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Sample records for allodynia mechanical hyperalgesia

  1. Differential regulation of peripheral IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min J; Lee, Sang Y; Yang, Kui Y; Nam, Soon H; Kim, Hyun J; Kim, Young J; Bae, Yong C; Ahn, Dong K

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the differential mechanisms of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after injection of interleukin (IL) 1β into the orofacial area of male Sprague-Dawley rats. The subcutaneous administration of IL-1β produced both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Although a pretreatment with iodoresiniferatoxin (IRTX), a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist, did not affect IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia, it significantly abolished IL-1β-induced thermal hyperalgesia. On the other hand, a pretreatment with D-AP5, an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, and NBQX, an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, blocked IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia. Pretreatment with H89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, blocked IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia but not thermal hyperalgesia. In contrast, pretreatment with chelerythrine, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, inhibited IL-1β-induced thermal hyperalgesia. Subcutaneous injections of 2% lidocaine, a local anesthetic agent, blocked IL-1β-induced thermal hyperalgesia but not IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia. In the resiniferatoxin (RTX)-pretreated rats, a subcutaneous injection of IL-1β did not produce thermal hyperalgesia due to the depletion of TRPV1 in the primary afferent fibers. Double immunofluorescence revealed the colocalization of PKA with neurofilament 200 (NF200) and of PKC with the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the trigeminal ganglion. Furthermore, NMDA receptor 1 (NR1) and TRPV1 predominantly colocalize with PKA and PKC, respectively, in the trigeminal ganglion. These results suggest that IL-1β-induced mechanical allodynia is mediated by sensitized peripheral NMDA/AMPA receptors through PKA-mediated signaling in the large-diameter primary afferent nerve fibers, whereas IL-1β-induced thermal hyperalgesia is mediated by sensitized peripheral TRPV1 receptors through PKC

  2. Lowering barometric pressure aggravates mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sato, J; Morimae, H; Seino, Y; Kobayashi, T; Suzuki, N; Mizumura, K

    1999-04-30

    To examine the effects of meteorological change on the pain-related behaviors of neuropathic rats, animals with a chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve were exposed to low barometric pressure (LP), 20 mmHg below the natural atmospheric pressure in a climate-controlled room. CCI caused a decreased hindpaw withdrawal threshold to von Frey hair (VFH) stimulation (mechanical allodynia) and prolonged duration of hindpaw withdrawal in response to pinprick stimulation (mechanical hyperalgesia). When the CCI rats were exposed to LP, both these pain-related behaviors were aggravated, whereas no change was seen in a group of controls. In the CCI rats sympathectomy inhibited this LP-induced augmentation of pain-related behaviors. These results show that LP intensifies the abnormalities in the pain-related behaviors of neuropathic rats, and that sympathetic activity contributes to the LP effect.

  3. Bilateral mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia after chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Gui; Kong, Wei-Wei; Ge, Da-Long; Luo, Ceng; Hu, San-Jue

    2011-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Low back pain is one of the most inextricable problems encountered in clinics. Animal models that imitate symptoms in humans are valuable tools for investigating low back pain mechanisms and the possible therapeutic applications. With the development of genetic technology in pain field, the possibility of mutating specific genes in mice has provided a potent tool for investigating the specific mechanisms of pain. The aim of the present study was to develop a mouse model of chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion (CCD), in which gene mutation can be applied to facilitate the studies of chronic pain. METHODS Chronic compression of L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia was conducted in mice by inserting fine stainless steel rods into the intervertebral foramina, one at L4 and the other at L5. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were examined with von Frey filaments and radiating heat stimulator, respectively. RESULTS The CCD mice displayed dramatic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia as well as tactile allodynia in the hindpaw ipsilateral to CCD. In addition, this mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia as well as tactile allodynia was also found to spread to the contralateral hindpaw. CONCLUSION This model, combined with the possible genetic modification, will strengthen our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of low back pain. It also favors the development of new treatment strategies for pain and hyperalgesia after spinal injury and other disorders which affect the dorsal root ganglion in humans. PMID:21788994

  4. Tetrodotoxin suppresses thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in a rat full thickness thermal injury pain model.

    PubMed

    Salas, Margaux M; McIntyre, Matthew K; Petz, Lawrence N; Korz, Walter; Wong, Donald; Clifford, John L

    2015-10-21

    Burn injuries have been identified as the primary cause of injury in 5% of U.S. military personnel evacuated from Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Severe burn-associated pain is typically treated with opioids such as fentanyl, morphine, and methadone. Side effects of opioids include respiratory depression, cardiac depression, decrease in motor and cognitive function, as well as the development of hyperalgesia, tolerance and dependence. These effects have led us to search for novel analgesics for the treatment of burn-associated pain in wounded combat service members. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocker currently in clinical trials as an analgesic. A phase 3 clinical trial for cancer-related pain has been completed and phase 3 clinical trials on chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain are planned. It has also been shown in mice to inhibit the development of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. TTX was originally identified as a neurotoxin in marine animals but has now been shown to be safe in humans at therapeutic doses. The antinociceptive effects of TTX are thought to be due to inhibition of Na(+) ion influx required for initiation and conduction of nociceptive impulses. One TTX sensitive sodium channel, Nav1.7, has been shown to be essential in lowering the heat pain threshold after burn injuries. To date, the analgesic effect of TTX has not been tested in burn-associated pain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a full thickness thermal injury on the right hind paw. TTX (8 μg/kg) was administered once a day systemically by subcutaneous injection beginning 3 days post thermal injury and continued through 7 days post thermal injury. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were assessed 60 and 120 min post injection on each day of TTX treatment. TTX significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia at all days tested and had a less robust, but statistically significant suppressive effect on mechanical

  5. Tetrodotoxin suppresses thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in a rat full thickness thermal injury pain model.

    PubMed

    Salas, Margaux M; McIntyre, Matthew K; Petz, Lawrence N; Korz, Walter; Wong, Donald; Clifford, John L

    2015-10-21

    Burn injuries have been identified as the primary cause of injury in 5% of U.S. military personnel evacuated from Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Severe burn-associated pain is typically treated with opioids such as fentanyl, morphine, and methadone. Side effects of opioids include respiratory depression, cardiac depression, decrease in motor and cognitive function, as well as the development of hyperalgesia, tolerance and dependence. These effects have led us to search for novel analgesics for the treatment of burn-associated pain in wounded combat service members. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocker currently in clinical trials as an analgesic. A phase 3 clinical trial for cancer-related pain has been completed and phase 3 clinical trials on chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain are planned. It has also been shown in mice to inhibit the development of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. TTX was originally identified as a neurotoxin in marine animals but has now been shown to be safe in humans at therapeutic doses. The antinociceptive effects of TTX are thought to be due to inhibition of Na(+) ion influx required for initiation and conduction of nociceptive impulses. One TTX sensitive sodium channel, Nav1.7, has been shown to be essential in lowering the heat pain threshold after burn injuries. To date, the analgesic effect of TTX has not been tested in burn-associated pain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a full thickness thermal injury on the right hind paw. TTX (8 μg/kg) was administered once a day systemically by subcutaneous injection beginning 3 days post thermal injury and continued through 7 days post thermal injury. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were assessed 60 and 120 min post injection on each day of TTX treatment. TTX significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia at all days tested and had a less robust, but statistically significant suppressive effect on mechanical

  6. Unity vs. diversity of neuropathic pain mechanisms: Allodynia and hyperalgesia in rats selected for heritable predisposition to spontaneous pain.

    PubMed

    Ziv-Sefer, Sagit; Raber, Pnina; Barbash, Shahar; Devor, Marshall

    2009-11-01

    Do contrasting neuropathic pain diagnoses share common pathophysiological mechanisms? Selective breeding was used to derive rat lines with a common genetic background but a striking difference in the degree of spontaneous pain behavior expressed in the neuroma model of neuropathic pain (HA rats (high autotomy) and LA rats (low autotomy)). The contrasting pain phenotype in these lines is attributable to allelic differences at a small number of genetic loci. Here we show that HA and LA rats also differ in their nocifensive response to applied stimuli in the Chung (spinal nerve ligation, SNL) model of neuropathic pain. This includes tactile allodynia and hyperalgesia, and heat allodynia. The degree of hypersensibility varied with sex, age at the time of nerve injury, and the extent of the nerve lesion. F1 crosses of HA and LA rats and inbred Lewis rats showed low levels of autotomy but variable levels of hypersensibility to applied stimuli. Results indicate that alleles which predispose to spontaneous neuropathic pain also predispose to stimulus-evoked pain (allodynia and hyperalgesia). This, in turn, suggests that despite contrasting etiology and behavioral endpoints, pain phenotype in the neuroma and the SNL models shares common pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:19683390

  7. Antibody directed against GD(2) produces mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia when administered systemically or intrathecally despite its dependence on capsaicin sensitive afferents.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, L S; Yu, A L; Junger, H; Doom, C M

    2002-03-15

    Anti-GD(2) antibodies have been shown to be effective for immunotherapy of neuroblastoma and other GD(2) enriched malignancies. Infusion of anti-GD(2) antibodies frequently causes spontaneous pain and allodynia for the duration of the immunotherapy and occasionally longer lasting neuropathic pain. Bolus intravenous injection of anti-GD(2) in rats initiates mechanical allodynia as measured by withdrawal threshold of the hindpaws. In this study, thermal thresholds were measured prior to and for up to 6 h following systemic anti-GD(2) administration in adult rats. In addition, both thermal and mechanical thresholds were tested following intrathecal administration of anti-GD(2) and IgG(2a). Murine anti-GD(2) elicited mechanical allodynia when administered into either the vasculature or the intrathecal space. Effective systemic doses were 1--3 mg/kg as previously shown. Intrathecally, optimal doses ranged from 0.01 to 0.1 ng; a higher dose was ineffective. Thermal hyperalgesia was not observed via either route of administration. Intrathecal pretreatment 48--72 h prior to the experiment with capsaicin at doses sufficient to cause a 50% depletion of dorsal horn CGRP, caused a total blockade of the mechanical allodynia indicating an involvement of peptidergic fine afferent fibers. It is likely that the antibody reacts with an antigen on peripheral nerve and/or myelin to initiate its effect. The lack of observed thermal hyperalgesia is surprising especially in light of the capsaicin-associated blockade, however, it is consistent with several other immune system related models of pain.

  8. Inhibition of endogenous NGF degradation induces mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously shown a sprouting of sympathetic fibers into the upper dermis of the skin following subcutaneous injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the hindpaw. This sprouting correlated with an increase in pain-related sensitivity. We hypothesized that this sprouting and pain-related behavior were caused by an increase in nerve growth factor (NGF) levels. In this study, we investigated whether the inhibition of mature NGF degradation, using a matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 (MMP-2/9) inhibitor, was sufficient to reproduce a similar phenotype. Results Behavioral tests performed on male Sprague–Dawley rats at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after intra-plantar MMP-2/9 inhibitor administration demonstrated that acute and chronic injections of the MMP-2/9 inhibitor induced sensitization, in a dose dependent manner, to mechanical, hot and cold stimuli as measured by von Frey filaments, Hargreaves and acetone tests, respectively. Moreover, the protein levels of mature NGF (mNGF) were increased, whereas the levels and enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 were reduced in the glabrous skin of the hind paw. MMP-2/9 inhibition also led to a robust sprouting of sympathetic fibers into the upper dermis but there were no changes in the density of peptidergic nociceptive afferents. Conclusions These findings indicate that localized MMP-2/9 inhibition provokes a pattern of sensitization and fiber sprouting comparable to that previously obtained following CFA injection. Accordingly, the modulation of endogenous NGF levels should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for the management of inflammatory pain associated with arthritis. PMID:23889761

  9. The kainate receptor antagonist 2S,4R-4-methylglutamate attenuates mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat model of nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Sutton, J L; Maccecchini, M L; Kajander, K C

    1999-01-01

    Opioids and receptor antagonists of excitatory amino acids attenuate mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in animal models of neuropathic pain. Recently, a kainate receptor antagonist, 2S,4R-4-methylglutamate, has been developed but has not been tested for antinociceptive effects in animal models of neuropathic pain. We evaluated whether 2S,4R-4-methylglutamate attenuated responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli in uninjured (control) rats and increased responsiveness in rats with chronic constriction injury. Rats were tested for a number of withdrawal responses using a calibrated von Frey filament (mechanical stimulus) and withdrawal latencies from a radiant heat source (thermal stimulus). In control rats, 2S,4R-4-methylglutamate produced a small but significant decrease in responses from the mechanical stimulus (25 mg/kg) and significantly increased withdrawal latencies from the thermal stimulus at the highest dose administered (100 mg/kg). In addition, 2S,4R-4-methylglutamate greatly attenuated increased responsiveness in rats with chronic constriction injury. At four to eight days following chronic constriction injury, animals that displayed increased responsiveness to mechanical and thermal stimuli were injected intraperitoneally with either dizocilpine maleate (0.1 mg/kg), morphine (4 mg/kg), vehicle as controls, or 2S,4R-4-methylglutamate (25, 50, 75 or 100 mg/kg). 2S,4R-4-Methylglutamate (25, 50, 75 and 100 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the frequency of responses to mechanical stimuli (Wilcoxon, P < 0.05) and the latency of responses to thermal stimuli (analysis of variance and Duncan's, P < 0.05). Dizocilpine maleate and morphine, as expected, also reduced these responses. These results suggest that, in addition to opioid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, kainate receptors may play a role in the maintenance of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia associated with peripheral nerve injury.

  10. Metformin attenuates hyperalgesia and allodynia in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy induced by streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxiong; Yu, Hailong; Liu, Jun; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qi; Xiang, Liangbi

    2015-10-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, which often makes the patients suffer from severe hyperalgesia and allodynia. Thus far, the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy remains unsatisfactory. Metformin, which is the first-line drug for type-2 diabetes, has been proved to attenuate hyperexcitability in sensory neurons linked to chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain, highlighting its potential in alleviating pain related with painful diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the potential beneficial effect of metformin on hyperalgesia and allodynia in diabetic rats. The mechanical sensitivity, heat nociception, and cold allodynia were examined. The levels of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and advanced glycation end-products in the blood were measured. The expression of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and AMPK target genes were examined in the sciatic nerves of the animals. It was found that metformin was capable of attenuating diabetes-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. In addition, metformin was capable of decreasing malondialdehyde and glycation end-products levels in blood, as well as increasing superoxide dismutas activity, indicating the inhibitory effect of metformin against diabetes-induced oxidative stress. Further studies showed that metformin could activate AMPK and increase the AMPK target genes in sciatic nerves in diabetic rats. In conclusion, metformin is able to attenuate diabetes-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia, which might be associated its anti-oxidative effect through AMPK pathway. Metformin might be used as an effective drug, especially with fewer side effects, for abnormal sensation in painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26054810

  11. Metformin attenuates hyperalgesia and allodynia in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy induced by streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxiong; Yu, Hailong; Liu, Jun; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qi; Xiang, Liangbi

    2015-10-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, which often makes the patients suffer from severe hyperalgesia and allodynia. Thus far, the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy remains unsatisfactory. Metformin, which is the first-line drug for type-2 diabetes, has been proved to attenuate hyperexcitability in sensory neurons linked to chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain, highlighting its potential in alleviating pain related with painful diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the potential beneficial effect of metformin on hyperalgesia and allodynia in diabetic rats. The mechanical sensitivity, heat nociception, and cold allodynia were examined. The levels of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and advanced glycation end-products in the blood were measured. The expression of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and AMPK target genes were examined in the sciatic nerves of the animals. It was found that metformin was capable of attenuating diabetes-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. In addition, metformin was capable of decreasing malondialdehyde and glycation end-products levels in blood, as well as increasing superoxide dismutas activity, indicating the inhibitory effect of metformin against diabetes-induced oxidative stress. Further studies showed that metformin could activate AMPK and increase the AMPK target genes in sciatic nerves in diabetic rats. In conclusion, metformin is able to attenuate diabetes-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia, which might be associated its anti-oxidative effect through AMPK pathway. Metformin might be used as an effective drug, especially with fewer side effects, for abnormal sensation in painful diabetic neuropathy.

  12. Complications of sodium hydroxide chemical matrixectomy: nail dystrophy, allodynia, hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bostancı, Seher; Koçyiğit, Pelin; Güngör, Hilayda Karakök; Parlak, Nehir

    2014-11-01

    Ingrown toenails are seen most commonly in young adults, and they can seriously affect daily life. Partial nail avulsion with chemical matrixectomy, generally by using either sodium hydroxide or phenol, is one of the most effective treatment methods. Known complications of phenol matrixectomy are unpredictable tissue damage, prolonged postoperative drainage, increased secondary infection rates, periostitis, and poor cosmetic results. To our knowledge, there have been no reports about the complications related to sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. Herein, we describe three patients who developed nail dystrophy, allodynia, and hyperalgesia after sodium hydroxide matrixectomy.

  13. Intraneural dexamethasone applied simultaneously to rat sciatic nerve constriction delays the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Medeiros, Daniel C; Vieira, Rafael P; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2012-02-21

    Although neuroimmune interactions associated with the development of pain sensitization in models of neuropathic pain have been widely studied, there are some aspects that require further investigation. Thus, we aimed to evaluate whether the local intraneural or perineural injections of dexamethasone, an efficacious anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drug, delays the development of both thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in an experimental model of neuropathic pain in rats. Hargreaves and electronic von Frey tests were applied. The chronic constriction injury (CCI) of right sciatic nerve was performed. Single intraneural dexamethasone administration at the moment of constriction delayed the development of sensitization for thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. However, perineural administration of dexamethasone, at the highest dose, did not delay experimental pain development. These results show that inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is an essential trigger for the pathological changes that lead to both hyperalgesia and allodynia. In conclusion, this approach opens new opportunities to study cellular and molecular neuroimmune interactions associated with the development of pain derived from peripheral neuropathies. PMID:22240103

  14. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Dustin; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen; Hargreaves, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids . Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain.

  15. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia after burn injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Dustin; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen; Hargreaves, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids . Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain. PMID:27411353

  16. Blockade of calcium channels can prevent the onset of secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats.

    PubMed

    Sluka, K A

    1997-06-01

    Intradermal capsaicin injection in humans results in primary hyperalgesia to heat and mechanical stimuli applied near the injection site, as well as secondary mechanical hyperalgesia (increased pain from noxious stimuli) and mechanical allodynia (pain from innocuous stimuli) in an area surrounding the site of primary hyperalgesia. This study in rats tested the hypothesis that the secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia observed following intradermal injection of capsaicin was dependent upon activation of voltage sensitive calcium channels in the spinal cord. Responses to application of von Frey filaments of 10 mN and 90 mN bending forces were tested in all rats before and after injection of capsaicin into the plantar surface of a hindpaw. Animals were pretreated with L-type (nifedipine), N-type (omega-conotoxin GVIA) or P-type (omega-agatoxin IVA) calcium channels blockers through a microdialysis fiber implanted in the spinal dorsal horn prior to the injection of capsaicin. None of the calcium channel blockers had any affect on normal sensory or motor responses. However, all three blockers dose dependently prevented the development of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia. The threshold to mechanical stimulation with von Frey filaments was also increased significantly in animals treated with these calcium channel blockers when compared to articial cerebrospinal fluid control animals. These data suggest that calcium channels are important for the development of mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia that occurs following capsaicin injection. PMID:9211477

  17. Central origin of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Klede, Monika; Handwerker, Hermann O; Schmelz, Martin

    2003-07-01

    The contribution for the development of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia by peripheral mechanisms has not been fully elucidated. We have reevaluated the effects of local anesthetics on electrically evoked flare reaction and mechanical hyperalgesia in human skin. We applied 2% lidocaine via intradermal microdialysis fibers at a length of 10 cm for 110 min to the volar forearm to establish a narrow and stable "anesthetic strip." After 60 min of lidocaine perfusion, transdermal electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 50 mA) was applied at a distance of 1 cm from the microdialysis fibers for 30 min. The areas of allodynia and punctate hyperalgesia were marked at the end of the stimulation period. The flare reaction was assessed by laser Doppler scanner and infrared thermography. Total protein content of the dialysate collected at the stimulating electrode was measured photometrically. We found no increase in protein content during electrical stimulation. Flare area (12.4 +/- 2.3 vs. 3.5 +/- 1.2 cm2) and intensity (426 +/- 24 vs. 257 +/- 21 PU) were significantly reduced beyond the lidocaine strip. The mean temperature increase in the area beyond the lidocaine strip was significantly reduced (1.1 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.2 +/- 0.1 degrees C) and did not differ from control areas. In contrast, allodynia (7.4 +/- 0.7 and 8.6 +/- 0.9 cm) and punctate hyperalgesia (7.6 +/- 0.7 and 8.6 +/- 0.9 cm) developed symmetrically on both sides of the anesthetic strip. Allodynia subsided 4 min after the end of the electrical stimulation. We conclude that the development of allodynia and punctate hyperalgesia in human skin is centrally mediated, whereas the axon reflex vasodilation is of peripheral origin. PMID:12843313

  18. Intradermal glutamate and capsaicin injections: intra- and interindividual variability of provoked hyperalgesia and allodynia.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Matias; Lassen, Dorte; Andresen, Trine; Nielsen, Anders K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2014-06-01

    Intradermal injections of glutamate and capsaicin are attractive to use in human experimental pain models because hyperalgesia and allodynia mimic isolated aspects of clinical pain disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the reproducibility of these models. Twenty healthy male volunteers (mean age 24 years; range 18-38 years) received intradermal injections of glutamate and capsaicin in the volar forearm. Magnitudes of secondary pinprick hyperalgesia and brush-evoked allodynia were investigated using von Frey filaments (gauges 10, 15, 60 and 100 g) and brush strokes. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia were quantified immediately after injection and after 15, 30 and 60 min. Two identical experiments separated by at least 7 days were performed. Reproducibility across and within volunteers (inter- and intra-individual variation, respectively) was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV). Secondary pinprick hyperalgesia was observed as a marked increase in the visual analogue scale (VAS) response to von Frey gauges 60 and 100 g (P < 0.001) after glutamate injection. For capsaicin, secondary pinprick hyperalgesia was detected with all von Frey gauges (P < 0.001). Glutamate evoked reproducible VAS response to all von Frey gauges (ICC > 0.60) and brush strokes (ICC > 0.83). Capsaicin injection was reproducible for secondary hyperalgesia (ICC > 0.70) and allodynia (ICC > 0.71). Intra-individual variability was generally lower for the VAS response to von Frey and brush compared with areas of secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia. In conclusion, glutamate and capsaicin yield reproducible hyperalgesic and allodynic responses, and the present model is well suited for basic research, as well as for assessing the modulation of central phenomena.

  19. Fucoidan attenuates the existing allodynia and hyperalgesia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuanyin; Zhang, Guoping; Zhao, Yun-Tao

    2014-06-13

    Fucoidan is an active constituent found in brown seaweeds, which have potential neuroprotection. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of fucoidan on the maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) and the underlying mechanism related to the spinal neuroimmune responses. Animals were randomized into 5 groups: sham-operation with vehicle and SNL with vehicle or fucoidan (15, 50, and 100mg/kg). Different doses of fucoidan or vehicle were administered intrathecally once daily from postoperative day (POD) 11-20. Mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) was measured on 1 day before operation and days 10, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 after operation. Glial activation markers such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and macrophage antigen complex-1 (mac-1), inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 activation, and extracellular signalregulated protein kinase (ERK) activation in the lumbar spinal cord were determined on day 30 after operation. The results showed that fucoidan caused dose-dependently attenuation of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Furthermore, fucoidan could markedly inhibit neuroimmune activation characterized by glial activation, production of cytokines as well as ERK activation. The analgesic effect of intrathecal fucoidan in rats receiving SNL might partly attribute to the inhibition of neuroimmune activation associated with the maintenance of neuropathic pain.

  20. siRNA-mediated downregulation of GluN2B in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex attenuates mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat model of pain associated with bone cancer

    PubMed Central

    XU, YONGGUANG; WANG, GONGMING; ZOU, XULI; YANG, ZAIQI; WANG, QIN; FENG, HAO; ZHANG, MENGYUAN

    2016-01-01

    It has previously been suggested that the upregulation of GluN2B-containing N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (GluN2B) within the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) may contribute to the development of chronic pain. The present study used a rat model of bone cancer pain in order to investigate whether lentiviral-mediated delivery of small interfering RNAs targeting GluN2B (LV-GluN2B) could attenuate pain associated with bone cancer, by selectively decreasing GluN2B expression within the rACC. Sprague Dawley rats were inoculated with osteosarcoma cells into the intramedullary space of the right tibia in order to induce persistent bone cancer-associated pain. Intra-rACC administration of the lentiviral siRNA was performed in the tumor bearing rats; and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were performed in order to detect the expression levels of GluN2B. Pain behavior changes were evaluated via paw withdrawal threshold and latency determinations. Marked and region-selective decreases in the mRNA and protein expression levels of GluN2B were detected in the rACC following the intra-rACC administration of LV-GluN2B. Furthermore, the rats also exhibited pain behavior changes corresponding to the decreased levels of GluN2B. By post-operative day 14, inoculation of osteosarcoma cells had significantly enhanced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in the rats, which were subsequently attenuated by the intra-rACC administration of LV-GluN2B. Notably, the paw withdrawal threshold and latency of the tumor-bearing rats had recovered to normal levels, by day 14 post-administration. The results of the present study suggest that GluN2B within the rACC may be a potential target for RNA interference therapy for the treatment of pain associated with bone cancer. Furthermore, the lentiviral vector delivery strategy may be a promising novel approach for the treatment of bone cancer pain. PMID:26889244

  1. Differential pharmacological alleviation of oxaliplatin-induced hyperalgesia/allodynia at cephalic versus extra-cephalic level in rodents.

    PubMed

    Michot, Benoit; Kayser, Valérie; Bastian, Gérard; Bourgoin, Sylvie; Hamon, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Previous data showed that neuropathic pain induced by mechanical lesion of peripheral nerves responds differently to alleviating drugs at cephalic versus extracephalic level. Because neuropathic pain evoked by anti-cancer drugs differs from that triggered by mechanical nerve lesion, we investigated whether differences between cephalic and extracephalic levels could also be characterized in rodents rendered neuropathic by treatment with the anti-cancer platinum derivative oxaliplatin. C57BL/6J mice received two injections and Sprague-Dawley rats three injections of oxaliplatin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle, with three days intervals. Supersensitivity to mechanical (von Frey filaments), cold (acetone drop) and chemical/inflammatory (formalin) stimulations was assessed in vibrissae and hindpaw territories. Transcripts of neuroinflammatory markers were quantified by real-time RT-qPCR in rat ganglia and central tissues. Oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, cold hyperalgesia and chemical/inflammatory supersensitivity at both hindpaw and vibrissal levels in mice and rats. Acute treatment with gabapentin (30 mg/kg i.p.), morphine (3 mg/kg s.c.) or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.16 mg/kg s.c.) significantly reduced oxaliplatin-induced supersensitivity in hindpaw but not vibrissal territory. In contrast, the antimigraine drugs naratriptan (0.1 mg/kg s.c.) and olcegepant (0.6 mg/kg i.v.) decreased oxaliplatin-induced supersensitivity in vibrissal territory only. Among the various markers investigated, only TRPA1 transcript was upregulated in ganglia of oxaliplatin-treated rats. These data showed that oxaliplatin induced supersensitivity to various stimuli in both cephalic and extra-cephalic territories in rodents. Regional differences in the efficacy of drugs to alleviate oxaliplatin-induced allodynia/hyperalgesia further support the idea that mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain have peculiarities at cephalic versus extra-cephalic level.

  2. Isolation rearing reduces mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of chronic inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Naotaka; Ago, Yukio; Hasebe, Shigeru; Higashino, Kosuke; Asada, Kazuki; Kita, Yuki; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2013-11-15

    Social isolation rearing in mice after weaning reduces pain sensitivity to acute pain, and this hypoalgesia is mediated by the descending serotonergic pain inhibitory system in which the spinal serotonin (5-HT)1A receptor is involved. However, it is not known whether isolation rearing affects pain sensitivity to neuropathic or inflammatory chronic pain. In this study, we examined the effects of isolation rearing on chronic pain induced by Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and partial sciatic nerve ligation using the von Frey test (to assess mechanical allodynia) and the plantar test (to assess thermal hyperalgesia). In the FCA model, isolation rearing reduced mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia. In contrast, isolation rearing had no effect on allodynia or hyperalgesia in the sciatic nerve ligation model. The isolation rearing-induced inhibition of allodynia was alleviated by intrathecal injection of WAY100635, a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. FCA increased 5-HT turnover and decreased 5-HT1A receptor expression in the spinal cord of group-reared mice, while it did not have these effects in isolation-reared mice. These results suggest that FCA suppresses the serotonergic pain inhibitory system selectively in group-reared mice. Moreover, systemic administration of osemozotan, a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, inhibited FCA-induced mechanical allodynia in group-reared mice, and this effect of the drug was suppressed by intrathecal injection of WAY100635. Collectively, these findings suggest that isolation rearing selectively reduces FCA-induced mechanical allodynia in mice and that this effect is mediated by the activation of spinal 5-HT1A receptors.

  3. Mechanical stimulation enhances endothelin-1 hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Joseph, E K; Gear, R W; Levine, J D

    2011-03-31

    When comparing a cumulative dose-response curve for endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced mechanical hyperalgesia to the effect of individual doses (1 ng, 10 ng, 100 ng, and 1 μg) administered in separate groups of rats, a marked difference was observed in the peak magnitude of hyperalgesia. Hyperalgesia was measured as decrease in the threshold for mechanically-induced withdrawal of the hind paw. The cumulative dosing protocol produced markedly greater maximum hyperalgesia. To determine whether this was due to the cumulative dosing protocol or to the repeated exposure to the mechanical test stimulus, we evaluated the impact of repeated testing on ET-1-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. While ET-1-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was dose- and time-dependent, repeated testing of nociceptive threshold, at 5 min intervals, following a single dose of ET-1, produced further decrease in nociceptive threshold. This mechanical stimulation-induced enhancement of ET-1 hyperalgesia lasted only 3-4 h, while the hyperalgesia lasted in excess of 5 days. The stimulation-enhanced hyperalgesia also occurred after a second injection of ET-1, administered 24 h after the initial dose. That this phenomenon is unique to ET-1 is suggested by the observation that while five additional, direct-acting hyperalgesic agents-prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), nerve growth factor (NGF), glia-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-induced robust mechanical hyperalgesia, none produced mechanical stimulation-enhanced hyperalgesia.

  4. Oxaliplatin elicits mechanical and cold allodynia in rodents via TRPA1 receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nassini, Romina; Gees, Maarten; Harrison, Selena; De Siena, Gaetano; Materazzi, Serena; Moretto, Nadia; Failli, Paola; Preti, Delia; Marchetti, Nicola; Cavazzini, Alberto; Mancini, Francesca; Pedretti, Pamela; Nilius, Bernd; Patacchini, Riccardo; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2011-07-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs cause neurotoxicity. In particular, oxaliplatin produces early-developing, painful, and cold-exacerbated paresthesias. However, the mechanism underlying these bothersome and dose-limiting adverse effects is unknown. We hypothesized that the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), a cation channel activated by oxidative stress and cold temperature, contributes to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity caused by oxaliplatin and cisplatin. Oxaliplatin and cisplatin evoked glutathione-sensitive relaxation, mediated by TRPA1 stimulation and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory nerve terminals in isolated guinea pig pulmonary arteries. No calcium response was observed in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons or in naïve Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to oxaliplatin or cisplatin. However, oxaliplatin, and with lower potency, cisplatin, evoked a glutathione-sensitive calcium response in CHO cells expressing mouse TRPA1. One single administration of oxaliplatin produced mechanical and cold hyperalgesia in rats, an effect selectively abated by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Oxaliplatin administration caused mechanical and cold allodynia in mice. Both responses were absent in TRPA1-deficient mice. Administration of cisplatin evoked mechanical allodynia, an effect that was reduced in TRPA1-deficient mice. TRPA1 is therefore required for oxaliplatin-evoked mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, and contributes to cisplatin-evoked mechanical allodynia. Channel activation is most likely caused by glutathione-sensitive molecules, including reactive oxygen species and their byproducts, which are generated after tissue exposure to platinum-based drugs from cells surrounding nociceptive nerve terminals.

  5. Maternal Separation Induces Orofacial Mechanical Allodynia in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, M; Shinoda, M; Honda, K; Fujita, M; Kawata, A; Nagashima, H; Watanabe, M; Shoji, N; Takahashi, O; Kimoto, S; Iwata, K

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that exposure to maternal separation (MS) in early life causes plastic changes in the nervous system in adulthood, occasionally resulting in ubiquitous chronic pain. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of pain hypersensitivity remain unclear. Here, the authors examined the involvement of corticosterone in orofacial mechanical hypersensitivity induced by MS. To establish a rat model of MS, pups were placed in isolated cages 180 min/d and kept in a temperature-controlled environment at 22 ± 2 °C for 14 d. Mechanical allodynia in the whisker pad skin in adulthood was induced by MS and was significantly suppressed by successive postnatal subcutaneous administration of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. Corticosterone levels were increased in the serum of MS rats, and successive postnatal administration of subcutaneous corticosterone to naive rats induced mechanical allodynia in the whisker pad skin. The number of P2X3 receptor-immunoreactive (P2X3R-IR) trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the whisker pad skin was significantly increased in MS rats and decreased following subcutaneous administration of mifepristone. The number of P2X3R-IR TG neurons innervating the whisker pad skin was also significantly increased following successive postnatal administration of subcutaneous corticosterone in naive rats. Moreover, the mechanical allodynia was suppressed 30 min after administration of the P2X3R antagonist A317491 to the whisker pad skin in MS rats. These findings suggest that the increase in P2X3R-IR TG neurons innervating the whisker pad skin via enhanced neonatal corticosterone signaling by MS plays an important role in orofacial mechanical allodynia in adulthood.

  6. Maternal Separation Induces Orofacial Mechanical Allodynia in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, M; Shinoda, M; Honda, K; Fujita, M; Kawata, A; Nagashima, H; Watanabe, M; Shoji, N; Takahashi, O; Kimoto, S; Iwata, K

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that exposure to maternal separation (MS) in early life causes plastic changes in the nervous system in adulthood, occasionally resulting in ubiquitous chronic pain. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of pain hypersensitivity remain unclear. Here, the authors examined the involvement of corticosterone in orofacial mechanical hypersensitivity induced by MS. To establish a rat model of MS, pups were placed in isolated cages 180 min/d and kept in a temperature-controlled environment at 22 ± 2 °C for 14 d. Mechanical allodynia in the whisker pad skin in adulthood was induced by MS and was significantly suppressed by successive postnatal subcutaneous administration of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. Corticosterone levels were increased in the serum of MS rats, and successive postnatal administration of subcutaneous corticosterone to naive rats induced mechanical allodynia in the whisker pad skin. The number of P2X3 receptor-immunoreactive (P2X3R-IR) trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the whisker pad skin was significantly increased in MS rats and decreased following subcutaneous administration of mifepristone. The number of P2X3R-IR TG neurons innervating the whisker pad skin was also significantly increased following successive postnatal administration of subcutaneous corticosterone in naive rats. Moreover, the mechanical allodynia was suppressed 30 min after administration of the P2X3R antagonist A317491 to the whisker pad skin in MS rats. These findings suggest that the increase in P2X3R-IR TG neurons innervating the whisker pad skin via enhanced neonatal corticosterone signaling by MS plays an important role in orofacial mechanical allodynia in adulthood. PMID:27474258

  7. Burn injury-induced mechanical allodynia is maintained by Rac1-regulated dendritic spine dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Samad, Omar A; Liu, Shujun; Bandaru, Samira; Zhao, Peng; Waxman, Stephen G

    2013-10-01

    Although nearly 11 million individuals yearly require medical treatment due to burn injuries and develop clinically intractable pain, burn injury-induced pain is poorly understood, with relatively few studies in preclinical models. To elucidate mechanisms of burn injury-induced chronic pain, we utilized a second-degree burn model, which produces a persistent neuropathic pain phenotype. Rats with burn injury exhibited reduced mechanical pain thresholds ipsilateral to the burn injury. Ipsilateral WDR neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn exhibited hyperexcitability in response to a range of stimuli applied to their hindpaw receptive fields. Because dendritic spine morphology is strongly associated with synaptic function and transmission, we profiled dendritic spine shape, density, and distribution of WDR neurons. Dendritic spine dysgenesis was observed on ipsilateral WDR neurons in burn-injured animals exhibiting behavioral and electrophysiological evidence of neuropathic pain. Heat hyperalgesia testing produced variable results, as expected from previous studies of this model of second-degree burn injury in rats. Administration of Rac1-inhibitor, NSC23766, attenuated dendritic spine dysgenesis, decreased mechanical allodynia and electrophysiological signs of burn-induced neuropathic pain. These results support two related implications: that the presence of abnormal dendritic spines contributes to the maintenance of neuropathic pain, and that therapeutic targeting of Rac1 signaling merits further investigation as a novel strategy for pain management after burn injury.

  8. Milnacipran inhibits oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia through spinal action in mice.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kitamura, Ryo; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether milnacipran, a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, would have therapeutic effect on oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg) induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection and almost completely subsided by day 20. Ten days post-oxaliplatin injection, the intraperitoneal administration of milnacipran (3-30 mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the established mechanical allodynia. Intrathecal injections of milnacipran (2.1-21 µg/site) also significantly and dose-dependently inhibited mechanical allodynia, but intracisternal and intracereboventricular injections at the same doses did not. The present results suggest that milnacipran is effective against oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and that the antiallodynic effect is mainly mediated by actions on the spinal cord. PMID:25744472

  9. Prokineticin 2 facilitates mechanical allodynia induced by α,β-methylene ATP in rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Gan, Xiong; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Rao, Zhiguo; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-11-15

    Prokineticin 2 (PK2), a new chemokine, causes mechanical hypersensitivity in the rat hind paw, but little is known about the molecular mechanism. Here, we have found that ionotropic P2X receptor is essential to mechanical allodynia induced by PK2. First, intraplantar injection of high dose (3 or 10 pmol) of PK2 significantly increased paw withdrawal response frequency (%) to innocuous mechanical stimuli (mechanical allodynia). And the mechanical allodynia induced by PK2 was prevented by co-administration of TNP-ATP, a selective P2X receptor antagonist. Second, although low dose (0.3 or 1 pmol) of PK2 itself did not produce an allodynic response, it significantly facilitated the mechanical allodynia evoked by intraplantar injection of α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP). Third, PK2 concentration-dependently potentiated α,β-meATP-activated currents in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Finally, PK2 receptors and intracellular signal transduction were involved in PK2 potentiation of α,β-meATP-induced mechanical allodynia and α,β-meATP-activated currents, since the potentiation were blocked by PK2 receptor antagonist PKRA and selective PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. These results suggested that PK2 facilitated mechanical allodynia induced by α,β-meATP through a mechanism involved in sensitization of cutaneous P2X receptors expressed by nociceptive nerve endings.

  10. The Major Brain Endocannabinoid 2-AG Controls Neuropathic Pain and Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica

    PubMed Central

    Pellkofer, Hannah L.; Havla, Joachim; Hauer, Daniela; Schelling, Gustav; Azad, Shahnaz C.; Kuempfel, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent myelitis is one of the predominant characteristics in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO). While paresis, visual loss, sensory deficits, and bladder dysfunction are well known symptoms in NMO patients, pain has been recognized only recently as another key symptom of the disease. Although spinal cord inflammation is a defining aspect of neuromyelitis, there is an almost complete lack of data on altered somatosensory function, including pain. Therefore, eleven consecutive patients with NMO were investigated regarding the presence and clinical characteristics of pain. All patients were examined clinically as well as by Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) following the protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS). Additionally, plasma endocannabinoid levels and signs of chronic stress and depression were determined. Almost all patients (10/11) suffered from NMO-associated neuropathic pain for the last three months, and 8 out of 11 patients indicated relevant pain at the time of examination. Symptoms of neuropathic pain were reported in the vast majority of patients with NMO. Psychological testing revealed signs of marked depression. Compared to age and gender-matched healthy controls, QST revealed pronounced mechanical and thermal sensory loss, strongly correlated to ongoing pain suggesting the presence of deafferentation-induced neuropathic pain. Thermal hyperalgesia correlated to MRI-verified signs of spinal cord lesion. Heat hyperalgesia was highly correlated to the time since last relapse of NMO. Patients with NMO exhibited significant mechanical and thermal dysesthesia, namely dynamic mechanical allodynia and paradoxical heat sensation. Moreover, they presented frequently with either abnormal mechanical hypoalgesia or hyperalgesia, which depended significantly on plasma levels of the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerole (2-AG). These data emphasize the high prevalence of neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia in patients

  11. Spinal mechanism of standard analgesics: evaluation using mouse models of allodynia.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Mina; Kiso, Tetsuo; Shimoshige, Yukinori; Aoki, Toshiaki; Matsuoka, Nobuya

    2010-05-25

    Spinal neurotransmission plays an important role in the perception of pain signaling. In the present study, we investigated the spinal anti-nociceptive mechanism of current standard analgesics in mouse models of tactile allodynia induced by intrathecal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and bicuculline. NMDA-induced allodynia is induced by postsynaptic NMDA receptor activation, while PGE2-induced allodynia is triggered by the enhancement of presynaptic glutamate release via EP1 receptor activation. In contrast, bicuculline induces allodynia by the blockade of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated inhibitory system. As the clinically available analgesics, pregabalin (alpha2delta-subunit calcium channel ligand), ziconotide (N-type calcium channel blocker), mexiletine (sodium channel blocker), and duloxetine (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors) were evaluated in these neurochemically-induced allodynia models. Pregabalin almost completely alleviated NMDA-, PGE2-, and bicuculline-induced allodynia. Despite being classified as an agent with a similar molecular target mechanism, ziconotide could only alleviate PGE2-induced allodynia, but not NMDA- or bicuculline-induced allodynia, as did mexiletine and duloxetine. These results taken together suggest that ziconotide, mexiletine, and duloxetine suppress spinal hyperactivity via the presynaptic site mechanism. In contrast, pregabalin could suppress via the downstream step during spinal hyperactivation such as postsynaptic NMDA activation or dysfunction of GABAergic control in addition to presynaptic mechanism. In conclusion, present findings provide implication that the spinal anti-nociceptive mechanistic site of pregabalin is different from that of ziconotide, mexiletine, and duloxetine, and pregabalin could have a broader anti-nociceptive mechanism other than N-type calcium channel blockade. PMID:20188724

  12. Peripheral Receptor Mechanisms Underlying Orofacial Muscle Pain and Hyperalgesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloman, Jami L.

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders (TMD) are severely debilitating and affect approximately 12% of the population. Identifying peripheral nociceptive mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia, a prominent feature of persistent muscle pain, could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. This study provides evidence of functional interactions between ligand-gated channels, P2X3 and TRPV1/TRPA1, in trigeminal sensory neurons, and proposes that these interactions underlie the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. In the masseter muscle, direct P2X3 activation, via the selective agonist αβmeATP, induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, or the TRPA1 antagonist, AP18. P2X3 was co-expressed with both TRPV1 and TRPA1 in masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Moreover, in a subpopulation of P2X3 /TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca2+ transients were significantly potentiated following P2X3 activation. Inhibition of Ca2+-dependent kinases, PKC and CaMKII, prevented P2X3-mechanical hyperalgesia whereas blockade of Ca2+-independent PKA did not. Finally, activation of P2X3 induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 minutes, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Similar data were obtained regarding another nonselective cation channel, the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Our data propose P2X3 and NMDARs interact with TRPV1 in a facilitatory manner, which could contribute to the peripheral sensitization underlying masseter hyperalgesia. This study offers novel mechanisms by which individual pro-nociceptive ligand

  13. Effects of Adjuvant Analgesics on Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Mechanical Allodynia.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Wataru; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain (CPSP), a potential sequela of stroke, is classified as neuropathic pain. Although we recently established a CPSP-like model in mice, the effects of adjuvant analgesics as therapeutic drugs for neuropathic pain in this model are unknown. Hence, the aim of the present study was to assess the usefulness of our model by evaluating the effects of adjuvant analgesics used for treating neuropathic pain in this mouse model of CPSP. Male ddY mice were subjected to 30 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). The development of hind paw mechanical allodynia was measured after BCAO using the von Frey test. The mechanical allodynia was significantly increased on day 3 after BCAO compared with that during the pre-BCAO assessment. BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by intraperitoneal injections of imipramine (a tricyclic antidepressant), mexiletine (an antiarrhythmic), gabapentin (an antiepileptic), or a subcutaneous injection of morphine (an opioid receptor agonist) compared with that following vehicle treatment in BCAO-mice. By contrast, milnacipran (a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor), paroxetine (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), carbamazepine (antiepileptic), and indomethacin (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) did not affect the BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia. Our results show that BCAO in mice may be useful as an animal model of CPSP. In addition, BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia may be suppressed by some adjuvant analgesics used to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:27150152

  14. Analgesic Effect of Photobiomodulation on Bothrops Moojeni Venom-Induced Hyperalgesia: A Mechanism Dependent on Neuronal Inhibition, Cytokines and Kinin Receptors Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Victoria Regina da Silva; Toniolo, Elaine Flamia; Feliciano, Regiane dos Santos; da Silva Jr., José Antonio; Zamuner, Stella Regina

    2016-01-01

    Background Envenoming induced by Bothrops snakebites is characterized by drastic local tissue damage that involves an intense inflammatory reaction and local hyperalgesia which are not neutralized by conventional antivenom treatment. Herein, the effectiveness of photobiomodulation to reduce inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by Bothrops moojeni venom (Bmv), as well as the mechanisms involved was investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Bmv (1 μg) was injected through the intraplantar route in the right hind paw of mice. Mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia were evaluated by von Frey filaments at different time points after venom injection. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) was applied at the site of Bmv injection at wavelength of red 685 nm with energy density of 2.2 J/cm2 at 30 min and 3 h after venom inoculation. Neuronal activation in the dorsal horn spinal cord was determined by immunohistochemistry of Fos protein and the mRNA expression of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, B1 and B2 kinin receptors were evaluated by Real time-PCR 6 h after venom injection. Photobiomodulation reversed Bmv-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia and decreased Fos expression, induced by Bmv as well as the mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-α and B1 and B2 kinin receptors. Finally, an increase on IL-10, was observed following LLLT. Conclusion/Significance These data demonstrate that LLLT interferes with mechanisms involved in nociception and hyperalgesia and modulates Bmv-induced nociceptive signal. The use of photobiomodulation in reducing local pain induced by Bothropic venoms should be considered as a novel therapeutic tool for the treatment of local symptoms induced after bothropic snakebites. PMID:27749899

  15. Contact Hypersensitivity to Oxazolone Provokes Vulvar Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martinov, Tijana; Glenn-Finer, Rose; Burley, Sarah; Tonc, Elena; Balsells, Evelyn; Ashbaugh, Alyssa; Swanson, Linnea; Daughters, Randy S.; Chatterjea, Devavani

    2013-01-01

    The interplay among pain, allergy and dysregulated inflammation promises to yield significant conceptual advances in immunology and chronic pain. Hapten-mediated contact hypersensitivity reactions are used to model skin allergies in rodents but have not been utilized to study associated changes in pain perception in the affected skin. Here we characterized changes in mechanical hyperalgesia in oxazolone-sensitized female mice challenged with single and repeated labiar skin exposure to oxazolone. Female mice were sensitized with topical oxazolone on their flanks and challenged 1-3 times on the labia. We then measured mechanical sensitivity of the vulvar region with an electronic pressure meter and evaluated expression of inflammatory genes, leukocyte influx and levels of innervation in the labiar tissue. Oxazolone-sensitized mice developed vulvar mechanical hyperalgesia after a single labiar oxazolone challenge. Hyperalgesia lasted up to 24 hours along with local influx of neutrophils, upregulation of inflammatory cytokine gene expression, and increased density of cutaneous labiar nerve fibers. Three daily oxazolone challenges produced vulvar mechanical hyperalgesic responses and increases in nerve density that were detectable up to 5 days post-challenge even after overt inflammation resolved. This persistent vulvar hyperalgesia is resonant with vulvodynia, an understudied chronic pain condition that is remarkably prevalent in 18-60 year-old women. An elevated risk for vulvodynia has been associated with a history of environmental allergies. Our pre-clinical model can be readily adapted to regimens of chronic exposures and long-term assessment of vulvar pain with and without concurrent inflammation to improve our understanding of mechanisms underlying subsets of vulvodynia and to develop new therapeutics for this condition. PMID:24205293

  16. Mechanical and cold allodynia in a rat spinal cord contusion model.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young Wook; Dong, Hongxin; Arends, Joop J A; Jacquin, Mark F

    2004-03-01

    This study examined the time course of mechanical and cold allodynia in rat hindpaw after spinal cord contusion. Hindpaw withdrawal threshold to graded von Frey hair stimulation and withdrawal frequency to acetone application were measured in rats subjected to contusions of varying severity, produced by a MASCIS impactor device with a 10 g weight dropped from 6.25, 12.5, or 25 mm. Mechanical and cold allodynia developed following the injury, and differences in the incidence of allodynia and in withdrawal threshold were significant among these groups. The least severe injury (6.25 mm) most consistently caused a decreased hindpaw threshold to mechanical stimulation and an increased withdrawal frequency to cold. PMID:15203971

  17. Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood or amniotic epithelial stem cells alleviates mechanical allodynia after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Roh, Dae-Hyun; Seo, Min-Soo; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Park, Sang-Bum; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), and a variety of different stem cell types have been grafted into humans suffering from spinal cord trauma or into animal models of spinal injury. Although several studies have reported functional motor improvement after transplantation of stem cells into injured spinal cord, the benefit of these cells for treating SCI-induced neuropathic pain is not clear. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of transplanting human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) or amniotic epithelial stem cells (hAESCs) on SCI-induced mechanical allodynia (MA) and thermal hyperalgesia (TH) in T13 spinal cord hemisected rats. Two weeks after SCI, hUCB-MSCs or hAESCs were transplanted around the spinal cord lesion site, and behavioral tests were performed to evaluate changes in SCI-induced MA and TH. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were also performed to evaluate possible therapeutic effects on SCI-induced inflammation and the nociceptive-related phosphorylation of the NMDA NR1 receptor subunit. While transplantation of hUCB-MSCs showed a tendency to reduce MA, transplantation of hAESCs significantly reduced MA. Neither hUCB-MSC nor hAESC transplantation had any effect on SCI-induced TH. Transplantation of hAESCs also significantly reduced the SCI-induced increase in NMDA receptor NR1 subunit phosphorylation (pNR1) expression in the spinal cord. Both hUCB-MSCs and hAESCs reduced the SCI-induced increase in spinal cord expression of the microglial marker, F4/80, but not the increased expression of GFAP or iNOS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the transplantation of hAESCs into the injured spinal cord can suppress mechanical allodynia, and this effect seems to be closely associated with the modulation of spinal cord microglia activity and NR1 phosphorylation.

  18. Comparison of mechanical allodynia and the affective component of inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Boyce-Rustay, Janel M; Zhong, Chengmin; Kohnken, Rebecca; Baker, Scott J; Simler, Gricelda H; Wensink, Erica J; Decker, Michael W; Honore, Prisca

    2010-02-01

    Most animal models of pain cannot separate the sensory and affective components of pain. One model that has been used to assess affective pain is the place escape avoidance paradigm (PEAP). The aim of the current study is two-fold. First, validate PEAP with Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation for the assessment of the affective component of pain using the reference analgesics celecoxib, diclofenac and duloxetine; fluoxetine and scopolamine were tested as negative controls. Secondly, determine if there is a difference in efficacy in PEAP in comparison to the effects of the same compounds on von Frey-evoked mechanical allodynia in CFA animals. All compounds were tested in mechanical allodynia, place escape/avoidance, and for potentially confounding side effects in locomotor activity. Results show that celecoxib, diclofenac, and duloxetine significantly increased the time spent on the side associated with stimulation of the injured paw, whereas fluoxetine and scopolamine had no effect. Higher doses of celecoxib, diclofenac, duloxetine, and fluoxetine were required to attenuate von Frey-evoked mechanical allodynia. In the side effect assays, only fluoxetine decreased locomotor activity at doses used in PEAP. These results show that in inflammatory pain induced by CFA injection, PEAP is more sensitive to the effects of pain relieving compounds than mechanical allodynia. Fluoxetine showed efficacy in the mechanical allodynia test, but not PEAP, whereas duloxetine showed efficacy in mechanical allodynia and PEAP. These studies show that methods other than reflex based measures of pain such as affective pain models could be more predictive of efficacy/potency in the clinic.

  19. An Improved Model of Heat-Induced Hyperalgesia—Repetitive Phasic Heat Pain Causing Primary Hyperalgesia to Heat and Secondary Hyperalgesia to Pinprick and Light Touch

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Florian; Magerl, Walter; May, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This study tested a modified experimental model of heat-induced hyperalgesia, which improves the efficacy to induce primary and secondary hyperalgesia and the efficacy-to-safety ratio reducing the risk of tissue damage seen in other heat pain models. Quantitative sensory testing was done in eighteen healthy volunteers before and after repetitive heat pain stimuli (60 stimuli of 48°C for 6 s) to assess the impact of repetitive heat on somatosensory function in conditioned skin (primary hyperalgesia area) and in adjacent skin (secondary hyperalgesia area) as compared to an unconditioned mirror image control site. Additionally, areas of flare and secondary hyperalgesia were mapped, and time course of hyperalgesia determined. After repetitive heat pain conditioning we found significant primary hyperalgesia to heat, and primary and secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick and to light touch (dynamic mechanical allodynia). Acetaminophen (800 mg) reduced pain to heat or pinpricks only marginally by 11% and 8%, respectively (n.s.), and had no effect on heat hyperalgesia. In contrast, the areas of flare (−31%) and in particular of secondary hyperalgesia (−59%) as well as the magnitude of hyperalgesia (−59%) were significantly reduced (all p<0.001). Thus, repetitive heat pain induces significant peripheral sensitization (primary hyperalgesia to heat) and central sensitization (punctate hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia). These findings are relevant to further studies using this model of experimental heat pain as it combines pronounced peripheral and central sensitization, which makes a convenient model for combined pharmacological testing of analgesia and anti-hyperalgesia mechanisms related to thermal and mechanical input. PMID:24911787

  20. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents.

  1. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents. PMID:26804251

  2. Effects of repeated milnacipran and fluvoxamine treatment on mechanical allodynia in a mouse paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain model.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Soh; Sato, Kazuma; Yagi, Tomomi; Kishikawa, Yukinaga; Nakamura, Hitoshi

    2013-04-01

    Paclitaxel is widely used in cancer chemotherapy for the treatment of solid tumors, but it frequently causes peripheral neuropathy. Milnacipran, a serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor and fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, have shown efficacy against several chronic pain syndromes. In this study, we investigated the attenuation of paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia in mice by milnacipran and fluvoxamine. Paclitaxel was administered once per day (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) for 5 days to mice. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated by measuring the withdrawal response to stimulation with a von Frey filament. In paclitaxel-treated mice, mechanical allodynia was observed on days 3-15 of paclitaxel administration. A single administration of milnacipran (20 mg/kg, i.p.) or fluvoxamine (40 mg/kg, i.p.) had no effect on paclitaxel- induced mechanical allodynia. However, repeated administration of milnacipran (10, 20 mg/kg, once per day, i.p.) for 5 days significantly reduced paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. In contrast, repeated fluvoxamine administration (40 mg/kg, once per day, i.p.) for 5 days resulted in a weak attenuation of paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that chronic paclitaxel administration induces mechanical allodynia, and that repeated milnacipran administration may be an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain caused by paclitaxel treatment for cancer.

  3. Peripherally injected linalool and bergamot essential oil attenuate mechanical allodynia via inhibiting spinal ERK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kuwahata, Hikari; Komatsu, Takaaki; Katsuyama, Soh; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Shinobu; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Takahama, Kazuo

    2013-02-01

    Bergamot essential oil (BEO) is one of the most common essential oil containing linalool and linalyl acetate as major volatile components. This study investigated the effect of intraplantar (i.pl.) bergamot essential oil (BEO) or linalool on neuropathic hypersensitivity induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) in mice. The i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool into the ipsilateral hindpaw to PSNL reduced PSNL-induced mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. Peripheral (i.pl.) injection of BEO or linalool into the contralateral hindpaw did not yield anti-allodynic effects, suggesting a local anti-mechanical allodynic effect of BEO or linalool in PSNL mice. Anti-mechanical hypersensitivity of morphine was enhanced by the combined injection of BEO or linalool at an ineffective dose when injected alone. We also examined the possible involvement of spinal extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) in BEO or linalool-induced anti-mechanical allodynia. In western blotting analysis, i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool resulted in a significant blockade of spinal ERK activation induced by PSNL. These results suggest that i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool may reduce PSNL-induced mechanical allodynia followed by decreasing spinal ERK activation.

  4. Insular cortex representation of dynamic mechanical allodynia in trigeminal neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Pedro; Dieb, Wisam; Hafidi, Aziz; Voisin, Daniel L; Dallel, Radhouane

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical allodynia is a widespread symptom of neuropathic pain for which mechanisms are still poorly understood. The present study investigated the organization of dynamic mechanical allodynia processing in the rat insular cortex after chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (IoN-CCI). Two weeks after unilateral IoN-CCI, rats showed a dramatic bilateral trigeminal dynamic mechanical allodynia. Light, moving stroking of the infraorbital skin resulted in strong, bilateral upregulation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation (pERK-1/2) in the insular cortex of IoN-CCI animals but not sham rats, in whose levels were similar to those of unstimulated IoN-CCI rats. pERK-1/2 was located in neuronal cells only. Stimulus-evoked pERK-1/2 immunopositive cell bodies displayed rostrocaudal gradient and layer selective distribution in the insula, being predominant in the rostral insula and in layers II-III of the dysgranular and to a lesser extent, of the agranular insular cortex. In layers II-III of the rostral dysgranular insular cortex, intense pERK also extended into distal dendrites, up to layer I. These results demonstrate that trigeminal nerve injury induces a significant alteration in the insular cortex processing of tactile stimuli and suggest that ERK phosphorylation contributes to the mechanisms underlying abnormal pain perception under this condition.

  5. Intact cutaneous C fibre afferent properties in mechanical and cold neuropathic allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, Richard; Wynick, David; Donaldson, Lucy F.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with neuropathy, report changes in sensory perception, particularly mechanical and thermal allodynia, and spontaneous pain. Similar sensory changes are seen in experimental neuropathies, in which alteration in primary afferent properties can also be determined. The neural correlate of spontaneous pain is ongoing activity in sensory afferents. Mechanical and heat allodynia are thought to result from lowered activation thresholds in primary afferent and/or central neurones, but the mechanisms underlying cold allodynia are very poorly understood. We investigated nociceptive behaviours and the properties of C and A fibre intact afferents running adjacent to damaged afferents following a partial ligation injury of the saphenous nerve (PSNI). Animals developed mechanical and cold allodynia by 3 days after PSNI. Intact mechanosensitive C fibre afferents developed ongoing activity, and had slower conduction velocities 3 and 7 days following nerve injury, with no change in mechanical threshold. There was a large increase (∼46-fold) in calculated afferent input 3 days after nerve injury, as a result of the ongoing activity in these fibres. Mechano-cooling-sensitive C fibre afferents showed both enhanced cooling-evoked firing, and increased ongoing activity. The afferent barrage associated with mechano-cooling-sensitive afferents was increased 26-fold 7 days after nerve injury. We observed no differences in the properties of intact A fibre mechanosensitive afferents. These studies demonstrate for the first time that the altered nociception seen after PSNI is associated with ongoing activity and enhanced cooling-evoked activity in intact C fibre afferents in the saphenous nerve, with no concurrent alteration in A fibre afferents. PMID:19942464

  6. Inhibition of mechanical allodynia in neuropathic pain by TLR5-mediated A-fiber blockade

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Kim, Yong Ho; Bang, Sangsu; Zhang, Yi; Berta, Temugin; Wang, Fan; Oh, Seog Bae; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Mechanical allodynia, induced by normally innocuous low-threshold mechanical stimulation, represents a cardinal feature of neuropathic pain. Blockade or ablation of high-threshold small-diameter unmyelinated C-fibers has limited effects on mechanical allodynia1–4. While large myelinated A-fibers, in particular Aβ-fibers, have previously been implicated in mechanical allodynia5–7, an A-fiber-selective pharmacological blocker is still lacking. Here we report a new method for targeted silencing of A-fibers in neuropathic pain. We found that Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) is co-expressed with neurofilament-200 in large-diameter A-fiber neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Activation of TLR5 with its ligand flagellin results in neuronal entry of the membrane impermeable lidocaine derivative QX-314, leading to TLR5-dependent blockade of sodium currents predominantly in A-fiber neurons of mouse DRGs. Intraplantar co-application of flagellin and QX-314 (flagellin/QX-314) dose-dependently suppressed mechanical allodynia following chemotherapy, nerve injury, and diabetic neuropathy, but this blockade is abrogated in Tlr5-deficient mice. In vivo electrophysiology demonstrated that flagellin/QX-314 co-application selectively suppressed Aβ-fiber conduction in naive and chemotherapy-treated mice. TLR5-mediated Aβ blockade but not capsaicin-mediated C-fiber blockade also reduced chemotherapy-induced ongoing pain without impairing motor function. Finally, flagellin/QX-314 co-application suppressed sodium currents in large-diameter human DRG neurons. Thus, our findings provide a new tool for targeted silencing of Aβ-fibers and neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:26479925

  7. Persistent At-Level Thermal Hyperalgesia and Tactile Allodynia Accompany Chronic Neuronal and Astrocyte Activation in Superficial Dorsal Horn following Mouse Cervical Contusion Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Jaime L.; Hala, Tamara J.; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Sannie, Daniel; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, sensory abnormalities, including neuropathic pain, often result from traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI can induce cellular changes in the CNS, termed central sensitization, that alter excitability of spinal cord neurons, including those in the dorsal horn involved in pain transmission. Persistently elevated levels of neuronal activity, glial activation, and glutamatergic transmission are thought to contribute to the hyperexcitability of these dorsal horn neurons, which can lead to maladaptive circuitry, aberrant pain processing and, ultimately, chronic neuropathic pain. Here we present a mouse model of SCI-induced neuropathic pain that exhibits a persistent pain phenotype accompanied by chronic neuronal hyperexcitability and glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. We generated a unilateral cervical contusion injury at the C5 or C6 level of the adult mouse spinal cord. Following injury, an increase in the number of neurons expressing ΔFosB (a marker of chronic neuronal activation), persistent astrocyte activation and proliferation (as measured by GFAP and Ki67 expression), and a decrease in the expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter GLT1 are observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn of cervical spinal cord. These changes have previously been associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to altered pain transmission and chronic neuropathic pain. In our model, they are accompanied by robust at-level hyperaglesia in the ipsilateral forepaw and allodynia in both forepaws that are evident within two weeks following injury and persist for at least six weeks. Furthermore, the pain phenotype occurs in the absence of alterations in forelimb grip strength, suggesting that it represents sensory and not motor abnormalities. Given the importance of transgenic mouse technology, this clinically-relevant model provides a resource that can be used to study the molecular mechanisms contributing to neuropathic pain

  8. Unique action mechanisms of tramadol in global cerebral ischemia-induced mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Wataru; Kageyama, Erika; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-06-15

    Central poststroke pain is associated with specific somatosensory abnormalities, such as neuropathic pain syndrome. Although central poststroke pain is a serious condition, details pertaining to underlying mechanisms are not well established, making current standard treatments only partially effective. Here, we assessed the effects of tramadol, an analgesic drug mediated by opioid receptors, using a mouse model of global cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion (30 min) in male ddY mice. Development of hind-paw mechanical allodynia was measured 3 days after bilateral carotid artery occlusion using the von Frey test. Mechanical allodynia was significantly and dose dependently suppressed by intraperitoneal tramadol (10 or 20 mg/kg). These effects, which peaked at 10 min and continued for at least 60 min, were inhibited by naloxone (nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Tramadol antinociception was significantly negated by β-funaltrexamine (selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist, 20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), but not naltrindole (selective δ-opioid receptor antagonist, 5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) or nor-binaltorphimine (selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) after 5 min, by β-funaltrexamine and nor-binaltorphimine but not naltrindole after 10 min, and by all selective opioid receptor antagonists at 15 and 30 min after tramadol treatment. These results suggested that antinociception induced by tramadol through various opioid receptors was time dependent. Furthermore, it is possible that the opioid receptors involved in tramadol-induced antinociception change over time with the metabolism of this drug.

  9. Evaluation of milnacipran, in comparison with amitriptyline, on cold and mechanical allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Berrocoso, Esther; Mico, Juan-Antonio; Vitton, Olivier; Ladure, Philippe; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Depoortère, Ronan; Bardin, Laurent

    2011-03-25

    Milnacipran, a serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), has shown efficacy against several chronic pain conditions, including fibromyalgia. Here, we evaluated, in rats, its anti-allodynic effects following acute or sub-chronic treatment in a model of neuropathic pain (chronic constriction injury, CCI, of the sciatic nerve). Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant active pre-clinically and clinically against neuropathic pains, was added as a comparison compound. Upon acute i.p. administration, milnacipran was potently efficacious in the CCI model. It significantly reduced thermal allodynia in the cold (4°C) plate test (MED=2.5mg/kg), and attenuated mechanical allodynia in the von Frey filaments test (MED=10mg/kg). Given sub-chronically (7day, b.i.d.), milnacipran was effective at 10mg/kgi.p. in both tests. Acute amitriptyline (10mg/kgi.p.) was efficacious against mechanical, but less so against cold allodynia; under sub-chronic conditions, it was only active against mechanical allodynia. These data show that milnacipran is as efficacious as the reference compound amitriptyline in a pre-clinical model of injury-induced neuropathy, and demonstrate for the first time that it is active acutely and sub-chronically against cold allodynia. They also suggest that milnacipran has the potential to alleviate allodynia associated with nerve compression-induced neuropathic pain in the clinic (for example following discal hernia, avulsion or cancer-induced tissue damage). PMID:21277295

  10. Huperzine A Alleviates Mechanical Allodynia but Not Spontaneous Pain via Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhen-Xing; Wang, Yong-Jie; Liu, Li; Wang, Yiner; Mei, Shu-Hao; Feng, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Maode; Li, Xiang-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a major health issue and most patients suffer from spontaneous pain. Previous studies suggest that Huperzine A (Hup A), an alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herb Huperzia serrata, is a potent analgesic with few side effects. However, whether it alleviates spontaneous pain is unclear. We evaluated the effects of Hup A on spontaneous pain in mice using the conditioned place preference (CPP) behavioral assay and found that application of Hup A attenuated the mechanical allodynia induced by peripheral nerve injury or inflammation. This effect was blocked by atropine. However, clonidine but not Hup A induced preference for the drug-paired chamber in CPP. The same effects occurred when Hup A was infused into the anterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, ambenonium chloride, a competitive inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, also increased the paw-withdrawal threshold but failed to induce place preference in CPP. Therefore, our data suggest that acetylcholinesterase in both the peripheral and central nervous systems is involved in the regulation of mechanical allodynia but not the spontaneous pain. PMID:26697233

  11. Ethnocultural allodynia.

    PubMed

    Comas-Díaz, L; Jacobsen, F M

    2001-01-01

    The authors introduce and define ethnocultural allodynia as an abnormally increased sensitivity to relatively innocuous or neutral stimuli resulting from previous exposure to painful culturally based situations. Ethnocultural, gender-specific, and cognitive-behavioral techniques are used in clinical vignettes to illustrate the pervasive ethnic, racial, and gender effects of ethnocultural allodynia in the lives of people of color. Therapy components for the treatment of ethnocultural allodynia are described, including psychoeducation regarding racism and its sequelae, racial socialization, inoculation, and racial stress management.

  12. Goshajinkigan reduces bortezomib-induced mechanical allodynia in rats: Possible involvement of kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hitomi; Yamamoto, Shota; Ushio, Soichiro; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Egashira, Nobuaki

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of a Kampo medicine Goshajinkigan (GJG) on the bortezomib-induced mechanical allodynia in von Frey test in rats. The single administration of tramadol (10 mg/kg), GJG (1.0 g/kg) and its component processed Aconiti tuber (0.1 g/kg) significantly reversed the reduction in withdrawal threshold by bortezomib. These effects were abolished by the intrathecal injection of nor-binaltorphimine (10 μg/body), kappa opioid receptor antagonist. These findings suggest that kappa opioid receptor is involved in the effect of GJG on the bortezomib-induced mechanical allodynia.

  13. Mechanisms mediating nitroglycerin-induced delayed-onset hyperalgesia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Levine, J D; Green, P G

    2016-03-11

    Nitroglycerin (glycerol trinitrate, GTN) induces headache in migraineurs, an effect that has been used both diagnostically and in the study of the pathophysiology of this neurovascular pain syndrome. An important feature of this headache is a delay from the administration of GTN to headache onset that, because of GTN's very rapid metabolism, cannot be due to its pharmacokinetic profile. It has recently been suggested that activation of perivascular mast cells, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine, may contribute to this delay. We reported that hyperalgesia induced by intradermal GTN has a delay to onset of ∼ 30 min in male and ∼ 45 min in female rats. This hyperalgesia was greater in females, was prevented by pretreatment with the anti-migraine drug, sumatriptan, as well as by chronic pretreatment with the mast cell degranulator, compound 48/80. The acute administration of GTN and compound 48/80 both induced hyperalgesia that was prevented by pretreatment with octoxynol-9, which attenuates endothelial function, suggesting that GTN and mast cell-mediated hyperalgesia are endothelial cell-dependent. Furthermore, A-317491, a P2X3 antagonist, which inhibits endothelial cell-dependent hyperalgesia, also prevents GTN and mast cell-mediated hyperalgesia. We conclude that delayed-onset mechanical hyperalgesia induced by GTN is mediated by activation of mast cells, which in turn release mediators that stimulate endothelial cells to release ATP, to act on P2X3, a ligand-gated ion channel, in perivascular nociceptors. A role of the mast and endothelial cell in GTN-induced hyperalgesia suggests potential novel risk factors and targets for the treatment of migraine.

  14. ASIC3 in muscle mediates mechanical, but not heat, hyperalgesia associated with muscle inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sluka, Kathleen A; Radhakrishnan, Rajan; Benson, Christopher J; Eshcol, Jayasheel O; Price, Margaret P; Babinski, Kazimierz; Audette, Katherine M; Yeomans, David C; Wilson, Steven P

    2007-05-01

    Peripheral initiators of muscle pain are virtually unknown, but likely key to development of chronic pain after muscle insult. The current study tested the hypothesis that ASIC3 in muscle is necessary for development of cutaneous mechanical, but not heat, hyperalgesia induced by muscle inflammation. Using mechanical and heat stimuli, we assessed behavioral responses in ASIC3-/- and ASIC3+/+ mice after induction of carrageenan muscle inflammation. ASIC3-/- mice did not develop cutaneous mechanical hyperalgesia after muscle inflammation when compared to ASIC3+/+ mice; heat hyperalgesia developed similarly between groups. We then tested if the phenotype could be rescued in ASIC3-/- mice by using a recombinant herpes virus vector to express ASIC3 in skin (where testing occurred) or muscle (where inflammation occurred). Infection of mouse DRG neurons with ASIC3-encoding virus resulted in functional expression of ASICs. Injection of ASIC3-encoding virus into muscle or skin of ASIC3-/- mice resulted in ASIC3 mRNA in DRG and protein expression in DRG and the peripheral injection site. Injection of ASIC3-encoding virus into muscle, but not skin, resulted in development of mechanical hyperalgesia similar to that observed in ASIC3+/+ mice. Thus, ASIC3 in primary afferent fibers innervating muscle is critical to development of hyperalgesia that results from muscle insult.

  15. ASIC3 in muscle mediates mechanical, but not heat, hyperalgesia associated with muscle inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sluka, Kathleen A.; Radhakrishnan, Rajan; Benson, Christopher J.; Eshcol, Jayasheel O.; Price, Margaret P.; Babinski, Kazimierz; Audette, Katherine M.; Yeomans, David C.; Wilson, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral initiators of muscle pain are virtually unknown, but likely key to development of chronic pain after muscle insult. The current study tested the hypothesis that ASIC3 in muscle is necessary for development of cutaneous mechanical, but not heat hyperalgesia induced by muscle inflammation. Using mechanical and heat stimuli, we assessed behavioral responses in ASIC3−/− and ASIC3+/+ mice after induction of carrageenan muscle inflammation. ASIC3−/−mice did not develop cutaneous mechanical hyperalgesia after muscle inflammation when compared to ASIC3+/+ mice; heat hyperalgesia developed similarly between groups. We then tested if the phenotype could be rescued in ASIC3−/− mice by using a recombinant herpes virus vector to express ASIC3 in skin (where testing occurred) or muscle (where inflammation occurred). Infection of mouse DRG neurons with ASIC3-encoding virus resulted in functional expression of ASICs. Injection of ASIC3-encoding virus into muscle or skin of ASIC3−/− mice resulted in ASIC3 mRNA in DRG and protein expression in DRG and the peripheral injection site. Injection of ASIC3-encoding virus into muscle, but not skin, resulted in development of mechanical hyperalgesia similar to that observed in ASIC3+/+ mice. Thus, ASIC3 in primary afferent fibers innervating muscle is critical to development of hyperalgesia that results from muscle insult. PMID:17134831

  16. Intraplantar PGE2 causes nociceptive behaviour and mechanical allodynia: the role of prostanoid E receptors and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Kassuya, C A L; Ferreira, J; Claudino, R F; Calixto, J B

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Receptor subtypes involved in PGE2-induced nociception are still controversial. The present study investigated the prostanoid E receptor (EP) subtypes and the protein kinase (PK) pathways involved in the nociception induced by PGE2 injection in the mouse paw. Experimental approach: Paw-licking and mechanical allodynia were measured in vivo and protein kinase activation ex vivo by Western blots of extracts of paw skin. Key results: Intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of PGE2 into the mouse paw caused nociceptive behaviour of short duration with mean ED50 of 1.43 nmol. PGE2 produced a longer-lasting mechanical allodynia, with an ED50 of 0.05 nmol. Intraplantar injection of antagonists at EP3 or EP4, but not at EP1 or EP2 receptors inhibited PGE2-induced paw-licking. Paw-licking caused by PGE2 was blocked by an inhibitor of PKA but only partially decreased by inhibition of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK). Selective inhibitors of PKC, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or p38, all failed to affect PGE2-induced paw-licking. An EP3 antagonist inhibited PGE2-induced mechanical allodynia. However, inhibitors of PKA, PKC or ERK, but not p38 or JNK, also partially inhibited PGE2-induced mechanical allodynia. Western blot analyses confirmed that i.pl. injection of PGE2 activated PKA, PKCα, and mitogen activated kinases (MAPKs) in the paw. Co-treatment with EP3 or EP4 receptor antagonists reduced PGE2-induced PKA and ERK, but not PKCα activation. Conclusions and Implications: The present results indicate that the nociceptive behaviour and mechanical allodynia caused by i.pl. PGE2 are mediated through activation of distinct EP receptors and PK-dependent mechanisms. PMID:17310141

  17. Spinally administered dynorphin A produces long-lasting allodynia: involvement of NMDA but not opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, T M; Vanderah, T W; Lashbrook, J; Nichols, M L; Ossipov, M; Porreca, F; Wilcox, G L

    1997-08-01

    The endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin A has non-opioid effects that can damage the spinal cord when given in high doses. Dynorphin has been shown to increase the receptive field size of spinal cord neurons and facilitate C-fiber-evoked reflexes. Furthermore, endogenous dynorphin levels increase following damage to the spinal cord, injury to peripheral nerves, or inflammation. In this study, sensory processing was characterized following a single, intrathecal injection of dynorphin A (1-17) in mice. A single intrathecal injection of dynorphin A (1-17) (3 nmol, i.t.) induced mechanical allodynia (hind paw, von Frey filaments) lasting 70 days, tactile allodynia (paint brush applied to flank) lasting 14 days, and cold allodynia (acetone applied to the dorsal hind paw) lasting 7 days. Similarly, dynorphin A (2-17) (3 nmol, i.t.), a non-opioid peptide, induced cold and tactile allodynia analogous to that induced by dynorphin A (1-17), indicating the importance of non-opioid receptors. Pretreatment with the NMDA antagonists, MK-801 and LY235959, but not the opioid antagonist, naloxone, blocked the induction of allodynia. Post-treatment with MK-801 only transiently blocked the dynorphin-induced allodynia, suggesting the NMDA receptors may be involved in the maintenance of allodynia as well as its induction. We have induced a long-lasting state of allodynia and hyperalgesia by a single intrathecal injection of dynorphin A (1-17) in mice. The allodynia induced by dynorphin required NMDA receptors rather than opioid receptors. This result is consistent with results in rats and with signs of clinically observed neuropathic pain. This effect of exogenously administered dynorphin raises the possibility that increased levels of endogenous dynorphins associated with spinal cord injuries may participate in the genesis and maintenance of neuropathic pain. PMID:9272810

  18. Astrocytes are involved in trigeminal dynamic mechanical allodynia: potential role of D-serine.

    PubMed

    Dieb, W; Hafidi, A

    2013-09-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain affects millions of people worldwide. Despite decades of study on the neuronal processing of pain, mechanisms underlying enhanced pain states after injury remain unclear. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent changes play a critical role in triggering central sensitization in neuropathic pain. These receptors are regulated at the glycine site through a mandatory endogenous co-agonist D-serine, which is synthesized by astrocytes. Therefore, the present study was carried out to determine whether astrocytes are involved, through D-serine secretion, in dynamic mechanical allodynia (DMA) obtained after chronic constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-IoN) in rats. Two weeks after CCI-IoN, an important reaction of astrocytes was present in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as revealed by an up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in allodynic rats. In parallel, an increase in D-serine synthesis, which co-localized with its synthesis enzyme serine racemase, was strictly observed in astrocytes. Blocking astrocyte metabolism by intracisternal delivery of fluorocitrate alleviated DMA. Furthermore, the administration of D-amino-acid oxidase (DAAO), a D-serine-degrading enzyme, or that of L-serine O-sulfate (LSOS), a serine racemase inhibitor, significantly decreased pain behavior in allodynic rats. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are involved in the modulation of orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain via the release of the gliotransmitter D-serine.

  19. Systemic Administration of Propentofylline, Ibudilast, and (+)-Naltrexone Each Reverses Mechanical Allodynia in a Novel Rat Model of Central Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Amanda; Wieseler, Julie; Favret, Jacob; Johnson, Kirk W.; Rice, Kenner C.; Maier, Steven F.; Falci, Scott; Watkins, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    Central neuropathic pain (CNP) is a debilitating consequence of central nervous system (CNS) damage for which current treatments are ineffective. To explore mechanisms underlying CNP, we developed a rat model involving T13/L1 dorsal root avulsion. The resultant dorsal horn damage creates bilateral below-level (L4-6) mechanical allodynia. This allodynia, termed spinal neuropathic avulsion pain (SNAP), occurs in the absence of confounding paralysis. To characterize this model, we undertook a series of studies aimed at defining whether SNAP could be reversed by any of 3 putative glial activation inhibitors, each with distinct mechanisms of action. Indeed, the phosphodiesterase inhibitor propentofylline, the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) inhibitor ibudilast, and the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist (+)-naltrexone each reversed below-level allodynia bilaterally. Strikingly, none of these impacted SNAP upon first administration but required 1–2 wk of daily administration before pain reversal was obtained. Given reversal of CNP by each of these glial modulatory agents, these results suggest that glia contribute to the maintenance of such pain and enduring release of MIF and endogenous agonists of TLR4 is important for sustaining CNP. The markedly delayed efficacy of all 3 glial modulatory drugs may prove instructive for interpretation of apparent drug failures after shorter dosing regimens. PMID:24412802

  20. Lesion of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway induces trigeminal dynamic mechanical allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Dieb, Wisam; Ouachikh, Omar; Durif, Franck; Hafidi, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain constitutes the major non motor syndrome in Parkinson's disease (PD) and includes neuropathic pain; however current drug therapies used to alleviate it have only limited efficacy. This is probably due to poor understanding of the mechanisms underlying it. Aims We investigated a major class of trigeminal neuropathic pain, dynamic mechanical allodynia (DMA), in a rat model of PD and in which a bilateral 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) injection was administered to produce a lesion of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Results and discussion Lesioned animals presented significant DMA in the orofacial area that occurred from 4 days to 5 weeks post-injury. To investigate a segmental implication in the neuropathic pain induced by dopamine depletion, the expression of the isoform gamma of the protein kinase C (PKCg) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (pERK1/2) was explored in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH). There was a high increase in PKCg expression in the III and IIi laminae of the MDH of lesioned-animals compared to shams. pERK1/2 expression was also significantly high in the ipsilateral MDH of lesioned rats in response to non-noxious tactile stimulus of the orofacial region. Since pERK1/2 is expressed only in response to nociceptive stimuli in the dorsal spinal horn, the current study demonstrates that non-noxious stimuli evoke allodynic response. Intraperitoneal and intracisternal administrations of bromocriptine, a dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) agonist, significantly decreased DMA compared to control rats injected with saline. These data demonstrate for the first time that nigrostriatal dopaminergic depletion produces trigeminal neuropathic pain that at least involves a segmental mechanism. In addition, bromocriptine was shown to have a remarkable analgesic effect on this neuropathic pain symptom. PMID:24944866

  1. Dynamic mechanical assessment of muscle hyperalgesia in humans: The dynamic algometer

    PubMed Central

    Finocchietti, Sara; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is often associated with a nonhomogeneous distribution of mechanical hyperalgesia. Consequently, new methods able to detect this distribution are needed. OBJECTIVE: To develop and test a new method for assessing muscle hyperalgesia with high temporal and spatial resolution that provides complementary information compared with information obtained by traditional static pressure algometry. METHODS: The dynamic pressure algometer was tested bilaterally on the tibialis anterior muscle in 15 healthy subjects and compared with static pressure algometry. The device consisted of a wheel that was rolled over the muscle tissue with a fixed velocity and different predefined forces. The pain threshold force was determined and pain intensity to a fixed-force stimulation was continuously rated on a visual analogue scale while the wheel was rolling over the muscle. The pressure pain sensitivity was evaluated before, during, and after muscle pain and hyperalgesia induced unilaterally by either injection of hypertonic saline (0.5 mL, 6%) into the tibialis anterior or eccentric exercise evoking delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). RESULTS: The intraclass correlation coefficient was >0.88 for the dynamic thresholds; thus, the method was reliable. Compared with baseline, both techniques detected hyperalgesia at the saline injection site and during DOMS (P<0.05). The dynamic algometer also detected the widespread, patchy distribution of sensitive loci during DOMS, which was difficult to evaluate using static pressure algometry. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The present study showed that dynamic pressure algometry is a reliable tool for evaluating muscle hyperalgesia (threshold and pain rating) with high temporal and spatial resolution. It can be applied as a simple clinical bed-side test and as a quantitative tool in pharmacological profiling studies. PMID:25664539

  2. Activation of medullary dorsal horn γ isoform of protein kinase C interneurons is essential to the development of both static and dynamic facial mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Pham-Dang, Nathalie; Descheemaeker, Amélie; Dallel, Radhouane; Artola, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The γ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCγ), which is concentrated in a specific class of interneurons within inner lamina II (IIi ) of the spinal dorsal horn and medullary dorsal horn (MDH), is known to be involved in the development of mechanical allodynia, a widespread and intractable symptom of inflammatory or neuropathic pain. However, although genetic and pharmacological impairment of PKCγ were shown to prevent mechanical allodynia in animal models of pain, after nerve injury or reduced inhibition, the functional consequences of PKCγ activation alone on mechanical sensitivity are still unknown. Using behavioural and anatomical approaches in the rat MDH, we tested whether PKCγ activation in naive animals is sufficient for the establishment of mechanical allodynia. Intracisternal injection of the phorbol ester, 12,13-dibutyrate concomitantly induced static as well as dynamic facial mechanical allodynia. Monitoring neuronal activity within the MDH with phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 immunoreactivity revealed that activation of both lamina I-outer lamina II and IIi -outer lamina III neurons, including lamina IIi PKCγ-expressing interneurons, was associated with the manifestation of mechanical allodynia. Phorbol ester, 12,13-dibutyrate-induced mechanical allodynia and associated neuronal activations were all prevented by inhibiting selectively segmental PKCγ with KIG31-1. Our findings suggest that PKCγ activation, without any other experimental manipulation, is sufficient for the development of static and dynamic mechanical allodynia. Lamina IIi PKCγ interneurons have been shown to be directly activated by low-threshold mechanical inputs carried by myelinated afferents. Thus, the level of PKCγ activation within PKCγ interneurons might gate the transmission of innocuous mechanical inputs to lamina I, nociceptive output neurons, thus turning touch into pain.

  3. Melatonin Alters the Mechanical and Thermal Hyperalgesia Induced by Orofacial Pain Model in Rats.

    PubMed

    Scarabelot, Vanessa Leal; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; de Oliveira, Carla; Adachi, Lauren Naomi Spezia; de Macedo, Isabel Cristina; Cioato, Stefania Giotti; de Freitas, Joice S; de Souza, Andressa; Quevedo, Alexandre; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is a neuroendocrine hormone that presents a wide range of physiological functions including regulating circadian rhythms and sleep, enhancing immune function, sleep improvement, and antioxidant effects. In addition, melatonin has received special attention in pain treatment since it is effective and presents few adverse effects. In this study, we evaluated the effect of acute dose of melatonin upon hyperalgesia induced by complete Freund's adjuvant in a chronic orofacial pain model in Sprague-Dawley rats. Nociceptive behavior was assessed by facial Von Frey and the hot plate tests at baseline and thereafter 30, 60, and 120 min, 24 h, and 7 days after melatonin treatment. We demonstrated that acute melatonin administration alters mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by an orofacial pain model (TMD), highlighting that the melatonin effect upon mechanical hyperalgesia remained until 7 days after its administration. Besides, we observed specific tissue profiles of neuroimmunomodulators linked to pain conditions and/or melatonin effect (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, and interleukins 6 and 10) in the brainstem levels, and its effects were state-dependent of the baseline of these animals. PMID:27378529

  4. Effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid treatment over mechanical allodynia and depressive-like behavior associated with experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Redivo, Daiany D B; Schreiber, Anne K; Adami, Eliana R; Ribeiro, Deidiane E; Joca, Samia R L; Zanoveli, Janaína M; Cunha, Joice M

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain and depression are very common comorbidities in diabetic patients. As the pathophysiological mechanisms are very complex and multifactorial, current treatments are only symptomatic and often worsen the glucose control. Thus, the search for more effective treatments are extremely urgent. In this way, we aimed to investigate the effect of chronic treatment with fish oil (FO), a source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, over the mechanical allodynia and in depressive-like behaviors in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. It was observed that the diabetic (DBT) animals, when compared to normoglycemic (NGL) animals, developed a significant mechanical allodynia since the second week after diabetes induction, peaking at fourth week which is completely prevented by FO treatment (0.5, 1 or 3g/kg). Moreover, DBT animals showed an increase of immobility frequency and a decrease of swimming and climbing frequencies in modified forced swimming test (MFST) since the second week after diabetes injection, lasting up at the 4th week. FO treatment (only at a dose of 3g/kg) significantly decreased the immobility frequency and increased the swimming frequency, but did not induce significant changes in the climbing frequency in DBT rats. Moreover, it was observed that DBT animals had significantly lower levels of BDNF in both hippocampus and pre frontal cortex when compared to NGL rats, which is completely prevented by FO treatment. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that FO treatment was able to prevent the mechanical allodynia and the depressive-like behaviors in DBT rats, which seems to be related to its capacity of BDNF level restoration.

  5. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Wei; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Ren, Ning; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Li, Yong-Qi

    2010-05-14

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1{beta} was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1{beta} was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1{beta}. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1{beta} expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  6. Placebo manipulations reduce hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Gitte Laue; Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Nørskov, Kathrine Næsted; Grosen, Kasper; Pilegaard, Hans K; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Price, Donald D; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Vase, Lene

    2012-06-01

    Several studies have shown that placebo analgesia effects can be obtained in healthy volunteers, as well as patients suffering from acute postoperative pain and chronic pain conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome. However, it is unknown whether placebo analgesia effects can be elicited in chronic pain conditions with a known pathophysiology such as a nerve injury. Nineteen patients who had developed neuropathic pain after thoracotomy were exposed to a placebo manipulation in which they received either open or hidden administrations of lidocaine. Before the treatment, the patients rated their levels of spontaneous pain and expected pain and completed a questionnaire on their emotional feelings (Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule) and went through quantitative sensory testing of evoked pain (brush and cold allodynia, heat pain tolerance, area of pinprick hyperalgesia, wind-up-like pain after pinprick stimulation). The placebo manipulation significantly reduced the area of pinprick hyperalgesia (P=.027), and this placebo effect was significantly related to low levels of negative affect (P=.008; R(2)=0.362) but not to positive affect or expected pain levels. No placebo effect was observed in relation to spontaneous pain or evoked pain, which is most likely due to low pain levels resulting in floor effects. This is the first study to demonstrate a placebo effect in neuropathic pain. The possible mechanisms underlying the placebo effects in hyperalgesia are discussed, and implications for treatment are outlined.

  7. Role of glutamate receptors in the dorsal reticular nucleus in formalin-induced secondary allodynia.

    PubMed

    Ambriz-Tututi, Mónica; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Ramirez-López, Fernanda; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Drucker-Colín, And René

    2013-10-01

    The role of glutamate receptors present in the medullary dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt) in the formalin test and formalin-induced secondary nociception was studied in rats. Secondary mechanical allodynia was assessed with von Frey filaments applied to the rat's hindpaw, and secondary thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated with the tail-immersion test. The selective glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist), 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) (AMPA/KA receptor antagonist) and A841720 (metabotropic glutamate 1 receptor antagonist) were injected into the DRt before or 6 days after formalin injection in the rat. In the formalin test, the three antagonists significantly reduced the number of flinches in both phases of the test. DRt microinjection of MK801 or A841720, but not of CNQX, reduced both secondary nociceptive behaviors. Moreover, pre-treatment with the three antagonists injected into the DRt prevented the development of secondary mechanical allodynia and secondary thermal hyperalgesia. Similarly, in these rats, the number of c-Fos-like immunoreactive neurons were markedly reduced in both the superficial and deep lamina of the dorsal horn. Our findings support the role of DRt as a pain facilitator in acute and chronic pain states, and suggest a key role of glutamate receptors during the development and maintenance of formalin-induced secondary allodynia. PMID:23869620

  8. Glycemia-dependent Nuclear Factor κB Activation Contributes to Mechanical Allodynia in Rats with Chronic Postischemia Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Huot, Marie-Christine; Laferrière, André; Khorashadi, Mina; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemia-reperfusion injury causes chronic postischemia pain (CPIP), and rats with higher glycemia during ischemia-reperfusion injury exhibit increased allodynia. Glycemia-induced elevation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB) may contribute to increased allodynia. Methods Glycemia during a 3 h ischemia-reperfusion injury was manipulated by: normal feeding; or normal feeding with administration of insulin; dextrose; or insulin/dextrose. In these groups, NFκB was measured in ipsilateral hind paw muscle and spinal dorsal horn by ELISA, and SN50, an NFκB inhibitor, was administered to determine its differential anti-allodynic effects depending on glycemia. Results CPIP fed/insulin rats (12.03 ± 4.9, N = 6) had less allodynia than fed, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed/dextrose rats (6.29 ± 3.37 N = 7, 4.57 ± 3.03 g, N = 6, 2.95 ± 1.10, N = 9), respectively. Compared to fed rats (0.209 ± 0.022, N = 7), NFκB in ipsilateral plantar muscles was significantly lower for fed/insulin rats and significantly higher for fed/dextrose rats (0.152 ± 0.053, N = 6; 0.240 ± 0.057, N = 7, respectively). Furthermore, NFκB in the dorsal horn of fed, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed/dextrose rats (0.293 ± 0.049, N = 6) was significantly higher than in fed/insulin animals (0.267 ± 0.037, N = 6). The anti-allodynic SN50 dose-response curves of CPIP rats in the fed/insulin/dextrose, fed/dextrose and fed conditions exhibited a rightward shift compared to the fed/insulin group. The threshold SN50 dose of CPIP fed/dextrose, fed/insulin/dextrose and fed rats (328.94 ± 92.4, 77.80 ± 44.50 and 24.89 ± 17.20, respectively) was higher than that for fed/insulin rats (4.06 ± 7.04). Conclusions NFκB was activated in a glycemia-dependent manner in CPIP rats. Hypoglycemic rats were more sensitive to SN50 than rats with higher glycemia. The finding that SN50 reduces mechanical allodynia suggests that NFκB inhibitors might be useful for treating postischemia pain. PMID:23695173

  9. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice display cold allodynia, but enhanced recovery from spared-nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Piskoun, Boris; Russo, Lori; Norcini, Monica; Blanck, Thomas; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Background The function of the Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Mounting evidence suggest that CB1R expression and activation may contribute to pain. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice (CB1R−/−) generated on a C57Bl/6 background exhibit hypoalgesia in the hotplate assay and formalin test. These findings suggest that Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression mediates the responses to at least some types of painful stimuli. By using this mouse line, we sought to determine if the lack of Cannabinoid 1 receptor unveils a general hypoalgesic phenotype, including protection against the development of neuropathic pain. The acetone test was used to measure cold sensitivity, the electronic von Frey was used to measure mechanical thresholds before and after spared-nerve injury, and analysis of footprint patterns was conducted to determine if motor function is differentially affected after nerve-injury in mice with varying levels of Cannabinoid 1 receptor. Results At baseline, CB1R−/− mice were hypersensitive in the acetone test, and this phenotype was maintained after spared-nerve injury. Using calcium imaging of lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, a higher percentage of neurons isolated from CB1R−/− mice were menthol sensitive relative to DRG isolated from wild-type (CB1R+/+) mice. Baseline mechanical thresholds did not differ among genotypes, and mechanical hypersensitivity developed similarly in the first two weeks following spared-nerve injury (SNI). At two weeks post-SNI, CB1R−/− mice recovered significantly from mechanical hypersensitivity, while the CB1R+/+ mice did not. Heterozygous knockouts (CB1R+/−) transiently developed cold allodynia only after injury, but recovered mechanical thresholds to a similar extent as the CB1R−/− mice. Sciatic functional indices, which reflect overall nerve health, and alternation coefficients, which indicate uniformity of strides, were not significantly different

  10. TRPC1 and TRPC6 channels cooperate with TRPV4 to mediate mechanical hyperalgesia and nociceptor sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Alessandri-Haber, Nicole; Dina, Olayinka A.; Chen, Xiaoje; Levine, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) contributes to mechanical hyperalgesia of diverse etiologies, presumably as part of a mechanoreceptor signaling complex (Alessandri-Haber et al., 2008). To investigate the hypothesis that a functional interaction between TRPV4 and stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) is involved in this mechanical transduction mechanism, we used a selective SACs inhibitor, GsMTx-4. Intradermal injection of GsMTx-4 in the rat hind paw reversed the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by intradermal injection of inflammatory mediators. In vivo single fiber recordings showed that GsMTx-4 reversed inflammatory mediator-induced decrease in mechanical threshold in half of sensitized C-fibers. Furthermore, GsMTx-4 reduced hyperalgesia to both mechanical and hypotonic stimuli in different models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain while it had no effect on baseline mechanical nociceptive thresholds. TRPC1 and TRPC6, two GsMTx-4-sensitive SACs are expressed in dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG). Single-cell RT-PCR showed that messenger RNAs for TRPV4, TRPC1 and TRPC6 are frequently co-expressed in DRG neurons. Spinal intrathecal administration of oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to TRPC1 and TRPC6, like that to TRPV4, reversed the hyperalgesia to mechanical and hypotonic stimuli induced by inflammatory mediators without affecting baseline mechanical nociceptive threshold. However, antisense to TRPC6, but not to TRPC1, reversed the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by a thermal injury or the TRPV4 selective agonist 4α-PDD. We conclude that TRPC1 and TRPC6 channels cooperate with TRPV4 channels to mediate mechanical hyperalgesia and primary afferent nociceptor sensitization although they may have distinctive roles. PMID:19439599

  11. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia: a review of epidemiology, mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Low, Yinghui; Clarke, Collin F; Huh, Billy K

    2012-05-01

    There has been a growing interest in opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which is an increased sensitivity to pain caused by opioid exposure. Multiple underlying pathways may contribute to the development of OIH, and the mechanism may vary with the duration of opioid exposure, dose, type and route of administration. In addition, the distinction between OIH, tolerance and withdrawal should be made in both the basic and clinical science literature so as to help translate findings to the clinical phenomenon and to help determine the best strategies to prevent or treat OIH.

  12. Clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist relieves mechanical allodynia in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic mice; potentiation by spinal p38 MAPK inhibition without motor dysfunction and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Ji-Hee; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kim, Sol-Ji; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern; Beitz, Alvin J; Roh, Dae-Hyun

    2016-05-15

    Cancer chemotherapy with platinum-based antineoplastic agents including oxaliplatin frequently results in a debilitating and painful peripheral neuropathy. We evaluated the antinociceptive effects of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. Specifically, we determined if (i) the intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of clonidine reduces mechanical allodynia in mice with an oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and (ii) concurrent inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 enhances clonidine's antiallodynic effect. Clonidine (0.01-0.1 mg kg(-1), i.p.), with or without SB203580(1-10 nmol, intrathecal) was administered two weeks after oxaliplatin injection(10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) to mice. Mechanical withdrawal threshold, motor coordination and blood pressure were measured. Postmortem expression of p38 MAPK and ERK as well as their phosphorylated forms(p-p38 and p-ERK) were quantified 30 min or 4 hr after drug injection in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated and control mice. Clonidine dose-dependently reduced oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and spinal p-p38 MAPK expression, but not p-ERK. At 0.1 mg kg(-1), clonidine also impaired motor coordination and decreased blood pressure. A 10 nmol dose of SB203580 alone significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and p-p38 MAPK expression, while a subeffective dose(3 nmol) potentiated the antiallodynic effect of 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine and reduced the increased p-p38 MAPK. Coadministration of SB203580 and 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine decreased allodynia similar to that of 0.10 mg kg(-1) clonidine, but without significant motor or vascular effects. These findings demonstrate that clonidine treatment reduces oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. The concurrent administration of SB203580 reduces the dosage requirements for clonidine, thereby alleviating allodynia without producing undesirable motor or cardiovascular effects.

  13. A streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathic pain model for static or dynamic mechanical allodynia and vulvodynia: validation using topical and systemic gabapentin.

    PubMed

    Ali, Gowhar; Subhan, Fazal; Abbas, Muzaffar; Zeb, Jehan; Shahid, Muhammad; Sewell, Robert D E

    2015-11-01

    Neuropathic vulvodynia is a state of vulval discomfort characterized by a burning sensation, diffuse pain, pruritus or rawness with an acute or chronic onset. Diabetes mellitus may cause this type of vulvar pain in several ways, so this study was conducted to evaluate streptozotocin-induced diabetes as a neuropathic pain model for vulvodynia in female rats. The presence of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg i.p.)-induced diabetes was initially verified by disclosure of pancreatic tissue degeneration, blood glucose elevation and body weight loss 5-29 days after a single treatment. Dynamic (shortened paw withdrawal latency to light brushing) and static (diminished von Frey filament threshold pressure) mechanical allodynia was then confirmed on the plantar foot surface. Subsequently, both static and dynamic vulvodynia was detected by application of the paradigm to the vulval region. Systemic gabapentin (75 mg/kg, i.p.) and topical gabapentin (10 % gel) were finally tested against allodynia and vulvodynia. Topical gabapentin and the control gel vehicle significantly increased paw withdrawal threshold in the case of the static allodynia model and also paw withdrawal latency in the model for dynamic allodynia when compared with the streptozotocin-pretreated group. Likewise, in the case of static and dynamic vulvodynia, there was a significant antivulvodynia effect of systemic and topical gabapentin treatment. These outcomes substantiate the value of this model not only for allodynia but also for vulvodynia, and this was corroborated by the findings not only with systemic but also with topical gabapentin.

  14. Acute single dose of ketamine relieves mechanical allodynia and consequent depression-like behaviors in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Fen; Wang, Jing; Han, Jin-Feng; Guo, Jie; Xie, Ze-Min; Pan, Wei; Yang, Jian-Jun; Sun, Kang-Jian

    2016-09-19

    Both chronic pain and depression are debilitating diseases, which often coexist in clinic. However, current analgesics and antidepressants exhibit limited efficacy for this comorbidity. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of ketamine on the comorbidity of inflammatory pain and consequent depression-like behaviors in a rat model established by intraplantar administration of complete Freunds adjuvant (CFA). The mechanical withdrawal threshold, thermal withdrawal latency, open field test, forced swimming test, and sucrose preference test were evaluated after the CFA injection and ketamine treatment. The hippocampus was harvested to determine the levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), kynurenine (KYN), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and tryptophan (TRP). The inflammatory pain-induced depression-like behaviors presented on 7days and lasted to at least 14days after the CFA injection. Single dose of ketamine at 20mg/kg relieved both the mechanical allodynia and the associated depression-like behaviors as demonstrated by the attenuated mechanical withdrawal threshold, reduced immobility time in the forced swim test, and increased sucrose preference after ketamine treatment. The total distance had no significant change after the CFA injection or ketamine treatment in the open field test. Simultaneously, ketamine reduced the levels of IL-6, IL-1β, IDO, and KYN/TRP ratio and increased the 5-HT/TRP ratio in the hippocampus. In conclusion, acute single dose of ketamine can rapidly attenuate mechanical allodynia and consequent depression-like behaviors and down-regulate hippocampal proinflammatory responses and IDO/KYN signal pathway in rats. PMID:27497920

  15. A partial L5 spinal nerve ligation induces a limited prolongation of mechanical allodynia in rats: an efficient model for studying mechanisms of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yun; Yuan, Frank; Carteret, Alene F; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2010-02-26

    The relationship between pain severity and the extent of injury to a peripheral nerve remains elusive. In this study, we compared the pain behavior resulting from partial (1/3-1/2 thickness) and full L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats. The decrease in paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli in the hindpaw ipsilateral to the injury was comparable in the two groups on days 3-21 post-injury. However, the decreased PWT recovered earlier in the partial SNL group than in the full SNL group. These observations suggest that the duration of neuropathic pain behavior, but not the early development of mechanical allodynia, is dependent on the extent of nerve injury. On days 6 and 15 post-injury, when the mechanical allodynia was similar in the two groups, systemic morphine induced a greater reduction of mechanical allodynia in the partial SNL group than in the full SNL group. Furthermore, in partial SNL rats, at post-injury time points when they had largely recovered from the neuropathic pain state, systemic administration of naloxone hydrochloride (day 53) or naloxone methiodide (a non-selective peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonist; day 64) or intra-plantar injection of naloxone methiodide rekindled mechanical pain hypersensitivity in the ipsilateral hindpaw, suggesting a prolonged activation of endogenous opioidergic pain-inhibition. Therefore, partial SNL in rats may represent an efficient model for studying the mechanisms of neuropathic pain, testing effects of analgesic/antihyperalgesic drugs, and understanding endogenous pain-inhibitory mechanisms that lead to reversal of the pain behavior with time.

  16. Is mechanism and symptom-based analgesia an answer to opioid-induced hyperalgesia?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mayank; Gupta, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    "Cancer Pain" and "Pain in cancer patient" are not synonymous. Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia (OIH) is a paradoxical state of nociceptive sensitization caused by exposure to opioids. Neuropathic pain is only partially responsive to opioids; injudicious increase in dose of opioids in neuropathic pain may not only result in inadequate pain relief but also OIH. Majority of literature on OIH is in non-cancer pain with systemic use of opioids. We describe the development and successful treatment of OIH in a 55-year-old male patient with Small cell Carcinoma Lung. Opioid tapering, rotation, systemic desensitization helps in combatting OIH. The use of anti-neuropathic adjuvant analgesics helps not only in preventing and treating OIH but also in understanding putative mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain and OIH.

  17. Selective Cathepsin S Inhibition with MIV-247 Attenuates Mechanical Allodynia and Enhances the Antiallodynic Effects of Gabapentin and Pregabalin in a Mouse Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Ellen; Pitcher, Thomas; Rizoska, Biljana; Tunblad, Karin; Henderson, Ian; Sahlberg, Britt-Louise; Grabowska, Urszula; Classon, Björn; Edenius, Charlotte; Malcangio, Marzia; Lindström, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Cathepsin S inhibitors attenuate mechanical allodynia in preclinical neuropathic pain models. The current study evaluated the effects when combining the selective cathepsin S inhibitor MIV-247 with gabapentin or pregabalin in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Mice were rendered neuropathic by partial sciatic nerve ligation. MIV-247, gabapentin, or pregabalin were administered alone or in combination via oral gavage. Mechanical allodynia was assessed using von Frey hairs. Neurobehavioral side effects were evaluated by assessing beam walking. MIV-247, gabapentin, and pregabalin concentrations in various tissues were measured. Oral administration of MIV-247 (100-200 µmol/kg) dose-dependently attenuated mechanical allodynia by up to approximately 50% reversal when given as a single dose or when given twice daily for 5 days. No behavioral deficits were observed at any dose of MIV-247 tested. Gabapentin (58-350 µmol/kg) and pregabalin (63-377 µmol/kg) also inhibited mechanical allodynia with virtually complete reversal at the highest doses tested. The minimum effective dose of MIV-247 (100 µmol/kg) in combination with the minimum effective dose of pregabalin (75 µmol/kg) or gabapentin (146 µmol/kg) resulted in enhanced antiallodynic efficacy without augmenting side effects. A subeffective dose of MIV-247 (50 µmol/kg) in combination with a subeffective dose of pregabalin (38 µmol/kg) or gabapentin (73 µmol/kg) also resulted in substantial efficacy. Plasma levels of MIV-247, gabapentin, and pregabalin were similar when given in combination as to when given alone. Cathepsin S inhibition with MIV-247 exerts significant antiallodynic efficacy alone, and also enhances the effect of gabapentin and pregabalin without increasing side effects or inducing pharmacokinetic interactions.

  18. Selective Cathepsin S Inhibition with MIV-247 Attenuates Mechanical Allodynia and Enhances the Antiallodynic Effects of Gabapentin and Pregabalin in a Mouse Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Ellen; Pitcher, Thomas; Rizoska, Biljana; Tunblad, Karin; Henderson, Ian; Sahlberg, Britt-Louise; Grabowska, Urszula; Classon, Björn; Edenius, Charlotte; Malcangio, Marzia; Lindström, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Cathepsin S inhibitors attenuate mechanical allodynia in preclinical neuropathic pain models. The current study evaluated the effects when combining the selective cathepsin S inhibitor MIV-247 with gabapentin or pregabalin in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Mice were rendered neuropathic by partial sciatic nerve ligation. MIV-247, gabapentin, or pregabalin were administered alone or in combination via oral gavage. Mechanical allodynia was assessed using von Frey hairs. Neurobehavioral side effects were evaluated by assessing beam walking. MIV-247, gabapentin, and pregabalin concentrations in various tissues were measured. Oral administration of MIV-247 (100-200 µmol/kg) dose-dependently attenuated mechanical allodynia by up to approximately 50% reversal when given as a single dose or when given twice daily for 5 days. No behavioral deficits were observed at any dose of MIV-247 tested. Gabapentin (58-350 µmol/kg) and pregabalin (63-377 µmol/kg) also inhibited mechanical allodynia with virtually complete reversal at the highest doses tested. The minimum effective dose of MIV-247 (100 µmol/kg) in combination with the minimum effective dose of pregabalin (75 µmol/kg) or gabapentin (146 µmol/kg) resulted in enhanced antiallodynic efficacy without augmenting side effects. A subeffective dose of MIV-247 (50 µmol/kg) in combination with a subeffective dose of pregabalin (38 µmol/kg) or gabapentin (73 µmol/kg) also resulted in substantial efficacy. Plasma levels of MIV-247, gabapentin, and pregabalin were similar when given in combination as to when given alone. Cathepsin S inhibition with MIV-247 exerts significant antiallodynic efficacy alone, and also enhances the effect of gabapentin and pregabalin without increasing side effects or inducing pharmacokinetic interactions. PMID:27335437

  19. Protection against oxaliplatin-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and intraepidermal nerve fiber loss by minocycline.

    PubMed

    Boyette-Davis, J; Dougherty, P M

    2011-06-01

    Treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin produces a robust painful neuropathy similar to various other neuropathic conditions which result in loss of nerve fibers innervating the skin. This loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) appears to play an important role in neuropathy, but has yet to be investigated in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. For this study, mechanical hyperalgesia and IENF density were measured in rats receiving oxaliplatin, given at a dosage of 2 mg/kg every other day for four injections. The immunomodulatory agent minocycline (25 mg/kg) was also administered and was given 24 h prior to the first dose of oxaliplatin and continued throughout oxaliplatin treatment. Immunohistochemistry using the pan-neuronal marker PGP9.5 was used to investigate IENF densities in hind paw skin on Day 15 and Day 30. The results show that a robust mechanical sensitivity developed in oxaliplatin treated animals, as did a pronounced decrease in epidermal nerve fibers, and these outcomes were effectively prevented by minocycline treatment. This is the first study to show changes in IENF density in oxaliplatin treated animals, and confirm not only a relationship between IENF loss and hypersensitivity but also prevention of both with minocycline treatment.

  20. Spatio-Temporal Expression and Functional Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 in Diabetic Mechanical Allodynia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huang-Hui; Qi, Jian; Shi, Juan; Li, Yun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP) is one of the most common clinical manifestations of diabetes mellitus (DM), which is characterized by prominent mechanical allodynia (DMA). However, the molecular mechanism underlying it has not fully been elucidated. In this study, we examined the spatio-temporal expression of a major nociceptive channel protein transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and analyzed its functional involvement by intrathecal (i.t.) application of TRPV1 antagonists in streptozocin (STZ)-induced DMA rat models. Western blot and immunofluorescent staining results showed that TRPV1 protein level was significantly increased in the soma of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on 14 days after STZ treatment (DMA 14 d), whereas those in spinal cord and skin (mainly from the central and peripheral processes of DRG neurons) had already been enhanced on DMA 7 d to peak on DMA 14 d. qRT-PCR experiments confirmed that TRPV1 mRNA level was significantly up-regulated in the DRG on DMA 7 d, indicating a preceding translation of TRPV1 protein in the soma but preferential distribution of this protein to the processes under the DMA conditions. Cell counting assay based on double immunostaining suggested that increased TRPV1-immunoreactive neurons were likely to be small-sized and CGRP-ergic. Finally, single or multiple intrathecal applications of non-specific or specific TRPV1 antagonists, ruthenium red and capsazepine, at varying doses, effectively alleviated DMA, although the effect of the former was more prominent and long-lasting. These results collectively indicate that TRPV1 expression dynamically changes during the development of DMA and this protein may play important roles in mechanical nociception in DRG neurons, presumably through facilitating the release of CGRP. PMID:25020137

  1. Co- transplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells with Schwann Cells Evokes Mechanical Allodynia in the Contusion Model of Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pourheydar, Bagher; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Bakhtiari, Mehrdad; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Yekta, Zahra; Najafzadeh, Norooz

    2012-01-01

    functioning but greater Allodynia compared to the other experimental groups. Conclusion: The present study has shown that, although transplantation of BMSCs, SCs and a combination of these cells into the injured rat spinal cord can improve functional recovery, it leads to the development of mechanical Allodynia. This finding indicates that strategies to reduce Allodynia in cell transplantation studies are required. PMID:23508042

  2. Peripheral involvement of PKA and PKC in subcutaneous bee venom-induced persistent nociception, mechanical hyperalgesia, and inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Sheng; Lei, Jing; He, Xiang; Qu, Fang; Wang, Yang; Wen, Wei-Wei; You, Hao-Jun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2008-03-01

    The roles of central protein kinases A and C (PKA and PKC) in various pain states have intensively been investigated during the past decade. The aim of the present study was to investigate the peripheral involvement of PKA and PKC in persistent nociceptive response, evoked pain behaviors, and inflammation induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of bee venom (BV, 0.2mg/50 microl) in rats. The effects of intraplantar injection of H-89 (a PKA inhibitor, 5-100 microg/50 microl) and chelerythrine chloride (a PKC inhibitor, 5-100 microg/50 microl) on BV-elicited persistent nociception (nociceptive flinching reflex), mechanical hyperalgesia, and inflammation were systematically investigated. Pre-treatment with H-89 dose-dependently inhibited only BV-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, but not the persistent nociception and inflammation. In contrast, pre-treatment with chelerythrine chloride dose-dependently inhibited BV-induced sustained nociception and inflammation, but not the mechanical hyperalgesia. Topical pre-treatment of the sciatic nerve with 1% capsaicin significantly blocked the inhibitory effects of the PKC inhibitor on BV-induced inflammation, but not the persistent flinching response. These results indicate that peripheral PKA and PKC involvements in BV-induced pain behaviors differ, and capsaicin-sensitive afferents appear to participate in the pro-inflammatory role of PKC in the BV pain model. Findings from the present study also suggest that targeting specific peripheral protein kinases might prove effective in the treatment of persistent pain and inflammation.

  3. Assessment of Morphine-induced Hyperalgesia and Analgesic Tolerance in Mice Using Thermal and Mechanical Nociceptive Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Elhabazi, Khadija; Ayachi, Safia; Ilien, Brigitte; Simonin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance severely impact the clinical efficacy of opiates as pain relievers in animals and humans. The molecular mechanisms underlying both phenomena are not well understood and their elucidation should benefit from the study of animal models and from the design of appropriate experimental protocols. We describe here a methodological approach for inducing, recording and quantifying morphine-induced hyperalgesia as well as for evidencing analgesic tolerance, using the tail-immersion and tail pressure tests in wild-type mice. As shown in the video, the protocol is divided into five sequential steps. Handling and habituation phases allow a safe determination of the basal nociceptive response of the animals. Chronic morphine administration induces significant hyperalgesia as shown by an increase in both thermal and mechanical sensitivity, whereas the comparison of analgesia time-courses after acute or repeated morphine treatment clearly indicates the development of tolerance manifested by a decline in analgesic response amplitude. This protocol may be similarly adapted to genetically modified mice in order to evaluate the role of individual genes in the modulation of nociception and morphine analgesia. It also provides a model system to investigate the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents to improve opiate analgesic efficacy. PMID:25145878

  4. The involvement of the transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) in the maintenance of mechanical and cold hyperalgesia in persistent inflammation.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Diogo Santos M; Meotti, Flavia Carla; Andrade, Edinéia Lemos; Leal, Paulo César; Motta, Emerson Marcelo; Calixto, João B

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the role of TRPA1 in the development and maintenance of mechanical and cold hyperalgesia in persistent inflammation induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in mice. The intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of CFA induced a long lasting (28 days) hyperalgesia for both mechanical and thermal (cold) stimuli. The intraperitoneal (i.p., 30-300 mg/kg), intraplantar (i.pl., 100 microg/site) or intrathecal (i.t., 10 microg/site) injection of the TRPA1 selective antagonist HC-030031 significantly reduced the mechanical hyperalgesia evaluated by the von Frey hair test. The effect of HC-030031 was evidenced on the day after CFA injection and was kept throughout the test. However, the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v., 10 microg/site) injection of HC-030031 did not interfere with CFA-induced hyperalgesia. Treatment with HC-030031 (300 mg/kg, i.p.) completely inhibited the noxious cold hyperalgesia induced by tetrafluoroethane in mice that received CFA. The pre-treatment with the TRPA1 oligonucleotide antisense (AS-ODN, i.t.) consistently prevented both mechanical and cold hyperalgesia. Interestingly, both TRPA1 protein expression and mRNA were over-expressed in spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of mice treated with CFA, an effect that was fully prevented by the pre-treatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Collectively, the present results showed that TRPA1 present at either peripheral or spinal sites play a relevant role in the development and maintenance of both mechanical and cold hyperalgesia during CFA-induced inflammation. Thus, TRPA1 selective antagonists represent promising candidates to treat hyperalgesia in persistent inflammatory states.

  5. Etodolac, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, attenuates paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model of mechanical allodynia.

    PubMed

    Ito, Sunao; Tajima, Koyuki; Nogawa, Masaki; Inoue, Naoki; Kyoi, Takashi; Takahashi, Yosuke; Sasagawa, Takahiro; Nakamura, Akio; Kotera, Takashi; Ueda, Makoto; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Banno, Kouji

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor etodolac on the mechanical allodynia induced by paclitaxel was investigated in mice and compared with the effects of the nonselective COX inhibitors indomethacin and diclofenac, the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib, the calcium channel α(2)δ subunit inhibitor pregabalin, the sodium channel blocker mexiletine, and the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine. The decrease in the paw-withdrawal threshold induced by paclitaxel was reversed by oral administration of etodolac at 10 mg/kg but was not affected by indomethacin, diclofenac, or celecoxib. The antiallodynic effect of etodolac gradually increased during repeated administration, and after 2 weeks the paw-withdrawal threshold at the preadministration point was significantly increased. Pregabalin, duloxetine, and mexiletine also showed an antiallodynic effect in this model. Whereas pregabalin had a preadministration effect similar to that of etodolac during repeated administration, mexiletine or duloxetine had no such effect. There was almost no difference in the distribution of etodolac and diclofenac in nervous tissue, indicating that COX inhibition is unlikely to be involved in the antiallodynic effect of etodolac. Etodolac did not show a neuroprotective effect against morphological transformations such as the axonal degeneration induced by paclitaxel. Instead, etodolac probably acts at the level of functional changes accompanying paclitaxel treatment, such as alterations in the activation state of components of the pain transmission pathway. Our findings suggest that etodolac attenuates paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by a COX-independent pathway and that it might be useful for the treatment of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22460833

  6. Human Adipose Stem Cells Improve Mechanical Allodynia and Enhance Functional Recovery in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Yeong; Lee, Hye-Lan; Yun, Yeomin; Kim, Jin-Su; Ha, Yoon; Yoon, Do Heum; Lee, Soo-Hong; Shin, Dong Ah

    2015-07-01

    Stem cells are a promising source of tissue engineering due to their differentiation potential. Today, direct transplantation of stem cells for cell therapy is commonly performed. However, in cases of nerve injury, direct transplantation of cells could lead to secondary nerve damage. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: the phosphate-buffered saline epineural transplantation (PBS-ENT) group, the PBS intraneural transplantation (PBS-INT) group, the human adipose-derived stem cells epineural transplantation (hASCs-ENT) group, and human adipose-derived stem cells intraneural transplantation (hASCs-INT) group. Transplantation was conducted 1 week later after inflicting a crush injury with subsequent observation for 5 weeks. To evaluate pain, each group was examined with regard to paw withdrawal latency and evoked potentials. The sciatic functional index (SFI) was calculated to estimate functional recovery. The sciatic nerve was also examined histologically. The hASCs-ENT group showed a more rapid paw withdrawal threshold and SFI recovery than the other groups (p<0.05). The hASCs-ENT group also showed shorter initial latencies in both somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) and motor evoked potential (MEP) than the PBS-INT group (p<0.05). In addition, the N1 latency of the MEP and the N1 and P1 latencies of the SSEP were significantly shorter than those of the PBS-INT group (p<0.05). Histological examination revealed that the transplanted groups showed better neural recovery and remyelination than the groups injected with PBS. These results show that the transplantation of hASCs into the injured sciatic nerve improved mechanical allodynia and functional recovery as determined by the paw withdrawal test, SFI analysis, and electrophysiological studies. ENT is superior to INT in terms of invasiveness and better outcomes.

  7. Human Adipose Stem Cells Improve Mechanical Allodynia and Enhance Functional Recovery in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Yeong; Lee, Hye-Lan; Yun, Yeomin; Kim, Jin-Su; Ha, Yoon; Yoon, Do Heum; Lee, Soo-Hong; Shin, Dong Ah

    2015-07-01

    Stem cells are a promising source of tissue engineering due to their differentiation potential. Today, direct transplantation of stem cells for cell therapy is commonly performed. However, in cases of nerve injury, direct transplantation of cells could lead to secondary nerve damage. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: the phosphate-buffered saline epineural transplantation (PBS-ENT) group, the PBS intraneural transplantation (PBS-INT) group, the human adipose-derived stem cells epineural transplantation (hASCs-ENT) group, and human adipose-derived stem cells intraneural transplantation (hASCs-INT) group. Transplantation was conducted 1 week later after inflicting a crush injury with subsequent observation for 5 weeks. To evaluate pain, each group was examined with regard to paw withdrawal latency and evoked potentials. The sciatic functional index (SFI) was calculated to estimate functional recovery. The sciatic nerve was also examined histologically. The hASCs-ENT group showed a more rapid paw withdrawal threshold and SFI recovery than the other groups (p<0.05). The hASCs-ENT group also showed shorter initial latencies in both somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) and motor evoked potential (MEP) than the PBS-INT group (p<0.05). In addition, the N1 latency of the MEP and the N1 and P1 latencies of the SSEP were significantly shorter than those of the PBS-INT group (p<0.05). Histological examination revealed that the transplanted groups showed better neural recovery and remyelination than the groups injected with PBS. These results show that the transplantation of hASCs into the injured sciatic nerve improved mechanical allodynia and functional recovery as determined by the paw withdrawal test, SFI analysis, and electrophysiological studies. ENT is superior to INT in terms of invasiveness and better outcomes. PMID:25857679

  8. Glucocorticoid regulation of ATP release from spinal astrocytes underlies diurnal exacerbation of neuropathic mechanical allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Satoru; Kusunose, Naoki; Taniguchi, Marie; Akamine, Takahiro; Kanado, Yuki; Ozono, Yui; Masuda, Takahiro; Kohro, Yuta; Matsunaga, Naoya; Tsuda, Makoto; Salter, Michael W.; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal variations in pain hypersensitivity are common in chronic pain disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are enigmatic. Here, we report that mechanical pain hypersensitivity in sciatic nerve-injured mice shows pronounced diurnal alterations, which critically depend on diurnal variations in glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. Diurnal enhancement of pain hypersensitivity is mediated by glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of the extracellular release of ATP in the spinal cord, which stimulates purinergic receptors on microglia in the dorsal horn. We identify serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1) as the key molecule responsible for the glucocorticoid-enhanced release of ATP from astrocytes. SGK-1 protein levels in spinal astrocytes are increased in response to glucocorticoid stimuli and enhanced ATP release by opening the pannexin-1 hemichannels. Our findings reveal an unappreciated circadian machinery affecting pain hypersensitivity caused by peripheral nerve injury, thus opening up novel approaches to the management of chronic pain. PMID:27739425

  9. The evolution of primary hyperalgesia in orthopedic surgery: quantitative sensory testing and clinical evaluation before and after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Valéria; Fletcher, Dominique; Bouhassira, Didier; Sessler, Daniel I.; Chauvin, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Background Quantitative sensory testing (QST), which allows a better characterization of sensory deficits and painful symptoms, may offer additional information on the pathophysiology of postoperative pain. Methodology Twenty patients scheduled for total knee anthroplasty were evaluated clinically and with QST before surgery, at one and four days, and at one and four months after surgery. Clinical evaluation included preoperative pain and inflammation of operative knee, postoperative assessment of pain at rest and during movement (Visual Analog Scale score), cumulative morphine consumption, and circumference and temperature of both knees. QST included thermal and mechanical (pressure) pain threshold measurements and assessment of responses to suprathreshold stimuli. Brush-evoked allodynia was also evaluated. Measurements were taken on the operative knee, contra lateral knee, and on the hand as a control site. Results All patients had prolonged and severe pain before surgery and inflammation of operative knee. Preoperative OST provided evidence of heat hyperalgesia in the inflammatory area on the operative knee, but absence of punctate or brush-evoked allodynia in the adjacent non inflamed area. Patients had intense postoperative pain, mostly induced by movement. Primary heat hyperalgesia was present on the operative knee on the first and fourth days after surgery, and was associated with punctate mechanical allodynia in the inflammatory area, but not in the adjacent non inflamed area. Postoperative morphine consumption was correlated with preoperative heat hyperalgesia (r=0.63; P=0.01). QST was normalyzed at the 4-month evaluation and only 4 patients had moderate knee pain induced by movement at that time. Conclusion Heat hyperalgesia was the predominant OST symptom associated with perioperative pain after total knee arthroplastv and was predictive of postoperative morphine consumption PMID:17717244

  10. Central or peripheral delivery of an adenosine A1 receptor agonist improves mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Katz, N K; Ryals, J M; Wright, D E

    2015-01-29

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, and a significant proportion of individuals suffer debilitating pain that significantly affects their quality of life. Unfortunately, symptomatic treatment options have limited efficacy, and often carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. Activation of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) by the analgesic small molecule adenosine has been shown to have antinociceptive benefits in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The current study used a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy to determine the effect of diabetes on endogenous adenosine production, and if central or peripheral delivery of adenosine receptor agonists could alleviate signs of mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced using streptozocin in male A/J mice. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured weekly to characterize neuropathy phenotype. Hydrolysis of AMP into adenosine by ectonucleotidases was determined in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at 8 weeks post-induction of diabetes. AMP, adenosine and the specific A1R agonist, N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), were administered both centrally (intrathecal) and peripherally (intraplantar) to determine the effect of activation of adenosine receptors on mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Eight weeks post-induction, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased hydrolysis of extracellular AMP in the DRG; at this same time, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal thresholds compared to nondiabetic controls. Central delivery AMP, adenosine and CPA significantly improved mechanical withdrawal thresholds in diabetic mice. Surprisingly, peripheral delivery of CPA also improved mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. This study provides new evidence that diabetes significantly affects endogenous AMP hydrolysis, suggesting that altered adenosine production could contribute to the development of

  11. The beta-lactam antibiotic, ceftriaxone, inhibits the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijun; He, Ying; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2012-02-16

    The glutamate transporter GLT-1 is primarily responsible for glutamate clearance in the spinal cord. beta-Lactam antibiotics have been shown to attenuate neuropathic pain behaviors by promoting GLT-1 expression and function in the CNS. The present study tested the hypothesis that ceftriaxone, a prototype beta-lactam antibiotic, can prevent the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) in mice. Repeated morphine administration produced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, signs of OIH, and reduced spinal GLT-1 expression in mice. Ceftriaxone (200mg/kg/d, i.p., for 7 d) inhibited OIH. Correlating with the behavioral effects, ceftriaxone reversed downregulation of GLT-1 expression that was induced by OIH. These results suggest that ceftriaxone inhibited the development of OIH by up-regulating spinal GLT-1 expression.

  12. Central activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 by novel endogenous agonists contributes to mechanical and thermal allodynia after burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Green, Dustin P; Ruparel, Shivani; Gao, Xiaoli; Ruparel, Nikita; Patil, Mayur; Akopian, Armen

    2016-01-01

    The primary complaint of burn victims is an intense, often devastating spontaneous pain, with persistence of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The transient receptor potential channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1, are expressed by a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons and contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity. Although their function in the periphery is well known, a role for these TRP channels in central pain mechanisms is less well defined. Lipid agonists of TRPV1 are released from peripheral tissues via enzymatic oxidation after burn injury; however, it is not known if burn injury triggers the release of oxidized lipids in the spinal cord. Accordingly, we evaluated whether burn injury evoked the central release of oxidized lipids. Analysis of lipid extracts of spinal cord tissue with HPLC-MS revealed a significant increase in levels of the epoxide and diol metabolites of linoleic acid: 9,10-DiHOME, 12,13-DiHOME, 9(10)-EpOME, and 12(13)-EpOME, that was reduced after intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the oxidative enzyme inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, we found that these four lipid metabolites were capable of specifically activating both TRPV1 and TRPA1. Intrathecal injection of specific antagonists to TRPV1 (AMG-517) or TRPA1 (HC-030031) significantly reduced post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Finally, i.t. injection of ketoconazole significantly reversed post-burn mechanical and thermal allodynia. Our data indicate that spinal cord TRPV1 and TRPA1 contributes to pain after burn and identifies a novel class of oxidized lipids elevated in the spinal cord after burn injury. Since the management of burn pain is problematic, these findings point to a novel approach for treating post-burn pain. PMID:27411353

  13. Activation of the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) reverses referred mechanical hyperalgesia induced by colonic inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Robson; Motta, Emerson M; Manjavachi, Marianne N; Cola, Maíra; Calixto, João B

    2012-10-01

    In the current study, we investigated the effect of the activation of the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) on dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis and referred mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Colitis was induced in CD1 male mice through the intake of 4% DSS in tap water for 7 days. Control mice received unadulterated water. Referred mechanical hyperalgesia was evaluated for 7 days after the beginning of 4% DSS intake. Referred mechanical hyperalgesia started within 1 day after beginning DSS drinking, peaked at 3 days and persisted for 7 days. This time course profile perfectly matched with the appearance of signs of colitis. Both acute and chronic oral treatments with nicotine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, p.o.) were effective in inhibiting the established referred mechanical hyperalgesia. The antinociceptive effect of nicotine was completely abrogated by cotreatment with the selective α7 nAchR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) (1.0 mg/kg). Consistent with these results, i.p. treatment with the selective α7 nAchR agonist PNU 282987 (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) reduced referred mechanical hyperalgesia at all periods of evaluation. Despite their antinociceptive effects, nicotinic agonists did not affect DSS-induced colonic damage or inflammation. Taken together, the data generated in the present study show the potential relevance of using α7 nAchR agonists to treat referred pain and discomfort associated with inflammatory bowel diseases.

  14. Increasing 2-arachidonoyl glycerol signaling in the periphery attenuates mechanical hyperalgesia in a model of bone cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Khasabova, Iryna A.; Chandiramani, Anisha; Harding-Rose, Catherine; Simone, Donald A.; Seybold, Virginia S.

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic and primary bone cancers are usually accompanied by severe pain that is difficult to manage. In light of the adverse side effects of opioids, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system may provide an effective alternative for the treatment of cancer pain. The present study determined that a local, peripheral increase in the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycgerol (2-AG) reduced mechanical hyperalgesia evoked by the growth of a fibrosarcoma tumor in and around the calcaneous bone. Intraplantar (ipl) injection of 2-AG attenuated hyperalgesia (ED50 of 8.2 μg) by activation of peripheral CB2 but not CB1 receptors and had an efficacy comparable to that of morphine. JZL184 (10 μg, ipl.), an inhibitor of 2-AG degradation, increased the local level of 2AG and mimicked the antihyperalgesic effect of 2-AG, also through a CB2 receptor-dependent mechanism. These effects were accompanied by an increase in CB2 receptor protein in plantar skin of the tumor-bearing paw as well as an increase in the level of 2AG. In naïve mice, intraplantar administration of the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630 did not alter responses to mechanical stimuli demonstrating that peripheral CB2 receptor tone does not modulate mechanical sensitivity. These data extend our previous findings with anandamide in the same model and suggest that the peripheral endocannabinoid system is a promising target for the management of cancer pain. PMID:21440630

  15. The chemokine CCL5 induces CCR1-mediated hyperalgesia in mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 tumoral cells.

    PubMed

    Pevida, M; Lastra, A; Meana, Á; Hidalgo, A; Baamonde, A; Menéndez, Luis

    2014-02-14

    Although the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR1 has been demonstrated in several structures related to nociception, supporting the nociceptive role of chemokines able to activate it, the involvement of CCR1 in neoplastic pain has not been previously assessed. We have assayed the effects of a CCR1 antagonist, J113863, in two murine models of neoplastic hyperalgesia based on the intratibial injection of either NCTC 2472 fibrosarcoma cells, able to induce osteolytic bone injury, or B16-F10 melanoma cells, associated to mixed osteolytic/osteoblastic bone pathological features. The systemic administration of J113863 inhibited thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia in mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 cells. Moreover, in these mice, thermal hyperalgesia was counteracted following the peritumoral (10-30μg) but not spinal (3-5μg) administration of J113863. In contrast, hyperalgesia and allodynia measured in mice inoculated with B16-F10 cells remained unaffected after the administration of J113863. The inoculation of tumoral cells did not modify the levels of CCL3 at tumor or spinal cord. In contrast, although the concentration of CCL5 remained unmodified in mice inoculated with B16-F10 cells, increased levels of this chemokine were measured in tumor-bearing limbs, but not the spinal cord, of mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 cells. Increased levels of CCL5 were also found following the incubation of NCTC 2472, but not B16-F10, cells in the corresponding culture medium. The intraplantar injection of CCL5 (0.5ng) to naïve mice evoked thermal hyperalgesia prevented by the coadministration of J113863 or the CCR5 antagonist, d-Ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA), demonstrating that CCL5 can induce thermal hyperalgesia in mice through the activation of CCR1 or CCR5. However, contrasting with the inhibitory effect evoked by J113863, the systemic administration of DAPTA did not prevent tumoral hyperalgesia. Finally, the peritumoral administration of an anti

  16. Intrastriatal grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalon improve allodynia-like withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Ryuichiro; Ishida, Yasushi; Ebihara, Kosuke; Abe, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hisae; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Koganemaru, Go; Kuramashi, Aki; Funahashi, Hideki; Magata, Yasuhiro; Kawai, Keiichi; Nishimori, Toshikazu

    2014-06-24

    We previously reported that a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson's disease showed allodynia-like withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation of the ipsilateral side of the rat hindpaw. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of intrastriatal grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM) on the withdrawal response in 6-OHDA rats. The withdrawal threshold in response to the mechanical stimulation of the rat hindpaw was measured using von Frey filaments. In the ipsilateral side of the 6-OHDA lesions, the withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation significantly increased in 6-OHDA rats with VM grafts compared with those with sham grafts, but did not change in the contralateral side at 5 weeks after transplantation. The present results suggest that the intrastriatal grafts of fetal VM may relieve pain sensation induced by mechanical stimulation in 6-OHDA rats. PMID:24831182

  17. A comparison of chronic aspartame exposure to aspirin on inflammation, hyperalgesia and open field activity following carrageenan-induced monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    LaBuda, C J; Fuchs, P N

    2001-06-15

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether chronic aspartame exposure possesses analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions in the carrageenan-induced monoarthritis model similar to those properties of aspirin. Prior research demonstrated that aspartame can reduce second phase formalin pain and increase motor activity in arthritic patients. Fifty-eight male Sprague-Dawly rats were treated with aspartame (25, 50, 100 mg/kg) or saline for six days. An additional group of animals received daily injections of saline and on the sixth treatment day, received a 150-mg/kg dose of aspirin 30-minutes prior to behavioral testing. On Day 6, animals received an intra-articular (i.a.) injection of 2% lambda carrageenan (CARR) or an equal volume of saline and were tested four hours later on threshold to mechanical and thermal stimuli, open field activity, and knee joint diameter. Aspirin-treated arthritic animals exhibited significantly less mechanical hyperalgesia and knee joint inflammation compared with vehicle treated arthritic animals. However, aspirin did not reverse thermal hyperalgesia or increase motor activity to control levels. Aspartame did not reduce inflammation, increase motor activity, or attenuate thermal allodynia, but at 50 mg/kg did attenuate mechanical allodynia compared with vehicle treated arthritic animals. The anti-hyperalgesic effect on mechanical hyperalgesia was not seen at 25 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg aspartame. These results suggest that a certain amount of aspartame may provide relief of arthritic pain to a similar degree as aspirin in some individuals. The specific effect of aspartame and aspirin on mechanical hyperalgesia should be considered when these agents are used for the therapeutic treatment of arthritic conditions.

  18. Deletion of the CCK2 receptor gene reduces mechanical sensitivity and abolishes the development of hyperalgesia in mononeuropathic mice.

    PubMed

    Kurrikoff, Kaido; Kõks, Sulev; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Bourin, Michel; Arend, Andres; Aunapuu, Marina; Vasar, Eero

    2004-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that cholecystokinin (CCK) is implicated in the modulation of pain sensitivity and the development of neuropathic pain. We used CCK(2) receptor deficient (CCK(2) (-/-)) mice and assessed their mechanical sensitivity using Von Frey filaments, as well as the development and time course of mechanical hyperalgesia in a model of neuropathic pain. We found that CCK(2) (-/-) mice displayed mechanical hyposensitivity, which was reversed to the level of wild-type animals after administration of naloxone (0.1-10 mg/kg). On the other hand, injection of L-365260 (0.01-1 mg/kg), an antagonist of CCK(2) receptors, decreased dose-dependently, mechanical sensitivity in wild-type mice. The mechanism of reduced mechanical sensitivity in CCK(2) (-/-) mice may be explained by changes in interactions between CCK and opioid systems. Indeed, CCK(2) (-/-) mice natively expressed higher levels of lumbar CCK(1), opioid delta and kappa receptors. Next, we found that CCK(2) (-/-) mice did not develop mechanical hyperalgesia in the Bennett's neuropathic pain model. Induction of neuropathy resulted in decrease of lumbar pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene expression in wild-type mice, but increase of POMC expression in CCK(2) (-/-) mice. In addition, induction of neuropathy resulted in further increase of opioid delta receptor in CCK(2) (-/-) mice. Gene expression results indicate up-regulation of opioid system in CCK(2) (-/-) mice, which apparently result in decreased neuropathy score. Our study suggests that not only pain sensitivity, but also mechanical sensitivity and the development of neuropathic pain are regulated by antagonistic interactions between CCK and opioid systems.

  19. Peripheral gene expression profile of mechanical hyperalgesia induced by repeated cold stress in SHRSP5/Dmcr rats.

    PubMed

    Kozaki, Yasuko; Umetsu, Rena; Mizukami, Yukako; Yamamura, Aya; Kitamori, Kazuya; Tsuchikura, Satoru; Ikeda, Katsumi; Yamori, Yukio

    2015-09-01

    Repeated cold stress (RCS) is known to transiently induce functional disorders associated with hypotension and hyperalgesia. In this study, we investigated the effects of RCS (24 and 4 °C alternately at 30-min intervals during the day and 4 °C at night for 2 days, followed by 4 °C on the next 2 consecutive nights) on the thresholds for cutaneous mechanical pain responses and on peripheral expression of "pain-related genes" in SHRSP5/Dmcr rats, which are derived from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats. To define genes peripherally regulated by RCS, we detected changes in the expression of pain-related genes in dorsal root ganglion cells by PCR-based cDNA subtraction analysis or DNA microarray analysis, and confirmed the changes by RT-PCR. We found significantly changed expression in eight pain-related genes (upregulated: Fyn, St8sia1, and Tac 1; downregulated: Ctsb, Fstl1, Itpr1, Npy, S100a10). At least some of these genes may play key roles in hyperalgesia induced by RCS.

  20. Peripheral gene expression profile of mechanical hyperalgesia induced by repeated cold stress in SHRSP5/Dmcr rats.

    PubMed

    Kozaki, Yasuko; Umetsu, Rena; Mizukami, Yukako; Yamamura, Aya; Kitamori, Kazuya; Tsuchikura, Satoru; Ikeda, Katsumi; Yamori, Yukio

    2015-09-01

    Repeated cold stress (RCS) is known to transiently induce functional disorders associated with hypotension and hyperalgesia. In this study, we investigated the effects of RCS (24 and 4 °C alternately at 30-min intervals during the day and 4 °C at night for 2 days, followed by 4 °C on the next 2 consecutive nights) on the thresholds for cutaneous mechanical pain responses and on peripheral expression of "pain-related genes" in SHRSP5/Dmcr rats, which are derived from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats. To define genes peripherally regulated by RCS, we detected changes in the expression of pain-related genes in dorsal root ganglion cells by PCR-based cDNA subtraction analysis or DNA microarray analysis, and confirmed the changes by RT-PCR. We found significantly changed expression in eight pain-related genes (upregulated: Fyn, St8sia1, and Tac 1; downregulated: Ctsb, Fstl1, Itpr1, Npy, S100a10). At least some of these genes may play key roles in hyperalgesia induced by RCS. PMID:25972297

  1. Streptozotocin-Induced Early Thermal Hyperalgesia is independent of Glycemic State of Rats: Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1(TRPV1) and Inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptozotocin (STZ) is used as a common tool to induce diabetes and to study diabetes-induced complications including diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Previously, we have reported that STZ induces a direct effect on neurons through expression and function of the Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel in sensory neurons resulting in thermal hyperalgesia, even in non-diabetic STZ-treated mice. In the present study, we investigated the role of expression and function of TRPV1 in the central sensory nerve terminals in the spinal cord in STZ-induced hyperalgesia in rats. Results We found that a proportion of STZ-treated rats were normoglycemic but still exhibited thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Immunohistochemical data show that STZ treatment, irrespective of glycemic state of the animal, caused microglial activation and increased expression of TRPV1 in spinal dorsal horn. Further, there was a significant increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in spinal cord tissue, irrespective of the glycemic state. Capsaicin-stimulated release of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) was significantly higher in the spinal cord of STZ-treated animals. Intrathecal administration of resiniferatoxin (RTX), a potent TRPV1 agonist, significantly attenuated STZ-induced thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. RTX treatment also prevented the increase in TRPV1-mediated neuropeptide release in the spinal cord tissue. Conclusions From these results, it is concluded that TRPV1 is an integral component of initiating and maintaining inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia, which can be alleviated by intrathecal administration of RTX. Further, the results suggest that enhanced expression and inflammation-induced sensitization of TRPV1 at the spinal cord may play a role in central sensitization in STZ-induced neuropathy. PMID:21794120

  2. Transient Heat Hyperalgesia During Resolution of Ropivacaine Sciatic Nerve Block in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Kolarczyk, Lavinia M.; Williams, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Preliminary studies using perineural sciatic ropivacaine in rat demonstrated unexpected heat hyperalgesia after block resolution. To better characterize the time course relative to mechanical anesthesia-analgesia, we tested the hypothesis that ropivacaine 0.5% leads to transient heat hyperalgesia in rat independent of mechanical nociception. We also evaluated functional toxicity (e.g., long-term hyperalgesia and/or tactile allodynia 2 weeks post-injection). Methods Under surgical exposure, left sciatic nerve block was performed in 2 groups of adult male rats – ropivacaine (200 μL, 5 mg/mL, n=14) versus vehicle (n=11). The efficacy and duration of block was assessed with serial heat, mechanical (Randall-Selitto testing), and tactile (von Frey-like monofilaments) tests; motor-proprioceptive (rotarod) and sedation tests were employed 1 hr and 7 hr post-injection. The presence of nerve injury was assessed by repeating the heat, tactile, and motor tests 12–14 days post-injection. Results Ropivacaine-induced anesthesia was fully manifest at 1 hr post-injection. At 3 hr post-injection, heat hypersensitivity was present in the setting of resolved mechanical analgesia. All behavioral measures returned to baseline by 2 wk post-injection. There was no evidence of (i) behavioral sedation, (ii) persistent changes in heat or mechanical sensitivity, or (iii) persistent changes in proprioceptive-motor function at 12–14 days post-injection. Conclusions Ropivacaine 0.5% induces transient heat hyperalgesia in the setting of resolved mechanical analgesia, further suggestive of modality and/or nociceptive fiber specificity. Whether this finding partially translates to “rebound pain” after patients’ nerve blocks wear off requires further study. PMID:21451438

  3. Small interfering RNA-mediated selective knockdown of Na(V)1.8 tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel reverses mechanical allodynia in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, X-W; Goregoaker, S; Engler, H; Zhou, X; Mark, L; Crona, J; Terry, R; Hunter, J; Priestley, T

    2007-05-11

    The biophysical properties of a tetrodotoxin resistant (TTXr) sodium channel, Na(V)1.8, and its restricted expression to the peripheral sensory neurons suggest that blocking this channel might have therapeutic potential in various pain states and may offer improved tolerability compared with existing sodium channel blockers. However, the role of Na(V)1.8 in nociception cannot be tested using a traditional pharmacological approach with small molecules because currently available sodium channel blockers do not distinguish between sodium channel subtypes. We sought to determine whether small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) might be capable of achieving the desired selectivity. Using Northern blot analysis and membrane potential measurement, several siRNAs were identified that were capable of a highly-selective attenuation of Na(V)1.8 message as well as functional expression in clonal ND7/23 cells which were stably transfected with the rat Na(V)1.8 gene. Functional knockdown of the channel was confirmed using whole-cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology. One of the siRNA probes showing a robust knockdown of Na(V)1.8 current was evaluated for in vivo efficacy in reversing an established tactile allodynia in the rat chronic constriction nerve-injury (CCI) model. The siRNA, which was delivered to lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) via an indwelling epidural cannula, caused a significant reduction of Na(V)1.8 mRNA expression in lumbar 4 and 5 (L4-L5) DRG neurons and consequently reversed mechanical allodynia in CCI rats. We conclude that silencing of Na(V)1.8 channel using a siRNA approach is capable of producing pain relief in the CCI model and further support a role for Na(V)1.8 in pathological sensory dysfunction. PMID:17367951

  4. SPINAL CORD MECHANISMS MEDIATING BEHAVIORAL HYPERALGESIA INDUCED BY NEUROKININ-1 TACHYKININ RECEPTOR ACTIVATION IN THE ROSTRAL VENTROMEDIAL MEDULLA

    PubMed Central

    Lagraize, S. C.; Guo, W.; Yang, K.; Wei, F.; Ren, K.; Dubner, R.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperalgesia in animal injury models is linked to activation of descending raphespinal modulatory circuits originating in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). A neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist microinjected into the RVM before or after inflammation produced by complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) resulted in an attenuation of thermal hyperalgesia. A transient (acute) or a continuous infusion of Substance P (SP) microinjected into the RVM of non-inflamed animals led to similar pain hypersensitivity. Intrathecal pretreatment or post-treatment of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (Y-25130 or ondansetron) blocked the SP-induced hyperalgesia. The SP-induced hyperalgesia was both GABAA and NMDA receptor-dependent after pre- and post-treatment with selective antagonists at the spinal level. A microinjection of SP into the RVM also led to increased NMDA NR1 receptor subunit phosphorylation in spinal cord tissue. The GABAA receptor-mediated hyperalgesia involved a shift in the anionic gradient in dorsal horn nociceptive neurons and an increase in phosphorylated NKCC1 protein (isoform of the Na-K-Cl cotransporter). Following a low dose of SP infused into the RVM, intrathecal muscimol (GABAA agonist) increased SP-induced thermal hyperalgesia, phosphorylated NKCC1 protein expression, and NMDA NR1 subunit phosphorylation in the spinal cord. The thermal hyperalgesia was blocked by intrathecal gabazine, the GABAA receptor antagonist, and MK-801, the NMDA receptor channel blocker. These findings indicate that NK-1 receptors in the RVM are involved in SP-induced thermal hyperalgesia, this hyperalgesia is 5-HT3-receptor dependent at the spinal level, and involves the functional interaction of spinal GABAA and NMDA receptors. PMID:20888891

  5. Myelinated Afferents Are Involved in Pathology of the Spontaneous Electrical Activity and Mechanical Hyperalgesia of Myofascial Trigger Spots in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are common causes for chronic pain. Myelinated afferents were considered to be related with muscular pain, and our clinical researches indicated they might participate in the pathology of MTrPs. Here, we applied myofascial trigger spots (MTrSs, equal to MTrPs in human) of rats to further investigate role of myelinated afferents. Modified pyridine-silver staining revealed more nerve endings at MTrSs than non-MTrSs (P < 0.01), and immunohistochemistry with Neurofilament 200 indicated more myelinated afferents existed in MTrSs (P < 0.01). Spontaneous electrical activity (SEA) recordings at MTrSs showed that specific block of myelinated afferents in sciatic nerve with tetrodotoxin (TTX) led to significantly decreased SEA (P < 0.05). Behavioral assessment showed that mechanical pain thresholds (MPTs) of MTrSs were lower than those of non-MTrSs (P < 0.01). Block of myelinated afferents by intramuscular TTX injection increased MPTs of MTrSs significantly (P < 0.01), while MPTs of non-MTrSs first decreased (P < 0.05) and then increased (P > 0.05). 30 min after the injection, MPTs at MTrSs were significantly lower than those of non-MTrSs (P < 0.01). Therefore, we concluded that proliferated myelinated afferents existed at MTrSs, which were closely related to pathology of SEA and mechanical hyperalgesia of MTrSs. PMID:26064165

  6. NSAIDs attenuate hyperalgesia induced by TRP channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz; Tsagareli, Merab G.

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels have been extensively investigated as targets for analgesic drug discovery. Because some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are structural analogs of prostaglandins (mediators of inflammation) and NSAIDs attenuate heat nociception and mechanical allodynia in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, we examined three widely used NSAIDs (diclofenac, ketorolac, and xefocam) on the activation of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels using thermal paw withdrawal (Hargreaves) test and mechanical paw withdrawal (von Frey) test in male rats. Thermal withdrawal latencies and mechanical thresholds for both hind paws were obtained with 5, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min intraplantar post-injection of TRPA1 agonizts, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) (a natural compound of mustard oil) and cinnamaldehyde (CA), and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin or vehicle. Twenty minutes prior to the start of the experiment with TRP agonizts, diclofenac, ketorolac or xefocam were pre-injected in the same hindpaw and animals were examined by these two tests. After pretreatment of all three NSAIDs in the ipsilateral (injected) hindpaw that produced strong antinociceptive effects, AITC, CA, and capsaicin caused significant decreases in latency of the thermal withdrawal reflex compared with vehicle or the contralateral hindpaw. The same findings were observed for the paw withdrawal threshold. In approximately 30 min the effects of CA, AITC, and capsaicin returned to baseline. The data are different from our previous evidence, where TRPA1 agonizts AITC and CA and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin produced hyperalgesia for nearly 2 h and resulted in facilitation of these withdrawal reflexes (Tsagareli et al., 2010, 2013). Thus, our data showing that NSAIDs suppress thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia following TRP activation could presumably due to inactivation or desensitization of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels by NSAIDs. PMID:26909384

  7. Mas-related gene (Mrg) C receptors inhibit mechanical allodynia and spinal microglia activation in the early phase of neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongmei; Xue, Yaping; Chen, Yajuan; Ruan, Liqin; Hong, Yanguo

    2016-04-01

    Mas-related gene (Mrg) C receptors are exclusively expressed in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, their functional roles are poorly understood. This study was aimed to determine the effect of MrgC receptors on pain hypersensitivity in the early phase of neuropathic pain and its underlying mechanisms. Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of the selective MrgC receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22) at 1 or 10nmol attenuated mechanical allodynia one day after L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) surgery. I.t. BAM8-22 (10 nmol) inhibited SNL-induced microglia activation in the spinal dorsal horn on day 2 post-SNL. The BAM8-22 treatment also abolished SNL-induced upregulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthesis (nNOS) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). On the other hand, SNL, but not sham, surgery reduced the expression of MrgC receptor mRNA in the injured L5 DRG without changing thier levels in the adjacent uninjured L4 or L6 DRG on day 2 following the surgery. These results suggest that the activation of MrgC receptors can relieve pain hypersensitivity by the inhibition of nNOS increase in DRG neurons and microglia activation in the spinal dorsal horn in the early time following peripheral nerve injury. This study provides evidence that MrgC receptors could be targeted as a novel therapy for neuropathic pain with limited unwanted effects.

  8. Phosphorylation of the GluN1 subunit in dorsal horn neurons by remifentanil: a mechanism for opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Li, S S; Zhao, N; Yu, C

    2015-03-13

    Remifentanil (an ultra-short acting μ-opioid receptor agonist) use has been associated with acute opioid tolerance and hyperalgesia. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that remifentanil elicits rapid and prolonged upregulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) currents. However, the effect of remifentanil on the levels of the GluN1 subunit of the NMDAR in dorsal horn neurons (DHNs) has not been reported. We investigated the effect of remifentanil, along with ketamine (NMDAR antagonist) and naloxone (μ-opioid receptor antagonist), on GluN1 mRNA levels and the amount of phosphorylated GluN1 in primary cultures of embryonic rat DHNs. DHNs were isolated from 18-19-day rat embryos and treated with remifentanil or vehicle for 1 h. GluN1 mRNA and protein levels, determined by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively, were significantly and persistently increased by remifentanil exposure compared with the control group (P < 0.05). These results may partially account for the mechanism of remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. This increase was prevented by ketamine (NMDAR antagonist) and naloxone (μ-opioid receptors antagonist), thus providing a potential therapeutic mechanism for the prevention of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

  9. A novel model of combined neuropathic and inflammatory pain displaying long-lasting allodynia and spontaneous pain-like behaviour.

    PubMed

    Allchorne, Andrew J; Gooding, Hayley L; Mitchell, Rory; Fleetwood-Walker, Sue M

    2012-12-01

    Many clinical cases of chronic pain exhibit both neuropathic and inflammatory components. In contrast, most animal models of chronic pain focus on one type of injury alone. Here we present a novel combined model of both neuropathic and inflammatory pain and characterise its distinctive properties. This combined model of chronic constriction injury (CCI) and intraplantar Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) injection results in enhanced mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, a static weight bearing deficit, and notably pronounced spontaneous foot lifting (SFL) behaviour (which under our conditions was not seen in either individual model and may reflect ongoing/spontaneous pain). Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) expression of Activating Transcription Factor-3 (ATF-3), a marker of axonal injury, was no greater in the combined model than CCI alone. Initial pharmacological characterisation of the new model showed that the SFL was reversed by gabapentin or diclofenac, typical analgesics for neuropathic or inflammatory pain respectively, but not by mexiletine, a Na(+) channel blocker effective in both neuropathic and inflammatory pain models. Static weight bearing deficit was moderately reduced by gabapentin, whereas only diclofenac reversed mechanical allodynia. This novel animal model of chronic pain may prove a useful test-bed for further analysing the pharmacological susceptibility of complicated clinical pain states. PMID:23131427

  10. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha is required for the initiation and maintenance of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2010-01-01

    Repeated administration of opioids not only leads to tolerance and dependence, but also results in nociceptive enhancement called opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Nociceptive mediators involved in OIH generation remain poorly understood. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-depent protein kinase II (CaMKIIalpha) is critical for OIH. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia was produced by repeated morphine administration or pellet implantation in mice. Correlating with the development of tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, spinal CaMKIIalpha activity was significantly increased in OIH. KN93, a CaMKII inhibitor, dose- and time-dependently reversed OIH and CaMKII activation without impairing locomotor coordination. To elucidate the specific CaMKII isoform involved, we targeted CaMKIIalpha by using small interfering RNA and demonstrated that knockdown of spinal CaMKIIalpha attenuated OIH. Furthermore, morphine failed to induce OIH in CaMKIIalpha(T286A) point mutant mice, although wild-type littermate mice developed robust OIH after repeated treatments with morphine. These data implicate, for the first time, an essential role of CaMKIIalpha as a cellular mechanism leading to and maintaining opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

  11. Comparison of Mechanical Allodynia and Recovery of Locomotion and Bladder Function by Different Parameters of Low Thoracic Spinal Contusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michael W.; Johnson, Kathia M.; Lee, Jun Yeon; Hulsebosch, Claire E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study was designed to examine the functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) by adjusting the parameters of impact force and dwell-time using the Infinite Horizon (IH) impactor device. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (225–240 g) were divided into eight injury groups based on force of injury (Kdyn) and dwell time (seconds), indicated as Force-Dwell time: 150-4, 150-3, 150-2, 150-1, 150-0, 200-0, 90-2 and sham controls, respectively. Results After T10 SCI, higher injury force produced greater spinal cord displacement (P < 0.05) and showed a significant correlation (r = 0.813) between the displacement and the force (P < 0.05). In neuropathic pain-like behavior, the percent of paw withdrawals scores in the hindpaw for the 150-4, 150-3, 150-2, 150-1 and the 200-0 injury groups were significantly lowered compared with sham controls (P < 0.05). The recovery of locomotion had a significant within-subjects effect of time (P < 0.05) and the 150-0 group had increased recovery compared to other groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the 200-0 and the 90-2 recovered significantly better than all the 150 kdyn impact groups that included a dwell-time (P < 0.05). In recovery of spontaneous bladder function, the 150-4 injury group took significantly longer recovery time whereas the 150-0 and the 90-2 groups had the shortest recovery times. Conclusions The present study demonstrates SCI parameters optimize development of mechanical allodynia and other pathological outcomes. PMID:27103963

  12. The 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist F 13640 attenuates mechanical allodynia in a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Deseure, Kristof; Koek, Wouter; Colpaert, Francis C; Adriaensen, Hugo

    2002-12-01

    The effects of acute intraperitoneal injections of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonists F 13640 [(3-chloro-4-fluoro-phenyl)-[4-fluoro-4-[[(5-methyl-pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-amino]-methyl]piperidin-1-yl]-methadone] and F 13714 [3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl-(4-fluoro-4-[[(5-methyl-6-methylamino-pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-amino]-methyl]-piperidin-1-yl-methanone] were studied in comparison with those of baclofen and morphine on responsiveness to von Frey hair stimulation after chronic constriction injury to the rat's infraorbital nerve (IoN-CCI). Following IoN-CCI, an ipsilateral hyperresponsiveness developed that remained stable in control rats throughout the period of drug testing. F 13640, F 13714, baclofen and morphine dose-dependently decreased the hyperresponsiveness; normalization of the response occurred at doses 0.63, 0.04, 5 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. Confirming earlier data, baclofen's effects further validate IoN-CCI as a model of trigeminal neuralgia. The effects of F 13640 and F 13714 are initial evidence that 5-HT(1A) receptor agonists produce profound analgesia in the IoN-CCI model. The present data extend recent evidence that high-efficacy 5-HT(1A) receptor activation constitutes a new mechanism of central analgesia the spectrum of which may also encompass trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:12450569

  13. Heat-rekindling in UVB-irradiated skin above NGF-sensitized muscle: experimental models of prolonged mechanical hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Silvia Lo; Finocchietti, Sara; Gazerani, Parisa; Petersen, Lars J; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Experimental models of prolonged pain hypersensitivity in humans are desirable for screening novel analgesic compounds. In this study, heat stimuli were applied in ultraviolet-B (UVB)-irradiated skin and in the UVB-irradiated skin combined with nerve growth factor (NGF)-injected muscle to investigate 1) whether the evoked mechanical hypersensitivity by UVB irradiation would be prolonged or enhanced following heat rekindling, and 2) whether the combination between cutaneous and muscle hypersensitivity may influence the rekindling effects. Skin sensitization was induced in 25 volunteers by UVB irradiation in areas above the upper-trapezius muscle, low-back or forearm. Muscle sensitization was induced in the low back by bilateral injections of NGF. The area of cutaneous hyperalgesia was evaluated 3 days after the irradiation by mechanical pin-prick stimulation whereas the areas of allodynia were evaluated 1, 2 and 3 days after irradiation by von Frey hair assessments. Cutaneous heat stimulation (40°C for 5 min) was performed on the 3(rd) day to investigate its effect on the areas of cutaneous allodynia and hyperalgesia. Findings revealed that 1) allodynia and hyperalgesia developed following UVB irradiation, 2) heat stimulation of the UVB-irradiated skin enlarged both hyperalgesic and allodynic areas (P < 0.01), and 3) muscle sensitization did not influence the effect of UVB on allodynia or the response to heat rekindling. These data suggest that heat rekindling applied to an UVB-sensitized skin can maintain or facilitate allodynia and hyperalgesia for a longer period offering a suitable model for testing analgesic compounds when sufficient duration of time is needed for investigation of drug efficacy. PMID:25349637

  14. Reduction in mechanical allodynia in complex regional pain syndrome patients with ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the superficial peroneal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Won Soek; Kim, Sang Hyun; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lee, Mi Sun

    2016-01-01

    The superficial peroneal nerve is vulnerable to damage from ankle sprain injuries and fractures as well as surgery to this region. And it is also one of the most commonly involved nerves in complex regional pain syndrome type II in the foot and ankle region. We report two cases of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of superficial peroneal nerve for reduction of allodynia in CRPS patients. PMID:27738506

  15. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1 receptors prevents the induction of thermal hyperalgesia via modulation of TRPV1 expression in carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain rats: involvement of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in DRGs.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Gu; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2014-04-01

    Although previous reports have suggested that P2Y1 receptors (P2Y1Rs) are involved in cutaneous nociceptive signaling, it remains unclear how P2Y1Rs contribute to peripheral sensitization. The current study was designed to delineate the role of peripheral P2Y1Rs in pain and to investigate potential linkages to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in DRGs and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) expression in a rodent inflammatory pain model. Following injection of 2% carrageenan into the hind paw, expressions of P2Y1 and TRPV1 and the phosphorylation rates of both p38 MAPK and ERK but not JNK were increased and peaked at day 2 post-injection. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1Rs by the P2Y1R antagonist, MRS2500 injection (i.pl, D0 to D2) significantly reduced the induction of thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Simultaneously, MRS2500 injections suppressed upregulated TRPV1 expression and DRG p38 phosphorylation, while pERK signaling was not affected. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 activation in the DRGs by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor, i.t, D0 to D2) prevented the upregulation of TRPV1 and a single i.t injection of SB203580 reversed the established thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Lastly, to identify the mechanism of action of P2Y1Rs, we repeatedly injected the P2Y1 agonist, MRS2365 into the naïve rat's hind paw and observed a dose-dependent increase in TRPV1 expression and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These data demonstrate a sequential role for P2Y1R, p38 MAPK and TRPV1 in inflammation-induced thermal hyperalgesia; thus, peripheral P2Y1Rs activation modulates p38 MAPK signaling and TRPV1 expression, which ultimately leads to the induction of thermal hyperalgesia. PMID:24333674

  16. Eccentric Muscle Contraction and Stretching Evoke Mechanical Hyperalgesia and Modulate CGRP and P2X3 Expression in a Functionally Relevant Manner

    PubMed Central

    Dessem, Dean; Ambalavanar, Ranjinidevi; Evancho, Melena; Moutanni, Aicha; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Bai, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive, movement-based models were used to investigate muscle pain. In rats, the masseter muscle was rapidly stretched or electrically stimulated during forced lengthening to produce eccentric muscle contractions (EC). Both EC and stretching disrupted scattered myofibers and produced intramuscular plasma extravasation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were elevated in the masseter 24h following EC. At 48h, neutrophils increased and ED1 macrophages infiltrated myofibers while ED2 macrophages were abundant at 4d. Mechanical hyperalgesia was evident in the ipsilateral head 4h-4d after a single bout of EC and for 7d following multiple bouts (1 bout/d for 4d). Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA increased in the trigeminal ganglion 24h following EC while immunoreactive CGRP decreased. By 2d, CGRP-muscle afferent numbers equaled naive numbers implying that CGRP is released following EC and replenished within 2d. EC elevated P2X3 mRNA and increased P2X3-muscle afferent neuron number for 12d while electrical stimulation without muscle contraction altered neither CGRP nor P2X3 mRNA levels. Muscle stretching produced hyperalgesia for 2d whereas contraction alone produced no hyperalgesia. Stretching increased CGRP mRNA at 24h but not CGRP-muscle afferent number at 2–12d. In contrast, stretching significantly increased the number of P2X3-muscle afferent neurons for 12d. The sustained, elevated P2X3 expression evoked by EC and stretching may enhance nociceptor responsiveness to ATP released during subsequent myofiber damage. Movement-based actions such as EC and muscle stretching produce unique tissue responses and modulate neuropeptide and nociceptive receptor expression in a manner particularly relevant to repeated muscle damage. PMID:20207080

  17. Go-sha-jinki-Gan (GJG) ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of TNF-α expression in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Miho; Nakae, Aya; Kishida, Yuki; Baba, Kousuke; Sakashita, Noriko; Shibata, Masahiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternative medicine is noted for its clinical effect and minimal invasiveness in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Go-sha-jinki-Gan, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, has been used for meralgia and numbness in elderly patients. However, the exact mechanism of GJG is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of the analgesic effect of GJG in a chronic constriction injury model. Results GJG significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia from the early phase (von Frey test, p < 0.0001; cold-plate test, p < 0.0001; hot-plate test p = 0.011; two-way repeated measures ANOVA). Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed that GJG decreased the expression of Iba1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord. Double staining immunohistochemistry showed that most of the tumor necrosis factor-α was co-expressed in Iba1-positive cells at day 3 post-operation. GJG decreased the phosphorylation of p38 in the ipsilateral dorsal horn. Moreover, intrathecal injection of tumor necrosis factor-α opposed the anti-allodynic effect of GJG in the cold-plate test. Conclusions Our data suggest that GJG ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α expression derived from activated microglia. GJG is a promising drug for the treatment of neuropathic pain induced by neuro-inflammation. PMID:27296622

  18. Suspected opioid-induced hyperalgesia in an infant.

    PubMed

    Hallett, B R; Chalkiadis, G A

    2012-01-01

    One explanation for diminished opioid analgesic efficacy is opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). We report a case of OIH in an infant with gastroschisis, requiring multiple surgical interventions and prolonged sedation for ventilation. This is the first report of OIH in an infant. On day 41 of life after nine separate surgical interventions, the patient's pain scores increased and remained elevated, despite increasing opioid administration. The patient also developed hyperalgesia, allodynia, and photophobia and became extremely irritable upon handling. Other possible causes were excluded, including interruption to opioid delivery, sepsis, acid-base and electrolyte disturbance, and ongoing surgical pathology. An opioid rotation to hydromorphone was initiated and ketamine was commenced. Sedation for ventilation was achieved with dexmedetomidine and midazolam infusions. Over a period of 24 h after opioid de-escalation, pain scores reduced rapidly and the patient became significantly less irritable with handling. All infusions were gradually weaned and eventually ceased.

  19. Contact lenses, migraine, and allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Timucin, Ozgur Bulent; Karadag, Mehmet Fatih; Mehmet, Baykara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials and electrophysiologic studies demonstrated increased perceptual sensitivity in patients suffering from migraines. At least, one triggering factor is described in 85% of migraine patients. The aim of this report was to investigate the relationship between contact lens (CL) usage and migraine attacks in two cases. Two patients who were diagnosed with migraine reported that the frequency of migraine attacks increased after they switched to using CL with different base curves (BCs). These two patients, who began using CL with different BCs experienced discomfort and dryness of the eye. The ocular complaints were followed by migraine attacks. CL intolerance was also developed during migraine attack in one of the cases. The frequency of migraine attacks decreased and allodynia relieved significantly when flatter BCs were selected. CL related stimulus could have triggered the migraine attack. CLs should be well fitted in migraine patients with allodynia. PMID:27433037

  20. Berberine Ameliorates Allodynia Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury of the Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether berberine could ameliorate allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After inducement of CCI, significant increases in the number of paw lifts from a cold plate test (cold allodynia) and decreased paw withdrawal threshold in the von Frey hair stimulation test (mechanical allodynia) were observed. However, these cold and mechanical allodynia were markedly alleviated by berberine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Sciatic nerve myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities were also attenuated by berberine administration. Continuous injection for 7 days induced no development of tolerance. The antiallodynic effect of 20 mg/kg berberine was comparable to that of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that berberine could mitigate allodynia induced by CCI, a neuropathic pain model, and it suggested that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of berberine contributed to the antiallodynic effect in the CCI model.

  1. Berberine Ameliorates Allodynia Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury of the Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether berberine could ameliorate allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After inducement of CCI, significant increases in the number of paw lifts from a cold plate test (cold allodynia) and decreased paw withdrawal threshold in the von Frey hair stimulation test (mechanical allodynia) were observed. However, these cold and mechanical allodynia were markedly alleviated by berberine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Sciatic nerve myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities were also attenuated by berberine administration. Continuous injection for 7 days induced no development of tolerance. The antiallodynic effect of 20 mg/kg berberine was comparable to that of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that berberine could mitigate allodynia induced by CCI, a neuropathic pain model, and it suggested that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of berberine contributed to the antiallodynic effect in the CCI model. PMID:25674823

  2. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion. The 30 animals were divided into experimental groups according to the drug used. The drugs were administered for two weeks after the surgical procedure to induce hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated using the paw pressure test, von Frey electronic test and Hargreaves test, over a seven-week period. Results: The greatest reduction of hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals treated with morphine, followed by dexamethasone, indomethacin and atenolol. Reductions in hyperalgesia were observed after drug administration ceased, except for the group of animals treated with morphine, in which there was an increase in hyperalgesia after discontinuation of the treatment. Conclusion: Hyperalgesia induced by NP contact with the DRG can be reduced through administration of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs, but a greater reduction was observed with the administration of dexamethasone. PMID:27026966

  3. Inhibition of CaMKIIα in the Central Nucleus of Amygdala Attenuates Fentanyl-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Li, Chenhong; Yin, Pingping; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Luo, Fang

    2016-10-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is a less-studied phenomenon that has been reported in both preclinical and clinical studies. Although the underlying cause is not entirely understood, OIH is a real-life problem that affects millions of patients on a daily basis. Research has implicated the important contribution of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) to OIH at the level of spinal nociceptors. To expand our understanding of the entire brain circuitry driving OIH, in this study we investigated the role of CaMKIIα in the laterocapcular division of the central amygdala (CeLC), the conjunctive point between the spinal cord and rostro-ventral medulla. OIH was produced by repeated fentanyl administration in the rat. Correlating with the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, CaMKIIα activity was significantly elevated in the CeLC in OIH. In addition, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in CeLC neurons were significantly increased in OIH. 2-[N-(2-hidroxyethyl)-N-(4-methoxy-benzenesulfonyl)]-amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine, a CaMKIIα inhibitor, dose dependently reversed sensory hypersensitivity, activation of CeLC CaMKIIα, and mEPSCs in OIH. Taken together, our data for the first time implicate a critical role of CeLC CaMKIIα in OIH. PMID:27451410

  4. Induction of Hyperalgesia in Pigs through Blocking Low Hydraulic Resistance Channels and Reduction of the Resistance through Acupuncture: A Mechanism of Action of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Bo; Xu, Yi-Hui; Tian, Yu-Ying; Li, Hong; Wang, Guang-Jun; Huang, Tao; Jia, Shu-Yong

    2013-01-01

    According to the classic theory of Chinese medicine, pain is due to the blockage in meridian channels, and acupuncture was invented to treat pain by “dredging” the channels. To test the theory, a hyperalgesia model was made by injecting hydrogel into low hydraulic resistance channel (LHRC) in 12 anaesthetized minipigs. Tail-flick threshold and ear-flick threshold were measured using a thermal radiation dolorimeter, and relative flick threshold (RFT) was calculated. Hydraulic resistance (HR) was measured with a biological HR measuring instrument on low HR points on LHRC and on control points with higher HR located outside LHRC; readings were recorded before, during, and after acupuncture treatment. RFT decreased after blocking the LRHC and was still significantly decreased 2 days and 4 days afterwards. No significant changes occurred when injecting saline into the same points or injecting gel into points outside the channel. Subsequent acupuncture reduced HR on LRHC along meridians but had no significant effect on sites with higher HR located outside LHRC. One of the mechanisms of action of acupuncture treatment for chronic pain may be that acupuncture affects peripheral tissue by reducing the HR in LHRC along meridians, improving the flow of interstitial fluid and removing algogenic substances and thereby relieving pain. PMID:23997798

  5. Capsaicin avoidance as a measure of chemical hyperalgesia in orofacial nerve injury models.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Yves; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Sawyer, Carolyn M; Zanotto, Karen L; Merrill, Austin W; Carstens, E

    2013-05-24

    Many patients suffer from trigeminal neuralgia and other types of orofacial pain that are poorly treated, necessitating preclininal animal models for development of mechanisms-based therapies. The present study assessed capsaicin avoidance and other nocifensive behavioral responses in three models of orofacial nerve injury in rats: chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the mental nerves, partial tight ligation of mental nerves, and CCI of lingual nerves. We additionally investigated if nerve injury resulted in enhanced capsaicin-evoked activation of neurons in trigeminal caudalis (Vc) or nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) based on expression of Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI). Mental nerve CCI resulted in an enhancement of capsaicin avoidance in a two-bottle preference paradigm, while neither mental nerve injury produced thermal hyperalgesia or mechanical allodynia. CCI of lingual nerves did not affect capsaicin avoidance. Counts of FLI in Vc were significantly higher in the lingual sham and mental nerve CCI groups compared to mental shams; FLI counts in NTS did not differ among groups. Mental nerve CCI may have induced central sensitization of chemical nociception since increased capsaicin avoidance was accompanied by greater activation of Vc neurons in response to oral capsaicin.

  6. A comprehensive review of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Marion; Silverman, Sanford M; Hansen, Hans; Patel, Vikram B; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2011-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is defined as a state of nociceptive sensitization caused by exposure to opioids. The condition is characterized by a paradoxical response whereby a patient receiving opioids for the treatment of pain could actually become more sensitive to certain painful stimuli. The type of pain experienced might be the same as the underlying pain or might be different from the original underlying pain. OIH appears to be a distinct, definable, and characteristic phenomenon that could explain loss of opioid efficacy in some patients. Findings of the clinical prevalence of OIH are not available. However, several observational, cross-sectional, and prospective controlled trials have examined the expression and potential clinical significance of OIH in humans. Most studies have been conducted using several distinct cohorts and methodologies utilizing former opioid addicts on methadone maintenance therapy, perioperative exposure to opioids in patients undergoing surgery, and healthy human volunteers after acute opioid exposure using human experimental pain testing. The precise molecular mechanism of OIH, while not yet understood, varies substantially in the basic science literature, as well as clinical medicine. It is generally thought to result from neuroplastic changes in the peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) that lead to sensitization of pronociceptive pathways. While there are many proposed mechanisms for OIH, 5 mechanisms involving the central glutaminergic system, spinal dynorphins, descending facilitation, genetic mechanisms, and decreased reuptake and enhanced nociceptive response have been described as the important mechanisms. Of these, the central glutaminergic system is considered the most common possibility. Another is the hypothesis that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in OIH include activation, inhibition of the glutamate transporter system, facilitation of calcium regulated intracellular protein kinase C, and cross

  7. Fatiguing exercise enhances hyperalgesia to muscle inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sluka, Kathleen A; Rasmussen, Lynn A

    2010-02-01

    Since many people with chronic fatigue present with pain and many people with chronic pain present with fatigue, we tested if fatigue would enhance the response to pain in male and female mice. We further tested for the activation of brainstem nuclei by the fatigue task using c-fos as a marker. Fatigue was induced by having mice spontaneously run in running wheel for 2h. Carrageenan (0.03%) was injected into the gastrocnemius muscle either 2h before or 2h after the fatigue task. The mechanical sensitivity of the paw (von Frey filaments), muscle (tweezers), grip force and running wheel activity was assessed before and 24h after injection of carrageenan. Both male and female mice that performed the fatigue task, either before or after intramuscular injection of carrageenan, showed an enhanced mechanical sensitivity of the paw, but not the muscle. Ovariectomized mice showed a similar response to male mice. There was a decrease in running wheel activity after carrageenan injection, but no change in grip force suggesting that mice had no deficit in motor performance induced by the carrageenan. C-fos expression was observed in the nucleus raphe pallidus, obscurus, and magnus after the fatigue task suggesting an increased activity in the raphe nuclei in response to the fatigue task. Therefore, widespread hyperalgesia is enhanced by the fatigue response but not hyperalgesia at the site of insult. We suggest that this effect is sex-dependent and involves mechanisms in the brainstem to result in an enhanced hyperalgesia.

  8. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia: when pain killers make pain worse.

    PubMed

    Kaneria, Anshuni

    2014-06-04

    A 44-year-old woman had a temporal glioma and was admitted to the hospice with pain that was not controlled despite escalating opioids. Her pain levels rose after every dose increase resulting now in continuous pain, making her very low in mood. Her short-term memory had also declined in a stepwise fashion with each increase in opioids. Additionally, her poor health had had a detrimental effect on family life. Physical examination was difficult due to allodynia but no major abnormality was found. The team suspected opioid-induced hyperalgesia and decided to cut the patient's opioids by one-third initially. This immediately improved the overall pain. The opioids continued to be decreased incrementally every 1-2 days until the pain had disappeared completely. She was stabilised on a dose almost one-seventh of her original regime. Mood and memory also improved as opioids decreased and she was discharged home after 8 days.

  9. Opioid induced hyperalgesia altered with propofol infusion.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Alan D; Chung, Keun Sam; Vadivelu, Nalini; Cantemir, Catalin; Urman, Richard D; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2014-01-01

    Propofol is a common induction agent that is utilized worldwide in the field of anesthesiology. In recent years, its potential therapeutic role in a variety of patient states has been demonstrated. Controversy exists regarding Propofol mediated analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties. Recent studies have suggested a variety of different mechanisms of action, including modulation of N-Methyl-D- Aspartate receptors and the endocannabinoid system. The N-Methyl-D- Aspartate receptor is part of a larger family of glutamate receptors and is an important mediator of excitatory neurotransmission. In the case presented, the pain experienced by the patient was not well-controlled, in spite of increasing doses of opioids, potentially due to superimposed opioid induced hyperalgesia. In the present case, we demonstrate a cycle of opioid induced hyperalgesia which was successfully affected with a Propofol infusion. Controversial reports exist in animal studies on the analgesic properties of Propofol. Randomized controlled studies in animal models studying the effect of Propofol on pain sensation have shown that Propofol possesses an analgesic effect. This clinical case demonstrates that Propofol could possibly have antihyperalgesic effects on opioid induced hyperalgesia caused by high-doses of chronic opioids and worsened by fentanyl. We postulate that a probable mechanism of complete pain relief after the procedure could be the inhibition of activity of the N-Methyl-D- Aspartate receptor by Propofol because it was the only agent the patient received during the procedure, causing a break of the cycle of opioid induced hyperalgesia. Additional research is required to clarify Propofol mediated or modulated analgesic properties in humans.

  10. Transplanted astrocytes derived from BMP- or CNTF-treated glial-restricted precursors have opposite effects on recovery and allodynia after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jeannette E; Pröschel, Christoph; Zhang, Ningzhe; Noble, Mark; Mayer-Pröschel, Margot; Davies, Stephen JA

    2008-01-01

    Background Two critical challenges in developing cell-transplantation therapies for injured or diseased tissues are to identify optimal cells and harmful side effects. This is of particular concern in the case of spinal cord injury, where recent studies have shown that transplanted neuroepithelial stem cells can generate pain syndromes. Results We have previously shown that astrocytes derived from glial-restricted precursor cells (GRPs) treated with bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) can promote robust axon regeneration and functional recovery when transplanted into rat spinal cord injuries. In contrast, we now show that transplantation of GRP-derived astrocytes (GDAs) generated by exposure to the gp130 agonist ciliary neurotrophic factor (GDAsCNTF), the other major signaling pathway involved in astrogenesis, results in failure of axon regeneration and functional recovery. Moreover, transplantation of GDACNTF cells promoted the onset of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at 2 weeks after injury, an effect that persisted through 5 weeks post-injury. Delayed onset of similar neuropathic pain was also caused by transplantation of undifferentiated GRPs. In contrast, rats transplanted with GDAsBMP did not exhibit pain syndromes. Conclusion Our results show that not all astrocytes derived from embryonic precursors are equally beneficial for spinal cord repair and they provide the first identification of a differentiated neural cell type that can cause pain syndromes on transplantation into the damaged spinal cord, emphasizing the importance of evaluating the capacity of candidate cells to cause allodynia before initiating clinical trials. They also confirm the particular promise of GDAs treated with bone morphogenetic protein for spinal cord injury repair. PMID:18803859

  11. Patterns of hyperalgesia in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sieweke, N; Birklein, F; Riedl, B; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1999-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is characterized by a triad of sensory, motor and autonomic dysfunctions, with long-standing pain and temperature differences of the affected and contralateral limb as predominant symptoms. The pathogenesis of the disorder still remains unclear. Among the main hypotheses of an underlying pathophysiology we find inflammatory processes and dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system. Whether the main site of dysfunction is found centrally or peripherally is not known. With psychophysical methods we studied patterns of hyperalgesia to obtain a better understanding of the neuropathic pain component in CRPS. Forty patients in an acute phase of CRPS and a median duration of the disease of 10 weeks, were included in the study. Hyperalgesia to heat was tested with a thermode providing feedback-controlled temperature increases. Two forms of mechanical hyperalgesia were examined: phasic mechanical stimuli by using a custom-made impact stimulator for the determination of individual pain thresholds, tonic mechanical stimuli were applied using a pinch-device. Additionally a 'wind-up' paradigm was used to study a pain phenomenon of presumed central origin: a defined impact stimulus was given once and five times in repetition. A subpopulation of patients was reevaluated for mechanical hyperalgesia after i.v. injection of 500 mg acetyl-salicylic acid. Hyperalgesia to heat was insignificant. We found, however, a marked mechanical hyperalgesia to phasic impact stimuli (P < 0.005), whereas, static stimulation (squeezing skin folds) results were insignificant again. Wind-up related pain was also significantly enhanced in the affected limb (P < 0.02). The anti-inflammatory agent had no effect. These results indicate a non-inflammatory pathogenesis in CRPS presumably central in origin. PMID:10204729

  12. [Pathophysiology of neuropathic pain: review of experimental models and proposed mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Magnin, Michel

    2008-02-01

    Neuropathic pain can be conceptualized as the result of an "aberrant learning" process, associated with maladaptive plasticity of the nervous system. A number of modifications of the peripheral nervous system have been described in animal models of neuropathic pain, but their relation with different symptoms in humans is far from fully understood. We note in particular ectopic discharges in damaged myelinated fibers, abnormal activity in undamaged fibers, overexpression of calcium channels increasing the release of excitatory neurotransmitters, and sympathetic sprouting towards the spinal ganglia. Spinal mechanisms involve central sensitization, kindling and potentiation phenomena. Underlying these phenomena may be connectivity changes--still controversial--of non-nociceptive terminals and variations in the sensitivity of postsynaptic receptors. Also contributing to these pathophysiologic modifications are attenuation of spinal inhibition by selective neuronal loss and the development of inflammatory phenomena, including cytokine secretion by macrophages and glial cells. Changes in the dorsal horn modify the activity of projections towards the brainstem and increase spinal hyperactivity still further by feedback loops. These effects are delayed, suggesting that maintenance of spinal sensitization requires the involvement of mechanisms of descending facilitation involving the brainstem. These phenomena induce changes in the activity of thalamocortical networks, which develop autonomous processes that maintain the pain. The cortical representation of body areas change after nervous lesions, and these changes may correlate with the emergence of pain. Neuropathic allodynia and hyperalgesia are supported by cortical modifications that experimental models reproduce very incompletely. Experimental allodynia and neuropathic allodynia share the activation of the cortical pain matrix as well as the bilateralization of insular activity. However, although experimental

  13. Antinociceptive effects of fisetin against diabetic neuropathic pain in mice: Engagement of antioxidant mechanisms and spinal GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Li, Xin-Lin; Liu, Xin; Wang, Chuang; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Hu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral painful neuropathy is one of the most common complications in diabetes and necessitates improved treatment. Fisetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effect in previous studies. As antidepressant drugs are employed clinically to treat neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate whether fisetin possess beneficial effect on diabetic neuropathic pain and explore the mechanism(s). We subjected mice to diabetes by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (200mg/kg), and von Frey test or Hargreaves test was used to assess mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Chronic treatment of diabetic mice with fisetin not only ameliorated the established symptoms of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but also arrested the development of neuropathic pain when given at low doses. Although chronic fisetin administration did not impact on the symptom of hyperglycemia in diabetic mice, it reduced exacerbated oxidative stress in tissues of spinal cord, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and sciatic verve. Furthermore, the analgesic actions of fisetin were abolished by repetitive co-treatment with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) donor tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), but potentiated by the ROS scavenger phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN). Finally, acute blockade of spinal GABAA receptors by bicuculline totally counteracted such fisetin analgesia. These findings indicate that chronic fisetin treatment can delay or correct neuropathic hyperalgesia and allodynia in mice with type 1 diabetes. Mechanistically, the present fisetin analgesia may be associated with its antioxidant activity, and spinal GABAA receptors are likely rendered as downstream targets. PMID:26520392

  14. Antinociceptive effects of fisetin against diabetic neuropathic pain in mice: Engagement of antioxidant mechanisms and spinal GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Li, Xin-Lin; Liu, Xin; Wang, Chuang; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Hu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral painful neuropathy is one of the most common complications in diabetes and necessitates improved treatment. Fisetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effect in previous studies. As antidepressant drugs are employed clinically to treat neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate whether fisetin possess beneficial effect on diabetic neuropathic pain and explore the mechanism(s). We subjected mice to diabetes by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (200mg/kg), and von Frey test or Hargreaves test was used to assess mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Chronic treatment of diabetic mice with fisetin not only ameliorated the established symptoms of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but also arrested the development of neuropathic pain when given at low doses. Although chronic fisetin administration did not impact on the symptom of hyperglycemia in diabetic mice, it reduced exacerbated oxidative stress in tissues of spinal cord, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and sciatic verve. Furthermore, the analgesic actions of fisetin were abolished by repetitive co-treatment with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) donor tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), but potentiated by the ROS scavenger phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN). Finally, acute blockade of spinal GABAA receptors by bicuculline totally counteracted such fisetin analgesia. These findings indicate that chronic fisetin treatment can delay or correct neuropathic hyperalgesia and allodynia in mice with type 1 diabetes. Mechanistically, the present fisetin analgesia may be associated with its antioxidant activity, and spinal GABAA receptors are likely rendered as downstream targets.

  15. Spinal activity of interleukin 6 mediates myelin basic protein-induced allodynia.

    PubMed

    Ko, Justin S; Eddinger, Kelly A; Angert, Mila; Chernov, Andrei V; Dolkas, Jennifer; Strongin, Alex Y; Yaksh, Tony L; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2016-08-01

    Mechanosensory fibers are enveloped by myelin, a unique multilamellar membrane permitting saltatory neuronal conduction. Damage to myelin is thought to contribute to severe pain evoked by innocuous tactile stimulation (i.e., mechanical allodynia). Our earlier (Liu et al., 2012) and present data demonstrate that a single injection of a myelin basic protein-derived peptide (MBP84-104) into an intact sciatic nerve produces a robust and long-lasting (>30days) mechanical allodynia in female rats. The MBP84-104 peptide represents the immunodominant epitope and requires T cells to maintain allodynia. Surprisingly, only systemic gabapentin (a ligand of voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ1), but not ketorolac (COX inhibitor), lidocaine (sodium channel blocker) or MK801 (NMDA antagonist) reverse allodynia induced by the intrasciatic MBP84-104. The genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the sciatic nerve followed by the bioinformatics analyses of the expression changes identified interleukin (IL)-6 as the major cytokine induced by MBP84-104 in both the control and athymic T cell-deficient nude rats. The intrasciatic MBP84-104 injection resulted in both unilateral allodynia and unilateral IL-6 increase the segmental spinal cord (neurons and astrocytes). An intrathecal delivery of a function-blocking IL-6 antibody reduced the allodynia in part by the transcriptional effects in large-diameter primary afferents in DRG. Our data suggest that MBP regulates IL-6 expression in the nervous system and that the spinal IL-6 activity mediates nociceptive processing stimulated by the MBP epitopes released after damage or disease of the somatosensory nervous system. PMID:26970355

  16. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia: is it clinically relevant for the treatment of pain patients?

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V

    2013-09-01

    There is a curious and paradoxic phenomenon, reliably demonstrated in animal models, that consists of an increased sensitivity to pain that is apparently induced by the very opioid drugs used to ameliorate the pain. This phenomenon is termed "opioid-induced hyperalgesia." Whether opioid-induced hyperalgesia occurs in humans, and, if so, to what extent and consequence, is far less established. This is a critical question for attempting to treat pain. If opioid-induced hyperalgesia develops in a patient, it would masquerade as tolerance (because the clinical effectiveness of the opioid would be diminished), yet the appropriate clinical adjustment would be precisely the opposite to that of tolerance. It would be to decrease, rather than increase, the dose of opioid. We review the evidence, particularly the clinical evidence, about opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the postulated mechanisms. We conclude that given the clinical ramifications, opioid-induced hyperalgesia is one of the most understudied important aspects of opioid research.

  17. Secoisolariciresinol diglycoside, a flaxseed lignan, exerts analgesic effects in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes: Engagement of antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pei; Mei, Qi-Yong; Ma, Li; Cui, Wu-Geng; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Dong-Ying; Zhao, Xin; Lu, Qin; Hu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-11-15

    Peripheral painful neuropathy is one of the most common complications in diabetes and necessitates improved treatment. Secoisolariciresinol diglycoside (SDG), a predominant lignan in flaxseed, has been shown in our previous studies to exert antidepressant-like effect. As antidepressant drugs are clinically used to treat chronic neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate the potential analgesic efficacy of SDG against diabetic neuropathic pain in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. We subjected mice to diabetes by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg/kg), and Hargreaves test or von Frey test was used to assess thermal hyperalgesia or mechanical allodynia, respectively. Chronic instead of acute SDG treatment (3, 10 or 30 mg/kg, p.o., twice per day for three weeks) ameliorated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice, and these analgesic actions persisted about three days when SDG treatment was terminated. Although chronic treatment of SDG to diabetic mice did not impact on the symptom of hyperglycemia, it greatly attenuated excessive oxidative stress in sciatic nerve and spinal cord tissues, and partially counteracted the condition of weight decrease. Furthermore, the analgesic actions of SDG were abolished by co-treatment with the reactive oxygen species donor tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), but potentiated by the reactive oxygen species scavenger phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN). These findings indicate that chronic SDG treatment can correct neuropathic hyperalgesia and allodynia in mice with type 1 diabetes. Mechanistically, the analgesic actions of SDG in diabetic mice may be associated with its antioxidant activity. PMID:26494631

  18. Secoisolariciresinol diglycoside, a flaxseed lignan, exerts analgesic effects in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes: Engagement of antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pei; Mei, Qi-Yong; Ma, Li; Cui, Wu-Geng; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Dong-Ying; Zhao, Xin; Lu, Qin; Hu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-11-15

    Peripheral painful neuropathy is one of the most common complications in diabetes and necessitates improved treatment. Secoisolariciresinol diglycoside (SDG), a predominant lignan in flaxseed, has been shown in our previous studies to exert antidepressant-like effect. As antidepressant drugs are clinically used to treat chronic neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate the potential analgesic efficacy of SDG against diabetic neuropathic pain in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. We subjected mice to diabetes by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg/kg), and Hargreaves test or von Frey test was used to assess thermal hyperalgesia or mechanical allodynia, respectively. Chronic instead of acute SDG treatment (3, 10 or 30 mg/kg, p.o., twice per day for three weeks) ameliorated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice, and these analgesic actions persisted about three days when SDG treatment was terminated. Although chronic treatment of SDG to diabetic mice did not impact on the symptom of hyperglycemia, it greatly attenuated excessive oxidative stress in sciatic nerve and spinal cord tissues, and partially counteracted the condition of weight decrease. Furthermore, the analgesic actions of SDG were abolished by co-treatment with the reactive oxygen species donor tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), but potentiated by the reactive oxygen species scavenger phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN). These findings indicate that chronic SDG treatment can correct neuropathic hyperalgesia and allodynia in mice with type 1 diabetes. Mechanistically, the analgesic actions of SDG in diabetic mice may be associated with its antioxidant activity.

  19. Synthesis of Lipid Mediators during UVB-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Angioni, Carlo; Ferreiros, Nerea; Schuh, Claus-Dieter; Suo, Jing; Schreiber, Yannick; Dawes, John M.; Antunes-Martins, Ana; Bennett, David L. H.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral sensitization during inflammatory pain is mediated by a variety of endogenous proalgesic mediators including a number of oxidized lipids, some of which serve endogenous modulators of sensory TRP-channels. These lipids are eicosanoids of the arachidonic acid and linoleic acid pathway, as well as lysophophatidic acids (LPAs). However, their regulation pattern during inflammatory pain and their contribution to peripheral sensitization is still unclear. Here, we used the UVB-model for inflammatory pain to investigate alterations of lipid concentrations at the site of inflammation, the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) as well as the spinal dorsal horn and quantified 21 lipid species from five different lipid families at the peak of inflammation 48 hours post irradiation. We found that known proinflammatory lipids as well as lipids with unknown roles in inflammatory pain to be strongly increased in the skin, whereas surprisingly little changes of lipid levels were seen in DRGs or the dorsal horn. Importantly, although there are profound differences between the number of cytochrome (CYP) genes between mice and rats, CYP-derived lipids were regulated similarly in both species. Since TRPV1 agonists such as LPA 18∶1, 9- and 13-HODE, 5- and 12-HETE were elevated in the skin, they may contribute to thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia during UVB-induced inflammatory pain. These results may explain why some studies show relatively weak analgesic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors in UVB-induced skin inflammation, as they do not inhibit synthesis of other proalgesic lipids such as LPA 18∶1, 9-and 13-HODE and HETEs. PMID:24349046

  20. Non-Invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulation as Treatment for Trigeminal Allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Oshinsky, Michael L.; Murphy, Angela L.; Hekierski, Hugh; Cooper, Marnie; Simon, Bruce J.

    2014-01-01

    Implanted vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been used to treat seizures and depression. In this study, we explore the mechanism of action of non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) for the treatment of trigeminal allodynia. Rats were repeatedly infused with inflammatory mediators directly onto the dura, which leads to chronic trigeminal allodynia. nVNS for 2min decreases periorbital sensitivity in rats with periorbital trigeminal allodynia for up to 3.5hr after stimulation. Using microdialysis, we quantified levels of extracellular neurotransmitters in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Allodynic rats showed a 7.7±0.9 fold increase in extracellular glutamate in the TNC following i.p. administration of the chemical headache trigger, glyceryl trinitrate (GTN; 0.1mg/kg). Allodynic rats, which received nVNS, had only a 2.3±0.4 fold increase in extracellular glutamate following GTN similar to the response in control naive rats. When nVNS was delayed until 120min after GTN treatment, the high levels of glutamate in the TNC were reversed following nVNS. The nVNS stimulation parameters used in this study did not produce significant changes in blood pressure or heart rate. These data suggest that nVNS may be used to treat trigeminal allodynia. PMID:24530613

  1. An animal model of oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia reveals a crucial role for Nav1.6 in peripheral pain pathways

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Zimmermann, Katharina; Romanovsky, Andrej A; Possani, Lourival D; Cabot, Peter J; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Cold allodynia, pain in response to cooling, occurs during or within hours of oxaliplatin infusion and is thought to arise from a direct effect of oxaliplatin on peripheral sensory neurons. To characterize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying acute oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia, we established a new intraplantar oxaliplatin mouse model that rapidly developed long-lasting cold allodynia mediated entirely through tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav pathways. Using selective inhibitors and knockout animals, we found that Nav1.6 was the key isoform involved, while thermosensitive transient receptor potential channels were not involved. Consistent with a crucial role for delayed-rectifier potassium channels in excitability in response to cold, intraplantar administration of the K+-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine mimicked oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia and was also inhibited by Navl.6 blockers. Intraplantar injection of the Nav1.6-activator Cn2 elicited spontaneous pain, mechanical allodynia and enhanced 4-aminopyridine-induced cold allodynia. These findings provide behavioural evidence for a crucial role of Nav1.6 in multiple peripheral pain pathways including cold allodynia. PMID:23711479

  2. Opioid induced hyperalgesia in anesthetic settings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Yeomans, David C

    2014-11-01

    Pain is difficult to investigate and difficult to treat, in part, because of problems in quantification and assessment. The use of opioids, combined with classic anesthetics to maintain hemodynamic stability by controlling responses to intraoperative painful events has gained significant popularity in the anesthetic field. However, several side effects profiles concerning perioperative use of opioid have been published. Over the past two decades, many concerns have arisen with respect to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which is the paradoxical effect wherein opioid usage may decrease pain thresholds and increase atypical pain unrelated to the original, preexisting pain. This brief review focuses on the evidence, mechanisms, and modulatory and pharmacologic management of OIH in order to elaborate on the clinical implication of OIH.

  3. Transplant-mediated enhancement of spinal cord GABAergic inhibition reverses paclitaxel-induced mechanical and heat hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bráz, João M; Wang, Xidao; Guan, Zhonghui; Rubenstein, John L; Basbaum, Allan I

    2015-06-01

    Decreased spinal cord GABAergic inhibition is a major contributor to the persistent neuropathic pain that can follow peripheral nerve injury. Recently, we reported that restoring spinal cord GABAergic signaling by intraspinal transplantation of cortical precursors of GABAergic interneurons from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) can reverse the mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia) that characterizes a neuropathic pain model in the mouse. We show that MGE cell transplants are also effective against both the mechanical allodynia and the heat hyperalgesia produced in a paclitaxel-induced chemotherapy model of neuropathic pain. To test the necessity of GABA release by the transplants, we also studied the utility of transplanting MGE cells from mice with a deletion of VGAT, the vesicular GABA transporter. Transplants from these mice, in which GABA is synthesized but cannot be stored or released, had no effect on mechanical hypersensitivity or heat hyperalgesia in the paclitaxel model. Taken together, these results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of GABAergic precursor cell transplantation in diverse neuropathic pain models and support our contention that restoration of inhibitory controls through release of GABA from the transplants is their mode of action. PMID:25760475

  4. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  5. Mu Opioid Splice Variant MOR-1K Contributes to the Development of Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Oladosu, Folabomi A.; Conrad, Matthew S.; O’Buckley, Sandra C.; Rashid, Naim U.; Slade, Gary D.; Nackley, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Background A subset of the population receiving opioids for the treatment of acute and chronic clinical pain develops a paradoxical increase in pain sensitivity known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Given that opioid analgesics are one of few treatments available against clinical pain, it is critical to determine the key molecular mechanisms that drive opioid-induced hyperalgesia in order to reduce its prevalence. Recent evidence implicates a splice variant of the mu opioid receptor known as MOR-1K in the emergence of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Results from human genetic association and cell signaling studies demonstrate that MOR-1K contributes to decreased opioid analgesic responses and produces increased cellular activity via Gs signaling. Here, we conducted the first study to directly test the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Methods and Results In order to examine the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia, we first assessed pain responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli prior to, during, and following chronic morphine administration. Results show that genetically diverse mouse strains (C57BL/6J, 129S6, and CXB7/ByJ) exhibited different morphine response profiles with corresponding changes in MOR-1K gene expression patterns. The 129S6 mice exhibited an analgesic response correlating to a measured decrease in MOR-1K gene expression levels, while CXB7/ByJ mice exhibited a hyperalgesic response correlating to a measured increase in MOR-1K gene expression levels. Furthermore, knockdown of MOR-1K in CXB7/ByJ mice via chronic intrathecal siRNA administration not only prevented the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia, but also unmasked morphine analgesia. Conclusions These findings suggest that MOR-1K is likely a necessary contributor to the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. With further research, MOR-1K could be exploited as a target for antagonists that reduce or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:26270813

  6. Spinal changes of a newly isolated neuropeptide endomorphin-2 concomitant with vincristine-induced allodynia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Lin, Guo-An; Xie, He-Qiu; Pan, Hai-Tao; Huang, Ben-Qing; Liu, Ji-Dong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Nan; Li, Li; Chen, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain (CNP) is the major dose-limiting factor in cancer chemotherapy. However, the neural mechanisms underlying CNP remain unclear. There is increasing evidence implicating the involvement of spinal endomorphin-2 (EM2) in neuropathic pain. In this study, we used a vincristine-evoked rat CNP model displaying mechanical allodynia and central sensitization, and observed a significant decrease in the expression of spinal EM2 in CNP. Also, while intrathecal administration of exogenous EM2 attenuated allodynia and central sensitization, the mu-opioid receptor antagonist β-funaltrexamine facilitated these events. We found that the reduction in spinal EM2 was mediated by increased activity of dipeptidylpeptidase IV, possibly as a consequence of chemotherapy-induced oxidative stress. Taken together, our findings suggest that a decrease in spinal EM2 expression causes the loss of endogenous analgesia and leads to enhanced pain sensation in CNP. PMID:24586889

  7. Acidosis Mediates the Switching of Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε Dependence in Prolonged Hyperalgesia Induced by Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Yu; Dai, Shih-Ping; Chang, Yan-Ching; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory pain, when not effectively treated, is a costly health problem and has a harmful effect on all aspects of health-related quality of life. Previous studies suggested that in male Sprague Dawley rats, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-induced short-term hyperalgesia depends on protein kinase A (PKA) activity, whereas long-lasting hyperalgesia induced by PGE2 with carrageenan pre-injection, requires protein kinase Cε (PKCε). However, the mechanism underlying the kinase switch with short- to long-term hyperalgesia remains unclear. In this study, we used the inflammatory agents carrageenan or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to induce long-term hyperalgesia, and examined PKA and PKCε dependence and switching time. Hyperalgesia induced by both agents depended on PKA/PKCε and Gs/Gi-proteins, and the switching time from PKA to PKCε and from Gs to Gi was about 3 to 4 h after inflammation induction. Among the single inflammatory mediators tested, PGE2 and 5-HT induced transient hyperalgesia, which depended on PKA and PKCε, respectively. Only acidic solution-induced hyperalgesia required Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε, and the switch time for kinase dependency matched inflammatory hyperalgesia, in approximately 2 to 4 h. Thus, acidosis in inflamed tissues may be a decisive factor to regulate switching of PKA and PKCε dependence via proton-sensing G-protein–coupled receptors. PMID:25933021

  8. Acute-onset opioid-induced hyperalgesia in a child with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Vini; Moran, Ryan; Elder, Melissa E; Sukumaran, Sukesh

    2012-10-01

    We describe a child with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) presenting with severe diffuse pain refractory to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and high-dose opioids. Her JIA involved her knees and ankles and was mildly active on etanercept and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. At presentation, she complained of hip pain progressing to severe diffuse pain and allodynia involving her extremities. No abnormalities were seen in her laboratory parameters and imaging of her lower extremities. After appreciating no substantial benefit by increasing her opioids, her opioids were tapered and discontinued, and this was followed by significant alleviation in her pain, and a diagnosis of opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) was made. Despite reports in adults, the phenomenon of OIH has been reported infrequently in children. To our knowledge, OIH has not been described in children with rheumatologic conditions. We recommend investigating the possibility of OIH when treating a child with JIA and severe refractory pain.

  9. The impact of opioid-induced hyperalgesia for postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Koppert, Wolfgang; Schmelz, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that--besides their well known analgesic activity - opioids can increase rather than decrease sensitivity to noxious stimuli. Based on the observation that opioids can activate pain inhibitory and pain facilitatory systems, this pain hypersensitivity has been attributed to a relative predominance of pronociceptive mechanisms. Acute receptor desensitization via uncoupling of the receptor from G-proteins, upregulation of the cAMP pathway, activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor system, as well as descending facilitation, have been proposed as potential mechanisms underlying opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Numerous reports exist demonstrating that opioid-induced hyperalgesia is observed both in animal and human experimental models. Brief exposures to micro-receptor agonists induce long-lasting hyperalgesic effects for days in rodents, and also in humans large-doses of intraoperative micro-receptor agonists were found to increase postoperative pain and morphine consumption. Furthermore, the prolonged use of opioids in patients is often associated with a requirement for increasing doses and the development of abnormal pain. Successful strategies that may decrease or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia include the concomitant administration of drugs like NMDA-antagonists, alpha2-agonists, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioid rotation or combinations of opioids with different receptor/selectivity.

  10. [Opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Pathophysiology and clinical relevance].

    PubMed

    Koppert, W

    2004-05-01

    Opioids are the drugs of choice for the treatment of moderate to severe acute and chronic pain. However, clinical evidence suggests that opioids can elicit increased sensitivity to noxious stimuli suggesting that administration of opioids can activate both pain inhibitory and pain facilitatory systems. Acute receptor desensitization via uncoupling of the receptor from G-proteins, up-regulation of the cAMP pathway, activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system, as well as descending facilitation, have been proposed as potential mechanisms underlying opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Numerous reports exist demonstrating that opioid-induced hyperalgesia is observed both in animal and human experimental models. Brief exposures to micro-receptor agonists induce long-lasting hyperalgesic effects for days, which might by reflected by clinical observations that large doses of intraoperative micro-receptor agonists increased postoperative pain and morphine consumption. Furthermore, the prolonged use of opioids in patients often requires increasing doses and may be accompanied by the development of abnormal pain. Successful strategies that may decrease or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia include the concomitant administration of drugs like NMDA-antagonists, alpha(2)-agonists, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioid rotation or combinations of opioids with different receptor selectivity.

  11. Carbamazepine Withdrawal-induced Hyperalgesia in Chronic Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhenyu; Yang, Bing; Yang, Bin; Shi, Le; Sun, Qing-Li; Sun, A-Ping; Lu, Lin; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Rongsheng; Zhai, Suodi

    2015-11-01

    Combined pharmacological treatments are the most used approach for neuropathic pain. Carbamazepine, an antiepileptic agent, is generally used as a third-line treatment for neuropathic pain and can be considered an option only when patients have not responded to the first- and second-line medications. In the case presented herein, a patient with neuropathic pain was treated using a combined pharmacological regimen. The patient's pain deteriorated, despite increasing the doses of opioids, when carbamazepine was discontinued, potentially because carbamazepine withdrawal disrupted the balance that was achieved by the multifaceted pharmacological regimen, thus inducing hyperalgesia. Interestingly, when carbamazepine was prescribed again, the patient's pain was successfully managed. Animal research has reported that carbamazepine can potentiate the analgesic effectiveness of morphine in rodent models of neuropathic pain and postoperative pain. This clinical case demonstrates that carbamazepine may have a synergistic effect on the analgesic effectiveness of morphine and may inhibit or postpone opioid-induced hyperalgesia. We postulate that a probable mechanism of action of carbamazepine may involve -aminobutyric acid-ergic potentiation and the interruption of glutamatergic function via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Further research is warranted to clarify the analgesic action of carbamazepine and its potential use for the prevention of opioid-induced hyperalgesia in chronic neuropathic pain patients.

  12. Chondroitin sulfate attenuates formalin-induced persistent tactile allodynia.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Wataru; Yamada, Kotaro; Ogata, Yoshiki; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Onodera, Katsuhito; Sakurai, Hidetomo; Tan-No, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We examined the effect of chondroitin sulfate (CS), a compound used in the treatment of osteoarthritis and joint pain, on the formalin-induced tactile allodynia in mice. A repeated oral administration of CS (300 mg/kg, b.i.d.) significantly ameliorated the formalin-induced tactile allodynia from day 10 after formalin injection. On day 14, the phosphorylation of spinal p38 MAPK and subsequent increase in c-Fos-immunoreactive dorsal lumbar neurons were attenuated by the repeated administration of CS. These findings suggest that CS attenuates formalin-induced tactile allodynia through the inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation and subsequent up-regulation of c-Fos expression in the dorsal lumbar spinal cord. PMID:27567476

  13. Mu-opioid receptors are not necessary for nortriptyline treatment of neuropathic allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Tessier, Luc-Henri; Yalcin, Ipek; Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are among the first line treatments clinically recommended against neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism by which they alleviate pain is still unclear. Pharmacological and genetic approaches evidenced a critical role of delta-opioid receptors (DORs) in the therapeutic action of chronic TCA treatment. It is however unclear whether mu-opioid receptors (MORs) are also necessary to the pain-relieving action of TCAs. The lack of highly selective MOR antagonists makes difficult to conclude based on pharmacological studies. In the present work, we thus used a genetic approach and compared mutant mice lacking MORs and their wild-type littermates. The neuropathy was induced by unilateral sciatic nerve cuffing. The threshold for mechanical response was evaluated using von Frey filaments. MOR-deficient mice displayed the same baseline for mechanical sensitivity as their wild-type littermates. After sciatic nerve cuffing, both wild-type and MOR-deficient mice displayed an ipsilateral mechanical allodynia. After about 10 days of treatment, nortriptyline suppressed this allodynia in both wild-type and MOR-deficient mice. MORs are thus not critical for nortriptyline action against neuropathic pain. An acute injection of the DOR antagonist naltrindole induced a relapse of neuropathic allodynia in both wild-type and MOR-deficient mice, thus confirming the critical role of DORs in nortriptyline action. Moreover, morphine induced an acute analgesia in control and in neuropathic wild-type mice, but was without effect in MOR-deficient mice. While MORs are crucial for morphine action, they are not critical for nortriptyline action. Our results highlight the functional difference between DORs and MORs in mechanisms of pain relief. PMID:20056557

  14. Peripheral tackykinin and excitatory amino acid receptors mediate hyperalgesia induced by Phoneutria nigriventer venom.

    PubMed

    Zanchet, Eliane Maria; Cury, Yara

    2003-04-25

    The generation of hyperalgesia by Phoneutria nigriventer venom was investigated in rats using the paw pressure test, through the intraplantar injection of the venom. Hyperalgesia was significantly inhibited by N-[2-(4-chlorophenyl) ethyl]-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-2H-2-benzazepine-2-carbothioamide (capsazepine), a vanilloid receptor antagonist, by the local administration of pGlu-Ala-Asp-Pro-Asn-Lys-Phe-Tyr-Pro (spiro-gamma-lactam) Leu-Trp-NH(2) (GR82334) or of Phenyl-CO-Ala-Ala-D-Trp-Phe-D-Pro-Pro-Nle-NH(2) (GR94800), inhibitors of tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptors, respectively, or by the local injection of dizocilpine (MK 801), (+/-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid ((+/-)-AP-5), or 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA excitatory amino acid receptors. The correlation between hyperalgesia and the inflammatory response induced by the venom was also investigated. The venom-induced edematogenic response was not modified by the pharmacological treatments. These results suggest that hyperalgesia induced by P. nigriventer venom is mediated by stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive neurons, with activation of peripheral tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptors and of both the NMDA and AMPA receptors. Distinct mechanisms are involved in the development of hyperalgesia and edema induced by the venom.

  15. TRPA1 contributes to capsaicin-induced facial cold hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kuniya; Shinoda, Masamichi; Furukawa, Akihiko; Kita, Kozue; Noma, Noboru; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-12-01

    Orofacial cold hyperalgesia is known to cause severe persistent pain in the face following trigeminal nerve injury or inflammation, and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankylin 1 (TRPA1) are thought to be involved in cold hyperalgesia. However, how these two receptors are involved in cold hyperalgesia is not fully understood. To clarify the mechanisms underlying facial cold hyperalgesia, nocifensive behaviors to cold stimulation, the expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons, and TG neuronal excitability to cold stimulation following facial capsaicin injection were examined in rats. The head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWRT) to cold stimulation of the lateral facial skin was significantly decreased following facial capsaicin injection. This reduction of HWRT was significantly recovered following local injection of TRPV1 antagonist as well as TRPA1 antagonist. Approximately 30% of TG neurons innervating the lateral facial skin expressed both TRPV1 and TRPA1, and about 64% of TRPA1-positive neurons also expressed TRPV1. The TG neuronal excitability to noxious cold stimulation was significantly increased following facial capsaicin injection and this increase was recovered by pretreatment with TRPA1 antagonist. These findings suggest that TRPA1 sensitization via TRPV1 signaling in TG neurons is involved in cold hyperalgesia following facial skin capsaicin injection.

  16. [The clinical relevance of opioid-induced hyperalgesia remains unresolved].

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jakob; Sjøgren, Per

    2011-03-28

    Opioids are widely used as analgesics in chronic pain of malignant as well as non-malignant origin. During opioid treatment, pain is occasionally worsened. This could be due to progression of the disease or tolerance or opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The present article summarizes the preclinical and clinical data in support of the existence of OIH. Further, possible mechanisms and potential treatments are outlined. We conclude that only a few clinical studies on OIH are available. However, a growing body of experimental data supports the presence of OIH in clinical settings. Diagnostic tools for assessment of OIH have yet to be developed.

  17. Secondary Hyperalgesia Phenotypes Exhibit Differences in Brain Activation during Noxious Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Mads Utke; Mårtensson, Johan; Larsson, Henrik B. W.; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2015-01-01

    Noxious stimulation of the skin with either chemical, electrical or heat stimuli leads to the development of primary hyperalgesia at the site of injury, and to secondary hyperalgesia in normal skin surrounding the injury. Secondary hyperalgesia is inducible in most individuals and is attributed to central neuronal sensitization. Some individuals develop large areas of secondary hyperalgesia (high-sensitization responders), while others develop small areas (low-sensitization responders). The magnitude of each area is reproducible within individuals, and can be regarded as a phenotypic characteristic. To study differences in the propensity to develop central sensitization we examined differences in brain activity and anatomy according to individual phenotypical expression of secondary hyperalgesia by magnetic resonance imaging. Forty healthy volunteers received a first-degree burn-injury (47°C, 7 min, 9 cm2) on the non-dominant lower-leg. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia were assessed 100 min after the injury. We measured neuronal activation by recording blood-oxygen-level-dependent-signals (BOLD-signals) during mechanical noxious stimulation before burn injury and in both primary and secondary hyperalgesia areas after burn-injury. In addition, T1-weighted images were used to measure differences in gray-matter density in cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. We found significant differences in neuronal activity between high- and low-sensitization responders at baseline (before application of the burn-injury) (p < 0.05). After the burn-injury, we found significant differences between responders during noxious stimulation of both primary (p < 0.01) and secondary hyperalgesia (p ≤ 0.04) skin areas. A decreased volume of the right (p = 0.001) and left caudate nucleus (p = 0.01) was detected in high-sensitization responders in comparison to low-sensitization responders. These findings suggest that brain-structure and neuronal activation to noxious stimulation

  18. Secondary hyperalgesia phenotypes exhibit differences in brain activation during noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Pereira, Manuel Pedro; Werner, Mads Utke; Mårtensson, Johan; Larsson, Henrik B W; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2015-01-01

    Noxious stimulation of the skin with either chemical, electrical or heat stimuli leads to the development of primary hyperalgesia at the site of injury, and to secondary hyperalgesia in normal skin surrounding the injury. Secondary hyperalgesia is inducible in most individuals and is attributed to central neuronal sensitization. Some individuals develop large areas of secondary hyperalgesia (high-sensitization responders), while others develop small areas (low-sensitization responders). The magnitude of each area is reproducible within individuals, and can be regarded as a phenotypic characteristic. To study differences in the propensity to develop central sensitization we examined differences in brain activity and anatomy according to individual phenotypical expression of secondary hyperalgesia by magnetic resonance imaging. Forty healthy volunteers received a first-degree burn-injury (47 °C, 7 min, 9 cm(2)) on the non-dominant lower-leg. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia were assessed 100 min after the injury. We measured neuronal activation by recording blood-oxygen-level-dependent-signals (BOLD-signals) during mechanical noxious stimulation before burn injury and in both primary and secondary hyperalgesia areas after burn-injury. In addition, T1-weighted images were used to measure differences in gray-matter density in cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. We found significant differences in neuronal activity between high- and low-sensitization responders at baseline (before application of the burn-injury) (p < 0.05). After the burn-injury, we found significant differences between responders during noxious stimulation of both primary (p < 0.01) and secondary hyperalgesia (p ≤ 0.04) skin areas. A decreased volume of the right (p = 0.001) and left caudate nucleus (p = 0.01) was detected in high-sensitization responders in comparison to low-sensitization responders. These findings suggest that brain-structure and neuronal activation to noxious

  19. Motor Cortex Stimulation Reduces Hyperalgesia in an Animal Model of Central Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Jessica M; Ji, Yadong; Masri, Radi

    2011-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the primary motor cortex has been used since 1991 to treat chronic neuropathic pain. Since its inception, motor cortex stimulation (MCS) treatment has had varied clinical outcomes. Until this point, there has not been a systematic study of the stimulation parameters that most effectively treat chronic pain, or of the mechanisms by which MCS relieves pain. Here, using a rodent model of central pain, we perform a systematic study of stimulation parameters used for MCS and investigate the mechanisms by which MCS reduces hyperalgesia. Specifically, we study the role of the inhibitory nucleus zona incerta (ZI) in mediating the analgesic effects of MCS. In animals with mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, we find that stimulation at 50 µA, 50 Hz, and 300 µs square pulses, for 30 minutes is sufficient to reverse mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. We also find that stimulation of the ZI mimics the effects of MCS and that reversible inactivation of ZI blocks the effects of MCS. These findings suggest that the reduction of hyperalgesia maybe due to MCS effects on ZI. PMID:21396776

  20. Toll-like receptor 4-mediated nuclear factor-κB activation in spinal cord contributes to chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liying; Zhai, Caihong; Han, Kun; Li, Zhisong; Qian, Junliang; Jing, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Ji-Tian

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the spinal cord is involved in pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated pain facilitation. However, the role of NF-κB activation in chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we found that the level of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) was increased in the dorsal horn of the lumbar 4-6 segments after intrathecal administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days, and the p-p65 was co-localized with neurons and astrocytes. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β was also increased in the same area. In addition, pretreatment with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) or SN50, inhibitors of NF-κB, prevented the development of morphine analgesic tolerance and alleviated morphine withdrawal-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. The increase in TNF-α and IL-1β expression induced by chronic morphine exposure was also partially blocked by PDTC pretreatment. In another experiment, rats receiving PDTC or SN50 beginning on day 7 of morphine injection showed partial recovery of the anti-nociceptive effects of morphine and attenuation of the withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. Meanwhile, intrathecal pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an antagonist of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), blocked the activation of NF-κB, and prevented the development of morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. These data indicated that TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation in the spinal cord is involved in the development and maintenance of morphine analgesic tolerance and withdrawal-induced pain hypersensitivity.

  1. Toll-like receptor 4-mediated nuclear factor-κB activation in spinal cord contributes to chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liying; Zhai, Caihong; Han, Kun; Li, Zhisong; Qian, Junliang; Jing, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Ji-Tian

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the spinal cord is involved in pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated pain facilitation. However, the role of NF-κB activation in chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we found that the level of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) was increased in the dorsal horn of the lumbar 4-6 segments after intrathecal administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days, and the p-p65 was co-localized with neurons and astrocytes. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β was also increased in the same area. In addition, pretreatment with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) or SN50, inhibitors of NF-κB, prevented the development of morphine analgesic tolerance and alleviated morphine withdrawal-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. The increase in TNF-α and IL-1β expression induced by chronic morphine exposure was also partially blocked by PDTC pretreatment. In another experiment, rats receiving PDTC or SN50 beginning on day 7 of morphine injection showed partial recovery of the anti-nociceptive effects of morphine and attenuation of the withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. Meanwhile, intrathecal pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an antagonist of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), blocked the activation of NF-κB, and prevented the development of morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. These data indicated that TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation in the spinal cord is involved in the development and maintenance of morphine analgesic tolerance and withdrawal-induced pain hypersensitivity. PMID:25446875

  2. Pathological mechanism of musculoskeletal manifestations associated with CRPS type II: an animal study.

    PubMed

    Ota, Hideyuki; Arai, Tetsuya; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Urano, Hideki; Kurahashi, Toshikazu; Kato, Shuichi; Yamamoto, Michiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2014-10-01

    Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) often complain of abnormal sensations beyond the affected body part, but causes of this spread of musculoskeletal manifestations into contiguous areas remain unclear. In addition, immobilization can predispose to the development of CRPS. We examined functional, biochemical, and histological alterations in affected parts, including contiguous zones, using an animal model. Ten-week-old male Wistar rats were assigned to 5 groups: a normal group receiving no treatment, a sham operation group with surgical exploration, an immobilization group with surgical exploration plus internal knee joint immobilization, a surgical neuropathy group prepared by spinal nerve ligation (SNL) of the left L5 nerve root, and a surgical neuropathy+immobilization group with simultaneous SNL and knee joint immobilization. Mechanical allodynia and knee contracture were compared between groups, and tissues were harvested for histological assessments and gene and protein expression analyses. Neither surgical procedures nor immobilization induced detectable mechanical sensitivity. However, the addition of nerve injury resulted in detectable mechanical allodynia, and immobilization not only accelerated hyperalgesia, but also resulted in muscle fibrosis. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and other mediators of neurogenic inflammation were highly expressed not only in denervated muscles, but also in innervated muscles in contiguous areas, suggesting the spread of NGF production beyond the myotome of the injured nerve. Transforming growth factor β was involved in the development of contracture in CRPS. These findings imply that neuroinflammatory components play major roles in the progression and dispersion of both sensory pathologies and pathologies that are exacerbated by immobilization.

  3. Heat hyperalgesia after incision requires TRPV1 and is distinct from pure inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther M; Shimizu, Isao; Caterina, Michael; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2005-06-01

    Postoperative pain significantly impacts patient recovery. However, postoperative pain management remains suboptimal, perhaps because treatment strategies are based mainly on studies using inflammatory pain models. We used a recently developed mouse model of incisional pain to investigate peripheral and spinal mechanisms contributing to heat hyperalgesia after incision. Behavioral experiments involving TRPV1 KO mice demonstrate that, as previously observed in inflammatory models, TRPV1 is necessary for heat (but not mechanical) hyperalgesia after incision. However, in WT mice, neither the proportion of TRPV1 immunoreactive neurons in the DRG nor the intensity of TRPV1 staining in the sciatic nerve was different from that in controls up to 4 days after incision. This result was corroborated by immunoblot analysis of sciatic nerve in rats subjected to an incision, and is distinct from that following inflammation of the rat hind paw, a situation in which TRPV1 expression levels in sciatic nerve increases. In the absence of heat exposure, spinal c-Fos staining was similar between incised TRPV1 KO and WT mice. However, differences in c-Fos staining between heat exposed TRPV1 KO and WT mice after incision suggest that the incision-mediated enhancement of heat-evoked signaling to the spinal cord involves a TRPV1-dependent mechanism. Finally, heat hyperalgesia after incision was reversed by antagonism of spinal non-NMDA receptors, unlike inflammatory hyperalgesia, which is mediated via NMDA receptors . Thus, TRPV1 is important for the generation of thermal hyperalgesia after incision. Our observations suggest that all experimental pain models may not be equally appropriate to guide the development of postoperative pain therapies.

  4. Hyperalgesia in an immobilized rat hindlimb: effect of treadmill exercise using non-immobilized limbs.

    PubMed

    Chuganji, Sayaka; Nakano, Jiro; Sekino, Yuki; Hamaue, Yohei; Sakamoto, Junya; Okita, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Cast immobilization of limbs causes hyperalgesia, which is a decline of the threshold of mechanical and thermal mechanical stimuli. The immobilization-induced hyperalgesia (IIH) can disturb rehabilitation and activities of daily living in patients with orthopedic disorders. However, it is unclear what therapeutic and preventive approaches can be used to alleviate IIH. Exercise that activates the descending pain modulatory system may be effective for IIH. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise during the immobilization period, using the non-immobilized limbs, on IIH. Thirty-six 8-week-old Wistar rats were randomly divided into (1) control, (2) immobilization (Im), and (3) immobilization and treadmill exercise (Im+Ex) groups. In the Im and Im+Ex groups, the right ankle joints of each rat were immobilized in full plantar flexion with a plaster cast for an 8-week period. In the Im+Ex group, treadmill exercise (15 m/min, 30 min/day, 5 days/week) was administered during the immobilization period while the right hindlimb was kept immobilized. Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured using von Frey filaments every week. To investigate possible activation of the descending pain modulatory system, beta-endorphin expression levels in hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray were analyzed. Although IIH clearly occurred in the Im group, the hyperalgesia was partially but significantly reduced in the Im+Ex group. Beta-endorphin, which is one of the endogenous opioids, was selectively increased in the hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray of the Im+Ex group. Our data suggest that treadmill running using the non-immobilized limbs reduces the amount of hyperalgesia induced in the immobilized limb even if it is not freed. This ameliorating effect might be due to the descending pain modulatory system being activated by upregulation of beta-endorphin in the brain. PMID:25304541

  5. EVALUATION OF HYPERALGESIA AND HISTOLOGICAL CHANGES OF DORSAL ROOT GANGLION INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Grava, André Luiz de Souza; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the hyperalgesia and histological abnormalities induced by contact between the dorsal root ganglion and the nucleus pulposus. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats were used, divided into two experimental groups. In one of the groups, a fragment of autologous nucleus pulposus was removed from the sacrococcygeal region and deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. In the other group (control), a fragment of adipose tissue was deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated on the third day and the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation. A L5 dorsal root ganglion was removed in the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation for histological study using HE staining and histochemical study using specific labeling for iNOS. Results: Higher intensity of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion. In this group, the histological study showed abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue, characterized by an inflammatory process and axonal degeneration. The histopathological abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue presented increasing intensity with increasing length of observation, and there was a correlation with maintenance of the hyperalgesia observed in the behavioral assessment. Immunohistochemistry using specific labeling for iNOS in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion showed higher expression of this enzyme in the nuclei of the inflammatory cells (glial cells) surrounding the neurons. Conclusion: Contact between the nucleus pulposus and the dorsal root ganglion induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and caused histological abnormalities in the dorsal root ganglion components. These abnormalities were characterized by an inflammatory and degenerative process in the structures of the dorsal root

  6. Protective effects of dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zenggui; Wu, Weilan; Wu, Xiaodan; Lei, Hongyi; Gong, Cansheng; Xu, Shiyuan

    2016-01-01

    High dosages of intra-operative remifentanil are associated with opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of combined dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil treatment on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. Patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status of I–II who were diagnosed with hysteromyoma and scheduled for laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) were randomly divided into three groups. Group hyperalgesia (Group H, n=29) received intra-operative remifentanil, Group hyperalgesia and dexmedetomidine (Group HD, n=28) received remifentanil and a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine, and Group hyperalgesia, dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil (Group HDF, n=29) received remifentanil, flurbiprofen axetil and dexmedetomidine. Mechanical pain thresholds were measured during the preoperative visit and postoperatively at 1, 6 and 24-h time points. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores, time to analgesic requirement, total sufentanil consumption and side effects were assessed postoperatively. Mechanical pain threshold at the incision site was significantly lower in Group H compared with Groups HD and HDF (both P<0.05), and significantly higher in Group HDF than in Group HD (P<0.05). The area of secondary hyperalgesia at the incision site was greater in Group H than in the other two groups (both P<0.05), and significantly smaller in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). VAS scores and total sufentanil consumption were significantly higher in Group H compared with the other two groups (both P<0.05), and were significantly lower in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). Dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil exhibits synergetic effects in the prevention of remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing LAVH. PMID:27698764

  7. Protective effects of dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zenggui; Wu, Weilan; Wu, Xiaodan; Lei, Hongyi; Gong, Cansheng; Xu, Shiyuan

    2016-01-01

    High dosages of intra-operative remifentanil are associated with opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of combined dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil treatment on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. Patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status of I–II who were diagnosed with hysteromyoma and scheduled for laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) were randomly divided into three groups. Group hyperalgesia (Group H, n=29) received intra-operative remifentanil, Group hyperalgesia and dexmedetomidine (Group HD, n=28) received remifentanil and a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine, and Group hyperalgesia, dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil (Group HDF, n=29) received remifentanil, flurbiprofen axetil and dexmedetomidine. Mechanical pain thresholds were measured during the preoperative visit and postoperatively at 1, 6 and 24-h time points. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores, time to analgesic requirement, total sufentanil consumption and side effects were assessed postoperatively. Mechanical pain threshold at the incision site was significantly lower in Group H compared with Groups HD and HDF (both P<0.05), and significantly higher in Group HDF than in Group HD (P<0.05). The area of secondary hyperalgesia at the incision site was greater in Group H than in the other two groups (both P<0.05), and significantly smaller in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). VAS scores and total sufentanil consumption were significantly higher in Group H compared with the other two groups (both P<0.05), and were significantly lower in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). Dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil exhibits synergetic effects in the prevention of remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing LAVH.

  8. TRPV1 channel-mediated bilateral allodynia induced by unilateral masseter muscle inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pain in masticatory muscles is among the most prominent symptoms of temperomandibular disorders (TMDs) that have diverse and complex etiology. A common complaint of TMD is that unilateral pain of craniofacial muscle can cause a widespread of bilateral pain sensation, although the underlying mechanism remains unknown. To investigate whether unilateral inflammation of masseter muscle can cause a bilateral allodynia, we generated masseter muscle inflammation induced by unilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) in rats, and measured the bilateral head withdrawal threshold at different time points using a von Frey anesthesiometer. After behavioral assessment, both right and left trigeminal ganglia (TRG) were dissected and examined for histopathology and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) mRNA expression using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. A significant increase in TRPV1 mRNA expression occurred in TRG ipsilateral to CFA injected masseter muscle, whereas no significant alteration in TRPV1 occurred in the contralateral TRG. Interestingly, central injection of TRPV1 antagonist 5-iodoresiniferatoxin into the hippocampus significantly attenuated the head withdrawal response of both CFA injected and non-CFA injected contralateral masseter muscle. Our findings show that unilateral inflammation of masseter muscle is capable of inducing bilateral allodynia in rats. Upregulation of TRPV1 at the TRG level is due to nociception caused by inflammation, whereas contralateral nocifensive behavior in masticatory muscle nociception is likely mediated by central TRPV1, pointing to the involvement of altered information processing in higher centers. PMID:24377488

  9. Role of TNF in sickness behavior and allodynia during the acute phase of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Angulo, H; Thomas, L E; Castillo, E; Cárdenas, E; Mogollón, F; Mijares, A

    2013-08-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is associated with inflammation, discomfort and pain during the acute phase. The influence of TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor) in this disease outcome is controversial. In this way, the aim of this work was to determine the role of the TNF-α blocker etanercept in the pain, discomfort, and survival during the Chagas' acute phase of mice experimentally infected with a wild virulent strain of T. cruzi. The infection with this wild strain was responsible for a severe visceral inflammation and said parasite showed a tropism in peritoneal fluid cells. Etanercept was able to restore spontaneous vertical and horizontal activities during the second week after infection and to abolish mechanical allodynia during the first week after infection. Finally, etanercept delayed the mortality without any effect on the parasitemia rates. This is the first report that correlates sickness behavior and allodynia with TNF-α and suggests that this cytokine may play an important role in the physiopathology of the acute phase. PMID:23684908

  10. Paclitaxel-induced hyperalgesia modulates negative affective component of pain and NR1 receptor expression in the frontal cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kazuko; Akita, Hisanao; Ogata, Masanori; Saji, Makoto

    2014-03-01

    Paclitaxel, one of the chemotherapeutic agents clinically used to treat several types of cancer, produces side effects such as peripheral neuropathy, sensory abnormalities, and hyperalgesia. Since hyperalgesia remains after cessation of paclitaxel therapy and becomes chronic, we hypothesize that alteration in memory and the cognitive process of pain underlies hyperalgesia. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether drug-induced hyperalgesia alters the affective component of pain and the NMDA-NR1 and mGluR1 receptors as a mediator for signal transmission and memory of pain. Mechanical sensitivity was measured by von Frey filament test after intraperitoneal injection of paclitaxel in rats. Paclitaxel-induced hyperalgesia was confirmed over almost the entire 14-day period of observation after the treatment. The effect of paclitaxel-induced hyperalgesia on the affective component of pain was assessed using pain-induced place aversion. The formalin-induced conditioned place aversion was completely abolished in the paclitaxel-treated rats. Immunoblot analysis of NR1 and mGluR1 protein levels in various brain regions was performed after paclitaxel treatment. Treatment reduced only the NR1 expression within the frontal cortex. These results suggest that the hypofunction of memory processes with the reduced NMDA receptors in the frontal cortex might be involved in the expression of abnormal emotional behaviors accompanied by hyperalgesia.

  11. Effect of Intraperitoneal Administered Ginseng Total Saponins on Hyperalgesia Induced by Repeated Intramuscular Injection of Acidic Saline in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Joong; Kim, Jung Eun; Choi, Geun Joo; Shin, Hwa Yong; Baek, Chong Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Choel; Kim, Su Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the antinociceptive activity of ginseng total saponins (GTS) on hyperalgesia induced by repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline in rats and to examine the mechanisms involved. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with a 0.9% saline vehicle or various doses of GTS after the development of hyperalgesia. Rats were then injected with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or naloxone 10 min before GTS injection. The mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) was assessed with von Frey filaments. The MWT was significantly increased after intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of GTS when compared with the MWT after the development of hyperalgesia. Injection of GTS with NMDA showed a significant decrease in the MWT when compared with GTS injection. GTS showed an antinociceptive activity against chronic muscle-induced pain, and the effect of GTS may be mediated by NMDA. PMID:24853193

  12. Intrathecal rapamycin attenuates morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ji-Tian; Sun, Linlin; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Repeated and long-term administration of opioids is often accompanied by the initiation of opioid-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients. Our previous studies showed that repeated intrathecal morphine injection activated the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in spinal dorsal horn neurons and that blocking this activation prevented the initiation of morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in healthy rats. However, whether spinal mTORC1 is required for morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia under neuropathic pain conditions remains elusive. We here observed the effect of intrathecal infusion of rapamycin, a specific mTORC1 inhibitor, on morphine-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia in a neuropathic pain model in rats induced by the fifth lumbar spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Continuous intrathecal infusion of morphine for one week starting on day 8 post-SNL led to morphine tolerance demonstrated by morphine-induced reduction in maximal possible analgesic effect (MPAE) to tail heat stimuli and ipsilateral paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) to mechanical stimuli in SNL rats. Such reduction was attenuated by co-infusion of rapamycin. Co-infusion of rapamycin also blocked morphine tolerance demonstrated by attenuation of morphine-induced reduction in MPAE in sham rats and morphine-induced hyperalgesia demonstrated by the reverse of morphine-induced reduction in PWT on both sides of sham rats and on the contralateral side of SNL rats. The results suggest that mTORC1 inhibitors could serve as promising medications for use as adjuvants with opioids in clinical neuropathic pain management. PMID:26339682

  13. Chronic CRF1 receptor blockade reduces heroin intake escalation and dependence-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Park, Paula E; Schlosburg, Joel E; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schulteis, Gery; Edwards, Scott; Koob, George F

    2015-03-01

    Opioids represent effective drugs for the relief of pain, yet chronic opioid use often leads to a state of increased sensitivity to pain that is exacerbated during withdrawal. A sensitization of pain-related negative affect has been hypothesized to closely interact with addiction mechanisms. Neuro-adaptive changes occur as a consequence of excessive opioid exposure, including a recruitment of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and norepinephrine (NE) brain stress systems. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the transition to dependence, we determined the effects of functional antagonism within these two systems on hyperalgesia-like behavior during heroin withdrawal utilizing models of both acute and chronic dependence. We found that passive or self-administered heroin produced a significant mechanical hypersensitivity. During acute opioid dependence, systemic administration of the CRF1 receptor antagonist MPZP (20 mg/kg) alleviated withdrawal-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In contrast, several functional adrenergic system antagonists (clonidine, prazosin, propranolol) failed to alter mechanical hypersensitivity in this state. We then determined the effects of chronic MPZP or clonidine treatment on extended access heroin self-administration and found that MPZP, but not clonidine, attenuated escalation of heroin intake, whereas both drugs alleviated chronic dependence-associated hyperalgesia. These findings suggest that an early potentiation of CRF signaling occurs following opioid exposure that begins to drive both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and eventually intake escalation.

  14. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and burn pain.

    PubMed

    Holtman, Joseph R; Jellish, W Scott

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of pain produced during the management of burn injury has been an ongoing problem for physicians caring for these patients. The main therapeutic option for analgesia has been the repeated and prolonged use of opioids. The adverse effects of opioids are well known but the long term use of opioids which produces tolerance with accompanying dose escalation and dependence is most problematic. Another potentially important consequence of opioid exposure that sometimes masks as tolerance is that of opioid induced hyperalgesia. This syndrome is manifest as enhanced pain, sensitivity and loss of analgesic efficacy in patients treated with opioids who actually become sensitized to painful stimuli. This article focuses on the treatment of burn pain and how current analgesic therapies with opioids may cause hyperalgesia and affect the adequacy of treatment for burn pain. This article also provides possible modalities to help therapeutically manage these patients and considers future analgesic strategies which may help to improve pain management in this complicated patient population.

  15. Deficits in visceral pain and hyperalgesia of mice with a disruption of the tachykinin NK1 receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Laird, J M; Olivar, T; Roza, C; De Felipe, C; Hunt, S P; Cervero, F

    2000-01-01

    Studies in mice lacking genes encoding for substance P or its receptor (NK1), or with NK1 antagonists, have shown that this system contributes to nociception, but the data are complex. Here, we have further examined the role of NK1 receptors in pain and hyperalgesia by comparing nociceptive responses to mechanical and chemical stimulation of viscera and the resulting hyperalgesia and inflammation in NK1 knockout (-/-) and wild-type (+/+) mice. We concentrated on visceral nociception because substance P is expressed by a much greater proportion of visceral than cutaneous afferents. NK1 -/- mice showed normal responses to visceral mechanical stimuli, measured as behavioural responses to intraperitoneal acetylcholine or hypertonic saline or reflex responses to colon distension in anaesthetized mice, although -/- mice failed to encode the intensity of noxious colon distensions. In contrast, NK1 -/- mice showed profound deficits in spontaneous behavioural reactions to an acute visceral chemical stimulus (intracolonic capsaicin) and failed to develop referred hyperalgesia or tissue oedema. However, in an identical procedure, intracolonic mustard oil evoked normal spontaneous behaviour, referred hyperalgesia and oedema in -/- mice. The inflammatory effects of capsaicin were abolished by denervation of the extrinsic innervation of the colon in rats, whereas those of mustard oil were unchanged, showing that intracolonic capsaicin evokes neurogenic inflammation, but mustard oil does not. Tests of other neurogenic inflammatory stimuli in NK1 -/- mice revealed impaired behavioural responses to cyclophosphamide cystitis and no acute reflex responses or primary hyperalgesia to intracolonic acetic acid. We conclude that NK1 receptors have an essential role mediating central nociceptive and peripheral inflammatory responses to noxious stimuli that evoke neurogenic inflammation, and modulating responses to noxious mechanical stimuli. We propose that two separate hyperalgesia

  16. PLGA-Curcumin Attenuates Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia and Inhibits Spinal CaMKIIα.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Tian, Xuebi; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2016-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is one of the major problems associated with prolonged use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain. Effective treatment for OIH is lacking. In this study, we examined the efficacy and preliminary mechanism of curcumin in attenuating OIH. We employed a newly developed PLGA-curcumin nanoformulation (PLGA-curcumin) in order to improve the solubility of curcumin, which has been a major obstacle in properly characterizing curcumin's mechanism of action and efficacy. We found that curcumin administered intrathecally or orally significantly attenuated hyperalgesia in mice with morphine-induced OIH. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effects of curcumin on OIH correlated with the suppression of chronic morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the superficial laminae of the spinal dorsal horn. These data suggest that PLGA-curcumin may reverse OIH possibly by inhibiting CaMKIIα and its downstream signaling.

  17. PLGA-Curcumin Attenuates Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia and Inhibits Spinal CaMKIIα

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Tian, Xuebi; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2016-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is one of the major problems associated with prolonged use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain. Effective treatment for OIH is lacking. In this study, we examined the efficacy and preliminary mechanism of curcumin in attenuating OIH. We employed a newly developed PLGA-curcumin nanoformulation (PLGA-curcumin) in order to improve the solubility of curcumin, which has been a major obstacle in properly characterizing curcumin’s mechanism of action and efficacy. We found that curcumin administered intrathecally or orally significantly attenuated hyperalgesia in mice with morphine-induced OIH. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effects of curcumin on OIH correlated with the suppression of chronic morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the superficial laminae of the spinal dorsal horn. These data suggest that PLGA-curcumin may reverse OIH possibly by inhibiting CaMKIIα and its downstream signaling. PMID:26744842

  18. PLGA-Curcumin Attenuates Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia and Inhibits Spinal CaMKIIα.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Tian, Xuebi; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2016-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is one of the major problems associated with prolonged use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain. Effective treatment for OIH is lacking. In this study, we examined the efficacy and preliminary mechanism of curcumin in attenuating OIH. We employed a newly developed PLGA-curcumin nanoformulation (PLGA-curcumin) in order to improve the solubility of curcumin, which has been a major obstacle in properly characterizing curcumin's mechanism of action and efficacy. We found that curcumin administered intrathecally or orally significantly attenuated hyperalgesia in mice with morphine-induced OIH. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effects of curcumin on OIH correlated with the suppression of chronic morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the superficial laminae of the spinal dorsal horn. These data suggest that PLGA-curcumin may reverse OIH possibly by inhibiting CaMKIIα and its downstream signaling. PMID:26744842

  19. Fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia in acute pain management.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Pamela J; Rivosecchi, Ryan M; Nery, Jose P; Kane-Gill, Sandra L

    2015-06-01

    There are safety concerns with the use of fentanyl, including respiratory depression, nausea, constipation, and possibly opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The purpose of this review is to evaluate the occurrence and significance of opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) after acute fentanyl exposure. A literature search was conducted from October 1995 through January 2015 using MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus with the terms hyperalgesia, fentanyl, pronociceptive, acute tolerance, and acute. Published articles evaluating the adverse effects of fentanyl during acute pain management (≤96 hours) in humans were included. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia is a phenomenon defined by increasing pain after opioid exposure with the worsening of pain occurring when opioid doses are increased. Hyperalgesia has been described following remifentanil and morphine use, but the question remains about the associated risk with acute fentanyl exposure. Six randomized, controlled trials evaluating the effect of fentanyl on pain in the acute setting have been conducted. Two trials oppose whereas four trials support the occurrence of fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia. The data on OIH after acute fentanyl exposure are limited and conflicting. Hyperalgesia should be considered in patients with uncontrolled pain despite escalating fentanyl doses, since the possibility of fentanyl-induced OIH exists in the acute setting. Well-designed trials are needed to determine the clinical significance of this phenomenon.

  20. Minocycline blocks lipopolysaccharide induced hyperalgesia by suppression of microglia but not astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoon, S-Y; Patel, D; Dougherty, P M

    2012-09-27

    Systemic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a robust immune response as well as thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. Spinal and peripheral glial cells have been implicated as important mediators in this hyperalgesia but the specific contributions of microglia versus astrocytes are not entirely clear. To better define these mechanisms, this study examined the febrile response, nociceptive sensitivity, glial cell reactivity and cytokine production in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord in rats following systemic treatment with LPS and the effects of minocycline in countering these responses. Intraperitoneal LPS injection resulted in an increase in core body temperature and produced hyperalgesia to heat and mechanical stimuli. Western blot studies revealed increased expression of microgial cell, macrophage and satellite cell markers in DRG and microglial and astrocyte markers in spinal cord following LPS treatment. Real-time RT-PCR indicated that LPS treatment increased cytokine mRNA expression levels in both the DRG and the spinal cord. Minocycline suppressed all LPS-induced behavioral effects but not the febrile response. Moreover, minocycline prevented LPS-induced microglia/macrophage activation and cytokine responses in spinal cord and DRG, but did not affect the activation of astrocytes/satellite cells. These data demonstrate that LPS-induced changes in nociceptive sensitivity are likely mediated by activation of microglial cells and/or macrophages in the spinal cord and DRG.

  1. Demonstration of Cutaneous Allodynia in Association with Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jarrell, John

    2009-01-01

    Pelvic pain is a common condition that is associated with dysmenorrhea and endometriosis. In some women the severe episodes of cyclic pain change and the resultant pain becomes continuous and this condition becomes known as Chronic Pelvic Pain. This state can be present even after the appropriate medical or surgical therapy has been instituted. It can be associated with pain and tenderness in the muscles of the abdomen wall and intra-pelvic muscles leading to severe dyspareunia. Additional symptoms of irritable bowel and interstitial cystitis are common. A common sign of the development of this state is the emergence of cutaneous allodynia which emerges from the so-called viscero-somatic reflex. A simple bedside test for the presence of cutaneous allodynia is presented that does not require excessive time or special equipment. This test builds on previous work associated with changes in sensation related to gall bladder function and the viscera-somatic reflex(1;2). The test is undertaken with the subject s permission after an explanation of how the test will be performed. Allodynia refers to a condition in which a stimulus that is not normally painful is interpreted by the subject as painful. In this instance the light touch associated with a cotton-tipped applicator would not be expected to be painful. A positive test is however noted by the woman as suddenly painful or suddenly sharp. The patterns of this sensation are usually in a discrete pattern of a dermatome of the nerves that innervate the pelvis. The underlying pathology is now interpreted as evidence of neuroplasticity as a consequence of severe and repeating pain with changes in the functions of the dorsal horns of the spinal cord that results in altered function of visceral tissues and resultant somatic symptoms(3). The importance of recognizing the condition lies in an awareness that this process may present coincidentally with the initiating condition or after it has been treated. It also permits the

  2. Acid evoked thermal hyperalgesia involves peripheral P2Y1 receptor mediated TRPV1 phosphorylation in a rodent model of thrombus induced ischemic pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously developed a thrombus-induced ischemic pain (TIIP) animal model, which was characterized by chronic bilateral mechanical allodynia without thermal hyperalgesia (TH). On the other hand we had shown that intraplantar injection of acidic saline facilitated ATP-induced pain, which did result in the induction of TH in normal rats. Because acidic pH and increased ATP are closely associated with ischemic conditions, this study is designed to: (1) examine whether acidic saline injection into the hind paw causes the development of TH in TIIP, but not control, animals; and (2) determine which peripheral mechanisms are involved in the development of this TH. Results Repeated intraplantar injection of pH 4.0 saline, but not pH 5.5 and 7.0 saline, for 3 days following TIIP surgery resulted in the development of TH. After pH 4.0 saline injections, protein levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) were elevated in the plantar muscle indicating that acidic stimulation intensified ischemic insults with decreased tissue acidity. At the same time point, there were no changes in the expression of TRPV1 in hind paw skin, whereas a significant increase in TRPV1 phosphorylation (pTRPV1) was shown in acidic saline (pH 4.0) injected TIIP (AS-TIIP) animals. Moreover, intraplantar injection of chelerythrine (a PKC inhibitor) and AMG9810 (a TRPV1 antagonist) effectively alleviated the established TH. In order to investigate which proton- or ATP-sensing receptors contributed to the development of TH, amiloride (an ASICs blocker), AMG9810, TNP-ATP (a P2Xs antagonist) or MRS2179 (a P2Y1 antagonist) were pre-injected before the pH 4.0 saline. Only MRS2179 significantly prevented the induction of TH, and the increased pTRPV1 ratio was also blocked in MRS2179 injected animals. Conclusion Collectively these data show that maintenance of an acidic environment in the ischemic hind paw of TIIP rats results in the phosphorylation of

  3. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients and the mitigating effects of gabapentin.

    PubMed

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Russell, Daric; Weidner, Greg; Durda, Michael; Joseph, Nicholas C; Yu, Jeffrey; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain patients receiving opioid drugs are at risk for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), wherein opioid pain medication leads to a paradoxical pain state. OIH involves central sensitization of primary and secondary afferent neurons in the dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion, similar to neuropathic pain. Gabapentin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog anticonvulsant used to treat neuropathic pain, has been shown in animal models to reduce fentanyl hyperalgesia without compromising analgesic effect. Chronic pain patients have also exhibited lower opioid consumption and improved pain response when given gabapentin. However, few human studies investigating gabapentin use in OIH have been performed in recent years. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie OIH and provide a critical overview of interventional therapeutic strategies, especially the clinically-successful drug gabapentin, which may reduce OIH.

  4. Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis Exhibit Widespread Hyperalgesia to Pressure and Cold.

    PubMed

    Moss, Penny; Knight, Emma; Wright, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Hyperalgesia to mechanical and thermal stimuli are characteristics of a range of disorders such as tennis elbow, whiplash and fibromyalgia. This study evaluated the presence of local and widespread mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, compared to healthy control subjects. Twenty-three subjects with knee osteoarthritis and 23 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and body mass index, were recruited for the study. Volunteers with any additional chronic pain conditions were excluded. Pain thresholds to pressure, cold and heat were tested at the knee, ipsilateral heel and ipsilateral elbow, in randomized order, using standardised methodology. Significant between-groups differences for pressure pain and cold pain thresholds were found with osteoarthritic subjects demonstrating significantly increased sensitivity to both pressure (p = .018) and cold (p = .003) stimuli, compared with controls. A similar pattern of results extended to the pain-free ipsilateral ankle and elbow indicating widespread pressure and cold hyperalgesia. No significant differences were found between groups for heat pain threshold, although correlations showed that subjects with greater sensitivity to pressure pain were also likely to be more sensitive to both cold pain and heat pain. This study found widespread elevated pain thresholds in subjects with painful knee osteoarthritis, suggesting that altered nociceptive system processing may play a role in ongoing arthritic pain for some patients. PMID:26809009

  5. Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis Exhibit Widespread Hyperalgesia to Pressure and Cold

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Penny; Knight, Emma; Wright, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Hyperalgesia to mechanical and thermal stimuli are characteristics of a range of disorders such as tennis elbow, whiplash and fibromyalgia. This study evaluated the presence of local and widespread mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, compared to healthy control subjects. Twenty-three subjects with knee osteoarthritis and 23 healthy controls, matched for age, gender and body mass index, were recruited for the study. Volunteers with any additional chronic pain conditions were excluded. Pain thresholds to pressure, cold and heat were tested at the knee, ipsilateral heel and ipsilateral elbow, in randomized order, using standardised methodology. Significant between-groups differences for pressure pain and cold pain thresholds were found with osteoarthritic subjects demonstrating significantly increased sensitivity to both pressure (p = .018) and cold (p = .003) stimuli, compared with controls. A similar pattern of results extended to the pain-free ipsilateral ankle and elbow indicating widespread pressure and cold hyperalgesia. No significant differences were found between groups for heat pain threshold, although correlations showed that subjects with greater sensitivity to pressure pain were also likely to be more sensitive to both cold pain and heat pain. This study found widespread elevated pain thresholds in subjects with painful knee osteoarthritis, suggesting that altered nociceptive system processing may play a role in ongoing arthritic pain for some patients. PMID:26809009

  6. Bradykinin is involved in hyperalgesia induced by Bothrops jararaca venom.

    PubMed

    Chacur, M; Picolo, G; Teixeira, C F P; Cury, Y

    2002-07-01

    Bradykinin is involved in hyperalgesia (pain hypersensitivity) induced by Bothrops jararaca venom-intraplantar injection of B. jararaca venom (5microg/paw) in rats caused hyperalgesia, which peaked 1h after venom injection. This phenomenon was not modified by promethazine (H(1) receptor antagonist), methysergide (5-HT receptor antagonist), guanethidine (sympathetic function inhibitor), anti-TNF-alpha or anti-interleukin-1 antibodies or by the chelating agent CaNa(2)EDTA. Venom-induced hyperalgesia was blocked by the bradykinin B(2) receptor antagonist HOE 140. On the other hand, des-Arg(9), [Leu(8)]-bradykinin, a bradykinin B(1) receptor antagonist, did not modify the hyperalgesic response. These results suggest that bradykinin, acting on B(2) receptor, is a mediator of hyperalgesia induced by B. jararaca venom.

  7. Hyperalgesia induced in the rat by the amino-terminal octapeptide of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Y O; Levine, J D; Burch, R M; Woo, J E; Mobley, W C

    1991-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) in the mouse submandibular gland undergoes cleavage of its amino-terminal octapeptide when salivation is induced by epinephrine. The significance of this event is uncertain; cleaved NGF demonstrates bioactivity and no function has been attributed to the octapeptide produced (NGF-OP; Ser-Ser-Thr-His-Pro-Val-Phe-His). Enzyme inhibition studies indicating structural relatedness of NGF-OP and bradykinin (BK) prompted us to determine whether NGF-OP would elicit BK-like actions. We found that like BK, NGF-OP induced a decrease in mechanical nociceptive threshold (i.e., produced hyperalgesia) in the hairy skin of the rat. This effect was dose-dependent and sequence-specific; like BK it was attenuated by sympathectomy and indomethacin pretreatment. However, NGF-OP actions appeared to be distinct from those for BK in that tissue injury was required for NGF-OP to induce hyperalgesia. Furthermore, we found no evidence that NGF-OP bound to or activated BK receptors. Our data indicate that NGF-OP is a distinct mediator of hyperalgesia. We suggest that NGF-OP alters pain threshold in the injured target regions of NGF-responsive neurons. PMID:1647026

  8. The effect of the sex of a model on nocebo hyperalgesia induced by social observational learning.

    PubMed

    Swider, Karolina; Bąbel, Przemysław

    2013-08-01

    Research shows that placebo analgesia can be induced through social observational learning. Our aim was to replicate and extend this result by studying the effect of the sex of both the model and the subject on the magnitude of placebo analgesia induced by social observational learning. Four experimental (1 through 4) and 2 control (5 and 6) groups were observed: groups 1, 3, and 5 were female; groups 2, 4, and 6 were male. All subjects received pain stimuli of the same intensity preceded by green and red lights. Before receiving pain stimuli, groups 1 and 4 observed a female model and groups 2 and 3 a male model; both models simulated responses to pain stimuli preceded by green lights as less painful than those preceded by red lights. Groups 1 through 4 also rated pain stimuli preceded by green lights as less painful. Further investigation revealed that in fact subjects in experimental groups rated red-associated stimuli as more painful than subjects from control groups who did not observe a model before receiving the same pain stimuli, indicating that nocebo hyperalgesia rather than placebo analgesia was induced. Empathy traits predicted the magnitude of nocebo hyperalgesia. Regardless of the sex of the subject, nocebo hyperalgesia was greater after the male model was observed. The results show that social observational learning is a mechanism that produces placebo effects. They also indicate that the sex of the model plays an important role in this process.

  9. Prior chronic stress induces persistent polyI:C-induced allodynia and depressive-like behavior in rats: Possible involvement of glucocorticoids and microglia.

    PubMed

    Chijiwa, Takeharu; Oka, Takakazu; Lkhagvasuren, Battuvshin; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-08-01

    When animals suffer from viral infections, they develop a set of symptoms known as the "sickness response." Recent studies suggest that psychological stress can modulate the sickness response. However, it remains uncertain whether acute and chronic psychosocial stresses have the same effect on viral infection-induced sickness responses. To address this question, we compared changes in polyI:C-induced sickness responses, such as fever, change of body weight and food intake, mechanical allodynia, and depressive-like behavior, in rats that had been pre-exposed to single and repeated social defeat stresses. Intraperitoneal injection of polyI:C induced a maximal fever of 38.0°C 3h after injection. Rats exposed to prior social defeat stress exhibited blunted febrile responses, which were more pronounced in the repeated stress group. Furthermore, only the repeated stress group showed late-onset and prolonged mechanical allodynia lasting until 8days after injection in the von Frey test and prolonged immobility time in the forced swim test 9days post-injection. To assess the role of glucocorticoids and microglia in the delayed and persistent development of these sickness responses in rats exposed to repeated stress, we investigated the effect of pretreatment with RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, and minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation, on polyI:C-induced allodynia and depressive-like behavior. Pretreatment with either drug inhibited both the delayed allodynia and depressive-like behavior. The present study demonstrates that repeated, but not single, social defeat stress followed by systemic polyI:C administration induced prolonged allodynia and depressive-like behavior in rats. Our results show that even though a single-event psychosocial stress does not have any effect by itself, animals may develop persistent allodynia and depressive-like behavior when they suffer from an infectious disease if they are pre-exposed to repeated or chronic

  10. Regionally selective activation of ERK and JNK in morphine paradoxical hyperalgesia: a step toward improving opioid pain therapy.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2014-11-01

    In addition to analgesia, opioid agonists may increase pain sensitivity under different conditions varying dose and administration pattern. While opioid hyperalgesia induced by tolerance and withdrawal is largely studied, little is known on the mechanisms underlying ultra-low dose morphine hyperalgesia. This pronociceptive response appears to play an opposing role in morphine analgesia and might have clinical relevance. Ultra-low dose morphine elicited thermal hyperalgesia through activation of μ opioid receptors. To elucidate the intracellular mechanism of morphine nociceptive behaviour, we investigated the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), crucial pathways in pain hypersensitivity. The catalytic activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), upstream modulators and transcription factors was investigated in the mouse periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), thalamus and prefrontal cortex by western blotting. Ultra-low dose morphine intensively increased pERK1 contents in the PAG and cortex and, to a lesser extent, increased cortical ERK2 and JNK phosphorylation. No involvement of p38 was detected. Morphine exposure also increased phosphorylation of cortical c-Jun whereas levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) remained unmodified. Blockade of protein kinase C (PKC) prevented increases in phosphorylation showing a PKC-dependent mechanism of activation. Pharmacological inhibitors of PKC, ERK, and JNK activity prevented morphine hyperalgesia. No modulation of MAPK and transcription factors' activity was detected in the thalamus. These results support the concept that selective activation of ERK and JNK on descending pathways plays an important role in ultra-low dose morphine hyperalgesia. The modulation of these signalling processes might improve pain management with opiate analgesics.

  11. Allodynia mediated by C-tactile afferents in human hairy skin

    PubMed Central

    Nagi, Saad S; Rubin, Troy K; Chelvanayagam, David K; Macefield, Vaughan G; Mahns, David A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We recently showed a contribution of low-threshold cutaneous mechanoreceptors to vibration-evoked changes in the perception of muscle pain. Neutral-touch stimulation (vibration) of the hairy skin during underlying muscle pain evoked an overall increase in pain intensity, i.e. allodynia. This effect appeared to be dependent upon cutaneous afferents, as allodynia was abolished by intradermal anaesthesia. However, it remains unclear whether allodynia results from activation of a single class of cutaneous afferents or the convergence of inputs from multiple classes. Intriguingly, no existing human study has examined the contribution of C-tactile (CT) afferents to allodynia. Detailed psychophysical observations were made in 29 healthy subjects (18 males and 11 females). Sustained muscle pain was induced by infusing hypertonic saline (HS: 5%) into tibialis anterior muscle (TA). Sinusoidal vibration (200 Hz–200 μm) was applied to the hairy skin overlying TA. Pain ratings were recorded using a visual analogue scale (VAS). In order to evaluate the role of myelinated and unmyelinated cutaneous afferents in the expression of vibration-evoked allodynia, compression block of the sciatic nerve, and low-dose intradermal anaesthesia (Xylocaine 0.25%) were used, respectively. In addition, the modulation of muscle pain by gentle brushing (1.0 and 3.0 cm s−1) – known to excite CT fibres – was examined. Brushing stimuli were applied to the hairy skin with all fibres intact and following the blockade of myelinated afferents. During tonic muscle pain (VAS 4–6), vibration evoked a significant and reproducible increase in muscle pain (allodynia) that persisted following compression of myelinated afferents. During compression block, the sense of vibration was abolished, but the vibration-evoked allodynia persisted. In contrast, selective anaesthesia of unmyelinated cutaneous afferents abolished the allodynia, whereas the percept of vibration remained unaffected

  12. The degree of acute descending control of spinal nociception in an area of primary hyperalgesia is dependent on the peripheral domain of afferent input

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Robert A R; Hulse, Richard P; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-01-01

    Descending controls of spinal nociceptive processing play a critical role in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Acute peripheral nociceptor sensitization drives spinal sensitization and activates spino–supraspinal–spinal loops leading to descending inhibitory and facilitatory controls of spinal neuronal activity that further modify the extent and degree of the pain state. The afferent inputs from hairy and glabrous skin are distinct with respect to both the profile of primary afferent classes and the degree of their peripheral sensitization. It is not known whether these differences in afferent input differentially engage descending control systems to different extents or in different ways. Injection of complete Freund's adjuvant resulted in inflammation and swelling of hairy hind foot skin in rats, a transient thermal hyperalgesia lasting <2 h, and longlasting primary mechanical hyperalgesia (≥7 days). Much longer lasting thermal hyperalgesia was apparent in glabrous skin (1 h to >72 h). In hairy skin, transient hyperalgesia was associated with sensitization of withdrawal reflexes to thermal activation of either A- or C-nociceptors. The transience of the hyperalgesia was attributable to a rapidly engaged descending inhibitory noradrenergic mechanism, which affected withdrawal responses to both A- and C-nociceptor activation and this could be reversed by intrathecal administration of yohimbine (α-2-adrenoceptor antagonist). In glabrous skin, yohimbine had no effect on an equivalent thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. We conclude that acute inflammation and peripheral nociceptor sensitization in hind foot hairy skin, but not glabrous skin, rapidly activates a descending inhibitory noradrenergic system. This may result from differences in the engagement of descending control systems following sensitization of different primary afferent classes that innervate glabrous and hairy skin. PMID:24879873

  13. Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Carullo, Veronica; Fitz-James, Ingrid; Delphin, Ellise

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are utilized frequently for the treatment of moderate to severe acute pain in the perioperative setting, as well as in the treatment of cancer-related pain. When prescribing chronic opioid therapy to patients with chronic pain, it is crucial for the practitioner to be aware not only of the issues of tolerance and withdrawal, but also to have knowledge of the possibility for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). An understanding of the differences between tolerance and OIH when escalating opioid therapy allows the titration of opioid as well as nonopioid analgesics in order to obtain maximum control of both chronic and acute pain. A case study is described to highlight the importance of judicious utilization of opioids in the treatment of cancer-related pain. In this case, high-dose opioid therapy did not improve chronic pain and contributed to a hyperalgesic state in which a young man experienced severe intractable pain postoperatively after two routine thoracotomies, despite aggressive pharmacologic measures to manage his perioperative pain. Furthermore, it illustrates the potential advantages of opioid rotation to methadone when OIH is suspected.

  14. Spinal nociceptive transmission by mechanical stimulation of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Takemi; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Kawamata, Mikito

    2016-01-01

    Background Since bone marrow receives innervation from A-delta and C-fibers and since an increase in intramedullary pressure in bone marrow may induce acute pain in orthopedic patients during surgery and chronic pain in patients with bone marrow edema, skeletal pain may partly originate from bone marrow. Intraosseous lesions, such as osteomyelitis and bone cancer, are also known to produce cutaneous hypersensitivity, which might be referred pain from bone. However, little is known about pain perception in bone marrow and referred pain induced by bone disease. Thus, we carried out an in vivo electrophysiological study and behavioral study to determine whether increased intraosseous pressure of the femur induces acute pain and whether increased intraosseous pressure induces referred pain in the corresponding receptive fields of the skin. Results Intraosseous balloon inflation caused spontaneous pain-related behavior and mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in the lumbosacral region. Single neuronal activities of spinal dorsal horn neurons were extracellularly isolated, and then evoked responses to non-noxious and noxious cutaneous stimuli and intraosseous balloon inflation were recorded. Ninety-four spinal dorsal horn neurons, which had somatic receptive fields at the lower back and thigh, were obtained. Sixty-two percent of the wide-dynamic-range neurons (24/39) and 86% of the high-threshold neurons (12/14) responded to intraosseous balloon inflation, while none of the low-threshold neurons (0/41) responded to intraosseous balloon inflation. Spinally administered morphine (1 µg) abolished balloon inflation-induced spontaneous pain-related behavior and mechanical hyperalgesia in awake rats and also suppressed evoked activities of wide-dynamic-range neurons to noxious cutaneous stimulation and intraosseous balloon inflation. Conclusions The results suggest that mechanical stimulation to bone marrow produces nociception, concomitantly producing its referred pain

  15. Phosphorylation of TRPV1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 promotes TRPV1 surface localization, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Du, Junxie; Yang, Yanrui; Wang, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an important serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in many physiological processes. Recently, Cdk5 has been reported to phosphorylate TRPV1 at threonine 407 (Thr-407) in humans (Thr-406 in rats), which enhances the function of TRPV1 channel and promotes thermal hyperalgesia in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain rats. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates TRPV1 at Threonine 406 and promotes the surface localization of TRPV1, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. The mutation of Thr-406 of TRPV1 to alanine reduced the interaction of TRPV1 with the cytoskeletal elements and decreased the binding of TRPV1 with the motor protein KIF13B, which led to reduced surface distribution of TRPV1. Disrupting the phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 dramatically reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in HEK 293 cells after transient expression and the channel function in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Notably, intrathecal administration of the interfering peptide against the phosphorylation of Thr-406 alleviated heat hyperalgesia and reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in inflammatory pain rats. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 increases the surface level and the function of TRPV1, while the TAT-T406 peptide can effectively attenuate thermal hyperalgesia. Our studies provide a potential therapy for inflammatory pain.

  16. Chronic psychosocial stress induces visceral hyperalgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Tramullas, Mónica; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2012-05-01

    Experimental and clinical evidence has shown that chronic stress plays an important role in the onset and/or exacerbation of symptoms of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Here, we aimed to investigate whether exposure to a chronic and temporally unpredictable psychosocial stressor alters visceral and somatic nociception as well as anxiety-related behaviour. In male C57BL/6J mice, chronic stress was induced by repeated exposure to social defeat (SD, 2 h) and overcrowding (OC, 24 h) during 19 consecutive days. Visceral and somatic nociception was evaluated by colorectal distension and a hot plate, respectively. The social interaction test was used to assess social anxiety. Mice exposed to psychosocial stress developed visceral hyperalgesia and somatic hypoalgesia 24 h following the last stress session. SD/OC mice also exhibited social anxiety-like behaviour. All these changes were also associated with physiological alterations, measured as a decreased faecal pellet output and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis disruption. Taken together, these data confirm that this mouse model of chronic psychosocial stress may be useful for studies on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying such stress-associated disorders and to further test potential therapies.

  17. Nocebo hyperalgesia induced by social observational learning.

    PubMed

    Vögtle, Elisabeth; Barke, Antonia; Kröner-Herwig, Birgit

    2013-08-01

    Nocebo effects can be acquired by verbal suggestion, but it is unknown whether they can be induced through observational learning and whether they are influenced by factors known to influence pain perception, such as pain anxiety or pain catastrophizing. Eighty-five female students (aged 22.5 ± 4.4 years) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Participants in the control condition (CC) received information that an ointment had no effect on pain perception. Participants in the verbal suggestion condition (VSC) received information that it increased pain sensitivity. Participants in the social observational learning condition (OLC) watched a video in which a model displayed more pain when ointment was applied. Subsequently, all participants received three pressure pain stimuli (60 seconds) on each hand. On one hand, the ointment was applied prior to the stimulation. Numerical pain ratings were collected at 20-second intervals during pain stimulation. The participants filled in questionnaires regarding pain-related attitudes (Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Somatosensory Amplification Scale). Participants in the OLC showed higher pain ratings with than without ointment. Pain ratings within the CC and the VSC were at the same level with and without ointment. In the VSC, the pain ratings were higher than in the CC with and without ointment. The nocebo response correlated with pain catastrophizing but not with pain anxiety or somatosensory amplification. A nocebo response to pressure pain was induced by observational learning but not by verbal suggestion. This finding highlights the importance of investigating the influence of observational learning on nocebo hyperalgesia.

  18. Sustained Suppression of Hyperalgesia during Latent Sensitization by μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors and α2A Adrenergic Receptors: Role of Constitutive Activity

    PubMed Central

    Walwyn, Wendy M.; Chen, Wenling; Kim, Hyeyoung; Minasyan, Ani; Ennes, Helena S.; McRoberts, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Many chronic pain disorders alternate between bouts of pain and periods of remission. The latent sensitization model reproduces this in rodents by showing that the apparent recovery (“remission”) from inflammatory or neuropathic pain can be reversed by opioid antagonists. Therefore, this remission represents an opioid receptor-mediated suppression of a sustained hyperalgesic state. To identify the receptors involved, we induced latent sensitization in mice and rats by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the hindpaw. In WT mice, responses to mechanical stimulation returned to baseline 3 weeks after CFA. In μ-opioid receptor (MOR) knock-out (KO) mice, responses did not return to baseline but partially recovered from peak hyperalgesia. Antagonists of α2A-adrenergic and δ-opioid receptors reinstated hyperalgesia in WT mice and abolished the partial recovery from hyperalgesia in MOR KO mice. In rats, antagonists of α2A adrenergic and μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors reinstated hyperalgesia during remission from CFA-induced hyperalgesia. Therefore, these four receptors suppress hyperalgesia in latent sensitization. We further demonstrated that suppression of hyperalgesia by MORs was due to their constitutive activity because of the following: (1) CFA-induced hyperalgesia was reinstated by the MOR inverse agonist naltrexone (NTX), but not by its neutral antagonist 6β-naltrexol; (2) pro-enkephalin, pro-opiomelanocortin, and pro-dynorphin KO mice showed recovery from hyperalgesia and reinstatement by NTX; (3) there was no MOR internalization during remission; (4) MORs immunoprecipitated from the spinal cord during remission had increased Ser375 phosphorylation; and (5) electrophysiology recordings from dorsal root ganglion neurons collected during remission showed constitutive MOR inhibition of calcium channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic pain causes extreme suffering to millions of people, but its mechanisms remain to be unraveled. Latent

  19. A tarantula spider toxin, GsMTx4, reduces mechanical and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Pyo; Kim, Byung Moon; Koo, Jae Yeon; Cho, Hawon; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Misook; Na, Heung Sik; Oh, Uhtaek

    2008-07-01

    Mechanosensitive channels mediate various physiological functions including somatic sensation or pain. One of the peptide toxins isolated from the venom of the Chilean rose tarantula spider (Grammostola spatulata), mechanotoxin 4 (GsMTx4) is known to block stretch-activated cation channels. Since mechanosensitive channels in sensory neurons are thought to be molecular sensors for mechanotransduction, i.e., for touch, pressure, proprioception, and pain, we considered that the venom might block some types of mechanical pain. In order to prepare sufficiently large amounts of GsMTx4 for in vivo nociceptive behavioral tests, we constructed recombinant peptide of GsMTx4. Because the amino-acid sequence of the toxin, but not the nucleotide sequence, is known, we back-translated its amino-acid sequence to nucleotide sequence of yeast codons, constructed a template DNA, subcloned this into a Pichia pastoris expression vector, and purified the recombinant peptide. Intraperitoneal injection of the recombinant GsMTx4 to rats significantly increased the mechanical threshold for paw withdrawal in Randall Sellito test, eliciting significant analgesic responses to inflammation-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. GsMTx4 also reduced mechanical allodynia induced by inflammation and by sciatic nerve injury in Von Frey test. However, the venom was ineffective at changing withdrawal latency in hot plate and tail-flick tests. These results suggest that GsMTx4 selectively alleviates mechanical hyperalgesia, which it presumably achieves by blocking mechanosensitive channels. Because the peptide venom induces analgesia for some forms of mechanical pain, GsMTx4 appears to have potential clinical use as a pain treatment. PMID:18359568

  20. Effects of systemic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on nociception during tail ischaemia and on reperfusion hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gelgor, L.; Butkow, N.; Mitchell, D.

    1992-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effects of five non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on nociception during ischaemia and on reperfusion hyperalgesia in rats. 2. We induced tail ischaemia in conscious rats by applying a tourniquet at the base of the tail until the rats exhibited co-ordinated escape behaviour when we released the tourniquet. 3. We assessed hyperalgesia by measuring the tail flick latency following tail immersion in water at 49 degrees C, before applying and immediately after releasing the tourniquet, and then at 30 min intervals for 2 h. 4. Intraperitoneal injection of NSAIDs prior to applying the tourniquet had no effect on the co-ordinated escape behaviour during ischaemia, nor on tail flick latency in the absence of prior ischaemia. However all the drugs attenuated reperfusion hyperalgesia in a log dose-dependent manner. Doses required to abolish hyperalgesia, were indomethacin 5 mg kg-1, diclofenac sodium 42 mg kg-1, ibuprofen 54 mg kg-1, dipyrone 168 mg kg-1 and paracetamol 170 mg kg-1. 5. We conclude that the mechanisms underlying nociception during ischaemia are not the same as those underlying reperfusion hyperalgesia. Moreover our procedure provides a rapid and more humane method for measuring the antinociceptive potency of NSAIDs. PMID:1559131

  1. Pain referral and regional deep tissue hyperalgesia in experimental human hip pain models.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masashi; Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Hip disorder patients typically present with extensive pain referral and hyperalgesia. To better understand underlying mechanisms, an experimental hip pain model was established in which pain referrals and hyperalgesia could be studied under standardized conditions. In 16 healthy subjects, pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection into the gluteus medius tendon (GMT), adductor longus tendon (ALT), or gluteus medius muscle (GMM). Isotonic saline was injected contralaterally as control. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects mapped the pain distribution. Before, during, and after injections, passive hip joint pain provocation tests were completed, together with quantitative sensory testing as follows: pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), cuff algometry pain thresholds (cuff PPTs), cutaneous pin-prick sensitivity, and thermal pain thresholds. Hypertonic saline injected into the GMT resulted in higher VAS scores than hypertonic injections into the ALT and GMM (P<.05). Referred pain areas spread to larger parts of the leg after GMT and GMM injections compared with more regionalized pain pattern after ALT injections (P<.05). PPTs at the injection site were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into GMT and GMM compared with baseline, ALT injections, and isotonic saline. Cuff PPTs from the thigh were decreased after hypertonic saline injections into the ALT compared with baseline, GMT injections, and isotonic saline (P<.05). More subjects had positive joint pain provocation tests after hypertonic compared with isotonic saline injections (P<.05), indicating that this provocation test also assessed hyperalgesia in extra-articular soft tissues. The experimental models may open for better understanding of pain mechanisms associated with painful hip disorders.

  2. Intraplantar-injected ceramide in rats induces hyperalgesia through an NF-κB- and p38 kinase-dependent cyclooxygenase 2/prostaglandin E2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tim; Chen, Zhoumou; Muscoli, Carolina; Obeid, Lina M.; Salvemini, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory pain represents an important unmet clinical need with important socioeconomic implications. Ceramide, a potent proinflammatory sphingolipid, has been shown to elicit mechanical hyperalgesia, but the mechanisms remain largely unknown. We now demonstrate that, in addition to mechanical hyperalgesia, intraplantar injection of ceramide (10 μg) led to the development of thermal hyperalgesia that was dependent on induction of the inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and subsequent increase of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The development of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and increased production of PGE2 was blocked by NS-398 (15–150 ng), a selective COX-2 inhibitor. The importance of the COX-2 to PGE2 pathway in ceramide signaling was underscored by the findings that intraplantar injection of a monoclonal PGE2 antibody (4 μg) blocked the development of hyperalgesia. Our results further revealed that COX-2 induction is regulated by NF-κB and p38 kinase activation, since intraplantar injection of SC-514 (0.1–1 μg) or SB 203580 (1–10 μg), well-characterized inhibitors of NF-κB and p38 kinase activation, respectively, blocked COX-2 induction and increased formation of PGE2 and thermal hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, activation of NF-κB was dependent on upstream activation of p38 MAPK, since SB 203580 (10 μg) blocked p65 phosphorylation, whereas p38 kinase phosphorylation was unaffected by NF-κB inhibition by SC-514 (1 μg). Our findings not only provide mechanistic insight into the signaling pathways engaged by ceramide in the development of hyperalgesia, but also provide a potential pharmacological basis for developing inhibitors targeting the ceramide metabolic-to-COX-2 pathway as novel analgesics.—Doyle, T., Chen, Z., Muscoli, C., Obeid, L. M., Salvemini, D. Intraplantar-injected ceramide in rats induces hyperalgesia through an NF-κB- and p38 kinase-dependent cyclooxygenase 2/prostaglandin E2 pathway. PMID:21551240

  3. Dezocine Prevents Postoperative Hyperalgesia in Patients Undergoing Open Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fang; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Suyun; Xu, Huan; Wang, Xiangrui

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Postoperative hyperalgesia is very frequent and hard to treat. Dezocine is widely used and has a modulatory effect for thermal hyperalgesia in animal models. So, this study was designed to investigate the potential role of dezocine in decreasing postoperative hyperalgesia for patients undergoing open abdominal surgery. Methods. This is a randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled trial. 50 patients for elective open gastrectomy were randomly allocated to either a true treatment group (0.15 mg/kg intravenous dezocine at the end of surgery) or a sham treatment group (equivalent volume of saline) in a 1 : 1 ratio. Patients were followed up for 48 hours postoperatively and pain threshold to Von Frey filaments, pain scores, PCIA consumption, rescue analgesics use, sedation score, and occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting were recorded. Results. Patients in the true treatment group experienced statistically significantly higher pain threshold on forearm and smaller extent of peri-incisional hyperalgesia than the sham treatment group. Rescue analgesic use, cumulative PCIA consumption, and pain scores were statistically significantly decreased in the true treatment group compared to the sham treatment group. Conclusions. Dezocine offers a significant antihyperalgesic and analgesic effect in patients undergoing elective open gastrectomy for up to 48 hours postoperatively. PMID:26170890

  4. Resveratrol attenuates inflammation-induced hyperexcitability of trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis neurons associated with hyperalgesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Kenta; Takehana, Shiori; Shibuya, Eri; Matsuzawa, Nichiwa; Hidaka, Shiori; Kanai, Yurie; Inoue, Maki; Kubota, Yoshiko; Shimazu, Yoshihito

    2016-01-01

    Background Resveratrol, a component of red wine, has been reported to decrease prostaglandin E2 production by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase-2 cascade and to modulate various voltage-dependent ion channels, suggesting that resveratrol could attenuate inflammatory hyperalgesia. However, the effects of resveratrol on inflammation-induced hyperexcitability of nociceptive neurons in vivo remain to be determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine whether daily systemic administration of resveratrol to rats attenuates the inflammation-induced hyperexcitability of spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis wide-dynamic range neurons associated with hyperalgesia. Results Inflammation was induced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into the whisker pad. The threshold of escape from mechanical stimulation applied to whisker pad in inflamed rats was significantly lower than in control rats. The decreased mechanical threshold in inflamed rats was restored to control levels by daily systemic administration of resveratrol (2 mg/kg, i.p.). The mean discharge frequency of spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis wide-dynamic range neurons to both nonnoxious and noxious mechanical stimuli in inflamed rats was significantly decreased after resveratrol administration. In addition, the increased mean spontaneous discharge of spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis wide-dynamic range neurons in inflamed rats was significantly decreased after resveratrol administration. Similarly, resveratrol significantly diminished noxious pinch-evoked mean after discharge frequency and occurrence in inflamed rats. Finally, resveratrol restored the expanded mean size of the receptive field in inflamed rats to control levels. Conclusion These results suggest that chronic administration of resveratrol attenuates inflammation-induced mechanical inflammatory hyperalgesia and that this effect is due primarily to the suppression of spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis wide dynamic range neuron

  5. When medications make pain worse: opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caren McHenry

    2011-08-01

    Opioid medications are commonly used to treat moderate-to-severe pain. While these medications are generally an effective means of pain control, they can, in rare cases, actually exacerbate the pain. This paradoxical reaction is called opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Patients experiencing OIH may benefit from decreasing or discontinuing the opioid, switching to an alternative opioid, and/or using a nonopioid medication for pain.

  6. Hydrogen-rich saline prevents remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia and inhibits MnSOD nitration via regulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptor in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Shu, R; Wang, H; Yu, Y; Wang, C; Yang, M; Wang, M; Wang, G

    2014-11-01

    Remifentanil administration may subsequently cause paradoxical hyperalgesia in animals and humans, but mechanisms remain unclear. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) nitration and inactivation caused by generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are involved in the induction and maintenance of central neuropathic pain. Hydrogen which selectively removes superoxide has gained much attention in recent years. In this study, we investigated antinociceptive effects of hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) on remifentanil-induced postsurgical hyperalgesia in a rat model of incisional pain. HRS was injected intraperitoneally 10 min before remifentanil infusion (1 μg kg(-1) min(-1) for 60 min). A selective NR2B antagonist Ro25-6981 was used to investigate whether antihypernociception of HRS is associated with NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Nociception was evaluated by the paw withdrawal mechanical threshold and thermal latency respectively. Then we assessed MnSOD, NR2A and NR2B in spinal cord dorsal horn via Western blot and immunohistochemistry after nociceptive tests. Here, we found that the analgesic effect of remifentanil was followed by long-term hyperalgesia lasting at least postoperative 7 days, which was accompanied with increase in NR2B expression and trafficking from cytoplasm to surface and MnSOD nitration in dorsal horn. Pretreatment with HRS (10 ml/kg) significantly attenuated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, blocked NR2B trafficking and MnSOD nitration in dorsal horn after remifentanil infusion. Ro25-6981 not 5 μg but 10 and 50 μg dosage-dependently attenuated hyperalgesia, and inhibited MnSOD nitration. Hyperalgesia and MnSOD nitration were attenuated after the combination of HRS (2.5 ml/kg) and Ro25-6981 (5 μg). In conclusion, HRS (10 ml/kg) might reverse remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia, through regulating NR2B-containing NMDAR trafficking to control MnSOD nitration and enhance MnSOD activity.

  7. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and rapid opioid detoxification after tacrolimus administration.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Piraccini, Emanuele; Miklosova, Zuzana; Taddei, Stefania; Faenza, Stefano; Martinelli, Gerardo

    2008-02-01

    Opioids can induce central sensitization and hyperalgesia, referred to as "opioid-induced hyperalgesia." Our report describes a patient who underwent intestinal transplant followed by immunosuppressant-related neuropathic pain. Her pain was treated with limited success over the course of 3 yr with different therapies, including i.v. morphine. She developed opioid-induced hyperalgesia, which was successfully treated with rapid detoxification under general anesthesia. Detoxification improved her quality of life, including the ability to resume physiotherapy. Six months after treatment, she remained opioid free. Our experience suggests that rapid detoxification under general anesthesia may be an effective treatment for opioid-induced hyperalgesia and merits comparison to traditional detoxification methods.

  8. Effects of COX inhibition on experimental pain and hyperalgesia during and after remifentanil infusion in humans.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Harald; Raeder, Johan; Draegni, Tomas; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Schmelz, Martin; Stubhaug, Audun

    2011-06-01

    Opioids may enhance pain sensitivity resulting in opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Activation of spinal cyclooxygenase may play a role in the development of OIH. The aim of this study was to demonstrate remifentanil-induced postinfusion hyperalgesia in an electrical pain and a cold pain model, and to investigate whether COX-2 (parecoxib) or COX-1 (ketorolac) inhibition could prevent hyperalgesia after remifentanil infusion. Sixteen healthy males were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. Each subject went through 4 sessions: control, remifentanil, parecoxib+remifentanil, and ketorolac+remifentanil. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation induced acute pain and areas of pinprick hyperalgesia. The areas of pinprick hyperalgesia were assessed before, during, and after a 30-minute infusion of either remifentanil or saline. The cold-pressor test (CPT) was performed before, at the end of, and 1 hour after the infusions. The subjects received a bolus of either saline, 40 mg parecoxib, or 30 mg ketorolac intravenously after the first CPT. The areas of pinprick hyperalgesia and CPT pain after the end of remifentanil infusion increased significantly compared to control (P < 0.001 and P = 0.005, respectively). Pretreatment with parecoxib or ketorolac reduced the postinfusion area of pinprick hyperalgesia (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively), compared to the remifentanil group. Parecoxib reduced the area significantly more than ketorolac (P = 0.009). In the CPT, pretreatment with parecoxib or ketorolac did not prevent postinfusion hyperalgesia. These results demonstrated OIH in both models, and may suggest that COX-2 inhibition is more important than COX-1 inhibition in reducing hyperalgesia. Remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia was demonstrated for both electrically induced pain and cold-pressor pain. Both parecoxib and ketorolac prevented hyperalgesia in the electrical model, parecoxib to a larger extent.

  9. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 antibody attenuates thermal hyperalgesia in the dorsal root ganglion: Neurochemical changes and behavioral studies after sciatic nerve-pinch injury.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qiong; Yu, Chao; Zhu, Yao-Feng; Li, Chun-Yan; Tian, Rong-Bo; Li, Xian-Hui

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress is generated in several peripheral nerve injury models.Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is activated to have a role in antioxidant effect. After nerve injury, the severely painful behavior is also performed. However, little has been explored regarding the function of Nrf2 in this painful process. Therefore, in this study, we compared the effects of Nrf2 antibody administration following sciatic nerve-pinch injury on painful behavior induced in young mice and neurochemical changes in dorsal root ganglion neurons. After pinch nerve injury, we found that the magnitude of the thermal allodynia was significantly decreased after application of Nrf2 antibody (5ul, 1mg/ml) in such injured animals and phosphorylated ERK(p-ERK) as well as the apoptotic protein (i.e., Bcl-6) in DRG neurons were also down-regulated in the anti-Nrf2-treated injured groups compared to the saline-treated groups. Taken collectively, these data suggested that the Nrf2 antibody reduced thermal hyperalgesia via ERK pathway and the down regulation of Bcl-6 protein from the apoptosis pathway might be protecting against the protein deletions caused by anti-Nrf2 effect and suggested the new therapeutic strategy with Nrf2 inhibitor following nerve injury. PMID:27316447

  10. Tactile C fibers and their contributions to pleasant sensations and to tactile allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Liljencrantz, Jaquette; Olausson, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    In humans converging evidence indicates that affective aspects of touch are signaled by low threshold mechanoreceptive C tactile (CT) afferents. Analyses of electrophysiological recordings, psychophysical studies in denervated subjects, and functional brain imaging, all indicate that CT primary afferents contribute to pleasant touch and provide an important sensory underpinning of social behavior. Considering both these pleasant and social aspects of gentle skin-to-skin contact, we have put forward a framework within which to consider CT afferent coding properties and pathways—the CT affective touch hypothesis. Recent evidence from studies in mice suggests that CTs, when activated, may have analgesic or anxiolytic effects. However, in neuropathic pain conditions, light touch can elicit unpleasant sensations, so called tactile allodynia. In humans, tactile allodynia is associated with reduced CT mediated hedonic touch processing suggesting loss of the normally analgesic effect of CT signaling. We thus propose that the contribution of CT afferents to tactile allodynia is mainly through a loss of their normally pain inhibiting role. PMID:24639633

  11. Vitamin B complex attenuated heat hyperalgesia following infraorbital nerve constriction in rats and reduced capsaicin in vivo and in vitro effects.

    PubMed

    Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Reis, Renata C; Bressan, Elisangela; Reeh, Peter W; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2015-09-01

    Vitamins of the B complex attenuate some neuropathic pain sensory aspects in various animal models and in patients, but the mechanisms underlying their effects remain to be elucidated. Herein it was investigated if the treatment with a vitamin B complex (VBC) reduces heat hyperalgesia in rats submitted to infraorbital nerve constriction and the possibility that TRPV1 receptors represent a target for B vitamins. In the present study, the VBC refers to a combination of vitamins B1, B6 and B12 at low- (18, 18 and 1.8mg/kg, respectively) or high- (180, 180 and 18mg/kg, respectively) doses. Acute treatment of rats with either the low- or the high-doses combination reduced heat hyperalgesia after nerve injury, but the high-doses combination resulted in a long-lasting effect. Repeated treatment with the low-dose combination reduced heat hyperalgesia on day four after nerve injury and showed a synergist effect with a single injection of carbamazepine (3 or 10mg/kg), which per se failed to modify the heat threshold. In naïve rats, acute treatment with the high-dose of VBC or B1 and B12 vitamins independently reduced heat hyperalgesia evoked by capsaicin (3µg into the upper lip). Moreover, the VBC, as well as, each one of the B vitamins independently reduced the capsaicin-induced calcium responses in HEK 293 cells transiently transfected with the human TRPV1 channels. Altogether, these results indicate that B vitamins can be useful to control heat hyperalgesia associated with trigeminal neuropathic pain and that modulation of TRPV1 receptors may contribute to their anti-hyperalgesic effects.

  12. A novel intrinsic analgesic mechanism: the enhancement of the conduction failure along polymodal nociceptive C-fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuchao; Wang, Shan; Wang, Wenting; Duan, Jianhong; Zhang, Ming; Lv, Xiaohua; Niu, Chunxiao; Tan, Chao; Wu, Yuanbin; Yang, Jing; Hu, Sanjue; Xing, Junling

    2016-10-01

    Although conduction failure has been observed in nociceptive C-fibers, little is known regarding its significance or therapeutic potential. In a previous study, we demonstrated that C-fiber conduction failure, which is regarded as an intrinsic self-inhibition mechanism, was reduced in circumstances of painful diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we extend this finding in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of inflammatory pain and validate that the degree of conduction failure decreased and led to a greater amount of pain signals conveyed to the central nervous system. In complete Freund's adjuvant-injected animals, conduction failure occurred in a C-fiber-selective, activity-dependent manner and was associated with an increase in the rising slope of the C-fiber after-hyperpolarization potential. To target conduction failure in a therapeutic modality, we used ZD7288, an antagonist of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-modulated channels which are activated by hyperpolarization and play a pivotal role in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. ZD7288 promoted conduction failure by suppressing Ih as a mechanism to reduce the rising slope of the after-hyperpolarization potential. Moreover, perineuronal injection of ZD7288 inhibited abnormal mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia without affecting motor function or heart rate. Our data highlight the analgesic potential of local ZD7288 application and identify conduction failure as a novel target for analgesic therapeutic development.

  13. A novel intrinsic analgesic mechanism: the enhancement of the conduction failure along polymodal nociceptive C-fibers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuchao; Wang, Shan; Wang, Wenting; Duan, Jianhong; Zhang, Ming; Lv, Xiaohua; Niu, Chunxiao; Tan, Chao; Wu, Yuanbin; Yang, Jing; Hu, Sanjue; Xing, Junling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although conduction failure has been observed in nociceptive C-fibers, little is known regarding its significance or therapeutic potential. In a previous study, we demonstrated that C-fiber conduction failure, which is regarded as an intrinsic self-inhibition mechanism, was reduced in circumstances of painful diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we extend this finding in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of inflammatory pain and validate that the degree of conduction failure decreased and led to a greater amount of pain signals conveyed to the central nervous system. In complete Freund's adjuvant–injected animals, conduction failure occurred in a C-fiber-selective, activity-dependent manner and was associated with an increase in the rising slope of the C-fiber after-hyperpolarization potential. To target conduction failure in a therapeutic modality, we used ZD7288, an antagonist of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide–modulated channels which are activated by hyperpolarization and play a pivotal role in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. ZD7288 promoted conduction failure by suppressing Ih as a mechanism to reduce the rising slope of the after-hyperpolarization potential. Moreover, perineuronal injection of ZD7288 inhibited abnormal mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia without affecting motor function or heart rate. Our data highlight the analgesic potential of local ZD7288 application and identify conduction failure as a novel target for analgesic therapeutic development. PMID:27583680

  14. A novel intrinsic analgesic mechanism: the enhancement of the conduction failure along polymodal nociceptive C-fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuchao; Wang, Shan; Wang, Wenting; Duan, Jianhong; Zhang, Ming; Lv, Xiaohua; Niu, Chunxiao; Tan, Chao; Wu, Yuanbin; Yang, Jing; Hu, Sanjue; Xing, Junling

    2016-10-01

    Although conduction failure has been observed in nociceptive C-fibers, little is known regarding its significance or therapeutic potential. In a previous study, we demonstrated that C-fiber conduction failure, which is regarded as an intrinsic self-inhibition mechanism, was reduced in circumstances of painful diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we extend this finding in the complete Freund's adjuvant model of inflammatory pain and validate that the degree of conduction failure decreased and led to a greater amount of pain signals conveyed to the central nervous system. In complete Freund's adjuvant-injected animals, conduction failure occurred in a C-fiber-selective, activity-dependent manner and was associated with an increase in the rising slope of the C-fiber after-hyperpolarization potential. To target conduction failure in a therapeutic modality, we used ZD7288, an antagonist of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-modulated channels which are activated by hyperpolarization and play a pivotal role in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. ZD7288 promoted conduction failure by suppressing Ih as a mechanism to reduce the rising slope of the after-hyperpolarization potential. Moreover, perineuronal injection of ZD7288 inhibited abnormal mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia without affecting motor function or heart rate. Our data highlight the analgesic potential of local ZD7288 application and identify conduction failure as a novel target for analgesic therapeutic development. PMID:27583680

  15. Effect of painless diabetic neuropathy on pressure pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia) after acute foot trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wienemann, Tobias; Chantelau, Ernst A.; Koller, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and objective Acute injury transiently lowers local mechanical pain thresholds at a limb. To elucidate the impact of painless (diabetic) neuropathy on this post-traumatic hyperalgesia, pressure pain perception thresholds after a skeletal foot trauma were studied in consecutive persons without and with neuropathy (i.e. history of foot ulcer or Charcot arthropathy). Design and methods A case–control study was done on 25 unselected clinical routine patients with acute unilateral foot trauma (cases: elective bone surgery; controls: sprain, toe fracture). Cases were 12 patients (11 diabetic subjects) with severe painless neuropathy and chronic foot pathology. Controls were 13 non-neuropathic persons. Over 1 week after the trauma, cutaneous pressure pain perception threshold (CPPPT) and deep pressure pain perception threshold (DPPPT) were measured repeatedly, adjacent to the injury and at the opposite foot (pinprick stimulators, Algometer II®). Results In the control group, post-traumatic DPPPT (but not CPPPT) at the injured foot was reduced by about 15–25%. In the case group, pre- and post-operative CPPPT and DPPPT were supranormal. Although DPPPT fell post-operatively by about 15–20%, it remained always higher than the post-traumatic DPPPT in the control group: over musculus abductor hallucis 615 kPa (kilopascal) versus 422 kPa, and over metatarsophalangeal joint 518 kPa versus 375 kPa (medians; case vs. control group); CPPPT did not decrease post-operatively. Conclusion Physiological nociception and post-traumatic hyperalgesia to pressure are diminished at the foot with severe painless (diabetic) neuropathy. A degree of post-traumatic hypersensitivity required to ‘pull away’ from any one, even innocuous, mechanical impact in order to avoid additional damage is, therefore, lacking. PMID:25397867

  16. Involvement of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in orofacial thermal hyperalgesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms that may underlie the sensitization of trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) and upper cervical spinal cord (C1-C2) neurons to heat or cold stimulation of the orofacial region following glutamate (Glu) injection. Results Glu application to the tongue or whisker pad skin caused an enhancement of head-withdrawal reflex and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in Vc-C2 neurons. Head-withdrawal reflex and ERK phosphorylation were also enhanced following cold stimulation of the tongue but not whisker pad skin in Glu-injected rats, and the head-withdrawal reflex and ERK phosphorylation were enhanced following heat stimulation of the tongue or whisker pad skin. The enhanced head-withdrawal reflex and ERK phosphorylation after heat stimulation of the tongue or whisker pad skin, and those following cold stimulation of the tongue but not whisker pad skin were suppressed following ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists administration into the tongue or whisker pad skin. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of MEK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 caused significant suppression of enhanced head-withdrawal reflex in Glu-injected rats, heat head-withdrawal reflex in the rats with Glu injection into the tongue or whisker pad skin and cold head-withdrawal reflex in the rats with Glu injection into the tongue. Conclusions The present findings suggest that peripheral Glu receptor mechanisms may contribute to cold hyperalgesia in the tongue but not in the facial skin, and also contribute to heat hyperalgesia in the tongue and facial skin, and that the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in Vc-C2 neurons may be involved in these Glu-evoked hyperalgesic effects. PMID:21952000

  17. Diffuse traumatic brain injury induces prolonged immune dysregulation and potentiates hyperalgesia following a peripheral immune challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K; Ellis, Gavin I; Harrison, Jordan L; Bachstetter, Adam D; Corder, Gregory F; Van Eldik, Linda J; Taylor, Bradley K; Marti, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Background Nociceptive and neuropathic pain occurs as part of the disease process after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. Central and peripheral inflammation, a major secondary injury process initiated by the traumatic brain injury event, has been implicated in the potentiation of peripheral nociceptive pain. We hypothesized that the inflammatory response to diffuse traumatic brain injury potentiates persistent pain through prolonged immune dysregulation. Results To test this, adult, male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to midline fluid percussion brain injury or to sham procedure. One cohort of mice was analyzed for inflammation-related cytokine levels in cortical biopsies and serum along an acute time course. In a second cohort, peripheral inflammation was induced seven days after surgery/injury with an intraplantar injection of carrageenan. This was followed by measurement of mechanical hyperalgesia, glial fibrillary acidic protein and Iba1 immunohistochemical analysis of neuroinflammation in the brain, and flow cytometric analysis of T-cell differentiation in mucosal lymph. Traumatic brain injury increased interleukin-6 and chemokine ligand 1 levels in the cortex and serum that peaked within 1–9 h and then resolved. Intraplantar carrageenan produced mechanical hyperalgesia that was potentiated by traumatic brain injury. Further, mucosal T cells from brain-injured mice showed a distinct deficiency in the ability to differentiate into inflammation-suppressing regulatory T cells (Tregs). Conclusions We conclude that traumatic brain injury increased the inflammatory pain associated with cutaneous inflammation by contributing to systemic immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells are immune suppressors and failure of T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells leads to unregulated cytokine production which may contribute to the potentiation of peripheral pain through the excitation of peripheral sensory neurons. In addition, regulatory T cells are

  18. Amitriptyline reverses hyperalgesia and improves associated mood-like disorders in a model of experimental monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Amorim, D; David-Pereira, A; Pertovaara, A; Almeida, A; Pinto-Ribeiro, F

    2014-05-15

    Affective disorders are common comorbidities of chronic inflammatory pain that are often overlooked in primary care. As the impact of inflammatory pain upon mood-like disorders in animal models is not well known, our objective was to assess whether prolonged experimental monoarthritis (ARTH) induced the development of anxiety and depressive-like behaviours in rodents and if amitriptyline, an antidepressant commonly used in the treatment of chronic pain, could reverse both nociceptive and mood-like impairments. Experimental ARTH was induced through an injection of kaolin/carrageenan into the right knee joint with control (SHAM) animals injected with saline. Four weeks after induction, ARTH animals displayed mechanical hyperalgesia and a depressive-like phenotype as they showed a significant increase in immobility and a decrease in the latency to immobility in the forced-swimming test at the expense of the time spent climbing/swimming. ARTH animals also displayed a decreased sucrose preference, an index of anhedonia and anxiety-like behaviour as time spent exploring the open arms of the elevated-plus-maze was decreased when compared to controls. The anxiety-like phenotype was also supported by an increase in the number of fecal boli left in the open field. In ARTH animals, the administration of amitriptyline decreased mechanical hyperalgesia and increased sucrose preference and the time spent climbing, although it had a deleterious effect in the performance of control animals. Our data show that this model of ARTH can be useful for the study of chronic pain-mood disorders comorbidities and that amitriptyline is able to partly reverse the associated nociceptive and emotional impairments.

  19. Thermal hyperalgesia after sciatic nerve block in rat is transient and clinically insignificant.

    PubMed

    Janda, Allison; Lydic, Ralph; Welch, Kathleen B; Brummett, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    Ropivacaine has been associated with transient heat hyperalgesia in sciatic nerve blocks in rat. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the hypothesized presence of transient heat hyperalgesia after perineural injection of ropivacaine with a secondary subanalysis of 2 published studies. Paw withdrawal latency was used to assess the duration of sensory blockade and presence of heat hyperalgesia at 210, 240, 270, and 300 minutes and 24 hours after injection. The analysis revealed hyperalgesia at a single time point (240 minutes after injection; mean difference, -0.60 seconds; P = 0.012) that resolved within 30 minutes, and there was no other significant hyperalgesia at other time points. Although statistically significant, the single time point measurement represented only an 11% change from baseline and was no longer present 30 minutes later. These data support the need for a reevaluation of the interpretation that pain can be worsened by perineural ropivacaine injection.

  20. Genetic evidence for an essential role of neuronally expressed IL-6 signal transducer gp130 in the induction and maintenance of experimentally induced mechanical hypersensitivity in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tenderness and mechanical allodynia are key symptoms of malignant tumor, inflammation and neuropathy. The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) is causally involved in all three pathologies. IL-6 not only regulates innate immunity and inflammation but also causes nociceptor sensitization and hyperalgesia. In general and in most cell types including immune cells and sensory neurons, IL-6 binds soluble μ receptor subunits which heteromerizes with membrane bound IL-6 signal transducer gp130. In the present study, we used a conditional knock-out strategy to investigate the importance of signal transducer gp130 expressed in C nociceptors for the generation and maintenance of mechanical hypersensitivity. Nociceptors were sensitized to mechanical stimuli by experimental tumor and this nociceptor sensitization was preserved at later stages of the pathology in control mice. However, in mice with a conditional deletion of gp130 in Nav1.8 expressing nociceptors mechanical hypersensitivity by experimental tumor, nerve injury or inflammation recovery was not preserved in the maintenance phase and nociceptors exhibited normal mechanical thresholds comparable to untreated mice. Together, the results argue for IL-6 signal transducer gp130 as an essential prerequisite in nociceptors for long-term mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cancer, inflammation and nerve injury. PMID:21951917

  1. δ-Opioid receptor agonists inhibit migraine-related hyperalgesia, aversive state and cortical spreading depression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A; Smith, Monique L; Zyuzin, Jekaterina; Charles, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine is an extraordinarily common brain disorder for which treatment options continue to be limited. Agonists that activate the δ-opioid receptor may be promising for the treatment of migraine as they are highly effective for the treatment of chronic rather than acute pain, do not induce hyperalgesia, have low abuse potential and have anxiolytic and antidepressant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of δ-opioid receptor agonists for migraine by characterizing their effects in mouse migraine models. Experimental Approach Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed in mice treated with acute and chronic doses of nitroglycerin (NTG), a known human migraine trigger. Conditioned place aversion to NTG was also measured as a model of migraine-associated negative affect. In addition, we assessed evoked cortical spreading depression (CSD), an established model of migraine aura, in a thinned skull preparation. Key Results NTG evoked acute and chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice, as well as conditioned place aversion. Three different δ-opioid receptor agonists, SNC80, ARM390 and JNJ20788560, significantly reduced NTG-evoked hyperalgesia. SNC80 also abolished NTG-induced conditioned place aversion, suggesting that δ-opioid receptor activation may also alleviate the negative emotional state associated with migraine. We also found that SNC80 significantly attenuated CSD, a model that is considered predictive of migraine preventive therapies. Conclusions and Implications These data show that δ-opioid receptor agonists modulate multiple basic mechanisms associated with migraine, indicating that δ-opioid receptors are a promising therapeutic target for this disorder. PMID:24467301

  2. Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation alleviates remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanqing; Yao, Yusheng; Wu, Yihuan; Dai, Dongsheng; Zhao, Qiuyan; Qiu, Liangcheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, we verified the hypothesis that TEAS can alleviate remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods: 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA) I-IIpatients, aged 18-60 year, scheduled for thyroidectomy were randomly allocated to TEAS or sham groups. TEAS consisted of 30 min of stimulation (6-9 mA, 2/10 Hz) on the Hegu (LI4) and Neiguan (PC6) before anesthesia. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane adjusted to bispectral index (40-60) and target remifentanil 5.0 ng/ml. Mechanical pain thresholds were assessed using electronic von Frey. The primary outcome was mechanical pain thresholds. Secondary outcomes included postoperative pain scores, the time to first rescue analgesic, cumulative number of rescue analgesia, and side effects, including postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), dizziness and shivering in 24 h postoperatively. Results: Baseline mechanical pain thresholds were similar between the groups. The analysis revealed the decrease in mechanical threshold was greater in the sham group than the TEAS group (P < 0.001). Postoperative pain scores and cumulative number of rescue analgesia were lower in the TEAS group (P < 0.05). In addition, TEAS group patients reduced the incidence of PONV and shivering. Conclusion: Preoperative TEAS can attenuate remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. PMID:26131165

  3. Role of Corticotropin-releasing Factor Signaling in Stress-related Alterations of Colonic Motility and Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Taché, Yvette; Million, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling systems encompass CRF and the structurally related peptide urocortin (Ucn) 1, 2, and 3 along with 2 G-protein coupled receptors, CRF1 and CRF2. CRF binds with high and moderate affinity to CRF1 and CRF2 receptors, respectively while Ucn1 is a high-affinity agonist at both receptors, and Ucn2 and Ucn3 are selective CRF2 agonists. The CRF systems are expressed in both the brain and the colon at the gene and protein levels. Experimental studies established that the activation of CRF1 pathway in the brain or the colon recaptures cardinal features of diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (stimulation of colonic motility, activation of mast cells and serotonin, defecation/watery diarrhea, and visceral hyperalgesia). Conversely, selective CRF1 antagonists or CRF1/CRF2 antagonists, abolished or reduced exogenous CRF and stress-induced stimulation of colonic motility, defecation, diarrhea and colonic mast cell activation and visceral hyperalgesia to colorectal distention. By contrast, the CRF2 signaling in the colon dampened the CRF1 mediated stimulation of colonic motor function and visceral hyperalgesia. These data provide a conceptual framework that sustained activation of the CRF1 system at central and/or peripheral sites may be one of the underlying basis of IBS-diarrhea symptoms. While targeting these mechanisms by CRF1 antagonists provided a relevant novel therapeutic venue, so far these promising preclinical data have not translated into therapeutic use of CRF1 antagonists. Whether the existing or newly developed CRF1 antagonists will progress to therapeutic benefits for stress-sensitive diseases including IBS for a subset of patients is still a work in progress. PMID:25611064

  4. CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND PAIN: CONDITIONED ANALGESIA AND HYPERALGESIA

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity. PMID:24269884

  5. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia: clinically relevant or extraneous research phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Tompkins, D Andrew; Campbell, Claudia M

    2011-04-01

    Opioids have become the unequivocal therapy of choice in treating many varieties of chronic pain. With the increased prescription of opioids, some unintended consequences have occurred. After prolonged opioid exposure, opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), the paradoxical effect that opioid therapy may in fact enhance or aggravate preexisting pain, may occur. Over the past several decades, an increasing number of laboratory and clinical reports have suggested lowered pain thresholds and heightened atypical pain unrelated to the original perceived pain sensations as hallmarks of OIH. However, not all evidence supports the clinical importance of OIH, and some question whether the phenomenon exists at all. Here, we present a nonexhaustive, brief review of the recent literature. OIH will be reviewed in terms of preclinical and clinical evidence for and against its existence; recommendations for clinical evaluation and intervention also will be discussed.

  6. Classical conditioning and pain: conditioned analgesia and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A; Miller, Ralph R

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity.

  7. Anti-GD2 with an FC point mutation reduces complement fixation and decreases antibody-induced allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Linda S.; Otto, Mario; Baldwin, William M.; Vail, Emily; Gillies, Stephen D.; Handgretinger, Rupert; Barfield, Raymond C.; Yu, Hui Ming; Yu, Alice L.

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against GD2 ganglioside, such as ch14.18, the human–mouse chimeric antibody, have been shown to be effective for the treatment of neuroblastoma. However, treatment is associated with generalized, relatively opiate-resistant pain. We investigated if a point mutation in ch14.18 antibody (hu14.18K332A) to limit complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) would ameliorate the pain behavior, while preserving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro, CDC and ADCC were measured using europium-TDA assay. In vivo, allodynia was evaluated by measuring thresholds to von Frey filaments applied to the hindpaws after injection of either ch14.18 or hu14.18K332 into wild type rats or rats with deficient complement factor 6. Other rats were pretreated with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist and tested following ch14.18 injection. The mutation reduces the antibody’s ability to activate complement, while maintaining its ADCC capabilities. Injection of hu14.18K322 (1 or 3 mg/kg) produced faster resolving allodynia than that engendered by ch14.18 (1 mg/kg). Injection of ch14.18 (1 mg/kg) into rats with C6 complement deficiency further reduced antibody-induced allodynia, while pre-treatment with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist completely abolished ch14.18-induced allodynia. These findings showed that mutant hu14.18 K322 elicited less allodynia than ch14.18 and that ch14.18-elicited allodynia is due to activation of the complement cascade: in part, to formation of membrane attack complex, but more importantly to release of complement factor C5a. Development of immunotherapeutic agents with decreased complement-dependent lysis while maintaining cellular cytotoxicity may offer treatment options with reduced adverse side effects, thereby allowing dose escalation of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:20171010

  8. Resiniferatoxin (RTX) Causes a Uniquely Protracted Musculoskeletal Hyperalgesia in Mice by Activation of TRPV1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E.; Kovács, Katalin J.; Honda, Christopher N.; Nunez, Myra G.; Larson, Alice A.

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of TRPV1 receptors is one approach to analgesic drug development. However, TRPV1 receptors exert different effects on each modality of pain. Because muscle pain is clinically important, we compared the effect of TRPV1 ligands on musculoskeletal nociception to that on thermal and tactile nociception. Injected parenterally, capsaicin had no effect on von Frey fiber responses (tactile) but induced a transient hypothermia and hyperalgesia in both the tail flick (thermal) and grip force (musculoskeletal) assays, presumably by its agonistic action at TRPV1 sites. In contrast, RTX produced a chronic (>58 days) thermal antinociception, consistent with its reported ability to desensitize TRPV1 sites. In the same mice, RTX produced a transient hypothermia (7 h) and a protracted (28 day) musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in spite of a 35.5% reduction in TRPV1 receptor-immunoreactivity in muscle afferents. Once musculoskeletal hyperalgesia subsided, mice were tolerant to the hyperalgesic effects of either capsaicin or RTX while tolerance to hypothermia did not develop until after three injections. Musculoskeletal hyperalgesia was prevented but not reversed by SB-366791, a TRPV1 antagonist, indicating that TRPV1 receptors initiate but do not maintain hyperalgesia. Injected intrathecally, RTX produced only a brief musculoskeletal hyperalgesia (2 days) after which mice were tolerant to this effect. Perspective The effect of TRPV1 receptors varies depending on modality and tissue type such that RTX causes thermal antinociception, musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, and no effect on tactile nociception in healthy mice. Spinal TRPV1 receptors are a potential target for pain relief as they induce only a short musculoskeletal hyperalgesia followed by desensitization. PMID:24188863

  9. Contributions of spinal D-amino acid oxidase to chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuai; Li, Xin-Yan; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-12-10

    Spinal D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) is an FAD-dependent peroxisomal flavoenzyme which mediates the conversion of neutral and polar D-amino acids (including D-serine) to the corresponding α-keto acids, and simultaneously produces hydrogen peroxide and ammonia. This study has aimed to explore the potential contributions of spinal DAAO and its mediated hydrogen peroxide/D-serine metabolism to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia. Bi-daily subcutaneous injections of morphine to mice over 7 days induced thermal hyperalgesia as measured by both the hot-plate and tail-immersion tests, and spinal astroglial activation with increased spinal gene expression of DAAO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)). Subcutaneous injections of the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[D]isoxazol-3-ol) prevented and reversed the chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. CBIO also inhibited both astrocyte activation and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intrathecal injection of the hydrogen peroxide scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) and of catalase completely reversed established morphine hyperalgesia, whereas subcutaneous injections of exogenous D-serine failed to alter chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. These results provided evidence that spinal DAAO and its subsequent production of hydrogen peroxide rather than the D-serine metabolism contributed to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

  10. Evodiamine suppresses capsaicin-induced thermal hyperalgesia through activation and subsequent desensitization of the transient receptor potential V1 channels.

    PubMed

    Iwaoka, Emiko; Wang, Shenglan; Matsuyoshi, Nobuyuki; Kogure, Yoko; Aoki, Shunji; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Noguchi, Koichi; Dai, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Evodiae fructus (EF), a fruit of Evodia rutaecarpa Bentham, has long been used as an analgesic drug in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of its pharmacological action is unclear. Here, using calcium imaging, whole-cell patch-clamp recording, and behavioral analysis, we investigated the pharmacological action of EF and its principal compound, evodiamine, on the transient receptor potential (TRP) V1 channels. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and TRPV1- or TRPA1-transfected human embryonic kidney-derived (HEK) 293 cells were used for calcium imaging or whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Twenty male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the capsaicin-induced thermal hyperalgesia behavioral analyses. We found that evodiamine induced significant increases in intracellular calcium and robust inward currents in a subpopulation of isolated rat DRG neurons, most of which were also sensitive to capsaicin. The effect of evodiamine was completely blocked by capsazepine, a competitive antagonist of TRPV1. Evodiamine induced significant inward currents in TRPV1-, but not TRPA1-transfected HEK293 cells. Pretreatment with evodiamine reduced capsaicin-induced currents significantly. Furthermore, the in vivo pre-treatment of evodiamine suppressed thermal hyperalgesia induced by intraplantar injection of capsaicin in rats. These results identify that the analgesic effect of EF and evodiamine may be due to the activation and subsequent desensitization of TRPV1 in sensory neurons.

  11. Is the Volume of the Caudate Nuclei Associated With Area of Secondary Hyperalgesia? – Protocol for a 3-Tesla MRI Study of Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Johan Mårtensson, Johan; Becerra, Lino; Christensen, Anders; Nybing, Janus Damm; Havsteen, Inger; Boesen, Mikael; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience and development of pain may be influenced by a number of physiological, psychological, and psychosocial factors. In a previous study we found differences in neuronal activation to noxious stimulation, and microstructural neuroanatomical differences, when comparing healthy volunteers with differences in size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following a standardized burn injury. Objective We aim to investigate the degree of association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization. Methods The study consists of one experimental day, in which whole-brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans will be conducted including T1-weighed three-dimensional anatomy scan, diffusion tensor imaging, and resting state functional MRI. Before the experimental day, all included participants will undergo experimental pain testing in a parallel study (Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02527395). Results from this experimental pain testing, as well as the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia from the included participants, will be extracted from this parallel study. Results The association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the area of secondary hyperalgesia will be investigated by linear regression of the estimated best linear unbiased predictors on the individual volumes of the pain relevant brain structures. Conclusions We plan to investigate the association between experimental pain testing parameters and the volume, connectivity, and resting state activity of pain-relevant structures in the brain. These results may improve our knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for the development of acute and chronic pain. ClinicalTrial Danish Research Ethics Committee (identifier: H-15010473). Danish Data Protection Agency (identifier: RH-2015-149). Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02567318; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02567318

  12. Role of kinin B2 receptors in opioid-induced hyperalgesia in inflammatory pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Grastilleur, Sébastien; Mouledous, Lionel; Bedel, Jerome; Etcheverry, Jonathan; Bader, Michael; Girolami, Jean-Pierre; Fourcade, Olivier; Frances, Bernard; Minville, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Postoperative pain management is a clinical challenge that can be complicated by opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Kinin receptors could mediate both the acute and chronic phases of inflammation and pain. A few recent studies suggest that dynorphin A could maintain neuropathic pain by activating the bradykinin (BK) receptor. Thus, the effect of a single administration of sufentanil (a μ-opioid receptor agonist) was investigated in a model of carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain using three strains of mice, i.e., knockout mice for one kinin receptor, B1R or B2R (B1KO, B2KO), and wild-type C57/BL6J mice (WT) treated with either a B1R (R954) or a B2R antagonist (HOE140) or a KKS inhibitor (aprotinin). Pain was assessed and compared between the different groups using two behavioral tests exploring mechanical (von Frey filaments) and thermal (Hargreaves test) sensitivity. Pretreatment with sufentanil induced a sustained increase in pain sensitivity with a delayed return to baseline values characterizing an OIH in carrageenan-injected mice only. Sufentanil-induced OIH was not observed in B2KO but persisted in B1KO and was blunted by aprotinin and the B2R antagonist only. Collectively, our data indicate that the B2R receptor and BK synthesis or availability are essential peripheral steps in the mechanism leading to OIH in a pain context.

  13. Role of kinin B2 receptors in opioid-induced hyperalgesia in inflammatory pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Grastilleur, Sébastien; Mouledous, Lionel; Bedel, Jerome; Etcheverry, Jonathan; Bader, Michael; Girolami, Jean-Pierre; Fourcade, Olivier; Frances, Bernard; Minville, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Postoperative pain management is a clinical challenge that can be complicated by opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Kinin receptors could mediate both the acute and chronic phases of inflammation and pain. A few recent studies suggest that dynorphin A could maintain neuropathic pain by activating the bradykinin (BK) receptor. Thus, the effect of a single administration of sufentanil (a μ-opioid receptor agonist) was investigated in a model of carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain using three strains of mice, i.e., knockout mice for one kinin receptor, B1R or B2R (B1KO, B2KO), and wild-type C57/BL6J mice (WT) treated with either a B1R (R954) or a B2R antagonist (HOE140) or a KKS inhibitor (aprotinin). Pain was assessed and compared between the different groups using two behavioral tests exploring mechanical (von Frey filaments) and thermal (Hargreaves test) sensitivity. Pretreatment with sufentanil induced a sustained increase in pain sensitivity with a delayed return to baseline values characterizing an OIH in carrageenan-injected mice only. Sufentanil-induced OIH was not observed in B2KO but persisted in B1KO and was blunted by aprotinin and the B2R antagonist only. Collectively, our data indicate that the B2R receptor and BK synthesis or availability are essential peripheral steps in the mechanism leading to OIH in a pain context. PMID:23324378

  14. Clinical interpretation of opioid tolerance versus opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lucy; Sein, Michael; Vo, Trang; Amhmed, Shihab; Zhang, Yi; Hilaire, Kristin St; Houghton, Mary; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Opioid analgesics are commonly used to manage moderate to severe pain. However, the long-term use of opioids could lead to opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Distinguishing OIH from OT would impact the practice of opioid therapy because opioid dose adjustment may differentially influence OT and OIH. Currently, there are no standard criteria of OT versus OIH causing considerable ambiguity in clinical interpretation and management of these conditions. The authors designed a practitioner-based survey consisting of 20 targeted questions. Answering these questions would require responders' actual clinical experiences with opioid therapy. The survey was conducted between 2011 and 2012 through direct mails or e-mails to 1,408 physicians who are currently practicing in the United States. The authors find that certain clinical characteristics (eg, increased pain despite opioid dose escalation) are often used by practitioners to make differential diagnosis of OT and OIH despite some overlap in their clinical presentation. A key difference in clinical outcome is that OT and OIH could be improved and exacerbated by opioid dose escalation, respectively. Our survey results revealed a significant knowledge gap in some responders regarding differential diagnosis and management of OT and OIH. The results also identified several issues, such as opioid dose adjustment and clinical comorbidities related to OT and OIH, which require future patient-based studies.

  15. Targeting Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia in Clinical Treatment: Neurobiological Considerations.

    PubMed

    Arout, Caroline A; Edens, Ellen; Petrakis, Ismene L; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2015-06-01

    Opioid analgesics have become a cornerstone in the treatment of moderate to severe pain, resulting in a steady rise of opioid prescriptions. Subsequently, there has been a striking increase in the number of opioid-dependent individuals, opioid-related overdoses, and fatalities. Clinical use of opioids is further complicated by an increasingly deleterious profile of side effects beyond addiction, including tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), where OIH is defined as an increased sensitivity to already painful stimuli. This paradoxical state of increased nociception results from acute and long-term exposure to opioids, and appears to develop in a substantial subset of patients using opioids. Recently, there has been considerable interest in developing an efficacious treatment regimen for acute and chronic pain. However, there are currently no well-established treatments for OIH. Several substrates have emerged as potential modulators of OIH, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate and γ-aminobutyric acid receptors, and most notably, the innate neuroimmune system. This review summarizes the neurobiology of OIH in the context of clinical treatment; specifically, we review evidence for several pathways that show promise for the treatment of pain going forward, as prospective adjuvants to opioid analgesics. Overall, we suggest that this paradoxical state be considered an additional target of clinical treatment for chronic pain.

  16. Effects of ginsenosides on opioid-induced hyperalgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Tang, Minke; Li, Hui; Huang, Xinjie; Chen, Lei; Zhai, Haifeng

    2014-07-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is characterized by nociceptive sensitization caused by the cessation of chronic opioid use. OIH can limit the clinical use of opioid analgesics and complicate withdrawal from opioid addiction. In this study, we investigated the effects of Re, Rg1, and Rb1 ginsenosides, the bioactive components of ginseng, on OIH. OIH was achieved in mice after subcutaneous administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days three times per day. During withdrawal (days 8 and 9), these mice were administered Re, Rg1, or Rb1 intragastrically two times per day. On the test day (day 10), mice were subjected to the thermal sensitivity test and the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Re (300 mg/kg) inhibited OIH in both the thermal sensitivity test and the acetic acid-induced writhing test. However, the Rg1 and Rb1 ginsenosides failed to prevent OIH in either test. Furthermore, Rg1 showed a tendency to aggravate OIH in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Our data suggested that the ginsenoside Re, but not Rg1 or Rb1, may contribute toward reversal of OIH.

  17. alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors augment thermal hyperalgesia in mildly burnt skin.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D

    2009-03-01

    The effect of the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine on sensitivity to heat was investigated at three sites of mild burn injury in the cutaneous forearm of 19 healthy participants. Two of the sites were pre-treated with the alpha(1)-antagonist terazosin, to determine whether the effect of phenylephrine was mediated by alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. Terazosin was administered before the burn injury at one site, and after the burn injury at the other site. In another 15 participants, the nociceptive effect of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine was investigated with and without prior treatment with the alpha(2)-antagonist rauwolscine. Drugs were introduced into the skin by iontophoresis, and burns were induced by heating the skin to 48 degrees C for 2min. Heat pain thresholds to a temperature ramp (0.5 degrees C/s), and heat pain ratings to a thermal stimulus (45 degrees C, 7s), were determined before and after the administration of each drug. Thermal hyperalgesia provoked by phenylephrine was inhibited by terazosin administered after the burn injury, but not by terazosin administered before the burn injury. However, neither alpha(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation nor blockade affected sensitivity to heat in the mildly burnt skin. These findings suggest that stimulation of cutaneous alpha(1)-adrenoceptors increased the excitability of heat-sensitized nociceptive afferents. As terazosin was more effective when administered in burnt skin, an inflammatory response induced by the burn injury may have facilitated access of adrenergic agents to alpha(1)-adrenoceptors.

  18. Expression and Regulation of Cav3.2 T-Type Calcium Channels during Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yasuhiro; Kumamoto, Natsuko; Shimada, Shoichi; Ugawa, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The Cav3.2 isoform of the T-type calcium channel is expressed in primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and these channels contribute to nociceptive and neuropathic pain in rats. However, there are conflicting reports on the roles of these channels in pain processing in rats and mice. In addition, the function of T-type channels in persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia is poorly understood. We performed behavioral and comprehensive histochemical analyses to characterize Cav3.2-expressing DRG neurons and examined the regulation of T-type channels in DRGs from C57BL/6 mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. We show that approximately 20% of mouse DRG neurons express Cav3.2 mRNA and protein. The size of the majority of Cav3.2-positive DRG neurons (69 ± 8%) ranged from 300 to 700 μm2 in cross-sectional area and 20 to 30 μm in estimated diameter. These channels co-localized with either neurofilament-H (NF-H) or peripherin. The peripherin-positive cells also overlapped with neurons that were positive for isolectin B4 (IB4) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) but were distinct from transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-positive neurons during normal mouse states. In mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia, Cav3.2 channels, but not Cav3.1 or Cav3.3 channels, were upregulated in ipsilateral DRG neurons during the sub-acute phase. The increased Cav3.2 expression partially resulted from an increased number of Cav3.2-immunoreactive neurons; this increase in number was particularly significant for TRPV1-positive neurons. Finally, preceding and periodic intraplantar treatment with the T-type calcium channel blockers mibefradil and NNC 55-0396 markedly reduced and reversed mechanical hyperalgesia during the acute and sub-acute phases, respectively, in mice. These data suggest that Cav3.2 T-type channels participate in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia, and this channel might play an even greater

  19. Combined action of vasoactive amines and bradykinin mediates allergen-evoked thermal hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lavich, Tatiana R; Cordeiro, Renato S B; Calixto, João B; e Silva, Patrícia M R; Martins, Marco A

    2003-02-21

    The ability of allergens to induce hyperalgesia in immunoglobulin E (IgE)-sensitized rats was investigated. The left hind paws of Wistar rats were sensitized with intraplantar injections of IgE anti-dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin monoclonal antibody, and challenged with dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin 24 h later. Allergen challenge yielded rapid thermal hyperalgesia and oedema formation in the ipsilateral paws, both reaching a plateau from 15 min to 3 h, and both diminishing thereafter. Allergen-evoked hyperalgesia was inhibited by intraperitoneal treatment with meclizine or methysergide, histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonists. There was also sensitivity to local treatment with either bradykinin B(1) or B(2) receptor antagonists, des-Arg(9)-[Leu(8)]-bradykinin or D-arginyl-[Hyp3, Thi5, D-Tic7, Oic8]-bradykinin (Hoe 140). Anaphylactic hyperalgesia was mimicked by the combined administration of histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and bradykinin at doses which were ineffective when injected alone. This synergistic effect was abolished by treatment with either meclizine, methysergide, Hoe 140 or des-Arg(9)-[Leu(8)]-bradykinin. Our findings show that local thermal hyperalgesia is a feature of allergen-evoked inflammation, and that a synergistic interaction among bradykinin, 5-hydroxytryptamine and histamine plays a critical role in this phenomenon. PMID:12591112

  20. URB597, an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase, reduces hyperalgesia in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hasanein, Parisa; Parviz, Mohsen; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Roohbakhsh, Ali

    2009-06-01

    Diabetic rats display increased pain responses after injection of formalin into the paw or thermal stimulation of the tail, suggesting the presence of hyperalgesia. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of URB597 (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of endocannabinoids metabolism, on 2 models of experimental hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Animals were divided into control, URB597-treated control (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mg/kg), diabetic, and URB597-treated diabetic (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mg/kg) groups. Formalin and tail-flick tests were performed 4 and 8 weeks after the onset of hyperglycemia, respectively. Diabetes caused significant hyperalgesia during these tests. URB597 (0.3 and 0.5 mg/kg) reversed chemical and thermal hyperalgesia in diabetic rats. Administration of URB597 at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg did not alter pain-related behaviors in control and diabetic groups compared with those of the respective control groups. URB597 treatment did not affect body weight or plasma glucose level of treated animals compared with nontreated animals. This study shows that increasing endocannabinoid neurotransmission with URB597 displays efficacy in chemical and thermal models of diabetic hyperalgesia. It also suggests that URB597 is a promising tool for treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

  1. The pattern and time course of somatosensory changes in the human UVB sunburn model reveal the presence of peripheral and central sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gustorff, Burkhard; Sycha, Thomas; Lieba-Samal, Doris; Rolke, Roman; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Magerl, Walter

    2013-04-01

    The ultraviolet B (UVB) sunburn model was characterized with a comprehensive battery of quantitative sensory testing (QST). Primary hyperalgesia in UVB-irradiated skin and secondary hyperalgesia in adjacent nonirradiated skin were studied in 22 healthy subjects 24h after irradiation with UVB at 3-fold minimal erythema dose of a skin area 5 cm in diameter at the thigh and compared to mirror-image contralateral control areas. The time course of hyperalgesia over 96 h was studied in a subgroup of 12 subjects. Within the sunburn area, cold hyperesthesia (P=.01), profound generalized hyperalgesia to heat (P<.001), cold (P<.05), pinprick and pressure (P<.001), and mild dynamic mechanical allodynia (P<.001) were present. The finding of cold hyperalgesia and cold hyperesthesia is new in this model. The sunburn was surrounded by large areas of pinprick hyperalgesia (mean±SEM, 218±32 cm(2)) and a small rim of dynamic mechanical allodynia but no other sensory changes. Although of smaller magnitude, secondary hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia adjacent to the UVB-irradiated area were statistically highly significant. Primary and secondary hyperalgesia developed in parallel within hours, peaked after 24-32 h, and lasted for more than 96 h. These data reveal that the UVB sunburn model activates a broad spectrum of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms and hence is a useful human surrogate model to be used as a screening tool for target engagement in phases 1 and 2a of drug development.

  2. Vinpocetine Reduces Carrageenan-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mice by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress, Cytokine Production and NF-κB Activation in the Paw and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Miyazawa, Kenji W.; Zarpelon, Ana C.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Pavão-de-Souza, Gabriela F.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2015-01-01

    Vinpocetine is a safe nootropic agent used for neurological and cerebrovascular diseases. The anti-inflammatory activity of vinpocetine has been shown in cell based assays and animal models, leading to suggestions as to its utility in analgesia. However, the mechanisms regarding its efficacy in inflammatory pain treatment are still not completely understood. Herein, the analgesic effect of vinpocetine and its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms were addressed in murine inflammatory pain models. Firstly, we investigated the protective effects of vinpocetine in overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone (PBQ) and formalin. The intraplantar injection of carrageenan was then used to induce inflammatory hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated using the electronic von Frey and the hot plate tests, respectively, with neutrophil recruitment to the paw assessed by a myeloperoxidase activity assay. A number of factors were assessed, both peripherally and in the spinal cord, including: antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, superoxide anion, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) levels, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Vinpocetine inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, PBQ and formalin (at both phases), as well as the carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and associated neutrophil recruitment. Both peripherally and in the spinal cord, vinpocetine also inhibited: antioxidant capacity and GSH depletion; increased superoxide anion; IL-1β and TNF-α levels; and NF-κB activation. As such, vinpocetine significantly reduces inflammatory pain by targeting oxidative stress, cytokine production and NF-κB activation at both peripheral and spinal cord levels. PMID:25822523

  3. Evaluation of heat hyperalgesia and anxiety like-behaviors in a rat model of orofacial cancer.

    PubMed

    Gambeta, Eder; Kopruszinski, Caroline Machado; Dos Reis, Renata Cristiane; Zanoveli, Janaina Menezes; Chichorro, Juliana Geremias

    2016-04-21

    Pain and anxiety are commonly experienced by cancer patients and both significantly impair their quality of life. Some authors claim that there is a relationship between pain and anxiety, while others suggest that there is not a direct association. In any case, there is indeed a consensus that anxiety impairs the pain condition beyond be under diagnosed and undertreated in cancer pain patients. Herein we investigated if rats presenting heat hyperalgesia induced by orofacial cancer cell inoculation would display anxiety-like behaviors. In addition, we evaluated if pain blockade would result in alleviation of anxiety behaviors, as well as, if blockade of anxiety would result in pain relief. Orofacial cancer was induced in male Wistar rats by inoculation of Walker-256 cells into the right vibrissal pad. Heat facial hyperalgesia was assessed on day 6 after the inoculation, and on this time point rats were submitted to the elevated plus maze and the light-dark transition tests. The influence of lidocaine and midazolam on heat hyperalgesia and anxiety-like behaviors was assessed. The peak of facial heat hyperalgesia was detected 6 days after cancer cells inoculation, and at this time point, rats exhibited increased anxiety-like behaviors. Local treatment with lidocaine (2%/50μL) caused a marked reduction of heat hyperalgesia, but failed to affect the anxiety-like behaviors, while midazolam (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) treatment failed to change the heat threshold, but induced an anxiolytic-like effect. Altogether, our data demonstrated that rats with orofacial cancer present pain- and anxiety-like behaviors, but brief heat hyperalgesia relief does not affect the anxiety-like behaviors, and vice-versa, in our experimental conditions.

  4. Evaluation of heat hyperalgesia and anxiety like-behaviors in a rat model of orofacial cancer.

    PubMed

    Gambeta, Eder; Kopruszinski, Caroline Machado; Dos Reis, Renata Cristiane; Zanoveli, Janaina Menezes; Chichorro, Juliana Geremias

    2016-04-21

    Pain and anxiety are commonly experienced by cancer patients and both significantly impair their quality of life. Some authors claim that there is a relationship between pain and anxiety, while others suggest that there is not a direct association. In any case, there is indeed a consensus that anxiety impairs the pain condition beyond be under diagnosed and undertreated in cancer pain patients. Herein we investigated if rats presenting heat hyperalgesia induced by orofacial cancer cell inoculation would display anxiety-like behaviors. In addition, we evaluated if pain blockade would result in alleviation of anxiety behaviors, as well as, if blockade of anxiety would result in pain relief. Orofacial cancer was induced in male Wistar rats by inoculation of Walker-256 cells into the right vibrissal pad. Heat facial hyperalgesia was assessed on day 6 after the inoculation, and on this time point rats were submitted to the elevated plus maze and the light-dark transition tests. The influence of lidocaine and midazolam on heat hyperalgesia and anxiety-like behaviors was assessed. The peak of facial heat hyperalgesia was detected 6 days after cancer cells inoculation, and at this time point, rats exhibited increased anxiety-like behaviors. Local treatment with lidocaine (2%/50μL) caused a marked reduction of heat hyperalgesia, but failed to affect the anxiety-like behaviors, while midazolam (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) treatment failed to change the heat threshold, but induced an anxiolytic-like effect. Altogether, our data demonstrated that rats with orofacial cancer present pain- and anxiety-like behaviors, but brief heat hyperalgesia relief does not affect the anxiety-like behaviors, and vice-versa, in our experimental conditions. PMID:26952973

  5. Pressure Pain Sensitivity in Patients With Suspected Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Ronald A.; Hassett, Afton L.; Harte, Steven E.; Goesling, Jenna; Malinoff, Herbert L.; Berland, Daniel W.; Zollars, Jennifer; Moser, Stephanie E.; Brummett, Chad M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives This study was designed to test whether a brief quantitative sensory testing (QST) assessment could be used to detect hyperalgesia in patients with suspected opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Methods Twenty patients on long-term opioid therapy with suspected opioid-induced hyperalgesia were recruited along with and 20 healthy controls. Pressure pain threshold, Pain50, a measure of intermediate suprathreshold pressure pain sensitivity, and tolerance levels, were evaluated. As a secondary outcome, changes in pressure pain sensitivity following intravenous administration of placebo (saline) and fentanyl (1.5 μg/kg) were assessed. Results There were no significant differences in pain measures between healthy controls and patients. However, there was an association between higher doses of opioids and having a lower pain tolerance (r= -0.46, P=0.041) and lower Pain50 (r=-0.46, P = 0.044), which was consistent with the hypothesis. Patients on >100 mg oral morphine equivalents (OME) displayed decreased pressure pain tolerance compared to patients taking <100 mg OME (P = 0.042). In addition, male patients showed a hyperalgesic response to fentanyl administration, which was significant for the Pain50 measure (P=0.002). Conclusions Whereas there were no differences between patients suspected of having opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the healthy controls, the finding that higher doses of opioids were associated with more sensitivity suggests that dose might be an important factor in the development of hyperalgesia. In addition, male patients demonstrated a hyperalgesic response after a bolus of fentanyl. Future studies are needed to develop better diagnostics for detecting hyperalgesia in the clinical setting. PMID:26469365

  6. Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion Enhances Mechanically Evoked Pain Behavior and the Activity of Cutaneous Nociceptors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Hurwitz, Olivia; Shimada, Steven G.; Qu, Lintao; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Pu; Ma, Chao; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Radicular pain in humans is usually caused by intraforaminal stenosis and other diseases affecting the spinal nerve, root, or dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Previous studies discovered that a chronic compression of the DRG (CCD) induced mechanical allodynia in rats and mice, with enhanced excitability of DRG neurons. We investigated whether CCD altered the pain-like behavior and also the responses of cutaneous nociceptors with unmyelinated axons (C-fibers) to a normally aversive punctate mechanical stimulus delivered to the hairy skin of the hind limb of the mouse. The incidence of a foot shaking evoked by indentation of the dorsum of foot with an aversive von Frey filament (tip diameter 200 μm, bending force 20 mN) was significantly higher in the foot ipsilateral to the CCD surgery as compared to the contralateral side on post-operative days 2 to 8. Mechanically-evoked action potentials were electrophysiologically recorded from the L3 DRG, in vivo, from cell bodies visually identified as expressing a transgenically labeled fluorescent marker (neurons expressing either the receptor MrgprA3 or MrgprD). After CCD, 26.7% of MrgprA3+ and 32.1% MrgprD+ neurons exhibited spontaneous activity (SA), while none of the unoperated control neurons had SA. MrgprA3+ and MrgprD+ neurons in the compressed DRG exhibited, in comparison with neurons from unoperated control mice, an increased response to the punctate mechanical stimuli for each force applied (6, 20, 40, and 80 mN). We conclude that CCD produced both a behavioral hyperalgesia and an enhanced response of cutaneous C-nociceptors to aversive punctate mechanical stimuli. PMID:26356638

  7. Intraplantar injection of linalool reduces paclitaxel-induced acute pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Soh; Kuwahata, Hikari; Yagi, Tomomi; Kishikawa, Yukinaga; Komatsu, Takaaki; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Linalool is the principal component of many essential oils known to possess biological activities. We previously reported that intraplantar injection of linalool reduces the nociceptive response as assayed by the capsaicin test. In this study, we sought to determine whether intraplantar injection of linalool could influence the induction of acute pain (allodynia and hyperalgesia) by paclitaxel in mice. Paclitaxel is widely used in cancer chemotherapy for the treatment of solid tumors, but it sometimes induces moderate to severe acute pain. Paclitaxel administered intraperitoneally as a single dose of 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg produced mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in mice. Paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia began 1 day after administration of paclitaxel and resolved within 7 days. Linalool injected into the hindpaw caused a significant reduction in paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia. Pretreatment with naloxone hydrochloride, an opioid receptor antagonist, or naloxone methiodide, a peripherally acting µ-opioid receptor-preferring antagonist, significantly reversed linalool-induced antiallodynia and antihyperalgesia. Our results provide evidence for the involvement of peripheral opioids in antiallodynia and antihyperalgesia induced by linalool. These results suggest that activation of peripheral opioid receptors may play an important role in reducing paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia.

  8. Intraepidermal nerve fiber loss corresponds to the development of taxol-induced hyperalgesia and can be prevented by treatment with minocycline.

    PubMed

    Boyette-Davis, J; Xin, W; Zhang, H; Dougherty, P M

    2011-02-01

    Loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) has been speculated to play a critical role in the development of various neuropathies. In this study, the density of IENFs were studied over time during the induction of Taxol (Bristol-Myers Squibb, NY, USA)-induced chemoneuropathy and compared with the changes in IENFs in animals co-treated with Taxol plus the protective agent minocycline. Rats were injected (intraperitoneally) with 2mg/kg of Taxol every other day for four injections (day 1, 3, 5, and 7). Minocycline (25mg/kg) was given in a separate group of rats 24h prior to the first dose of Taxol and every day for the next 9days (day 0 through 9). Animals were tested for mechanical paw withdrawal thresholds prior to any drug administrations and again on day 7, 14, and 30. Immunohistochemistry using the pan-neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 was performed on glabrous skin of the hind-paw foot pad to stain for IENFs also on day 7, 14, and 30. The results show that Taxol-treated animals developed mechanical sensitivity and corresponding IENF loss. Animals receiving minocycline plus Taxol showed no hyperalgesia or loss of IENFs. This study confirms, for the first time, that a loss of IENFs occurs as a neuropathy develops, and further shows a protection against both IENF loss and hyperalgesia with minocycline treatment. The progression of Taxol-induced mechanical hypersensitivity coincides with loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers, and the hyperalgesia and nerve fiber loss were prevented with minocycline treatment.

  9. Sativex successfully treats neuropathic pain characterised by allodynia: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Nurmikko, Turo J; Serpell, Mick G; Hoggart, Barbara; Toomey, Peter J; Morlion, Bart J; Haines, Derek

    2007-12-15

    Cannabinoids are known to have analgesic properties. We evaluated the effect of oro-mucosal sativex, (THC: CBD), an endocannabinoid system modulator, on pain and allodynia, in 125 patients with neuropathic pain of peripheral origin in a five-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial. Patients remained on their existing stable analgesia. A self-titrating regimen was used to optimise drug administration. Sixty-three patients were randomised to receive sativex and 62 placebo. The mean reduction in pain intensity scores (primary outcome measure) was greater in patients receiving sativex than placebo (mean adjusted scores -1.48 points vs. -0.52 points on a 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (p=0.004; 95% CI: -1.59, -0.32). Improvements in Neuropathic Pain Scale composite score (p=0.007), sleep NRS (p=0.001), dynamic allodynia (p=0.042), punctate allodynia (p=0.021), Pain Disability Index (p=0.003) and Patient's Global Impression of Change (p<0.001) were similarly greater on sativex vs. placebo. Sedative and gastrointestinal side effects were reported more commonly by patients on active medication. Of all participants, 18% on sativex and 3% on placebo withdrew during the study. An open-label extension study showed that the initial pain relief was maintained without dose escalation or toxicity for 52 weeks. PMID:17997224

  10. N-hexane neuropathy with vertigo and cold allodynia in a silk screen printer: A case study.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sunil; Tandon, Ruchika

    2015-01-01

    N-hexane neuropathy is an occupational disease caused by exposure to n-hexane, which is used as a solvent in silk screen printing. Here, we describe a 35-year-old man, a silk screen printer by profession, who presented with dizziness, distal swelling of both lower limbs for 10 months and tingling and burning sensation in both feet for 9.5 months along with cold allodynia. The patient had normal results of a motor and sensory system examination, apart from an impaired temperature sense. Nerve conduction tests showed a conduction block in bilateral common peroneal nerves and absence of conduction in bilateral sural nerves. These symptoms resolved when further exposure to n-hexane was ceased but cold allodynia remained. Thus, cold allodynia and impaired temperature sense can be a manifestation of n-hexane neuropathy. Hence, abnormalities on nerve conduction studies can be detected in n-hexane neuropathy patients, even before clinical examination detects any such abnormalities. In the case of the patients presenting with sensory motor neuropathy, history of occupational exposure to n-hexane becomes important, as the sooner the disease is detected, the better the chances of recovery.

  11. The impact of allodynia on the efficacy of almotriptan when given early in migraine: data from the "Act when mild" study.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Insa, S; Goadsby, P J; Zanchin, G; Fortea, J; Falqués, M; Vila, C

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of allodynia on treatment outcomes in the patients with acute migraine treated in the "Act when Mild" (AwM) study. AwM, a randomized placebo-controlled trial, studied almotriptan 12.5 mg in the early treatment (within 1 hr) of acute migraine when the pain was still mild, and investigated clinical outcomes in the presence or absence of allodynia, which was prospectively recorded using patient questionnaires. Of the total population, 39% (n = 404) reported allodynia that did not alter the efficacy of almotriptan administered for early/mild pain in terms of 2-hr pain-free rates (53.9% for allodynic patients vs. 52.5% for nonallodynic patients). Similarly, sustained pain-free rates were 47.2% versus 45.5%, and migraine duration 1.40 versus 1.54 hr, respectively. However, allodynia impaired the effectiveness of almotriptan in the patients with moderate/severe pain in terms of longer migraine duration, fewer patients achieving pain-free status, and more requiring rescue medication. In conclusion, the lack of effect of allodynia on the efficacy of almotriptan given for early/mild migraine pain might help explain the improved outcomes associated with the early-treatment strategy in AwM. Moreover, the data suggest that pain intensity is the main driver of triptan response, and not the presence or absence of allodynia. PMID:21777163

  12. Inhibition of microglial activation attenuates the development but not existing hypersensitivity in a rat model of neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Vasudeva; Tanga, Flobert; DeLeo, Joyce A

    2003-08-01

    Microglia, the intrinsic macrophages of the central nervous system, have previously been shown to be activated in the spinal cord in several rat mononeuropathy models. Activation of microglia and subsequent release of proinflammatory cytokines are known to play a role in inducing a behavioral hypersensitive state (hyperalgesia and allodynia) in these animals. The present study was undertaken to determine whether minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation, could attenuate both the development and existing mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in an L5 spinal nerve transection model of neuropathic pain. In a preventive paradigm (to study the effect on the development of hypersensitive behaviors), minocycline (10, 20, or 40 mg/kg intraperitoneally) was administered daily, beginning 1 h before nerve transection. This regimen produced a decrease in mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia, with a maximum inhibitory effect observed at the dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg. The attenuation of the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia by minocycline was associated with an inhibitory action on microglial activation and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines at the L5 lumbar spinal cord of the nerveinjured animals. The effect of minocycline on existing allodynia was examined after its intraperitoneal administration initiated on day 5 post-L5 nerve transection. Although the postinjury administration of minocycline significantly inhibited microglial activation in neuropathic rats, it failed to attenuate existing hyperalgesia and allodynia. These data demonstrate that inhibition of microglial activation attenuated the development of behavioral hypersensitivity in a rat model of neuropathic pain but had no effect on the treatment of existing mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia.

  13. Traumatic Stress Promotes Hyperalgesia via Corticotropin-Releasing Factor-1 Receptor (CRFR1) Signaling in Central Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Itoga, Christy A; Roltsch Hellard, Emily A; Whitaker, Annie M; Lu, Yi-Ling; Schreiber, Allyson L; Baynes, Brittni B; Baiamonte, Brandon A; Richardson, Heather N; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2016-09-01

    Hyperalgesia is an exaggerated response to noxious stimuli produced by peripheral or central plasticity. Stress modifies nociception, and humans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibit co-morbid chronic pain and amygdala dysregulation. Predator odor stress produces hyperalgesia in rodents. Systemic blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) type 1 receptors (CRFR1s) reduces stress-induced thermal hyperalgesia. We hypothesized that CRF-CRFR1 signaling in central amygdala (CeA) mediates stress-induced hyperalgesia in rats with high stress reactivity. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to predator odor stress in a conditioned place avoidance paradigm and indexed for high (Avoiders) and low (Non-Avoiders) avoidance of predator odor-paired context, or were unstressed Controls. Rats were tested for the latency to withdraw hindpaws from thermal stimuli (Hargreaves test). We used pharmacological, molecular, and immunohistochemical techniques to assess the role of CRF-CRFR1 signaling in CeA in stress-induced hyperalgesia. Avoiders exhibited higher CRF peptide levels in CeA that did not appear to be locally synthesized. Intra-CeA CRF infusion mimicked stress-induced hyperalgesia. Avoiders exhibited thermal hyperalgesia that was reversed by systemic or intra-CeA injection of a CRFR1 antagonist. Finally, intra-CeA infusion of tetrodotoxin produced thermal hyperalgesia in unstressed rats and blocked the anti-hyperalgesic effect of systemic CRFR1 antagonist in stressed rats. These data suggest that rats with high stress reactivity exhibit hyperalgesia that is mediated by CRF-CRFR1 signaling in CeA.

  14. Shugan-decoction relieves visceral hyperalgesia and reduces TRPV1 and SP colon expression

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing-Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ye; Xu, Hui; Tang, Rong-Zhu; Dong, Yue-Bin; Xie, Jian-Qun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of Shugan-decoction (SGD) on visceral hyperalgesia and colon gene expressions using a rat model. METHODS: Ninety-six adult male Wistar rats were randomized into six equal groups for assessment of SGD effects on psychological stress-induced changes using the classic water avoidance stress (WAS) test. Untreated model rats were exposed to chronic (1 h/d for 10 d consecutive) WAS conditions; experimental treatment model rats were administered with intragastric SGD at 1 h before WAS on consecutive days 4-10 (low-dose: 0.1 g/mL; mid-dose: 0.2 g/mL; high-dose: 0.4 g/mL); control treatment model rats were similarly administered with the irritable bowel syndrome drug, dicetel (0.0042 g/mL); untreated normal control rats received no drug and were not subjected to the WAS test. At the end of the 10-d WAS testing period, a semi-quantitative measurement of visceral sensitivity was made by assessing the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) to colorectal balloon-induced distension (at 5 mmHg increments) to determine the pain pressure threshold (PPT, evidenced by pain behavior). Subsequently, the animals were sacrificed and colonic tissues collected for assessment of changes in expressions of proteins related to visceral hypersensitivity (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, TRPV1) and sustained visceral hyperalgesia (substance P, SP) by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Inter-group differences were assessed by paired t test or repeated measures analysis of variance. RESULTS: The WAS test successfully induced visceral hypersensitivity, as evidenced by a significantly reduced AWR pressure in the untreated model group as compared to the untreated normal control group (190.4 ± 3.48 mmHg vs 224.0 ± 4.99 mmHg, P < 0.001). SGD treatments at mid-dose and high-dose and the dicetel treatment significantly increased the WAS-reduced PPT (212.5 ± 2.54, 216.5 ± 3.50 and 217.7 ± 2.83 mmHg respectively, all P < 0

  15. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Araldi, D; Bogen, O; Levine, J D

    2016-06-01

    We propose that the extracellular matrix (ECM) signals CD44, a hyaluronan receptor, to increase the responsiveness to mechanical stimulation in the rat hind paw. We report that intradermal injection of hyaluronidase induces mechanical hyperalgesia, that is inhibited by co-administration of a CD44 receptor antagonist, A5G27. The intradermal injection of low (LMWH) but not high (HMWH) molecular weight hyaluronan also induces mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect that was attenuated by pretreatment with HMWH or A5G27. Pretreatment with HMWH also attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by hyaluronidase. Similarly, intradermal injection of A6, a CD44 receptor agonist, produced hyperalgesia that was inhibited by HMWH and A5G27. Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and Src, but not protein kinase C (PKC), significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by both A6 and LMWH. Finally, to determine if CD44 receptor signaling is involved in a preclinical model of inflammatory pain, we evaluated the effect of A5G27 and HMWH on the mechanical hyperalgesia associated with the inflammation induced by carrageenan. Both A5G27 and HMWH attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, while LMWH acts at its cognate receptor, CD44, to induce mechanical hyperalgesia, HMWH acts at the same receptor as an antagonist. That the local administration of HMWH or A5G27 inhibits carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia supports the suggestion that carrageenan produces changes in the ECM that contributes to inflammatory pain. These studies define a clinically relevant role for signaling by the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, in increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. PMID:26996509

  16. Neural correlates of hyperalgesia in the monosodium iodoacetate model of osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Abaei, Maryam; Sagar, Devi R; Stockley, Elizabeth G; Spicer, Clare H; Prior, Malcolm; Auer, Dorothee P

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanisms driving osteoarthritic pain remain poorly understood, but there is increasing evidence for a role of the central nervous system in the chronification of pain. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the influence of a model of unilateral knee osteoarthritis on nociceptive processing. Results Four to five weeks post intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA, 1 mg) into the left knee, Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to characterize the neural response to a noxious stimulus (intra-articular capsaicin injection). In a two-arm cross-over design, 5 µM/50 µl capsaicin was injected into either the left knee (n = 8, CAPS-MIA) or right control knee (n = 8, CAPS-CON), preceded by contralateral vehicle (SAL) injection. To assess neural correlates of mechanical hyperalgesia, hindpaws were stimulated with von Frey hairs (8 g: MIA; 15 g: control knee, based on behavioral withdrawal responses). The CAPS-MIA group exhibited significant activation of the periaqueductal gray, unilateral thalamus and bilateral mensencephalon, superior-colliculus, and hippocampus, with no significant activation in the other groups/conditions. Capsaicin injection increased functional connectivity in the mid-brain network and mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, hippocampus, and globus pallidus, which was significantly stronger in CAPS-MIA compared to CAPS-CON groups. Mechanical stimulation of the hyperalgesic (ipsilateral to MIA knee) and normalgesic (contralateral) hindpaws evoked qualitatively different brain activation with more widespread brainstem and anterior cingulate (ACC) activation when stimulating the hyperalgesic paw, and clearer frontal sensory activation from the normalgesic paw. Conclusions We provide evidence for modulation of nociceptive processing in a chronic knee osteoarthritis pain model with stronger brain activation and alteration of brain networks

  17. [Relationship between cutaneous temperature and hand edema and allodynia after stroke--the etiology of shoulder-hand syndrome].

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hiroko; Yamanaka, Hidekata

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of shoulder-hand syndrome is as yet unknown. We hypothesized that it may be due to damaged unmyelinated fibers in front of the subscapular muscle. We examined the existence of edema and hypersensitivity to pain in the hands of stroke patients during the subacute stage and their relationships to cutaneous temperatures of the index fingertips in 75 hemiplegic patients (23 without edema, 32 with only edema, and 20 with edema plus allodynia). Patients were placed into two groups (comfortable and warm) depending on room temperature (22.2-25.6°C and 25.7-30°C, respectively). Of the patients with hand edema plus allodynia, 75% had a large lesion in the capsula, cortical white matter, and putamen. It was previously reported that the cutaneous temperature of the arm on the paralysis side of patients with lesions of the capsula or putamen was lower than that on the non-paralysis side. In the edema plus allodynia group, the temperature of the index fingertip on the affected side was higher than that of their contralateral fingers; the differences were smaller under warm conditions possibly due to blockade of the sympathetic nerves in the peripheral nerve. By contrast, in patients in the edema group, there were no differences in cutaneous temperatures of their two index fingers. Thus, it appears that patients with mild cases of shoulder-hand syndrome have conduction blocks in the posterior cord of the brachial plexus, while those with severe cases have both conduction blocks and neurogenic inflammation in both the lateral and posterior cords.

  18. The Area of Secondary Hyperalgesia following Heat Stimulation in Healthy Male Volunteers: Inter- and Intra-Individual Variance and Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Morten Sejer; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Østervig, Rebecca; Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical pain models can be applied when investigating basic physiologic pain responses in healthy volunteers. Several pain models exist; however, only few have been adequately validated. Our primary aim with this prospective study was to investigate the intra- and inter-individual variation in secondary hyperalgesia elicited by brief thermal sensitization (45°C for 3 min) in healthy volunteers. Material and Methods Fifty healthy volunteers were included. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization were investigated by 2 observers on 4 experimental days, with a minimum interval of 7 days. Additionally, heat pain detection threshold and pain during thermal stimulation (45°C for 1 min.), and the psychological tests Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score were applied. Results For areas of secondary hyperalgesia, an intra-observer intra-person correlation of 0.85, 95% CI [0.78, 0.90], an intra-observer inter-person correlation of 0.03, 95% CI [0.00, 0.16], and a coefficient of variation of 0.17, 95% CI [0.14, 0.21] was demonstrated. Four percent of the study population had areas of secondary hyperalgesia both below the 1st and above the 3rd quartile considering all included participants. Heat pain detection threshold predicted area of secondary hyperalgesia with an adjusted R2 of 0.20 (P = 0.0006). Conclusions We have demonstrated a low intra-individual, and a high inter-individual variation in thermally induced secondary hyperalgesia. We conclude that brief thermal sensitization produce secondary hyperalgesia with a high level of reproducibility, which can be applied to investigate different phenotypes related to secondary hyperalgesia in healthy volunteers. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT02166164 PMID:27167119

  19. Magnesium ions and opioid agonist activity in streptozotocin-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bujalska, Magdalena; Malinowska, Ewelina; Makulska-Nowak, Helena; Gumułka, Stanisław Witold

    2008-01-01

    Streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia accompanied by a chronic decrease in the nociceptive threshold is considered a useful model of experimental hyperalgesia. We examined (1) the effect of the opioid receptor agonists and (2) the effect of the magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) on the antinociceptive action of opioid agonists in a diabetic neuropathic pain model. When administered alone, opioid agonists like morphine (5 mg/kg i.p.) and fentanyl (0.0625 mg/kg i.p.), as well as the partial agonist buprenorphine (0.075 mg/kg) had only little effect on streptozotocin-induced hyperalgesia. However, pretreatment with Mg(2+) at a dose of 40 mg magnesium sulfate/kg i.p. markedly enhanced the analgesic activity of all three investigated opioids. Practical aspects of co-administration of magnesium and opioids in diabetic neuropathy are discussed. PMID:18701828

  20. Lateral Hypothalamic Stimulation Reduces Hyperalgesia Through Spinally Descending Orexin-A Neurons in Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Wardach, Jacob; Wagner, Monica; Jeong, Younhee; Holden, Janean E

    2016-03-01

    No evidence to date shows that lateral hypothalamic (LH) stimulation produces orexin-A-mediated antinociception in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in a model of neuropathic pain. We conducted experiments to examine the effect of orexin-A-mediated LH stimulation in female rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) on thermal hyperalgesia. Rats receiving carbachol into the LH demonstrated antinociception on both the left CCI and right nonligated paws (p < .05). Rats were given carbachol in the LH followed by intrathecal injection of the orexin-1 (OX1) receptor antagonist SB-334867, which blocked LH-induced antinociception compared with control groups (p < .05) in the left paw, but not in the right paw. These findings support the hypothesis that LH stimulation produces antinociception in rats with thermal hyperalgesia from neuropathic pain via an orexin-A connection between the LH and the SCDH. Identification of this pathway may lead to studies using orexins to manage clinical pain.

  1. Failure of intrathecal ketorolac to reduce remifentanil-induced postinfusion hyperalgesia in humans.

    PubMed

    Eisenach, James C; Tong, Chuanyao; Curry, Regina S

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, acute exposure to opioids results in transient antinociception followed by longer lasting hypersensitivity to tactile or thermal stimuli, a phenomenon termed opioid-induced hyperalgesia. This hypersensitivity can be blocked or reversed by intrathecally administered cyclooxygenase inhibitors, including ketorolac, suggesting a role for spinal prostaglandins. In surgical patients, the dose of intraoperative opioid, particularly the short-acting drug, remifentanil, is directly related to increased pain and opioid requirements for many hours postoperatively. In addition, experimentally induced tactile hypersensitivity in humans is exaggerated after cessation of remifentanil infusions. The degree of this experimental opioid-induced hyperalgesia is reduced by systemic treatment with cyclooxygenase inhibitors, and investigators have speculated that this reduction reflects the actions in the central nervous system, most likely in the spinal cord. To test this hypothesis, we measured cerebrospinal fluid prostaglandin E2 concentrations during and after remifentanil infusion in 30 volunteers. These volunteers received intrathecal ketorolac or saline in a random, blinded manner during intravenous remifentanil infusion after generation of hypersensitivity by topical capsaicin. Remifentanil reduced pain to noxious heat stimuli and reduced areas of capsaicin-induced hypersensitivity similarly in those receiving intrathecal ketorolac or saline. The primary outcome measure, area of capsaicin-induced hypersensitivity after stopping remifentanil, showed a similar increase in those receiving ketorolac as in those receiving saline. Cerebrospinal fluid prostaglandin E2 concentrations did not increase during postinfusion hyperalgesia compared with those during infusion, and they were not increased during infusion compared with those in historical controls. These data fail to support the hypothesis that acute opioid-induced hyperalgesia reflects spinal cyclooxygenase activation

  2. Movement-evoked hyperalgesia induced by lipopolysaccharides is not suppressed by glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Katalin J.; Papic, Jonathan C.; Larson, Alice A.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) produces a variety of effects, including movement-evoked hyperalgesia that can be measured using the grip force assay in mice. Because both lethality and enhanced sensitivity to cutaneous pain following exposure to endotoxins have each been attributed to inflammatory mediators, we explored the possibility that LPS-induced movement-evoked hyperalgesia is also sensitive to manipulations of glucocorticoids that regulate these other LPS responses. We found that the hyperalgesic effect of LPS (5 mg/kg s.c.) in mice that were adrenalectomized did not differ from that in control mice that were sham-operated, even though mortality after LPS was potentiated by adrenalectomy. The development of tolerance to the movement-evoked hyperalgesic effect of LPS also did not differ between adrenalectomized and sham-operated control mice. In addition, mifepristone (25 mg/kg s.c.), a glucocorticoid antagonist, did not attenuate the hyperalgesic effect of LPS (2 mg/kg s.c.), yet this dose of mifepristone was sufficient to enhance the incidence of lethality induced by LPS. Enhancement of glucocorticoid activity by two injections of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg s.c.) had no effect on the degree of hyperalgesia in mice injected with LPS (5 mg/kg s.c.), yet this dose of dexamethasone was sufficient to attenuate the incidence of mortality induced by LPS in adrenalectomized mice. Finally, morphine (10 mg/kg i.p.) reversed the decrease in grip force caused by LPS (5 mg/kg i.p.), supporting the interpretation that decreases in grip force produced by LPS reflect muscle hyperalgesia that is not sensitive to glucocorticoids. PMID:17686584

  3. Influence of trimebutine on inflammation- and stress-induced hyperalgesia to rectal distension in rats.

    PubMed

    Lacheze, C; Coelho, A M; Fioramonti, J; Buéno, L

    1998-08-01

    The effects of trimebutine and its major metabolite, N-desmethyltrimebutine on inflammation- and stress-induced rectal hyperalgesia have been evaluated in rats fitted with electrodes implanted in the longitudinal striated muscle of the abdomen. Intermittent rectal distension was performed before and 3 days after induction of rectal inflammation by local infusion of trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (in ethanol). Stress consisted of 2h partial restraint and rectal distension was performed before and 30min after the end of the partial restraint session. The animals were treated intraperitoneally with trimebutine or desmethyltrimebutine (5, 10 or 20mgkg(-1)) or vehicle 15min before rectal distension. Naloxone (1mgkg(-1)) or saline was injected subcutaneously before trimebutine and desmethyltrimebutine. Before treatment trimebutine at the highest dose (20mgkg(-1)) reduced the abdominal response to rectal distension for the highest volume of distension (1.6mL) whereas desmethyltrimebutine was inactive. After rectocolitis the abdominal response to rectal distension was enhanced and trimebutine at 5mgkg(-1) reduced and at 10 mgkg(-1) suppressed inflammation-induced hyperalgesia, an effect reversed by naloxone. Desmethyltrimebutine was inactive. Stress-induced hypersensitivity was attenuated or suppressed, or both, by trimebutine and desmethyltrimebutine at doses of 5, 10 or 20mgkg(-l); greater efficacy was observed for desmethyltrimebutine and the effects were not reversed by naloxone. It was concluded that trimebutine and desmethyltrimebutine are active against inflammation- and stress-induced rectal hyperalgesia but act differently. The effect of trimebutine on inflammation-induced hyperalgesia is mediated through opioid receptors. PMID:9751458

  4. Pharmacological treatment of opioid-induced hyperalgesia: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Ramasubbu, Chitra; Gupta, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Opioids are commonly used to treat moderate to severe pain. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia is a paradoxical response to opioid agonists resulting in an increased perception of pain rather than an antinociceptive effect. Even though there is a debate regarding its clinical relevance, it is becoming a challenge in both acute and chronic pain settings. The study of opioid-induced hyperalgesia is an emerging field with multiple challenges faced by investigators with regard to defining the diagnosis and characterizing the findings. The objective of this study was to review the preliminary evidence related to the treatment and management of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Lack of data, small patient numbers, short-term follow-up, and variations in study design limited the review. With the literature on this subject being sparse, this study attempts to provide a preliminary look at the available data and to set the stage for an eventual meta-analysis. Case reports in the literature have shown success with various pharmacological interventions. Possible treatment regimens include ketamine, dextromethorphan, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioid switching, amantadine, buprenorphine, α(2) agonists, and methadone. These agents are briefly discussed in this paper. Further well-designed, placebo-controlled trials are needed to assess the effectiveness of the interventions investigated in this review.

  5. Effects of hydroxytyrosol-20 on carrageenan-induced acute inflammation and hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Dezheng; Geng, Chengyan; Jiang, Liping; Cao, Jun; Yoshimura, Hiroyuki; Zhong, Laifu

    2009-05-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) is a simple phenol compound extracted from olive leaves. The content of HT in the studied preparation was about 20%, and the preparation was called hydroxytyrosol-20 (HT-20). HT has antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities. There has been no report so far on the efficacy of HT-20 in carrageenan-induced acute inflammation and hyperalgesia in rats. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the inhibitory role of HT-20 on carrageenan-induced swelling and hyperalgesia of rat paw. Paw inflammation was assessed by the increase in paw volume and hyperalgesia. The rat paws were cut out under ether anesthesia at 270 min after administration of carrageenan. The tissue of the right paw was isolated separately from the individual rat. The levels of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) mRNA in the tissue were estimated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that the paw pressure thresholds of rats orally administered HT-20 significantly increased at 210, 240 and 270 min after administration of carrageenan, compared with corresponding basal paw pressure thresholds; the degree of swelling of the right hind paw showed a statistically significant reduction, compared with rats in the carrageenan-treated control. In this model, HT-20 appears to decrease pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha and not to increase the antiinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression of IL-10.

  6. Involvement of peripheral TRPV1 in TMJ hyperalgesia induced by ethanol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Urtado, Marília Bertoldo; Gameiro, Gustavo Hauber; Tambeli, Cláudia Herrera; Fischer, Luana; Urtado, Christiano Bertoldo; de Arruda Veiga, Maria Cecília Ferraz

    2007-11-30

    Ethanol withdrawal increases nociception after the injection of formalin into the rat's temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Little is known about the neurological basis for hyperalgesia induced by ethanol withdrawal, but it has been reported that ethanol can potentiate the response of transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) in superficial tissues. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that peripheral TRPV1 could be involved on nociceptive behavioral responses induced by the injection of formalin into the TMJ region of rats exposed to chronic ethanol administration and ethanol withdrawal. Behavioral hyperalgesia was verified 12 h after ethanol withdrawal in rats that drank an ethanol solution (6.5%) for 10 days. In another group submitted to the same ethanol regimen, the selective vanilloid receptor antagonist capsazepine (300, 600 or 1200 microg/25 microl) or an equal volume of vehicle were injected into the TMJ regions 30 min before the TMJ formalin test. The local injections of capsazepine reduced the increased nociceptive responses induced by ethanol withdrawal. The effect of capsazepine on rats that did not drink ethanol was not significant. These results indicate that the peripheral TRPV1 can contribute to the hyperalgesia induced by ethanol withdrawal on deep pain conditions.

  7. Spinal microglial proliferation is evident in a rat model of painful disc herniation both in the presence of behavioral hypersensitivity and following minocycline treatment sufficient to attenuate allodynia.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Sarah M; Guarino, Benjamin B; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2009-09-01

    Although spinal glia acquire a reactive profile in radiculopathy, glial cell proliferation remains largely unstudied. This study investigated spinal glial proliferation in a model simulating painful disc herniation; the C7 nerve root underwent compression and chromic gut suture exposure or sham procedures. A subset of injured rats received minocycline injections prior to injury. Allodynia was assessed and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected 2 hr before tissue harvest on day 1 or 3. Spinal cell proliferation and phenotype identification were assayed by fluorescent colabeling with antibodies to BrdU and either glial fibrillary acidic protein (astrocytes) or Iba1 (microglia). At day 1, ipsilateral allodynia was significantly increased (P < 0.001) for injury over sham. Minocycline treatment significantly decreased ipsilateral allodynia to sham levels at day 1 (P < 0.001). At day 3, ipsilateral allodynia remained and contralateral allodynia was also present for injury (P< 0.003) over sham. The number of BrdU-positive cells in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn at day 1 after injury was significantly elevated (P < 0.001) over sham. Approximately 70% of BrdU-positive cells labeled positively for Iba1; dividing microglia were significantly increased (P < 0.004) in the ipsilateral dorsal horn at day 1 following injury compared with sham. Spinal cellular proliferation after injury was not changed by minocycline injection. By day 3, the number of BrdU-positive cells had returned to sham levels bilaterally. Data indicate that spinal microglia proliferate after injury but that proliferation is not abolished by minocycline treatment that attenuates allodynia, indicating that spinal microglial proliferation may be related to injury and may not be linked to changes in sensory perception.

  8. DAMGO in the central amygdala alleviates the affective dimension of pain in a rat model of inflammatory hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R-X; Zhang, M; Li, A; Pan, L; Berman, B M; Ren, K; Lao, L

    2013-11-12

    Pain has sensory-discriminative and emotional-affective dimensions. Recent studies show that the affective component can be assessed with a conditioned place avoidance (CPA) test. We hypothesized that systemic morphine before a post-conditioning test would more potently attenuate the affective aspect compared to the sensory component and that [d-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO), a μ-selective opioid receptor agonist, injected into the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) would reduce established CPA. A rat model of inflammatory pain, produced by a complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) injection into the hind paw, was combined with a CPA test. Three experiments were performed on adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Systemic morphine (0.5 or 1.0mg/kg) in Experiment 1, intrathecal (i.t.) morphine (2.5 μg/rat) in Experiment 2, and intra-CeA DAMGO (7.7-15.4 ng/0.4 μl) in Experiment 3 were given to CFA-injected rats (n=6-8/group) prior to a post-conditioning test. Saline-injected rats were used as control. Time spent in a pain-paired compartment was recorded twice, before conditioning and after a post-conditioning test. Paw withdrawal latency (PWL) to a noxious thermal stimulus was measured before experiment at day-1 and after the post-conditioning test; hyperalgesia was defined as a decrease in PWL. The data showed that CFA-injected rats had significantly negative CPA compared to those of saline-injected rats (P<0.05). Low-dosage systemic morphine significantly (P<0.05) reduced CFA-induced CPA but had no effect on PWL. I.t. morphine did not inhibit the display of CPA but significantly increased PWL, suppressing hyperalgesia (P<0.05). Intra-CeA DAMGO significantly inhibited the display of CPA compared to saline (P<0.05) but had no effect on PWL. The data demonstrate that morphine attenuates the affective component more powerfully than it does the sensory and suggests that the sensory and the emotional-affective dimensions are underpinned by different mechanisms.

  9. Enhanced brain responses to C-fiber input in the area of secondary hyperalgesia induced by high-frequency electrical stimulation of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Mouraux, André

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) of the human skin induces an increase in both mechanical and heat pain sensitivity in the surrounding unconditioned skin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HFS on the intensity of perception and brain responses elicited by the selective activation of C fibers. HFS was applied to the ventral forearm of 15 healthy volunteers. Temperature-controlled CO2 laser stimulation was used to activate selectively low-threshold C-fiber afferents without concomitantly activating Aδ-fiber afferents. These stimuli were detected with reaction times compatible with the conduction velocity of C fibers. The intensity of perception and event-related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by thermal stimuli delivered to the surrounding unconditioned skin were recorded before (T0) and after HFS (T1: 20 min after HFS; T2: 45 min after HFS). The contralateral forearm served as a control. Mechanical hyperalgesia following HFS was confirmed by measuring the change in the intensity of perception elicited by mechanical punctate stimuli. HFS resulted in increased intensity of perception to mechanical punctate stimulation and selective C-fiber thermal stimulation at both time points. In contrast, the N2 wave of the ERP elicited by C-fiber stimulation (679 ± 88 ms; means ± SD) was enhanced at T1 but not at T2. The P2 wave (808 ± 105 ms) was unaffected by HFS. Our results suggest that HFS enhances the sensitivity to thermal C-fiber input in the area of secondary hyperalgesia. However, there was no significant enhancement of the magnitude of the C-fiber ERPs at T2, suggesting that quickly adapting C fibers do not contribute to this enhancement. PMID:25098966

  10. Warming Moxibustion Relieves Chronic Visceral Hyperalgesia in Rats: Relations to Spinal Dynorphin and Orphanin-FQ System

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Liu, Hui-Rong; Yi, Tao; Wu, Lu-Yi; Liu, Xi-Ru; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Yin; Ma, Xiao-Peng; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2013-01-01

    As a twin therapy of acupuncture in traditional Chinese medicine, moxibustion has shown its effects in relieving abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and IBS rat models, but its mechanisms are largely unknown. In this paper, we determined the role of spinal dynorphin and orphanin-FQ system in analgesic effect of warming moxibustion (WM) on chronic visceral hyperalgesia (CVH) in IBS-like rat model. Here, we show that (1) repeated WM at bilateral ST25 and ST37 acupoints markedly attenuated the abdominal withdrawal reflex scores in CVH rats; (2) intrathecal administration of κ receptor antagonist prior to WM significantly attenuated the WM analgesia and dynorphinA (1-17) enhanced the WM analgesia. WM significantly reinforced the upregulation of spinal dynorphin mRNA/protein and κ receptor mRNA levels in CVH rats; (3) intrathecal administration of orphanin-FQ receptor antagonist prior to WM significantly attenuated the WM analgesia and orphanin-FQ enhanced the WM analgesia. WM reinforced the upregulation of spinal orphanin-FQ mRNA/protein and orphanin-FQ receptor mRNA levels in CVH rats. These results suggest that moxibustion may relieve CVH at least in part by activating spinal dynorphin and orphanin-FQ system. PMID:23573158

  11. Electroacupuncture Inhibition of Hyperalgesia in Rats with Adjuvant Arthritis: Involvement of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Dopamine Receptor Subtypes in Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yin; Yang, Yang; Xu, Ming-Shu; Zhao, Ying-Qian; Ge, Lin-Bao; Zhang, Bi-Meng

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been regarded as an alternative treatment for inflammatory pain for several decades. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effect of EA have not been thoroughly clarified. Previous studies have shown that cannabinoid CB1 receptors are related to pain relief. Accumulating evidence has shown that the CB1 and dopamine systems sometimes interact and may operate synergistically in rat striatum. To our knowledge, dopamine D1/D2 receptors are involved in EA analgesia. In this study, we found that repeated EA at Zusanli (ST36) and Kunlun (BL60) acupoints resulted in marked improvements in thermal hyperalgesia. Both western blot assays and FQ-PCR analysis results showed that the levels of CB1 expression in the repeated-EA group were much higher than those in any other group (P = 0.001). The CB1-selective antagonist AM251 inhibited the effects of repeated EA by attenuating the increases in CB1 expression. The two kinds of dopamine receptors imparted different actions on the EA-induced CB1 upregulation in AA rat model. These results suggested that the strong activation of the CB1 receptor after repeated EA resulted in the concomitant phenomenon of the upregulation of D1 and D2 levels of gene expression. PMID:23762129

  12. Activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptors reduces hyperalgesia in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Weisi; Taylor, Bradley K

    2015-05-19

    Clinical trials investigating the analgesic efficacy of cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis have yielded mixed results, possibly due to psychotropic side effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. We hypothesized that, a CB2-specific agonist (JWH-133) would decrease hyperalgesia in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Four weeks after induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we found that intrathecal administration of JWH-133 (10-100μg) dose-dependently reduced both mechanical and cold hypersensitivity without producing signs of sedation or ataxia. The anti-hyperalgesic effects of JWH-133 could be dose-dependently prevented by intrathecal co-administration of the CB2 antagonist, AM-630 (1-3μg). Our results suggest that JWH-133 acts at CB2 receptors, most likely within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, to suppress the hypersensitivity associated with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These are the first pre-clinical studies to directly promote CB2 as a promising target for the treatment of central pain in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

  13. Activation of Cannabinoid CB2 receptors Reduces Hyperalgesia in an Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Weisi; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials investigating the analgesic efficacy of cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis have yielded mixed results, possibly due to psychotropic side effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. We hypothesized that a CB2-specific agonist (JWH-133) would decrease hyperalgesia in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of multiple sclerosis. 4 weeks after induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we found that intrathecal administration of JWH-133 (10–100 μg) dose-dependently reduced both mechanical and cold hypersensitivity without producing signs of sedation or ataxia. The anti-hyperalgesic effects of JWH-133 could be dose-dependently prevented by intrathecal co-administration of the CB2 antagonist, AM-630 (1–3 μg). Our results suggest that JWH-133 acts at CB2 receptors, most likely within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, to suppress the hypersensitivity associated with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These are the first pre-clinical studies to directly promote CB2 as a promising target for the treatment of central pain in an animal model of multiple sclerosis. PMID:25849525

  14. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Godin, Adriana M; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C S; Machado, Renes R; Maier, Steven F; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P; Fiebich, Bernd L; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2013-05-24

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline's positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline's antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca(2+); Mg(2+)) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75 mg/kg, 47.50mg/kg or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca(2+) chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca(2+) chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines. PMID:23523650

  15. Effect of intraoperative infusion of ketamine on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eunji; Park, Hahck Soo; Lee, Guie Yong; Kim, Youn Jin; Baik, Hee-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioid induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is related with high opioid dosage, a long duration of opioid administration, and abrupt discontinuation of infused opioids in anesthetic settings. Ketamine is known to attenuate OIH efficiently, but methods of administration and methods to quantify and assess a decrease in OIH vary. We demonstrated the existence of remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia and investigated the ability of ketamine to attenuate OIH. Methods Seventy-five patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery under remifentanil-based anesthesia were assigned to one of the following groups: (1) group RL (remifentanil 0.05 µg/kg/min), (2) group RH (remifentanil 0.3 µg/kg/min), or (3) group KRH (remifentanil 0.3 µg/kg/min + ketamine 0.5 mg/kg bolus with 5 µg/kg/min infusion intraoperatively). Desflurane was administered for maintenance of anesthesia to target bispectral index scores (40-60) and hemodynamic parameters (heart rate and blood pressure < ± 20% of baseline values). All parameters related to OIH and its attenuation induced by ketamine were investigated. Results There was no significant difference among the three groups related to demographic and anesthetic parameters except the end-tidal concentration of desflurane. Additional analgesic consumption, numerical rating scale scores at 6 and 24 h, and cumulative fentanyl dose were significantly higher in group RH than in the other two groups. The value difference of the Touch-Test sensory evaluation was significantly higher negative in group RH than in the other two groups. Conclusions Remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia is significantly attenuated by intraoperative bolus and infusion of ketamine. Ketamine also decreased tactile sensitization, as measured by Touch-Test sensory evaluation. PMID:26495058

  16. Resveratrol attenuates inflammatory hyperalgesia by inhibiting glial activation in mice spinal cords.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Shi, Dong-Ling; Gu, Hui-Yao; Zheng, Ming-Zhi; Hu, Jue; Song, Xing-Hui; Shen, Yue-Liang; Chen, Ying-Ying

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of resveratrol on inflammatory pain. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 5 consecutive days to induce subacute systemic inflammation. Acetic acid‑induced writhing tests and tail‑flick tests were performed following the final LPS injection. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; an astrocyte‑specific activation marker), ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba‑1; a microglia‑specific activation marker) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein expression levels were detected using immunohistochemistry analysis or western blotting. Following administration of LPS for 5 days, the number of writhes increased and the tail‑flick latency decreased. Resveratrol (10 or 20 mg/kg) partly inhibited LPS‑induced hyperalgesia and prevented the increase in tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin 6 levels induced by LPS. LPS injection reduced the SIRT1 protein expression and increased the number of GFAP‑positive and Iba‑1‑positive cells in the spinal cord. Resveratrol increased the SIRT1 protein expression levels and decreased the number of GFAP‑positive and Iba‑1‑positive cells in LPS‑treated mice. The protective effect of resveratrol was partly blocked by a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, EX‑257. Results from the present study suggest that subacute treatment with LPS induced the activation of glial cells and hyperalgesia. Resveratrol was demonstrated to inhibit the activation of glial cells and attenuate inflammatory hyperalgesia in a SIRT1‑dependent manner.

  17. Withania somnifera root extract prolongs analgesia and suppresses hyperalgesia in mice treated with morphine.

    PubMed

    Orrù, Alessandro; Marchese, Giorgio; Casu, Gianluca; Casu, Maria Antonietta; Kasture, Sanjay; Cottiglia, Filippo; Acquas, Elio; Mascia, Maria Paola; Anzani, Nicola; Ruiu, Stefania

    2014-04-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that Withania somnifera Dunal (WS), a safe medicinal plant, prevents the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine. In the present study, we investigated whether WS extract (WSE) (100 mg/kg, i.p.) may also modulate the analgesic effect induced by acute morphine administration (2.5, 5, 10 mg/kg, s.c.) in the tail-flick and in the hot plate tests, and if it may prevent the development of 2.5 mg/kg morphine-induced rebound hyperalgesia in the low intensity tail-flick test. Further, to characterize the receptor(s) involved in these effects, we studied, by receptor-binding assay, the affinity of WSE for opioid (μ, δ, k), cannabinoid (CB1, CB2), glutamatergic (NMDA), GABAergic (GABAA, GABAB), serotoninergic (5HT2A) and adrenergic (α2) receptors. The results demonstrated that (i) WSE alone failed to alter basal nociceptive threshold in both tests, (ii) WSE pre-treatment significantly protracted the antinociceptive effect induced by 5 and 10 mg/kg of morphine only in tail-flick test, (iii) WSE pre-treatment prevented morphine-induced hyperalgesia in the low intensity tail-flick test, and (iv) WSE exhibited a high affinity for the GABAA and moderate affinity for GABAB, NMDA and δ opioid receptors. WSE prolongs morphine-induced analgesia and suppresses the development of morphine-induced rebound hyperalgesia probably through involvement of GABAA, GABAB, NMDA and δ opioid receptors. This study suggests the therapeutic potential of WSE as a valuable adjuvant agent in opioid-sparing therapies.

  18. Antagonists of toll like receptor 4 maybe a new strategy to counteract opioid-induced hyperalgesia and opioid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian

    2012-12-01

    Long term opioid treatment results in hyperalgesia and tolerance, which is a troublesome phenomenon in clinic application. Recent studies have revealed a critical role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the neuropathological process of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance. TLR4 is predominantly expressed by microglial cells and is a key modulator in the activation of the innate immune system. Activation of TLR4 may initiate the activation of microglia and hence a number of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators that could enhance neuronal excitability are released. Blockade of TLR4 activation by its antagonists alleviate neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that opioid antagonists such as naloxone and naltrexone, which were also demonstrated to be TLR4 antagonist, may have clinic application value in attenuation of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance.

  19. [PROPHYLAXIS OF POSTOPERATIVE HYPERALGESIA, BASED ON MORPHOLOGICAL SUBSTANTIATION OF THE ANALGESIA METHOD].

    PubMed

    Dmytriyev, D V; Konoplytskyi, V S

    2016-03-01

    The investigation was conducted in 20 children, operated on for abdominal oncological diseases in a 2010-2015 yrs period, using various methods of analgesia. While application of a constant infusion of high doses of phentanyl--1-4 MKr/(kg x h) in perioperative period the occurrence of the opiate-induced hyperalgesia is possible with the accompanied morphological changes in intestinal wall; in anesthesia of a transverse abdominal muscle (a TAP-blockade) and combined spinal epidural analgesia such changes were not observed. PMID:27514091

  20. [MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES OF SKIN IN OPERATIVE WOUND IN SYNDROME OF OPIOID-INDUCED HYPERALGESIA].

    PubMed

    Dmytriyev, D V; Konoplytskyi, V S

    2015-10-01

    Morphological changes of skin in region of operative wound were investigated. There was established, that while application of fentanyl in high doses, using constant infusion for anesthesia in early postoperative period in children, operated for abdominal cavity tumors, the opioid-induced hyperalgesia occurrence is possible, what is accompanied by morphological changes in skin around operative wound, necrosis in centre of focus, pronounced perifocal reactive changes in a kind of significant inflammation and essential disorder of microcirculation with formation of small neural fibers on the 14th day. Pronounced fibrosis of derma, formation of big quantity of collagen fibers with edema, stratification.

  1. Intrathecal Urocortin I in the spinal cord as a murine model of stress hormone-induced musculoskeletal and tactile hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Alice A.; Nunez, Myra G.; Kissel, Casey L.; Kovács, Katalin J.

    2015-01-01

    Stress is antinociceptive in some models of pain but enhances musculoskeletal nociceptive responses in mice and muscle pain in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. To test the hypothesis that urocortins are stress hormones that are sufficient to enhance tactile and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, we measured von Frey fiber sensitivity and grip force after injection of corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF), urocortin I and urocortin II in mice. Urocortin I (a CRF1 and CRF2 receptor ligand) produced hyperalgesia in both assays when injected intrathecally (i.t.) but not intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), and only at a large dose when injected peripherally, suggesting a spinal action. Morphine inhibited urocortin I-induced changes in nociceptive responses in a dose-related fashion, confirming that changes in behavior reflect hyperalgesia rather than weakness. No tolerance developed to the effect of urocortin I (i.t.) when injected repeatedly, consistent with a potential to enhance pain chronically. Tactile hyperalgesia was inhibited by NBI-35965, a CRF1 receptor antagonist, but not astressin 2B, a CRF2 receptor antagonist. However, while urocortin I-induced decreases in grip force were not observed when coadministered i.t. with either NBI-35965 or astressin 2B, they were even more sensitive to inhibition by astressin, a nonselective CRF receptor antagonist. Together these data indicate that urocortin I acts at CRF receptors in the mouse spinal cord to elicit a reproducible and persistent tactile (von Frey) and musculoskeletal (grip force) hyperalgesia. Urocortin I-induced hyperalgesia may serve as a screen for drugs that alleviate painful conditions that are exacerbated by stress. PMID:26332847

  2. Development of a peptidomimetic antagonist of neuropeptide FF receptors for the prevention of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bihel, Frédéric; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Schneider, Séverine; Bertin, Isabelle; Wagner, Patrick; Schmitt, Martine; Laboureyras, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoît; Schneider, Elodie; Mollereau, Catherine; Simonnet, Guy; Simonin, Frédéric; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques

    2015-03-18

    Through the development of a new class of unnatural ornithine derivatives as bioisosteres of arginine, we have designed an orally active peptidomimetic antagonist of neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFR). Systemic low-dose administration of this compound to rats blocked opioid-induced hyperalgesia, without any apparent side-effects. Interestingly, we also observed that this compound potentiated opioid-induced analgesia. This unnatural ornithine derivative provides a novel therapeutic approach for both improving analgesia and reducing hyperalgesia induced by opioids in patients being treated for chronic pain.

  3. Selective neutralization of prostaglandin E2 blocks inflammation, hyperalgesia, and interleukin 6 production in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The role of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the development of inflammatory symptoms and cytokine production was evaluated in vivo using a neutralizing anti-PGE2 monoclonal antibody 2B5. In carrageenan-induced paw inflammation, pretreatment of rats with 2B5 substantially prevented the development of tissue edema and hyperalgesia in affected paws. The antibody was shown to bind the majority of PGE2 produced at the inflammatory site. In adjuvant-induced arthritis, the therapeutic administration of 2B5 to arthritic rats substantially reversed edema in affected paws. Anti-PGE2 treatment also reduced paw levels of IL-6 RNA and serum IL-6 protein without modifying tumor necrosis factor RNA levels in the same tissue. In each model, the antiinflammatory efficacy of 2B5 was indistinguishable from that of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug indomethacin, which blocked the production of all PGs. These results indicate that PGE2 plays a major role in tissue edema, hyperalgesia, and IL-6 production at sites of inflammation, and they suggest that selective pharmacologic modulation of PGE2 synthesis or activity may provide a useful means of mitigating the symptoms of inflammatory disease. PMID:9064348

  4. Remifentanil-acute opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hun; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Soghomonyan, Suren; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    The use of opioids may seem to be a double-edged sword; they provide straight analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects initially, but subsequently are associated with the expression of acute opioid tolerance (AOT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) that have been reported in experimental studies and clinical observations. It has been suggested that opioids can induce an acute tolerance and hyperalgesia in dose- and/or time-dependent manners even when used within the clinically accepted doses. Recently, remifentanil has been used for pain management in clinical anesthesia and in the intensive care units because of its rapid onset and offset. We reviewed articles analyzing AOT and/or OIH by remifentanil and focused on the following issues: (1) evidence of remifentanil inducing AOT and/or OIH and (2) importance of AOT and/or OIH in considering the reduction of remifentanil dosage or adopting preventive modulations. Twenty-four experimental and clinical studies were identified using electronic searches of MEDLINE (PubMed, Ovid, Springer, and Elsevier). However, the development of AOT and OIH by remifentanil administration remains controversial. There is no sufficient evidence to support or refute the existence of OIH in humans.

  5. Bilateral hyperalgesia to chemical stimulation of the nasal mucosa following unilateral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mohammadian, P; Hummel, T; Loetsch, J; Kobal, G

    1997-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the bilateral sensory changes to chemical noxious stimuli in the trigeminally innervated areas following unilateral nasal inflammation. Twenty healthy volunteers took part in five experiments. Intranasal inflammation was induced by means of a constant flow of cold air (145 ml/s); temperature and humidity of the airstream were varied across experiments. For the non-inflamed (NOI) condition, air temperature was 36 degrees C and its humidity 80%. In the other experiments the airstream's humidity was either 25% or 80% with a constant temperature of 20 degrees C; the airstream was applied to the left or right nostril. In order to produce noxious chemical stimuli, gaseous CO2 was applied to the left nostril (36 stimuli of 200 ms; 65% v/v CO2; interstimulus interval 30 s). Subjects rated the pain intensity of the stimuli by means of a visual analogue scale (VAS). As an indicator for hyperalgesia, the subjective pain ratings to CO2 stimuli increased not only while they were applied at the inflamed site, but also during their application contralaterally to the inflamed side. These results demonstrate the occurrence of bilateral hyperalgesia to noxious chemical stimuli in the nasal mucosa following unilateral inflammation which indicates the involvement of central changes.

  6. Sensitization of lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons parallels heat hyperalgesia in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Andrew, David

    2009-05-01

    It has been proposed that spinal lamina I neurons with ascending axons that project to the midbrain play a crucial role in hyperalgesia. To test this hypothesis the quantitative properties of lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain were compared to those of unoperated and sham-operated controls. Behavioural testing showed that animals with a CCI exhibited heat hyperalgesia within 4 days of the injury, and this hyperalgesia persisted throughout the 14-day post-operative testing period. In the CCI, nociceptive lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons had heat thresholds that were significantly lower than controls (43.0 +/- 2.8 degrees C vs. 46.7 +/- 2.6 degrees C; P < 10(-4), ANOVA). Nociceptive lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons were also significantly more responsive to graded heat stimuli in the CCI, compared to controls (P < 0.02, 2-factor repeated-measures ANOVA), and increased after-discharges were also observed. Furthermore, the heat-evoked stimulus-response functions of lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons in CCI animals co-varied significantly (P < 0.03, ANCOVA) with the amplitude of heat hyperalgesia determined behaviourally. Taken together these results are consistent with the hypothesis that lamina I spinoparabrachial neurons have an important mechanistic role in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain.

  7. Sex Difference in Oxytocin-Induced Anti-Hyperalgesia at the Spinal Level in Rats with Intraplantar Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Lok-Hi; Chen, Yuan-Hao; Wu, Wan-Chuan; Chang, En-Pei; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated intrathecal administration of oxytocin strongly induced anti-hyperalgesia in male rats. By using an oxytocin-receptor antagonist (atosiban), the descending oxytocinergic pathway was found to regulate inflammatory hyperalgesia in our previous study using male rats. The activity of this neural pathway is elevated during hyperalgesia, but whether this effect differs in a sex-dependent manner remains unknown. We conducted plantar tests on adult male and female virgin rats in which paw inflammation was induced using carrageenan. Exogenous (i.t.) application of oxytocin exerted no anti-hyperalgesic effect in female rats, except at an extremely high dose. Female rats exhibited similar extent of hyperalgesia to male rats did when the animals received the same dose of carrageenan. When atosiban was administered alone, the severity of hyperalgesia was not increased in female rats. Moreover, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) was expressed at higher levels in the spinal cords of female rats compared with those of male rats. Oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia exhibits a sex-dependent difference in rats. This difference can partially result from the higher expression of IRAP in the spinal cords of female rats, because IRAP functions as an enzyme that degrades oxytocin. Our study confirms the existence of a sex difference in oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia at the spinal level in rats. PMID:27606886

  8. Sex Difference in Oxytocin-Induced Anti-Hyperalgesia at the Spinal Level in Rats with Intraplantar Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chow, Lok-Hi; Chen, Yuan-Hao; Wu, Wan-Chuan; Chang, En-Pei; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated intrathecal administration of oxytocin strongly induced anti-hyperalgesia in male rats. By using an oxytocin-receptor antagonist (atosiban), the descending oxytocinergic pathway was found to regulate inflammatory hyperalgesia in our previous study using male rats. The activity of this neural pathway is elevated during hyperalgesia, but whether this effect differs in a sex-dependent manner remains unknown. We conducted plantar tests on adult male and female virgin rats in which paw inflammation was induced using carrageenan. Exogenous (i.t.) application of oxytocin exerted no anti-hyperalgesic effect in female rats, except at an extremely high dose. Female rats exhibited similar extent of hyperalgesia to male rats did when the animals received the same dose of carrageenan. When atosiban was administered alone, the severity of hyperalgesia was not increased in female rats. Moreover, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) was expressed at higher levels in the spinal cords of female rats compared with those of male rats. Oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia exhibits a sex-dependent difference in rats. This difference can partially result from the higher expression of IRAP in the spinal cords of female rats, because IRAP functions as an enzyme that degrades oxytocin. Our study confirms the existence of a sex difference in oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia at the spinal level in rats. PMID:27606886

  9. Molecular hydrogen attenuates neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masanori; Satoh, Yasushi; Otsubo, Yukiko; Kazama, Tomiei

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains intractable and the development of new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Accumulating evidence indicates that overproduction of oxidative stress is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, repeated intra-peritoneal or intrathecal injections of antioxidants are unsuitable for continuous use in therapy. Here we show a novel therapeutic method against neuropathic pain: drinking water containing molecular hydrogen (H2) as antioxidant. The effect of hydrogen on neuropathic pain was investigated using a partial sciatic nerve ligation model in mice. As indicators of neuropathic pain, temporal aspects of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were analysed for 3 weeks after ligation. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured using the von Frey test and the plantar test, respectively. When mice were allowed to drink water containing hydrogen at a saturated level ad libitum after ligation, both allodynia and hyperalgesia were alleviated. These symptoms were also alleviated when hydrogen was administered only for the induction phase (from day 0 to 4 after ligation). When hydrogen was administered only for the maintenance phase (from day 4 to 21 after ligation), hyperalgesia but not allodynia was alleviated. Immunohistochemical staining for the oxidative stress marker, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, showed that hydrogen administration suppressed oxidative stress induced by ligation in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion, oral administration of hydrogen water may be useful for alleviating neuropathic pain in a clinical setting. PMID:24941001

  10. Molecular Hydrogen Attenuates Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Masanori; Satoh, Yasushi; Otsubo, Yukiko; Kazama, Tomiei

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains intractable and the development of new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Accumulating evidence indicates that overproduction of oxidative stress is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, repeated intra-peritoneal or intrathecal injections of antioxidants are unsuitable for continuous use in therapy. Here we show a novel therapeutic method against neuropathic pain: drinking water containing molecular hydrogen (H2) as antioxidant. The effect of hydrogen on neuropathic pain was investigated using a partial sciatic nerve ligation model in mice. As indicators of neuropathic pain, temporal aspects of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were analysed for 3 weeks after ligation. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured using the von Frey test and the plantar test, respectively. When mice were allowed to drink water containing hydrogen at a saturated level ad libitum after ligation, both allodynia and hyperalgesia were alleviated. These symptoms were also alleviated when hydrogen was administered only for the induction phase (from day 0 to 4 after ligation). When hydrogen was administered only for the maintenance phase (from day 4 to 21 after ligation), hyperalgesia but not allodynia was alleviated. Immunohistochemical staining for the oxidative stress marker, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, showed that hydrogen administration suppressed oxidative stress induced by ligation in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion, oral administration of hydrogen water may be useful for alleviating neuropathic pain in a clinical setting. PMID:24941001

  11. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH): a real clinical problem or just an experimental phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; Suzan, Erica; Pud, Dorit

    2015-03-01

    Although opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is mentioned as a potential cause of opioid dose escalation without adequate analgesia, true evidence in support of this notion is relatively limited. Most studies conducted in the context of acute and experimental pain, which seemingly demonstrated evidence for OIH, actually might have measured other phenomena such as acute opioid withdrawal or tolerance. OIH studies in patients with chronic pain have used various experimental pain models (such as cold pain tolerance or heat pain intensity). Therefore, the fact that they have yielded inconsistent results is hard to interpret. Thus far, with the exception of a few clinical case reports on OIH in patients with cancer pain and one prospective study in patients with chronic neuropathic pain, evidence for OIH in patients with chronic or cancer-related pain is lacking. Whether experimental pain models are necessary for establishing the clinical diagnosis of OIH, and which specific model is preferred, are yet to be determined. PMID:25128284

  12. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH): a real clinical problem or just an experimental phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; Suzan, Erica; Pud, Dorit

    2015-03-01

    Although opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is mentioned as a potential cause of opioid dose escalation without adequate analgesia, true evidence in support of this notion is relatively limited. Most studies conducted in the context of acute and experimental pain, which seemingly demonstrated evidence for OIH, actually might have measured other phenomena such as acute opioid withdrawal or tolerance. OIH studies in patients with chronic pain have used various experimental pain models (such as cold pain tolerance or heat pain intensity). Therefore, the fact that they have yielded inconsistent results is hard to interpret. Thus far, with the exception of a few clinical case reports on OIH in patients with cancer pain and one prospective study in patients with chronic neuropathic pain, evidence for OIH in patients with chronic or cancer-related pain is lacking. Whether experimental pain models are necessary for establishing the clinical diagnosis of OIH, and which specific model is preferred, are yet to be determined.

  13. BK channels in microglia are required for morphine-induced hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Zhang, Jing; Satoh, Yasushi; Meredith, Andrea L.; Nakata, Takahiro; Wu, Zhou; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Although morphine is a gold standard medication, long-term opioid use is associated with serious side effects, such as morphine-induced hyperalgesia (MIH) and anti-nociceptive tolerance. Microglia-to-neuron signalling is critically involved in pain hypersensitivity. However, molecules that control microglial cellular state under chronic morphine treatment remain unknown. Here we show that the microglia-specific subtype of Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is responsible for generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance. We find that, after chronic morphine administration, an increase in arachidonic acid levels through the μ-opioid receptors leads to the sole activation of microglial BK channels in the spinal cord. Silencing BK channel auxiliary β3 subunit significantly attenuates the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance, and increases neurotransmission after chronic morphine administration. Therefore, microglia-specific BK channels contribute to the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance. PMID:27241733

  14. BK channels in microglia are required for morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Zhang, Jing; Satoh, Yasushi; Meredith, Andrea L; Nakata, Takahiro; Wu, Zhou; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-05-31

    Although morphine is a gold standard medication, long-term opioid use is associated with serious side effects, such as morphine-induced hyperalgesia (MIH) and anti-nociceptive tolerance. Microglia-to-neuron signalling is critically involved in pain hypersensitivity. However, molecules that control microglial cellular state under chronic morphine treatment remain unknown. Here we show that the microglia-specific subtype of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel is responsible for generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance. We find that, after chronic morphine administration, an increase in arachidonic acid levels through the μ-opioid receptors leads to the sole activation of microglial BK channels in the spinal cord. Silencing BK channel auxiliary β3 subunit significantly attenuates the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance, and increases neurotransmission after chronic morphine administration. Therefore, microglia-specific BK channels contribute to the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance.

  15. Nocebo hyperalgesia: contributions of social observation and body-related cognitive styles

    PubMed Central

    Vögtle, Elisabeth; Kröner-Herwig, Birgit; Barke, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recently, it has been shown that nocebo hyperalgesia can be acquired through observational learning. The aim of this study was to investigate socially induced nocebo hyperalgesia and its relationship with pain catastrophizing, somatic complaints, hypochondriacal concerns, and empathy. Participants and methods Ninety-seven women (43.1±15.5 years) were randomly assigned to one of the two conditions. Participants in the nocebo condition (NC) watched a video in which a female model displayed more pain when an ointment was applied and less pain when no ointment was applied. In the control condition (CC), the model demonstrated low pain with and without the ointment. Subsequently, all participants received three pressure pain stimuli (60 seconds) on each hand. On one hand, the ointment was applied prior to the stimulation. The order of the stimulation of the fingers (middle, index, or ring finger), the side of ointment application (left or right hand), and the side with which the stimulation began were randomized within each group and balanced across the groups. Depending on the randomization, the pressure pain application started with or without ointment and on the left or right hand. Pain ratings on a numerical rating scale (0–10) were collected. In addition, the participants completed questionnaires regarding body-related cognitive styles and empathy. Results There was a significant difference in the pain ratings between the CC and the NC. The effect of ointment application was also significant, but no interaction between condition and ointment application was found. Only in the CC did the nocebo response correlate with hypochondriacal concerns and somatic complaints. Conclusion Application of an ointment as well as the observation of a model demonstrating more pain after a treatment produced elevated pain ratings. Cognitive styles were not related to the socially induced nocebo response, but were related to the nocebo response in the CC. PMID:27175092

  16. Effects of symptomatic treatments on cutaneous hyperalgesia and laser evoked potentials during migraine attack.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Losito, L; Libro, G; Guido, M; Di Fruscolo, O; Sardaro, M; Sciruicchio, V; Lamberti, P; Livrea, P

    2005-05-01

    Previously an amplitude enhancement of laser evoked potentials (LEPs) was detected during migraine attack: we further examined pain threshold to CO2 laser stimuli and LEPs during attacks, evaluating the effect of almotriptan, lysine-acetylsalicylate and placebo treatment on cutaneous hyperalgesia to thermal stimuli delivered by CO2 laser and on LEP components. Eighteen patients suffering from migraine without aura were analysed. They were divided into three groups of six patients each, randomly assigned to lysine acetyl-salicylate, almotriptan or placebo treatments. The supraorbital zones and the dorsum of the hand were stimulated on both the symptomatic and not symptomatic side in all patients. The LEPs were recorded by 25 scalp electrodes. During attacks, the P2 wave was significantly enhanced; the amplitude of the P2 component obtained by the stimulation of the supraorbital zone during the attack on the side of the headache was significantly correlated with the intensity of pain and the frequency of headache. Both almotriptan and lysine acetyl-salicylate significantly reduced the P2 amplitude but they showed no effects on hyperalgesia to laser stimulation; headache relief following therapy was correlated with the reduction of the P2 amplitude. The cortical elaboration of laser-induced experimental pain seemed increased during migraine attack, and the severity of headache was mainly related to the increase of the later LEPs components expressing the attentive and emotive compounds of suffering. Reversion of this process appeared to be primarily responsible for the efficacy of drugs in treating migraine, though both almotriptan and lysine-acetil salicilate seemed to have no effect in reducing sensitization at second and third order nociceptive neurons. PMID:15839851

  17. Experimental pelvic pain facilitates pain provocation tests and causes regional hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The extra-articular sacroiliac joint (SIJ) structure is a potential source for low back and pelvic pain. This study hypothesised that experimental pain induced in a superficial pelvic ligament causes (1) hyperalgesia to pressure, (2) distinct pain referral, and (3) an increased frequency of positive pain provocation tests of the SIJ complex. Thirty healthy subjects (15 females) participated in this study designed as a randomised crossover trial. Pain was induced in the long posterior sacroiliac ligament by injection of hypertonic saline, with the contralateral ligament injected with isotonic saline as control. Pain intensity was assessed on an electronic visual analogue scale (VAS). Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and pain provocation tests were assessed on 3 occasions: at baseline, after injection, and when pain had subsided. PPT sites were located bilaterally at the injection site, lateral to spinous processes of S2 and L5, and at the gluteus medius and gastrocnemius muscles. Hypertonic saline caused significantly higher VAS scores and more extended pain referral than isotonic saline (P<0.001). PPTs at the injection site and lateral to S2 were significantly reduced after hypertonic saline compared with baseline and isotonic saline (P<0.002). Significantly more subjects had positive pain provocation tests after hypertonic (67% of subjects) compared with isotonic saline (20%; P<0.001). These data demonstrate that the extra-articular SIJ structure accommodates nociceptors that are capable of inducing pain referral and regional hyperalgesia sensitive to manual pain provocation tests similar to what previously have been found in pelvic girdle pain patients.

  18. Effects of symptomatic treatments on cutaneous hyperalgesia and laser evoked potentials during migraine attack.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Losito, L; Libro, G; Guido, M; Di Fruscolo, O; Sardaro, M; Sciruicchio, V; Lamberti, P; Livrea, P

    2005-05-01

    Previously an amplitude enhancement of laser evoked potentials (LEPs) was detected during migraine attack: we further examined pain threshold to CO2 laser stimuli and LEPs during attacks, evaluating the effect of almotriptan, lysine-acetylsalicylate and placebo treatment on cutaneous hyperalgesia to thermal stimuli delivered by CO2 laser and on LEP components. Eighteen patients suffering from migraine without aura were analysed. They were divided into three groups of six patients each, randomly assigned to lysine acetyl-salicylate, almotriptan or placebo treatments. The supraorbital zones and the dorsum of the hand were stimulated on both the symptomatic and not symptomatic side in all patients. The LEPs were recorded by 25 scalp electrodes. During attacks, the P2 wave was significantly enhanced; the amplitude of the P2 component obtained by the stimulation of the supraorbital zone during the attack on the side of the headache was significantly correlated with the intensity of pain and the frequency of headache. Both almotriptan and lysine acetyl-salicylate significantly reduced the P2 amplitude but they showed no effects on hyperalgesia to laser stimulation; headache relief following therapy was correlated with the reduction of the P2 amplitude. The cortical elaboration of laser-induced experimental pain seemed increased during migraine attack, and the severity of headache was mainly related to the increase of the later LEPs components expressing the attentive and emotive compounds of suffering. Reversion of this process appeared to be primarily responsible for the efficacy of drugs in treating migraine, though both almotriptan and lysine-acetil salicilate seemed to have no effect in reducing sensitization at second and third order nociceptive neurons.

  19. Evaluation of extemporaneously manufactured topical gels containing aceclofenac on inflammation and hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Pabreja, Kavita; Dua, Kamal; Padi, Satyanaryana S V

    2010-10-01

    The systemic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which act by inhibiting cyclooxygenase (COX) is severely hampered by gastric and peptic ulcers. The topical delivery of NSAIDs has the advantages of avoiding gastric and peptic ulcers and delivering the drug to the inflammation site. Importance of aceclofenac as a new generational NSAID has inspired the development of topical dosage forms. This mode of administration may help to avoid typical side effects of NSAIDs associated with oral and systemic administration such as gastric irritation, particularly diarrhoea, nausea, abdominal pain and flatulence. The aim of this study was to formulate topical gel containing 1% of aceclofenac in carbopol and PEG base and to evaluate it for analgesic and antiinflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia and paw oedema in rats. Carrageenan administration into the hind paw produced a significant inflammation associated with hyperalgesia as shown by decreased rat paw withdrawal latency in response to a thermal stimulus (47+/-0.5 degrees C) 4 h after carrageenan injection. Topical application of AF1 significantly attenuated the development of hypersensitivity to thermal stimulus as compared to control (P<0.05) and other formulation treated groups (P<0.05). All the AF semisolid formulations, when applied topically 2 h before carrageenan administration, inhibited paw edema in a timedependent manner with maximum percent edema inhibition of 80.33+/-2.52 achieved with AF1 after 5 h of carrageenan administration However, topical application of AF2 markedly prevented the development of edema as compared to other formulation (AF2 and AF3) treated groups (P<0.05). Among all the semisolid formulations, Carbopol gel base was found to be most suitable dermatological base for aceclofenac.

  20. Experimental tooth clenching. A model for studying mechanisms of muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    ) participated in two sessions at a minimum interval of 1 wk. Microdialysis was done to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to measure masseter muscle blood flow. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth clenching task (50% of MVCF) or a control session (no clenching). Pain intensity was measured throughout the experiment. Substance levels and blood flow were unaltered at all time points between sessions, and between genders in each session. Pain intensity was significantly higher after clenching in the clenching session compared to the same time point in the control session. In (IV), 15 patients with M-TMD and 15 healthy controls participated in one session and the methodology described above was used. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT and significantly lower blood flows than healthy controls. No significant differences for any substance at any time point were observed between groups. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity. Qu-ATEBS, the 7-item evidence-based quality assessment tool, is reliable, exhibits face-validity, and has excellent discriminative validity. Tooth clenching was associated with pain, fatigue, and short-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia, but not with proprioceptive allodynia. It seems that tooth clenching is not directly related to delayed onset muscle soreness. In healthy subjects and in patients with M-TMD, levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate were unaltered after tooth clenching. But 5-HT levels were significantly higher and blood flows significantly lower in M-TMD patients than in healthy controls at all time points. These two factors may facilitate the release, and enhance the effects, of other algesic substances that may cause pain.

  1. Experimental tooth clenching. A model for studying mechanisms of muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    ) participated in two sessions at a minimum interval of 1 wk. Microdialysis was done to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to measure masseter muscle blood flow. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth clenching task (50% of MVCF) or a control session (no clenching). Pain intensity was measured throughout the experiment. Substance levels and blood flow were unaltered at all time points between sessions, and between genders in each session. Pain intensity was significantly higher after clenching in the clenching session compared to the same time point in the control session. In (IV), 15 patients with M-TMD and 15 healthy controls participated in one session and the methodology described above was used. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT and significantly lower blood flows than healthy controls. No significant differences for any substance at any time point were observed between groups. Time and group had significant main effects on pain intensity. Qu-ATEBS, the 7-item evidence-based quality assessment tool, is reliable, exhibits face-validity, and has excellent discriminative validity. Tooth clenching was associated with pain, fatigue, and short-lasting mechanical hyperalgesia, but not with proprioceptive allodynia. It seems that tooth clenching is not directly related to delayed onset muscle soreness. In healthy subjects and in patients with M-TMD, levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate were unaltered after tooth clenching. But 5-HT levels were significantly higher and blood flows significantly lower in M-TMD patients than in healthy controls at all time points. These two factors may facilitate the release, and enhance the effects, of other algesic substances that may cause pain. PMID:23631112

  2. Cav3.2-expressing low-threshold C fibres in human hairy skin contribute to cold allodynia--a non-TRPV1- and non-TRPM8-dependent phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Samour, Mohamad S; Nagi, Saad S; Mahns, David A

    2015-08-01

    It is generally agreed that cold allodynia is a consequence of impaired (Aδ-fibre-mediated) central inhibition of C-nociceptive inputs. However, it is also known that C polymodal nociceptors are not activated at innocuous low temperatures. Recently, we demonstrated the contribution of C-tactile fibres to tactile allodynia. In this study, we investigated whether this, or a related, C-fibre class contributes to cold allodynia. In 30 healthy and 3 chronic pain subjects, a series of normally innocuous localised thermal stimuli were applied to the skin overlying a painful tibialis anterior muscle (induced by infusion of hypertonic saline). The effects of thermal stimulation on muscle pain were observed before and after compression blockade of myelinated fibres. Furthermore, intradermal capsaicin, menthol and TTA-A2 were used for desensitisation of TRPV1, TRPM8, and T-type calcium (Cav3.2) channels, respectively. Before muscle pain, all thermal stimuli were reported as nonpainful regardless of whether myelinated fibres were conducting or not. During muscle pain, dynamic skin cooling (32°C → 20°C) evoked significant and reproducible increases in the overall pain intensity (allodynia). This increase was short lived and locked to the dynamic phase of cooling with pain levels returning to baseline during sustained cooling. Dynamic warming (32°C → 39°C) had no effect on pain levels. Cold allodynia persisted after nerve compression and TRPV1 and TRPM8 desensitisation but was abolished by localised Cav3.2 blockade. In clinical subjects, C-fibre-mediated allodynia was observed without the need for experimental pain-producing manipulations. In conclusion, cold allodynia represents a non-TRPV1- and non-TRPM8-dependent phenomenon, which is mediated by low-threshold Cav3.2-expressing C fibres. PMID:25932689

  3. Biogenic amine depletion causes chronic muscular pain and tactile allodynia accompanied by depression: A putative animal model of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Nagakura, Yukinori; Oe, Tomoya; Aoki, Toshiaki; Matsuoka, Nobuya

    2009-11-01

    Fibromyalgia is a prevalent and burdensome disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain and complex comorbid symptoms. To develop better treatments for pain-centered fibromyalgia symptoms, there is still a need for animal models which mimic the features of fibromyalgia patients. In the present study, we have established a fibromyalgia animal model by utilizing a never-before-published pharmacological effect of reserpine. Repeated administration of reserpine (1mg/kg s.c., once daily, for three consecutive days) causes a significant decrease in the muscle pressure threshold and tactile allodynia, which are sustained for 1week or more in both male and female rats. This treatment regimen decreases the amount of biogenic amines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine) in the spinal cord, thalamus, and prefrontal cortex, which are deeply involved in pain signal processing. It also significantly increases immobility time in the forced swim test, which is indicative of depression, a common comorbid symptom of fibromyalgia. Pregabalin, duloxetine, and pramipexole significantly attenuated the reserpine-induced decrease in muscle pressure threshold, but diclofenac did not. The validity of the use of this reserpinized animal as a fibromyalgia model is demonstrated from three different aspects, i.e., face validity (manifestation of chronic pain and comorbid symptoms), construct validity (dysfunction of biogenic amine-mediated central nervous system pain control is involved), and predictive validity (similar responses to treatments used in fibromyalgia patients). This animal model is expected to contribute to the better understanding of fibromyalgia pathophysiology and the evaluation of drugs, especially those which would activate biogenic amine system.

  4. Activation of the galanin receptor 2 in the periphery reverses nerve injury-induced allodynia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Galanin is expressed at low levels in the intact sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia with a dramatic increase after peripheral nerve injury. The neuropeptide is also expressed in primary afferent terminals in the dorsal horn, spinal inter-neurons and in a number of brain regions known to modulate nociception. Intrathecal administration of galanin modulates sensory responses in a dose-dependent manner with inhibition at high doses. To date it is unclear which of the galanin receptors mediates the anti-nociceptive effects of the neuropeptide and whether their actions are peripherally and/or centrally mediated. In the present study we investigated the effects of direct administration into the receptive field of galanin and the galanin receptor-2/3-agonist Gal2-11 on nociceptive primary afferent mechanical responses in intact rats and mice and in the partial saphenous nerve injury (PSNI) model of neuropathic pain. Results Exogenous galanin altered the responses of mechano-nociceptive C-fibre afferents in a dose-dependent manner in both naive and nerve injured animals, with low concentrations facilitating and high concentrations markedly inhibiting mechano-nociceptor activity. Further, use of the galanin fragment Gal2-11 confirmed that the effects of galanin were mediated by activation of galanin receptor-2 (GalR2). The inhibitory effects of peripheral GalR2 activation were further supported by our demonstration that after PSNI, mechano-sensitive nociceptors in galanin over-expressing transgenic mice had significantly higher thresholds than in wild type animals, associated with a marked reduction in spontaneous neuronal firing and C-fibre barrage into the spinal cord. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the high level of endogenous galanin in injured primary afferents activates peripheral GalR2, which leads to an increase in C-fibre mechanical activation thresholds and a marked reduction in evoked and ongoing nociceptive

  5. Chronic pain in patients with the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: evidence for generalized hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Rombaut, Lies; Scheper, Mark; De Wandele, Inge; De Vries, Janneke; Meeus, Mira; Malfait, Fransiska; Engelbert, Raoul; Calders, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Chronic widespread pain is highly present in patients with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT), but up to now, evidence for generalized hyperalgesia is lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate whether pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at both symptomatic and asymptomatic body areas differ in EDS-HT patients compared to healthy subjects. Twenty-three women with EDS-HT and 23 gender- and age-matched healthy controls participated. All subjects marked on Margolis Pain Diagram where they felt pain lasting longer than 24 h in the past 4 weeks. Then, they completed several questionnaires assessing pain cognitions, fatigue, disability, and general health status, in order to take the possible influence of these factors on PPTs into account. Patients also completed a form concerning the type of pain they experienced. Thereupon, a blinded researcher assessed PPTs at 14 body locations on the trunk and extremities. PPTs were compared for the two complete groups. In addition, PPTs of patients and controls who did not report pain in a respective zone were compared. PPTs of the patients were significantly lower compared to those of the control group, also when pain-free samples per zone were compared. The mean (SD) PPT was 2.9 (1.62) kg/cm(2) in the EDS-HT patients and 5.2 (1.88) kg/cm(2) in the controls (P < 0.001). No confounding factors responsible for the observed differences could be revealed. In half of the patient group, a predominantly neuropathic pain component was likely present. This study provides evidence for the existence of hyperalgesia even in asymptomatic areas (generalized secondary hyperalgesia). The generalized hyperalgesia may represent the involvement of a sensitized central nervous system, which inquires an adapted pain management for this patient group.

  6. Persistent changes in spinal cord gene expression after recovery from inflammatory hyperalgesia: A preliminary study on pain memory

    PubMed Central

    Yukhananov, Rustam; Kissin, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous studies found that rats subjected to carrageenan injection develop hyperalgesia, and despite complete recovery in several days, they continue to have an enhanced hyperalgesic response to a new noxious challenge for more than 28d. The study's aim was to identify candidate genes that have a role in the formation of the long-term hyperalgesia-related imprint in the spinal cord. This objective was undertaken with the understanding that the long-lasting imprint of acute pain in the central nervous system may contribute to the transition of acute pain to chronicity. Results To analyze changes in gene expression when carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia has disappeared but propensity for the enhanced hyperalgesic response is still present, we determined the gene expression profile using oligo microarray in the lumbar part of the spinal cord in three groups of rats: 28d after carrageenan injection, 24h after injection (the peak of inflammation), and with no injection (control group). Out of 17,000 annotated genes, 356 were found to be differentially expressed compared with the control group at 28d, and 329 at 24h after carrageenan injection (both groups at p < 0.01). Among differentially expressed genes, 67 (39 in 28d group) were identified as being part of pain-related pathways, altered in different models of pain, or interacting with proteins involved in pain-related pathways. Using gene ontology (GO) classification, we have identified 3 functional classes deserving attention for possible association with pain memory: They are related to cell-to-cell interaction, synaptogenesis, and neurogenesis. Conclusion Despite recovery from inflammatory hyperalgesia, persistent changes in spinal cord gene expression may underlie the propensity for the enhanced hyperalgesic response. We suggest that lasting changes in expression of genes involved in the formation of new synapses and neurogenesis may contribute to the transition of acute pain to chronicity. PMID

  7. Chronic pain in patients with the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: evidence for generalized hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Rombaut, Lies; Scheper, Mark; De Wandele, Inge; De Vries, Janneke; Meeus, Mira; Malfait, Fransiska; Engelbert, Raoul; Calders, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Chronic widespread pain is highly present in patients with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT), but up to now, evidence for generalized hyperalgesia is lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate whether pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at both symptomatic and asymptomatic body areas differ in EDS-HT patients compared to healthy subjects. Twenty-three women with EDS-HT and 23 gender- and age-matched healthy controls participated. All subjects marked on Margolis Pain Diagram where they felt pain lasting longer than 24 h in the past 4 weeks. Then, they completed several questionnaires assessing pain cognitions, fatigue, disability, and general health status, in order to take the possible influence of these factors on PPTs into account. Patients also completed a form concerning the type of pain they experienced. Thereupon, a blinded researcher assessed PPTs at 14 body locations on the trunk and extremities. PPTs were compared for the two complete groups. In addition, PPTs of patients and controls who did not report pain in a respective zone were compared. PPTs of the patients were significantly lower compared to those of the control group, also when pain-free samples per zone were compared. The mean (SD) PPT was 2.9 (1.62) kg/cm(2) in the EDS-HT patients and 5.2 (1.88) kg/cm(2) in the controls (P < 0.001). No confounding factors responsible for the observed differences could be revealed. In half of the patient group, a predominantly neuropathic pain component was likely present. This study provides evidence for the existence of hyperalgesia even in asymptomatic areas (generalized secondary hyperalgesia). The generalized hyperalgesia may represent the involvement of a sensitized central nervous system, which inquires an adapted pain management for this patient group. PMID:24487572

  8. Contribution of mast cells and snake venom metalloproteinases to the hyperalgesia induced by Bothrops jararaca venom in rats.

    PubMed

    Bonavita, André Gustavo C; da Costa, Aline S; Pires, Ana Lucia A; Neves-Ferreira, Ana G C; Perales, Jonas; Cordeiro, Renato S B; Martins, Marco A; e Silva, Patrícia M R

    2006-06-15

    Bothrops jararaca venom (Bjv) is known to induce local inflammation and severe pain. Since, mast cells are able to secrete mediators involved in algesic processes, in this study we examined the putative role of these cells in the hyperalgesia triggered by Bjv in the rat paw. We noted that treatment with mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglicate as well as with histamine and 5-hydroxytriptamine receptor antagonists meclizine and methysergide, respectively, inhibited the Bjv-induced hyperalgesia. In addition, we showed that stimulation of isolated rat peritoneal mast cells with Bjv in vitro resulted in the release of stored and neo-generated inflammatory mediators such as histamine and leukotriene C(4), respectively. Bjv-induced histamine secretion was clearly sensitive to treatment with sodium cromoglicate and sodium nedocromil. We further observed that metalloproteinase inhibitors 1,10-phenantroline and DM43 inhibited mast cell degranulation in vitro, under conditions where inhibitors of phospholipase A(2) as well as of serine- and cysteine-proteinases were inactive. Altogether, our findings indicate that mast cells seem to contribute to the hyperalgesia caused by Bjv in the rat paw, and also provide evidence that this response might be dependent on the ability of the Bjv to activate directly mast cells. PMID:16730041

  9. A novel p38 MAPK docking groove-targeted compound is a potent inhibitor of inflammatory hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Willemen, Hanneke L.D.M.; Campos, Pedro M.; Lucas, Elisa; Morreale, Antonio; Gil-Redondo, Rubén; Agut, Juan; González, Florenci V.; Ramos, Paula; Heijnen, Cobi; Mayor, Federico; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Murga, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 is an important mediator of inflammation and of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We recently described that docking-groove dependent interactions are important for p38 MAPK-mediated signal transduction. Thus, virtual screening was performed to identify putative docking groove-targeted p38 MAPK inhibitors. Several compounds of the benzooxadiazol family were identified with low micromolar inhibitory activity both in a p38 MAPK activity assay, and in THP-1 human monocytes acting as inhibitors of LPS-induced TNFα secretion. Positions 2 and 5 in the phenyl ring are essential for the described inhibitory activity with a chloride in position 5 and a methyl-group in position 2 yielding the best results with an IC50 of 1.8 μM (FGA-19 compound). Notably, FGA-19 exerted a potent and long-lasting analgesic effect in vivo when tested in a mouse model of inflammatory hyperalgesia. A single intrathecal injection of FGA-19 completely resolved hyperalgesia, being ten times as potent and displaying longer lasting effects than the established p38 MAPK inhibitor SB239063. FGA-19 also reversed persistent pain in a model of post-inflammatory hyperalgesia (in LysM-GRK2+/− mice). These potent in vivo effects put forward p38 MAPK docking-site targeted inhibitors as a potential novel strategy for the treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:24517375

  10. Inflammatory mediators involved in the paw edema and hyperalgesia induced by Batroxase, a metalloproteinase isolated from Bothrops atrox snake venom.

    PubMed

    De Toni, Lanuze G B; Menaldo, Danilo L; Cintra, Adélia C O; Figueiredo, Maria J; de Souza, Anderson R; Maximiano, William M A; Jamur, Maria C; Souza, Glória E P; Sampaio, Suely V

    2015-09-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases have been described as responsible for several inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the edema and hyperalgesia induced in rats by Batroxase, a P-I metalloproteinase from Bothrops atrox venom, along with possible inflammatory mediators involved in these responses. Batroxase or sterile saline was injected into rat paws and the edema and hyperalgesic effects were evaluated for 6h by using a plethysmometer and a Von Frey system, respectively. Batroxase induced significant edematogenic and hyperalgesic peak responses in the first hours after administration. The inflammatory mediators involved in these responses were assayed by pretreatment of animals with synthesis inhibitors or receptor antagonists. Peak responses were significantly reduced by administration of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone, the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine and the FLAP inhibitor MK-886. Rat paws injected with compound 48/80, a mast cell degranulating agent, followed by Batroxase injection resulted in significant reduction of the edema and hyperalgesia. However, Batroxase itself induced minor degranulation of RBL-2H3 mast cells in vitro. Additionally, the inflammatory responses did not seem to be related to prostaglandins, bradykinin or nitric oxide. Our results indicate a major involvement of histamine and leukotrienes in the edema and hyperalgesia induced by Batroxase, which could be related, at least in part, to mast cell degranulation. PMID:26072684

  11. Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Resveratrol During Inflammatory Hyperalgesia via Differential Regulation of pro-Inflammatory Mediators.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajeet Kumar; Vinayak, Manjula

    2016-07-01

    Sensitization of nociceptive neurons by inflammatory mediators leads to hypersensitivity for normal painful stimuli which is termed hyperalgesia. Oxidative stress is an essential factor in pathological pain; therefore, antioxidants qualify as potential anti-hyperalgesic agents. The present study examines the efficacy of the natural antioxidant resveratrol in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced hyperalgesic rats. Thermal hyperalgesia was measured at different time points by paw withdrawal latency test and confirmed by c-Fos expression in spinal dorsal horn. The impact of resveratrol treatment on inflammatory mediators at peripheral (paw skin) and central (spinal cord) sites was determined during early (6 h) as well as late phase (48 h) of hyperalgesia. Intraplanter injection of CFA increased the level of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 as well as inflammatory enzymes COX-2 and iNOS in paw skin in both phases. In case of spinal cord, the level of COX-2 was found to be elevated in both phases, whereas iNOS could not be detected. The cytokines were found to be elevated only in late phase in spinal cord. Administration of resveratrol (20 mg/kg) shifted the level of all inflammatory mediators towards normal, except cytokines in paw skin. The present study suggests that the anti-nociceptive effect of resveratrol is implicated at both peripheral and central sites in a tissue specific manner. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27060370

  12. Minocycline attenuates the development of diabetic neuropathic pain: possible anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pabreja, Kavita; Dua, Kamal; Sharma, Saurabh; Padi, Satyanarayana S V; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2011-07-01

    Painful neuropathy, a common complication of diabetes mellitus is characterized by allodynia and hyperalgesia. Recent studies emphasized on the role of non-neuronal cells, particularly microglia in the development of neuronal hypersensitivity. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of minocyline, a selective inhibitor of microglial activation to define the role of neuroimmune activation in experimental diabetic neuropathy. Cold allodynia and thermal and chemical hyperalgesia were assessed and the markers of inflammation and oxidative and nitrosative stress were estimated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Chronic administration of minocycline (40 and 80 mg/kg, i.p.) for 2 weeks started 2 weeks after diabetes induction attenuated the development of diabetic neuropathy as compared to diabetic control animals. In addition, minocyline treatment reduced the levels of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, lipid peroxidation, nitrite and also improved antioxidant defense in spinal cords of diabetic rats as compared to diabetic control animals. In contrast, minocycline (80 mg/kg, per se) had no effect on any of these behavioral and biochemical parameters assessed in age-matched control animals. The results of the present study strongly suggest that activated microglia are involved in the development of experimental diabetic neuropathy and minocycline exerted its effect probably by inhibition of neuroimmune activation of microglia. In addition, the beneficial effects of minocycline are partly mediated by its anti-inflammatory effect by reducing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and in part by modulating oxidative and nitrosative stress in the spinal cord that might be involved in attenuating the development of behavioral hypersensitivity in diabetic rats.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reversed Morphine Tolerance and Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhen; Liu, LiPing; Shen, Jun; Cheng, Katherine; Liu, Aijun; Yang, Jing; Wang, Lina; Qu, Tingyu; Yang, HongNa; Li, Yan; Wu, Haiyan; Narouze, John; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-08-24

    More than 240 million opioid prescriptions are dispensed annually to treat pain in the US. The use of opioids is commonly associated with opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which limit efficacy and compromise safety. The dearth of effective way to prevent or treat OT and OIH is a major medical challenge. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate OT and OIH in rats and mice based on the understanding that MSCs possess remarkable anti-inflammatory properties and that both OT and chronic pain are associated with neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. We found that the development of OT and OIH was effectively prevented by either intravenous or intrathecal MSC transplantation (MSC-TP), which was performed before morphine treatment. Remarkably, established OT and OIH were significantly reversed by either intravenous or intrathecal MSCs when cells were transplanted after repeated morphine injections. The animals did not show any abnormality in vital organs or functions. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the treatments significantly reduced activation level of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord. We have thus demonstrated that MSC-TP promises to be a potentially safe and effective way to prevent and reverse two of the major problems of opioid therapy.

  14. Muscle hyperalgesia is widespread in patients with complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Rooijen, Diana E; Marinus, Johan; van Hilten, Jacobus J

    2013-12-01

    Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) frequently show prominent sensory abnormalities in their affected limb, which may extend proximally and even to unaffected body regions. This study examines whether sensory dysfunction is observed in unaffected body parts of CRPS patients, and investigates whether the extent of dysfunction is similar for the various sensory modalities. Quantitative sensory testing was performed in the unaffected extremities and cheeks of 48 patients with CRPS of the arm (31 with dystonia), and the results were compared with values obtained among healthy controls. The most prominent abnormality was the pressure pain threshold, which showed a consistent pattern of higher sensitivity in unaffected contralateral arms and unaffected legs, as well as the cheek, and demonstrated the largest effect sizes. The cheeks of CRPS patients showed thermal hypoesthesia and hyperalgesia as well as a loss of vibration detection. Except for a lower vibration threshold in the contralateral leg of CRPS patients with dystonia, no differences in sensory modalities were found between CRPS patients with and without dystonia. These results point to a general disturbance in central pain processing in patients with CRPS, which may be attributed to impaired endogenous pain control. Since pressure pain is the most deviant sensory abnormality in both unaffected and affected body regions of CRPS patients, this test may serve as an important outcome parameter in future studies and may be used as a tool to monitor the course of the disease.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reversed Morphine Tolerance and Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zhen; Liu, LiPing; Shen, Jun; Cheng, Katherine; Liu, Aijun; Yang, Jing; Wang, Lina; Qu, Tingyu; Yang, HongNa; Li, Yan; Wu, Haiyan; Narouze, John; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    More than 240 million opioid prescriptions are dispensed annually to treat pain in the US. The use of opioids is commonly associated with opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which limit efficacy and compromise safety. The dearth of effective way to prevent or treat OT and OIH is a major medical challenge. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate OT and OIH in rats and mice based on the understanding that MSCs possess remarkable anti-inflammatory properties and that both OT and chronic pain are associated with neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. We found that the development of OT and OIH was effectively prevented by either intravenous or intrathecal MSC transplantation (MSC-TP), which was performed before morphine treatment. Remarkably, established OT and OIH were significantly reversed by either intravenous or intrathecal MSCs when cells were transplanted after repeated morphine injections. The animals did not show any abnormality in vital organs or functions. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the treatments significantly reduced activation level of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord. We have thus demonstrated that MSC-TP promises to be a potentially safe and effective way to prevent and reverse two of the major problems of opioid therapy. PMID:27554341

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reversed Morphine Tolerance and Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhen; Liu, LiPing; Shen, Jun; Cheng, Katherine; Liu, Aijun; Yang, Jing; Wang, Lina; Qu, Tingyu; Yang, HongNa; Li, Yan; Wu, Haiyan; Narouze, John; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    More than 240 million opioid prescriptions are dispensed annually to treat pain in the US. The use of opioids is commonly associated with opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which limit efficacy and compromise safety. The dearth of effective way to prevent or treat OT and OIH is a major medical challenge. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate OT and OIH in rats and mice based on the understanding that MSCs possess remarkable anti-inflammatory properties and that both OT and chronic pain are associated with neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. We found that the development of OT and OIH was effectively prevented by either intravenous or intrathecal MSC transplantation (MSC-TP), which was performed before morphine treatment. Remarkably, established OT and OIH were significantly reversed by either intravenous or intrathecal MSCs when cells were transplanted after repeated morphine injections. The animals did not show any abnormality in vital organs or functions. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the treatments significantly reduced activation level of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord. We have thus demonstrated that MSC-TP promises to be a potentially safe and effective way to prevent and reverse two of the major problems of opioid therapy. PMID:27554341

  17. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with NW-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It’s effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  18. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with N(W)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It's effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  19. A COMBINED EFFECT OF DEXTROMETHORPHAN AND MELATONIN ON NEUROPATHIC PAIN BEHAVIOR IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuxing; Zhang, Lin; Lim, Grewo; Sung, Backil; Tian, Yinghong; Chou, Chiu-Wen; Hernstadt, Hayley; Rusanescu, Gabriel; Ma, Yuxin; Mao, Jianren

    2009-01-01

    Previous study has shown that administration of melatonin into the anterior cingulate cortex contralateral to peripheral nerve injury prevented exacerbation of mechanical allodynia with a concurrent improvement of depression-like behavior in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a genetic variation of Wistar rats. In the present study, we examined the effect of the individual versus combined treatment of melatonin and/or dextromethorphan (DM), a clinically available N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, on pain behaviors in WKY rats with chronic constriction sciatic nerve injury (CCI). Pain behaviors (thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia) were established at one week after CCI. WKY rats were then treated intraperitoneally with various doses of melatonin, DM or their combination once daily for the following week. At the end of this one-week treatment, behavioral tests were repeated in these same rats. While DM alone was effective in reducing thermal hyperalgesia at three tested doses (15, 30 or 60 mg/kg), it reduced mechanical allodynia only at high doses (30 or 60 mg/kg). By comparison, administration of melatonin alone was effective in reducing thermal hyperalgesia only at the highest dose (120 mg/kg, but not 30 or 60 mg/kg) tested in this experiment. Melatonin alone failed to reverse allodynia at all three tested doses (30, 60 and 120 mg/kg). However, the combined intraperitoneal administration of melatonin (30 mg/kg) and DM (15 mg/kg) effectively reversed both thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia although each individual dose alone did not reduce pain behaviors. These results suggest that a combination of melatonin with a clinically available NMDA receptor antagonist might be more effective than either drug alone for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:19595681

  20. Effect of Intramuscular Protons, Lactate, and ATP on Muscle Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Nicholas S; Whitley, Phillip E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic muscle pain is a significant health problem leading to disability[1]. Muscle fatigue can exacerbate muscle pain. Metabolites, including ATP, lactate, and protons, are released during fatiguing exercise and produce pain in humans. These substances directly activate purinergic (P2X) and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) on muscle nociceptors, and when combined, produce a greater increase in neuron firing than when given alone. Whether the enhanced effect of combining protons, lactate, and ATP is the sum of individual effects (additive) or more than the sum of individual effects (synergistic) is unknown. Using a rat model of muscle nociceptive behavior, we tested each of these compounds individually over a range of physiologic and supra-physiologic concentrations. Further, we combined all three compounds in a series of dilutions and tested their effect on muscle nociceptive behavior. We also tested a non-hydrolyzable form of ATP (α,β-meATP) alone and in combination with lactate and acidic pH. Surprisingly, we found no dose-dependent effect on muscle nociceptive behavior for protons, lactate, or ATP when given alone. We similarly found no effect after application of each two-metabolite combination. Only pH 4 saline and α,β-meATP produced hyperalgesia when given alone. When all 3 substances were combined, however, ATP (2.4μm), lactate (10mM), and acidic pH (pH 6.0) produced an enhanced effect greater than the sum of the effects of the individual components, i.e. synergism. α,β me ATP (3nmol), on the other hand, showed no enhanced effects when combined with lactate (10mM) or acidic pH (pH 6.0), i.e. additive. These data suggest that combining fatigue metabolites in muscle produces a synergistic effect on muscle nociception.

  1. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in community-dwelling adults with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hooten, W Michael; Lamer, Tim J; Twyner, Channing

    2015-06-01

    The hyperalgesic effects of long-term opioid use in community-dwelling adults with chronic pain have not been widely reported. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to determine the associations between opioid use and heat pain (HP) perception in a sample of community-dwelling adults with chronic pain. The study cohort involved 187 adults (85 opioid and 102 nonopioid) with chronic pain consecutively admitted to an outpatient interdisciplinary pain treatment program. Heat pain perception was assessed using a validated quantitative sensory test method of levels. An effect of opioid use was observed for nonstandardized (P = 0.004) and standardized (P = 0.005) values of HP 5-0.5 in which values of the opioid group were lower (more hyperalgesic) compared with those of the nonopioid group. HP 5-0.5 is a measure of the slope of the line connecting HP 0.5 (HP threshold) and HP 5 (intermediate measure of HP tolerance). In univariable (P = 0.019) and multiple variable (P = 0.003) linear regression analyses (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, work status, pain diagnosis, pain severity, depression, and pain catastrophizing), opioid use was associated with lower (more hyperalgesic) nonstandardized values of HP 5-0.5. Similarly, in univariable (P = 0.004) and multiple variable (P = 0.011) linear regression analyses (adjusted for work status, pain diagnosis, pain severity, depression, and pain catastrophizing), opioid use was associated with lower standardized values of HP 5-0.5. In this sample of community-dwelling adults, these observations suggest that long-term opioid use was associated with hyperalgesia independent of other clinical factors known to influence HP perception.

  2. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in community-dwelling adults with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hooten, W Michael; Lamer, Tim J; Twyner, Channing

    2015-06-01

    The hyperalgesic effects of long-term opioid use in community-dwelling adults with chronic pain have not been widely reported. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to determine the associations between opioid use and heat pain (HP) perception in a sample of community-dwelling adults with chronic pain. The study cohort involved 187 adults (85 opioid and 102 nonopioid) with chronic pain consecutively admitted to an outpatient interdisciplinary pain treatment program. Heat pain perception was assessed using a validated quantitative sensory test method of levels. An effect of opioid use was observed for nonstandardized (P = 0.004) and standardized (P = 0.005) values of HP 5-0.5 in which values of the opioid group were lower (more hyperalgesic) compared with those of the nonopioid group. HP 5-0.5 is a measure of the slope of the line connecting HP 0.5 (HP threshold) and HP 5 (intermediate measure of HP tolerance). In univariable (P = 0.019) and multiple variable (P = 0.003) linear regression analyses (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, work status, pain diagnosis, pain severity, depression, and pain catastrophizing), opioid use was associated with lower (more hyperalgesic) nonstandardized values of HP 5-0.5. Similarly, in univariable (P = 0.004) and multiple variable (P = 0.011) linear regression analyses (adjusted for work status, pain diagnosis, pain severity, depression, and pain catastrophizing), opioid use was associated with lower standardized values of HP 5-0.5. In this sample of community-dwelling adults, these observations suggest that long-term opioid use was associated with hyperalgesia independent of other clinical factors known to influence HP perception. PMID:25815431

  3. Exercise prevents development of autonomic dysregulation and hyperalgesia in a mouse model of chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A; Chapleau, Mark W

    2016-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic functions. Regular physical activity prevents the development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function of sedentary mice with CMP, and whether exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was induced by 2 intramuscular injections of pH 5.0 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access to it for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability, and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24 hours after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows the development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia, which can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP.

  4. The Qualitative Hyperalgesia Profile: A New Metric to Assess Chronic Post-Thoracotomy Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chi-Fei Wang, Jeffrey; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Gerner, Peter; Ji, Ru-Rong; Strichartz, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    Thoracotomy often results in chronic pain, characterized by resting pain and elevated mechano-sensitivity. This paper defines complex behavioral responses to tactile stimulation in rats after thoracotomy, shown to be reversibly relieved by systemic morphine, in order to develop a novel qualitative “pain” score. A deep incision and 1 hour of rib retraction in male Sprague-Dawley rats resulted in reduced threshold and a change in the locus of greatest tactile (von Frey filament) sensitivity, from the lower back to a more rostral location around the wound site, and extending bilaterally. The fraction of rats showing nocifensive responses to mild stimulation (10 gm) increased after thoracotomy (from a pre-operative value of 0/10 to 8/10 at 10 days post-op), and the average threshold decreased correspondingly, from 15 gm to ∼4 gm. The nature of the nocifensive responses to tactile stimulation, composed pre-operatively only of no response (Grade 0) or brief contractions of the local subcutaneous muscles (Grade I), changed markedly after thoracotomy, with the appearance of new behaviors including a brisk lateral “escape” movement and/or a 180° rotation of the trunk (both included as Grade II), and whole body shuddering, and scratching and squealing (Grade III). Systemic morphine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) transiently raised the threshold for response and reduced the frequency of Grade II and III responses, supporting the interpretation that these represent pain. The findings support the development of a Qualitative Hyperalgesic Profile to assess the complex behavior that indicates a central integration of hyperalgesia. PMID:24567767

  5. Exercise prevents development of autonomic dysregulation and hyperalgesia in a mouse model of chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A; Chapleau, Mark W

    2016-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic functions. Regular physical activity prevents the development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function of sedentary mice with CMP, and whether exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was induced by 2 intramuscular injections of pH 5.0 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access to it for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability, and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24 hours after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows the development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia, which can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP. PMID:26313406

  6. Galanin-Mediated Behavioural Hyperalgesia from the Dorsomedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Involves Two Independent Descending Pronociceptive Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Diana; Viisanen, Hanna; Wei, Hong; Almeida, Armando; Pertovaara, Antti; Pinto-Ribeiro, Filipa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) by galanin (GAL) induces behavioural hyperalgesia. Since DMH neurones do not project directly to the spinal cord, we hypothesized that the medullary dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt), a pronociceptive region projecting to the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) and/or the serotoninergic raphe-spinal pathway acting on the spinal 5-HT3 receptor (5HT3R) could relay descending nociceptive facilitation induced by GAL in the DMH. Heat-evoked paw-withdrawal latency (PWL) and activity of SDH neurones were assessed in monoarthritic (ARTH) and control (SHAM) animals after pharmacological manipulations of the DMH, DRt and spinal cord. The results showed that GAL in the DMH and glutamate in the DRt lead to behavioural hyperalgesia in both SHAM and ARTH animals, which is accompanied particularly by an increase in heat-evoked responses of wide-dynamic range neurons, a group of nociceptive SDH neurones. Facilitation of pain behaviour induced by GAL in the DMH was reversed by lidocaine in the DRt and by ondansetron, a 5HT3R antagonist, in the spinal cord. However, the hyperalgesia induced by glutamate in the DRt was not blocked by spinal ondansetron. In addition, in ARTH but not SHAM animals PWL was increased after lidocaine in the DRt and ondansetron in the spinal cord. Our data demonstrate that GAL in the DMH activates two independent descending facilitatory pathways: (i) one relays in the DRt and (ii) the other one involves 5-HT neurones acting on spinal 5HT3Rs. In experimental ARTH, the tonic pain-facilitatory action is increased in both of these descending pathways. PMID:26565961

  7. Deficits in visceral pain and referred hyperalgesia in Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3)-null mice.

    PubMed

    Laird, Jennifer M A; Souslova, Veronika; Wood, John N; Cervero, Fernando

    2002-10-01

    The tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel alpha subunit Nav1.8 is expressed exclusively in primary sensory neurons and is proposed to play an important role in sensitization of nociceptors. Here we compared visceral pain and referred hyperalgesia in Nav1.8-null mice and their wild-type littermates in five tests that differ in the degree to which behavior depends on spontaneous, ongoing firing in sensitized nociceptors. Nav1.8-null mice showed normal nociceptive behavior provoked by acute noxious stimulation of abdominal viscera (intracolonic saline or intraperitoneal acetylcholine). However, Nav1.8-null mutants showed weak pain and no referred hyperalgesia to intracolonic capsaicin, a model in which behavior is sustained by ongoing activity in nociceptors sensitized by the initial application. Nav1.8-null mice also showed blunted pain and hyperalgesia to intracolonic mustard oil, which sensitizes nociceptors but also provokes tissue damage. To distinguish between a possible role for Nav1.8 in ongoing activity per se and ongoing activity after sensitization in the absence of additional stimuli, we tried a visceral model of tonic noxious chemical stimulation, cyclophosphamide cystitis. Cyclophosphamide produces cystitis by gradual accumulation of toxic metabolites in the bladder. In this model, Nav1.8-null mice showed normal responses. There were no differences between null mutants and their normal littermates in tissue damage and inflammation evoked by any of the stimuli tested, suggesting that the behavioral differences are not secondary to impairment of inflammatory responses. We conclude that there is an essential role for Nav1.8 in mediating spontaneous activity in sensitized nociceptors.

  8. GABAergic Transmission in Rat Pontine Reticular Formation Regulates the Induction Phase of Anesthesia and Modulates Hyperalgesia Caused by Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Nemanis, Kriste; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) contributes to the regulation of sleep, anesthesia, and pain. The role of PnO GABA in modulating these states remains incompletely understood. The present study used time to Loss and time to Resumption of Righting Response (LoRR and RoRR) as surrogate measures of loss and resumption of consciousness. This study tested three hypotheses: (1) pharmacologically manipulating GABA levels in rat PnO alters LoRR, RoRR, and nociception; (2) propofol decreases GABA levels in the PnO; and (3) inhibiting GABA synthesis in the PnO blocks hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. Administering a GABA synthesis inhibitor (3-MPA) or a GABA uptake inhibitor (NPA) into rat PnO significantly altered LoRR caused by propofol. 3-MPA significantly decreased LoRR for propofol (−18%). NPA significantly increased LoRR during administration of propofol (36%). Neither 3-MPA nor NPA altered RoRR following cessation of propofol or isoflurane delivery. The finding that LoRR was decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA is consistent with measures showing that extracellular GABA levels in the PnO were decreased (41%) by propofol. Thermal nociception was significantly decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA, and 3-MPA blocked the hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. The results demonstrate that GABA levels in the PnO regulate the time for loss of consciousness caused by propofol, extend the concept that anesthetic induction and emergence are not inverse processes, and suggest that GABAergic transmission in the PnO mediates hyperalgesia caused by sleep loss. PMID:24674578

  9. Ursolic acid prevents augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in high-fat diet-induced obese rats by restoring downregulated spinal PPARα.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanan; Song, Chengwei; Li, Haiou; Hou, Jingdong; Li, Dongliang

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for several pain syndromes and is associated with increased pain sensitivity. Evidence suggests that obesity causes the downregulation of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor (PPAR)α in the spinal cord, contributing to augmented peripheral edema and inflammatory hyperalgesia. Ursolic acid (UA), a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid carboxylic acid, has been shown to upregulate PPARα in the peripheral tissues of obese animals. The present study hypothesized that UA prevents augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in obesity by restoring downregulated spinal PPARα. The present study demonstrated that Sprague‑Dawley rats fed a high‑fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks developed obesity and metabolic disorder. Following carrageenan injection, the HFD rats exhibited increased thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema, compared with the rats fed a low‑fat diet. Molecular investigations revealed that the HFD rats exhibited decreased PPARα activity, and exaggerated expression of inflammatory mediators and nuclear factor‑kB activity in the spinal cord in response to carrageenan. Oral administration of UA ameliorated obesity and metabolic disorder, and prevented increased thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema in the HFD rats. Additionally, UA normalized PPARα activity and inhibited the exaggerated spinal cord inflammatory response to carrageenan. Although the knockdown of spinal PPARα with small interfering RNA following the administration of UA did not alter obesity or metabolic parameters, it eradicated the beneficial effects of UA on thermal hyperalgesia and paw edema, and reversed the spinal cord inflammatory response. These results suggested that the systemic administration of UA inhibited the exaggerated spinal cord inflammatory response to peripheral inflammatory stimulation in HFD‑induced obesity by restoring downregulated spinal PPARα, preventing peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia. UA may be a

  10. Analgesic Efficacy of Firocoxib, a Selective Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase 2, in a Mouse Model of Incisional Pain

    PubMed Central

    Reddyjarugu, Balagangadharreddy; Pavek, Todd; Southard, Teresa; Barry, Jason; Singh, Bhupinder

    2015-01-01

    Pain management in laboratory animals is generally accomplished by using opioids and NSAIDs. However, opioid use is hindered by controlled substance requirements and a relatively short duration of action. In this study, we compared the analgesic efficacy of firocoxib (a cyclooxygenase-2-selective NSAID) with that of buprenorphine in the mouse model of plantar incisional pain by objective measurement of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia using von Frey and Hargreaves equipment, respectively. Our experimental design included 5 treatment groups: firocoxib at 10 mg/kg IP every 24 h (F10 group); firocoxib at 20 mg/kg IP every 24 h (F20); buprenorphine at 0.2 mg/kg SC every 8 h; intraperitoneal normal saline every 24 h; and sham group (anesthesia, no incision) treated with firocoxib at 20 mg/kg IP every 24 h (sham+F20). All mice underwent nociceptive assays at 24 h before and 4, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. Buprenorphine alleviated allodynia at all time points after incision. The F10 treatment alleviated allodynia at 4, 24, and 48 h, whereas F20 alleviated allodynia at 24, 48, and 72 h. None of the treatments alleviated thermal hyperalgesia at 4h. Except for F10 and buprenorphine at 24 h, all treatments alleviated thermal hyperalgesia at 24, 48, and 72 h. No significant differences were noted between the 2 doses of firocoxib and buprenorphine regarding mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at all time points. In conclusion, the analgesic efficacy of firocoxib is comparable to that of buprenorphine in this mouse pain model. PMID:26224441

  11. Early life stress elicits visceral hyperalgesia and functional reorganization of pain circuits in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Holschneider, D.P.; Guo, Y.; Mayer, E.A.; Wang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for developing functional gastrointestinal disorders, and has been proposed to be related to a central amplification of sensory input and resultant visceral hyperalgesia. We sought to characterize ELS-related changes in functional brain responses during acute noxious visceral stimulation. Neonatal rats (males/females) were exposed to limited bedding (ELS) or standard bedding (controls) on postnatal days 2–9. Age 10–11 weeks, animals were implanted with venous cannulas and transmitters for abdominal electromyography (EMG). Cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was mapped during colorectal distension (CRD) using [14C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography, and analyzed in three-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping and functional connectivity. EMG responses to CRD were increased after ELS, with no evidence of a sex difference. ELS rats compared to controls showed a greater significant positive correlation of EMG with amygdalar rCBF. Factorial analysis revealed a significant main effect of ‘ELS’ on functional activation of nodes within the pain pathway (somatosensory, insular, cingulate and prefrontal cortices, locus coeruleus/lateral parabrachial n. [LC/LPB], periaqueductal gray, sensory thalamus), as well as in the amygdala, hippocampus and hypothalamus. In addition, ELS resulted in an increase in the number of significant functional connections (i.e. degree centrality) between regions within the pain circuit, including the amygdala, LC/LPB, insula, anterior ventral cingulate, posterior cingulate (retrosplenium), and stria terminalis, with decreases noted in the sensory thalamus and the hippocampus. Sex differences in rCBF were less broadly expressed, with significant differences noted at the level of the cortex, amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, raphe, sensory thalamus, and caudate-putamen. ELS showed a sexually dimorphic effect (‘Sex x ELS’ interaction) at the LC/LPB complex, globus pallidus

  12. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α inhibition produced anti-allodynia effect and suppressed inflammatory cytokine production in early stage of mouse complex regional pain syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hung-Tsung; Lin, Ya-Chi; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Tsai, Yu-Chuan; Liu, Yen-Chin

    2016-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is related to microcirculation impairment associated with tissue hypoxia and peripheral cytokine overproduction in the affected limb. Previous studies suggest that the pathogenesis involves hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and exaggerated regional inflammatory response. 1-methylpropyl 2-imidazolyl disulfide (PX-12) acts as the thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) inhibitor and decreases the level of HIF-1α, and can rapidly be metabolized for Trx-1 redox inactivation. This study hypothesized that PX-12 can decrease the cytokine production for nociceptive sensitization in the hypoxia-induced pain model. CD1 mice weighing around 30 g were used. The animal CRPS model was developed via the chronic post-ischaemic pain (CPIP) model. The model was induced by using O-rings on the ankles of the mice hind limbs to produce 3-h ischaemia-reperfusion injury on the paw. PX-12 (25 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg) was given through tail vein injection immediately after ischaemia. Animal behaviour was tested using the von Frey method for 7 days. Local paw skin tissue was harvest from three groups (control, 5 mg/kg, 25 mg/kg) 2 h after injection of PX-12. The protein expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and HIF-1α was analysed with the Western blotting method. Mice significantly present an anti-allodynia effect in a dose-related manner after the PX-12 administration. Furthermore, PX-12 not only decreased the expression of HIF-1α but also decreased the expression of IL-1β over the injured palm. This study, therefore, shows the first evidence of the anti-allodynia effect of PX-12 in a CPIP animal model for pain behaviour. The study concluded that inhibition of HIF-1α may produce an analgesic effect and the associated suppression of inflammatory cytokine IL-1β in a CPIP model. PMID:26711019

  13. Ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar S

    2015-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum and its saponin rich fraction in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The chronic constriction injury was induced by placing four loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve, proximal to its trifurcation. The mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, paw heat hyperalgesia and cold tail hyperalgesia were assessed by performing the pinprick, acetone, hot plate and cold tail immersion tests, respectively. Biochemically, the tissue thio-barbituric acid reactive species, super-oxide anion content (markers of oxidative stress) and total calcium levels were measured. Chronic constriction injury was associated with the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat and cold hyperalgesia along with an increase in oxidative stress and calcium levels. However, administration of Ocimum sanctum (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) and its saponin rich fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) for 14 days significantly attenuated chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain as well as decrease the oxidative stress and calcium levels. It may be concluded that saponin rich fraction of Ocimum sanctum has ameliorative potential in attenuating painful neuropathic state, which may be attributed to a decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels. PMID:25673470

  14. Exploring the potential effect of Ocimum sanctum in vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum and its saponin rich fraction in vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathic pain in rats. Peripheral neuropathy was induced in rats by administration of vincristine sulfate (50 μg/kg i.p.) for 10 consecutive days. The mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, paw heat hyperalgesia and cold tail hyperalgesia were assessed by performing the pinprick, acetone, hot plate and cold tail immersion tests, respectively. Biochemically, the tissue thio-barbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), super-oxide anion content (markers of oxidative stress) and total calcium levels were measured. Vincristine administration was associated with the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat and cold hyperalgesia. Furthermore, vincristine administration was also associated with an increase in oxidative stress and calcium levels. However, administration of Ocimum sanctum (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) and its saponin rich fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) for 14 days significantly attenuated vincristine-induced neuropathic pain along with decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels. It may be concluded that Ocimum sanctum has ameliorative potential in attenuating chemotherapy induced-painful neuropathic state, which may be attributed to decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels. Furthermore, saponin rich fraction of Ocimum sanctum may be responsible for its noted beneficial effect in neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:20181005

  15. Pioglitazone rapidly reduces neuropathic pain through astrocyte and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Ryan B.; Donahue, Renee R.; Morgenweck, Jenny; Grace, Peter M.; Sutton, Amanda; Watkins, Linda R.; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated administration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists reduces neuropathic pain-like behavior and associated changes in glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. As PPARγ is a nuclear receptor, sustained changes in gene expression are widely believed to be the mechanism of pain reduction. However, we recently reported that a single intrathecal injection of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, reduced hyperalgesia within 30 minutes, a time frame that is typically less than that required for genomic mechanisms. To determine the very rapid anti-hyperalgesic actions of PPARγ activation we administered pioglitazone to rats with spared nerve injury (SNI) and evaluated hyperalgesia. Pioglitazone inhibited hyperalgesia within 5 min of injection, consistent with a non-genomic mechanism. Systemic or intrathecal administration of GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist, inhibited the anti-hyperalgesic actions of intraperitoneal or intrathecal pioglitazone, suggesting a spinal PPARγ-dependent mechanism. To further address the contribution of non-genomic mechanisms, we blocked new protein synthesis in the spinal cord with anisomycin. When co-administered intrathecally, anisomycin did not change pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia at an early 7.5 min timepoint, further supporting a rapid non-genomic mechanism. At later timepoints anisomycin reduced pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia, suggesting a delayed recruitment of genomic mechanisms. Pioglitazone reduction of SNI-induced increases in GFAP expression occurred more rapidly than expected, within 60 min. We are the first to show that activation of spinal PPARγ rapidly reduces neuropathic pain independent from canonical genomic activity. We conclude that acute pioglitazone inhibits neuropathic pain in part by reducing astrocyte activation, and via both genomic and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms. PMID:25599238

  16. Differential effect of spironolactone in chronic constriction injury and vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2010-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of spironolactone in chronic constriction injury and vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The chronic constriction injury was induced by placing four loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve, while vincristine (50 μg/kg) was administered for 10 days to induce chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. Acetone drop, pin-prick, hot plate and paint brush tests were performed to assess cold allodynia; mechanical and heat hyperalgesia; dynamic mechanical allodynia, respectively. The spontaneous pain and postural index in terms of foot deformity was also assessed. The levels of TNF-α were measured in the sciatic nerve as an index of inflammation. Chronic constriction injury led to significant development of cold allodynia; mechanical and heat hyperalgesia; dynamic mechanical allodynia; spontaneous pain and foot deformity along with rise in the levels of TNF-α. Administration of vincristine was associated with the development of allodynia and hyperalgesia without spontaneous pain, foot deformity and elevation in the levels of TNF-α. Administration of spironolactone (10 and 20 mg/kg) significantly attenuated chronic constriction injury-induced pain related behaviour and foot deformity along with attenuation of TNF-α levels, without modulating vincristine-induced neuropathic pain. The attenuating effect of spironolactone in chronic constriction injury may be due to its anti-inflammatory properties and ability to decrease pro-inflammatory cytokines, while involvement of non-inflammatory mechanisms in the pathogenesis of vincristine-induced pain may probably explain its lack of beneficial effect in chemotherapy associated pain. PMID:20846523

  17. A-887826 is a structurally novel, potent and voltage-dependent Na(v)1.8 sodium channel blocker that attenuates neuropathic tactile allodynia in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Shieh, Char-Chang; Chapman, Mark L; Matulenko, Mark A; Hakeem, Ahmed H; Atkinson, Robert N; Kort, Michael E; Marron, Brian E; Joshi, Shailen; Honore, Prisca; Faltynek, Connie R; Krafte, Douglas S; Jarvis, Michael F

    2010-09-01

    Activation of sodium channels is essential to action potential generation and propagation. Recent genetic and pharmacological evidence indicates that activation of Na(v)1.8 channels contributes to chronic pain. Herein, we describe the identification of a novel series of structurally related pyridine derivatives as potent Na(v)1.8 channel blockers. A-887826 exemplifies this series and potently (IC(50)=11nM) blocked recombinant human Na(v)1.8 channels. A-887826 was approximately 3 fold less potent to block Na(v)1.2, approximately 10 fold less potent to block tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium (TTX-S Na(+)) currents and was >30 fold less potent to block Na(V)1.5 channels. A-887826 potently blocked tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium (TTX-R Na(+)) currents (IC(50)=8nM) from small diameter rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in a voltage-dependent fashion. A-887826 effectively suppressed evoked action potential firing when DRG neurons were held at depolarized potentials and reversibly suppressed spontaneous firing in small diameter DRG neurons from complete Freund's adjuvant inflamed rats. Following oral administration, A-887826 significantly attenuated tactile allodynia in a rat neuropathic pain model. Further characterization of TTX-R current block in rat DRG neurons demonstrated that A-887826 (100nM) shifted the mid-point of voltage-dependent inactivation of TTX-R currents by approximately 4mV without affecting voltage-dependent activation and did not exhibit frequency-dependent inhibition. The present data demonstrate that A-887826 is a structurally novel and potent Na(v)1.8 blocker that inhibits rat DRG TTX-R currents in a voltage-, but not frequency-dependent fashion. The ability of this structurally novel Na(v)1.8 blocker to effectively reduce tactile allodynia in neuropathic rats further supports the role of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels in pathological pain states. PMID:20566409

  18. How diagnostic tests help to disentangle the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms in painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Truini, Andrea; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain, ie, pain arising directly from a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory afferent pathway, manifests with various symptoms, the commonest being ongoing burning pain, electrical shock-like sensations, and dynamic mechanical allodynia. Reliable insights into the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms come from diagnostic tests documenting and quantifying somatosensory afferent pathway damage in patients with painful neuropathies. Neurophysiological investigation and skin biopsy studies suggest that ongoing burning pain primarily reflects spontaneous activity in nociceptive-fiber pathways. Electrical shock-like sensations presumably arise from high-frequency ectopic bursts generated in demyelinated, nonnociceptive, Aβ fibers. Although the mechanisms underlying dynamic mechanical allodynia remain debatable, normally innocuous stimuli might cause pain by activating spared and sensitized nociceptive afferents. Extending the mechanistic approach to neuropathic pain symptoms might advance targeted therapy for the individual patient and improve testing for new drugs.

  19. Exploring the potential of telmisartan in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2011-09-30

    The present study was designed to investigate the potential of telmisartan, an angiotensin AT(1) receptor, in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats. Four loose ligatures were placed around the sciatic nerve to induce chronic constriction injury and neuropathic pain. Acetone drop, pin-prick, hot plate and paint brush tests were performed to assess cold allodynia; mechanical and heat hyperalgesia; and dynamic mechanical allodynia, respectively along with assessment of spontaneous pain and postural index in terms of foot deformity. The levels of TNF-α were measured in the sciatic nerve as an index of inflammation. Chronic constriction injury was associated with development of cold allodynia; mechanical and heat hyperalgesia; dynamic mechanical allodynia; and spontaneous pain and foot deformity along with rise in the levels of TNF-α. Telmisartan (1, 2, 5 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for 14 days in chronic constriction injury subjected rats. Administration of telmisartan (2, 5 mg/kg) significantly attenuated chronic constriction injury-induced pain related behavior, foot deformity and rise in TNF-α level. It may be concluded that telmisartan has a potential in attenuating neuropathic pain behavior in chronic constriction injury model which may possibly be attributed to its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:21741378

  20. Antinociceptive effect of matrine on vincristine-induced neuropathic pain model in mice.

    PubMed

    Linglu, Dun; Yuxiang, Li; Yaqiong, Xu; Ru, Zhou; Lin, Ma; Shaoju, Jin; Juan, Du; Tao, Sun; Jianqiang, Yu

    2014-06-01

    Chemotherapy drugs treatment causes neuropathic pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia are common components of neuropathic pain, so effectively therapeutic strategy is required. In this study, we evaluated the antinociceptive effects of matrine on vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in mice. Vincristine (100 μg/kg i.p.) was administered once per day for 7 days (day 0-6) in mice. Matrine (15, 30, 60 mg/kg, i.p.) was repeated administration in early phase (day 0-6) or late phase (day 7-13). Hyperalgesia and allodynia were evaluated by withdrawal response using von Frey filaments, plantar and cold-plate on 7, 14 and 21 day. Injection of vincristine produced mechanical hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. Matrine was found to produce a protective role in both von Frey filaments and cold-plate test. The analysis of the effect supports the hypothesis that matrine is useful in therapy of vincristine-induced neuropathic pain. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that administration of matrine is associated with antinociceptive effect on mechanical and cold stimuli in a mice model of vincristine-induced neuropathy pain.

  1. Repeated forced swim stress enhances CFA-evoked thermal hyperalgesia and affects the expressions of pCREB and c-Fos in the insular cortex.

    PubMed

    Imbe, H; Kimura, A; Donishi, T; Kaneoke, Y

    2014-02-14

    Stress affects brain activity and promotes long-term changes in multiple neural systems. Exposure to stressors causes substantial effects on the perception and response to pain. In several animal models, chronic stress produces lasting hyperalgesia. The insular (IC) and anterior cingulate cortices (ACC) are the regions exhibiting most reliable pain-related activity. And the IC and ACC play an important role in pain modulation via the descending pain modulatory system. In the present study we examined the expression of phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) and c-Fos in the IC and ACC after forced swim stress (FS) and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection to clarify changes in the cerebral cortices that affect the activity of the descending pain modulatory system in the rats with stress-induced hyperalgesia. FS (day 1, 10min; days 2-3, 20min) induced an increase in the expression of pCREB and c-Fos in the anterior IC (AIC). CFA injection into the hindpaw after the FS shows significantly enhanced thermal hyperalgesia and induced a decrease in the expression of c-Fos in the AIC and the posterior IC (PIC). Quantitative image analysis showed that the numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the left AIC and PIC were significantly lower in the FS+CFA group (L AIC, 95.9±6.8; L PIC, 181.9±23.1) than those in the naive group (L AIC, 151.1±19.3, p<0.05; L PIC, 274.2±37.3, p<0.05). These findings suggest a neuroplastic change in the IC after FS, which may be involved in the enhancement of CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia through dysfunction of the descending pain modulatory system.

  2. Bromoenol Lactone, an Inhibitor of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2, Suppresses Carrageenan-Induced Prostaglandin Production and Hyperalgesia in Rat Hind Paw

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, Keiichiro; Ibuki, Takae; Matsumura, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2 and PGI2 are essential to hyperalgesia in inflammatory tissues. These prostaglandins are produced from arachidonic acid, which is cleaved from membrane phospholipids by the action of phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Which isozyme of PLA2 is responsible for the cleavage of arachidonic acid and the production of prostaglandins essential to inflammation-induced hyperalgesia is not clear. In this study, we examined the effects of two PLA2 isozyme-specific inhibitors on carrageenan-induced production of PGE2 and PGI2 in rat hind paw and behavioral nociceptive response to radiant heat. Local administration of bromoenol lactone (BEL), an inhibitor of calcium-independent PLA2 (iPLA2), significantly reduced carrageenan-induced elevation of prostaglandins in the inflamed foot pad 3 h after injection. It also ameliorated the hyperalgesic response between 1 h and 3 h after carrageenan injection. On the other hand, AACOCF3, an inhibitor of cytosolic PLA2, suppressed neither prostaglandin production nor the hyperalgesic response. BEL did not suppress the mRNA levels of iPLA2β, iPLA2γ, cyclooxygenase-2, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase, prostaglandin I synthase, or proinflammatory cytokines in the inflamed foot pad, indicating that BEL did not suppress inflammation itself. These results suggest that iPLA2 is involved in the production of prostaglandins and hyperalgesia at the inflammatory loci. PMID:26063975

  3. Nuclear factor-kappa B mediates TRPV4-NO pathway involved in thermal hyperalgesia following chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Ning, Li-Ping; Wang, Yong-Hui; Zhang, Yang; Ding, Xin-Li; Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Yue, Shou-Wei

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is involved in TRPV4-NO pathway in thermal hyperalgesia following chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) (the procedure hereafter termed CCD) in rat. Intrathecal administration of two NF-κB inhibitors, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC; 10(-1) to 10(-2)M) and BAY (100-50 μM), both induced significantly dose-dependent increase in the paw withdrawal latency (PWL) and decrease in nitric oxide (NO) content in DRG when compared with control rats. Pretreatment with 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4α-PDD, transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic activator, 1 nm) attenuated the suppressive effects of PDTC (10(-1)M) and BAY (100 μM) on CCD-induced thermal hyperalgesia and NO production. In addition, Western blot analysis indicated that CCD rats exhibited nuclear NF-κB protein expression and low levels of cytoplasmic inhibitory-kappa B (I-κB) expression; the increase in NF-κB expression and decrease in I-κB expression were reversed after intrathecal injection of PDTC. In conclusion, our data suggested that NF-κB could be involved in TRPV4-NO pathway in CCD-induced thermal hyperalgesia.

  4. ATP in human skin elicits a dose-related pain response which is potentiated under conditions of hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, S G; Warburton, J; Bhattacharjee, A; Ward, J; McMahon, S B

    2000-06-01

    Despite the considerable interest in the possibility that ATP may function as a peripheral pain mediator, there has been little quantitative study of the pain-producing effects of ATP in humans. Here we have used iontophoresis to deliver ATP to the forearm skin of volunteers who rated the magnitude of the evoked pain on a visual analogue scale. ATP consistently produced a modest burning pain, which began within 20 s of starting iontophoresis and was maintained for several minutes. Persistent iontophoresis of ATP led to desensitization within 12 min but recovery from this was almost complete 1 h later. Different doses of ATP were delivered using different iontophoretic driving currents. Iontophoresis of ATP produced a higher pain rating than saline, indicating that the pain was specifically caused by ATP. The average pain rating for ATP, but not saline, increased with increasing current. Using an 0.8 mA current, subjects reported pain averaging 27.7 +/- 2.8 (maximum possible = 100). Iontophoresis of ATP caused an increase in blood flow, as assessed using a laser Doppler flow meter. The increase in blood flow was significantly greater using ATP than saline in both the iontophoresed skin (P < 0.01) and in the surrounding skin, 3 mm outside the iontophoresed area (P < 0.05). The pain produced by ATP was dependent on capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons, since in skin treated repeatedly with topical capsaicin pain was reduced to less than 25% of that elicited on normal skin (2.1 +/- 0.4 compared with 9.3 +/- 1.5 on normal skin). Conversely, the pain-producing effects of ATP were greatly potentiated in several models of hyperalgesia. Thus, with acute capsaicin treatment when subjects exhibited touch-evoked hyperalgesia but no ongoing pain, there was a threefold increase in the average pain rating during ATP iontophoresis (22.7 +/- 3.1) compared with pre-capsaicin treatment (7.8 +/- 2.6). Moreover, ATP iontophoresed into skin 24 h after solar simulated radiation (2 x

  5. [Neuropathic pain and neuroplasticity in functional imaging studies].

    PubMed

    Maihöfner, C; Nickel, F T; Seifert, F

    2010-04-01

    Neuropathic pain syndromes are characterised by the occurrence of spontaneous ongoing and stimulus-induced pain. Stimulus-induced pain (hyperalgesia and allodynia) may result from sensitisation processes in the peripheral (primary hyperalgesia) or central (secondary hyperalgesia) nervous system. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms at the nociceptor itself and at spinal synapses have become better understood. However, the cerebral processing of hyperalgesia and allodynia is still controversially discussed. In recent years, neuroimaging methods (functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI; magnetoencephalography, MEG; positron emission tomography, PET) have provided new insights into the aberrant cerebral processing of neuropathic pain. The present paper reviews different cerebral mechanisms contributing to chronicity processes in neuropathic pain syndromes. These mechanisms include reorganisation of cortical somatotopic maps in sensory or motor areas (highly relevant for phantom limb pain and CRPS), increased activity in primary nociceptive areas, recruitment of new cortical areas usually not activated by nociceptive stimuli and aberrant activity in brain areas normally involved in descending inhibitory pain networks. Moreover, there is evidence from PET studies for changes of excitatory and inhibitory transmitter systems. Finally, advanced methods of structural brain imaging (voxel-based morphometry, VBM) show significant structural changes suggesting that chronic pain syndromes may be associated with neurodegeneration.

  6. Chronic At- and Below-Level Pain after Moderate Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Rodel E.; Houlé, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Chronic neuropathic pain is a significant consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI) that is associated with evoked pain, including allodynia and/or hyperalgesia. Allodynia is defined as a painful response to normally innocuous stimuli, and hyperalgesia occurs when there is an amplified pain response to normally noxious stimuli. We describe a model of a unilateral cervical level (C5) contusion injury where sensory recovery was assessed weekly for 6 weeks in 32 adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Bilateral thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia are detectable in the fore- and hindpaws as early as 7 days post-injury (dpi) and persist for at least 42 days. Paw withdrawal latency in response to a noxious thermal stimulus significantly intra-animal pre-operative values. Change in paw withdrawal latency plateaued at 21 dpi. Interestingly, bilateral forepaw allodynia develops in fewer than 40% of rats as measured by von Frey monofilament testing. Similar results occur in the hindpaws, where bilateral allodynia occurs in 46% of rats with SCI. The contralesional forepaw and both hindpaws of rats showed a slight increase in paw withdrawal threshold to tactile stimuli acutely after SCI, corresponding to ipsilesional forelimb motor deficits that resolve over time. That there is no difference among allodynic and non-allodynic groups in overall spared tissue or specifically of the dorsal column or ventrolateral white matter where ascending sensory tracts reside suggests that SCI-induced pain does not depend solely on the size or extent of the lesion, but that other mechanisms are in play. These observations provide a valid model system for future testing of therapeutic interventions to prevent the onset or to reduce the debilitating effects of chronic neuropathic pain after SCI. PMID:23216008

  7. Alloxan-induced diabetic thermal hyperalgesia, prophylaxis and phytotherapeutic effects of Rheum ribes L. in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Raafat, Karim; Aboul-Ela, Maha; El-Lakany, Abdalla

    2014-03-26

    Rheum ribes L., known as Syrian rhubarb, is used in traditional Lebanese folk medicine for the treatment of diabetes. The present study aims to investigate the activities of R. ribes aqueous extract for glucose homeostasis, in vivo antioxidant and diabetic neuropathy protection in mice. The acute and the subacute effects of various doses of R. ribes on blood glucose and in vivo antioxidant activity utilizing serum catalase level (CAT) were studied in alloxan-diabetic mice. The high doses significantly lowered glucose level and increased serum CAT in alloxan-diabetic mice. Pretreatment with the extract prior to alloxination, protected the mice from acquiring diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. Treatment with the extract for 8 weeks alleviated hyperalgesia in diabetic mice. Our findings provide clinicians with promising drugs intended for the management of the symptoms of diabetic complications. The protective activity of R. ribes against acquiring diabetes and diabetic neuropathy might pave the way for preparing a prophylactic treatment for diabetes risk groups.

  8. Simultaneous Inhibition of PGE2 and PGI2 Signals Is Necessary to Suppress Hyperalgesia in Rat Inflammatory Pain Models

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Harumi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is well known as a mediator of inflammatory symptoms such as fever, arthritis, and inflammatory pain. In the present study, we evaluated the analgesic effect of our selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound I, 2-methyl-2-[cis-4-([1-(6-methyl-3-phenylquinolin-2-yl)piperidin-4-yl]carbonyl amino)cyclohexyl] propanoic acid, in rat yeast-induced acute and adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain models. Although this compound suppressed the synthesis of PGE2 selectively, no analgesic effect was shown in both inflammatory pain models. Prostacyclin (PGI2) also plays crucial roles in inflammatory pain, so we evaluated the involvement of PGI2 signaling in rat inflammatory pain models using prostacyclin receptor (IP) antagonist, RO3244019. RO3244019 showed no analgesic effect in inflammatory pain models, but concomitant administration of compound I and RO3244019 showed analgesic effects comparable to celecoxib, a specific cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 inhibitor. Furthermore, coadministration of PGE2 receptor 4 (EP4) antagonist, CJ-023423, and RO3244019 also showed an analgesic effect. These findings suggest that both PGE2 signaling, especially through the EP4 receptor, and PGI2 signaling play critical roles in inflammatory pain and concurrent inhibition of both signals is important for suppression of inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:27478311

  9. Complications of long-term opioid therapy for management of chronic pain: the paradox of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Brush, D Eric

    2012-12-01

    While opioids remain a valid and effective analgesic strategy for patients suffering from a wide variety of painful conditions, they are not a panacea. Increasingly, physicians must balance patient expectations of adequate pain control with known limitations of opioid pharmaceuticals including adverse effects, tolerance, addiction, withdrawal, and drug diversion. Further complicating the issue over the last decade is a growing body of evidence suggesting chronic opioid use may unexpectedly worsen the perception of pain in some individuals. This syndrome, termed opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), fundamentally changes our understanding of opioid pharmacodynamics and may influence our approach to management of chronic pain. This manuscript describes the concept OIH and provides an overview of basic science and clinical research to date attempting to characterize this syndrome, as well as ascertain its clinical relevance. The potential existence of OIH in humans is framed within the context of our current understanding of opioids and our prescribing patterns so that physicians may begin to incorporate these ideas into their philosophy of pain management as further information develops. Animal studies reliably validate OIH in controlled models. Rigorous research protocols in humans are lacking, and we cannot yet confidently conclude that OIH manifests in clinically significant ways. However, clinicians should consider the possibility of OIH when evaluating outcomes of patients on chronic opioid therapy.

  10. Occludin oligomeric assembly at tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier is disrupted by peripheral inflammatory hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Gwen; Seelbach, Melissa J.; Staatz, William D.; Nametz, Nicole; Quigley, Carolyn; Campos, Chris R.; Brooks, Tracy A.; Davis, Thomas P.

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) dynamically alter paracellular diffusion of blood-borne substances from the peripheral circulation to the CNS in response to external stressors, such as pain, inflammation, and hypoxia. In this study, we investigated the effect of λ-carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammatory pain (i.e., hyperalgesia) on the oligomeric assembly of the key TJ transmembrane protein, occludin. Oligomerization of integral membrane proteins is a critical step in TJ complex assembly that enables the generation of tightly packed, large multiprotein complexes capable of physically obliterating the interendothelial space to inhibit paracellular diffusion. Intact microvessels isolated from rat brains were fractionated by detergent-free density gradient centrifugation, and gradient fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate—polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/Western blot. Injection of λ-carrageenan into the rat hind paw produced after 3 h a marked change in the relative amounts of oligomeric, dimeric, and monomeric occludin isoforms associated with different plasma membrane lipid raft domains and intracellular compartments in endothelial cells at the BBB. Our findings suggest that increased BBB permeability (i.e., leak) associated with λ-carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammatory pain is promoted by the disruption of disulfide-bonded occludin oligomeric assemblies, which renders them incapable of forming an impermeant physical barrier to paracellular transport. PMID:18647175

  11. Simultaneous Inhibition of PGE2 and PGI2 Signals Is Necessary to Suppress Hyperalgesia in Rat Inflammatory Pain Models.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Ryusuke; Kuwabara, Harumi; Kubota, Kazufumi; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Kiho, Toshihiro; Tengeiji, Atsushi; Kawakami, Katsuhiro; Shimada, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is well known as a mediator of inflammatory symptoms such as fever, arthritis, and inflammatory pain. In the present study, we evaluated the analgesic effect of our selective PGE2 synthesis inhibitor, compound I, 2-methyl-2-[cis-4-([1-(6-methyl-3-phenylquinolin-2-yl)piperidin-4-yl]carbonyl amino)cyclohexyl] propanoic acid, in rat yeast-induced acute and adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain models. Although this compound suppressed the synthesis of PGE2 selectively, no analgesic effect was shown in both inflammatory pain models. Prostacyclin (PGI2) also plays crucial roles in inflammatory pain, so we evaluated the involvement of PGI2 signaling in rat inflammatory pain models using prostacyclin receptor (IP) antagonist, RO3244019. RO3244019 showed no analgesic effect in inflammatory pain models, but concomitant administration of compound I and RO3244019 showed analgesic effects comparable to celecoxib, a specific cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 inhibitor. Furthermore, coadministration of PGE2 receptor 4 (EP4) antagonist, CJ-023423, and RO3244019 also showed an analgesic effect. These findings suggest that both PGE2 signaling, especially through the EP4 receptor, and PGI2 signaling play critical roles in inflammatory pain and concurrent inhibition of both signals is important for suppression of inflammatory hyperalgesia. PMID:27478311

  12. Telmisartan inhibits hyperalgesia and inflammatory progression in a diabetic neuropathic pain model of Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rejaie, Salim S.; Abuohashish, Hatem M.; Ahmed, Mohammed M.; Arrejaie, Aws S.; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M.; AlSharari, Shakir D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the potential therapeutic value of telmisartan (TMT) against diabetic neuropathy (DN) and associated pain in Wistar rats. Methods: Peripheral DN was induced by a single intraperitoneal streptozotocin injection (55 mg/kg), and 3 weeks later TMT treatment was started (5 and 10 mg/kg/day), and continued for 4 weeks. Mechanical nociceptive threshold, motor coordination, and thermal nociceptive threshold tests were performed before and after TMT treatment. In serum, glucose, pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 were assessed. Nerve growth factor (NGF) levels and histopathological changes were estimated in the sciatic nerve. This study was conducted at the Experimental Animal Care Center, Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2013 and May 2014. Results: We observed a significant reduction in mechanical nociceptive threshold, motor coordination, and thermal nociceptive threshold in diabetic animals. The TMT treatment significantly enhanced the reduced mechanical nociceptive threshold. The untreated diabetic animals revealed a significant decrease in sciatic NGF, which was markedly attenuated by TMT. The elevated serum levels of cytokines in diabetic animals were inhibited by the TMT treatments. Histopathological evaluation showed obvious nerve degeneration in the diabetic group that was eliminated in the TMT treated diabetic groups. Conclusion: Telmisartan has a potential neuro-protective effect on peripheral DN; this is mediated through its anti-inflammatory effects and its dual properties as an angiotensin receptor blocker, and a partial peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-g ligand. PMID:25864063

  13. Inhibition of spinal constitutive NOS-2 by 1400W attenuates tissue injury and inflammation-induced hyperalgesia and spinal p38 activation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qingbo; Svensson, Camilla I; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Webb, Michael; Yaksh, Tony L; Hua, Xiao-Ying

    2007-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its synthesizing enzymes, including NO synthase-2 (NOS-2, also called inducible NOS, iNOS), have been implicated in spinal nociception. 1400W is a highly selective NOS-2 inhibitor, as compared with either NOS-1 (neuronal NOS, nNOS) or NOS-3 (endothelial NOS). Here we examined the anti-nociceptive effects of intrathecal (IT) administration of 1400W in two experimental models of hyperalgesia (formalin and carrageenan models), in addition to the effect of 1400W on stimulation-induced activation of spinal p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38). IT treatment of rats with 1400W produced a dose-dependent inhibition of paw formalin-induced phase II flinches, and attenuated carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia. In contrast, IT injection of a selective inhibitor of NOS-1, nNOS inhibitor-I, had no effect in either model. Furthermore, 1400W at a dose that suppressed formalin-induced flinching behavior also blocked formalin-evoked p38 phosphorylation (activation) in the spinal cord, while nNOS inhibitor-I displayed no activity. The prompt effects of IT 1400W suggest involvement of constitutively expressed NOS-2 in spinal nociception. The NOS-2 protein in rat spinal cords was undetectable by Western blotting. However, when the protein was immunoprecipitated prior to Western blotting, NOS-2-immunoreactive bands were detected in the tissues, including naïve spinal cords. The presence of constitutive spinal NOS-2 was further confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, the present studies suggest that constitutively expressed spinal NOS-2 mediates tissue injury and inflammation-induced hyperalgesia, and that activation of p38 is one of the downstream factors in NO-mediated signaling in the initial processing of spinal nociception.

  14. Microglial activation of p38 contributes to scorpion envenomation-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qing-Shan; Jiang, Feng; Hua, Li-Ming; Fu, Jin; Jiao, Yun-Lu; Ji, Yong-Hua; Ding, Gang

    2013-10-25

    Intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of BmK I, a receptor site 3-specific modulator of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) from the venom of scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch (BmK), was shown to induce long-lasting and spontaneous nociceptive responses as demonstrated through experiments utilizing primary thermal and mirror-imaged mechanical hypersensitivity with different time course of development in rats. In this study, microglia was activated on both sides of L4-L5 spinal cord by i.pl. injection of BmK I. Meanwhile, the activation of p38/MAPK in L4-L5 spinal cord was found to be co-expressed with OX-42, the cell marker of microglia. The unilateral thermal and bilateral mechanical pain hypersensitivity of rat induced by BmK I was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner following pretreatment with SB203580 (a specific inhibitor of p-p38). Interestingly, microglia activity was also reduced in the presence of SB203580, which suggests that BmK I-induced microglial activation is mediated by p38/MAPK pathway. Combined with previously published literature, the results of this study demonstrate that p38-dependent microglial activation plays a role in scorpion envenomation-induced pain-related behaviors. PMID:24064352

  15. The antinociceptive effect of systemic gabapentin is related to the type of sensitization-induced hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Curros-Criado, M Mar; Herrero, Juan F

    2007-01-01

    Background Gabapentin is a structural analogue of gamma-aminobutyric acid with strong anticonvulsant and analgesic activities. Important discrepancies are observed on the effectiveness and potency of gabapentin in acute nociception and sensitization due to inflammation and neuropathy. There is also some controversy in the literature on whether gabapentin is only active in central areas of the nervous system or is also effective in the periphery. This is probably due to the use of different experimental models, routes of administration and types of sensitization. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the spinal cord sensitization on the antinociceptive activity of gabapentin in the absence and in the presence of monoarthritis and neuropathy, using the same experimental protocol of stimulation and the same technique of evaluation of antinociception. Methods We studied the antinociceptive effects of iv. gabapentin in spinal cord neuronal responses from adult male Wistar rats using the recording of single motor units technique. Gabapentin was studied in the absence and in the presence of sensitization due to arthritis and neuropathy, combining noxious mechanical and repetitive electrical stimulation (wind-up). Results The experiments showed that gabapentin was effective in arthritic (max. effect of 41 ± 15% of control and ID50 of 1,145 ± 14 micromol/kg; 200 mg/kg) and neuropathic rats (max. effect of 20 ± 8% of control and ID50 of 414 ± 27 micromol/kg; 73 mg/kg) but not in normal rats. The phenomenon of wind-up was dose-dependently reduced by gabapentin in neuropathy but not in normal and arthritic rats. Conclusion We conclude that systemic gabapentin is a potent and effective antinociceptive agent in sensitization caused by arthritis and neuropathy but not in the absence of sensitization. The potency of the antinociception was directly related to the intensity of sensitization in the present experimental conditions. The effect is mainly

  16. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Gallbladder Calculosis in Fibromyalgia Patients: Impact on Musculoskeletal Pain, Somatic Hyperalgesia and Central Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Raffaele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Massimini, Francesca; Tana, Claudio; Innocenti, Paolo; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia, a chronic syndrome of diffuse musculoskeletal pain and somatic hyperalgesia from central sensitization, is very often comorbid with visceral pain conditions. In fibromyalgia patients with gallbladder calculosis, this study assessed the short and long-term impact of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on fibromyalgia pain symptoms. Fibromyalgia pain (VAS scale) and pain thresholds in tender points and control areas (skin, subcutis and muscle) were evaluated 1week before (basis) and 1week, 1,3,6 and 12months after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in fibromyalgia patients with symptomatic calculosis (n = 31) vs calculosis patients without fibromyalgia (n. 26) and at comparable time points in fibromyalgia patients not undergoing cholecystectomy, with symptomatic (n = 27) and asymptomatic (n = 28) calculosis, and no calculosis (n = 30). At basis, fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis patients presented a significant linear correlation between the number of previously experienced biliary colics and fibromyalgia pain (direct) and muscle thresholds (inverse)(p<0.0001). After cholecystectomy, fibromyalgia pain significantly increased and all thresholds significantly decreased at 1week and 1month (1-way ANOVA, p<0.01-p<0.001), the decrease in muscle thresholds correlating linearly with the peak postoperative pain at surgery site (p<0.003-p<0.0001). Fibromyalgia pain and thresholds returned to preoperative values at 3months, then pain significantly decreased and thresholds significantly increased at 6 and 12months (p<0.05-p<0.0001). Over the same 12-month period: in non-fibromyalgia patients undergoing cholecystectomy thresholds did not change; in all other fibromyalgia groups not undergoing cholecystectomy fibromyalgia pain and thresholds remained stable, except in fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis at 12months when pain significantly increased and muscle thresholds significantly decreased (p<0.05-p<0.0001). The results of the study show that biliary colics from

  17. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Gallbladder Calculosis in Fibromyalgia Patients: Impact on Musculoskeletal Pain, Somatic Hyperalgesia and Central Sensitization.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Raffaele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Massimini, Francesca; Tana, Claudio; Innocenti, Paolo; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia, a chronic syndrome of diffuse musculoskeletal pain and somatic hyperalgesia from central sensitization, is very often comorbid with visceral pain conditions. In fibromyalgia patients with gallbladder calculosis, this study assessed the short and long-term impact of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on fibromyalgia pain symptoms. Fibromyalgia pain (VAS scale) and pain thresholds in tender points and control areas (skin, subcutis and muscle) were evaluated 1week before (basis) and 1week, 1,3,6 and 12months after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in fibromyalgia patients with symptomatic calculosis (n = 31) vs calculosis patients without fibromyalgia (n. 26) and at comparable time points in fibromyalgia patients not undergoing cholecystectomy, with symptomatic (n = 27) and asymptomatic (n = 28) calculosis, and no calculosis (n = 30). At basis, fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis patients presented a significant linear correlation between the number of previously experienced biliary colics and fibromyalgia pain (direct) and muscle thresholds (inverse)(p<0.0001). After cholecystectomy, fibromyalgia pain significantly increased and all thresholds significantly decreased at 1week and 1month (1-way ANOVA, p<0.01-p<0.001), the decrease in muscle thresholds correlating linearly with the peak postoperative pain at surgery site (p<0.003-p<0.0001). Fibromyalgia pain and thresholds returned to preoperative values at 3months, then pain significantly decreased and thresholds significantly increased at 6 and 12months (p<0.05-p<0.0001). Over the same 12-month period: in non-fibromyalgia patients undergoing cholecystectomy thresholds did not change; in all other fibromyalgia groups not undergoing cholecystectomy fibromyalgia pain and thresholds remained stable, except in fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis at 12months when pain significantly increased and muscle thresholds significantly decreased (p<0.05-p<0.0001). The results of the study show that biliary colics from

  18. Cold and L-menthol-induced sensitization in healthy volunteers--a cold hypersensitivity analogue to the heat/capsaicin model.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Hjalte H; Poulsen, Jeppe N; Uchida, Yugo; Nikbakht, Anahita; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-05-01

    Topical high-concentration L-menthol is the only established human experimental pain model to study mechanisms underlying cold hyperalgesia. We aimed at investigating the combinatorial effect of cold stimuli and topical L-menthol on cold pain and secondary mechanical hyperalgesia. Analogue to the heat-capsaicin model on skin sensitization, we proposed that cold/menthol enhances or prolong L-menthol-evoked sensitization. Topical 40% L-menthol or vehicle was applied (20 minutes) on the volar forearms of 20 healthy females and males (age, 28.7 ± 0.6 years). Cold stimulation of 5°C for 5 minutes was then applied to the treated area 3 times with 40-minute intervals. Cold detection threshold and pain, mechanical hyperalgesia (pinprick), static and dynamic mechanical allodynia (von Frey and brush), skin blood flow (laser speckle), and temperature (thermocamera) were assessed. Cold detection threshold and cold pain threshold (CPT) increased after L-menthol and remained high after the cold rekindling cycles (P < 0.001). L-menthol evoked secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick (P < 0.001) particularly in females (P < 0.05) and also induced secondary allodynia to von Frey and brush (P < 0.001). Application of cold stimuli kept these areas enlarged with a higher response in females to brush after the third cold cycle (P < 0.05). Skin blood flow increased after L-menthol (P < 0.001) and stayed stable after cold cycles. Repeated application of cold on skin treated by L-menthol facilitated and prolonged L-menthol-induced cold pain and hyperalgesia. This model may prove beneficial for testing analgesic compounds when a sufficient duration of time is needed to see drug effects on CPT or mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:25719613

  19. Cold and L-menthol-induced sensitization in healthy volunteers--a cold hypersensitivity analogue to the heat/capsaicin model.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Hjalte H; Poulsen, Jeppe N; Uchida, Yugo; Nikbakht, Anahita; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-05-01

    Topical high-concentration L-menthol is the only established human experimental pain model to study mechanisms underlying cold hyperalgesia. We aimed at investigating the combinatorial effect of cold stimuli and topical L-menthol on cold pain and secondary mechanical hyperalgesia. Analogue to the heat-capsaicin model on skin sensitization, we proposed that cold/menthol enhances or prolong L-menthol-evoked sensitization. Topical 40% L-menthol or vehicle was applied (20 minutes) on the volar forearms of 20 healthy females and males (age, 28.7 ± 0.6 years). Cold stimulation of 5°C for 5 minutes was then applied to the treated area 3 times with 40-minute intervals. Cold detection threshold and pain, mechanical hyperalgesia (pinprick), static and dynamic mechanical allodynia (von Frey and brush), skin blood flow (laser speckle), and temperature (thermocamera) were assessed. Cold detection threshold and cold pain threshold (CPT) increased after L-menthol and remained high after the cold rekindling cycles (P < 0.001). L-menthol evoked secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick (P < 0.001) particularly in females (P < 0.05) and also induced secondary allodynia to von Frey and brush (P < 0.001). Application of cold stimuli kept these areas enlarged with a higher response in females to brush after the third cold cycle (P < 0.05). Skin blood flow increased after L-menthol (P < 0.001) and stayed stable after cold cycles. Repeated application of cold on skin treated by L-menthol facilitated and prolonged L-menthol-induced cold pain and hyperalgesia. This model may prove beneficial for testing analgesic compounds when a sufficient duration of time is needed to see drug effects on CPT or mechanical hypersensitivity.

  20. Mechanisms of PDGF siRNA-mediated inhibition of bone cancer pain in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Jia; He, Mu; Liu, Ran; Belegu, Visar; Dai, Ping; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Shang, Fei-Fei; Luo, Chao-Zhi; Zhou, Xue; Liu, Su; McDonald, JohnW.; Liu, Jin; Zuo, Yun-Xia; Liu, Fei; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Patients with tumors that metastasize to bone frequently suffer from debilitating pain, and effective therapies for treating bone cancer are lacking. This study employed a novel strategy in which herpes simplex virus (HSV) carrying a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was used to alleviate bone cancer pain. HSV carrying PDGF siRNA was established and intrathecally injected into the cavum subarachnoidale of animals suffering from bone cancer pain and animals in the negative group. Sensory function was assessed by measuring thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. The mechanism by which PDGF regulates pain was also investigated by comparing the differential expression of pPDGFRα/β and phosphorylated ERK and AKT. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia developed in the rats with bone cancer pain, and these effects were accompanied by bone destruction in the tibia. Intrathecal injection of PDGF siRNA and morphine reversed thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with bone cancer pain. In addition, we observed attenuated astrocyte hypertrophy, down-regulated pPDGFRα/β levels, reduced levels of the neurochemical SP, a reduction in CGRP fibers and changes in pERK/ERK and pAKT/AKT ratios. These results demonstrate that PDGF siRNA can effectively treat pain induced by bone cancer by blocking the AKT-ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27282805

  1. Fisetin exerts antihyperalgesic effect in a mouse model of neuropathic pain: engagement of spinal serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Chuang; Cui, Wu-Geng; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Wen-Hua

    2015-03-12

    Fisetin, a natural flavonoid, has been shown in our previous studies to exert antidepressant-like effect. As antidepressant drugs are clinically used to treat chronic neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate the potential antinociceptive efficacies of fisetin against neuropathic pain and explore mechanism(s). We subjected mice to chronic constriction injury (CCI) by loosely ligating the sciatic nerves, and Hargreaves test or von Frey test was used to assess thermal hyperalgesia or mechanical allodynia, respectively. Chronic fisetin treatment (5, 15 or 45 mg/kg, p.o.) ameliorated thermal hyperalgesia (but not mechanical allodynia) in CCI mice, concomitant with escalated levels of spinal monoamines and suppressed monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A activity. The antihyperalgesic action of fisetin was abolished by chemical depletion of spinal serotonin (5-HT) but potentiated by co-treatment with 5-HTP, a precursor of 5-HT. Moreover, intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) co-treatment with 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-258719 completely abrogated fisetin's antihyperalgesia. These findings confirm that chronic fisetin treatment exerts antinociceptive effect on thermal hyperalgesia in neuropathic mice, with spinal serotonergic system (coupled with 5-HT7) being critically involved. Of special benefit, fisetin attenuated co-morbidly behavioral symptoms of depression and anxiety (evaluated in forced swim test, novelty suppressed feeding test and light-dark test) evoked by neuropathic pain.

  2. A potential anti-allodynic mechanism of GDNF following L5 spinal nerve ligation; Mitigation of NPY up-regulation in the touch sense pathway.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, T; Noguchi, K

    2015-09-24

    Intrathecal delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) reverses mechanical allodynia after 5th lumbar (L5) spinal nerve ligation (SNL). However, the molecular mechanism behind this process is not fully understood. Following sciatic nerve injury, primary afferent neurons in the injured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) begin to express neuropeptide Y (NPY) that is absent in normal DRG. The aim of the current study was to determine the relationship of this de novo expression of NPY and the anti-allodynic effect of GDNF. Following L5 SNL, 73% of neurons began to express NPY mRNA in the ipsilateral L5 DRG and robust NPY-immunoreactive fibers appeared in the ipsilateral GN where the touch-sense mediating A-fiber primary afferents from the hindpaw terminate. Seven-daylong intrathecal infusion of GDNF at the L5 DRG level, starting on day three when mechanical allodynia had fully developed, reversed once-established these changes. The GN neurons normally expressed NPY Y1 receptor, but not Y2, Y4, or Y5 receptors, and L5 SNL did not change the expression pattern. Bolus intracisternal injection of BIBP3226, a Y1 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently reversed mechanical allodynia. We demonstrated that GDNF reversed once-established mechanical allodynia as well as NPY induction in the touch-sense processing pathway. NPY could facilitate touch-sense processing by Y1 receptor in the gracile nucleus after peripheral nerve injury. GDNF may exert anti-allodynic effects through mitigation of this NPY up-regulation. The effectiveness of delayed treatment further indicates the therapeutic potential of GDNF on neuropathic pain.

  3. Antinociceptive effects of maprotiline in a rat model of peripheral neuropathic pain: possible involvement of opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Banafshe, Hamid Reza; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Mesdaghinia, Azam; Abed, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuropathic pain remains a clinical problem and is poorly relieved by conventional analgesics. This study was designed to determine whether maprotiline administration was effective in alleviating symptoms of neuropathic pain and whether the antinociceptive effect of maprotiline mediated through the opioid system. Materials and Methods: Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats, which resulted in thermal hyperalgesia, and mechanical and cold allodynia. Maprotiline (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, IP) was administered on the 7th and 14th days after surgery. To study the role of the opioid system in the antinociceptive effects of maprotiline, maprotiline (20 mg/kg, IP) was administered in combination with naloxone (1 mg/kg, SC) on the 7th post-surgery day. Behavioral tests were done at 45 min after drug injections on the 7th and 14th days after surgery. Results: Systemic administration of maprotiline blocked heat hyperalgesia, cold allodynia and reduced mechanical allodynia. Also antihyperalgesic effect of maprotiline was reversed by pretreatment with naloxone. Conclusion: Our results suggest that maprotiline can be considered a potential therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain, and the opioid system may be involved in the antihyperalgesic effects of maprotiline. PMID:26557963

  4. Early dexamethasone relieves trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Han, S R; Yeo, S P; Lee, M K; Bae, Y C; Ahn, D K

    2010-09-01

    The analgesic effects of dexamethasone on neuropathic pain have been controversial. The present study investigated the effects of dexamethasone on mechanical allodynia in rats with mal-positioned dental implants. Under anesthesia, the left mandibular second molar was extracted and replaced by a miniature dental implant to injure the inferior alveolar nerve. Nociceptive behavior was examined on each designated day after surgery. Mal-positioned dental implants significantly decreased air-puff thresholds both ipsilateral and contralateral to the injury site. Distinct mechanical hyperalgesia and cold and thermal hypersensitivity were also observed bilaterally. Daily administration of dexamethasone produced prolonged anti-allodynic effects (25 or 50 mg/kg, i.p.), but failed to reduce mechanical allodynia when it had already been established. Therefore, our findings provide that early treatment with dexamethasone is important in the treatment of nociceptive behavior suggestive of trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:20581355

  5. Curcumin attenuates diabetic neuropathic pain by downregulating TNF-α in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Yong; Liu, De-bao; Liu, Hai-ying; Hou, Wu-gang; Dong, Yu-shu

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in diabetic neuropathic pain are complex and involve peripheral and central pathophysiological phenomena. Proinflammatory tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and TNF-α receptor 1, which are markers of inflammation, contribute to neuropathic pain. The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of curcumin on diabetic pain in rats. We tested 24 rats with diabetes induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin and 24 healthy control rats. Twelve rats in each group received 60 mg/kg oral curcumin daily for 28 days, and the other 12 received vehicle. On days 7, 14, 21, and 28, we tested mechanical allodynia with von Frey hairs and thermal hyperalgesia with radiant heat. Markers of inflammation in the spinal cord dorsal horn on day 28 were estimated with a commercial assay and Western blot analysis. Compared to control rats, diabetic rats exhibited increased mean plasma glucose concentration, decreased mean body weight, and significant pain hypersensitivity, as evidenced by decreased paw withdrawal threshold to von Frey hairs and decreased paw withdrawal latency to heat. Curcumin significantly attenuated the diabetes-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia and reduced the expression of both TNF-α and TNF-α receptor 1. Curcumin seems to relieve diabetic hyperalgesia, possibly through an inhibitory action on TNF-α and TNF-α receptor 1. PMID:23471081

  6. A novel human surrogate model of noninjurious sharp mechanical pain.

    PubMed

    Shabes, Polina; Schloss, Natalie; Magerl, Walter; Schmahl, Christian; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Baumgärtner, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    We propose a blade as a noninjurious nociceptive stimulus modeling sharp mechanical pain and yielding acute pain and hyperalgesia responses with closer proximity to incision-induced pain/hyperalgesia than punctate or blunt pressure mechanical pain models. Twenty-six healthy men and women were investigated to compare a small incision in the left forearm with noninvasive stimuli of different shapes and modalities to the right forearm. The magnitude and time course of incisional and blade-induced pain were assessed by numerical rating scales. Affective vs sensory components of pain experience were differentiated using a pain sensation questionnaire. The magnitude and time course of the axon reflex vasodilator response and of secondary hyperalgesia following a 7-second blade application were assessed. The maximum blade or incisional pain was similar (visual analogue scale [mean ± SD]: 32.9 ± 22.5 [blade] vs. 33.6 ± 29.8 [incision]), and both time courses matched closely in the first 10 seconds (paired t test; P = 0.5-1.0), whereas incision but not blade was followed by a second phase of pain, probably related to the tissue injury (decrease to half maximum pain 8 ± 2 vs. 33 ± 35 seconds; P < 0.01). Affective pain scores were significantly lower than sensory scores for all stimuli (P < 0.001). Comparing blade and incision, patterns of affective and sensory pain descriptors exhibited a remarkably similar pattern. Hence, we suggest the blade as novel model of sharp mechanical pain, which will be useful in investigating postoperative/mechanical pain and the role of self-injurious behavior in, eg, patients with borderline personality disorder.

  7. Involvement of the Heme-Oxygenase Pathway in the Antiallodynic and Antihyperalgesic Activity of Harpagophytum procumbens in Rats.

    PubMed

    Parenti, Carmela; Aricò, Giuseppina; Chiechio, Santina; Di Benedetto, Giulia; Parenti, Rosalba; Scoto, Giovanna M

    2015-01-01

    Harpagophytum procumbens (H. procumbens), also known as Devil's Claw, has been used to treat a wide range of pathological conditions, including pain, arthritis and inflammation. Inflammatory mediators, released at the site of injury, can sensitize nociceptive terminals and are responsible for allodynia and hyperalgesia. Carbon monoxide (CO), produced in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), may play a role in nociceptive processing and has also been recognized to act as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the nervous system. This study was designed to investigate whether the HO/CO pathway is involved in the analgesic response of H. procumbens in carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia in rats. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated by using von Frey filaments and the plantar test, respectively. The results of our experiments showed that pretreatment with the HO inhibitor ZnPP IX significantly decreased the antihyperalgesic effect produced by H. procumbens (800 mg/kg, i.p.) in carrageenan-injected rats. Consistently, the pretreatment with hemin, a HO-1 substrate, or CORM-3, a CO releasing molecule, before a low dose of H. procumbens (300 mg/kg, i.p.) induced a clear antiallodynic response in carrageenan injected rats. These results suggest the involvement of HO-1/CO system in the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effect of H. procumbens in carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. PMID:26389871

  8. Snake venom components enhance pain upon subcutaneous injection: an initial examination of spinal cord mediators.

    PubMed

    Chacur, Marucia; Gutiérrez, José Maria; Milligan, Erin D; Wieseler-Frank, Julie; Britto, Luiz R G; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R; Cury, Yara

    2004-09-01

    Snakebites are a relevant public health problem in Central and South America. Snake bite envenomations cause intense pain, not relieved by anti-venom. The fangs of many species are short, causing subcutaneous injection. Fangs of larger species inflict subcutaneous or intramuscular envenomation. To understand pain induced by subcutaneous venom, this study examined spinal mechanisms involved in pain-enhancing effects of subcutaneous Lys49 and Asp49 secretory phospholipase-A(2) (sPLA2), two components of Bothrops asper snake venom showing highly different enzymatic activities. Unilateral intraplantar sPLA2-Lys49 (catalytically inactive) or sPLA2-Asp49 (catalytically active) into rat hindpaws each induced mechanical hyperalgesia (Randall-Selitto test), whereas only catalytically active sPLA2-Asp49 caused mechanical allodynia (von Frey test). Effects induced by both sPLA2s were inhibited by intrathecal fluorocitrate, a reversible glial metabolic inhibitor. In support, immunohistochemical analysis revealed activation of dorsal horn astrocytes and microglia after intraplantar injection of either sPLA2. Spinal proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, and prostanoids each appear to be involved in the pain-enhancing effects of these sPLA2s. Blockade of interleukin-1 (IL1) inhibited hyperalgesia induced by both sPLA2s, while leaving allodynia unaffected. Blockade of tumor necrosis factor reduced responses to sPLA2-Asp49. An inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), inhibited hyperalgesia induced by both sPLA2s, without interfering with allodynia induced by sPLA2-Asp49. On the other hand, L-N(6)-(1-iminoethyl)lysine (L-NI), an inhibitor of the inducible nitric oxide synthase, did not alter any sPLA2-induced effect. Lastly, celecoxib, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, attenuated sPLA2 actions. These data provide the first evidence of spinal mediators involved in pain facilitation induced by subcutaneous venoms.

  9. Activation of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in rat dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord contributes toward induction and maintenance of bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gui-Qin; Liu, Su; He, Duan-Duan; Liu, Yue-Peng; Song, Xue-Jun

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) signaling in the development of bone cancer pain in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (N=48) were divided randomly into four groups: sham (n=8), tumor cell implantation (TCI) (n=16), TCI+saline (n=8), and TCI+PKA inhibitor (n=16). Bone cancer-induced pain behaviors - thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia - were tested at postoperative days -3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14. A PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMPS (1 mmol/l/20 μl), was injected intrathecally on postoperative days 3, 4, and 5 (early phase) or 7, 8, and 9 postoperative days (late phase). The expression of PKA mRNA in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was detected by reverse transcription-PCR. The concentration of cAMP and activity of PKA in DRG and spinal cord were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TCI treatment induced significant pain behaviors, manifested as thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Spinal administration of the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMPS during the early phase and late phase significantly delayed or reversed, respectively, TCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. TCI treatment also led to obvious tumor growth and bone destruction. The level of PKA mRNA in the DRG, as well as the concentration of cAMP and the activity of PKA, in both the DRG and spinal cord were significantly increased after TCI treatment (P<0.01). We conclude that the inhibition of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway may reduce bone cancer pain. PMID:24978483

  10. Effects of serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists on stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea in rats: a comparative study with opioid receptor agonists, a muscarinic receptor antagonist and a synthetic polymer.

    PubMed

    Hirata, T; Keto, Y; Nakata, M; Takeuchi, A; Funatsu, T; Akuzawa, S; Sasamata, M; Miyata, K

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of serotonin (5-HT)3 receptor antagonists (5-HT3RAs) including ramosetron, alosetron, and cilansetron on colonic nociceptive threshold in rats. Furthermore, we established a restraint stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia model in rats, and compared the inhibitory effects of 5-HT3RAs on restraint stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea with those of loperamide, trimebutine, tiquizium and polycarbophil. The colonic nociceptive threshold was measured as the balloon pressure at the time the rat showed a nociceptive response during colonic distension by an intrarectally inserted balloon. Oral administration of ramosetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)), alosetron (30-300 microg kg(-1)), or cilansetron (30-300 microg kg(-1)) increased the colonic nociceptive threshold in a dose-dependent manner in non-stressed rats. Restraint stress for 1 h significantly decreased the colonic nociceptive threshold, but ramosetron (0.3-3 microg kg(-1)), alosetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)), cilansetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)) and trimebutine (100-1000 mg kg(-1)) significantly inhibited the decrease in the threshold. Loperamide (3-30 mg kg(-1)), tiquizium (100-1000 mg kg(-1)) and polycarbophil (1000 mg kg(-1)) did not affect the restraint stress-induced decrease in the colonic nociceptive threshold. All drugs tested in this study showed dose-dependent inhibition of restraint stress-induced diarrhoea in rats. These results indicate that, unlike existing antidiarrhoeal and spasmolytic agents, 5-HT3RAs have inhibitory effects on colonic nociception, and prevented restraint stress-induced both diarrhoea and hyperalgesia at almost the same doses in rats. This suggests that the 5-HT3RAs may be useful in ameliorating both colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:18221252

  11. Involvement of subtype 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors in apoptosis and caspase-7 over-expression in spinal cord of neuropathic rats

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalco, Dario; Giordano, Catia; Fuccio, Carlo; Luongo, Livio; Ferraraccio, Franca; Rossi, Francesca; de Novellis, Vito; Roth, Kevin A.; Maione, Sabatino

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the non-selective, 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA), and selective (3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrano[2,3-b]quinolin-7-yl)-(cis-4- methoxycyclohexyl) methanone (JNJ16259685), metabotropic glutamate subtype 1 (mGlu1) receptor antagonists, on rat sciatic nerve chronic constrictive injury (CCI)- induced hyperalgesia, allodynia, spinal dorsal horn apoptosis, and gliosis was examined at 3 and 7 days post-injury. RT-PCR analysis showed increased expression of bax, apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 (apaf-1), nestin, GFAP, and caspase-7 mRNA in the dorsal horn spinal cord by 3 days post-CCI. At 7 days post-CCI, only over-expression of bcl-2, nestin and GFAP mRNA was observed. Administration of AIDA reduced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia at 3 and 7 days post-CCI; administration of JNJ16259685 reduced thermal hyperalgesia at 3 and 7 days post-CCI, but not mechanical allodynia. AIDA decreased the mRNA levels of bax, apaf-1, GFAP and caspase-7 genes. JNJ16259685 increased the mRNA levels of bcl- 2 and GFAP gene, and decreased APAF-1 and caspases-7 genes. Inhibiting mGlu1 receptors also reduced TUNEL-positive profiles and immunohistochemical reactivity for caspase-7. We report here that despite inhibiting CCI-induced over-expression of pro-apoptotic genes in the spinal cord dorsal horn, the selective mGlu1 receptor antagonist JNJ16259685 exerted only a slight and transient allodynic effect. Moreover, JNJ16259685, but not the non-selective AIDA, increased astrogliosis which may account for its decreased analgesic efficacy. This study provides evidence that the contemporary and partial blockade of group I and likely ionotropic glutamate receptors may be a more suitable therapy than selective blockade of mGlu1 subtype receptors condition to decrease neuropathic pain symptoms. PMID:18325779

  12. Nitric oxide is involved in ibuprofen preemptive analgesic effect in the plantar incisional model of postsurgical pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sherin S T; Hamza, May; Bahr, Mohamed H; Masoud, Somaia I

    2016-02-12

    Control of postoperative pain is far from satisfactory. Yet, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain an important choice. The production of nitric oxide (NO), which plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia, is inhibited by NSAIDs. Monoamines also play a key role in the modulation of nociception. The aim of the present work is to study the involvement of NO and monoamines in the antinociceptive mechanism of ibuprofen in postsurgical pain in mice. Surgical incision resulted in mechanical allodynia and increased spinal NO levels. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NAME (50mg/kg), administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), 30min before the incision decreased the development of postsurgical mechanical allodynia and reduced spinal NO levels. Ibuprofen (100 and 300mg/kg, i.p.), administered 30min before the incision, dose-dependently decreased both spinal NO levels and the development of mechanical allodynia. Administration of ibuprofen (100mg/kg i.p.), 20min following surgery, did not significantly reduce spinal NO level and resulted in a smaller antiallodynic effect. l-Arginine (600mg/kg i.p.), administered 20min before ibuprofen administration, restored both spinal NO level and mechanical allodynia in ibuprofen-treated mice. The selective alpha-2 adrenoceptor blocker yohimbine (4mg/kg i.p.), administered 30min before ibuprofen, also blocked ibuprofen effect on both mechanical allodynia and spinal NO level. These results suggest that inhibition of NO synthesis is involved in the analgesic activity of ibuprofen in post-surgical pain. Alpha-2 adrenoceptors are also involved in the analgesic activity of ibuprofen and NO may be involved in this mechanism.

  13. Acute and chronic nociceptive phases observed in a rat hind paw ischemia/reperfusion model depend on different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Klafke, J Z; da Silva, M A; Rossato, M F; de Prá, S Dal Toé; Rigo, F K; Walker, C I B; Bochi, G V; Moresco, R N; Ferreira, J; Trevisan, G

    2016-02-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) may be evoked by ischemia/reperfusion, eliciting acute and chronic pain that is difficult to treat. Despite this, the underlying mechanism of CRPS1 has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the goal of this study is to evaluate the involvement of inflammation, oxidative stress, and the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel, a chemosensor of inflammation and oxidative substances, in an animal model of chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP). Male Wistar rats were subjected to 3 h hind paw ischemia/reperfusion (CPIP model). Different parameters of nociception, inflammation, ischemia, and oxidative stress were evaluated at 1 (acute) and 14 (chronic) days after CPIP. The effect of a TRPA1 antagonist and the TRPA1 immunoreactivity were also observed after CPIP. In the CPIP acute phase, we observed mechanical and cold allodynia; increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (hind paw), ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) (serum), protein carbonyl (hind paw and spinal cord), lactate (serum), and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, hind paw and spinal cord); and higher myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) activities (hind paw). In the CPIP chronic phase, we detected mechanical and cold allodynia and increased levels of IMA (serum), protein carbonyl (hind paw and spinal cord), and 4-HNE (hind paw and spinal cord). TRPA1 antagonism reduced mechanical and cold allodynia 1 and 14 days after CPIP, but no change in TRPA1 immunoreactivity was observed. Different mechanisms underlie acute (inflammation and oxidative stress) and chronic (oxidative stress) phases of CPIP. TRPA1 activation may be relevant for CRPS1/CPIP-induced acute and chronic pain.

  14. Acute and chronic nociceptive phases observed in a rat hind paw ischemia/reperfusion model depend on different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Klafke, J Z; da Silva, M A; Rossato, M F; de Prá, S Dal Toé; Rigo, F K; Walker, C I B; Bochi, G V; Moresco, R N; Ferreira, J; Trevisan, G

    2016-02-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) may be evoked by ischemia/reperfusion, eliciting acute and chronic pain that is difficult to treat. Despite this, the underlying mechanism of CRPS1 has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the goal of this study is to evaluate the involvement of inflammation, oxidative stress, and the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel, a chemosensor of inflammation and oxidative substances, in an animal model of chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP). Male Wistar rats were subjected to 3 h hind paw ischemia/reperfusion (CPIP model). Different parameters of nociception, inflammation, ischemia, and oxidative stress were evaluated at 1 (acute) and 14 (chronic) days after CPIP. The effect of a TRPA1 antagonist and the TRPA1 immunoreactivity were also observed after CPIP. In the CPIP acute phase, we observed mechanical and cold allodynia; increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (hind paw), ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) (serum), protein carbonyl (hind paw and spinal cord), lactate (serum), and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, hind paw and spinal cord); and higher myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) activities (hind paw). In the CPIP chronic phase, we detected mechanical and cold allodynia and increased levels of IMA (serum), protein carbonyl (hind paw and spinal cord), and 4-HNE (hind paw and spinal cord). TRPA1 antagonism reduced mechanical and cold allodynia 1 and 14 days after CPIP, but no change in TRPA1 immunoreactivity was observed. Different mechanisms underlie acute (inflammation and oxidative stress) and chronic (oxidative stress) phases of CPIP. TRPA1 activation may be relevant for CRPS1/CPIP-induced acute and chronic pain. PMID:26490459

  15. Standardized Aqueous Tribulus terristris (nerunjil) extract attenuates hyperalgesia in experimentally induced diabetic neuropathic pain model: role of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Ranjithkumar, Ravichandran; Prathab Balaji, S; Balaji, Bhaskar; Ramesh, R V; Ramanathan, Muthiah

    2013-11-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate standardized aqueous Tribulus terristris (nerunjil) extract on the pain threshold response in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic neuropathic pain model in rats. After a single injection of STZ (40 mg/kg; i.p.), Wistar male rats were tested by the thermal and chemical-induced pain models. Diabetic rats exhibited significant hyperalgesia, and these rats were left untreated for the first four weeks. Thereafter, treatment was initiated and continued up to week-8. All the rats except the vehicle-treated group received insulin 5 IU/kg/day to maintain plasma glucose levels. Treatment with nerunjil (100 and 300 mg/kg; p.o.) for 4 weeks significantly attenuated the nociception in behavioural models. Nerunjil also inhibited the tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1 beta levels. The effect of nerunjil (300 mg/kg) is comparable to the standard drug Pregabalin (100 mg/kg). Nerunjil increased the superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, and decreased the lipid peroxide levels in dose-dependent manner. Insulin alone-treated rats failed to attenuate hyperalgesic response. In comparison to insulin alone-treated rats, nerunjil exhibited significant increase in the pain threshold response. It could be concluded that in controlled diabetic states, nerunjil attenuated the neuropathic pain through modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine release.

  16. Opioid-induced redistribution of 6TM and 7TM μ opioid receptors: A hypothesized mechanistic facilitator model of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Xiaoju; Liu, Yusheng; Xu, Shiqin; Lei, Liming; Shen, Xiaofeng; Guo, Xirong; Xia, Xiaoqiong; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-08-01

    Opioids are still the most popular form of pain treatment, but many unavoidable side effects make opioids a big challenge in effective pain management. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), a paradoxical phenomenon, portrays an increased sensitivity to harmful stimuli caused by opioid exposure. Changes in the neural modulation are considered a major contributor to the development of OIH. Activation of opioid receptors (ORs) and corresponding downstream molecules are the vital composition of functional performance of opioids. Increasing interests were proposed of the interaction between ORs and other neural transmitter systems such as glutamatergic, GABAergic and adrenergic ones to the genesis of OIH. G protein coupled μ-opioid receptor (MOR) was studied comprehensively on its role in the development of OIH. In addition to the relationship between MOR and other neurotransmitter receptors, a new intracellular MOR that has six transmembrane (6TM) domains was identified, and found to perform a pro-nociceptive task in contrast to the counterpart 7TM isoform. A mechanistic model of OIH in which both 6TM and 7TM MORs undergoing membrane redistribution upon opioid exposure is proposed which eventually facilitates the neurons more sensitive to nociceptive stimulation than that of the preceding opioid exposure.

  17. HCN1 Channels as Targets for Anesthetic and Nonanesthetic Propofol Analogs in the Amelioration of Mechanical and Thermal Hyperalgesia in a Mouse Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tibbs, Gareth R.; Rowley, Thomas J.; Sanford, R. Lea; Herold, Karl F.; Proekt, Alex; Hemmings, Hugh C.; Andersen, Olaf S.; Flood, Pamela D.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain after peripheral nerve injury is associated with afferent hyperexcitability and upregulation of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-regulated (HCN)–mediated IH pacemaker currents in sensory neurons. HCN channels thus constitute an attractive target for treating chronic pain. HCN channels are ubiquitously expressed; analgesics targeting HCN1-rich cells in the peripheral nervous system must spare the cardiac pacemaker current (carried mostly by HCN2 and HCN4) and the central nervous system (where all four isoforms are expressed). The alkylphenol general anesthetic propofol (2,6-di-iso-propylphenol) selectively inhibits HCN1 channels versus HCN2–HCN4 and exhibits a modest pharmacokinetic preference for the periphery. Consequently, we hypothesized that propofol, and congeners, should be antihyperalgesic. Alkyl-substituted propofol analogs have different rank-order potencies with respect to HCN1 inhibition, GABAA receptor (GABAA-R) potentiation, and general anesthesia. Thus, 2,6- and 2,4-di-tertbutylphenol (2,6- and 2,4-DTBP, respectively) are more potent HCN1 antagonists than propofol, whereas 2,6- and 2,4-di-sec-butylphenol (2,6- and 2,4-DSBP, respectively) are less potent. In contrast, DSBPs, but not DTBPs, enhance GABAA-R function and are general anesthetics. 2,6-DTBP retained propofol’s selectivity for HCN1 over HCN2–HCN4. In a peripheral nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, 2,6-DTBP and subhypnotic propofol are antihyperalgesic. The findings are consistent with these alkylphenols exerting analgesia via non-GABAA-R targets and suggest that antagonism of central HCN1 channels may be of limited importance to general anesthesia. Alkylphenols are hydrophobic, and thus potential modifiers of lipid bilayers, but their effects on HCN channels are due to direct drug-channel interactions because they have little bilayer-modifying effect at therapeutic concentrations. The alkylphenol antihyperalgesic target may be HCN1 channels in the damaged peripheral nervous system. PMID:23549867

  18. Quantitative gait analysis as a method to assess mechanical hyperalgesia modulated by disease-modifying antirheumatoid drugs in the adjuvant-induced arthritic rat

    PubMed Central

    Simjee, Shabana Usman; Jawed, Huma; Quadri, Javeria; Saeed, Sheikh Arshad

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, azothioprine, chloroquine, D-penicillamine, methotrexate and sodium aurothiomalate (gold salt) were evaluated for possible disease-modifying effects in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model of human rheumatoid arthritis in rats. Gait analysis was used to examine the role of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in the development of pain. Body weights were also measured to monitor the progression of disease and the systemic antiarthritic effects of the test compounds used in this study, as well as their systemic toxicity. Our results showed that azothioprine (5 mg/kg/day), chloroquine (12.5 mg/kg/day), sodium aurothiomalate (2.5 mg/kg/day) and methotrexate (1 mg/kg/week) not only inhibited the macroscopic changes such as erythema and swelling of limbs, but also exhibited significant reversal of gait deficits seen in the untreated or saline-treated arthritic rats. No reduction in the body weights were observed in the arthritic rats treated with azothioprine, chloroquine, sodium aurothiomalate and methotrexate. D-Penicillamine (12.5 mg/kg/day), however, showed a significant reduction (P < 0.03) in the body weights of the arthritic rats over a period of 22 days; furthermore, it was unable to show any reduction in arthritic score (P < 0.1). In earlier experiments, chloroquine and methotrexate failed to suppress carageenan-induced edema, suggesting that the mode of antiarthritic action may be different from those of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Since these disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are reported to have an immunomodulatory role, especially the gold salt, which influences the monocyte–macrophage system, it is suggested that the observed antiarthritic effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs may be partly attributed to their immunomodulatory activity. PMID:17848187

  19. Peripheral neurobiologic mechanisms of antiallodynic effect of warm water immersion therapy on persistent inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Martins, Daniel F; Brito, Rômulo N; Stramosk, Juliana; Batisti, Ana P; Madeira, Fernanda; Turnes, Bruna L; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Santos, Adair R S; Piovezan, Anna P

    2015-01-01

    Water immersion is widely used in physiotherapy and might relieve pain, probably by activating several distinct somatosensory modalities, including tactile, pressure, and thermal sensations. However, the endogenous mechanisms behind this effect remain poorly understood. This study examined whether warm water immersion therapy (WWIT) produces an antiallodynic effect in a model of localized inflammation and whether peripheral opioid, cannabinoid, and adenosine receptors are involved in this effect. Mice were injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA; intraplantar; i.pl.). The withdrawal frequency to mechanical stimuli (von Frey test) was used to determine 1) the effect of WWIT against CFA-induced allodynia and 2) the effect of i.pl. preadministration of naloxone (a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist; 5 µg/paw), caffeine (a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist; 150 nmol/paw), 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX; a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist; 10 nmol/paw), and AM630 (a selective cannabinoid receptor type 2 antagonist; 4 µg/paw) on the antiallodynic effect of WWIT against CFA-induced allodynia. Moreover, the influence of WWIT on paw inflammatory edema was measured with a digital micrometer. WWIT produced a significant time-dependent reduction of paw inflammatory allodynia but did not influence paw edema induced by CFA. Naloxone, caffeine, DPCPX, and AM630 injected in the right, but not in the left, hind paw significantly reversed the antiallodynic effect of WWIT. This is the first study to demonstrate the involvement of peripheral receptors in the antiallodynic effect of WWIT in a murine model of persistent inflammatory pain.

  20. Effects of chronic doxepin and amitriptyline administration in naïve mice and in neuropathic pain mice model.

    PubMed

    Mika, J; Jurga, A M; Starnowska, J; Wasylewski, M; Rojewska, E; Makuch, W; Kwiatkowski, K; Malek, N; Przewlocka, B

    2015-05-21

    Neuropathic pain is a severe clinical problem, often appearing as a co-symptom of many diseases or manifesting as a result of damage to the nervous system. Many drugs and agents are currently used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). The aims of this paper were to test the effects of two classic TCAs, doxepin and amitriptyline, in naïve animals and in a model of neuropathic pain and to determine the role of cytokine activation in the effects of these drugs. All experiments were carried out with Albino-Swiss mice using behavioral tests (von Frey test and the cold plate test) and biochemical analyses (qRT-PCR and Western blot). In the mice subjected to chronic constriction injury (CCI), doxepin and amitriptyline attenuated the symptoms of neuropathic pain and diminished the CCI-induced increase in the levels of spinal interleukin (IL)-6 and -1β mRNA, but not the protein levels of these cytokines, measured on day 12. Unexpectedly, chronic administration of doxepin or amitriptyline for 12 days produced allodynia and hyperalgesia in naïve mice. The treatment with these drugs did not influence the spinal levels of IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA, however, the protein levels of these pronociceptive factors were increased. The administration of ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist) significantly weakened the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by both antidepressants in naïve mice; in contrast, yohimbine (α2-adrenergic receptors antagonist) did not influence these effects. Allodynia and hyperalgesia induced in naïve animals by amitriptyline and doxepin may be associated with an increase in the levels of pronociceptive cytokines resulting from 5-HT3-induced hypersensitivity. Our results provide new and important information about the possible side effects of antidepressants. Further investigation of these mechanisms may help to guide decisions about the use of classic TCAs for therapy. PMID:25769941

  1. Palvanil, a non-pungent capsaicin analogue, inhibits inflammatory and neuropathic pain with little effects on bronchopulmonary function and body temperature.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Livio; Costa, Barbara; D'Agostino, Bruno; Guida, Francesca; Comelli, Francesca; Gatta, Luisa; Matteis, Maria; Sullo, Nikol; De Petrocellis, Luciano; de Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2012-09-01

    N-Palmitoyl-vanillamide (palvanil) is a non-pungent capsaicinoid, found in low amounts in Capsicum and shown to rapidly desensitize transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels to the action of capsaicin and to exert analgesic effects after local administration. We have investigated here if systemic administration of palvanil to mice causes two typical adverse events of TRPV1 agonists, i.e. profound changes in body temperature and bronchoconstriction, and if it can still produce effective inhibition of inflammatory and chronic pain in different experimental models. Varying doses of palvanil were tested subcutaneously and acutely on body temperature in vivo or, or as a bolus, on bronchopulmunary function ex vivo, in comparison with capsaicin. Intraperitoneal palvanil was also tested against formalin-induced nocifensive behavior and carrageenan-induced oedema and thermal hyperalgesia, acutely, and against mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in mice with spared nerve injury (SNI) of the sciatic nerve, after repeated administration over 7 days from SNI. Palvanil, at therapeutically relevant doses, produced significantly less hypothermia and bronchoconstriction than capsaicin. Palvanil (0.5-2.5 mg/kg) abolished formalin-induced nocifensive behavior and strongly attenuated SNI-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and carrageenan-induced oedema and thermal hyperalgesia. Systemic administration of the non-pungent capsaicinoid, palvanil, produces, at least in mice, much less of those side effects typical of TRPV1 agonists (hypothermia and bronchoconstriction), whilst being very effective at reducing pain and oedema. Thus, palvanil might be developed further as a novel pharmacological treatment for chronic abnormal pain.

  2. Abdominal pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a review of putative psychological, neural and neuro-immune mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2011-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common symptom of great clinical significance in several areas of medicine. In many cases no organic cause can be established resulting in the classification as functional gastrointestinal disorder. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is the most common of these conditions and is considered an important public health problem because it can be disabling and constitutes a major social and economic burden given the lack of effective treatments. IBS aetiology is most likely multi-factorial involving biological, psychological and social factors. Visceral hyperalgesia (or hypersensitivity) and visceral hypervigilance, which could be mediated by peripheral, spinal, and/or central pathways, constitute key concepts in current research on pathophysiological mechanisms of visceral hyperalgesia. The role of central nervous system mechanisms along the "brain-gut axis" is increasingly appreciated, owing to accumulating evidence from brain imaging studies that neural processing of visceral stimuli is altered in IBS together with long-standing knowledge regarding the contribution of stress and negative emotions to symptom frequency and severity. At the same time, there is also growing evidence suggesting that peripheral immune mechanisms and disturbed neuro-immune communication could play a role in the pathophysiology of visceral hyperalgesia. This review presents recent advances in research on the pathophysiology of visceral hyperalgesia in IBS, with a focus on the role of stress and anxiety in central and peripheral response to visceral pain stimuli. Together, these findings support that in addition to lower pain thresholds displayed by a significant proportion of patients, the evaluation of pain appears to be altered in IBS. This may be attributable to affective disturbances, negative emotions in anticipation of or during visceral stimulation, and altered pain-related expectations and learning processes. Disturbed "top-down" emotional and cognitive pain

  3. Test-retest reliability of a new technique with pressure algometry applied to teeth in healthy Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ran; Gu, Xinyu; Zhang, Jinglu; Yu, Linfeng; Chen, Wenjing; Wang, Kelun; Svensson, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) have been shown to be useful measures of mechanical pain sensitivity in deep tissues. However, clinical methods for measuring mechanical allodynia or hyperalgesia in teeth have not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of PPTs in periodontal ligament of healthy Chinese participants. Twenty healthy young adults participated. Pressure pain thresholds were measured at six teeth and in two directions. The tests included three consecutive trials, in two separate sessions, which were performed on the first day by one examiner. After 1-3 wk, an identical protocol was carried out by two examiners, also in two separate sessions. There were no significant differences between repeated measures for all teeth. The PPTs had excellent reliability with high intraclass coefficients (ICCs) across different sessions (ICC: 0.871-0.956), days (ICC: 0.879-0.951), and examiners (ICC: 0.845-0.950). Pressure pain thresholds applied to the teeth have excellent intra- and inter-examiner agreement in healthy participants. This method may be proposed as an easy and reliable technique to assess mechanical pain sensitivity (e.g. mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia) in the periodontal ligament, which is associated with endodontic or periodontal conditions. PMID:27017942

  4. Oral opioid use alters DNIC but not cold pain perception in patients with chronic pain - new perspective of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ram, Kerstin Carlin; Eisenberg, Elon; Haddad, May; Pud, Dorit

    2008-10-15

    Opioids can elicit unexpected changes in pain sensitivity, known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The aim of this study was to explore whether OIH exists in patients with chronic pain treated with oral opioids (OP) versus non-opioid (NOP) analgesics. The sensitivity to cold pain and the magnitude of diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC) were evaluated in 73 OP and 37 NOP treated patients. Pain threshold, intensity and tolerance in response to the cold pressor (1 degrees C) were measured. DNIC was tested by co-administrating conditioned heat stimulation (47 degrees C) to the left forearm and a conditioning stimulation of 12 degrees C for 30s to the right hand. The results showed no differences between the two groups in any of the cold pain measures. In contrast, the magnitude of DNIC was significantly larger in the NOP than in the OP treated patients (p=0.003). A gender based analysis showed a significant difference in DNIC between OP and NOP treated men only. However, a mixed model ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of treatment (OP versus NOP) (F=5.928, p=0.017) rather than gender on DNIC. A regression analysis showed that opioid dosage and treatment duration had a significant negative effect on the magnitude of DNIC in OP treated men (beta=-2.175, p=0.036 and beta=-2.061, p=0.047, respectively). In conclusion, oral opioids usage for the treatment of chronic pain does not result in abnormal sensitivity to cold pain, but seems to alter pain modulation. The use of 'advanced' psychophysics tests such as evaluation of DNIC can help understanding the phenomenon of OIH. PMID:18583047

  5. Analgesic effects evoked by a CCR2 antagonist or an anti-CCL2 antibody in inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Llorián-Salvador, María; Pevida, Marta; González-Rodríguez, Sara; Lastra, Ana; Fernández-García, María-Teresa; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana; Menéndez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine CCL2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), is a molecule that in addition to its well-established role in chemotaxis can also act as nociceptor sensitizer. The upregulation of this chemokine in inflamed tissues could suggest its involvement in inflammatory hypernociception. Thus, we have measured CCL2 levels in mice with acute or chronic inflammation due to the intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), respectively, and we have studied whether inflammatory hyperalgesia or allodynia could be attenuated by blocking CCR2 receptors or neutralizing CCL2 with an anti-CCL2 antibody. A remarkable increase in CCL2 concentration was detected by ELISA in paw homogenates coming from carrageenan- or CFA-inflamed mice, being its expression mainly localized in macrophages, as shown by immunohistochemical assays. The s.c. (0.3-3 mg/kg) or i.pl. (0.3-3 μg) administration of the CCR2 antagonist, RS 504393, dose dependently inhibited thermal hyperalgesia measured in acutely or chronically inflamed mice, whereas s.c. administration of this drug did not reduce inflammatory mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, the inhibition of inflammatory hyperalgesia after the administration of an anti-CCL2 antibody (0.1-1 μg; i.pl.) suggests that CCL2 could be the endogenous chemokine responsible for CCR2-mediated hyperalgesic effects. Besides, the acute administration of the highest antihyperalgesic dose of RS 504393 assayed did not reduce paw tumefaction or modify the presence of inflammatory cells. These results indicate that the blockade of the CCL2/CCR2 system can counteract inflammatory hyperalgesia, being this antinociceptive effect unrelated to a decrease in the inflammatory reaction. PMID:26820818

  6. Analgesic effects evoked by a CCR2 antagonist or an anti-CCL2 antibody in inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Llorián-Salvador, María; Pevida, Marta; González-Rodríguez, Sara; Lastra, Ana; Fernández-García, María-Teresa; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana; Menéndez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine CCL2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), is a molecule that in addition to its well-established role in chemotaxis can also act as nociceptor sensitizer. The upregulation of this chemokine in inflamed tissues could suggest its involvement in inflammatory hypernociception. Thus, we have measured CCL2 levels in mice with acute or chronic inflammation due to the intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), respectively, and we have studied whether inflammatory hyperalgesia or allodynia could be attenuated by blocking CCR2 receptors or neutralizing CCL2 with an anti-CCL2 antibody. A remarkable increase in CCL2 concentration was detected by ELISA in paw homogenates coming from carrageenan- or CFA-inflamed mice, being its expression mainly localized in macrophages, as shown by immunohistochemical assays. The s.c. (0.3-3 mg/kg) or i.pl. (0.3-3 μg) administration of the CCR2 antagonist, RS 504393, dose dependently inhibited thermal hyperalgesia measured in acutely or chronically inflamed mice, whereas s.c. administration of this drug did not reduce inflammatory mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, the inhibition of inflammatory hyperalgesia after the administration of an anti-CCL2 antibody (0.1-1 μg; i.pl.) suggests that CCL2 could be the endogenous chemokine responsible for CCR2-mediated hyperalgesic effects. Besides, the acute administration of the highest antihyperalgesic dose of RS 504393 assayed did not reduce paw tumefaction or modify the presence of inflammatory cells. These results indicate that the blockade of the CCL2/CCR2 system can counteract inflammatory hyperalgesia, being this antinociceptive effect unrelated to a decrease in the inflammatory reaction.

  7. Analgesic tolerance without demonstrable opioid-induced hyperalgesia: a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of sustained-release morphine for treatment of chronic nonradicular low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Chu, Larry F; D'Arcy, Nicole; Brady, Caitlin; Zamora, Abigail Kathleen; Young, Chelsea Anne; Kim, Julie Eunwoo; Clemenson, Anna Marie; Angst, Martin S; Clark, J David

    2012-08-01

    Although often successful in acute settings, long-term use of opioid pain medications may be accompanied by waning levels of analgesic response not readily attributable to advancing underlying disease, necessitating dose escalation to attain pain relief. Analgesic tolerance, and more recently opioid-induced hyperalgesia, have been invoked to explain such declines in opioid effectiveness over time. Because both phenomena result in inadequate analgesia, they are difficult to distinguish in a clinical setting. Patients with otherwise uncomplicated low-back pain were titrated to comfort or dose-limiting side effects in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial using sustained-release morphine or weight-matched placebo capsules for 1 month. A total of 103 patients completed the study, with an average end titration dose of 78 mg morphine/d. After 1 month, the morphine-treated patients developed tolerance to the analgesic effects of remifentanil, but did not develop opioid-induced hyperalgesia. On average, these patients experienced a 42% reduction in analgesic potency. The morphine-treated patients experienced clinically relevant improvements in pain relief, as shown by a 44% reduction in average visual analogue scale pain levels and a 31% improvement in functional ability. The differences in visual analogue scale pain levels (P = .003) and self-reported disability (P = .03) between both treatment groups were statistically significant. After 1 month of oral morphine therapy, patients with chronic low-back pain developed tolerance but not opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Improvements in pain and functional ability were observed.

  8. Characterization of chronic constriction of the saphenous nerve, a model of neuropathic pain in mice showing rapid molecular and electrophysiological changes.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Jean-Sébastien; Pichette, Vincent; Leblond, François; Desbiens, Karine; Beaulieu, Pierre

    2006-05-15

    Neuropathic pain is one of the most inextricable problems encountered in clinics, because few facts are known about its etiology. Nerve injury often leads to allodynia and hyperalgesia, which are symptoms of neuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to understand some molecular and electrophysiological mechanisms of neuropathic pain after chronic constriction of the saphenous nerve (CCS) in mice. After surgery, CCS mice displayed significant allodynia and hyperalgesia, which were sensitive to acute systemic injection of morphine (4 mg/kg), gabapentin (50 mg/kg), amitriptyline (10 mg/kg), and the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (5 mg/kg). These behavioral changes were accompanied after surgery by an increase of c-Fos expression and by an overexpression of mu-opioid and cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the spinal cord and the dorsal hind paw skin. In combination with the skin-nerve preparation, this model showed a decrease in functional receptive fields downstream to the injury and the apparition of A-fiber ectopic discharges. In conclusion, CCS injury induced behavioral, molecular, and electrophysiological rearrangements that might help us in better understanding the peripheral mechanisms of neuropathic pain. This model takes advantage of the possible use in the future of genetically modified mice and of an exclusively sensory nerve for a comprehensive study of peripheral mechanisms of neuropathic pain.

  9. Antidepressants suppress neuropathic pain by a peripheral β2-adrenoceptor mediated anti-TNFα mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bohren, Yohann; Tessier, Luc-Henri; Megat, Salim; Petitjean, Hugues; Hugel, Sylvain; Daniel, Dorothée; Kremer, Mélanie; Fournel, Sylvie; Hein, Lutz; Schlichter, Rémy; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Yalcin, Ipek; Barrot, Michel

    2013-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. It is usually chronic and challenging to treat. Some antidepressants are first-line pharmacological treatments for neuropathic pain. The noradrenaline that is recruited by the action of the antidepressants on reuptake transporters has been proposed to act through β2-adrenoceptors (β2-ARs) to lead to the observed therapeutic effect. However, the complex downstream mechanism mediating this action remained to be identified. In this study, we demonstrate in a mouse model of neuropathic pain that an antidepressant's effect on neuropathic allodynia involves the peripheral nervous system and the inhibition of cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) production. The antiallodynic action of nortriptyline is indeed lost after peripheral sympathectomy, but not after lesion of central descending noradrenergic pathways. More particularly, we report that antidepressant-recruited noradrenaline acts, within dorsal root ganglia, on β2-ARs expressed by non-neuronal satellite cells. This stimulation of β2-ARs decreases the neuropathy-induced production of membrane-bound TNFα, resulting in relief of neuropathic allodynia. This indirect anti-TNFα action was observed with the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline, the selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine and the β2-AR agonist terbutaline. Our data revealed an original therapeutic mechanism that may open novel research avenues for the management of painful peripheral neuropathies. PMID:23978467

  10. Natural history of sensory function after herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin L; Rowbotham, Michael C

    2010-07-01

    The natural history of sensory function in the first 6months after herpes zoster (HZ) was determined in a cohort of 94 subjects at elevated risk for developing post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). All four visits included ratings of pain and sensory symptoms, mapping areas of altered sensation and allodynia, and quantitative thermal and mechanical sensory testing. The last three visits included the capsaicin response test. Sensory thresholds in distant control skin were stable. Mirror-image skin was persistently hyperesthetic to warming and mechanical stimuli and hyperalgesic to heat compared to distant control skin. HZ skin showed deficits in all thermal modalities. Sensory recovery was limited and selective. Allodynia area and severity, hyperalgesia to von Frey hair, and cold detection threshold improved, but deficits to warmth and heat pain did not. Capsaicin on HZ skin significantly aggravated pain and allodynia in the majority of subjects at 6-8weeks after HZ onset. At study entry, eventual PHN subjects had significantly more impairment in detecting warmth and cold, a larger area of altered sensation, a larger area of allodynia, and more severe allodynia. The results support the study hypothesis that severity of initial injury predicts PHN, especially impaired cold sensation in HZ skin. The hypothesis that PHN develops because of a failure to recover normal neural function was not supported. Sensory recovery proceeded at the same rate in eventual pain-free and eventual PHN subjects and is not a requirement for pain resolution. Early interventions that reduce neural injury or enhance recovery should be of benefit.

  11. A rat model of bone cancer pain induced by intra-tibia inoculation of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mao-Ying, Q.-L.; Zhao Jun; Dong Zhiqiang; Wang Jun; Yu Jin; Yan Minfen; Zhang Yuqiu; Wu Gencheng; Wang Yanqing . E-mail: wangyanqing@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-07-14

    This study described a modified rat model of bone cancer pain. Syngeneic Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells were injected into the tibia medullary cavity via intercondylar eminence. Series of tests were carried out including bone radiology, bone histology, ambulatory pain, thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, weight bearing ability, and electrophysiological recording from primary afferent fibers. The rats inoculated with carcinoma cells showed significant ambulatory pain, mechanical allodynia, and reduction in weight bearing, as well as increased incidence of spontaneous activity in A{beta} fibers in affected limb, whereas PBS (vehicle) or heat-killed cells (sham) injected rats showed no significant difference in comparison to normal rats. The pain hypersensitive behaviors were aggravated with time and destruction of bone. Interestingly, mechanical allodynia was also observed in the contralateral limb, indicating the involvement of 'mirror image' pain in bone cancer pain. In summary, the present study provided a useful and easily established rat model of bone cancer pain which will contribute to further study of the mechanisms underlying cancer pain.

  12. [Differences between myofascial trigger points and tender points].

    PubMed

    Mense, S

    2011-02-01

    The article describes and compares the characteristics of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) of the myofascial pain syndrome and the tender points (TePs) of the fibromyalgia syndrome. Many statements are hypothetical, because not all aspects of the disorders have been clarified in solid studies. Signs and symptoms of MTrPs: (1) palpable nodule, often located close to the muscle belly, (2) often single, (3) allodynia and hyperalgesia at the MTrP, (4) referral of the MTrP pain, (5) normal pain sensitivity outside the MTrPs, (6) local twitch response, (7) local contracture in biopsy material, (8) peripheral mechanism probable. Signs and symptoms of TePs: (1) no palpable nodule, (2) location often close to the muscle attachments, (3) multiple by definition, (4) allodynia and hyperalgesia also outside the TePs, (5) enhanced pain under psychic stress, (6) unspecific histological changes in biopsy material, (7) central nervous mechanism probable. The multitude of differences speak against a common aetiology and pathophysiology.

  13. Expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the rat trigeminal ganglion during the development of temporomandibular joint inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, G.C.; Rizzi, E.; Gerlach, R.F.; Leite-Panissi, C.R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial pain is a prevalent symptom in modern society. Some musculoskeletal orofacial pain is caused by temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). This condition has a multi-factorial etiology, including emotional factors and alteration of the masticator muscle and temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMJ inflammation is considered to be a cause of pain in patients with TMD. Extracellular proteolytic enzymes, specifically the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), have been shown to modulate inflammation and pain. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the expression and level of gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the trigeminal ganglion are altered during different stages of temporomandibular inflammation, as determined by gelatin zymography. This study also evaluated whether mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia, induced by the injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the TMJ capsule, were altered by an MMP inhibitor (doxycycline, DOX). TMJ inflammation was measured by plasma extravasation in the periarticular tissue (Evans blue test) and infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils into the synovial fluid (myeloperoxidase enzyme quantification). MMP expression in the trigeminal ganglion was shown to vary during the phases of the inflammatory process. MMP-9 regulated the early phase and MMP-2 participated in the late phase of this process. Furthermore, increases in plasma extravasation in periarticular tissue and myeloperoxidase activity in the joint tissue, which occurred throughout the inflammation process, were diminished by treatment with DOX, a nonspecific MMP inhibitor. Additionally, the increases of mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia were attenuated by the same treatment. PMID:24270905

  14. Radiotherapy Suppresses Bone Cancer Pain through Inhibiting Activation of cAMP Signaling in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guiqin; Dong, Yanbin; He, Xueming; Zhao, Ping; Yang, Aixing; Zhou, Rubing; Ma, Jianhua; Xie, Zhong; Song, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the major clinical approaches for treatment of bone cancer pain. Activation of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway plays important roles in bone cancer pain. Here, we examined the effects of radiotherapy on bone cancer pain and accompanying abnormal activation of cAMP-PKA signaling. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used and received tumor cell implantation (TCI) in rat tibia (TCI cancer pain model). Some of the rats that previously received TCI treatment were treated with X-ray radiation (radiotherapy). Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were measured and used for evaluating level of pain caused by TCI treatment. PKA mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was detected by RT-PCR. Concentrations of cAMP, IL-1β, and TNF-α as well as PKA activity in DRG and the spinal cord were measured by ELISA. The results showed that radiotherapy significantly suppressed TCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. The level of PKA mRNA in DRG, cAMP concentration and PKA activity in DRG and in the spinal cord, and concentrations of IL-1β and TNF-α in the spinal cord were significantly reduced by radiotherapy. In addition, radiotherapy also reduced TCI-induced bone loss. These findings suggest that radiotherapy may suppress bone cancer pain through inhibition of activation of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in DRG and the spinal cord. PMID:26989332

  15. Effects of Nefopam on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Neuropathic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jae Sik; Cheong, Yu Seon; Karm, Myong Hwan; Ahn, Ho Soo; Sim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jin Sun; Leem, Jeong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Background Nefopam is a centrally acting non-opioid analgesic agent. Its analgesic properties may be related to the inhibitions of monoamine reuptake and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. The antinociceptive effect of nefopam has been shown in animal models of acute and chronic pain and in humans. However, the effect of nefopam on diabetic neuropathic pain is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the preventive effect of nefopam on diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin (STZ) in rats. Methods Pretreatment with nefopam (30 mg/kg) was performed intraperitoneally 30 min prior to an intraperitoneal injection of STZ (60 mg/kg). Mechanical and cold allodynia were tested before, and 1 to 4 weeks after drug administration. Thermal hyperalgesia was also investigated. In addition, the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) expression levels in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were evaluated. Results Pretreatment with nefopam significantly inhibited STZ-induced mechanical and cold allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia. The STZ injection increased TRPM8, but not TRPA1, expression levels in DRG neurons. Pretreatment with nefopam decreased STZ-induced TRPM8 expression levels in the DRG. Conclusions These results demonstrate that a nefopam pretreatment has strong antiallodynic effects on STZ-induced diabetic rats, which may be associated with TRPM8 located in the DRG. PMID:25317281

  16. Levo-Tetrahydropalmatine Attenuates Bone Cancer Pain by Inhibiting Microglial Cells Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mao-yin; Liu, Yue-peng; Zhang, Lian-yi; Yue, Dong-mei; Qi, Dun-yi; Liu, Gong-jian; Liu, Su

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The present study is to investigate the analgesic roles of L-THP in rats with bone cancer pain caused by tumor cell implantation (TCI). Methods. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were measured at different time points before and after operation. L-THP (20, 40, and 60 mg/kg) were administrated intragastrically at early phase of postoperation (before pain appearance) and later phase of postoperation (after pain appearance), respectively. The concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-18 in spinal cord were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot was used to test the activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in spinal cord after TCI treatment. Results. TCI treatment induced significant thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Administration of L-THP at high doses significantly prevented and/or reversed bone cancer-related pain behaviors. Besides, TCI-induced activation of microglial cells and the increased levels of TNF-α and IL-18 were inhibited by L-THP administration. However, L-THP failed to affect TCI-induced astrocytes activation and IL-1β increase. Conclusion. This study suggests the possible clinical utility of L-THP in the treatment of bone cancer pain. The analgesic effects of L-THP on bone cancer pain maybe underlying the inhibition of microglial cells activation and proinflammatory cytokines increase. PMID:26819501

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Scolopendra Pharmacopuncture on the Development and Maintenance of Neuropathic Pain in Rats: Possible Involvement of Spinal Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjin; Ji, Byeong Uk; Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Min Young; Kim, Sungchul; Kim, Seung Tae; Koo, Sungtae

    2015-10-01

    Scolopendra extracts were used for pharmacopuncture at the Kidney 1 acupoint to investigate the role of Scolopendra pharmacopuncture (SPP) in both the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation in rats and the contribution of spinal glial cells. A single treatment and five once-daily treatments with SPP were given to evaluate its effects on the development and maintenance stages of neuropathic pain, respectively, which was followed by behavioral tests. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting tests were also carried out. A single treatment of SPP delayed spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and induced a profound decrease in the expression of ionized calcium binding adaptor protein in the lumbar spinal cord. Repeated SPP treatments reliably suppressed mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at later time points, and these results correlated mainly with decreases in glial fibrillary acidic protein. Intriguingly, ionized calcium binding adaptor protein expression was also reduced after repeated SPP. These results illustrate that neuropathic pain in the development and maintenance stages is alleviated by SPP treatment, which may be ascribed principally to deactivations of microglia and astroglia, respectively. Additionally, microglial inactivation seems to be partially involved in preventing neuropathic pain in the maintenance stage. PMID:26433800

  18. Dose-related neuropathic and anti-neuropathic effects of simvastatin in vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Shrutya; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-06-01

    The present study explores the role of simvastatin in vincristine-induced neuropathic pain, which was induced by administering vincristine (100 µg/kg i.p.) for 10 days (two 5 day cycles with 2 days pause). Pain was assessed by determining mechanical hyperalgesia, mechanical dynamic allodynia, heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. Biochemically, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured along with serum cholesterol levels. Simvastatin (7.5, 15 and 30 mg/kg) was administered for 14 days after administration of vincristine. Simvastatin (7.5 and 15 mg/kg) reversed vincristine-induced neuropathic pain and attenuated vincristine-induced increase in MPO, without altering cholesterol levels. Simvastatin at higher dose (30 mg/kg) did not alter neuropathic pain despite decreasing MPO levels. Furthermore, administration of simvastatin (30 mg/kg i.p.) in vincristine treated rats as well as it's per se administration in normal rats reduced cholesterol levels. Per se administration of simvastatin in normal rats produced neuropathic pain. It is concluded that simvastatin attenuates neuropathic pain only at lower doses with no reduction in cholesterol levels and anti-inflammatory effects may possibly reverse neuropathic pain. However, despite reducing inflammation, simvastatin did not confer beneficial effects at higher doses at which there is reduction in cholesterol levels, suggesting the critical role of cholesterol in neuropathic pain induction.

  19. Effects of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) Stigma Extract and its Active Constituent Crocin on Neuropathic Pain Responses in a Rat Model of Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Safakhah, Hossein Ali; Taghavi, Tahereh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sokhanvar, Mina; Mohebbi, Narges; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its main constituent crocin on neuropathic pain behavioral responses induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 250 g) were randomly assigned into 5 groups: Sham + saline, CCI + saline, CCI+ saffron (30 mg/kg), CCI + crocin (15 mg/kg) and CCI + crocin (30 mg/kg). CCI was induced by applying 4 loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve. Two weeks after nerve lesion, injections of saline, saffron or crocin were started and continued until 26(th) day post-surgery. Pain behavioral responses including mechanical allodynia (von Frey filament testing) and thermal hyperalgesia were measured in 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, and 40(th) days after CCI. CCI significantly increased pain behavioral responses. Saffron and crocin (30 mg/kg) decreased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia on day 26, and this effect continued until the day 40. Crocin at lower dose (15 mg/kg) was ineffective. These findings indicate that treatment of saffron and crocin after CCI may have a therapeutic effect against neuropathic pain, suggesting that these substances may offer new strategies for the treatment of this highly debilitating condition. PMID:27610166

  20. Effects of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) Stigma Extract and its Active Constituent Crocin on Neuropathic Pain Responses in a Rat Model of Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Safakhah, Hossein Ali; Taghavi, Tahereh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sokhanvar, Mina; Mohebbi, Narges; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its main constituent crocin on neuropathic pain behavioral responses induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 250 g) were randomly assigned into 5 groups: Sham + saline, CCI + saline, CCI+ saffron (30 mg/kg), CCI + crocin (15 mg/kg) and CCI + crocin (30 mg/kg). CCI was induced by applying 4 loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve. Two weeks after nerve lesion, injections of saline, saffron or crocin were started and continued until 26(th) day post-surgery. Pain behavioral responses including mechanical allodynia (von Frey filament testing) and thermal hyperalgesia were measured in 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, and 40(th) days after CCI. CCI significantly increased pain behavioral responses. Saffron and crocin (30 mg/kg) decreased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia on day 26, and this effect continued until the day 40. Crocin at lower dose (15 mg/kg) was ineffective. These findings indicate that treatment of saffron and crocin after CCI may have a therapeutic effect against neuropathic pain, suggesting that these substances may offer new strategies for the treatment of this highly debilitating condition.

  1. Chloride Regulation in the Pain Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J; Cervero, Fernando; Gold, Michael S; Hammond, Donna L; Prescott, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Melzack and Wall’s Gate Control Theory of Pain laid the theoretical groundwork for a role of spinal inhibition in endogenous pain control. While the Gate Control Theory was based on the notion that spinal inhibition is dynamically regulated, mechanisms underlying the regulation of inhibition have turned out to be far more complex than Melzack and Wall could have ever imagined. Recent evidence indicates that an exquisitely sensitive form of regulation involves changes in anion equilibrium potential (Eanion), which subsequently impacts fast synaptic inhibition mediated GABAA, and to a lesser extent, glycine receptor activation, the prototypic ligand gated anion channels. The cation-chloride co-transporters (in particular NKCC1 and KCC2) have emerged as proteins that play a critical role in the dynamic regulation of Eanion which in turn appears to play a critical role in hyperalgesia and allodynia following peripheral inflammation or nerve injury. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge in this area with particular attention to how such findings relate to endogenous mechanisms of hyperalgesia and allodynia and potential applications for therapeutics based on modulation of intracellular Cl− gradients or pharmacological interventions targeting GABAA receptors PMID:19167425

  2. Effects of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) Stigma Extract and its Active Constituent Crocin on Neuropathic Pain Responses in a Rat Model of Chronic Constriction Injury

    PubMed Central

    Safakhah, Hossein Ali; Taghavi, Tahereh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sokhanvar, Mina; Mohebbi, Narges; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its main constituent crocin on neuropathic pain behavioral responses induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 250 g) were randomly assigned into 5 groups: Sham + saline, CCI + saline, CCI+ saffron (30 mg/kg), CCI + crocin (15 mg/kg) and CCI + crocin (30 mg/kg). CCI was induced by applying 4 loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve. Two weeks after nerve lesion, injections of saline, saffron or crocin were started and continued until 26th day post-surgery. Pain behavioral responses including mechanical allodynia (von Frey filament testing) and thermal hyperalgesia were measured in 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, and 40th days after CCI. CCI significantly increased pain behavioral responses. Saffron and crocin (30 mg/kg) decreased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia on day 26, and this effect continued until the day 40. Crocin at lower dose (15 mg/kg) was ineffective. These findings indicate that treatment of saffron and crocin after CCI may have a therapeutic effect against neuropathic pain, suggesting that these substances may offer new strategies for the treatment of this highly debilitating condition. PMID:27610166

  3. Cell cycle inhibition limits development and maintenance of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junfang; Zhao, Zaorui; Zhu, Xiya; Renn, Cynthia L; Dorsey, Susan G; Faden, Alan I

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) may present as hyperalgesia, allodynia, and/or spontaneous pain and is often resistant to conventional pain medications. Identifying more effective interventions to manage SCI pain requires improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved. Cell cycle activation (CCA) has been implicated as a key pathophysiological event following SCI. We have shown that early central or systemic administration of a cell cycle inhibitor reduces CCA, prevents glial changes, and limits SCI-induced hyperesthesia. Here, we compared the effects of early vs late treatment with the pan-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol on allodynia as well as spontaneous pain. Adult C57BL/6 male mice subjected to moderate SCI were treated with intraperitoneal injections of flavopiridol (1 mg/kg), daily for 7 days beginning either 3 hours or 5 weeks after injury. Mechanical/thermal allodynia was evaluated, as well as spontaneous pain using the mouse grimace scale (MGS). We show that sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimulation, and locomotor dysfunction were significantly reduced by early flavopiridol treatment compared with vehicle-treated controls. Spinal cord injury caused robust and extended increases of MGS up to 3 weeks after trauma. Early administration of flavopiridol significantly shortened duration of MGS changes. Late flavopiridol intervention significantly limited hyperesthesia at 7 days after treatment, associated with reduced glial changes, but without effect on locomotion. Thus, our data suggest that cell cycle modulation may provide an effective therapeutic strategy to reduce hyperesthesia after SCI, with a prolonged therapeutic window.

  4. Central pain mechanisms following combined acid and capsaicin perfusion of the human oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Brock, Christina; Andresen, Trine; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gale, Jeremy; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2010-03-01

    Visceral afferents originating from different gut-segments converge at the spinal level. We hypothesized that chemically-induced hyperalgesia in the oesophagus could provoke widespread visceral hypersensitivity and also influence descending modulatory pain pathways. Fifteen healthy volunteers were studied at baseline, 30, 60 and 90 min after randomized perfusion of the distal oesophagus with either saline or 180 ml 0.1M HCl+2mg capsaicin. Electro-stimulation of the oesophagus, 8 cm proximal to the perfusion site, rectosigmoid electrical stimulation and rectal mechanical and heat stimulations were used. Evoked brain potentials were recorded after electrical stimulations before and after oesophageal perfusion. After the perfusion, rectal hyperalgesia to heat (P<0.01, 37%) and mechanical (P=0.01, 11%) stimulations were demonstrated. In contrast, hypoalgesia to electro-stimulation was observed in both the oesophagus (P<0.03, 23%) and the sigmoid colon (P<0.001, 18%). Referred pain areas to electro-stimulation in oesophagus were reduced by 13% after perfusion (P=0.01). Evoked brain potentials to rectosigmoid stimulations showed decreased latencies and amplitudes of P1, N1 and P2 (P<0.05), whereas oesophagus-evoked brain potentials were unaffected after perfusion. In conclusion, modality-specific hyperalgesia was demonstrated in the lower gut following chemical sensitization of the oesophagus, reflecting widespread central hyperexcitability. Conversely, hypoalgesia to electrical stimulation, decreases in referred pain and latencies of evoked brain potentials was seen. This outcome may reflect a counterbalancing activation of descending inhibitory pathways. As these findings are also seen in the clinical setting, the model may be usable for future basic and pharmacological studies.

  5. Ionic mechanisms of spinal neuronal cold hypersensitivity in ciguatera.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ryan; Brice, Nicola L; Lewis, Richard J; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-12-01

    Cold hypersensitivity is evident in a range of neuropathies and can evoke sensations of paradoxical burning cold pain. Ciguatoxin poisoning is known to induce a pain syndrome caused by consumption of contaminated tropical fish that can persist for months and include pruritus and cold allodynia; at present no suitable treatment is available. This study examined, for the first time, the neural substrates and molecular components of Pacific ciguatoxin-2-induced cold hypersensitivity. Electrophysiological recordings of dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurones were made in non-sentient rats. Subcutaneous injection of 10 nm ciguatoxin-2 into the receptive field increased neuronal responses to innocuous and noxious cooling. In addition, neuronal responses to low-threshold but not noxious punctate mechanical stimuli were also elevated. The resultant cold hypersensitivity was not reversed by 6-({2-[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-methylpropyl}carbamoyl)pyridine-3-carboxylic acid, an antagonist of transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8). Both mechanical and cold hypersensitivity were completely prevented by co-injection with the Nav 1.8 antagonist A803467, whereas the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) antagonist A967079 only prevented hypersensitivity to innocuous cooling and partially prevented hypersensitivity to noxious cooling. In naive rats, neither innocuous nor noxious cold-evoked neuronal responses were inhibited by antagonists of Nav 1.8, TRPA1 or TRPM8 alone. Ciguatoxins may confer cold sensitivity to a subpopulation of cold-insensitive Nav 1.8/TRPA1-positive primary afferents, which could underlie the cold allodynia reported in ciguatera. These data expand the understanding of central spinal cold sensitivity under normal conditions and the role of these ion channels in this translational rat model of ciguatoxin-induced hypersensitivity. PMID:26454262

  6. Selective inhibition of JNK with a peptide inhibitor attenuates pain hypersensitivity and tumor growth in a mouse skin cancer pain model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Jing; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Zeng, Qing; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Decosterd, Isabelle; Xu, Xiaoyin; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2009-09-01

    Cancer pain significantly affects the quality of cancer patients, and current treatments for this pain are limited. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been implicated in tumor growth and neuropathic pain sensitization. We investigated the role of JNK in cancer pain and tumor growth in a skin cancer pain model. Injection of luciferase-transfected B16-Fluc melanoma cells into a hindpaw of mouse induced robust tumor growth, as indicated by increase in paw volume and fluorescence intensity. Pain hypersensitivity in this model developed rapidly (<5 days) and reached a peak in 2 weeks, and was characterized by mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. Tumor growth was associated with JNK activation in tumor mass, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and spinal cord and a peripheral neuropathy, such as loss of nerve fibers in the hindpaw skin and induction of ATF-3 expression in DRG neurons. Repeated systemic injections of D-JNKI-1 (6 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective and cell-permeable peptide inhibitor of JNK, produced an accumulative inhibition of mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. A bolus spinal injection of D-JNKI-1 also inhibited mechanical allodynia. Further, JNK inhibition suppressed tumor growth in vivo and melanoma cell proliferation in vitro. In contrast, repeated injections of morphine (5 mg/kg), a commonly used analgesic for terminal cancer, produced analgesic tolerance after 1 day and did not inhibit tumor growth. Our data reveal a marked peripheral neuropathy in this skin cancer model and important roles of the JNK pathway in cancer pain development and tumor growth. JNK inhibitors such as D-JNKI-1 may be used to treat cancer pain. PMID:19445931

  7. Nocistatin: milestone of one decade of research.

    PubMed

    Okuda-Ashitaka, Emiko; Ito, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    A neuropeptide nociceptin or orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) is an endogenous ligand for the orphan opioid receptor-like receptor. During studies on the analysis of the precursor of N/OFQ, we identified a novel neuropeptide produced from the same precursor and named it "nocistatin (NST)". Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of N/OFQ induces pain responses including touch-evoked allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, and simultaneous administration of NST blocks the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by N/OFQ. In the years since these discoveries, N/OFQ has been shown to be involved in a wide range of pharmacological activities, such as relaying pain perception in peripheral tissues, to the central nervous system, and NST was shown to have opposite effects on various central functions evoked by N/OFQ. Pharmacological characterization using various neurotransmitter agents, agonists, antagonists and knockout mice in vivo; electrophysiological and immunohistological analysis ex vivo; and molecular cloning using affinity chromatography of high-performance affinity nanobeads; and protein processing measurement using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in vitro have generated new insights into pain transmission regulated by NST and N/OFQ. This review focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of pain transmission regulated by NST. PMID:25345611

  8. Tetrahydrocurcumin exerts protective effect on vincristine induced neuropathy: Behavioral, biochemical, neurophysiological and histological evidence.

    PubMed

    Greeshma, N; Prasanth, K G; Balaji, Bhaskar

    2015-08-01

    Hyperalgesia, allodynia, delayed motor nerve conduction velocity, oxidative stress and axonal damage are signs and symptoms of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Present treatment/preventive strategies of CIPN are futile and the neuropathy may even lead to discontinuation of chemotherapy. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) 40 and 80mg/kg in experimental vincristine induced neuropathy in rats. Hyperalgesia was assessed by hot plate (thermal), Randall-Selitto (mechanical) test, allodynia was assessed by cold plate (thermal) test, functional loss was measured by sciatic function index, nociception was evaluated by formalin test. Neurophysiological recordings were carried out to assess motor nerve conduction velocity. Total calcium levels, oxidative stress and TNF-α was measured in sciatic nerve tissue homogenate to assess neuropathy. Histopathological changes was observed on sciatic nerve to assess the protective effect of THC against the vincristine. Pregabalin was used as a standard in this study. Rats administered with THC at 80mg/kg significantly attenuated the vincristine induced neuropathic pain manifestations which may be due to its multiple actions including anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, calcium inhibitory and antioxidant effect. This study delineates that THC can be a promising candidate for the prevention of CIPN by chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26102012

  9. Mechanical signalling in tissues and its possible role in nociception.

    PubMed

    Traverso, Silvano

    2011-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is known to play a key role in physiological as well as pathological processes. In the present work, the possibility is discussed that even weak mechanical signals travelling through the extracellular matrix can elicit significant cellular responses, by causing gel/sol transitions and actomyosin contractions. Such mechanical cues can result from both physiological activities, such as the heartbeat, and noxious stimuli to which tissues respond by rearranging the cells' cytoskeleton and remodelling the extracellular matrix. The possibility is explored that such viscoelastic modifications also affect the function of nociceptors, thus modulating pain transmission. Growing evidence indicates that the rearrangement of the axonal cytoskeleton represents a key step in nociception. Hyperalgesia is suggested to result from an exceedingly dynamical state of the nociceptor's cytoskeleton, which would lead to enhanced electrical conduction and synaptic facilitation.

  10. Alcohol consumption enhances antiretroviral painful peripheral neuropathy by mitochondrial mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Luiz F.; Levine, Jon D.

    2010-01-01

    A major dose-limiting side effect of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) chemotherapies, such as the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), is a small-fiber painful peripheral neuropathy, mediated by its mitochondrial toxicity. Co-morbid conditions may also contribute to this dose-limiting effect of HIV/AIDS treatment. Alcohol abuse, which alone also produces painful neuropathy, is one of the most important co-morbid risk factors for peripheral neuropathy in patients with HIV/AIDS. Despite the prevalence of this problem and its serious impact on the quality of life and continued therapy in HIV/AIDS patients, the mechanisms by which alcohol abuse exacerbates highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced neuropathic pain has not been demonstrated. In this study, performed in rats, we investigated the cellular mechanism by which consumed alcohol impacts antiretroviral-induced neuropathic pain. NRTI 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC) (50 mg/kg) neuropathy was mitochondrial dependent and PKCε independent, and alcohol-induced painful neuropathy, PKCε dependent and mitochondrial independent. At low doses, ddC (5 mg/kg) and alcohol (6.5% ethanol diet for one week), which alone do not affect nociception, together produce profound mechanical hyperalgesia. This hyperalgesia is mitochondrial dependent but PKCε independent. These experiments, which provide the first model for studying the impact of co-morbidity in painful neuropathy, support the clinical impression that alcohol consumption enhances HIV/AIDS therapy neuropathy, and provide evidence for a role of mitochondrial mechanisms underlying this interaction. PMID:20726883

  11. Self-injurious behavior in neurodevelopmental disorders: relevance of nociceptive and immune mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Symons, Frank J

    2011-04-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) among individuals with intellectual and related neurodevelopmental disorders (IDD) is a clinical challenge and scientific puzzle. The physiological mechanisms regulating the sensory components of SIB remain a mystery with no clear understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. The central dogma regarding sensory processing in general and pain in particular among individuals with IDD and chronic SIB is that sensory processing is reduced and pain is absent or blunted. In this paper, recent findings challenging some of the conventional wisdom regarding pain and sensory function among individuals with IDD and SIB are reviewed. It seems that at least a subgroup of individuals with IDD and chronic SIB may be in a physiological state similar to neuropathic pain in which hyperalgesia is mediated by plasticity mechanisms regulating inflammatory, immune, and nociceptive systems. In response to repeated tissue damage associated with chronic self-injury, innate immune cells may be producing pro-inflammatory and pro-nociceptive cytokines that act on the brain to cause sickness-like behavior and sensitize primary sensory nerve afferents contributing to pain hypersensitivity (i.e., hyperalgesia). PMID:21237197

  12. ANTINOCICEPTIVE EFFECTS OF THE N-ACYLETHANOLAMINE ACID AMIDASE INHIBITOR ARN077 IN RODENT PAIN MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Oscar; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Martucci, Cataldo; Realini, Natalia; Dionisi, Mauro; Mengatto, Luisa; Duranti, Andrea; Tarozzo, Glauco; Tarzia, Giorgio; Mor, Marco; Bertorelli, Rosalia; Reggiani, Angelo; Piomelli, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs), which include palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA), are endogenous agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) and important regulators of the inflammatory response. They are degraded in macrophages by the lysosomal cysteine amidase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA). Previous studies have shown that pharmacological inhibition of NAAA activity suppresses macrophage activation in vitro and causes marked anti-inflammatory effects in vivo, which is suggestive of a role for NAAA in the control of inflammation. It is still unknown, however, whether NAAA-mediated FAE deactivation might regulate pain signaling. In the present study, we examined the effects of ARN077, a potent and selective NAAA inhibitor recently disclosed by our group, in rodent models of hyperalgesia and allodynia caused by inflammation or nerve damage. Topical administration of ARN077 attenuated, in a dose-dependent manner, heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia elicited in mice by carrageenan injection or sciatic nerve ligation. The anti-nociceptive effects of ARN077 were prevented by the selective PPAR-α antagonist GW6471 and did not occur in PPAR-α-deficient mice. Furthermore, topical ARN077 reversed the allodynia caused by ultraviolet B-radiation in rats, and this effect was blocked by pretreatment with GW6471. Sciatic nerve ligation or application of the pro-inflammatory phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) decreased FAE levels in sciatic nerve and skin tissue, respectively. ARN077 reversed these biochemical effects. The results identify ARN077 as a potent inhibitor of intracellular NAAA activity, which is active in vivo by topical administration. The findings further suggest that NAAA regulates peripheral pain initiation by interrupting endogenous FAE signaling at PPAR-α. PMID:23218523

  13. Modulatory Mechanism of Nociceptive Neuronal Activity by Dietary Constituent Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Mamoru; Takehana, Shiori; Sekiguchi, Kenta; Kubota, Yoshiko; Shimazu, Yoshihito

    2016-01-01

    Changes to somatic sensory pathways caused by peripheral tissue, inflammation or injury can result in behavioral hypersensitivity and pathological pain, such as hyperalgesia. Resveratrol, a plant polyphenol found in red wine and various food products, is known to have several beneficial biological actions. Recent reports indicate that resveratrol can modulate neuronal excitability, including nociceptive sensory transmission. As such, it is possible that this dietary constituent could be a complementary alternative medicine (CAM) candidate, specifically a therapeutic agent. The focus of this review is on the mechanisms underlying the modulatory effects of resveratrol on nociceptive neuronal activity associated with pain relief. In addition, we discuss the contribution of resveratrol to the relief of nociceptive and/or pathological pain and its potential role as a functional food and a CAM. PMID:27727178

  14. Brain mechanisms supporting violated expectations of pain.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Fadel; Lobanov, Oleg V; Kraft, Robert A; Coghill, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    The subjective experience of pain is influenced by interactions between experiences, future predictions, and incoming afferent information. Expectations of high pain can exacerbate pain, whereas expectations of low pain during a consistently noxious stimulus can produce significant reductions in pain. However, the brain mechanisms associated with processing mismatches between expected and experienced pain are poorly understood, but are important for imparting salience to a sensory event to override erroneous top-down expectancy-mediated information. This investigation examined pain-related brain activation when expectations of pain were abruptly violated. After conditioning participants to cues predicting low or high pain, 10 incorrectly cued stimuli were administered across 56 stimulus trials to determine whether expectations would be less influential on pain when there is a high discordance between prestimulus cues and corresponding thermal stimulation. Incorrectly cued stimuli produced pain ratings and pain-related brain activation consistent with placebo analgesia, nocebo hyperalgesia, and violated expectations. Violated expectations of pain were associated with activation in distinct regions of the inferior parietal lobe, including the supramarginal and angular gyrus, and intraparietal sulcus, the superior parietal lobe, cerebellum, and occipital lobe. Thus, violated expectations of pain engage mechanisms supporting salience-driven sensory discrimination, working memory, and associative learning processes. By overriding the influence of expectations on pain, these brain mechanisms are likely engaged in clinical situations in which patients' unrealistic expectations of pain relief diminish the efficacy of pain treatments. Accordingly, these findings underscore the importance of maintaining realistic expectations to augment the effectiveness of pain management.

  15. Respective pharmacological features of neuropathic-like pain evoked by intrathecal BDNF versus sciatic nerve ligation in rats.

    PubMed

    M'Dahoma, Saïd; Barthélemy, Sandrine; Tromilin, Claire; Jeanson, Tiffany; Viguier, Florent; Michot, Benoit; Pezet, Sophie; Hamon, Michel; Bourgoin, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Numerous reported data support the idea that Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is critically involved in both depression and comorbid pain. The possible direct effect of BDNF on pain mechanisms was assessed here and compared with behavioral/neurobiological features of neuropathic pain caused by chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve (CCI-SN). Sprague-Dawley male rats were either injected intrathecally with BDNF (3.0 ng i.t.) or subjected to unilateral CCI-SN. Their respective responses to anti-hyperalgesic drugs were assessed using the Randall-Selitto test and both immunohistochemical and RT-qPCR approaches were used to investigate molecular/cellular mechanisms underlying hyperalgesia in both models. Long lasting hyperalgesia and allodynia were induced by i.t. BDNF in intact healthy rats like those found after CCI-SN. Acute treatment with the BDNF-TrkB receptor antagonist cyclotraxin B completely prevented i.t. BDNF-induced hyperalgesia and partially reversed this symptom in both BDNF-pretreated and CCI-SN lesioned rats. Acute administration of the anticonvulsant pregabalin, the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, the opioid analgesics morphine and tapentadol or the antidepressant agomelatine also transiently reversed hyperalgesia in both i.t. BDNF injected- and CCI-SN lesioned-rats. Marked induction of microglia activation markers (OX42, Iba1, P-p38), proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, NMDA receptor subunit NR2B and BDNF was found in spinal cord and/or dorsal root ganglia of CCI-SN rats. A long lasting spinal BDNF overexpression was also observed in BDNF i.t. rats, indicating an autocrine self-induction, with downstream long lasting TrkB-mediated neuropathic-like pain. Accordingly, TrkB blockade appeared as a relevant approach to alleviate not only i.t. BDNF- but also nerve lesion-evoked neuropathic pain. PMID:26343858

  16. Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced hyperalgesia and the release of TNF-α and IL-1β in the mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cunjin; Song, Siyuan; Zhang, Yang; Ge, Yali; Fang, Xiangzhi; Huang, Tianfeng; Du, Jin; Gao, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by various routes produces profound inflammatory pain hypersensitivity. However, the molecular events that induce this response remain largely uncharacterized. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the role of the Rho/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway in the release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) following injection of LPS into the mouse paw, which is associated with nociceptive behavior. The spinal cord of LPS-treated mice showed increased active GTP-bound RhoA and upregulation of ROCK2 and c-fos compared to the normal saline group. Furthermore, the inflammation-related cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β were markedly increased in the spinal dorsal horn after intraplantar injection of LPS. However, the latter effects were prevented by prophylactic intrathecal administration of the Rho inhibitor (C3 exoenzyme) or the ROCK inhibitor (Y27632). Collectively, our results suggest that the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway plays a critical role in LPS-induced inflammatory pain and that this pathway is coincident with the release of the pro-nociceptive cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, which produces hyperalgesia. PMID:26416580

  17. Importance of CRF receptor-mediated mechanisms of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in the processing of anxiety and pain.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lee; Schulkin, Jay; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2014-10-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-mediated mechanisms in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) have a pivotal role in stress-induced anxiety and hyperalgesia. Although CRF is known to activate two receptor subtypes, CRF1 and CRF2, attempts to delineate the specific role of each subtype in modulating anxiety and nociception have been inconsistent. Here we test the hypothesis that CRF1 and CRF2 receptor activation in the anteriolateral BNST (BNSTAL) facilitates divergent mechanisms modulating comorbid anxiety and hyperalgesia. Microinfusions of the specific antagonists CP376395 and Astressin2B into the BNSTAL were used to investigate CRF1 and CRF2 receptor functions, respectively. We found that CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the BNSTAL had opposing effects on exploratory behavior in the elevated plus-maze, somatic mechanical threshold, and the autonomic and endocrine response to stress. However, CRF1 or CRF2 receptor antagonism in the BNSTAL revealed complementary roles in facilitating the acoustic startle and visceromotor reflexes. Our results suggest that the net effect of CRF1 and CRF2 receptor activation in the BNSTAL is pathway-dependent and provides important insight into the CRF receptor-associated circuitry that likely underpins stress-induced pathologies.

  18. Importance of CRF Receptor-Mediated Mechanisms of the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis in the Processing of Anxiety and Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Lee; Schulkin, Jay; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2014-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-mediated mechanisms in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) have a pivotal role in stress-induced anxiety and hyperalgesia. Although CRF is known to activate two receptor subtypes, CRF1 and CRF2, attempts to delineate the specific role of each subtype in modulating anxiety and nociception have been inconsistent. Here we test the hypothesis that CRF1 and CRF2 receptor activation in the anteriolateral BNST (BNSTAL) facilitates divergent mechanisms modulating comorbid anxiety and hyperalgesia. Microinfusions of the specific antagonists CP376395 and Astressin2B into the BNSTAL were used to investigate CRF1 and CRF2 receptor functions, respectively. We found that CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the BNSTAL had opposing effects on exploratory behavior in the elevated plus-maze, somatic mechanical threshold, and the autonomic and endocrine response to stress. However, CRF1 or CRF2 receptor antagonism in the BNSTAL revealed complementary roles in facilitating the acoustic startle and visceromotor reflexes. Our results suggest that the net effect of CRF1 and CRF2 receptor activation in the BNSTAL is pathway-dependent and provides important insight into the CRF receptor-associated circuitry that likely underpins stress-induced pathologies. PMID:24853772

  19. Pediatric complex regional pain syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Rotem; Uziel, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic, intensified localized pain condition that can affect children and adolescents as well as adults, but is more common among adolescent girls. Symptoms include limb pain; allodynia; hyperalgesia; swelling and/or changes in skin color of the affected limb; dry, mottled skin; hyperhidrosis and trophic changes of the nails and hair. The exact mechanism of CRPS is unknown, although several different mechanisms have been suggested. The diagnosis is clinical, with the aid of the adult criteria for CRPS. Standard care consists of a multidisciplinary approach with the implementation of intensive physical therapy in conjunction with psychological counseling. Pharmacological treatments may aid in reducing pain in order to allow the patient to participate fully in intensive physiotherapy. The prognosis in pediatric CRPS is favorable. PMID:27130211

  20. [Neuropathic pain: pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy].

    PubMed

    Sommer, C

    2013-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by lesions in the somatosensory system. Characteristic but not exclusive features are spontaneous burning pain, electrifying and shooting pain, hyperalgesia, and allodynia. The basic concept of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is the combination of peripheral and central sensitization. Knowledge on the molecular mechanisms has grown exponentially in recent years. The problem lies in identifying the individual mechanisms and in determining a comprehensive concept. Progress has also been made in assessment, e.g., methods for detecting dysfunction of nociceptors have significantly improved. In addition, there are many more therapeutic options available than 15 years ago. The drugs available include antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, and topical medications. Data from controlled trials and recommendations from guidelines are available. PMID:24217854

  1. Peripheral and spinal mechanisms of nociception in a rat reserpine-induced pain model.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Toru; Katanosaka, Kimiaki; Yasui, Masaya; Hayashi, Koei; Yamashita, Mai; Wakatsuki, Koji; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Mizumura, Kazue

    2015-03-01

    Chronic widespread pain is a serious medical problem, yet the mechanisms of nociception and pain are poorly understood. Using a reserpine-induced pain model originally reported as a putative animal model for fibromyalgia, this study was undertaken to examine the following: (1) expression of several ion channels responsible for pain, mechanotransduction, and generation/propagation of action potentials in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), (2) activities of peripheral nociceptive afferents, and (3) alterations in spinal microglial cells. A significant increase in mRNA expression of the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC)-3 was detected in the DRG, and the behavioral mechanical hyperalgesia was significantly reversed by subcutaneous injection of APETx2, a selective blocker of ASIC3. Single-fiber recordings in vitro revealed facilitated mechanical responses of mechanoresponsive C-fibers both in the skin and muscle although the proportion of mechanoresponsive C-nociceptors was paradoxically decreased. In the spinal dorsal horn, microglial cells labeled with Iba1 immunoreactivity was activated, especially in laminae I-II where the nociceptive input is mainly processed compared with the other laminae. The activated microglia and behavioral hyperalgesia were significantly tranquilized by intraperitoneal injection of minocycline. These results suggest that the increase in ASIC3 in the DRG facilitated mechanical response of the remaining C-nociceptors and that activated spinal microglia may direct to intensify pain in this model. Pain may be further amplified by reserpine-induced dysfunction of the descending pain inhibitory system and by the decrease in peripheral drive to this system resulting from a reduced proportion of mechanoresponsive C-nociceptors.

  2. The antinociceptive effects of ferulic acid on neuropathic pain: involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Lin, Dan; Yu, Xuefeng; Xie, Xupei; Wang, Liqun; Lian, Lejing; Fei, Ning; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Naping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Xianfeng; Pan, Jianchun

    2016-04-12

    Neuropathic pain can be considered as a form of chronic stress that may share common neuropathological mechanism between pain and stress-related depression and respond to similar treatment. Ferulic acid (FA) is a major active component of angelica sinensis and has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects; however, it remains unknown whether FA ameliorate chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and the involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors. Chronic treatment with FA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) ameliorated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey hair and hot plate tasks, accompanied by increasing spinal noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels. Subsequent study suggested that treatment of CCI animals with 40 and 80 mg/kg FA also inhibited spinal MAO-A levels. FA's effects on mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesiawas blocked by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) via pharmacological depletion of spinal noradrenaline or serotonin. Moreover, the anti-allodynic action of FA on mechanical stimuli was prevented by pre-treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551, or by the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. While the anti-hyperalgesia on thermal stimuli induced by FA was blocked by pre-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, or with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. These results suggest that the effect of FA on neuropathic pain is potentially mediated via amelioration of the descending monoaminergic system that coupled with spinal beta2- and 5-HT1A receptors and the downstream delta- and mu-opioid receptors differentially. PMID:26967251

  3. Sensory signs in complex regional pain syndrome and peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gierthmühlen, Janne; Maier, Christoph; Baron, Ralf; Tölle, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Birbaumer, Niels; Huge, Volker; Koroschetz, Jana; Krumova, Elena K; Lauchart, Meike; Maihöfner, Christian; Richter, Helmut; Westermann, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    This study determined patterns of sensory signs in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type I and II and peripheral nerve injury (PNI). Patients with upper-limb CRPS-I (n=298), CRPS-II (n=46), and PNI (n=72) were examined with quantitative sensory testing according to the protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain. The majority of patients (66%-69%) exhibited a combination of sensory loss and gain. Patients with CRPS-I had more sensory gain (heat and pressure pain) and less sensory loss than patients with PNI (thermal and mechanical detection, hypoalgesia to heat or pinprick). CRPS-II patients shared features of CRPS-I and PNI. CRPS-I and CRPS-II had almost identical somatosensory profiles, with the exception of a stronger loss of mechanical detection in CRPS-II. In CRPS-I and -II, cold hyperalgesia/allodynia (28%-31%) and dynamic mechanical allodynia (24%-28%) were less frequent than heat or pressure hyperalgesia (36%-44%, 67%-73%), and mechanical hypoesthesia (31%-55%) was more frequent than thermal hypoesthesia (30%-44%). About 82% of PNI patients had at least one type of sensory gain. QST demonstrates more sensory loss in CRPS-I than hitherto considered, suggesting either minimal nerve injury or central inhibition. Sensory profiles suggest that CRPS-I and CRPS-II may represent one disease continuum. However, in contrast to recent suggestions, small fiber deficits were less frequent than large fiber deficits. Sensory gain is highly prevalent in PNI, indicating a better similarity of animal models to human patients than previously thought. These sensory profiles should help prioritize approaches for translation between animal and human research.

  4. Transient Receptor Potential Channel and Interleukin-17A Involvement in LTTL Gel Inhibition of Bone Cancer Pain in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juyong; Zhang, Ruixin; Dong, Changsheng; Jiao, Lijing; Xu, Ling; Liu, Jiyong; Wang, Zhengtao; Lao, Lixing

    2015-07-01

    Cancer pain management is a challenge for which Chinese herbal medicine might be useful. To study the spinal mechanisms of the Chinese medicated gel Long-Teng-Tong-Luo (LTTL), a 7-herb compound, on bone cancer pain, a bone cancer pain model was made by inoculating the tibias of female rats with Walker 256 cells. LTTL gel or inert gel, 0.5 g/cm(2)/d, was applied to the skin of tumor-bearing tibias for 21 days beginning a day after the inoculation. Mechanical threshold and paw withdrawal latency to thermal stimulation was measured. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were immunostained and counted, and lumbar spinal cord interleukin-17A (IL-17A) was measured with real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TRP antagonists and interleukin (IL)-17A antibodies were intrathecally administered to determine their effects on bone cancer pain. The gel significantly (P < .05) alleviated cancer-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and inhibited cancer-enhanced expression of IL-17A in spinal astrocytes and the TRP subfamily members V1, A1, and V4 in lumbar DRG. Intrathecal TRP antagonists at 10 µg significantly (P < .05) attenuated mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, and IL-17A expression, indicating that TRP channels facilitate spinal IL-17 expression and cancer pain. IL-17A antibodies inhibited cancer pain, suggesting that IL-17A promotes such pain. The data show that LTTL gel inhibits cancer pain, and this might be accounted for by the decrease in expression of DRG TRP channels and spinal astrocyte IL-17A.

  5. Transient Receptor Potential Channel and Interleukin-17A Involvement in LTTL Gel Inhibition of Bone Cancer Pain in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juyong; Zhang, Ruixin; Dong, Changsheng; Jiao, Lijing; Xu, Ling; Liu, Jiyong; Wang, Zhengtao; Lao, Lixing

    2015-07-01

    Cancer pain management is a challenge for which Chinese herbal medicine might be useful. To study the spinal mechanisms of the Chinese medicated gel Long-Teng-Tong-Luo (LTTL), a 7-herb compound, on bone cancer pain, a bone cancer pain model was made by inoculating the tibias of female rats with Walker 256 cells. LTTL gel or inert gel, 0.5 g/cm(2)/d, was applied to the skin of tumor-bearing tibias for 21 days beginning a day after the inoculation. Mechanical threshold and paw withdrawal latency to thermal stimulation was measured. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were immunostained and counted, and lumbar spinal cord interleukin-17A (IL-17A) was measured with real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TRP antagonists and interleukin (IL)-17A antibodies were intrathecally administered to determine their effects on bone cancer pain. The gel significantly (P < .05) alleviated cancer-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and inhibited cancer-enhanced expression of IL-17A in spinal astrocytes and the TRP subfamily members V1, A1, and V4 in lumbar DRG. Intrathecal TRP antagonists at 10 µg significantly (P < .05) attenuated mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, and IL-17A expression, indicating that TRP channels facilitate spinal IL-17 expression and cancer pain. IL-17A antibodies inhibited cancer pain, suggesting that IL-17A promotes such pain. The data show that LTTL gel inhibits cancer pain, and this might be accounted for by the decrease in expression of DRG TRP channels and spinal astrocyte IL-17A. PMID:26100378

  6. Quercetin ameliorates paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by stabilizing mast cells, and subsequently blocking PKCε-dependent activation of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Zan, Yan; Wang, Zai-jie Jim; Hu, Xiao-yu; Huang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Severe painful sensory neuropathy often occurs during paclitaxel chemotherapy. Since paclitaxel can activate mast cell and basophils, whereas quercetin, a polyphenolic flavonoid contained in various plants, which can specifically inhibit histamine release as a mast cell stabilizer. In this study we explore whether quercetin could ameliorate paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Quercetin inhibition on histamine release was validated in vitro by detecting histamine release from rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells stimulated with paclitaxel (10 μmol/L). In the in vivo experiments, rats and mice received quercetin (20, 40 mg·kg-1·d-1) for 40 and 12 d, respectively. Meanwhile, the animals were injected with paclitaxel (2 mg/kg, ip) four times on d 1, 3, 5 and 7. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were evaluated at the different time points. The animals were euthanized and spinal cords and dorsal root ganglions were harvested for analyzing PKCε and TRPV1 expression levels. The plasma histamine levels were assessed in rats on d 31. Results: Pretreatment with quercetin (3, 10, 30 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited excessive histamine release from paclitaxel-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells in vitro, and quercetin administration significantly suppressed the high plasma histamine levels in paclitaxel-treated rats. Quercetin administration dose-dependently raised the thresholds for heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in paclitaxel-treated rats and mice. Furthermore, quercetin administration dose-dependently suppressed the increased expression levels of PKCε and TRPV1 in the spinal cords and DRGs of paclitaxel-treated rats and mice. Moreover, quercetin administration may inhibited the translocation of PKCε from the cytoplasm to the membrane in the spinal cord and DRG of paclitaxel-treated rats. Conclusion: Our results reveal the underlying mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy and

  7. The antinociceptive effects of ferulic acid on neuropathic pain: involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Lin, Dan; Yu, Xuefeng; Xie, Xupei; Wang, Liqun; Lian, Lejing; Fei, Ning; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Naping; Wang, Gang; Huang, Xianfeng; Pan, Jianchun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can be considered as a form of chronic stress that may share common neuropathological mechanism between pain and stress-related depression and respond to similar treatment. Ferulic acid (FA) is a major active component of angelica sinensis and has been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects; however, it remains unknown whether FA ameliorate chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and the involvement of descending monoaminergic system and opioid receptors. Chronic treatment with FA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) ameliorated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey hair and hot plate tasks, accompanied by increasing spinal noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels. Subsequent study suggested that treatment of CCI animals with 40 and 80 mg/kg FA also inhibited spinal MAO-A levels. FA's effects on mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesiawas blocked by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) via pharmacological depletion of spinal noradrenaline or serotonin. Moreover, the anti-allodynic action of FA on mechanical stimuli was prevented by pre-treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551, or by the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. While the anti-hyperalgesia on thermal stimuli induced by FA was blocked by pre-treatment with 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, or with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. These results suggest that the effect of FA on neuropathic pain is potentially mediated via amelioration of the descending monoaminergic system that coupled with spinal beta2- and 5-HT1A receptors and the downstream delta- and mu-opioid receptors differentially. PMID:26967251

  8. ACTIVATION OF TRPA1 ON DURAL AFFERENTS: A POTENTIAL MECHANISM OF HEADACHE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Edelmayer, Rebecca M.; Le, Larry N.; Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Preti, Delia; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Dodick, David W.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Porreca, Frank; Dussor, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) on meningeal nerve endings has been suggested to contribute to environmental irritant-induced headache but this channel may also contribute to other forms of headache such as migraine. The preclinical studies described here examined functional expression of TRPA1 on dural afferents and investigated whether activation of TRPA1 contributes to headache-like behaviors. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in vitro using two TRPA1 agonists, mustard oil (MO) and the environmental irritant umbellulone (UMB), on dural-projecting trigeminal ganglion neurons. Application of MO and UMB to dural afferents produced TRPA1-like currents in approximately 42% and 38% of cells, respectively. Using an established in vivo behavioral model of migraine-related allodynia, dural application of MO and UMB produced robust time-related tactile facial and hindpaw allodynia that was attenuated by pretreatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Additionally, MO or UMB were applied to the dura and exploratory activity was monitored for 30 minutes using an automated open-field activity chamber. Dural MO and UMB decreased the number of vertical rearing episodes and the time spent rearing in comparison to vehicle treated animals. This change in activity was prevented in rats pretreated with HC-030031 as well as sumatriptan, a clinically effective anti-migraine agent. These data indicate that TRPA1 is expressed on a substantial fraction of dural afferents and activation of meningeal TRPA1 produces behaviors consistent with those seen in patients during migraine attacks. Further, they suggest that activation of meningeal TRPA1 via endogenous or exogenous mechanisms can lead to afferent signaling and headache. PMID:22809691

  9. Unraveling mechanisms of action of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Philip M; Ossa, Juan C; Johnson-Henry, Kathene

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as living organisms that, when administered in sufficient numbers, are of benefit to the host. Current evidence indicates that varying probiotic strains mediate their effects by a variety of different effects that are dependent on the dosage employed as well as the route and frequency of delivery. Some probiotics act in the lumen of the gut by elaborating antibacterial molecules such as bacteriocins; others enhance the mucosal barrier by increasing the production of innate immune molecules, including goblet cell-derived mucins and trefoil factors and defensins produced by intestinal Paneth cells; and other probiotics mediate their beneficial effects by promoting adaptive immune responses (secretory immune globulin A, regulatory T cells, interleukin-10). Some probiotics have the capacity to activate receptors in the enteric nervous system, which could be used to promote pain relief in the setting of visceral hyperalgesia. Future development of the effective use of probiotics in treating various gastroenterological disorders in human participants should take advantage of this new knowledge. The creation of novel formulations of probiotics could be directed to effectively target certain mechanisms of actions that are altered in specific disease states.