Science.gov

Sample records for allogeneic dendritic cells

  1. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: benefit or burden?

    PubMed Central

    Auletta, JJ; Devine, SM; Waller, EK

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) bridge innate and adaptive immune responses and have important roles in hematopoietic engraftment, GvHD and graft-versus-leukemia responses following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In addition, pDCs mediate antiviral immunity, particularly as they are the body’s primary cellular source of type I interferon. Given their pleiotropic roles, pDCs have emerged as cells that critically impact transplant outcomes, including overall survival. In this article, we will review the pre-clinical and clinical literature, supporting the crucial roles that pDCs assume as key immune effector cells during HCT. PMID:26642333

  2. Allogeneic IgG combined with dendritic cell stimuli induces anti-tumor T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Carmi, Yaron; Spitzer, Matthew H.; Linde, Ian L.; Burt, Bryan M; Prestwood, Tyler R.; Perlman, Nikola; Davidson, Matthew G.; Kenkel, Justin A.; Segal, Ehud; Pusapati, Ganesh V.; Bhattacharya, Nupur; Engleman, Edgar G.

    2015-01-01

    While cancers grow in their hosts and evade host immunity through immunoediting and immunosuppression1–5, tumors are rarely transmissible between individuals. Much like transplanted allogeneic organs, allogeneic tumors are reliably rejected by host T cells, even when the tumor and host share the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, the most potent determinants of transplant rejection6–10. How such tumor-eradicating immunity is initiated remains unknown, though elucidating this process could provide a roadmap for inducing similar responses against naturally arising tumors. We found that allogeneic tumor rejection is initiated by naturally occurring tumor-binding IgG antibodies, which enable dendritic cells (DC) to internalize tumor antigens and subsequently activate tumor-reactive T cells. We exploited this mechanism to successfully treat autologous and autochthonous tumors. Either systemic administration of DC loaded with allogeneic IgG (alloIgG)-coated tumor cells or intratumoral injection of alloIgG in combination with DC stimuli induced potent T cell mediated anti-tumor immune responses, resulting in tumor eradication in mouse models of melanoma, pancreas, lung and breast cancer. Moreover, this strategy led to eradication of distant tumors and metastases, as well as the injected primary tumors. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we studied antibodies and cells from patients with lung cancer. T cells from these patients responded vigorously to autologous tumor antigens after culture with alloIgG-loaded DC, recapitulating our findings in mice. These results reveal that tumor-binding alloIgG can induce powerful anti-tumor immunity that can be exploited for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25924063

  3. Whole-cell cancer vaccination: from autologous to allogeneic tumor- and dendritic cell-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J. M.; Pinedo, Herbert M.

    2008-01-01

    The field of tumor vaccination is currently undergoing a shift in focus, from individualized tailor-made vaccines to more generally applicable vaccine formulations. Although primarily predicated by financial and logistic considerations, stemming from a growing awareness that clinical development for wide-scale application can only be achieved through backing from major pharmaceutical companies, these new approaches are also supported by a growing knowledge of the intricacies and minutiae of antigen presentation and effector T-cell activation. Here, the development of whole-cell tumor and dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines from an individualized autologous set-up to a more widely applicable allogeneic approach will be discussed as reflected by translational studies carried out over the past two decades at our laboratories and clinics in the vrije universiteit medical center (VUmc) in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. PMID:18523771

  4. A Novel Cancer Vaccine Strategy Based on HLA-A*0201 Matched Allogeneic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aspord, Caroline; Charles, Julie; Leccia, Marie-Therese; Laurin, David; Richard, Marie-Jeanne; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of effective cancer vaccines still remains a challenge. Despite the crucial role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in anti-tumor responses, their therapeutic potential has not yet been worked out. We explored the relevance of HLA-A*0201 matched allogeneic pDCs as vectors for immunotherapy. Methods and Findings Stimulation of PBMC from HLA-A*0201+ donors by HLA-A*0201 matched allogeneic pDCs pulsed with tumor-derived peptides triggered high levels of antigen-specific and functional cytotoxic T cell responses (up to 98% tetramer+ CD8 T cells). The pDC vaccine demonstrated strong anti-tumor therapeutic in vivo efficacy as shown by the inhibition of tumor growth in a humanized mouse model. It also elicited highly functional tumor-specific T cells ex-vivo from PBMC and TIL of stage I-IV melanoma patients. Responses against MelA, GP100, tyrosinase and MAGE-3 antigens reached tetramer levels up to 62%, 24%, 85% and 4.3% respectively. pDC vaccine-primed T cells specifically killed patients' own autologous melanoma tumor cells. This semi-allogeneic pDC vaccine was more effective than conventional myeloid DC-based vaccines. Furthermore, the pDC vaccine design endows it with a strong potential for clinical application in cancer treatment. Conclusions These findings highlight HLA-A*0201 matched allogeneic pDCs as potent inducers of tumor immunity and provide a promising immunotherapeutic strategy to fight cancer. PMID:20454561

  5. Programming of donor T cells using allogeneic δ-like ligand 4-positive dendritic cells to reduce GVHD in mice.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Meng, Lijun; Mochizuki, Izumi; Tong, Qing; He, Shan; Liu, Yongnian; Purushe, Janaki; Fung, Henry; Zaidi, M Raza; Zhang, Yanyun; Reshef, Ran; Blazar, Bruce R; Yagita, Hideo; Mineishi, Shin; Zhang, Yi

    2016-06-23

    Alloreactive T cells play a critical role in eliminating hematopoietic malignant cells but are also the mediators of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a major complication that subverts the success of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, induction of alloreactive T cells does not necessarily lead to GVHD. Here we report the development of a cellular programming approach to render alloreactive T cells incapable of causing severe GVHD in both major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched and MHC-identical but minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched mouse models. We established a novel platform that produced δ-like ligand 4-positive dendritic cells (Dll4(hi)DCs) from murine bone marrow using Flt3 ligand and Toll-like receptor agonists. Upon allogeneic Dll4(hi)DC stimulation, CD4(+) naïve T cells underwent effector differentiation and produced high levels of interferon γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-17 in vitro, depending on Dll4 activation of Notch signaling. Following transfer, allogeneic Dll4(hi)DC-induced T cells were unable to mediate severe GVHD but preserved antileukemic activity, significantly improving the survival of leukemic mice undergoing allogeneic HSCT. This effect of Dll4(hi)DC-induced T cells was associated with their impaired expansion in GVHD target tissues. IFN-γ was important for Dll4(hi)DC programming to reduce GVHD toxicities of alloreactive T cells. Absence of T-cell IFN-γ led to improved survival and expansion of Dll4(hi)DC-induced CD4(+) T cells in transplant recipients and caused lethal GVHD. Our findings demonstrate that Dll4(hi)DC programming can overcome GVHD toxicity of donor T cells and produce leukemia-reactive T cells for effective immunotherapy. PMID:27143255

  6. Allogeneic mRNA-based electrotransfection of autologous dendritic cells and specific antitumor effects against osteosarcoma in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhe; Qian, Jixian; Wu, Jiachang; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Minghua

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with tumor-derived mRNA antigen has emerged as a promising strategy for generating protective immunity in mammals. However, the integration of allogeneic osteosarcoma mRNA and autologous DCs has not been fully examined. This study was designed to investigate the antitumor effects of tumor vaccine produced by autologous DCs transfected of allogeneic osteosarcoma mRNA through electroporation in tumor-bearing rats model. In the present study, extraction of Wistar rat tumor mRNA was performed as a two-step procedure. First, total RNA was extracted by use of Trizol; then, mRNA purification was performed by use of polyT-coated magnetic beads. Then, we transfected the allogeneic-derived tumor mRNA to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat bone marrow-derived DCs through electroporation. The tumor vaccine was applied to tumor-bearing rats model, and the specific antitumor effects of the tumor vaccine were observed. The immunization using autologous DCs electrotransfected with allogeneic osteosarcoma total RNA induced specific CTL responses, which were statistically significant (P < 0.05), and the cytotoxic activity was confirmed in cold target inhibition assays and using mAbs blocking MHC class I molecules. In in vivo experiments, 70 % of the rats immunized with allogeneic osteosarcoma RNA transfected to DCs were typically able to reject tumor challenge and remained tumor-free. Vaccinated survivors developed long immunological memory and were able to reject a subsequent rechallenge with the same tumor cells but not a syngeneic unrelated tumor line. In the present study, we demonstrated that allogeneic tumor mRNA isolated from rat osteosarcoma cell line could be applied to produce tumor vaccine inducing specific antitumor effects, especially in DC-based immunotherapy strategy. This study also provides the foundations for an effective and broadly applicable treatment to a wide range of cancer indications for which tumor-associated antigens

  7. Induction of Cytomegalovirus-Specific T Cell Responses in Healthy Volunteers and Allogeneic Stem Cell Recipients Using Vaccination With Messenger RNA–Transfected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H.; Smits, Evelien L.J.; Anguille, Sébastien; Van de Velde, Ann; Stein, Barbara; Braeckman, Tessa; Van Camp, Kirsten; Nijs, Griet; Ieven, Margareta; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi N.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.I.; Verpooten, Gert A.; Van Damme, Pierre; Cools, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Methods The present study explored the safety, feasibility, and immunogenicity of CMV pp65 messenger RNA–loaded autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) as a cellular vaccine for active immunization in healthy volunteers and allogeneic HSCT recipients. Four CMV-seronegative healthy volunteers and three allogeneic HSCT recipients were included in the study. Four clinical-grade autologous monocyte-derived DC vaccines were prepared after a single leukapheresis procedure and administered intradermally at a weekly interval. Results De novo induction of CMV-specific T-cell responses was detected in three of four healthy volunteers without serious adverse events. Of the HSCT recipients, none developed CMV disease and one of two patients displayed a remarkable threefold increase in CMV pp65-specific T cells on completion of the DC vaccination trial. Conclusion In conclusion, our DC vaccination strategy induced or expanded a CMV-specific cellular response in four of six efficacy-evaluable study subjects, providing a base for its further exploration in larger cohorts. PMID:25050468

  8. Dose-Dependent Changes in Influenza Virus-Infected Dendritic Cells Result in Increased Allogeneic T-Cell Proliferation at Low, but Not High, Doses of Virus

    PubMed Central

    Oh, SangKon; McCaffery, J. Michael; Eichelberger, Maryna C.

    2000-01-01

    During the acute phase of infection with influenza A virus, the degree of lymphopenia correlates with severity of disease. Factors that contribute to T-cell activation during influenza virus infection may contribute to this observation. Since the immune response is initiated when dendritic cells (DC) interact with T cells, we have established an in vitro system to examine the effects of influenza virus infection on DC function. Our results show that allogeneic T-cell proliferation was dependent on the dose of A/PR/8/34 used to infect DC, with enhanced responses at low, but not high, multiplicities of infection. The lack of enhancement at high virus doses was not primarily due to the increased rate of DC apoptosis, but required viral replication and neuraminidase (NA) activity. Clusters that formed between DC or between DC and T cells were also dependent on the viral dose. This change in cellular interaction may oppose T-cell proliferation in response to DC infected with high doses of PR8, since the increased contact between DC resulted in the exclusion of T cells. The enhanced alloreactive T-cell response was restored by neutralization of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1). It is likely that NA present on viral particles released from DC infected with high doses of PR8 activates TGF-β1. Future studies will determine the mechanism by which TGF-β1 modifies the in vitro T-cell response and address the contribution of this cytokine to the lymphopenia observed in severe disease. PMID:10823850

  9. Rapid reconstitution of functionally active 6-sulfoLacNAc+ dendritic cells (slanDCs) of donor origin following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant

    PubMed Central

    Mimiola, E; Marini, O; Perbellini, O; Micheletti, A; Vermi, W; Lonardi, S; Costantini, C; Meneghelli, E; Andreini, A; Bonetto, C; Vassanelli, A; Cantini, M; Zoratti, E; Massi, D; Zamo', A; Leso, A; Quaresmini, G; Benedetti, F; Pizzolo, G; Cassatella, M A; Tecchio, C

    2014-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is critical in determining the extent of graft-versus-host response. The goal of this study was to analyse slanDCs, a subset of human proinflammatory DCs, in haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) sources, as well as to evaluate their 1-year kinetics of reconstitution, origin and functional capacities in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) of patients who have undergone HSCT, and their presence in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) tissue specimens. slanDCs were also compared to myeloid (m)DCs, plasmacytoid (p)DCs and monocytes in HSC sources and in patients' PB and BM throughout reconstitution. slanDCs accounted for all HSC sources. In patients' PB and BM, slanDCs were identified from day +21, showing median frequencies comparable to healthy donors, donor origin and kinetics of recovery similar to mDCs, pDCs, and monocytes. Under cyclosporin treatment, slanDCs displayed a normal pattern of maturation, and maintained an efficient chemotactic activity and capacity of releasing tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. None the less, they were almost undetectable in GVHD tissue specimens, being present only in intestinal acute GVHD samples. slanDCs reconstitute early, being donor-derived and functionally competent. The absence of slanDCs from most of the GVHD-targeted tissue specimens seems to rule out the direct participation of these cells in the majority of the local reactions characterizing GVHD. PMID:24853271

  10. Generation of a cord blood-derived Wilms Tumor 1 dendritic cell vaccine for AML patients treated with allogeneic cord blood transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de Haar, Colin; Plantinga, Maud; Blokland, Nina JG; van Til, Niek P; Flinsenberg, Thijs WH; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Smits, Evelien L; Boon, Louis; Spel, Lotte; Boes, Marianne; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The poor survival rates of refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients after haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) requires the development of additional immune therapeutic strategies. As the elicitation of tumor-antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is associated with reduced relapses and enhanced survival, enhanced priming of these CTLs using an anti-AML vaccine may result in long-term immunity against AML. Cord blood (CB), as allogeneic HCT source, may provide a unique setting for such post-HCT vaccination, considering its enhanced graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effects and population of highly responsive naïve T cells. It is our goal to develop a powerful and safe immune therapeutic strategy composed of CB-HCT followed by vaccination with CB CD34+-derived dendritic cells (DCs) presenting the oncoprotein Wilms Tumor-1 (WT1), which is expressed in AML-blasts in the majority of patients. Here, we describe the optimization of a clinically applicable DC culture protocol. This two-step protocol consisting of an expansion phase followed by the differentiation toward DCs, enables us to generate sufficient cord blood-derived DCs (CBDCs) in the clinical setting. At the end of the culture, the CBDCs exhibit a mature surface phenotype, are able to migrate, express tumor antigen (WT1) after electroporation with mRNA encoding the full-length WT1 protein, and stimulate WT1-specific T cells. PMID:26451309

  11. PD-1/PD-L1 Interaction Maintains Allogeneic Immune Tolerance Induced by Administration of Ultraviolet B-Irradiated Immature Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that transfusion of ultraviolet B-irradiated immature dendritic cells (UVB-iDCs) induced alloantigen-specific tolerance between two different strains of mice. Programmed death-1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) have been suggested to play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance. In the present study, we seek to address whether PD-1/PD-L1 plays a role in the maintenance of UVB-iDC-induced tolerance. We first observe that the UVB-iDC-induced alloantigen-specific tolerance can be maintained for over 6 weeks. Supporting this, at 6 weeks after tolerance induction completion, alloantigen-specific tolerance is still able to be transferred to syngeneic naïve mice through adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, skin transplantation study shows that the survival of allogeneic grafts is prolonged in those tolerant recipients. Further studies show that PD-1/PD-L1 interaction is essential for maintaining the induced tolerance as blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 by anti-PD-L1 antibodies largely breaks the tolerance at both cellular and humoral immunological levels. Importantly, we show that PD-1/PD-L1 interaction in tolerant mice is also essential for controlling alloantigen-responding T cells, which have never experienced alloantigens. The above findings suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 plays a crucial role in maintaining immune tolerance induced by UVB-iDCs, as well as in actively controlling effector T cells specific to alloantigens. PMID:27556047

  12. Safety and tolerability of allogeneic dendritic cell vaccination with induction of Wilms tumor 1-specific T cells in a pediatric donor and pediatric patient with relapsed leukemia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shoji; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Yoshikawa, Kentaro; Higuchi, Yumiko; Koya, Terutsugu; Yoshizawa, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Miyuki; Sakashita, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kurata, Takashi; Hirabayashi, Koichi; Nakazawa, Yozo; Shiohara, Masaaki; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Okamoto, Masato; Sugiyama, Haruo; Koike, Kenichi; Shimodaira, Shigetaka

    2015-03-01

    A 15-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia received allogeneic dendritic cell vaccination, pulsed with Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) peptide, after her third hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The vaccines were generated from the third HSCT donor, who was her younger sister, age 12 years. The patient received 14 vaccines and had no graft-versus-host disease or systemic adverse effect, aside from grade 2 skin reaction at the injection site. WT1-specific immune responses were detected after vaccination by both WT1-tetramer analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. This strategy may be safe, tolerable and even feasible for patients with a relapse after HSCT. PMID:25484308

  13. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Most hematological malignancies occur in older patients. Until recently these patients and those with comorbidities were not candidates for treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation because they were unable to tolerate the heretofore used high-dose conditioning regimens. The finding that many of the cures achieved with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation were due to graft-versus-tumor effects led to the development of less toxic and well-tolerated reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative regimens. These regimens enabled allogeneic engraftment, thereby setting the stage for graft-versus-tumor effects. This review summarizes the encouraging early results seen with the new regimens and discusses the two hurdles that need to be overcome for achieving even greater success, disease relapse and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27132278

  14. The Biology of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shizuru, Judith A.; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2016-01-01

    At the most basic level, success of an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) procedure relies upon the engraftment of recipients with donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that will generate blood formation for the life of that individual. The formula to achieve durable HSC engraftment involves multiple factors including the recipient conditioning regimen, the nature of the genetic disparity between donor and recipient, and the content of the hematopoietic graft. Animal and clinical studies have shown that the biology of host resistance is complex, involving both immune and nonimmune elements. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to host resistance, describe emerging concepts on the basic biology of resistance, and discuss hematopoietic resistance as it relates specifically to patients with severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID)— disorders that bring unique insights into the dynamics of cell replacement by allogeneic HSCs and progenitor cells. PMID:19913629

  15. ALLOGENEIC NATURAL KILLER CELLS FOR REFRACTORY LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J.; McKenna, David H.; Curtsinger, Julie; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Lindgren, Bruce R.; Cooley, Sarah; Weisdorf, Daniel; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    We reported that IL-2 activated autologous NK cells can induce, but not maintain durable remissions in lymphoma patients. We hypothesized that allogeneic NK cells may overcome class I MHC-mediated inhibition of NK cell killing. In a pilot study we evaluated infusion of haploidentical donor NK cells for anti-tumor efficacy. Six patients with advanced B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) received rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and fludarabine as immunosupression to permit homeostatic NK cell expansion, followed by CD3-depleted NK cell enriched cell products followed by subcutaneous IL-2 administration (10×106 units every other day × 6 doses). At 2 months, four patients showed an objective clinical response. We observed early donor cell persistence in 2 patients (blood and in tumor-bearing node), but this was not detectable beyond 7 days. All patients demonstrated substantial increases in host regulatory T cells (Treg) after NK cell and IL-2 therapy (180±80 cells/μl vs baseline: 58±24 cells/μl, p=0.04) which may have limited donor cell expansion in vivo. These findings suggest safety and feasibility of allogeneic NK cell therapy in patients with lymphoma; however host Treg and inadequate immunodepletion may contribute to a hostile milieu for NK cell survival and expansion. Cell therapy trials should incorporate novel strategies to limit Treg expansion. PMID:20680271

  16. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Achandira M.; Al-Bahri, Maiya; Burney, Ikram A.; Al-Haddabi, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a rare neoplasm with a non-specific and insidious presentation further complicated by the difficult diagnostic and therapeutic assessment. It has a low to intermediate risk of recurrence and metastasis. Unlike other soft tissue sarcomas or histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms, cytogenetic studies are very limited in FDCS cases. Although no specific chromosomal marker has yet been established, complex aberrations and different ploidy types have been documented. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with FDCS who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in February 2013. Ultrastructural, immunophenotypical and histological findings are reported. In addition, karyotypic findings showed deletions of the chromosomes 1p, 3q, 6q, 7q, 8q and 11q. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, these have not been reported previously in this tumour. Techniques such as spectral karyotyping may help to better characterise chromosomal abnormalities in this type of tumour. PMID:26355964

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Othman, T; Torjemane, L; Abdelkefi, A; Lakhal, A; Ladeb, S; Ben Hamed, L; Slama, H; Ben Abdeladhim, A

    2008-08-01

    In 1998, the Tunisian team of the 'Centre National de Greffe de Moelle Osseuse' initiated allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (AHSCT) in Tunisia. As of June 2007, information was collected about 299 patients with a first AHSCT and 12 additional retransplants. The median age was 19 years (range 2-49 years). The main indications were aplastic anemia (n=106, 36%), leukemia and nonmalignant disorders (n=153, 51%), Fanconi anemia (n=26, 9%) and other nonmalignant disorders (n=14, 4%). Preparative regimens depended on indication. All donors were HLA geno-identical. The stem cell sources were BM (87%) and PBSCs (13%). At the time of analysis, 200 patients (67%) were alive after a median follow-up of 42 months (range 3-112 months). The overall TRM rate was 17%. Outcome depended on indication. According to our results, allogeneic HSCT is potentially curative for hematological diseases, but it is a toxic approach for malignant disorders. PMID:18724288

  18. Dendritic cells in asthma.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Mary J; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2013-12-01

    The lungs are constantly exposed to antigens, most of which are non-pathogenic and do not require the induction of an immune response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are situated at the basolateral site of the lungs and continuously scan the environment to detect the presence of pathogens and subsequently initiate an immune response. They are a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells that exert specific functions. Compelling evidence is now provided that DCs are both sufficient and necessary to induce allergic responses against several inhaled harmless allergens. How various DC subsets exactly contribute to the induction of allergic asthma is currently a subject of intense investigation. We here review the current progress in this field. PMID:24455765

  19. Can dendritic cells see light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    There are many reports showing that low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) can enhance wound healing, upregulate cell proliferation and has anti-apoptotic effects by activating intracellular protective genes. In the field of immune response study, it is not known with any certainty whether light/laser is proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Increasingly in recent times dendritic cells have been found to play an important role in inflammation and the immunological response. In this study, we try to look at the impact of low level near infrared light (810-nm) on murine bone-marrow derived dendritic cells. Changes in surface markers, including MHC II, CD80 and CD11c and the secretion of interleukins induced by light may provide additional evidence to reveal the mystery of how light affects the maturation of dendritic cells as well how these light-induced mature dendritic cells would affect the activation of adaptive immune response.

  20. Solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Rochelle E.; Socié, Gérard; Sobocinski, Kathleen A.; Gilbert, Ethel; Landgren, Ola; Travis, Lois B.; Travis, William D.; Flowers, Mary E. D.; Friedman, Debra L.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Wingard, John R.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Transplant recipients have been reported to have an increased risk of solid cancers but most studies are small and have limited ability to evaluate the interaction of host, disease, and treatment-related factors. In the largest study to date to evaluate risk factors for solid cancers, we studied a multi-institutional cohort of 28 874 allogeneic transplant recipients with 189 solid malignancies. Overall, patients developed new solid cancers at twice the rate expected based on general population rates (observed-to-expected ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.8-2.5), with the risk increasing over time (P trend < .001); the risk reached 3-fold among patients followed for 15 years or more after transplantation. New findings showed that the risk of developing a non–squamous cell carcinoma (non-SCC) following conditioning radiation was highly dependent on age at exposure. Among patients irradiated at ages under 30 years, the relative risk of non-SCC was 9 times that of nonirradiated patients, while the comparable risk for older patients was 1.1 (P interaction < .01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease and male sex were the main determinants for risk of SCC. These data indicate that allogeneic transplant survivors, particularly those irradiated at young ages, face increased risks of solid cancers, supporting strategies to promote lifelong surveillance among these patients. PMID:18971419

  1. Present and Future of Allogeneic Natural Killer Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Okjae; Jung, Mi Young; Hwang, Yu Kyeong; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the antitumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions. PMID:26089823

  2. Organ-derived dendritic cells have differential effects on alloreactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Theo D.; Terwey, Theis H.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Suh, David; Kochman, Adam A.; Chen, Megan E.; King, Chris G.; Borsotti, Chiara; Grubin, Jeremy; Smith, Odette M.; Heller, Glenn; Liu, Chen; Murphy, George F.; Alpdogan, Onder

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered critical for the induction of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In addition to their priming function, dendritic cells have been shown to induce organ-tropism through induction of specific homing molecules on T cells. Using adoptive transfer of CFSE-labeled cells, we first demonstrated that alloreactive T cells differentially up-regulate specific homing molecules in vivo. Host-type dendritic cells from the GVHD target organs liver and spleen or skin- and gut-draining lymph nodes effectively primed naive allogeneic T cells in vitro with the exception of liver-derived dendritic cells, which showed less stimulatory capacity. Gut-derived dendritic cells induced alloreactive donor T cells with a gut-homing phenotype that caused increased GVHD mortality and morbidity compared with T cells stimulated with dendritic cells from spleen, liver, and peripheral lymph nodes in an MHC-mismatched murine BMT model. However, in vivo analysis demonstrated that the in vitro imprinting of homing molecules on alloreactive T cells was only transient. In conclusion, organ-derived dendritic cells can efficiently induce specific homing molecules on alloreactive T cells. A gut-homing phenotype correlates with increased GVHD mortality and morbidity after murine BMT, underlining the importance of the gut in the pathophysiology of GVHD. PMID:18178870

  3. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: diagnostic criteria and therapeutical approaches.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Livio; Valentini, Caterina G; Grammatico, Sara; Pulsoni, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare haematological malignancy derived from the precursors of plamacytoid dendritic cells, with an aggressive clinical course and high frequency of cutaneous and bone marrow involvement. Neoplastic cells express CD4, CD43 (also termed SPN), CD45RA and CD56 (also termed NCAM1), as well as the plasmacytoid dendritic cell-associated antigens CD123 (also termed IL3RA), BDCA-2 (also termed CD303, CLEC4E) TCL1 and CTLA1 (also termed GZMB). The median survival is only a few months as the tumour exhibits a progressive course despite initial response to chemotherapy. The best modality of treatment remains to be defined. Generally, patients receive acute leukaemia-like induction, according to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)-type or acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL)-type regimens. The frequent neuromeningeal involvement indicates systematic pre-emptive intrathecal chemotherapy in addition to intensive chemotherapy. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), particularly when performed in first remission, may improve the survival. Preliminary data suggest a potential role for immunomodulatory agents and novel targeted drugs. Herein epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of BPDCN will be presented. In detail, this review focuses on the therapeutic aspects of BPDCN, proposing a treatment algorithm for the management of the disease, including induction chemotherapy, allogeneic HSCT and intrathecal prophylaxis at different steps of treatment, according to compliance, biological and clinical characteristics of patients. PMID:27264021

  4. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells migrate in afferent skin lymph.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Florentina; Pascale, Florentia; Contreras, Vanessa; Bonneau, Michel; Courbet, Alexandre; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Epardaud, Mathieu; Eparaud, Mathieu; Niborski, Violeta; Riffault, Sabine; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Foulon, Eliane; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Riteau, Beatrice; Hope, Jayne; Bertho, Nicolas; Charley, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2008-05-01

    Conventional dendritic cells enter lymph nodes by migrating from peripheral tissues via the lymphatic route, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), also called IFN-producing cells (IPC), are described to gain nodes from blood via the high endothelial venules. We demonstrate here that IPC/pDC migrate in the afferent lymph of two large mammals. In sheep, injection of type A CpG oligodinucleotide (ODN) induced lymph cells to produce type I IFN. Furthermore, low-density lymph cells collected at steady state produced type I IFN after stimulation with type A CpG ODN and enveloped viruses. Sheep lymph IPC were found within a minor B(neg)CD11c(neg) subset expressing CD45RB. They presented a plasmacytoid morphology, expressed high levels of TLR-7, TLR-9, and IFN regulatory factor 7 mRNA, induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic CD4(pos) T cells, and differentiated into dendritic cell-like cells under viral stimulation, thus fulfilling criteria of bona fide pDC. In mini-pig, a CD4(pos)SIRP(pos) subset in afferent lymph cells, corresponding to pDC homologs, produced type I IFN after type A CpG-ODN triggering. Thus, pDC can link innate and acquired immunity by migrating from tissue to draining node via lymph, similarly to conventional dendritic cells. PMID:18424716

  5. Blue light irradiation suppresses dendritic cells activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael R; Abel, Manuela; Lopez Kostka, Susanna; Rudolph, Berenice; Becker, Detlef; von Stebut, Esther

    2013-08-01

    Blue light is a UV-free irradiation suitable for treating chronic skin inflammation, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and hand- and foot eczema. However, a better understanding of the mode of action is still missing. For this reason, we investigated whether dendritic cells (DC) are directly affected by blue light irradiation in vitro. Here, we report that irradiation neither induced apoptosis nor maturation of monocyte-derived and myeloid DC. However, subsequent DC maturation upon LPS/IFNγ stimulation was impaired in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by maturation markers and cytokine release. Moreover, the potential of this DC to induce cytokine secretion from allogeneic CD4 T cells was reduced. In conclusion, unlike UV irradiation, blue light irradiation at high and low doses only resulted in impaired DC maturation upon activation and a reduced subsequent stimulatory capacity in allogeneic MLRs with strongest effects at higher doses. PMID:23879817

  6. Clinical trials of dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pyzer, Athalia R; Avigan, David E; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn

    2015-01-01

    The potential for the immune system to target hematological malignancies is demonstrated in the allogeneic transplant setting, where durable responses can be achieved. However, allogeneic transplantation is associated with significant morbidity and mortality related to graft versus host disease. Cancer immunotherapy has the capacity to direct a specific cytotoxic immune response against cancer cells, particularly residual cancer cells, in order to reduce the likelihood of disease relapse in a more targeted and tolerated manner. Ex vivo dendritic cells can be primed in various ways to present tumor associated antigen to the immune system, in the context of co-stimulatory molecules, eliciting a tumor specific cytotoxic response in patients. Several approaches to prime dendritic cells and overcome the immunosuppressive microenvironment have been evaluated in pre-clinical and early clinical trials with promising results. In this review, we summarize the clinical data evaluating dendritic cell based vaccines for the treatment of hematological malignancies. PMID:25625926

  7. Thy-1+ dendritic cells in murine epidermis are bone marrow-derived

    SciTech Connect

    Breathnach, S.M.; Katz, S.I.

    1984-07-01

    Thy-1+, Ly-5+ dendritic cells have recently been described as a resident cell population in murine epidermis, but their ontogeny and function are unknown. The origin and turnover of epidermal Thy-1+ cells utilizing chimeric mice were investigated. Lethally x-irradiated AKR/J (Thy-1.1+) and AKR/Cum (Thy-1.2+) mice were reconstituted with allogeneic bone marrow cells with or without thymocytes from congenic AKR/Cum or AKR/J mice, respectively. The density of residual indigenous Thy-1.1+ cells in AKR/J chimeras and Thy-1.2+ cells in AKR/Cum chimeras was substantially reduced following x-irradiation, as determined by immunofluorescence staining of epidermal sheets. Epidermal repopulation by allogeneic Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal cells was first observed at 5 weeks in AKR/J chimeras and at 7 weeks in AKR/Cum chimeras and progressed slowly. Repopulation was not enhanced by increasing the number of allogeneic bone marrow cells injected from 2 X 10(7) to 10(8) cells or by the addition of 8 X 10(7) allogeneic thymocytes to the donor inoculate. Epidermal repopulation by allogeneic Thy-1.2+ cells was not seen in AKR/J mice reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow cells and allogeneic Thy-1.2+ AKR/Cum thymocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal cells are derived from the bone marrow and suggest that they are not related to conventional peripheral T-lymphocytes.

  8. Systematic Nutritional Support in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Shigeo; Einsele, Hermann; Savani, Bipin N; Kapp, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become an established treatment modality for various hematological diseases. However, in allogeneic HSCT, patients often suffer from severe gastrointestinal complications caused by the conditioning regimen and acute/chronic graft-versus-host disease, which requires support by multidisciplinary nutritional support teams (NST). In addition, pretransplantation nutritional status can affect the clinical outcome after allogeneic HSCT. Therefore, it is important to refer the patient to a NST when becoming aware of nutritional problems before allogeneic HSCT. It is also important to follow nutritional status over the long term, as patients often suffer from various nutritional problems, such as malnutrition and metabolic syndrome, even late after allogeneic HSCT. In summary, NST can contribute to the improvement of nutritional status and possibly prognosis at every stage before and after allogeneic HSCT. Here, we aim to give a comprehensive overview of current understanding about nutritional support in allogeneic HSCT and try to provoke a constructive discussion to stimulate further investigation. PMID:26172477

  9. Regulatory T Cells in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that cellular adoptive immunotherapy is becoming an attractive though challenging approach in regulating tumor immunity and alloresponses in clinical transplantation. Naturally arising CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) have emerged as a key component in this regard. Over the last decade, a large body of evidence from preclinical models has demonstrated their crucial role in auto- and tumor immunity and has opened the door to their “first-in-man” clinical application. Initial studies in clinical allogeneic stem cell transplantation are very encouraging and may pave the way for other applications. Further improvements in Treg ex vivo or in vivo expansion technologies will simplify their global clinical application. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of Treg biology and their potential for cell-based immunotherapy in allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:23737813

  10. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kalaycio, Matt E.; Kukreja, Manisha; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Szer, Jeffrey; Cortes, Jorge; Maziarz, Richard T.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Buser, Andreas; Copelan, Edward; Gale, Robert Peter; Gupta, Vikas; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Marks, David I; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Arora, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    The poor prognosis of patients with prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL) has led some clinicians to recommend allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). However, the data to support this approach is limited to case-reports and small case-series. We reviewed the database of the Center for International Blood & Marrow Transplant Research to determine outcomes after allotransplant for patients with PLL. We identified 47 patients with a median age of 54 years (range, 30–75). With a median follow-up of 13 months, progression-free survival was 33% (95% Confidence Interval 20–47%) at 2 years. The most common cause of death was relapse or progression in 49%. The cumulative incidence of treatment-related mortality at 1-year post transplant was 28%. The small patient population prohibited prognostic factor analysis but these data support consideration of allotransplant for PLL. Further study of a larger population of patients is needed to determine which patients are more likely to benefit. PMID:19961946

  11. Phenotype and function of nasal dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haekyung; Ruane, Darren; Law, Kenneth; Ho, Yan; Garg, Aakash; Rahman, Adeeb; Esterházy, Daria; Cheong, Cheolho; Goljo, Erden; Sikora, Andrew G.; Mucida, Daniel; Chen, Benjamin; Govindraj, Satish; Breton, Gaëlle; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal vaccination generates immunity across local, regional and distant sites. However, nasal dendritic cells (DC), pivotal for the induction of intranasal vaccine- induced immune responses, have not been studied in detail. Here, using a variety of parameters, we define nasal DCs in mice and humans. Distinct subsets of “classical” DCs, dependent on the transcription factor zbtb46 were identified in the murine nose. The murine nasal DCs were FLT3 ligand-responsive and displayed unique phenotypic and functional characteristics including the ability to present antigen, induce an allogeneic T cell response and migrate in response to LPS or live bacterial pathogens. Importantly, in a cohort of human volunteers, BDCA-1+ DCs were observed to be the dominant nasal DC population at steady state. During chronic inflammation, the frequency of both BDCA-1+ and BDCA-3hi DCs was reduced in the nasal tissue, associating the loss of these immune sentinels with chronic nasal inflammation. The present study is the first detailed description of the phenotypic, ontogenetic and functional properties of nasal DCs and will inform the design of preventative immunization strategies as well as therapeutic modalities against chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25669151

  12. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathon B; Burns, Linda J; Bachanova, Veronika

    2015-04-01

    Despite a wide spectrum of treatment options, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) remains a challenging hematologic malignancy to manage. Advances in front-line therapy, including the monoclonal antibody rituximab and increasing use of cytarabine, have improved remission rates. Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can effectively consolidate remission of MCL, leading to encouraging survival beyond 5 yr. However, nearly all patients with MCL will relapse and require salvage therapy. Novel agents such as ibrutinib, bortezomib, and lenalidomide have dramatically expanded the options for treating relapsed MCL. In this review, we summarize the clinical evidence supporting the use of allogeneic donor HCT in MCL and make recommendations on indications for its use. Data suggest that allogeneic donor HCT is the only curative therapy for patients with poor prognosis or aggressive MCL. Patient selection, timing, and optimal use remain a matter of scientific debate and given the rapidly changing therapeutic landscape of MCL, the outcomes of allogeneic HCT should be interpreted in the context of novel therapeutics. PMID:25154430

  13. Antigen mRNA-transfected, allogeneic fibroblasts loaded with NKT-cell ligand confer antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shin-ichiro; Goto, Akira; Shimizu, Kanako

    2009-04-30

    The maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) in situ by danger signals plays a central role in linking innate and adaptive immunity. We previously demonstrated that the activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells by administration of alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer)-loaded tumor cells can act as a cellular adjuvant through the DC maturation. In the current study, we used allogeneic fibroblasts loaded with alpha-GalCer and transfected with antigen-encoding mRNA, thus combining the adjuvant effects of iNKT-cell activation with delivery of antigen to DCs in vivo. We found that these cells produce antigen protein and activate NK and iNKT cells. When injected into major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched mice, they elicited antigen-specific T-cell responses and provided tumor protection, suggesting that these immune responses depend on host DCs. In addition, antigen-expressing fibroblasts loaded with alpha-GalCer lead to a more potent T-cell response than those expressing NK cell ligands. Thus, glycolipid-loaded, mRNA-transfected allogeneic fibroblasts act as cellular vectors to provide iNKT-cell activation, leading to DC maturation and T-cell immunity. By harnessing the innate immune system and generating an adaptive immune response to a variety of antigens, this unique tool could prove clinically beneficial in the development of immunotherapies against malignant and infectious diseases. PMID:19164596

  14. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mycosis fungoides*

    PubMed Central

    Atalla, Angelo; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias; Siqueira, Denise Bittencourt; Toledo, Gabriela Cumani

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis Fungoides is typically an indolent disease in early stages. However, approximately 30% of patients have advanced staged disease at presentation and 20% will develop it at some time. These patients have a poorer prognosis with a median survival of 2-4 years. The only curative option for mycosis fungoides may be hematopoietic allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We report the case of a patient with mycosis fungoides in an advanced stage (IIB), refractory to treatment options. She underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The patient remains in complete remission nineteen months after allo-HSCT. Allogeneic transplantation can alter the natural history of mycosis fungoides and should be considered in patients who have refractory disease or short-lived responses with standard therapies. PMID:24346924

  15. Cell salvage for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Carless, Paul A; Henry, David A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Brown, Tamara; Fergusson, Dean A

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have prompted reconsideration of the use of allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and a range of techniques to minimise transfusion requirements. Objectives To examine the evidence for the efficacy of cell salvage in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes. Search methods We identified studies by searching CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2009), EMBASE (1980 to June 2009), the internet (to August 2009) and bibliographies of published articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials with a concurrent control group in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to cell salvage (autotransfusion) or to a control group who did not receive the intervention. Data collection and analysis Data were independently extracted and the risk of bias assessed. Relative risks (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. The primary outcomes were the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red cell transfusion and the amount of blood transfused. Other clinical outcomes are detailed in the review. Main results A total of 75 trials were included. Overall, the use of cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 38% (RR 0.62; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.70). The absolute reduction in risk (ARR) of receiving an allogeneic RBC transfusion was 21% (95% CI 15% to 26%). In orthopaedic procedures the RR of exposure to RBC transfusion was 0.46 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.57) compared to 0.77 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.86) for cardiac procedures. The use of cell salvage resulted in an average saving of 0.68 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (WMD −0.68; 95% CI −0.88 to −0.49). Cell salvage did not appear to impact adversely on clinical outcomes. Authors’ conclusions

  16. Dendritic Cell-Targeted Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Lillian; Delamarre, Lélia

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant effort, the development of effective vaccines inducing strong and durable T-cell responses against intracellular pathogens and cancer cells has remained a challenge. The initiation of effector CD8+ T-cell responses requires the presentation of peptides derived from internalized antigen on class I major histocompatibility complex molecules by dendritic cells (DCs) in a process called cross-presentation. A current strategy to enhance the effectiveness of vaccination is to deliver antigens directly to DCs. This is done via selective targeting of antigen using monoclonal antibodies directed against endocytic receptors on the surface of the DCs. In this review, we will discuss considerations relevant to the design of such vaccines: the existence of DC subsets with specialized functions, the impact of the antigen intracellular trafficking on cross-presentation, and the influence of maturation signals received by DCs on the outcome of the immune response. PMID:24910635

  17. Fate Mapping of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poltorak, Mateusz Pawel; Schraml, Barbara Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous group of mononuclear phagocytes with versatile roles in immunity. They are classified predominantly based on phenotypic and functional properties, namely their stellate morphology, expression of the integrin CD11c, and major histocompatibility class II molecules, as well as their superior capacity to migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and stimulate naïve T cells. However, these attributes are not exclusive to DCs and often change within inflammatory or infectious environments. This led to debates over cell identification and questioned even the mere existence of DCs as distinct leukocyte lineage. Here, we review experimental approaches taken to fate map DCs and discuss how these have shaped our understanding of DC ontogeny and lineage affiliation. Considering the ontogenetic properties of DCs will help to overcome the inherent shortcomings of purely phenotypic- and function-based approaches to cell definition and will yield a more robust way of DC classification. PMID:25999945

  18. Allogenic benefit in stem cell therapy: cardiac repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Al-Daccak, R; Charron, D

    2015-09-01

    Stem cell (SC)-based therapies are a developing mean to repair, restore, maintain, or enhance organ functioning through life span. They are in particular a fast track to restore function in failing heart. Various types of SCs have been used in experimental and clinical studies showing the potential of these cells to revolutionize the treatment of heart diseases. Autologous cells have been privileged to overpass immunological barriers. The field has progressed tremendously and the hurdles, which have been largely overlooked in the excitement over the expected benefit the immunogenicity, have been revealed. Also, manufacturing of patient-specific clinical grade SC product, whether adult stem or reprogrammed induced pluripotent SCs, and the availability of these cells in sufficient amounts and status when needed is questionable. In contrast, adult SCs derived from healthy donors, thus allogeneic, have the advantage to be immediately available as an 'off-the-shelf' therapeutic product. The challenge is to overcome the immunological barriers to their transplantation. Recent research provided new insights into the mode of action and immune behavior of SCs in autologous as well as allogeneic settings. Lessons are learned and immune paradigms are changing: allogenicity, if balanced could be part of the dynamic and durable mechanisms that are critical to sustain cardiac regeneration and repair. We discuss the hurdles, lessons, and advances accomplished in the field through the progressive journey of cardiac-derived stem/progenitor cells toward allogeneic cardiac regenerative/reparative therapy. PMID:26206374

  19. Cellular therapy following allogeneic stem-cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is the most effective approach for many patients with hematologic malignancies. Unfortunately, relapse remains the most common cause of death after allogeneic HSCT, and the prognosis of relapsed disease is poor for most patients. Induction of a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL), or graft-versus-tumor, effect through the use of donor leukocyte infusion (DLI), or donor lymphocyte infusion, has been remarkably successful for relapsed chronic myelogenous leukemia. Unfortunately, response to DLI in other hematologic malignancies is much less common and depends on many factors including histology, pace and extent of relapse, and time from HSCT to relapse. Furthermore, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is common after DLI and often limits successful immunotherapy. Ultimately, manipulations to minimize GVHD while preserving or enhancing GVL are necessary to improve outcomes for relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:23556106

  20. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells turn into foamy dendritic cells with IL-17A.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Giulia; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Bissay, Nathalie; Debard, Cyrille; Daira, Patricia; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Proamer, Fabienne; Hanau, Daniel; Vidal, Hubert; Aricò, Maurizio; Delprat, Christine; Mahtouk, Karène

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. In the field of immunometabolism, we have studied the impact of IL-17A on the lipid metabolism of human in vitro-generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Microarrays and lipidomic analysis revealed an intense remodeling of lipid metabolism induced by IL-17A in DCs. IL-17A increased 2-12 times the amounts of phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters in DCs. Palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and oleic (18:ln-9c) acid were the main fatty acid chains present in DCs. They were strongly increased in response to IL-17A while their relative proportion remained unchanged. Capture of extracellular lipids was the major mechanism of lipid droplet accumulation, visualized by electron microscopy and Oil Red O staining. Besides this foamy phenotype, IL-17A induced a mixed macrophage-DC phenotype and expression of the nuclear receptor NR1H3/liver X receptor-α, previously identified in the context of atherosclerosis as the master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. These IL-17A-treated DCs were as competent as untreated DCs to stimulate allogeneic naive T-cell proliferation. Following this first characterization of lipid-rich DCs, we propose to call these IL-17A-dependent cells "foamy DCs" and discuss the possible existence of foamy DCs in atherosclerosis, a metabolic and inflammatory disorder involving IL-17A. PMID:25833686

  1. Actinomycosis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation despite penicillin prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Barraco, F; Labussière-Wallet, H; Valour, F; Ducastelle-Leprêtre, S; Nicolini, F-E; Thomas, X; Ferry, T; Dumitrescu, O; Michallet, M; Ader, F

    2016-08-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare chronic and multifaceted disease caused by Actinomyces species frequently mimicking malignancy or other chronic granulomatous lung diseases. We report 4 original presentations of actinomycosis arising under supposed penicillin prophylaxis in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. PMID:27203624

  2. Probiotic modulation of dendritic cell function is influenced by ageing.

    PubMed

    You, Jialu; Dong, Honglin; Mann, Elizabeth R; Knight, Stella C; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2014-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical for the generation of T-cell responses. DC function may be modulated by probiotics, which confer health benefits in immunocompromised individuals, such as the elderly. This study investigated the effects of four probiotics, Bifidobacterium longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486, B. longum SP 07/3, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (L.GG) and L. casei Shirota (LcS), on DC function in an allogeneic mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR) model, using DCs and T-cells from young and older donors in different combinations. All four probiotics enhanced expression of CD40, CD80 and CCR7 on both young and older DCs, but enhanced cytokine production (TGF-β, TNF-α) by old DCs only. LcS induced IL-12 and IFNγ production by DC to a greater degree than other strains, while B. longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486 favoured IL-10 production. Stimulation of young T cells in an allogeneic MLR with DC was enhanced by probiotic pretreatment of old DCs, which demonstrated greater activation (CD25) than untreated controls. However, pretreatment of young or old DCs with LPS or probiotics failed to enhance the proliferation of T-cells derived from older donors. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that ageing increases the responsiveness of DCs to probiotics, but this is not sufficient to overcome the impact of immunosenescence in the MLR. PMID:24094416

  3. Unique immunomodulatory effects of azelastine on dendritic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, S; Kietzmann, M; Stark, H; Bäumer, W

    2014-11-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis are among the most common inflammatory skin diseases in western countries, and antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells (DC) are key players in their pathophysiology. Histamine, an important mediator of allergic reactions, influences DC maturation and cytokine secretion, which led us to investigate the immunomodulatory potential of the well-known histamine H1 receptor antagonists: azelastine, olopatadine, cetirizine, and pyrilamine. Unlike other H1 antihistamines, azelastine decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-12 secretion from murine bone marrow-derived DC. This effect was independent of histamine receptors H1, H2, or H4 and may be linked to inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Moreover, only azelastine reduced proliferation of allogenic T cells in a mixed leukocyte reaction. We then tested topical application of the H1 antihistamines on mice sensitized against toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, a model of Th2-mediated allergic contact dermatitis. In contrast to the in vitro results, all investigated substances were efficacious in reducing allergic ear swelling. Azelastine has unique effects on dendritic cells and T cell interaction in vitro. However, this did not translate into superior in vivo efficacy for Th2-mediated allergic dermatitis, possibly due to the effects of the antihistamines on other cell types involved in skin inflammation. Future research will have to clarify whether these properties are relevant to in vivo models of allergic inflammation with a different T cell polarization. PMID:25119779

  4. Dendritic cells in lung immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Cook, Peter C; MacDonald, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) lie at the heart of the innate immune system, specialised at recognising danger signals in many forms including foreign material, infection or tissue damage and initiating powerful adaptive immune and inflammatory responses. In barrier sites such as the lung, the instrumental role that DCs play at the interface between the environment and the host places them in a pivotal position in determining the severity of inflammatory disease. The past few years has seen a significant increase in our fundamental understanding of the subsets of DCs involved in pulmonary immunity, as well as the mechanisms by which they are activated and which they may use to coordinate downstream inflammation and pathology. In this review, we will summarise current understanding of the multi-faceted role that DCs play in the induction, maintenance and regulation of lung immunopathology, with an emphasis on allergic pulmonary disease. PMID:27256370

  5. Dendritic cells in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Kabel, P J; Voorbij, H A; van der Gaag, R D; Wiersinga, W M; de Haan, M; Drexhage, H A

    1987-01-01

    Dendritic cells form a morphologically distinct class of cells characterized by shape, reniform nucleus, absent to weak acid-phosphatase activity and strong Class II MHC determinant positivity. Functionally they are the most efficient cells in antigen presentation to T-lymphocytes which indicates their role in the initiation of an immune response. Using immunehistochemical techniques we studied the presence of dendritic cells in normal Wistar rat and human thyroids, in thyroids of BBW rats developing thyroid autoimmunity and in Graves' goitres. Dendritic cells could be identified in all thyroids studied and were positioned underneath the thyrocytes in between the follicles. Skin dendritic cells travel via lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, thus forming an antigen presenting cell system. It is likely that a similar cell system exists on the level of the thyroid for dendritic cells have also been detected in thyroid draining lymph nodes. In normal thyroid tissue of both human and rat dendritic cells were relatively scarce. During the initial phases of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BBW rat (before the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) numbers of thyroid dendritic cells increased. Intrathyroidal T-helper cells, B-cells or plasma cells could not be found. The thyroid draining lymph node contained large numbers of plasma cells. During the later stages of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BB/W rat (after the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) and in Graves' goitres dendritic cells were not only present in high number, but 20-30% were seen in contact with now-present intrathyroidal T-helper lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3475920

  6. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling

    PubMed Central

    Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G.; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for podosomes of dendritic cells. PMID:24424029

  7. SHIPi Enhances Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sandra; Brooks, Robert; Gumbleton, Matthew; Park, Mi-Young; Russo, Christopher M.; Howard, Kyle T.; Chisholm, John D.; Kerr, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a highly effective procedure enabling long-term survival for patients with hematologic malignancy or heritable defects. Although there has been a dramatic increase in the success rate of HSCT over the last two decades, HSCT can result in serious, sometimes untreatable disease due to toxic conditioning regimens and Graft-versus-Host-Disease. Studies utilizing germline knockout mice have discovered several candidate genes that could be targeted pharmacologically to create a more favorable environment for transplant success. SHIP1 deficiency permits improved engraftment of hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells (HS-PCs) and produces an immunosuppressive microenvironment ideal for incoming allogeneic grafts. The recent development of small molecule SHIP1 inhibitors has opened a different therapeutic approach by creating transient SHIP1-deficiency. Here we show that SHIP1 inhibition (SHIPi) mobilizes functional HS-PC, accelerates hematologic recovery, and enhances donor HS-PC engraftment in both allogeneic and autologous transplant settings. We also observed the expansion of key cell populations known to suppress host-reactive cells formed during engraftment. Therefore, SHIPi represents a non-toxic, new therapeutic that has significant potential to improve the success and safety of therapies that utilize autologous and allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26052545

  8. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Döring, Yvonne; Zernecke, Alma

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall and the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is initiated and maintained by innate and adaptive immunity. Accumulating evidence suggests an important contribution of autoimmune responses to this disease. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), a specialized cell type known to produce large amounts of type I interferons (IFNs) in response to bacterial and viral infections, have recently been revealed to play important roles in atherosclerosis. For example, the development of autoimmune complexes consisting of self-DNA and antimicrobial peptides, which trigger chronic type I IFN production by pDCs, promote early atherosclerotic lesion formation. pDCs and pDC-derived type I IFNs can also induce the maturation of conventional DCs and macrophages, and the development of autoreactive B cells and antibody production. These mechanisms, known to play a role in the pathogenesis of other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis, may also affect the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesion formation. This review discusses emerging evidence showing a contribution of pDCs in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:22754539

  9. Human Decidua Contains Potent Immunostimulatory CD83+ Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kämmerer, Ulrike; Schoppet, Michael; McLellan, Alexander D.; Kapp, Michaela; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Kämpgen, Eckhart; Dietl, Johannes

    2000-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinel cells of the immune system important in initiating antigen-specific T-cell responses to microbial and transplantation antigens. DCs are particularly found in surface tissues such as skin and mucosa, where the organism is threatened by infectious agents. The human decidua, despite its proposed immunosuppressive function, hosts a variety of immunocompetent CD45 cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, and T cells. Here we describe the detection, isolation, and characterization of CD45+, CD40+, HLA-DR++, and CD83+ cells from human early pregnancy decidua with typical DC morphology. CD83+ as well as CD1a+ cells were found in close vicinity to endometrial glands, with preference to the basal layer of the decidua. In vitro, decidual CD83+ cells could be enriched to ∼30%, with the remainder of cells encompassing DC-bound CD3+ T cells. Stimulation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed leukocyte reaction by the decidual cell fraction enriched for CD83+ cells, was similar to that obtained with blood monocyte-derived DCs, demonstrating the potent immunostimulatory capacity of these cells. Decidual DCs with morphological, phenotypic, and functional characteristics of immunostimulatory DCs might be important mediators in the regulation of immunological balance between maternal and fetal tissue, leading to successful pregnancy. PMID:10880386

  10. A rapid culture technique produces functional dendritic-like cells from human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ning, Jian; Morgan, David; Pamphilon, Derwood

    2011-01-01

    Most anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies involving dendritic cells (DC) as vaccines rely upon the adoptive transfer of DC loaded with exogenous tumour-peptides. This study utilized human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells as progenitors from which functional dendritic-like antigen presenting cells (DLC) were generated, that constitutively express tumour antigens for recognition by CD8(+) T cells. DLC were generated from AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3 using rapid culture techniques and appropriate cytokines. DLC were evaluated for their cell-surface phenotype, antigen uptake and ability to stimulate allogeneic responder cell proliferation, and production of IFN-γ; compared with DC derived from normal human PBMC donors. KG-1 and MUTZ-3 DLC increased expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR, and MUTZ-3 DLC downregulated CD14 and expressed CD1a. Importantly, both KG-1 and MUTZ-3-derived DLC promoted proliferation of allogeneic responder cells more efficiently than unmodified cells; neither cells incorporated FITC-labeled dextran, but both stimulated IFN-γ production from responding allogeneic CD8(+) T cells. Control DC produced from PBMC using the FastDC culture also expressed high levels of critical cell surface ligands and demonstrated good APC function. This paper indicates that functional DLC can be cultured from the AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3, and FastDC culture generates functional KG-1 DLC. PMID:22187520

  11. A Rapid Culture Technique Produces Functional Dendritic-Like Cells from Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Jian; Morgan, David; Pamphilon, Derwood

    2011-01-01

    Most anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies involving dendritic cells (DC) as vaccines rely upon the adoptive transfer of DC loaded with exogenous tumour-peptides. This study utilized human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells as progenitors from which functional dendritic-like antigen presenting cells (DLC) were generated, that constitutively express tumour antigens for recognition by CD8+ T cells. DLC were generated from AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3 using rapid culture techniques and appropriate cytokines. DLC were evaluated for their cell-surface phenotype, antigen uptake and ability to stimulate allogeneic responder cell proliferation, and production of IFN-γ; compared with DC derived from normal human PBMC donors. KG-1 and MUTZ-3 DLC increased expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR, and MUTZ-3 DLC downregulated CD14 and expressed CD1a. Importantly, both KG-1 and MUTZ-3-derived DLC promoted proliferation of allogeneic responder cells more efficiently than unmodified cells; neither cells incorporated FITC-labeled dextran, but both stimulated IFN-γ production from responding allogeneic CD8+ T cells. Control DC produced from PBMC using the FastDC culture also expressed high levels of critical cell surface ligands and demonstrated good APC function. This paper indicates that functional DLC can be cultured from the AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3, and FastDC culture generates functional KG-1 DLC. PMID:22187520

  12. Aspergillus Thyroiditis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ataca, Pinar; Atilla, Erden; Saracoglu, Pelin; Yilmaz, Gulden; Civriz Bozdag, Sinem; Toprak, Selami Kocak; Yuksel, Meltem Kurt; Ceyhan, Koray; Topcuoglu, Pervin

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus thyroiditis is a rare disorder detected in immunocompromised patients during disseminated infections. Early management is essential to prevent high mortality. A 61-year-old allogeneic stem cell male recipient presented with painful thyroid nodular enlargement. He had low TSH and low free T4 levels. The thyroid ultrasound showed a hypoechoic nodule; biopsy indicated suppurative Aspergillus thyroiditis. He was successfully treated by amphotericin B. PMID:26640727

  13. Immunological aspects of allogeneic and autologous mesenchymal stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Hoogduijn, M J; Roemeling-van Rhijn, M; Korevaar, S S; Engela, A U; Weimar, W; Baan, C C

    2011-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have potential for therapeutic application as an immunomodulatory and regenerative agent. The immunogenicity and survival of MSCs after infusion are, however, not clear and evidence suggests that allogeneic but also autologous MSCs disappear rapidly after infusion. This may be associated with the susceptibility of MSCs to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells, possibly a result of culture-induced stress. In the present study we examined whether NK cell-mediated lysis of MSCs could be inhibited by immunosuppressive drugs. Human MSCs were isolated from adipose tissue and expanded in culture. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were activated with interleukin (IL)-2 (200 U/ml) and IL-15 (10 ng/ml) for 7 days. CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+) NK cells were then isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and added to europium-labeled MSCs for 4 hr in the presence or absence of immunosuppressive drugs. Lysis of MSCs was determined by spectrophotometric measurement of europium release. Nonactivated NK cells were not capable of lysing MSCs. Cytokine-activated NK cells showed upregulated levels of granzyme B and perforin and efficiently lysed allogeneic and autologous MSCs. Addition of tacrolimus, rapamycin or sotrastaurin to the lysis assay did not inhibit MSC killing. Furthermore, preincubation of activated NK cells with the immunosuppressive drugs for 24 hr before exposure to MSCs had no effect on MSC lysis. Last, addition of the immunosuppressants before and during the activation of NK cells, reduced NK cell numbers but did not affect their capacity to lyse MSCs. We conclude that the immunosuppressive drugs tacrolimus, rapamycin, and sotrastaurin are not capable of inhibiting the lysis of allogeneic and autologous MSCs by activated NK cells. Other approaches to controlling lysis of MSCs should be investigated, as controlling lysis may determine the efficacy of MSC therapy. PMID:21732766

  14. Regulation of Th2 Cell Immunity by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyeongjin

    2016-01-01

    Th2 cell immunity is required for host defense against helminths, but it is detrimental in allergic diseases in humans. Unlike Th1 cell and Th17 cell subsets, the mechanism by which dendritic cells modulate Th2 cell responses has been obscure, in part because of the inability of dendritic cells to provide IL-4, which is indispensable for Th2 cell lineage commitment. In this regard, immune cells other than dendritic cells, such as basophils and innate lymphoid cells, have been suggested as Th2 cell inducers. More recently, multiple independent researchers have shown that specialized subsets of dendritic cells mediate Th2 cell responses. This review will discuss the current understanding related to the regulation of Th2 cell responses by dendritic cells and other immune cells. PMID:26937227

  15. CTLA4-Ig immunosuppressive activity at the level of dendritic cell/T cell crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Edda; Hölzl, Markus; Ahmadi, Sarah; Dillinger, Barbara; Pilat, Nina; Fuchs, Dietmar; Wekerle, Thomas; Heitger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Immunosuppressive cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 immunoglobulin fusion proteins (CTLA4-Ig) block the CD28:CD80/86 costimulatory pathway. On a cellular level, CTLA4-Ig is understood to dampen T cell responses. As a mechanism, CTLA4-Ig has been reported to affect dendritic cell (DC) function via inducing the immunosuppressive indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) pathway and promoting a DC regulatory phenotype. We here probed cellular mechanisms of CTLA4-Ig immunoregulation in an allogeneic setting using C57BL/6 splenic or bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs) as stimulators of allogeneic Balb/c derived T cells. To address whether CTLA4-Ig immunosuppression affected DCs, we pre-exposed C57BL/6 splenic or BMDCs to CTLA4-Ig and removed unbound CTLA4-Ig before co-culture with allogeneic T cells. CTLA4-Ig disappeared rapidly (within 4 h) from the cell membrane by combined internalization and dissociation. These CTLA4-Ig pre-exposed DCs were fully capable of stimulating allogeneic T cell proliferation, suggesting that CTLA4-Ig does not impair the DC stimulatory capacity. Only the presence of CTLA4-Ig during DC/T cell co-culture resulted in the expected inhibition of proliferation. C57BL/6 splenic or BMDCs exposed to CTLA4-Ig did not display IDO activity. We conclude that CTLA4-Ig immunosuppressive activity does not depend on a DC regulatory phenotype but on its presence during DC/T cell interaction. PMID:23434857

  16. Financial burden in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khera, Nandita; Chang, Yu-hui; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Slack, James; Beebe, Timothy; Roy, Vivek; Noel, Pierre; Fauble, Veena; Sproat, Lisa; Tilburt, Jon; Leis, Jose F; Mikhael, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Although allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an expensive treatment for hematological disorders, little is known about the financial consequences for the patients who undergo this procedure. We analyzed factors associated with its financial burden and its impact on health behaviors of allogeneic HCT recipients. A questionnaire was retrospectively mailed to 482 patients who underwent allogeneic HCT from January 2006 to June 2012 at the Mayo Clinic, to collect information regarding current financial concerns, household income, employment, insurance, out-of-pocket expenses, and health and functional status. A multivariable logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with financial burden and treatment nonadherence. Of the 268 respondents (56% response rate), 73% reported that their sickness had hurt them financially. All patients for whom the insurance information was available (missing, n = 13) were insured. Forty-seven percent of respondents experienced financial burden, such as household income decreased by >50%, selling/mortgaging home, or withdrawing money from retirement accounts. Three percent declared bankruptcy. Younger age and poor current mental and physical functioning increased the likelihood of financial burden. Thirty-five percent of patients reported deleterious health behaviors because of financial constraints. These patients were likely to be younger, have lower education, and with a longer time since HCT. Being employed decreased the likelihood of experiencing financial burden and treatment nonadherence due to concern about costs. A significant proportion of allogeneic HCT survivors experience financial hardship despite insurance coverage. Future research should investigate potential interventions to help at-risk patients and prevent adverse financial outcomes after this life-saving procedure. PMID:24867778

  17. Cimetidine modulates the antigen presenting capacity of dendritic cells from colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Fujiwara, H; Ueda, Y; Itoh, T; Yamashita, T; Yoshimura, T; Okugawa, K; Yamamoto, Y; Yano, Y; Yamagishi, H

    2002-04-22

    Cimetidine, a H(2) receptor antagonist, has been reported to improve survival in gastrointestinal cancer patients. These effects have largely been attributed to the enhancing effects of cimetidine on the host's antitumour cell-mediated immune response, such as inhibition of suppressor T lymphocyte activity, stimulation of natural killer cell activity and increase of interleukin-2 production from helper T lymphocytes. We conducted an in vitro study on the effects of cimetidine on differentiation and antigen presenting capacity of monocyte-derived dendritic cells from advanced colorectal cancer patients and normal controls. As a result, an investigation of expression of surface molecules associated with dendritic cells by flow cytometric analyses showed that cimetidine had no enhancing effect on differentiation of dendritic cells from cancer patients and normal controls. An investigation of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions revealed that cimetidine increased the antigen presenting capacity of dendritic cells from both materials. Moreover, a higher antigen presenting capacity was observed in advanced cancer patients compared to normal controls. These effects might be mediated via specific action of cimetidine and not via H(2) receptors because famotidine did not show similar effects. Our results suggest that cimetidine may enhance the host's antitumour cell-mediated immunity by improving the suppressed dendritic cells function of advanced cancer patients. PMID:11953882

  18. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Halter, Joerg P; Michael, W; Schüpbach, M; Mandel, Hanna; Casali, Carlo; Orchard, Kim; Collin, Matthew; Valcarcel, David; Rovelli, Attilio; Filosto, Massimiliano; Dotti, Maria T; Marotta, Giuseppe; Pintos, Guillem; Barba, Pere; Accarino, Anna; Ferra, Christelle; Illa, Isabel; Beguin, Yves; Bakker, Jaap A; Boelens, Jaap J; de Coo, Irenaeus F M; Fay, Keith; Sue, Carolyn M; Nachbaur, David; Zoller, Heinz; Sobreira, Claudia; Pinto Simoes, Belinda; Hammans, Simon R; Savage, David; Martí, Ramon; Chinnery, Patrick F; Elhasid, Ronit; Gratwohl, Alois; Hirano, Michio

    2015-10-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been proposed as treatment for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, a rare fatal autosomal recessive disease due to TYMP mutations that result in thymidine phosphorylase deficiency. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all known patients suffering from mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy who underwent allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 2005 and 2011. Twenty-four patients, 11 males and 13 females, median age 25 years (range 10-41 years) treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation from related (n = 9) or unrelated donors (n = 15) in 15 institutions worldwide were analysed for outcome and its associated factors. Overall, 9 of 24 patients (37.5%) were alive at last follow-up with a median follow-up of these surviving patients of 1430 days. Deaths were attributed to transplant in nine (including two after a second transplant due to graft failure), and to mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy in six patients. Thymidine phosphorylase activity rose from undetectable to normal levels (median 697 nmol/h/mg protein, range 262-1285) in all survivors. Seven patients (29%) who were engrafted and living more than 2 years after transplantation, showed improvement of body mass index, gastrointestinal manifestations, and peripheral neuropathy. Univariate statistical analysis demonstrated that survival was associated with two defined pre-transplant characteristics: human leukocyte antigen match (10/10 versus <10/10) and disease characteristics (liver disease, history of gastrointestinal pseudo-obstruction or both). Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation can restore thymidine phosphorylase enzyme function in patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy and improve clinical manifestations of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy in the long term. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  19. Alefacept and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    Thalassemia; Sickle Cell Disease; Glanzmann Thrombasthenia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic-granulomatous Disease; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Schwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Fanconi Anemia; Dyskeratosis-congenita; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia

  20. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation corrects biochemical derangements in MNGIE.

    PubMed

    Hirano, M; Martí, R; Casali, C; Tadesse, S; Uldrick, T; Fine, B; Escolar, D M; Valentino, M L; Nishino, I; Hesdorffer, C; Schwartz, J; Hawks, R G; Martone, D L; Cairo, M S; DiMauro, S; Stanzani, M; Garvin, J H; Savage, D G

    2006-10-24

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is a multisystemic autosomal recessive disease due to primary thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficiency. To restore TP activity, we performed reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantations (alloSCTs) in two patients. In the first, alloSCT failed to engraft, but the second achieved mixed donor chimerism, which partially restored buffy coat TP activity and lowered plasma nucleosides. Thus, alloSCT can correct biochemical abnormalities in the blood of patients with MNGIE, but clinical efficacy remains unproven. PMID:16971696

  1. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy. PMID:27398454

  2. Ragweed subpollen particles of respirable size activate human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pazmandi, Kitti; Kumar, Brahma V; Szabo, Krisztina; Boldogh, Istvan; Szoor, Arpad; Vereb, Gyorgy; Veres, Agota; Lanyi, Arpad; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(P)H oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3(+) pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs) in the airways and SPPs' NAD(P)H oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins. PMID:23251688

  3. ISOLATION OF CHICKEN FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to isolate chicken follicular dendritic cells (FDC). A combination of methods involving panning, iodixanol density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic cell separation technology made it possible to obtain functional FDC from the cecal tonsils from chickens, which h...

  4. Curative treatment for severe sickle cell disease: allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oshrine, Benjamin; Talano, Julie-An

    2015-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited hematologic disorder that in its severe form can result in substantial morbidity and early mortality. Patients with this disorder can suffer from severe pain, lung disease, and strokes, resulting in chronic debilitating conditions, end organ dysfunction, and organ failure. The health care costs of caring for these chronically ill patients are substantial. Allogeneic transplantation is a modality that has the potential to cure these patients. To date, matched sibling donor transplantation is widely accepted as a standard of care for pediatric patients. Utilizing alternative donors for transplant is still under investigation, as is transplant for adult patients with sickle cell disease. This review focuses on the most recent data for hematopoietic cell transplantation for patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:26352583

  5. The multifaceted biology of plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Swiecki, Melissa; Colonna, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a unique dendritic cell subset that specializes in the production of type I interferons (IFNs). pDCs promote antiviral immune responses and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases characterized by a type I IFN signature. However, pDCs can also induce tolerogenic immune responses. Here, we review recent progress from the field of pDC biology, focusing on: the molecular mechanisms that regulate pDC development and functions; the pathways involved in their sensing of pathogens and endogenous nucleic acids; the function of pDCs at mucosal sites; and their roles in infections, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26160613

  6. Suppression of zinc dendrites in zinc electrode power cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damjanovic, A.; Diggle, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    Addition of various tetraalkyl quarternary ammonium salts, to alkaline zincate electrolyte of cell, prevents formation of zinc dendrites during charging of zinc electrode. Electrode capacity is not impaired and elimination of dendrites prolongs cell life.

  7. Thrombin regulates the function of human blood dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagita, Manabu; Kobayashi, Ryohei; Kashiwagi, Yoichiro; Shimabukuro, Yoshio; Murakami, Shinya E-mail: ipshinya@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2007-12-14

    Thrombin is the key enzyme in the coagulation cascade and activates endothelial cells, neutrophils and monocytes via protease-activated receptors (PARs). At the inflammatory site, immune cells have an opportunity to encounter thrombin. However little is known about the effect of thrombin for dendritic cells (DC), which are efficient antigen-presenting cells and play important roles in initiating and regulating immune responses. The present study revealed that thrombin has the ability to stimulate blood DC. Plasmacytoid DC (PDC) and myeloid DC (MDC) isolated from PBMC expressed PAR-1 and released MCP-1, IL-10, and IL-12 after thrombin stimulation. Unlike blood DC, monocyte-derived DC (MoDC), differentiated in vitro did not express PAR-1 and were unresponsive to thrombin. Effects of thrombin on blood DC were significantly diminished by the addition of anti-PAR-1 Ab or hirudin, serine protease inhibitor. Moreover, thrombin induced HLA-DR and CD86 expression on DC and the thrombin-treated DC induced allogenic T cell proliferation. These findings indicate that thrombin plays a role in the regulation of blood DC functions.

  8. Antigen loading of dendritic cells with whole tumor cell preparations.

    PubMed

    Thumann, Peter; Moc, Isabelle; Humrich, Jens; Berger, Thomas G; Schultz, Erwin S; Schuler, Gerold; Jenne, Lars

    2003-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) based vaccinations have been widely used for the induction of anti-tumoral immunity in clinical studies. Antigen loading of DC with whole tumor cell preparations is an attractive method whenever tumor cell material is available. In order to determine parameters for the loading procedure, we performed dose finding and timing experiments. We found that apoptotic and necrotic melanoma cells up to a ratio of one-to-one, equivalent to 1mg/ml protein per 1 x 10(6) DC, can be added to monocyte derived DC without effecting DC recovery extensively. Using the isolated protein content of tumor cells (lysate) as a parameter, up to 5 mg/ml protein per 1 x 10(6) DC can be added. To achieve significant protein uptake at least 1 mg/ml of protein have to be added for more than 24 h as tested with FITC-labelled ovalbumin. Maturation inducing cytokines can be added simultaneously with the tumor cell preparations to immature DC without affecting the uptake. Furthermore, we tested the feasibility of cryopreservation of loaded and matured DC to facilitate the generation of ready to use aliquots. DC were cryopreserved in a mix of human serum albumin, DMSO and 5% glucose. After thawing, surface expression of molecules indicating the mature status (CD83, costimulatory and MHC molecules), was found to be unaltered. Furthermore, cryopreserved DC kept the capability to stimulate allogenic T-cell proliferation in mixed leukocyte reactions at full level. Loaded and matured DC pulsed with influenza matrix peptide (IMP) retained the capacity to induce the generation of IMP-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes after cryopreservation as measured by ELISPOT and tetramer staining. The expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR-4 and CCR-7 remained unaltered during cryopreservation and the migratory responsiveness towards MIP-3beta was unaltered as measured in a migration assay. Thus we conclude that the large scale loading and maturation of DC with whole tumor cell preparations can be

  9. [Application of dendritic cells in clinical tumor therapy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Xian, Li-jian

    2002-04-01

    The active immunotherapy of dendritic cells is hot in tumor therapy research area. This article is a review of the source of dendritic cells, loading antigen, immunotherapy pathway, clinical application, choice of patients, and so on. It makes preparation for further research of dendritic cells. PMID:12452029

  10. Dendritic Cell Activation by Glucan Isolated from Umbilicaria Esculenta

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Sook; Kim, Jee Youn; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Moo Sung; Lee, Sang Rin; Kang, Jong Soon; Kim, Hwan Mook; Lee, Kyung-Ae; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2010-01-01

    Background Lichen-derived glucans have been known to stimulate the functions of immune cells. However, immunostimulatory activity of glucan obtained from edible lichen, Umbilicaria esculenta, has not been reported. Thus we evaluated the phenotype and functional maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) following treatment of extracted glucan (PUE). Methods The phenotypic and functional maturation of PUE-treated DCs was assessed by flow cytometric analysis and cytokine production, respectively. PUE-treated DCs was also used for mixed leukocyte reaction to evaluate T cell-priming capacity. Finally we detected the activation of MAPK and NF-κB by immunoblot. Results Phenotypic maturation of DCs was shown by the elevated expressions of CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II molecules. Functional activation of DCs was proved by increased cytokine production of IL-12, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-α/β, decreased endocytosis, and enhanced proliferation of allogenic T cells. Polymyxin B, specific inhibitor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), did not affect PUE activity, which suggested that PUE was free of LPS contamination. As a mechanism of action, PUE increased phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPKs, and enhanced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p50/p65 in DCs. Conclusion These results indicate that PUE induced DC maturation via MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:21286379

  11. Endocrinopathies after allogeneic and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Orio, Francesco; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90-99% of women and 60-90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40-50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  12. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, M J; Lazarus, H M; Carreras, J; Laport, G G; Cutler, C S; Wiernik, P H; Hale, G A; Maharaj, D; Gale, R P; Rowlings, P A; Freytes, C O; Miller, A M; Vose, J M; Maziarz, R T; Montoto, S; Maloney, D G; Hari, P N

    2014-11-01

    We describe outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome (MF/SS). Outcomes of 129 subjects with MF/SS reported to the Center for the International Blood and Marrow Transplant from 2000-2009. Median time from diagnosis to transplant was 30 (4-206) months and most subjects were with multiply relapsed/ refractory disease. The majority (64%) received non-myeloablative conditioning (NST) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). NST/RIC recipients were older in age compared with myeloablative recipients (median age 51 vs 44 years, P=0.005) and transplanted in recent years. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 and 5 years was 19% (95% confidence interval (CI) 12-27%) and 22% (95% CI 15-31%), respectively. Risk of disease progression was 50% (95% CI 41-60%) at 1 year and 61% (95% CI 50-71%) at 5 years. PFS at 1 and 5 years was 31% (95% CI 22-40%) and 17% (95% CI 9-26%), respectively. OS at 1 and 5 years was 54% (95% CI 45-63%) and 32% (95% CI 22-44%), respectively. Allogeneic HCT in MF/SS results in 5-year survival in approximately one-third of patients and of those, half remain disease-free. PMID:25068422

  13. ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES AND SEZARY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Carreras, Jeanette; Laport, Ginna G.; Cutler, Corey S.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Hale, Gregory A.; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Gale, Robert Peter; Rowlings, Phillip A.; Freytes, César O; Miller, Alan M.; Vose, Julie M.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Montoto, Silvia; Maloney, David G.; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2014-01-01

    We describe outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for mycosis fungoides and sezary syndrome (MF/SS). Outcomes of 129 subjects with MF/SS reported to the Center for the International Blood and Marrow Transplant (CIBMTR) from 2000–2009. Median time from diagnosis to transplant was 30 (4–206) months and most subjects were with multiply relapsed/refractory disease. Majority (64%) received non-myeloablative conditioning (NST) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). NST/RIC recipients were older in age compared to myeloablative recipients (median age 51 vs. 44 y p= 0.005) and transplanted in recent years. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 and 5 years was 19% (95 % CI 12–27%) and 22% (95 % CI 15–31%) respectively. Risk of disease progression was 50% (95% CI 41–60%) at 1 year and 61% (95% CI 50–71%) at 5 years. Progression free survival (PFS) at 1 and 5 years was 31% (95% CI 22–40%) and 17% (95% CI 9–26%) respectively. Overall survival at 1 and 5 years was 54% (95% CI 45–63%) and 32% (95% CI 22–44%) respectively. Allogeneic HCT in MF/SS results in 5 year survival in approximately one-third of patients and of those, half of them remain disease-free. PMID:25068422

  14. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  15. Engraftment syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation predicts poor outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lawrence; Frame, David; Braun, Thomas; Gatza, Erin; Hanauer, David A; Zhao, Shuang; Magenau, John M; Schultz, Kathryn; Tokala, Hemasri; Ferrara, James L M; Levine, John E; Reddy, Pavan; Paczesny, Sophie; Choi, Sung Won

    2014-09-01

    Engraftment syndrome (ES), characterized by fever, rash, pulmonary edema, weight gain, liver and renal dysfunction, and/or encephalopathy, occurs at the time of neutrophil recovery after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In this study, we evaluated the incidence, clinical features, risk factors, and outcomes of ES in children and adults undergoing first-time allogeneic HCT. Among 927 patients, 119 (13%) developed ES at a median of 10 days (interquartile range 9 to 12) after HCT. ES patients experienced significantly higher cumulative incidence of grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD at day 100 (75% versus 34%, P < .001) and higher nonrelapse mortality at 2 years (38% versus 19%, P < .001) compared with non-ES patients, resulting in lower overall survival at 2 years (38% versus 54%, P < .001). There was no significant difference in relapse at 2 years (26% versus 31%, P = .772). Suppression of tumorigenicity 2, interleukin 2 receptor alpha, and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 plasma biomarker levels were significantly elevated in ES patients. Our results illustrate the clinical significance and prognostic impact of ES on allogeneic HCT outcomes. Despite early recognition of the syndrome and prompt institution of corticosteroid therapy, outcomes in ES patients were uniformly poor. This study suggests the need for a prospective approach of collecting clinical features combined with correlative laboratory analyses to better characterize ES. PMID:24892262

  16. Risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Ethel S.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Socié, Gérard; Banks, Peter M.; Sobocinski, Kathleen A.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Kingma, Douglas W.; Travis, Lois B.; Flowers, Mary E.; Martin, Paul J.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Curtis, Rochelle E.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated 26 901 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at 271 centers worldwide to define patterns of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). PTLDs developed in 127 recipients, with 105 (83%) cases occurring within 1 year after transplantation. In multivariate analyses, we confirmed that PTLD risks were strongly associated (P < .001) with T-cell depletion of the donor marrow, antithymocyte globulin (ATG) use, and unrelated or HLA-mismatched grafts (URD/HLA mismatch). Significant associations were also confirmed for acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The increased risk associated with URD/HLA-mismatched donors (RR = 3.8) was limited to patients with T-cell depletion or ATG use (P = .004). New findings were elevated risks for age 50 years or older at transplantation (RR = 5.1; P < .001) and second transplantation (RR = 3.5; P < .001). Lower risks were found for T-cell depletion methods that remove both T and B cells (alemtuzumab and elutriation, RR = 3.1; P = .025) compared with other methods (RR = 9.4; P = .005 for difference). The cumulative incidence of PTLDs was low (0.2%) among 21 686 patients with no major risk factors, but increased to 1.1%, 3.6%, and 8.1% with 1, 2, and more than 3 major risk factors, respectively. Our findings identify subgroups of patients who underwent allogeneic HCT at elevated risk of PTLDs for whom prospective monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus activation and early treatment intervention may be particularly beneficial. PMID:19264919

  17. Detecting Danger: The Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe; Cayzer, Steve

    The "Dendritic Cell Algorithm" (DCA) is inspired by the function of the dendritic cells of the human immune system. In nature, dendritic cells are the intrusion detection agents of the human body, policing the tissue and organs for potential invaders in the form of pathogens. In this research, an abstract model of dendritic cell (DC) behavior is developed and subsequently used to form an algorithm—the DCA. The abstraction process was facilitated through close collaboration with laboratory-based immunologists, who performed bespoke experiments, the results of which are used as an integral part of this algorithm. The DCA is a population-based algorithm, with each agent in the system represented as an "artificial DC". Each DC has the ability to combine multiple data streams and can add context to data suspected as anomalous. In this chapter, the abstraction process and details of the resultant algorithm are given. The algorithm is applied to numerous intrusion detection problems in computer security including the detection of port scans and botnets, where it has produced impressive results with relatively low rates of false positives.

  18. Characterization of chicken dendritic cell markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal and Natural Resources Institute, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD, USA. New mouse monoclonal antibodies which detect CD80 and CD83 were developed to characterize chicken dendritic cells (DCs). The characteristics of these molecules have been studied in human, swine, ovine, feline, and canine but not ...

  19. Innate Allorecognition Results in Rapid Accumulation of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kevin V; Delconte, Rebecca B; Huntington, Nicholas D; Tarlinton, David M; Sutherland, Robyn M; Zhan, Yifan; Lew, Andrew M

    2016-09-01

    Although the mechanisms governing the innate recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns have been well defined, how allogeneic cellular stimuli evoke innate responses remains less so. In this article, we report that upon i.v. transfer (to avoid major iatrogenic interference), allogeneic but not syngeneic leukocytes could induce a rapid (after 1 d) accumulation of host monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) without any increase in conventional DCs. This occurred in various donor-host strain combinations, did not require MHC mismatch, and could be induced by various donor cell types including B cells, T cells, or NK cells. Using RAG(-/-)γc(-/-) and scid γc(-/-)mice with different MHC, we found that the presence of either donor or host lymphoid cells was required. Alloinduced moDC accumulation was significantly reduced when splenocytes from mice deficient in NK cells by genetic ablation were used as donors. A major component of this moDC accumulation appears to be recruitment. Our findings provide new insights into how the innate and adaptive immune system may interact during allogeneic encounters and thus transplant rejection. PMID:27474076

  20. Allogenic banking of dental pulp stem cells for innovative therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Chaubron, Franck; De Vos, John; Cuisinier, Frédéric J

    2015-01-01

    Medical research in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapy has brought encouraging perspectives for the use of stem cells in clinical trials. Multiple types of stem cells, from progenitors to pluripotent stem cells, have been investigated. Among these, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are mesenchymal multipotent cells coming from the dental pulp, which is the soft tissue within teeth. They represent an interesting adult stem cell source because they are recovered in large amount in dental pulps with non-invasive techniques compared to other adult stem cell sources. DPSCs can be obtained from discarded teeth, especially wisdom teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons. To shift from promising preclinical results to therapeutic applications to human, DPSCs must be prepared in clinical grade lots and transformed into advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP). As the production of patient-specific stem cells is costly and time-consuming, allogenic biobanking of clinical grade human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed DPSC lines provides efficient innovative therapeutic products. DPSC biobanks represent industrial and therapeutic innovations by using discarded biological tissues (dental pulps) as a source of mesenchymal stem cells to produce and store, in good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, DPSC therapeutic batches. In this review, we discuss about the challenges to transfer biological samples from a donor to HLA-typed DPSC therapeutic lots, following regulations, GMP guidelines and ethical principles. We also present some clinical applications, for which there is no efficient therapeutics so far, but that DPSCs-based ATMP could potentially treat. PMID:26328017

  1. Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the tonsil

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Tuba; Serinsoz, Ebru; Arpaci, Rabia Bozdogan; Vayisoglu, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is an uncommon tumour within the spectrum of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms that can occur at nodal and extra-nodal sites. Besides being rare, these tumours are difficult to diagnose. A 72-year-old man with a painless mass in the right tonsil was admitted to the Mersin University Hospital. Tonsillectomy was performed. Microscopically, the tumour consisted of spindle-shaped cells with large oval to polygonal nuclei. Lymphocytes were scattered among the tumour cells. Immunohistochemically, the cells were positive for CD23 and vimentin. The tumour was diagnosed as FDCS with histological and immunohistochemical findings. Recognition of extranodal FDCS requires knowledge of this entity and to consider it during the diagnosis. Confirmatory immunohistochemical staining is essential for diagnosis. Correct characterisation of this neoplasm is important because of its potential for recurrence and metastasis. PMID:23365157

  2. Antitumor immunomodulatory activity of allogenic bone marrow cells on TiNi scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokorev, O. V.; Hodorenko, V. N.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Gunther, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of modulation of anti-tumor response by allogenic bone marrow cell transplantation into porous TiNi-based scaffold. Transplantation of bone marrow cells into porous TiNi-based scaffold leads to antitumor (35%) and antimetastatic (55%) effects. The lifetime of tumor-bearing animals and implanted allogenic bone marrow cells in incubator of TiNi increases up to 60%. The possible mechanisms of the effect of allogenic cells on tumor process are the stimulation of endogenous effectors of antitumor immunity.

  3. Autophagy gene Atg16l1 prevents lethal T cell alloreactivity mediated by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M.; Shono, Yusuke; Maurer, Katie; West, Mallory L.; Singer, Natalie V.; Ziegler, Carly G. K.; Lezcano, Cecilia; Motta, Ana Carolina Fragoso; Schmid, Karin; Levi, Samuel M.; Murphy, George F.; Liu, Chen; Winkler, Jeffrey D.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Rogler, Gerhard; Dickinson, Anne M.; Holler, Ernst; van den Brink, Marcel RM; Cadwell, Ken

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Atg16L1 mediates the cellular degradative process of autophagy and is considered a critical regulator of inflammation based on its genetic association with inflammatory bowel disease. Here we find that Atg16L1 deficiency leads to an exacerbated graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in a mouse model of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Atg16L1-deficient allo-HSCT recipients with GVHD displayed increased T cell proliferation due to increased dendritic cell (DC) numbers and co-stimulatory molecule expression. Reduced autophagy within DCs was associated with lysosomal abnormalities and decreased amounts of A20, a negative regulator of DC activation. These results broaden the function of Atg16L1 and the autophagy pathway to include a role in limiting a DC-mediated response during inflammatory disease, such as GVHD. PMID:25308334

  4. Autophagy gene Atg16L1 prevents lethal T cell alloreactivity mediated by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M; Shono, Yusuke; Maurer, Katie; West, Mallory L; Singer, Natalie V; Ziegler, Carly G K; Lezcano, Cecilia; Motta, Ana Carolina Fragoso; Schmid, Karin; Levi, Samuel M; Murphy, George F; Liu, Chen; Winkler, Jeffrey D; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Rogler, Gerhard; Dickinson, Anne M; Holler, Ernst; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Cadwell, Ken

    2014-10-16

    Atg16L1 mediates the cellular degradative process of autophagy and is considered a critical regulator of inflammation based on its genetic association with inflammatory bowel disease. Here we find that Atg16L1 deficiency leads to an exacerbated graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in a mouse model of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Atg16L1-deficient allo-HSCT recipients with GVHD displayed increased T cell proliferation due to increased dendritic cell (DC) numbers and costimulatory molecule expression. Reduced autophagy within DCs was associated with lysosomal abnormalities and decreased amounts of A20, a negative regulator of DC activation. These results broaden the function of Atg16L1 and the autophagy pathway to include a role in limiting a DC-mediated response during inflammatory disease, such as GVHD. PMID:25308334

  5. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Juliana Maria; Rumjanek, Vivian Mary

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies. PMID:27088097

  6. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response. PMID:27127520

  7. Bullous pemphigoid after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Keisuke; Koike, Kazutoshi; Kobayashi, Chie; Iijima, Shigeruko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Tsuchida, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune skin disorder characterized by subepidermal blisters due to deposit of autoantibody against dermal basement membrane protein. It has been reported that BP can occur after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe a patient with BP having autoantibody against BP180 after unrelated-donor HSCT against T lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient was treated with steroid leading to complete resolution of BP, but T lymphoblastic leukemia progressed rapidly after steroid hormone treatment. Given that immunosuppressant may reduce graft-versus-tumor effect, immunomodulatory agents such as nicotinamide and tetracycline, erythromycin, and immunoglobulin may be appropriate as soon as typical blister lesions are seen after HSCT. PMID:26113316

  8. ALLOGENEIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN FIRST COMPLETE REMISSION

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Betul; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The optimal post-remission therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) is uncertain. This review summarizes the recent developments in the clinical research and therapeutic applications defining the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) in CR1. Recent findings Molecular markers in combinations with cytogenetics have improved the risk stratification and informed decision-making in patients with AML in CR1. In parallel, several important advances in the transplant field, such as better supportive care, improved transplant technology, increased availability of alternative donors, and reduced-intensity conditioning have improved the safety as well as access of allo-HCT for a larger number of patients. Summary The progress in risk stratification and transplant technology dictate that early donor identification search should be initiated for all eligible AML patients in CR1. PMID:21912256

  9. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell role in cutaneous malignancies.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Dana; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) correspond to a specialized dendritic cell population that exhibit plasma cell morphology, express CD4, CD123, HLA-DR, blood-derived dendritic cell antigen-2 (BDCA-2), and Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 within endosomal compartments. Through their production of type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, pDCs provide anti-viral resistance and link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. While lacking from normal skin, pDCs are usually recruited to the skin in several cutaneous pathologies where they appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Among the latter group, pDCs have the potential to induce anti-tumour immunity; however, the complex interaction of pDCs with tumor cells and their micro-environment appears to contribute to immunologic tolerance. In this review, we aim at highlighting the role played by pDCs in cutaneous malignancies with special emphasis on the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27236509

  10. Evidence of dysregulation of dendritic cells in primary HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; O'Brien, Meagan; Subedi, Abhignya; Qin, Li; Hu, Nan; Taylor, Elizabeth; Dibben, Oliver; Stacey, Andrea; Fellay, Jacques; Shianna, Kevin V.; Siegal, Frederick; Shodell, Michael; Shah, Kokila; Larsson, Marie; Lifson, Jeffrey; Nadas, Arthur; Marmor, Michael; Hutt, Richard; Margolis, David; Garmon, Donald; Markowitz, Martin; Valentine, Fred; Borrow, Persephone

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) are important mediators of both innate and adaptive immunity against pathogens such as HIV. During the course of HIV infection, blood DC numbers fall substantially. In the present study, we sought to determine how early in HIV infection the reduction occurs and whether the remaining DC subsets maintain functional capacity. We find that both myeloid DC and plasmacytoid DC levels decline very early during acute HIV in-fection. Despite the initial reduction in numbers, those DCs that remain in circulation retain their function and are able to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses, and up-regulate maturation markers plus produce cytokines/chemokines in response to stimulation with TLR7/8 agonists. Notably, DCs from HIV-infected subjects produced significantly higher levels of cytokines/chemokines in response to stimulation with TLR7/8 agonists than DCs from uninfected controls. Further examination of gene expression profiles indicated in vivo activation, either directly or indirectly, of DCs during HIV infection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that despite the reduction in circulating DC numbers, those that remain in the blood display hyperfunctionality and implicates a possible role for DCs in promoting chronic immune activation. PMID:20693428

  11. Interaction of Rotavirus with Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Narváez, Carlos F.; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that very few rotavirus (RV)-specific T cells that secrete gamma interferon circulate in recently infected and seropositive adults and children. Here, we have studied the interaction of RV with myeloid immature (IDC) and mature dendritic cells (MDC) in vitro. RV did not induce cell death of IDC or MDC and induced maturation of between 12 and 48% of IDC. Nonetheless, RV did not inhibit the maturation of IDC or change the expression of maturation markers on MDC. After treatment with RV, few IDC expressed the nonstructural viral protein NSP4. In contrast, a discrete productive viral infection was shown in MDC of a subset of volunteers, and between 3 and 46% of these cells expressed NSP4. RV-treated IDC secreted interleukin 6 (IL-6) (but not IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or transforming growth factor beta), and MDC released IL-6 and small amounts of IL-10 and IL-12p70. The patterns of cytokines secreted by T cells stimulated by staphylococcal enterotoxin B presented by MDC infected with RV or uninfected were comparable. The frequencies and patterns of cytokines secreted by memory RV-specific T cells evidenced after stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with RV were similar to those evidenced after stimulation of PBMC with RV-infected MDC. Finally, IDC treated with RV strongly stimulated naive allogeneic CD4+ T cells to secrete Th1 cytokines. Thus, although RV does not seem to be a strong maturing stimulus for DC, it promotes their capacity to prime Th1 cells. PMID:16282452

  12. Bortezomib for the prevention and treatment of graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Al-Homsi, Ahmad Samer; Feng, Yuxin; Duffner, Ulrich; Al Malki, Monzr M; Goodyke, Austin; Cole, Kelli; Muilenburg, Marlee; Abdel-Mageed, Aly

    2016-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the standard treatment for a variety of benign and malignant conditions. However, graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) continues to present a major barrier to the success and wide applicability of this procedure. Although current GvHD prevention and treatment regimens exclusively target T cells, bortezomib, a reversible proteasome inhibitor, possesses unique immune regulatory activities that span a wide variety of cellular processes of T and dendritic cells essential for the development of GvHD. Herein, we review the current understanding of the effects of bortezomib in vitro and in animal models and summarize the clinical data relevant to its use in the prevention and treatment of GvHD. We conclude with an outline of the remaining challenges and opportunities to optimize bortezomib's potential role in this setting. PMID:27224851

  13. NCI First International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention and Treatment of Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Report from the Committee on Prevention of Relapse Following Allogeneic Cell Transplantation for Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Alyea, Edwin P.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Moldrem, Jeffrey; Pagel, John M.; Przepiorka, Donna; Riddell, Stan; Sadelin, Michel; Young, James W.; Giralt, Sergio; Bishop, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Prevention of relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the most likely approach to improve survival of patients treated for hematologic malignancies. Herein we review the limits of currently available transplant therapies and the innovative strategies being developed to overcome resistance to therapy or to fill therapeutic modalities not currently available. These novel strategies include nonimmunologic therapies, such as targeted preparative regimens and posttransplant drug therapy, as well as immunologic interventions, including graft engineering, donor lymphocyte infusions, T cell engineering, vaccination and dendritic cell-based approaches. Several aspects of the biology of the malignant cells as well as the host have been identified that obviate success of even these newer strategies. To maximize the potential for success, we recommend pursuing research to develop additional targeted therapies to be used in the preparative regimen or as maintenance post-transplant, better characterize the T-cell and dendritic cells subsets involved in graft-versus-host disease and the graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect, identify strategies for timing immunologic or nonimmunologic therapies to eliminate the noncycling cancer stem cell, identify more targets for immunotherapies, develop new vaccines that will not be limited by HLA, and develop methods to identify population at very high risk for relapse in order to accelerate clinical development and avoid toxicity in patients not at risk for relapse. PMID:20580849

  14. Toll like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Mike; Lee, Stephanie J; Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLR) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) we have investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs3764879, which is located on the X chromosome, was significantly associated with outcome at the Bonferroni corrected level P≤0.001. Male hemizygosity and female homozygosity for the minor allele were significantly associated with disease free survival (DFS) (hazard ratio (HR) 1.47 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.85); P=0.001). Further analysis stratified by donor sex due to confounding by sex, was suggestive for associations with overall survival (male donor: HR 1.41 (95% CI 1.09–1.83), P=0.010); female donor: (HR 2.78 (95% CI 1.43–5.41), P=0.003), DFS (male donor: HR 1.45 (95% CI 1.12–1.87), P=0.005; female donor: HR 2.34 (95% CI 1.18–4.65), P=0.015) and treatment related mortality (male donor: HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.09–2.04), P=0.012; female donor: HR 3.12 (95% CI 1.44–6.74), P=0.004). In conclusion our findings suggest that the minor allele of TLR8 rs3764879 of the donor is associated with outcome after myeloablative conditioned allogeneic HCT. PMID:25464115

  15. Extracoporeal photopheresis treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Flinn, Aisling M.; Gennery, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD) continues to be a major obstacle to allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Thymic damage secondary to aGvHD along with corticosteroids and other non-selective T lymphocyte-suppressive agents used in the treatment of aGvHD concurrently impair thymopoiesis and negatively impact on immunoreconstitution of the adaptive immune compartment and ultimately adversely affect clinical outcome. Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an alternative therapeutic strategy that appears to act in an immunomodulatory fashion, potentially involving regulatory T lymphocytes and dendritic cells. By promoting immune tolerance and simultaneously avoiding systemic immunosuppression, ECP could reduce aGvHD and enable a reduction in other immunosuppression, allowing thymic recovery, restoration of normal T lymphopoiesis, and complete immunoreconstitution with improved clinical outcome. Although the safety and efficacy of ECP has been demonstrated, further randomised controlled studies are needed as well as elucidation of the underlying mechanisms responsible and the effect of ECP on thymic recovery. PMID:27408705

  16. Dendritic Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Heather M.; Matsushima, Glenn K.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) persists as a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease and is characterized by the production of autoantibodies and immune complexes that affects multiple organs. The underlying mechanism that triggers and sustain disease are complex and involves certain susceptibility genes and environmental factors. There have been several immune mediators linked to SLE including cytokines and chemokines that have been reviewed elsewhere(1–3). A number of articles have reviewed the role of B cells and T cells in SLE(4–10). Here, we focus on role of dendritic cells (DC) and innate immune factors that may regulate autoreactive B cells. PMID:20367140

  17. Effects of human mesenchymal stem cells on the differentiation of dendritic cells from CD34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Yue, Han; Han, Qin; Chen, Bin; Shi, Mingxia; Li, Jing; Li, Binzong; You, Shengguo; Shi, Yufang; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2007-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have profound immunomodulatory functions both in vitro and in vivo. However, their effects on the differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs) are unknown. In this study, we employed an in vitro model to investigate the effects of human MSCs on the development of DCs. CD34(+) cells isolated from cord blood were cultured under conventional DC(cDC) or plasmacytoid DC (pDC) differentiation conditions, in the presence or absence of MSCs or their conditioned medium. Here we show that both MSCs and their conditioned medium dramatically increased the numbers of cells generated under either condition. The percentage of cells with the cDC phenotype is significantly reduced in the presence of MSCs or their conditioned medium, whereas the percentage of pDC increased. The capacity of cDCs from MSCs or their conditioned medium-treated CD34(+) cells to stimulate allogeneic T cells was weakened. Furthermore, MSCs can skew the DC function from cDC to pDC, thus biasing the immune system toward Th2 and away from Th1 responses. Blocking the prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) synthesis of MSCs can reverse most of these influences of MSCs on DCs differentiation and function. Therefore, MSCs can significantly influence DC development through PGE(2) production. PMID:17999594

  18. Tolerance Associated Gene Expression following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pidala, Joseph; Bloom, Gregory C.; Eschrich, Steven; Sarwal, Minnie; Enkemann, Steve; Betts, Brian C.; Beato, Francisca; Yoder, Sean; Anasetti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Biologic markers of immune tolerance may facilitate tailoring of immune suppression duration after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In a cross-sectional study, peripheral blood samples were obtained from tolerant (n = 15, median 38.5 months post-HCT) and non-tolerant (n = 17, median 39.5 post-HCT) HCT recipients and healthy control subjects (n = 10) for analysis of immune cell subsets and differential gene expression. There were no significant differences in immune subsets across groups. We identified 281 probe sets unique to the tolerant (TOL) group and 122 for non-tolerant (non-TOL). These were enriched for process networks including NK cell cytotoxicity, antigen presentation, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell cycle and apoptosis. Differential gene expression was enriched for CD56, CD66, and CD14 human lineage-specific gene expression. Differential expression of 20 probe sets between groups was sufficient to develop a classifier with > 90% accuracy, correctly classifying 14/15 TOL cases and 15/17 non-TOL cases. These data suggest that differential gene expression can be utilized to accurately classify tolerant patients following HCT. Prospective investigation of immune tolerance biologic markers is warranted. PMID:25774806

  19. ABO-Mismatched Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Worel, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Summary Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative option for a variety of malignant and non-malignant hematological and congenital diseases. Due to the fact that the human leukocyte antigen system is inherited independently of the blood group system, approximately 40-50% of all HSCTs are performed across the ABO blood group barrier. The expected immune-hematological consequences after transplantation of an ABO-mismatched stem cell graft are immediate and delayed hemolytic complications due to presence of isohemagglutinins or passenger lymphocyte syndrome. The risks of these complications can partially be prevented by graft manipulation and appropriate transfusion support. Dependent on the kind of ABO mismatch, different effects on engraftment have been observed, e.g. delayed red blood cell recovery and pure red cell aplasia. Data on incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality, relapse, and overall survival are inconsistent as most studies include limited patient numbers, various graft sources, and different conditioning and GVHD prophylaxis regimens. This makes it difficult to detect a consistent effect of ABO-mismatched transplantation in the literature. However, knowledge of expectable complications and close monitoring of patients helps to detect problems early and to treat patients efficiently, thus reducing the number of fatal or life-threatening events caused by ABO-mismatched HSCT. PMID:27022317

  20. Treatment of CMV infection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Maffini, Enrico; Giaccone, Luisa; Festuccia, Moreno; Brunello, Lucia; Busca, Alessandro; Bruno, Benedetto

    2016-06-01

    Despite a remarkable reduction in the past decades, cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients remains a feared complication, still associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Today, first line treatment of CMV infection/reactivation is still based on dated antiviral compounds Ganciclovir (GCV), Foscarnet (FOS) and Cidofovir (CDF) with their burdensome weight of side effects. Maribavir (MBV), Letermovir (LMV) and Brincidofovir (BDF) are three new promising anti-CMV drugs without myelosuppressive properties or renal toxic effects that are under investigation in randomized phase II and III trials. Adoptive T-cell therapy (ATCT) in CMV infection possesses a strong rationale, demonstrated by several proof of concept studies; its feasibility is currently under investigation by clinical trials. ATCT from third-party and naïve donors could meet the needs of HSCT recipients of seronegative donors and cord blood grafts. In selected patients such as recipients of T-cell depleted grafts, ATCT, based on CMV-specific host T-cells reconstitution kinetics, would be of value in the prophylactic and/or preemptive CMV treatment. Vaccine-immunotherapy has the difficult task to reduce the incidence of CMV reactivation/infection in highly immunocompromised HSCT patients. Newer notions on CMV biology may represent the base to flush out the Troll of transplantation. PMID:27043241

  1. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  2. Dendritic cell-based cancer therapeutic vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has seen tremendous developments in novel cancer therapies, through targeting of tumor cell-intrinsic pathways whose activity is linked to genetic alterations, as well as the targeting of tumor cell-extrinsic factors such as growth factors. Furthermore, immunotherapies are entering the clinic at an unprecedented speed following the demonstration that T cells can efficiently reject tumors and that their anti-tumor activity can be enhanced with antibodies against immune regulatory molecules (checkpoints blockade). Current immunotherapy strategies include monoclonal antibodies against tumor cells or immune regulatory molecules, cell-based therapies such as adoptive transfer of ex vivo activated T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, and cancer vaccines. Herein, we discuss the immunological basis for therapeutic cancer vaccines and how the current understanding of dendritic cell (DC) and T cell biology might enable development of next-generation curative therapies for patients with cancer. PMID:23890062

  3. Galectin-1 Regulates Tissue Exit of Specific Dendritic Cell Populations*

    PubMed Central

    Thiemann, Sandra; Man, Jeanette H.; Chang, Margaret H.; Lee, Benhur; Baum, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    During inflammation, dendritic cells emigrate from inflamed tissue across the lymphatic endothelium into the lymphatic vasculature and travel to regional lymph nodes to initiate immune responses. However, the processes that regulate dendritic cell tissue egress and migration across the lymphatic endothelium are not well defined. The mammalian lectin galectin-1 is highly expressed by vascular endothelial cells in inflamed tissue and has been shown to regulate immune cell tissue entry into inflamed tissue. Here, we show that galectin-1 is also highly expressed by human lymphatic endothelial cells, and deposition of galectin-1 in extracellular matrix selectively regulates migration of specific human dendritic cell subsets. The presence of galectin-1 inhibits migration of immunogenic dendritic cells through the extracellular matrix and across lymphatic endothelial cells, but it has no effect on migration of tolerogenic dendritic cells. The major galectin-1 counter-receptor on both dendritic cell populations is the cell surface mucin CD43; differential core 2 O-glycosylation of CD43 between immunogenic dendritic cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells appears to contribute to the differential effect of galectin-1 on migration. Binding of galectin-1 to immunogenic dendritic cells reduces phosphorylation and activity of the protein-tyrosine kinase Pyk2, an effect that may also contribute to reduced migration of this subset. In a murine lymphedema model, galectin-1−/− animals had increased numbers of migratory dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes, specifically dendritic cells with an immunogenic phenotype. These findings define a novel role for galectin-1 in inhibiting tissue emigration of immunogenic, but not tolerogenic, dendritic cells, providing an additional mechanism by which galectin-1 can dampen immune responses. PMID:26216879

  4. Mucosal dendritic cells shape mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun-Young; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key modulators that shape the immune system. In mucosal tissues, DCs act as surveillance systems to sense infection and also function as professional antigen-presenting cells that stimulate the differentiation of naive T and B cells. On the basis of their molecular expression, DCs can be divided into several subsets with unique functions. In this review, we focus on intestinal DC subsets and their function in bridging the innate signaling and adaptive immune systems to maintain the homeostasis of the intestinal immune environment. We also review the current strategies for manipulating mucosal DCs for the development of efficient mucosal vaccines to protect against infectious diseases. PMID:24626170

  5. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Coco; Plantinga, Maud; Besseling, Paul; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has evolved into a potent curative treatment option for a variety of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The occurrence of complications and mortality after allo-HCT is, however, still high and is strongly associated with immune reconstitution (IR). Therefore, detailed information on IR through immunomonitoring is crucial to improve survival chances after HCT. To date, information about the reconstituting immune system after allo-HCT in pediatric patients is mostly derived from routine standard-of-care measurements. More profound knowledge on IR may provide tools to better predict and modulate adverse reactions and, subsequently, improve survival chances. Here, we provide an overview of IR (eg, immune cell subsets and circulating chemokines/cytokines) after allo-HCT in children, taking into account different cell sources and serotherapy, and discuss strategies to enhance immunomonitoring. We conclude that available IR data after allo-HCT contain limited information on immune cell families (mostly only generic T, B, and NK cells), which would improve with more detailed information on reconstituting cell subsets or effector cell functionality at earlier time points (<1 month). In addition, secretome data (eg, multiplex cytokine/chemokine profiles) could add to the understanding of IR mechanisms and cell functionality and may even provide (early) biomarkers for individual disease outcome, such as viral reactivity, graft-versus-host disease, or graft-versus-leukemia. The present data and suggestions for more detailed, standardized, and harmonized immunomonitoring in future (pediatric) allo-HCT studies will pave the path to "precision transplantation:" an individualized HCT approach (including conditioning), based on detailed information on IR and biomarkers, aiming to reduce transplantation related mortality and relapse, and subsequently improve survival chances. PMID:26341398

  6. Neutrophil function in children following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Kent, Michael W; Kelher, Marguerite R; Silliman, Christopher C; Quinones, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    HSCT is a lifesaving procedure for children with malignant and non-malignant conditions. The conditioning regimen renders the patient severely immunocompromised and recovery starts with neutrophil (PMN) engraftment. We hypothesize that children demonstrate minimal PMN dysfunction at engraftment and beyond, which is influenced by the stem cell source and the conditioning regimen. Peripheral blood was serially collected from children at 1 to 12 months following allogeneic HSCT. PMN superoxide (O2-) production, degranulation (elastase), CD11b surface expression, and phagocytosis were assessed. Twenty-five patients, mean age of 10.5 yr with 65% males, comprised the study and transplant types included: 14 unrelated cord blood stem cells (cords), seven matched related bone marrow donors, three matched unrelated bone marrow donors, and one peripheral blood progenitor cells. Engraftment occurred at 24 days. There were no significant differences between controls and patients in PMN O2- production, phagocytosis, CD11b surface expression, and total PMN elastase. Elastase release was significantly decreased <6 months vs. controls (p < 0.05) and showed normalization by six months for cords only. The conditioning regimen did not affect PMN function. PMN function returns with engraftment, save elastase release, which occurs later related to the graft source utilized, and its clinical significance is unknown. PMID:27114335

  7. [Human Herpesvirus-6 Encephalitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-07-01

    The reactivation of human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) is common after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), and it is sporadically associated with the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops around 2-6 weeks after allo-HCT, and it is characterized by short-term memory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows bilateral signal abnormalities in the limbic system. The incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis is reportedly 0-11.6% after bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and 4.9-21.4% after cord blood transplantation. The mortality of HHV-6 encephalitis is high, and survivors are often left with serious sequelae. Antiviral therapy using foscarnet or ganciclovir is recommended for the treatment of HHV-6 encephalitis, but the efficacy of the currently available treatment is insufficient once HHV-6 encephalitis has developed. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HHV-6 encephalitis and the establishment of preventative therapy are needed to overcome this disease. PMID:26160819

  8. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-06-01

    Observational studies indicate a similar or higher probability of disease control, higher risk of non-relapse mortality (NRM), and similar overall survival (OS) with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), compared to autologous SCT, in relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Careful patient selection and utilization of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) alloSCT may allow reduction in NRM. The optimal conditioning regimen and the roles of radioimmunotherapy, T cell depletion, and tandem SCT continue to be explored. Recent studies highlight comparable results with haploidentical SCT and cord blood SCT, thus providing alternate donor sources. Disease relapse and late effects continue to be major problems. Optimization of SCT techniques (e.g., improved graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis), post-transplant monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance, or pre-emptive therapy (e.g., with novel therapies) are emerging strategies to reduce the risk of relapse. Survivorship management using a multidisciplinary care approach, adoption of healthy lifestyle, and socioeconomic counseling are integral parts of a high-quality transplant program. PMID:26983957

  9. Generation of regulatory dendritic cells after treatment with paeoniflorin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Li, Yingxi; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Keqiu; Jing, Yaqing; He, Jinghua; Qiang, Zhaoyan; Tong, Jingzhi; Sun, Ke; Ding, Wen; Kang, Yi; Li, Guang

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory dendritic cells are a potential therapeutic tool for assessing a variety of immune overreaction diseases. Paeoniflorin, a bioactive glucoside extracted from the Chinese herb white paeony root, has been shown to be effective at inhibiting the maturation and immunostimulatory function of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. However, whether paeoniflorin can program conventional dendritic cells toward regulatory dendritic cells and the underlying mechanism remain unknown. Here, our study demonstrates that paeoniflorin can induce the production of regulatory dendritic cells from human peripheral blood monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not from mature dendritic cells, thereby demonstrating the potential of paeoniflorin as a specific immunosuppressive drug with fewer complications and side effects. These regulatory dendritic cells treated with paeoniflorin exhibited high CD11b/c and low CD80, CD86 and CD40 expression levels as well as enhanced abilities to capture antigen and promote the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells and reduced abilities to migrate and promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, which is associated with the upregulation of endogenous transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-mediated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression. Collectively, paeoniflorin could program immature dendritic cells (imDCs) and imDCs stimulated with LPS toward a regulatory DC fate by upregulating the endogenous TGF-β-mediated IDO expression level, thereby demonstrating its potential as a specific immunosuppressive drug. PMID:26721806

  10. Spinal fluid lymphocytes responsive to autologous and allogeneic cells in multiple sclerosis and control individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, G; Kotilinek, L; Schwartz, M; Sternad, M

    1984-01-01

    Spinal fluid lymphocytes from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and controls were stimulated with either autologous non-T cells or with allogeneic non-T cells followed by stimulation with autologous non-T lymphocytes. Cells responding to these stimuli were cloned and their proliferative responses to autologous and allogeneic MS and normal non-T cells were measured. Large numbers of clones with specific patterns of reaction to both autologous and allogeneic cells were obtained from lymphocytes in MS cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but only occasionally from cells in control CSF. Patterns of responses among clones from a particular CSF were similar and often identical, which suggested that cells in MS CSF were relatively restricted in their specificities. Surface antigen phenotyping of the clones showed them to be predominantly OKT4+, with 13% OKT8+ and 11% OKT4+8+. Peripheral T cells that were stimulated and cultured in parallel with CSF cells were different in that they usually did not give rise to as many clones nor were their patterns of response similar. Many CSF clones were heteroclitic, that is they responded to particular allogeneic cells but not autologous cells. Lymphocytes in MS CSF thus appear to represent a selected population of cells with a high frequency of responsiveness to autologous and allogeneic antigens. Such responses may be evidence for immune regulation within the central nervous system or could represent responses to altered-self antigens. PMID:6237121

  11. Antitumor effect of murine dendritic and tumor cells transduced with IL-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Wojas-Turek, Justyna; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elżbieta; Rossowska, Joanna; Piasecki, Egbert; Duś, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL-) 2 acts on a number of types of immune cells promoting their effector functions. To replace systemic administration of recombinant form of this cytokine, various genetically modified cells have been used indifferent preclinical models for tumor growth inhibition. In this study, dendritic or tumor cells transduced with retroviral vector carrying IL-2 gene (JAWS II/IL-2, X63/IL-2, MC38/IL-2 cells) alone or combined with tumor antigen-stimulated dendritic cells (JAWS II/TAg) were exploited to treat colon carcinoma MC38-bearing mice. After the peritumoral injection of vaccine cells, the tumor growth delay and the increase in the number of tumor infiltrating CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T lymphocytes were noted. A considerable increase in CD4⁺ cell influx into tumor tissue was observed when JAWS II/IL-2 cells or JAWS II/TAg with syngeneic MC38/IL-2 cells were applied. The increase in intensity of CD8⁺ cell infiltration was associated with immune reaction triggered by the same combination of applied cells or JAWS II/TAg with allogeneic X63/IL-2 cells. The effect observed in vivo was accompanied by MC38/0 cell specific cytotoxic activity of spleen cells in vitro. Thus, the application of vaccines, including IL-2-secreting cells of various origins, was able to induce different antitumor responses polarized by exogenous IL-2 and the encountered tumor antigen. PMID:23042272

  12. Functional canine dendritic cells can be generated in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and contain a cytoplasmic ultrastructural marker.

    PubMed

    Ibisch, C; Pradal, G; Bach, J M; Lieubeau, B

    2005-03-01

    For physiological and practical reasons the dog is a large animal model used increasingly to study the pathogenesis of human diseases and new therapeutic approaches, in particular for immune disorders. However, some immunological resources are lacking in this model, especially concerning dendritic cells. The aim of our study was to develop an efficient method to generate dendritic cells (DC) in vitro from dog peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and to characterize their functional, structural and ultrastructural properties. PBMC were cultured in vitro with IL-4 and GM-CSF. After 1 week of culture, a great proportion of non-adherent cells displayed typical cytoplasmic processes, as evidenced both by optical and electron microscopy. Cytometric analysis revealed the presence of 41.7+/-24.6% CD14+ cells expressing both CD11c and MHC class II molecules. Allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions confirmed the ability of these cultures to stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic lymphocytes as already reported as a characteristic of DC in other species. In addition, we describe for the first time the presence in canine DC of cytoplasmic periodic microstructures (PMS) that could represent ultrastructural markers of canine DC. In conclusion, our study provides an easy method to generate DC from PBMC in sufficient numbers for immunological in vitro investigations in dogs, a pre-clinical model for many human diseases. PMID:15847807

  13. The Role of Dendritic Cells in Graft-Versus-Tumor Effect

    PubMed Central

    Toubai, Tomomi; Mathewson, Nathan; Reddy, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells. DCs play a pivotal role in determining the character and magnitude of immune responses to tumors. Host and donor hematopoietic-derived DCs play a critical role in the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. GVHD is tightly linked with the graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect. Although both host and donor DCs are important regulators of GVHD, the role of DCs in GVT is poorly understood. GVT is caused by donor T cells that attack recipient tumor cells. The donor T cells recognize alloantigens, and tumor specific antigens (TSAs) are mediating GVHD. The process of presentation of these antigens, especially TSAs remains unknown. Recent data suggested that DC may be essential role for inducing GVT. The mechanisms that DCs possess may include direct presentation, cross-presentation, cross-dressing. The role they play in GVT will be reviewed. PMID:24600454

  14. Immunometabolism governs dendritic cell and macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on intracellular metabolism in dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages provide new insights on the functioning of these critical controllers of innate and adaptive immunity. Both cell types undergo profound metabolic reprogramming in response to environmental cues, such as hypoxia or nutrient alterations, but importantly also in response to danger signals and cytokines. Metabolites such as succinate and citrate have a direct impact on the functioning of macrophages. Immunogenicity and tolerogenicity of DCs is also determined by anabolic and catabolic processes, respectively. These findings provide new prospects for therapeutic manipulation in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:26694970

  15. Functional Reconstitution of Natural Killer Cells in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Md Ashik; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Tey, Siok-Keen

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the first lymphocyte population to reconstitute following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and are important in mediating immunity against both leukemia and pathogens. Although NK cell numbers generally reconstitute within a month, the acquisition of mature NK cell phenotype and full functional competency can take 6 months or more, and is influenced by graft composition, concurrent pharmacologic immunosuppression, graft-versus-host disease, and other clinical factors. In addition, cytomegalovirus infection and reactivation have a dominant effect on NK cell memory imprinting following allogeneic HSCT just as it does in healthy individuals. Our understanding of NK cell education and licensing has evolved in the years since the “missing self” hypothesis for NK-mediated graft-versus-leukemia effect was first put forward. For example, we now know that NK cell “re-education” can occur, and that unlicensed NK cells can be more protective than licensed NK cells in certain settings, thus raising new questions about how best to harness graft-versus-leukemia effect. Here, we review current understanding of the functional reconstitution of NK cells and NK cell education following allogeneic HSCT, highlighting a conceptual framework for future research. PMID:27148263

  16. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities. PMID:26486534

  17. Prevention of Allogeneic Cardiac Graft Rejection by Transfer of Ex Vivo Expanded Antigen-Specific Regulatory T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takasato, Fumika; Morita, Rimpei; Schichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Niimi, Masanori; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rate of graft survival has dramatically increased using calcineurin inhibitors, however chronic graft rejection and risk of infection are difficult to manage. Induction of allograft-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) is considered an ideal way to achieve long-term tolerance for allografts. However, efficient in vitro methods for developing allograft-specific Tregs which is applicable to MHC full-mismatched cardiac transplant models have not been established. We compared antigen-nonspecific polyclonal-induced Tregs (iTregs) as well as antigen-specific iTregs and thymus-derived Tregs (nTregs) that were expanded via direct and indirect pathways. We found that iTregs induced via the indirect pathway had the greatest ability to prolong graft survival and suppress angiitis. Antigen-specific iTregs generated ex vivo via both direct and indirect pathways using dendritic cells from F1 mice also induced long-term engraftment without using MHC peptides. In antigen-specific Treg transferred models, activation of dendritic cells and allograft-specific CTL generation were suppressed. The present study demonstrated the potential of ex vivo antigen-specific Treg expansion for clinical cell-based therapeutic approaches to induce lifelong immunological tolerance for allogeneic cardiac transplants. PMID:24498362

  18. Reduced Purkinje cell dendritic arborization and loss of dendritic spines in essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Louis, Elan D; Lee, Michelle; Babij, Rachel; Ma, Karen; Cortés, Etty; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G; Faust, Phyllis L

    2014-12-01

    Based on accumulating post-mortem evidence of abnormalities in Purkinje cell biology in essential tremor, we hypothesized that regressive changes in dendritic morphology would be apparent in the Purkinje cell population in essential tremor cases versus age-matched controls. Cerebellar cortical tissue from 27 cases with essential tremor and 27 age-matched control subjects was processed by the Golgi-Kopsch method. Purkinje cell dendritic anatomy was quantified using a Neurolucida microscopic system interfaced with a motorized stage. In all measures, essential tremor cases demonstrated significant reductions in dendritic complexity compared with controls. Median values in essential tremor cases versus controls were: 5712.1 versus 10 403.2 µm (total dendrite length, P=0.01), 465.9 versus 592.5 µm (branch length, P=0.01), 22.5 versus 29.0 (maximum branch order, P=0.001), and 165.3 versus 311.7 (number of terminations, P=0.008). Furthermore, the dendritic spine density was reduced in essential tremor cases (medians=0.82 versus 1.02 µm(-1), P=0.03). Our demonstration of regressive changes in Purkinje cell dendritic architecture and spines in essential tremor relative to control brains provides additional evidence of a pervasive abnormality of Purkinje cell biology in this disease, which affects multiple neuronal cellular compartments including their axon, cell body, dendrites and spines. PMID:25367027

  19. Sexual function 1-year after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Noerskov, K H; Schjødt, I; Syrjala, K L; Jarden, M

    2016-06-01

    Treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with short and long-term toxicities that can result in alterations in sexual functioning. The aims of this prospective evaluation were to determine: (1) associations between HSCT and increased sexual dysfunction 1 year after treatment; and (2) associations between sexual dysfunction, body image, anxiety and depression. This controlled prospective cohort study was conducted from October 2010 to November 2013. Patients completed assessments 2-3 weeks before HSCT (N=124) and 1 year after treatment (N=63). Assessment included descriptive data, Sexual Functioning Questionnaire, Body Image Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The results showed a significant decline in overall sexual function in both men and women (P=<0.001, P=0.010, respectively), although men generally scored higher than women. Forty-seven percent of men and 60% of women reported at least one physical sexual problem 1 year after HSCT. Patients with chronic GVHD trended toward reporting lower levels of sexual function. Finally, women with chronic GVHD scored lower than those without chronic GVHD on the sexual function problem subscale (P=0.008). Sexual dysfunction remains a major problem for men and women 1 year after HSCT and requires routine evaluation and treatment after HSCT. PMID:26878660

  20. Immune Monitoring Using mRNA-Transfected Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by mRNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA. PMID:27236804

  1. Allogeneic T cell responses are regulated by a specific miRNA-mRNA network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaping; Tawara, Isao; Zhao, Meng; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Toubai, Tomomi; Mathewson, Nathan; Tamaki, Hiroya; Nieves, Evelyn; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Reddy, Pavan

    2013-01-01

    Donor T cells that respond to host alloantigens following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) induce graft-versus-host (GVH) responses, but their molecular landscape is not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene (mRNA) expression and fine-tune the molecular responses of T cells. We stimulated naive T cells with either allogeneic or nonspecific stimuli and used argonaute cross-linked immunoprecipitation (CLIP) with subsequent ChIP microarray analyses to profile miR responses and their direct mRNA targets. We identified a unique expression pattern of miRs and mRNAs following the allostimulation of T cells and a high correlation between the expression of the identified miRs and a reduction of their mRNA targets. miRs and mRNAs that were predicted to be differentially regulated in allogeneic T cells compared with nonspecifically stimulated T cells were validated in vitro. These analyses identified wings apart-like homolog (Wapal) and synaptojanin 1 (Synj1) as potential regulators of allogeneic T cell responses. The expression of these molecular targets in vivo was confirmed in MHC-mismatched experimental BMT. Targeted silencing of either Wapal or Synj1 prevented the development of GVH response, confirming a role for these regulators in allogeneic T cell responses. Thus, this genome-wide analysis of miRNA-mRNA interactions identifies previously unrecognized molecular regulators of T cell responses. PMID:24216511

  2. Dendritic cells as therapeutic targets in neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Lüssi, Felix; Zipp, Frauke; Witsch, Esther

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system characterized by infiltration of immune cells and progressive damage to myelin sheaths and neurons. There is still no cure for the disease, but drug regimens can reduce the frequency of relapses and slightly delay progression. Myeloid cells or antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, and resident microglia, are key players in both mediating immune responses and inducing immune tolerance. Mounting evidence indicates a contribution of these myeloid cells to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and to the effects of treatment, the understanding of which might provide strategies for more potent novel therapeutic interventions. Here, we review recent insights into the role of APCs, with specific focus on DCs in the modulation of neuroinflammation in MS. PMID:26970979

  3. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  4. Transcriptional control of dendritic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Izumi; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells involved critically not only in provoking innate immune responses but also in establishing adaptive immune responses. Dendritic cells are heterogenous and divided into several subsets, including plasmactyoid DCs (pDCs) and several types of conventional DCs (cDCs), which show subset-specific functions. Plasmactyoid DCs are featured by their ability to produce large amounts of type I interferons (IFNs) in response to nucleic acid sensors, TLR7 and TLR9 and involved in anti-viral immunity and pathogenesis of certain autoimmune disorders such as psoriasis. Conventional DCs include the DC subsets with high crosspresentation activity, which contributes to anti-viral and anti-tumor immunity. These subsets are generated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) via several intermediate progenitors and the development is regulated by the transcriptional mechanisms in which subset-specific transcription factors play major roles. We have recently found that an Ets family transcription factor, SPI-B, which is abundantly expressed in pDCs among DC subsets, plays critical roles in functions and late stage development of pDCs. SPI-B functions in cooperation with other transcription factors, especially, interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members. Here we review the transcription factor-based molecular mechanisms for generation and functions of DCs, mainly by focusing on the roles of SPI-B and its relatives. PMID:24875951

  5. Dendritic cells treated with resveratrol during differentiation from monocytes gain substantial tolerogenic properties upon activation

    PubMed Central

    Švajger, Urban; Obermajer, Nataša; Jeras, Matjaž

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol that acts on multiple molecular targets important for cell differentiation and activation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are a functionally diverse cell type and represent the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. In this study, we investigated resveratrol-induced effects on DCs during their differentiation and maturation. Our results show that resveratrol induces DC-associated tolerance, particularly when applied during DC differentiation. Costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 were down-regulated, as was the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. Surface expression of inhibitory immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 (ILT3) and ILT4 molecules was induced, while human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G expression was not affected. Resveratrol-treated DCs lost the ability to produce interleukin (IL)-12p70 after activation, but had an increased ability to produce IL-10. Such DCs were poor stimulators of allogeneic T cells and had lowered ability to induce CD4+ T-cell migration. Furthermore, treated cells were able to generate allogeneic IL-10-secreting T cells, but were not competent in inducing FoxP3 expression These tolerogenic effects are probably associated with the effect of resveratrol on multiple molecular targets through which it interferes with DC differentiation and nuclear factor (NF)-κB translocation. Our data provide new insights into the molecular and functional mechanisms of the tolerogenic effects that resveratrol exerts on DCs. PMID:20002210

  6. Regulation of Dendritic Cell Function in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Said, André; Weindl, Günther

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells and link the innate and adaptive immune system. During steady state immune surveillance in skin, DC act as sentinels against commensals and invading pathogens. Under pathological skin conditions, inflammatory cytokines, secreted by surrounding keratinocytes, dermal fibroblasts, and immune cells, influence the activation and maturation of different DC populations including Langerhans cells (LC) and dermal DC. In this review we address critical differences in human DC subtypes during inflammatory settings compared to steady state. We also highlight the functional characteristics of human DC subsets in inflammatory skin environments and skin diseases including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Understanding the complex immunoregulatory role of distinct DC subsets in inflamed human skin will be a key element in developing novel strategies in anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:26229971

  7. Comparative dendritic cell biology of veterinary mammals.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Artur; Auray, Gael; Ricklin, Meret

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have a main function in innate immunity in that they sense infections and environmental antigens at the skin and mucosal surfaces and thereby critically influence decisions about immune activation or tolerance. As professional antigen-presenting cells, they are essential for induction of adaptive immune responses. Consequently, knowledge on this cell type is required to understand the immune systems of veterinary mammals, including cattle, sheep, pigs, dogs, cats, and horses. Recent ontogenic studies define bona fide DC as an independent lineage of hematopoietic cells originating from a common precursor. Distinct transcription factors control the development into the two subsets of classical DC and plasmacytoid DC. These DC subsets express a distinguishable transcriptome, which differs from that of monocyte-derived DC. Using a comparative approach based on phenotype and function, this review attempts to classify DC of veterinary mammals and to describe important knowledge gaps. PMID:25387110

  8. Functions of fascin in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Shigeko

    2012-01-01

    Fascin-1 is an actin-bundling protein that shares no homology with other actin-bundling proteins. It is greatly induced upon maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). However, fascin-1 is not expressed in other primary blood cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, indicating a unique role of fascin-1 in the function of DCs upon maturation. An increasing body of evidence has shown that fascin-1 plays critical roles in maturation-associated DC functions, including dynamic assembly of veil-like membrane protrusions, disassembly of podosomes, migration to lymph nodes, and the assembly of the immunological synapse. Pathological analyses of fascin-1 expression revealed that fascin-1 is a useful marker of diseases of immune cells, including Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Hodgkin diseases. Furthermore, attempts have been made to explore the use of a fascin-1 promoter for DNA vaccination because it is strong and specific to DCs. PMID:22428853

  9. Developmental mechanisms that regulate retinal ganglion cell dendritic morphology

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ning

    2011-01-01

    One of the fundamental features of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is that dendrites of individual RGCs are confined to one or a few narrow strata within the inner plexiform layer (IPL), and each RGC synapses only with a small group of presynaptic bipolar and amacrine cells with axons/dendrites ramified in the same strata to process distinct visual features. The underlying mechanisms which control the development of this laminar-restricted distribution pattern of RGC dendrites have been extensively studied, and it is still an open question whether the dendritic pattern of RGCs is determined by molecular cues or by activity-dependent refinement. Accumulating evidence suggests that both molecular cues and activity-dependent refinement might regulate RGC dendrites in a cell subtype-specific manner. However, identification of morphological subtypes of RGCs before they have achieved their mature dendritic pattern is a major challenge in the study of RGC dendritic development. This problem is now being circumvented through the use of molecular markers in genetically engineered mouse lines to identify RGC subsets early during development. Another unanswered fundamental question in the study of activity-dependent refinement of RGC dendrites is how changes in synaptic activity lead to the changes in dendritic morphology. Recent studies have started to shed light on the molecular basis of activity-dependent dendritic refinement of RGCs by showing that some molecular cascades control the cytoskeleton reorganization of RGCs. PMID:21542137

  10. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells turn into foamy dendritic cells with IL-17A1[S

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Giulia; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Bissay, Nathalie; Debard, Cyrille; Daira, Patricia; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Proamer, Fabienne; Hanau, Daniel; Vidal, Hubert; Aricò, Maurizio; Delprat, Christine; Mahtouk, Karène

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. In the field of immunometabolism, we have studied the impact of IL-17A on the lipid metabolism of human in vitro-generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Microarrays and lipidomic analysis revealed an intense remodeling of lipid metabolism induced by IL-17A in DCs. IL-17A increased 2–12 times the amounts of phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters in DCs. Palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and oleic (18:ln-9c) acid were the main fatty acid chains present in DCs. They were strongly increased in response to IL-17A while their relative proportion remained unchanged. Capture of extracellular lipids was the major mechanism of lipid droplet accumulation, visualized by electron microscopy and Oil Red O staining. Besides this foamy phenotype, IL-17A induced a mixed macrophage-DC phenotype and expression of the nuclear receptor NR1H3/liver X receptor-α, previously identified in the context of atherosclerosis as the master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. These IL-17A-treated DCs were as competent as untreated DCs to stimulate allogeneic naive T-cell proliferation. Following this first characterization of lipid-rich DCs, we propose to call these IL-17A-dependent cells “foamy DCs” and discuss the possible existence of foamy DCs in atherosclerosis, a metabolic and inflammatory disorder involving IL-17A. PMID:25833686

  11. Allogeneic and autologous mode of stem cell transplantation in regenerative medicine: which way to go?

    PubMed

    Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Dutta, Susmita; Bhonde, Ramesh; Das, Anjan Kumar; Pal, Rajarshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a generic term covering different techniques. However there is argument over the pros and cons of autologous and allogeneic transplants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative therapy. Given that the MSCs have already been proven to be safe in patients, we hypothesize that allogeneic transplantation could be more effective and cost-effective as compared to autologous transplantation specifically in older subjects who are the likely victims of degenerative diseases. This analysis is based on the scientific logic that allogeneic stem cells extracted in large numbers from young and healthy donors could be physiologically, metabolically and genetically more stable. Therefore stem cells from young donors may be expected to exhibit higher vigor in secreting trophic factors leading to activation of host tissue-specific stem cells and also be more efficient in remodeling the micro-environmental niche of damaged tissue. PMID:25456787

  12. Measles Virus Induces Functional TRAIL Production by Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Azocar, Olga; Lamouille, Barbara; Astier, Anne; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Servet-Delprat, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Measles virus infection induces a profound immunosuppression that can lead to serious secondary infections. Here we demonstrate that measles virus induces tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA and protein expression in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Moreover, measles virus-infected dendritic cells are shown to be cytotoxic via the TRAIL pathway. PMID:10590149

  13. Dendritic web silicon photovoltaic cell research

    SciTech Connect

    Easoz, J.A.; Rosey, R.; Campbell, R.B.; Rupnik, R.; Sprecace, R.P.; Piotrowski, P.A. . Advanced Energy Systems Div.); McHugh, J.P.; Seidensticker, R.G. . Science and Technology Center)

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes the evaluation of a checkpoint demonstration of the throughout capability of the silicon dendritic web growth process as of January 1989. The demonstrated throughput of about 20,000 sq.cm/furnace/week was less than desired for a commercial production facility, however the results clearly indicated that the desired 35,000 sq.cm/furnace/week would be reached with continuous melt replenishment during growth. Improvements in seeding and increase in crystal length would increase the throughput even more. Solar cells subsequently fabricated on the material grown during the demonstration had average efficiency levels (14%) equivalent to cells fabricated on web produced prior to the demonstration run. Finally, a business analysis based on the present results gave estimated photovoltaic module costs in agreement with potential commercial viability. 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Dendritic cell control of tolerogenic responses

    PubMed Central

    Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Pulendran, Bali

    2011-01-01

    Summary One of the most fundamental problems in immunology is the seemingly schizophrenic ability of the immune system to launch robust immunity against pathogens, while acquiring and maintaining a state of tolerance to the body’s own tissues and the trillions of commensal microorganisms and food antigens that confront it every day. A fundamental role for the innate immune system, particularly dendritic cells (DCs), in orchestrating immunological tolerance has been appreciated, but emerging studies have highlighted the nature of the innate receptors and the signaling pathways that program DCs to a tolerogenic state. Furthermore, several studies have emphasized the major role played by cellular interactions, and the microenvironment in programming tolerogenic DCs. Here we review these studies and suggest that the innate control of tolerogenic responses can be viewed as different hierarchies of organization, in which DCs, their innate receptors and signaling networks, and their interactions with other cells and local microenvironments represent different levels of the hierarchy. PMID:21488899

  15. Dendritic cell defects in the colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Legitimo, Annalisa; Consolini, Rita; Failli, Alessandra; Orsini, Giulia; Spisni, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the accumulation of both genetic and epigenetic alterations of the genome. However, also the formation of an inflammatory milieu plays a pivotal role in tumor development and progression. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a relevant role in tumor by exerting differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions, depending on the local milieu. Quantitative and functional impairments of DCs have been widely observed in several types of cancer, including CRC, representing a tumor-escape mechanism employed by cancer cells to elude host immunosurveillance. Understanding the interactions between DCs and tumors is important for comprehending the mechanisms of tumor immune surveillance and escape, and provides novel approaches to therapy of cancer. This review summarizes updated information on the role of the DCs in colon cancer development and/or progression. PMID:25483675

  16. Alarmins Link Neutrophils and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, De; de la Rosa, Gonzalo; Tewary, Poonam; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first major population of leukocyte to infiltrate infected or injured tissues and are crucial for initiating host innate defense and adaptive immunity. Although the contribution of neutrophils to innate immune defense is mediated predominantly by phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms, neutrophils also participate in the induction of adaptive immune responses. At sites of infection and/or injury, neutrophils release numerous mediators upon degranulation or death, among these are alarmins which have a characteristic dual capacity to mobilize and activate antigen-presenting cells. We describe here how alarmins released by neutrophil degranulation and/or death can link neutrophils to dendritic cells by promoting their recruitment and activation, resulting in the augmentation of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:19699678

  17. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B-cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerize Ags and present them polyvalently to B-cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B-cell receptors for Ag (BCRs). FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC periodicity, and FDC-Ag presentation combined with other soluble and membrane bound signals contributed by FDCs, like FDC-BAFF, -IL-6, and -C4bBP, are essential for the induction of the germinal center (GC) reaction, the maintenance of serological memory, and the remarkable ability of FDC-Ags to induce specific Ab responses in the absence of cognate T-cell help. On the other hand, FDCs play a negative role in several disease conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, HIV/AIDS, prion diseases, and follicular lymphomas. Compared to other accessory immune cells, FDCs have received little attention, and their functions have not been fully elucidated. This review gives an overview of FDC structure, and recapitulates our current knowledge on the immunoregulatory functions of FDCs in health and disease. A better understanding of FDCs should permit better regulation of Ab responses to suit the therapeutic manipulation of regulated and dysregulated immune responses. PMID:23049531

  18. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease.

    PubMed

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B-cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerize Ags and present them polyvalently to B-cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B-cell receptors for Ag (BCRs). FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC periodicity, and FDC-Ag presentation combined with other soluble and membrane bound signals contributed by FDCs, like FDC-BAFF, -IL-6, and -C4bBP, are essential for the induction of the germinal center (GC) reaction, the maintenance of serological memory, and the remarkable ability of FDC-Ags to induce specific Ab responses in the absence of cognate T-cell help. On the other hand, FDCs play a negative role in several disease conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, HIV/AIDS, prion diseases, and follicular lymphomas. Compared to other accessory immune cells, FDCs have received little attention, and their functions have not been fully elucidated. This review gives an overview of FDC structure, and recapitulates our current knowledge on the immunoregulatory functions of FDCs in health and disease. A better understanding of FDCs should permit better regulation of Ab responses to suit the therapeutic manipulation of regulated and dysregulated immune responses. PMID:23049531

  19. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Harigae, Hideo

    2016-07-28

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin(-)Sca-1(+)Kit(+) cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte-related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation. PMID:27259979

  20. Bridging channel dendritic cells induce immunity to transfused red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Calabro, Samuele; Gallman, Antonia; Gowthaman, Uthaman; Liu, Dong; Chen, Pei; Liu, Jingchun; Krishnaswamy, Jayendra Kumar; Nascimento, Manuela Sales L; Xu, Lan; Patel, Seema R; Williams, Adam; Tormey, Christopher A; Hod, Eldad A; Spitalnik, Steven L; Zimring, James C; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Stowell, Sean R; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C

    2016-05-30

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a life-saving therapeutic tool. However, a major complication in transfusion recipients is the generation of antibodies against non-ABO alloantigens on donor RBCs, potentially resulting in hemolysis and renal failure. Long-lived antibody responses typically require CD4(+) T cell help and, in murine transfusion models, alloimmunization requires a spleen. Yet, it is not known how RBC-derived antigens are presented to naive T cells in the spleen. We sought to answer whether splenic dendritic cells (DCs) were essential for T cell priming to RBC alloantigens. Transient deletion of conventional DCs at the time of transfusion or splenic DC preactivation before RBC transfusion abrogated T and B cell responses to allogeneic RBCs, even though transfused RBCs persisted in the circulation for weeks. Although all splenic DCs phagocytosed RBCs and activated RBC-specific CD4(+) T cells in vitro, only bridging channel 33D1(+) DCs were required for alloimmunization in vivo. In contrast, deletion of XCR1(+)CD8(+) DCs did not alter the immune response to RBCs. Our work suggests that blocking the function of one DC subset during a narrow window of time during RBC transfusion could potentially prevent the detrimental immune response that occurs in patients who require lifelong RBC transfusion support. PMID:27185856

  1. Allogeneic adipose-derived stem cells promote survival of fat grafts in immunocompetent diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Bai, Xiaozhi; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yunchuan; Su, Linlin; Chang, Peng; Wang, Xujie; Han, Shichao; Gao, Jianxin; Hu, Xiaolong; Hu, Dahai; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2016-05-01

    Autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can protect fat grafts in cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL). However, diabetes alters the intrinsic properties of ADSCs and impairs their function so that they lack these protective effects. We investigate whether allogeneic ADSCs from healthy donors could protect fat grafts in immunocompetent diabetic rats. Syngeniec adipose tissues and ADSCs were derived from diabetic Lewis (LEW) rats, whereas allogeneic ADSCs were from healthy brown-Norway rats. A grafted mixture containing 0.7 ml granule fat and 0.3 ml 6 × 10(6) allogeneic/syngeneic ADSCs was injected subcutaneously on the skulls of diabetic LEW rats. Fat samples were harvested to evaluate the levels of injury and vascularization as shown by perilipin A, CD34 and VEGF at 14 days. The immune response was evaluated with a lymphocytotoxicity test and the CD4/CD8 ratio in peripheral blood at 14 days. The volume retention of fat grafts was measured at 3 months. Healthy allogeneic ADSCs increased the expression levels of perilipin A, CD34 and VEGF at 14 days. The volume retention of fat grafts was improved by allogeneic ADSCs at 3 months. ADSCs were demonstrated to have low immunogenicity by the lymphocyte proliferation test and immunophenotype including MHC and co-stimulatory markers. The lymphocytotoxicity test and CD4/CD8 ratio indicated no obvious immune response elicited by allogeneic ADSCs. Thus, healthy allogeneic ADSCs can promote the survival of fat grafts in this immunocompetent diabetic rat model, with little or no obvious immune rejection. PMID:26662284

  2. Cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer cells on U251 glioma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Wu, Tingting; Wan, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to observe the cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells on U251 glioma cells and to investigate their mechanism of action to establish an effective treatment strategy for neuroglioma. Cell survival curves, colony formation assays and karyotype analysis were performed to investigate the characteristics of U251 glioma cells. The present study demonstrated that natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D)‑major histocompatibility complex class I‑related chain A/B (MICA/B) interactions contributed to the cytotoxic effect of NK cells on K562 and U251 cells. In antibody‑blocking assays to inhibit NKG2D ligands, the cytotoxic activity was not completely attenuated, which suggested that other signaling pathways contribute to the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on tumor cells in addition to the NKG2D‑mediated activity. The present study identified that the expression levels of NKG2D ligands on the surface of target cells influenced the strength of the NK cell immune response. Furthermore, allogeneic NK cells were observed to kill glioma cells in vitro, and this anticancer activity is associated with the rate of NKG2D expression on the surface of glioma cells. PMID:27175912

  3. [Effects of IFN-γ treatment on biological characteristics and functions of dendritic cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanling; Wang, Hongmei; Yu, Yanrong; Yuan, Keng; Zhang, Yujuan; Min, Weiping

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of IFN-γ treatment on the biological characteristics and functions of C57BL/6 murine dendritic cells (DCs). Methods In the process of DC culture, 20 ng/mL IFN-γ was added in the DCs at the early (day 2) or late (day 5) stage, and on day 7, LPS was added to stimulate DC maturation. The expressions of DC surface molecules CD11c, CD80 and CD86 were determined by flow cytometry. To analyze cell functions, DCs were co-cultured with BALB/c mouse-derived lymphocyte cells. The 5, 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labelling was used to detect their ability to stimulate allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation and flow cytometry was used to measure their ability to induce the production of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Results Compared with the control group, the early IFN-γ treatment group had decreased DC number and inhibited cell differentiation; though there was no difference in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules, early IFN-γ treatment resisted the stimulatory effect of LPS on DC maturation, weakened the ability to stimulate allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation and enhanced the ability to induce more Tregs. Compared with the control group, the late IFN-γ treatment group showed no change in DC number and differentiation; the expressions of co-stimulatory molecules CD86 and CD80 were upregulated; the results of DC maturation and mixed allogeneic lymphocyte reaction stimulated by LPS were similar to those in the control group, but its ability to induce Tregs was stronger. Conclusion DCs treated with IFN-γ at early stage and those at late stage showed obvious difference in biological characteristics and functions. PMID:27412927

  4. KIR2DS1-dependent acquisition of CCR7 and migratory properties by human NK cells interacting with allogeneic HLA-C2+ DCs or T-cell blasts.

    PubMed

    Marcenaro, Emanuela; Pesce, Silvia; Sivori, Simona; Carlomagno, Simona; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro

    2013-04-25

    Natural killer (NK) cells may capture the CCR7 chemokine receptor from allogeneic CCR7(+) cells by trogocytosis and acquire migrating properties in response to lymph node chemokines. This event is negatively regulated by inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and NKG2A. In this study, we analyzed the role of the HLA-C2-specific activating receptor KIR2DS1 in the process of CCR7 uptake by NK cells interacting with different allogeneic CCR7(+) cells. Co-incubation of KIR2DS1(+) fresh NK cells or NK-cell clones with HLA-C2(+) CCR7(+) lymphoblastoid cell lines resulted in increased CCR7 uptake. Remarkably, KIR2DS1 expression represented a major advantage for acquiring CCR7 from HLA-C2(+) allogeneic dendritic cells (DCs) and T-cell blasts. These findings have important implications in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in which donor-derived (alloreactive) KIR2DS1(+) NK cells, upon CCR7 acquisition, become capable of migrating toward lymph nodes, where they may kill patient DCs and T cells, preventing graft-versus-host and host-versus-graft reactions. PMID:23449637

  5. Strategies to reduce dendritic cell activation through functional biomaterial design

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Patrick S.; He, Jing; Haskins, Kathryn; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a key role in determining adaptive immunity, and there is growing interest in characterizing and manipulating the interactions between dendritic cells and biomaterial surfaces. Contact with several common biomaterials can induce the maturation of immature dendritic cells, but substrates that reduce dendritic cell maturation are of particular interest within the field of cell-based therapeutics where the goal is to reduce the immune response to cell-laden material carriers. In this study, we use a materials-based strategy to functionalize poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with immobilized immunosuppressive factors (TGF-β1 and IL-10) to reduce the maturation of immature dendritic cells. TGF-β1 and IL-10 are commonly employed as soluble factors to program dendritic cells in vitro, and we demonstrate that these proteins retain bioactivity towards dendritic cells when immobilized on hydrogel surfaces. Following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or cytokines, a dendritic cell line interacting with the surfaces of immunosuppressive hydrogels expressed reduced markers of maturation, including IL-12 and MHCII. The bioactivity of these immunomodulatory hydrogels was further confirmed with primary bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs) isolated from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, as quantified by a decrease in activation markers and a significantly reduced capacity to activate T cells. Furthermore, by introducing a second signal to promote BMDC-material interactions combined with the presentation of tolerizing signals, the mulitfunctional PEG hydrogels were found to further increase signaling towards BMDCs, as evidenced by greater reductions in maturation markers. PMID:22361099

  6. DEX-1 and DYF-7 establish sensory dendrite length by anchoring dendritic tips during cell migration.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Maxwell G; Shaham, Shai

    2009-04-17

    Cells are devices whose structures delimit function. For example, in the nervous system, neuronal and glial shapes dictate paths of information flow. To understand how cells acquire their shapes, we examined the formation of a sense organ in C. elegans. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that sensory dendrites form by stationary anchoring of dendritic tips during cell-body migration. A genetic screen identified DEX-1 and DYF-7, extracellular proteins required for dendritic tip anchoring, which act cooperatively at the time and place of anchoring. DEX-1 and DYF-7 contain, respectively, zonadhesin and zona pellucida domains, and DYF-7 self-associates into multimers important for anchoring. Thus, unlike other dendrites, amphid dendritic tips are positioned by DEX-1 and DYF-7 without the need for long-range guidance cues. In sequence and function, DEX-1 and DYF-7 resemble tectorins, which anchor stereocilia in the inner ear, suggesting that a sensory dendrite anchor may have evolved into part of a mechanosensor. PMID:19344940

  7. Tolerogenic IDO+ Dendritic Cells Are Induced by PD-1-Expressing Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Cecilia Pessoa; Ferreira, Ana Carolina Franco; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; de Moraes, Cristiano Jacob; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident cells, rich in inflammatory mediators, involved in allergic reactions, and with an increasingly recognized role in immunomodulation. Dendritic cells (DCs), on the other hand, are central to the determination of immune response patterns, being highly efficient antigen-presenting cells that respond promptly to changes in their microenvironment. Here, we show that direct cell contact between immature monocyte-derived DCs (iDCs) and MC bends DCs toward tolerance induction. DCs that had direct contact with MC (MC-iDC) decreased HLA-DR but increased PD-L1 expression and stimulated regulatory T lymphocytes, which expresses FoxP3+, secrete TGF-β and IL-10, and suppress the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated naïve T lymphocytes. Furthermore, MC-iDC expressed higher levels of indoleamine-2,3-deoxigenase (IDO), a phenomenon that was blocked by treatment of MC with anti-PD-1 or by the treatment of DCs with anti-PD-L1 or anti-PD-L2, but not by blocking of H1 and H2 histamine receptors on DCs. Contact with MC also increased phosphorylated STAT-3 levels in iDCs. When a STAT-3 inhibitor, JSI-124, was added to the DCs before contact with MC, the MC-iDC recovered their ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation and did not increase their IDO expression. PMID:26834749

  8. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Imaging Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobukai, Saho; Baheza, Richard; Cobb, Jared G.; Virostko, Jack; Xie, Jingping; Gillman, Amelie; Koktysh, Dmitry; Kerns, Denny; Does, Mark; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIOs) nanoparticles and investigate the migration of SPIO-labeled dendritic cells (DCs) in a syngeneic mouse model using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The size of the dextran-coated SPIO is roughly 30 nm, and the DCs are capable of independent uptake of these particles, although not at levels comparable to particle uptake in the presence of a transfecting reagent. On average, with the assistance of polylysine, the particles were efficiently delivered inside DCs within one hour of incubation. The SPIO particles occupy approximately 0.35% of cell surface and are equivalent to 34.6 pg of iron per cell. In vivo imaging demonstrated that the labeled cells migrated from the injection site in the footpad to the corresponding popliteal lymph node. The homing of labeled cells in the lymph nodes resulted in a signal drop of up to 79%. Furthermore, labeling DCs with SPIO particles did not compromise cell function, we demonstrated that SPIO-enhanced MR imaging can be used to track the migration of DCs effectively in vivo. Magn Reson Med 63:1383–1390, 2010. PMID:20432309

  9. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 3-Deficient Dendritic Cells Modulate Splenic Responses to Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Amandeep; Huang, Liping; Kurmaeva, Elvira; Gigliotti, Joseph C; Ye, Hong; Miller, Jacqueline; Rosin, Diane L; Lobo, Peter I; Okusa, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    The plasticity of dendritic cells (DCs) permits phenotypic modulationex vivoby gene expression or pharmacologic agents, and these modified DCs can exert therapeutic immunosuppressive effectsin vivothrough direct interactions with T cells, either inducing T regulatory cells (TREGs) or causing anergy. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingolipid and the natural ligand for five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, and S1P5), and S1PR agonists reduce kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in mice.S1pr3(-/-)mice are protected from kidney IRI, because DCs do not mature. We tested the therapeutic advantage ofS1pr3(-/-)bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (BMDC) transfers in kidney IRI. IRI produced a rise in plasma creatinine (PCr) levels in mice receiving no cells (NCs) and mice pretreated with wild-type (WT) BMDCs. However,S1pr3(-/-)BMDC-pretreated mice were protected from kidney IRI.S1pr3(-/-)BMDC-pretreated mice had significantly higher numbers of splenic TREGs compared with NC and WT BMDC-pretreated mice.S1pr3(-/-)BMDCs did not attenuate IRI in splenectomized,Rag-1(-/-), or CD11c(+)DC-depleted mice. Additionally,S1pr3(-/-)BMDC-dependent protection required CD169(+)marginal zone macrophages and the macrophage-derived chemokine CCL22 to increase splenic CD4(+)Foxp3(+)TREGs. Pretreatment withS1pr3(-/-)BMDCs also induced TREG-dependent protection against IRI in an allogeneic mouse model. In summary, adoptively transferredS1pr3(-/-)BMDCs prevent kidney IRI through interactions within the spleen and expansion of splenic CD4(+)Foxp3(+)TREGs. We conclude that genetically induced deficiency ofS1pr3in allogenic BMDCs could serve as a therapeutic approach to prevent IRI-induced AKI. PMID:26286732

  10. No evidence of plasticity in hair follicles of recipients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rovó, Alicia; Meyer-Monard, Sandrine; Heim, Dominik; Arber, Caroline; Passweg, Jakob R; Gratwohl, Alois; Tichelli, André

    2005-08-01

    Here we show in a prospective quantitative study of 115 patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation that hair follicles remain exclusively of recipient type despite full whole blood donor-type chimerism. Our data indicate that unmanipulated hematopoietic donor stem cells do not contribute directly to reconstitution even in an organ at highest need for repair. PMID:16038783

  11. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  12. Autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Multiple Sclerosis: perspective on mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Van Wijmeersch, Bart; Sprangers, Ben; Dubois, Bénédicte; Waer, Mark; Billiau, An D

    2008-07-15

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a frequent demyelinating immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects principally young adults and leads to severe physical and cognitive impairment. The current standard treatment makes use of the immune modulators beta-interferon, glatiramer acetate and natalizumab, or immunosuppressants such as mitoxantrone. However, these agents are only partially effective and in a number of patients fail to achieve satisfactory disease control. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is being explored in the treatment of severe MS as a means of delivering high-dose immunosuppression followed by 'rescue' of the immuno-hematopoietic system with autologous HSC. The potential therapeutic benefit is based on the concept of so-called 'resetting' the immune system. The use of allogeneic HSCT as a possible therapeutic approach for severe MS is inspired by case reports of MS patients that underwent allogeneic HSCT for a concomitant hematological malignancy, and subsequently is supported by data from rodent models of MS. Allogeneic HSCT may offer specific therapeutic effects, such as the replacement of the autoreactive immune compartment by healthy allogeneic cells and the development of a graft-versus-autoimmunity (GVA) effect. Here, we review the currently available experimental and clinical evidence to support the role of autologous and allogeneic HSCT in MS. PMID:18541311

  13. Reconstruction of Beagle Hemi-Mandibular Defects with Allogenic Mandibular Scaffolds and Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, JinChao; Liu, HuaWei; Hu, Min; Yue, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Massive bone allografts are frequently used in orthopedic reconstructive surgery, but carry a high failure rate of approximately 25%. We tested whether treatment of graft with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can increase the integration of massive allografts (hemi-mandible) in a large animal model. Methods Thirty beagle dogs received surgical left-sided hemi-mandibular defects, and then divided into two equal groups. Bony defects of the control group were reconstructed using allografts only. Those of the experimental group were reconstructed using allogenic mandibular scaffold-loaded autologous MSCs. Beagles from each group were killed at4 (n = 4), 12 (n = 4), 24 (n = 4) or 48 weeks (n = 3) postoperatively. CT and micro-CT scans, histological analyses and the bone mineral density (BMD) of transplants were used to evaluate defect reconstruction outcomes. Results Gross and CT examinations showed that the autologous bone grafts had healed in both groups. At 48 weeks, the allogenic mandibular scaffolds of the experimental group had been completely replaced by new bone, which has a smaller surface area to that of the original allogenic scaffold, whereas the scaffold in control dogs remained the same size as the original allogenic scaffold throughout. At 12 weeks, the BMD of the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05), and all micro-architectural parameters were significantly different between groups (p<0.05). Histological analyses showed almost all transplanted allogeneic bone was replaced by new bone, principally fibrous ossification, in the experimental group, which differed from the control group where little new bone formed. Conclusions Our study demonstrated the feasibility of MSC-loaded allogenic mandibular scaffolds for the reconstruction of hemi-mandibular defects. Further studies are needed to test whether these results can be surpassed by the use of allogenic mandibular scaffolds loaded with a

  14. Dendritic Cells in the Cancer Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yang; Shurin, Galina V.; Peiyuan, Zhu; Shurin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of the tumor immunoenvironment is underscored by the emergence and discovery of different subsets of immune effectors and regulatory cells. Tumor-induced polarization of immune cell differentiation and function makes this unique environment even more intricate and variable. Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a special group of cells that display different phenotype and activity at the tumor site and exhibit differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions. DCs play a key role in inducing and maintaining the antitumor immunity, but in the tumor environment their antigen-presenting function may be lost or inefficient. DCs might be also polarized into immunosuppressive/tolerogenic regulatory DCs, which limit activity of effector T cells and support tumor growth and progression. Although various factors and signaling pathways have been described to be responsible for abnormal functioning of DCs in cancer, there are still no feasible therapeutic modalities available for preventing or reversing DC malfunction in tumor-bearing hosts. Thus, better understanding of DC immunobiology in cancer is pivotal for designing novel or improved therapeutic approaches that will allow proper functioning of DCs in patients with cancer. PMID:23386903

  15. Shark cartilage 14 kDa protein as a dendritic cells activator.

    PubMed

    Safari, Elahe; Hassan, Zuhair M; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Low molecular weight components of shark cartilage are reported to have anti-tumor as well as immuno-stimulating effects. Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that have a key role in establishment of anti-cancer immune response. In this study, the effect of 14 kDa protein from shark cartilage was investigated on stimulation and maturation of dendritic cells. The isolated 14 kDa protein from shark cartilage extract was added to DCs medium during overnight culture and their maturation and T cells stimulation potential was investigated. The majority of shark-cartilage-treated DCs expressed higher levels of maturation markers and were more effective in stimulation of allogenic T cells compared with non-treated DCs (p < 0.05). Our results showed that shark cartilage 14 kDa protein can potentially be used in DC-mediated T-cells stimulation and induction of desirable immune responses in clinical trials such as cancer immunotherapy. However, further studies are required to examine this proposal. PMID:25669314

  16. Elimination of allogeneic multipotent stromal cells by host macrophages in different models of regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Arutyunyan, Irina; Elchaninov, Andrey; Fatkhudinov, Timur; Makarov, Andrey; Kananykhina, Evgeniya; Usman, Natalia; Bolshakova, Galina; Glinkina, Valeria; Goldshtein, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic multipotent stromal cells were previously thought to be poorly recognized by host immune system; the prolonged survival in host environments was explained by their immune privileged status. As long as the concept is currently reconsidered, the routes of elimination of allogeneic multipotent stromal cells by host immunity must be taken into account. This is necessary for correct comprehension of their therapeutic action. The study was focused upon survival of umbilical cord-derived allogeneic multipotent stromal cells in different rat models of tissue regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy or by critical limb ischemia. The observations were carried out by means of vital labeling of the cells with PKH26 prior to injection, in combination with differential immunostaining of host macrophages with anti-CD68 antibody. According to the results, allogeneic multipotent stromal cells are specifically eliminated by host immune system; the efficacy can reach 100%. Massive clearance of transplanted cells by host macrophages is accompanied by appropriation of the label by the latter, and this is a pronounced case of misleading presentation of exogenous label by host cells. The study emphasizes the role of macrophages in host response and also the need of additional criteria for correct data interpretation. PMID:26191137

  17. Elimination of allogeneic multipotent stromal cells by host macrophages in different models of regeneration.

    PubMed

    Arutyunyan, Irina; Elchaninov, Andrey; Fatkhudinov, Timur; Makarov, Andrey; Kananykhina, Evgeniya; Usman, Natalia; Bolshakova, Galina; Glinkina, Valeria; Goldshtein, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic multipotent stromal cells were previously thought to be poorly recognized by host immune system; the prolonged survival in host environments was explained by their immune privileged status. As long as the concept is currently reconsidered, the routes of elimination of allogeneic multipotent stromal cells by host immunity must be taken into account. This is necessary for correct comprehension of their therapeutic action. The study was focused upon survival of umbilical cord-derived allogeneic multipotent stromal cells in different rat models of tissue regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy or by critical limb ischemia. The observations were carried out by means of vital labeling of the cells with PKH26 prior to injection, in combination with differential immunostaining of host macrophages with anti-CD68 antibody. According to the results, allogeneic multipotent stromal cells are specifically eliminated by host immune system; the efficacy can reach 100%. Massive clearance of transplanted cells by host macrophages is accompanied by appropriation of the label by the latter, and this is a pronounced case of misleading presentation of exogenous label by host cells. The study emphasizes the role of macrophages in host response and also the need of additional criteria for correct data interpretation. PMID:26191137

  18. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Wen Jing; Ahl, Patricia Jennifer; Connolly, John Edward

    2016-01-01

    Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential. PMID:26980944

  19. I-131-Metaiodobenzylguanidine therapy with allogeneic cord blood stem cell transplantation for recurrent neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuya; Kurosawa, Hidemitsu; Fukushima, Keitaro; Okuya, Mayuko; Hagisawa, Susumu; Sugita, Kenichi; Arisaka, Osamu; Inaki, Anri; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Ayane; Fukuoka, Makoto; Kayano, Daiki; Kinuya, Seigo

    2012-01-01

    Iodine-131-metaiodiobenzylguanidine (131I-MIBG) therapy combined with allogeneic cord blood stem cell transplantation (SCT) was used to treat a 4-year-old girl with recurrent neuroblastoma. The patient experienced relapse 2 years after receiving first-line therapies, which included chemotherapy, surgical resection, irradiation, and autologous peripheral SCT. Although 131I-MIBG treatment did not achieve complete remission, the size of the tumor was reduced after treatment. Based on our findings, we suggest that 131I-MIBG treatment with myeloablative allogeneic SCT should be considered as first-line therapy for high-risk neuroblastoma patients when possible. PMID:23067429

  20. Brain dendritic cells: biology and pathology.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Paul M; Gottfried-Blackmore, Andres; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Bulloch, Karen

    2012-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. In their quiescent and mature form, the presentation of self-antigens by DC leads to tolerance; whereas, antigen presentation by mature DC, after stimulation by pathogen-associated molecular patterns, leads to the onset of antigen-specific immunity. DC have been found in many of the major organs in mammals (e.g. skin, heart, lungs, intestines and spleen); while the brain has long been considered devoid of DC in the absence of neuroinflammation. Consequently, microglia, the resident immune cell of the brain, have been charged with many functional attributes commonly ascribed to DC. Recent evidence has challenged the notion that DC are either absent or minimal players in brain immune surveillance. This review will discuss the recent literature examining DC involvement within both the young and aged steady-state brain. We will also examine DC contributions during various forms of neuroinflammation resulting from neurodegenerative autoimmune disease, injury, and CNS infections. This review also touches upon DC trafficking between the central nervous system and peripheral immune compartments during viral infections, the new molecular technologies that could be employed to enhance our current understanding of brain DC ontogeny, and some potential therapeutic uses of DC within the CNS. PMID:22825593

  1. DAS181 Treatment of Severe Parainfluenza Virus 3 Pneumonia in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients Requiring Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, B.; D'Souza, A.; Pasquini, M.; Saber, W.; Fenske, T. S.; Moss, R. B.; Drobyski, W. R.; Hari, P.; Abidi, M. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Parainfluenza virus (PIV) may cause life-threatening pneumonia in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Currently, there are no proven effective therapies. We report the use of inhaled DAS181, a novel sialidase fusion protein, for treatment of PIV type 3 pneumonia in two allogeneic hematopoietic SCT recipients with respiratory failure. PMID:26941799

  2. A fatal case of acute HHV-6 myocarditis following allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Yvonne; Gottlieb, David J; Baewer, David; Blyth, Emily

    2015-11-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is an ubiquitous virus that can reactivate in immunocompromised hosts, resulting in diverse clinical sequelae. We describe a case of fatal acute HHV-6 myocarditis in a patient who underwent allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of biopsy proven HHV-6 myocarditis post-HSCT. PMID:26465970

  3. Porcine Intervertebral Disc Repair Using Allogeneic Juvenile Articular Chondrocytes or Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank L.; Metz, Lionel; Adkisson, Huston Davis; Liu, Jane; Carruthers-Liebenberg, Ellen; Milliman, Curt; Maloney, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies for intervertebral disc repair have focused on the use of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes. Difficulties with graft procurement, harvest site morbidity, and functionality, however, may limit the utility of this cell source. We used an in vivo porcine model to investigate allogeneic non-disc-derived chondrocytes and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for disc repair. After denucleation, lumbar discs were injected with either fibrin carrier alone, allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes (JCs), or allogeneic MSCs. Discs were harvested at 3, 6, and 12 months, and cell viability and functionality were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. JC-treated discs demonstrated abundant cartilage formation at 3 months, and to a lesser extent at 6 and 12 months. For the carrier and MSC-treated groups, however, there was little evidence of proteoglycan matrix or residual notochordal/chondrocyte cells, but rather a type I/II collagen-enriched scar tissue. By contrast, JCs produced a type II collagen-rich matrix that was largely absent of type I collagen. Viable JCs were observed at all time points, whereas no evidence of viable MSCs was found. These data support the premise that committed chondrocytes are more appropriate for use in disc repair, as they are uniquely suited for survival in the ischemic disc microenvironment. PMID:21910592

  4. Apoptotic cells induce dendritic cell-mediated suppression via interferon-γ-induced IDO

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Charlotte A; Harry, Rachel A; McLeod, Julie D

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are sensitive to their local environment and are affected by proximal cell death. This study investigated the modulatory effect of cell death on DC function. Monocyte-derived DC exposed to apoptotic Jurkat or primary T cells failed to induce phenotypic maturation of the DC and were unable to support CD4+ allogeneic T-cell proliferation compared with DC exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or necrotic cells. Apoptotic cells coincubated with LPS- or necrotic cell-induced mature DC significantly suppressed CD80, CD86 and CD83 and attenuated LPS-induced CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Reduced levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-10, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were found to be concomitant with the suppressive activity of apoptotic cells upon DC. Furthermore, intracellular staining confirmed IFN-γ expression by DC in association with apoptotic environments. The specific generation of IFN-γ by DC within apoptotic environments is suggestive of an anti-inflammatory role by the induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Both neutralization of IFN-γ and IDO blockade demonstrated a role for IFN-γ and IDO in the suppression of CD4+ T cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that IDO expression within the DC was found to be IFN-γ-dependent. Blocking transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) also produced a partial release in T-cell proliferation. Our study strongly suggests that apoptosis-induced DC suppression is not an immunological null event and two prime mediators underpinning these functional effects are IFN-γ-induced IDO and TGF-β. PMID:18067553

  5. Transcriptional Regulation of Dendritic Cell Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Chopin, Michaël; Allan, Rhys S.; Belz, Gabrielle T.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration, and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These findings open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle – identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man – now sets the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection. PMID:22566910

  6. Mechanisms regulating dendritic cell specification and development

    PubMed Central

    Watowich, Stephanie S.; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Summary Understanding the diversification of dendritic cell (DC) lineages is one of the last frontiers in mapping the developmental hierarchy of the hematopoietic system. DCs are a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune responses, thus elucidating their developmental pathways is crucial for insight into the generation of natural immunity and for learning how to regulate DCs in clinical settings. DCs arise from hematopoietic stem cells through specialized progenitor subsets under the direction of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) and Flt3L receptor (Flt3) signaling. Recent studies have revealed important contributions from granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and type I interferons (IFNs) in vivo. Furthermore, DC development is guided by lineage-restricted transcription factors such as IRF8, E2-2, and Batf3. A critical question centers on how cytokines and lineage-restricted transcription factors operate molecularly to direct DC diversification. Here we review recent findings that provide new insight into the DC developmental process. PMID:20969586

  7. Dendritic cell interactions with Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides.

    PubMed

    Thind, Sharanjeet K; Taborda, Carlos P; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are among the most common microbes encountered by humans. More than 100, 000 fungal species have been described in the environment to date, however only a few species cause disease in humans. Fungal infections are of particular importance to immunocompromised hosts in whom disease is often more severe, especially in those with impaired cell-mediated immunity such as individuals with HIV infection, hematologic malignancies, or those receiving TNF-α inhibitors. Nevertheless, environmental disturbances through natural processes or as a consequence of deforestation or construction can expose immunologically competent people to a large number of fungal spores resulting in asymptomatic acquisition to life-threatening disease. In recent decades, the significance of the innate immune system and more importantly the role of dendritic cells (DC) have been found to play a fundamental role in the resolution of fungal infections, such as in dimorphic fungi like Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides. In this review article the general role of DCs will be illustrated as the bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems, as well as their specific interactions with these 2 dimorphic fungi. PMID:25933034

  8. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  9. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G; Davies, Jeffrey K

    2016-07-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  10. Controversies in autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in peripheral T/NK-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Shustov, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell and NK-cell lymphomas (PT/NKCL) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoid neoplasms with poor outcomes. There is no consensus on the best front line therapy or management of relapsed/refractory disease. The use of autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been studied in both settings to improve outcomes. Multiple retrospective and several prospective trials were reported. While at first sight the outcomes in the relapsed/refractory setting appear similar in B-cell and T-cell lymphomas when treated with high dose therapy (HDT) and autologous HCT, it is becoming obvious that only specific subtypes of PTCL benefit from this approach (i.e. anaplastic large cell lymphoma [ALCL] and angioimmunoblastic lymphoma [AITL] in second CR). In less favorable histologies, HDT seems to provide limited benefit, with the majority of patients experiencing post-transplant relapse. The use of autologous HCT to consolidate first remission has been evaluated in several prospective trials. Again, the best results were observed in ALCL, but the superiority of this approach over chemotherapy alone needs confirmation in randomized trials. In less favorable histologies, high-dose consolidation resulted in low survival rates comparable to those obtained with chemotherapy alone, and without randomized trials it is hard to recommend this strategy to all patients with newly diagnosed PT/NKCL. Allogeneic HCT might provide potent and potentially curative graft-vs-lymphoma effect and overcome chemotherapy resistance. Only a few studies have been reported to date on allogeneic HCT in PT/NKCL. Based on available data, eligible patients benefit significantly from this approach, with 50% or more patients achieving long-term disease control or cure, although at the expense of significant treatment related mortality (TRM). Reduced-intensity conditioning regimens appear to have lower TRM and might extend this approach to older patients. With the recent approval of

  11. Immunosuppressive human anti-CD83 monoclonal antibody depletion of activated dendritic cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Seldon, T A; Pryor, R; Palkova, A; Jones, M L; Verma, N D; Findova, M; Braet, K; Sheng, Y; Fan, Y; Zhou, E Y; Marks, J D; Munro, T; Mahler, S M; Barnard, R T; Fromm, P D; Silveira, P A; Elgundi, Z; Ju, X; Clark, G J; Bradstock, K F; Munster, D J; Hart, D N J

    2016-03-01

    Current immunosuppressive/anti-inflammatory agents target the responding effector arm of the immune response and their nonspecific action increases the risk of infection and malignancy. These effects impact on their use in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation and other forms of transplantation. Interventions that target activated dendritic cells (DCs) have the potential to suppress the induction of undesired immune responses (for example, graft versus host disease (GVHD) or transplant rejection) and to leave protective T-cell immune responses intact (for example, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunity). We developed a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3C12, specific for CD83, which is expressed on activated but not resting DC. The 3C12 mAb and an affinity improved version, 3C12C, depleted CD83(+) cells by CD16(+) NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and inhibited allogeneic T-cell proliferation in vitro. A single dose of 3C12C prevented human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-induced acute GVHD in SCID mouse recipients. The mAb 3C12C depleted CMRF-44(+)CD83(bright) activated DC but spared CD83(dim/-) DC in vivo. It reduced human T-cell activation in vivo and maintained the proportion of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) CD25(+) Treg cells and also viral-specific CD8(+) T cells. The anti-CD83 mAb, 3C12C, merits further evaluation as a new immunosuppressive agent in transplantation. PMID:26286117

  12. Select forms of tumor cell apoptosis induce dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Sandra; Santori, Fabio R; Ng, Bruce; Liebes, Leonard; Formenti, Silvia C; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2005-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a crucial role in initiating immune responses to tumors. DC can efficiently present antigens from apoptotic tumor cells, but apoptotic cells are thought to lack the inflammatory signals required to induce DC maturation. Here, we show that apoptosis of 67NR mouse carcinoma cells via the Fas (CD95) pathway or induced by the anticancer drug bortezomib (PS-341) but not by ultraviolet irradiation is associated with the production of maturation signals for DC. These data have important implications for the effects of chemotherapy on antitumor immunity in solid and hematologic malignancies. PMID:15569694

  13. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient. PMID:25674158

  14. Immune responses to an encapsulated allogeneic islet {beta}-cell line in diabetic NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Sasha P. . E-mail: Sasha.Black@ca.crl.com; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Cui, Hong; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Weber, Collin J.; Safley, Susan A.

    2006-02-03

    Our goal is to develop effective islet grafts for treating type 1 diabetes. Since human islets are scarce, we evaluated the efficacy of a microencapsulated insulin-secreting conditionally transformed allogeneic {beta}-cell line ({beta}TC-tet) in non-obese diabetic mice treated with tetracycline to inhibit cell growth. Relatively low serum levels of tetracycline controlled proliferation of {beta}TC-tet cells without inhibiting effective control of hyperglycemia in recipients. There was no significant host cellular reaction to the allografts or host cell adherence to microcapsules, and host cytokine levels were similar to those of sham-operated controls. We conclude that encapsulated allogeneic {beta}-cell lines may be clinically relevant, because they effectively restore euglycemia and do not elicit a strong cellular immune response following transplantation. To our knowledge, this is First extensive characterization of the kinetics of host cellular and cytokine responses to an encapsulated islet cell line in an animal model of type 1 diabetes.

  15. Tumor immunotherapy across MHC barriers using allogeneic T-cell precursors

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Suh, David; Markley, John C; Smith, Odette M; King, Christopher; Goldberg, Gabrielle L; Jenq, Robert; Holland, Amanda M; Grubin, Jeremy; Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Brentjens, Renier J; Lu, Sydney X; Rizzuto, Gabrielle; Sant’Angelo, Derek B; Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel; Heller, Glenn; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Lu, Chen; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2009-01-01

    We present a strategy for adoptive immunotherapy using T-lineage committed lymphoid precursor cells generated by Notch1-based culture. We found that allogeneic T-cell precursors can be transferred to irradiated individuals irrespective of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) disparities and give rise to host-MHC restricted and host-tolerant functional allogeneic T cells, improving survival in irradiated recipients as well as enhancing anti-tumor responses. T-cell precursors transduced to express a chimeric receptor targeting hCD19 resulted in significant additional anti-tumor activity, demonstrating the feasibility of genetic engineering of these cells. We conclude that ex vivo generated MHC-disparate T-cell precursors from any donor can be used universally for ‘off-the-shelf’ immunotherapy, and can be further enhanced by genetic engineering for targeted immunotherapy. PMID:18376399

  16. Dendritic cell reprogramming by the hypoxic environment.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Maria Carla; Varesio, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells central to the orchestration of innate and acquired immunity and the maintenance of self-tolerance. The local microenvironment contributes to the regulation of DC development and functions, and deregulated DC responses may result in amplification of inflammation, loss of tolerance, or establishment of immune escape mechanisms. DC generation from monocytic precursors recruited at sites of inflammation, tissue damage, or neoplasia occurs under condition of low partial oxygen pressure (pO(2), hypoxia). We reviewed the literature addressing the phenotypic and functional changes triggered by hypoxia in monocyte-derived immature (i) and mature (m) DCs. The discussion will revolve around in vitro studies of gene expression profile, which give a comprehensive representation of the complexity of response of these cells to low pO(2). The gene expression pattern of hypoxic DC will be discussed to address the question of the relationship with a specific maturation stage. We will summarize data relative to the regulation of the chemotactic network, which points to a role for hypoxia in promoting a migratory phenotype in iDCs and a highly proinflammatory state in mDCs. Current knowledge of the strict regulatory control exerted by hypoxia on the expression of immune-related cell surface receptors will also be addressed, with a particular focus on a newly identified marker of hypoxic DCs endowed with proinflammatory properties. Furthermore, we discuss the literature on the transcription mechanisms underlying hypoxia-regulated gene expression in DCs, which support a major role for the HIF/HRE pathway. Finally, recent advances shedding light on the in vivo influence of the local hypoxic microenvironment on DCs infiltrating the inflamed joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients are outlined. PMID:22901977

  17. Follicular dendritic cell function and murine AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, A; Burton, G F; Fuchs, B A; Bhogal, B S; Rupper, R; Szakal, A K; Tew, J G

    1994-01-01

    Infection of mice with LP-BM5 elicits an immunodeficiency state referred to as murine acquired immune deficiency syndrome (MAIDS). Shortly after infection, retrovirus particles become associated with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and this study was undertaken to determine whether retroviruses alter FDC functions. The FDC functions examined included the ability to: (1) retain antigen (Ag) trapped prior to infection; (2) trap new Ag after infection; (3) maintain specific IgG responses; and (4) provide co-stimulatory signals to B cells. Mice were infected with LP-BM5 and the ability of their FDC to trap and retain 125I-Ag (HSA) was assessed. Serum anti-HSA levels were monitored and FDC co-stimulatory activity was indicated by increased B-cell proliferation. HSA trapped on FDC prior to infection began to disappear by 3 weeks and was practically gone by 6 weeks. Serum anti-HSA titres were maintained normally for about 3 weeks after infection and then declined precipitously. The ability of FDC to trap new Ag began to disappear around the second and third week of infection and was markedly depressed by the fourth week. However, FDC recovered from infected mice retained their ability to co-stimulate anti-mu- and interleukin-4 (IL-4)-activated B cells throughout a 5-week period. In short, the ability of FDC to trap and retain specific Ag and maintain specific antibody levels was markedly depressed after retrovirus infection. However, FDC from infected mice continued to provide co-stimulatory signals and these signals may contribute to the lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly characteristic of MAIDS. Images Figure 4 PMID:8132218

  18. Dendritic cell-based therapy for mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Munger, Corey M; Vose, Julie M; Joshi, Shantaram S

    2006-06-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a B cell malignancy that is resistant to conventional therapies. High-dose therapy (HDT) followed by stem cell transplantation is effective in inducing remission. However, residual lymphoma cells are eventually responsible for the subsequent relapse. Effective therapeutic strategies to eliminate the residual lymphoma is required. In this study, we have examined the in vitro and in vivo anti-lymphoma effects of MCL-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that were generated using dendritic cells (DCs) fused with MCL cells for immunostimulation. Dendritic cells were generated in vitro using dendritic cell-specific medium, cytomorphology, immunophenotypes and functional capabilities of the generated DCs were studied. Such DCs were then used for the preparation of DC-MCL hybrids and the DC-MCL hybrids were used to generate CTLs against MCL cells and tested for their MCL-specific cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. The CTLs demonstrated MCL-specific cytotoxicity in vitro against GRANT-519, a human MCL cell line. These CTLs did not show significant effect against an irrelevant target. To test the in vivo therapeutic effect of DC-MCL hybrid-stimulated CTLs, a preclinical model consisting of NOD-SCID mice bearing Granta 519 was developed. The NOD-SCID mice bearing Granta-519 MCL tumors were treated with DC-MCL hybrids and the same donor T lymphocytes. There was an increase in survival (60% in mice treated with DC-MCL hybrid approach compared to 20% in the untreated group). Histological analysis of liver from control and treated mice displayed a decrease in the number of the tumor nodules in the treatment group. These results indicate the potential of DC-based therapy for the treatment of MCL. PMID:16685434

  19. Dendritic polymers: Universal glue for cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Holger

    2012-05-01

    A dendritic polymer consisting of inversely oriented lipid head groups on a polyvalent polyglycerol scaffold makes an effective reversible biomembrane adhesive that may find use as a tissue sealant and a drug-delivery vehicle.

  20. Dendritic cells in inflammatory sinonasal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cao, P-P; Shi, L-L; Xu, K; Yao, Y; Liu, Z

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical in linking the innate and adaptive immune responses, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many immune and inflammatory diseases as well as the development of tumours. The role of DCs in the pathophysiology of lung diseases has been widely studied. However, the phenotype, subset and function of DCs in upper airways under physiological or pathological conditions remain largely undefined. Allergic rhinitis (AR) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) are two important upper airway diseases with a high worldwide prevalence. Aberrant innate and adaptive immune responses have been considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of AR and CRS. To this end, understanding the function of DCs in shaping the immune responses in sinonasal mucosa is critical in exploring the pathogenic mechanisms underlying AR and CRS as well as in developing novel therapeutic strategies. This review summarizes the phenotype, subset, function and regulation of DCs in sinonasal mucosa, particularly in the setting of AR and CRS. Furthermore, this review discusses the perspectives for future research and potential clinical utility focusing on DC pathways in the context of AR and CRS. PMID:27159777

  1. Autologous is Superior to Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in Second Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Jennifer L. Holter; Rubinger, Morel; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Wang, Hai-Lin; Grigg, Andrew; Selby, George B.; Szer, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jacob M.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify favored choice of transplantation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission. PATIENTS We studied 294 acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients receiving allogeneic (n=232) or autologous (62) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in second complete remission (CR2) reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2006 including pre-HCT PML/RAR∝ status in 155 (49% of allogeneic and 66% of autologous). METHODS Patient characteristics and transplant characteristics including treatment related mortality, overall survival, and disease free survival were collected and analyzed for both univariate and multivariate outcomes. RESULTS With median follow-up of 115 (allogeneic) and 72 months (autologous), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) favored autologous 63% (49-75%) compared to allogeneic 50% (44-57%) (p=0.10) and overall survival (OS) 75% (63-85%) vs. 54% (48-61%) (p=.002) Multivariate analysis showed significantly worse DFS after allogeneic HCT (HR=1.88, 95% CI=1.16-3.06, p=0.011) and age >40 years (HR=2.30, 95% CI 1.44-3.67, p=0.0005). OS was significantly worse after allogeneic HCT (HR=2.66, 95%CI 1.52-4.65, p=0.0006; age >40 (HR=3.29, 95% CI 1.95-5.54, p<0.001) and CR1<12 months (HR=1.56 95% CI 1.07-2.26, p=0.021). Positive pre-HCT PML-RAR∝ status in 17/114 allogeneic and 6/41 autologous transplants did not influence relapse, treatment failure or survival in either group. The survival advantage for autografting was attributable to increased 3 years TRM: allogeneic 30%; autologous 2%, and GVHD. CONCLUSION We conclude that autologous HCT yields superior overall survival for APL in CR2. Long term DFS in autologous recipients, even with MRD+ grafts remains an important subject for further study. PMID:24691221

  2. Naive Donor NK Cell Repertoires Associated with Less Leukemia Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Andreas T; Clancy, Trevor; Goodridge, Jodie P; Béziat, Vivien; Schaffer, Marie; Hovig, Eivind; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Ljungman, Per T; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2016-02-01

    Acute and latent human CMV cause profound changes in the NK cell repertoire, with expansion and differentiation of educated NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors. In this study, we addressed whether such CMV-induced imprints on the donor NK cell repertoire influenced the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hierarchical clustering of high-resolution immunophenotyping data covering key NK cell parameters, including frequencies of CD56(bright), NKG2A(+), NKG2C(+), and CD57(+) NK cell subsets, as well as the size of the educated NK cell subset, was linked to clinical outcomes. Clusters defining naive (NKG2A(+)CD57(-)NKG2C(-)) NK cell repertoires in the donor were associated with decreased risk for relapse in recipients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (hazard ratio [HR], 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03-0.27; p < 0.001). Furthermore, recipients with naive repertoires at 9-12 mo after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had increased disease-free survival (HR, 7.2; 95% CI: 1.6-33; p = 0.01) and increased overall survival (HR, 9.3; 95% CI: 1.1-77, p = 0.04). Conversely, patients with a relative increase in differentiated NK cells at 9-12 mo displayed a higher rate of late relapses (HR, 8.41; 95% CI: 6.7-11; p = 0.02), reduced disease-free survival (HR, 0.12; 95% CI: 0.12-0.74; p = 0.02), and reduced overall survival (HR, 0.07; 95% CI: 0.01-0.69; p = 0.02). Thus, our data suggest that naive donor NK cell repertoires are associated with protection against leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26746188

  3. Ion channels modulating mouse dendritic cell functions.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Nguyen, Thi Xuan; Duszenko, Michael; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Lang, Florian

    2008-11-15

    Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathways play a central regulatory role in dendritic cell (DC) responses to diverse Ags. However, the mechanisms leading to increased [Ca(2+)](i) upon DC activation remained ill-defined. In the present study, LPS treatment (100 ng/ml) of mouse DCs resulted in a rapid increase in [Ca(2+)](i), which was due to Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores and influx of extracellular Ca(2+) across the cell membrane. In whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments, LPS-induced currents exhibited properties similar to the currents through the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels (CRAC). These currents were highly selective for Ca(2+), exhibited a prominent inward rectification of the current-voltage relationship, and showed an anomalous mole fraction and a fast Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. In addition, the LPS-induced increase of [Ca(2+)](i) was sensitive to margatoxin and ICAGEN-4, both inhibitors of voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels Kv1.3 and Kv1.5, respectively. MHC class II expression, CCL21-dependent migration, and TNF-alpha and IL-6 production decreased, whereas phagocytic capacity increased in LPS-stimulated DCs in the presence of both Kv channel inhibitors as well as the I(CRAC) inhibitor SKF-96365. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Ca(2+) influx in LPS-stimulated DCs occurs via Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels, is sensitive to Kv channel activity, and is in turn critically important for DC maturation and functions. PMID:18981098

  4. Geriatric assessment to predict survival in older allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients

    PubMed Central

    Muffly, Lori S.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Stock, Wendy; Chu, Quynh; Bishop, Michael R.; Godley, Lucy A.; Kline, Justin; Liu, Hongtao; Odenike, Olatoyosi M.; Larson, Richard A.; van Besien, Koen; Artz, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is increasingly utilized in older adults. This study prospectively evaluated the prognostic utility of geriatric assessment domains prior to allogeneic transplantation in recipients aged 50 years and over. Geriatric assessment was performed prior to transplant, and included validated measures across domains of function and disability, comorbidity, frailty, mental health, nutritional status, and systemic inflammation. A total of 203 patients completed geriatric assessment and underwent transplant. Median age was 58 years (range 50–73). After adjusting for established prognostic factors, limitations in instrumental activities of daily living (HR 2.38, 95%CI: 1.59–3.56; P<0.001), slow walk speed (HR 1.80, 95%CI: 1.14–2.83; P=0.01), high comorbidity by hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HR 1.56, 95%CI: 1.07–2.28; P=0.02), low mental health by short-form-36 mental component summary (HR 1.67, 95%CI: 1.13–2.48; P=0.01), and elevated serum C-reactive protein (HR 2.51, 95%CI: 1.54–4.09; P<0.001) were significantly associated with inferior overall survival. These associations were more pronounced in the cohort 60 years and over. Geriatric assessment measures confer independent prognostic utility in older allogeneic transplant recipients. Implementation of geriatric assessment prior to allogeneic transplantation may aid appropriate selection of older adults. PMID:24816237

  5. Murine allogeneic CD19 CAR T cells harbor potent antileukemic activity but have the potential to mediate lethal GVHD.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Elad; Yang, Yinmeng; Qin, Haiying; Chien, Christopher D; Kochenderfer, James N; Fry, Terry J

    2016-03-10

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) persisting or relapsing following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has a dismal prognosis. Success with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells offers an opportunity to treat these patients with leukemia-redirected donor-derived T cells, which may be more functional than T cells derived from patients with leukemia but have the potential to mediate graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We, together with others, have previously demonstrated tumor-specific T-cell dysfunction in the allogeneic environment. Here, we studied CAR T-cell function following BMT using an immunocompetent murine model of minor mismatched allogeneic transplantation followed by donor-derived CD19-CAR T cells. Allogeneic donor-derived CD19-CAR T cells eliminated residual ALL with equal potency to those administered after syngeneic BMT. Surprisingly, allogeneic CAR T cells mediated lethal acute GVHD with early mortality, which is atypical for this minor mismatch model. We demonstrated that both allogeneic and syngeneic CAR T cells show initial expansion as effector T cells, with a higher peak but rapid deletion of allogeneic CAR T cells. Interestingly, CAR-mediated acute GVHD was only seen in the presence of leukemia, suggesting CAR-target interactions induced GVHD. Indeed, serum interleukin (IL)-6 was elevated only in the presence of both leukemia and CAR T cells, and IL-6 neutralization ameliorated the severity of GVHD in a delayed donor lymphocyte infusion model. Finally, allogeneic CD4(+) CAR T cells were responsible for GVHD, which correlated with their ability to produce IL-6 upon CAR stimulation. Altogether, we demonstrate that donor-derived allogeneic CAR T cells are active but have the capacity to drive GVHD. PMID:26660684

  6. The effect of dendritic cells on the retinal cell transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Akio; Nagai, Takayuki; Mandai, Michiko Takahashi, Masayo; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2007-11-16

    The potential of bone marrow cell-derived immature dendritic cells (myeloid iDCs) in modulating the efficacy of retinal cell transplantation therapy was investigated. (1) In vitro, myeloid iDCs but not BMCs enhanced the survival and proliferation of embryonic retinal cells, and the expression of various neurotrophic factors by myeloid iDCs was confirmed with RT-PCR. (2) In subretinal transplantation, neonatal retinal cells co-transplanted with myeloid iDCs showed higher survival rate compared to those transplanted without myeloid iDCs. (3) CD8 T-cells reactive against donor retinal cells were significantly increased in the mice with transplantation of retinal cells alone. These results suggested the beneficial effects of the use of myeloid iDCs in retinal cell transplantation therapy.

  7. In vivo imaging of dendritic pruning in dentate granule cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J Tiago; Bloyd, Cooper W; Shtrahman, Matthew; Johnston, Stephen T; Schafer, Simon T; Parylak, Sarah L; Tran, Thanh; Chang, Tina; Gage, Fred H

    2016-06-01

    We longitudinally imaged the developing dendrites of adult-born mouse dentate granule cells (DGCs) in vivo and found that they underwent over-branching and pruning. Exposure to an enriched environment and constraint of dendritic growth by disrupting Wnt signaling led to increased branch addition and accelerated growth, which were, however, counteracted by earlier and more extensive pruning. Our results indicate that pruning is regulated in a homeostatic fashion to oppose excessive branching and promote a similar dendrite structure in DGCs. PMID:27135217

  8. Allogeneic cell-mediated immunotherapy for breast cancer after autologous stem cell transplantation: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Or, R; Ackerstein, A; Nagler, A; Kapelushnik, J; Naparstek, E; Samuel, S; Amar, A; Bruatbar, C; Slavin, S

    1998-03-01

    Allogeneic cell therapy (allo-CT) is emerging as an effective treatment for patients relapsing after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), indicating that tumor cells resisting chemoradiotherapy may still respond to immunocompetent allogeneic lymphocytes. We investigated possible graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects in six patients with metastatic breast cancer that would be comparable to the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) phenomenon occurring after allogeneic BMT in hematologic malignancies. The patients were cytoreduced with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), and were treated ambulatory with allo-CT consisting of adoptive transfer of HLA-matched donor peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) activated in vivo with human recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2). If no graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed, allo-CT was augmented with infusion of donor PBL, preactivated in vitro with rIL-2. Treatment was well tolerated, with low therapy-related toxicity in all patients. Two patients developed signs and symptoms compatible with GVHD grade I-II, one of whom shows no evidence of disease at more than 34 months out. In the remaining patients, progression-free survival following allo-CT ranged between 7 and 13 months. Allogeneic cell-mediated, cytokine-activated immunotherapy might be utilized for induction of GVT in metastatic breast cancer. A search for techniques to boost chimerism without severe GVHD is indicated. PMID:9557210

  9. Transplantation of Tail Skin to Study Allogeneic CD4 T Cell Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Simona W.

    2014-01-01

    The study of T cell responses and their consequences during allo-antigen recognition requires a model that enables one to distinguish between donor and host T cells, to easily monitor the graft, and to adapt the system in order to answer different immunological questions. Medawar and colleagues established allogeneic tail-skin transplantation in mice in 1955. Since then, the skin transplantation model has been continuously modified and adapted to answer specific questions. The use of tail-skin renders this model easy to score for graft rejection, requires neither extensive preparation nor deep anesthesia, is applicable to animals of all genetic background, discourages ischemic necrosis, and permits chemical and biological intervention. In general, both CD4+ and CD8+ allogeneic T cells are responsible for the rejection of allografts since they recognize mismatched major histocompatibility antigens from different mouse strains. Several models have been described for activating allogeneic T cells in skin-transplanted mice. The identification of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules in different mouse strains including C57BL/6 mice was an important step toward understanding and studying T cell-mediated alloresponses. In the tail-skin transplantation model described here, a three-point mutation (I-Abm12) in the antigen-presenting groove of the MHC-class II (I-Ab) molecule is sufficient to induce strong allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation in C57BL/6 mice. Skin grafts from I-Abm12 mice on C57BL/6 mice are rejected within 12-15 days, while syngeneic grafts are accepted for up to 100 days. The absence of T cells (CD3-/- and Rag2-/- mice) allows skin graft acceptance up to 100 days, which can be overcome by transferring 2 x 104 wild type or transgenic T cells. Adoptively transferred T cells proliferate and produce IFN-γ in I-Abm12-transplanted Rag2-/- mice. PMID:25147005

  10. Therapeutic vaccine generated by electrofusion of dendritic cells and tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, H; Shimizu, K; Lee, W; Kjaergaard, J; Parkhurst, M R; Cohen, P A; Shu, S

    2004-01-01

    Immunotherapy with fusion of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumour cells potentially confers the advantages of DC antigen-presenting functionality and a continuous source of unaltered tumour antigens. However, fusion using chemical or viral fusogens has been inefficient. We have recently developed a high throughput electrofusion technique with which very efficient fusion rates (15-54%) were observed in over 300 experiments, using a variety of murine and human tumour cell lines. The fused cells display a mature DC phenotype and express tumour-associated antigens. In two pre-clinical animal models (B16 melanoma transduced with the LacZ gene and the MCA 205 fibrosarcoma), a single vaccination of mice bearing tumours established in the lung, brain and skin resulted in tumour regression and prolongation of life. However, therapeutic efficacy required the administration of adjuvants such as IL-12 and OX-40R mAbs. Effective immunotherapy also required the delivery of fusion cells directly into lymphoid organs (spleen or lymph nodes). Using five defined human T cell lines derived from melanoma patients, allogeneic DCs of HLA-A2, HLA-DR4 and HLA-DR7 haplotypes fused with MART-1, gp100, tyrosinase and TRP-2 expressing 888 mel melanoma cells were analysed for their ability to stimulate specific cytokine (IFN-gamma and GM-CSF) secretion. DC-888 mel hybrids presented all tumour-associated epitopes to both CD4 and CD8 T cell lines in the context of MHC class II and I molecules, respectively. The therapeutic efficacy of a DC-tumour fusion vaccine is now being evaluated for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:15603192

  11. Targeting specificity of dendritic cells on breast cancer stem cells: in vitro and in vivo evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Huyen Lam; Pham, Viet Quoc; Nguyen, Giang Thuy; Tran, Cuong Do-Thanh; Phan, Ngoc Kim; Pham, Phuc Van

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death in women, and almost all complications are due to chemotherapy resistance. Drug-resistant cells with stem cell phenotypes are thought to cause failure in breast cancer chemotherapy. Dendritic cell (DC) therapy is a potential approach to eradicate these cells. This study evaluates the specificity of DCs for breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in vitro and in vivo. BCSCs were enriched by a verapamil-resistant screening method, and reconfirmed by ALDH expression analysis and mammosphere assay. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated from allogeneic murine bone marrow. DCs were induced from bone marrow-derived monocytes with 20 ng/mL GC-MSF and 20 ng/mL IL-4. Immature DCs were primed with BCSC- or MSC-derived antigens to make two kinds of mature DCs: BCSC-DCs and MSC-DCs, respectively. In vitro ability of BCSC-DCs and MSC-DCs with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) to inhibit BCSCs was tested using the xCELLigence technique. In vivo, BCSC-DCs and MSC-DCs were transfused into the peripheral blood of BCSC tumor-bearing mice. The results show that in vitro BCSC-DCs significantly inhibited BCSC proliferation at a DC:CTL ratio of 1:40, while MSC-DCs nonsignificantly decreased BCSC proliferation. In vivo, tumor sizes decreased from 18.8% to 23% in groups treated with BCSC-DCs; in contrast, tumors increased 14% in the control group (RPMI 1640) and 47% in groups treated with MSC-DCs. The results showed that DC therapy could target and be specific to BCSCs. DCs primed with MSCs could trigger tumor growth. These results also indicate that DCs may be a promising therapy for treating drug-resistant cancer cells as well as cancer stem cells. PMID:25674007

  12. Pretransplant CSF-1 therapy expands recipient macrophages and ameliorates GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Daigo; Chow, Andrew; Greter, Melanie; Saenger, Yvonne; Kwan, Wing-Hong; Leboeuf, Marylene; Ginhoux, Florent; Ochando, Jordi C.; Kunisaki, Yuya; van Rooijen, Nico; Liu, Chen; Teshima, Takanori; Heeger, Peter S.; Stanley, E. Richard; Frenette, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) results from the attack of host tissues by donor allogeneic T cells and is the most serious limitation of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Host antigen-presenting cells are thought to control the priming of alloreactive T cells and the induction of acute GVHD after allo-HCT. However, whereas the role of host DC in GVHD has been established, the contribution of host macrophages to GVHD has not been clearly addressed. We show that, in contrast to DC, reducing of the host macrophage pool in recipient mice increased donor T cell expansion and aggravated GVHD mortality after allo-HCT. We also show that host macrophages that persist after allo-HCT engulf donor allogeneic T cells and inhibit their proliferation. Conversely, administration of the cytokine CSF-1 before transplant expanded the host macrophage pool, reduced donor T cell expansion, and improved GVHD morbidity and mortality after allo-HCT. This study establishes the unexpected key role of host macrophages in inhibiting GVHD and identifies CSF-1 as a potential prophylactic therapy to limit acute GVHD after allo-HCT in the clinic. PMID:21536742

  13. Feasibility of combination allogeneic stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cellular therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) is overviewed focusing on bone marrow mononuclear cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. A case is made for the possibility of combining cell types, as well as for allogeneic use. We report the case of 29 year old male who suffered a crush fracture of the L1 vertebral body, lacking lower sensorimotor function, being a score A on the ASIA scale. Stem cell therapy comprised of intrathecal administration of allogeneic umbilical cord blood ex-vivo expanded CD34 and umbilical cord matrix MSC was performed 5 months, 8 months, and 14 months after injury. Cell administration was well tolerated with no adverse effects observed. Neuropathic pain subsided from intermittent 10/10 to once a week 3/10 VAS. Recovery of muscle, bowel and sexual function was noted, along with a decrease in ASIA score to "D". This case supports further investigation into allogeneic-based stem cell therapies for SCI. PMID:21070647

  14. Dendritic Cell-Nerve Clusters Are Sites of T Cell Proliferation in Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Veres, Tibor Z.; Shevchenko, Marina; Krasteva, Gabriela; Spies, Emma; Prenzler, Frauke; Rochlitzer, Sabine; Tschernig, Thomas; Krug, Norbert; Kummer, Wolfgang; Braun, Armin

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between T cells and dendritic cells in the airway mucosa precede secondary immune responses to inhaled antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the anatomical locations where dendritic cell–T cell interactions occur, resulting in T cells activation by dendritic cells. In a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we applied whole-mount immunohistology and confocal microscopy to visualize dendritic cells and T cells together with nerves, epithelium, and smooth muscle in three dimensions. Proliferating T cells were identified by the detection of the incorporation of the nucleotide analogue 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine into the DNA. We developed a novel quantification method that enabled the accurate determination of cell–cell contacts in a semi-automated fashion. Dendritic cell–T cell interactions occurred beneath the smooth muscle layer, but not in the epithelium. Approximately 10% of the dendritic cells were contacted by nerves, and up to 4% of T cells formed clusters with these dendritic cells. T cells that were clustered with nerve-contacting dendritic cells proliferated only in the airways of mice with allergic inflammation but not in the airways of negative controls. Taken together, these results suggest that during the secondary immune response, sensory nerves influence dendritic cell-driven T cell activation in the airway mucosa. PMID:19179611

  15. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions. PMID:27034589

  16. A Model of Dendritic Cell Therapy for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    DePillis, Lisette; Gallegos, Angela; Radunskaya, Ami

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a promising immunotherapy tool for boosting an individual’s antigen-specific immune response to cancer. We develop a mathematical model using differential and delay-differential equations to describe the interactions between dendritic cells, effector-immune cells, and tumor cells. We account for the trafficking of immune cells between lymph, blood, and tumor compartments. Our model reflects experimental results both for dendritic cell trafficking and for immune suppression of tumor growth in mice. In addition, in silico experiments suggest more effective immunotherapy treatment protocols can be achieved by modifying dose location and schedule. A sensitivity analysis of the model reveals which patient-specific parameters have the greatest impact on treatment efficacy. PMID:23516248

  17. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aliberti, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions. PMID:27034589

  18. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Combination with Hyaluronic Acid for the Treatment of Osteoarthritis in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, En-Rung; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Wang, Jung-Pan; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies may aid in the repair of articular cartilage defects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of intraarticular injection of allogeneic MSCs in an in vivo anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model of osteoarthritis in rabbits. Allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs were isolated and cultured under hypoxia (1% O2). After 8 weeks following ACLT, MSCs suspended in hyaluronic acid (HA) were injected into the knees, and the contralateral knees were injected with HA alone. Additional controls consisted of a sham operation group as well as an untreated osteoarthritis group. The tissues were analyzed by macroscopic examination as well as histologic and immunohistochemical methods at 6 and 12 weeks post-transplantation. At 6 and 12 weeks, the joint surface showed less cartilage loss and surface abrasion after MSC injection as compared to the tissues receiving HA injection alone. Significantly better histological scores and cartilage content were observed with the MSC transplantation. Furthermore, engraftment of allogenic MSCs were evident in surface cartilage. Thus, injection of the allogeneic MSCs reduced the progression of osteoarthritis in vivo. PMID:26915044

  19. Optimal timing of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo G Della; Malcovati, Luca; Jackson, Christopher H; Pascutto, Cristiana; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Teresa van Lint, Maria; Falda, Michele; Bernardi, Massimo; Onida, Francesco; Guidi, Stefano; Iori, Anna Paola; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Angelucci, Emanuele; Oneto, Rosi; Ripamonti, Francesco; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bosi, Alberto; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents the only curative treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but involves non-negligible morbidity and mortality. Registry studies have shown that advanced disease stage at transplantation is associated with inferior overall survival. To define the optimal timing of allogeneic HSCT, we carried out a decision analysis by studying 660 patients who received best supportive care and 449 subjects who underwent transplantation. Risk assessment was based on both the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the World Health Organization classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS). We used a continuous-time multistate Markov model to describe the natural history of disease and evaluate the effect of allogeneic HSCT on survival. This model estimated life expectancy from diagnosis according to treatment policy at different risk stages. Relative to supportive care, estimated life expectancy increased when transplantation was delayed from the initial stages until progression to intermediate-1 IPSS-risk or to intermediate WPSS-risk stage, and then decreased for higher risks. Modeling decision analysis on WPSS versus IPSS allowed better estimation of the optimal timing of transplantation. These observations indicate that allogeneic HSCT offers optimal survival benefits when the procedure is performed before MDS patients progress to advanced disease stages. Am. J. Hematol. 88:581–588, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23606215

  20. Activation of B cells by antigens on follicular dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; El Sayed, Rania M.; Sukumar, Selvakumar; Szakal, Andras K.; Tew, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A need for antigen-processing and presentation to B cells is not widely appreciated. However, cross-linking of multiple B cell receptors (BCRs) by T-independent antigens delivers a potent signal that induces antibody responses. Such BCR cross-linking also occurs in germinal centers where follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) present multimerized antigens as periodically arranged antigen-antibody complexes (ICs). Unlike T cells that recognize antigens as peptide-MHC complexes, optimal B cell-responses are induced by multimerized FDC-ICs that simultaneously engage multiple BCRs. FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC-periodicity and FDC-BAFF, -IL-6 and -C4bBP are co-stimulators. Remarkably, specific antibody responses can be induced by FDC-ICs in the absence of T cells, opening up the exciting possibility that people with T cell insufficiencies may be immunized with T-dependent vaccines via FDC-ICs. PMID:20418164

  1. How Follicular Dendritic Cells Shape the B-Cell Antigenome

    PubMed Central

    Kranich, Jan; Krautler, Nike Julia

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are stromal cells residing in primary follicles and in germinal centers of secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs (SLOs and TLOs). There, they play a crucial role in B-cell activation and affinity maturation of antibodies. FDCs have the unique capacity to bind and retain native antigen in B-cell follicles for long periods of time. Therefore, FDCs shape the B-cell antigenome (the sum of all B-cell antigens) in SLOs and TLOs. In this review, we discuss recent findings that explain how this stromal cell type can arise in almost any tissue during TLO formation and, furthermore, focus on the mechanisms of antigen capture and retention involved in the generation of long-lasting antigen depots displayed on FDCs. PMID:27446069

  2. Influence of benzoporphyrin-derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA, verteporfin) on murine dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, David W. C.; King, Diane E.; Levy, Julia G.

    1997-05-01

    The impact of bensoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A, and visible light was determined for mouse splenic dendritic cells (DC), potent antigen-presenting cells (APC) of the immune system. It was discovered that sub-lethal doses of BPD-MA and light significantly altered the surface receptor pattern of DC as well as diminishing the capacity of these cells to activate allogeneic T cells. Treatment of highly purified DC with BPD-MA and 690 nm wavelength light decreased DC expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) Class I and II antigens, leukocyte common antigen CD45, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54), the co- stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, CD95 as well as integrin CD11c. In contrast, DC expression of leukocyte function-associated-1 (LFA-1, CD11a), CD11b, CD18, CD40, and the DC DEC-205 receptor increased after the treatment. Changes in receptor levels occurred rapidly. DC MHC Class I and ICAM-1 expression declined to 40 percent of control levels by 2 hours post-PDT. DC treated with BPD-MA and light were poor stimulators of allogeneic T cells in the mixed leukocyte reaction. BPD-MA, in the absence of light, had no effect on the immunostimulatory properties of these cells. The changes in DC receptor expression pattern produced by BPD-MA and light were comparable to those produced by ultraviolet B light, a treatment known to alter the immunostimulatory characteristics of DC. Photodynamic therapy with BPD-MA represents an innovative approach for the modification of immune reactivity.

  3. The distribution and functional properties of dendritic cells in patients with seronegative arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Stagg, A J; Harding, B; Hughes, R A; Keat, A; Knight, S C

    1991-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), potent antigen-presenting cells, are known to be increased in numbers in inflammatory lesions in rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile chronic arthritis. In this study, patients with seronegative arthritis were studied; the distribution and functional properties of DC enriched low density cells (LDC) from peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) were compared. The composition of LDC from both sources was similar, comprising approximately 30% DC, 60% monocytes with few T lymphocytes. SF was significantly enriched for LDC compared with paired peripheral blood (P less than 0.0001) or peripheral blood from healthy controls (P less than 0.001). In contrast, patient PB contained fewer LDC (P less than 0.05) overall than healthy controls. LDC from both sources were potent simulators of allogeneic PB T cells in a mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR), but in four out of 10 patients SF LDC were significantly more stimulatory. In autologous MLRs (AMLRs) SF T cells were not stimulated by either LDC population. This anergy of T cells was confined to the joint as patient PB T cells showed an AMLR response to PB LDC which was similar to that seen in cells from healthy controls. PB T cells also responded to SF LDC; in a minority of patients SF LDC caused significantly greater stimulation in AMLR than PB LDC and the possibility is discussed that this may represent presentation of antigen acquired in vivo. PMID:1826647

  4. High proportions of regulatory T cells in PBSC grafts predict improved survival after allogeneic haematopoietic SCT

    PubMed Central

    Danby, R D; Zhang, W; Medd, P; Littlewood, T J; Peniket, A; Rocha, V; Roberts, D J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate immune responses and improve survival in murine transplant models. However, whether the Treg content of allogeneic cell grafts influences the outcome in human haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is not well established. In a prospective study of 94 adult allogeneic PBSC transplants (60% unrelated; 85% reduced intensity conditioning), the median Treg (CD3+CD4+CD25+FOXP3+CD127dim/−) dose transplanted was 4.7 × 106/kg, with Tregs accounting for a median of 2.96% of CD4+ T cells. Patients transplanted with grafts containing a Treg/CD4+ T-cell ratio above the median had a 3-year overall survival of 75%, compared with 49% in those receiving grafts with a Treg/CD4+ T-cell ratio below the median (P=0.02), with a 3-year non-relapse mortality of 13% and 35%, respectively (P=0.02). In multivariate analysis, a high graft Treg/CD4+ T-cell ratio was an independent predictor of lower non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio (HR), 0.30; P=0.02), improved overall survival (HR, 0.45; P=0.03) and improved sustained neutrophil (HR, 0.52; P=0.002), platelet (HR, 0.51; P<0.001) and lymphocyte (HR, 0.54; P=0.009) recovery. These data support the hypothesis that the proportion of Tregs in allogeneic HSC grafts influences clinical outcome and suggest that Treg therapies could improve allogeneic HSC transplantation. PMID:26389831

  5. Resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 infection: an emerging concern after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Scieux, C; Garrait, V; Socié, G; Rocha, V; Molina, J M; Thouvenot, D; Morfin, F; Hocqueloux, L; Garderet, L; Espérou, H; Sélimi, F; Devergie, A; Leleu, G; Aymard, M; Morinet, F; Gluckman, E; Ribaud, P

    2000-10-01

    Fourteen cases of severe acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, 7 of which showed resistance to foscarnet, were diagnosed among 196 allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients within a 29-month period. Recipients of unrelated stem cell transplants were at higher risk. All patients received foscarnet; 8 subsequently received cidofovir. Strains were initially foscarnet-resistant in 3 patients and secondarily so in 4 patients. In vitro resistance to acyclovir or foscarnet was associated with clinical failure of these drugs; however, in vitro susceptibility to foscarnet was associated with complete response in only 5 of 7 patients. No strain from any of the 7 patients was resistant in vitro to cidofovir; however, only 3 of 7 patients achieved complete response. Therefore, acyclovir- and/or foscarnet-resistant HSV-1 infections after allogeneic stem cell transplantation have become a concern; current strategies need to be reassessed and new strategies must be evaluated in this setting. PMID:11049772

  6. The Extracellular Domain of CD83 Inhibits Dendritic Cell–mediated T Cell Stimulation and Binds to a Ligand on Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lechmann, Matthias; Krooshoop, Daniëlle J.E.B.; Dudziak, Diana; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kuhnt, Christine; Figdor, Carl G.; Schuler, Gerold; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    CD83 is an immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily member that is upregulated during the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). It has been widely used as a marker for mature DCs, but its function is still unknown. To approach its potential functional role, we have expressed the extracellular Ig domain of human CD83 (hCD83ext) as a soluble protein. Using this tool we could show that immature as well as mature DCs bind to CD83. Since CD83 binds a ligand also expressed on immature DCs, which do not express CD83, indicates that binding is not a homophilic interaction. In addition we demonstrate that hCD83ext interferes with DC maturation downmodulating the expression of CD80 and CD83, while no phenotypical effects were observed on T cells. Finally, we show that hCD83ext inhibits DC-dependent allogeneic and peptide-specific T cell proliferation in a concentration dependent manner in vitro. This is the first report regarding functional aspects of CD83 and the binding of CD83 to DCs. PMID:11748282

  7. Avian dendritic cells: Phenotype and ontogeny in lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Nándor; Bódi, Ildikó; Oláh, Imre

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are critically important accessory cells in the innate and adaptive immune systems. Avian DCs were originally identified in primary and secondary lymphoid organs by their typical morphology, displaying long cell processes with cytoplasmic granules. Several subtypes are known. Bursal secretory dendritic cells (BSDC) are elongated cells which express vimentin intermediate filaments, MHC II molecules, macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), and produce 74.3+ secretory granules. Avian follicular dendritic cells (FDC) highly resemble BSDC, express the CD83, 74.3 and CSF1R molecules, and present antigen in germinal centers. Thymic dendritic cells (TDC), which express 74.3 and CD83, are concentrated in thymic medulla while interdigitating DC are found in T cell-rich areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Avian Langerhans cells are a specialized 74.3-/MHC II+ cell population found in stratified squamous epithelium and are capable of differentiating into 74.3+ migratory DCs. During organogenesis hematopoietic precursors of DC colonize the developing lymphoid organ primordia prior to immigration of lymphoid precursor cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the ontogeny, cytoarchitecture, and immunophenotype of avian DC, and offers an antibody panel for the in vitro and in vivo identification of these heterogeneous cell types. PMID:26751596

  8. T cells from the tumor microenvironment of patients with progressive myeloma can generate strong, tumor-specific cytolytic responses to autologous, tumor-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Krasovsky, Joseph; Olson, Kara

    2002-10-01

    Most untreated cancer patients develop progressive tumors. We tested the capacity of T lymphocytes from patients with clinically progressive, multiple myeloma to develop killer function against fresh autologous tumor. In this malignancy, it is feasible to reproducibly evaluate freshly isolated tumor cells and T cells from the marrow tumor environment. When we did this with seven consecutive patients, with all clinical stages of disease, we did not detect reactivity to autologous cancer cells. However, both cytolytic and IFN--producing responses to autologous myeloma were generated in six of seven patients after stimulation ex vivo with dendritic cells that had processed autologous tumor cells. The antitumor effectors recognized fresh autologous tumor but not nontumor cells in the bone marrow, myeloma cell lines, dendritic cells loaded with tumor-derived Ig, or allogeneic tumor. Importantly, these CD8+ effectors developed with similar efficiency by using T cells from both the blood and the bone marrow tumor environment. Therefore, even in the setting of clinical tumor progression, the tumor bed of myeloma patients contains T cells that can be activated readily by dendritic cells to kill primary autologous tumor.

  9. Murine Melanoma-Infiltrating Dendritic Cells Are Defective in Antigen Presenting Function Regardless of the Presence of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ataera, Haley; Hyde, Evelyn; Price, Kylie M.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Ronchese, Franca

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells are often ineffective at presenting tumor-derived antigen in vivo, a defect usually ascribed to the suppressive tumor environment. We investigated the effects of depleting CD4+CD25+ “natural” regulatory T cells (Treg) on the frequency, phenotype and function of total dendritic cell populations in B16.OVA tumors and in tumor-draining lymph nodes. Intraperitoneal injection of the anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody PC61 reduced Treg frequency in blood and tumors, but did not affect the frequency of tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells, or their expression of CD40, CD86 and MHCII. Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells from PC61-treated or untreated mice induced the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in vitro, but could not induce proliferation of OVA-specific OTI and OTII T cells unless specific peptide antigen was added in culture. Some proliferation of naïve, OVA-specific OTI T cells, but not OTII T cells, was observed in the tumor-draining LN of mice carrying B16.OVA tumors, however, this was not improved by PC61 treatment. Experiments using RAG1−/− hosts adoptively transferred with OTI and CD25-depleted OTII cells also failed to show improved OTI and OTII T cell proliferation in vivo compared to C57BL/6 hosts. We conclude that the defective presentation of B16.OVA tumor antigen by tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells and in the tumor-draining lymph node is not due to the presence of “natural” CD4+CD25+ Treg. PMID:21390236

  10. Umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation through multiple immunoregulations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiu-Ling; Liu, Xiao-Yun; Nie, Di-Min; Zhu, Xia-Xia; Fang, Jun; You, Yong; Zhong, Zhao-Dong; Xia, Ling-Hui; Hong, Mei

    2015-08-01

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are increasingly used to treat graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), their immune regulatory mechanism in the process is elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the curative effect of third-party umbilical cord blood-derived human MSCs (UCB-hMSCs) on GVHD patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and their immune regulatory mechanism. Twenty-four refractory GVHD patients after allo-HSCT were treated with UCB-hMSCs. Immune cells including T lymphocyte subsets, NK cells, Treg cells and dendritic cells (DCs) and cytokines including interleukin-17 (IL-17) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were monitored before and after MSCs transfusion. The results showed that the symptoms of GVHD were alleviated significantly without increased relapse of primary disease and transplant-related complications after MSCs transfusion. The number of CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) cells decreased significantly, and that of NK cells remained unchanged, whereas the number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) Tregs increased and reached a peak at 4 weeks; the number of mature DCs, and the levels of TNF-α and IL-17 decreased and reached a trough at 2 weeks. It was concluded that MSCs ameliorate GVHD and spare GVL effect via immunoregulations. PMID:26223913

  11. Allogeneic Cell Therapy Bioprocess Economics and Optimization: Single-Use Cell Expansion Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Simaria, Ana S; Hassan, Sally; Varadaraju, Hemanthram; Rowley, Jon; Warren, Kim; Vanek, Philip; Farid, Suzanne S

    2014-01-01

    For allogeneic cell therapies to reach their therapeutic potential, challenges related to achieving scalable and robust manufacturing processes will need to be addressed. A particular challenge is producing lot-sizes capable of meeting commercial demands of up to 109 cells/dose for large patient numbers due to the current limitations of expansion technologies. This article describes the application of a decisional tool to identify the most cost-effective expansion technologies for different scales of production as well as current gaps in the technology capabilities for allogeneic cell therapy manufacture. The tool integrates bioprocess economics with optimization to assess the economic competitiveness of planar and microcarrier-based cell expansion technologies. Visualization methods were used to identify the production scales where planar technologies will cease to be cost-effective and where microcarrier-based bioreactors become the only option. The tool outputs also predict that for the industry to be sustainable for high demand scenarios, significant increases will likely be needed in the performance capabilities of microcarrier-based systems. These data are presented using a technology S-curve as well as windows of operation to identify the combination of cell productivities and scale of single-use bioreactors required to meet future lot sizes. The modeling insights can be used to identify where future R&D investment should be focused to improve the performance of the most promising technologies so that they become a robust and scalable option that enables the cell therapy industry reach commercially relevant lot sizes. The tool outputs can facilitate decision-making very early on in development and be used to predict, and better manage, the risk of process changes needed as products proceed through the development pathway. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 69–83. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23893544

  12. Rat CD8+ FOXP3+ T suppressor cells mediate tolerance to allogeneic heart transplants, inducing PIR-B in APC and rendering the graft invulnerable to rejection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiawang; Liu, Zhuoru; Witkowski, Piotr; Vlad, George; Manavalan, John S; Scotto, Luigi; Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; Cortesini, Raffaello; Hardy, Mark A; Suciu-Foca, Nicole

    2004-12-01

    Human CD8+ FOXP3+ T suppressor cells (TS) were previously shown to induce the expression of the inhibitory receptors, Immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT) 3 and ILT4 on dendritic and endothelial cells, rendering them tolerogenic to allogeneic T cells. We have demonstrated the importance of CD8+ TS in a rat model of heart allo-transplantation. Tolerance was induced in ACI recipients by multiple transfusions of UVB-irradiated blood from Lewis heart donors. CD8+ T cells from tolerant ACI rats expressed FOXP3, transferred tolerance to naive secondary hosts and induced the upregulation of the inhibitory receptor, paired immunoglobulin-like receptor (PIR)-B, an ILT4 orthologue, in Lewis dendritic cells (DC) and heart endothelial cells (EC). When long-term surviving Lewis heart allografts with PIR-B+ EC were retransplanted from a primary to a secondary ACI recipient they did not elicit rejection. This study focuses attention on the need to develop agents that act directly on graft EC in order to achieve tolerance. PMID:15589736

  13. Donor cell leukemia after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Murata, Makoto; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Terakura, Seitaro; Ozeki, Kazutaka; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2008-07-01

    A 49-year-old male developed recurrent acute myeloid leukemia 27 months after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) from an HLA-identical brother. The immunophenotype of the blastic cell population was incompatible with that of the pre-transplant blast cells; a mutation in C/EBPA gene was found in the pre-transplant blast cells that was not present in the post-transplant blast cells, and short tandem repeat analysis of marrow cells, which included 71% blasts, showed complete donor chimera. Thus, this recipient developed donor cell leukemia (DCL). The donor was healthy when DCL developed in the recipient as well as before donation of the peripheral blood stem cells. Only five cases of DCL after PBSCT have been reported in the literature. As a mechanism for the development of DCL, a vigorous proliferative demand on the donor cells, which often correlates with a higher likelihood of replication error or mutation, has been proposed. Peripheral blood stem cells might have an advantage in that they are associated with a low incidence of DCL development because PBSCT recipients receive a higher total cell dose than recipients of bone marrow or cord blood cells. PMID:18470599

  14. CD8+FOXP3+T cells from renal transplant recipients in quiescence induce immunoglobulin-like transcripts-3 and -4 on dendritic cells from their respective donors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H; Wang, Z-D; Zhu, X; You, Y; Zou, P

    2007-12-01

    In previous studies, CD8+FOXP3+ T cells have been shown to upgrade the inhibitory receptors on dendritic cells (DC) in heart transplantation patients. The inhibitory receptor were immunoglobulin-like transcripts (ILT)-3 and ILT-4, which were highly expressed on tolerogenic dendritic cells. Our study focused on the CD8+FOXP3+ T cells from allogeneic renal transplant recipients, seeking to dissert their function in inducing ILT-3- and ILT-4-expressing dendritic cells. We analyzed 11 quiescent renal transplant recipients and their respective donors. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the levels of Foxp3 mRNA in CD8+ T cells after renal transplantation were significantly higher than those in CD8+ T cells before transplantation. We further investigated the capacity of allospecific CD8+FOXP3+ T cells to induce upregulation of the inhibitory receptors ILT-3 and ILT-4 on DC. Data from FACS showed that CD8+FOXP3+ T cells induced greater expression of ILT-3 and ILT-4 on DC in an allospecific fashion. This study confirmed that Foxp3 gene expression was enhanced among quiescent renal transplant patients, suggesting that CD8+FOXP3+ T cells play an important role in unresponsiveness related to upregulated ILT-3 and ILT-4 receptors on DC. PMID:18089323

  15. The Role of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus; Kazantsev, Ilya; Zabelina, Tatjana; Ayuk, Francis; Zander, Axel Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Despite the favorable prognosis of most patients with Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL), 15–20% of patients remain refractory to chemoradiotherapy, and 20–40% experience relapses following autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) being used as salvage approach in this situation. Long-term survival of only 20% was reported for patients who failed this option. As some authors suggested the presence of a graft versus HL effect, allogeneic SCT was introduced as a further option. Myeloablative strategies were reported to be able to achieve cure in some younger patients, but high nonrelapse mortality remains a problem. Reduced intensity conditioning, in turn, was found to be associated with high posttransplant relapse rates. As there is currently no standard in the management of HL patients who failed autologous SCT, we here review the literature on allogeneic stem cell transplantation in HL patients with a special focus on the outcomes and risk factors being reported in the largest studies. PMID:20981158

  16. Infectious diseases in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: prevention and prophylaxis strategy guidelines 2016.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Andrew J; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Bertz, Hartmut; Heinz, Werner J; Kiehl, Michael; Krüger, William; Mousset, Sabine; Neuburger, Stefan; Neumann, Silke; Penack, Olaf; Silling, Gerda; Vehreschild, Jörg Janne; Einsele, Hermann; Maschmeyer, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Infectious complications after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) remain a clinical challenge. This is a guideline provided by the AGIHO (Infectious Diseases Working Group) of the DGHO (German Society for Hematology and Medical Oncology). A core group of experts prepared a preliminary guideline, which was discussed, reviewed, and approved by the entire working group. The guideline provides clinical recommendations for the preventive management including prophylactic treatment of viral, bacterial, parasitic, and fungal diseases. The guideline focuses on antimicrobial agents but includes recommendations on the use of vaccinations. This is the updated version of the AGHIO guideline in the field of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation utilizing methods according to evidence-based medicine criteria. PMID:27339055

  17. Manipulation of dendritic cell functions by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, John

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the mammalian immune system and are central to the initiation and maintenance of the adaptive immune response. They are crucial for the presentation of antigen to T cells and B cells, as well as the induction of chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines, which orchestrate the balance of the cell-mediated (Th1) and antibody (Th2) response. This ability of dendritic cells to present antigen and release chemokines and cytokines also bridges the innate and adaptive immune responses by driving T cell activation. These cells thus possess key immunological functions that make them the front line of defence for the targeting and clearance of any invading pathogen and, as such, they underpin the host immune response to infection. For efficient infection, invading pathogens often need to overcome these sentinel immune functions. It is therefore not surprising that pathogens have evolved numerous mechanisms to target dendritic cell functions directly or indirectly during infection, and at least one herpesvirus--human cytomegalovirus--has evolved a life cycle that hijacks dendritic cells for its long-term persistence in the infected host. PMID:19025715

  18. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid T cells differ in their response to alloantigens and recall antigens presented by dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stagg, A J; Harding, B; Hughes, R A; Keat, A; Knight, S C

    1991-01-01

    Properties of T cells from inflammatory lesions were analysed by comparing the response of peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) T cells from 19 patients with a range of arthropathies to enriched allogeneic dendritic cells (DC) in a primary mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR). In 17 patients the proliferative response of SF T cells was significantly (P less than 0.05) less than that of PB lymphocytes. The reduced response of SF T cells was observed in all disease categories studied and could not be attributed to differences in cell number requirements or response kinetics. Addition of recombinant interleukin-2 enhanced the response of SF T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cell mixing experiments suggested that active suppression was not the underlying mechanism of the poor MLR response of SF T cells. In contrast to the MLR response. SF T cells were able to mount vigorous proliferative responses to recall antigen presented by autologous antigen-presenting cells. The possibility is discussed that T cells compartmentalized at inflammatory lesions are a unique population with a diminished ability to interact with DC and respond to primary stimuli but an ability to respond to secondary antigenic challenge. PMID:1826648

  19. Distinct activation of primary human BDCA1(+) dendritic cells upon interaction with stressed or infected β cells.

    PubMed

    Schulte, B M; Kers-Rebel, E D; Bottino, R; Piganelli, J D; Galama, J M D; Engelse, M A; de Koning, E J P; Adema, G J

    2016-06-01

    Derailment of immune responses can lead to autoimmune type 1 diabetes, and this can be accelerated or even induced by local stress caused by inflammation or infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) shape both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we report on the responses of naturally occurring human myeloid BDCA1(+) DCs towards differentially stressed pancreatic β cells. Our data show that BDCA1(+) DCs in human pancreas-draining lymph node (pdLN) suspensions and blood-derived BDCA1(+) DCs both effectively engulf β cells, thus mimicking physiological conditions. Upon uptake of enterovirus-infected, but not mock-infected cells, BDCA1(+) DCs induced interferon (IFN)-α/β responses, co-stimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Notably, induction of stress in β cells by ultraviolet irradiation, culture in serum-free medium or cytokine-induced stress did not provoke strong DC activation, despite efficient phagocytosis. DC activation correlated with the amount of virus used to infect β cells and required RNA within virally infected cells. DCs encountering enterovirus-infected β cells, but not those incubated with mock-infected or stressed β cells, suppressed T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines and variably induced IFN-γ in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Thus, stressed β cells have little effect on human BDCA1(+) DC activation and function, while enterovirus-infected β cells impact these cells significantly, which could help to explain their role in development of autoimmune diabetes in individuals at risk. PMID:26888163

  20. Voriconazole-Induced Periostitis Mimicking Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Annie; Rondelli, Damiano; Patel, Pritesh

    2016-01-01

    Voriconazole is an established first-line agent for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). It is associated with the uncommon complication of periostitis. We report this complication in a 58-year-old female undergoing HSCT. She was treated with corticosteroids with minimal improvement. The symptoms related to periostitis can mimic chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients undergoing HSCT and clinicians should differentiate this from other diagnoses and promptly discontinue therapy. PMID:27403356

  1. Fungemia Caused by Zygoascus hellenicus in an Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Mary E.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Pappas, Peter G.; Iqbal, Naureen; Arthington-Skaggs, Beth A.; Lee-Yang, Wendy; Smith, Maudy T.

    2004-01-01

    Zygoascus hellenicus (Candida hellenica) was isolated from a blood culture from a patient who had received an allogeneic stem cell transplant. The isolate displayed an antifungal susceptibility pattern of decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and itraconazole, high susceptibility to voriconazole, and low susceptibility to caspofungin. The organism was misidentified by a commercial yeast identification system. This is the first reported case of human infection with this rare ascomycetous yeast. PMID:15243118

  2. Fungemia caused by Zygoascus hellenicus in an allogeneic stem cell transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Mary E; Kauffman, Carol A; Pappas, Peter G; Iqbal, Naureen; Arthington-Skaggs, Beth A; Lee-Yang, Wendy; Smith, Maudy T

    2004-07-01

    Zygoascus hellenicus (Candida hellenica) was isolated from a blood culture from a patient who had received an allogeneic stem cell transplant. The isolate displayed an antifungal susceptibility pattern of decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and itraconazole, high susceptibility to voriconazole, and low susceptibility to caspofungin. The organism was misidentified by a commercial yeast identification system. This is the first reported case of human infection with this rare ascomycetous yeast. PMID:15243118

  3. Bacterial Ghosts of Escherichia coli Drive Efficient Maturation of Bovine Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hajam, Irshad Ahmed; Dar, Pervaiz Ahmad; Appavoo, Elamurugan; Kishore, Subodh; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Ganesh, Kondabattula

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial ghosts (BGs) are empty cell envelopes derived from Gram-negative bacteria. They not only represent a potential platform for development of novel vaccines but also provide a tool for efficient adjuvant and antigen delivery system. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between BGs of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and bovine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). MoDCs are highly potent antigen-presenting cells and have the potential to act as a powerful tool for manipulating the immune system. We generated bovine MoDCs in vitro from blood monocytes using E. coli expressed bovine GM-CSF and IL-4 cytokines. These MoDCs displayed typical morphology and functions similar to DCs. We further investigated the E. coli BGs to induce maturation of bovine MoDCs in comparison to E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We observed the maturation marker molecules such as MHC-II, CD80 and CD86 were induced early and at higher levels in BG stimulated MoDCs as compared to the LPS stimulated MoDCs. BG mediated stimulation induced significantly higher levels of cytokine expression in bovine MoDCs than LPS. Both pro-inflammatory (IL-12 and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines were induced in MoDCs after BGs stimulation. We further analysed the effects of BGs on the bovine MoDCs in an allogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). We found the BG-treated bovine MoDCs had significantly (p<0.05) higher capacity to stimulate allogenic T cell proliferation in MLR as compared to the LPS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the E. coli BGs induce a strong activation and maturation of bovine MoDCs. PMID:26669936

  4. Regulatory multitasking of tolerogenic dendritic cells - lessons taken from vitamin d3-treated tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Tatjana; Roep, Bart O

    2013-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) work through silencing of differentiated antigen-specific T cells, activation and expansion of naturally occurring T regulatory cells (Tregs), transfer of regulatory properties to T cells, and the differentiation of naïve T cells into Tregs. Due to an operational definition based on T cell activation assays, the identity of tolerogenic DCs has been a matter of debate and it need not represent a specialized DC subset. Human tolerogenic DCs generated in vitro using inhibitory cytokines, growth factors, natural immunomodulators, or genetic manipulation have been effective and several of these tolerogenic DCs are currently being tested for clinical use. Ex vivo generated tolerogenic DCs reduce activation of naïve T cells using various means, promote a variety of regulatory T cells and most importantly, frequently show stable inhibitory phenotypes upon repetitive maturation with inflammatory factors. Yet, tolerogenic DCs differ with respect to the phenotype or the number of regulatory mechanisms they employ to modulate the immune system. In our experience, tolerogenic DCs generated using the biologically active form of vitamin D (VD3-DCs), alone, or combined with dexamethasone are proficient in their immunoregulatory functions. These tolerogenic DCs show a stable maturation-resistant semi-mature phenotype with low expression of activating co-stimulatory molecules, no production of the IL-12 family of cytokines and high expression of inhibitory molecules and IL-10. VD3-DCs induce increased apoptosis of effector T cells and induce antigen-specific regulatory T cells, which work through linked suppression ensuring infectious tolerance. Lessons learned on VD3-DCs help understanding the contribution of different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and secondary signals to the tolerogenic function and how a cross-talk between DCs and T cells translates into immune regulation. PMID:23717310

  5. Reticulated platelets as a marker of platelet recovery after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Michur, H; Maślanka, K; Szczepiński, A; Mariańska, B

    2008-12-01

    Reticulated platelets (RP) are the youngest forms of platelets in blood and reflect the rate of bone marrow platelet production. In the present study, we used flow cytometric analysis to determine the percentage of RPs in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We investigated 10 patients after transplantation from HLA identical siblings: five with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), four with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and one patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Of the patients examined, four patients underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and six patients underwent peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. It was observed that the initially reduced percentage of RPs (2.9 +/- 1.7%; mean +/- SD) was significantly higher (P = 0.0109) in all patients (13.6 +/- 6.4%) in the following 10-26 days. The RP percentage peak preceded the recovery of peripheral platelet count up to 45.6 x 10(9)/l on average by 3 days. We found no difference in RP% between the AML and CML patients but we did observe that in CML patients the RP percentage increased on average 7 days earlier than in AML patients. The elevated RP percentage reflects increased bone marrow regeneration and can be considered an additional marker of thrombopoietic recovery in the patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:18983304

  6. Frequent genomic alterations in epithelium measured by microsatellite instability following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in humans.

    PubMed

    Faber, Philipp; Fisch, Paul; Waterhouse, Miguel; Schmitt-Gräff, Annette; Bertz, Hartmut; Finke, Jürgen; Spyridonidis, Alexandros

    2006-04-15

    Although typically found in cancers, frameshift mutations in microsatellites have also been detected in chronically inflamed tissues. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) may potentially produce chronic tissue stress through graft-versus-host reactions. We examined non-neoplastic epithelial tissues (colon, buccal) obtained 1 to 5061 days after human allogeneic HCT for the presence of genomic alterations at 3 tetranucleotide and 3 mononucleotide microsatellite loci. Novel bands indicative of microsatellite instability (MSI) at tetranucleotide repeats were detected in laser-microdissected colonic crypts and in buccal smears of 75% and 42% of patients who received an allograft, respectively. In contrast, no MSI was found in similar tissues from control subjects and from patients after intensive chemotherapy or in buccal cells from patients after autologous HCT. The MSI found in colon, which was often affected by graft-versus-host disease, was not due to loss of expression or nitrosylation of DNA repair proteins. MSI in clinically intact oral mucosa was more frequently found at later time points after HCT. MSI was also found in 3 posttransplant squamous cell cancers examined. Our data show that genomic alterations in epithelium regularly occur after allogeneic HCT and may be implicated in the evolution of posttransplantation diseases, including secondary cancer. PMID:16368884

  7. Appropriateness of allogeneic red blood cell transfusion: the international consensus conference on transfusion outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Fink, Arlene; Javidroozi, Mazyar; Erhard, Jochen; Farmer, Shannon L; Corwin, Howard; Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Hofmann, Axel; Isbister, James; Ozawa, Sherri; Spahn, Donat R

    2011-07-01

    An international multidisciplinary panel of 15 experts reviewed 494 published articles and used the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to determine the appropriateness of allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion based on its expected impact on outcomes of stable nonbleeding patients in 450 typical inpatient medical, surgical, or trauma scenarios. Panelists rated allogeneic RBC transfusion as appropriate in 53 of the scenarios (11.8%), inappropriate in 267 (59.3%), and uncertain in 130 (28.9%). Red blood cell transfusion was most often rated appropriate (81%) in scenarios featuring patients with hemoglobin (Hb) level 7.9 g/dL or less, associated comorbidities, and age older than 65 years. Red blood cell transfusion was rated inappropriate in all scenarios featuring patients with Hb level 10 g/dL or more and in 71.3% of scenarios featuring patients with Hb level 8 to 9.9 g/dL. Conversely, no scenario with patient's Hb level of 8 g/dL or more was rated as appropriate. Nearly one third of all scenarios were rated uncertain, indicating the need for more research. The observation that allogeneic RBC transfusions were rated as either inappropriate or uncertain in most scenarios in this study supports a more judicious transfusion strategy. In addition, the large number of scenarios in which RBC transfusions were rated as uncertain can serve as a road map to identify areas in need of further investigation. PMID:21498040

  8. Allogeneic adipose-derived stem cells regenerate bone in a critical-sized ulna segmental defect.

    PubMed

    Wen, Congji; Yan, Hai; Fu, Shibo; Qian, Yunliang; Wang, Danru; Wang, Chen

    2016-07-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) with multilineage potential can be induced into osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. ASCs as seed cell are widely used in the field of tissue engineering, but most studies either use autologous cells as the source or an immunodeficient animal as the host. In our present study, we explored the feasibility of applying allogeneic ASCs and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) scaffolds for repairing tubular bone defects without using immunosuppressive therapy. Allogeneic ASCs were expanded and seeded on DBM scaffolds and induced to differentiate along the osteogenic lineage. Eight Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used in this study and bilateral critical-sized defects (8 mm) of the ulna were created and divided into two groups: with ASC-DBM constructs or DBM alone. The systemic immune response and the extent of bone healing were evaluated post-operatively. Twenty-four weeks after implantation, digital radiography (DR) testing showed that new bones had formed in the experimental group. By contrast, no bone tissue formation was observed in the control group. This study demonstrated that allogeneic ASCs could promote bone regeneration and repair tubular bone defects combined with DBM by histologically typical bone without systemic immune response. PMID:25819682

  9. Regulation of Dendritic Cell Function by Vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Barragan, Myriam; Good, Misty; Kolls, Jay K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies over the last two decades have revealed profound immunomodulatory aspects of vitamin D on various aspects of the immune system. This review will provide an overview of Vitamin D metabolism, a description of dendritic cell subsets, and highlight recent advances on the effects of vitamin D on dendritic cell function, maturation, cytokine production and antigen presentation. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, has important immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Specifically, the 1,25(OH)2D3-Vitamin D3 complex can affect the maturation and migration of many dendritic cell subsets, conferring a special immunoregulatory role as well as tolerogenic properties affecting cytokine and chemokine production. Furthermore, there have been many recent studies demonstrating the effects of Vitamin D on allergic disease and autoimmunity. A clear understanding of the effects of the various forms of Vitamin D will provide new opportunities to improve human health. PMID:26402698

  10. Optimal graft source for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant: bone marrow or peripheral blood?

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Janak; Sharma, Priyadarshani; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral blood (PB), compared with bone marrow graft, has higher stem cell content, leads to faster engraftment and is more convenient for collection. Consequently, the use of PB graft has significantly increased in recent years. Although the use of PB graft is acceptable or even preferred to bone marrow graft in matched related donor allogeneic transplant due to a possibility of improved survival, PB graft increases the risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease and associated long-term toxicities in the setting of matched unrelated donor allogeneic transplant. In haploidentical transplant, mitigation of graft-versus-host disease with the use of post-transplant cyclophosphamide is a hypothesis-generating possibility; however, available studies have significant limitations to draw any definite conclusion. PMID:27168462

  11. A Multidrug-resistant Engineered CAR T Cell for Allogeneic Combination Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Julien; Guyot, Valérie; Marechal, Alan; Filhol, Jean-Marie; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe; Poirot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell represents a highly promising strategy to fight against multiple cancers. The clinical outcome of such therapies is intimately linked to the ability of effector cells to engraft, proliferate, and specifically kill tumor cells within patients. When allogeneic CAR T-cell infusion is considered, host versus graft and graft versus host reactions must be avoided to prevent rejection of adoptively transferred cells, host tissue damages and to elicit significant antitumoral outcome. This work proposes to address these three requirements through the development of multidrug-resistant T cell receptor αβ-deficient CAR T cells. We demonstrate that these engineered T cells displayed efficient antitumor activity and proliferated in the presence of purine and pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, currently used in clinic as preconditioning lymphodepleting regimens. The absence of TCRαβ at their cell surface along with their purine nucleotide analogues-resistance properties could prevent their alloreactivity and enable them to resist to lymphodepleting regimens that may be required to avoid their ablation via HvG reaction. By providing a basic framework to develop a universal T cell compatible with allogeneic adoptive transfer, this work is laying the foundation stone of the large-scale utilization of CAR T-cell immunotherapies. PMID:26061646

  12. Donor CD4 T Cell Diversity Determines Virus Reactivation in Patients After HLA-Matched Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, J; Seitz, V; Balzer, H; Gary, R; Lenze, D; Moi, S; Pasemann, S; Seegebarth, A; Wurdack, M; Hennig, S; Gerbitz, A; Hummel, M

    2015-01-01

    Delayed reconstitution of the T cell compartment in recipients of allogeneic stem cell grafts is associated with an increase of reactivation of latent viruses. Thereby, the transplanted T cell repertoire appears to be one of the factors that affect T cell reconstitution. Therefore, we studied the T cell receptor beta (TCRβ) gene rearrangements of flow cytometry–sorted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the peripheral blood of 23 allogeneic donors before G-CSF administration and on the day of apheresis. For this purpose, TCRβ rearrangements were amplified by multiplex PCR followed by high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Overall, CD4+ T cells displayed a significantly higher TCRβ diversity compared to CD8+ T cells irrespective of G-CSF administration. In line, no significant impact of G-CSF treatment on the TCR Vβ repertoire usage was found. However, correlation of the donor T cell repertoire with clinical outcomes of the recipient revealed that a higher CD4+ TCRβ diversity after G-CSF treatment is associated with lower reactivation of cytomegalovirus and Epstein–Barr virus. By contrast, no protecting correlation was observed for CD8+ T cells. In essence, our deep TCRβ analysis identifies the importance of the CD4+ T cell compartment for the control of latent viruses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25873100

  13. Programmed Cell Death of Dendritic Cells in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Wang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Programmed cell death is essential for the maintenance of lymphocyte homeostasis and immune tolerance. Dendritic cells (DCs), the most efficient antigen presenting cells, represent a small cell population in the immune system. However, DCs play major roles in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Programmed cell death in DCs is essential for regulating DC homeostasis and consequently, the scope of immune responses. Interestingly, different DC subsets show varied turnover rates in vivo. The conventional DCs are relatively short-lived in most lymphoid organs, while plasmacytoid DCs are long-lived cells. Mitochondrion-dependent programmed cell death plays an important role in regulating spontaneous DC turnover. Antigen-specific T cells are also capable of killing DCs, thereby providing a mechanism for negative feedback regulation of immune responses. It has been shown that a surplus of DCs due to defects in programmed cell death leads to overactivation of lymphocytes and the onset of autoimmunity. Studying programmed cell death in DCs will shed light on the roles for DC turnover in the regulation of the duration and magnitude of immune responses in vivo, and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. PMID:20636805

  14. Dendritic cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP gene generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes against ovarian cancer in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li; Kong, Beihua; Sheng, Xiugui; Sheu, Jim Jinn-Chyuan; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2010-04-09

    Recently, some studies have indicated that Rsf-1/HBXAP plays a role in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation that may contribute to tumorigenesis in ovarian cancer. The present study demonstrates that using dendritic cells (DCs) from human cord blood CD34{sup +} cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP DNA plasmids by nucleofection generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against ovarian cancer in vitro. After transfection, DCs were analyzed for Rsf-1/HBXAP mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Then the DC phenotypes, T-cell stimulatory capacity, endocytic activity and migration capacity were explored by flow cytometry analysis, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction, endocytosis and transwell chemotaxis assay, respectively. After transfection, Rsf-1/HBXAP expression was detected at mRNA and protein levels. Allogeneic T-cell proliferation induced by transfected DCs was obviously higher than non-transfected DCs, but the endocytosis capacity and migratory ability were not different. Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs could induce antigen-specific CTL and generate a very potent cytotoxicity to OVCAR3 cells. These data suggest that Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs may be a potential adjuvant immunotherapy for ovarian cancer in clinical applications.

  15. Imaging of plasmacytoid dendritic cell interactions with T cells.

    PubMed

    Mittelbrunn, María; Martínez del Hoyo, Gloria; López-Bravo, María; Martín-Cofreces, Noa B; Scholer, Alix; Hugues, Stéphanie; Fetler, Luc; Amigorena, Sebastián; Ardavín, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) efficiently produce type I interferon and participate in adaptive immune responses, although the molecular interactions between pDCs and antigen-specific T cells remain unknown. This study examines immune synapse (IS) formation between murine pDCs and CD4(+) T cells. Mature pDCs formed canonical ISs, involving relocation to the contact site of the microtubule-organizing center, F-actin, protein kinase C-, and pVav, and activation of early signaling molecules in T cells. However, immature pDCs were less efficient at forming conjugates with T cells and inducing IS formation, microtubule-organizing center translocation, and T-cell signaling and activation. Time-lapse videomicroscopy and 2-photon in vivo imaging of pDC-T-cell interactions revealed that immature pDCs preferentially mediated transient interactions, whereas mature pDCs promoted more stable contacts. Our data indicate that, under steady-state conditions, pDCs preferentially establish transient contacts with naive T cells and show a very modest immunogenic capability, whereas on maturation, pDCs are able to form long-lived contacts with T cells and significantly enhance their capacity to activate these lymphocytes. PMID:18818393

  16. T Cell Motility as Modulator of Interactions with Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jens V.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the balance of costimulatory and inhibitory signals during interactions with dendritic cells (DCs) determines T cell transition from a naïve to an activated or tolerant/anergic status. Although many of these molecular interactions are well reproduced in reductionist in vitro assays, the highly dynamic motility of naïve T cells in lymphoid tissue acts as an additional lever to fine-tune their activation threshold. T cell detachment from DCs providing suboptimal stimulation allows them to search for DCs with higher levels of stimulatory signals, while storing a transient memory of short encounters. In turn, adhesion of weakly reactive T cells to DCs presenting peptides presented on major histocompatibility complex with low affinity is prevented by lipid mediators. Finally, controlled recruitment of CD8+ T cells to cognate DC–CD4+ T cell clusters shapes memory T cell formation and the quality of the immune response. Dynamic physiological lymphocyte motility therefore constitutes a mechanism to mitigate low avidity T cell activation and to improve the search for “optimal” DCs, while contributing to peripheral tolerance induction in the absence of inflammation. PMID:26579132

  17. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with leukemic presentation: an Italian multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Livio; Valentini, Caterina Giovanna; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Fisogni, Simona; Carluccio, Paola; Mannelli, Francesco; Lunghi, Monia; Pica, Gianmatteo; Onida, Francesco; Cattaneo, Chiara; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Di Bona, Eros; Todisco, Elisabetta; Musto, Pellegrino; Spadea, Antonio; D'Arco, Alfonso; Pileri, Stefano; Leone, Giuseppe; Amadori, Sergio; Facchetti, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and efficacy of treatments in patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with a leukemic presentation at onset of the disease. In order to do this, a retrospective multicenter study was performed from 2005-2011 in 28 Italian hematology divisions in which 43 cases were collected. Forty-one patients received an induction therapy, consisting of an acute myeloid leukemia-type regimen in 26 patients (60%) and acute lymphoid leukemia/lymphoma-type regimen in 15 patients (35%). Six patients (14%) underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Seventeen patients (41%) achieved a complete remission: seven after acute myeloid leukemia-type treatment and 10 after an acute lymphoid leukemia/lymphoma-type regimen, with a significant advantage for acute lymphoid leukemia/lymphoma-type chemotherapy (P=0.02). Relapse occurred in six of the 17 patients (35%) who achieved complete remission, more frequently after acute lymphoid leukemia/lymphoma-type chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 8.7 months (range, 0.2-32.9). The patients treated with an acute myeloid leukemia-type regimen had an overall survival of 7.1 months (range, 0.2-19.5), whereas that of the patients receiving acute lymphoid leukemia/lymphoma-type chemotherapy was 12.3 months (range, 1-32.9) (P=0.02). The median overall survival of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients was 22.7 months (range, 12-32.9), and these patients had a significant survival advantage compared to the non-transplanted patients (median 7.1 months, 0.2-21.3; P=0.03). In conclusion, blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with bone-marrow involvement is an aggressive subtype of high-risk acute leukemia. The rarity of this disease does not enable prospective clinical trials to identify the better therapeutic strategy, which, at present, is based on clinicians' experience. PMID:23065521

  18. Quantitative characterization of T-cell repertoire in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Yew, P Y; Alachkar, H; Yamaguchi, R; Kiyotani, K; Fang, H; Yap, K L; Liu, H T; Wickrema, A; Artz, A; van Besien, K; Imoto, S; Miyano, S; Bishop, M R; Stock, W; Nakamura, Y

    2015-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is one of curative treatment options for patients with hematologic malignancies. Although GVHD mediated by the donor's T lymphocytes remains the most challenging toxicity of allo-HSCT, graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect targeting leukemic cells, has an important role in affecting the overall outcome of patients with AML. Here we comprehensively characterized the TCR repertoire in patients who underwent matched donor or haplo-cord HSCT using next-generation sequencing approach. Our study defines the functional kinetics of each TCRA and TCRB clone, and changes in T-cell diversity (with identification of CDR3 sequences) and the extent of clonal expansion of certain T-cells. Using this approach, our study demonstrates that higher percentage of cord-blood cells at 30 days after transplant was correlated with higher diversity of TCR repertoire, implicating the role of cord-chimerism in enhancing immune recovery. Importantly, we found that GVHD and relapse, exclusive of each other, were correlated with lower TCR repertoire diversity and expansion of certain T-cell clones. Our results highlight novel insights into the balance between GVHD and GVL effect, suggesting that higher diversity early after transplant possibly implies lower risks of both GVHD and relapse following the HSCT transplantation. PMID:26052909

  19. Quantitative characterization of T-cell repertoire in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yew, P Y; Alachkar, H; Yamaguchi, R; Kiyotani, K; Fang, H; Yap, K L; Liu, H T; Wickrema, A; Artz, A; van Besien, K; Imoto, S; Miyano, S; Bishop, M R; Stock, W; Nakamura, Y

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is one of curative treatment options for patients with hematologic malignancies. Although GVHD mediated by the donor's T lymphocytes remains the most challenging toxicity of allo-HSCT, graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect targeting leukemic cells, has an important role in affecting the overall outcome of patients with AML. Here we comprehensively characterized the TCR repertoire in patients who underwent matched donor or haplo-cord HSCT using next-generation sequencing approach. Our study defines the functional kinetics of each TCRA and TCRB clone, and changes in T-cell diversity (with identification of CDR3 sequences) and the extent of clonal expansion of certain T-cells. Using this approach, our study demonstrates that higher percentage of cord-blood cells at 30 days after transplant was correlated with higher diversity of TCR repertoire, implicating the role of cord-chimerism in enhancing immune recovery. Importantly, we found that GVHD and relapse, exclusive of each other, were correlated with lower TCR repertoire diversity and expansion of certain T-cell clones. Our results highlight novel insights into the balance between GVHD and GVL effect, suggesting that higher diversity early after transplant possibly implies lower risks of both GVHD and relapse following the HSCT transplantation. PMID:26052909

  20. Engraftment syndrome after nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: incidence and effects on survival.

    PubMed

    Gorak, Edward; Geller, Nancy; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Espinoza-Delgado, Igor; Donohue, Teresa; Barrett, A John; Suffredini, Anthony; Childs, Richard

    2005-07-01

    Engraftment syndrome (ES) encompasses a constellation of symptoms that occur during neutrophil recovery after both autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). Although it is well characterized after conventional myeloablative procedures, limited data exist on this complication after nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT. The clinical manifestations, incidence, and risk factors associated with ES were investigated in a consecutive series of patients undergoing cyclophosphamide/fludarabine-based nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT from a related HLA-compatible donor. Fifteen (10%) of 149 patients (median age, 53 years; range, 27-66 years) developed ES; the onset of symptoms occurred at a median of 10 days (range, 3-14 days), and they consisted of fever (100%), cough (53%), diffuse pulmonary infiltrates (100%), rash (13%), and room air hypoxia (87%). ES was more likely to develop in patients who received empiric amphotericin formulations after transplant conditioning (Fisher exact test; P=.007). In a multivariate analysis, older patient age, female sex, and treatment with amphotericin were predictors for the development of ES. Intravenous methylprednisolone led to the rapid resolution of ES; however, transplant-related mortality was significantly higher (cumulative incidence, 49% versus 16%; P=.0005), and median survival was significantly shorter (168 versus 418 days; P=.005) in patients with ES compared with non-ES patients. In conclusion, ES occurs commonly after cyclophosphamide/fludarabine-based nonmyeloablative transplantation and responds rapidly to corticosteroid treatment, but it is associated with a higher risk of nonrelapse mortality and with shorter overall survival. PMID:15983554

  1. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for advanced acute promyelocytic leukemia in the ATRA and ATO era

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Safaa M.; Di Veroli, Ambra; Camboni, Agnese; Breccia, Massimo; Iori, Anna Paola; Aversa, Franco; Cupelli, Luca; Papayannidis, Cristina; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Arcese, William; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The role of allogeneic stem cell transplant in advanced acute promyelocytic leukemia patients who received standard first- and second-line therapy is still unknown. We report the outcome of 31 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients (median age 39 years) who underwent allogeneic transplant in second remission (n=15) or beyond (n=16). Sixteen patients were real-time polymerase chain reaction positive and 15 negative for PML/RARA pre-transplant. The 4-year overall survival was 62% and 31% for patients transplanted in second remission and beyond, respectively (P=0.05), and 64% and 27% for patients with pre-transplant negative and positive real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively (P=0.03). The 4-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 32% and 44% for patients transplanted in second remission and beyond, respectively (P=0.37), and 30% and 47% for patients transplanted with negative and positive real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively (P=0.30). Transplant-related mortality was 19.6%. In conclusion, allogeneic transplant is effective in advanced acute promyelocytic leukemia in the all-trans-retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide era, and should be considered once relapse is diagnosed. PMID:22689684

  2. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for consolidation of VGPR or CR for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Nishihori, T; Ochoa-Bayona, J L; Kim, J; Pidala, J; Shain, K; Baz, R; Sullivan, D; Jim, H S; Anasetti, C; Alsina, M

    2013-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a potentially curative approach in patients with multiple myeloma, but its use for consolidation of first remission has not yet been fully explored. Twenty-two myeloma patients with very good partial response (VGPR) or CR received allogeneic peripheral blood grafts as consolidation from HLA-matched donors between 2007 and 2012. Conditioning regimens were fludarabine (30 mg/m(2) i.v. if with bortezomib and 40 mg/m(2) i.v. when without bortezomib, × 4 days) plus melphalan (70 mg/m(2) intravenously × 2 days) with (n=13) or without (n=9) bortezomib (1.3 mg/m(2)). The cumulative incidence of grades II - IV acute GVHD at day 100 was 45% (95% CI: 24-65%) and moderate-to-severe chronic GVHD at 2 years was 46% (95% CI: 19-69%). With a median follow-up of 18 (range, 2-61) months, the 2-year PFS estimate is 74.8% (95% CI: 45-90%), which compares favorably with the 52% (95% CI: 35-66%) after autologous HCT for similar patients (a median follow-up of 30 (range, 9-55) months). We are conducting a phase 2 study to assess the efficacy of allogeneic HCT as post-remission therapy. PMID:23542223

  3. Secondary solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation using busulfan-cyclophosphamide conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Brazauskas, Ruta; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Sobecks, Ronald M.; Wang, Zhiwei; Horowitz, Mary M.; Bolwell, Brian; Wingard, John R.; Socie, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Risks of secondary solid cancers among allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients who receive conditioning without total body irradiation are not well known. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for solid cancers after HCT using high-dose busulfan-cyclophosphamide conditioning in 4318 recipients of first allogeneic HCT for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission (N = 1742) and chronic myeloid leukemia in first chronic phase (N = 2576). Our cohort represented 22 041 person-years at risk. Sixty-six solid cancers were reported at a median of 6 years after HCT. The cumulative-incidence of solid cancers at 5 and 10 years after HCT was 0.6% and 1.2% among acute myeloid leukemia and 0.9% and 2.4% among chronic myeloid leukemia patients. In comparison to general population incidence rates, HCT recipients had 1.4× higher than expected rate of invasive solid cancers (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.79, P = .01). Significantly elevated risks were observed for tumors of the oral cavity, esophagus, lung, soft tissue, and brain. Chronic graft-versus-host disease was an independent risk factor for all solid cancers, and especially cancers of the oral cavity. Recipients of allogeneic HCT using busulfan-cyclophosphamide conditioning are at risk for developing solid cancers. Their incidence continues to increase with time, and lifelong cancer surveillance is warranted in this population. PMID:20926773

  4. Incidence, etiology, and outcome of pleural effusions in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Modi, Dipenkumar; Jang, Hyejeong; Kim, Seongho; Deol, Abhinav; Ayash, Lois; Bhutani, Divaya; Lum, Lawrence G; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Manasa, Richard; Mellert, Kendra; Uberti, Joseph P

    2016-09-01

    Pleural effusion is a known entity in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); however, the incidence, risk factors, and morbidity-mortality outcomes associated with pleural effusions remain unknown. We retrospectively evaluated pleural effusions in 618 consecutive adult patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT from January 2008 to December 2013 at our institution. Seventy one patients developed pleural effusion at a median of 40 days (range, 1 - 869) post-HSCT with the cumulative incidence of 9.9% (95% CI, 7.7 - 12.5%) at 1 year. Infectious etiology was commonly associated with pleural effusions followed by volume overload and serositis type chronic GVHD. In multivariate analysis, higher comorbidity index (P = 0.03) and active GVHD (P = 0.018) were found to be significant independent predictors for pleural effusion development. Higher comorbidity index, very high disease risk index, ≤7/8 HLA matching, and unrelated donor were associated with inferior overall survival (OS) (P < 0.03). More importantly, patients with pleural effusion were noted to have poor OS in comparison to patients without pleural effusion (P < 0.001). Overall, pleural effusion is a frequently occurring complication after allogeneic HSCT, adding to morbidity and mortality and hence, early identification is required. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E341-E347, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27238902

  5. Epidermal Viral Immunity Induced by CD8α+ Dendritic Cells But Not by Langerhans Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Rhys S.; Smith, Chris M.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; van Lint, Allison L.; Wakim, Linda M.; Heath, William R.; Carbone, Francis R.

    2003-09-01

    The classical paradigm for dendritic cell function derives from the study of Langerhans cells, which predominate within skin epidermis. After an encounter with foreign agents, Langerhans cells are thought to migrate to draining lymph nodes, where they initiate T cell priming. Contrary to this, we show here that infection of murine epidermis by herpes simplex virus did not result in the priming of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by Langerhans cells. Rather, the priming response required a distinct CD8α+ dendritic cell subset. Thus, the traditional view of Langerhans cells in epidermal immunity needs to be revisited to accommodate a requirement for other dendritic cells in this response.

  6. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. III. Characterization of allogeneic bone marrow cell populations that increase allogeneic chimerism independently of graft-vs-host disease in mixed marrow recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Chester, C.H.; Sundt, T.M.; Romick, M.L.; Hoyles, K.A.; Sachs, D.H. )

    1989-12-01

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease vs failure of alloengraftment severely limit the success of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation as a therapeutic modality. We have recently used a murine bone marrow transplantation model involving reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with mixtures of allogeneic and syngeneic marrow to demonstrate that an allogeneic bone marrow subpopulation, removed by T cell depletion with rabbit anti-mouse brain serum and complement (RAMB/C), is capable of increasing levels of allogeneic chimerism. This effect was observed in an F1 into parent genetic combination lacking the potential for graft-vs-host disease, and radiation protection studies suggested that it was not due to depletion of stem cells by RAMB/C. We have now attempted to characterize the cell population responsible for increasing allogeneic chimerism in this model. The results indicate that neither mature T cells nor NK cells are responsible for this activity. However, an assay involving mixed marrow reconstitution in an Ly-5 congenic strain combination was found to be more sensitive to small degrees of stem cell depletion than radiation protection assays using three-fold titrations of bone marrow cells. Using this assay, we were able to detect some degree of stem cell depletion by treatment with RAMB/C, but not with anti-T cell mAb. Nevertheless, if the effects of alloresistance observed in this model are considered, the degree of stem cell depletion detected by such mixing studies in insufficient to account for the effects of RAMB/C depletion on levels of allogeneic chimerism, suggesting that another cell population with this property remains to be identified.

  7. Early Lung Computed Tomography Scan after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cornetto, Marie Alice; Chevret, Sylvie; Abbes, Sarah; de Margerie-Mellon, Constance; Hussenet, Claire; Sicre de Fontbrune, Flore; Tazi, Abdellatif; Ribaud, Patricia; Bergeron, Anne

    2016-08-01

    A lung computed tomography (CT) scan is essential for diagnosing lung diseases in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. As a result, lung CT scans are increasingly prescribed in the early phase after allogeneic HSCT, with no assessment of the added value for global patient management. Among 250 patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT in our center over a 2-year period, we evaluated 68 patients who had at least 1 lung CT scan within the first 30 days post-transplantation. The median interval between allogeneic HSCT and lung CT scan was 8.5 days. Patients who underwent an early lung CT scan were more immunocompromised and had a more severe course. Fever was the main indication for the CT scan (78%). The lung CT scan was abnormal in 52 patients, including 17 patients who had an abnormal pre-HSCT CT scan. A therapeutic change was noted in 37 patients (54%) within 24 hours after the lung CT scan. The main changes included the introduction of corticosteroids (n = 23; 62%), especially in patients with a normal CT scan (89%). In univariate models, we found that a normal pretransplantation CT scan (P = .002), the absence of either dyspnea (P = .029) or hypoxemia (P = .015), and a serum C-reactive protein level <10 mg/L (P = .004) were associated with a normal post-HSCT lung CT scan. We found that the association of these variables could predict the normality of early post-HSCT lung CT scans. Pretransplantation lung CT scans are useful for the interpretation of subsequent lung CT scans following allogeneic HSCT, which are frequently abnormal. Early post-HSCT lung CT scans are helpful in patient management, but prescriptions could be more targeted. PMID:27189110

  8. Alloantigen-specific T-cell hyporesponsiveness induced by dnIKK2 gene-transfected recipient immature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Cai-bin; Wang, Yi; Wang, Qing-ping; Du, Ke-lin; Wen, Duan-gai; Ouyang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Immature dendritic cells (iDCs) have been shown to be able to induce peripheral T-cell tolerance through distinct pathways. Here, we investigated the tolerogenic property of recipient iDCs whose maturation was arrested by a dominant negative mutant of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase 2 (dnIKK2) gene. We found that dnIKK2-iDCs presented a typical semi-mature morphology and expressed lower levels of CD80 and CD86, slightly higher MHC-II than untransfected iDCs. The expression of these molecules had no significant change even dnIKK2-iDCs were pulsed by donor antigen. In primary mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR), dnIKK2-iDCs exhibited impaired ability to stimulate allogeneic T-cells, but induced CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cell formation. In co-culture MLR, these CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cells suppressed T-cell alloreaction in an antigen-specific manner. Besides, CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cells inhibited IL-2 and IFN-γ release, whereas promoted IL-10 and TGF-β secretion. These data suggested recipient dnIKK2-iDCs could maintain peripheral tolerance through down-regulating costimulatory molecule expressions and inducing CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cell formation. PMID:26253357

  9. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Julie A.; McGuire, Travis C. . E-mail: mcguiret@vetmed.wsu.edu

    2005-05-10

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAV{sub WSU5} infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with {sup 51}Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection.

  10. Identification of proteins derived from Listeria monocytogenes inducing human dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Reza; Saei, Azad; Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Azarian, Bahareh; Jalili, Ahmad; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Vaziri, Behrouz; Hadjati, Jamshid

    2016-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that can promote antitumor immunity when pulsed with tumor antigens and then matured by stimulatory agents. Despite apparent progress in DC-based cancer immunotherapy, some discrepancies were reported in generating potent DCs. Listeria monocytogenes as an intracellular microorganism is able to effectively activate DCs through engaging pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs). This study aimed to find the most potent components derived from L. monocytogenes inducing DC maturation. The preliminary results demonstrated that the ability of protein components is higher than DNA components to promote DC maturation and activation. Protein lysate fractionation demonstrated that fraction 2 HIC (obtained by hydrophobic interaction chromatography) was able to efficiently mature DCs. F2HIC-matured DCs are able to induce allogeneic CD8(+) T cells proliferation better than LPS-matured DCs and induce IFN-γ producing CD8(+) T cells. Mass spectrometry results showed that F2HIC contains 109 proteins. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for these 109 proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) could be considered as a PRR ligand for stimulating DC maturation. PMID:26886282

  11. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN): a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ming Sheng; Lemmert, Karla; Enjeti, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare and aggressive haematological malignancy in the elderly, with a high frequency of cutaneous and bone marrow involvement and poor prognosis. We report a case of BPDCN with classic presentation and discuss its treatment and the value of different investigation tools used in diagnosis and response assessment. PMID:26791132

  12. Glucocorticoids Reduce Sepsis by Diminishing Dendritic Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Richard

    2015-10-01

    How does the body's immune system strike the delicate balance between under- and over-response? A new study shows that glucocorticoids limit the production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 by dendritic cells in response to invading bacteria, thereby helping to avoid sepsis. Read the Research Article. PMID:26441144

  13. Susceptibility of neonatal T cells and adult thymocytes to peripheral tolerance to allogeneic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    do Canto, Fábio B; Lima, Celso; Teixeira, Ivan A; Bellio, Maria; Nóbrega, Alberto; Fucs, Rita

    2008-01-01

    We studied the tolerization of neonatal thymocytes (NT), neonatal splenocytes (NS) and adult thymocytes (AT), transferred to syngeneic nude (nu/nu) hosts previously injected with semi-allogeneic splenocytes, without any supportive immunosuppressive treatment. This protocol allows the study of peripheral tolerance in the absence of the thymus. BALB/c neonatal T cells and ATs were able to expand in syngeneic BALB/c nu/nu mice and functionally reconstituted an allogeneic response, rejecting (BALB/c × B6.Ba) F1 splenocytes transferred 3–4 weeks after injection of BALB/c cells. However, if (BALB/c × B6.Ba) F1 cells were injected into BALB/c nude hosts 30 days before transfer of NT, NS or AT cells, the F1 population was preserved and specific tolerance to B6 allografts was established. Furthermore, transfer to lymphopenic F1 nu/nu showed that tolerance could be established only for neonatal populations, showing that unique properties of neonatal T cells allow their tolerization in both lymphopenic and non-lymphopenic conditions, in the absence of suppressive immunotherapy. These results bring empirical support to the possibility of T-cell engraftment in immunodeficient patients showing partial identity with donor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes; the manipulation of immunological maturity of donor T cells may be the key for successful reconstitution of immunocompetence without induction of graft-versus-host disease. PMID:18462348

  14. Strategies to accelerate immune recovery after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Barbarella; Merli, Pietro; Bertaina, Valentina; Locatelli, Franco

    2016-03-01

    The interplay existing between immune reconstitution and patient outcome has been extensively demonstrated in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. One of the leading causes of infection-related mortality is the slow recovery of T-cell immunity due to the conditioning regimen and/or age-related thymus damage, poor naïve T-cell output, and restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoires. With the aim of improving posttransplantation immune reconstitution, several immunotherapy approaches have been explored. Donor leukocyte infusions are widely used to accelerate immune recovery, but they carry the risk of provoking graft-versus-host disease. This review will focus on sophisticated strategies of thymus function-recovery, adoptive infusion of donor-derived, allodepleted T cells, T-cell lines/clones specific for life-threatening pathogens, regulatory T cells, and of T cells transduced with suicide genes. PMID:26588325

  15. Modulation of human allogeneic and syngeneic pluripotent stem cells and immunological implications for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sackett, S D; Brown, M E; Tremmel, D M; Ellis, T; Burlingham, W J; Odorico, J S

    2016-04-01

    Tissues derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising source of cells for building various regenerative medicine therapies; from simply transplanting cells to reseeding decellularized organs to reconstructing multicellular tissues. Although reprogramming strategies for producing iPSCs have improved, the clinical use of iPSCs is limited by the presence of unique human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, the main immunologic barrier to transplantation. In order to overcome the immunological hurdles associated with allogeneic tissues and organs, the generation of patient-histocompatible iPSCs (autologous or HLA-matched cells) provides an attractive platform for personalized medicine. However, concerns have been raised as to the fitness, safety and immunogenicity of iPSC derivatives because of variable differentiation potential of different lines and the identification of genetic and epigenetic aberrations that can occur during the reprogramming process. In addition, significant cost and regulatory barriers may deter commercialization of patient specific therapies in the short-term. Nonetheless, recent studies provide some evidence of immunological benefit for using autologous iPSCs. Yet, more studies are needed to evaluate the immunogenicity of various autologous and allogeneic human iPSC-derived cell types as well as test various methods to abrogate rejection. Here, we present perspectives of using allogeneic vs. autologous iPSCs for transplantation therapies and the advantages and disadvantages of each related to differentiation potential, immunogenicity, genetic stability and tumorigenicity. We also review the current literature on the immunogenicity of syngeneic iPSCs and discuss evidence that questions the feasibility of HLA-matched iPSC banks. Finally, we will discuss emerging methods of abrogating or reducing host immune responses to PSC derivatives. PMID:26970668

  16. Increasing the efficacy of antitumor glioma vaccines by photodynamic therapy and local injection of allogeneic glioma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Peng, Qian; Madsen, Steen J.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Immunotherapy of brain tumors involves the stimulation of an antitumor immune response. This type of therapy can be targeted specifically to tumor cells thus sparing surrounding normal brain. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier, the brain is relatively isolated from the systemic circulation and, as such, the initiation of significant immune responses is more limited than other types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to show that the efficacy of tumor primed antigen presenting macrophage vaccines could be increased by: (1) PDT of the priming tumor cells, and (2) injection of allogeneic glioma cells directly into brain tumors. Experiments were conducted in an in vivo brain tumor model using Fisher rats and BT4C (allogeneic) and F98 (syngeneic) glioma cells. Preliminary results showed that vaccination alone had significantly less inhibitory effect on F98 tumor growth compared to the combination of vaccination and allogeneic cell (BT4C) injection.

  17. The role of human dendritic cells in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zahra; Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Shimada, Shinji; Piguet, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and their subsets have multifaceted roles in the early stages of HIV-1 transmission and infection. DC studies have led to remarkable discoveries, including identification of restriction factors, cellular structures promoting viral transmission including the infectious synapse or the interplay of the C-type lectins, Langerin on Langerhans cells (LCs), and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin on other DC subsets, limiting or facilitating HIV transmission to CD4(+) T cells, respectively. LCs/DCs are also exposed to encountering HIV-1 and other sexually transmitted infections (herpes simplex virus-2, bacteria, fungi), which reprogram HIV-1 interaction with these cells. This review will summarize advances in the role of DCs during HIV-1 infection and discuss their potential involvement in the development of preventive strategies against HIV-1 and other sexually transmitted infections. PMID:25407434

  18. How tolerogenic dendritic cells induce regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Roberto A.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery by Steinman and Cohn in 1973, dendritic cells (DCs) have become increasingly recognized for their crucial role as regulators of innate and adaptive immunity. DCs are exquisitely adept at acquiring, processing and presenting antigens to T cells. They also adjust the context (and hence the outcome) of antigen presentation in response to a plethora of environmental inputs that signal the occurence of pathogens or tissue damage. Such signals generally boost DC maturation, which promotes their migration from peripheral tissues into and within secondary lymphoid organs and their capacity to induce and regulate effector T cell responses. Conversely, more recent observations indicate that DCs are also crucial to ensure immunological peace. Indeed, DCs constantly present innocuous self and non-self antigens in a fashion that promotes tolerance, at least in part, through the control of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs are specialized T cells that exert their immuno-suppressive function through a variety of mechanisms affecting both DCs and effector cells. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between tolerogenic DCs and Tregs. PMID:21056730

  19. Fascin1 promotes cell migration of mature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yamakita, Yoshihiko; Matsumura, Fumio; Lipscomb, Michael W; Chou, Po-chien; Werlen, Guy; Burkhardt, Janis K; Yamashiro, Shigeko

    2011-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play central roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Upon maturation, DCs assemble numerous veil-like membrane protrusions, disassemble podosomes, and travel from the peripheral tissues to lymph nodes to present Ags to T cells. These alterations in morphology and motility are closely linked to the primary function of DCs, Ag presentation. However, it is unclear how and what cytoskeletal proteins control maturation-associated alterations, in particular, the change in cell migration. Fascin1, an actin-bundling protein, is specifically and greatly induced upon maturation, suggesting a unique role for fascin1 in mature DCs. To determine the physiological roles of fascin1, we characterized bone marrow-derived, mature DCs from fascin1 knockout mice. We found that fascin1 is critical for cell migration: fascin1-null DCs exhibit severely decreased membrane protrusive activity. Importantly, fascin1-null DCs have lower chemotactic activity toward CCL19 (a chemokine for mature DCs) in vitro, and in vivo, Langerhans cells show reduced emigration into draining lymph nodes. Morphologically, fascin1-null mature DCs are flatter and fail to disassemble podosomes, a specialized structure for cell-matrix adhesion. Expression of exogenous fascin1 in fascin1-null DCs rescues the defects in membrane protrusive activity, as well as in podosome disassembly. These results indicate that fascin1 positively regulates migration of mature DCs into lymph nodes, most likely by increasing dynamics of membrane protrusions, as well as by disassembling podosomes. PMID:21263068

  20. Teratocarcinomas Arising from Allogeneic Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Tissue Constructs Provoked Host Immune Rejection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Ai; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Kawamura, Takuji; Kashiyama, Noriyuki; Ito, Emiko; Watabe, Tadashi; Masuda, Shigeo; Toda, Koichi; Hatazawa, Jun; Morii, Eiichi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac tissue constructs is a promising regenerative treatment for cardiac failure: however, its tumourigenic potential is concerning. We hypothesised that the tumourigenic potential may be eliminated by the host immune response after allogeneic cell transplantation. Scaffold-free iPSC-derived cardaic tissue sheets of C57BL/6 mouse origin were transplanted into the cardiac surface of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice and allogeneic BALB/c mice with or without tacrolimus injection. Syngeneic mice and tacrolimus-injected immunosuppressed allogeneic mice formed teratocarcinomas with identical phenotypes, characteristic, and time courses, as assessed by imaging tools including 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. In contrast, temporarily immunosuppressed allogeneic mice, following cessation of tacrolimus injection displayed diminished progression of the teratocarcinoma, accompanied by an accumulation of CD4/CD8-positive T cells, and finally achieved complete elimination of the teratocarcinoma. Our results indicated that malignant teratocarcinomas arising from induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac tissue constructs provoked T cell-related host immune rejection to arrest tumour growth in murine allogeneic transplantation models. PMID:26763872

  1. Mobilizing dendritic cells for tolerance by engagement of immune inhibitory receptors for HLA-G.

    PubMed

    Liang, Siyuan; Horuzsko, Anatolij

    2003-11-01

    The presence of dendritic cells (DC) in the maternal decidua has pointed to a biologic role of antigen-presenting cell in maternal-fetal interaction. The expression of immune inhibitory receptors on DC opens the intriguing possibility that these types of receptors are directly involved in maturation/activation of DC and modulate their function. We show that the triggering of the murine inhibitory receptor paired immunoglobulin-like receptor-B by cross-linking or by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G tetramer resulted in the modulation of DC function and prolongation of allogeneic graft survival. In addition, we found that the engagement of human inhibitory receptor ILT4 by its natural ligand, HLA-G, alters maturation of human DC. In this study, we examined the mechanisms for the modulation of antigen-presenting cells by HLA-G. These findings have established an important link between HLA-G and immune inhibitory receptor regulation in vivo and in vitro, thereby placing HLA-G in the inhibitory pathway. PMID:14602231

  2. Effect of ovarian hormones on maturation of dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wijewardana, Viskam; Sugiura, Kikuya; Wijesekera, Daluthgamage Patsy H; Hatoya, Shingo; Nishimura, Toshiya; Kanegi, Ryoji; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Inaba, Toshio

    2015-07-01

    Previously, we reported that ovarian hormones affect the immune response against E. coli isolated from the dogs affected with pyometra. In order to investigate mechanisms underlying the immune modulation, we examined the effects of ovarian hormones on the generation of dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cell. DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMOs) using a cytokine cocktail. Both estrogen receptor and progesterone receptors were expressed by the PBMOs and immature DCs. When various ovarian hormones were added to the culture for the DC differentiation, progesterone significantly decreased the expression of DC maturation markers, such as CD1a, CD80 and CD86, on mature DCs. Conversely, the addition of estrogen to the cultures increased the expression of CD86, but not other maturation makers. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of progesterone did not stimulate allogeneic mononuclear cells in PB. Taken together, these results indicate that progesterone diminishes the maturation of DCs, leading to decreased immune responses against invading pathogens. PMID:25715707

  3. Effect of ovarian hormones on maturation of dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes in dogs

    PubMed Central

    WIJEWARDANA, Viskam; SUGIURA, Kikuya; WIJESEKERA, Daluthgamage Patsy H.; HATOYA, Shingo; NISHIMURA, Toshiya; KANEGI, Ryoji; USHIGUSA, Takahiro; INABA, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported that ovarian hormones affect the immune response against E. coli isolated from the dogs affected with pyometra. In order to investigate mechanisms underlying the immune modulation, we examined the effects of ovarian hormones on the generation of dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cell. DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMOs) using a cytokine cocktail. Both estrogen receptor and progesterone receptors were expressed by the PBMOs and immature DCs. When various ovarian hormones were added to the culture for the DC differentiation, progesterone significantly decreased the expression of DC maturation markers, such as CD1a, CD80 and CD86, on mature DCs. Conversely, the addition of estrogen to the cultures increased the expression of CD86, but not other maturation makers. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of progesterone did not stimulate allogeneic mononuclear cells in PB. Taken together, these results indicate that progesterone diminishes the maturation of DCs, leading to decreased immune responses against invading pathogens. PMID:25715707

  4. Platycodon grandiflorum polysaccharide induces dendritic cell maturation via TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Jeong; Ryu, Hwa Sun; Kim, Ji Sung; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kang, Jong Soon; Yun, Jieun; Kim, Sung Yeon; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation is critical for initiation of the adoptive immune response. DC maturation is often attenuated in several pathological conditions including cancer. In this study, we report the effect of Platycodon grandiflorum polysaccharide (PG) on DC maturation. PG induced phenotypic maturation of DCs, as proved by the increase in the expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I/II on the cell surface. PG also induced functional maturation of DCs, as proved by elevated production of interleukin (IL)-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and interferon-β, and by enhanced allogeneic T cell stimulation ability of PG-treated DCs. PG efficiently induced maturation of DCs from C3H/HeN mice, which have normal Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), but not that of DCs from C3H/HeJ mice, which have mutated TLR4, suggesting that TLR4 might be one of the PG receptors in DCs. In line with TLR4 activation, PG increased the phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and JNK, and the nuclear translocation of p-c-Jun, p-CREB, and c-Fos. PG also activated NF-κB signaling, as evidenced by degradation of IκBα/β and nuclear translocation of p65 and p50. In summary, our data suggest that PG induces DC maturation by activating MAPK and NF-κB signaling downstream of TLR4. PMID:25019244

  5. Classification and clinical behavior of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms according to their maturation-associated immunophenotypic profile

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Lourdes; López, Antonio; Vidriales, Belén; Caballero, María Dolores; Rodrigues, António Silva; Ferreira, Silvia Inês; Lima, Margarida; Almeida, Sérgio; Valverde, Berta; Martínez, Pilar; Ferrer, Ana; Candeias, Jorge; Ruíz-Cabello, Francisco; Buadesa, Josefa Marco; Sempere, Amparo; Villamor, Neus

    2015-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare subtype of leukemia/lymphoma, whose diagnosis can be difficult to achieve due to its clinical and biological heterogeneity, as well as its overlapping features with other hematologic malignancies. In this study we investigated whether the association between the maturational stage of tumor cells and the clinico-biological and prognostic features of the disease, based on the analysis of 46 BPDCN cases classified into three maturation-associated subgroups on immunophenotypic grounds. Our results show that blasts from cases with an immature plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) phenotype exhibit an uncommon CD56− phenotype, coexisting with CD34+ non-pDC tumor cells, typically in the absence of extramedullary (e.g. skin) disease at presentation. Conversely, patients with a more mature blast cell phenotype more frequently displayed skin/extramedullary involvement and spread into secondary lymphoid tissues. Despite the dismal outcome, acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type therapy (with central nervous system prophylaxis) and/or allogeneic stem cell transplantation appeared to be the only effective therapies. Overall, our findings indicate that the maturational profile of pDC blasts in BPDCN is highly heterogeneous and translates into a wide clinical spectrum -from acute leukemia to mature lymphoma-like behavior-, which may also lead to variable diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26056082

  6. Secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Marian F.; Otten, Henny G.; Franssen, Laurens E.; van Dorp, Suzanne; Strooisma, Theo; Lokhorst, Henk M.; van de Donk, Niels W.C.J.

    2014-01-01

    In the course of multiple myeloma, patients may develop a M-protein band different from the original: secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. In this retrospective single center analysis, we describe the occurrence and clinical relevance of secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (post-transplant monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance). A total of 138 patients who had undergone 139 allogeneic stem cell transplantations (39.6% in the upfront setting and 60.4% for relapsed multiple myeloma) were included in the study. Sixty-seven (48.2%) patients developed secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, after a median latency of 6.9 months. Secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance occurred more often in patients who achieved at least very good partial response after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, compared to partial response or less (54.8% vs. 26.5%; P=0.005). The incidence was also higher in the upfront setting as compared to relapsed disease, or with a sibling donor compared to matched unrelated donor, but less often after T-cell depletion. Importantly, development of post-transplant monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance as a time-dependent variable independently predicted for superior progression-free and overall survival (median progression-free survival 37.5 vs. 6.3 months, P<0.001; median overall survival 115.3 vs. 31.0 months, P=0.004). Clinicians should be aware of the benign nature of this phenomenon, and secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance should not be confused with relapse or progression of disease. (Trial registered with trialregister.nl; HOVON 108: NTR 2958.) PMID:25193963

  7. Interactions of bacterial pathogens with dendritic cells during invasion of mucosal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Granucci, Francesca; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2003-02-01

    Recent studies of mucosal immunity suggest a key role for dendritic cells in the regulation of gut immune responses, in both physiological and pathological conditions. Dendritic cells are widely distributed in the lamina propria of the gut and are involved in direct bacterial uptake across mucosal surfaces, which questions the role of dendritic cells in innate mucosal responses. Approximately 400 commensal microbial species are present in the gut lumen. So how do dendritic cells distinguish pathogens from luminal microflora? Are the cytokines and chemokines induced in dendritic cells tailored to the class of microbes being recognized? Several very important questions still need to be addressed. PMID:12615223

  8. A Comparison between Growth Morphology of "Eutectic" Cells/Dendrites and Single-Phase Cells/Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Raj, S. V.; Locci, I. E.

    2003-01-01

    Directionally solidified (DS) intermetallic and ceramic-based eutectic alloys with an in-situ composite microstructure containing finely distributed, long aspect ratio, fiber, or plate reinforcements are being seriously examined for several advanced aero-propulsion applications. In designing these alloys, additional solutes need to be added to the base eutectic composition in order to improve heir high-temperature strength, and provide for adequate toughness and resistance to environmental degradation. Solute addition, however, promotes instability at the planar liquid-solid interface resulting in the formation of two-phase eutectic "colonies." Because morphology of eutectic colonies is very similar to the single-phase cells and dendrites, the stability analysis of Mullins and Sekerka has been extended to describe their formation. Onset of their formation shows a good agreement with this approach; however, unlike the single-phase cells and dendrites, there is limited examination of their growth speed dependence of spacing, morphology, and spatial distribution. The purpose of this study is to compare the growth speed dependence of the morphology, spacing, and spatial distribution of eutectic cells and dendrites with that for the single-phase cells and dendrites.

  9. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells for Regulatory T Cell Induction in Man

    PubMed Central

    Raker, Verena K.; Domogalla, Matthias P.; Steinbrink, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized professional antigen-presenting cells that regulate immune responses, maintaining the balance between tolerance and immunity. Mechanisms via which they can promote central and peripheral tolerance include clonal deletion, the inhibition of memory T cell responses, T cell anergy, and induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). These properties have led to the analysis of human tolerogenic DCs as a therapeutic strategy for the induction or re-establishment of tolerance. In recent years, numerous protocols for the generation of human tolerogenic DCs have been developed and their tolerogenic mechanisms, including induction of Tregs, are relatively well understood. Phase I trials have been conducted in autoimmune disease, with results that emphasize the feasibility and safety of treatments with tolerogenic DCs. Therefore, the scientific rationale for the use of tolerogenic DCs therapy in the fields of transplantation medicine and allergic and autoimmune diseases is strong. This review will give an overview on efforts and protocols to generate human tolerogenic DCs with focus on IL-10-modulated DCs as inducers of Tregs and discuss their clinical applications and challenges faced in further developing this form of immunotherapy. PMID:26617604

  10. Facilitation of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by a T cell-specific immunotoxin containing daunomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, S.S.; Inazawa, M.; Sinha, N.; Sawada, S.; Vergidis, R.; Diener, E.

    1987-12-01

    Daunomycin coupled via an acid-sensitive spacer to monoclonal Thy-1.2-specific antibody was used to purge T lymphocytes from a 1:1 mixture of murine C57BL/6J bone marrow and spleen cells prior to engraftment in fully allogeneic, irradiated BALB/c recipients. Treatment of bone marrow with the immunotoxin at a concentration used for purging had no effect on the viability of committed hematopoietic progenitor or multipotent stem cells. All of the recipients of purged bone marrow were at least 80% chimeric for donor peripheral blood cells and none developed graft-versus-host disease. Out of 50 chimeras, 49 were still alive more than 200 days posttransplantation. The chimeras were shown to be tolerant to donor tissue as tested by mixed lymphocyte reactivity, cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and skin grafting. The same tests revealed full immunocompetence of chimeras to third-party alloantigens. In vivo IgM and IgG antibody responses to sheep red blood cells were similar in magnitude in allogeneically and syngeneically reconstituted mice.

  11. Durable responses to ibrutinib in patients with relapsed CLL after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Link, C S; Teipel, R; Heidenreich, F; Rücker-Braun, E; Schmiedgen, M; Reinhardt, J; Oelschlägel, U; von Bonin, M; Middeke, J M; Muetherig, A; Trautmann-Grill, K; Platzbecker, U; Bornhäuser, M; Schetelig, J

    2016-06-01

    Ibrutinib, a recently approved inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), has shown great efficacy in patients with high-risk CLL. Nevertheless, there are few data regarding its use in patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT). We report clinical data from five CLL patients treated with ibrutinib for relapse after first or even second allogeneic transplantation. Additionally, we performed analyses on cytokine levels and direct measuring of CD4 Th1 and CD4 Th2 cells to evaluate possible clinically relevant immunomodulatory effects of ibrutinib. All patients achieved partial responses including one minimal residual disease (MRD)-negative remission. Within 1 year of follow-up, no relapse was observed. One patient died of severe pneumonia while on ibrutinib treatment. Beside this, no unexpected adverse events were observed. Flow cytometry and analyses of T cell-mediated cytokine levels (IL10 and TNFα) did not reveal substantial changes in T-cell distribution in favor of a CD4 Th1 T-cell shift in our patients. No acute exacerbation of GvHD was reported. In conclusion, these results support further evaluation of ibrutinib in CLL patients relapsing after alloSCT. PMID:26752141

  12. Cytomegalovirus-infected human endothelial cells can stimulate allogeneic CD4+ memory T cells by releasing antigenic exosomes1

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jason D.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2008-01-01

    Human CMV infection is controlled by T cell-mediated immunity and in immunosuppressed transplant patients it is associated with acute allograft rejection as well as chronic allograft vasculopathy. CMV infects endothelial cells (EC) and it is thought that CMV-specific host immune responses to infected allograft EC contribute to rejection. In vitro, CD4+ T cells from CMV-positive donors (but not CMV-negative donors) are readily activated by CMV-infected allogeneic EC, although it is unclear how allogeneic CMV-infected EC activate self-class II MHC-restricted memory CD4+ T cells. In this study we confirm that purified CD4+ T cells from CMV+ donors are activated by allogeneic CMV-infected EC, but find that the response is dependent upon co-purified APC expressing class II MHC that are autologous to the T cells. The transfer of CMV antigens from infected EC to APC can be mediated by EC-derived exosome-like particles. These results provide a mechanism by which CMV can exacerbate allograft rejection, and suggest a novel function of EC-derived exosomes that could contribute in a more general manner to immune surveillance. PMID:19155503

  13. Dendritic Cell Regulation by Cannabinoid-Based Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Mattias; Chen, Puran; Hammarfjord, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the cannabinoid system was discovered. Studies in experimental models and in humans have produced promising results using cannabinoid-based drugs for the treatment of obesity and cancer, as well as neuroinflammatory and chronic inflammatory diseases. Moreover, as we discuss here, additional studies also indicates that these drugs have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties including modulation of immune cell function. Thus, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies against inflammatory disorders. At least two types of cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid 1 and cannabinoid 2 receptors are expressed on immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC). Dendritic cells are recognized for their critical role in initiating and maintaining immune responses. Therefore, DC are potential targets for cannabinoid-mediated modulation. Here, we review the effects of cannabinoids on DC and provide some perspective concerning the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for the treatment of human diseases involving aberrant inflammatory processes.

  14. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    PubMed

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease. PMID:20357073

  15. Variation of dorsal horn cell dendritic spread with map scale.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Millecchia, R; Culberson, J L; Gladfelter, W; Covalt-Dunning, D

    1996-10-21

    Cells in laminae III, IV, and V of cat dorsal horn were injected with horseradish peroxidase or neurobiotin. Dorsal views of the dendritic domains were constructed in order to measure their lengths, widths, areas, and length/width ratios in the horizontal plane (the plane of the somatotopic map). Dendritic domain width and area in the horizontal plane were negatively correlated with fractional distance between the medial and lateral edges of the dorsal horn. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that dendritic domain width varies with map scale, which is maximal in the medial dorsal horn. This is similar to the variation in widths of primary afferent bouton distributions. The parallel variation of dorsal horn cell dendritic domain width and primary afferent bouton distribution width with map scale suggests that there is a causal relation between morphology and map scale in the dorsal horn representation of the hindlimb. This variation of adult morphology with map scale must reflect mechanisms responsible for the assembly of receptive fields. PMID:8906504

  16. In vivo proof of concept of adoptive immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma using allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells.

    PubMed

    Leboeuf, Céline; Mailly, Laurent; Wu, Tao; Bour, Gaetan; Durand, Sarah; Brignon, Nicolas; Ferrand, Christophe; Borg, Christophe; Tiberghien, Pierre; Thimme, Robert; Pessaux, Patrick; Marescaux, Jacques; Baumert, Thomas F; Robinet, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Cell therapy based on alloreactivity has completed clinical proof of concept against hematological malignancies. However, the efficacy of alloreactivity as a therapeutic approach to treat solid tumors is unknown. Using cell culture and animal models, we aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells as a cell-based therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), for which treatment options are limited. Allogeneic killer cells from healthy donors were isolated, expanded, and phenotypically characterized. Antitumor cytotoxic activity and safety were studied using a panel of human or murine HCC cell lines engrafted in immunodeficient or immunocompetent mouse models. Human allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells (aSGMKCs) exhibit a high, rapid, interleukin-2-dependent, and non-major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted in vitro cytotoxicity toward human hepatoma cells, mainly mediated by natural killer (NK) and NK-like T cells. In vivo evaluation of this cell therapy product demonstrates a marked, rapid, and sustained regression of HCC. Preferential liver homing of effector cells contributed to its marked efficacy. Calcineurin inhibitors allowed preventing rejection of allogeneic lymphocytes by the host immune system without impairing their antitumor activity. Our results demonstrate proof of concept for aSGMKCs as immunotherapy for HCC and open perspectives for the clinical development of this approach. PMID:24445938

  17. Self-Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Rupp, Anne; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The operation of both central and peripheral tolerance ensures the prevention of autoimmune diseases. The maintenance of peripheral tolerance requires self-antigen presentation by professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as major APCs involved in this process. The current review discusses the role of DCs in autoimmune diseases, the various factors involved in the induction and maintenance of tolerogenic DC phenotype, and pinpoints their therapeutic capacity as well as potential novel targets for future clinical studies. PMID:24592266

  18. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal-placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+)CD1a(-) phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  19. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  20. Brain dendritic cells and macrophages/microglia in central nervous system inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, H G; Reichmann, G

    2001-02-15

    Microglia subpopulations were studied in mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and toxoplasmic encephalitis. CNS inflammation was associated with the proliferation of CD11b(+) brain cells that exhibited the dendritic cell (DC) marker CD11c. These cells constituted up to 30% of the total CD11b(+) brain cell population. In both diseases CD11c(+) brain cells displayed the surface phenotype of myeloid DC and resided at perivascular and intraparenchymatic inflammatory sites. By lacking prominent phagocytic organelles, CD11c(+) cells from inflamed brain proved distinct from other microglia, but strikingly resembled bone marrow-derived DC and thus were identified as DC. This brain DC population comprised cells strongly secreting IL-12p70, whereas coisolated CD11c(-) microglia/brain macrophages predominantly produced TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, and NO. In comparison, the DC were more potent stimulators of naive or allogeneic T cell proliferation. Both DC and CD11c(-) microglia/macrophages from inflamed brain primed naive T cells from DO11.10 TCR transgenic mice for production of Th1 cytokines IFN-gamma and IL-2. Resting microglia that had been purified from normal adult brain generated immature DC upon exposure to GM-CSF, while CD40 ligation triggered terminal maturation. Consistently, a functional maturation of brain DC was observed to occur following the onset of encephalitis. In conclusion, these findings indicate that in addition to inflammatory macrophage-like brain cells, intraparenchymatical DC exist in autoimmune and infectious encephalitis. These DC functionally mature upon disease onset and can differentiate from resident microglia. Their emergence, maturation, and prolonged activity within the brain might contribute to the chronicity of intracerebral Th1 responses. PMID:11160337

  1. Mast Cells Condition Dendritic Cells to Mediate Allograft Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Victor C.; Pino-Lagos, Karina; Nowak, Elizabeth C.; Bennett, Kathy A.; Oliva, Carla; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Peripheral tolerance orchestrated by regulatory T cells, dendritic cells (DCs), and mast cells (MCs) has been studied in several models including skin allograft tolerance. We now define a role for MCs in controlling DC behavior (“conditioning”) to facilitate tolerance. Under tolerant conditions, we show that MCs mediated a marked increase in tumor necrosis factor (TNFα)-dependent accumulation of graft-derived DCs in the dLN compared to nontolerant conditions. This increase of DCs in the dLN is due to the local production of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by MCs that induces a survival advantage of graft-derived DCs. DCs that migrated to the dLN from the tolerant allograft were tolerogenic; i.e., they dominantly suppress T cell responses and control regional immunity. This study underscores the importance of MCs in conditioning DCs to mediate peripheral tolerance and shows a functional impact of peripherally produced TNFα and GM-CSF on the migration and function of tolerogenic DCs. PMID:22035846

  2. Selection of Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Asmita; Anasetti, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Because MDS predominantly affects an older population, age-associated comorbidities can preclude patients from cure. HSCT is associated with the risk of morbidity and mortality; however, with safer conditioning regimens and improved supportive care, eligible patients with an appropriately matched donor can receive this therapy without exclusion by older age alone. We discuss the role of improved MDS prognostic scoring systems and molecular testing for selection for HSCT, and review the pre-HSCT tolerability assessment required for this advanced aged population. PMID:27521324

  3. Strategies to Reduce Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mawad, Raya; Lionberger, Jack M.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is expected to increase in conjunction with our ageing population. Although it is proving to be a heterogeneous disease process, the only treatment with proven survival benefit for poor risk AML remains allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. Although this is presumed to be a curative strategy, many patients relapse after transplant, prompting us to examine various ways that we can improve outcomes. These efforts involve every step of AML diagnostics and therapy, including the intricate processes of conditioning, graft manipulation and immunomodulation. The hope is that improvement in these steps will ultimately improve survival and decrease relapse rates for AML patients after transplant. PMID:23456518

  4. Intestinal immune homeostasis is regulated by the crosstalk between epithelial cells and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Monica; Chieppa, Marcello; Salucci, Valentina; Avogadri, Francesca; Sonzogni, Angelica; Sampietro, Gianluca M; Nespoli, Angelo; Viale, Giuseppe; Allavena, Paola; Rescigno, Maria

    2005-05-01

    The control of damaging inflammation by the mucosal immune system in response to commensal and harmful ingested bacteria is unknown. Here we show epithelial cells conditioned mucosal dendritic cells through the constitutive release of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and other mediators, resulting in the induction of 'noninflammatory' dendritic cells. Epithelial cell-conditioned dendritic cells released interleukins 10 and 6 but not interleukin 12, and they promoted the polarization of T cells toward a 'classical' noninflammatory T helper type 2 response, even after exposure to a T helper type 1-inducing pathogen. This control of immune responses seemed to be lost in patients with Crohn disease. Thus, the intimate interplay between intestinal epithelial cells and dendritic cells may help to maintain gut immune homeostasis. PMID:15821737

  5. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Grzegorz W.; Soverini, Simona; Martinelli, Giovanni; Mauro, Michael J.; Müller, Martin C.; Hochhaus, Andreas; Chuah, Charles; Dufva, Inge H.; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; Saglio, Giuseppe; Michallet, Mauricette; Labussière, Hélène; Morisset, Stéphane; Hayette, Sandrine; Etienne, Gabriel; Olavarria, Eduardo; Zhou, Wei; Peter, Senaka; Apperley, Jane F.; Cortes, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    T315I+ Philadelphia chromosome–positive leukemias are inherently resistant to all licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and therapeutic options remain limited. We report the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in 64 patients with documented BCR-ABLT315I mutations. Median follow-up was 52 months from mutation detection and 26 months from transplantation. At transplantation, 51.5% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia were in the chronic phase and 4.5% were in advanced phases. Median overall survival after transplantation was 10.3 months (range 5.7 months to not reached [ie, still alive]) for those with chronic myeloid leukemia in the blast phase and 7.4 months (range 1.4 months to not reached [ie, still alive]) for those with Philadelphia chromosome–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia but has not yet been reached for those in the chronic and accelerated phases of chronic myeloid leukemia. The occurrence of chronic GVHD had a positive impact on overall survival (P = .047). Transplant-related mortality rates were low. Multivariate analysis identified only blast phase at transplantation (hazard ratio 3.68, P = .0011) and unrelated stem cell donor (hazard ratio 2.98, P = .011) as unfavorable factors. We conclude that allogeneic stem cell transplantation represents a valuable therapeutic tool for eligible patients with BCR-ABLT315I mutation, a tool that may or may not be replaced by third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:21926354

  6. Trends in allogeneic stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma: a CIBMTR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shaji; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Li, Peigang; Dispenzieri, Angela; Milone, Gustavo A.; Lonial, Sagar; Krishnan, Amrita; Maiolino, Angelo; Wirk, Baldeep; Weiss, Brendan; Freytes, César O.; Vogl, Dan T.; Vesole, David H.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Meehan, Kenneth R.; Hamadani, Mehdi; Lill, Michael; Callander, Natalie S.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Nath, Rajneesh; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Vij, Ravi; Kyle, Robert A.; Gale, Robert Peter

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in multiple myeloma is limited by prior reports of high treatment-related mortality. We analyzed outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for multiple myeloma in 1207 recipients in 3 cohorts based on the year of transplantation: 1989-1994 (n = 343), 1995-2000 (n = 376), and 2001-2005 (n = 488). The most recent cohort was significantly older (53% > 50 years) and had more recipients after prior autotransplantation. Use of unrelated donors, reduced-intensity conditioning and the blood cell grafts increased over time. Rates of acute graft-versus-host (GVHD) were similar, but chronic GVHD rates were highest in the most recent cohort. Overall survival (OS) at 1-year increased over time, reflecting a decrease in treatment-related mortality, but 5-year relapse rates increased from 39% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33%-44%) in 1989-1994 to 58% (95% CI, 51%-64%; P < .001) in the 2001-2005 cohort. Projected 5-year progression-free survival and OS are 14% (95% CI, 9%-20%) and 29% (95% CI, 23%-35%), respectively, in the latest cohort. Increasing age, longer interval from diagnosis to transplantation, and unrelated donor grafts adversely affected OS in multivariate analysis. Survival at 5 years for subjects with none, 1, 2, or 3 of these risk factors were 41% (range, 36%-47%), 32% (range, 27%-37%), 25% (range, 19%-31%), and 3% (range, 0%-11%), respectively (P < .0001). PMID:21690560

  7. Hematopoietic stem cells from NOD mice exhibit autonomous behavior and a competitive advantage in allogeneic recipients.

    PubMed

    Chilton, Paula M; Rezzoug, Francine; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Fugier-Vivier, Isabelle; Ratajczak, Janina; Kucia, Magda; Huang, Yiming; Tanner, Michael K; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2005-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be cured by transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from disease-resistant donors. Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice have a number of features that distinguish them as bone marrow transplant recipients that must be understood prior to the clinical application of chimerism to induce tolerance. In the present studies, we characterized NOD HSCs, comparing their engraftment characteristics to HSCs from disease-resistant strains. Strikingly, NOD HSCs are significantly enhanced in engraftment potential compared with HSCs from disease-resistant donors. Unlike HSCs from disease-resistant strains, they do not require graft-facilitating cells to engraft in allogeneic recipients. Additionally, they exhibit a competitive advantage when coadministered with increasing numbers of syngeneic HSCs, produce significantly more spleen colony-forming units (CFU-Ss) in vivo in allogeneic recipients, and more granulocyte macrophage-colony-forming units (CFU-GMs) in vitro compared with HSCs from disease-resistant controls. NOD HSCs also exhibit significantly enhanced chemotaxis to a stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) gradient and adhere significantly better on primary stroma. This enhanced engraftment potential maps to the insulin-dependent diabetes locus 9 (Idd9) locus, and as such the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family as well as ski/sno genes may be involved in the mechanism underlying the autonomy of NOD HSCs. These findings may have important implications to understand the evolution of autoimmune disease and impact on potential strategies for cure. PMID:15522953

  8. Ectonucleotidases in Solid Organ and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chernogorova, Petya; Zeiser, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides are ubiquitous signalling molecules which modulate distinct physiological and pathological processes. Nucleotide concentrations in the extracellular space are strictly regulated by cell surface enzymes, called ectonucleotidases, which hydrolyze nucleotides to the respective nucleosides. Recent studies suggest that ectonucleotidases play a significant role in inflammation by adjusting the balance between ATP, a widely distributed proinflammatory danger signal, and the anti-inflammatory mediator adenosine. There is increasing evidence for a central role of adenosine in alloantigen-mediated diseases such as solid organ graft rejection and acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Solid organ and hematopoietic cell transplantation are established treatment modalities for a broad spectrum of benign and malignant diseases. Immunological complications based on the recognition of nonself-antigens between donor and recipient like transplant rejection and GvHD are still major challenges which limit the long-term success of transplantation. Studies in the past two decades indicate that purinergic signalling influences the severity of alloimmune responses. This paper focuses on the impact of ectonucleotidases, in particular, NTPDase1/CD39 and ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73, on allograft rejection, acute GvHD, and graft-versus-leukemia effect, and on possible clinical implications for the modulation of purinergic signalling after transplantation. PMID:23125523

  9. Matrine derivate MASM suppresses LPS-induced phenotypic and functional maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Qi, Yang; Xu, Wei-Heng; Liu, Ying; Qiu, Lie; Wang, Ke-Qi; Hu, Hong-Gang; He, Zhi-Gao; Zhang, Jun-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation process is a crucial step for the development of T cell immune responses and immune tolerance. In this study, we evaluated MASM, a novel derivative of the natural compound matrine that possesses a significant anti-inflammatory and immune-regulating property, for its efficacy to inhibit lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Here we show that MASM profoundly suppresses LPS-induced phenotypic and functional DC maturation. MASM inhibited LPS-induced expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in a concentration-dependent manner. MASM also attenuated LPS-induced IL-12p70, TNF-α, IL-6 and NO release of DCs. The MASM-treated DCs were highly efficient at antigen capture via mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis but showed weak stimulatory capacity for allogeneic T cell proliferation. Furthermore, MASM inhibited LPS-induced PI3K/Akt, MAPK and NF-κB pathways. These novel findings provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of MASM in impacting on the DCs. PMID:27107799

  10. Steroid Pulse Therapy for Blood Cell Recovery in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yutaka; Kudo, Yoko; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Abe, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Doki, Noriko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-01-01

    Objective Steroid pulse therapy is used to relieve pancytopenias in our hospital and is effective in some patients. However, it is unclear which patients will benefit from such therapy. Thus, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical features of patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation who received steroid pulse therapy to facilitate recovery in their blood cell counts. Methods Between 2004 and 2012, 24 patients underwent steroid pulse therapy and the medical records of 17 of these evaluable patients (11 men, 6 women) were retrospectively reviewed. Bone marrow smears were assessed to calculate the proportion of hemophagocytic macrophages just prior to receiving pulse therapy. Results Steroid pulse therapy was started at a median of 15 days after transplantation (range, 10-28 days). The median white blood cell count was 0.02×10(3)/μL (range, 0.01-0.4×10(3)/μL). Eight patients responded to pulse therapy and subsequent engraftment was achieved in all responders. None of the patients who underwent cord blood transplantation responded to the pulse therapy. Among the non-responders, only two patients achieved engraftment and four of nine non-responders died within one month. When evaluating the efficacy of steroid pulse therapy according to the ferritin level and proportion of hemophagocytic macrophages among patients undergoing bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, both values were higher in responders than in non-responders. Conclusion We speculate that responders have a hemophagocytic syndrome which is responsive to steroid pulse therapy. Thus, our results imply that the use of ferritin levels in combination with the proportion of hemophagocytic macrophages may be useful for the early detection of potential hemophagocytic syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:26984072

  11. Large-Scale mRNA Transfection of Dendritic Cells by Electroporation in Continuous Flow Systems.

    PubMed

    Selmeczi, David; Hansen, Thomas Steen; Met, Özcan; Svane, Inge Marie; Larsen, Niels B

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is well established for transient mRNA transfection of many mammalian cells, including immune cells such as dendritic cells used in cancer immunotherapy. Therapeutic application requires methods to efficiently electroporate and transfect millions of immune cells in a fast process with high cell survival. Continuous flow of suspended dendritic cells through a channel incorporating spatially separated microporous meshes with a synchronized electrical pulsing sequence can yield dendritic cell transfection rates of >75 % with survival rates of >90 %. This chapter describes the instrumentation and methods needed for the efficient transfection by electroporation of millions of dendritic cells in one continuous flow process. PMID:27236798

  12. Novel Murine Dendritic Cell Lines: A Powerful Auxiliary Tool for Dendritic Cell Research

    PubMed Central

    Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A.; Grosjean, Frédéric; Duval, Anaïs; Rosa, Muriel; Lavanchy, Christine; Ashok, Devika; Haller, Sergio; Otten, Luc A.; Steiner, Quynh-Giao; Descombes, Patrick; Luber, Christian A.; Meissner, Felix; Mann, Matthias; Szeles, Lajos; Reith, Walter; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Research in vitro facilitates discovery, screening, and pilot experiments, often preceding research in vivo. Several technical difficulties render Dendritic Cell (DC) research particularly challenging, including the low frequency of DC in vivo, thorough isolation requirements, and the vulnerability of DC ex vivo. Critically, there is not as yet a widely accepted human or murine DC line and in vitro systems of DC research are limited. In this study, we report the generation of new murine DC lines, named MutuDC, originating from cultures of splenic CD8α conventional DC (cDC) tumors. By direct comparison to normal WT splenic cDC subsets, we describe the phenotypic and functional features of the MutuDC lines and show that they have retained all the major features of their natural counterpart in vivo, the splenic CD8α cDC. These features include expression of surface markers Clec9A, DEC205, and CD24, positive response to TLR3 and TLR9 but not TLR7 stimuli, secretion of cytokines, and chemokines upon activation, as well as cross-presentation capacity. In addition to the close resemblance to normal splenic CD8α cDC, a major advantage is the ease of derivation and maintenance of the MutuDC lines, using standard culture medium and conditions, importantly without adding supplementary growth factors or maturation-inducing stimuli to the medium. Furthermore, genetically modified MutuDC lines have been successfully obtained either by lentiviral transduction or by culture of DC tumors originating from genetically modified mice. In view of the current lack of stable and functional DC lines, these novel murine DC lines have the potential to serve as an important auxiliary tool for DC research. PMID:23162549

  13. Suppression of antigen-specific adaptive immunity by IL-37 via induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuchun; Cai, Xiangna; Liu, Sucai; Wang, Sen; Nold-Petry, Claudia A.; Nold, Marcel F.; Bufler, Philip; Norris, David; Dinarello, Charles A.; Fujita, Mayumi

    2014-01-01

    IL-1 family member IL-37 limits innate inflammation in models of colitis and LPS-induced shock, but a role in adaptive immunity remains unknown. Here, we studied mice expressing human IL-37b isoform (IL-37tg) subjected to skin contact hypersensitivity (CHS) to dinitrofluorobenzene. CHS challenge to the hapten was significantly decreased in IL-37tg mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice (−61%; P < 0.001 at 48 h). Skin dendritic cells (DCs) were present and migrated to lymph nodes after antigen uptake in IL-37tg mice. When hapten-sensitized DCs were adoptively transferred to WT mice, antigen challenge was greatly impaired in mice receiving DCs from IL-37tg mice compared with those receiving DCs from WT mice (−60%; P < 0.01 at 48 h). In DCs isolated from IL-37tg mice, LPS-induced increase of MHC II and costimulatory molecule CD40 was reduced by 51 and 31%, respectively. In these DCs, release of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 was reduced whereas IL-10 secretion increased (37%). Consistent with these findings, DCs from IL-37tg mice exhibited a lower ability to stimulate syngeneic and allogeneic naive T cells as well as antigen-specific T cells and displayed enhanced induction of T regulatory (Treg) cells (86%; P < 0.001) in vitro. Histological analysis of CHS skin in mice receiving hapten-sensitized DCs from IL-37tg mice revealed a marked reduction in CD8+ T cells (−74%) but an increase in Treg cells (2.6-fold). Together, these findings reveal that DCs expressing IL-37 are tolerogenic, thereby impairing activation of effector T-cell responses and inducing Treg cells. IL-37 thus emerges as an inhibitor of adaptive immunity. PMID:25294929

  14. Provision of antifungal immunity and concomitant alloantigen tolerization by conditioned dendritic cells in experimental hematopoietic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Montagnoli, Claudia; Perruccio, Katia; Bozza, Silvia; Bonifazi, Pierluigi; Zelante, Teresa; De Luca, Antonella; Moretti, Silvia; D'Angelo, Carmen; Bistoni, Francesco; Martelli, Massimo; Aversa, Franco; Velardi, Andrea; Romani, Luigina

    2008-01-01

    FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are important mediators of peripheral tolerance, and deficiency of this population is associated with autoimmune inflammation and onset of acute lethal graft-vs.-host disease in transplantation. Type I IFN-producing plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are implicated in the induction and maintenance of tolerance and contribute to engraftment facilitation and prevention of graft-vs.-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (HSCT). Because host DC function is impaired during the immediate period post-transplant, the administration of donor DC may be useful for the educational program of recovering T cells. Distinct DC subsets could be derived from bone marrow (murine) or peripheral CD14(+) cell (human) cultures in the presence of either GM-CSF/IL-4 (myeloid DC) or FLT3-ligand (mainly pDC). The ability of either DC subset to induce Th1/Treg cell priming against Aspergillus fumigatus as well as the relative contribution of murine DC subsets to antifungal priming upon adoptive transfer in hematopoietic transplanted mice with aspergillosis is not known. We found specialization and complementarity in priming and tolerization by the different DC subsets, with FL-DC fulfilling the requirement for (i) Th1/Treg antifungal priming; ii) tolerization toward alloantigens and (iii) diversion from alloantigen-specific to antigen-specific T cell responses in the presence of donor T lymphocytes. Interestingly, thymosin alpha1 (Talpha1), known to modulate human pDC functions trough TLR9, affects mobilization and tolerization of pDC by activating the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-dependent pathway, and this resulted in Treg development and tolerization. Thus, transplantation tolerance and concomitant pathogen clearance could be achieved through the therapeutic induction of antigen-specific Treg cells via instructive immunotherapy with pathogen- or TLR-conditioned donor DC. PMID:17827038

  15. Immune Reconstitution and Graft-Versus-Host Reactions in Rat Models of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zinöcker, Severin; Dressel, Ralf; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Dickinson, Anne M.; Rolstad, Bent

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) extends the lives of thousands of patients who would otherwise succumb to hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemias and lymphomas, aplastic anemia, and disorders of the immune system. In alloHCT, different immune cell types mediate beneficial graft-versus-tumor (GvT) effects, regulate detrimental graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), and are required for protection against infections. Today, the “good” (GvT effector cells and memory cells conferring protection) cannot be easily separated from the “bad” (GvHD-causing cells), and alloHCT remains a hazardous medical modality. The transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells into an immunosuppressed patient creates a delicate environment for the reconstitution of donor blood and immune cells in co-existence with host cells. Immunological reconstitution determines to a large extent the immune status of the allo-transplanted host against infections and the recurrence of cancer, and is critical for long-term protection and survival after clinical alloHCT. Animal models continue to be extremely valuable experimental tools that widen our understanding of, for example, the dynamics of post-transplant hematopoiesis and the complexity of immune reconstitution with multiple ways of interaction between host and donor cells. In this review, we discuss the rat as an experimental model of HCT between allogeneic individuals. We summarize our findings on lymphocyte reconstitution in transplanted rats and illustrate the disease pathology of this particular model. We also introduce the rat skin explant assay, a feasible alternative to in vivo transplantation studies. The skin explant assay can be used to elucidate the biology of graft-versus-host reactions, which are known to have a major impact on immune reconstitution, and to perform genome-wide gene expression studies using controlled combinations of minor and major histocompatibility between the donor and the recipient

  16. Bone Marrow GvHD after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Szyska, Martin; Na, Il-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow is the origin of all hematopoietic lineages and an important homing site for memory cells of the adaptive immune system. It has recently emerged as a graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) target organ after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), marked by depletion of both hematopoietic progenitors and niche-forming cells. Serious effects on the restoration of hematopoietic function and immunological memory are common, especially in patients after myeloablative conditioning therapy. Cytopenia and durable immunodeficiency caused by the depletion of hematopoietic progenitors and destruction of bone marrow niches negatively influence the outcome of alloHSCT. The complex balance between immunosuppressive and cell-depleting treatments, GvHD and immune reconstitution, as well as the desirable graft-versus-tumor (GvT) effect remains a great challenge for clinicians. PMID:27066008

  17. Bone Marrow GvHD after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Szyska, Martin; Na, Il-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow is the origin of all hematopoietic lineages and an important homing site for memory cells of the adaptive immune system. It has recently emerged as a graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) target organ after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), marked by depletion of both hematopoietic progenitors and niche-forming cells. Serious effects on the restoration of hematopoietic function and immunological memory are common, especially in patients after myeloablative conditioning therapy. Cytopenia and durable immunodeficiency caused by the depletion of hematopoietic progenitors and destruction of bone marrow niches negatively influence the outcome of alloHSCT. The complex balance between immunosuppressive and cell-depleting treatments, GvHD and immune reconstitution, as well as the desirable graft-versus-tumor (GvT) effect remains a great challenge for clinicians. PMID:27066008

  18. Targeting Dendritic Cells in vivo for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Caminschi, Irina; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Heath, William Ross

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that recognize cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC) for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumor immunity elicited using this immunization strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialization of DC subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumor CD4 and CD8 T cell responses that can recognize tumor-specific antigens. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress toward targeting human DC in vivo. PMID:22566899

  19. Dextromethorphan inhibits activations and functions in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN- γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF- κ B translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  20. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  1. Epidermal cells are the primary phagocytes in the fragmentation and clearance of degenerating dendrites in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hui; Wang, Denan; Franc, Nathalie C.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh-Nung

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY During developmental remodeling, neurites destined for pruning often degenerate on-site. Physical injury also induces degeneration of neurites distal to the injury site. Prompt clearance of degenerating neurites is important for maintaining tissue homeostasis and preventing inflammatory responses. Here we show that in both dendrite pruning and dendrite injury of Drosophila sensory neurons, epidermal cells rather than hemocytes are the primary phagocytes in clearing degenerating dendrites. Epidermal cells act via Draper-mediated recognition to facilitate dendrite degeneration and to engulf and degrade degenerating dendrites. Using multiple dendritic membrane markers to trace phagocytosis, we show that two members of the CD36 family, croquemort (crq) and debris buster (dsb), act at distinct stages of phagosome maturation for dendrite clearance. Our finding reveals the physiological importance of coordination between neurons and their surrounding epidermis, for both dendrite fragmentation and clearance. PMID:24412417

  2. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation with peripheral blood stem cells mobilized by pegylated G-CSF.

    PubMed

    Hill, Geoffrey R; Morris, Edward S; Fuery, Madonna; Hutchins, Cheryl; Butler, Jason; Grigg, Andrew; Roberts, Andrew; Bradstock, Ken; Szer, Jeffrey; Kennedy, Glen; Morton, James; Durrant, Simon

    2006-06-01

    Mobilization of stem cells with pegylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (peg-G-CSF) modulates donor T- and natural killer T-cell (NKT-cell) functions, thus separating graft-versus-host from graft-versus-leukemia disease in animal models. We report a phase I/II study that analyzed the feasibility of mobilizing stem cells from normal donors with peg-G-CSF and the ability of these cells to restore hematopoiesis in allogeneic transplant recipients after myeloablative conditioning. Administration of 6 mg of peg-G-CSF resulted in suboptimal stem cell mobilization, with a peak peripheral blood CD34+ count of 29+/-5/microL. Apheresis 4 days after peg-G-CSF yielded 2.7+/-.4x10(6) CD34+ cells/kg recipient weight, and all donors required a second collection on day 5 to yield a total of 4.2+/-.5x10(6) CD34+ cells/kg recipient weight. After escalation of the dose to 12 mg, the peak CD34+ count was 99+/-11/microL and 12 of 13 donors collected sufficient stem cells for transplantation in a single apheresis (8.9+/-1.4x10(6) CD34+ cells/kg recipient weight). Late transient increases in serum hepatic transaminases were noted, but other side effects (predominantly bone pain) were otherwise similar to those seen in donors mobilized with standard G-CSF. Median neutrophil and platelet engraftments occurred on days 18 and 14, respectively, after transplantation and were identical to those seen with in recipients of grafts mobilized with standard G-CSF. With a median follow-up of 357 days, the incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease was 50% and there have been no relapses to date. Mobilization of stem cells with peg-G-CSF in normal donors is feasible and 12 mg results in mobilization characteristics similar to those of standard G-CSF. PMID:16737933

  3. Viral piracy: HIV-1 targets dendritic cells for transmission.

    PubMed

    Lekkerkerker, Annemarie N; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2006-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells, are critical for host immunity by inducing specific immune responses against a broad variety of pathogens. Remarkably the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) subverts DC function leading to spread of the virus. At an early phase of HIV-1 transmission, DCs capture HIV-1 at mucosal surfaces and transmit the virus to T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Capture of the virus on DCs takes place via C-type lectins of which the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3) grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is the best studied. DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles accumulate in CD81(+) multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in DCs and are subsequently transmitted to CD4+ T cells resulting in infection of T cells. The viral cell-to-cell transmission takes place at the DC-T cell interface termed the infectious synapse. Recent studies demonstrate that direct infection of DCs contributes to the transmission to T cells at a later phase. Moreover, the infected DCs may function as cellular reservoirs for HIV-1. This review discusses the different processes that govern viral piracy of DCs by HIV-1, emphasizing the intracellular routing of the virus from capture on the cell surface to egress in the infectious synapse. PMID:16611055

  4. Distress Screening in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell (HSCT) Caregivers and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bevans, Margaret; Wehrlen, Leslie; Prachenko, Olena; Soeken, Karen; Zabora, James; Wallen, Gwenyth R.

    2011-01-01

    Family caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients are at risk for experiencing significant psychological distress yet screening caregivers has not been well studied. Objective This analysis explored the psychometric characteristics of the Distress Thermometer (DT) by examining its relationship, sensitivity and specificity relative to the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI-18) and the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory (MFSI) in a sample of allogeneic HSCT caregivers and patients. Methods Longitudinal data were drawn from an ongoing intervention study for HSCT caregivers and patients. Data from one hundred and fifty-six English-speaking adults where patients (n=65) were receiving their first allogeneic HSCT with at least one adult caregiver (n=91) were eligible for this analysis. Study questionnaires were administered at baseline, initial discharge and 6 weeks following discharge. Results Construct validity was supported by significant relationships (p<0.001) between the DT and the BSI-18 GSI and the MFSI-Emotional subscales for caregivers and patients. The diagnostic utility of the DT for patients was good (AUC=.85±.05, p=.001), while for caregivers it was poor (AUC=.61±.08, p=.28). A DT cut point of 5 was supported for patients (sensitivity=1.0, specificity=.68), while for caregivers there was less confidence (sensitivity=.70, specificity=.52). Caregivers and patients reporting a higher number of problems had a greater level of distress (p<0.001). Conclusions These findings support the validity of the DT in screening for distress in HSCT caregivers and patients. Although the diagnostic utility of the DT for HSCT caregivers may be limited, understanding factors associated with distress can guide practice for this understudied population. PMID:21626610

  5. Long-Term Survival and Late Deaths After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wingard, John R.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Sobocinski, Kathleen A.; Jacobsohn, David; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Bolwell, Brian; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Socié, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is curative but is associated with life-threatening complications. Most deaths occur within the first 2 years after transplantation. In this report, we examine long-term survival in 2-year survivors in the largest cohort ever studied. Patients and Methods Records of 10,632 patients worldwide reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research who were alive and disease free 2 years after receiving a myeloablative allogeneic HCT before 2004 for acute myelogenous or lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, lymphoma, or severe aplastic anemia were reviewed. Results Median follow-up was 9 years, and 3,788 patients had been observed for 10 or more years. The probability of being alive 10 years after HCT was 85%. The chief risk factors for late death included older age and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). For patients who underwent transplantation for malignancy, relapse was the most common cause of death. The greatest risk factor for late relapse was advanced disease at transplantation. Principal risk factors for nonrelapse deaths were older age and GVHD. When compared with age, sex, and nationality-matched general population, late deaths remained higher than expected for each disease, with the possible exception of lymphoma, although the relative risk generally receded over time. Conclusion The prospect for long-term survival is excellent for 2-year survivors of allogeneic HCT. However, life expectancy remains lower than expected. Performance of HCT earlier in the course of disease, control of GVHD, enhancement of immune reconstitution, less toxic regimens, and prevention and early treatment of late complications are needed. PMID:21464398

  6. A Characterization of the Oral Microbiome in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Nancy J.; Sulima, Pawel; Ngo, Thoi; Barb, Jennifer; Munson, Peter J.; Paster, Bruce J.; Hart, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The mouth is a complex biological structure inhabited by diverse bacterial communities. The purpose of this study is to describe the effects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation on the oral microbiota and to examine differences among those patients who acquired respiratory complications after transplantation. Methodology/Principal Findings All patients were consented at the National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center. Bacterial DNA was analyzed from patients' oral specimens using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray. The specimens were collected from four oral sites in 45 allogeneic transplantation patients. Specimens were collected at baseline prior to transplantation, after transplantation at the nadir of the neutrophil count and after myeloid engraftment. If respiratory signs and symptoms developed, additional specimens were obtained. Patients were followed for 100 days post transplantation. Eleven patients' specimens were subjected to further statistical analysis. Many common bacterial genera, such as Streptococcus, Veillonella, Gemella, Granulicatella and Camplyobacter were identified as being present before and after transplantation. Five of 11 patients developed respiratory complications following transplantation and there was preliminary evidence that the oral microbiome changed in their oral specimens. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis revealed this change in the oral microbiota. Conclusions/Significance After allogeneic transplantation, the oral bacterial community's response to a new immune system was not apparent and many of the most common core oral taxa remained unaffected. However, the oral microbiome was affected in patients who developed respiratory signs and symptoms after transplantation. The association related to the change in the oral microbiota and respiratory complications after transplantation will be validated by future studies using high throughput molecular methods. PMID:23144704

  7. Thymus and immune reconstitution after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in humans: never say never again.

    PubMed

    Toubert, A; Glauzy, S; Douay, C; Clave, E

    2012-02-01

    Assessment of the host immune status is becoming a key issue in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). In the long-term follow-up of these patients, severe post-transplant infections, relapse or secondary malignancies may be directly related to persistent immune defects. In allo-HSCT, T-cell differentiation of donor progenitors within the recipient thymus is required to generate naive recent T-cell emigrants (RTE). These cells account for a durable T-cell reconstitution, generating a diverse T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire and robust response to infections. It is now possible to quantify the production of RTE by measuring thymic T-cell receptor excision circles or 'TREC' which are small circular DNA produced during the recombination of the genomic segments encoding the TCR alpha chain. Here we discuss the role of thymic function in allo-HSCT. The pre-transplant recipient thymic function correlates with clinical outcome in terms of survival and occurrence of severe infections. Post-transplant, TREC analysis showed that the thymus is a sensitive target to the allogeneic acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) reaction but is also prone to recovery in young adult patients. In all, thymus is a key player for the quality of immune reconstitution and clinical outcome after allo-HSCT. Thymic tissue is plastic and it is a future challenge to halt or reverse thymic GVHD therapeutically by acting at the level of T-cell progenitors generation, thymic homing and/or epithelial thymic tissue preservation. PMID:22220718

  8. New bone formation by allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in a patient with perinatal hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Mika; Kanai, Rie; Taketani, Takeshi; Uchio, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2009-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can show osteogenic differentiation capability when implanted in vivo, as well as cultured in vitro; therefore we attempted to use allogeneic MSCs for an 8-month-old patient with hypophosphatasia. MSCs were obtained by culture expansion of fresh marrow from the patient's father. Some of the MSCs were further cultured under osteogenic conditions on a culture dish or porous hydroxyapatite ceramics, resulting in cultured osteoblasts and osteogenic constructs, respectively. The MSCs and osteoblasts were injected into the patient, and the constructs were implanted locally. After traditional bone marrow transplantation, the MSCs, osteoblasts, and osteogenic constructs were used for treatment and to improve the patient's respiratory condition and skeletal abnormality. The condition worsened again, and an MSC booster shot was administered. At the same time, the construct was retrieved. The respiratory condition improved, and the retrieved construct showed de novo bone derived from both donor and patient cells. We demonstrated the importance of allogeneic MSC transplantation for hypophosphatasia and the constructs as an alternative to bone fragments that provided further osteogenic capability in the patient. PMID:19446101

  9. Hair follicle: a reliable source of recipient origin after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y C; Liu, H M; Chen, P S; Chen, Y J; Lyou, J Y; Hu, H Y; Yi, M F; Lin, J S; Tzeng, C-H

    2007-11-01

    Blood, buccal swab and hair follicles are among the most commonly used sources for forensic science, parentage testing and personal identification. A total of 29 patients who have had a sustained engraftment from 15 months to 21.5 years after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) without rejection, relapse or chronic GVHD involving oral mucosa were enrolled for a chimerism study. PCR-amplified short tandem repeat analyses were conducted per patient every 3 months for at least three consecutive times. The results for blood were all donor type except one who had a mixed chimerism, 14.5 years after receiving a transplant for lymphoma. As for buccal swab, mixed chimerism ranging from 10 to 96% donor origin was noted for 28 recipients except the one who had mixed chimerism of blood and retained total recipient type. In contrast, hair follicles were 100% recipient type for the entire group. It is concluded that the hair follicle is devoid of adult stem cell plasticity and may serve as a reliable source of recipient's origin when pre-transplant DNA fingerprinting or reference DNA is not available for people who have successfully received allogeneic HSCT while in need of a personal identification. PMID:17704789

  10. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678. PMID:25587040

  11. Allogeneic and Xenogeneic Transplantation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Immunocompetent Recipients Without Immunosuppressants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well known for their immunomodulatory capabilities. In particular, their immunosuppressive property is believed to permit their allogeneic or even xenogeneic transplantation into immunocompetent recipients without the use of immunosuppressants. Adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC), owing to its ease of isolation from an abundant tissue source, is a promising MSC for the treatment of a wide range of diseases. ADSC has been shown to lack major histocompatibility complex-II expression, and its immunosuppressive effects mediated by prostaglandin E2. Both preclinical and clinical studies have shown that allogeneic transplantation of ADSCs was able to control graft-versus-host disease. In regard to xenotransplantation a total of 27 preclinical studies have been published, with 20 of them performed with the investigators' intent. All 27 studies used ADSCs isolated from humans, possibly due to the wide availability of lipoaspirates. On the other hand, the recipients were mouse in 13 studies, rat in 11, rabbit in 2, and dog in 1. The targeted diseases varied greatly but all showed significant improvements after ADSC xenotransplantation. For clinical application in human medicine, ADSC xenotransplantation offers no obvious advantage over autotransplantation. But in veterinary medicine, xenotransplantation with porcine ADSC is a practical alternative to the costly and inconvenient autotransplantation. PMID:22621212

  12. Capacities of Migrating CD1b+ Lymph Dendritic Cells to Present Salmonella Antigens to Naive T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Michel; Foret, Benjamin; Le Vern, Yves; Guilloteau, Laurence A.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are well known as professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) able to initiate specific T-cell responses to pathogens in lymph nodes (LN) draining the site of infection. However, the respective contribution of migratory and LN-resident DCs in this process remains unclear. As DC subsets represent important targets for vaccination strategies, more precise knowledge of DC subsets able to present vaccine antigens to T cells efficiently is required. To investigate the capacities of DCs migrating in the lymph (L-DCs) to initiate a specific T-cell response, we used physiologically generated DCs collected from a pseudoafferent lymphatic cannulation model in sheep. The CD1b+ L-DCs were assessed for presenting antigens from the vaccine attenuated strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Abortusovis. CD1b+ L-DCs were able to phagocytose, process and to present efficiently Salmonella antigens to effector/memory T cells in vitro. They were shown to be efficient APC for the priming of allogeneic naive T cells associated with inducing both IFN-γ and IL-4 responses. They were also efficient in presenting Salmonella antigens to autologous naive T cells associated with inducing both IFN-γ and IL-10 responses. The capacities of L-DCs to process and present Salmonella antigens to T cells were investigated in vivo after conjunctival inoculation of Salmonella. The CD1b+ L-DCs collected after inoculation were able to induce the proliferative response of CD4+ T cells suggesting the in vivo capture of Salmonella antigens by the CD1b+ L-DCs, and their potential to present them directly to CD4+ T cells. In this study, CD1b+ L-DCs present potential characteristics of APC to initiate by themselves T cell priming in the LN. They could be used as target cells for driving immune activation in vaccinal strategies. PMID:22279590

  13. Dendritic web-type solar cell mini-modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five minimodules composed of dendritic web solar cells with nominal glass size of 12 by 40 cm were provided for study. The modules were identical with respect to design, materials, and manufacturing and assembly processes to full scale modules. The modules were also electrically functional. These minimodules were fabricated to provide test vehicle for environmental testing and to assess reliability of process and design procedures. The module design and performance are outlined.

  14. Induction and identification of rabbit peripheral blood derived dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Yang, FuYuan; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study a method of the induction of dendritic cells (DCs) from rabbit peripheral blood. Methods: Peripheral blood cells were removed from rabbit, filtered through nylon mesh. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood cells by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation (density of 1.077g/cm3).To obtain DCs, PBMC were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, 50U/mL penicillin and streptomycin, referred to subsequently as complete medium, at 37°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere for 4 hours. Nonadherent cells were aspirated, adherent cells were continued incubated in complete medium, supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 50ng/ml),and interleukin 4 (IL-4, 50ng/ml) for 9 days. Fluorescein labeled antibodies(anti-CD14, anti-HLA-DR, anti-CD86) were used to sign cells cultured for 3,6,9 days respectively, Then flow cytometry was performed. Results: Ratio of anti-HLA-DR and anti-CD86 labeled cells increased with induction time extension, in contrast with anti-CD14. Conclusion: Dendritic cells can be effectively induced by the method of this experiment, cell maturation status increased with induction time extension.

  15. NK cell education after allogeneic transplantation: dissociation between recovery of cytokine-producing and cytotoxic functions.

    PubMed

    Foley, Bree; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; Curtsinger, Julie; Luo, Xianghua; Waller, Edmund K; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2011-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells mediate GVL effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) by the production of inflammatory cytokines and by direct target lysis. The acquisition of both functions was presumed to be developmentally linked, but this linkage remained unstudied after allo-HCT. We tested the cytokine production and degranulation of reconstituting NK cells after adult unrelated donor or umbilical cord blood grafting. Recipients of T cell-depleted transplants, receiving no immune suppression, showed diminished NK cell degranulation. In contrast, degranulation was normal or increased after T-cell replete transplants given with immune suppression. Strikingly, target cell-induced IFNγ production was markedly diminished in all transplant settings, especially with T cell-depleted or naive T cell-containing umbilical cord blood grafts, suggesting a role for T cells in NK education. Although degranulation was similar in the KIR(+) and KIR(-) populations that coexpressed NKG2A, target cell-induced IFNγ production was limited to the subset of NK cells expressing KIR inhibited by self-ligands. Thus, cytokine production and cytotoxic function do not consistently coexist in NK cells reconstituting after allo-HCT. Exposure to IL-15 rapidly increased target-inducible IFNγ production, indicative of IL-15's potential as a therapeutic tool to enhance NK cell function to protect against infection and relapse after allo-HCT. PMID:21757615

  16. 3D visualization of HIV transfer at the virological synapse between dendritic cells and T cells

    PubMed Central

    Felts, Richard L.; Narayan, Kedar; Estes, Jacob D.; Shi, Dan; Trubey, Charles M.; Fu, Jing; Hartnell, Lisa M.; Ruthel, Gordon T.; Schneider, Douglas K.; Nagashima, Kunio; Bess, Julian W.; Bavari, Sina; Lowekamp, Bradley C.; Bliss, Donald; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of HIV infection is greatly enhanced when the virus is delivered at conjugates between CD4+ T cells and virus-bearing antigen-presenting cells such as macrophages or dendritic cells via specialized structures known as virological synapses. Using ion abrasion SEM, electron tomography, and superresolution light microscopy, we have analyzed the spatial architecture of cell-cell contacts and distribution of HIV virions at virological synapses formed between mature dendritic cells and T cells. We demonstrate the striking envelopment of T cells by sheet-like membrane extensions derived from mature dendritic cells, resulting in a shielded region for formation of virological synapses. Within the synapse, filopodial extensions emanating from CD4+ T cells make contact with HIV virions sequestered deep within a 3D network of surface-accessible compartments in the dendritic cell. Viruses are detected at the membrane surfaces of both dendritic cells and T cells, but virions are not released passively at the synapse; instead, virus transfer requires the engagement of T-cell CD4 receptors. The relative seclusion of T cells from the extracellular milieu, the burial of the site of HIV transfer, and the receptor-dependent initiation of virion transfer by T cells highlight unique aspects of cell-cell HIV transmission. PMID:20624966

  17. Cryopreservation of adenovirus-transfected dendritic cells (DCs) for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Gülen, D; Maas, S; Julius, H; Warkentin, P; Britton, H; Younos, I; Senesac, J; Pirruccello, Samuel M; Talmadge, J E

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of cryoprotectant, freezing and thawing, and adenovirus (Adv) transduction on the viability, transgene expression, phenotype, and function of human dendritic cells (DCs). DCs were differentiated from cultured peripheral blood (PB) monocytes following Elutra isolation using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) for 6 days and then transduced using an Adv vector with an IL-12 transgene. Fresh, cryopreserved, and thawed transduced immature DCs were examined for their: 1) cellular concentration and viability; 2) antigenicity using an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR); 3) phenotype (HLA-DR and CD11c) and activation (CD83); and 4) transgene expression based on IL-12 secretion. Stability studies revealed that transduced DCs could be held in cryoprotectant for as long as 75 min at 2-8°C prior to freezing with little effect on their viability and cellularity. Further, cryopreservation, storage, and thawing reduced the viability of the transduced DCs by an average of 7.7%; and had no significant impact on DC phenotype and activation. In summary, cryopreservation, storage, and thawing had no significant effect on DC viability, function, and transgene expression by Adv-transduced DCs. PMID:22465385

  18. Nectin-1 spots regulate the branching of olfactory mitral cell dendrites.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Inoue, Takahito; Maruo, Tomohiko; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Ieki, Nao; Mandai, Kenji; Kimura, Kazushi; Kayahara, Tetsuro; Wang, Shujie; Itoh, Yu; Sai, Kousyoku; Mori, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku; Takai, Yoshimi; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Olfactory mitral cells extend lateral secondary dendrites that contact the lateral secondary and apical primary dendrites of other mitral cells in the external plexiform layer (EPL) of the olfactory bulb. The lateral dendrites further contact granule cell dendrites, forming dendrodendritic reciprocal synapses in the EPL. These dendritic structures are critical for odor information processing, but it remains unknown how they are formed. We recently showed that the immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 constitutes a novel adhesion apparatus at the contacts between mitral cell lateral dendrites, between mitral cell lateral and apical dendrites, and between mitral cell lateral dendrites and granule cell dendritic spine necks in the deep sub-lamina of the EPL of the developing mouse olfactory bulb and named them nectin-1 spots. We investigated here the role of the nectin-1 spots in the formation of dendritic structures in the EPL of the mouse olfactory bulb. We showed that in cultured nectin-1-knockout mitral cells, the number of branching points of mitral cell dendrites was reduced compared to that in the control cells. In the deep sub-lamina of the EPL in the nectin-1-knockout olfactory bulb, the number of branching points of mitral cell lateral dendrites and the number of dendrodendritic reciprocal synapses were reduced compared to those in the control olfactory bulb. These results indicate that the nectin-1 spots regulate the branching of mitral cell dendrites in the deep sub-lamina of the EPL and suggest that the nectin-1 spots are required for odor information processing in the olfactory bulb. PMID:26169026

  19. Treatment Options for Transformed Lymphoma: Incorporating Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Multimodality Approach

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Nishitha; Savani, Bipin N

    2011-01-01

    Transformed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (TL) arising from follicular lymphoma carries a poor prognosis and the median survival time after transformation is approximately 10-12 months. Standard chemotherapy and radioimmunotherapy have offered promising responses however; the duration of response does not appear to last long. Several studies evaluating the role of autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT) as a salvage regimen have been reported and a subset of patients benefit from this modality of treatment. With an improvement in supportive care, outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has been improved significantly over past decades, however very limited data are available in TL. In the era of emerging novel therapies, the actual timing, optimal conditioning regimens and long term impact of the type of stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT vs. allo-SCT) is unclear. This review addresses the approaches to the management of patients with TL. PMID:21621630

  20. EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL-2-quenching dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Lu, Erick; Yi, Tangsheng; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of T cells carrying the CD4 antigen; they are important in supporting plasma cell and germinal centre responses. The initial induction of Tfh cell properties occurs within the first few days after activation by antigen recognition on dendritic cells, although how dendritic cells promote this cell-fate decision is not fully understood. Moreover, although Tfh cells are uniquely defined by expression of the follicle-homing receptor CXCR5 (refs 1, 2), the guidance receptor promoting the earlier localization of activated T cells at the interface of the B-cell follicle and T zone has been unclear. Here we show that the G-protein-coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183) and its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol mediate positioning of activated CD4 T cells at the interface of the follicle and T zone. In this location they interact with activated dendritic cells and are exposed to Tfh-cell-promoting inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) ligand. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine that has multiple influences on T-cell fate, including negative regulation of Tfh cell differentiation. We demonstrate that activated dendritic cells in the outer T zone further augment Tfh cell differentiation by producing membrane and soluble forms of CD25, the IL-2 receptor α-chain, and quenching T-cell-derived IL-2. Mice lacking EBI2 in T cells or CD25 in dendritic cells have reduced Tfh cells and mount defective T-cell-dependent plasma cell and germinal centre responses. These findings demonstrate that distinct niches within the lymphoid organ T zone support distinct cell fate decisions, and they establish a function for dendritic-cell-derived CD25 in controlling IL-2 availability and T-cell differentiation. PMID:27147029

  1. Encephalitozoon intestinalis Inhibits Dendritic Cell Differentiation through an IL-6-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carmen E; Zorro, Maria M; Sierra, Jelver; Gilchrist, Katherine; Botero, Jorge H; Baena, Andres; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of intracellular pathogens causing self-limited and severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, respectively. A cellular type 1 adaptive response, mediated by IL-12, IFNγ, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells has been shown to be essential for host resistance, and dendritic cells (DC) play a key role at eliciting anti-microsporidial immunity. We investigated the in vitro response of DC and DC precursors/progenitors to infection with Encephalitozoon intestinalis (Ei), a common agent of human microsporidosis. Ei-exposed DC cultures up-regulated the surface expression of MHC class II and the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, only when high loads of spores were used. A vigorous secretion of IL-6 but not of IL-1β or IL-12p70 was also observed in these cultures. Ei-exposed DC cultures consisted of immature infected and mature bystander DC, as assessed by MHC class II and costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that intracellular Ei spores deliver inhibitory signals in DC. Moreover, Ei selectively inhibited the secretion of IL-12p70 in LPS-stimulated DC. Whereas Ei-exposed DC promoted allogeneic naïve T cell proliferation and IL-2 and IFNγ secretion in DC-CD4+ T cell co-cultures, separated co-cultures with bystander or infected DCs showed stimulation or inhibition of IFNγ secretion, respectively. When DC precursors/progenitors were exposed to Ei spores, a significant inhibition of DC differentiation was observed without shifting the development toward cells phenotypically or functionally compatible with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Neutralization experiments demonstrated that this inhibitory effect is IL-6-dependent. Altogether this investigation reveals a novel potential mechanism of immune escape of microsporidian parasites through the modulation of DC differentiation and maturation. PMID:26870700

  2. Encephalitozoon intestinalis Inhibits Dendritic Cell Differentiation through an IL-6-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Carmen E.; Zorro, Maria M.; Sierra, Jelver; Gilchrist, Katherine; Botero, Jorge H.; Baena, Andres; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R.

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of intracellular pathogens causing self-limited and severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, respectively. A cellular type 1 adaptive response, mediated by IL-12, IFNγ, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells has been shown to be essential for host resistance, and dendritic cells (DC) play a key role at eliciting anti-microsporidial immunity. We investigated the in vitro response of DC and DC precursors/progenitors to infection with Encephalitozoon intestinalis (Ei), a common agent of human microsporidosis. Ei-exposed DC cultures up-regulated the surface expression of MHC class II and the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, only when high loads of spores were used. A vigorous secretion of IL-6 but not of IL-1β or IL-12p70 was also observed in these cultures. Ei-exposed DC cultures consisted of immature infected and mature bystander DC, as assessed by MHC class II and costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that intracellular Ei spores deliver inhibitory signals in DC. Moreover, Ei selectively inhibited the secretion of IL-12p70 in LPS-stimulated DC. Whereas Ei-exposed DC promoted allogeneic naïve T cell proliferation and IL-2 and IFNγ secretion in DC-CD4+ T cell co-cultures, separated co-cultures with bystander or infected DCs showed stimulation or inhibition of IFNγ secretion, respectively. When DC precursors/progenitors were exposed to Ei spores, a significant inhibition of DC differentiation was observed without shifting the development toward cells phenotypically or functionally compatible with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Neutralization experiments demonstrated that this inhibitory effect is IL-6-dependent. Altogether this investigation reveals a novel potential mechanism of immune escape of microsporidian parasites through the modulation of DC differentiation and maturation. PMID:26870700

  3. The VEGF-Receptor Inhibitor Axitinib Impairs Dendritic Cell Phenotype and Function

    PubMed Central

    Daecke, Solveig Nora; Riethausen, Kati; Kotthoff, Philipp; Flores, Chrystel; Kurts, Christian; Brossart, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of VEGF receptor (VEGFR) signaling such as sorafenib and sunitinib that are currently used in the treatment of malignant diseases have been shown to affect immunological responses by inhibition of the function of antigen presenting cells and T lymphocytes. The VEGFR-inhibitor axitinib has recently been approved for second line therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. While there is some evidence that axitinib might interfere with the activation of T cells, not much is known about the effects of axitinib on dendritic cell (DC) phenotype and function. We here show that the addition of axitinib during the final Toll-like receptor-4-induced maturation step of monocyte-derived human DCs results in a reduced DC activation characterized by impaired expression of activation markers and co-stimulatory molecules such as CD80, CD83 and CD86. We further found a decreased secretion of interleukin-12 which was accompanied by reduced nuclear expression of the transcription factor cRel. In addition, we found a dose-dependent reduced activation of p38 and STAT3 in axitinib-exposed DCs, whereas the expression was not affected. The dysfunction of axitinib-exposed DCs was further underlined by their impaired induction of allogeneic T cell proliferation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction assay and inhibition of DC migration. Our results demonstrate that axitinib significantly affects DC differentiation and function primarily via the inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway leading to impaired T cell activation. This will be of importance for the design of future vaccination protocols and therapeutic approaches aiming at combining different treatment strategies, eg such as programmed death-1 inhibitors with axitinib. PMID:26042424

  4. Survival in a recent cohort of mechanically ventilated pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, Josephus P J; Bollen, Casper W; Bierings, Marc B; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Wulffraat, Nico M; van Vught, Adrianus J

    2008-12-01

    There is ongoing discussion whether survival improved for children requiring mechanical ventilation after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We reviewed the outcomes of 150 children who received an allogeneic HSCT between January 1999 and April 2007, in a pediatric university hospital in The Netherlands. Thirty-five of the 150 patients received mechanical ventilation on 38 occasions. None of the recorded risk factors was significantly associated with the requirement of mechanical ventilation. Sixteen admissions resulted in death in the intensive care unit (ICU), giving a case fatality rate of 42% (95% confidence interval 26%-58%). ICU mortality was associated with multiorgan failure on the second day of admission and with the use of high frequency oscillatory ventilation. Patients had higher pediatric risk of mortality scores than in previous studies, reflecting higher acuity of illness on admission to the ICU. Six-month survival in patients discharged from the ICU was 82%. Compared to previous studies, we found an improvement in ICU survival and survival 6 months after ICU discharge in a recent cohort of ventilated children after allogeneic HSCT, even though our patients were more severely ill. Our results are promising, but they need to be confirmed in larger, preferably multicenter, studies. PMID:19041061

  5. Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Fanconi Anemia and Bone Marrow Failure.

    PubMed

    Ayas, Mouhab; Eapen, Mary; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Carreras, Jeanette; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Alter, Blanche P; Anderlini, Paolo; Battiwalla, Minoo; Bierings, Marc; Buchbinder, David K; Bonfim, Carmem; Camitta, Bruce M; Fasth, Anders L; Gale, Robert Peter; Lee, Michelle A; Lund, Troy C; Myers, Kasiani C; Olsson, Richard F; Page, Kristin M; Prestidge, Tim D; Radhi, Mohamed; Shah, Ami J; Schultz, Kirk R; Wirk, Baldeep; Wagner, John E; Deeg, H Joachim

    2015-10-01

    A second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the sole salvage option for individuals who develop graft failure after their first HCT. Data on outcomes after second HCT in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) are scarce. Here we report outcomes after second allogeneic HCT for FA (n = 81). The indication for second HCT was graft failure after the first HCT. Transplantations were performed between 1990 and 2012. The timing of the second HCT predicted subsequent graft failure and survival. Graft failure was high when the second HCT was performed less than 3 months from the first. The 3-month probability of graft failure was 69% when the interval between the first HCT and second HCT was less than 3 months, compared with 23% when the interval was longer (P < .001). Consequently, the 1-year survival rate was substantially lower when the interval between the first and second HCTs was less than 3 months compared with longer (23% vs 58%; P = .001). The corresponding 5-year probability of survival was 16% and 45%, respectively (P = .006). Taken together, these data suggest that fewer than one-half of patients with FA undergoing a second HCT for graft failure are long-term survivors. There is an urgent need to develop strategies to reduce the rate of graft failure after first HCT. PMID:26116087

  6. Avascular necrosis of bone after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaxin; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Baker, K Scott; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Frangoul, Haydar A; Gajewski, James L; Hale, Gregory A; Hsu, Jack W; Kamble, Rammurti T; Lazarus, Hillard M; Marks, David I; Maziarz, Richard T; Savani, Bipin N; Shah, Ami J; Shah, Nirali; Sorror, Mohamed L; Wood, William A; Majhail, Navneet S

    2014-04-01

    We conducted a nested case-control study within a cohort of 6244 patients to assess risk factors for avascular necrosis (AVN) of bone in children and adolescents after allogeneic transplantation. Eligible patients were ≤21 years of age, received their first allogeneic transplant between 1990 and 2008 in the United States, and had survived ≥ 6 months from transplantation. Overall, 160 patients with AVN and 478 control subjects matched by year of transplant, length of follow-up and transplant center were identified. Patients and control subjects were confirmed via central review of radiology, pathology, and/or surgical procedure reports. Median time from transplant to diagnosis of AVN was 14 months. On conditional logistic regression, increasing age at transplant (≥5 years), female gender, and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were significantly associated with increased risks of AVN. Compared with patients receiving myeloablative regimens for malignant diseases, lower risks of AVN were seen in patients with nonmalignant diseases and those who had received reduced-intensity conditioning regimens for malignant diseases. Children at high risk for AVN include those within the age group where rapid bone growth occurs as well as those who experience exposure to myeloablative conditioning regimens and immunosuppression after hematopoietic cell transplantation for the treatment of GVHD. More research is needed to determine whether screening strategies specifically for patients at high risk for developing AVN with early interventions may mitigate the morbidity associated with this complication. PMID:24388803

  7. Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Incidence, risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yakushijin, K; Atsuta, Y; Doki, N; Yokota, A; Kanamori, H; Miyamoto, T; Ohwada, C; Miyamura, K; Nawa, Y; Kurokawa, M; Mizuno, I; Mori, T; Onizuka, M; Taguchi, J; Ichinohe, T; Yabe, H; Morishima, Y; Kato, K; Suzuki, R; Fukuda, T

    2016-03-01

    This retrospective study was conducted in Japan to determine the incidence, risk factors and outcomes of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Among 4290 patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT between 1999 and 2010, 462 were diagnosed with SOS according to the Seattle criteria (cumulative incidence, 10.8%). The cumulative incidence of SOS diagnosed by the modified Seattle criteria was 9.3%. Of 462 patients, 107 met the Baltimore criteria and 168 had severe SOS with renal and/or respiratory failure. The median onset for SOS was 12 days after HSCT (range, -2-30). Overall survival at day 100 was 32% for SOS and 15% for severe SOS. Multivariate analyses showed that significant independent risk factors for SOS were the number of HSCTs, age, performance status, hepatitis C virus-seropositivity, advanced disease status and myeloablative regimen. SOS was highly associated with overall mortality (hazard ratio, 2.09; P<0.001). Our retrospective survey showed that the cumulative incidence of SOS in Japan was 10.8%, similar to that previously reported in Western countries, and that the overall survival of patients who developed SOS was low. Furthermore, several risk factors were identified. Preventive and therapeutic strategies for high-risk SOS patients must be established to improve overall survival. PMID:26595082

  8. Kaposi's sarcoma following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, B C; Rezuke, W N; Ricci, A; Tsongalis, G; Shen, P U; Bona, R D; Feingold, J M; Edwards, R L; Tutschka, P J; Bilgrami, S

    2000-01-01

    Unlike solid organ transplantation, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) occurs rarely following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In fact, only 5 cases of KS have been reported after allogeneic or autologous HSCT. The usual treatment combines a substantial decrease in, or elimination of, immunosuppressive therapy along with local measures such as surgical excision, cryotherapy or radiation therapy. A 46-year-old woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia who had received an allogeneic HSCT previously from an HLA-identical sibling, presented on day +814 with human herpes virus-8-associated KS involving her left lower extremity. She had been on continuous immunosuppressive therapy since her transplant because of chronic graft-versus-host disease. The intensity of immunosuppressive therapy was decreased once a diagnosis of KS had been established. However, the nodular lesions continued to progress in size and number. Therefore, a course of irradiation was administered to sites of bulk disease on her legs. Furthermore, thalidomide was initiated along with a topical retinoid, alitretinoin 0.1% gel applied twice daily to the nonirradiated lesions. This approach yielded a partial response in both irradiated and nonirradiated lesions over the course of the following 7 months. Both thalidomide and alitretinoin 0.1% gel appear to be beneficial in HSCT-associated KS and exhibit tolerable side effects. PMID:11154986

  9. Allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplants for patients with relapsed acute leukemia: long-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, A; Lamparelli, T; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Bregante, S; Raiola, A M; Ibatici, A; di Grazia, C; Dominietto, A; Piaggio, G; Podesta, M; Bruno, B; Lombardi, A; Frassoni, F; Viscoli, C; Sacchi, N; Van Lint, M T

    2007-03-01

    We assessed the long-term outcome of patients with relapsed acute myeloid (n=86) or acute lymphoid leukemia (n=66), undergoing an allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation in our unit. The median blast count in the marrow was 30%. Conditioning regimen included total body irradiation (TBI) (10-12 Gy) in 115 patients. The donor was a matched donor (n=132) or a family mismatched donor (n=20). Twenty-two patients (15%) survive disease free, with a median follow-up of 14 years: 18 are off medications. The cumulative incidence of transplant related mortality is 40% and the cumulative incidence of relapse related death (RRD) is 45%. In multivariate analysis of survival, favorable predictors were chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) (P=0.0003), donor other than family mismatched (P=0.02), donor age less than 34 years (P=0.02) and blast count less than 30% (P=0.07). Patients with all four favorable predictors had a 54% survival. In multivariate analysis of relapse, protective variables were the use of TBI (P=0.005) and cGvHD (P=0.01). This study confirms that a fraction of relapsed leukemias is cured with an allogeneic transplant: selection of patients with a blast count <30%, identification of young, human leukocyte antigen-matched donors and the use of total body radiation may significantly improve the outcome. PMID:17277788

  10. Venous Thromboembolism after Allogeneic Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Azık, Fatih; Gürlek Gökçebay, Dilek; Tavil, Betül; Işık, Pamir; Tunç, Bahattin; Uçkan, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in children who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has high morbidity. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence of VTE in allogeneic pediatric HSCT recipients and the contribution of pretransplant prothrombotic risk factors to thrombosis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 92 patients between April 2010 and November 2012 undergoing allogeneic HSCT who had completed 100 days post-HSCT. Before HSCT, coagulation profiles; acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors including FV G1691A (factor V Leiden), prothrombin G20210A, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, and MTHFR A1298C mutations; and serum homocysteine and lipoprotein (a), plasma antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S levels were obtained from all patients. Results: In the screening of thrombophilia, 8 patients (9%) were heterozygous for factor V Leiden, 5 (6%) were homozygous for MTHFR 677TT, 12 (14%) were homozygous for MTHFR 1298CC, and 2 (2%) were heterozygous for prothrombin G20210A mutation. We observed VTE in 5 patients (5.4%); a prothrombotic risk factor was found in 3 out of these 5 patients, while 4 out of 5 patients had central venous catheters. It was determined there was no significant relationship between VTE and inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Conclusion: VTE after HSCT seems to be a low-frequency event that may be due to low-dose, low-molecular-weight heparin prophylaxis, and the role of inherited prothrombotic risk factors cannot be entirely excluded without a prospective study. PMID:25912774

  11. Bilateral Maxillary, Sphenoid Sinuses and Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Extramedullary Relapse of CML Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Ansari, Shahla; Vosough, Parvaneh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Chahardouli, Bahram; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Mehrazma, Mitra; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplant is rare. There is a case report of a child who developed a granulocytic sarcoma of the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses and lumbosacral spinal cord mass 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplant for CML. He was presented with per orbital edema and neurological deficit of lower extremities and a mass lesion was found on spinal cord imaging. No evidence of hematologic relapse was identified at that time by bone marrow histology or cytogenetic. The patient died 1 month later with a picture of pneumonia, left ventricular dysfunction and a cardiopulmonary arrest on a presumed underlying sepsis with infectious etiology. Granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions presenting after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for CML, even if there is no evidence of bone marrow involvement. PMID:27252811

  12. Frequency of abnormal findings detected by comprehensive clinical evaluation at 1 year after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie J; Seaborn, Travis; Mao, Frances J; Massey, Susan C; Luu, Ngoc Q; Schubert, Mary A; Chien, Jason W; Carpenter, Paul A; Moravec, Carina; Martin, Paul J; Flowers, Mary E D

    2009-04-01

    Consensus guidelines recommend various screening examinations for survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but how often these examinations detect abnormal findings is unknown. We reviewed the medical records of 118 patients who received comprehensive, standardized evaluations at 1 year after allogeneic HCT at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Abnormal findings were common, including moderate to severe pulmonary dysfunction (16%), fasting hyperlipidemia (56%), osteopenia (52%), osteoporosis (6%), and active chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) (64%). Recurrent malignancy (4%) and cGVHD (29%) were detected in previously unsuspected cases. Only 3% of patients had no abnormal findings. We conclude that comprehensive evaluation at 1 year after allogeneic HCT detects a high prevalence of medical problems. Longer follow-up is needed to determine whether early detection and intervention affect later morbidity and mortality. PMID:19285628

  13. Bilateral Maxillary, Sphenoid Sinuses and Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Extramedullary Relapse of CML Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Ansari, Shahla; Vosough, Parvaneh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Chahardouli, Bahram; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Mehrazma, Mitra; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplant is rare. There is a case report of a child who developed a granulocytic sarcoma of the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses and lumbosacral spinal cord mass 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplant for CML. He was presented with per orbital edema and neurological deficit of lower extremities and a mass lesion was found on spinal cord imaging. No evidence of hematologic relapse was identified at that time by bone marrow histology or cytogenetic. The patient died 1 month later with a picture of pneumonia, left ventricular dysfunction and a cardiopulmonary arrest on a presumed underlying sepsis with infectious etiology. Granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions presenting after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for CML, even if there is no evidence of bone marrow involvement. PMID:27252811

  14. Functional Properties of Dendritic Gap Junctions in Cerebellar Golgi Cells.

    PubMed

    Szoboszlay, Miklos; Lőrincz, Andrea; Lanore, Frederic; Vervaeke, Koen; Silver, R Angus; Nusser, Zoltan

    2016-06-01

    The strength and variability of electrical synaptic connections between GABAergic interneurons are key determinants of spike synchrony within neuronal networks. However, little is known about how electrical coupling strength is determined due to the inaccessibility of gap junctions on the dendritic tree. We investigated the properties of gap junctions in cerebellar interneurons by combining paired somato-somatic and somato-dendritic recordings, anatomical reconstructions, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and modeling. By fitting detailed compartmental models of Golgi cells to their somato-dendritic voltage responses, we determined their passive electrical properties and the mean gap junction conductance (0.9 nS). Connexin36 immunofluorescence and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling revealed a large variability in gap junction size and that only 18% of the 340 channels are open in each plaque. Our results establish that the number of gap junctions per connection is the main determinant of both the strength and variability in electrical coupling between Golgi cells. PMID:27133465

  15. Specially modified stromal and immune microenvironment in injected bone marrow following intrabone transplantation facilitates allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell engraftment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Su, Yingjun; Chen, Jianwu; Song, Yajuan; Zhuang, Ran; Xiao, Bo; Guo, Shuzhong

    2016-07-01

    For allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the first key step is the engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barrier. Intrabone bone marrow transplantation (IBBMT) could replace more recipient stromal cells with donor cells and facilitate allogeneic organ transplantation compared with the conventional intravenous approach. However, it remains unknown whether and how IBBMT reconstructs the immune microenvironment for allogeneic HSCs. We explored where the BM microenvironment changes by determining BM stromal cell chimerism and measuring the change in CXCL-12 expression and regulatory T cells in recipient BM. We found that most stromal cells were replaced by allogeneic cells in the injected BM, with higher expression of immune regulatory cytokines (interleukin-10) compared with the contralateral BM and the intravenous group BM. This difference was independent of injury caused by intrabone injection. Consistent with the microenvironment modification, the allogeneic the engraftment rate and reconstitution capacity of HSCs were enhanced in the injected BM compared with the contralateral BM and intravenous group BM. Surgical removal of the injected bone at 7 days rather than 21 days reduced the levels of allogeneic granulocytes and HSCs in the peripheral blood. In conclusion, IBBMT specially modifies stromal cells in the injected BM which provide immune protective cues that improve the engraftment of allogeneic HSCs in an early period. PMID:27090963

  16. Donor-derived DNA in hair follicles of recipients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jacewicz, R; Lewandowski, K; Rupa-Matysek, J; Jedrzejczyk, M; Brzezinski, P M; Dobosz, T; Jonkisz, A; Szram, S; Komarnicki, M; Berent, J

    2010-11-01

    The hair follicles of recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) constitute the tissue with the greatest need for regeneration after high-dose chemotherapy. Previous studies have shown a lack of donor-derived DNA in the hair follicles of recipients. Therefore, we carried out a study to determine whether male donor-derived genetic material can be found in female recipients' hair follicles after HSCT. Fluorescent-based PCR with analyses of Y-chromosome STR (Y-STR) and RQ-PCR with the sex-determining region Y (SRY) were used independently to evaluate chimerism status. Our results proved the existence of donor-derived stem DNA in the recipients' hair follicle cells. This report undermines the validity of data indicating that hair follicle cells maintain 100% of recipient origin. PMID:20173789

  17. Rhodococcus equi pneumonia and sepsis in an allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Lokesh

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an aerobic facultative intracellular organism that is known to infect cells of the macrophage–monocyte lineage. It is a common veterinary pathogen; however, the incidence of this infection in humans has risen and it has been recognised as an emerging opportunistic pathogen among the immunocompromised patients. We present the case of a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia who had received allogenic stem cell transplant and presented to the hospital with clinical picture of pneumonia. Her condition worsened on initial broad spectrum antimicrobials and 3 weeks into her hospitalisation, R. equi was isolated from her broncheoalveolar lavage and blood cultures. Based on the susceptibility, therapy was changed to four active antimicrobials; however, the patient failed to improve and eventually died. This case highlights the importance of considering the diagnosis of R. equi among immunosuppressed patients early in the right clinical setting due to the high virulence associated with this organism. PMID:24943142

  18. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia Associated With Allogenic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Successfully Treated With Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Lam-Phuong; Ahdoot, Stella; Sriratanaviriyakul, Narin; Zhang, Yanhong; Stollenwerk, Nicholas; Schivo, Michael; Harper, Richart

    2016-01-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is an extremely rare, relatively new, and distinct histological pattern of acute lung injury characterized predominately by the presence of intra-alveolar fibrin and associated organizing pneumonia. AFOP may be idiopathic or associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. It has a variable clinical presentation from mild respiratory symptoms to that similar to the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Currently there is no consensus on treatment, and corticosteroids previously were of unclear benefit. To date, there are less than 40 cases of AFOP reported in the literature and only one has been linked to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we report the first case series of 2 patients who developed AFOP following allogenic stem cell transplant that were successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroids. PMID:27152316

  19. Conditioning with α-emitter based radioimmunotherapy in canine allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Chen, Yun; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    With the introduction of nonmyeloablative conditioning, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has become a viable treatment option for patients who due to age or comorbidities are ineligible for high dose conditioning. However, relapse and toxicities are still major problems in HCT. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT)-based conditioning is a promising approach that has the ability to specifically target radiation to hematopoietic cells. The most widely investigated isotopes are the β-emitters, but because of long path lengths and low linear energy transfer, α-emitters which have more favorable physical characteristics, might prove to be a better alternative. In the current study we have investigated the efficacy and safety of α-emitter based RIT as the only form of conditioning in a preclinical model of canine allogeneic HCT. PMID:22772070

  20. Sequential recovery of NK cell receptor repertoire after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Giebel, S; Dziaczkowska, J; Czerw, T; Wojnar, J; Krawczyk-Kulis, M; Nowak, I; Holowiecka, A; Segatti, A; Kyrcz-Krzemien, S; Kusnierczyk, P; Holowiecki, J

    2010-06-01

    Alloreactivity of natural killer (NK) cells contributes to the GVL reaction after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (allo-HSCT). However, various procedure-related factors may affect NK cell maturation and their ability to recognize and kill leukemic cells. In this study, we prospectively evaluated expression of NK cell inhibitory receptors in 83 adults treated with myeloablative, killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR)-ligand-matched allo-HSCT. NK cell maturation was evaluated by comparing the phenotypic patterns after allo-HSCT with the donor ones. The frequencies of KIR3DL1 were comparable to the donor ones on day +28, while they decreased significantly starting from day +100. The expression of KIR2DL2/3 was significantly lower in patients compared with donors up to day +100. The expression of KIR2DL1, despite continues growth, remained significantly decreased for 1 year after allo-HSCT. NKG2A was over-expressed up to day +180. Within 1 year after allo-HSCT, the NK cell phenotypic pattern tended to recapitulate the donor type. The process was disturbed by the use of steroids with significant differences observed on days +56 (P=0.01) and +100 (P=0.04). Up to day +100, reconstitution of NK cell receptor repertoire correlated with the absolute numbers of circulating CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) cells. Our observations should be taken into account when trying to predict potential benefit from NK cell alloreactivity. PMID:20118994

  1. Impact of donor age on outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Andrew R; Storer, Barry E; Guthrie, Katherine A; Schoch, H Gary; Maloney, David G; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storb, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    As older patients are eligible for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), older siblings are increasingly proposed as donors. We studied the impact of donor age on the tempo of hematopoietic engraftment and donor chimerism, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) among 1174 consecutive patients undergoing myeloablative and 367 patients undergoing nonmyeloablative HCT from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cell allografts. Sustained engraftment rates were 97% and 98% in patients undergoing myeloablative and nonmyeloablative conditioning, respectively, for grafts from donors < 60 years old (younger; n = 1416) and 98% and 100%, respectively, for those from donors ≥ 60 years old (older; n = 125). No significant differences were seen in the tempo of neutrophil and platelet recoveries and donor chimerism except for an average 1.3-day delay in neutrophil recovery among myeloablative patients with older donors (P = .04). CD34(+) cell dose had an independent effect on the tempo of engraftment. Aged stem cells did not convey an increased risk of donor-derived clonal disorders after HCT. Myeloablative and nonmyeloablative recipients with older sibling donors had significantly less grade II to IV acute GVHD than recipients with grafts from younger unrelated donors. Rates of grade III and IV acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, and NRM for recipients with older donors were not significantly different from recipients with younger donors. In conclusion, grafts from donors ≥ 60 years old do not adversely affect outcomes of allogeneic HCT compared with grafts from younger donors. PMID:25278458

  2. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. PMID:27338097

  3. Low immunogenicity of allogeneic human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Miyoung; Jeong, Sang Young; Ha, Jueun; Kim, Miyeon; Jin, Hye Jin; Kwon, Soon-Jae; Chang, Jong Wook; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Yang, Yoon Sun; Kim, Jae-Sung; Jeon, Hong Bae

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challenge in vitro. • Humanized NSG mice were established using human UCB CD34+ cells. • Repeated intravenous hUCB-MSC injection into mice did not lead to immune responses and adverse events. • Allogeneic hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Evaluation of the immunogenicity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an allogeneic setting during therapy has been hampered by lack of suitable models due to technical and ethical limitations. Here, we show that allogeneic human umbilical cord blood derived-MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challenge in vitro. To confirm these properties in vivo, a humanized mouse model was established by injecting isolated hUCB-derived CD34+ cells intravenously into immunocompromised NOD/SCID IL2γnull (NSG) mice. After repeated intravenous injection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) or MRC5 cells into these mice, immunological alterations including T cell proliferation and increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and human IgG levels, were observed. In contrast, hUCB-MSC injection did not elicit these responses. While lymphocyte infiltration in the lung and small intestine and reduced survival rates were observed after hPBMC or MRC5 transplantation, no adverse events were observed following hUCB-MSC introduction. In conclusion, our data suggest that allogeneic hUCB-MSCs have low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo, and are therefore “immunologically safe” for use in allogeneic clinical applications.

  4. Directing dendritic cell immunotherapy towards successful cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2010-01-01

    The use of dendritic cells (DCs) for tumor immunotherapy represents a powerful approach for harnessing the patient's own immune system to eliminate tumor cells. However, suboptimal conditions for generating potent immunostimulatory DCs, as well as the induction of tolerance and suppression mediated by the tumors and its microenvironment have contributed to limited success. Combining DC vaccines with new approaches that enhance immunogenicity and overcome the regulatory mechanisms underlying peripheral tolerance may be the key to achieving effective and durable anti-tumor immune responses that translate to better clinical outcomes. PMID:20473346

  5. Tolerogenic dendritic cells and their applications in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haibin; Shi, Bingyi

    2015-01-01

    In transplantation immunology, the ultimate goal is always to successfully and specifically induce immune tolerance of allografts. Tolerogenic dendritic cells (tol-DCs) with immunoregulatory functions have attracted much attention as they play important roles in inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. Here, we focused on tol-DCs that have the potential to promote immune tolerance after solid-organ transplantation. We focus on their development and interactions with other regulatory cells, and we also explore various tol-DC engineering protocols. Harnessing tol-DCs represents a promising cellular therapy for promoting long-term graft functional survival in transplant recipients that will most likely be achieved in the future. PMID:25109681

  6. Durable Scar Size Reduction Due to Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy Regulates Whole‐Chamber Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Adam R.; Suncion, Viky Y.; McCall, Frederic; Guerra, Danny; Mather, Jacques; Zambrano, Juan P.; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intramyocardial injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy is associated with reverse remodeling in experimental models and humans. Here, we tested the hypothesis that allogeneic MSC therapy drives ventricular remodeling by producing durable and progressive scar size reduction in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results Gottingen swine (n=12) underwent left anterior descending coronary artery myocardial infarction (MI), and 3 months post‐MI animals received either intramyocardial allogeneic MSC injection (200 mol/L cells; n=6) or left ventricle (LV) catheterization without injection (n=6). Swine were followed with serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for 9 months to assess structural and functional changes of the LV. Intramyocardial injection was performed using an integrated imaging platform combining electroanatomical mapping unipolar voltage and 3‐dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging angiography–derived anatomy to accurately target infarct border zone injections. MSC‐treated animals had a 19.62±2.86% reduction in scar size at 3 months postinjection, which progressed to 28.09±2.31% from 3 to 6 months postinjection (P<0.0001). MSC‐treated animals had unchanged end‐diastolic volume (EDV; P=0.08) and end‐systolic volume (ESV; P=0.28) from preinjection to 6 months postinjection, whereas controls had progressive dilatation in both EDV (P=0.0002) and ESV (P=0.0002). In addition, MSC‐treated animals had improved LV sphericity index. Percentage change in infarct size correlated with percentage change in EDV (r=0.68; P=0.01) and ESV (r=0.77; P=0.001). Ejection fraction increased from 29.69±1.68% to 35.85±2.74% at 3 months post‐MSC injection and progressed to 39.02±2.42% 6 months postinjection (P=0.0001), whereas controls had a persistently depressed ejection fraction during follow‐up (P=0.33). Conclusion Intramyocardial injection of allogeneic MSCs leads to a sustained and

  7. Human thymocytes bind to autologous and allogeneic thymic epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, K H; Wolf, L S; Lobach, D F; Denning, S M; Tuck, D T; Robertson, A L; Haynes, B F

    1986-01-01

    The thymus plays a critical role in the generation of immunocompetent T lymphocytes. In the thymus, lymphocytes are in close contact with epithelial cells, and this contact is necessary for T-cell maturation. Using cultured human thymic epithelial (TE) cells, we have found that human thymocytes bind to human TE cells in vitro. Thymocytes bound to both allogeneic and autologous TE cells and to the epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431 but did not bind to epidermal keratinocytes or to thymic fibroblasts. Thymocyte binding to TE cells was trypsin- and cytochalasin B-sensitive. Indirect immunofluorescence assays showed that both mature (T6-, T3+) and immature (T6+, T3-) thymocytes bound TE cells. In our system, TE-thymocyte binding was not inhibited by antibodies to class I or class II major histocompatibility antigens. In vitro binding of thymocytes to TE cells may represent a correlate of in vivo TE-thymocyte interactions and provides a model system for the study of human intrathymic T-lymphocyte maturation and activation. Images PMID:3092215

  8. Stereotaxic administrations of allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells efficiently control the development of human glioblastoma brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Jarry, Ulrich; Chauvin, Cynthia; Joalland, Noémie; Léger, Alexandra; Minault, Sandrine; Robard, Myriam; Bonneville, Marc; Oliver, Lisa; Vallette, François M; Vié, Henri; Pecqueur, Claire; Scotet, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents the most frequent and deadliest primary brain tumor. Aggressive treatment still fails to eliminate deep brain infiltrative and highly resistant tumor cells. Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, the major peripheral blood γδ T cell subset, react against a wide array of tumor cells and represent attractive immune effector T cells for the design of antitumor therapies. This study aims at providing a preclinical rationale for immunotherapies in GBM based on stereotaxic administration of allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. The feasibility and the antitumor efficacy of stereotaxic Vγ9Vδ2 T cell injections have been investigated in orthotopic GBM mice model using selected heterogeneous and invasive primary human GBM cells. Allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells survive and patrol for several days within the brain parenchyma following adoptive transfer and can successfully eliminate infiltrative GBM primary cells. These striking observations pave the way for optimized stereotaxic antitumor immunotherapies targeting human allogeneic Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in GBM patients. PMID:27471644

  9. Targeting Antigens to Dendritic Cell Receptors for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Thalhammer, Theresia; Tzakos, Andreas G.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized antigen presenting cells of the immune system which play a key role in regulating immune responses. Depending on the method of antigen delivery, DCs stimulate immune responses or induce tolerance. As a consequence of the dual function of DCs, DCs are studied in the context of immunotherapy for both cancer and autoimmune diseases. In vaccine development, a major aim is to induce strong, specific T-cell responses. This is achieved by targeting antigen to cell surface molecules on DCs that efficiently channel the antigen into endocytic compartments for loading onto MHC molecules and stimulation of T-cell responses. The most attractive cell surface receptors, expressed on DCs used as targets for antigen delivery for cancer and other diseases, are discussed. PMID:24228179

  10. Dendritic cells in progression and pathology of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Manches, Olivier; Frleta, Davor; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Although the major targets of HIV infection are CD4+ T cells, dendritic cells (DC) represent a crucial subset in HIV infection as they influence viral transmission, target cell infection and antigen presentation of HIV antigens. DC are potent antigen presenting cells that can modulate anti-viral immune responses. Through secretion of inflammatory cytokines and interferons (IFN), DC also alter T cell proliferation and differentiation, participating in the immune dysregulation characteristic of chronic HIV infection. Their wide distribution in close proximity with the mucosal epithelia makes them one of the first cell types to encounter HIV during sexual transmission [1]. We will discuss here the multiple roles that DC play at different stages of HIV infection, emphasizing their relevance to HIV pathology and progression. PMID:24246474

  11. Dendritic Cell Cancer Vaccines: From the Bench to the Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Tamar; Avivi, Irit; Benyamini, Noam; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn; Avigan, David

    2014-01-01

    The recognition that the development of cancer is associated with acquired immunodeficiency, mostly against cancer cells themselves, and understanding pathways inducing this immunosuppression, has led to a tremendous development of new immunological approaches, both vaccines and drugs, which overcome this inhibition. Both “passive” (e.g. strategies relying on the administration of specific T cells) and “active” vaccines (e.g. peptide-directed or whole-cell vaccines) have become attractive immunological approaches, inducing cell death by targeting tumor-associated antigens. Whereas peptide-targeted vaccines are usually directed against a single antigen, whole-cell vaccines (e.g. dendritic cell vaccines) are aimed to induce robust responsiveness by targeting several tumor-related antigens simultaneously. The combination of vaccines with new immuno-stimulating agents which target “immunosuppressive checkpoints” (anti-CTLA-4, PD-1, etc.) is likely to improve and maintain immune response induced by vaccination. PMID:25386340

  12. Nucleus pulposus cells expressing hBMP7 can prevent the degeneration of allogenic IVD in a canine transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Chaofeng, Wang; Chao, Zhang; Deli, Wang; Jianhong, Wu; Yan, Zhang; Cheng, Xu; Hongkui, Xin; Qing, He; Dike, Ruan

    2013-09-01

    We have previously explored the possibilities of allogenic intervertebral disc (IVD) curing disc degeneration disease in clinical practice. The results showed that the motion and stability of the spinal unit was preserved after transplantation of allogenic IVD in human beings at 5-year follow-up. However, mild degeneration was observed in the allogenic transplanted IVD cases. In this study, we construct the biological tissue engineering IVD by injecting the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) expressing human bone morphogenetic protein 7 (hBMP7) into cryopreserved IVD, and transplant the biological tissue engineering IVD into a beagle dog to investigate whether NPCs expressing hBMP7 could prevent the degeneration of the transplanted allogenic IVDs. At 24 weeks after transplantation, MRI scan showed that IVD allografts injected NPCs expressing hBMP7 have a slighter signs of degeneration than IVD allografts with NPCs or without NPCs. The range of motion of left-right rotation in the group without NPCs was bigger than that of two cells injection group. PKH-26-labeled cells were identified at IVD allograft. The study demonstrated that NPCs expressing hBMP7 could survive at least 24 weeks and prevent the degeneration of the transplanted IVD. This solution might have a potential role in preventing the IVD allograft degeneration in long time follow-up. PMID:23580474

  13. Efficacy of immune suppression tapering in treating relapse after reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kekre, Natasha; Kim, Haesook T.; Thanarajasingam, Gita; Armand, Philippe; Antin, Joseph H.; Cutler, Corey; Nikiforow, Sarah; Ho, Vincent T.; Koreth, John; Alyea, Edwin P.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    For patients who relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation while still on immune suppression, there is anecdotal evidence that tapering the immune suppression may result in graft-versus-tumor activity. We reviewed the medical records of all patients with documented histological or radiographic disease recurrence within 1 year of stem cell transplantation while on immune suppression at our institution. The median time to relapse was 110 days (range, 18–311) after transplant. Among 123 patients with relapse treated with immune suppression tapering without chemotherapy, radiation, or donor lymphocyte infusion, 34 responded (33/101 reduced intensity conditioning transplant and 1/22 myeloablative conditioning transplant, 32.7% and 4.5% respectively; P=0.007). The median time to response after initiation of immune suppression tapering was 82 days (range, 16–189). Thirty-three patients (97.1%) had development or progression of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease as a consequence of immune suppression tapering, at a median time of 39 days (range, 16–98). Six patients subsequently relapsed late after initial response to immune suppression tapering at a median time of 2 years (range, 0.9–3.8). The median overall survival from immune suppression tapering for responders was 5.1 years (range, 1.9-not estimable). When clinically feasible, immune suppression tapering alone in patients who relapse early after reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation can produce durable remissions, but is almost always associated with graft-versus-host disease. PMID:26088931

  14. Negative permeability and subwavelength focusing of quasi-periodic dendritic cell metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Fu, Quan H; Zhao, Jing; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Xiao P

    2006-08-01

    We present the design for a hexagonal cell made of quasi-periodic dendritic arranged collections of plasmonic metallic wires that may exhibit a resonant magnetic collective response. When such quasi-periodic dendritic cells are etched on a host medium, they may provide metamaterials with negative effective permeability. We also show that a clear point image is observed, as expected, with our left-handed metamaterials (LHMs) lens composed of metallic dendritic cells and wire strips. These prominent characteristics of quasi-periodic dendritic cells potentially enable us to prepare infrared or visible domain LHMs by using a general chemical method. PMID:19529087

  15. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides can induce human monocytic leukemia cells into dendritic cells with immuno-stimulatory function

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wing Keung; Cheung, Christopher Ching Hang; Law, Helen Ka Wai; Lau, Yu Lung; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous studies demonstrated Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GL-PS), a form of bioactive β-glucan can stimulate the maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The question of how leukemic cells especially in monocytic lineage respond to GL-PS stimuli remains unclear. Results In this study, we used in vitro culture model with leukemic monocytic cell-lines THP-1 and U937 as monocytic effectors cells for proliferation responses and DCs induction. We treated the THP-1 and U937 cells with purified GL-PS (100 μg/mL) or GL-PS with GM-CSF/IL-4. GL-PS alone induced proliferative response on both THP-1 and U937 cells but only THP-1 transformed into typical DC morphology when stimulated with GL-PS plus GM-CSF/IL-4. The transformed THP-1 DCs had significant increase expression of HLA-DR, CD40, CD80 and CD86 though not as high as the extent of normal monocyte-derived DCs. They had similar antigen-uptake ability as the normal monocyte-derived DCs positive control. However, their potency in inducing allogeneic T cell proliferation was also less than that of normal monocyte-derived DCs. Conclusion Our findings suggested that GL-PS could induce selected monocytic leukemic cell differentiation into DCs with immuno-stimulatory function. The possible clinical impact of using this commonly used medicinal mushroom in patients with monocytic leukemia (AML-M4 and M5) deserved further investigation. PMID:18644156

  16. Investigating Evolutionary Conservation of Dendritic Cell Subset Identity and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Bertho, Nicolas; Hosmalin, Anne; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Dalod, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T-cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks, and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization, and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation, and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes, and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types, organs, and

  17. Alterations in Memory and Impact on Academic Outcomes in Children Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lajiness-O'Neill, R; Hoodin, F; Kentor, R; Heinrich, K; Colbert, A; Connelly, J A

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of late effects following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), a curative treatment for pediatric leukemia, is high: 79% of HCT recipients experience chronic medical conditions. The few extant studies of cognitive late effects have focused on intelligence and are equivocal about HCT neurotoxicity. In an archival study of 30 children (mean transplant age = 6 years), we characterize neuropsychological predictors of academic outcomes. Mean intellectual and academic abilities were average, but evidenced extreme variability, particularly on measures of attention and memory: ∼25% of the sample exhibited borderline performance or lower. Medical predictors of outcome revealed paradoxically better memory associated with more severe acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and associated with steroid treatment. Processing speed and memory accounted for 69% and 61% of variance in mathematics and reading outcomes, respectively. Thus, our findings revealed neurocognitive areas of vulnerability in processing speed and memory following HCT that contribute to subsequent academic difficulties. PMID:26319492

  18. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Myelofibrosis: A Practical Review.

    PubMed

    Farhadfar, Nosha; Cerquozzi, Sonia; Patnaik, Mrinal; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2016-07-01

    Myelofibrosis is a myeloproliferative neoplasm with cardinal features of extramedullary hematopoiesis, hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, and constitutional symptoms that result in shortened survival and leukemic transformation. It is a disease predominantly of the elderly, and currently available therapies only offer symptom control without curative benefit or ability to alter disease progression. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplant (HSCT) is the only potentially curative intervention; however, this is only feasible in younger and medically fit patients and selectively offered to those with high-risk disease. Despite ongoing advancements, HSCT is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, and the determination of which patients with myelofibrosis are ideal candidates and the selection of the opportune moment to proceed with transplantation remains challenging. This review summarizes our current recommendations for the role of and indications for HSCT in myelofibrosis. PMID:27407157

  19. Radiation tolerance of boron doped dendritic web silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.

    1980-01-01

    The potential of dendritic web silicon for giving radiation hard solar cells is compared with the float zone silicon material. Solar cells with n(+)-p-P(+) structure and approximately 15% (AMl) efficiency were subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation. Radiation tolerance of web cell efficiency was found to be at least as good as that of the float zone silicon cell. A study of the annealing behavior of radiation-induced defects via deep level transient spectroscopy revealed that E sub v + 0.31 eV defect, attributed to boron-oxygen-vacancy complex, is responsible for the reverse annealing of the irradiated cells in the temperature range of 150 to 350 C.

  20. Regulation of Intestinal Immune System by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune cells survey antigenic materials beneath our body surfaces and provide a front-line response to internal and external danger signals. Dendritic cells (DCs), a subset of innate immune cells, are critical sentinels that perform multiple roles in immune responses, from acting as principal modulators to priming an adaptive immune response through antigen-specific signaling. In the gut, DCs meet exogenous, non-harmful food antigens as well as vast commensal microbes under steady-state conditions. In other instances, they must combat pathogenic microbes to prevent infections. In this review, we focus on the function of intestinal DCs in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. Specifically, we describe how intestinal DCs affect IgA production from B cells and influence the generation of unique subsets of T cell. PMID:25713503

  1. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin; Hoss, Mareike; Wong, John Erik; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  2. Interaction of Salmonella Typhimurium with Dendritic Cells Derived from Pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Raffaella; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Andrews, Robert; Abdellah, Zarah; Fairchild, Paul J.; Dougan, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Using an in vitro differentiation protocol we isolated cells with the properties of dendritic cells (DCs) from immunologically refractive pluripotent murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs). These ES-derived dendritic cells (ESDCs) expressed cytokines and were able to present antigen to a T cell line. Infection of ESDCs with Salmonella Typhimurium stimulated the expression of immune cell markers and thousands of murine genes, many associated with the immune response. Consequently, this system provides a novel in vitro model, amenable to genetic modification, for monitoring host/pathogen interactions. PMID:23284947

  3. Immunogenicity of decidual stromal cells in an epidermolysis bullosa patient and in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Kaipe, Helen; Carlson, Lena-Maria; Erkers, Tom; Nava, Silvia; Molldén, Pia; Gustafsson, Britt; Qian, Hua; Li, Xiaoguang; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sadeghi, Behnam; Alheim, Mats; Ringdén, Olle

    2015-06-15

    Allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are widely used in regenerative medicine, but little is known about their immunogenicity. In this study, we monitored the therapeutic and immunogenic effects of decidual stromal cells (DSCs) from term placentas when used as a therapy for generalized severe junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) (previously termed Herlitz JEB), a lethal condition caused by the lack of functional laminin-332. An 11-month-old JEB patient was treated with five infusions of allogeneic DSCs within a 3-month period. Amniotic membranes (AMs) were applied to severe wounds. After the treatment, wounds started to heal in the middle of the blisters, but the improvements were transient. After two infusions of DSCs, the JEB patient had developed multispecific anti-HLA class-I antibodies. No antibodies to laminin-332 were detected, but the patient had high levels of anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies, which could bind to DSCs. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from the patient had a higher proliferative response to DSCs than to third-party PBMCs, which contrasts with the pattern observed in healthy donors. Human DSCs and MSCs induced similar xenoreactivity in mice. Two of 16 allogeneic stem cell-transplanted patients, treated with DSCs for graft-versus-host disease or hemorrhagic cystitis, showed a positive flow cytometric crossmatch test. One patient had anti-HLA antibodies before DSC infusion, whereas the other had no anti-HLA antibodies at any time. AM and DSC infusions may have improved the healing process in the JEB patient, but DSCs appeared to induce anti-HLA antibodies. The risk of alloimmunization by DSCs seems to be low in immunocompromised patients. PMID:25658253

  4. Risk Factors and Impact of Secondary Failure of Platelet Recovery After Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Yu; Kanda, Junya; Gomyo, Ayumi; Hayakawa, Jin; Komiya, Yusuke; Harada, Naonori; Kameda, Kazuaki; Ugai, Tomotaka; Wada, Hidenori; Ishihara, Yuko; Kawamura, Koji; Sakamoto, Kana; Sato, Miki; Terasako-Saito, Kiriko; Kimura, Shun-Ichi; Kikuchi, Misato; Nakasone, Hideki; Kako, Shinichi; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2016-09-01

    Secondary failure of platelet recovery (SFPR), a late decrease in the platelet count after primary platelet recovery that is not due to relapse or graft rejection, occasionally occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk factors and impact of SFPR on transplantation outcomes are not well known in the clinical setting. Therefore, we retrospectively evaluated 184 adult patients who underwent their first allogeneic HSCT and achieved primary platelet recovery. The cumulative incidence of SFPR, defined as a decrease in the platelet count to below 20,000/µL for more than 7 days, was 12.2% at 3 years, with a median onset of 81 days (range, 39 to 729) after HSCT. Among patients who developed SFPR (n = 23), 19 (82.6%) showed recovery to a sustained platelet count of more than 20,000/µL without transfusion support, and the median duration of SFPR was 23 days (range, 7 to 1048 days). A multivariate analysis showed that in vivo T cell depletion (hazard ratio [HR], 6.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.31 to 20.7; P < .001), grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (HR, 3.99; 95% CI, 1.52 to 10.5; P = .005), and the use of ganciclovir or valganciclovir (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.05 to 7.77; P = .039) were associated with an increased risk for SFPR. The occurrence of SFPR as a time-dependent covariate was significantly associated with inferior overall survival (HR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.18 to 4.46; P = .015) in a multivariate analysis. These findings may help to improve the management and treatment strategy for SFPR. PMID:27288954

  5. Comparative evaluation of techniques for the manufacturing of dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Dohnal, Alexander Michael; Graffi, Sebastian; Witt, Volker; Eichstill, Christina; Wagner, Dagmar; Ul-Haq, Sidrah; Wimmer, Doris; Felzmann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Manufacturing procedures for cellular therapies are continuously improved with particular emphasis on product safety. We previously developed a dendritic cell (DC) cancer vaccine technology platform that uses clinical grade lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-y for the maturation of monocyte derived DCs. DCs are frozen after 6 hrs exposure at a semi-mature stage (smDCs) retaining the capacity to secret interleukin (IL)-12 and thus support cytolytic T-cell responses, which is lost at full maturation. We compared closed systems for monocyte enrichment from leucocyte apheresis products from healthy individuals using plastic adherence, CD14 selection, or CD2/19 depletion with magnetic beads, or counter flow centrifugation (elutriation) using a clinical grade in comparison to a research grade culture medium for the following DC generation. We found that elutriation was superior compared to the other methods showing 36 ± 4% recovery, which was approximately 5-fold higher as the most frequently used adherence protocol (8 ± 1%), and a very good purity (92 ± 5%) of smDCs. Immune phenotype and IL-12 secretion (adherence: 1.4 ± 0.4; selection: 20 ± 0.6; depletion: 1 ±0.5; elutriation: 3.6 ± 1.5 ng/ml) as well as the potency of all DCs to stimulate T cells in an allogeneic mixed leucocyte reaction did not show statistically significant differences. Research grade and clinical grade DC culture media were equally potent and freezing did not impair the functions of smDCs. Finally, we assessed the functional capacity of DC cancer vaccines manufactured for three patients using this optimized procedure thereby demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing DC cancer vaccines that secret IL-12 (9.4 ± 6.4 ng/ml). We conclude that significant steps were taken here towards clinical grade DC cancer vaccine manufacturing. PMID:18363835

  6. Gangliosides inhibit the development from monocytes to dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    WÖLFL, M; BATTEN, W Y; POSOVSZKY, C; BERNHARD, H; BERTHOLD, F

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) development and function is critical in the initiation phase of any antigen-specific immune response against tumours. Impaired function of DC is one explanation as to how tumours escape immunosurveillance. In the presence of various soluble tumour-related factors DC precursors lose their ability to differentiate into mature DC and to activate T cells. Gangliosides are glycosphingolipids shed by tumours of neuroectodermal origin such as melanoma and neuroblastoma. In this investigation we address the question of whether gangliosides suppress the development and function of monocyte-derived DC in vitro. In the presence of gangliosides, the monocytic DC precursors showed increased adherence, cell spreading and a reduced number of dendrites. The expression of MHC class II molecules, co-stimulatory molecules and the GM-CSF receptor (CD116) on the ganglioside-treated DC was significantly reduced. Furthermore, the function of ganglioside-treated DC was impaired as observed in endocytosis, chemotactic and T cell proliferation assays. In contrast to monocytic DC precursors, mature DC were unaffected even when higher doses of gangliosides were added to the culture. With regard to their carbohydrate structure, five different gangliosides (GM2, GM3, GD2, GD3, GT1b), which are typically shed by melanoma and neuroblastoma, were tested for their ability to suppress DC development and function. Suppression was induced by GM2, but not by the other gangliosides. These data suggest that certain gangliosides impair DC precursors, implying a possible mechanism for tumour escape. PMID:12452834

  7. Resistivity and thickness effects in dendritic web silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, D. L.; Hwang, J. M.; Greggi, J.; Campbell, R. B.

    The decrease of minority carrier lifetime as resistivity decreases in dendritic-web silicon solar cells is addressed. This variation is shown to be consistent with the presence of defect levels in the bandgap which arise from extended defects in the web material. The extended defects are oxide precipitates (SiOx) and the dislocation cores they decorate. Sensitivity to this background distribution of defect levels increases with doping because the Fermi level moves closer to the majority carrier band edge. For high-resistivity dendritic-web silicon, which has a low concentration of these extended defects, cell efficiencies as high as 16.6 percent (4 sq cm, 40 ohm-cm boron-doped base, AM1.5 global, 100 mW/sq cm, 25 C JPL LAPSS1 measurement) and a corresponding electron lifetime of 38 microsec have been obtained. Thickness effects occur in bifacial cell designs and in designs which use light trapping. In some cases, the dislocation/precipitate defect can be passivated through the full thickness of web cells by hydrogen ion implantation.

  8. Resistivity and thickness effects in dendritic web silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Hwang, J. M.; Greggi, J.; Campbell, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    The decrease of minority carrier lifetime as resistivity decreases in dendritic-web silicon solar cells is addressed. This variation is shown to be consistent with the presence of defect levels in the bandgap which arise from extended defects in the web material. The extended defects are oxide precipitates (SiOx) and the dislocation cores they decorate. Sensitivity to this background distribution of defect levels increases with doping because the Fermi level moves closer to the majority carrier band edge. For high-resistivity dendritic-web silicon, which has a low concentration of these extended defects, cell efficiencies as high as 16.6 percent (4 sq cm, 40 ohm-cm boron-doped base, AM1.5 global, 100 mW/sq cm, 25 C JPL LAPSS1 measurement) and a corresponding electron lifetime of 38 microsec have been obtained. Thickness effects occur in bifacial cell designs and in designs which use light trapping. In some cases, the dislocation/precipitate defect can be passivated through the full thickness of web cells by hydrogen ion implantation.

  9. Ex vivo generation of interstitial and Langerhans cell-like dendritic cell subset-based vaccines for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hutten, Tim; Thordardottir, Soley; Hobo, Willemijn; Hübel, Jessica; van der Waart, Anniek B; Cany, Jeannette; Dolstra, Harry; Hangalapura, Basav N

    2014-06-01

    Autologous, patient-specific, monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDC) vaccines have been successfully applied in the clinical studies so far. However, the routine application of this strategy has been hampered by the difficulties in generating sufficient numbers of DC and the poor DC vaccine quality because of pathology or prior treatment received by the patients. The immunotherapeutic potential of other subsets of DC has not been thoroughly investigated because of their rarity in tissues and difficulties associated with their ex vivo generation. The high expansion and differentiation potential of CD34 hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB), into different DC subsets make them an attractive alternative DC source for cancer immunotherapy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to generate a large number of different DC subsets from CD34 HPC and evaluate their functionality in comparison with MoDC. Our culture protocol generated a clinically relevant number of mature CD1a myeloid DC and CD207 Langerhans cells (LC)-like DC subsets from CD34 HPC with >95% purity. Both DC subsets exhibited a cytokine profile that favors cytotoxic T-cell responses. Furthermore, UCB-DC and UCB-LC demonstrated superior induction of proliferation of both allogeneic as well as viral antigen-specific CD8 T cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Additional studies revealed that UCC-DC and UCB-LC can efficiently expand minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA) HA-1-specific cytotoxic T cells in the peripheral blood of leukemia patients and prime MiHA HA-1-specific and HA-2-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro. These preclinical findings support the pharmaceutical development of the described culture protocol for clinical evaluation. PMID:24810638

  10. Nectin-1 spots as a novel adhesion apparatus that tethers mitral cell lateral dendrites in a dendritic meshwork structure of the developing mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takahito; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Maruo, Tomohiko; Mandai, Kenji; Kimura, Kazushi; Kayahara, Tetsuro; Wang, Shujie; Itoh, Yu; Sai, Kousyoku; Mori, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku; Mizoguchi, Akira; Takai, Yoshimi

    2015-08-15

    Mitral cells project lateral dendrites that contact the lateral and primary dendrites of other mitral cells and granule cell dendrites in the external plexiform layer (EPL) of the olfactory bulb. These dendritic structures are critical for odor information processing, but it remains unknown how they are formed. In immunofluorescence microscopy, the immunofluorescence signal for the cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 was concentrated on mitral cell lateral dendrites in the EPL of the developing mouse olfactory bulb. In electron microscopy, the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were symmetrically localized on the plasma membranes at the contacts between mitral cell lateral dendrites, which showed bilateral darkening without dense cytoskeletal undercoats characteristic of puncta adherentia junctions. We named the contacts where the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were symmetrically accumulated "nectin-1 spots." The nectin-1 spots were 0.21 μm in length on average and the distance between the plasma membranes was 20.8 nm on average. In 3D reconstruction of serial sections, clusters of the nectin-1 spots formed a disc-like structure. In the mitral cell lateral dendrites of nectin-1-knockout mice, the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were undetectable and the plasma membrane darkening was electron-microscopically normalized, but the plasma membranes were partly separated from each other. The nectin-1 spots were further identified between mitral cell lateral and primary dendrites and between mitral cell lateral dendrites and granule cell dendritic spine necks. These results indicate that the nectin-1 spots constitute a novel adhesion apparatus that tethers mitral cell dendrites in a dendritic meshwork structure of the developing mouse olfactory bulb. PMID:25967681

  11. Correlation of Pain and Fluoride Concentration in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients on Voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Barajas, Megan R; McCullough, Kristen B; Merten, Julianna A; Dierkhising, Ross A; Bartoo, Gabriel T; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Hogan, William J; Litzow, Mark R; Patnaik, Mrinal M; Wilson, John W; Wolf, Robert C; Wermers, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Supportive care guidelines recommend antimold prophylaxis in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients deemed to have high risk for invasive fungal infection, leading to long-term use of voriconazole after allogeneic HSCT in patients who remain immunocompromised. Voriconazole has been associated with periostitis, exostoses, and fluoride excess in patients after solid organ transplantation, HSCT, and leukemia therapy. The aims of this study were to describe the frequency and clinical presentation of patients presenting with pain and fluoride excess among allogeneic HSCT patients taking voriconazole, to identify when a plasma fluoride concentration was measured with respect to voriconazole initiation and onset of pain, and to describe the outcomes of patients with fluoride excess in the setting of HSCT. A retrospective review was conducted of all adult allogeneic HSCT patients receiving voriconazole at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, between January 1, 2009 and July 31, 2012. Of 242 patients included, 32 had plasma fluoride measured to explore the etiology of musculoskeletal pain. In 31 patients with fluoride measurement while on voriconazole, 29 (93.5%) had elevated levels. The median plasma fluoride was 11.1 μmol/L (range, 2.4 to 24.7). The median duration of voriconazole was 163 days (range, 2 to 1327). The median time to fluoride measurement was 128 days after voriconazole initiation (range, 28 to 692). At 1 year after the start of voriconazole after HSCT, 15.3% of patients had developed pain associated with voriconazole use and 35.7% developed pain while on voriconazole after 2 years. Of the patients with an elevated fluoride level, 22 discontinued voriconazole; pain resolved or improved in 15, stabilized in 3, and worsened in 4 patients. Ten patients continued voriconazole; pain resolved or improved in 7, was attributable to alternative causes in 2, and undefined in 1. Serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, alkaline phosphatase

  12. Correlation and Agreement of Handheld Spirometry with Laboratory Spirometry in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guang-Shing; Campbell, Angela P; Xie, Hu; Stednick, Zach; Callais, Cheryl; Leisenring, Wendy M; Englund, Janet A; Chien, Jason W; Boeckh, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Early detection of subclinical lung function decline may help identify allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients who are at increased risk for late noninfectious pulmonary complications, including bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. We evaluated the use of handheld spirometry in this population. Allogeneic HCT recipients enrolled in a single-center observational trial performed weekly spirometry with a handheld spirometer for 1 year after transplantation. Participants performed pulmonary function tests in an outpatient laboratory setting at 3 time points: before transplantation, at day 80 after transplantation, and at 1 year after transplantation. Correlation between the 2 methods was assessed by Pearson and Spearman correlations; agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. A total of 437 subjects had evaluable pulmonary function tests. Correlation for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was r = .954 (P < .0001) at day 80 and r = .931 (P < .0001) at 1 year when the handheld and laboratory tests were performed within 1 day of each other. Correlation for handheld forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6) with laboratory forced vital capacity was r = .914 (P < .0001) at day 80 and r = .826 (P < .0001) at 1 year. The bias, or the mean difference (handheld minus laboratory), for FEV1 at day 80 and 1 year was -.13 L (limits of agreement, -.63 to .37) and -.10 L (limits of agreement, -.77 to .56), respectively. FEV6 showed greater bias at day 80 (-.51 L [limits of agreement, -1.44 to .42]) and 1 year (-.40 L [limits of agreement, -1.81 to 1.01]). Handheld spirometry correlated well with laboratory spirometry after allogeneic HCT and may be useful for self-monitoring of patients for early identification of airflow obstruction. PMID:26748162

  13. Dendritic cells from human mesenteric lymph nodes in inflammatory and non-inflammatory bowel diseases: subsets and function of plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hostmann, Arwed; Kapp, Kerstin; Beutner, Marianne; Ritz, Jörg-Peter; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Ignatius, Ralf; Duchmann, Rainer; Daum, Severin; Gröne, Jörn; Hotz, Hubert; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Zeitz, Martin; Ullrich, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) may be important regulators of both inflammatory and non-inflammatory mucosal immune responses but human studies are rare. Here we compare pDC from human MLN and peripheral blood (PB) by phenotype and function. MLN from patients with or without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) undergoing colon surgery and PB from patients with IBD and from controls were used to isolate mononuclear cells. The pDC were analysed by flow cytometry for the expression of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CCR6, CCR7, CX3CR1, CD103 and HLA-DR. Purified pDC from MLN and PB were stimulated with staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB), CpG-A, interleukin-3 (IL-3), SEB + IL-3, CpG-A + IL-3 or left unstimulated, and cultured alone or with purified allogeneic CD4+ CD45RA+ HLA-DR- T cells. Subsequently, concentrations of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, interferon-α (IFN-α), IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in culture supernatants were determined by multiplex bead array. The PB pDC from IBD patients exhibited an activated and matured phenotype whereas MLN pDC and control PB pDC were less activated. CpG-A and CpG-A + IL-3-stimulated MLN pDC secreted less IL-6 and TNF-α compared with PB pDC from controls. Compared with co-cultures of naive CD4 T cells with PB pDC, co-cultures with MLN pDC contained more IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ when stimulated with SEB and SEB + IL-3, and less IFN-α when stimulated with CpG-A. MLN pDC differ phenotypically from PB pDC and their pattern of cytokine secretion and may contribute to specific outcomes of mucosal immune reactions. PMID:23278129

  14. Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in primary dendritic cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Langhoff, E; Terwilliger, E F; Bos, H J; Kalland, K H; Poznansky, M C; Bacon, O M; Haseltine, W A

    1991-01-01

    The ability of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to replicate in primary blood dendritic cells was investigated. Dendritic cells compose less than 1% of the circulating leukocytes and are nondividing cells. Highly purified preparations of dendritic cells were obtained using recent advances in cell fractionation. The results of these experiments show that dendritic cells, in contrast to monocytes and T cells, support the active replication of all strains of HIV-1 tested, including T-cell tropic and monocyte/macrophage tropic isolates. The dendritic cell cultures supported much more virus production than did cultures of primary unseparated T cells, CD4+ T cells, and adherent as well as nonadherent monocytes. Replication of HIV-1 in dendritic cells produces no noticeable cytopathic effect nor does it decrease total cell number. The ability of the nonreplicating dendritic cells to support high levels of replication of HIV-1 suggests that this antigen-presenting cell population, which is also capable of supporting clonal T-cell growth, may play a central role in HIV pathogenesis, serving as a source of continued infection of CD4+ T cells and as a reservoir of virus infection. Images PMID:1910172

  15. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  16. Targeting dendritic cells: a promising strategy to improve vaccine effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Macri, Christophe; Dumont, Claire; Johnston, Angus PR; Mintern, Justine D

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) targeting is a novel strategy to enhance vaccination efficacy. This approach is based on the in situ delivery of antigen via antibodies that are specific for endocytic receptors expressed at the surface of DCs. Here we review the complexity of the DC subsets and the antigen presentation pathways that need to be considered in the settings of DC targeting. We also summarize current knowledge about antigen delivery to DCs via DEC-205, Clec9A and Clec12A, receptor targets that strongly enhance cellular and humoral immune responses. Finally, we discuss the intracellular trafficking criteria of the targeted receptors that may impact their effectiveness as DC targets. PMID:27217957

  17. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma Mediastinum - a case report.

    PubMed

    Bushan, Kirti

    2014-12-01

    Follicular dendritic cell tumor (FDCT) are extremely rare difficult to diagnose category tumors.There has been a considerable controversy in medical community regarding precise classification and optimal management of this tumor with some treating it as a form of non Hodgkins lymphoma and some as soft tissue sarcomas.The number of published cases are still low and documentation too heterogenous to give statistically ified therapeutic recommendation of these tumors.This case report aims to highlight various aspects of diagnosing and treating this rare entity. PMID:25767341

  18. Hematopoietic mixed chimerism derived from allogeneic embryonic stem cells prevents autoimmune diabetes mellitus in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Verda, Larissa; Kim, Duck An; Ikehara, Susumu; Statkute, Laisvyde; Bronesky, Delphine; Petrenko, Yevgeniya; Oyama, Yu; He, Xiang; Link, Charles; Vahanian, Nicholas N; Burt, Richard K

    2008-02-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), unlike HSC harvested from the blood or marrow, are not contaminated by lymphocytes. We therefore evaluated whether ESC-derived HSC could produce islet cell tolerance, a phenomenon termed graft versus autoimmunity (GVA), without causing the usual allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant complication, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Herein, we demonstrate that ESC-derived HSC may be used to prevent autoimmune diabetes mellitus in NOD mice without GVHD or other adverse side effects. ESC were cultured in vitro to induce differentiation toward HSC, selected for c-kit expression, and injected either i.v. or intra-bone marrow (IBM) into sublethally irradiated NOD/LtJ mice. Nine of 10 mice from the IBM group and 5 of 8 from the i.v. group did not become hyperglycemic, in contrast to the control group, in which 8 of 9 mice developed end-stage diabetes. All mice with >5% donor chimerism remained free of diabetes and insulitis, which was confirmed by histology. Splenocytes from transplanted mice were unresponsive to glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65, a diabetic-specific autoantigen, but responded normally to third-party antigens. ESC-derived HSC can induce an islet cell tolerizing GVA effect without GVHD. This study represents the first instance, to our knowledge, of ESC-derived HSC cells treating disease in an animal model. PMID:17975228

  19. Antibody-Functionalized Peptidic Membranes for Neutralization of Allogeneic Skin Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Liu, Wen; Bagia, Christina; Zhang, Shaojuan; Bai, Mingfeng; Janjic, Jelena M.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gawalt, Ellen S.; Meng, Wilson S.

    2014-01-01

    We report herein application of an in situ material strategy to attenuate allograft T cell responses in a skin transplant mouse model. Functionalized peptidic membranes were used to impede trafficking of donor antigen-presenting cells (dAPCs) from skin allografts in recipient mice. Membranes formed by self-assembling peptides (SAPs) presenting antibodies were found to remain underneath grafted skins for up to 6 days. At the host-graft interface, dAPCs were targeted by using a monoclonal antibody that binds to a class II MHC molecule (IAd) expressed exclusively by donor cells. Using a novel cell labeling near-infrared nanoemulsion, we found more dAPCs remained in allografts treated with membranes loaded with aI-Ad than without. In vitro, dAPCs released from skin explants were found adsorbed preferentially on aI-Ad membranes. Recipient T cells from these mice produced lower concentrations of interferon-gamma cultured ex vivo with donor cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the strategy has the potential to alter the natural course of rejection immune mechanisms in stringent allogeneic models. PMID:25117952

  20. CXCR4-Related Increase of Circulating Human Lymphoid Progenitors after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Glauzy, Salomé; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Larghero, Jérôme; Ezine, Sophie; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Moins-Teisserenc, Hélène; Servais, Sophie; Robin, Marie; Socié, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Immune recovery after profound lymphopenia is a major challenge in many clinical situations, such as allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Recovery depends, in a first step, on hematopoietic lymphoid progenitors production in the bone marrow (BM). In this study, we characterized CD34+Lin−CD10+ lymphoid progenitors in the peripheral blood of allo-HSCT patients. Our data demonstrate a strong recovery of this population 3 months after transplantation. This rebound was abolished in patients who developed acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). A similar recovery profile was found for both CD24+ and CD24− progenitor subpopulations. CD34+lin−CD10+CD24− lymphoid progenitors sorted from allo-HSCT patients preserved their T cell potentiel according to in vitro T-cell differentiation assay and the expression profile of 22 genes involved in T-cell differentiation and homing. CD34+lin−CD10+CD24− cells from patients without aGVHD had reduced CXCR4 gene expression, consistent with an enhanced egress from the BM. CCR7 gene expression was reduced in patients after allo-HSCT, as were its ligands CCL21 and CCL19. This reduction was particularly marked in patients with aGVHD, suggesting a possible impact on thymic homing. Thus, the data presented here identify this population as an important early step in T cell reconstitution in humans and so, an important target when seeking to enhance immune reconstitution. PMID:24621606

  1. Changes in human dendritic cell number and function in severe obesity may contribute to increased susceptibility to viral infection.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, D; Corrigan, M; Dunne, M R; Jackson, R; Woods, C; Gaoatswe, G; Moynagh, P N; O'Connell, J; Hogan, A E

    2013-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key immune sentinels linking the innate and adaptive immune systems. DCs recognise danger signals and initiate T-cell tolerance, memory and polarisation. They are critical cells in responding to a viral illness. Obese individuals have been shown to have an impaired response to vaccinations against virally mediated conditions and to have an increased susceptibility to multi-organ failure in response to viral illness. We investigated if DCs are altered in an obese cohort (mean body mass index 51.7±7.3 kg m(-2)), ultimately resulting in differential T-cell responses. Circulating DCs were found to be significantly decreased in the obese compared with the lean cohort (0.82% vs 2.53%). Following Toll-like receptor stimulation, compared with lean controls, DCs generated from the obese cohort upregulated significantly less CD83 (40% vs 17% mean fluorescence intensity), a molecule implicated in the elicitation of T-cell responses, particularly viral responses. Obese DCs produced twofold more of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 than lean controls, and in turn stimulated fourfold more IL-4-production from allogenic naive T cells. We conclude that obesity negatively impacts the ability of DCs to mature and elicit appropriate T-cell responses to a general stimulus. This may contribute to the increased susceptibility to viral infection observed in severe obesity. PMID:23439322

  2. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens. PMID:23426134

  3. Modulation of dendritic cell maturation and function by B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Hermine, Olivier; Tough, David F; Kaveri, Srini V

    2005-07-01

    Investigating the signals that regulate the function of dendritic cells (DC), the sentinels of the immune system, is critical to understanding the role of DC in the regulation of immune responses. Accumulating lines of evidence indicate that in addition to innate stimuli and T cell-derived signals, B lymphocytes exert a profound regulatory effect in vitro and in vivo on the Ag-presenting function of DC. The identification of B cells as a cellular source of cytokines, chemokines, and autoantibodies that are critically involved in the process of maturation, migration, and function of DC provides a rationale for immunotherapeutic intervention of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions by targeting B cells. Conversely, efficient cross-presentation of Ags by DC pulsed with immune complexes provides an alternative approach in the immunotherapy of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:15972625

  4. Engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow following administration of anti-T cell monoclonal antibodies and low-dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sharabi, Y.; Sachs, D.H.

    1989-02-01

    A nonlethal conditioning regimen involving administration of mAb in vivo, low-dose WBI and 700 rads of thymic irradiation, permits engraftment of T cell-depleted allogeneic BM. Engraftment of class I + II disparate allogeneic BM after conditioning with this regimen required depletion of both L3T4 and Lyt2 host T cell subsets in vivo. Treatment with a combination of specific mAbs to each subset (GK1.5 plus 2.43) was more effective than treatment with an anti-Thy1 mAb (30-H12). The low incidence of engraftment after 30-H12 treatment is probably due to reduced efficiency of 30-H12 in depletion of host alloreactive cell populations rather than an effect of this mAb on a particular population of donor cells that are important for engraftment.

  5. Hepatic stellate cells undermine the allostimulatory function of liver myeloid dendritic cells via STAT3-dependent induction of IDO

    PubMed Central

    Sumpter, Tina L.; Dangi, Anil; Matta, Benjamin M.; Huang, Chao; Stolz, Donna B.; Vodovotz, Yoram; Thomson, Angus W.; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical for hepatic wound repair and tissue remodeling. They also produce cytokines and chemokines that may contribute to the maintenance of hepatic immune homeostasis and the inherent tolerogenicity of the liver. The functional relationship between HSCs and the professional migratory APCs in the liver, i.e. dendritic cells (DCs), has not been evaluated. Here, we report that murine liver DCs co-localize with HSCs in vivo under normal, steady-state conditions, and cluster with HSCs in vitro. In vitro, HSCs secrete high levels of DC chemoattractants, such as MIP1α and MCP-1, as well as cytokines that modulate DC activation, including TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β. Culture of HSCs with conventional liver myeloid (m) DCs resulted in increased IL-6 and IL-10 secretion compared to that of either cell population alone. Co-culture also resulted in enhanced expression of co-stimulatory (CD80, CD86) and co-inhibitory (B7-H1) molecules on mDCs. HSC-induced mDC maturation required cell-cell contact and could be blocked, in part, by neutralizing MIP1α or MCP-1. HSC-induced mDC maturation was dependent on activation of STAT3 in mDCs and in part on HSC-secreted IL-6. Despite up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules, mDCs conditioned by HSCs demonstrated impaired ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation, which was independent of B7-H1, but dependent upon HSC-induced STAT3 activation and subsequent up-regulation of IDO. In conclusion, by promoting IDO expression, HSCs may act as potent regulators of liver mDCs and function to maintain hepatic homeostasis and tolerogenicity. PMID:22962681

  6. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis and apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The induction of specific CD8+ Tlymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. This process is however, often sub-optimal, in part due to tumor-induced DC dysfunction. Instead of DC that can become mature and activated and have a potent antigen-presenting and immune stimulating phenotype, immature dendritic cells (iDC) are often found in tumors and are part of an immunosuppressive milieu including regulatory T-cells and immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL10. We here report on the use of a potent DC activating agent, an oligonucleotide (ODN) that contains a non-methylated CpG motif and acts as an agonist of toll like receptor (TLR) 9. TLR activation is a danger signal to notify the immune system of the presence of invading pathogens. CpG-ODN (but not scrambled non-CpG ODN) increased bone-marrow DC activation after exposure to PDT-killed tumor cells, and significantly increased tumor response to PDT and mouse survival after peri-tumoral administration. CpG may be a valuable immunoadjuvant to PDT especially for tumors that produce DC dysfunction.

  7. A multifunctional core-shell nanoparticle for dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Cheong, Taek-Chin; Min, Ji Hyun; Wu, Jun Hua; Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Daehong; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Sanguk; Kim, Young Keun; Seong, Seung-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires tumour antigens to be delivered efficiently into dendritic cells and their migration to be monitored in vivo. Nanoparticles have been explored as carriers for antigen delivery, but applications have been limited by the toxicity of the solvents used to make nanoparticles, and by the need to use transfection agents to deliver nanoparticles into cells. Here we show that an iron oxide-zinc oxide core-shell nanoparticle can deliver carcinoembryonic antigen into dendritic cells while simultaneously acting as an imaging agent. The nanoparticle-antigen complex is efficiently taken up by dendritic cells within one hour and can be detected in vitro by confocal microscopy and in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Mice immunized with dendritic cells containing the nanoparticle-antigen complex showed enhanced tumour antigen specific T-cell responses, delayed tumour growth and better survival than controls.

  8. Late Mortality and Causes of Death among Long-Term Survivors after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Atsuta, Yoshiko; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Nakasone, Hideki; Kurosawa, Saiko; Oshima, Kumi; Sakai, Rika; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Takahashi, Satoshi; Mori, Takehiko; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Fukuda, Takahiro; Kanamori, Heiwa; Morishima, Yasuo; Kato, Koji; Yabe, Hiromasa; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Yamashita, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    We sought to assess the late mortality risks and causes of death among long-term survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). The cases of 11,047 relapse-free survivors of a first HCT at least 2 years after HCT were analyzed. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated and specific causes of death were compared with those of the Japanese population. Among relapse-free survivors at 2 years, overall survival percentages at 10 and 15 years were 87% and 83%, respectively. The overall risk of mortality was significantly higher compared with that of the general population. The risk of mortality was significantly higher from infection (SMR = 57.0), new hematologic malignancies (SMR = 2.2), other new malignancies (SMR = 3.0), respiratory causes (SMR = 109.3), gastrointestinal causes (SMR = 3.8), liver dysfunction (SMR = 6.1), genitourinary dysfunction (SMR = 17.6), and external or accidental causes (SMR = 2.3). The overall annual mortality rate showed a steep decrease from 2 to 5 years after HCT; however, the decrease rate slowed after 10 years but was still higher than that of the general population at 20 years after HCT. SMRs in the earlier period of 2 to 4 years after HCT and 5 years or longer after HCT were 16.1 and 7.4, respectively. Long-term survivors after allogeneic HCT are at higher risk of mortality from various causes other than the underlying disease that led to HCT. Screening and preventive measures should be given a central role in reducing the morbidity and mortality of HCT recipients on long-term follow-up. PMID:27246369

  9. Intraarticular Injection of Allogenic Mesenchymal Stem Cells has a Protective Role for the Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Zhu, Tian-Yue; Wen, Li-Cheng; Cao, Yong-Ping; Liu, Chao; Cui, Yun-Peng; Meng, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Researchers initially proposed the substitution of apoptotic chondrocytes in the superficial cartilage by injecting mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) intraarticularly. This effect was termed as bio-resurfacing. Little evidence supporting the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) by the delivery of a MSC suspension exists. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of injecting allogenic MSCs intraarticularly in a rat OA model and to evaluate the influence of immobility on the effects of this treatment. Methods: We established a rat knee OA model after 4 and 6 weeks and cultured primary bone marrow MSCs. A MSC suspension was injected into the articular space once per week for 3 weeks. A subgroup of knee joints was immobilized for 3 days after each injection, while the remaining joints were nonimmobilized. We used toluidine blue staining, Mankin scores, and TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling staining to evaluate the therapeutic effect of the injections. Comparisons between the therapy side and the control side of the knee joint were made using paired t-test, and comparisons between the immobilized and nonimmobilized subgroups were made using the unpaired t-test. A P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The three investigative approaches revealed less degeneration on the therapy sides of the knee joints than the control sides in both the 4- and 6-week groups (P < 0.05), regardless of immobilization. No significant differences were observed between the immobilized and nonimmobilized subgroups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Therapy involving the intraarticular injection of allogenic MSCs promoted cartilage repair in a rat arthritis model, and 3-day immobility after injection had little effect on this therapy. PMID:26365972

  10. Hepatic injury after nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: a study of 193 patients.

    PubMed

    Hogan, William J; Maris, Michael; Storer, Barry; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Maloney, David G; Schoch, H Gary; Woolfrey, Ann E; Shulman, Howard M; Storb, Rainer; McDonald, George B

    2004-01-01

    Liver injury is a frequent, serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following myeloablative preparative regimens. We sought to determine the frequency and severity of hepatic injury after nonmyeloablative conditioning and its relationship to outcomes. One hundred ninety-three consecutive patients who received 2 Gy total body irradiation with or without fludarabine were evaluated for end points related to liver injury. Patients with diseases treatable by HCT who were ineligible for conventional myeloablative allogeneic HCT because of advanced age and/or comorbid conditions were included. Fifty-one patients (26%) developed hyperbilirubinemia of 68.4 microM (4 mg/dL) or greater, most commonly resulting from cholestasis due to graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or sepsis. Pretransplantation factors associated with liver dysfunction were a diagnosis of aggressive malignancy (hazard ratio [HR] 1.9; P =.04) and the inclusion of fludarabine in the conditioning regimen (HR 1.8; P =.07). Overall survival at 1 year was superior for patients who had maximal serum bilirubin levels in the normal (78%) or minimally elevated (22.23-66.69 microM [1.3-3.9 mg/dL]) ranges (69%) compared with those in the 68.4 to 117.99 microM (4-6.9 mg/dL; 20%), 119.7 to 169.29 microM (7.0-9.9 mg/dL; 17%), and 171.0 microM (10 mg/dL; 19%) or greater groups. In summary, significant jaundice occurred in 26% of patients and was predominantly due to cholestasis resulting from GVHD and/or sepsis. Aggressive malignancies (mainly advanced disease) and later development of jaundice after transplantation predicted inferior survival. PMID:12969980

  11. Prognostic Utility of Routine Chimerism Testing at 2 – 6 Months after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mossallam, Ghada I.; Kamel, Azza M.; Storer, Barry; Martin, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The utility of routine chimerism analysis as a prognostic indicator of subsequent outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with myeloablative conditioning regimens remains controversial. To address this controversy, routine chimerism test results at 2 – 6 months after HCT with myeloablative conditioning regimens were evaluated for association with subsequent risks of chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse and overall mortality. Only 70 (5%) of 1304 patients had <95% donor-derived cells in the marrow. Low donor chimerism in the marrow occurred predominantly among patients with low risk disease as compared to higher risk diseases and was significantly associated with a reduced risk of chronic GVHD. Among 673 patients tested, 164 (24%) had <85% donor-derived T cells in the blood. Low donor T cell chimerism occurred predominantly among patients with low risk disease as compared to higher risk diseases, among those who had conditioning with busulfan as compared to TBI, and among those with lower grades of acute GVHD. Low donor T cell chimerism in the blood was significantly associated with a reduced risk of chronic GVHD, but not with the risks of relapse, NRM or overall mortality. Routine testing of chimerism in the marrow and blood at 2 – 6 months after HCT with myeloablative conditioning regimens may be helpful in documenting engraftment in clinical trials but provides only limited prognostic information in clinical practice. PMID:19203726

  12. Differential Gene Expression in Adipose Stem Cells Cultured in Allogeneic Human Serum Versus Fetal Bovine Serum

    PubMed Central

    Aho, Kaisa-Leena; Kuokkanen, Hannu; Räty, Sari; Huhtala, Heini; Lemponen, Riina; Yli-Harja, Olli; Suuronen, Riitta; Miettinen, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    In preclinical studies, human adipose stem cells (ASCs) have been shown to have therapeutic applicability, but standard expansion methods for clinical applications remain yet to be established. ASCs are typically expanded in the medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS). However, sera and other animal-derived culture reagents stage safety issues in clinical therapy, including possible infections and severe immune reactions. By expanding ASCs in the medium containing human serum (HS), the problem can be eliminated. To define how allogeneic HS (alloHS) performs in ASC expansion compared to FBS, a comparative in vitro study in both serum supplements was performed. The choice of serum had a significant effect on ASCs. First, to reach cell proliferation levels comparable with 10% FBS, at least 15% alloHS was required. Second, while genes of the cell cycle pathway were overexpressed in alloHS, genes of the bone morphogenetic protein receptor–mediated signaling on the transforming growth factor beta signaling pathway regulating, for example, osteoblast differentiation, were overexpressed in FBS. The result was further supported by differentiation analysis, where early osteogenic differentiation was significantly enhanced in FBS. The data presented here underscore the importance of thorough investigation of ASCs for utilization in cell therapies. This study is a step forward in the understanding of these potential cells. PMID:20184435

  13. Outcomes of Autologous or Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Nishitha M.; Oluwole, Olalekan; Greer, John P.; Engelhardt, Brian G.; Jagasia, Madan H.; Savani, Bipin N.

    2016-01-01

    Transplant outcomes of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) have not been elucidated as a single cohort in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We analyzed the outcomes of 270 adult recipients receiving auto (n=198) or allo-SCT (n=72) for NHL between year 2000 and 2010. Five-year overall survival for B-cell and T-cell NHL were 58% and 50%, respectively (allo-SCT 51% vs. 54% for B and T-cell NHL, and auto-SCT 60% vs. 47% for B and T-cell lymphoma, respectively) (p=NS). In multivariate analysis, number of chemotherapy regimens and disease status pre-SCT were independently associated with long-term outcome after SCT (for both auto and allo-SCT). We conclude that based on patient selection and disease related factors, the type of transplantation offered to patients can achieve long term survival highlighting the importance of further improvement in disease control and reducing procedure related mortality. The role of transplantation needs to be reevaluated in the era of targeted therapy. PMID:24096123

  14. Radiologically guided fine needle lung biopsies in the evaluation of focal pulmonary lesions in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, E; Piilonen, A; Volin, L; Ruutu, P; Parkkali, T; Koukila-Kähkölä, P; Ruutu, T

    2002-02-01

    Lung problems are common in allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) recipients. To evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic yield of radiologically guided fine needle lung biopsy (FNLB) in allogeneic SCT recipients with focal pulmonary lesions, a retrospective analysis was carried out. Between 1989 and 1998, radiologists performed a total of 30 FNLBs in 21 allogeneic SCT recipients, guided either by ultrasound (n = 17) or computed tomography (n = 13). The median time from SCT to the first FNLB was 131 days (20-343 days). Prophylactic platelet transfusions were given in 19 procedures (66%). The complications of FNLB included clinically insignificant pneumothorax in four procedures (13%) and self-limiting haemoptysis in one case (3%). The first FNLB was suggestive of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in five patients (24%). Additional clinically useful findings of FNLB included Pseudomonas (two patients) and Nocardia (one patient). The final diagnosis of pulmonary lesions was IPA in 14 patients, immunological lung problems in four patients and other in three patients. Radiologically guided FNLB is feasible in allogeneic SCT recipients and has a low complication rate. The diagnostic yield is high especially for IPA. PMID:11896433

  15. Immunohistochemical detection of dendritic cell markers in cattle.

    PubMed

    Romero-Palomo, F; Risalde, M A; Molina, V; Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Pedrera, M; Gómez-Villamandos, J C

    2013-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are "professional" antigen-presenting cells with a critical role in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses and thus have been considered of great interest in the study of a variety of infectious diseases. The objective of this investigation was to characterize the in vivo distribution of DCs in bovine tissues by using potential DC markers to establish a basis for the study of DCs in diseased tissues. Markers evaluated included MHCII, CD208, CD1b, CD205, CNA.42, and S100 protein, the latter 2 being expressed by follicular dendritic cells whose origin and role are different from the rest of hematopoietic DCs. Paraffin wax-embedded tissues from 6 healthy Friesian calves were subjected to the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method, and the most appropriate fixatives, dilutions, and antigen retrieval pretreatments were studied for each of the primary antibodies. The most significant results included the localization of CD208-positive cells not only in the T zone of lymphoid organs but also within lymphoid follicles; CD1b-positive cells were mainly found in thymus and interfollicular areas of some lymph nodes; cells stained with anti-CD205 antibody were scarce, and their location was mainly in nonlymphoid tissues; and CNA.42- and S100 protein-positive cells localized in primary lymphoid follicles and light zones of germinal centers, although showing differences in the staining pattern. Furthermore, MHCII was established as one of the most sensitive markers for any DC of hematopoietic origin. These results increase our understanding of DC immunolabeling and will help in future DC studies of both healthy and diseased tissues. PMID:23528943

  16. Dysregulated Circulating Dendritic Cell Function in Ulcerative Colitis Is Partially Restored by Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Elizabeth R.; You, Jialu; Horneffer-van der Sluis, Verena; Omar Al-Hassi, Hafid; Landy, Jon; Peake, Simon T.; Thomas, Linda V.; Tee, Cheng T.; Hart, Ailsa L.; Knight, Stella C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dendritic cells regulate immune responses to microbial products and play a key role in ulcerative colitis (UC) pathology. We determined the immunomodulatory effects of probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) on human DC from healthy controls and active UC patients. Methods. Human blood DC from healthy controls (control-DC) and UC patients (UC-DC) were conditioned with heat-killed LcS and used to stimulate allogeneic T cells in a 5-day mixed leucocyte reaction. Results. UC-DC displayed a reduced stimulatory capacity for T cells (P < 0.05) and enhanced expression of skin-homing markers CLA and CCR4 on stimulated T cells (P < 0.05) that were negative for gut-homing marker β7. LcS treatment restored the stimulatory capacity of UC-DC, reflecting that of control-DC. LcS treatment conditioned control-DC to induce CLA on T cells in conjunction with β7, generating a multihoming profile, but had no effects on UC-DC. Finally, LcS treatment enhanced DC ability to induce TGFβ production by T cells in controls but not UC patients. Conclusions. We demonstrate a systemic, dysregulated DC function in UC that may account for the propensity of UC patients to develop cutaneous manifestations. LcS has multifunctional immunoregulatory activities depending on the inflammatory state; therapeutic effects reported in UC may be due to promotion of homeostasis. PMID:23970814

  17. Collagen Induces Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Signaling through Osteoclast-Associated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Heidi S.; Nitze, Louise M.; Zeuthen, Louise H.; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J.; Hamilton, John A.; Berchtold, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB–dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR–collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs. PMID:25725106

  18. Haploidentical Natural Killer Cells Infused before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Myeloid Malignancies: A Phase I Trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dean A; Denman, Cecele J; Rondon, Gabriela; Woodworth, Glenda; Chen, Julianne; Fisher, Tobi; Kaur, Indreshpal; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Cao, Kai; Ciurea, Stefan; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E

    2016-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for high-risk myeloid malignancies, but relapse remains the major post-transplantation cause of treatment failure. Alloreactive natural killer (NK) cells mediate a potent antileukemic effect and may also enhance engraftment and reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Haploidentical transplantations provide a setting in which NK cell alloreactivity can be manipulated, but they are associated with high rates of GVHD. We performed a phase I study infusing escalating doses of NK cells from an HLA haploidentical-related donor-selected for alloreactivity when possible-as a component of the preparative regimen for allotransplantation from a separate HLA-identical donor. The goal of infusing third-party alloreactive NK cells was to augment the antileukemic effect of the transplantation without worsening GVHD and, thus, improve the overall outcome of hematopoietic transplantation. Twenty-one patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or chronic myelogenous leukemia refractory or beyond first remission received a preparative regimen with busulfan and fludarabine followed by infusion of apheresis-derived, antibody-selected, and IL-2-activated NK cells. Doses were initially based on total nucleated cell (TNC) content and later based on CD56(+) cells to reduce variability. CD56(+) content ranged from .02 to 8.32 × 10(6)/kg. IL-2, .5 × 10(6) units/m(2) subcutaneously was administered daily for 5 days in the final cohort (n = 10). CD3(+) cells in the NK cell product were required to be < 10(5)/kg. Median relapse-free, overall, and GVHD-free/relapse-free survival for all patients enrolled was 102, 233, and 89 days, respectively. Five patients are alive, 5 patients died of transplantation-related causes, and 11 patients died of relapse. Despite the small sample size, survival was highly associated with CD56(+) cells delivered (P = .022) and development of

  19. Follicular Dendritic Cells Retain Infectious HIV in Cycling Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Heesters, Balthasar A.; Lindqvist, Madelene; Vagefi, Parsia A.; Scully, Eileen P.; Schildberg, Frank A.; Altfeld, Marcus; Walker, Bruce D.; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Carroll, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), it does not cure Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and discontinuation results in viral rebound. Follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are in direct contact with CD4+ T cells and they retain intact antigen for prolonged periods. We found that human FDC isolated from patients on ART retain infectious HIV within a non-degradative cycling compartment and transmit infectious virus to uninfected CD4 T cells in vitro. Importantly, treatment of the HIV+ FDC with a soluble complement receptor 2 purges the FDC of HIV virions and prevents viral transmission in vitro. Our results provide an explanation for how FDC can retain infectious HIV for extended periods and suggest a therapeutic strategy to achieve cure in HIV-infected humans. PMID:26623655

  20. Dendritic cells and macrophages in the genitourinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, N; Thompson, JM; Iwasaki, A

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that are important in innate immune defense as well as in the generation and regulation of adaptive immunity against a wide array of pathogens. The genitourinary (GU) tract, which serves an important reproductive function, is constantly exposed to numerous agents of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). To combat these STIs, several subsets of DCs and macrophages are strategically localized within the GU tract. In the female genital mucosa, recruitment and function of these APCs are uniquely governed by sex hormones. This review summarizes the latest advances in our understanding of DCs and macrophages in the GU tract with respect to their subsets, lineage, and function. In addition, we discuss the divergent roles of these cells in immune defense against STIs as well as in maternal tolerance to the fetus. PMID:19079212

  1. Polysialylation controls dendritic cell trafficking by regulating chemokine recognition.

    PubMed

    Kiermaier, Eva; Moussion, Christine; Veldkamp, Christopher T; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; de Vries, Ingrid; Williams, Larry G; Chaffee, Gary R; Phillips, Andrew J; Freiberger, Friedrich; Imre, Richard; Taleski, Deni; Payne, Richard J; Braun, Asolina; Förster, Reinhold; Mechtler, Karl; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Volkman, Brian F; Sixt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The addition of polysialic acid to N- and/or O-linked glycans, referred to as polysialylation, is a rare posttranslational modification that is mainly known to control the developmental plasticity of the nervous system. Here we show that CCR7, the central chemokine receptor controlling immune cell trafficking to secondary lymphatic organs, carries polysialic acid. This modification is essential for the recognition of the CCR7 ligand CCL21. As a consequence, dendritic cell trafficking is abrogated in polysialyltransferase-deficient mice, manifesting as disturbed lymph node homeostasis and unresponsiveness to inflammatory stimuli. Structure-function analysis of chemokine-receptor interactions reveals that CCL21 adopts an autoinhibited conformation, which is released upon interaction with polysialic acid. Thus, we describe a glycosylation-mediated immune cell trafficking disorder and its mechanistic basis. PMID:26657283

  2. Resident and “inflammatory” dendritic cells in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Zaba, Lisa C.; Krueger, James G; Lowes, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous group of antigen-presenting leukocytes that play an important role in activation of both the innate and acquired arms of the immune system. While there are several different DC populations in the body, DCs are globally defined by their capacity for potent antigen presentation and naive T cell activation. In non-inflamed human skin during steady-state, there are three main cutaneous DC populations: epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), dermal myeloid DCs, and dermal plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). In psoriasis, a model for cutaneous inflammation, there is an additional population of myeloid dermal DCs – “inflammatory DCs” – which appear to be critical for disease pathogenesis. PMID:18685620

  3. Dendritic Cells in the Gut: Interaction with Intestinal Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Mendlovic, Fela; Flisser, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The mucosal environment in mammals is highly tolerogenic; however, after exposure to pathogens or danger signals, it is able to shift towards an inflammatory response. Dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate immune responses and are highly responsible, through the secretion of cytokines and expression of surface markers, for the outcome of such immune response. In particular, the DC subsets found in the intestine have specialized functions and interact with different immune as well as nonimmune cells. Intestinal helminths primarily induce Th2 responses where DCs have an important yet not completely understood role. In addition, this cross-talk results in the induction of regulatory T cells (T regs) as a result of the homeostatic mucosal environment. This review highlights the importance of studying the particular relation “helminth-DC-milieu” in view of the significance that each of these factors plays. Elucidating the mechanisms that trigger Th2 responses may provide the understanding of how we might modulate inflammatory processes. PMID:20224759

  4. Dendritic cell development-History, advances, and open questions.

    PubMed

    Puhr, Sarah; Lee, Jaeyop; Zvezdova, Ekaterina; Zhou, Yu J; Liu, Kang

    2015-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are uniquely potent in orchestrating T cell immune response, thus they are indispensable immune sentinels. They originate from progenitors in the bone marrow through hematopoiesis, a highly regulated developmental process involving multiple cellular and molecular events. This review highlights studies of DC development-from the discovery of DCs as glass-adherent antigen presenting cells to the debate and resolution of their origin and lineage map. In particular, we summarize the roles of lineage-specific cytokines, the placement of distinct hematopoietic progenitors within the DC lineage and transcriptional programs governing DC development, which together have allowed us to diagram the current view of DC hematopoiesis. Important open questions and debates on the DC development and relevant models are also discussed. PMID:27040276

  5. Transmission of Clostridium difficile During Hospitalization for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Kamboj, Mini; Sheahan, Anna; Sun, Janet; Taur, Ying; Robilotti, Elizabeth; Babady, Esther; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Jakubowski, Ann; Pamer, Eric; Sepkowitz, Kent

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the role of unit-based transmission that accounts for cases of early Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) during hospitalization for allogeneic stem cell transplant. SETTING Stem cell transplant unit at a tertiary care cancer center. METHODS Serially collected stool from patients admitted for transplant was screened for toxigenic C. difficile through the hospital stay and genotyping was performed by multilocus sequence typing. In addition, isolates retrieved from cases of CDI that occurred in other patients hospitalized on the same unit were similarly characterized. Transmission links were established by time-space clustering of cases and carriers of shared toxigenic C. difficile strains. RESULTS During the 27-month period, 1,099 samples from 264 patients were screened, 69 of which had evidence of toxigenic C. difficile; 52 patients developed CDI and 17 were nonsymptomatic carriers. For the 52 cases, 41 had evidence of toxigenic C. difficile on the first study sample obtained within a week of admission, among which 22 were positive within the first 48 hours. A total of 24 sequence types were isolated from this group; 1 patient had infection with the NAP1 strain. A total of 11 patients had microbiologic evidence of acquisition; donor source could be established in half of these cases. CONCLUSIONS Most cases of CDI after stem cell transplant represent delayed onset disease in nonsymptomatic carriers. Transmission on stem cell transplant unit was confirmed in 19% of early CDI cases in our cohort with a probable donor source established in half of the cases. PMID:26486102

  6. Interleukin-22 in Graft-Versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lamarthée, Baptiste; Malard, Florent; Saas, Philippe; Mohty, Mohamad; Gaugler, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a potential curative treatment for hematologic malignancies and non-malignant diseases. Because of the lower toxicity of reduced intensity conditioning, the number of transplants is in constant increase. However, allo-HSCT is still limited by complications, such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), which is associated with important morbidity and mortality. Acute GVHD is an exacerbated inflammatory response that leads to the destruction of healthy host tissues by donor immune cells. Recently, the contribution of innate immunity in GVHD triggering has been investigated by several groups and resulted in the identification of new cellular and molecular effectors involved in GVHD pathogenesis. Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is produced by both immune and adaptive cells and has both protective and inflammatory properties. Its role in GVHD processes has been investigated, and the data suggest that its effect depends on the timing, the target tissue, and the origin of the producing cells (donor/host). In this review, we discuss the role of IL-22 in allo-HSCT and GVHD. PMID:27148267

  7. Primary Graft Failure after Myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Richard F.; Logan, Brent R.; Chaudhury, Sonali; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Gupta, Vikas; Ho, Vincent T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Ringdén, Olle T.H.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Schriber, Jeffrey R.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after primary graft failure (PGF) remain poor. Here we present a large retrospective analysis (n=23,272) which investigates means to prevent PGF and early detection of patients at high risk. In patients with hematologic malignancies, who underwent their first myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, PGF was reported in 1,278 (5.5%), and there was a marked difference in PGFs using peripheral blood stem cell compared to bone marrow grafts (2.5 vs. 7.3%; P<0.001). A 4-fold increase of PGF was observed in myeloproliferative disorders compared to acute leukemia (P<0.001). Other risk factors for PGF included recipient age below 30, HLA-mismatch, male recipients of female donor grafts, ABO-incompatibility, busulfan/cyclophosphamide conditioning, and cryopreservation. In bone marrow transplants, total nucleated cell doses ≤2.4 × 108/kg were associated with PGF (OR 1.39; P<0.001). The use of tacrolimus-based immunosuppression and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were associated with decreased PGF risk. These data, allow clinicians to do more informed choices with respect to graft source, donor selection, conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens to reduce the risk of PGF. Moreover, a novel risk score determined on day 21 post-transplant may provide the rationale for an early request for additional hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:25772027

  8. MicroRNAs as biomarkers for graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Fuji, Shigeo; Cucuianu, Andrei; Kapp, Markus; Pileczki, Valentina; Petrushev, Bobe; Selicean, Sonia; Tanase, Alina; Dima, Delia; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Irimie, Alexandru; Einsele, Hermann

    2015-07-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is a well-established treatment for many malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders. As frequent complication in up to 50 % of all patients, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is still the main cause for morbidity and non-relapse mortality. Diagnosis of GVHD is usually done clinically, even though confirmation by pathology is often used to support the clinical findings. Effective treatment requires intensified immunosuppression as early as possible. Although several promising biomarkers have been proposed for an early diagnosis, no internationally recognized consensus has yet been established. Here, microRNAs (miRs) represent an interesting tool since miRs have been recently reported to be an important regulator of various cells, including immune cells such as T cells. Therefore, we could assume that miRs play a key role in the pathogenesis of acute GVHD, and their detection might be an interesting possibility in the early diagnosis and monitoring of acute GVHD. Recent studies additionally demonstrated the implication of miRs in the pathogenesis of acute GVHD. In this review, we aim to summarize the previous reports of miRs, focusing on the pathogenesis of acute GVHD and possible implications in diagnostic approaches. PMID:25900787

  9. CT findings associated with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung W; Jeong, Katherine; Sokol, Lubomir

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematologic malignancy that is frequently misdiagnosed. We present a case of a 53-year-old man diagnosed with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with extensive computed tomography (CT) findings and provide an imaging focused review of this uncommon malignancy. PMID:27504192

  10. β-III spectrin is critical for development of purkinje cell dendritic tree and spine morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuanzheng; Perkins, Emma M; Clarkson, Yvonne L; Tobia, Steven; Lyndon, Alastair R; Jackson, Mandy; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2011-11-16

    Mutations in the gene encoding β-III spectrin give rise to spinocerebellar ataxia type 5, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive thinning of the molecular layer, loss of Purkinje cells and increasing motor deficits. A mouse lacking full-length β-III spectrin (β-III⁻/⁻) displays a similar phenotype. In vitro and in vivo analyses of Purkinje cells lacking β-III spectrin, reveal a critical role for β-III spectrin in Purkinje cell morphological development. Disruption of the normally well ordered dendritic arborization occurs in Purkinje cells from β-III⁻/⁻ mice, specifically showing a loss of monoplanar organization, smaller average dendritic diameter and reduced densities of Purkinje cell spines and synapses. Early morphological defects appear to affect distribution of dendritic, but not axonal, proteins. This study confirms that thinning of the molecular layer associated with disease pathogenesis is a consequence of Purkinje cell dendritic degeneration, as Purkinje cells from 8-month-old β-III⁻/⁻ mice have drastically reduced dendritic volumes, surface areas and total dendritic lengths compared with 5- to 6-week-old β-III⁻/⁻ mice. These findings highlight a critical role of β-III spectrin in dendritic biology and are consistent with an early developmental defect in β-III⁻/⁻ mice, with abnormal Purkinje cell dendritic morphology potentially underlying disease pathogenesis. PMID:22090485

  11. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  12. MHC Class I Expression by Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cells Is Required to Prevent NK Cell Attack in Allogeneic, but Not Syngeneic Recipient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Yuichi; Li, Hao-Wei; Takahashi, Kazuko; Ishii, Hiroshi; Sykes, Megan; Fujisaki, Joji

    2015-01-01

    NK cells resist engraftment of syngeneic and allogeneic bone marrow (BM) cells lacking major histocompatibility (MHC) class I molecules, suggesting a critical role for donor MHC class I molecules in preventing NK cell attack against donor hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), and their derivatives. However, using high-resolution in vivo imaging, we demonstrated here that syngeneic MHC class I knockout (KO) donor HSPCs persist with the same survival frequencies as wild-type donor HSPCs. In contrast, syngeneic MHC class I KO differentiated hematopoietic cells and allogeneic MHC class I KO HSPCs were rejected in a manner that was significantly inhibited by NK cell depletion. In vivo time-lapse imaging demonstrated that mice receiving allogeneic MHC class I KO HSPCs showed a significant increase in NK cell motility and proliferation as well as frequencies of NK cell contact with and killing of HSPCs as compared to mice receiving wild-type HSPCs. The data indicate that donor MHC class I molecules are required to prevent NK cell-mediated rejection of syngeneic differentiated cells and allogeneic HSPCs, but not of syngeneic HSPCs. PMID:26544200

  13. Functional characterization of a STAT3-dependent dendritic cell-derived CD14+ cell population arising upon IL-10-driven maturation

    PubMed Central

    Lindenberg, Jelle J.; van de Ven, Rieneke; Lougheed, Sinéad M.; Zomer, Anoek; Santegoets, Saskia J.A.M.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Hooijberg, Erik; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J.M.; Thijssen, Victor L.; Scheper, Rik J.; Oosterhoff, Dinja; de Gruijl, Tanja D.

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is a major cancer-related immunosuppressive factor, exhibiting a unique ability to hamper the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). We have previously reported that IL-10 induces the conversion of activated, migratory CD1a+ DCs found in the human skin to CD14+CD141+ macrophage-like cells. Here, as a model of tumor-conditioned DC maturation, we functionally assessed CD14- and CD14+ DCs that matured in vitro upon exposure to IL-10. IL-10-induced CD14+ DCs were phenotypically characterized by a low maturation state as well as by high levels of BDCA3 and DC-SIGN, and as such they closely resembled CD14+ cells infiltrating melanoma metastases. Compared with DC matured under standard conditions, CD14+ DCs were found to express high levels of B7-H1 on the cell surface, to secrete low levels of IL-12p70, to preferentially induce TH2 cells, to have a lower allogeneic TH cell and tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell priming capacity and to induce proliferative T-cell anergy. In contrast to their CD14+ counterparts, CD14- monocyte-derived DCs retained allogeneic TH priming capacity but induced a functionally anergic state as they completely abolished the release of effector cytokines. Transcriptional and cytokine release profiling studies indicated a more profound angiogenic and pro-invasive signature of CD14+ DCs as compared with DCs matured in standard conditions or CD14− DCs matured in the presence of IL-10. Importantly, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) depletion by RNA interference prevented the development of the IL-10-associated CD14+ phenotype, allowing for normal DC maturation and providing a potential means of therapeutic intervention. PMID:23734330

  14. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Activation and Subsequent Th1 Cell Polarization by Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Tae; Na, Hyeongjin; Ryu, Heeju; Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play an essential role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing cellular stress including pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns and by shaping the types of antigen-specific T cell immunity. Although lidocaine is widely used in clinical settings that trigger cellular stress, it remains unclear whether such treatment impacts the activation of innate immune cells and subsequent differentiation of T cells. Here we showed that lidocaine inhibited the production of IL-6, TNFα and IL-12 from dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor ligands including lipopolysaccharide, poly(I:C) and R837 in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the differentiation of Th1 cells was significantly suppressed by the addition of lidocaine while the same treatment had little effect on the differentiation of Th17, Th2 and regulatory T cells in vitro. Moreover, lidocaine suppressed the ovalbumin-specific Th1 cell responses in vivo induced by the adoptive transfer of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. These results demonstrate that lidocaine inhibits the activation of dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor signals and subsequently suppresses the differentiation of Th1 cell responses. PMID:26445366

  15. Dendritic cells and oral transmission of prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fang-Ping; MacPherson, G Gordon

    2004-04-19

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (scrapie, BSE, Kuru) develop as central nervous system (CNS) diseases after long incubation periods, and many of which may arise following the consumption of infected material. The infectious agent is thought to be a misfolded form (scrapie associated PrP (PrP(Sc))) of a normal host protein (cellular isoform of PrP (PrP(C))), which is relatively resistant to proteolytic degradation and which serves as a template, directing host prion protein (PrP) to accumulate in the misfolded form. Animal experiments have shown that CNS disease is preceded by a period in which the agent accumulates in secondary lymphoid organs (Peyer's patches (PP), lymph nodes, spleen), particularly follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in the B cell areas of these organs. How the agent is transmitted from the intestinal lumen to the FDCs is largely unknown. Dendritic cells (DCs, cells quite distinct from FDCs) are cells that are specialised to acquire antigens from peripheral tissues and to transport them to secondary lymphoid organs for presentation to T and B lymphocytes. We have shown that DCs can acquire PrP(Sc) from the intestinal lumen and deliver it to mesenteric lymph nodes. In this review we discuss the different stages involved in the migration of PrP(Sc) from the intestine to FDCs and consider the different stages and barriers involved in this process. We conclude that transport of the causative agent, using PrP(Sc) as a biomarker, from the intestine to FDCs is a very inefficient process, which may help to account for the apparent low frequency of individuals who have consumed infected material that go on to develop clinical disease. PMID:15063597

  16. Selective Expansion of Allogeneic Regulatory T Cells by Hepatic Stellate Cells: Role of Endotoxin and Implications for Allograft Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Dangi, Anil; Sumpter, Tina L.; Kimura, Shoko; Stolz, Donna B.; Murase, Noriko; Raimondi, Giorgio; Vodovotz, Yoram; Huang, Chao; Thomson, Angus W.; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) may play an important role in hepatic immune regulation by producing numerous cytokines/chemokines, and expressing Ag-presenting and T cell co-regulatory molecules. Due to disruption of the endothelial barrier during cold-ischemic storage and reperfusion of liver grafts, HSCs can interact directly with cells of the immune system. Endotoxin (LPS), levels of which increase in liver diseases and transplantation, stimulates the synthesis of many mediators by HSCs. We hypothesized that LPS-stimulated HSCs might promote hepatic tolerogenicity by influencing naturally-occurring immunosuppressive CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Following their portal venous infusion, allogeneic CD4+ T cells, including Tregs, were found closely associated with HSCs, and this association increased in LPS-treated livers. In vitro, both unstimulated and LPS-stimulated HSCs up-regulated Fas (CD95) expression on conventional CD4+ T cells and induced their apoptosis in a Fas/FasL-dependent manner. By contrast, HSCs induced Treg proliferation, which required cell-cell contact, and was MHC class II-dependent. This effect was augmented when HSCs were pretreated with LPS. LPS increased the expression of MHC class II, CD80 and CD86, and stimulated the production of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and TNFα by HSCs. Interestingly, production of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα was strongly inhibited, but that of IL-10 enhanced, in LPS-pretreated HSC/Treg co-cultures. Adoptively transferred allogeneic HSCs migrated to the secondary lymphoid tissues and induced Treg expansion in lymph nodes. These data implicate endotoxins-stimulated HSCs as important immune regulators in liver transplantation by inducing selective expansion of tolerance-promoting Tregs, and reducing inflammation and allo-immunity. PMID:22427640

  17. Alterations of circulating lymphoid committed progenitor cellular metabolism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in humans.

    PubMed

    Glauzy, Salomé; Peffault de Latour, Régis; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Lachuer, Joël; Servais, Sophie; Socié, Gérard; Clave, Emmanuel; Toubert, Antoine

    2016-09-01

    Lymphoid-committed CD34(+)lin(-)CD10(+)CD24(-) progenitors undergo a rebound at month 3 after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in the absence of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). Here, we analyzed transcriptional programs of cell-sorted circulating lymphoid-committed progenitors and CD34(+)Lin(-)CD10(-) nonlymphoid progenitors in 11 allo-HSCT patients who had (n = 5) or had not (n = 6) developed grade 2 or 3 aGVHD and in 7 age-matched healthy donors. Major upregulated pathways include protein synthesis, energy production, cell cycle regulation, and cytoskeleton organization. Notably, genes from protein biogenesis, translation machinery, and cell cycle (CDK6) were overexpressed in progenitors from patients in the absence of aGVHD compared with healthy donors and patients affected by aGVHD. Expression of many genes from the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation metabolic pathway leading to ATP production were more specifically increased in lymphoid-committed progenitors in the absence of aGVHD. This was also the case for genes involved in cell mobilization such as those regulating Rho GTPase activity. In all, we found that circulating lymphoid-committed progenitors undergo profound changes in metabolism, favoring cell proliferation, energy production, and cell mobilization after allo-HSCT in humans. These mechanisms are abolished in the case of aGVHD or its treatment, indicating a persistent cell-intrinsic defect after exit from the bone marrow. PMID:27321893

  18. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3–4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  19. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T.; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-01-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials. PMID:27247754

  20. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3-4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  1. Adverse Late and Long-Term Treatment Effects in Adult Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Survivors.

    PubMed

    Mosesso, Kara

    2015-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become the standard of care for many malignant and nonmalignant hematologic diseases that don't respond to traditional therapy. There are two types: autologous transplantation (auto-HSCT), in which an individual's stem cells are collected, stored, and infused back into that person; and allogeneic transplantation (allo-HSCT), in which healthy donor stem cells are infused into a recipient whose bone marrow has been damaged or destroyed. There have been numerous advancements in this field, leading to marked increases in the number of transplants performed annually. This article--the first of several on cancer survivorship--focuses on the care of adult allo-HSCT survivors because of the greater complexity of their posttransplant course. The author summarizes potential adverse late and long-term treatment-related effects, with special focus on the evaluation and management of several cardiovascular disease risk factors that can occur either independently or concurrently as part of the metabolic syndrome. These risk factors are potentially modifiable with appropriate nursing interventions and lifestyle modifications. PMID:26473441

  2. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-06-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials. PMID:27247754

  3. Primary proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell responses to HIV induced in vitro by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Macatonia, S E; Patterson, S; Knight, S C

    1991-01-01

    In earlier studies, primary proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses to influenza virus were produced in vitro by using mouse dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with virus or viral peptide as the stimulus for syngeneic T cells in 20-microliters hanging-drop cultures. We have now adapted this system for producing primary responses with cells from non-immune donors to produce primary proliferative and CTL responses to human immunodeficiency virus I (HIV) and to HIV peptides in vitro using cells from normal human peripheral blood. All donors in this study were laboratory personnel with no history of HIV infection. DC enriched from peripheral blood were exposed to HIV in vitro and small numbers were added to T lymphocytes in 20-microliters hanging drops. Proliferative responses to virus-infected DC were obtained after 3 days in culture. After 6 days, CTL were obtained that killed virus-infected autologous--but not allogeneic--phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated blast cells. Proliferative and CTL responses were obtained using cells from 14 random donors expressing a spectrum of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) types but the CTL, once produced, showed killing restricted by the MHC class I type. Treatment of cultures with monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD4-positive cells at the beginning of culture blocked the development of both proliferative and CTL responses, but treatment after 5 days had no effect on the CTL activity. Treatment with MCA to CD8-positive cells at the beginning of culture did not block proliferation significantly, but treatment either before or after the 5-day culture period blocked CTL responses. Collaboration between proliferating CD4-positive cells and CD8-positive cells may thus be required to produce CTL of the CD8 phenotype. DC exposed to HIV also produced CTL that killed autologous blast cells pulsed with gp120 envelope glycoprotein. However, DC infected with whole virus did not produce CTL that lysed target cells pulsed with a synthetic

  4. Apoptosis Susceptibility Prolongs the Lack of Memory B Cells in Acute Leukemic Patients After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mensen, Angela; Oh, Youngseong; Becker, Sonya C; Hemmati, Philipp G; Jehn, Christian; Westermann, Jörg; Szyska, Martin; Göldner, Henning; Dörken, Bernd; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Arnold, Renate; Na, Il-Kang

    2015-11-01

    Long-term survival after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation requires intact immunosurveillance, which is hampered by lymphoid organ damage associated with conditioning therapy, graft-versus-host disease, and immunosuppression. Our study aimed to identify the mechanisms contributing to sustained low memory B cell numbers after transplantation. Peripheral B and T cell subset recovery and functional marker expression were investigated in 35 acute leukemic patients up to 1 year after transplantation. Apoptosis of B cells after CD40/TLR-9, CD40/BCR, and CD40/BCR/TLR-9-dependent stimulation and drug efflux capacity were analyzed. One half of the patients suffered from infections after day 180. All patients had strongly diminished CD27(+) memory B cells despite already normalized total B cell numbers and fully recovered CD27(-)IgD(-) memory B cells, putatively of extra-follicular origin. Circulating memory follicular helper T cells were reduced in the majority of patients as well. Naïve B cells exhibited a decreased expression of CXCR5, which mediates follicular B cell entry. Additionally, a lower HLA-DR expression was found on naïve B cells, impairing antigen presentation. Upon CD40/TLR-9-dependent activation, B cells underwent significantly increased apoptosis paralleled by an aberrant up-regulation of Fas-L on activated T cells and Fas on resting B cells. Significantly increased B cell apoptosis was also observed after CD40/BCR and CD40/BCR/TLR-9-dependent activation. Drug efflux capacity of naïve B cells was diminished in cyclosporin A-treated patients, additionally contributing to an apoptosis-prone phenotype. We conclude that B cell survival and migration and T cell communication defects are contributing candidates for an impaired germinal center formation of memory B cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Follow-up studies should evaluate effectiveness of revaccinations on the cellular level and should

  5. Migratory dendritic cells transfer antigen to a lymph node-resident dendritic cell population for efficient CTL priming.

    PubMed

    Allan, Rhys S; Waithman, Jason; Bedoui, Sammy; Jones, Claerwen M; Villadangos, Jose A; Zhan, Yifan; Lew, Andrew M; Shortman, Ken; Heath, William R; Carbone, Francis R

    2006-07-01

    Skin dendritic cells (DCs) are thought to act as key initiators of local T cell immunity. Here we show that after skin infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV), cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activation required MHC class I-restricted presentation by nonmigratory CD8(+) DCs rather than skin-derived DCs. Despite a lack of direct presentation by migratory DCs, blocking their egress from infected skin substantially inhibited class I-restricted presentation and HSV-specific CTL responses. These results support the argument for initial transport of antigen by migrating DCs, followed by its transfer to the lymphoid-resident DCs for presentation and CTL priming. Given that relatively robust CTL responses were seen with small numbers of skin-emigrant DCs, we propose that this inter-DC antigen transfer functions to amplify presentation across a larger network of lymphoid-resident DCs for efficient T cell activation. PMID:16860764

  6. GM-CSF Controls Nonlymphoid Tissue Dendritic Cell Homeostasis but Is Dispensable for the Differentiation of Inflammatory Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Greter, Melanie; Helft, Julie; Chow, Andrew; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Agudo-Cantero, Judith; Bogunovic, Milena; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Miller, Jennifer; Leboeuf, Marylene; Lu, Geming; Aloman, Costica; Brown, Brian D.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Xiong, Huabao; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Frenette, Paul S.; Merad, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY GM-CSF (Csf-2) is a critical cytokine for the in vitro generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and is thought to control the development of inflammatory DCs and resident CD103+ DCs in some tissues. Here we showed that in contrast to the current understanding, Csf-2 receptor acts in the steady state to promote the survival and homeostasis of nonlymphoid tissue-resident CD103+ and CD11b+ DCs. Absence of Csf-2 receptor on lung DCs abrogated the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity after immunization with particulate antigens. In contrast, Csf-2 receptor was dispensable for the differentiation and innate function of inflammatory DCs during acute injuries. Instead, inflammatory DCs required Csf-1 receptor for their development. Thus, Csf-2 is important in vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell immunity through the regulation of nonlymphoid tissue DC homeostasis rather than control of inflammatory DCs in vivo. PMID:22749353

  7. Dendritic and Langerhans cells respond to Aβ peptides differently: implication for AD immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jiang; Lin, Xiaoyang; Morgan, David; Gordon, Marcia; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zhen-Hai; Li, Hai-Ning; He, Lan-Jie; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Cao, Chuanhai

    2015-01-01

    Both wild-type and mutated beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides can elicit an immune response when delivered subcutaneously. However, only mutated forms of Aβ can sensitize dendritic cells when administered intravenously or intraperitoneally. To understand the role of mutation and delivery routes in creating immune responses, and the function of dendritic cells as therapeutic agents, we used fluorescent-conjugated WT Aβ1-40 (WT40) and artificially mutated Aβ1-40 (22W40) peptides to treat dendritic and Langerhans cells from young and/or old mice at different time points. The cell types were analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify differences in function and antigen presentation, and Luminex and Western blots for cell activation and associated mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that the artificial mutant, 22W40, enhanced dendritic cell's phagocytosis and antigen presentation better than the WT40. Interestingly, Langerhans cells were more effective at early presentation. The artificial mutant 22W40 increased CD8α+ dendritic cells, CD8+ T-cells, and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with self-lymphocytes and dendritic cells from aged mice (30-month-old). Here, the 22W40 mutant peptide has been found to be potent enough to activate DCs, and that dendritic cell-based therapy may be a more effective treatment for age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). PMID:26473448

  8. Dendritic and Langerhans cells respond to Aβ peptides differently: implication for AD immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiang; Lin, Xiaoyang; Morgan, David; Gordon, Marcia; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zhen-Hai; Li, Hai-Ning; He, Lan-Jie; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Cao, Chuanhai

    2015-11-01

    Both wild-type and mutated beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides can elicit an immune response when delivered subcutaneously. However, only mutated forms of Aβ can sensitize dendritic cells when administered intravenously or intraperitoneally. To understand the role of mutation and delivery routes in creating immune responses, and the function of dendritic cells as therapeutic agents, we used fluorescent-conjugated WT Aβ1-40 (WT40) and artificially mutated Aβ1-40 (22W40) peptides to treat dendritic and Langerhans cells from young and/or old mice at different time points. The cell types were analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify differences in function and antigen presentation, and Luminex and Western blots for cell activation and associated mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that the artificial mutant, 22W40, enhanced dendritic cell's phagocytosis and antigen presentation better than the WT40. Interestingly, Langerhans cells were more effective at early presentation. The artificial mutant 22W40 increased CD8α+ dendritic cells, CD8+ T-cells, and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with self-lymphocytes and dendritic cells from aged mice (30-month-old). Here, the 22W40 mutant peptide has been found to be potent enough to activate DCs, and that dendritic cell-based therapy may be a more effective treatment for age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). PMID:26473448

  9. Immunological Characterization of Whole Tumour Lysate-Loaded Dendritic Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ottobrini, Luisa; Biasin, Mara; Borelli, Manuela; Lucignani, Giovanni; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dendritic cells play a key role as initiators of T-cell responses, and even if tumour antigen-loaded dendritic cells can induce anti-tumour responses, their efficacy has been questioned, suggesting a need to enhance immunization strategies. Matherials & Methods We focused on the characterization of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with whole tumour lysate (TAA-DC), as a source of known and unknown antigens, in a mouse model of breast cancer (MMTV-Ras). Dendritic cells were evaluated for antigen uptake and for the expression of MHC class I/II and costimulatory molecules and markers associated with maturation. Results Results showed that antigen-loaded dendritic cells are characterized by a phenotypically semi-mature/mature profile and by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and T-cell priming. Activated dendritic cells stimulated T-cell proliferation and induced the production of high concentrations of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ but only low levels of IL-10, indicating their ability to elicit a TH1-immune response. Furthermore, administration of Antigen loaded-Dendritic Cells in MMTV-Ras mice evoked a strong anti-tumour response in vivo as demonstrated by a general activation of immunocompetent cells and the release of TH1 cytokines. Conclusion Data herein could be useful in the design of antitumoral DC-based therapies, showing a specific activation of immune system against breast cancer. PMID:26795765

  10. Dendritic cell maturation and cross-presentation: timing matters!

    PubMed

    Alloatti, Andrés; Kotsias, Fiorella; Magalhaes, Joao Gamelas; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    As a population, dendritic cells (DCs) appear to be the best cross-presenters of internalized antigens on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules in the mouse. To do this, DCs have developed a number of unique and dedicated means to control their endocytic and phagocytic pathways: among them, the capacity to limit acidification of their phagosomes, to prevent proteolytic degradation, to delay fusion of phagosomes to lysosomes, to recruit ER proteins to phagosomes, and to export phagocytosed antigens to the cytosol. The regulation of phagocytic functions, and thereby of antigen processing and presentation by innate signaling, represents a critical level of integration of adaptive and innate immune responses. Understanding how innate signals control antigen cross-presentation is critical to define effective vaccination strategies for CD8(+) T-cell responses. PMID:27319345

  11. Engineered Lentivector Targeting of Dendritic Cells for In Vivo Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lili; Yang, Haiguang; Rideout, Kendra; Cho, Taehoon; Joo, Kye il; Ziegler, Leslie; Elliot, Abigail; Walls, Anthony; Yu, Dongzi; Baltimore, David; Wang, Pin

    2008-01-01

    We report a method of inducing antigen production in dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo targeting with lentiviral vectors that specifically bind to the DC surface protein, DC-SIGN. To target the DCs, the lentivector was enveloped with a viral glycoprotein from Sindbis virus, engineered to be DC-SIGN-specific. In vitro, this lentivector specifically transduced DCs and induced DC maturation. A remarkable frequency (up to 12%) of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific CD8+ T cells and a significant antibody response were observed 2 weeks following injection of a targeted lentiviral vector encoding an OVA transgene into naïve mice. These mice were solidly protected against the growth of the OVA-expressing E.G7 tumor and this methodology could even induce regression of an established tumor. Thus, lentiviral vectors targeting DCs provide a simple method of producing effective immunity and may provide an alternative route for immunization with protein antigens. PMID:18297056

  12. The role of dendritic cells in male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Duan, Yong-Gang

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells. The central role of various DC subsets as bridges between innate and adaptive immunity has become more and more evident. However, the role of DC subsets in male reproductive tract remains largely unexplored, in particular distinct DC subsets (including myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs), their maturation stage, and tissue distribution, as well as state of health or disease. Furthermore, infection and inflammation of male genital tract are thought to be a primary etiological factor of male infertility. This review sheds some light on this complex and rapidly growing field. It summarized the recent findings and deals with the characterization and role of DCs in male reproductive tract, that is, testis, epididymis, prostate, seminal vesicle, semen, and foreskin, which might help to understand the immunopathological mechanisms of male infertility and design effective vaccines for male reproductive health. PMID:27353336

  13. Cochlin produced by follicular dendritic cells promotes antibacterial innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Py, Bénédicte F; Gonzalez, Santiago F; Long, Kai; Kim, Mi-Sung; Kim, Young-A; Zhu, Hong; Yao, Jianhua; Degauque, Nicolas; Villet, Régis; Ymele-Leki, Patrick; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Pier, Gerald B; Carroll, Michael C; Yuan, Junying

    2013-05-23

    Cochlin, an extracellular matrix protein, shares homologies with the Factor C, a serine protease found in horseshoe crabs, which is critical for antibacterial responses. Mutations in the COCH gene are responsible for human DFNA9 syndrome, a disorder characterized by neurodegeneration of the inner ear that leads to hearing loss and vestibular impairments. The physiological function of cochlin, however, is unknown. Here, we report that cochlin is specifically expressed by follicular dendritic cells and selectively localized in the fine extracellular network of conduits in the spleen and lymph nodes. During inflammation, cochlin was cleaved by aggrecanases and secreted into blood circulation. In models of lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, Coch(-/-) mice show reduced survival linked to defects in local cytokine production, recruitment of immune effector cells, and bacterial clearance. By producing cochlin, FDCs thus contribute to the innate immune response in defense against bacteria. PMID:23684986

  14. Optimizing Dendritic Cell-Based Approaches for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Jashodeep; Terhune, Julia H.; Lowenfeld, Lea; Cintolo, Jessica A.; Xu, Shuwen; Roses, Robert E.; Czerniecki, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells uniquely suited for cancer immunotherapy. They induce primary immune responses, potentiate the effector functions of previously primed T-lymphocytes, and orchestrate communication between innate and adaptive immunity. The remarkable diversity of cytokine activation regimens, DC maturation states, and antigen-loading strategies employed in current DC-based vaccine design reflect an evolving, but incomplete, understanding of optimal DC immunobiology. In the clinical realm, existing DC-based cancer immunotherapy efforts have yielded encouraging but inconsistent results. Despite recent U.S. Federal and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of DC-based sipuleucel-T for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, clinically effective DC immunotherapy as monotherapy for a majority of tumors remains a distant goal. Recent work has identified strategies that may allow for more potent “next-generation” DC vaccines. Additionally, multimodality approaches incorporating DC-based immunotherapy may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25506283

  15. Dendritic Cells and Their Multiple Roles during Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Kelly N. S.; Chagas, Daniele C. G.; Sulczewski, Fernando B.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, efficiently presenting antigens to T cells. This ability relies on the presence of numerous surface and intracellular receptors capable of sensing microbial components as well as inflammation and on a very efficient machinery for antigen presentation. In this way, DCs sense the presence of a myriad of pathogens, including Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of malaria. Despite many efforts to control this infection, malaria is still responsible for high rates of morbidity and mortality. Different groups have shown that DCs act during Plasmodium infection, and data suggest that the phenotypically distinct DCs subsets are key factors in the regulation of immunity during infection. In this review, we will discuss the importance of DCs for the induction of immunity against the different stages of Plasmodium, the outcomes of DCs activation, and also what is currently known about Plasmodium components that trigger such activation. PMID:27110574

  16. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, Shawna A.; Montpetit, Alison J.; Lockey, R.F.; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2008-09-26

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14{sup +} monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant.

  17. Metabolic reprogramming in macrophages and dendritic cells in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Beth; O'Neill, Luke AJ

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pro-inflammatory stimuli causes them to undergo a metabolic switch towards glycolysis and away from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), similar to the Warburg effect in tumors. However, it is only recently that the mechanisms responsible for this metabolic reprogramming have been elucidated in more detail. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays an important role under conditions of both hypoxia and normoxia. The withdrawal of citrate from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been shown to be critical for lipid biosynthesis in both macrophages and DCs. Interference with this process actually abolishes the ability of DCs to activate T cells. Another TCA cycle intermediate, succinate, activates HIF-1α and promotes inflammatory gene expression. These new insights are providing us with a deeper understanding of the role of metabolic reprogramming in innate immunity. PMID:26045163

  18. Modulation of Dendritic Cells by Nanotechnology-Based Immunotherapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Mogrão, Joana; da Costa, Catarina A; Gaspar, Rogério; Florindo, Helena F

    2016-03-01

    In preceding decades, different mechanisms have been proposed to "instruct" dendritic cells (DCs) to induce immune responses against tumor antigens (TAs), thus breaking immune tolerance. Immunotherapy has been, for the last two decades, an attractive and promising therapeutic approach to fight cancer. This review will approach the nature of the immune response during cancer development and its correlation with DC function, as well as cancer vaccine principles and limitations. An overview of several delivery strategies used for in vivo modulation of DCs and direct activation of T cells will be provided, highlighting their advantages, limitations, and optimization strategies. This manuscript also presents a critical and systematic review of recent clinical trials that are investigating the therapeutic effect of these approaches, discussing prognostic outcomes of combined-treatment modalities. PMID:27280242

  19. Dendritic Cells and Their Multiple Roles during Malaria Infection.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Kelly N S; Chagas, Daniele C G; Sulczewski, Fernando B; Boscardin, Silvia B

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, efficiently presenting antigens to T cells. This ability relies on the presence of numerous surface and intracellular receptors capable of sensing microbial components as well as inflammation and on a very efficient machinery for antigen presentation. In this way, DCs sense the presence of a myriad of pathogens, including Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of malaria. Despite many efforts to control this infection, malaria is still responsible for high rates of morbidity and mortality. Different groups have shown that DCs act during Plasmodium infection, and data suggest that the phenotypically distinct DCs subsets are key factors in the regulation of immunity during infection. In this review, we will discuss the importance of DCs for the induction of immunity against the different stages of Plasmodium, the outcomes of DCs activation, and also what is currently known about Plasmodium components that trigger such activation. PMID:27110574

  20. Dendritic cells and cytokines in immune rejection of cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrantini, Maria; Capone, Imerio; Belardelli, Filippo

    2008-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in linking innate and adaptive immunity and, thus, in the generation of a protective immune response against both infectious diseases and tumors. The ability of DCs to prime and expand an immune response is regulated by signals acting through soluble mediators, mainly cytokines and chemokines. Understanding how cytokines influence DC functions and orchestrate the interactions of DCs with other immune cells is strictly instrumental to the progress in cancer immunotherapy. Herein, we will illustrate how certain cytokines and immune stimulating molecules can induce and sustain the antitumor immune response by acting on DCs. We will also discuss these cytokine-DC interactions in the light of clinical results in cancer patients. PMID:18054517

  1. Mechanisms of Dendritic Cell Lysosomal Killing of Cryptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Hole, Camaron R.; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L.; Wozniak, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death. PMID:23074646

  2. Mechanisms of dendritic cell lysosomal killing of Cryptococcus.

    PubMed

    Hole, Camaron R; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L; Wozniak, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death. PMID:23074646

  3. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Shawna A.; Montpetit, Alison J.; Lockey, R.F.; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14+ monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant. PMID:18639521

  4. Mechanisms of Dendritic Cell Lysosomal Killing of Cryptococcus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Camaron R.; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L.; Wozniak, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death.

  5. The role of dendritic cells in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Alla L.; Clarkson, Benjamin D.; Ortler, Sonja; Fabry, Zsuzsanna

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated, central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease. Clinical and histopathological features suggest an inflammatory etiology involving resident CNS innate cells as well as invading adaptive immune cells. Encephalitogenic myelin-reactive T cells have been implicated in the initiation of an inflammatory cascade, eventually resulting in demyelination and axonal damage (the histological hallmarks of MS). Dendritic cells (DC) have recently emerged as key modulators of this immunopathological cascade, as supported by studies in humans and experimental disease models. In one such model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), CNS microvessel-associated DC have been shown to be essential for local antigen recognition by myelin-reactive T cells. Moreover, the functional state and compartmental distribution of DC derived from CNS and associated lymphatics seem to be limiting factors in both the induction and effector phases of EAE. Moreover, DC modulate and balance the recruitment of encephalitogenic and regulatory T cells into CNS tissue. This capacity is critically influenced by DC surface expression of co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory molecules. The fact that DC accumulate in the CNS before T cells and can direct T-cell responses suggests that they are key determinants of CNS autoimmune outcomes. Here we provide a comprehensive review of recent advances in our understanding of CNS-derived DC and their relevance to neuroinflammation. PMID:20217033

  6. The Role of Dendritic Cells in Central Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaehak; Shin, Jeoung-Sook

    2015-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a significant role in establishing self-tolerance through their ability to present self-antigens to developing T cells in the thymus. DCs are predominantly localized in the medullary region of thymus and present a broad range of self-antigens, which include tissue-restricted antigens expressed and transferred from medullary thymic epithelial cells, circulating antigens directly captured by thymic DCs through coticomedullary junction blood vessels, and peripheral tissue antigens captured and transported by peripheral tissue DCs homing to the thymus. When antigen-presenting DCs make a high affinity interaction with antigen-specific thymocytes, this interaction drives the interacting thymocytes to death, a process often referred to as negative selection, which fundamentally blocks the self-reactive thymocytes from differentiating into mature T cells. Alternatively, the interacting thymocytes differentiate into the regulatory T (Treg) cells, a distinct T cell subset with potent immune suppressive activities. The specific mechanisms by which thymic DCs differentiate Treg cells have been proposed by several laboratories. Here, we review the literatures that elucidate the contribution of thymic DCs to negative selection and Treg cell differentiation, and discusses its potential mechanisms and future directions. PMID:26140042

  7. Dendritic-Tumor Fusion Cell-Based Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immunity. Therefore, various strategies have been developed to deliver tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) to DCs as cancer vaccines. The fusion of DCs and whole tumor cells to generate DC-tumor fusion cells (DC-tumor FCs) is an alternative strategy to treat cancer patients. The cell fusion method allows DCs to be exposed to the broad array of TAAs originally expressed by whole tumor cells. DCs then process TAAs endogenously and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of costimulatory molecules, resulting in simultaneous activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. DC-tumor FCs require optimized enhanced immunogenicity of both DCs and whole tumor cells. In this context, an effective fusion strategy also needs to produce immunogenic DC-tumor FCs. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor FCs and the recent progress in improving clinical outcomes by DC-tumor FC-based cancer vaccines. PMID:27240347

  8. Control of Immune Response to Allogeneic Embryonic Stem Cells by CD3 Antibody-Mediated Operational Tolerance Induction.

    PubMed

    Calderon, D; Prot, M; You, S; Marquet, C; Bellamy, V; Bruneval, P; Valette, F; de Almeida, P; Wu, J C; Pucéat, M; Menasché, P; Chatenoud, L

    2016-02-01

    Implantation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and their differentiated derivatives into allogeneic hosts triggers an immune response that represents a hurdle to clinical application. We established in autoimmunity and in transplantation that CD3 antibody therapy induces a state of immune tolerance. Promising results have been obtained with CD3 antibodies in the clinic. In this study, we tested whether this strategy can prolong the survival of undifferentiated ESCs and their differentiated derivatives in histoincompatible hosts. Recipients of either mouse ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) or cardiac progenitors received a single short tolerogenic regimen of CD3 antibody. In immunocompetent mice, allogeneic EBs and cardiac progenitors were rejected within 20-25 days. Recipients treated with CD3 antibody showed long-term survival of implanted cardiac progenitors or EBs. In due course, EBs became teratomas, the growth of which was self-limited. Regulatory CD4(+)FoxP3(+) T cells and signaling through the PD1/PDL1 pathway played key roles in the CD3 antibody therapeutic effect. Gene profiling emphasized the importance of TGF-β and the inhibitory T cell coreceptor Tim3 to the observed effect. These results demonstrate that CD3 antibody administered alone promotes prolonged survival of allogeneic ESC derivatives and thus could prove useful for enhancing cell engraftment in the absence of chronic immunosuppression. PMID:26492394

  9. Acupoint injection of autologous stromal vascular fraction and allogeneic adipose-derived stem cells to treat hip dysplasia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Marx, Camila; Silveira, Maiele Dornelles; Selbach, Isabel; da Silva, Ariel Silveira; Braga, Luisa Maria Gomes de Macedo; Camassola, Melissa; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells isolated from adipose tissue show great therapeutic potential in veterinary medicine, but some points such as the use of fresh or cultured cells and route of administration need better knowledge. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF, n = 4) or allogeneic cultured adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs, n = 5) injected into acupuncture points in dogs with hip dysplasia and weak response to drug therapy. Canine ASCs have proliferation and differentiation potential similar to ASCs from other species. After the first week of treatment, clinical evaluation showed marked improvement compared with baseline results in all patients treated with autologous SVF and three of the dogs treated with allogeneic ASCs. On days 15 and 30, all dogs showed improvement in range of motion, lameness at trot, and pain on manipulation of the joints, except for one ASC-treated patient. Positive results were more clearly seen in the SVF-treated group. These results show that autologous SVF or allogeneic ASCs can be safely used in acupoint injection for treating hip dysplasia in dogs and represent an important therapeutic alternative for this type of pathology. Further studies are necessary to assess a possible advantage of SVF cells in treating joint diseases. PMID:25180040

  10. Acupoint Injection of Autologous Stromal Vascular Fraction and Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Treat Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Camila; Silveira, Maiele Dornelles; Selbach, Isabel; da Silva, Ariel Silveira; Braga, Luisa Maria Gomes de Macedo; Camassola, Melissa; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells isolated from adipose tissue show great therapeutic potential in veterinary medicine, but some points such as the use of fresh or cultured cells and route of administration need better knowledge. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF, n = 4) or allogeneic cultured adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs, n = 5) injected into acupuncture points in dogs with hip dysplasia and weak response to drug therapy. Canine ASCs have proliferation and differentiation potential similar to ASCs from other species. After the first week of treatment, clinical evaluation showed marked improvement compared with baseline results in all patients treated with autologous SVF and three of the dogs treated with allogeneic ASCs. On days 15 and 30, all dogs showed improvement in range of motion, lameness at trot, and pain on manipulation of the joints, except for one ASC-treated patient. Positive results were more clearly seen in the SVF-treated group. These results show that autologous SVF or allogeneic ASCs can be safely used in acupoint injection for treating hip dysplasia in dogs and represent an important therapeutic alternative for this type of pathology. Further studies are necessary to assess a possible advantage of SVF cells in treating joint diseases. PMID:25180040

  11. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products.

  12. Suppressive effect of β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin on activated dendritic cells in an imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhao, Jingxia; Zhang, Lu; Di, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Lin, Yan; Zeng, Zuping; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin, a main component of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, on activated dendritic cells (DCs) in a psoriasis mouse model. Methods: BALB/c mice were used to establish the animal model for psoriasis-like skin lesion; alkannin at 10 mg/kg (high), 5 mg/kg (medium), 2.5 mg/kg (low), respectively, were intragastrically administered. Psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) was used to evaluate the skin lesions. Histological changes, the thickness of epidermis, and the quantity of interleukin (IL)-23 in skin lesion were measured. In in vitro experiments, mononuclear cells in peripheral blood from healthy people were isolated, and monocytes were obtained. DCs with a mature state in differentiation and function were obtained through in vitro induction with several cytokines, and identified by flow cytometry. The influence of DCs on proliferation of allogenic lymphocytes was analyzed. The influence of alkannin on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression of pro-inflammatory factors by mature DCs was evaluated using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Mice treated with alkannin at varying concentration showed obvious remission in psoriasis-like skin lesion compared to control group, with decreased PASI score, obviously reduced vertical thickness of epidermis. Besides, alkannin treatment decreased the expression of IL-23 in skin lesion. Alkannin (12.5 μg/mL) suppressed the ability of DCs to stimulate the proliferation of allogenic lymphocytes, and suppressed the expression and secretion of IL-6, IL-12 p40, IL-23, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA and proteins, respectively. Conclusions: β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin could suppress the function of activated DCs in imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model. PMID:26261548

  13. Time-Lapse Retinal Ganglion Cell Dendritic Field Degeneration Imaged in Organotypic Retinal Explant Culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas V.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Cone-Kimball, Elizabeth; Jefferys, Joan; Quigley, Harry A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an ex vivo organotypic retinal explant culture system suitable for multiple time-point imaging of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dendritic arbors over a period of 1 week, and capable of detecting dendrite neuroprotection conferred by experimental treatments. Methods Thy1-YFP mouse retinas were explanted and maintained in organotypic culture. Retinal ganglion cell dendritic arbors were imaged repeatedly using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Maximal projection z-stacks were traced by two masked investigators and dendritic fields were analyzed for characteristics including branch number, size, and complexity. One group of explants was treated with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) added to the culture media. Changes in individual dendritic fields over time were detected using pair-wise comparison testing. Results Retinal ganglion cells in mouse retinal explant culture began to degenerate after 3 days with 52.4% surviving at 7 days. Dendritic field parameters showed minimal change over 8 hours in culture. Intra- and interobserver measurements of dendrite characteristics were strongly correlated (Spearman rank correlations consistently > 0.80). Statistically significant (P < 0.001) dendritic tree degeneration was detected following 7 days in culture including: 40% to 50% decreases in number of branch segments, number of junctions, number of terminal branches, and total branch length. Scholl analyses similarly demonstrated a significant decrease in dendritic field complexity. Treatment of explants with BDNF+CNTF significantly attenuated dendritic field degeneration. Conclusions Retinal explant culture of Thy1-YFP tissue provides a useful model for time-lapse imaging of RGC dendritic field degeneration over a course of several days, and is capable of detecting neuroprotective amelioration of dendritic pruning within individual RGCs. PMID:26811145

  14. Direct Transfection of Dendritic Cells in the Epidermis After Plasmid Delivery Enhanced by Surface Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Amante, Dinah H.; Smith, Trevor R.F.; Kiosses, Bill B.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Humeau, Laurent M.P.F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The skin is rich in antigen-presenting cells and as such is an excellent target tissue for vaccination strategies. Electroporation is a physical delivery method that potentiates the uptake of DNA vaccines into target cells. Intradermal electroporation offers a minimally invasive solution to DNA delivery in the clinic. Here we describe the direct transfection of dendritic cells in the epidermis, using a surface dermal electroporation device, and specifically show a dendritic cell transfected with plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein. The dendritic cell has used its motile capabilities after transfection to move from the epidermis into the dermis, making its way to the lymphatic system. PMID:25470335

  15. Direct transfection of dendritic cells in the epidermis after plasmid delivery enhanced by surface electroporation.

    PubMed

    Amante, Dinah H; Smith, Trevor R F; Kiosses, Bill B; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Humeau, Laurent M P F; Broderick, Kate E

    2014-12-01

    The skin is rich in antigen-presenting cells and as such is an excellent target tissue for vaccination strategies. Electroporation is a physical delivery method that potentiates the uptake of DNA vaccines into target cells. Intradermal electroporation offers a minimally invasive solution to DNA delivery in the clinic. Here we describe the direct transfection of dendritic cells in the epidermis, using a surface dermal electroporation device, and specifically show a dendritic cell transfected with plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein. The dendritic cell has used its motile capabilities after transfection to move from the epidermis into the dermis, making its way to the lymphatic system. PMID:25470335

  16. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  17. Role of regulatory dendritic cells in allergy and asthma.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Omid; Umetsu, Dale T

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient inducers of all immune responses, and are capable of either inducing productive immunity or maintaining the state of tolerance to self antigens and allergens. In this review, we summarize the emerging literature on DCs, with emphasis on the regulatory function of DCs in allergy and asthma. In particular, we summarize recent data regarding the relationship between DC subsets and TH1, TH2, and regulatory T (TReg) cells. The diverse functions of DCs have been attributed to distinct lineages of DCs, which arise from common immature precursor cells that differentiate in response to specific maturation-inducing or local microenvironment conditions. These subsets of DCs induce different lineages of T cells, such as TH1, TH2, and TReg cells, including Th1Reg and Th2Reg cells, which regulate allergic diseases and asthma. Subsets of DCs regulate the induction of a variety of T-cell subtypes, which suppress the development of allergy and asthma, thus providing anti-inflammatory responses and protective immunity. PMID:15659264

  18. Treosulfan, cyclophosphamide and antithymocyte globulin for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in acquired severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Giebel, Sebastian; Wojnar, Jerzy; Krawczyk-Kulis, Malgorzata; Markiewicz, Miroslaw; Wylezoł, Iwona; Seweryn, Marek; Holowiecka-Goral, Aleksandra; Holowiecki, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    To reduce the risk of graft rejection after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) for patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia (SAA), we introduced an intensified preparative regimen consisting of treosulfan 10 g/m2/d on days -7, -6, cyclophosphamide 40 mg/kg/d on days -5, -4, -3, -2 and anti-thymocyte globulin 2 mg/kg/d on days -3, -2, -1. Six patients with the history of multiple transfusions were treated with alloHCT from either HLA-identical sibling (n=3) or an unrelated volunteer (n=3). Each, bone marrow and peripheral blood was used as a source of stem cells in three cases. All patients engrafted and achieved complete donor chimerism. None of the patients experienced severe organ toxicity. No severe acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) was observed; two patients experienced extensive chronic GVHD. At the median follow-up of 14.5 (13-27) months all patients remained alive and disease-free. Our observation indicates that treosulfan + cyclophosphamide + antithymocyte globulin conditioning is well-tolerated and allows stable engraftment in acquired SAA. PMID:17494286

  19. Plasmodium falciparum causing hemophagocytic syndrome after allogeneic blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, Abderrahman; Ben Othman, Tarek; Torjman, Lamia; Ladeb, Saloua; Lakhal, Amel; Belhadj, Samir; Ayari, Sameh; Cherif, Nadra; Ben Achour, Oumaya; Chaker, Emna; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2004-01-01

    We describe a case of Plasmodium falciparum infection in a 25-year-old male patient with a myelodysplastic syndrome, who underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) in September 2003. Conditioning regimen consisted of total body irradiation (10 Gy) and cyclophosphamide 60 mg/kg for 2 days. A dose of 4 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg was transfused. Engraftment was well documented on day 17 post-transplantation. Spiking fevers occurred on days 19 and 21, associated with a pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly and neurological signs. P. falciparum parasites were found on the peripheral blood smear (parasitemia = 23%). Marrow aspiration showed P. falciparum parasites and proliferation of mature histiocytes with hemophagocytosis. Quinine 10 mg/kg i.v. three times a day for 10 consecutive days was given. The fever subsided within 3 days, and pancytopenia vanished in 14 days. Parasitemia cleared in 6 days. The patient left the unit on day 46 with no further complications. The screening of donors showed that infection was acquired from two blood units (from a single donor) given 5 days before transplantation. We report the first case of profound hemophagocytosis in immunosuppressed patient with malaria of high parasitemia after a bone marrow transplant. PMID:15448674

  20. WU and KI Polyomaviruses in Respiratory Samples from Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Angela P.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Wright, Nancy L.; Englund, Janet A.; Corey, Lawrence; Boeckh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Data are limited regarding 2 new human polyomaviruses, KI polyomavirus (KIPyV) and WU polyomavirus (WUPyV), in immunocompromised patients. We used real-time PCR to test for these and 12 respiratory viruses in 2,732 nasal wash samples collected during the first year after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation from 222 patients. Specimens were collected weekly until day 100; then at least every 3 months. One year after hematopoietic cell transplantation, the cumulative incidence estimate was 26% for KIPyV and 8% for WUPyV. Age <20 years predicted detection of KIPyV (hazard ratio [HR] 4.6) and WUPyV (HR 4.4), and detection of a respiratory virus in the previous 2 weeks predicted KIPyV detection (HR 3.4). Sputum production and wheezing were associated with detection of KIPyV in the past week and WUPyV in the past month. There were no associations with polyomavirus detection and acute graft versus host disease, cytomegalovirus reactivation, neutropenia, lymphopenia, hospitalization, or death. PMID:23017213

  1. Achieving stringent CR is essential before reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in AML.

    PubMed

    Ustun, C; Wiseman, A C; Defor, T E; Yohe, S; Linden, M A; Oran, B; Burke, M; Warlick, E; Miller, J S; Weisdorf, D

    2013-11-01

    Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) can cure patients with AML in CR. However, relapse after RIC allo-HCT may indicate heterogeneity in the stringency of CR. Strict definition of CR requires no evidence of leukemia by both morphologic and flow cytometric criteria. We re-evaluated 85 AML patients receiving RIC allo-HCT in CR to test if a strict definition of CR had direct implications for the outcome. These patients had leukemia immunophenotype documented at diagnosis and analyzed at allo-HCT. Eight (9.4%) had persistent leukemia by flow cytometric criteria at allo-HCT. The patients with immunophenotypic persistent leukemia had a significantly increased relapse (hazard ratio (HR): 3.7; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-10.3, P=0.01) and decreased survival (HR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1.3-6.4, P<0.01) versus 77 patients in CR by both morphology and flow cytometry. However, the pre-allo-HCT bone marrow (BM) blast count (that is, 0-4%) was not significantly associated with risks of relapse or survival. These data indicate the presence of leukemic cells, but not the BM blast count affects survival. A strict morphologic and clinical lab flow cytometric definition of CR predicts outcomes after RIC allo-HCT, and therefore is critical to achieve at transplantation. PMID:23933764

  2. Total body irradiation, fludarabine, melphalan, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for advanced pediatric hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, D; Worth, L L; Mullen, C A; Madden, R; Mahajan, A; Choroszy, M; Ha, C S; Champlin, R C; Chan, K W

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of adding 9 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI), in three single daily fractions of 3 Gy, to the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine 30 mg/m2 i.v. x 4 days and melphalan 140 mg/m2 i.v. x 1 day in advanced pediatric hematologic malignancies. Twenty-two acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), six acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and one non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients were transplanted. Of these, 13 were beyond second remission, and five had prior hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Twenty-one donors were unrelated, of which 19 were from cord blood (CB) units. Three of the eight related donors were genotypically disparate. Oral mucositis and diarrhea were the most common toxicities. Twenty-seven patients achieved neutrophil engraftment (median 16 days), and 23 had platelet engraftment (median 42 days). One patient had primary graft failure. Seven patients died of non-relapse causes in the first 100 days. With a median follow-up of 52 months, seven of 22 ALL, five of six AML, and one of one lymphoma patients are alive and in remission. The regimen of TBI, fludarabine, and melphalan allows the engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (including mismatched CB). It was fairly well tolerated in pediatric patients, even for second transplants. Its efficacy requires further evaluation. PMID:16435013

  3. A 16 Month Survey of Cyclosporine Utilization Evaluation in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli Ardakani, Maria; Tafazoli, Ali; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid; Hajifathali, Abbas; Dadashzadeh, Simin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a life threatening reaction in the stem cell transplantation process. Nowadays Cyclosporine is the most commonly utilized agent for GVHD prophylaxis and it has a major role in successful transplantation. Cyclosporine has been applied for many years in this field but it could be stated that currently no general consensus is available for its optimal method of administration. Conditions related to cyclosporine administration and possible related adverse reactions observed closely in our patients with the aim of constructing a comprehensive practice guideline in the future. Patients and Methods: Allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients who have been taking cyclosporine were monitored during and after their hospitalization while recording all observations on predefined questionnaires on the basis of periodic clinical and laboratory examinations for a 16 month period. Results: Mean recorded duration of infusions was 1.44 ± 0.68 h and by twice daily administration, means intravenous and oral dose was 101.85 ± 22.03 mg and 219.28 ± 63.9 mg, respectively. A mean CsA trough level after about 12 h of specified unique doses was 223 ± 65 ng/mL. We found hypertension, nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in about 14, 20, 48, and 94 percent of patients. Conclusions: This study proposed that permanent guidance of healthcare team according to a fixed and standard method of cyclosporine administration routine with using efficient facilities and protocols would be helpful considerably for an optimal pharmacotherapy. PMID:27610174

  4. The effects of intestinal tract bacterial diversity on mortality following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jenq, Robert R.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Littmann, Eric R.; Morjaria, Sejal; Ling, Lilan; No, Daniel; Gobourne, Asia; Viale, Agnes; Dahi, Parastoo B.; Ponce, Doris M.; Barker, Juliet N.; Giralt, Sergio; van den Brink, Marcel; Pamer, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Highly diverse bacterial populations inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and modulate host inflammation and promote immune tolerance. In allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), the gastrointestinal mucosa is damaged, and colonizing bacteria are impacted, leading to an impaired intestinal microbiota with reduced diversity. We examined the impact of intestinal diversity on subsequent mortality outcomes following transplantation. Fecal specimens were collected from 80 recipients of allo-HSCT at the time of stem cell engraftment. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were characterized, and microbial diversity was estimated using the inverse Simpson index. Subjects were classified into high, intermediate, and low diversity groups and assessed for differences in outcomes. Mortality outcomes were significantly worse in patients with lower intestinal diversity; overall survival at 3 years was 36%, 60%, and 67% for low, intermediate, and high diversity groups, respectively (P = .019, log-rank test). Low diversity showed a strong effect on mortality after multivariate adjustment for other clinical predictors (transplant related mortality: adjusted hazard ratio, 5.25; P = .014). In conclusion, the diversity of the intestinal microbiota at engraftment is an independent predictor of mortality in allo-HSCT recipients. These results indicate that the intestinal microbiota may be an important factor in the success or failure in allo-HSCT. PMID:24939656

  5. Muscarinic regulation of Kenyon cell dendritic arborizations in adult worker honey bees.

    PubMed

    Dobrin, Scott E; Herlihy, J Daniel; Robinson, Gene E; Fahrbach, Susan E

    2011-09-01

    The experience of foraging under natural conditions increases the volume of mushroom body neuropil in worker honey bees. A comparable increase in neuropil volume results from treatment of worker honey bees with pilocarpine, an agonist for muscarinic-type cholinergic receptors. A component of the neuropil growth induced by foraging experience is growth of dendrites in the collar region of the calyces. We show here, via analysis of Golgi-impregnated collar Kenyon cells with wedge arborizations, that significant increases in standard measures of dendritic complexity were also found in worker honey bees treated with pilocarpine. This result suggests that signaling via muscarinic-type receptors promotes the increase in Kenyon cell dendritic complexity associated with foraging. Treatment of worker honey bees with scopolamine, a muscarinic inhibitor, inhibited some aspects of dendritic growth. Spine density on the Kenyon cell dendrites varied with sampling location, with the distal portion of the dendritic field having greater total spine density than either the proximal or medial section. This observation may be functionally significant because of the stratified organization of projections from visual centers to the dendritic arborizations of the collar Kenyon cells. Pilocarpine treatment had no effect on the distribution of spines on dendrites of the collar Kenyon cells. PMID:21262388

  6. Tissue-Related Hypoxia Attenuates Proinflammatory Effects of Allogeneic PBMCs on Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bobyleva, Polina I.; Andreeva, Elena R.; Gornostaeva, Aleksandra N.; Buravkova, Ludmila B.

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose tissue-stromal derived cells (ASCs)