter. Partial nerve injury induced a significant decrease in mechanical threshold compared to the sham operated controls. Daily subcutaneous injections of the calcium chelating agent, Quin 2 (20 microgram/2.5 microliter), significantly attenuated the nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia. Similarly, SNX-111, a N-type channel blocker, also significantly attenuated the nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia. SNX-230, a P and/or Q-type channel blocker, and nifedipine, a L-type channel blocker, had no effect on the hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation. In control experiments, SNX-111 had no effect on mechanical thresholds when administered subcutaneously in either the hindpaw of normal animals or the back of the neck in nerve injury animals. This study shows that neuropathic pain involves a local calcium-dependent mechanism in the receptive field of intact neurons of an injured nerve, since it can be alleviated by subcutaneous injections of either a calcium chelating agent or SNX-111, a N-type calcium channel blocker. These agents may be effective, peripherally acting therapeutic agents for neuropathic pain.

  6. The contribution of TRPM8 and TRPA1 channels to cold allodynia and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Caspani, Ombretta; Zurborg, Sandra; Labuz, Dominika; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2009-10-08

    Cold allodynia is a common feature of neuropathic pain however the underlying mechanisms of this enhanced sensitivity to cold are not known. Recently the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPM8 and TRPA1 have been identified and proposed to be molecular sensors for cold. Here we have investigated the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 mRNA in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and examined the cold sensitivity of peripheral sensory neurons in the chronic construction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain in mice.In behavioral experiments, chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve induced a hypersensitivity to both cold and the TRPM8 agonist menthol that developed 2 days post injury and remained stable for at least 2 weeks. Using quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization we examined the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 in DRG. Both channels displayed significantly reduced expression levels after injury with no change in their distribution pattern in identified neuronal subpopulations. Furthermore, in calcium imaging experiments, we detected no alterations in the number of cold or menthol responsive neurons in the DRG, or in the functional properties of cold transduction following injury. Intriguingly however, responses to the TRPA1 agonist mustard oil were strongly reduced.Our results indicate that injured sensory neurons do not develop abnormal cold sensitivity after chronic constriction injury and that alterations in the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 are unlikely to contribute directly to the pathogenesis of cold allodynia in this neuropathic pain model.

  7. Antagonism of the Prokineticin System Prevents and Reverses Allodynia and Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Mara; Amodeo, Giada; Negri, Lucia; Lattanzi, Roberta; Maftei, Daniela; Gotti, Cecilia; Pistillo, Francesco; Onnis, Valentina; Congu, Cenzo; Panerai, Alberto E.; Sacerdote, Paola; Franchi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a severe diabetes complication and its treatment is not satisfactory. It is associated with neuroinflammation-related events that participate in pain generation and chronicization. Prokineticins are a new family of chemokines that has emerged as critical players in immune system, inflammation and pain. We investigated the role of prokineticins and their receptors as modulators of neuropathic pain and inflammatory responses in experimental diabetes. In streptozotocin-induced-diabetes in mice, the time course expression of prokineticin and its receptors was evaluated in spinal cord and sciatic nerves, and correlated with mechanical allodynia. Spinal cord and sciatic nerve pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were measured as protein and mRNA, and spinal cord GluR subunits expression studied. The effect of preventive and therapeutic treatment with the prokineticin receptor antagonist PC1 on behavioural and biochemical parameters was evaluated. Peripheral immune activation was assessed measuring macrophage and T-helper cytokine production. An up-regulation of the Prokineticin system was present in spinal cord and nerves of diabetic mice, and correlated with allodynia. Therapeutic PC1 reversed allodynia while preventive treatment blocked its development. PC1 normalized prokineticin levels and prevented the up-regulation of GluN2B subunits in the spinal cord. The antagonist restored the pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance altered in spinal cord and nerves and also reduced peripheral immune system activation in diabetic mice, decreasing macrophage proinflammatory cytokines and the T-helper 1 phenotype. The prokineticin system contributes to altered sensitivity in diabetic neuropathy and its inhibition blocked both allodynia and inflammatory events underlying disease. PMID:26730729

  8. Functional brain mapping using specific sensory-circuit stimulation and a theoretical graph network analysis in mice with neuropathic allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Komaki, Yuji; Hikishima, Keigo; Shibata, Shinsuke; Konomi, Tsunehiko; Seki, Fumiko; Yamada, Masayuki; Miyasaka, Naoyuki; Fujiyoshi, Kanehiro; Okano, Hirotaka J.; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Allodynia, a form of neuropathic pain, is defined as pain in response to a non-nociceptive stimulus. The brain regions responsible for pain, which are not normally activated, can be activated in allodynic mice by providing a suitable stimulus to Aβ-fibers, which transmit signals from tactile sensory fibers. Functional MRI (fMRI) can be used to objectively observe abnormal brain activation. In the present study, fMRI was conducted to investigate allodynia in mice; allodynia was generated by surgical injury at the L4 spinal nerve root, thus selectively stimulating sensory nerve fibers. In intact mice, only the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) was activated by stimulation of Aβ-fibers. Meanwhile, allodynic mice showed significantly higher BOLD signals in the anterior cingulate area (ACA) and thalamus. Using resting state fMRI, both degree and eigenvector centrality were significantly decreased in the contralateral S1, clustering coefficient and local efficiency were significantly increased in the ACA, and betweenness centrality was significantly higher in the ventral posterolateral nucleus of the thalamus. These results suggest that the observed abnormal BOLD activation is associated with defects in Aβ-fibers when Aβ-fibers in allodynic mice are selectively stimulated. The objective approach enabled by fMRI can improve our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:27898057

  9. Immediate and lasting effects of a thoracic spine manipulation in a patient with signs of cervical radiculopathy and upper extremity hyperalgesia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Deschenes, Beth K; Zafereo, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) may present with accompanying symptoms of hyperalgesia, allodynia, heaviness in the arm, and non-segmental pain that do not appear to be related to a peripheral spinal nerve. These findings may suggest the presence of central or autonomic nervous system involvement, requiring a modified management approach. The purpose of this case report is to describe the treatment of a patient with signs of CR and upper extremity (UE) hyperalgesia who had a significant decrease in her UE pain and hypersensitivity after a single thoracic spine manipulation (TSM). A 48-year-old female presented to physical therapy with acute neck pain radiating into her left UE that significantly limited her ability to sleep and work. After a single TSM, the patient demonstrated immediate and lasting reduction in hyperalgesia, hypersensitivity to touch, elimination of perceived heaviness and coldness in her left UE, and improved strength in the C6-8 myotome, allowing for improved functional activity capacity and tolerance to a multi-modal PT program. Based on these results, clinicians should consider the early application of TSM in patients with CR who have atypical, widespread, or severe neurological symptoms that limit early mobilization and tolerance to treatment at the painful region.

  10. Individual differences in the sensitivity of cold allodynia to phentolamine in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kwang; Min, Byung-Il; Kim, Ji Hoon; Hwang, Byung Gil; Yoo, Gi Yong; Park, Dong Suk; Na, Heung Sik

    2005-10-31

    In neuropathic rats sensitive to phentolamine (alpha-adrenoreceptor antagonist, 2 mg/kg, i.p.), prazosin (alpha1-adrenoreceptor antagonist, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated cold allodynia whereas yohimbine (alpha2-adrenoreceptor antagonist, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) had no significant effect. In neuropathic rats insensitive to phentolamine, yohimbine significantly exacerbated cold allodynia whereas prazosin had no significant effect. These results suggest that the individual differences in the sensitivity of cold allodynia to phentolamine may be due to the difference in the alpha-adrenoreceptor subtype predominantly involved in cold allodynia.

  11. EVALUATION OF HYPERALGESIA AND HISTOLOGICAL CHANGES OF DORSAL ROOT GANGLION INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Grava, André Luiz de Souza; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the hyperalgesia and histological abnormalities induced by contact between the dorsal root ganglion and the nucleus pulposus. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats were used, divided into two experimental groups. In one of the groups, a fragment of autologous nucleus pulposus was removed from the sacrococcygeal region and deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. In the other group (control), a fragment of adipose tissue was deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated on the third day and the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation. A L5 dorsal root ganglion was removed in the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation for histological study using HE staining and histochemical study using specific labeling for iNOS. Results: Higher intensity of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion. In this group, the histological study showed abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue, characterized by an inflammatory process and axonal degeneration. The histopathological abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue presented increasing intensity with increasing length of observation, and there was a correlation with maintenance of the hyperalgesia observed in the behavioral assessment. Immunohistochemistry using specific labeling for iNOS in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion showed higher expression of this enzyme in the nuclei of the inflammatory cells (glial cells) surrounding the neurons. Conclusion: Contact between the nucleus pulposus and the dorsal root ganglion induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and caused histological abnormalities in the dorsal root ganglion components. These abnormalities were characterized by an inflammatory and degenerative process in the structures of the dorsal root

  12. Protective effects of dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zenggui; Wu, Weilan; Wu, Xiaodan; Lei, Hongyi; Gong, Cansheng; Xu, Shiyuan

    2016-01-01

    High dosages of intra-operative remifentanil are associated with opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of combined dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil treatment on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. Patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status of I–II who were diagnosed with hysteromyoma and scheduled for laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) were randomly divided into three groups. Group hyperalgesia (Group H, n=29) received intra-operative remifentanil, Group hyperalgesia and dexmedetomidine (Group HD, n=28) received remifentanil and a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine, and Group hyperalgesia, dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil (Group HDF, n=29) received remifentanil, flurbiprofen axetil and dexmedetomidine. Mechanical pain thresholds were measured during the preoperative visit and postoperatively at 1, 6 and 24-h time points. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores, time to analgesic requirement, total sufentanil consumption and side effects were assessed postoperatively. Mechanical pain threshold at the incision site was significantly lower in Group H compared with Groups HD and HDF (both P<0.05), and significantly higher in Group HDF than in Group HD (P<0.05). The area of secondary hyperalgesia at the incision site was greater in Group H than in the other two groups (both P<0.05), and significantly smaller in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). VAS scores and total sufentanil consumption were significantly higher in Group H compared with the other two groups (both P<0.05), and were significantly lower in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). Dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil exhibits synergetic effects in the prevention of remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing LAVH. PMID:27698764

  13. Role of the Excitability Brake Potassium Current IKD in Cold Allodynia Induced by Chronic Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    González, Alejandro; Ugarte, Gonzalo; Restrepo, Carlos; Herrera, Gaspar; Piña, Ricardo; Gómez-Sánchez, José Antonio; Pertusa, María; Orio, Patricio; Madrid, Rodolfo

    2017-03-22

    Cold allodynia is a common symptom of neuropathic and inflammatory pain following peripheral nerve injury. The mechanisms underlying this disabling sensory alteration are not entirely understood. In primary somatosensory neurons, cold sensitivity is mainly determined by a functional counterbalance between cold-activated TRPM8 channels and Shaker-like Kv1.1-1.2 channels underlying the excitability brake current IKD Here we studied the role of IKD in damage-triggered painful hypersensitivity to innocuous cold. We found that cold allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in mice, was related to both an increase in the proportion of cold-sensitive neurons (CSNs) in DRGs contributing to the sciatic nerve, and a decrease in their cold temperature threshold. IKD density was reduced in high-threshold CSNs from CCI mice compared with sham animals, with no differences in cold-induced TRPM8-dependent current density. The electrophysiological properties and neurochemical profile of CSNs revealed an increase of nociceptive-like phenotype among neurons from CCI animals compared with sham mice. These results were validated using a mathematical model of CSNs, including IKD and TRPM8, showing that a reduction in IKD current density shifts the thermal threshold to higher temperatures and that the reduction of this current induces cold sensitivity in former cold-insensitive neurons expressing low levels of TRPM8-like current. Together, our results suggest that cold allodynia is largely due to a functional downregulation of IKD in both high-threshold CSNs and in a subpopulation of polymodal nociceptors expressing TRPM8, providing a general molecular and neural mechanism for this sensory alteration.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This paper unveils the critical role of the brake potassium current IKD in damage-triggered cold allodynia. Using a well-known form of nerve injury and combining behavioral analysis, calcium imaging, patch clamping, and pharmacological

  14. Methylglyoxal modification of Nav1.8 facilitates nociceptive neuron firing and causes hyperalgesia in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bierhaus, Angelika; Fleming, Thomas; Stoyanov, Stoyan; Leffler, Andreas; Babes, Alexandru; Neacsu, Cristian; Sauer, Susanne K; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Schnölzer, Martina; Lasitschka, Felix; Lasischka, Felix; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Kichko, Tatjana I; Konrade, Ilze; Elvert, Ralf; Mier, Walter; Pirags, Valdis; Lukic, Ivan K; Morcos, Michael; Dehmer, Thomas; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J; Edelstein, Diane; Nau, Carla; Forbes, Josephine; Humpert, Per M; Schwaninger, Markus; Ziegler, Dan; Stern, David M; Cooper, Mark E; Haberkorn, Uwe; Brownlee, Michael; Reeh, Peter W; Nawroth, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    This study establishes a mechanism for metabolic hyperalgesia based on the glycolytic metabolite methylglyoxal. We found that concentrations of plasma methylglyoxal above 600 nM discriminate between diabetes-affected individuals with pain and those without pain. Methylglyoxal depolarizes sensory neurons and induces post-translational modifications of the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.8, which are associated with increased electrical excitability and facilitated firing of nociceptive neurons, whereas it promotes the slow inactivation of Na(v)1.7. In mice, treatment with methylglyoxal reduces nerve conduction velocity, facilitates neurosecretion of calcitonin gene-related peptide, increases cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and evokes thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. This hyperalgesia is reflected by increased blood flow in brain regions that are involved in pain processing. We also found similar changes in streptozotocin-induced and genetic mouse models of diabetes but not in Na(v)1.8 knockout (Scn10(-/-)) mice. Several strategies that include a methylglyoxal scavenger are effective in reducing methylglyoxal- and diabetes-induced hyperalgesia. This previously undescribed concept of metabolically driven hyperalgesia provides a new basis for the design of therapeutic interventions for painful diabetic neuropathy.

  15. Fear of pain potentiates nocebo hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Aslaksen, Per M; Lyby, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Nocebo hyperalgesia has received sparse experimental attention compared to placebo analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits and fear of pain could predict experimental nocebo hyperalgesia. One hundred and eleven healthy volunteers (76 females) participated in an experimental study in which personality traits and fear of pain were measured prior to induction of thermal heat pain. Personality traits were measured by the Big-Five Inventory-10. Fear of pain was measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode. Pain was measured by a computerized visual analog scale. Stress levels during the experiment were measured by numerical rating scales. The participants were randomized to a Nocebo group or to a no-treatment Natural History group. The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment. Mediation analysis showed that higher levels of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III factor "fear of medical pain" significantly increased stress levels after nocebo treatment and that higher stress levels were associated with increased nocebo hyperalgesic responses. There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect. The results from the present study suggest that dispositional fear of pain might be a useful predictor for nocebo hyperalgesia and emotional states concomitant with expectations of increased pain. Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality.

  16. Homocysteine-induced attenuation of vascular endothelium-dependent hyperalgesia in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Elizabeth K.; Green, Paul G.; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Levine, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated a role of the vascular endothelium in peripheral pain mechanism by disrupting endothelial cell function using intravascular administration of octoxynol-9, a non-selective membrane active agent. As an independent test of the role of endothelial cells in pain mechanisms, we evaluated the effect of homocysteine, an agent that damages endothelial cell function. Mechanical stimulus-induced enhancement of endothelin-1 hyperalgesia in the gastrocnemius muscle of the rat was first prevented then enhanced by intravenous administration of homocysteine, but was only inhibited by its precursor, methionine. Both homocysteine and methionine significantly attenuated mechanical hyperalgesia in two models of ergonomic muscle pain, induced by exposure to vibration, and by eccentric exercise, and cutaneous mechanical hyperalgesia in an ischemia-reperfusion injury model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I, all previously shown responsive to octoxynol-9. This study provides independent support for a role of the endothelial cell in pain syndromes thought to have a vascular basis, and suggests that substances that are endothelial cell toxins can enhance vascular pain. PMID:25451284

  17. Chronic CRF1 receptor blockade reduces heroin intake escalation and dependence-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Park, Paula E; Schlosburg, Joel E; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schulteis, Gery; Edwards, Scott; Koob, George F

    2015-03-01

    Opioids represent effective drugs for the relief of pain, yet chronic opioid use often leads to a state of increased sensitivity to pain that is exacerbated during withdrawal. A sensitization of pain-related negative affect has been hypothesized to closely interact with addiction mechanisms. Neuro-adaptive changes occur as a consequence of excessive opioid exposure, including a recruitment of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and norepinephrine (NE) brain stress systems. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the transition to dependence, we determined the effects of functional antagonism within these two systems on hyperalgesia-like behavior during heroin withdrawal utilizing models of both acute and chronic dependence. We found that passive or self-administered heroin produced a significant mechanical hypersensitivity. During acute opioid dependence, systemic administration of the CRF1 receptor antagonist MPZP (20 mg/kg) alleviated withdrawal-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In contrast, several functional adrenergic system antagonists (clonidine, prazosin, propranolol) failed to alter mechanical hypersensitivity in this state. We then determined the effects of chronic MPZP or clonidine treatment on extended access heroin self-administration and found that MPZP, but not clonidine, attenuated escalation of heroin intake, whereas both drugs alleviated chronic dependence-associated hyperalgesia. These findings suggest that an early potentiation of CRF signaling occurs following opioid exposure that begins to drive both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and eventually intake escalation.

  18. Attenuation of thermal nociception and hyperalgesia by VR1 blockers

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Carolina; Humet, Marc; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Gomis, Ana; Caprini, Marco; Viana, Felix; De la Peña, Elvira; Sanchez-Baeza, Francisco; Carbonell, Teresa; De Felipe, Carmen; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Belmonte, Carlos; Messeguer, Angel; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Vanilloid receptor subunit 1 (VR1) appears to play a critical role in the transduction of noxious chemical and thermal stimuli by sensory nerve endings in peripheral tissues. Thus, VR1 antagonists are useful compounds to unravel the contribution of this receptor to pain perception, as well as to induce analgesia. We have used a combinatorial approach to identify new, nonpeptidic channel blockers of VR1. Screening of a library of trimers of N-alkylglycines resulted in the identification of two molecules referred to as DD161515 {N-[2-(2-(N-methylpyrrolidinyl)ethyl]glycyl]-[N-[2,4-dichlorophenethyl]glycyl]-N-(2,4-dichlorophenethyl)glycinamide} and DD191515 {[N-[3-(N,N-diethylamino)propyl]glycyl]-[N-[2,4-dichlorophenethyl]glycyl]-N-(2,4-dichlorophenethyl)glycinamide} that selectively block VR1 channel activity with micromolar efficacy, rivaling that characteristic of vanilloid-related inhibitors. These compounds appear to be noncompetitive VR1 antagonists that recognize a receptor site distinct from that of capsaicin. Intraperitoneal administration of both trialkylglycines into mice significantly attenuated thermal nociception as measured in the hot plate test. It is noteworthy that these compounds eliminated pain and neurogenic inflammation evoked by intradermal injection of capsaicin into the animal hindpaw, as well as the thermal hyperalgesia induced by tissue irritation with nitrogen mustard. In contrast, responses to mechanical stimuli were not modified by either compound. Modulation of sensory nerve fibers excitability appears to underlie the peptoid analgesic activity. Collectively, these results indicate that blockade of VR1 activity attenuates chemical and thermal nociception and hyperalgesia, supporting the tenet that this ionotropic receptor contributes to chemical and thermal sensitivity and pain perception in vivo. These trialkylglycine-based, noncompetitive VR1 antagonists may likely be developed into analgesics to treat inflammatory pain. PMID:11854530

  19. Metallopeptidase inhibition potentiates bradykinin-induced hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Ruben; Por, Elaine D.; Berg, Kelly A.; Clarke, William P.; Glucksman, Marc J.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide bradykinin (BK) sensitizes nociceptor activation following its release in response to inflammatory injury. Thereafter, the bioactivity of bradykinin is controlled by the enzymatic activities of circulating peptidases. One such enzyme, the metalloendopeptidase EC3.4.24.15 (EP24.15), is co-expressed with bradykinin receptors in primary afferent neurons. In this study, utilizing approaches encompassing pharmacology, biochemistry, cell biology and behavioral animal models, we discover a crucial role for EP24.15 and the closely-related EP24.16 in modulating bradykinin-mediated hyperalgesia. Pharmacological analyses indicate that EP24.15 and EP24.16 inhibition significantly enhances bradykinin type-2 receptor activation by bradykinin in primary trigeminal ganglia cultures. In addition, bradykinin-induced sensitization of TRPV1 activation is increased in the presence of the EP24.15/16 inhibitor JA-2. Furthermore, behavioral analyses illustrate a significant dose-response relationship between JA-2 and bradykinin-mediated thermal hyperalgesia. These results indicate an important physiological role for the metallopeptidases EP24.15 and EP24.16 in regulating bradykinin-mediated sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors. PMID:21458920

  20. (-)-Linalool attenuates allodynia in neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve ligation in c57/bl6 mice.

    PubMed

    Berliocchi, Laura; Russo, Rossella; Levato, Alessandra; Fratto, Vincenza; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Shinobu; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana

    2009-01-01

    (-)-Linalool is a natural compound with anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties. The antinociceptive action of linalool has been reported in several models of inflammatory pain. However, its effects in neuropathic pain have not been investigated. Here, we used the spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model of neuropathic pain and studied the effects of acute and chronic administration of an established antinociceptive dose of linalool on mechanical and thermal sensitivity induced by the nerve injury in mice. Linalool did not affect pain behavior triggered by mechanical or thermal stimuli when administered as a single dose before SNL. However, mechanical allodynia was reduced transiently in neuropathic animals when linalool was administered for 7 consecutive days, while no changes were seen in the sensitivity to noxious radiant heat. We investigated the possible involvement of the PI3K/Akt pathway in linalool antinociceptive effect by western blot analysis. Linalool did not induce significant changes in Akt expression and phopshorylation though a trend toward an increased ratio of phosphorylated versus total Akt was observed in SNL animals treated with linalool, in comparison to SNL alone or sham. We then wondered whether linalool could modulate inflammatory processes and investigated spinal glia activation and IL-1beta contents following linalool treatment in SNL animals. The data suggest that mechanisms other than an action on inflammatory processes may mediate linalool ability to reduce mechanical allodynia in this model of neuropathic pain.

  1. Painful neuropathy: Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lee-Kubli, Corinne A; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2014-01-01

    Painful neuropathy, like the other complications of diabetes, is a growing healthcare concern. Unfortunately, current treatments are of variable efficacy and do not target underlying pathogenic mechanisms, in part because these mechanisms are not well defined. Rat and mouse models of type 1 diabetes are frequently used to study diabetic neuropathy, with rats in particular being consistently reported to show allodynia and hyperalgesia. Models of type 2 diabetes are being used with increasing frequency, but the current literature on the progression of indices of neuropathic pain is variable and relatively few therapeutics have yet been developed in these models. While evidence for spontaneous pain in rodent models is sparse, measures of evoked mechanical, thermal and chemical pain can provide insight into the pathogenesis of the condition. The stocking and glove distribution of pain tantalizingly suggests that the generator site of neuropathic pain is found within the peripheral nervous system. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that amplification in the spinal cord, via spinal disinhibition and neuroinflammation, and also in the brain, via enhanced thalamic activity or decreased cortical inhibition, likely contribute to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy. Several potential therapeutic strategies have emerged from preclinical studies, including prophylactic treatments that intervene against underlying mechanisms of disease, treatments that prevent gains of nociceptive function, treatments that suppress enhancements of nociceptive function, and treatments that impede normal nociceptive mechanisms. Ongoing challenges include unraveling the complexity of underlying pathogenic mechanisms, addressing the potential disconnect between the perceived location of pain and the actual pain generator and amplifier sites, and finding ways to identify which mechanisms operate in specific patients to allow rational and individualized choice of targeted therapies.

  2. Activation of JNK pathway in spinal astrocytes contributes to acute ultra-low-dose morphine thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that opioid analgesics can lead to paradoxical sensitization to pain when delivered in different administration patterns. Although opioid tolerance-induced hyperalgesia is largely studied, little is known about the mechanisms underlying acute ultra-low-dose morphine hyperalgesia. Activation of spinal glial cells is reported to regulate pain hypersensitivity. To elucidate the mechanism involved in acute ultra-low-dose morphine hyperalgesia, we tested whether an opioid agonist promoted the activation of spinal astrocytes and microglia and investigated the cellular pathways involved. Ultra-low-dose morphine activated spinal astrocytes with no effect on microglia. The astrocyte activation was selectively prevented by the opioid antagonist naloxone, the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) silencing and the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Morphine elevated spinal JNK1, JNK2, and c-Jun phosphorylation. Conversely, phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1) was not elevated, and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) levels remained unmodified. Administration of SP600125 and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist MK801 prevented morphine hyperalgesia. Ultra-low-dose morphine increased protein kinase C (PKC) γ phosphorylation. Pretreatment with a PKC inhibitor prevented morphine hyperalgesia and JNK and c-Jun overphosphorylation, indicating PKC is a JNK upstream modulator and illustrating the presence of a pathway involving PKC, NMDA, and JNK activated by morphine. Immunofluorescence experiments indicated the neuronal localization of spinal MOR. However, JNK was not detected in MOR-expressing cells, showing the presence of a neuron-astrocyte signaling pathway. These results illustrate the selective activation of an astrocyte JNK pathway after the stimulation of neuronal MOR, which contributes to ultra-low-dose morphine hyperalgesia.

  3. Oral administration of stavudine induces hyperalgesia without affecting activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Weber, Juliane; Mitchell, Duncan; Kamerman, Peter R

    2007-12-05

    We have investigated whether long-term oral administration of the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) stavudine affects nociception in Sprague-Dawley rats, and whether any changes of nociception are accompanied by deterioration in activity and appetite. Stavudine (50 mg kg(-1)) was administered to rats orally once daily for six weeks in gelatine cubes. Mechanical hyperalgesia of the tail was assessed using a bar algometer, and thermal hyperalgesia by tail immersion in 49 degrees C water. Withdrawal latencies were compared to those of rats receiving placebo gelatine cubes. Withdrawal latencies to the noxious thermal challenge were not affected by stavudine, but those to the mechanical challenge were significantly decreased in rats receiving stavudine, compared to rats receiving placebo, from week three to week six of drug administration (P<0.05, ANCOVA with Newman Keuls post-hoc comparisons). The overall condition of the rats was assessed by recording daily voluntary wheel running distance and maximum running speed, food intake and body mass. Daily stavudine administration did not adversely affect voluntary running activity, appetite or growth. We have shown that long-term daily oral administration of the NRTI stavudine results in mechanical hyperalgesia in rats within three weeks without affecting appetite, growth and physical activity.

  4. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients and the mitigating effects of gabapentin

    PubMed Central

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Russell, Daric; Weidner, Greg; Durda, Michael; Joseph, Nicholas C.; Yu, Jeffrey; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain patients receiving opioid drugs are at risk for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), wherein opioid pain medication leads to a paradoxical pain state. OIH involves central sensitization of primary and secondary afferent neurons in the dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion, similar to neuropathic pain. Gabapentin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog anticonvulsant used to treat neuropathic pain, has been shown in animal models to reduce fentanyl hyperalgesia without compromising analgesic effect. Chronic pain patients have also exhibited lower opioid consumption and improved pain response when given gabapentin. However, few human studies investigating gabapentin use in OIH have been performed in recent years. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie OIH and provide a critical overview of interventional therapeutic strategies, especially the clinically-successful drug gabapentin, which may reduce OIH. PMID:26074817

  5. Intrathecal injection of adenosine 2A receptor agonists reversed neuropathic allodynia through protein kinase (PK)A/PKC signaling.

    PubMed

    Loram, Lisa C; Taylor, Frederick R; Strand, Keith A; Harrison, Jacqueline A; Rzasalynn, Rachael; Sholar, Paige; Rieger, Jayson; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2013-10-01

    A single intrathecal dose of adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR) agonist was previously reported to produce a multi-week reversal of allodynia in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain. We aimed to determine if this long-term reversal was induced by A2AR agonism versus more generalized across adenosine receptor subtypes, and begin to explore the intracellular signaling cascades involved. In addition, we sought to identify whether the enduring effect could be extended to other models of neuropathic pain. We tested an A1R and A2BR agonist in CCI and found the same long duration effect with A2BR but not A1R agonism. An A2AR agonist (ATL313) produced a significant long-duration reversal of mechanical allodynia induced by long established CCI (administered 6 weeks after surgery), spinal nerve ligation and sciatic inflammatory neuropathy. To determine if ATL313 had a direct effect on glia, ATL313 was coadministered with lipopolysaccharide to neonatal microglia and astrocytes in vitro. ATL313 significantly attenuated TNFα production in both microglia and astrocytes but had no effect on LPS induced IL-10. Protein kinase C significantly reversed the ATL313 effects on TNFα in vitro in microglia and astrocytes, while a protein kinase A inhibitor only effected microglia. Both intrathecal PKA and PKC inhibitors significantly reversed the effect of the A2AR agonist on neuropathic allodynia. Therefore, A2AR agonists administered IT remain an exciting novel target for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  6. Spinal nociceptive transmission by mechanical stimulation of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Takemi; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Kawamata, Mikito

    2016-01-01

    Background Since bone marrow receives innervation from A-delta and C-fibers and since an increase in intramedullary pressure in bone marrow may induce acute pain in orthopedic patients during surgery and chronic pain in patients with bone marrow edema, skeletal pain may partly originate from bone marrow. Intraosseous lesions, such as osteomyelitis and bone cancer, are also known to produce cutaneous hypersensitivity, which might be referred pain from bone. However, little is known about pain perception in bone marrow and referred pain induced by bone disease. Thus, we carried out an in vivo electrophysiological study and behavioral study to determine whether increased intraosseous pressure of the femur induces acute pain and whether increased intraosseous pressure induces referred pain in the corresponding receptive fields of the skin. Results Intraosseous balloon inflation caused spontaneous pain-related behavior and mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in the lumbosacral region. Single neuronal activities of spinal dorsal horn neurons were extracellularly isolated, and then evoked responses to non-noxious and noxious cutaneous stimuli and intraosseous balloon inflation were recorded. Ninety-four spinal dorsal horn neurons, which had somatic receptive fields at the lower back and thigh, were obtained. Sixty-two percent of the wide-dynamic-range neurons (24/39) and 86% of the high-threshold neurons (12/14) responded to intraosseous balloon inflation, while none of the low-threshold neurons (0/41) responded to intraosseous balloon inflation. Spinally administered morphine (1 µg) abolished balloon inflation-induced spontaneous pain-related behavior and mechanical hyperalgesia in awake rats and also suppressed evoked activities of wide-dynamic-range neurons to noxious cutaneous stimulation and intraosseous balloon inflation. Conclusions The results suggest that mechanical stimulation to bone marrow produces nociception, concomitantly producing its referred pain

  7. Allodynia mediated by C-tactile afferents in human hairy skin

    PubMed Central

    Nagi, Saad S; Rubin, Troy K; Chelvanayagam, David K; Macefield, Vaughan G; Mahns, David A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We recently showed a contribution of low-threshold cutaneous mechanoreceptors to vibration-evoked changes in the perception of muscle pain. Neutral-touch stimulation (vibration) of the hairy skin during underlying muscle pain evoked an overall increase in pain intensity, i.e. allodynia. This effect appeared to be dependent upon cutaneous afferents, as allodynia was abolished by intradermal anaesthesia. However, it remains unclear whether allodynia results from activation of a single class of cutaneous afferents or the convergence of inputs from multiple classes. Intriguingly, no existing human study has examined the contribution of C-tactile (CT) afferents to allodynia. Detailed psychophysical observations were made in 29 healthy subjects (18 males and 11 females). Sustained muscle pain was induced by infusing hypertonic saline (HS: 5%) into tibialis anterior muscle (TA). Sinusoidal vibration (200 Hz–200 μm) was applied to the hairy skin overlying TA. Pain ratings were recorded using a visual analogue scale (VAS). In order to evaluate the role of myelinated and unmyelinated cutaneous afferents in the expression of vibration-evoked allodynia, compression block of the sciatic nerve, and low-dose intradermal anaesthesia (Xylocaine 0.25%) were used, respectively. In addition, the modulation of muscle pain by gentle brushing (1.0 and 3.0 cm s−1) – known to excite CT fibres – was examined. Brushing stimuli were applied to the hairy skin with all fibres intact and following the blockade of myelinated afferents. During tonic muscle pain (VAS 4–6), vibration evoked a significant and reproducible increase in muscle pain (allodynia) that persisted following compression of myelinated afferents. During compression block, the sense of vibration was abolished, but the vibration-evoked allodynia persisted. In contrast, selective anaesthesia of unmyelinated cutaneous afferents abolished the allodynia, whereas the percept of vibration remained unaffected

  8. Sildenafil Treatment Eliminates Pruritogenesis and Thermal Hyperalgesia in Rats with Portacaval Shunts.

    PubMed

    Belghiti, Majedeline; Agusti, Ana; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2017-03-01

    Pruritus is a common symptom in chronic liver diseases, which may also alter thermal sensitivity. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear and treatments are not satisfactory. Portal-systemic shunting has been proposed to alter thermal sensitivity in cirrhotics. Inflammation-induced enhanced activity of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) may contribute to pruritus and thermal hyperalgesia. Sildenafil reduces neuroinflammation in portacaval shunt (PCS) rats. The aims were to assess whether: (1) PCS rats show enhanced scratching or thermal sensitivity; (2) TRPV1 activity is enhanced in PCS rats; (3) treatment with sildenafil reduces TRPV1 activation, scratching and thermal hyperalgesia. Rats were treated with sildenafil beginning 3 weeks after surgery. The number of scratches performed were counted. Thermal hyperalgesia was analyzed using the Hargreaves' Plantar Test. TRPV1 activation by measuring the increase in Ca(2+) induced by capsaicin in dorsal root ganglia neurons. PCS rats show enhanced scratching behavior, reaching 66 ± 5 scratches/h (p < 0.01) at 21 days after surgery, while controls show 37 ± 2 scratches/h. PCS rats show thermal hyperalgesia. Paw withdrawal latency was reduced (p < 0.05) to 10 ± 1 s compared to controls (21 ± 2 s). Capsaicin-induced calcium increase was higher in dorsal root ganglia cultures from PCS rats, indicating TRPV1functional increase. PCS rats show enhanced scratching behavior and thermal sensitivity and are a good model to study these alterations in chronic liver diseases. Enhanced sensitivity and activity of TRPV1 channel underlies these alterations. Treatment with sildenafil reduces TRPV1 channel sensitivity and activity and normalizes scratching behavior and thermal sensitivity.

  9. The effect of the sex of a model on nocebo hyperalgesia induced by social observational learning.

    PubMed

    Swider, Karolina; Bąbel, Przemysław

    2013-08-01

    Research shows that placebo analgesia can be induced through social observational learning. Our aim was to replicate and extend this result by studying the effect of the sex of both the model and the subject on the magnitude of placebo analgesia induced by social observational learning. Four experimental (1 through 4) and 2 control (5 and 6) groups were observed: groups 1, 3, and 5 were female; groups 2, 4, and 6 were male. All subjects received pain stimuli of the same intensity preceded by green and red lights. Before receiving pain stimuli, groups 1 and 4 observed a female model and groups 2 and 3 a male model; both models simulated responses to pain stimuli preceded by green lights as less painful than those preceded by red lights. Groups 1 through 4 also rated pain stimuli preceded by green lights as less painful. Further investigation revealed that in fact subjects in experimental groups rated red-associated stimuli as more painful than subjects from control groups who did not observe a model before receiving the same pain stimuli, indicating that nocebo hyperalgesia rather than placebo analgesia was induced. Empathy traits predicted the magnitude of nocebo hyperalgesia. Regardless of the sex of the subject, nocebo hyperalgesia was greater after the male model was observed. The results show that social observational learning is a mechanism that produces placebo effects. They also indicate that the sex of the model plays an important role in this process.

  10. Experimental hypoglycemia is a human model of stress-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Christopher H; Adler, Gail K; Bonyhay, Istvan; Freeman, Roy

    2012-11-01

    Hypoglycemia is a physiological stress that leads to the release of stress hormones, such as catecholamines and glucocorticoids, and proinflammatory cytokines. These factors, in euglycemic animal models, are associated with stress-induced hyperalgesia. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether experimental hypoglycemia in humans would lead to a hyperalgesic state. In 2 separate 3-day admissions separated by 1 to 3 months, healthy study participants were exposed to two 2-hour euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps or two 2-hour hypoglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps. Thermal quantitative sensory testing and thermal pain assessments were measured the day before and the day after euglycemia or hypoglycemia. In contrast to prior euglycemia exposure, prior hypoglycemia exposure resulted in enhanced pain sensitivity to hot and cold stimuli as well as enhanced temporal summation to repeated heat-pain stimuli. These findings suggest that prior exposure to hypoglycemia causes a state of enhanced pain sensitivity that is consistent with stress-induced hyperalgesia. This human model may provide a framework for hypothesis testing and targeted, mechanism-based pharmacological interventions to delineate the molecular basis of hyperalgesia and pain susceptibility.

  11. Regionally selective activation of ERK and JNK in morphine paradoxical hyperalgesia: a step toward improving opioid pain therapy.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2014-11-01

    In addition to analgesia, opioid agonists may increase pain sensitivity under different conditions varying dose and administration pattern. While opioid hyperalgesia induced by tolerance and withdrawal is largely studied, little is known on the mechanisms underlying ultra-low dose morphine hyperalgesia. This pronociceptive response appears to play an opposing role in morphine analgesia and might have clinical relevance. Ultra-low dose morphine elicited thermal hyperalgesia through activation of μ opioid receptors. To elucidate the intracellular mechanism of morphine nociceptive behaviour, we investigated the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), crucial pathways in pain hypersensitivity. The catalytic activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), upstream modulators and transcription factors was investigated in the mouse periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), thalamus and prefrontal cortex by western blotting. Ultra-low dose morphine intensively increased pERK1 contents in the PAG and cortex and, to a lesser extent, increased cortical ERK2 and JNK phosphorylation. No involvement of p38 was detected. Morphine exposure also increased phosphorylation of cortical c-Jun whereas levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) remained unmodified. Blockade of protein kinase C (PKC) prevented increases in phosphorylation showing a PKC-dependent mechanism of activation. Pharmacological inhibitors of PKC, ERK, and JNK activity prevented morphine hyperalgesia. No modulation of MAPK and transcription factors' activity was detected in the thalamus. These results support the concept that selective activation of ERK and JNK on descending pathways plays an important role in ultra-low dose morphine hyperalgesia. The modulation of these signalling processes might improve pain management with opiate analgesics.

  12. The degree of acute descending control of spinal nociception in an area of primary hyperalgesia is dependent on the peripheral domain of afferent input.

    PubMed

    Drake, Robert A R; Hulse, Richard P; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-08-15

    Descending controls of spinal nociceptive processing play a critical role in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Acute peripheral nociceptor sensitization drives spinal sensitization and activates spino-supraspinal-spinal loops leading to descending inhibitory and facilitatory controls of spinal neuronal activity that further modify the extent and degree of the pain state. The afferent inputs from hairy and glabrous skin are distinct with respect to both the profile of primary afferent classes and the degree of their peripheral sensitization. It is not known whether these differences in afferent input differentially engage descending control systems to different extents or in different ways. Injection of complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in inflammation and swelling of hairy hind foot skin in rats, a transient thermal hyperalgesia lasting <2 h, and longlasting primary mechanical hyperalgesia (≥7 days). Much longer lasting thermal hyperalgesia was apparent in glabrous skin (1 h to >72 h). In hairy skin, transient hyperalgesia was associated with sensitization of withdrawal reflexes to thermal activation of either A- or C-nociceptors. The transience of the hyperalgesia was attributable to a rapidly engaged descending inhibitory noradrenergic mechanism, which affected withdrawal responses to both A- and C-nociceptor activation and this could be reversed by intrathecal administration of yohimbine (α-2-adrenoceptor antagonist). In glabrous skin, yohimbine had no effect on an equivalent thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. We conclude that acute inflammation and peripheral nociceptor sensitization in hind foot hairy skin, but not glabrous skin, rapidly activates a descending inhibitory noradrenergic system. This may result from differences in the engagement of descending control systems following sensitization of different primary afferent classes that innervate glabrous and hairy skin.

  13. Phosphorylation of TRPV1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 promotes TRPV1 surface localization, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Du, Junxie; Yang, Yanrui; Wang, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an important serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in many physiological processes. Recently, Cdk5 has been reported to phosphorylate TRPV1 at threonine 407 (Thr-407) in humans (Thr-406 in rats), which enhances the function of TRPV1 channel and promotes thermal hyperalgesia in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain rats. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates TRPV1 at Threonine 406 and promotes the surface localization of TRPV1, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. The mutation of Thr-406 of TRPV1 to alanine reduced the interaction of TRPV1 with the cytoskeletal elements and decreased the binding of TRPV1 with the motor protein KIF13B, which led to reduced surface distribution of TRPV1. Disrupting the phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 dramatically reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in HEK 293 cells after transient expression and the channel function in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Notably, intrathecal administration of the interfering peptide against the phosphorylation of Thr-406 alleviated heat hyperalgesia and reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in inflammatory pain rats. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 increases the surface level and the function of TRPV1, while the TAT-T406 peptide can effectively attenuate thermal hyperalgesia. Our studies provide a potential therapy for inflammatory pain.

  14. 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), a main metabolite of serotonin, is responsible for complete Freund's adjuvant-induced thermal hyperalgesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The role of serotonin (5-hydroxytrptamine, 5-HT) in the modulation of pain has been widely studied. Previous work led to the hypothesis that 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), a main metabolite of serotonin, might by itself influence pain thresholds. Results In the present study, we investigated the role of 5-HIAA in inflammatory pain induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the hind paw of mice. Wild-type mice were compared to mice deficient of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT-/- mice) using behavioral tests for hyperalgesia and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine tissue levels of 5-HIAA. Wild-type mice reproducibly developed thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema for 5 days after CFA injection. 5-HTT-/- mice treated with CFA had reduced thermal hyperalgesia on day 1 after CFA injection and normal responses to heat thereafter. The 5-HIAA levels in spinal cord and sciatic nerve as measured with HPLC were lower in 5-HTT-/- mice than in wild-type mice after CFA injection. Pretreatment of wild-type mice with intraperitoneal injection of para-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA), a serotonin synthesis inhibitor, resulted in depletion of the 5-HIAA content in spinal cord and sciatic nerve and decrease in thermal hyperalgesia in CFA injected mice. The application of exogenous 5-HIAA resulted in potentiation of thermal hyperalgesia induced by CFA in 5-HTT-/- mice and in wild-type mice pretreated with p-CPA, but not in wild-type mice without p-CPA pretreatment. Further, methysergide, a broad-spectrum serotonin receptor antagonist, had no effect on 5-HIAA-induced potentiation of thermal hyperalgesia in CFA-treated wild-type mice. Conclusion Taken together, the present results suggest that 5-HIAA plays an important role in modulating peripheral thermal hyperalgesia in CFA induced inflammation, probably via a non-serotonin receptor mechanism. PMID:21447193

  15. Spinal GABA receptors mediate the suppressive effect of electroacupuncture on cold allodynia in rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Han, Jae-Bok; Kim, Sun-Kwang; Park, Jung-Hyuk; Go, Dong-Hyun; Sun, Boram; Min, Byung-Il

    2010-03-31

    This study was performed to determine whether spinal GABAergic systems mediate the relieving effects of low frequency electroacupuncture (EA) on cold allodynia in a rat tail model of neuropathic pain. For neuropathic surgery, the right superior caudal trunk was resected at the level between the S1 and S2 spinal nerves innervating the tail. Two weeks after the nerve injury, the intrathecal catheter was implanted. Five days after the catheterization, rats were intrathecally injected with gabazine (GABA(A) receptor antagonist, 0.0003, 0.001 or 0.003mug), or saclofen (GABA(B) receptor antagonist, 3, 10 or 30mug). Ten minutes after the injection, EA (2Hz) was applied to the ST36 acupoint for 30min. The cold allodynia was assessed by the tail immersion test (i.e. immersing the tail in cold (4 degrees C) water and measuring the latency of an abrupt tail movement) before and after the EA treatment. EA stimulation at ST36 significantly inhibited the cold allodynia sign, whereas EA at non-acupoint and plain acupuncture at ST36 (without electrical stimulation) did not show antiallodynic effects. Intrathecal administration of gabazine or saclofen blocked the relieving effects of ST36 EA stimulation on cold allodynia. These results suggest that spinal GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors mediate the suppressive effect of low frequency EA on cold allodynia in the tail neuropathic rats.

  16. Sustained Suppression of Hyperalgesia during Latent Sensitization by μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors and α2A Adrenergic Receptors: Role of Constitutive Activity

    PubMed Central

    Walwyn, Wendy M.; Chen, Wenling; Kim, Hyeyoung; Minasyan, Ani; Ennes, Helena S.; McRoberts, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Many chronic pain disorders alternate between bouts of pain and periods of remission. The latent sensitization model reproduces this in rodents by showing that the apparent recovery (“remission”) from inflammatory or neuropathic pain can be reversed by opioid antagonists. Therefore, this remission represents an opioid receptor-mediated suppression of a sustained hyperalgesic state. To identify the receptors involved, we induced latent sensitization in mice and rats by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the hindpaw. In WT mice, responses to mechanical stimulation returned to baseline 3 weeks after CFA. In μ-opioid receptor (MOR) knock-out (KO) mice, responses did not return to baseline but partially recovered from peak hyperalgesia. Antagonists of α2A-adrenergic and δ-opioid receptors reinstated hyperalgesia in WT mice and abolished the partial recovery from hyperalgesia in MOR KO mice. In rats, antagonists of α2A adrenergic and μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors reinstated hyperalgesia during remission from CFA-induced hyperalgesia. Therefore, these four receptors suppress hyperalgesia in latent sensitization. We further demonstrated that suppression of hyperalgesia by MORs was due to their constitutive activity because of the following: (1) CFA-induced hyperalgesia was reinstated by the MOR inverse agonist naltrexone (NTX), but not by its neutral antagonist 6β-naltrexol; (2) pro-enkephalin, pro-opiomelanocortin, and pro-dynorphin KO mice showed recovery from hyperalgesia and reinstatement by NTX; (3) there was no MOR internalization during remission; (4) MORs immunoprecipitated from the spinal cord during remission had increased Ser375 phosphorylation; and (5) electrophysiology recordings from dorsal root ganglion neurons collected during remission showed constitutive MOR inhibition of calcium channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic pain causes extreme suffering to millions of people, but its mechanisms remain to be unraveled. Latent

  17. Characterizing pinprick-evoked brain potentials before and after experimentally induced secondary hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Mouraux, André; Groneberg, Antonia H.; Pfau, Doreen B.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Klein, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Secondary hyperalgesia is believed to be a key feature of “central sensitization” and is characterized by enhanced pain to mechanical nociceptive stimuli. The aim of the present study was to characterize, using EEG, the effects of pinprick stimulation intensity on the magnitude of pinprick-elicited brain potentials [event-related potentials (ERPs)] before and after secondary hyperalgesia induced by intradermal capsaicin in humans. Pinprick-elicited ERPs and pinprick-evoked pain ratings were recorded in 19 healthy volunteers, with mechanical pinprick stimuli of varying intensities (0.25-mm probe applied with a force extending between 16 and 512 mN). The recordings were performed before (T0) and 30 min after (T1) intradermal capsaicin injection. The contralateral noninjected arm served as control. ERPs elicited by stimulation of untreated skin were characterized by 1) an early-latency negative-positive complex peaking between 120 and 250 ms after stimulus onset (N120-P240) and maximal at the vertex and 2) a long-lasting positive wave peaking 400–600 ms after stimulus onset and maximal more posterior (P500), which was correlated to perceived pinprick pain. After capsaicin injection, pinprick stimuli were perceived as more intense in the area of secondary hyperalgesia and this effect was stronger for lower compared with higher stimulus intensities. In addition, there was an enhancement of the P500 elicited by stimuli of intermediate intensity, which was significant for 64 mN. The other components of the ERPs were unaffected by capsaicin. Our results suggest that the increase in P500 magnitude after capsaicin is mediated by facilitated mechanical nociceptive pathways. PMID:26334010

  18. [Severe chronic pain with allodynia in Parkinson's disease: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Asahina, M; Asahina, M; Oki, T; Hattori, T

    2001-01-01

    We report a 61-year-old man with Parkinson's disease, who had a 3-year history of severe chronic pain with allodynia in the lower extremities prior to motor symptoms. He always had tingling pain around the ankles, and tactile sensation induced severe burning pain expanding to the toes and thighs, so his pain was considered to be allodynia. Pain and motor symptoms were ameliorated by L-dopa therapy and exacerbated by withdrawal of L-dopa. Pain is known to occur in Parkinson's disease, but severe pain rarely occurs. To our knowledge, allodynia, which is usually recognized in causalgia or reflex sympathetic dystrophy, has never been reported in Parkinson's disease. Patients with Parkinson's disease may complain severe causalgia-like pain as an initial symptom.

  19. Analgesia targeting IB4-positive neurons in cancer-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yi; Dang, Dongmin; Viet, Chi T.; Dolan, John C.; Schmidt, Brian L.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer patients often suffer from pain and most will be prescribed μ-opioids. μ-opioids are not satisfactory in treating cancer pain and are associated with multiple debilitating side effects. Recent studies show that μ and δ opioid receptors are separately expressed on IB4 (−) and IB4 (+) neurons which control thermal and mechanical pain, respectively. In this study we investigated IB4 (+) and IB4 (−) neurons in mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in an orthotopic mouse oral cancer model. We used a δ opioid receptor agonist and a P2X3 antagonist to target IB4 (+) neurons and to demonstrate that this subset plays a key role in cancer-induced mechanical allodynia, but not in thermal hyperalgesia. Moreover, selective removal of IB4 (+) neurons using IB4-SAP impacts cancer-induced mechanical but not thermal hypersensitivity. Our results demonstrate that peripherally administered pharmacological agents targeting IB4 (+) neurons, such as a selective δ-opioid receptor agonist or P2X3 antagonist, might be useful in treating oral cancer pain. Perspective To clarify the mechanisms of oral cancer pain, we examined the differential role of IB4 (+) and IB4 (−) neurons. Characterization of these two subsets of putative nociceptors is important for further development of effective clinical cancer pain relief. PMID:22483679

  20. Loss of neurons in rostral ventromedial medulla that express neurokinin-1 receptors decreases the development of hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Khasabov, S G; Simone, D A

    2013-10-10

    It is well known that neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) are involved in descending modulation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. It has been shown that activation of neurokinin-1 receptors (NK-1Rs) in the RVM, which are presumably located on pain facilitating ON cells, produces hyperalgesia whereas blockade of NK-1Rs attenuates hyperalgesia. To obtain a better understanding of the functions of NK-1R expressing neurons in the RVM, we selectively ablated these neurons by injecting the stable analog of substance P (SP), Sar(9),Met(O2)(11)-Substance P, conjugated to the ribosomal toxin saporin (SSP-SAP) into the RVM. Rats received injections of SSP-SAP (1 μM) or an equal volume of 1 μM of saporin conjugated to artificial peptide (Blank-SAP). Stereological analysis of NK-1R- and NeuN-labeled neurons in the RVM was determined 21-24 days after treatment. Withdrawal responses to mechanical and heat stimuli applied to the plantar hindpaw were determined 5-28 days after treatment. Withdrawal responses were also determined before and after intraplantar injection of capsaicin (acute hyperalgesia) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) (prolonged hyperalgesia). The proportion of NK-1R-labeled neurons in the RVM was 8.8 ± 1.3% in naïve rats and 8.1 ± 0.8% in rats treated with Blank-SAP. However, injection of SSP-SAP into the RVM resulted in a 90% decrease in NK-1R-labeled neurons. SSP-SAP did not alter withdrawal responses to mechanical or heat stimuli under normal conditions, and did not alter analgesia produced by morphine administered into the RVM. In contrast, the duration of nocifensive behaviors produced by capsaicin and mechanical and heat hyperalgesia produced by capsaicin and CFA were decreased in rats pretreated with SSP-SAP as compared to those that received Blank-SAP. These data support our earlier studies using NK-1R antagonists in the RVM and demonstrate that RVM neurons that possess the NK-1R do not play a significant role in

  1. Pain referral and regional deep tissue hyperalgesia in experimental human hip pain models.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masashi; Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Hip disorder patients typically present with extensive pain referral and hyperalgesia. To better understand underlying mechanisms, an experimental hip pain model was established in which pain referrals and hyperalgesia could be studied under standardized conditions. In 16 healthy subjects, pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection into the gluteus medius tendon (GMT), adductor longus tendon (ALT), or gluteus medius muscle (GMM). Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects mapped the pain distribution. Before, during, and after injections, passive hip joint pain provocation tests were completed, together with quantitative sensory testing as follows: pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cuff algometry pain thresholds (cuff PPTs), cutaneous pin-prick sensitivity, and thermal pain thresholds. Hypertonic saline injected into the GMT resulted in higher VAS scores than hypertonic injections into the ALT and GMM (P<.05). Referred pain areas spread to larger parts of the leg after GMT and GMM injections compared with more regionalized pain pattern after ALT injections (P<.05). PPTs at the injection site were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into GMT and GMM compared with baseline, ALT injections, and isotonic saline. Cuff PPTs from the thigh were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into the ALT compared with baseline, GMT injections, and isotonic saline (P<.05). More subjects had positive joint pain provocation tests after hypertonic compared with isotonic saline injections (P<.05), indicating that this provocation test also assessed hyperalgesia in extra-articular soft tissues. The experimental models may open for better understanding of pain mechanisms associated with painful hip disorders.

  2. 17-Beta-estradiol enhanced allodynia of inflammatory temporomandibular joint through upregulation of hippocampal TRPV1 in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Wei; Bi, Ye-Ping; Kou, Xiao-Xing; Xu, Wen; Ma, Li-Qun; Wang, Ke-Wei; Gan, Ye-Hua; Ma, Xu-Chen

    2010-06-30

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) predominantly affect reproductive female patients, with pain the most frequent complaint. Although estrogens are believed to play important roles in TMD pain, the mechanism underlying modulation of TMD pain by estrogens remains largely unknown. Accumulating evidence implies that the hippocampus is involved in sexual dimorphism of pain sensitivity. In this study, we investigated the hippocampal TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) expression in ovariectomized rats that received 17-beta-estradiol substitution and found that 17-beta-estradiol enhanced the mechanical allodynia of inflamed temporomandibular joint (TMJ) induced by complete Freund's adjuvant. Real-time PCR and immunoblotting demonstrated that TMJ inflammation significantly induced hippocampal TRPV1 expression compared with the control group but failed to induce it in the ovariectomized rats that received no estradiol replacement. In addition, estradiol potentiated TMJ inflammation-induced hippocampal TRPV1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in the ovariectomized rats. In contrast, TRPV1 transcription in amygdala, prefrontal cortex, and thalamus was not affected by TMJ inflammation and estradiol. Immunostaining showed TRPV1 localized in the processes and cytoplasm of pyramidal neurons in CA1-CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Moreover, intrahippocampal injection of TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine and 5'-iodo-resiniferatoxin into the CA1 region of the hippocampus significantly attenuated allodynia of inflamed TMJ in both nonovariectomized and ovariectomized rats that received estradiol replacement. Our results suggested that hippocampal TRPV1 can modulate central pain processing and estradiol may contribute to the sexual dimorphism of TMD pain sensitivity through upregulation of TRPV1 expression in the hippocampus.

  3. Metamizole (dipyrone) effects on sevoflurane requirements and postoperative hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Pérez, Daniel; Benito, Javier; Largo, Carlota; Polo, Gonzalo; Canfrán, Susana; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio Alvarez

    2016-09-30

    Unlike non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), metamizole has poor anti-inflammatory effects; and is suitable for models where analgesia, but not anti-inflammatory effects, is desirable. Like opioids, these drugs produce perioperative analgesia while reducing anaesthetic requirements, but it remains unclear whether they may develop tolerance or hyperalgesia, and thus decrease in analgesic efficacy. The aim was to determine whether tolerance or hyperalgesia to metamizole occurred in rats, and whether the sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) was affected. In a randomized, prospective, controlled study, male Wistar rats (n = 8 per group) were administered metamizole (300 mg/kg, day 4). Previously, the following treatments were provided: daily metamizole for four days (0-3), morphine (10 mg/kg; positive control, day 0 only) or saline (negative control). The main outcome measures were mechanical (MNT) and warm thermal (WNT) nociceptive quantitative sensory thresholds. The baseline sevoflurane MAC and the reduction produced by the treatments were also determined. The mean (SD) baseline MAC [2.4(0.2)%vol] was decreased by morphine and metamizole by 45(11)% and 33(7)% (P = 0.000, both), respectively. Baseline MNT [35.4(4.5) g] and WNT [13.2(2.4) s] were decreased by morphine and metamizole: MNT reduction of 22(6)% (P = 0.000) and 22(7)% (P = 0.001), respectively and WNT reduction of 34(14)% (P = 0.000) and 24(13)% (P = 0.001). The baseline MAC on day 4 was neither modified by treatments nor the MAC reduction produced by metamizole (days 0 and 4; P > 0.05). In conclusion, repeated metamizole administration may produce hyperalgesia, although it may not modify its anaesthetic sparing effect. The clinical relevance of this effect in painful research models requiring prolonged analgesic therapy warrants further investigation.

  4. Bilateral hand/wrist heat and cold hyperalgesia, but not hypoesthesia, in unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Carnero, Josué; Padua, Luca; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate bilaterally warm/cold detection and heat/cold pain thresholds over the hand/wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). A total of 25 women with strictly unilateral CTS (mean 42 +/- 10 years), and 20 healthy matched women (mean 41 +/- 8 years) were recruited. Warm/cold detection and heat/cold pain thresholds were assessed bilaterally over the carpal tunnel and the thenar eminence in a blinded design. Self-reported measures included both clinical pain history (intensity, location and area) and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. No significant differences between groups for both warm and cold detection thresholds in either carpal tunnel or thenar eminence (P > 0.5) were found. Further, significant differences between groups, but not between sides, for both heat and cold pain thresholds in both the carpal tunnel and thenar eminence were found (all P < 0.001). Heat pain thresholds (P < 0.01) were negatively correlated, whereas cold pain thresholds (P < 0.001) were positively correlated with hand pain intensity and duration of symptoms. Our findings revealed bilateral thermal hyperalgesia (lower heat pain and reduced cold pain thresholds) but not hypoesthesia (normal warm/cold detection thresholds) in patients with strictly unilateral CTS when compared to controls. We suggest that bilateral heat and cold hyperalgesia may reflect impairments in central nociceptive processing in patients with unilateral CTS. The bilateral thermal hyperalgesia associated with pain intensity and duration of pain history supports a role of generalized sensitization mechanisms in the initiation, maintenance and spread of pain in CTS.

  5. Early transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces hyperalgesia and decreases activation of spinal glial cells in mice with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hideaki; Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Watanabe, Shuji; Takeura, Naoto; Sugita, Daisuke; Shimada, Seiichiro; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2014-09-01

    Although transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is widely used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, its effectiveness and mechanism of action in reducing neuropathic pain remain uncertain. We investigated the effects of early TENS (starting from the day after surgery) in mice with neuropathic pain, on hyperalgesia, glial cell activation, pain transmission neuron sensitization, expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and opioid receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. Following nerve injury, TENS and behavioral tests were performed every day. Immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and flow cytometric analysis of the lumbar spinal cord were performed after 8 days. Early TENS reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and decreased the activation of microglia and astrocytes (P<0.05). In contrast, the application of TENS at 1 week (TENS-1w) or 2 weeks (TENS-2w) after injury was ineffective in reducing hyperalgesia (mechanical and thermal) or activation of microglia and astrocytes. Early TENS decreased p-p38 within microglia (P<0.05), the expression levels of protein kinase C (PKC-γ), and phosphorylated anti-phospho-cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the superficial spinal dorsal horn neurons (P<0.05), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased the expression levels of opioid receptors (P<0.05). The results suggested that the application of early TENS relieved hyperalgesia in our mouse model of neuropathic pain by inhibiting glial activation, MAP kinase activation, PKC-γ, and p-CREB expression, and proinflammatory cytokines expression, as well as maintenance of spinal opioid receptors. The findings indicate that TENS treatment is more effective when applied as early after nerve injury as possible.

  6. Leishmania (L). amazonensis induces hyperalgesia in balb/c mice: Contribution of endogenous spinal cord TNFα and NFκB activation.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Sergio M; Fattori, Victor; Ruiz-Miyazawa, Kenji W; Miranda-Sapla, Milena M; Casagrande, Rúbia; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Pavanelli, Wander R; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2017-02-17

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is the most common form of the leishmaniasis in humans. Ulcerative painless skin lesions are predominant clinical features of CL. Wider data indicate pain accompanies human leishmaniasis, out with areas of painless ulcerative lesions per se. In rodents, Leishmania (L.) major infection induces nociceptive behaviors that correlate with peripheral cytokine levels. However, the role of the spinal cord in pain processing after Leishmania infection has not been investigated. Balb/c mice received intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of Leishmania (L). amazonensis and hyperalgesia, edema, parasitism, and spinal cord TNFα, TNFR1 and TNFR2 mRNA expression, and NFκB activation were evaluated. The effects of intrathecal (i.t.) injection of morphine, TNFα, TNFα inhibitors (etanercept and adalimumab) and NFκB inhibitor (PDTC) were investigated. The present study demonstrates that Leishmania (L.) amazonensis infection in balb/c mice induces chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in an opioid-sensitive manner. Spinal cord TNFα mRNA expression increased in a time-dependent manner, peaking between 30 and 40 days after infection. At the peak of TNFα mRNA expression (day 30), there was a concomitant increase in TNFR1 and TNFR2 mRNA expression. TNFα i.t. injection enhanced L. (L.) amazonensis-induced hyperalgesia. Corroborating a role for TNFα in L. (L.) amazonensis-induced hyperalgesia, i.t. treatment with the TNFα inhibitors, etanercept and adalimumab inhibited the hyperalgesia. L. (L.) amazonensis also induced spinal cord activation of NFκB, and PDTC (given i.t.), also inhibited L. (L.) amazonensis-induced hyperalgesia, and spinal cord TNFα, TNFR1 and TNFR2 mRNA expression. Moreover, L. (L.) amazonensis-induced spinal cord activation of NFκB was also inhibited by etanercept and adalimumab as well as PDTC i.t.

  7. The TrkA receptor mediates experimental thermal hyperalgesia produced by nerve growth factor: Modulation by the p75 neurotrophin receptor.

    PubMed

    Khodorova, Alla; Nicol, Grant D; Strichartz, Gary

    2017-01-06

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) and its activation of the sphingomyelin signaling cascade are essential for mechanical hypersensitivity resulting from locally injected nerve growth factor (NGF). Here the roles of the same effectors, and of the tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) receptor, are evaluated for thermal hyperalgesia from NGF. Sensitivity of rat hind paw plantar skin to thermal stimulation after local sub-cutaneous injection of NGF (500ng) was measured by the latency for paw withdrawal (PWL) from a radiant heat source. PWL was reduced from baseline values at 0.5-22h by ∼40% from that in naïve or vehicle-injected rats, and recovered to pre-injection levels by 48h. Local pre-injection with a p75(NTR) blocking antibody did not affect the acute thermal hyperalgesia (0.5-3.5h) but hastened its recovery so that it had reversed to baseline by 22h. In addition, GW4869 (2mM), an inhibitor of the neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) that is an enzyme in the p75(NTR) pathway, also failed to prevent thermal hyperalgesia. However, C2-ceramide, an analog of the ceramide produced by sphingomyelinase, did cause thermal hyperalgesia. Injection of an anti-TrkA antibody known to promote dimerization and activation of that receptor, independent of NGF, also caused thermal hyperalgesia, and prevented the further reduction of PWL from subsequently injected NGF. A non-specific inhibitor of tropomyosin receptor kinases, K252a, prevented thermal hyperalgesia from NGF, but not that from the anti-TrkA antibody. These findings suggest that the TrkA receptor has a predominant role in thermal hypersensitivity induced by NGF, while p75(NTR) and its pathway intermediates serve a modulatory role.

  8. Pregabalin in Neuropathic Pain: Evidences and Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Singh, Nirmal; Singh Jaggi, Amteshwar

    2014-01-01

    Pregabalin is an antagonist of voltage gated Ca2+ channels and specifically binds to alpha-2-delta subunit to produce antiepileptic and analgesic actions. It successfully alleviates the symptoms of various types of neuropathic pain and presents itself as a first line therapeutic agent with remarkable safety and efficacy. Preclinical studies in various animal models of neuropathic pain have shown its effectiveness in treating the symptoms like allodynia and hyperalgesia. Clinical studies in different age groups and in different types of neuropathic pain (peripheral diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, post-herpetic neuralgia, cancer chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain) have projected it as the most effective agent either as monotherapy or in combined regimens in terms of cost effectiveness, tolerability and overall improvement in neuropathic pain states. Preclinical studies employing pregabalin in different neuropathic pain models have explored various molecular targets and the signaling systems including Ca2+ channel-mediated neurotransmitter release, activation of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), potassium channels and inhibition of pathways involving inflammatory mediators. The present review summarizes the important aspects of pregabalin as analgesic in preclinical and clinical studies as well as focuses on the possible mechanisms. PMID:24533015

  9. The Complement System Component C5a Produces Thermal Hyperalgesia via Macrophage-to-Nociceptor Signaling That Requires NGF and TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Shutov, Leonid P.; Warwick, Charles A.; Shi, Xiaoyu; Gnanasekaran, Aswini; Shepherd, Andrew J.; Mohapatra, Durga P.; Woodruff, Trent M.; Clark, J. David

    2016-01-01

    The complement cascade is a principal component of innate immunity. Recent studies have underscored the importance of C5a and other components of the complement system in inflammatory and neuropathic pain, although the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In particular, it is unclear how the complement system communicates with nociceptors and which ion channels and receptors are involved. Here we demonstrate that inflammatory thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia induced by complete Freund's adjuvant was accompanied by C5a upregulation and was markedly reduced by C5a receptor (C5aR1) knock-out or treatment with the C5aR1 antagonist PMX53. Direct administration of C5a into the mouse hindpaw produced strong thermal hyperalgesia, an effect that was absent in TRPV1 knock-out mice, and was blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810. Immunohistochemistry of mouse plantar skin showed prominent expression of C5aR1 in macrophages. Additionally, C5a evoked strong Ca2+ mobilization in macrophages. Macrophage depletion in transgenic macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis mice abolished C5a-dependent thermal hyperalgesia. Examination of inflammatory mediators following C5a injection revealed a rapid upregulation of NGF, a mediator known to sensitize TRPV1. Preinjection of an NGF-neutralizing antibody or Trk inhibitor GNF-5837 prevented C5a-induced thermal hyperalgesia. Notably, NGF-induced thermal hyperalgesia was unaffected by macrophage depletion. Collectively, these results suggest that complement fragment C5a induces thermal hyperalgesia by triggering macrophage-dependent signaling that involves mobilization of NGF and NGF-dependent sensitization of TRPV1. Our findings highlight the importance of macrophage-to-neuron signaling in pain processing and identify C5a, NGF, and TRPV1 as key players in this cross-cellular communication. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study provides mechanistic insight into how the complement system, a key component of innate immunity, regulates the

  10. SHANK3 Deficiency Impairs Heat Hyperalgesia and TRPV1 Signaling in Primary Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Han, Qingjian; Kim, Yong Ho; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Di; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Bey, Alexandra L; Lay, Mark; Chang, Wonseok; Berta, Temugin; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2016-12-21

    Abnormal pain sensitivity is commonly associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and affects the life quality of ASD individuals. SHANK3 deficiency was implicated in ASD and pain dysregulation. Here, we report functional expression of SHANK3 in mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons and spinal cord presynaptic terminals. Homozygous and heterozygous Shank3 complete knockout (Δe4-22) results in impaired heat hyperalgesia in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Specific deletion of Shank3 in Nav1.8-expressing sensory neurons also impairs heat hyperalgesia in homozygous and heterozygous mice. SHANK3 interacts with transient receptor potential subtype V1 (TRPV1) via Proline-rich region and regulates TRPV1 surface expression. Furthermore, capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, inward currents in DRG neurons, and synaptic currents in spinal cord neurons are all reduced after Shank3 haploinsufficiency. Finally, partial knockdown of SHANK3 expression in human DRG neurons abrogates TRPV1 function. Our findings reveal a peripheral mechanism of SHANK3, which may underlie pain deficits in SHANK3-related ASDs.

  11. The C-terminus of murine S100A9 protein inhibits hyperalgesia induced by the agonist peptide of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2)

    PubMed Central

    Dale, C S; Cenac, N; Britto, L R G; Juliano, M A; Juliano, L; Vergnolle, N; Giorgi, R

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: S100A9 protein induces anti-nociception in rodents, in different experimental models of inflammatory pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of a fragment of the C-terminus of S100A9 (mS100A9p), on the hyperalgesia induced by serine proteases, through the activation of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2). Experimental approach: Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by PAR2 agonists (SLIGRL-NH2 and trypsin) was measured in rats submitted to the paw pressure or plantar tests, and Egr-1 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in rat spinal cord dorsal horn. Calcium flux in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK), which naturally express PAR2, in Kirsten virus-transformed kidney cells, transfected (KNRK-PAR2) or not (KNRK) with PAR2, and in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRG) was measured by fluorimetric methods. Key results: mS100A9p inhibited mechanical hyperalgesia induced by trypsin, without modifying its enzymatic activity. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by SLIGRL-NH2 were inhibited by mS100A9p. SLIGRL-NH2 enhanced Egr-1 expression, a marker of nociceptor activation, and this effect was inhibited by concomitant treatment with mS100A9p. mS100A9p inhibited calcium mobilization in DRG neurons in response to the PAR2 agonists trypsin and SLIGRL-NH2, but also in response to capsaicin and bradykinin, suggesting a direct effect of mS100A9 on sensory neurons. No effect on the calcium flux induced by trypsin or SLIGRL in HEK cells or KNRK-PAR2 cells was observed. Conclusions and implications: These data demonstrate that mS100A9p interferes with mechanisms involved in nociception and hyperalgesia and modulates, possibly directly on sensory neurons, the PAR2-induced nociceptive signal. PMID:16967049

  12. Epac–protein kinase C alpha signaling in purinergic P2X3R-mediated hyperalgesia after inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yanping; Li, Guangwen; Chen, Yong; Huang, Li-Yen Mae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sensitization of purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) is a major mechanism contributing to injury-induced exaggerated pain responses. We showed in a previous study that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)–dependent guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (Epac1) in rat sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) is upregulated after inflammatory injury, and it plays a critical role in P2X3R sensitization by activating protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) inside the cells. protein kinase C epsilon has been established as the major PKC isoform mediating injury-induced hyperalgesic responses. On the other hand, the role of PKCα in receptor sensitization was seldom considered. Here, we studied the participation of PKCα in Epac signaling in P2X3R-mediated hyperalgesia. The expression of both Epac1 and Epac2 and the level of cAMP in DRGs are greatly enhanced after complete Freund adjuvant (CFA)–induced inflammation. The expression of phosphorylated PKCα is also upregulated. Complete Freund adjuvant (CFA)–induced P2X3R-mediated hyperalgesia is not only blocked by Epac antagonists but also by the classical PKC isoform inhibitors, Go6976, and PKCα-siRNA. These CFA effects are mimicked by the application of the Epac agonist, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2 -O-methyl-cAMP (CPT), in control rats, further confirming the involvement of Epacs. Because the application of Go6976 prior to CPT still reduces CPT-induced hyperalgesia, PKCα is downstream of Epacs to mediate the enhancement of P2X3R responses in DRGs. The pattern of translocation of PKCα inside DRG neurons in response to CPT or CFA stimulation is distinct from that of PKCε. Thus, in contrast to prevalent view, PKCα also plays an essential role in producing complex inflammation-induced receptor-mediated hyperalgesia. PMID:26963850

  13. Effects of Different Electroacupuncture Scheduling Regimens on Murine Bone Tumor-Induced Hyperalgesia: Sex Differences and Role of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Smeester, Branden A.; Al-Gizawiy, Mona; Beitz, Alvin J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that electroacupuncture (EA) is able to reduce hyperalgesia in rodent models of persistent pain, but very little is known about the analgesic effects and potential sex differences of different EA treatment regimens. In the present study, we examined the effects of five different EA treatments on tumor-induced hyperalgesia in male and female mice. EA applied to the ST-36 acupoint either twice weekly (EA-2X/3) beginning on postimplantation day (PID) 3 or prophylactically three times prior to implantation produced the most robust and longest lasting antinociceptive effects. EA treatment given once per week beginning at PID 7 only produced an antinociceptive effect in female animals. The analgesic effect of EA-2X/3 began earlier in males, but lasted longer in females indicating sex differences in EA. We further demonstrate that EA-2X/3 elicits a marked decrease in tumor-associated inflammation as evidenced by a significant reduction in tumor-associated neutrophils at PID 7. Moreover, EA-2X/3 produced a significant reduction in tumor-associated PGE2 as measured in microperfusate samples. Collectively, these data provide evidence that EA-2X/3 treatment reduces tumor-induced hyperalgesia, which is associated with a decrease in tumor-associated inflammation and PGE2 concentration at the tumor site suggesting possible mechanisms by which EA reduces tumor nociception. PMID:23320035

  14. Hydrogen-rich saline prevents remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia and inhibits MnSOD nitration via regulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptor in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Shu, R; Wang, H; Yu, Y; Wang, C; Yang, M; Wang, M; Wang, G

    2014-11-07

    Remifentanil administration may subsequently cause paradoxical hyperalgesia in animals and humans, but mechanisms remain unclear. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) nitration and inactivation caused by generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are involved in the induction and maintenance of central neuropathic pain. Hydrogen which selectively removes superoxide has gained much attention in recent years. In this study, we investigated antinociceptive effects of hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) on remifentanil-induced postsurgical hyperalgesia in a rat model of incisional pain. HRS was injected intraperitoneally 10 min before remifentanil infusion (1 μg kg(-1) min(-1) for 60 min). A selective NR2B antagonist Ro25-6981 was used to investigate whether antihypernociception of HRS is associated with NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Nociception was evaluated by the paw withdrawal mechanical threshold and thermal latency respectively. Then we assessed MnSOD, NR2A and NR2B in spinal cord dorsal horn via Western blot and immunohistochemistry after nociceptive tests. Here, we found that the analgesic effect of remifentanil was followed by long-term hyperalgesia lasting at least postoperative 7 days, which was accompanied with increase in NR2B expression and trafficking from cytoplasm to surface and MnSOD nitration in dorsal horn. Pretreatment with HRS (10 ml/kg) significantly attenuated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, blocked NR2B trafficking and MnSOD nitration in dorsal horn after remifentanil infusion. Ro25-6981 not 5 μg but 10 and 50 μg dosage-dependently attenuated hyperalgesia, and inhibited MnSOD nitration. Hyperalgesia and MnSOD nitration were attenuated after the combination of HRS (2.5 ml/kg) and Ro25-6981 (5 μg). In conclusion, HRS (10 ml/kg) might reverse remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia, through regulating NR2B-containing NMDAR trafficking to control MnSOD nitration and enhance MnSOD activity.

  15. A novel intrinsic analgesic mechanism: the enhancement of the conduction failure along polymodal nociceptive C-fibers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuchao; Wang, Shan; Wang, Wenting; Duan, Jianhong; Zhang, Ming; Lv, Xiaohua; Niu, Chunxiao; Tan, Chao; Wu, Yuanbin; Yang, Jing; Hu, Sanjue; Xing, Junling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although conduction failure has been observed in nociceptive C-fibers, little is known regarding its significance or therapeutic potential. In a previous study, we demonstrated that C-fiber conduction failure, which is regarded as an intrinsic self-inhibition mechanism, was reduced in circumstances of painful diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we extend this finding in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of inflammatory pain and validate that the degree of conduction failure decreased and led to a greater amount of pain signals conveyed to the central nervous system. In complete Freund's adjuvant–injected animals, conduction failure occurred in a C-fiber-selective, activity-dependent manner and was associated with an increase in the rising slope of the C-fiber after-hyperpolarization potential. To target conduction failure in a therapeutic modality, we used ZD7288, an antagonist of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide–modulated channels which are activated by hyperpolarization and play a pivotal role in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. ZD7288 promoted conduction failure by suppressing Ih as a mechanism to reduce the rising slope of the after-hyperpolarization potential. Moreover, perineuronal injection of ZD7288 inhibited abnormal mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia without affecting motor function or heart rate. Our data highlight the analgesic potential of local ZD7288 application and identify conduction failure as a novel target for analgesic therapeutic development. PMID:27583680

  16. A novel intrinsic analgesic mechanism: the enhancement of the conduction failure along polymodal nociceptive C-fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuchao; Wang, Shan; Wang, Wenting; Duan, Jianhong; Zhang, Ming; Lv, Xiaohua; Niu, Chunxiao; Tan, Chao; Wu, Yuanbin; Yang, Jing; Hu, Sanjue; Xing, Junling

    2016-10-01

    Although conduction failure has been observed in nociceptive C-fibers, little is known regarding its significance or therapeutic potential. In a previous study, we demonstrated that C-fiber conduction failure, which is regarded as an intrinsic self-inhibition mechanism, was reduced in circumstances of painful diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we extend this finding in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of inflammatory pain and validate that the degree of conduction failure decreased and led to a greater amount of pain signals conveyed to the central nervous system. In complete Freund's adjuvant-injected animals, conduction failure occurred in a C-fiber-selective, activity-dependent manner and was associated with an increase in the rising slope of the C-fiber after-hyperpolarization potential. To target conduction failure in a therapeutic modality, we used ZD7288, an antagonist of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-modulated channels which are activated by hyperpolarization and play a pivotal role in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. ZD7288 promoted conduction failure by suppressing Ih as a mechanism to reduce the rising slope of the after-hyperpolarization potential. Moreover, perineuronal injection of ZD7288 inhibited abnormal mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia without affecting motor function or heart rate. Our data highlight the analgesic potential of local ZD7288 application and identify conduction failure as a novel target for analgesic therapeutic development.

  17. Medullary N-type and P/Q-type calcium channels contribute to neuropathy-induced allodynia.

    PubMed

    Urban, Mark O; Ren, Kunkun; Sablad, Marciano; Park, Kenneth T

    2005-04-25

    The present study was designed to determine the contribution of N-type, P/Q-type and L-type calcium channels in the rostral ventromedial medulla to tactile allodynia following peripheral nerve injury. L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation in rats produced tactile allodynia, which was dose-dependently inhibited by intrarostral ventromedial medulla microinjection of the N-type calcium channel antagonist omega-conotoxin MVIIA. Similarly, intrarostral ventromedial medulla microinjection of the P/Q-type calcium channel antagonist omega-agatoxin IVA inhibited spinal nerve ligation-induced tactile allodynia, whereas intrarostral ventromedial medulla microinjection of the L-type calcium channel antagonist nimodipine had no effect. These results demonstrate that N-type and P/Q-type calcium channels in the rostral ventromedial medulla contribute to tactile allodynia following peripheral neuropathy, likely via neurotransmitter-mediated activation of descending facilitatory systems from the rostral ventromedial medulla.

  18. Celecoxib alleviates oxaliplatin-induced hyperalgesia through inhibition of spinal ERK1/2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongping; Wang, Qinghua; Shi, Danni; Yao, Dongbo; Zhang, Lei; Xiong, Junping; Xu, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Numerous pieces of evidence have revealed that oxaliplatin (OXA) evokes mechanical and cold hypersensitivity. However, the mechanism underlying these bothersome side effects needs to be further investigated. It is well known that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) signaling play crucial roles in several pain states. Our previous data showed that Akt2 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) participated in the regulation of OXA-induced neuropathic pain. But it is still unclear whether spinal ERK1/2 signaling is involved in the regulation of OXA-induced hyperalgesia, and the linkage between COX-2 and ERK1/2 signaling in mediating OXA-induced hyperalgesia also remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the possible mechanism of celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, in OXA-induced neuropathic pain. Our results show that single dose of OXA (12 mg/kg) significantly attenuated both the tail withdrawal latency (TWL) and mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) at days 4 after the OXA treatment. Administration of celecoxib (30 mg/kg/day) for 4 and 6 days inhibited the decrease in TWL and MWT, and each was significantly higher than that of the OXA+vehicle group and was equivalent to that of the vehicles group. OXA increased the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (pERK1/2) protein in the lumbar 4-5 (L4-5) spinal cord dorsal horn neurons. Administration of celecoxib for 7 days suppressed the increase in expression of COX-2 and pERK1/2 induced by OXA. Our findings suggested that COX-2 and ERK1/2 signaling in spinal cord contributed to the OXA-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:27821910

  19. Kinin B(1) and B(2) receptors contribute to orofacial heat hyperalgesia induced by infraorbital nerve constriction injury in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Luiz, Ana Paula; Schroeder, Samilla Driessen; Chichorro, Juliana Geremias; Calixto, João Batista; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Rae, Giles Alexander

    2010-04-01

    Mechanisms coupled to kinin B(1) and B(2) receptors have been implicated in sensory changes associated to various models of neuropathy. The current study aimed to investigate if kinins also participate in orofacial thermal hyperalgesia induced by constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CION), a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain which displays persistent hypersensitivity to orofacial sensory stimulation, in rats and mice. Male Swiss mice (30-35g) or Wistar rats (200-250g; n=6-10 per group in both cases) underwent CION or sham surgery and were submitted repeatedly to application of heat ( approximately 50 degrees C) to the ipsilateral or contralateral snout, delivered by a heat source placed 1cm from the vibrissal pad. Decreases in latency to display head withdrawal or vigorous snout flicking were considered indicative of heat hyperalgesia. CION caused long-lasting heat hyperalgesia which started on Day 2 after surgery in both species and lasted up to Day 17 in mice and Day 10 in rats. Administration of DALBK or HOE-140 (peptidic B(1) and B(2) receptor antagonists, respectively; each at 3nmol in 10microl) onto the exposed infraorbital nerve of mice at the moment of surgery delayed the development of the thermal hyperalgesia. Systemic treatment on Day 5 (mice) or Day 4 (rats) with Des-Arg(9), Leu(8)-Bradykinin (DALBK, B(1) receptor antagonist, 0.1-1micromol/kg, i.p.) or HOE-140 (B(2) receptor antagonist, 0.001-1micromol/kg, i.p.) transiently reduced heat hyperalgesia in both species. Due to the peptidic nature of DALBK and HOE-140, it is likely that their effects reported herein resulted from blockade of peripheral kinin receptors. Thus, mechanisms operated by kinin B(1) and B(2) receptors, contribute to orofacial heat hyperalgesia induced by CION in both mice and rats. Perhaps kinin B(1) and B(2) receptor antagonists might constitute effective preventive and curative treatments for orofacial thermal hyperalgesia induced by nerve injury.

  20. The role of P2X3 receptors in bilateral masseter muscle allodynia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tariba Knežević, Petra; Vukman, Robert; Antonić, Robert; Kovač, Zoran; Uhač, Ivone; Simonić-Kocijan, Sunčana

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine the relationship between bilateral allodynia induced by masseter muscle inflammation and P2X3 receptor expression changes in trigeminal ganglia (TRG) and the influence of intramasseteric P2X3 antagonist administration on bilateral masseter allodynia. Methods To induce bilateral allodynia, rats received a unilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the masseter muscle. Bilateral head withdrawal threshold (HWT) was measured 4 days later. Behavioral measurements were followed by bilateral masseter muscle and TRG dissection. Masseter tissue was evaluated histopathologically and TRG tissue was analyzed for P2X3 receptor mRNA expression by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. To assess the P2X3 receptor involvement in nocifensive behavior, two doses (6 and 60 μg/50 μL) of selective P2X3 antagonist A-317491 were administrated into the inflamed masseter muscle 4 days after the CFA injection. Bilateral HWT was measured at 15-, 30-, 60-, and 120-minute time points after A-317491 administration. Results HWT was bilaterally reduced after the CFA injection (P < 0.001). Intramasseteric inflammation was confirmed ipsilaterally to the CFA injection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated enhanced P2X3 expression in TRG ipsilaterally to CFA administration (P < 0.01). In comparison with controls, the dose of 6 μg of A-317491 significantly increased bilateral HWT at 15-, 30-, and 60-minute time points after the A-317491 administration (P < 0.001), whereas the dose of 60 μg of A-317491 was efficient at all time points ipsilaterally (P = 0.004) and at 15-, 30-, and 60-minute time points contralaterally (P < 0.001). Conclusion Unilateral masseter inflammation can induce bilateral allodynia in rats. The study provided evidence that P2X3 receptors can functionally influence masseter muscle allodynia and suggested that P2X3 receptors expressed in TRG neurons are involved in masseter

  1. Salmon-derived thrombin inhibits development of chronic pain through an endothelial barrier protective mechanism dependent on APC

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jenell R; Galie, Peter A; Slochower, David R; Weisshaar, Christine L.; Janmey, Paul A; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2015-01-01

    Many neurological disorders are initiated by blood-brain barrier breakdown, which potentiates spinal neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Peripheral neuropathic injuries are known to disrupt the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) and to potentiate inflammation. But, it is not known whether BSCB breakdown facilitates pain development. In this study, a neural compression model in the rat was used to evaluate relationships among BSCB permeability, inflammation and pain-related behaviors. BSCB permeability increases transiently only after injury that induces mechanical hyperalgesia, which correlates with serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-7, IL-12, IL-1α and TNF-α. Mammalian thrombin dually regulates vascular permeability through PAR1 and activated protein C (APC). Since thrombin protects vascular integrity through APC, directing its affinity towards protein C, while still promoting coagulation, might be an ideal treatment for BSCB-disrupting disorders. Salmon thrombin, which prevents the development of mechanical allodynia, also prevents BSCB breakdown after neural injury and actively inhibits TNF-α-induced endothelial permeability in vitro, which is not evident the case for human thrombin. Salmon thrombin’s production of APC faster than human thrombin is confirmed using a fluorogenic assay and APC is shown to inhibit BSCB breakdown and pain-related behaviors similar to salmon thrombin. Together, these studies highlight the impact of BSCB on pain and establish salmon thrombin as an effective blocker of BSCB, and resulting nociception, through its preferential affinity for protein C. PMID:26708087

  2. Repeated 100 Hz TENS for the Treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Hyperalgesia and Suppression of Spinal Release of Substance P in Monoarthritic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Tian, Jin-Bin; Luo, Fei; Jiang, Yu-Hui; Deng, Zu-Guo; Xiong, Liang; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Jin-Shu

    2007-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has been shown to be an effective measure for pain relief. The aim of the present study was to determine the optimal intensity and interval of repeated 100 Hz TENS for the treatment of chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia in a monoarthritic pain model of the rat, and to assess the changes of the spinal substance P (SP) release in response to TENS treatment. A reliable, reproducible chronic monoarthritic pain model was produced by intra-articular injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) at single ankle joint. The efficacy of 100 Hz TENS treatments with different frequencies and intensities was compared. In the acute period (within 3 weeks) of monoarthritis, twice-a-week schedule of TENS reduced the swelling of the inflamed ankle significantly. In the stable period (4–9 weeks), however, once-a-week schedule produced a significantly better therapeutic effect on both inflammation and arthritic hyperalgesia than that of twice- or five-times-a-week schedule. Using three levels of intensity of TENS, we found that the weaker (1-1-2 mA) stimulation produced significantly better therapeutic effects. Repeated TENS produced a reduction of SP content in spinal perfusate in parallel with the progressive reduction of the arthritic pain scores. Our results suggest that (i) consecutive TENS treatments produced cumulative effect for chronic hyperalgesia, (ii) for chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia, a weaker intensity and more sparsely arranged treatment schedule may produce better therapeutic effect and (iii) a decrease in SP release may serve as one of the possible neurochemical mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of multiple TENS treatments on chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:17342243

  3. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia) after acute foot trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wienemann, Tobias; Chantelau, Ernst A.; Koller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and objective Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic) neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy). Design and methods A case–control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture). Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects) with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT) and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT) were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II®). Results In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT) at the injured foot was reduced by about 15–25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15–20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal) versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group); CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Conclusion Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic) neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to ‘pull away’ from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking. PMID:25397867

  4. δ-Opioid receptor agonists inhibit migraine-related hyperalgesia, aversive state and cortical spreading depression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A; Smith, Monique L; Zyuzin, Jekaterina; Charles, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine is an extraordinarily common brain disorder for which treatment options continue to be limited. Agonists that activate the δ-opioid receptor may be promising for the treatment of migraine as they are highly effective for the treatment of chronic rather than acute pain, do not induce hyperalgesia, have low abuse potential and have anxiolytic and antidepressant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of δ-opioid receptor agonists for migraine by characterizing their effects in mouse migraine models. Experimental Approach Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed in mice treated with acute and chronic doses of nitroglycerin (NTG), a known human migraine trigger. Conditioned place aversion to NTG was also measured as a model of migraine-associated negative affect. In addition, we assessed evoked cortical spreading depression (CSD), an established model of migraine aura, in a thinned skull preparation. Key Results NTG evoked acute and chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice, as well as conditioned place aversion. Three different δ-opioid receptor agonists, SNC80, ARM390 and JNJ20788560, significantly reduced NTG-evoked hyperalgesia. SNC80 also abolished NTG-induced conditioned place aversion, suggesting that δ-opioid receptor activation may also alleviate the negative emotional state associated with migraine. We also found that SNC80 significantly attenuated CSD, a model that is considered predictive of migraine preventive therapies. Conclusions and Implications These data show that δ-opioid receptor agonists modulate multiple basic mechanisms associated with migraine, indicating that δ-opioid receptors are a promising therapeutic target for this disorder. PMID:24467301

  5. Successful treatment of hydromorphone-induced neurotoxicity and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Keun Sam; Carson, Shawn; Glassman, David; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2004-10-01

    There has been an increase in opioid consumption world wide in the last decade. There has also been a disturbing increase in the number of reports of neuroexcitatory opioid-related side effects observed in patients receiving large doses of systemically administered morphine and its structural analogue, hydromorphone. It is now becoming clearer that patients receiving long-term opioid therapy can develop unexpected pain. We describe an interesting case of successful management of hydromorphone-induced neurotoxicity and hyperalgesia produced by short-term therapy with rapidly escalating doses of systemic hydromorphone.

  6. Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation alleviates remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanqing; Yao, Yusheng; Wu, Yihuan; Dai, Dongsheng; Zhao, Qiuyan; Qiu, Liangcheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, we verified the hypothesis that TEAS can alleviate remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods: 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA) I-IIpatients, aged 18-60 year, scheduled for thyroidectomy were randomly allocated to TEAS or sham groups. TEAS consisted of 30 min of stimulation (6-9 mA, 2/10 Hz) on the Hegu (LI4) and Neiguan (PC6) before anesthesia. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane adjusted to bispectral index (40-60) and target remifentanil 5.0 ng/ml. Mechanical pain thresholds were assessed using electronic von Frey. The primary outcome was mechanical pain thresholds. Secondary outcomes included postoperative pain scores, the time to first rescue analgesic, cumulative number of rescue analgesia, and side effects, including postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), dizziness and shivering in 24 h postoperatively. Results: Baseline mechanical pain thresholds were similar between the groups. The analysis revealed the decrease in mechanical threshold was greater in the sham group than the TEAS group (P < 0.001). Postoperative pain scores and cumulative number of rescue analgesia were lower in the TEAS group (P < 0.05). In addition, TEAS group patients reduced the incidence of PONV and shivering. Conclusion: Preoperative TEAS can attenuate remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. PMID:26131165

  7. TDAG8 involved in initiating inflammatory hyperalgesia and establishing hyperalgesic priming in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shih-Ping; Huang, Ya-Han; Chang, Chung-Jen; Huang, Yu-Fen; Hsieh, Wei-Shan; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Satoshii; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain, resulting from injury, arthritis, and cancer, is often accompanied by inflammation. High concentrations of protons found in inflamed tissues results in tissue acidosis, a major cause of pain and hyperalgesia. Acidosis signals may mediate a transition from acute to chronic hyperalgesia (hyperalgesic priming) via proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The expression of T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8), a proton-sensing GPCR, is increased during inflammatory hyperalgesia. Attenuating TDAG8 expression in the spinal cord inhibits bone cancer pain, but whether TDAG8 is involved in inflammatory hyperalgesia or hyperalgesic priming remains unclear. In this study, we used TDAG8-knockout or -knockdown to explore the role of TDAG8 in pain. Suppressed TDAG8 expression delayed the onset of inflammatory hyperalgesia and shortened hyperalgesic time in mice. In a dual acid-injection model (acid [pH 5.0] injected twice, 5 days apart), shRNA inhibition of TDAG8 shortened the duration of the second hyperalgesia. Similar results were found in TDAG8-deficient mice. The dual administration of TDAG8 agonist also confirmed that TDAG8 is involved in hyperalgsic priming. Accordingly, TDAG8 may mediate acidosis signals to initiate inflammatory hyperalgesia and establish hyperalgesic priming. PMID:28145512

  8. Role of Corticotropin-releasing Factor Signaling in Stress-related Alterations of Colonic Motility and Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Taché, Yvette; Million, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling systems encompass CRF and the structurally related peptide urocortin (Ucn) 1, 2, and 3 along with 2 G-protein coupled receptors, CRF1 and CRF2. CRF binds with high and moderate affinity to CRF1 and CRF2 receptors, respectively while Ucn1 is a high-affinity agonist at both receptors, and Ucn2 and Ucn3 are selective CRF2 agonists. The CRF systems are expressed in both the brain and the colon at the gene and protein levels. Experimental studies established that the activation of CRF1 pathway in the brain or the colon recaptures cardinal features of diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (stimulation of colonic motility, activation of mast cells and serotonin, defecation/watery diarrhea, and visceral hyperalgesia). Conversely, selective CRF1 antagonists or CRF1/CRF2 antagonists, abolished or reduced exogenous CRF and stress-induced stimulation of colonic motility, defecation, diarrhea and colonic mast cell activation and visceral hyperalgesia to colorectal distention. By contrast, the CRF2 signaling in the colon dampened the CRF1 mediated stimulation of colonic motor function and visceral hyperalgesia. These data provide a conceptual framework that sustained activation of the CRF1 system at central and/or peripheral sites may be one of the underlying basis of IBS-diarrhea symptoms. While targeting these mechanisms by CRF1 antagonists provided a relevant novel therapeutic venue, so far these promising preclinical data have not translated into therapeutic use of CRF1 antagonists. Whether the existing or newly developed CRF1 antagonists will progress to therapeutic benefits for stress-sensitive diseases including IBS for a subset of patients is still a work in progress. PMID:25611064

  9. The dorsomedial hypothalamus mediates stress-induced hyperalgesia and is the source of the pronociceptive peptide cholecystokinin in the rostral ventromedial medulla.

    PubMed

    Wagner, K M; Roeder, Z; Desrochers, K; Buhler, A V; Heinricher, M M; Cleary, D R

    2013-05-15

    While intense or highly arousing stressors have long been known to suppress pain, relatively mild or chronic stress can enhance pain. The mechanisms underlying stress-induced hyperalgesia (SIH) are only now being defined. The physiological and neuroendocrine effects of mild stress are mediated by the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), which has documented connections with the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), a brainstem region capable of facilitating nociception. We hypothesized that stress engages both the DMH and the RVM to produce hyperalgesia. Direct pharmacological activation of the DMH increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation in awake animals, confirming that the DMH can mediate behavioral hyperalgesia. A behavioral model of mild stress also produced mechanical hyperalgesia, which was blocked by inactivation of either the DMH or the RVM. The neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK) acts in the RVM to enhance nociception and is abundant in the DMH. Using a retrograde tracer and immunohistochemical labeling, we determined that CCK-expressing neurons in the DMH are the only significant supraspinal source of CCK in the RVM. However, not all neurons projecting from the DMH to the RVM contained CCK, and microinjection of the CCK2 receptor antagonist YM022 in the RVM did not interfere with SIH, suggesting that transmitters in addition to CCK play a significant role in this connection during acute stress. While the RVM has a well-established role in facilitation of nociception, the DMH, with its well-documented role in stress, may also be engaged in a number of chronic or abnormal pain states. Taken as a whole, these findings establish an anatomical and functional connection between the DMH and RVM by which stress can facilitate pain.

  10. Constriction of the buccal branch of the facial nerve produces unilateral craniofacial allodynia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Susannah S; Grace, Peter M; Hutchinson, Mark R; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2016-12-18

    Despite pain being a sensory experience, studies of spinal cord ventral root damage have demonstrated that motor neuron injury can induce neuropathic pain. Whether injury of cranial motor nerves can also produce nociceptive hypersensitivity has not been addressed. Herein, we demonstrate that chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the buccal branch of the facial nerve results in long-lasting, unilateral allodynia in the rat. An anterograde and retrograde tracer (3000MW tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated dextran) was not transported to the trigeminal ganglion when applied to the injury site, but was transported to the facial nucleus, indicating that this nerve branch is not composed of trigeminal sensory neurons. Finally, intracisterna magna injection of interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist reversed allodynia, implicating the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1 in the maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by facial nerve CCI. These data extend the prior evidence that selective injury to motor axons can enhance pain to supraspinal circuits by demonstrating that injury of a facial nerve with predominantly motor axons is sufficient for neuropathic pain, and that the resultant pain has a neuroimmune component.

  11. Supraspinal Gβγ-dependent stimulation of PLCβ3 originating from G inhibitory protein-μ opioid receptor-coupling is necessary for morphine induced acute hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Enrica; Norcini, Monica; Smrcka, Alan; Ghelardini, Carla

    2009-01-01

    Although alterations in μ-opioid receptor signaling mediate excitatory effects of opiates in opioid tolerance, the molecular mechanism for the excitatory effect of acute low dose morphine, as it relates to μ-opioid receptor coupling, is presently unknown. A pronounced coupling of μ-opioid receptor to the α subunit of G inhibitory protein emerged in periaqueductal gray from mice systemically administered with morphine at a dose producing acute thermal hyperalgesia. This coupling was abolished in presence of the selective μ-opioid receptor receptor antagonist CTOP administered at the periaqueductal gray site, showing that the low dose morphine effect is triggered by μ-opioid receptor activated G inhibitory protein at supraspinal level. When Gβγ downstream signalling was blocked by intra-periaqueductal gray co-administration of M119, a compound that inhibits Gβγ dimer-dependent signaling, a complete prevention of low dose morphine induced acute thermal hyperalgesia was obtained. Phospholipase C β3, an enzyme necessary to morphine hyperalgesia, was revealed to be associated with Gβγ in periaqueductal gray. Although opioid administration induces a shift in μ-opioid receptor-G protein coupling from Gi to Gs after chronic administration, our data support that this condition is not realized in acute treatment providing evidence that a separate molecular mechanism underlies morphine induced acute excitatory effect. PMID:19656263

  12. CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND PAIN: CONDITIONED ANALGESIA AND HYPERALGESIA

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity. PMID:24269884

  13. Chrysin induces hyperalgesia via the GABAA receptor in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Kui; Hu, Li; Chen, Juan; Fu, Cai-Yun; Chen, Qiang

    2008-08-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a natural flavone commonly found in many plants including PASSIFLORA COERULEA L. Researchers have performed extensive and detailed investigations on the behavioral and pharmacological effects of chrysin IN VIVO, but there was little information available on the effect of chrysin on nociception. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of chrysin on the nociceptive threshold using the tail-immersion test. Intraperitoneal ( I. P.) injection of chrysin (10, 25, 50, 75, 100 mg/kg) dose- and time-dependently induced a pronounced decrease of the tail withdrawal latencies (TWL), thus characterizing a hyperalgesic effect (ED50 = 65.59 mg/kg). The following results showed that GABAA receptors were involved in the hyperalgesic effects of chrysin. 1) The hyperalgesia induced by chrysin was significantly and dose-dependently blocked by pretreatment with flumazenil (0.75, 1 mg/kg, I. P.), a specific antagonist for benzodiazepine sites associated with GABAA receptors. 2) Bicuculline (2, 4 mg/kg, I. P.), a GABAA receptor antagonist, markedly antagonized the hyperalgesic effect of chrysin in a dose-dependent manner. 3) Picrotoxin (2 mg/kg, I. P.), a chloride channel blocker, could also notably antagonize the hyperalgesia of chrysin. Oral administration of chrysin (75 mg/kg) also produced a hyperalgesic effect in the tail-immersion test. In addition, diazepam (1 mg/kg, I. P.) showed a marked antinociceptive effect, which was completely blocked by flumazenil (1 mg/kg, I. P.). In conclusion, it can be summarized that both I. P. and oral administration of chrysin produced a significant hyperalgesic effect in the tail-immersion test and that the hyperalgesic effect of chrysin may be associated with GABAA receptors.

  14. Inflammation and hyperalgesia in rats neonatally treated with capsaicin: effects on two classes of nociceptive neurons in the superficial dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Ren, K; Williams, G M; Ruda, M A; Dubner, R

    1994-11-01

    To address the mechanisms of hyperalgesia and dorsal horn plasticity following peripheral tissue inflammation, the effects of adjuvant-induced inflammation of the rat hindpaw on behavioral nociception and nociceptive neuronal activity in the superficial dorsal horn were examined in neonatally capsaicin-treated rats 6-8 weeks of age. Capsaicin treatment resulted in an 82% loss of unmyelinated fibers in L5 dorsal roots, a dramatic reduction of substance P-like immunoreactivity in the spinal cord, and a significant decrease in the percentage of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons that responded to C-fiber stimulation and noxious heating of the skin. The thermal nociceptive threshold was significantly increased in capsaicin-treated rats, but behavioral hyperalgesia to thermal stimuli still developed in response to inflammation. Following inflammation, there was a significant decrease in mechanical threshold and an increase in response duration to mechanical stimuli in both vehicle- and capsaicin-treated rats, suggesting that a state of mechanical hyperalgesia was also induced. The capsaicin treatment appears to have differential effects on nociceptive specific (NS) and wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neurons in inflamed rats. Expansion of the receptive fields of nociceptive neurons, a measure of the effect of inflammation-induced CNS plasticity, was less extensive for NS than for WDR neurons in capsaicin-treated rats. Compared to vehicle-treated rats, a smaller population of NS neurons, but a similar percentage of WDR neurons, had background activity in inflamed capsaicin-treated rats. C-fiber strength electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve produced expansion of the receptive fields in a greater portion of NS neurons (53%, P < 0.05) in capsaicin- than in vehicle-treated rats (32%). There was no difference in stimulation-induced expansion of the receptive fields for WDR neurons between vehicle- or capsaicin-treated rats. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, MK-801

  15. Effects of intravenous Injections Paederiae and Stauntonia on spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and inflammation induced by cutaneous chemical tissue injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao-Li; Gao, Xi-Ling; Chen, Jun; Huang, Xi; Chen, Hui-Sheng

    2003-10-25

    To study whether commercial traditional Chinese medicinal preparations Injection Paederiae (IP) or Injection Stauntonia (IS) has anti-nociceptive and/or anti-inflammatory effects, we used two persistent pain models (bee venom and formalin test) to evaluate the systemic effects of IP or IS on the chemical tissue injury-induced persistent spontaneous pain-related responses (PSPR), primary thermal/mechanical hyperalgesia and inflammation in conscious rats. Injection of bee venom (BV, 0.1 mg, 50 microl) into the plantar surface of one hind paw resulted in not only a 1-h monophasic PSPR such as flinching reflex in the injected paw and a subsequent period of 3-4 days primary heat and mechanical hyperalgesia, but also a marked sign of inflammation, including redness and swelling of the plantar surface in the injected paw. Intraplantar injection of formalin produced two phases of PSPR as reported previously. Systemic pre-treatment with three doses of IP (0.32, 1.6 and 9.0 ml/kg, 500%) or IS (0.32, 1.6 and 9.0 ml/kg, 250%) produced a dose-dependent suppression of the BV- or formalin-induced flinching reflex of 1 h time course as compared with the saline control group. Post-treatment with IP or IS 5 min after BV injection also produced a significant suppression of the flinching reflex in both BV test and formalin test respectively, as compared with the control group. However, neither pre- nor post-treatment with IP or IS produced any significantly suppressive effect on the BV-induced primary heat and mechanical hyperalgesia and inflammation. The analgesia produced by IP or IS was not mediated by the endogenous opioid receptors since naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, had no reversal effect on the IP and IS-produced analgesia in the BV-induced PSPR. Our present results suggest that IP or IS might prevent and relieve clinical persistent spontaneous pain, but without any anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects on the primary heat hyperalgesia

  16. Synovial TRPV1 is upregulated by 17-β-estradiol and involved in allodynia of inflamed temporomandibular joints in female rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Wei; Hao, Ting; Kou, Xiao-Xing; Gan, Ye-Hua; Ma, Xu-Chen

    2015-09-01

    Women with reproductive capability are more likely to suffer from temporomandibular disorders (TMD), with orofacial pain as the most common complaint. In the past, we focused on the role of estradiol in TMD pain through the nervous system. In this study, we explored estradiol's influence on synoviocyte gene expressions involved in the allodynia of the inflamed TMJ. The influence of 17-β-estradiol on NGF and TRPV1 expression in TMJ synovium was determined in vivo and in vitro and analyzed by Western blot and real-time PCR. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection into the TMJ was used to induce TMJ arthritis. Capsazepine served as a TRPV1 antagonist. Head withdrawal threshold was examined using a von Frey Anesthesiometer. We observed that estradiol upregulated the expressions of TRPV1 and NGF in a dose-dependent manner. In the primary cultured synoviocytes, TRPV1 was upregulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), estradiol, and NGF, while NGF antibodies fully blocked LPS and estradiol-induced upregulation of TRPV1. Activation of TRPV1 in the primary synoviocytes with capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, dose-dependently enhanced COX-2 transcription. Moreover, intra-TMJ injection of TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, significantly attenuated allodynia of the inflamed TMJ induced by intra-TMJ injection of CFA in female rats. This article presents a possible local mechanism for estradiol that may be involved in TMJ inflammation or pain in the synovial membrane through the pain-related gene TRPV1. This finding could potentially help clinicians understand the sexual dimorphism of TMD pain.

  17. Chronic Oral Pelargonidin Alleviates Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Neuropathic Hyperalgesia in Rat: Involvement of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mirshekar, Mohammadali; Roghani, Mehrdad; Khalili, Mohsen; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Arab Moazzen, Saiedeh

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus in some clinical cases is accompanied with hyperalgesia. In this study, we evaluated the possible beneficial effect of chronic pelargonidin (PG) treatment on hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic neuropathic rat. Methods: Male Wistar rats (n = 56) were divided into seven groups, i.e. control, diabetic, PG-treated control, PG (single- and multiple-dose)-treated diabetic, and sodium salicylate-treated control and diabetics. For induction of diabetes, STZ was injected i.p. at a single dose of 60 mg/kg. PG was orally administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg once and/or on alternate days for 8 weeks; 1 week after diabetes induction. After two months, hyperalgesia was assessed using standard formalin and hot tail immersion tests. Meanwhile, markers of oxidative stress in brain were measured. One-way analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis of the data. Results: Diabetic rats showed a marked chemical and thermal hyperalgesia, indicating that development of diabetic neuropathy and PG treatment (especially multiple-doses) significantly ameliorated the alteration in hyperalgesia (P<0.05-0.01) in diabetic rats as compared to untreated diabetics. PG (multiple doses) also significantly decreased diabetes-induced thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation and non-significantly reversed elevation of nitrite level and reduction of antioxidant defensive enzyme superoxide dismutase. Conclusion: These results clearly suggest that PG prevents diabetic neuropathic hyperalgesia through attenuation of oxidative stress. PMID:20683496

  18. Contributions of spinal D-amino acid oxidase to chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuai; Li, Xin-Yan; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-12-10

    Spinal D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) is an FAD-dependent peroxisomal flavoenzyme which mediates the conversion of neutral and polar D-amino acids (including D-serine) to the corresponding α-keto acids, and simultaneously produces hydrogen peroxide and ammonia. This study has aimed to explore the potential contributions of spinal DAAO and its mediated hydrogen peroxide/D-serine metabolism to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia. Bi-daily subcutaneous injections of morphine to mice over 7 days induced thermal hyperalgesia as measured by both the hot-plate and tail-immersion tests, and spinal astroglial activation with increased spinal gene expression of DAAO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)). Subcutaneous injections of the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[D]isoxazol-3-ol) prevented and reversed the chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. CBIO also inhibited both astrocyte activation and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intrathecal injection of the hydrogen peroxide scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) and of catalase completely reversed established morphine hyperalgesia, whereas subcutaneous injections of exogenous D-serine failed to alter chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. These results provided evidence that spinal DAAO and its subsequent production of hydrogen peroxide rather than the D-serine metabolism contributed to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

  19. Is the Volume of the Caudate Nuclei Associated With Area of Secondary Hyperalgesia? – Protocol for a 3-Tesla MRI Study of Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Johan Mårtensson, Johan; Becerra, Lino; Christensen, Anders; Nybing, Janus Damm; Havsteen, Inger; Boesen, Mikael; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience and development of pain may be influenced by a number of physiological, psychological, and psychosocial factors. In a previous study we found differences in neuronal activation to noxious stimulation, and microstructural neuroanatomical differences, when comparing healthy volunteers with differences in size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following a standardized burn injury. Objective We aim to investigate the degree of association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization. Methods The study consists of one experimental day, in which whole-brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans will be conducted including T1-weighed three-dimensional anatomy scan, diffusion tensor imaging, and resting state functional MRI. Before the experimental day, all included participants will undergo experimental pain testing in a parallel study (Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02527395). Results from this experimental pain testing, as well as the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia from the included participants, will be extracted from this parallel study. Results The association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the area of secondary hyperalgesia will be investigated by linear regression of the estimated best linear unbiased predictors on the individual volumes of the pain relevant brain structures. Conclusions We plan to investigate the association between experimental pain testing parameters and the volume, connectivity, and resting state activity of pain-relevant structures in the brain. These results may improve our knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for the development of acute and chronic pain. ClinicalTrial Danish Research Ethics Committee (identifier: H-15010473). Danish Data Protection Agency (identifier: RH-2015-149). Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02567318; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02567318

  20. Epigenetic mechanisms of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Descalzi, Giannina; Ikegami, Daigo; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Nestler, Eric J; Zachariou, Venetia; Narita, Minoru

    2015-04-01

    Neuropathic and inflammatory pain promote a large number of persisting adaptations at the cellular and molecular level, allowing even transient tissue or nerve damage to elicit changes in cells that contribute to the development of chronic pain and associated symptoms. There is evidence that injury-induced changes in chromatin structure drive stable changes in gene expression and neural function, which may cause several symptoms, including allodynia, hyperalgesia, anxiety, and depression. Recent findings on epigenetic changes in the spinal cord and brain during chronic pain may guide fundamental advances in new treatments. Here, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic regulation in the nervous system and then discuss the still-limited literature that directly implicates epigenetic modifications in chronic pain syndromes.

  1. A touchy subject: an assessment of cutaneous allodynia in a chronic migraine population

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Paul G; Cutrer, Fred Michael; Garza, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Background Cutaneous allodynia (CA) is a common feature of migraine, which has a complex underlying pathophysiology that is not well understood. In addition to pain, photophobia, phonophobia, osmophobia, nausea, and vomiting, CA can contribute to the overall disability caused by migraine. The presence of CA can be established via a validated questionnaire. Validated questionnaires and other tests are rarely performed in clinical practice. As such, current prevalence estimates for CA may be an underestimation. Methods Utilizing a validated questionnaire, we assessed the presence of CA in consecutive patients (n=44) presenting with chronic migraine at a tertiary headache center. Results CA appears to be quite prevalent, at ~90%, among female patients with chronic migraine. Conclusion CA prevalence in chronic migraine may be underestimated in the literature, and larger studies may better demonstrate a more accurate estimate of its prevalence. PMID:26955290

  2. Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion Enhances Mechanically Evoked Pain Behavior and the Activity of Cutaneous Nociceptors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Hurwitz, Olivia; Shimada, Steven G.; Qu, Lintao; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Pu; Ma, Chao; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Radicular pain in humans is usually caused by intraforaminal stenosis and other diseases affecting the spinal nerve, root, or dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Previous studies discovered that a chronic compression of the DRG (CCD) induced mechanical allodynia in rats and mice, with enhanced excitability of DRG neurons. We investigated whether CCD altered the pain-like behavior and also the responses of cutaneous nociceptors with unmyelinated axons (C-fibers) to a normally aversive punctate mechanical stimulus delivered to the hairy skin of the hind limb of the mouse. The incidence of a foot shaking evoked by indentation of the dorsum of foot with an aversive von Frey filament (tip diameter 200 μm, bending force 20 mN) was significantly higher in the foot ipsilateral to the CCD surgery as compared to the contralateral side on post-operative days 2 to 8. Mechanically-evoked action potentials were electrophysiologically recorded from the L3 DRG, in vivo, from cell bodies visually identified as expressing a transgenically labeled fluorescent marker (neurons expressing either the receptor MrgprA3 or MrgprD). After CCD, 26.7% of MrgprA3+ and 32.1% MrgprD+ neurons exhibited spontaneous activity (SA), while none of the unoperated control neurons had SA. MrgprA3+ and MrgprD+ neurons in the compressed DRG exhibited, in comparison with neurons from unoperated control mice, an increased response to the punctate mechanical stimuli for each force applied (6, 20, 40, and 80 mN). We conclude that CCD produced both a behavioral hyperalgesia and an enhanced response of cutaneous C-nociceptors to aversive punctate mechanical stimuli. PMID:26356638

  3. The pattern and time course of somatosensory changes in the human UVB sunburn model reveal the presence of peripheral and central sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gustorff, Burkhard; Sycha, Thomas; Lieba-Samal, Doris; Rolke, Roman; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Magerl, Walter

    2013-04-01

    The ultraviolet B (UVB) sunburn model was characterized with a comprehensive battery of quantitative sensory testing (QST). Primary hyperalgesia in UVB-irradiated skin and secondary hyperalgesia in adjacent nonirradiated skin were studied in 22 healthy subjects 24h after irradiation with UVB at 3-fold minimal erythema dose of a skin area 5 cm in diameter at the thigh and compared to mirror-image contralateral control areas. The time course of hyperalgesia over 96 h was studied in a subgroup of 12 subjects. Within the sunburn area, cold hyperesthesia (P=.01), profound generalized hyperalgesia to heat (P<.001), cold (P<.05), pinprick and pressure (P<.001), and mild dynamic mechanical allodynia (P<.001) were present. The finding of cold hyperalgesia and cold hyperesthesia is new in this model. The sunburn was surrounded by large areas of pinprick hyperalgesia (mean±SEM, 218±32 cm(2)) and a small rim of dynamic mechanical allodynia but no other sensory changes. Although of smaller magnitude, secondary hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia adjacent to the UVB-irradiated area were statistically highly significant. Primary and secondary hyperalgesia developed in parallel within hours, peaked after 24-32 h, and lasted for more than 96 h. These data reveal that the UVB sunburn model activates a broad spectrum of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms and hence is a useful human surrogate model to be used as a screening tool for target engagement in phases 1 and 2a of drug development.

  4. The potential role of serotonergic mechanisms in the spinal oxytocin-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Godínez-Chaparro, Beatriz; Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Javier; Manzano-García, Alfredo; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo; Condés-Lara, Miguel; González-Hernández, Abimael

    2016-12-01

    The role of oxytocin (OXT) in pain modulation has been suggested. Indeed, hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei (PVN) electrical stimuli reduce the nociceptive neuronal activity (i.e., neuronal discharge associated with activation of Aδ- and C-fibers) of the spinal dorsal horn wide dynamic range (WDR) cells and nociceptive behavior. Furthermore, raphe magnus nuclei lesion reduces the PVN-induced antinociception, suggesting a functional interaction between the OXT and the serotoninergic system. The present study investigated in Wistar rats the potential role of spinal serotonergic mechanisms in the OXT- and PVN-induced antinociception. In long-term secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by formalin or extracellular unitary recordings of the WDR cells we evaluated the role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) effect on the OXT-induced antinociception. All drugs were given intrathecally (i.t.). OXT (1×10(-5)-1×10(-4)nmol) or 5-HT (1×10(-3)-1×10(-1)nmol) prevented the formalin-induced sensitization, an effect mimicked by PVN stimulation. Moreover, administration of OXT (1×10(-5)nmol) plus 5-HT (1×10(-3)nmol) at ineffective doses, produced antinociception. This effect was antagonized by: (i) d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)(2),Thr(4),Tyr-NH2(9)]OVT (oxytocin receptor antagonist; 2×10(-2)nmol); or (ii) methiothepin (a non-specific 5-HT1/2/5/6/7 receptor antagonist; 80nmol). Similar results were obtained with PVN stimulation plus 5-HT (5×10(-5)nmol). In WDR cell recordings, the PVN-induced antinociception was enhanced by i.t. 5-HT and partly blocked when the spinal cord was pre-treated with methiothepin (80nmol). Taken together, these results suggest that serotonergic mechanisms at the spinal cord level are partly involved in the OXT-induced antinociception.

  5. Targeting Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia in Clinical Treatment: Neurobiological Considerations.

    PubMed

    Arout, Caroline A; Edens, Ellen; Petrakis, Ismene L; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2015-06-01

    Opioid analgesics have become a cornerstone in the treatment of moderate to severe pain, resulting in a steady rise of opioid prescriptions. Subsequently, there has been a striking increase in the number of opioid-dependent individuals, opioid-related overdoses, and fatalities. Clinical use of opioids is further complicated by an increasingly deleterious profile of side effects beyond addiction, including tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), where OIH is defined as an increased sensitivity to already painful stimuli. This paradoxical state of increased nociception results from acute and long-term exposure to opioids, and appears to develop in a substantial subset of patients using opioids. Recently, there has been considerable interest in developing an efficacious treatment regimen for acute and chronic pain. However, there are currently no well-established treatments for OIH. Several substrates have emerged as potential modulators of OIH, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate and γ-aminobutyric acid receptors, and most notably, the innate neuroimmune system. This review summarizes the neurobiology of OIH in the context of clinical treatment; specifically, we review evidence for several pathways that show promise for the treatment of pain going forward, as prospective adjuvants to opioid analgesics. Overall, we suggest that this paradoxical state be considered an additional target of clinical treatment for chronic pain.

  6. URB597, an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase, reduces hyperalgesia in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hasanein, Parisa; Parviz, Mohsen; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Roohbakhsh, Ali

    2009-06-01

    Diabetic rats display increased pain responses after injection of formalin into the paw or thermal stimulation of the tail, suggesting the presence of hyperalgesia. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of URB597 (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of endocannabinoids metabolism, on 2 models of experimental hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Animals were divided into control, URB597-treated control (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mg/kg), diabetic, and URB597-treated diabetic (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mg/kg) groups. Formalin and tail-flick tests were performed 4 and 8 weeks after the onset of hyperglycemia, respectively. Diabetes caused significant hyperalgesia during these tests. URB597 (0.3 and 0.5 mg/kg) reversed chemical and thermal hyperalgesia in diabetic rats. Administration of URB597 at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg did not alter pain-related behaviors in control and diabetic groups compared with those of the respective control groups. URB597 treatment did not affect body weight or plasma glucose level of treated animals compared with nontreated animals. This study shows that increasing endocannabinoid neurotransmission with URB597 displays efficacy in chemical and thermal models of diabetic hyperalgesia. It also suggests that URB597 is a promising tool for treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Vinpocetine Reduces Carrageenan-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mice by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress, Cytokine Production and NF-κB Activation in the Paw and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Miyazawa, Kenji W.; Zarpelon, Ana C.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Pavão-de-Souza, Gabriela F.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2015-01-01

    Vinpocetine is a safe nootropic agent used for neurological and cerebrovascular diseases. The anti-inflammatory activity of vinpocetine has been shown in cell based assays and animal models, leading to suggestions as to its utility in analgesia. However, the mechanisms regarding its efficacy in inflammatory pain treatment are still not completely understood. Herein, the analgesic effect of vinpocetine and its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms were addressed in murine inflammatory pain models. Firstly, we investigated the protective effects of vinpocetine in overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone (PBQ) and formalin. The intraplantar injection of carrageenan was then used to induce inflammatory hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated using the electronic von Frey and the hot plate tests, respectively, with neutrophil recruitment to the paw assessed by a myeloperoxidase activity assay. A number of factors were assessed, both peripherally and in the spinal cord, including: antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, superoxide anion, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) levels, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Vinpocetine inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, PBQ and formalin (at both phases), as well as the carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and associated neutrophil recruitment. Both peripherally and in the spinal cord, vinpocetine also inhibited: antioxidant capacity and GSH depletion; increased superoxide anion; IL-1β and TNF-α levels; and NF-κB activation. As such, vinpocetine significantly reduces inflammatory pain by targeting oxidative stress, cytokine production and NF-κB activation at both peripheral and spinal cord levels. PMID:25822523

  8. Topical combinations aimed at treating microvascular dysfunction reduce allodynia in rat models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ragavendran, J. Vaigunda; Laferrière, André; Xiao, Wen Hua; Bennett, Gary J.; Padi, Satyanarayana S.V.; Zhang, Ji; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that various chronic pain syndromes exhibit tissue abnormalities caused by microvasculature dysfunction in the blood vessels of skin, muscle or nerve. We tested whether topical combinations aimed at improving microvascular function would relieve allodynia in animal models of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) and neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that topical administration of either α2-adrenergic (α2A) receptor agonists or nitric oxide (NO) donors combined with either phosphodiesterase (PDE) or phosphatidic acid (PA) inhibitors would effectively reduce allodynia in these animal models of chronic pain. Single topical agents produced significant dose-dependent anti-allodynic effects in rats with chronic post-ischemia pain, and the anti-allodynic dose-response curves of PDE and PA inhibitors were shifted 2.5–10 fold leftward when combined with non-analgesic doses of α2A receptor agonists or NO donors. Topical combinations also produced significant anti-allodynic effects in rats with sciatic nerve injury, painful diabetic neuropathy and chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy. These effects were shown to be produced by a local action, lasted up to 6 h after acute treatment, and did not produce tolerance over 15 days of chronic daily dosing. The present results support the hypothesis that allodynia in animal models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain is effectively relieved by topical combinations of α2A or NO donors with PDE or PA inhibitors. This suggests that topical treatments aimed at improving microvascular function may reduce allodynia in patients with CRPS-I and neuropathic pain. Perspective This article presents the synergistic anti-allodynic effects of combinations of α2A or NO donors with PDE or PA inhibitors in animal models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain. The data suggest effective clinical treatment of chronic neuropathic pain may be achieved by therapies that alleviate microvascular dysfunction in affected areas

  9. N-hexane neuropathy with vertigo and cold allodynia in a silk screen printer: A case study.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sunil; Tandon, Ruchika

    2015-01-01

    N-hexane neuropathy is an occupational disease caused by exposure to n-hexane, which is used as a solvent in silk screen printing. Here, we describe a 35-year-old man, a silk screen printer by profession, who presented with dizziness, distal swelling of both lower limbs for 10 months and tingling and burning sensation in both feet for 9.5 months along with cold allodynia. The patient had normal results of a motor and sensory system examination, apart from an impaired temperature sense. Nerve conduction tests showed a conduction block in bilateral common peroneal nerves and absence of conduction in bilateral sural nerves. These symptoms resolved when further exposure to n-hexane was ceased but cold allodynia remained. Thus, cold allodynia and impaired temperature sense can be a manifestation of n-hexane neuropathy. Hence, abnormalities on nerve conduction studies can be detected in n-hexane neuropathy patients, even before clinical examination detects any such abnormalities. In the case of the patients presenting with sensory motor neuropathy, history of occupational exposure to n-hexane becomes important, as the sooner the disease is detected, the better the chances of recovery.

  10. Sativex successfully treats neuropathic pain characterised by allodynia: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Nurmikko, Turo J; Serpell, Mick G; Hoggart, Barbara; Toomey, Peter J; Morlion, Bart J; Haines, Derek

    2007-12-15

    Cannabinoids are known to have analgesic properties. We evaluated the effect of oro-mucosal sativex, (THC: CBD), an endocannabinoid system modulator, on pain and allodynia, in 125 patients with neuropathic pain of peripheral origin in a five-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial. Patients remained on their existing stable analgesia. A self-titrating regimen was used to optimise drug administration. Sixty-three patients were randomised to receive sativex and 62 placebo. The mean reduction in pain intensity scores (primary outcome measure) was greater in patients receiving sativex than placebo (mean adjusted scores -1.48 points vs. -0.52 points on a 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (p=0.004; 95% CI: -1.59, -0.32). Improvements in Neuropathic Pain Scale composite score (p=0.007), sleep NRS (p=0.001), dynamic allodynia (p=0.042), punctate allodynia (p=0.021), Pain Disability Index (p=0.003) and Patient's Global Impression of Change (p<0.001) were similarly greater on sativex vs. placebo. Sedative and gastrointestinal side effects were reported more commonly by patients on active medication. Of all participants, 18% on sativex and 3% on placebo withdrew during the study. An open-label extension study showed that the initial pain relief was maintained without dose escalation or toxicity for 52 weeks.

  11. EP2 receptor antagonism reduces peripheral and central hyperalgesia in a preclinical mouse model of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Erin; Horne, Andrew W; Jerina, Helen; Mikolajczak, Marta; Hilferty, Lisa; Mitchell, Rory; Fleetwood-Walker, Sue M; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2017-03-10

    Endometriosis is an incurable gynecological disorder characterized by debilitating pain and the establishment of innervated endometriosis lesions outside the uterus. In a preclinical mouse model of endometriosis we demonstrated overexpression of the PGE2-signaling pathway (including COX-2, EP2, EP4) in endometriosis lesions, dorsal root ganglia (DRG), spinal cord, thalamus and forebrain. TRPV1, a PGE2-regulated channel in nociceptive neurons was also increased in the DRG. These findings support the concept that an amplification process occurs along the pain neuroaxis in endometriosis. We then tested TRPV1, EP2, and EP4 receptor antagonists: The EP2 antagonist was the most efficient analgesic, reducing primary hyperalgesia by 80% and secondary hyperalgesia by 40%. In this study we demonstrate reversible peripheral and central hyperalgesia in mice with induced endometriosis.

  12. EP2 receptor antagonism reduces peripheral and central hyperalgesia in a preclinical mouse model of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Erin; Horne, Andrew W.; Jerina, Helen; Mikolajczak, Marta; Hilferty, Lisa; Mitchell, Rory; Fleetwood-Walker, Sue M.; Saunders, Philippa T. K.

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is an incurable gynecological disorder characterized by debilitating pain and the establishment of innervated endometriosis lesions outside the uterus. In a preclinical mouse model of endometriosis we demonstrated overexpression of the PGE2-signaling pathway (including COX-2, EP2, EP4) in endometriosis lesions, dorsal root ganglia (DRG), spinal cord, thalamus and forebrain. TRPV1, a PGE2-regulated channel in nociceptive neurons was also increased in the DRG. These findings support the concept that an amplification process occurs along the pain neuroaxis in endometriosis. We then tested TRPV1, EP2, and EP4 receptor antagonists: The EP2 antagonist was the most efficient analgesic, reducing primary hyperalgesia by 80% and secondary hyperalgesia by 40%. In this study we demonstrate reversible peripheral and central hyperalgesia in mice with induced endometriosis. PMID:28281561

  13. TRPA1 mediates bladder hyperalgesia in a mouse model of cystitis.

    PubMed

    DeBerry, Jennifer J; Schwartz, Erica S; Davis, Brian M

    2014-07-01

    Urinary bladder pain is a primary symptom associated with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. We used systemic injections of cyclophosphamide (CYP), an alkylating antineoplastic agent, to induce cystitis and examine the roles of 2 channels previously demonstrated to be required for inflammatory visceral hyperalgesia: transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin-1 (TRPA1). Injection of CYP (100 mg/kg, i.p.) every other day for 5 days was accompanied by bladder edema and urothelial ulceration, but without significant plasma extravasation or infiltration of neutrophils. Toluidine blue staining showed a significant increase in the number of degranulated bladder mast cells after CYP treatment. Despite this mild pathology, CYP-treated mice exhibited bladder hyperalgesia 1 day after the final injection that persisted 7 days later. Although many previous studies of visceral hyperalgesia have reported changes in dorsal root ganglion neuron TRPV1 expression and/or function, we found no change in bladder afferent TRPV1 expression or sensitivity on the basis of the percentage of bladder afferents responsive to capsaicin, including at submaximal concentrations. In contrast, the percentage of bladder afferents expressing functional TRPA1 protein (i.e., those responsive to mustard oil) increased ∼2.5-fold 1 day after CYP treatment, and remained significantly elevated 7 days later. Moreover, bladder hyperalgesia was reversed by acute treatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (300 mg/kg, i.p.). Our results indicate that CYP-induced bladder hyperalgesia can be induced without robust inflammation or changes in primary afferent TRPV1. However, significant changes were observed in TRPA1 expression, and blockade of TRPA1 alleviated CYP-induced bladder hyperalgesia.

  14. Evaluation of heat hyperalgesia and anxiety like-behaviors in a rat model of orofacial cancer.

    PubMed

    Gambeta, Eder; Kopruszinski, Caroline Machado; Dos Reis, Renata Cristiane; Zanoveli, Janaina Menezes; Chichorro, Juliana Geremias

    2016-04-21

    Pain and anxiety are commonly experienced by cancer patients and both significantly impair their quality of life. Some authors claim that there is a relationship between pain and anxiety, while others suggest that there is not a direct association. In any case, there is indeed a consensus that anxiety impairs the pain condition beyond be under diagnosed and undertreated in cancer pain patients. Herein we investigated if rats presenting heat hyperalgesia induced by orofacial cancer cell inoculation would display anxiety-like behaviors. In addition, we evaluated if pain blockade would result in alleviation of anxiety behaviors, as well as, if blockade of anxiety would result in pain relief. Orofacial cancer was induced in male Wistar rats by inoculation of Walker-256 cells into the right vibrissal pad. Heat facial hyperalgesia was assessed on day 6 after the inoculation, and on this time point rats were submitted to the elevated plus maze and the light-dark transition tests. The influence of lidocaine and midazolam on heat hyperalgesia and anxiety-like behaviors was assessed. The peak of facial heat hyperalgesia was detected 6 days after cancer cells inoculation, and at this time point, rats exhibited increased anxiety-like behaviors. Local treatment with lidocaine (2%/50μL) caused a marked reduction of heat hyperalgesia, but failed to affect the anxiety-like behaviors, while midazolam (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) treatment failed to change the heat threshold, but induced an anxiolytic-like effect. Altogether, our data demonstrated that rats with orofacial cancer present pain- and anxiety-like behaviors, but brief heat hyperalgesia relief does not affect the anxiety-like behaviors, and vice-versa, in our experimental conditions.

  15. Pressure Pain Sensitivity in Patients With Suspected Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Ronald A.; Hassett, Afton L.; Harte, Steven E.; Goesling, Jenna; Malinoff, Herbert L.; Berland, Daniel W.; Zollars, Jennifer; Moser, Stephanie E.; Brummett, Chad M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives This study was designed to test whether a brief quantitative sensory testing (QST) assessment could be used to detect hyperalgesia in patients with suspected opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Methods Twenty patients on long-term opioid therapy with suspected opioid-induced hyperalgesia were recruited along with and 20 healthy controls. Pressure pain threshold, Pain50, a measure of intermediate suprathreshold pressure pain sensitivity, and tolerance levels, were evaluated. As a secondary outcome, changes in pressure pain sensitivity following intravenous administration of placebo (saline) and fentanyl (1.5 μg/kg) were assessed. Results There were no significant differences in pain measures between healthy controls and patients. However, there was an association between higher doses of opioids and having a lower pain tolerance (r= -0.46, P=0.041) and lower Pain50 (r=-0.46, P = 0.044), which was consistent with the hypothesis. Patients on >100 mg oral morphine equivalents (OME) displayed decreased pressure pain tolerance compared to patients taking <100 mg OME (P = 0.042). In addition, male patients showed a hyperalgesic response to fentanyl administration, which was significant for the Pain50 measure (P=0.002). Conclusions Whereas there were no differences between patients suspected of having opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the healthy controls, the finding that higher doses of opioids were associated with more sensitivity suggests that dose might be an important factor in the development of hyperalgesia. In addition, male patients demonstrated a hyperalgesic response after a bolus of fentanyl. Future studies are needed to develop better diagnostics for detecting hyperalgesia in the clinical setting. PMID:26469365

  16. Opioid-induced myoclonus and hyperalgesia following a short course of low-dose oral morphine

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Owen Bleddyn; Naraen, Sangeeta; Naraen, Akriti

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old man was admitted to hospital with a right-sided fractured neck of femur requiring repair via a cemented hemiarthroplasty. Intraoperatively he received 10 mg of intravenous morphine. Post-operatively he received a short course of low-dose oral opioids and subsequently developed myoclonic jerks and hyperalgesia. The opioids were discontinued and both adverse effects resolved. This case report discusses the concurrent development of myoclonus and hyperalgesia following a low dose of opioids and explores possible management options. PMID:28386402

  17. Quantitative test of responses to thermal stimulation in spinally injured rats using a Peltier thermode: a new approach to study cold allodynia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tianle; Hao, Jing-Xia; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Xu, Xiao-Jun

    2013-01-30

    In this work, we described a method of testing of responses of spinally injured rats to thermal stimulation (heating and cooling) to the flank area using a Peltier thermode. With a baseline holding temperature at 32°C and the temperature change rate of 0.5°C/s, we measured vocalization thresholds of rats to thermal stimulation in the flank area. While normal rats did not vocalize to temperatures changes ranging from 6°C to 50°C, the spinally injured rats exhibited significantly increased response to cooling with average response temperature above 15°C through the 70 day observation period after spinal cord injury. The response temperature to cooling in spinally injured rats is correlated with the magnitude of responses to cold stimulation scored after ethyl chloride spray and with the response threshold to mechanical stimulation. In contrast, we did not observe an increase in response to warm/heat stimuli. The results showed that ischemic spinal cord injury produced cold, but not heat, allodynia in rats. Furthermore, we showed that it is possible to quantitatively measure response of rats to thermal stimulation on the body using temperature as end points which may aid further studies on mechanisms and treatments of thermal stimulation, particularly cold, evoked pain.

  18. Expression and action of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase Ialpha in inflammatory hyperalgesia in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y X; Hassan, A; Haddad, E; Johns, R A

    2000-01-01

    important role in the central mechanism of formalin-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia in the spinal cord.

  19. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Araldi, D; Bogen, O; Levine, J D

    2016-06-02

    We propose that the extracellular matrix (ECM) signals CD44, a hyaluronan receptor, to increase the responsiveness to mechanical stimulation in the rat hind paw. We report that intradermal injection of hyaluronidase induces mechanical hyperalgesia, that is inhibited by co-administration of a CD44 receptor antagonist, A5G27. The intradermal injection of low (LMWH) but not high (HMWH) molecular weight hyaluronan also induces mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect that was attenuated by pretreatment with HMWH or A5G27. Pretreatment with HMWH also attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by hyaluronidase. Similarly, intradermal injection of A6, a CD44 receptor agonist, produced hyperalgesia that was inhibited by HMWH and A5G27. Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and Src, but not protein kinase C (PKC), significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by both A6 and LMWH. Finally, to determine if CD44 receptor signaling is involved in a preclinical model of inflammatory pain, we evaluated the effect of A5G27 and HMWH on the mechanical hyperalgesia associated with the inflammation induced by carrageenan. Both A5G27 and HMWH attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, while LMWH acts at its cognate receptor, CD44, to induce mechanical hyperalgesia, HMWH acts at the same receptor as an antagonist. That the local administration of HMWH or A5G27 inhibits carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia supports the suggestion that carrageenan produces changes in the ECM that contributes to inflammatory pain. These studies define a clinically relevant role for signaling by the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, in increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

  20. Dexmedetomidine blocks thermal hyperalgesia and spinal glial activation in rat model of monoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bo; Zhang, Wei-shi; Yang, Jia-le; Xu, Hua; Deng, Xiao-ming; Zhang, Yu-qiu

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of systemic administration dexmedetomidine, a selective alpha 2 adrenergic receptor (α2AR) agonist, on thermal hyperalgesia and spinal glial activation evoked by monoarthritis (MA). Methods: MA was induced by an intra-articular injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Thermal hyperalgesia was measured by Hargreaves' test. The spinal glial activation status was analyzed by GFAP (an astrocytic marker) and Iba-1 (a microglial marker) immunohistochemistry or immunoblotting. Results: Unilateral intra-articular injection of CFA produced a robust glial activation of astrocytes and microglia in the spinal cord, which was associated with the development and maintenance of thermal hyperalgesia. Intraperitoneal (ip) injection of dexmedetomidine (2.5 and 10 μg/kg) was repeatedly given once daily for 5 days with the first injection 60 min before intra-articular CFA. At the dose of 10 μg/kg, dexmedetomidine significantly attenuated MA-induced ipsilateral hyperalgesia from day 2 to day 5. MA-induced up-regulation of GFAP expression on both sides of the spinal dorsal horn was significantly suppressed by day 5 post-MA following dexmedetomidine application, whereas MA-induced Iba-1 up-regulation was only partially suppressed. Conclusion: Systemic dexmedetomidine inhibits the activation of spinal glia, which is possibly associated with its antihyperalgesia in monoarthritic rats. PMID:20364156

  1. CX3CR1 Mediates Nicotine Withdrawal-Induced Hyperalgesia via Microglial P38 MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yonghong; Shi, Wenhui; Xie, Guannan; Yu, Ailan; Wang, Qinghe; Zhang, Zongwang

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we reported that nicotine withdrawal (NT) significantly increased pain sensitivity in rats. Recent reports suggest that fractalkine is involved in the spinal cord neuron-to-microglia activation via CX3CR1 signaling. However, its contribution to NT-induced hyperalgesia and the underlying mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, a rat model of NT was used to test the changes in CX3CR1 expression in the spinal cord. We also evaluated the effect of the CX3CR1 neutralizing antibody on spinal microglial activity, the expression of phosphorylated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38-MAPK) and heat-induced pain responses. We established a NT model via subcutaneous injection of pure nicotine (3 mg/kg), three times daily for 7 days. The expression of CX3CR1 was studied by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Following NT, the rats received daily intrathecal injections of CX3CR1 neutralizing antibody for 3 days. The change in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed. The activation of microglia and the expression of p-p38-MAPK were investigated by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. The expression of CX3CR1 was significantly increased after NT and co-localized with IBA-1. NT rats treated with CX3CR1 neutralizing antibody showed significantly increased PWL on day 4 after NT. Furthermore, the activation of microglia and the expression of p-p38-MAPK in the spinal cord were suppressed. These results indicate that microglial CX3CR1/p38MAPK pathway is critical for the development of pain hypersensitivity after NT.

  2. Traumatic Stress Promotes Hyperalgesia via Corticotropin-Releasing Factor-1 Receptor (CRFR1) Signaling in Central Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Itoga, Christy A; Roltsch Hellard, Emily A; Whitaker, Annie M; Lu, Yi-Ling; Schreiber, Allyson L; Baynes, Brittni B; Baiamonte, Brandon A; Richardson, Heather N; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2016-09-01

    Hyperalgesia is an exaggerated response to noxious stimuli produced by peripheral or central plasticity. Stress modifies nociception, and humans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibit co-morbid chronic pain and amygdala dysregulation. Predator odor stress produces hyperalgesia in rodents. Systemic blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) type 1 receptors (CRFR1s) reduces stress-induced thermal hyperalgesia. We hypothesized that CRF-CRFR1 signaling in central amygdala (CeA) mediates stress-induced hyperalgesia in rats with high stress reactivity. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to predator odor stress in a conditioned place avoidance paradigm and indexed for high (Avoiders) and low (Non-Avoiders) avoidance of predator odor-paired context, or were unstressed Controls. Rats were tested for the latency to withdraw hindpaws from thermal stimuli (Hargreaves test). We used pharmacological, molecular, and immunohistochemical techniques to assess the role of CRF-CRFR1 signaling in CeA in stress-induced hyperalgesia. Avoiders exhibited higher CRF peptide levels in CeA that did not appear to be locally synthesized. Intra-CeA CRF infusion mimicked stress-induced hyperalgesia. Avoiders exhibited thermal hyperalgesia that was reversed by systemic or intra-CeA injection of a CRFR1 antagonist. Finally, intra-CeA infusion of tetrodotoxin produced thermal hyperalgesia in unstressed rats and blocked the anti-hyperalgesic effect of systemic CRFR1 antagonist in stressed rats. These data suggest that rats with high stress reactivity exhibit hyperalgesia that is mediated by CRF-CRFR1 signaling in CeA.

  3. Role for Peroxynitrite in Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induced Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tim; Finley, Amanda; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is an important mediator of inflammation recently shown in in vitro studies to increase the excitability of small diameter sensory neurons at least in part via activation of the S1P1 receptor subtype. Activation of S1PR1 has been reported to increase the formation of NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide (O2•−) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO). This process favors the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO−, PN), a potent mediator of hyperalgesia associated with peripheral and central sensitization. The aims of our study were to determine whether S1P causes peripheral sensitization and thermal hyperalgesia via S1PR1 activation and PN formation. Intraplantar injection of S1P in rats led to a time-dependent development of thermal hyperalgesia that was blocked by the S1PR1 antagonist, W146 but not its inactive enantiomer, W140. The hyperalgesic effects of S1P were mimicked by intraplantar injection of the well characterized S1PR1 agonist, SEW2871. The development of S1P-induced hyperalgesia was blocked by apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, L-NAME, a non-selective NOS inhibitor and by the potent PN decomposition catalysts (FeTM-4-PyP5+ and MnTE-2-PyP5+). Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the signaling pathways engaged by S1P in the development of hyperalgesia and highlight the contribution of the S1P1 receptor-to-PN signaling in this process. PMID:21239112

  4. Effect of a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor on nerve growth factor-induced thermal hyperalgesia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Amann, R; Schuligoi, R; Lanz, I; Peskar, B A

    1996-06-13

    Intraplantar injection of mouse beta (2.5S) nerve growth factor (NGF) caused thermal hyperalgesia and stimulated release of immunoreactive leukotriene B4 from the rat paw skin. Both effects of NGF were prevented by the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, (R)-2-[4-quinolin-2-yl-methoxy)phenyl]-2-cyclopentyl acetic acid (BAY X1005). BAY X1005 did not affect bradykinin-induced thermal hyperalgesia. These results suggest the participation of 5-lipoxygenase products of arachidonate in NGF-induced local thermal hyperalgesia.

  5. Neural correlates of hyperalgesia in the monosodium iodoacetate model of osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Abaei, Maryam; Sagar, Devi R; Stockley, Elizabeth G; Spicer, Clare H; Prior, Malcolm; Auer, Dorothee P

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanisms driving osteoarthritic pain remain poorly understood, but there is increasing evidence for a role of the central nervous system in the chronification of pain. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the influence of a model of unilateral knee osteoarthritis on nociceptive processing. Results Four to five weeks post intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 1 mg) into the left knee, Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to characterize the neural response to a noxious stimulus (intra-articular capsaicin injection). In a two-arm cross-over design, 5 µM/50 µl capsaicin was injected into either the left knee (n = 8, CAPS-MIA) or right control knee (n = 8, CAPS-CON), preceded by contralateral vehicle (SAL) injection. To assess neural correlates of mechanical hyperalgesia, hindpaws were stimulated with von Frey hairs (8 g: MIA; 15 g: control knee, based on behavioral withdrawal responses). The CAPS-MIA group exhibited significant activation of the periaqueductal gray, unilateral thalamus and bilateral mensencephalon, superior-colliculus, and hippocampus, with no significant activation in the other groups/conditions. Capsaicin injection increased functional connectivity in the mid-brain network and mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, hippocampus, and globus pallidus, which was significantly stronger in CAPS-MIA compared to CAPS-CON groups. Mechanical stimulation of the hyperalgesic (ipsilateral to MIA knee) and normalgesic (contralateral) hindpaws evoked qualitatively different brain activation with more widespread brainstem and anterior cingulate (ACC) activation when stimulating the hyperalgesic paw, and clearer frontal sensory activation from the normalgesic paw. Conclusions We provide evidence for modulation of nociceptive processing in a chronic knee osteoarthritis pain model with stronger brain activation and alteration of brain networks

  6. Spinal astrocytic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation as counteracting mechanism to the amitriptyline analgesic efficacy in painful peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2017-03-05

    Several drugs and agents are currently used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Among them amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant drug, represent a first line treatment. Despite its well-documented clinical efficacy, amitriptyline is ineffective in some animal models of neuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to investigate into amitriptyline poor efficacy in neuropathic pain and to determine the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation as counteracting mechanism to the analgesic effects of this drug. Experiments were performed in mice with painful peripheral neuropathies due to the antiretroviral agent 2,3-dideoxycytidine (ddC), and with the partial sciatic nerve injury produced in the spared nerve injury model (SNI). In mice subjected to SNI and antiretroviral treatment, amitriptyline did not attenuate mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Conversely, intrathecal injection of the JNK inhibitor SP600125 prevented SNI and ddC-induced nociceptive behavior and, its inactive dose co-administrated with amitriptyline induced an antinociceptive effect. Western blotting analysis showed an upregulation of p-JNK in the lumbar spinal cord of SNI and ddC-exposed mice, that was further enhanced after amitriptyline administration. Additionally, amitriptyline further promoted astrocyte activation in neuropathic mice, as illustrated by the increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), that was attenuated by intrathecal injection of the JNK inhibitor. These data indicate astrocyte JNK activation as counteracting pathway to amitriptyline analgesic response. Targeting the JNK pathway in spinal astroglia may present an efficient way to improve the analgesic efficacy of amitriptyline in the neuropathic pain treatment.

  7. Analgesic action of suspended moxibustion in rats with chronic visceral hyperalgesia correlates with enkephalins in the spinal cord☆

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tao; Qi, Li; Wu, Huangan; Ma, Xiaopeng; Liu, Huirong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2012-01-01

    Rats that modeled chronic visceral hyperalgesia received suspended moxibustion at bilateral Tianshu (ST25) and Shangjuxu (ST37) once daily over a period of 7 days. Results show that suspended moxibustion significantly depressed abdominal withdrawal reflex scores and increased enkephalin concentration in the spinal cord. The experimental findings suggest that spinal enkephalins contributed to the analgesic effect of suspended moxibustion in rats with chronic visceral hyperalgesia. PMID:25767503

  8. Sex and Hormonal Variations in the Development of At-level Allodynia In a Rat Chronic Spinal Cord Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Hubscher, Charles H.; Fell, Jason D.; Gupta, Daya S.

    2010-01-01

    The development of central neuropathic pain varies among patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). The factors contributing to the development and perpetuation of segmental pain (at-level allodynia) has been the focus of ongoing experiments in our laboratory. One such factor is hormonal status. We have shown previously, using a male rat model of SCI, that a severe contusion injury is necessary for the development of allodynia in trunk regions at and just above the level of a T8 injury. In this study, we examined at-level sensitivity for SCI ovariectomized (ovx) and cycling female rats as well as for SCI males implanted with either a placebo pellet or one that slowly releases 17β-estradiol. The proportion of ovx SCI female rats and placebo-treated SCI males displaying pain-like behaviors to touch/pressure of at-level dermatomes up to six weeks post-injury (67% and 75%, respectively) was similar to our previous studies on SCI males (69%). In contrast, significantly fewer cycling SCI female rats and 17β-estradiol treated SCI male rats showed sensitivity to touch at-level (26% and 30%, respectively). These results implicate 17β-estradiol as a potential target that can readily be modulated to prevent segmental pain following SCI. PMID:20434524

  9. Global gene expression analysis in the mouse brainstem after hyperalgesia induced by facial carrageenan injection--evidence for a form of neurovascular coupling?

    PubMed

    Poh, Kay-Wee; Lutfun, Nahar; Manikandan, Jayapal; Ong, Wei-Yi; Yeo, Jin-Fei

    2009-03-01

    The present study was carried out to examine global gene expression in the brainstem, in a mouse facial carrageenan injection model of orofacial pain. Mice that received facial carrageenan injection showed increased mechanical allodynia, demonstrated by increased responses to von Frey hair stimulation of the face. The brainstem was harvested at 3 days post-injection, corresponding to the time of peak responses, and analyzed by Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 microarrays. We sought to identify common genes that are changed in the respective sides of the brainstem after either right- or left-sided facial carrageenan injection. The result is a relatively small list of genes (22 genes), which were then classified using DAVID software. Many of them fell into the categories of "response to stress", "defence response", "response to biotic stimulus", "cell adhesion" and "leukocyte adhesion". Of these, increased expression of P-selectin, ICAM-1 and CCL12 after carrageenan injection could be verified by real-time RT-PCR on both the right and left sides, and increased in P-selectin and ICAM-1 further verified by Western blot analysis. P-selectin and ICAM-1 were immunolocalized to endothelial cells, and were double labelled with von Willebrand factor. Intraperitoneal injection of the P-selectin inhibitor KF38789 significantly reduced mechanical allodynia in the facial carrageenan-injected mice. P-selectin mediates the capturing of leukocytes from the bloodstream and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelial surface. We hypothesize that increased nociceptive input to the brainstem could attract circulating macrophages into the brain, resulting in neuroinflammation and pain.

  10. Lateral Hypothalamic Stimulation Reduces Hyperalgesia Through Spinally Descending Orexin-A Neurons in Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Wardach, Jacob; Wagner, Monica; Jeong, Younhee; Holden, Janean E

    2016-03-01

    No evidence to date shows that lateral hypothalamic (LH) stimulation produces orexin-A-mediated antinociception in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in a model of neuropathic pain. We conducted experiments to examine the effect of orexin-A-mediated LH stimulation in female rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) on thermal hyperalgesia. Rats receiving carbachol into the LH demonstrated antinociception on both the left CCI and right nonligated paws (p < .05). Rats were given carbachol in the LH followed by intrathecal injection of the orexin-1 (OX1) receptor antagonist SB-334867, which blocked LH-induced antinociception compared with control groups (p < .05) in the left paw, but not in the right paw. These findings support the hypothesis that LH stimulation produces antinociception in rats with thermal hyperalgesia from neuropathic pain via an orexin-A connection between the LH and the SCDH. Identification of this pathway may lead to studies using orexins to manage clinical pain.

  11. Prevention of Remifentanil Induced Postoperative Hyperalgesia by Dexmedetomidine via Regulating the Trafficking and Function of Spinal NMDA Receptors as well as PKC and CaMKII Level In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Zheng, Yuxin; Xie, Ke-liang; He, Ying; Wang, Zhifen; Wang, Guo-lin; Yu, Yong-hao

    2017-01-01

    Remifentanil-induced secondary hyperalgesia has been demonstrated in both animal experiments and clinical trials. Enhancement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor trafficking as well as protein kinase C (PKC) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) have been reported to be involved in the induction and maintenance of central sensitization. In the current study, it was demonstrated that dexmedetomidine could prevent remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia (RIH) via regulating spinal NMDAR-PKC-Ca2+/ CaMKII pathway in vivo and in vitro. We firstly investigated the effect of dexmedetomidine, a highly selective α2-adrenergic receptor agonist, on mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia using a rat model of RIH. NMDA receptor subunits (NR1, NR2A and NR2B) expression and membrane trafficking as well as PKC and CaMKII expression in spinal cord L4–L5 segments were measured by Western blot analysis. The expression of NMDA receptor subunits (NR1, NR2A and NR2B) were also detected by immunohistochemistry. Further more, the effect of dexmedetomidine on NMDA receptor current amplitude and frequency in spinal cord slices were investigated by whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We found that remifentail infusion at 1.2 μg.kg−1.min−1 for 90 min caused mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, up-regulated NMDA receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B expression in both membrane fraction and total lysate as well as increased PKC and CaMKII expression in spinal cord dorsal horn. Subcutaneously injection of dexmedetomidine at the dose of 50 μg/kg at 30 min before plantar incision significantly attenuated remifentanil-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia from 2 h to 48 h after infusion, and this was associated with reversal of up-regulated NR1 and NR2B subunits in both membrane fraction and total lysate as well as increased PKC and CaMKII expression in spinal cord dorsal horn. Furthermore, remifentanil incubation increased amplitude and frequency of NMDA receptor-induced current in

  12. Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia - Worsening Pain in Opioid-Dependent Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    shown to reduce pain . Amantadine is an NMDA receptor antagonist that may mitigate central sensitization. Adjuvant analgesics may lessen nociceptive ...FEB 2013 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Opioid-induced hyperalgesia--worsening pain in opioid-dependent...Report Opioid-induced hyperalgesia—worsening pain in opioid-dependent patients☆ Abstract Patients with chronic opioid use are commonly treated in the

  13. Movement-evoked hyperalgesia induced by lipopolysaccharides is not suppressed by glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Katalin J.; Papic, Jonathan C.; Larson, Alice A.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) produces a variety of effects, including movement-evoked hyperalgesia that can be measured using the grip force assay in mice. Because both lethality and enhanced sensitivity to cutaneous pain following exposure to endotoxins have each been attributed to inflammatory mediators, we explored the possibility that LPS-induced movement-evoked hyperalgesia is also sensitive to manipulations of glucocorticoids that regulate these other LPS responses. We found that the hyperalgesic effect of LPS (5 mg/kg s.c.) in mice that were adrenalectomized did not differ from that in control mice that were sham-operated, even though mortality after LPS was potentiated by adrenalectomy. The development of tolerance to the movement-evoked hyperalgesic effect of LPS also did not differ between adrenalectomized and sham-operated control mice. In addition, mifepristone (25 mg/kg s.c.), a glucocorticoid antagonist, did not attenuate the hyperalgesic effect of LPS (2 mg/kg s.c.), yet this dose of mifepristone was sufficient to enhance the incidence of lethality induced by LPS. Enhancement of glucocorticoid activity by two injections of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg s.c.) had no effect on the degree of hyperalgesia in mice injected with LPS (5 mg/kg s.c.), yet this dose of dexamethasone was sufficient to attenuate the incidence of mortality induced by LPS in adrenalectomized mice. Finally, morphine (10 mg/kg i.p.) reversed the decrease in grip force caused by LPS (5 mg/kg i.p.), supporting the interpretation that decreases in grip force produced by LPS reflect muscle hyperalgesia that is not sensitive to glucocorticoids. PMID:17686584

  14. Reduced GABAergic transmission in the ventrobasal thalamus contributes to thermal hyperalgesia in chronic inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chan; Chen, Rong-Xiang; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Jie; Liu, Feng-Yu; Cai, Jie; Liao, Fei-Fei; Xu, Fu-Qiang; Yi, Ming; Wan, You

    2017-01-01

    The ventrobasal (VB) thalamus is innervated by GABAergic afferents from the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and participates in nociception. But how the TRN-VB pathway regulates pain is not fully understood. In the present study, we reported decreased extracellular GABA levels in the VB of rats with CFA-induced chronic inflammatory pain, measured by microdialysis with HPLC analysis. In vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recording showed decreased amplitudes of tonic currents, increased frequencies of mIPSCs, and increased paired-pulse ratios in thalamic slices from chronic inflammatory rats (7 days). Microinjection of the GABAAR agonist muscimol and optogenetic activation of the TRN-VB pathway relieved thermal hyperalgesia in chronic inflammatory pain. By contrast, microinjecting the extrasynaptic GABAAR agonist THIP or selective knockout of synaptic GABAAR γ2 subunits aggravated thermal hyperalgesia in the chronic stage of inflammatory pain. Our findings indicate that reduced GABAergic transmission in the VB contributes to thermal hyperalgesia in chronic inflammatory pain, which could be a synaptic target for pharmacotherapy. PMID:28150719

  15. Model of methadone-induced hyperalgesia in rats and effect of memantine.

    PubMed

    Hay, Justin L; Kaboutari, Jahangir; White, Jason M; Salem, Abdallah; Irvine, Rod

    2010-01-25

    Methadone used for opioid dependence therapy is associated with increased pain sensitivity. This study aimed to investigate whether methadone administration lowers nociceptive threshold in adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, and if this threshold could be altered by the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine. Rats were implanted with osmotic pumps delivering 1mg/kg/day methadone (n=6), or saline placebo (n=6) (0.51 microl/h). A separate cohort of rats received either methadone 1mg/kg/day (n=8) or methadone 1mg/kg/day with 20mg/kg/day memantine (n=8). Nociception was measured by the Hargreave's paw withdrawal test. Baseline nociception was measured on day 0 prior to osmotic pump implantation and was measured daily for the following 21 days. Osmotic pumps were removed following nociceptive testing on day 14. Methadone only treated rats had a mean paw withdrawal latency significantly lower than the corresponding values for saline on days 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, and 17 (P<0.05). At all other time points the mean paw withdrawal latency was not significantly different from saline (P>0.05). Paw withdrawal latency of rats treated with methadone co-administered with memantine did not differ significantly compared to methadone only (P>0.05). This demonstrates that methadone induces hyperalgesia in the SD rat yet this hyperalgesia resolves following discontinuation of methadone administration. Furthermore, memantine does not alter the development of methadone-induced hyperalgesia.

  16. Reduction of spinal PGE2 concentrations prevents swim stress-induced thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Coram; Fernandez, Ana Cristina; Cardenas, Ricardo; Suarez-Roca, Heberto

    2015-03-30

    We evaluated the association between spinal PGE2 and thermal hyperalgesia following repeated stress. Thermal nociception was determined in male Sprague-Dawley rats using the hot-plate test, before and after forced-swimming; non-conditioned rats served as controls. Animals were pretreated with ketoprofen or meloxicam, preferential COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors, respectively. After the second hot-plate test, we measured serum corticosterone (stress marker), and lumbar spinal PGE2 (neuroinflammation marker) under peripheral inflammation (1% formalin plantar injection). Stressed rats displayed response latencies 40% shorter and inflammatory spinal PGE2 levels 95% higher than controls. Pretreatment with ketoprofen or meloxicam prevented hyperalgesia and elevation of spinal PGE2, increasing the escape behavior time during forced swimming 95% respect to saline-treated rats. Corticosterone levels in stressed rats were 97% higher than controls; COX inhibitors reduced them by 84%. PGE2 could participate in stress-induced hyperalgesia, learned helplessness, and corticosterone production, supporting the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for persistent pain associated with chronic stress and depression.

  17. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Leandro F. S.; Godin, Adriana M.; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C. S.; Machado, Renes R.; Maier, Steven F.; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P.; Fiebich, Bernd L.; Watkins, Linda R.; Coelho, Márcio M.; Moraes, Márcio F. D.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline’s positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline’s antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca2+; Mg2+) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100 mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75, 47.50 or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca2+ chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca2+ chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines. PMID:23523650

  18. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Godin, Adriana M; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C S; Machado, Renes R; Maier, Steven F; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P; Fiebich, Bernd L; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2013-05-24

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline's positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline's antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca(2+); Mg(2+)) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75 mg/kg, 47.50mg/kg or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca(2+) chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca(2+) chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines.

  19. Electroacupuncture Inhibition of Hyperalgesia in Rats with Adjuvant Arthritis: Involvement of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Dopamine Receptor Subtypes in Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yin; Yang, Yang; Xu, Ming-Shu; Zhao, Ying-Qian; Ge, Lin-Bao; Zhang, Bi-Meng

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been regarded as an alternative treatment for inflammatory pain for several decades. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effect of EA have not been thoroughly clarified. Previous studies have shown that cannabinoid CB1 receptors are related to pain relief. Accumulating evidence has shown that the CB1 and dopamine systems sometimes interact and may operate synergistically in rat striatum. To our knowledge, dopamine D1/D2 receptors are involved in EA analgesia. In this study, we found that repeated EA at Zusanli (ST36) and Kunlun (BL60) acupoints resulted in marked improvements in thermal hyperalgesia. Both western blot assays and FQ-PCR analysis results showed that the levels of CB1 expression in the repeated-EA group were much higher than those in any other group (P = 0.001). The CB1-selective antagonist AM251 inhibited the effects of repeated EA by attenuating the increases in CB1 expression. The two kinds of dopamine receptors imparted different actions on the EA-induced CB1 upregulation in AA rat model. These results suggested that the strong activation of the CB1 receptor after repeated EA resulted in the concomitant phenomenon of the upregulation of D1 and D2 levels of gene expression. PMID:23762129

  20. N-acetyl-cysteine attenuates remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia via inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-9 in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Ni, Yuan; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Yu-E; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2017-02-09

    Treatment of remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia (RIH) remains a clinical challenge because the mechanisms are not fully understood. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a key component in neuroinflammation because of its facilitation of pro-inflammatory cytokine maturation. Therefore, inhibition of MMP-9 may represent a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of RIH. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control, Incision and Remifentanil. A right plantar surgical incision was performed in Group Incision, and intraoperative remifentanil (0.04 mg/kg, 0.4 ml) was infused subcutaneously for 30 min in Group Remifentanil. The results indicated that intraoperative remifentanil induced an up-regulation and activation of MMP-9 in DRGs but not spinal cords. MMP-9 was expressed primarily in DRG neurons co-expressing mu opioid receptors (MOR), and elicited interleukin-1β (IL-1β) cleavage in DRG neurons and satellite glial cells (SGCs). Intraperitoneal injection of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a broadly used safe drug, significantly attenuated RIH via suppressing the activation of MMP-9 in DRGs. NAC inhibited the cleavage of IL-1β in DRGs, which is a critical substrate of MMP-9, and markedly suppressed glial activation and neuron excitability in spinal dorsal horn induced by remifentanil. These results demonstrated that NAC can effectively alleviate RIH via powerfully inhibiting MMP-9 activation in DRGs.

  1. Activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptors reduces hyperalgesia in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Weisi; Taylor, Bradley K

    2015-05-19

    Clinical trials investigating the analgesic efficacy of cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis have yielded mixed results, possibly due to psychotropic side effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. We hypothesized that, a CB2-specific agonist (JWH-133) would decrease hyperalgesia in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Four weeks after induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we found that intrathecal administration of JWH-133 (10-100μg) dose-dependently reduced both mechanical and cold hypersensitivity without producing signs of sedation or ataxia. The anti-hyperalgesic effects of JWH-133 could be dose-dependently prevented by intrathecal co-administration of the CB2 antagonist, AM-630 (1-3μg). Our results suggest that JWH-133 acts at CB2 receptors, most likely within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, to suppress the hypersensitivity associated with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These are the first pre-clinical studies to directly promote CB2 as a promising target for the treatment of central pain in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

  2. Effect of resiniferatoxin on the noxious heat threshold temperature in the rat: a novel heat allodynia model sensitive to analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Almási, Róbert; Pethö, Gábor; Bölcskei, Kata; Szolcsányi, János

    2003-01-01

    An increasing-temperature hot plate (ITHP) was introduced to measure the noxious heat threshold (45.3±0.3°C) of unrestrained rats, which was reproducible upon repeated determinations at intervals of 5 or 30 min or 1 day. Morphine, diclofenac and paracetamol caused an elevation of the noxious heat threshold following i.p. pretreatment, the minimum effective doses being 3, 10 and 200 mg kg−1, respectively. Unilateral intraplantar injection of the VR1 receptor agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX, 0.048 nmol) induced a profound drop of heat threshold to the innocuous range with a maximal effect (8–10°C drop) 5 min after RTX administration. This heat allodynia was inhibited by pretreatment with morphine, diclofenac and paracetamol, the minimum effective doses being 1, 1 and 100 mg kg−1 i.p., respectively. The long-term sensory desensitizing effect of RTX was examined by bilateral intraplantar injection (0.048 nmol per paw) which produced, after an initial threshold drop, an elevation (up to 2.9±0.5°C) of heat threshold lasting for 5 days. The VR1 receptor antagonist iodo-resiniferatoxin (I-RTX, 0.05 nmol intraplantarly) inhibited by 51% the heat threshold-lowering effect of intraplantar RTX but not α,β-methylene-ATP (0.3 μmol per paw). I-RTX (0.1 or 1 nmol per paw) failed to alter the heat threshold either acutely (5–60 min) or on the long-term (5 days). The heat threshold of VR1 receptor knockout mice was not different from that of wild-type animals (45.6±0.5 vs 45.2±0.4°C). In conclusion, the RTX-induced drop of heat threshold measured by the ITHP is a novel heat allodynia model exhibiting a high sensitivity to analgesics. PMID:12746222

  3. Heat pain detection threshold is associated with the area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization: a study of healthy male volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Morten Sejer; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization (BTS) of the skin and heat pain detection thresholds (HPDT) may both have predictive abilities in regards to pain sensitivity and clinical pain states. The association between HPDT and secondary hyperalgesia, however, remains unsettled, and the dissimilarities in physiologic properties suggest that they may represent 2 distinctively different pain entities. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between HPDT and BTS-induced secondary hyperalgesia. Methods A sample of 121 healthy male participants was included and tested on 2 separate study days with BTS (45°C, 3 minutes), HPDT, and pain during thermal stimulation (45°C, 1 minute). Areas of secondary hyperalgesia were quantified after monofilament pinprick stimulation. The pain catastrophizing scale (PCS) and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) were also applied. Results A significant association between HPDT and the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia (p<0.0001) was found. The expected change in area of secondary hyperalgesia due to a 1-degree increase in HPDT was estimated to be −27.38 cm2, 95% confidence interval (CI) of −37.77 to −16.98 cm2, with an R2 of 0.19. Likewise, a significant association between HADS-depression subscore and area of secondary hyperalgesia (p=0.046) was found, with an estimated expected change in secondary hyperalgesia to a 1-point increase in HADS-depression subscore of 11 cm2, 95% CI (0.19–21.82), and with R2 of 0.03. We found no significant associations between secondary hyperalgesia area and PCS score or pain during thermal stimulation. Conclusion HPDT and the area of secondary hyperalgesia after BTS are significantly associated; however, with an R2 of only 19%, HPDT only offers a modest explanation of the inter-participant variation in the size of the secondary hyperalgesia area elicited by BTS. PMID:28184167

  4. Goshajinkigan reduces oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy without affecting anti-tumour efficacy in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Soichiro; Egashira, Nobuaki; Sada, Hikaru; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Shirahama, Masafumi; Masuguchi, Ken; Oishi, Ryozo

    2012-06-01

    Oxaliplatin is a key drug in the treatment of colorectal cancer, but it causes acute and chronic neuropathies in patients. Goshajinkigan (GJG) is a Kampo medicine that is used for the treatments of several neurological symptoms including pain and numbness. More recently, GJG has been reported to prevent the oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in clinical studies. No experimental study, however, has been conducted to date to determine the effect of GJG on pain behaviour in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Moreover, the impact on the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin remains unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of GJG on the peripheral neuropathy and anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin in rodents. Repeated administration of oxaliplatin caused cold hyperalgesia from days 3 to 37 and mechanical allodynia from days 21 to 28. Repeated administration of GJG prevented the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia and axonal degeneration in rat sciatic nerve. Single administration of GJG reduced both cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after the development of neuropathy. In addition, GJG did not affect the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin in the tumour cells or tumour cells-implanted mice. These results suggest that GJG relieves the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia without affecting anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin, and, therefore, may be useful for the oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in clinical practice.

  5. The effects of Botulinum Toxin type A on capsaicin-evoked pain, flare, and secondary hyperalgesia in an experimental human model of trigeminal sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gazerani, Parisa; Staahl, Camilla; Drewes, Asbjøn M; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2006-06-01

    The trigeminovascular system is involved in migraine. Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin type A (BoNT-A) in migraine has been investigated in clinical studies but the mechanism of action remains unexplored. It is hypothesized that BoNT-A inhibits peripheral sensitization of nociceptive fibers and indirectly reduces central sensitization. We examined the effect of intramuscular injection of BoNT-A on an experimental human model of trigeminal sensitization induced by intradermal capsaicin injection to the forehead. BoNT-A (BOTOX) or saline was injected intramuscularly in precranial, neck and shoulder muscles to 32 healthy male volunteers in a double blind-randomized manner. Intradermally capsaicin-induced pain, flare and secondary hyperalgesia were obtained before and 1, 4 and 8 weeks after the above treatments. A significant suppressive effect of BoNT-A on pain, flare and hyperalgesia area was observed. The pain intensity area was significantly smaller in BoNT-A group (9.16+/-0.83 cm x s) compared to saline group (15.41+/-0.83cm x s) (P=0.011). The flare area was also reduced significantly in BoNT-A group (29.81+/-0.69 cm2) compared to saline group (39.71+/-0.69 cm2) (P<0.001). Similarly, the mean area of secondary hyperalgesia was significantly smaller in BoNT-A group (4.25+/-0.91 cm2) compared to saline group (7.03+/-0.91 cm2) (P=0.040). Post hoc analysis showed significant differences across the trials with a remarkable suppression effect of BoNT-A on capsaicin-induced sensory and vasomotor reactions as early as week1 (P<0.001). BoNT-A presented suppressive effects on the trigeminal/cervical nociceptive system activated by intradermal injection of capsaicin to the forehead. The effects are suggested to be caused by a local peripheral effect of BoNT-A on cutaneous nociceptors.

  6. The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor PF-3845 acts in the nervous system to reverse LPS-induced tactile allodynia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Lamont; Kinsey, Steven G; Abdullah, Rehab A; Blankman, Jacqueline L; Long, Jonathan Z; Ezzili, Cyrine; Boger, Dale L; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inflammatory pain presents a problem of clinical relevance and often elicits allodynia, a condition in which non-noxious stimuli are perceived as painful. One potential target to treat inflammatory pain is the endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) system, which is comprised of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors and several endogenous ligands, including anandamide (AEA). Blockade of the catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) elevates AEA levels and elicits antinociceptive effects, without the psychomimetic side effects associated with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Allodynia was induced by intraplantar injection of LPS. Complementary genetic and pharmacological approaches were used to determine the strategy of blocking FAAH to reverse LPS-induced allodynia. Endocannabinoid levels were quantified using mass spectroscopy analyses. KEY RESULTS FAAH (−/−) mice or wild-type mice treated with FAAH inhibitors (URB597, OL-135 and PF-3845) displayed an anti-allodynic phenotype. Furthermore, i.p. PF-3845 increased AEA levels in the brain and spinal cord. Additionally, intraplantar PF-3845 produced a partial reduction in allodynia. However, the anti-allodynic phenotype was absent in mice expressing FAAH exclusively in the nervous system under a neural specific enolase promoter, implicating the involvement of neuronal fatty acid amides (FAAs). The anti-allodynic effects of FAAH-compromised mice required activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors, but other potential targets of FAA substrates (i.e. µ-opioid, TRPV1 and PPARα receptors) had no apparent role. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS AEA is the primary FAAH substrate reducing LPS-induced tactile allodynia. Blockade of neuronal FAAH reverses allodynia through the activation of both cannabinoid receptors and represents a promising target to treat inflammatory pain. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To

  7. Lack of effect of central nervous system-active doses of nabilone on capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, Jarkko; Philipp, Andrew; Baxendale, Jane; Annas, Peter; Karlsten, Rolf; Segerdahl, Märta

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of nabilone on capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia, as well as on biomarkers of cannabinoid central nervous system (CNS) effects. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was conducted in 30 healthy male volunteers receiving single doses of nabilone (1, 2 or 3 mg). Pain intensity after intradermal capsaicin injections in the forearm was assessed by continuous visual analogue scale (0-100 mm). Capsaicin cream was applied to the calf to induce hyperalgesia. Primary hyperalgesia was assessed by measuring heat pain thresholds, whereas secondary hyperalgesia was assessed by measuring the area where light tactile stimulation was felt to be painful. Pain and hyperalgesia were measured at baseline and 2-3.5 h after dosing. The CNS effects were assessed at baseline and up to 24 h after dosing using visual analogue mood scales for feeling 'stimulated', 'anxious', 'sedated' and 'down'. Plasma samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were obtained up to 24 h after drug administration. Nabilone did not significantly attenuate either ongoing pain or primary or secondary hyperalgesia, whereas dose-dependent CNS effects were observed from 1.5 to 6 h after dosing, being maximal at 4-6 h. Plasma concentrations of nabilone and its metabolite carbinol were maximal 1-2 h after dosing. Adverse events (AE) were common on nabilone treatment. Four subjects withdrew due to pronounced CNS AE (anxiety, agitation, altered perception, impaired consciousness). Although nabilone had marked CNS effects, no analgesic or antihyperalgesic effects were observed.

  8. Intrathecal urocortin I in the spinal cord as a murine model of stress hormone-induced musculoskeletal and tactile hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Larson, Alice A; Nunez, Myra G; Kissel, Casey L; Kovács, Katalin J

    2015-11-01

    Stress is antinociceptive in some models of pain, but enhances musculoskeletal nociceptive responses in mice and muscle pain in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. To test the hypothesis that urocortins are stress hormones that are sufficient to enhance tactile and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, von Frey fibre sensitivity and grip force after injection of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), urocortin I and urocortin II were measured in mice. Urocortin I (a CRF1 and CRF2 receptor ligand) produced hyperalgesia in both assays when injected intrathecally (i.t.) but not intracerebroventricularly, and only at a large dose when injected peripherally, suggesting a spinal action. Morphine inhibited urocortin I-induced changes in nociceptive responses in a dose-related fashion, confirming that changes in behaviour reflect hyperalgesia rather than weakness. No tolerance developed to the effect of urocortin I (i.t.) when injected repeatedly, consistent with a potential to enhance pain chronically. Tactile hyperalgesia was inhibited by NBI-35965, a CRF1 receptor antagonist, but not astressin 2B, a CRF2 receptor antagonist. However, while urocortin I-induced decreases in grip force were not observed when co-administered i.t. with either NBI-35965 or astressin 2B, they were even more sensitive to inhibition by astressin, a non-selective CRF receptor antagonist. Together these data indicate that urocortin I acts at CRF receptors in the mouse spinal cord to elicit a reproducible and persistent tactile (von Frey) and musculoskeletal (grip force) hyperalgesia. Urocortin I-induced hyperalgesia may serve as a screen for drugs that alleviate painful conditions that are exacerbated by stress.

  9. Intrathecal Urocortin I in the spinal cord as a murine model of stress hormone-induced musculoskeletal and tactile hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Alice A.; Nunez, Myra G.; Kissel, Casey L.; Kovács, Katalin J.

    2015-01-01

    Stress is antinociceptive in some models of pain but enhances musculoskeletal nociceptive responses in mice and muscle pain in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. To test the hypothesis that urocortins are stress hormones that are sufficient to enhance tactile and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, we measured von Frey fiber sensitivity and grip force after injection of corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF), urocortin I and urocortin II in mice. Urocortin I (a CRF1 and CRF2 receptor ligand) produced hyperalgesia in both assays when injected intrathecally (i.t.) but not intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), and only at a large dose when injected peripherally, suggesting a spinal action. Morphine inhibited urocortin I-induced changes in nociceptive responses in a dose-related fashion, confirming that changes in behavior reflect hyperalgesia rather than weakness. No tolerance developed to the effect of urocortin I (i.t.) when injected repeatedly, consistent with a potential to enhance pain chronically. Tactile hyperalgesia was inhibited by NBI-35965, a CRF1 receptor antagonist, but not astressin 2B, a CRF2 receptor antagonist. However, while urocortin I-induced decreases in grip force were not observed when coadministered i.t. with either NBI-35965 or astressin 2B, they were even more sensitive to inhibition by astressin, a nonselective CRF receptor antagonist. Together these data indicate that urocortin I acts at CRF receptors in the mouse spinal cord to elicit a reproducible and persistent tactile (von Frey) and musculoskeletal (grip force) hyperalgesia. Urocortin I-induced hyperalgesia may serve as a screen for drugs that alleviate painful conditions that are exacerbated by stress. PMID:26332847

  10. Distinct TRPV1- and TRPA1-based mechanisms underlying enhancement of oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain by 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kiichiro; Ono, Kentaro; Hitomi, Suzuro; Ito, Misa; Nodai, Tomotaka; Goto, Tetsuya; Harano, Nozomu; Watanabe, Seiji; Inoue, Hiromasa; Miyano, Kanako; Uezono, Yasuhito; Matoba, Motohiro; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2016-05-01

    In many patients with cancer, chemotherapy-induced severe oral ulcerative mucositis causes intractable pain, leading to delays and interruptions in therapy. However, the pain mechanism in oral ulcerative mucositis after chemotherapy has not been extensively studied. In this study, we investigated spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia in a preclinical model of oral ulcerative mucositis after systemic administration of the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil, using our proprietary pain assay system for conscious rats. 5-Fluorouracil caused leukopenia but did not induce pain-related behaviors. After 5-fluorouracil administration, oral ulcers were developed with topical acetic acid treatment. Compared with saline-treated rats, 5-fluorouracil-exposed rats showed more severe mucositis with excessive bacterial loading due to a lack of leukocyte infiltration, as well as enhancements of spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia. Antibacterial drugs, the lipid A inhibitor polymyxin B and the TRPV1/TRPA1 channel pore-passing anesthetic QX-314, suppressed both the spontaneous pain and the mechanical allodynia. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin and the TRPV1 antagonist SB-366791 inhibited the spontaneous pain, but not the mechanical allodynia. In contrast, the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 and the N-formylmethionine receptor FPR1 antagonist Boc MLF primarily suppressed the mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that 5-fluorouracil-associated leukopenia allows excessive oral bacterial infection in the oral ulcerative region, resulting in the enhancement of spontaneous pain through continuous TRPV1 activation and cyclooxygenase pathway, and mechanical allodynia through mechanical sensitization of TRPA1 caused by neuronal effects of bacterial toxins. These distinct pain mechanisms explain the difficulties encountered with general treatments for oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain in patients with cancer and suggest more effective approaches.

  11. Crotalphine desensitizes TRPA1 ion channels to alleviate inflammatory hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Elisangela; Touska, Filip; Vetter, Irina; Kistner, Katrin; Kichko, Tatjana I; Teixeira, Nathália B; Picolo, Gisele; Cury, Yara; Lewis, Richard J; Fischer, Michael J M; Zimmermann, Katharina; Reeh, Peter W

    2016-11-01

    Crotalphine is a structural analogue to a novel analgesic peptide that was first identified in the crude venom from the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Although crotalphine's analgesic effect is well established, its direct mechanism of action remains unresolved. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of crotalphine on ion channels in peripheral pain pathways. We found that picomolar concentrations of crotalphine selectively activate heterologously expressed and native TRPA1 ion channels. TRPA1 activation by crotalphine required intact N-terminal cysteine residues and was followed by strong and long-lasting desensitization of the channel. Homologous desensitization of recombinant TRPA1 and heterologous desensitization in cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons was observed. Likewise, crotalphine acted on peptidergic TRPA1-expressing nerve endings ex vivo as demonstrated by suppression of calcitonin gene-related peptide release from the trachea and in vivo by inhibition of chemically induced and inflammatory hypersensitivity in mice. The crotalphine-mediated desensitizing effect was abolished by the TRPA1 blocker HC030031 and absent in TRPA1-deficient mice. Taken together, these results suggest that crotalphine is the first peptide to mediate antinociception selectively and at subnanomolar concentrations by targeting TRPA1 ion channels.

  12. Complete Freund's adjuvant-induced hyperalgesia: a human perception.

    PubMed

    Gould, H J

    2000-03-01

    Much of our current understanding about chronic pain and the mechanisms of nociception has been derived from animal models (Bennett GJ. Animal models of neuropathic pain. In: Gebhart, GF, Hammond DL, Jensen TS, editors. Progress in pain research and management, vol. 2, Proceedings of the 7th World Congress of Pain. Seattle, WA: IASP Press, 1994. pp. 495-510; Dubner R, Methods of assessing pain in animals. In: Wall PD, Melzack R, editors. Textbook of pain, vol. 3. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 1994. pp. 293-302). It has been argued in some cases that animals do not perceive 'pain' as humans do, and thus extrapolation of the results of studies in animals is invalid. Clearly, the animal models used in the laboratory do not approach the complexity of chronic pain encountered in the clinical setting. Human pain perception is more complex since it encompasses lesion variability, as well as psychosocial, cultural, developmental, and environmental variables. Where parallels exist, it is possible to gain insight into certain aspects of human pain syndromes that are likely to lead to improved therapeutic opportunities for individual patients. One such model that is frequently used in animals to study pain associated with inflammation is the subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). For ethical reasons, however, little information is available from humans concerning pain associated with this form of inflammation. Due to an inadvertent subcutaneous injection of CFA into the terminal phalanx of this investigator, a study with an N of 1, was conducted to compare the subjective effects of CFA-induced inflammation with objective measurements.

  13. Spinal prostaglandin E receptors of the EP2 subtype and the glycine receptor alpha3 subunit, which mediate central inflammatory hyperalgesia, do not contribute to pain after peripheral nerve injury or formalin injection.

    PubMed

    Hösl, Katharina; Reinold, Heiko; Harvey, Robert J; Müller, Ulrike; Narumiya, Shuh; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich

    2006-12-15

    Inflammation, peripheral nerve injury and chemical irritants can cause central sensitization in pain pathways. Prostaglandins produced in the CNS induce central sensitization during inflammation mainly by relieving nociceptive neurons from glycinergic inhibition. We have recently identified spinal prostaglandin E receptors of the EP2 subtype (EP2 receptors) and the glycine receptor alpha3 subunit (GlyR alpha3) as signal transduction elements involved in the generation of central inflammatory hyperalgesia. It is however still unknown to what extent inhibition of glycine receptors by PGE2 contributes to neuropathic or chemically induced pain. To address this question, we have analyzed mice deficient in the EP2 receptor (EP2-/- mice) or in the GlyR alpha3 subunit (GlyR alpha3-/- mice) using the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin test. We found that EP2-/- mice and GlyR alpha3-/- mice develop thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in the CCI model indistinguishable from that seen in wild-type mice. In the formalin test, EP2-/- mice, but not GlyR alpha3-/- mice, exhibited reduced nocifensive behavior. The lack of a phenotype in GlyR alpha3-/- mice together with the absence of a facilitating effect of intrathecal PGE2 on formalin-induced nociception in wild-type mice suggests that peripheral rather than spinal EP2 receptors are involved. These results indicate that inhibition of glycinergic neurotransmission by EP2 receptor activation does not contribute to pain following peripheral nerve injury or chemical irritation with formalin. Our results thus provide further evidence that inflammatory hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain involve different mechanisms of central sensitization.

  14. Down-regulation of PPARα in the spinal cord contributes to augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhao, L; Li, D; Fu, Z; Liang, L

    2014-10-10

    Obesity is associated with augmented peripheral inflammation and pain sensitivity in response to inflammatory stimulation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Emerging evidence has shown that activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) in the central nervous system controls peripheral inflammation and pain. We hypothesized that obesity might down-regulate PPARα in the spinal cord, leading to enhanced peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet (HF) for 12weeks developed metabolic disorder and displayed significantly decreased spinal PPARα expression and activity. Interestingly, intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of the PPARα activator palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in HF-fed rats for 2weeks normalized spinal PPARα expression and activity without altering metabolic parameters. HF-fed rats were more sensitive to stimulation of the inflamed paw, and exhibited more severe paw edema following carrageenan injection, whereas HF-fed rats receiving ICV PEA had similar pain sensitivity and paw edema to LF-fed rats. No difference in the expression of inflammatory mediators or nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity was observed at baseline among groups. Carrageenan induced decreased PPARα expression and activity, increased spinal cord inflammatory mediator expression and NF-κB activity in both LF-and HF-fed rats. However, the increase was more pronounced in HF-fed rats and corrected by PEA. Intrathecal injection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against PPARα in HF-fed rats completely abolished PEA effects on peripheral pain sensitivity and paw edema. These findings suggest that diet-induced obesity causes down-regulation of spinal PPARα, which facilitates the susceptibility to peripheral inflammatory challenge by increasing inflammatory response in the spinal cord, contributing to augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in obesity.

  15. Neuropeptide Y in the rostral ventromedial medulla reverses inflammatory and nerve injury hyperalgesia in rats via non-selective excitation of local neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Daniel R.; Roeder, Zachary; Elkhatib, Rania; Heinricher, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain reflects not only sensitization of the ascending nociceptive pathways, but also changes in descending modulation. The rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) is a key structure in a well-studied descending pathway, and contains two classes of modulatory neurons, the ON-cells and the OFF-cells. Disinhibition of OFF-cells depresses nociception; increased ON-cell activity facilitates nociception. Multiple lines of evidence show that sensitization of ON-cells contributes to chronic pain, and reversing or blocking this sensitization is of interest as a treatment of persistent pain. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) acting via the Y1 receptor has been shown to attenuate hypersensitivity in nerve-injured animals without affecting normal nociception when microinjected into the RVM, but the neural basis for this effect was unknown. We hypothesized that behavioral anti-hyperalgesia was due to selective inhibition of ON-cells by NPY at the Y1 receptor. To explore the possibility of Y1 selectivity on ON-cells, we stained for the NPY-Y1 receptor in the RVM, and found it broadly expressed on both serotonergic and non-serotonergic neurons. In subsequent behavioral experiments, NPY microinjected into the RVM in lightly anesthetized animals reversed signs of mechanical hyperalgesia following either nerve injury or chronic hindpaw inflammation. Unexpectedly, rather than decreasing ON-cell activity, NPY increased spontaneous activity of both ON- and OFF-cells without altering noxious-evoked changes in firing. Based on these results, we conclude that the anti-hyperalgesic effects of NPY in the RVM are not explained by selective inhibition of ON-cells, but rather by increased spontaneous activity of OFF-cells. Although ON-cells undoubtedly facilitate nociception and contribute to hypersensitivity, the present results highlight the importance of parallel OFF-cell mediated descending inhibition in limiting the expression of chronic pain. PMID:24792711

  16. Lycopene attenuates thermal hyperalgesia in a diabetic mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kuhad, Anurag; Sharma, Sameer; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2008-07-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain, an important microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus is recognized as one of the most difficult types of pain to treat. The development of tolerance, inadequate relief and potential toxicity of classical antinociceptives warrant the investigation of the newer agents to relieve this pain. The aim of the present study was to explore the antinociceptive effect of lycopene and its effect on tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and nitric oxide (NO) release in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice. Four weeks after a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (200 mg/kg), mice were tested in the tail immersion and hot-plate assays. Diabetic mice exhibited significant hyperalgesia alongwith increased plasma glucose and decreased body weights as compared with control mice. Lycopene (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg body weight; per oral) treatment, from the 4th to 8th week after streptozotocin injection, significantly attenuated thermal hyperalgesia and the hot-plate latencies. Lycopene also inhibited the TNF-alpha and NO release in a dose dependent manner. These results indicate an antinociceptive activity of lycopene possibly through its inhibitory action on NO and TNF-alpha release and point towards its potential to attenuate diabetic neuropathic pain.

  17. 5-HT7 receptor activation attenuates thermal hyperalgesia in streptozocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ulugol, Ahmet; Oltulu, Cagatay; Gunduz, Ozgur; Citak, Cihad; Carrara, Roberto; Shaqaqi, Mohammad Reza; Sanchez, Alicia Mansilla; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2012-08-01

    The role of 5-HT7 receptors in the nociceptive processing received most attention during the last few years. The involvement of 5-HT₇ receptors in nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain states have been reported only recently; however, there are no reports on its contribution in diabetic neuropathic pain. We therefore planned to investigate the effect of 5-HT₇ receptor activation on the changes of nociceptive threshold in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin (150 mg/kg, i.p.). The nociceptive responses in normal and diabetic animals were tested in the hot-plate and tail-flick assays. Both hot-plate and tail-flick latencies significantly shortened at 1-3/4 weeks (thermal hyperalgesia) and prolonged at 6-7 weeks (thermal hypoalgesia) after streptozocin administration. At the dose of 10 mg/kg, systemic injections of AS-19, a selective 5-HT₇ receptor agonist, reduced thermal hyperalgesia at early stage of diabetes, but did not influence thermal hypoalgesia at late stage. Co-administration of SB-258719, a selective 5-HT₇ receptor antagonist, at a dose that had no effect on its own (10 mg/kg), reversed the anti-hyperalgesic effect of AS-19. Our results indicate that systemic administration of 5-HT₇ receptor agonists may have clinical utility in treating diabetic neuropathic pain.

  18. A cyclic peptide targeted against PSD-95 blocks central sensitization and attenuates thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, B W; Iwata, M; Mallon, A P; Rupasinghe, C N; Goebel, D J; Marshall, J; Spaller, M R; Saab, C Y

    2010-05-05

    Post-synaptic density protein PSD-95 is emerging as a valid target for modulating nociception in animal studies. Based on the key role of PSD-95 in neuronal plasticity and the maintenance of pain behavior, we predicted that CN2097, a peptide-based macrocycle of nine residues that binds to the PSD-95 Discs large, Zona occludens 1 (PDZ) domains of PSD-95, would interfere with physiologic phenomena in the spinal cord related to central sensitization. Furthermore, we tested whether spinal intrathecal injection of CN2097 attenuates thermal hyperalgesia in a rat model of sciatic neuropathy. Results demonstrate that spinal CN2097 reverses hyperexcitability of wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in the dorsal horn of neuropathic rats and decreases their evoked responses to peripheral stimuli (brush, low caliber von Frey and pressure), whereas CN5125 ("negative control") has no effect. CN2097 also blocks C-fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dorsal horn, which is linked to neuronal plasticity and central sensitization. At a molecular level, CN2097 attenuates the increase in phosphorylated p38 MAPK, a key intracellular signaling pathway in neuropathic pain. Moreover, spinal injection of CN2097 blocks thermal hyperalgesia in neuropathic rats. We conclude that CN2097 is a small molecule peptide with putative anti-nociceptive effects that modulates physiologic phenomena related to central sensitization under conditions of chronic pain.

  19. Evidence for an inhibitory role of central histamine on carrageenin-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Netti, C; Sibilia, V; Guidobono, F; Villani, P; Pecile, A; Braga, P C

    1994-02-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of histamine, the H1 agonist 2-methyl-histamine and the H2 agonist dimaprit were tested on carrageenin induced hyperalgesia by the Randall-Selitto paw pressure test in the rat. Treatment with histamine (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 mumol/rat, i.c.v.) 150 min after intraplantar carrageenin (0.1 ml of 1% solution) caused a significant increase of paw pressure thresholds in inflamed (but not in non-inflamed) paws. The magnitude and the duration of the antinociceptive effects of histamine were dose-dependent. Administration of 2-methyl-histamine (0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.0 mumol/rat, i.c.v.) and dimaprit (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 mumol/rat, i.c.v.) also displayed dose-dependent blockade of carrageenin-induced hyperalgesia. Antinociceptive ED50 values calculated 30 min after drug treatments were: histamine 0.18 mumol/rat; 2-methyl-histamine 0.65 mumol/rat; dimaprit 0.33 mumol/rat. These data indicate that histamine through central H1 and H2 receptors exerts an inhibitory role in the control of nociception in pain resulting from inflammation.

  20. Visceral hyperalgesia caused by peptide YY deletion and Y2 receptor antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed M.; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Fröhlich, Esther E.; Farzi, Aitak; Reichmann, Florian; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Altered levels of colonic peptide YY (PYY) have been reported in patients suffering from functional and inflammatory bowel disorders. While the involvement of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Y receptors in the regulation of nociception is well established, the physiological role of PYY in somatic and visceral pain is poorly understood. In this work, the role of PYY in pain sensitivity was evaluated using PYY knockout (PYY(−/−)) mice and Y2 receptor ligands. PYY(−/−) mice were more sensitive to somatic thermal pain compared to wild type (WT) mice. Visceral pain was assessed by evaluating pain-related behaviors, mouse grimace scale (MGS) and referred hyperalgesia after intrarectal administration of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, 1 or 2%) or its vehicle, peanut oil. The pain-related behaviors induced by AITC were significantly exaggerated by PYY deletion, whereas the MGS readout and the referred hyperalgesia were not significantly affected. The Y2 receptor antagonist, BII0246, increased pain-related behaviors in response to intrarectal AITC compared to vehicle treatment while the Y2 receptor agonist, PYY(3–36), did not have a significant effect. These results indicate that endogenous PYY has a hypoalgesic effect on somatic thermal and visceral chemical pain. The effect on visceral pain seems to be mediated by peripheral Y2 receptors. PMID:28106168

  1. MDA7: a novel selective agonist for CB2 receptors that prevents allodynia in rat neuropathic pain models

    PubMed Central

    Naguib, M; Diaz, P; Xu, J J; Astruc-Diaz, F; Craig, S; Vivas-Mejia, P; Brown, D L

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is growing interest in using cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor agonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain. In this report, we describe the pharmacological characteristics of MDA7 (1-[(3-benzyl-3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1-benzofuran-6-yl)carbonyl]piperidine), a novel CB2 receptor agonist. Experimental approach: We characterized the pharmacological profile of MDA7 by using radioligand-binding assays and in vitro functional assays at human cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors. In vitro functional assays were performed at rat CB1 and CB2 receptors. The effects of MDA7 in reversing neuropathic pain were assessed in spinal nerve ligation and paclitaxel-induced neuropathy models in rats. Key results: MDA7 exhibited selectivity and agonist affinity at human and rat CB2 receptors. MDA7 treatment attenuated tactile allodynia produced by spinal nerve ligation or by paclitaxel in a dose-related manner. These effects were selectively antagonized by a CB2 receptor antagonist but not by CB1 or opioid receptor antagonists. MDA7 did not affect rat locomotor activity. Conclusion and implications: MDA7, a novel selective CB2 agonist, was effective in suppressing neuropathic nociception in two rat models without affecting locomotor behaviour. These results confirm the potential for CB2 agonists in the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:18846037

  2. Pharmacology of intracisternal or intrathecal glycine, muscimol, and baclofen in strychnine-induced thermal hyperalgesia of mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il Ok; Son, Jin Kook; Lim, Eui-Sung; Kim, Yeon-Soo

    2011-10-01

    Glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are localized and released by the same interneurons in the spinal cord. Although the effects of glycine and GABA on analgesia are well known, little is known about the effect of GABA in strychnine-induced hyperalgesia. To investigate the effect of GABA and the role of the glycine receptor in thermal hyperalgesia, we designed an experiment involving the injection of muscimol (a GABA(A) receptor agonist), baclofen (a GABA(B) receptor agonist) or glycine with strychnine (strychnine sensitive glycine receptor antagonist). Glycine, muscimol, or baclofen with strychnine was injected into the cisterna magna or lumbar subarachnoidal spaces of mice. The effects of treatment on strychnine-induced heat hyperalgesia were observed using the pain threshold index via the hot plate test. The dosages of experimental drugs and strychnine we chose had no effects on motor behavior in conscious mice. Intracisternal or intrathecal administration of strychnine produced thermal hyperalgesia in mice. Glycine antagonize the effects of strychnine, whereas, muscimol or baclofen does not. Our results indicate that glycine has anti-thermal hyperalgesic properties in vivo; and GABA receptor agonists may lack the binding abilities of glycine receptor antagonists with their sites in the central nervous system.

  3. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Mutant and Null Mice Retain Morphine-Induced Tolerance, Hyperalgesia, and Physical Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Theresa Alexandra; Leduc-Pessah, Heather; Skelhorne-Gross, Graham; Nicol, Christopher J. B.; Milne, Brian; Trang, Tuan; Cahill, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system modulates opioid-induced effects within the central nervous system and one target that has received considerable attention is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here, we examined the contribution of TLR4 in the development of morphine tolerance, hyperalgesia, and physical dependence in two inbred mouse strains: C3H/HeJ mice which have a dominant negative point mutation in the Tlr4 gene rendering the receptor non-functional, and B10ScNJ mice which are TLR4 null mutants. We found that neither acute antinociceptive response to a single dose of morphine, nor the development of analgesic tolerance to repeated morphine treatment, was affected by TLR4 genotype. Likewise, opioid induced hyperalgesia and opioid physical dependence (assessed by naloxone precipitated withdrawal) were not altered in TLR4 mutant or null mice. We also examined the behavioural consequence of two stereoisomers of naloxone: (−) naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, and (+) naloxone, a purported antagonist of TLR4. Both stereoisomers of naloxone suppressed opioid induced hyperalgesia in wild-type control, TLR4 mutant, and TLR4 null mice. Collectively, our data suggest that TLR4 is not required for opioid-induced analgesic tolerance, hyperalgesia, or physical dependence. PMID:24824631

  4. Sensitization of lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons parallels heat hyperalgesia in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, David

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that spinal lamina I neurons with ascending axons that project to the midbrain play a crucial role in hyperalgesia. To test this hypothesis the quantitative properties of lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain were compared to those of unoperated and sham-operated controls. Behavioural testing showed that animals with a CCI exhibited heat hyperalgesia within 4 days of the injury, and this hyperalgesia persisted throughout the 14-day post-operative testing period. In the CCI, nociceptive lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons had heat thresholds that were significantly lower than controls (43.0 ± 2.8°C vs. 46.7 ± 2.6°C; P < 10−4, ANOVA). Nociceptive lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons were also significantly more responsive to graded heat stimuli in the CCI, compared to controls (P < 0.02, 2-factor repeated-measures ANOVA), and increased after-discharges were also observed. Furthermore, the heat-evoked stimulus–response functions of lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons in CCI animals co-varied significantly (P < 0.03, ANCOVA) with the amplitude of heat hyperalgesia determined behaviourally. Taken together these results are consistent with the hypothesis that lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons have an important mechanistic role in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain. PMID:19289544

  5. Effect of valdecoxib pretreatment on pain and secondary hyperalgesia: a randomized controlled trial in healthy volunteers [ISRCTN05282752, NCT00260325

    PubMed Central

    Burns, David; Hill, Lindsay; Essandoh, Michael; Jarzembowski, Tomasz M; Schuler, H Gregg; Janicki, Piotr K

    2006-01-01

    Background Induction of the COX-2 isoenzyme appears to play a major role in the genesis of central sensitization after nociceptive stimulation. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a single, oral dose of the specific COX-2 inhibitor-valdecoxib in attenuating the central sensitization – induced secondary hyperalgesia in a heat/capsaicin pain model in healthy volunteers. Methods The study was a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, crossover, single dose efficacy trial using 20 healthy volunteers. Two hours following placebo or 40 mg, PO valdecoxib, participants underwent skin sensitization with heat/capsaicin, as well as supra-threshold pain and re-kindling measurements according to an established, validated pain model. Subjects rated pain intensity and unpleasantness on a visual analog scale and the area of secondary hyperalgesia was serially mapped. Results The area of secondary hyperalgesia produced after 40 mg of valdecoxib was no different than that after placebo. Furthermore, there were no significantly relevant differences when volunteers were treated with valdecoxib or placebo in relation to either cold- or hot pain threshold or the intensity of pain after supra-threshold, thermal pain stimulation. Conclusion We demonstrated that a single, oral dose of valdecoxib when does not attenuate secondary hyperalgesia induced by heat/capsaicin in a cutaneous sensitization pain model in healthy volunteers. PMID:16529650

  6. Modulation of imidazoline I2 binding sites by CR4056 relieves postoperative hyperalgesia in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Marco; Ferrari, Flora; Menghetti, Ilaria; Tremolada, Dario; Caselli, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE CR4056 is a novel imidazoline-2 (I2) ligand exhibiting potent analgesic activity in animal models of pain. In this study, we investigated the effects of CR4056 in a well-established model of postoperative pain where rats develop hyperalgesia in the injured hind paw. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH By measuring paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical pressure, we studied the pharmacology of CR4056, potential sex differences in pain perception and response to treatment, and the pharmacodynamic interaction of CR4056 with morphine. KEY RESULTS Oral CR4056 and subcutaneous morphine dose-dependently reversed the hyperalgesic response. Analgesic effects of CR4056 were completely suppressed by the non-selective imidazoline I2/α2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan, were partially reduced (∼30%; P < 0.05) by the selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine, but were not influenced by the non-selective I1/α2-adrenoceptor antagonist efaroxan or by the μ opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. We found no differences in responses to CR4056 or morphine between male and female rats. However, females had a lower pain threshold than males, and needed lower doses of drugs to reach a significant analgesia. When CR4056 and morphine were combined, their median effective doses were lower than expected for additive effects, both in males and in females. Isobolographic analysis confirmed a synergism between CR4056 and morphine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS CR4056 is a novel pharmacological agent under development for postoperative pain both as stand-alone treatment and in association with morphine. CR4056 has successfully completed Phase I studies for tolerability and pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers, and is currently entering the first proof-of-concept study in patients. PMID:24758515

  7. Sex Difference in Oxytocin-Induced Anti-Hyperalgesia at the Spinal Level in Rats with Intraplantar Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Lok-Hi; Chen, Yuan-Hao; Wu, Wan-Chuan; Chang, En-Pei; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated intrathecal administration of oxytocin strongly induced anti-hyperalgesia in male rats. By using an oxytocin-receptor antagonist (atosiban), the descending oxytocinergic pathway was found to regulate inflammatory hyperalgesia in our previous study using male rats. The activity of this neural pathway is elevated during hyperalgesia, but whether this effect differs in a sex-dependent manner remains unknown. We conducted plantar tests on adult male and female virgin rats in which paw inflammation was induced using carrageenan. Exogenous (i.t.) application of oxytocin exerted no anti-hyperalgesic effect in female rats, except at an extremely high dose. Female rats exhibited similar extent of hyperalgesia to male rats did when the animals received the same dose of carrageenan. When atosiban was administered alone, the severity of hyperalgesia was not increased in female rats. Moreover, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) was expressed at higher levels in the spinal cords of female rats compared with those of male rats. Oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia exhibits a sex-dependent difference in rats. This difference can partially result from the higher expression of IRAP in the spinal cords of female rats, because IRAP functions as an enzyme that degrades oxytocin. Our study confirms the existence of a sex difference in oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia at the spinal level in rats. PMID:27606886

  8. Experimental tooth clenching. A model for studying mechanisms of muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    ) participated in two sessions at a minimum interval of 1 wk. Microdialysis was done to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to measure masseter muscle blood flow. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth clenching task (50% of MVCF) or a control session (no clenching). Pain intensity was measured throughout the experiment. Substance levels and blood flow were unaltered at all time points between sessions, and between genders in each session. Pain intensity was significantly higher after clenching in the clenching session compared to the same time point in the control session. In (IV), 15 patients with M-TMD and 15 healthy controls participated in one session and the methodology described above was used. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT and significantly lower blood flows than healthy controls. No significant differences for any substance at any time point were observed between groups. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity. Qu-ATEBS, the 7-item evidence-based quality assessment tool, is reliable, exhibits face-validity, and has excellent discriminative validity. Tooth clenching was associated with pain, fatigue, and short-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia, but not with proprioceptive allodynia. It seems that tooth clenching is not directly related to delayed onset muscle soreness. In healthy subjects and in patients with M-TMD, levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate were unaltered after tooth clenching. But 5-HT levels were significantly higher and blood flows significantly lower in M-TMD patients than in healthy controls at all time points. These two factors may facilitate the release, and enhance the effects, of other algesic substances that may cause pain.

  9. [THE CHOICE OF THE ANESTHESY OPTIMAL METHOD, USING DETERMINATION OF THE TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS LEVEL IN THE PLASM AS A MARKER OF HYPERALGESIA IN EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD].

    PubMed

    Dmytriyev, D V

    2016-01-01

    There were examined 47 children, operated on for tumors of abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space. The opioid-induced hyperalgesia may occur in early postoperative period. The anesthesia conduction of m. transverses abdominis (TAP-block), using 0.375% bupivacaine solution and combined spinal epidural analgesia (CSEA) for postoperative anesthesia have promoted the hyperalgesia severity reduction. Hyperalgesia in early postoperative period was demonstrated by upgrading of the toll-like receptors (TLR-4) level in the blood. The TLR-4 expression increased in the blood was noted while application of a TAP-block and CSEA.

  10. Cav3.2-expressing low-threshold C fibres in human hairy skin contribute to cold allodynia--a non-TRPV1- and non-TRPM8-dependent phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Samour, Mohamad S; Nagi, Saad S; Mahns, David A

    2015-08-01

    It is generally agreed that cold allodynia is a consequence of impaired (Aδ-fibre-mediated) central inhibition of C-nociceptive inputs. However, it is also known that C polymodal nociceptors are not activated at innocuous low temperatures. Recently, we demonstrated the contribution of C-tactile fibres to tactile allodynia. In this study, we investigated whether this, or a related, C-fibre class contributes to cold allodynia. In 30 healthy and 3 chronic pain subjects, a series of normally innocuous localised thermal stimuli were applied to the skin overlying a painful tibialis anterior muscle (induced by infusion of hypertonic saline). The effects of thermal stimulation on muscle pain were observed before and after compression blockade of myelinated fibres. Furthermore, intradermal capsaicin, menthol and TTA-A2 were used for desensitisation of TRPV1, TRPM8, and T-type calcium (Cav3.2) channels, respectively. Before muscle pain, all thermal stimuli were reported as nonpainful regardless of whether myelinated fibres were conducting or not. During muscle pain, dynamic skin cooling (32°C → 20°C) evoked significant and reproducible increases in the overall pain intensity (allodynia). This increase was short lived and locked to the dynamic phase of cooling with pain levels returning to baseline during sustained cooling. Dynamic warming (32°C → 39°C) had no effect on pain levels. Cold allodynia persisted after nerve compression and TRPV1 and TRPM8 desensitisation but was abolished by localised Cav3.2 blockade. In clinical subjects, C-fibre-mediated allodynia was observed without the need for experimental pain-producing manipulations. In conclusion, cold allodynia represents a non-TRPV1- and non-TRPM8-dependent phenomenon, which is mediated by low-threshold Cav3.2-expressing C fibres.

  11. BK channels in microglia are required for morphine-induced hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Zhang, Jing; Satoh, Yasushi; Meredith, Andrea L.; Nakata, Takahiro; Wu, Zhou; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Although morphine is a gold standard medication, long-term opioid use is associated with serious side effects, such as morphine-induced hyperalgesia (MIH) and anti-nociceptive tolerance. Microglia-to-neuron signalling is critically involved in pain hypersensitivity. However, molecules that control microglial cellular state under chronic morphine treatment remain unknown. Here we show that the microglia-specific subtype of Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is responsible for generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance. We find that, after chronic morphine administration, an increase in arachidonic acid levels through the μ-opioid receptors leads to the sole activation of microglial BK channels in the spinal cord. Silencing BK channel auxiliary β3 subunit significantly attenuates the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance, and increases neurotransmission after chronic morphine administration. Therefore, microglia-specific BK channels contribute to the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance. PMID:27241733

  12. Effects of symptomatic treatments on cutaneous hyperalgesia and laser evoked potentials during migraine attack.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Losito, L; Libro, G; Guido, M; Di Fruscolo, O; Sardaro, M; Sciruicchio, V; Lamberti, P; Livrea, P

    2005-05-01

    Previously an amplitude enhancement of laser evoked potentials (LEPs) was detected during migraine attack: we further examined pain threshold to CO2 laser stimuli and LEPs during attacks, evaluating the effect of almotriptan, lysine-acetylsalicylate and placebo treatment on cutaneous hyperalgesia to thermal stimuli delivered by CO2 laser and on LEP components. Eighteen patients suffering from migraine without aura were analysed. They were divided into three groups of six patients each, randomly assigned to lysine acetyl-salicylate, almotriptan or placebo treatments. The supraorbital zones and the dorsum of the hand were stimulated on both the symptomatic and not symptomatic side in all patients. The LEPs were recorded by 25 scalp electrodes. During attacks, the P2 wave was significantly enhanced; the amplitude of the P2 component obtained by the stimulation of the supraorbital zone during the attack on the side of the headache was significantly correlated with the intensity of pain and the frequency of headache. Both almotriptan and lysine acetyl-salicylate significantly reduced the P2 amplitude but they showed no effects on hyperalgesia to laser stimulation; headache relief following therapy was correlated with the reduction of the P2 amplitude. The cortical elaboration of laser-induced experimental pain seemed increased during migraine attack, and the severity of headache was mainly related to the increase of the later LEPs components expressing the attentive and emotive compounds of suffering. Reversion of this process appeared to be primarily responsible for the efficacy of drugs in treating migraine, though both almotriptan and lysine-acetil salicilate seemed to have no effect in reducing sensitization at second and third order nociceptive neurons.

  13. Nocebo hyperalgesia: contributions of social observation and body-related cognitive styles

    PubMed Central

    Vögtle, Elisabeth; Kröner-Herwig, Birgit; Barke, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recently, it has been shown that nocebo hyperalgesia can be acquired through observational learning. The aim of this study was to investigate socially induced nocebo hyperalgesia and its relationship with pain catastrophizing, somatic complaints, hypochondriacal concerns, and empathy. Participants and methods Ninety-seven women (43.1±15.5 years) were randomly assigned to one of the two conditions. Participants in the nocebo condition (NC) watched a video in which a female model displayed more pain when an ointment was applied and less pain when no ointment was applied. In the control condition (CC), the model demonstrated low pain with and without the ointment. Subsequently, all participants received three pressure pain stimuli (60 seconds) on each hand. On one hand, the ointment was applied prior to the stimulation. The order of the stimulation of the fingers (middle, index, or ring finger), the side of ointment application (left or right hand), and the side with which the stimulation began were randomized within each group and balanced across the groups. Depending on the randomization, the pressure pain application started with or without ointment and on the left or right hand. Pain ratings on a numerical rating scale (0–10) were collected. In addition, the participants completed questionnaires regarding body-related cognitive styles and empathy. Results There was a significant difference in the pain ratings between the CC and the NC. The effect of ointment application was also significant, but no interaction between condition and ointment application was found. Only in the CC did the nocebo response correlate with hypochondriacal concerns and somatic complaints. Conclusion Application of an ointment as well as the observation of a model demonstrating more pain after a treatment produced elevated pain ratings. Cognitive styles were not related to the socially induced nocebo response, but were related to the nocebo response in the CC. PMID:27175092

  14. Pain management with intrathecal clonidine in a colon cancer patient with opioid hyperalgesia: case presentation.

    PubMed

    Pirbudak, Lütfiye; Sevinç, Alper; Maralcan, Göktürk; Kılıç, Ertuğrul

    2014-01-01

    Hyperalgesia is normally an increase in the response to a painful stimulant. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is a situation frequently encountered in algology clinics. Its treatment is complicated and problematic and often requires alternative methods. A 40-year-old male patient 45 kg weighing had been diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer 2.5 years ago. He had used non-steroid antiinflammatory drugs, opioid analgesics and steroid preparations casually for his increased pain without any monitoring for one year. He was admitted five times for pain control. In the last visit, he complained of severe abdominal, pubic and rectal pain (visual analogue scale [VAS] 8), which was unresponsive to epidural analgesic, and later presented to the algology clinic; he was sleep-deprived, restless and in a panic state. Intrathecal morphine (1 mg) was applied considering his opioid tolerance. Because of increased pain (VAS 8-9) one hour after surgery for abscess in the liver and peritonea, the patient was given intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol and diazem considering his OIH. Then, bolus dexmedetomidine (1 µg/kg) followed by dexmedetomidine infusion (0.2 µg/kg/h) was started. Three days later, diagnostic intrathecal clonidine (30 µg) was applied, and the patient's complaints regressed. With the patient reporting relaxed pain (VAS 1-2) after 30 minutes, an intrathecal port was placed. Both cancer pain and OIH were controlled with clonidine 90 µg/day. He was more relaxed, and his pain was tolerable until his death. Intrathecal clonidine administration may be an effective method for the treatment of OIH.

  15. How the pain of others enhances our pain: searching the cerebral correlates of 'compassional hyperalgesia'.

    PubMed

    Godinho, F; Faillenot, I; Perchet, C; Frot, M; Magnin, M; Garcia-Larrea, L

    2012-05-01

    Observing other people's pain increases our own reports to painful stimuli, a phenomenon that can be defined as 'compassional hyperalgesia' (CH). This functional magnetic resonance imaging study examined the neural correlates of CH, and whether CH could emerge when exposure to the driving stimulus was subliminal. Subjects received electric somatosensory stimuli while observing images of people undergoing painful or enjoyable somatic sensations, presented during a period allowing or not allowing conscious perception. The intensity attributed to painful stimuli increased significantly when these were delivered close to images showing human pain, but only when such images were consciously perceived. The basic core of the Pain Matrix (SI, SII, insula, mid-anterior cingulate) was activated by painful stimuli, but its activation magnitude did not increase during CH. Compassional hyperalgesia was associated with increased activity in polymodal areas involved in emotional tuning (anterior prefrontal, pregenual cingulated) and areas involved in multisensory integration and short-term memory (dorsolateral prefrontal, temporo-parieto-occipital junction). CH appears as a high-order phenomenon needing conscious appraisal of the eliciting visual stimulus, and supported by polymodal areas distinct from the basic Pain Matrix. This suggests that compassion to pain does not result from a mere 'sensory resonance' in pain networks, but rather from an interaction between the output of a first-line processing in the Pain Matrix, and the activity of a high-order network involving multisensory integration (temporo-parietal), encoding of internal states (mid-prefrontal) and short-time memory encoding (dorsolateral prefrontal). The Pain Matrix cannot be considered as an 'objective' correlate of the pain experience in all situations.

  16. Electroacupuncture and lumbar transplant of GDNF-secreting fibroblasts synergistically attenuate hyperalgesia after sciatic nerve constriction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiqiang; Sun, Yong; Lu, Peihua; Wang, Yanqing; Wu, Gencheng

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been shown to induce potent analgesic effects on neuropathic pain in both patients and rodents. Cell therapy to release antinociceptive agents near the pain processing centers of the spinal cord is a promising next step in the development of treatment modalities. This study investigated the effects of the combination of EA and cell therapy by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on neuropathic pain in rats. The hyperalgesic state was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve and fibroblasts genetically modified to secrete bioactive GDNF (FBs-GDNF) were used for cell therapy. Fifty-eight rats with neuropathic pain were randomly divided into five groups (CCI+PBS, n = 11; CCI+FBs-GDNF, n = 12; CCI+EA+PBS, n = 11; CCI+EA+FBs-pLNCX2, n = 12; CCI+EA+FBs-GDNF, n = 12). On the 7th day after CCI, the rats received intrathecal transplantation of FBs-GDNF or control fibroblasts (FBs-pLNCX2). In the meantime, EA was administered once every other day from the 7th day after CCI surgery for 21 days. The paw withdrawal latency (PWL) to radiant heat was measured every other day. The results showed that the ipsilateral PWL of the rats from all three EA treatment groups significantly increased starting on the 12th day compared with the PBS control group. Strikingly, the group which received EA treatment and FBs-GDNF transplantation (CCI+EA+FBs-GDNF) showed a significantly decreased thermal hyperalgesia after 2 weeks post CCI surgery compared with the groups which received EA treatment and FBs-pLNCX2 transplantation (CCI+EA+FBs-pLNCX2) or PBS (CCI+EA+PBS) as well as the FBs-GDNF transplantation group without EA treatment (CCI+FBs-GDNF). Our data suggest that EA and cell therapy can synergistically attenuate hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain rats.

  17. Nerve injury induces robust allodynia and ectopic discharges in Nav1.3 null mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Mohammed A; Baker, Mark D; Levato, Alessandra; Ingram, Rachel; Mallucci, Giovanna; McMahon, Stephen B; Wood, John N

    2006-01-01

    Changes in sodium channel activity and neuronal hyperexcitability contribute to neuropathic pain, a major clinical problem. There is strong evidence that the re-expression of the embryonic voltage-gated sodium channel subunit Nav1.3 underlies neuronal hyperexcitability and neuropathic pain. Here we show that acute and inflammatory pain behaviour is unchanged in global Nav1.3 mutant mice. Surprisingly, neuropathic pain also developed normally in the Nav1.3 mutant mouse. To rule out any genetic compensation mechanisms that may have masked the phenotype, we investigated neuropathic pain in two conditional Nav1.3 mutant mouse lines. We used Nav1.8-Cre mice to delete Nav1.3 in nociceptors at E14 and NFH-Cre mice to delete Nav1.3 throughout the nervous system postnatally. Again normal levels of neuropathic pain developed after nerve injury in both lines. Furthermore, ectopic discharges from damaged nerves were unaffected by the absence of Nav1.3 in global knock-out mice. Our data demonstrate that Nav1.3 is neither necessary nor sufficient for the development of nerve-injury related pain. PMID:17052333

  18. Bv8, a small protein from frog skin and its homologue from snake venom induce hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Mollay, C; Wechselberger, C; Mignogna, G; Negri, L; Melchiorri, P; Barra, D; Kreil, G

    1999-06-18

    From skin secretions of Bombina variegata and Bombina bombina, we isolated a small protein termed Bv8. The sequence of its 77 amino acids was established by peptide analysis and by cDNA cloning of the Bv8 precursor. Bv8 stimulates the contraction of the guinea-pig ileum at nanomolar concentrations. The contraction is not inhibited by a variety of antagonists. Injection of a few micrograms of Bv8 into the brain of rats elicits, as assessed by the tail-flick test and paw pressure threshold, a marked hyperalgesia which lasts for about 1 h. Bv8 is related to protein A, a component of the venom of the black mamba. After i.c.v. injection, protein A is even more active than Bv8 in inducing hyperalgesia.

  19. Different analgesic effects of intrathecal endomorphin-2 on thermal hyperalgesia and evoked inflammatory pain in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Hui; Zhao, Ya-Qun; Zhu, Chao; Chen, Lei; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Ting; Dong, Yu-Lin; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Kaye, Alan David; Wang, Wen; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Hormone replacement remains one of the common therapies for menopause-related pain but is associated with risk of orofacial or back pain. Spinal endomorphin-2 (EM-2) is involved in varied pain and its release is steroid-dependent, but whether increasing spinal EM-2 can inhibit thermal hyperalgesia and inflammatory pain in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats, an animal model mimicking menopause, is not clear, nor is the potential involvement of spinal mu-opioid receptor (MOR). In the current study, we revealed that the temporal decrease of spinal EM-2 is accompanied with OVX-induced thermal hyperalgesia that was dose-dependently attenuated by intrathecal (IT) delivery of EM-2. The subcutaneous injection of formalin-induced inflammatory pain in OVX rats was exacerbated and IT delivery of EM-2 dose-dependently inhibited the inflammatory pain. However, the ED50 for IT delivery of EM-2 on thermal hyperalgesia is smaller than that on inflammatory pain in OVX rats, suggesting different contributions of the EM-2 system to these 2 pain modalities in OVX rats. IT pretreatment with MOR antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (β-FNA), attenuated IT EM-2 analgesia on both thermal hyperalgesia and inflammatory pain in OVX rats. Furthermore, IT delivery of EM-2 did not affect the animals' locomotion or anxiety status. Our findings suggested that IT EM-2 might be a safer analgesia strategy than hormone replacement therapy in reducing risk of orofacial or back pain. However, a long-lasting form of EM-2 with less tolerance is needed to induce sustained analgesia.

  20. Effects of tramadol on viscero-visceral hyperalgesia in a rat model of endometriosis plus ureteral calculosis.

    PubMed

    Lopopolo, Mariangela; Affaitati, Giannapia; Fabrizio, Alessandra; Massimini, Francesca; Lapenna, Domenico; Giamberardino, Maria Adele; Costantini, Raffaele

    2014-06-01

    The effects of tramadol versus placebo administration on behavioral indicators of ureteral pain, pelvic pain and referred lumbar muscle hyperalgesia were investigated in a rat model of viscero-visceral hyperalgesia from endometriosis plus ureteral calculosis (endo + stone). Fifty female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent surgical induction of endometriosis and, 2 weeks later, were randomly assigned to five groups (10 each), to be treated i.p., twice a day, with tramadol (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg) or saline for 5 days (14-18th day postendometriosis; prestone treatment). On the 21st day, they underwent laparotomy for stone formation in the upper left ureter (dental cement injection). All were video-taped 24 h nonstop for 7 days before and 4 days after stone formation (14-25th day postendometriosis) to record ureteral and pelvic pain behaviors. Lumbar sensitivity (L1) was tested bilaterally, daily over the same period, by verifying presence/absence of vocalization upon muscle pinching at a predefined pressure (calibrated forceps). Additional fifty endo + stone rats underwent the same protocol, except that treatment was performed on 21st-25th day (poststone treatment). Tramadol vs. saline significantly reduced number and duration of ureteral crises, duration of pelvic behavior, and incidence of muscle hyperalgesia (P < 0.0001), with a dose-dependent effect. Prestone treatment was significantly more effective than poststone treatment for the 1.25 dose for all parameters and 2.5 dose for pelvic and muscle parameters (0.003 > P < 0.02). Tramadol, even at low doses, is thus highly protective against pain from 'viscero-visceral hyperalgesia' in endometriosis plus ureteral calculosis; it can represent a valid therapeutic approach in women with these comorbidities.

  1. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activates ERK in primary sensory neurons and mediates inflammatory heat hyperalgesia through TRPV1 sensitization.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Zhi-Ye; Xu, Haoxing; Clapham, David E; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2004-09-22

    Although the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase) pathway typically regulates cell growth and survival, increasing evidence indicates the involvement of this pathway in neural plasticity. It is unknown whether the PI3K pathway can mediate pain hypersensitivity. Intradermal injection of capsaicin and NGF produce heat hyperalgesia by activating their respective TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1) and TrkA receptors on nociceptor sensory nerve terminals. We examined the activation of PI3K in primary sensory DRG neurons by these inflammatory agents and the contribution of PI3K activation to inflammatory pain. We further investigated the correlation between the PI3K and the ERK (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) pathway. Capsaicin and NGF induce phosphorylation of the PI3K downstream target AKT (protein kinase B), which is blocked by the PI3K inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin, indicative of the activation of PI3K by both agents. ERK activation by capsaicin and NGF was also blocked by PI3K inhibitors. Similarly, intradermal capsaicin in rats activated PI3K and ERK in C-fiber DRG neurons and epidermal nerve fibers. Injection of PI3K or MEK (ERK kinase) inhibitors into the hindpaw attenuated capsaicin- and NGF-evoked heat hyperalgesia but did not change basal heat sensitivity. Furthermore, PI3K, but not ERK, inhibition blocked early induction of hyperalgesia. In acutely dissociated DRG neurons, the capsaicin-induced TRPV1 current was strikingly potentiated by NGF, and this potentiation was completely blocked by PI3K inhibitors and primarily suppressed by MEK inhibitors. Therefore, PI3K induces heat hyperalgesia, possibly by regulating TRPV1 activity, in an ERK-dependent manner. The PI3K pathway also appears to play a role that is distinct from ERK by regulating the early onset of inflammatory pain.

  2. Chronic pain in patients with the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: evidence for generalized hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Rombaut, Lies; Scheper, Mark; De Wandele, Inge; De Vries, Janneke; Meeus, Mira; Malfait, Fransiska; Engelbert, Raoul; Calders, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Chronic widespread pain is highly present in patients with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT), but up to now, evidence for generalized hyperalgesia is lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate whether pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at both symptomatic and asymptomatic body areas differ in EDS-HT patients compared to healthy subjects. Twenty-three women with EDS-HT and 23 gender- and age-matched healthy controls participated. All subjects marked on Margolis Pain Diagram where they felt pain lasting longer than 24 h in the past 4 weeks. Then, they completed several questionnaires assessing pain cognitions, fatigue, disability, and general health status, in order to take the possible influence of these factors on PPTs into account. Patients also completed a form concerning the type of pain they experienced. Thereupon, a blinded researcher assessed PPTs at 14 body locations on the trunk and extremities. PPTs were compared for the two complete groups. In addition, PPTs of patients and controls who did not report pain in a respective zone were compared. PPTs of the patients were significantly lower compared to those of the control group, also when pain-free samples per zone were compared. The mean (SD) PPT was 2.9 (1.62) kg/cm(2) in the EDS-HT patients and 5.2 (1.88) kg/cm(2) in the controls (P < 0.001). No confounding factors responsible for the observed differences could be revealed. In half of the patient group, a predominantly neuropathic pain component was likely present. This study provides evidence for the existence of hyperalgesia even in asymptomatic areas (generalized secondary hyperalgesia). The generalized hyperalgesia may represent the involvement of a sensitized central nervous system, which inquires an adapted pain management for this patient group.

  3. Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Resveratrol During Inflammatory Hyperalgesia via Differential Regulation of pro-Inflammatory Mediators.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajeet Kumar; Vinayak, Manjula

    2016-07-01

    Sensitization of nociceptive neurons by inflammatory mediators leads to hypersensitivity for normal painful stimuli which is termed hyperalgesia. Oxidative stress is an essential factor in pathological pain; therefore, antioxidants qualify as potential anti-hyperalgesic agents. The present study examines the efficacy of the natural antioxidant resveratrol in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced hyperalgesic rats. Thermal hyperalgesia was measured at different time points by paw withdrawal latency test and confirmed by c-Fos expression in spinal dorsal horn. The impact of resveratrol treatment on inflammatory mediators at peripheral (paw skin) and central (spinal cord) sites was determined during early (6 h) as well as late phase (48 h) of hyperalgesia. Intraplanter injection of CFA increased the level of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 as well as inflammatory enzymes COX-2 and iNOS in paw skin in both phases. In case of spinal cord, the level of COX-2 was found to be elevated in both phases, whereas iNOS could not be detected. The cytokines were found to be elevated only in late phase in spinal cord. Administration of resveratrol (20 mg/kg) shifted the level of all inflammatory mediators towards normal, except cytokines in paw skin. The present study suggests that the anti-nociceptive effect of resveratrol is implicated at both peripheral and central sites in a tissue specific manner. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Coadministration of indomethacin and minocycline attenuates established paclitaxel-induced neuropathic thermal hyperalgesia: Involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Parvathy, Subramanian S.; Masocha, Willias

    2015-01-01

    Taxanes such as paclitaxel, which are chemotherapeutic drugs, cause dose-dependent painful neuropathy in some patients. We investigated whether coadministration of minocycline and indomethacin produces antinociceptive effects in mice with paclitaxel-induced neuropathic thermal hyperalgesia and if the cannabinoid system is involved. Previously, we reported that coadministration of these two drugs results in antinociception against inflammatory pain at doses where either drug alone lack significant activity. In the current study, we observed that treatment of female mice with indomethacin or minocycline alone did not affect established paclitaxel-induced thermal hyperalgesia, whereas coadministration of the two drugs attenuated it. In male mice indomethacin had some antihyperalgesic activity, whilst minocycline did not. Coadministration of the two drugs had supraadditive antihyperalgesic activity in male mice. Administration of a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM 251 blocked the antihyperalgesic effects of the combination of minocycline and indomethacin in both male and female mice. In conclusion our results indicate that coadministration of minocycline and indomethacin abrogates established paclitaxel-induced neuropathic thermal hyperalgesia in mice, and the potentiation of the antinociceptive effects of this combination involves the cannabinoid system. PMID:26085115

  5. A randomized study of the effect of oral lamotrigine and hydromorphone on pain and hyperalgesia following heat/capsaicin sensitization.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin L; Maloney, Alan; Hoke, Frank; Dahl, Jørgen B; Rowbotham, Michael C

    2003-09-01

    In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study, the analgesic effect of oral lamotrigine (400 mg) on cutaneous sensitization induced with the heat/capsaicin sensitization model was compared with the effect of oral hydromorphone (8 mg) in healthy volunteers. In a separate session, intravenous remifentanil (0.10 microg.kg(-1).min(-1)) and placebo were administered. This session was used as an additional reference comparator. Outcome measures were the areas of secondary hyperalgesia to brush and von Frey hair stimulation and the painfulness of noxious thermal stimulation in nonsensitized skin. Compared with placebo, both intravenous remifentanil and oral hydromorphone significantly suppressed secondary hyperalgesia and acute thermal nociception. Oral lamotrigine did not reduce secondary hyperalgesia or acute thermal nociception but produced side effects of severity comparable with that of oral hydromorphone. Although lamotrigine is efficacious in the management of some types of chronic neuropathic pain, the lack of effect of this agent on human experimental pain suggests that its analgesic effects depend on nerve injury-associated abnormalities, which cannot be simulated in healthy human volunteers.

  6. Anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 therapy in CCI neuropathy decreases thermal hyperalgesia, macrophage recruitment, and endoneurial TNF-alpha expression.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R; Janjigian, M; Myers, R R

    1998-01-01

    The chronic constriction injury model of mononeuropathy is a direct, partial nerve injury yielding thermal hyperalgesia. The inflammation that results from this injury is believed to contribute importantly to both the neuropathological and behavioral sequelae. This study involved administering a single dose (250 ng) of interleukin-10 (IL-10), an endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide, at the site and time of a chronic constriction injury (CCI) lesion to determine if IL-10 administration could attenuate the inflammatory response of the nerve to CCI and resulting thermal hyperalgesia. In IL-10-treated animals, thermal hyperalgesia was significantly reduced following CCI (days 3, 5 and 9). Histological sections from the peripheral nerve injury site of those animals had decreased cell profiles immunoreactive for ED-1, a marker of recruited macrophages, at both times studied (2 and 5 days post-CCI). IL-10 treatment also decreased cell profiles immunoreactive for the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) at day 2, but not day 5. Qualitative light microscopic assessment of neuropathology at the lesion site did not suggest substantial differences between IL-10 and vehicle-treated sections. The authors propose that initial production of TNF-alpha and perhaps other proinflammatory cytokines at the peripheral nerve lesion site importantly influences the long-term behavioral outcome of nerve injury, and that IL-10 therapy may accomplish this by downregulating the inflammatory response of the nerve to injury.

  7. Spinal 5-HT3 receptor mediates nociceptive effect on central neuropathic pain; possible therapeutic role for tropisetron

    PubMed Central

    Nasirinezhad, Farinaz; Hosseini, Marjan; Karami, Zohre; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Janzadeh, Autosa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To test the analgesic effect of 5-HT-3 receptor antagonist, tropisetron, in a clip compression injury model of spinal cord pain in rats. Methods Four weeks post compression of the spinal cord at lumbar level, tropisetron was administered intrathecally at 100 μg and 150 μg dosages. Behavioral tests were assessed before administration. Fifteen minutes after injection, behavioral tests were repeated. Randall-Sellitto and plantar test was used for mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Mechanical and cold allodynia were evaluated by Von Frey filament and acetone droplets, respectively. The analgesic effect of tropisetron was compared with intrathecal administration of salicylate. Locomotor score was evaluated by Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) test every week after spinal cord injury. Results Intrathecal administration of tropisetron, decreased hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not cold allodynia were observed after compression of the spinal cord. Conclusion Blockade of 5-HT-3 receptors by tropisetron at the spinal level induces an antinociceptive effect on chronic central neuropathic pain and suggests that this compound may have potential clinical utility for the management of central neuropathic pain, particularly in patients with hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia. PMID:26338446

  8. Effects of target-controlled infusion of high-dose naloxone on pain and hyperalgesia in a human thermal injury model: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Springborg, Anders D.; Jensen, Elisabeth K.; Taylor, Bradley K.; Werner, Mads U.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mu-opioid-receptor antagonists have been extensively studied in experimental research as pharmacological tools uncovering mechanisms of pain modulation by the endogenous opioid system. In rodents, administration of high doses of mu-opioid-receptor antagonists after the resolution of an inflammatory injury has demonstrated reinstatement of nociceptive hypersensitivity indicating unmasking of latent sensitization. In a recent human study, pain hypersensitivity assessed as secondary hyperalgesia area (SHA), was reinstated 7 days after a mild thermal injury, in 4 out of 12 subjects after a naloxone infusion. The aims of the present study are first, to replicate our previous findings in a larger-sized study; second, to examine if high sensitizers (subjects presenting with large SHA after a thermal injury) develop a higher degree of hypersensitivity after naloxone challenge than low sensitizers (subjects presenting with restricted SHA after a thermal injury); and third to examine a dose–response relationship between 3 stable naloxone concentrations controlled by target-controlled infusion, and the unmasking of latent sensitization. Healthy participants (n = 80) underwent a screening day (day 0) with induction of a thermal skin injury (47°C, 420 seconds, 12.5 cm2). Assessment of SHA was performed 1 and 2 hours after the injury. Using an enriched design, only participants belonging to the upper quartile of SHA (Q4, high sensitizers; n = 20) and the lower quartile of SHA (Q1, low sensitizers; n = 20) continued the study, comprising 4 consecutive days—days 1 to 4. Thermal skin injuries were repeated on day 1 and day 3, whereas day 2 and day 4 (7 days after day 1 and day 3, respectively) were target-controlled infusion days in which the subjects were randomly allocated to receive either naloxone (3.25 mg/kg, 4 mg/mL) or placebo (normal saline) intravenous. The primary outcome was SHA assessed by weighted-pin instrument (128 mN) 0, 1, 2

  9. Atenolol Reduces Leishmania major-Induced Hyperalgesia and TNF-α Without Affecting IL-1β or Keratinocyte Derived Chemokines (KC)

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Marc C.; Merckbawi, Rana; Salman, Sara; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Infection with a high dose of the intracellular parasitic protozoan Leishmania major induces a sustained hyperalgesia in susceptible BALB/c mice accompanied by up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6. Interleukin-13 (IL-13) has been shown to reduce this hyperalgesia (despite increased levels of IL-6) and the levels of IL-1β during and after the treatment period. These findings favor the cytokine cascade leading to the production of sympathetic amines (involving TNF-α and KC) over prostaglandins (involving IL-lβ and IL-6) as the final mediators of hyperalgesia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of daily treatment with the β-blockers atenolol on L. major-induced inflammation in mice with respect to hyperalgesia as well as the levels of TNF-α and KC (the analog of IL-8 in mice). Our data demonstrates that atenolol is able to reduce the L. major induced sustained peripheral hyperalgesia, which does not seem to involve a direct role for neither IL-lβ nor KC. Moreover, our results show that TNF-α may play a pivotal and direct role in sensitizing the peripheral nerve endings (nociceptors) since its level was reduced during the period of atenolol treatment, which correlates well with the reduction of the observed peripheral, but not central, hyperalgesia. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the cytokine cascade leading to hyperalgesia and may lead to the development of new and more efficient medications for many types of pain. PMID:26913003

  10. EXERCISE PREVENTS DEVELOPMENT OF AUTONOMIC DYSREGULATION AND HYPERALGESIA IN A MOUSE MODEL OF CHRONIC MUSCLE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Chapleau, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic function. Regular physical activity prevents development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function in sedentary mice with CMP, and if exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. CMP was induced by two intramuscular injections of pH 5 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24h after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia that can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP. PMID:26313406

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reversed Morphine Tolerance and Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zhen; Liu, LiPing; Shen, Jun; Cheng, Katherine; Liu, Aijun; Yang, Jing; Wang, Lina; Qu, Tingyu; Yang, HongNa; Li, Yan; Wu, Haiyan; Narouze, John; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    More than 240 million opioid prescriptions are dispensed annually to treat pain in the US. The use of opioids is commonly associated with opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which limit efficacy and compromise safety. The dearth of effective way to prevent or treat OT and OIH is a major medical challenge. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate OT and OIH in rats and mice based on the understanding that MSCs possess remarkable anti-inflammatory properties and that both OT and chronic pain are associated with neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. We found that the development of OT and OIH was effectively prevented by either intravenous or intrathecal MSC transplantation (MSC-TP), which was performed before morphine treatment. Remarkably, established OT and OIH were significantly reversed by either intravenous or intrathecal MSCs when cells were transplanted after repeated morphine injections. The animals did not show any abnormality in vital organs or functions. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the treatments significantly reduced activation level of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord. We have thus demonstrated that MSC-TP promises to be a potentially safe and effective way to prevent and reverse two of the major problems of opioid therapy. PMID:27554341

  12. JCM-16021, a Chinese Herbal Formula, Attenuated Visceral Hyperalgesia in TNBS-Induced Postinflammatory Irritable Bowel Syndrome through Reducing Colonic EC Cell Hyperplasia and Serotonin Availability in Rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong-Yan; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Leung, Fung-Ping; Yang, Zhi-Jun; Wu, Justin C Y; Sung, Joseph J Y; Xu, Hong-Xi; Tong, Xu-Dong; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the analgesic effect of JCM-16021, a revised traditional Chinese herbal formula, on postinflammatory irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) in rats. The trinitrobenzene sulfonic (TNBS) acid-induced PI-IBS model rats were orally administrated with different doses of JCM-16021 (1.2, 2.4, and 4.8 g/kg/d) for 14 consecutive days. The results showed that JCM-16021 treatment dose-dependently attenuated visceral hyperalgesia in PI-IBS rats. Further, the colonic enterochromaffin (EC) cell number, serotonin (5-HT) content, tryptophan hydroxylase expression, and mechanical-stimuli-induced 5-HT release were significantly ameliorated. Moreover, the decreased levels of mucosal cytokines in PI-IBS, especially the helper T-cell type 1- (T(h)1-) related cytokine TNF-α, were also elevated after JCM-16021 treatment. These data demonstrate that the analgesic effect of JCM-16021 on TNBS-induced PI-IBS rats may be medicated via reducing colonic EC cell hyperplasia and 5-HT availability.

  13. Analgesic Efficacy of Firocoxib, a Selective Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase 2, in a Mouse Model of Incisional Pain

    PubMed Central

    Reddyjarugu, Balagangadharreddy; Pavek, Todd; Southard, Teresa; Barry, Jason; Singh, Bhupinder

    2015-01-01

    Pain management in laboratory animals is generally accomplished by using opioids and NSAIDs. However, opioid use is hindered by controlled substance requirements and a relatively short duration of action. In this study, we compared the analgesic efficacy of firocoxib (a cyclooxygenase-2-selective NSAID) with that of buprenorphine in the mouse model of plantar incisional pain by objective measurement of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia using von Frey and Hargreaves equipment, respectively. Our experimental design included 5 treatment groups: firocoxib at 10 mg/kg IP every 24 h (F10 group); firocoxib at 20 mg/kg IP every 24 h (F20); buprenorphine at 0.2 mg/kg SC every 8 h; intraperitoneal normal saline every 24 h; and sham group (anesthesia, no incision) treated with firocoxib at 20 mg/kg IP every 24 h (sham+F20). All mice underwent nociceptive assays at 24 h before and 4, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. Buprenorphine alleviated allodynia at all time points after incision. The F10 treatment alleviated allodynia at 4, 24, and 48 h, whereas F20 alleviated allodynia at 24, 48, and 72 h. None of the treatments alleviated thermal hyperalgesia at 4h. Except for F10 and buprenorphine at 24 h, all treatments alleviated thermal hyperalgesia at 24, 48, and 72 h. No significant differences were noted between the 2 doses of firocoxib and buprenorphine regarding mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at all time points. In conclusion, the analgesic efficacy of firocoxib is comparable to that of buprenorphine in this mouse pain model. PMID:26224441

  14. Valproic acid and progestin inhibit lesion growth and reduce hyperalgesia in experimentally induced endometriosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Maohua; Liu, Xishi; Zhang, Yuqiu; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2012-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endometriosis is an epigenetic disease. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of valproic acid (VPA) and progesterone (P4) in a rat model of endometriosis on serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, hot plate and tail-flick latencies, lesion size, and body weight. We used 77 adult female rats, and endometriosis was induced by autotransplanting pieces of uterus (ENDO) or fat (SHAM) to the pelvic cavity. The BLANK group received no surgery. After 2 weeks, the ENDO group was further divided, randomly, into 5 groups, receiving, respectively, treatment with low- and high-dose VPA, P4 alone, VPA + P4, and no treatment. The SHAM rats received no treatment. The BLANK rats were further divided into 2 groups, one received VPA treatment and the other, no treatment. After 4 weeks, all rats were sacrificed. Response latency in hot plate and tail-flick tests, body weight, and serum TNF-α levels were measured before the surgery, before and after the treatment, along with lesion size. We found that induced endometriosis reduced response latency. ENDO rats receiving VPA and/or P4 treatment had significantly reduced lesion size as compared with untreated ones, and had significantly improved response to noxious thermal stimuli. They also had significantly increased weight gain. Serum TNF-α levels increased following surgery but eventually decreased regardless of treatment or not. In conclusion, VPA is well tolerated. Treatment with VPA significantly reduces lesion growth and improves sensitivity to nocifensive stimuli. The improvement is specific to endometriosis-induced hyperalgesia. Thus, histone deacetylase inhibitors may be a promising therapeutics for treating endometriosis.

  15. Exercise prevents development of autonomic dysregulation and hyperalgesia in a mouse model of chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A; Chapleau, Mark W

    2016-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic functions. Regular physical activity prevents the development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function of sedentary mice with CMP, and whether exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was induced by 2 intramuscular injections of pH 5.0 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access to it for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability, and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24 hours after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows the development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia, which can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP.

  16. Effect of Intramuscular Protons, Lactate, and ATP on Muscle Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Nicholas S; Whitley, Phillip E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic muscle pain is a significant health problem leading to disability[1]. Muscle fatigue can exacerbate muscle pain. Metabolites, including ATP, lactate, and protons, are released during fatiguing exercise and produce pain in humans. These substances directly activate purinergic (P2X) and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) on muscle nociceptors, and when combined, produce a greater increase in neuron firing than when given alone. Whether the enhanced effect of combining protons, lactate, and ATP is the sum of individual effects (additive) or more than the sum of individual effects (synergistic) is unknown. Using a rat model of muscle nociceptive behavior, we tested each of these compounds individually over a range of physiologic and supra-physiologic concentrations. Further, we combined all three compounds in a series of dilutions and tested their effect on muscle nociceptive behavior. We also tested a non-hydrolyzable form of ATP (α,β-meATP) alone and in combination with lactate and acidic pH. Surprisingly, we found no dose-dependent effect on muscle nociceptive behavior for protons, lactate, or ATP when given alone. We similarly found no effect after application of each two-metabolite combination. Only pH 4 saline and α,β-meATP produced hyperalgesia when given alone. When all 3 substances were combined, however, ATP (2.4μm), lactate (10mM), and acidic pH (pH 6.0) produced an enhanced effect greater than the sum of the effects of the individual components, i.e. synergism. α,β me ATP (3nmol), on the other hand, showed no enhanced effects when combined with lactate (10mM) or acidic pH (pH 6.0), i.e. additive. These data suggest that combining fatigue metabolites in muscle produces a synergistic effect on muscle nociception.

  17. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in community-dwelling adults with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hooten, W Michael; Lamer, Tim J; Twyner, Channing

    2015-06-01

    The hyperalgesic effects of long-term opioid use in community-dwelling adults with chronic pain have not been widely reported. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to determine the associations between opioid use and heat pain (HP) perception in a sample of community-dwelling adults with chronic pain. The study cohort involved 187 adults (85 opioid and 102 nonopioid) with chronic pain consecutively admitted to an outpatient interdisciplinary pain treatment program. Heat pain perception was assessed using a validated quantitative sensory test method of levels. An effect of opioid use was observed for nonstandardized (P = 0.004) and standardized (P = 0.005) values of HP 5-0.5 in which values of the opioid group were lower (more hyperalgesic) compared with those of the nonopioid group. HP 5-0.5 is a measure of the slope of the line connecting HP 0.5 (HP threshold) and HP 5 (intermediate measure of HP tolerance). In univariable (P = 0.019) and multiple variable (P = 0.003) linear regression analyses (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, work status, pain diagnosis, pain severity, depression, and pain catastrophizing), opioid use was associated with lower (more hyperalgesic) nonstandardized values of HP 5-0.5. Similarly, in univariable (P = 0.004) and multiple variable (P = 0.011) linear regression analyses (adjusted for work status, pain diagnosis, pain severity, depression, and pain catastrophizing), opioid use was associated with lower standardized values of HP 5-0.5. In this sample of community-dwelling adults, these observations suggest that long-term opioid use was associated with hyperalgesia independent of other clinical factors known to influence HP perception.

  18. The Qualitative Hyperalgesia Profile: A New Metric to Assess Chronic Post-Thoracotomy Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chi-Fei Wang, Jeffrey; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Gerner, Peter; Ji, Ru-Rong; Strichartz, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    Thoracotomy often results in chronic pain, characterized by resting pain and elevated mechano-sensitivity. This paper defines complex behavioral responses to tactile stimulation in rats after thoracotomy, shown to be reversibly relieved by systemic morphine, in order to develop a novel qualitative “pain” score. A deep incision and 1 hour of rib retraction in male Sprague-Dawley rats resulted in reduced threshold and a change in the locus of greatest tactile (von Frey filament) sensitivity, from the lower back to a more rostral location around the wound site, and extending bilaterally. The fraction of rats showing nocifensive responses to mild stimulation (10 gm) increased after thoracotomy (from a pre-operative value of 0/10 to 8/10 at 10 days post-op), and the average threshold decreased correspondingly, from 15 gm to ∼4 gm. The nature of the nocifensive responses to tactile stimulation, composed pre-operatively only of no response (Grade 0) or brief contractions of the local subcutaneous muscles (Grade I), changed markedly after thoracotomy, with the appearance of new behaviors including a brisk lateral “escape” movement and/or a 180° rotation of the trunk (both included as Grade II), and whole body shuddering, and scratching and squealing (Grade III). Systemic morphine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) transiently raised the threshold for response and reduced the frequency of Grade II and III responses, supporting the interpretation that these represent pain. The findings support the development of a Qualitative Hyperalgesic Profile to assess the complex behavior that indicates a central integration of hyperalgesia. PMID:24567767

  19. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces pain, fatigue and hyperalgesia while restoring central inhibition in primary fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Vance, Carol G T; Liebano, Richard E; Amrit, Anand S; Bush, Heather M; Lee, Kyoung S; Lee, Jennifer E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2013-11-01

    Because transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) works by reducing central excitability and activating central inhibition pathways, we tested the hypothesis that TENS would reduce pain and fatigue and improve function and hyperalgesia in people with fibromyalgia who have enhanced central excitability and reduced inhibition. The current study used a double-blinded randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over design to test the effects of a single treatment of TENS with people with fibromyalgia. Three treatments were assessed in random order: active TENS, placebo TENS and no TENS. The following measures were assessed before and after each TENS treatment: pain and fatigue at rest and in movement; pressure pain thresholds, 6-m walk test, range of motion; 5-time sit-to-stand test, and single-leg stance. Conditioned pain modulation was completed at the end of testing. There was a significant decrease in pain and fatigue with movement for active TENS compared to placebo and no TENS. Pressure pain thresholds increased at the site of TENS (spine) and outside the site of TENS (leg) when compared to placebo TENS or no TENS. During active TENS, conditioned pain modulation was significantly stronger compared to placebo TENS and no TENS. No changes in functional tasks were observed with TENS. Thus, the current study suggests TENS has short-term efficacy in relieving symptoms of fibromyalgia while the stimulator is active. Future clinical trials should examine the effects of repeated daily delivery of TENS, similar to the way in which TENS is used clinically on pain, fatigue, function, and quality of life in individuals with fibromyalgia.

  20. Hyperalgesia and Persistent Pain after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial with Perioperative COX-2 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    van Helmond, Noud; Steegers, Monique A.; Filippini-de Moor, Gertie P.; Vissers, Kris C.; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent pain is a challenging clinical problem after breast cancer treatment. After surgery, inflammatory pain and nociceptive input from nerve injury induce central sensitization which may play a role in the genesis of persistent pain. Using quantitative sensory testing, we tested the hypothesis that adding COX-2 inhibition to standard treatment reduces hyperalgesia after breast cancer surgery. A secondary hypothesis was that patients developing persistent pain would exhibit more postoperative hyperalgesia. Methods 138 women scheduled for lumpectomy/mastectomy under general anesthesia with paravertebral block were randomized to COX-2 inhibition (2x40mg parecoxib on day of surgery, thereafter 2x200mg celecoxib/day until day five) or placebo. Preoperatively and 1, 5, 15 days and 1, 3, 6, 12 months postoperatively, we determined electric and pressure pain tolerance thresholds in dermatomes C6/T4/L1 and a 100mm VAS score for pain. We calculated the sum of pain tolerance thresholds and analyzed change in these versus preoperatively using mixed models analysis with factor medication. To assess hyperalgesia in persistent pain patients we performed an additional analysis on patients reporting VAS>30 at 12 months. Results 48 COX-2 inhibition and 46 placebo patients were analyzed in a modified intention to treat analysis. Contrary to our primary hypothesis, change in the sum of tolerance thresholds in the COX-2 inhibition group was not different versus placebo. COX-2 inhibition had an effect on pain on movement at postoperative day 5 (p<0.01). Consistent with our secondary hypothesis, change in sum of pressure pain tolerance thresholds in 11 patients that developed persistent pain was negative versus patients without pain (p<0.01) from day 5 to 1 year postoperatively. Conclusions Perioperative COX-2 inhibition has limited value in preventing sensitization and persistent pain after breast cancer surgery. Central sensitization may play a role in the genesis of

  1. GABAergic Transmission in Rat Pontine Reticular Formation Regulates the Induction Phase of Anesthesia and Modulates Hyperalgesia Caused by Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Nemanis, Kriste; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) contributes to the regulation of sleep, anesthesia, and pain. The role of PnO GABA in modulating these states remains incompletely understood. The present study used time to Loss and time to Resumption of Righting Response (LoRR and RoRR) as surrogate measures of loss and resumption of consciousness. This study tested three hypotheses: (1) pharmacologically manipulating GABA levels in rat PnO alters LoRR, RoRR, and nociception; (2) propofol decreases GABA levels in the PnO; and (3) inhibiting GABA synthesis in the PnO blocks hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. Administering a GABA synthesis inhibitor (3-MPA) or a GABA uptake inhibitor (NPA) into rat PnO significantly altered LoRR caused by propofol. 3-MPA significantly decreased LoRR for propofol (−18%). NPA significantly increased LoRR during administration of propofol (36%). Neither 3-MPA nor NPA altered RoRR following cessation of propofol or isoflurane delivery. The finding that LoRR was decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA is consistent with measures showing that extracellular GABA levels in the PnO were decreased (41%) by propofol. Thermal nociception was significantly decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA, and 3-MPA blocked the hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. The results demonstrate that GABA levels in the PnO regulate the time for loss of consciousness caused by propofol, extend the concept that anesthetic induction and emergence are not inverse processes, and suggest that GABAergic transmission in the PnO mediates hyperalgesia caused by sleep loss. PMID:24674578

  2. Galanin-Mediated Behavioural Hyperalgesia from the Dorsomedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Involves Two Independent Descending Pronociceptive Pathways.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Diana; Viisanen, Hanna; Wei, Hong; Almeida, Armando; Pertovaara, Antti; Pinto-Ribeiro, Filipa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) by galanin (GAL) induces behavioural hyperalgesia. Since DMH neurones do not project directly to the spinal cord, we hypothesized that the medullary dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt), a pronociceptive region projecting to the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) and/or the serotoninergic raphe-spinal pathway acting on the spinal 5-HT3 receptor (5HT3R) could relay descending nociceptive facilitation induced by GAL in the DMH. Heat-evoked paw-withdrawal latency (PWL) and activity of SDH neurones were assessed in monoarthritic (ARTH) and control (SHAM) animals after pharmacological manipulations of the DMH, DRt and spinal cord. The results showed that GAL in the DMH and glutamate in the DRt lead to behavioural hyperalgesia in both SHAM and ARTH animals, which is accompanied particularly by an increase in heat-evoked responses of wide-dynamic range neurons, a group of nociceptive SDH neurones. Facilitation of pain behaviour induced by GAL in the DMH was reversed by lidocaine in the DRt and by ondansetron, a 5HT3R antagonist, in the spinal cord. However, the hyperalgesia induced by glutamate in the DRt was not blocked by spinal ondansetron. In addition, in ARTH but not SHAM animals PWL was increased after lidocaine in the DRt and ondansetron in the spinal cord. Our data demonstrate that GAL in the DMH activates two independent descending facilitatory pathways: (i) one relays in the DRt and (ii) the other one involves 5-HT neurones acting on spinal 5HT3Rs. In experimental ARTH, the tonic pain-facilitatory action is increased in both of these descending pathways.

  3. GABAergic transmission in rat pontine reticular formation regulates the induction phase of anesthesia and modulates hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Nemanis, Kriste; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-07-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) contributes to the regulation of sleep, anesthesia and pain. The role of PnO γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in modulating these states remains incompletely understood. The present study used time to loss and time to resumption of righting response (LoRR and RoRR) as surrogate measures of loss and resumption of consciousness. This study tested three hypotheses: (i) pharmacologically manipulating GABA levels in rat PnO alters LoRR, RoRR and nociception; (ii) propofol decreases GABA levels in the PnO; and (iii) inhibiting GABA synthesis in the PnO blocks hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. Administering a GABA synthesis inhibitor [3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA)] or a GABA uptake inhibitor [nipecotic acid (NPA)] into rat PnO significantly altered LoRR caused by propofol. 3-MPA significantly decreased LoRR for propofol (-18%). NPA significantly increased LoRR during administration of propofol (36%). Neither 3-MPA nor NPA altered RoRR following cessation of propofol or isoflurane delivery. The finding that LoRR was decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA is consistent with measures showing that extracellular GABA levels in the PnO were decreased (41%) by propofol. Thermal nociception was significantly decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA, and 3-MPA blocked the hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. The results demonstrate that GABA levels in the PnO regulate the time for loss of consciousness caused by propofol, extend the concept that anesthetic induction and emergence are not inverse processes, and suggest that GABAergic transmission in the PnO mediates hyperalgesia caused by sleep loss.

  4. Intra-cerebral and intra-nasal melanocortin-4 receptor antagonist blocks withdrawal hyperalgesia in alcohol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Roltsch Hellard, Emily A; Impastato, Renata A; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2016-01-24

    Humans diagnosed with alcohol use disorder are more sensitive to painful stimuli during withdrawal, which suggests that excessive alcohol drinking worsens pain outcomes. Alcohol-dependent rats exhibit increases in nociceptive sensitivity during withdrawal. Data from animal models suggest that brain melanocortin-4 receptors (MC4Rs) mediate alcohol drinking and nociception. Here we tested: (1) the effect of alcohol dependence on thermal nociception in rats, and (2) the ability of acute alcohol and (3) MC4R antagonists to reverse hyperalgesia during withdrawal in alcohol-dependent rats. Rats were trained to self-administer operant alcohol and were tested for baseline thermal nociception. Half of the rats were made dependent on alcohol, then all rats were cannulated in the lateral ventricle. We tested the effects of acute alcohol drinking, acute fixed-dose alcohol, intra-ventricular agouti-related protein (endogenous MC4R antagonist), intra-ventricular HS014 (synthetic MC4R antagonist) and intra-nasal HS014 on hyperalgesia during withdrawal in alcohol-dependent rats, relative to non-dependent drinkers and alcohol-naïve controls. Alcohol-dependent rats exhibit thermal hyperalgesia that is abolished by alcohol drinking, bolus alcohol and intra-ventricular and intra-nasal MC4R antagonists. These manipulations did not affect thermal nociception in non-dependent drinkers and alcohol-naïve controls, suggesting that alcohol dependence produces neuroadaptations in brain MC4R systems. These results suggest that brain MC4R systems may be an effective therapeutic target for reducing nociception in the alcohol-dependent organism.

  5. Chronic administration of modafinil induces hyperalgesia in mice: reversal by L-NG-nitro-arginine methyl ester and 7-nitroindazole.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rachna; Gupta, Lalit Kumar; Bhattacharya, Swapan K

    2014-08-05

    Modafinil [2-((diphenylmethyl) sulfinyl) acetamide] is a central nervous system stimulant. It has received considerable attention as a potential psychotropic agent in several psychiatric disorders. The current study was carried out to investigate the effect of modafinil after acute administration on animal models of pain in mice. Also, this study evaluated the effect of L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) and naloxone following chronic administration of modafinil. Modafinil was administered in the doses of 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg once in acute study and it showed significantly increased tail-flick latency (tfl) and paw-licking latency. In formalin test modafinil (100 mg/kg) significantly reduced licking/biting time in both early and late phases in comparison to control. In chronic study, modafinil 100 mg/kg administered for 10 days, produced a progressive decrease in the reaction time (i.e., tfl/paw-licking latency) in comparison to day 1 values which started building up from day 4 and fully established at day 6, indicating hyperalgesic response. Prior administration of 7-NI (on day 7) and L-NAME (on day 10) prevented the hyperalgesic response while naloxone on day 10 did not have a significant effect on modafinil-induced hyperalgesia. These results demonstrate that modafinil has a potential role in pain as it exhibited antinociceptive effect after acute administration in a dose-dependent manner and on chronic administration it caused hyperalgesia. This hyperalgesia is reversed by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, suggesting the possibility of involvement of nitric oxide pathway. Further studies are required to evaluate the role of modafinil in clinical pain.

  6. Increases in PKC gamma expression in trigeminal spinal nucleus is associated with orofacial thermal hyperalgesia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-Ying; Xu, Fei; Li, Yue; Zeng, Zhao-Bin; Zhang, Ran; Xu, Hui-Jun; Qian, Nian-Song; Zhang, Yi-Guan

    2015-01-01

    Painful diabetic polyneuropathy (PDN) at the early phrase of diabetes frequently exhibits increased responsiveness to nociception. In diabetic patients and animal models, alterations in the transmission of orofacial sensory information have been demonstrated in trigeminal system. Herein, we examined the changes of protein kinase Cγ subunit (PKCγ) in trigeminal spinal nucleus (Sp5C) and observed the development of orofacial thermal sensitivity in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mice. With hyperglycemia and body weight loss, STZ mice exhibited orofacial thermal hyperalgesia, along with increased PKCγ expression in Sp5C. Insulin treatment at the early stage of diabetes could alleviate the orofacial thermal hyperalgesia and impaired increased PKCγ in Sp5C in diabetic mice. In summary, our results demonstrate that PKCγ might be involved in orofacial thermal hyperalgesia of diabetes, and early insulin treatment might be effective way to treat orofacial PDN.

  7. Downregulation of the spinal NMDA receptor NR2B subunit during electro-acupuncture relief of chronic visceral hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongping; Zhang, Yuhua; Qi, Debo; Li, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    The involvement of spinal NR2B, a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit, in the therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on chronic visceral hyperalgesia was investigated. Chronic visceral hyperalgesia was induced using an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) model in rats. Graded colorectal distention (CRD) stimuli at strengths of 20, 40, 60 and 80 mmHg were applied, and behavioral tests were performed to measure the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in response to the CRD stimuli and assess the severity of the visceral hyperalgesia. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal intact (control) group, IBS model (model) group, EA-treated IBS rats (EA) group and sham EA-treated IBS rats (sham EA) group. For the EA treatment, electric stimuli were applied through needles inserted into two acupoints [Zu-san-li (ST-36) and Shang-ju-xu (ST-37)] in both hind limbs, while the sham EA treatment consisted of only the insertion of needles into these same acupoints without an application of electric stimuli. Our results showed that AWR scores of the model group responding to CRD stimuli of 20, 40, 60 and 80 mmHg were significantly increased. These increased scores subsequently decreased following EA treatment (P < 0.05) compared with those for the other groups. The expression of NR2B in the superficial laminae (SDH, laminae I and II), nucleus proprius (NP, laminae III and IV), neck of the dorsal horn (NECK, laminae V and VI) and central canal region (lamina X) at thoracolumbar (T13-L2) and lumbosacral (L6-S2) segmental level significantly increased in the model group versus the control group (P < 0.05) and significantly decreased after EA treatment (P < 0.05). There were no significant changes in neither AWR scores nor expression of the NR2B subunit in these spinal regions after the sham EA treatment. These results confirm that EA can relieve chronic visceral hyperalgesia in IBS model rats and suggest that such an effect is possibly mediated through the

  8. Hyperalgesic and hypoalgesic mechanisms evoked by the acute administration of CCL5 in mice.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Sara; Álvarez, Miguel G; García-Domínguez, Mario; Lastra, Ana; Cernuda-Cernuda, Rafael; Folgueras, Alicia R; Fernández-García, María Teresa; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana; Menéndez, Luis

    2017-05-01

    We show here that the intraplantar administration of CCL5 in mice produces hyperalgesia at low doses but activates compensatory antinociceptive mechanisms at doses slightly higher. Thus, the injection of 3-10ng of CCL5 evoked thermal hyperalgesia through the activation of CCR1 and CCR5 receptors, as demonstrated by the inhibitory effect exerted by the selective antagonists J113863 (0.01-0.1μg) and DAPTA (0.3-3μg), respectively. The prevention of this hyperalgesia by diclofenac (1-10μg), the inhibitors of COX-1 SC-560 (0.1-1μg) or COX-2 celecoxib (1-5μg), the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (0.03-0.3μg) or the TRPA1 antagonist HC030031 (10-50μg) demonstrates the involvement of prostaglandin synthesis and TRP sensitization in CCL5-evoked hyperalgesia. Doses of CCL5 higher than 17μg did not evoke hyperalgesia. However, this effect was restored by the administration of naloxone-methiodide (5μg), nor-binaltorphimine (10mg/kg) or an anti-dynorphin A antibody (0.62-2.5ng). The administration of 30ng of CCL5 also induced hyperalgesia in mice with reduced number of circulating white blood cells in response to cyclophosphamide or with selective neutrophil depletion induced by an anti-Ly6G antibody. In fact, the number of neutrophils present in paws treated with 30ng of CCL5 was greater than in paws receiving the administration of the hyperalgesic dose of 10ng. Finally, the expression of the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin A was demonstrated by double immunofluorescence assays in these neutrophils attracted by CCL5. These results support previous data describing the hyperalgesic properties of CCL5 and constitute the first indication that a chemokine of the CC group can activate endogenous analgesic mechanisms.

  9. How diagnostic tests help to disentangle the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms in painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Truini, Andrea; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain, ie, pain arising directly from a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory afferent pathway, manifests with various symptoms, the commonest being ongoing burning pain, electrical shock-like sensations, and dynamic mechanical allodynia. Reliable insights into the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms come from diagnostic tests documenting and quantifying somatosensory afferent pathway damage in patients with painful neuropathies. Neurophysiological investigation and skin biopsy studies suggest that ongoing burning pain primarily reflects spontaneous activity in nociceptive-fiber pathways. Electrical shock-like sensations presumably arise from high-frequency ectopic bursts generated in demyelinated, nonnociceptive, Aβ fibers. Although the mechanisms underlying dynamic mechanical allodynia remain debatable, normally innocuous stimuli might cause pain by activating spared and sensitized nociceptive afferents. Extending the mechanistic approach to neuropathic pain symptoms might advance targeted therapy for the individual patient and improve testing for new drugs.

  10. Nociception and inflammatory hyperalgesia evaluated in rodents using infrared laser stimulation after Trpv1 gene knockout or resiniferatoxin lesion.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kendall; Lebovitz, Evan E; Keller, Jason M; Mannes, Andrew J; Nemenov, Michael I; Iadarola, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    TRPV1 is expressed in a subpopulation of myelinated Aδ and unmyelinated C-fibers. TRPV1+ fibers are essential for the transmission of nociceptive thermal stimuli and for the establishment and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia. We have previously shown that high-power, short-duration pulses from an infrared diode laser are capable of predominantly activating cutaneous TRPV1+ Aδ-fibers. Here we show that stimulating either subtype of TRPV1+ fiber in the paw during carrageenan-induced inflammation or following hind-paw incision elicits pronounced hyperalgesic responses, including prolonged paw guarding. The ultrapotent TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX) dose-dependently deactivates TRPV1+ fibers and blocks thermal nociceptive responses in baseline or inflamed conditions. Injecting sufficient doses of RTX peripherally renders animals unresponsive to laser stimulation even at the point of acute thermal skin damage. In contrast, Trpv1-/- mice, which are generally unresponsive to noxious thermal stimuli at lower power settings, exhibit withdrawal responses and inflammation-induced sensitization using high-power, short duration Aδ stimuli. In rats, systemic morphine suppresses paw withdrawal, inflammatory guarding, and hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent fashion using the same Aδ stimuli. The qualitative intensity of Aδ responses, the leftward shift of the stimulus-response curve, the increased guarding behaviors during carrageenan inflammation or after incision, and the reduction of Aδ responses with morphine suggest multiple roles for TRPV1+ Aδ fibers in nociceptive processes and their modulation of pathological pain conditions.

  11. Pioglitazone rapidly reduces neuropathic pain through astrocyte and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Ryan B.; Donahue, Renee R.; Morgenweck, Jenny; Grace, Peter M.; Sutton, Amanda; Watkins, Linda R.; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated administration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists reduces neuropathic pain-like behavior and associated changes in glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. As PPARγ is a nuclear receptor, sustained changes in gene expression are widely believed to be the mechanism of pain reduction. However, we recently reported that a single intrathecal injection of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, reduced hyperalgesia within 30 minutes, a time frame that is typically less than that required for genomic mechanisms. To determine the very rapid anti-hyperalgesic actions of PPARγ activation we administered pioglitazone to rats with spared nerve injury (SNI) and evaluated hyperalgesia. Pioglitazone inhibited hyperalgesia within 5 min of injection, consistent with a non-genomic mechanism. Systemic or intrathecal administration of GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist, inhibited the anti-hyperalgesic actions of intraperitoneal or intrathecal pioglitazone, suggesting a spinal PPARγ-dependent mechanism. To further address the contribution of non-genomic mechanisms, we blocked new protein synthesis in the spinal cord with anisomycin. When co-administered intrathecally, anisomycin did not change pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia at an early 7.5 min timepoint, further supporting a rapid non-genomic mechanism. At later timepoints anisomycin reduced pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia, suggesting a delayed recruitment of genomic mechanisms. Pioglitazone reduction of SNI-induced increases in GFAP expression occurred more rapidly than expected, within 60 min. We are the first to show that activation of spinal PPARγ rapidly reduces neuropathic pain independent from canonical genomic activity. We conclude that acute pioglitazone inhibits neuropathic pain in part by reducing astrocyte activation, and via both genomic and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms. PMID:25599238

  12. Antagonism of the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) attenuates hyperalgesia and urinary bladder overactivity in cyclophosphamide-induced haemorrhagic cystitis.

    PubMed

    Meotti, Flavia C; Forner, Stefânia; Lima-Garcia, Juliana F; Viana, Alice F; Calixto, João B

    2013-04-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in haemorrhagic cystitis, the main side effect of cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy. Hannover female rats received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cyclophosphamide (three doses of 100 mg/kg, every other day, in a total of five days). This treatment was followed by the treatment with TRPA1 antagonist HC 030031 (50 mg/kg, p.o.). The threshold for hindpaw withdrawal or abdominal retraction to von Frey Hair and the locomotor activity were measured. The treatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC 030031 significantly decreased mechanical hyperalgesia induced by cyclophosphamide without interfere with locomotor activity. Urodynamic parameters were performed by cystometry 24 h after a single treatment with cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg, i.p.) in control and HC 030031 treated rats. Analyses of the urodynamic parameters showed that a single dose of cyclophosphamide was enough to significantly increase the number and amplitude of non-voiding contractions and to decrease the voided volume and voiding efficiency, without significantly altering basal, threshold or maximum pressure. The treatment with HC 030031 either before (100 mg/kg, p.o.) or after (30 mg/kg, i.v.) cyclophosphamide inhibited the non-voiding contractions but failed to counteract the loss in voiding efficiency. Our data demonstrates that nociceptive symptoms and urinary bladder overactivity caused by cyclophosphamide, in part, are dependent upon the activation of TRPA1. In this context, the antagonism of the receptor may be an alternative to minimise the urotoxic symptoms caused by this chemotherapeutic agent.

  13. A polyamine-deficient diet opposes hyperalgesia, tolerance and the increased anxiety-like behaviour associated with heroin withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Le Roy, Chloé; Laboureyras, Emilie; Laulin, Jean-Paul; Simonnet, Guy

    2013-01-01

    In humans, hyperalgesia, tolerance and anxiety disorders are common symptoms during heroin withdrawal syndrome. Significant evidence supports a role of NMDA receptors in these phenomena. Because polyamines may positively modulate the functioning of NMDA receptors and mainly originate from dietary intake, one hypothesis is that a polyamine deficient diet (PD diet) may reduce withdrawal symptoms. To address this question, we investigated the ability of a PD diet to prevent or to alleviate some symptoms of withdrawal syndrome as hyperalgesia, and increased anxiety-like behaviour in rats receiving 14 once daily subcutaneous heroin injections. Here, we show that a PD diet has both preventive and curative properties for reducing certain signs of withdrawal such as hyperalgesia, tolerance and increased anxiety-like behaviour observed in rats fed with a standard diet. Moreover, in heroin-withdrawn rats which were returned to basal pain sensitivity level, hyperalgesia following acute analgesia induced by a single heroin dose was observed in heroin-treated rats fed with standard diet, not in rats fed with a PD diet. Similarly, a stress-induced hyperalgesia induced by a non-nociceptive environmental stress session was observed in heroin-treated rats fed with standard diet. In contrast, a stress-induced analgesia was observed in heroin-treated rats fed with a PD diet, as it was observed in non heroin-treated rats. Since a PD diet for several weeks did not induce appreciable side-effects in rats, these preclinical results suggest that a PD diet could be an effective strategy for improving the relief of certain negative emotional states of heroin withdrawal syndrome and to allow reducing other medications generally used, such as opioid maintenance drugs.

  14. Rikkunshito prevents paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy through the suppression of the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) phosphorylation in spinal cord of mice.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junzo; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Sakai, Akane; Nakanishi, Yuki; Kai, Misa; Ikegami, Megumi; Ikeda, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the major side effect caused by paclitaxel, a microtubule-binding antineoplastic drug. Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy causes a long-term negative impact on the patient's quality of life. However, the mechanism underlying paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is still unknown, and there is no established treatment. Ghrelin is known to attenuate thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, and inhibit the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) in the spinal dorsal horn. Rikkunshito (RKT), a kampo medicine, increases the secretion of ghrelin in rodents and humans. Thus, RKT may attenuate paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by inhibiting phosphorylated NFκB (pNFκB) in the spinal cord. We found that paclitaxel dose-dependently induced mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Paclitaxel increased the protein levels of spinal pNFκB, but not those of spinal NFκB. NFκB inhibitor attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia suggesting that the activation of NFκB mediates paclitaxel-induced hyperalgesia. RKT dose-dependently attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Ghrelin receptor antagonist reversed the RKT-induced attenuation of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. RKT inhibited the paclitaxel-induced increase in the protein levels of spinal pNFκB. Taken together, the present study indicates that RKT exerts an antihyperalgesic effect in paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing the activation of spinal NFκB.

  15. Rikkunshito prevents paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy through the suppression of the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) phosphorylation in spinal cord of mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Junzo; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Sakai, Akane; Nakanishi, Yuki; Kai, Misa; Ikegami, Megumi; Ikeda, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the major side effect caused by paclitaxel, a microtubule-binding antineoplastic drug. Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy causes a long-term negative impact on the patient's quality of life. However, the mechanism underlying paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is still unknown, and there is no established treatment. Ghrelin is known to attenuate thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, and inhibit the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) in the spinal dorsal horn. Rikkunshito (RKT), a kampo medicine, increases the secretion of ghrelin in rodents and humans. Thus, RKT may attenuate paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by inhibiting phosphorylated NFκB (pNFκB) in the spinal cord. We found that paclitaxel dose-dependently induced mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Paclitaxel increased the protein levels of spinal pNFκB, but not those of spinal NFκB. NFκB inhibitor attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia suggesting that the activation of NFκB mediates paclitaxel-induced hyperalgesia. RKT dose-dependently attenuated paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Ghrelin receptor antagonist reversed the RKT-induced attenuation of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. RKT inhibited the paclitaxel-induced increase in the protein levels of spinal pNFκB. Taken together, the present study indicates that RKT exerts an antihyperalgesic effect in paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by suppressing the activation of spinal NFκB. PMID:28182729

  16. Opioid-independent mechanisms supporting offset analgesia and temporal sharpening of nociceptive information.

    PubMed

    Martucci, K T; Eisenach, J C; Tong, C; Coghill, R C

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms supporting temporal processing of pain remain poorly understood. To determine the involvement of opioid mechanisms in temporal processing of pain, responses to dynamic noxious thermal stimuli and offset analgesia were assessed after administration of naloxone, a μ-opioid antagonist, and on a separate day, during and after intravenous administration of remifentanil, a μ-opioid agonist, in 19 healthy human volunteers. Multiple end points were sampled from real-time computerized visual analog scale ratings (VAS, 1 to 10) to assess thermal sensitivity, magnitude and duration of offset analgesia, and painful after sensations. It was hypothesized that the magnitude of offset analgesia would be reduced by direct opioid antagonism and during states of acute opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), as well as diminished by the presence of exogenous opioids. Surprisingly, the magnitude of offset analgesia was not altered after naloxone administration, during remifentanil infusion, or after the termination of remifentanil infusion. Because thermal hyperalgesia was observed after both drugs, 8 of the original 19 subjects returned for an additional session without drug administration. Thermal hyperalgesia and increased magnitude of offset analgesia were observed across conditions of remifentanil, naloxone, and no drug within this subset analysis, indicating that repeated heat testing induced thermal hyperalgesia, which potentiated the magnitude of offset analgesia. Thus, it is concluded that the mechanisms subserving temporal processing of nociceptive information are largely opioid-independent, but that offset analgesia may be potentiated by heat-induced thermal hyperalgesia in a proportion of individuals.

  17. Opioid-Independent Mechanisms Supporting Offset Analgesia and Temporal Sharpening of Nociceptive Information

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, K. T.; Eisenach, J. C.; Tong, C.; Coghill, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms supporting temporal processing of pain remain poorly understood. To determine the involvement of opioid mechanisms in temporal processing of pain, responses to dynamic noxious thermal stimuli and offset analgesia were assessed following administration of naloxone, a μ-opioid antagonist, and on a separate day, during and following intravenous administration of remifentanil, a μ-opioid agonist, in 19 healthy human volunteers. Multiple end points were sampled from real time computerized visual analog scale ratings (VAS, 1–10) to assess thermal sensitivity, magnitude and duration of offset analgesia, and painful after sensations. It was hypothesized that the magnitude of offset analgesia would be reduced by direct opioid antagonism and during states of acute opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), as well as diminished by the presence of exogenous opioids. Surprisingly, the magnitude of offset analgesia was not altered following naloxone administration, during remifentanil infusion, or following the termination of remifentanil infusion. Since thermal hyperalgesia was observed following both drugs, 8 of the original 19 subjects returned for an additional session without drug administration. Thermal hyperalgesia and increased magnitude of offset analgesia were observed across conditions of remifentanil, naloxone and no drug within this subset analysis, indicating that repeated heat testing induced thermal hyperalgesia which potentiated the magnitude of offset analgesia. Thus, it is concluded that the mechanisms subserving temporal processing of nociceptive information are largely opioid-independent, but that offset analgesia may be potentiated by heat-induced thermal hyperalgesia in a proportion of individuals. PMID:22503222

  18. Evidence for the participation of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels in formalin-induced acute and chronic nociception.

    PubMed

    García, Guadalupe; Martínez-Rojas, Vladimir A; Rocha-González, Héctor I; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Murbartián, Janet

    2014-09-04

    In this study we determined the role of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (CaCC) in acute and chronic nociceptive responses elicited by 1% formalin. Formalin injection produced a typical pattern of flinching behavior for about 1h. Moreover, it produced secondary allodynia and hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral and contralateral paws for at least 6 days. Local peripheral and intrathecal pre-treatment (-10 min) with the non-selective and selective CaCC blockers niflumic acid and CaCCinh-A01, respectively, prevented formalin-induced flinching behavior mainly during phase 2 of the formalin test. Furthermore, niflumic acid and CaCCinh-A01 also prevented in a dose-dependent manner the long-lasting evoked secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral and contralateral paws. Moreover, local peripheral and intrathecal post-treatment (on day 6) with both CaCC blockers decreased the established formalin-induced secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia behavior in both paws. CaCC anoctamin-1 and bestrophin-1 were detected in the dorsal root ganglia. Formalin injection increased anoctamin-1, but not bestrophin-1 protein levels at 6 days. Intrathecal injection of the CaCC inhibitor CaCCinh-A01 prevented formalin-induced anoctamin-1 increase. Data suggest that peripheral and spinal CaCC, and particularly anoctamin-1, participates in the acute nociception induced by formalin as well as in the development and maintenance of secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia. Thus, CaCC activity contributes to neuronal excitability in the process of nociception induced by formalin.

  19. Virus-Mediated Knockdown of Nav1.3 in Dorsal Root Ganglia of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Alleviates Tactile Allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Andrew M; Samad, Omar A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain affects a substantial number of people and represents a major public health problem. Available clinical treatments for diabetic neuropathic pain remain only partially effective and many of these treatments carry the burden of side effects or the risk of dependence. The misexpression of sodium channels within nociceptive neurons contributes to abnormal electrical activity associated with neuropathic pain. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.3 produces tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents with rapid repriming kinetics and has been shown to contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability and ectopic firing in injured neurons. Suppression of Nav1.3 activity can attenuate neuropathic pain induced by peripheral nerve injury. Previous studies have shown that expression of Nav1.3 is upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of diabetic rats that exhibit neuropathic pain. Here, we hypothesized that viral-mediated knockdown of Nav1.3 in painful diabetic neuropathy would reduce neuropathic pain. We used a validated recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-shRNA-Nav1.3 vector to knockdown expression of Nav1.3, via a clinically applicable intrathecal injection method. Three weeks following vector administration, we observed a significant rate of transduction in DRGs of diabetic rats that concomitantly reduced neuronal excitability of dorsal horn neurons and reduced behavioral evidence of tactile allodynia. Taken together, these findings offer a novel gene therapy approach for addressing chronic diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:26101954

  20. BXD recombinant inbred strains participate in social preference, anxiety and depression behaviors along sex-differences in cytokines and tactile allodynia.

    PubMed

    López-Granero, Caridad; Antunes Dos Santos, Alessandra; Ferrer, Beatriz; Culbreth, Megan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Barrasa, Angel; Gulinello, Maria; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2017-03-06

    Depression and anxiety are the most common psychiatric disorders, representing a major public health concern. Dysregulation of oxidative and inflammatory systems may be associated with psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Due to the need to find appropriate animal models to the understanding of such disorders, we queried whether 2 BXD recombinant inbred (RI) mice strains (BXD21/TyJ RI and BXD84/RwwJ RI mice) and C57BL/6 wild-type mice show differential performance in depression and anxiety related behaviors and biomarkers. Specifically, we assessed social preference, elevated plus maze, forced swim, and Von Frey tests at 3-4 months-of-age, as well as activation of cytokines and antioxidant mRNA levels in the cortex at 7 months-of-age. We report that (1) the BXD84/RwwJ RI strain exhibits anxiety disorder and social avoidance-like behavior (2) BXD21/TyJ RI strain shows a resistance to depression illness, and (3) sex-dependent cytokine profiles and allodynia with elevated inflammatory activity were inherent to male BXD21/TyJ RI mice. In conclusion, we provide novel data in favor of the use of BXD recombinant inbred mice to further understand anxiety and depression disorders.

  1. Actions of the dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitor JZL195 in a murine inflammatory pain model.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Wayne B; Gould, Michael J; Torres, Romeo D; Mitchell, Vanessa A; Vaughan, Christopher W

    2014-06-01

    The analgesic efficacy of cannabinoids in chronic pain models is limited by side-effects. It has been proposed that this might be overcome by using agents which indirectly activate the endocannabinoid system. We examined the analgesic and side-effect profile of the dual FAAH/MAGL inhibitor JZL195 in an inflammatory pain model. The effect of systemic injections of a range of doses of JZL195 and the pan-cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212 were performed 1 day following intraplantar injection of CFA in C57BL/6 mice. JZL195 and WIN55212 both reduced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, and produced catalepsy and sedation in a dose dependent manner. Unlike WIN55212, JZL195 reduced allodynia at doses below those at which side-effects were observed. The effects of JZL195 and WIN55212 were abolished by co-application with the CB1 antagonist AM251. The CB2 antagonist also reduced the JZL195 anti-allodynia, and reversed the WIN55212 anti-allodynia. The reduction in allodynia produced by JZL195 was greater than that produced individually by the FAAH and MAGL inhibitors, URB597 and JZL184. These findings suggest that JZL195 reduces inflammation induced allodynia at doses below those which produce side-effects, and displays greater efficacy that FAAH or MAGL inhibitors. Thus, dual FAAH/MAGL inhibition has the potential to alleviate inflammatory pain with reduced cannabinoid-like side-effects.

  2. Antinociceptive effect of matrine on vincristine-induced neuropathic pain model in mice.

    PubMed

    Linglu, Dun; Yuxiang, Li; Yaqiong, Xu; Ru, Zhou; Lin, Ma; Shaoju, Jin; Juan, Du; Tao, Sun; Jianqiang, Yu

    2014-06-01

    Chemotherapy drugs treatment causes neuropathic pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia are common components of neuropathic pain, so effectively therapeutic strategy is required. In this study, we evaluated the antinociceptive effects of matrine on vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in mice. Vincristine (100 μg/kg i.p.) was administered once per day for 7 days (day 0-6) in mice. Matrine (15, 30, 60 mg/kg, i.p.) was repeated administration in early phase (day 0-6) or late phase (day 7-13). Hyperalgesia and allodynia were evaluated by withdrawal response using von Frey filaments, plantar and cold-plate on 7, 14 and 21 day. Injection of vincristine produced mechanical hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. Matrine was found to produce a protective role in both von Frey filaments and cold-plate test. The analysis of the effect supports the hypothesis that matrine is useful in therapy of vincristine-induced neuropathic pain. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that administration of matrine is associated with antinociceptive effect on mechanical and cold stimuli in a mice model of vincristine-induced neuropathy pain.

  3. Paclitaxel therapy potentiates cold hyperalgesia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats through enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and TRPA1 sensitization.

    PubMed

    Barrière, David André; Rieusset, Jennifer; Chanteranne, Didier; Busserolles, Jérôme; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Chapuis, Laëtitia; Salles, Jérôme; Dubray, Claude; Morio, Béatrice

    2012-03-01

    Diabetes comorbidities include disabling peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and an increased risk of developing cancer. Antimitotic drugs, such as paclitaxel, are well known to facilitate the occurrence of peripheral neuropathy. Practitioners frequently observe the development or co-occurrence of enhanced DPN, especially cold sensitivity, in diabetic patients during chemotherapy. Preclinical studies showed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cold activate transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) cation channels, which are involved in cold-evoked pain transduction signaling in DPN. Additionally, paclitaxel treatment has been associated with an accumulation of atypical mitochondria in the sensory nerves of rats. We hypothesized that paclitaxel might potentiate cold hyperalgesia by increasing mitochondrial injuries and TRPA1 activation. Thus, the kinetics of paclitaxel-induced cold hyperalgesia, mitochondrial ROS production, and TRPA1 expression were evaluated in dorsal root ganglia of normoglycemic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic rats, paclitaxel significantly enhanced cold hyperalgesia in comparison to normoglycemic paclitaxel-treated control rats. These effects were prevented by N-acetyl-cysteine, a reducing agent, and by HC030031, an antagonist of TRPA1. In diabetic and control rats, paclitaxel treatment was associated with an accumulation of atypical mitochondria and a 2-fold increase in mitochondrial ROS production. Moreover, mRNA levels of glutathione peroxidase 4 and glutathione-S-reductase were significantly lower in diabetic groups treated with paclitaxel. Finally, TRPA1 gene expression was enhanced by 45% in diabetic rats. Paclitaxel potentiation of cold hyperalgesia in diabetes may result from the combination of increased mitochondrial ROS production and poor radical detoxification induced by paclitaxel treatment and diabetes-related overexpression of TRPA1.

  4. Intra-Articular Blockade of P2X7 Receptor Reduces the Articular Hyperalgesia and Inflammation in the Knee Joint Synovitis Especially in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Juliana Maia; Dias, Elayne Vieira; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Tambeli, Cláudia Herrera

    2017-02-01

    Synovitis is a key factor in joint disease pathophysiology, which affects a greater proportion of women than men. P2X7 receptor activation contributes to arthritis, but whether it plays a role in articular inflammatory pain in a sex-dependent manner is unknown. We investigated whether the P2X7 receptor blockade in the knee joint of male and female rats reduces the articular hyperalgesia and inflammation induced by a carrageenan knee joint synovitis model. Articular hyperalgesia was quantified using the rat knee joint incapacitation test and the knee joint inflammation, characterized by the concentration of cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, and by neutrophil migration, was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by myeloperoxidase enzyme activity measurement, respectively. P2X7 receptor blockade by the articular coadministration of selective P2X7 receptor antagonist A740003 with carrageenan significantly reduced articular hyperalgesia, pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations, and myeloperoxidase activity induced by carrageenan injection into the knee joint of male and estrus female rats. However, a lower dose of P2X7 receptor antagonist was sufficient to significantly induce the antihyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in estrus female but not in male rats. These results suggest that P2X7 receptor activation by endogenous adenosine 5'-triphosphate is essential to articular hyperalgesia and inflammation development in the knee joint of male and female rats. However, female rats are more responsive than male rats to the antihyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects induced by P2X7 receptor blockade.

  5. Inhibition of spinal ERK1/2-c-JUN signaling pathway counteracts the development of low doses morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Mello, Tommaso; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2015-10-05

    Morphine-induced hyperalgesia is a pharmacological phenomenon often hindering its prolonged applications in the clinic. It has been shown that systemic administration of morphine induced a hyperalgesic response at an extremely low dose. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway contributes to pain sensitization, and its phosphorylation under pain conditions results in the induction and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity. The present study was designed to determine whether low dose morphine treatment in mice could influence the spinal activity of ERK. The data showed that morphine (1 µg/kg) induced a marked increase in ERK phosphorylation. Intrathecal pre-treatment with a selective mitogen-activated and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059, attenuated morphine-associated thermal hyperalgesia. Morphine exposure increased phosphorylation of c-JUN, that was prevented by the inhibition of ERK pathway. In addition, double immunofluorescence studies revealed that, p-ERK and p-c-JUN are localized on neurons of the spinal dorsal horn expressing µ receptors. These data suggest that ERK contributes to the morphine-induced hyperalgesia by regulating the activation of c-JUN.

  6. Effects of target-controlled infusion of high-dose naloxone on pain and hyperalgesia in a human thermal injury model: a study protocol: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial with an enriched design.

    PubMed

    Springborg, Anders D; Jensen, Elisabeth K; Taylor, Bradley K; Werner, Mads U

    2016-11-01

    Mu-opioid-receptor antagonists have been extensively studied in experimental research as pharmacological tools uncovering mechanisms of pain modulation by the endogenous opioid system. In rodents, administration of high doses of mu-opioid-receptor antagonists after the resolution of an inflammatory injury has demonstrated reinstatement of nociceptive hypersensitivity indicating unmasking of latent sensitization. In a recent human study, pain hypersensitivity assessed as secondary hyperalgesia area (SHA), was reinstated 7 days after a mild thermal injury, in 4 out of 12 subjects after a naloxone infusion.The aims of the present study are first, to replicate our previous findings in a larger-sized study; second, to examine if high sensitizers (subjects presenting with large SHA after a thermal injury) develop a higher degree of hypersensitivity after naloxone challenge than low sensitizers (subjects presenting with restricted SHA after a thermal injury); and third to examine a dose-response relationship between 3 stable naloxone concentrations controlled by target-controlled infusion, and the unmasking of latent sensitization.Healthy participants (n = 80) underwent a screening day (day 0) with induction of a thermal skin injury (47°C, 420 seconds, 12.5 cm). Assessment of SHA was performed 1 and 2 hours after the injury. Using an enriched design, only participants belonging to the upper quartile of SHA (Q4, high sensitizers; n = 20) and the lower quartile of SHA (Q1, low sensitizers; n = 20) continued the study, comprising 4 consecutive days-days 1 to 4. Thermal skin injuries were repeated on day 1 and day 3, whereas day 2 and day 4 (7 days after day 1 and day 3, respectively) were target-controlled infusion days in which the subjects were randomly allocated to receive either naloxone (3.25 mg/kg, 4 mg/mL) or placebo (normal saline) intravenous. The primary outcome was SHA assessed by weighted-pin instrument (128 mN) 0, 1, 2, and 165 to 169

  7. Simultaneous Inhibition of PGE2 and PGI2 Signals Is Necessary to Suppress Hyperalgesia in Rat Inflammatory Pain Models

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Harumi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is well known as a mediator of inflammatory symptoms such as fever, arthritis, and inflammatory pain. In the present study, we evaluated the analgesic effect of our selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound I, 2-methyl-2-[cis-4-([1-(6-methyl-3-phenylquinolin-2-yl)piperidin-4-yl]carbonyl amino)cyclohexyl] propanoic acid, in rat yeast-induced acute and adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain models. Although this compound suppressed the synthesis of PGE2 selectively, no analgesic effect was shown in both inflammatory pain models. Prostacyclin (PGI2) also plays crucial roles in inflammatory pain, so we evaluated the involvement of PGI2 signaling in rat inflammatory pain models using prostacyclin receptor (IP) antagonist, RO3244019. RO3244019 showed no analgesic effect in inflammatory pain models, but concomitant administration of compound I and RO3244019 showed analgesic effects comparable to celecoxib, a specific cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 inhibitor. Furthermore, coadministration of PGE2 receptor 4 (EP4) antagonist, CJ-023423, and RO3244019 also showed an analgesic effect. These findings suggest that both PGE2 signaling, especially through the EP4 receptor, and PGI2 signaling play critical roles in inflammatory pain and concurrent inhibition of both signals is important for suppression of inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:27478311

  8. Alloxan-induced diabetic thermal hyperalgesia, prophylaxis and phytotherapeutic effects of Rheum ribes L. in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Raafat, Karim; Aboul-Ela, Maha; El-Lakany, Abdalla

    2014-03-26

    Rheum ribes L., known as Syrian rhubarb, is used in traditional Lebanese folk medicine for the treatment of diabetes. The present study aims to investigate the activities of R. ribes aqueous extract for glucose homeostasis, in vivo antioxidant and diabetic neuropathy protection in mice. The acute and the subacute effects of various doses of R. ribes on blood glucose and in vivo antioxidant activity utilizing serum catalase level (CAT) were studied in alloxan-diabetic mice. The high doses significantly lowered glucose level and increased serum CAT in alloxan-diabetic mice. Pretreatment with the extract prior to alloxination, protected the mice from acquiring diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. Treatment with the extract for 8 weeks alleviated hyperalgesia in diabetic mice. Our findings provide clinicians with promising drugs intended for the management of the symptoms of diabetic complications. The protective activity of R. ribes against acquiring diabetes and diabetic neuropathy might pave the way for preparing a prophylactic treatment for diabetes risk groups.

  9. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) reduces pain, fatigue, and hyperalgesia while restoring central inhibition in primary fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Vance, Carol GT; Liebano, Richard E; Anand, Amrit S; Bush, Heather M; Lee, Kyoung S; Lee, Jennifer E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Because TENS works by reducing central excitability and activating central inhibition pathways, we tested the hypothesis that TENS would reduce pain and fatigue and improve function and hyperalgesia in people with fibromyalgia who have enhanced central excitability and reduced inhibition. The current study used a double-blinded randomized, placebo controlled cross-over design to test effects of a single treatment of TENS in people with fibromyalgia. Three treatments were assessed in random order: active TENS, placebo TENS, no TENS. The following measures were assessed before and after each TENS treatment: pain and fatigue at rest and movement, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), 6 minute walk test (6MWT), range of motion (ROM), five time sit to stand test (FTSTS), and single leg stance (SLS). Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) was completed at end of testing. There was a significant decrease in pain and fatigue with movement for active TENS compared to placebo and no TENS. PPTs increased at site of TENS (spine) and outside site of TENS (leg) when compared to placebo TENS or no TENS. During Active TENS CPM was significantly stronger compared to placebo TENS and no TENS. No changes in functional tasks were observed with TENS. Thus, the current study suggests TENS has short-term efficacy in relieving symptoms of fibromyalgia while the stimulator is active. Future clinical trials should examine the effects of repeated daily delivery of TENS, similar to how TENS is used clinically, on pain, fatigue, function and quality of life in individuals with fibromyalgia. PMID:23900134

  10. Potential Contribution of Antioxidant Mechanism in the Defensive Effect of Lycopene Against Partial Sciatic Nerve Ligation Induced Behavioral, Biochemical and Histopathological Modification in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Goel, R; Tyagi, N

    2016-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is a severe and unbearable condition which arises due to activation of peripheral nociceptors after tissue damage, neuropathic pain is caused from anomalous physiology of central or peripheral nervous system and it may not be related to the ongoing tissue damage or inflammation. Involvement of oxidative damage has been reported in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of lycopene to quench the free radicals produced as a result of the increased oxidative stress in neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was induced in wistar rats by partial sciatic nerve ligation. The effect was evaluated by assessing various behavioral parameters (thermal hyperalgesia, cold hyperalgesia), biochemical parameters (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase) as well as histopathological parameters in sciatic nerve. During the experiment group of 8 rats each was administered drugs once daily intraperitonealy (I.P.) and naïve groups, sham group and sciatic nerve ligated group were treated with vehicle for the duration of 14 days. Partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) significantly caused thermal hyperalgesia, cold hyperalgesia and oxidative damage compared to normal and sham groups. Daily administration of lycopene (25 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg) and gabapentin (100 mg/kg) considerably reversed hyperalgesia, cold hyperalgesia and attenuated oxidative stress when compared to control group. There was significant histological improvement in the in the architecture of myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. The results indicated that free radical generation mechanism might be involved in PSNL induced behavior, biochemical and histopathological changes in wistar rats.

  11. Bilateral central pain sensitization in rats following a unilateral thalamic lesion may be treated with high doses of ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic pain condition caused by a vascular lesion, of either ischemic or hemorrhagic origin, in the central nervous system and more precisely involving the spinothalamocortical pathway responsible for the transmission of painful sensations. Few animal models have been developed to study this problem. The objectives of this study were to evaluate different modalities of pain in a central neuropathic pain rat model and to assess the effects of ketamine administered at different doses. Animals were evaluated on the rotarod, Hargreaves, Von Frey and acetone tests. A very small hemorrhage was created by injecting a collagenase solution in the right ventral posterolateral thalamic nucleus. Following the establishment of the neuropathy, ketamine was evaluated as a therapeutic drug for this condition. Results Histopathological observations showed a well localized lesion with neuronal necrosis and astrocytosis following the collagenase injection that was localized within the VPL. No significant change in motor coordination was observed following surgery in either the saline or collagensae groups. In the collagenase group, a significant decrease in mechanical allodynia threshold was observed. A sporadic and transient cold allodynia was also noted. No thermal hyperalgesia was seen following the collagenase injection. Ketamine was then tested as a potential therapeutic drug. A significant decrease in motor coordination was seen only following the administration of 25 mg/kg of ketamine in both groups. An alleviation of mechanical allodynia was achieved only with the high ketamine dose. The minimal effective ketamine serum concentration (150 ng/mL) was only achieved in animals that received 25 mg/kg. Conclusions An intrathalamic hemorrhage induced a bilateral mechanical allodynia in rats. Cold hyperalgesia was observed in 60% of these animals. Mechanical allodynia was alleviated with high doses of ketamine which corresponded

  12. Attenuation of hyperalgesia responses via the modulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine signalings in the rostral ventromedial medulla and spinal cord in a 6-hydroxydopamine-induced rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen-Tao; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Zhang, Cai-Yi; Lv, Dong-Jun; Yang, Ya-Ping; Xia, Kai-Lin; Liu, Jun-Yi; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Background Although pain is one of the most distressing non-motor symptoms among patients with Parkinson’s disease, the underlying mechanisms of pain in Parkinson’s disease remain elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and spinal cord in pain sensory abnormalities in a 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rat model of Parkinson’s disease. Methods The rotarod test was used to evaluate motor function. The radiant heat test and von Frey test were conducted to evaluate thermal and mechanical pain thresholds, respectively. Immunofluorescence was used to examine 5-hydroxytryptamine neurons and fibers in the rostral ventromedial medulla and spinal cord. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to determine 5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. Results The duration of running time on the rotarod test was significantly reduced in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats. Nociceptive thresholds of both mechanical and heat pain were reduced compared to sham-treated rats. In addition to the degeneration of cell bodies and fibers in the substantia nigra pars compacta, the number of rostral ventromedial medulla 5-hydroxytryptamine neurons and 5-hydroxytryptamine fibers in the spinal dorsal horn was dramatically decreased. 5-Hydroxytryptamine concentrations in both the rostral ventromedial medulla and spinal cord were reduced. Furthermore, the administration of citalopram significantly attenuated pain hypersensitivity. Interestingly, Intra-rostral ventromedial medulla (intra-RVM) microinjection of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine partially reversed pain hypersensitivity of 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats. Conclusions These results suggest that the decreased 5-hydroxytryptamine contents in the rostral ventromedial medulla and spinal dorsal horn may be involved in hyperalgesia in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced rat model of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28326933

  13. Pharmacogenomic study of the role of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor and opioid receptors in diabetic hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Kris; Tzschentke, Thomas M; Koch, Thomas; Schiene, Klaus; Christoph, Thomas

    2014-10-15

    Targeting functionally independent receptors may provide synergistic analgesic effects in neuropathic pain. To examine the interdependency between different opioid receptors (µ-opioid peptide [MOP], δ-opioid peptide [DOP] and κ-opioid peptide [KOP]) and the nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic polyneuropathy, nocifensive activity was measured using a hot plate test in wild-type and NOP, MOP, DOP and KOP receptor knockout mice in response to the selective receptor agonists Ro65-6570, morphine, SNC-80 and U50488H, or vehicle. Nocifensive activity was similar in non-diabetic wild-type and knockout mice at baseline, before agonist or vehicle administration. STZ-induced diabetes significantly increased heat sensitivity in all mouse strains, but MOP, DOP and KOP receptor knockouts showed a smaller degree of hyperalgesia than wild-type mice and NOP receptor knockouts. For each agonist, a significant antihyperalgesic effect was observed in wild-type diabetic mice (all P<0.05 versus vehicle); the effect was markedly attenuated in diabetic mice lacking the cognate receptor compared with wild-type diabetic mice. Morphine was the only agonist that demonstrated near-full antihyperalgesic efficacy across all non-cognate receptor knockouts. Partial or near-complete reductions in efficacy were observed with Ro65-6570 in DOP and KOP receptor knockouts, with SNC-80 in NOP, MOP and KOP receptor knockouts, and with U50488H in NOP and DOP receptor knockouts. There was no evidence of NOP and MOP receptor interdependency in response to selective agonists for these receptors. These findings suggest that concurrent activation of NOP and MOP receptors, which showed functional independence, may yield an effective and favorable therapeutic analgesic profile.

  14. Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide reduces viscerovisceral hyperalgesia in a rat model of endometriosis plus ureteral calculosis: role of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Iuvone, Teresa; Affaitati, Giannapia; De Filippis, Daniele; Lopopolo, Mariangela; Grassia, Gianluca; Lapenna, Domenico; Negro, Luana; Costantini, Raffaele; Vaia, Massimo; Cipollone, Francesco; Ialenti, Armando; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    The effects of ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide were evaluated on pain behaviours and markers of mast cell (MC) activity in a rat model of endometriosis plus ureteral calculosis (ENDO+STONE)-induced viscerovisceral hyperalgesia (VVH). Female Sprague-Dawley rats that underwent surgical induction of endometriosis were randomly assigned to receive active (ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide 10 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), orally) or placebo treatment for 25 days. At day 21, they underwent ureteral stone formation and were video-recorded till day 25 to evaluate ureteral and uterine pain behaviours. At autopsy (day 25), ureteral condition and number and diameter of endometrial cysts were evaluated. The following were then measured: number and percentage of degranulating MCs, number of vessels, chymase, nerve growth factor (NGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Flk-1 (VEGF receptor) in cysts, and NGF in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide-treated vs placebo-treated rats showed significantly lower number, duration and complexity of ureteral crises, shorter duration of uterine pain, and smaller cyst diameter (0.0001 < P < 0.004); a significantly higher percentage of expelled stones (P < 0.0001); significantly lower MC number (P < 0.01), vessel number (P < 0.01), chymase (P < 0.05), NGF (P < 0.05), VEGF (P < 0.01), and Flk-1 (P < 0.01) expression in cysts and NGF expression in DRG (P < 0.01). In all animals, the global duration of ureteral crises correlated linearly and directly with cyst diameter, MC number and chymase in cysts, and NGF in cysts and DRG (0.02 < P < 0.0002). Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide significantly reduces VVH from ENDO+STONE, probably by modulating MC expression/activity in cysts, thus reducing central sensitization due to noxious signals from endometriotic lesions. The results suggest potential utility of the compound for VVH in clinics.

  15. Pressure sensitivity and phenotypic changes in patients with suspected opioid-induced hyperalgesia being withdrawn from full mu agonists

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Ronald A.; Hassett, Afton L.; Harte, Steven E.; Goesling, Jenna; Malinoff, Herbert L.; Berland, Daniel W.; Zollars, Jennifer; Moser, Stephanie E.; Brummett, Chad M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess changes in phenotype and pressure sensitivity in patients with suspected opioid-induced-hyperalgesia (OIH) after transitioning to buprenorphine. Methods Twenty patients with suspected OIH were enrolled to transition to buprenorphine therapy. Patients completed validated self-report measures at baseline and at 1, 4, 8 weeks, and 6 months after initiation of buprenorphine along with quantitative sensory testing including measures of pressure pain threshold, pain tolerance and Pain 50 (a pain intensity rating). Results 20 patients were enrolled, 17 were treated with buprenorphine and 11 completed all assessment points. We found that after transitioning to buprenorphine, patients on higher opioid doses (≥100mg oral morphine equivalents) had significant improvements for some measures including decreased pain severity and fibromyalgia survey scores, fewer neuropathic pain features, less catastrophizing, fewer depressive symptoms, and improved functioning 1-week after transitioning to buprenorphine with an eventual return back to baseline. Although not statistically significant, patients on high dose opioids (≥100mg OME) also showed a trend of decreased pressure sensitivity 1-week after transitioning to buprenorphine with a gradual return back to baseline. Conclusions Our study is the first to look at pressure pain sensitivity in patients who were taking opioids and transitioned to buprenorphine. These results suggest that the patients most likely to benefit from buprenorphine therapy are those on higher doses. In addition, the eventual return back to baseline on measures of pain phenotype and pressure sensitivity suggests that buprenorphine may over time result in a return of the hyperalgesic effects of a full mu agonist. PMID:28361126

  16. Telmisartan inhibits hyperalgesia and inflammatory progression in a diabetic neuropathic pain model of Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rejaie, Salim S.; Abuohashish, Hatem M.; Ahmed, Mohammed M.; Arrejaie, Aws S.; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M.; AlSharari, Shakir D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the potential therapeutic value of telmisartan (TMT) against diabetic neuropathy (DN) and associated pain in Wistar rats. Methods: Peripheral DN was induced by a single intraperitoneal streptozotocin injection (55 mg/kg), and 3 weeks later TMT treatment was started (5 and 10 mg/kg/day), and continued for 4 weeks. Mechanical nociceptive threshold, motor coordination, and thermal nociceptive threshold tests were performed before and after TMT treatment. In serum, glucose, pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 were assessed. Nerve growth factor (NGF) levels and histopathological changes were estimated in the sciatic nerve. This study was conducted at the Experimental Animal Care Center, Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2013 and May 2014. Results: We observed a significant reduction in mechanical nociceptive threshold, motor coordination, and thermal nociceptive threshold in diabetic animals. The TMT treatment significantly enhanced the reduced mechanical nociceptive threshold. The untreated diabetic animals revealed a significant decrease in sciatic NGF, which was markedly attenuated by TMT. The elevated serum levels of cytokines in diabetic animals were inhibited by the TMT treatments. Histopathological evaluation showed obvious nerve degeneration in the diabetic group that was eliminated in the TMT treated diabetic groups. Conclusion: Telmisartan has a potential neuro-protective effect on peripheral DN; this is mediated through its anti-inflammatory effects and its dual properties as an angiotensin receptor blocker, and a partial peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-g ligand. PMID:25864063

  17. cAMP and cGMP contribute to sensory neuron hyperexcitability and hyperalgesia in rats with dorsal root ganglia compression.

    PubMed

    Song, Xue-Jun; Wang, Zheng-Bei; Gan, Qiang; Walters, Edgar T

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway in producing hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons under conditions associated with pain. Evidence is presented for roles of both the cAMP-PKA and cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG) pathways in maintaining neuronal hyperexcitability and behavioral hyperalgesia in a neuropathic pain model: chronic compression of the DRG (CCD treatment). Lumbar DRGs were compressed by a steel rod inserted into the intervertebral foramen. Thermal hyperalgesia was revealed by shortened latencies of foot withdrawal to radiant heat. Intracellular recordings were obtained in vitro from lumbar ganglia after in vivo DRG compression. Activators of the cAMP-PKA pathway, 8-Br-cAMP and Sp-cAMPS, and of the cGMP-PKG pathway, 8-Br-cGMP and Sp-cGMPS, increased the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons already produced by CCD treatment, as shown by further decreases in action potential threshold and increased repetitive discharge during depolarization. The adenylate cyclase inhibitor, SQ22536, the PKA antagonist, Rp-cAMPS, the guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ, and the PKG inhibitor, Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS, reduced the hyperexcitability of CCD DRG neurons. In vivo application of PKA and PKG antagonists transiently depressed behavioral hyperalgesia induced by CCD treatment. Unexpectedly, application of these agonists and antagonists to ganglia of naïve, uninjured animals had little effect on electrophysiological properties of DRG neurons and no effect on foot withdrawal, suggesting that sensitizing actions of these pathways in the DRG are enabled by prior injury or stress. The only effect observed in uncompressed ganglia was modest depolarization of DRG neurons by PKA and PKG agonists. CCD treatment also depolarized DRG neurons, but CCD-induced depolarization was not affected by agonists or antagonists of these pathways.

  18. Long-Term Treatment by Vitamin B1 and Reduction of Serum Proinflammatory Cytokines, Hyperalgesia, and Paw Edema in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zaringhalam, Jalal; Akbari, Akhtar; Zali, Alireza; Manaheji, Homa; Nazemian, Vida; Shadnoush, Mahdi; Ezzatpanah, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Immune system is involved in the etiology and pathophysiology of inflammation and vitamins are important sources of substances inducing nonspecific immunomodulatory effects. Given the proinflammatory role of cytokines in the inflammation and pain induction, this study aimed to assess the effects of long-term administration of vitamin B1 on the proinflammatory cytokines, edema, and hyperalgesia during the acute and chronic phases of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Methods: On the first day of study, inflammation was induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the hindpaws of rats. Vitamin B1 at doses of 100, 150, and 200 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally during 21 days of the study. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin B1 were also compared to indomethacin (5 mg/kg). Inflammatory symptoms such as thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema were measured by radiant heat and plethysmometer, respectively. Serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels were checked by rat standard enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) specific kits. Results: The results indicated that vitamin B1(150 and 200 mg/kg) attenuated the paw edema, thermal hyperalgesia, and serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β during both phases of CFA-induced inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Effective dose of vitamin B1(150 mg/kg) reduced inflammatory symptoms and serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β compare to indomethacin during the chronic phase of inflammation. Conclusion: Anti-inflammatory and antihyperalgesic effects of vitamin B1 during CFA-induced arthritis, more specifically after chronic vitamin B1 administration, suggest its therapeutic property for inflammation. PMID:27872694

  19. Cold and L-menthol-induced sensitization in healthy volunteers--a cold hypersensitivity analogue to the heat/capsaicin model.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Hjalte H; Poulsen, Jeppe N; Uchida, Yugo; Nikbakht, Anahita; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-05-01

    Topical high-concentration L-menthol is the only established human experimental pain model to study mechanisms underlying cold hyperalgesia. We aimed at investigating the combinatorial effect of cold stimuli and topical L-menthol on cold pain and secondary mechanical hyperalgesia. Analogue to the heat-capsaicin model on skin sensitization, we proposed that cold/menthol enhances or prolong L-menthol-evoked sensitization. Topical 40% L-menthol or vehicle was applied (20 minutes) on the volar forearms of 20 healthy females and males (age, 28.7 ± 0.6 years). Cold stimulation of 5°C for 5 minutes was then applied to the treated area 3 times with 40-minute intervals. Cold detection threshold and pain, mechanical hyperalgesia (pinprick), static and dynamic mechanical allodynia (von Frey and brush), skin blood flow (laser speckle), and temperature (thermocamera) were assessed. Cold detection threshold and cold pain threshold (CPT) increased after L-menthol and remained high after the cold rekindling cycles (P < 0.001). L-menthol evoked secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick (P < 0.001) particularly in females (P < 0.05) and also induced secondary allodynia to von Frey and brush (P < 0.001). Application of cold stimuli kept these areas enlarged with a higher response in females to brush after the third cold cycle (P < 0.05). Skin blood flow increased after L-menthol (P < 0.001) and stayed stable after cold cycles. Repeated application of cold on skin treated by L-menthol facilitated and prolonged L-menthol-induced cold pain and hyperalgesia. This model may prove beneficial for testing analgesic compounds when a sufficient duration of time is needed to see drug effects on CPT or mechanical hypersensitivity.

  20. TRPV1 function is modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation: insights into the molecular mechanism of nociception.

    PubMed

    Jendryke, Thomas; Prochazkova, Michaela; Hall, Bradford E; Nordmann, Grégory C; Schladt, Moritz; Milenkovic, Vladimir M; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Wetzel, Christian H

    2016-02-23

    TRPV1 is a polymodally activated cation channel acting as key receptor in nociceptive neurons. Its function is strongly affected by kinase-mediated phosphorylation leading to hyperalgesia and allodynia. We present behavioral and molecular data indicating that TRPV1 is strongly modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation at position threonine-407(mouse)/T406(rat). Increasing or decreasing Cdk5 activity in genetically engineered mice has severe consequences on TRPV1-mediated pain perception leading to altered capsaicin consumption and sensitivity to heat. To understand the molecular and structural/functional consequences of TRPV1 phosphorylation, we generated various rTRPV1T406 receptor variants to mimic phosphorylated or dephosphorylated receptor protein. We performed detailed functional characterization by means of electrophysiological whole-cell and single-channel recordings as well as Ca(2+)-imaging and challenged recombinant rTRPV1 receptors with capsaicin, low pH, or heat. We found that position T406 is critical for the function of TRPV1 by modulating ligand-sensitivity, activation, and desensitization kinetics as well as voltage-dependence. Based on high resolution structures of TRPV1, we discuss T406 being involved in the molecular transition pathway, its phosphorylation leading to a conformational change and influencing the gating of the receptor. Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of T406 can be regarded as an important molecular switch modulating TRPV1-related behavior and pain sensitivity.

  1. TRPV1 function is modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation: insights into the molecular mechanism of nociception

    PubMed Central

    Jendryke, Thomas; Prochazkova, Michaela; Hall, Bradford E.; Nordmann, Grégory C.; Schladt, Moritz; Milenkovic, Vladimir M.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Wetzel, Christian H.

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 is a polymodally activated cation channel acting as key receptor in nociceptive neurons. Its function is strongly affected by kinase-mediated phosphorylation leading to hyperalgesia and allodynia. We present behavioral and molecular data indicating that TRPV1 is strongly modulated by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation at position threonine-407(mouse)/T406(rat). Increasing or decreasing Cdk5 activity in genetically engineered mice has severe consequences on TRPV1-mediated pain perception leading to altered capsaicin consumption and sensitivity to heat. To understand the molecular and structural/functional consequences of TRPV1 phosphorylation, we generated various rTRPV1T406 receptor variants to mimic phosphorylated or dephosphorylated receptor protein. We performed detailed functional characterization by means of electrophysiological whole-cell and single-channel recordings as well as Ca2+-imaging and challenged recombinant rTRPV1 receptors with capsaicin, low pH, or heat. We found that position T406 is critical for the function of TRPV1 by modulating ligand-sensitivity, activation, and desensitization kinetics as well as voltage-dependence. Based on high resolution structures of TRPV1, we discuss T406 being involved in the molecular transition pathway, its phosphorylation leading to a conformational change and influencing the gating of the receptor. Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of T406 can be regarded as an important molecular switch modulating TRPV1-related behavior and pain sensitivity. PMID:26902776

  2. Mechanisms of PDGF siRNA-mediated inhibition of bone cancer pain in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Jia; He, Mu; Liu, Ran; Belegu, Visar; Dai, Ping; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Shang, Fei-Fei; Luo, Chao-Zhi; Zhou, Xue; Liu, Su; McDonald, JohnW.; Liu, Jin; Zuo, Yun-Xia; Liu, Fei; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Patients with tumors that metastasize to bone frequently suffer from debilitating pain, and effective therapies for treating bone cancer are lacking. This study employed a novel strategy in which herpes simplex virus (HSV) carrying a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was used to alleviate bone cancer pain. HSV carrying PDGF siRNA was established and intrathecally injected into the cavum subarachnoidale of animals suffering from bone cancer pain and animals in the negative group. Sensory function was assessed by measuring thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. The mechanism by which PDGF regulates pain was also investigated by comparing the differential expression of pPDGFRα/β and phosphorylated ERK and AKT. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia developed in the rats with bone cancer pain, and these effects were accompanied by bone destruction in the tibia. Intrathecal injection of PDGF siRNA and morphine reversed thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with bone cancer pain. In addition, we observed attenuated astrocyte hypertrophy, down-regulated pPDGFRα/β levels, reduced levels of the neurochemical SP, a reduction in CGRP fibers and changes in pERK/ERK and pAKT/AKT ratios. These results demonstrate that PDGF siRNA can effectively treat pain induced by bone cancer by blocking the AKT-ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27282805

  3. Fisetin exerts antihyperalgesic effect in a mouse model of neuropathic pain: engagement of spinal serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Chuang; Cui, Wu-Geng; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Wen-Hua

    2015-03-12

    Fisetin, a natural flavonoid, has been shown in our previous studies to exert antidepressant-like effect. As antidepressant drugs are clinically used to treat chronic neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate the potential antinociceptive efficacies of fisetin against neuropathic pain and explore mechanism(s). We subjected mice to chronic constriction injury (CCI) by loosely ligating the sciatic nerves, and Hargreaves test or von Frey test was used to assess thermal hyperalgesia or mechanical allodynia, respectively. Chronic fisetin treatment (5, 15 or 45 mg/kg, p.o.) ameliorated thermal hyperalgesia (but not mechanical allodynia) in CCI mice, concomitant with escalated levels of spinal monoamines and suppressed monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A activity. The antihyperalgesic action of fisetin was abolished by chemical depletion of spinal serotonin (5-HT) but potentiated by co-treatment with 5-HTP, a precursor of 5-HT. Moreover, intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) co-treatment with 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-258719 completely abrogated fisetin's antihyperalgesia. These findings confirm that chronic fisetin treatment exerts antinociceptive effect on thermal hyperalgesia in neuropathic mice, with spinal serotonergic system (coupled with 5-HT7) being critically involved. Of special benefit, fisetin attenuated co-morbidly behavioral symptoms of depression and anxiety (evaluated in forced swim test, novelty suppressed feeding test and light-dark test) evoked by neuropathic pain.

  4. Chronic at-level thermal hyperalgesia following rat cervical contusion spinal cord injury is accompanied by neuronal and astrocyte activation and loss of the astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT1, in superficial dorsal horn

    PubMed Central

    Putatunda, Rajarshi; Hala, Tamara J.; Chin, Jeannie; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a form of pathological nociception that occurs in a significant portion of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, resulting in debilitating and often long-term physical and psychological burdens. While many peripheral and central mechanisms have been implicated in neuropathic pain, central sensitization of dorsal horn spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons is a major underlying substrate. Furthermore, dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis and chronic astrocyte activation play important underlying roles in persistent hyperexcitability of these superficial dorsal horn neurons. To date, central sensitization and astrocyte changes have not been characterized in cervical SCI-induced neuropathic pain models, despite the fact that a major portion of SCI patients suffer contusion trauma to cervical spinal cord. In this study, we have characterized two rat models of unilateral cervical contusion SCI that behaviorally result in chronic persistence of thermal hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral forepaw. In addition, we find that STT neurons are chronically activated in both models when compared to laminectomy-only uninjured rats. Finally, persistent astrocyte activation and significantly reduced expression of the major CNS glutamate transporter, GLT1, in superficial dorsal horn astrocytes are associated with both excitability changes in STT neurons and the neuropathic pain behavioral phenotype. In conclusion, we have characterized clinically-relevant rodent models of cervical contusion-induced neuropathic pain that result in chronic activation of both STT neurons and astrocytes, as well as compromise in astrocyte glutamate transporter expression. These models can be used as important tools to further study mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain post-SCI and to test potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:24833066

  5. Acupuncture alleviates the affective dimension of pain in a rat model of inflammatory hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Meng, Xianze; Li, Aihui; Xin, Jiajia; Berman, Brian M.; Lao, Lixing; Tan, Ming; Ren, Ke; Zhang, Rui-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Although studies demonstrate that electroacupuncture (EA) alleviates the sensory dimension of pain, they have not addressed EA’s effect on the affective dimension. An inflammatory pain rat model, produced by a complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) injection into the hind paw, was combined with a conditioned place avoidance (CPA) test to determine EA’s effects and its underpinning mechanism on the affective dimension of pain. CFA-injected rats showed place aversion, i.e. the affective dimension of pain, by spending less time in a pain-paired compartment after conditioning than before, while saline-injected rats did not. CFA rats given EA treatment at GB30 before a postconditioning test showed no aversion to the pain-paired compartment, indicating that EA inhibited the affective response. Intra-rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) administration of a κ-, but not μ-opioid receptor antagonist, blocked EA action. These data demonstrate that EA activates opioid receptors in the rACC to inhibit the affective dimension of pain. PMID:21695393

  6. Distinct Terminal and Cell Body Mechanisms in the Nociceptor Mediate Hyperalgesic Priming

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Luiz F.; Araldi, Dioneia

    2015-01-01

    Hyperalgesic priming, a form of neuroplasticity in nociceptors, is a model of the transition from acute to chronic pain in the rat, which involves signaling from the site of an acute tissue insult in the vicinity of the peripheral terminal of a nociceptor to its cell body that, in turn, induces a signal that travels back to the terminal to mediate a marked prolongation of prostaglandin E2-induced hyperalgesia. In the present experiments, we studied the underlying mechanisms in the cell body and compared them to the mechanisms in the nerve terminal. Injection of a cell-permeant cAMP analog, 8-bromo cAMP, into the dorsal root ganglion induced mechanical hyperalgesia and priming with an onset more rapid than when induced at the peripheral terminal. Priming induced by intraganglion 8-bromo cAMP was prevented by an oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to mRNA for a transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and by an inhibitor of importin, which is required for activated CREB to get into the nucleus. While peripheral administration of 8-bromo cAMP also produced hyperalgesia, it did not produc