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Sample records for allogeneic dendritic cells

  1. Allogeneic IgG combined with dendritic cell stimuli induce antitumour T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Carmi, Yaron; Spitzer, Matthew H; Linde, Ian L; Burt, Bryan M; Prestwood, Tyler R; Perlman, Nicola; Davidson, Matthew G; Kenkel, Justin A; Segal, Ehud; Pusapati, Ganesh V; Bhattacharya, Nupur; Engleman, Edgar G

    2015-05-01

    Whereas cancers grow within host tissues and evade host immunity through immune-editing and immunosuppression, tumours are rarely transmissible between individuals. Much like transplanted allogeneic organs, allogeneic tumours are reliably rejected by host T cells, even when the tumour and host share the same major histocompatibility complex alleles, the most potent determinants of transplant rejection. How such tumour-eradicating immunity is initiated remains unknown, although elucidating this process could provide the basis for inducing similar responses against naturally arising tumours. Here we find that allogeneic tumour rejection is initiated in mice by naturally occurring tumour-binding IgG antibodies, which enable dendritic cells (DCs) to internalize tumour antigens and subsequently activate tumour-reactive T cells. We exploited this mechanism to treat autologous and autochthonous tumours successfully. Either systemic administration of DCs loaded with allogeneic-IgG-coated tumour cells or intratumoral injection of allogeneic IgG in combination with DC stimuli induced potent T-cell-mediated antitumour immune responses, resulting in tumour eradication in mouse models of melanoma, pancreas, lung and breast cancer. Moreover, this strategy led to eradication of distant tumours and metastases, as well as the injected primary tumours. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we studied antibodies and cells from patients with lung cancer. T cells from these patients responded vigorously to autologous tumour antigens after culture with allogeneic-IgG-loaded DCs, recapitulating our findings in mice. These results reveal that tumour-binding allogeneic IgG can induce powerful antitumour immunity that can be exploited for cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Allogeneic IgG combined with dendritic cell stimuli induces anti-tumor T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Carmi, Yaron; Spitzer, Matthew H.; Linde, Ian L.; Burt, Bryan M; Prestwood, Tyler R.; Perlman, Nikola; Davidson, Matthew G.; Kenkel, Justin A.; Segal, Ehud; Pusapati, Ganesh V.; Bhattacharya, Nupur; Engleman, Edgar G.

    2015-01-01

    While cancers grow in their hosts and evade host immunity through immunoediting and immunosuppression1–5, tumors are rarely transmissible between individuals. Much like transplanted allogeneic organs, allogeneic tumors are reliably rejected by host T cells, even when the tumor and host share the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, the most potent determinants of transplant rejection6–10. How such tumor-eradicating immunity is initiated remains unknown, though elucidating this process could provide a roadmap for inducing similar responses against naturally arising tumors. We found that allogeneic tumor rejection is initiated by naturally occurring tumor-binding IgG antibodies, which enable dendritic cells (DC) to internalize tumor antigens and subsequently activate tumor-reactive T cells. We exploited this mechanism to successfully treat autologous and autochthonous tumors. Either systemic administration of DC loaded with allogeneic IgG (alloIgG)-coated tumor cells or intratumoral injection of alloIgG in combination with DC stimuli induced potent T cell mediated anti-tumor immune responses, resulting in tumor eradication in mouse models of melanoma, pancreas, lung and breast cancer. Moreover, this strategy led to eradication of distant tumors and metastases, as well as the injected primary tumors. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we studied antibodies and cells from patients with lung cancer. T cells from these patients responded vigorously to autologous tumor antigens after culture with alloIgG-loaded DC, recapitulating our findings in mice. These results reveal that tumor-binding alloIgG can induce powerful anti-tumor immunity that can be exploited for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25924063

  3. Vaccination of melanoma patients using dendritic cells loaded with an allogeneic tumor cell lysate.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Margarita; Bercovici, Nadège; Taylor, Rachel; Vereecken, Pierre; Massicard, Séverine; Duriau, Dominique; Vernel-Pauillac, Frédérique; Boyer, Aurélie; Baron-Bodo, Véronique; Mallard, Eric; Bartholeyns, Jacques; Goxe, Béatrice; Latour, Nathalie; Leroy, Sophie; Prigent, Didier; Martiat, Philippe; Sales, François; Laporte, Marianne; Bruyns, Catherine; Romet-Lemonne, Jean-Loup; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Lehmann, Frédéric; Velu, Thierry

    2006-07-01

    The aim of the present phase I/II study was to evaluate the safety, immune responses and clinical activity of a vaccine based on autologous dendritic cells (DC) loaded with an allogeneic tumor cell lysate in advanced melanoma patients. DC derived from monocytes were generated in serum-free medium containing GM-CSF and IL-13 according to Good Manufacturing Practices. Fifteen patients with metastatic melanoma (stage III or IV) received four subcutaneous, intradermal, and intranodal vaccinations of both DC loaded with tumor cell lysate and DC loaded with hepatitis B surface protein (HBs) and/or tetanus toxoid (TT). No grade 3 or 4 adverse events related to the vaccination were observed. Enhanced immunity to the allogeneic tumor cell lysate and to TAA-derived peptides were documented, as well as immune responses to HBs/TT antigens. Four out of nine patients who received the full treatment survived for more than 20 months. Two patients showed signs of clinical response and received 3 additional doses of vaccine: one patient showed regression of in-transit metastases leading to complete remission. Eighteen months later, the patient was still free of disease. The second patient experienced stabilization of lung metastases for approximately 10 months. Overall, our results show that vaccination with DC loaded with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate was feasible in large-scale and well-tolerated in this group of advanced melanoma patients. Immune responses to tumor-related antigens documented in some treated patients support further investigations to optimize the vaccine formulation.

  4. Allogeneic Mature Human Dendritic Cells Generate Superior Alloreactive Regulatory T Cells in the Presence of IL-15.

    PubMed

    Litjens, Nicolle H R; Boer, Karin; Zuijderwijk, Joke M; Klepper, Mariska; Peeters, Annemiek M A; Prens, Errol P; Verschoor, Wenda; Kraaijeveld, Rens; Ozgur, Zeliha; van den Hout-van Vroonhoven, Mirjam C; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Baan, Carla C; Betjes, Michiel G H

    2015-06-01

    Expansion of Ag-specific naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTregs) is required to obtain sufficient numbers of cells for cellular immunotherapy. In this study, different allogeneic stimuli were studied for their capacity to generate functional alloantigen-specific nTregs. A highly enriched nTreg fraction (CD4(+)CD25(bright)CD127(-) T cells) was alloantigen-specific expanded using HLA-mismatched immature, mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs), or PBMCs. The allogeneic mature moDC-expanded nTregs were fully characterized by analysis of the demethylation status within the Treg-specific demethylation region of the FOXP3 gene and the expression of both protein and mRNA of FOXP3, HELIOS, CTLA4, and cytokines. In addition, the Ag-specific suppressive capacity of these expanded nTregs was tested. Allogeneic mature moDCs and skin-derived DCs were superior in inducing nTreg expansion compared with immature moDCs or PBMCs in an HLA-DR- and CD80/CD86-dependent way. Remarkably, the presence of exogenous IL-15 without IL-2 could facilitate optimal mature moDC-induced nTreg expansion. Allogeneic mature moDC-expanded nTregs were at low ratios (<1:320), potent suppressors of alloantigen-induced proliferation without significant suppression of completely HLA-mismatched, Ag-induced proliferation. Mature moDC-expanded nTregs were highly demethylated at the Treg-specific demethylation region within the FOXP3 gene and highly expressed of FOXP3, HELIOS, and CTLA4. A minority of the expanded nTregs produced IL-10, IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, but few IL-17-producing nTregs were found. Next-generation sequencing of mRNA of moDC-expanded nTregs revealed a strong induction of Treg-associated mRNAs. Human allogeneic mature moDCs are highly efficient stimulator cells, in the presence of exogenous IL-15, for expansion of stable alloantigen-specific nTregs with superior suppressive function. PMID:25917092

  5. Dendritic Cell Therapy in an Allogeneic-Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Setting: An Effective Strategy toward Better Disease Control?

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Maud; de Haar, Colin; Nierkens, Stefan; Boelens, Jaap Jan

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a last treatment resort and only potentially curative treatment option for several hematological malignancies resistant to chemotherapy. The induction of profound immune regulation after allogeneic HCT is imperative to prevent graft-versus-host reactions and, at the same time, allow protective immune responses against pathogens and against tumor cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells that are essential in regulating this balance and are of major interest as a tool to modulate immune responses in the complex and challenging phase of immune reconstitution early after allo-HCT. This review focuses on the use of DC vaccination to prevent cancer relapses early after allo-HCT. It describes the role of host and donor-DCs, various vaccination strategies, different DC subsets, antigen loading, DC maturation/activation, and injection sites and dose. At last, clinical trials using DC vaccination post-allo-HCT and the future perspectives of DC vaccination in combination with other cancer immunotherapies are discussed. PMID:24904573

  6. Suppression of lentivirus-mediated transgenic dendritic cells in graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y J; Chen, W R; Li, D P; Song, L X; Wu, J Q; Zhang, P; Li, Z Y; Huang, Y H

    2015-01-01

    We determined whether genetically engineered immature dendritic cells (imDCs) mediated by lentiviral vectors alleviate acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) in mice. We introduced the mouse chemokine receptor 7 (Ccr7) gene into the bone marrow-derived imDCs of C57BL/6 mice to construct genetically engineered imDCs. A 1:1 mixture of bone marrow and spleen cells from the donors was injected into the recipients, which were divided into four groups: radiation, transplantation, empty vector, and transgenic imDC groups. Symptoms, clinical scores, GVHD pathological changes, and survival times and rates of recipients were recorded; secretion of IFN-γ and IL-4, and allogeneic chimerism rates were detected. The survival time of the transgenic imDC group (27.5 ± 7.55 days) was significantly longer than in the other three groups (P < 0.01). The GVHD score of the imDC group mice was significantly lower than in the transplantation and empty vector groups (P < 0.05), which meant that mice in the transgenic imDC group had the lightest pathology damage in the target organs. In the transplantation group, IFN-γ increased while IL-4 decreased. In contrast, IFN-γ decreased and IL-4 increased in both empty vector and trans-imDC groups, and the difference was significant in the latter (P < 0.01). Thirty days or more following transplantation, the allogeneic chimerism rate was still 95-100%, suggesting complete donor type implantation. Ccr7 transfection into imDCs suppressed occurrence and severity of acute GVHD after allo-BMT in mice; the mechanism might be associated with IFN-γ decrease and IL-4 increase. PMID:26436385

  7. Rapid reconstitution of functionally active 6-sulfoLacNAc+ dendritic cells (slanDCs) of donor origin following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant

    PubMed Central

    Mimiola, E; Marini, O; Perbellini, O; Micheletti, A; Vermi, W; Lonardi, S; Costantini, C; Meneghelli, E; Andreini, A; Bonetto, C; Vassanelli, A; Cantini, M; Zoratti, E; Massi, D; Zamo', A; Leso, A; Quaresmini, G; Benedetti, F; Pizzolo, G; Cassatella, M A; Tecchio, C

    2014-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is critical in determining the extent of graft-versus-host response. The goal of this study was to analyse slanDCs, a subset of human proinflammatory DCs, in haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) sources, as well as to evaluate their 1-year kinetics of reconstitution, origin and functional capacities in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) of patients who have undergone HSCT, and their presence in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) tissue specimens. slanDCs were also compared to myeloid (m)DCs, plasmacytoid (p)DCs and monocytes in HSC sources and in patients' PB and BM throughout reconstitution. slanDCs accounted for all HSC sources. In patients' PB and BM, slanDCs were identified from day +21, showing median frequencies comparable to healthy donors, donor origin and kinetics of recovery similar to mDCs, pDCs, and monocytes. Under cyclosporin treatment, slanDCs displayed a normal pattern of maturation, and maintained an efficient chemotactic activity and capacity of releasing tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. None the less, they were almost undetectable in GVHD tissue specimens, being present only in intestinal acute GVHD samples. slanDCs reconstitute early, being donor-derived and functionally competent. The absence of slanDCs from most of the GVHD-targeted tissue specimens seems to rule out the direct participation of these cells in the majority of the local reactions characterizing GVHD. PMID:24853271

  8. Generation of a cord blood-derived Wilms Tumor 1 dendritic cell vaccine for AML patients treated with allogeneic cord blood transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de Haar, Colin; Plantinga, Maud; Blokland, Nina JG; van Til, Niek P; Flinsenberg, Thijs WH; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Smits, Evelien L; Boon, Louis; Spel, Lotte; Boes, Marianne; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The poor survival rates of refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients after haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) requires the development of additional immune therapeutic strategies. As the elicitation of tumor-antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is associated with reduced relapses and enhanced survival, enhanced priming of these CTLs using an anti-AML vaccine may result in long-term immunity against AML. Cord blood (CB), as allogeneic HCT source, may provide a unique setting for such post-HCT vaccination, considering its enhanced graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effects and population of highly responsive naïve T cells. It is our goal to develop a powerful and safe immune therapeutic strategy composed of CB-HCT followed by vaccination with CB CD34+-derived dendritic cells (DCs) presenting the oncoprotein Wilms Tumor-1 (WT1), which is expressed in AML-blasts in the majority of patients. Here, we describe the optimization of a clinically applicable DC culture protocol. This two-step protocol consisting of an expansion phase followed by the differentiation toward DCs, enables us to generate sufficient cord blood-derived DCs (CBDCs) in the clinical setting. At the end of the culture, the CBDCs exhibit a mature surface phenotype, are able to migrate, express tumor antigen (WT1) after electroporation with mRNA encoding the full-length WT1 protein, and stimulate WT1-specific T cells. PMID:26451309

  9. Soluble mouse B7-H3 down-regulates dendritic cell stimulatory capacity to allogenic T cell proliferation and production of IL-2 and IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junfa; Huang, Baojun; Xiong, Ping; Feng, Wei; Xu, Yong; Fang, Min; Zheng, Fang; Gong, Feili

    2006-06-01

    B7-H3 is a recently identified member of the B7 gene family. Its ubiquitous expression in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues suggests that it could play an important role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. However, the exact function of B7-H3 is still elusive. The purpose of current study is to demonstrate the possible function of soluble mouse B7-H3 for prevention of DC-mediated T cell activation. For this purpose, we established a soluble mouse B7-H3 fusion protein (mB7h3-hIg) eukaryotic expression vector (pmB7h3-hIg) with a C-terminal human IgG1 Fc. A C57BL/6 (B6)-derived dendritic cell line (DC2.4 cells) was used for the establishment of stable transfectants for generation of soluble mB7h3-hIg. Ectopic mB7h3-hIg expression was confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blot and ELISA analyses. A 49.7 kD protein was detected by Western blot from DC2.4 cells transfected with pmB7h3-hIg. It was found that soluble mB7h3-hIg expression has no effect on cell cycling and apoptosis and the expression of CD80 and CD86 of the DC2.4 cells. However, ectopic soluble mB7h3-hIg expression was found to significantly affect the allo-stimulatory capability for DC2.4 cells. DC2.4 cells expressing soluble mB7h3-hIg showed a significant reduced allo-stimulatory capability as compared with the controls determined by MLC. Further studies revealed that soluble mB7h3-hIg could also inhibit IL-2 and IFN-gamma production of allogenic T cells. These results suggested a great potential of soluble B7-H3 for treatment of graft rejection and autoimmume disease.

  10. PD-1/PD-L1 Interaction Maintains Allogeneic Immune Tolerance Induced by Administration of Ultraviolet B-Irradiated Immature Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that transfusion of ultraviolet B-irradiated immature dendritic cells (UVB-iDCs) induced alloantigen-specific tolerance between two different strains of mice. Programmed death-1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) have been suggested to play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance. In the present study, we seek to address whether PD-1/PD-L1 plays a role in the maintenance of UVB-iDC-induced tolerance. We first observe that the UVB-iDC-induced alloantigen-specific tolerance can be maintained for over 6 weeks. Supporting this, at 6 weeks after tolerance induction completion, alloantigen-specific tolerance is still able to be transferred to syngeneic naïve mice through adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, skin transplantation study shows that the survival of allogeneic grafts is prolonged in those tolerant recipients. Further studies show that PD-1/PD-L1 interaction is essential for maintaining the induced tolerance as blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 by anti-PD-L1 antibodies largely breaks the tolerance at both cellular and humoral immunological levels. Importantly, we show that PD-1/PD-L1 interaction in tolerant mice is also essential for controlling alloantigen-responding T cells, which have never experienced alloantigens. The above findings suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 plays a crucial role in maintaining immune tolerance induced by UVB-iDCs, as well as in actively controlling effector T cells specific to alloantigens. PMID:27556047

  11. Cross-dressing by donor dendritic cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation contributes to formation of the immunological synapse and maximizes responses to indirectly presented antigen.

    PubMed

    Markey, Kate A; Koyama, Motoko; Gartlan, Kate H; Leveque, Lucie; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2014-06-01

    The stimulation of naive donor T cells by recipient alloantigen is central to the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Using mouse models of transplantation, we have observed that donor cells become "cross-dressed" in very high levels of recipient hematopoietic cell-derived MHC class I and II molecules following BMT. Recipient-type MHC is transiently present on donor dendritic cells (DCs) after BMT in the setting of myeloablative conditioning but is persistent after nonmyeloablative conditioning, in which recipient hematopoietic cells remain in high numbers. Despite the high level of recipient-derived alloantigen present on the surface of donor DCs, donor T cell proliferative responses are generated only in response to processed recipient alloantigen presented via the indirect pathway and not in response to cross-dressed MHC. Assays in which exogenous peptide is added to cross-dressed MHC in the presence of naive TCR transgenic T cells specific to the MHC class II-peptide combination confirm that cross-dressed APC cannot induce T cell proliferation in isolation. Despite failure to induce T cell proliferation, cross-dressing by donor DCs contributes to generation of the immunological synapse between DCs and CD4 T cells, and this is required for maximal responses induced by classical indirectly presented alloantigen. We conclude that the process of cross-dressing by donor DCs serves as an efficient alternative pathway for the acquisition of recipient alloantigen and that once acquired, this cross-dressed MHC can assist in immune synapse formation prior to the induction of full T cell proliferative responses by concurrent indirect Ag presentation.

  12. Isolation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, K; Swiggard, W J; Steinman, R M; Romani, N; Schuler, G

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents two methods for preparing dendritic cells (DCs), a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell (APC). The first method involves the isolation of DCs from mouse spleen, resulting in a cell population that is highly enriched in accessory cell and APC function. A support protocol for collagenase digestion of splenocyte suspensions is described to increase the yield of dendritic cells. The second method involves generating large numbers of DCs from mouse bone marrow progenitor cells. In that technique, bone marrow cells are cultured in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to yield 5-10 10(6) cells, 60% of which express DC surface markers (e.g., B-7-2/CD86). Additional techniques for isolating DCs from mouse spleens or other mouse tissues, as well as from human tissues, are also discussed.

  13. Isolation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kayo; Swiggard, William J; Steinman, Ralph M; Romani, Nikolaus; Schuler, Gerold; Brinster, Carine

    2009-08-01

    This unit presents two methods for preparing dendritic cells (DCs), a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell (APC). The first method involves the isolation of DCs from mouse spleen, resulting in a cell population that is highly enriched in accessory cell and APC function. A support protocol for collagenase digestion of splenocyte suspensions is described to increase the yield of dendritic cells. The second method involves generating large numbers of DCs from mouse bone marrow progenitor cells. In that technique, bone marrow cells are cultured in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to yield 5-10 x 10(6) cells, 60% of which express DC surface markers (e.g., B-7-2/CD86). Additional techniques for isolating DCs from mouse spleens or other mouse tissues, as well as from human tissues, are also discussed.

  14. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Most hematological malignancies occur in older patients. Until recently these patients and those with comorbidities were not candidates for treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation because they were unable to tolerate the heretofore used high-dose conditioning regimens. The finding that many of the cures achieved with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation were due to graft-versus-tumor effects led to the development of less toxic and well-tolerated reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative regimens. These regimens enabled allogeneic engraftment, thereby setting the stage for graft-versus-tumor effects. This review summarizes the encouraging early results seen with the new regimens and discusses the two hurdles that need to be overcome for achieving even greater success, disease relapse and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27132278

  15. Dendritic cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Edward J.; Everts, Bart

    2015-01-01

    The past 15 years have seen enormous advances in our understanding of the receptor and signalling systems that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to respond to pathogens or other danger signals and initiate innate and adaptive immune responses. We are now beginning to appreciate that many of these pathways not only stimulate changes in the expression of genes that control DC immune functions, but also affect metabolic pathways, thereby integrating the cellular requirements of the activation process. In this Review, we focus on this relatively new area of research and attempt to describe an integrated view of DC immunometabolism. PMID:25534620

  16. Generation of allo-restricted peptide-specific T cells using RNA-pulsed dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Susanne; Geiger, Christiane; Milosevic, Slavoljub; Mosetter, Barbara; Eichenlaub, Sabine; Schendel, Dolores J.

    2012-01-01

    Designer T cells expressing transgenic T cell receptors (TCR) with anti-tumor specificity offer new treatment options for cancer patients. We developed a three phase procedure to identify T cells of high avidity based on the fact that T cells recognizing peptides presented by allogeneic MHC efficiently kill tumor cells. Autologous dendritic cells (DC) are co-transfected with ivt-RNA encoding an allogeneic MHC molecule and a selected antigen to allow them to express allogeneic MHC-peptide complexes that activate allo-restricted peptide-specific T cells. This approach provides great flexibility for obtaining high-avidity T cells as potential sources of TCR for adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:22720234

  17. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: diagnostic criteria and therapeutical approaches.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Livio; Valentini, Caterina G; Grammatico, Sara; Pulsoni, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare haematological malignancy derived from the precursors of plamacytoid dendritic cells, with an aggressive clinical course and high frequency of cutaneous and bone marrow involvement. Neoplastic cells express CD4, CD43 (also termed SPN), CD45RA and CD56 (also termed NCAM1), as well as the plasmacytoid dendritic cell-associated antigens CD123 (also termed IL3RA), BDCA-2 (also termed CD303, CLEC4E) TCL1 and CTLA1 (also termed GZMB). The median survival is only a few months as the tumour exhibits a progressive course despite initial response to chemotherapy. The best modality of treatment remains to be defined. Generally, patients receive acute leukaemia-like induction, according to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)-type or acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL)-type regimens. The frequent neuromeningeal involvement indicates systematic pre-emptive intrathecal chemotherapy in addition to intensive chemotherapy. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), particularly when performed in first remission, may improve the survival. Preliminary data suggest a potential role for immunomodulatory agents and novel targeted drugs. Herein epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of BPDCN will be presented. In detail, this review focuses on the therapeutic aspects of BPDCN, proposing a treatment algorithm for the management of the disease, including induction chemotherapy, allogeneic HSCT and intrathecal prophylaxis at different steps of treatment, according to compliance, biological and clinical characteristics of patients. PMID:27264021

  18. Present and Future of Allogeneic Natural Killer Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Okjae; Jung, Mi Young; Hwang, Yu Kyeong; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the antitumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions. PMID:26089823

  19. Blue light irradiation suppresses dendritic cells activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael R; Abel, Manuela; Lopez Kostka, Susanna; Rudolph, Berenice; Becker, Detlef; von Stebut, Esther

    2013-08-01

    Blue light is a UV-free irradiation suitable for treating chronic skin inflammation, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and hand- and foot eczema. However, a better understanding of the mode of action is still missing. For this reason, we investigated whether dendritic cells (DC) are directly affected by blue light irradiation in vitro. Here, we report that irradiation neither induced apoptosis nor maturation of monocyte-derived and myeloid DC. However, subsequent DC maturation upon LPS/IFNγ stimulation was impaired in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by maturation markers and cytokine release. Moreover, the potential of this DC to induce cytokine secretion from allogeneic CD4 T cells was reduced. In conclusion, unlike UV irradiation, blue light irradiation at high and low doses only resulted in impaired DC maturation upon activation and a reduced subsequent stimulatory capacity in allogeneic MLRs with strongest effects at higher doses. PMID:23879817

  20. Characterization of a phenotypically unique population of CD13+ dendritic cells resident in the spleen.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yan; Mwangi, Waithaka; Brown, Wendy C; Davis, William C; Hope, Jayne C; Palmer, Guy H

    2006-09-01

    Immature dendritic cells (DCs) resident in bovine spleens represent a distinct CD11a(+) CD11c(+) CD13(+) CD172(+) CD205(+) population compared to those circulating in peripheral blood or trafficking via afferent lymph. Upon cytokine-induced maturation, splenic DCs both efficiently present antigen in the stimulation of allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation and recall antigen-specific responses.

  1. Systematic Nutritional Support in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Shigeo; Einsele, Hermann; Savani, Bipin N; Kapp, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become an established treatment modality for various hematological diseases. However, in allogeneic HSCT, patients often suffer from severe gastrointestinal complications caused by the conditioning regimen and acute/chronic graft-versus-host disease, which requires support by multidisciplinary nutritional support teams (NST). In addition, pretransplantation nutritional status can affect the clinical outcome after allogeneic HSCT. Therefore, it is important to refer the patient to a NST when becoming aware of nutritional problems before allogeneic HSCT. It is also important to follow nutritional status over the long term, as patients often suffer from various nutritional problems, such as malnutrition and metabolic syndrome, even late after allogeneic HSCT. In summary, NST can contribute to the improvement of nutritional status and possibly prognosis at every stage before and after allogeneic HSCT. Here, we aim to give a comprehensive overview of current understanding about nutritional support in allogeneic HSCT and try to provoke a constructive discussion to stimulate further investigation.

  2. Relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, A John; Battiwalla, Minoo

    2012-01-01

    Since allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) represents an intensive curative treatment for high-risk malignancies, its failure to prevent relapse leaves few options for successful salvage treatment. While many patients have a high early mortality from relapse, some respond and have sustained remissions, and a minority has a second chance of cure with appropriate therapy. The prognosis for relapsed hematological malignancies after SCT depends on four factors: the time elapsed from SCT to relapse (with relapses occurring within 6 months having the worst prognosis), the disease type (with chronic leukemias and some lymphomas having a second possibility of cure with further treatment), the disease burden and site of relapse (with better treatment success if disease is treated early), and the conditions of the first transplant (with superior outcome for patients where there is an opportunity to increase either the alloimmune effect, the specificity of the antileukemia effect with targeted agents or the intensity of the conditioning in a second transplant). These features direct treatments toward either modified second transplants, chemotherapy, targeted antileukemia therapy, immunotherapy or palliative care. PMID:21083034

  3. Antigen mRNA-transfected, allogeneic fibroblasts loaded with NKT-cell ligand confer antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shin-ichiro; Goto, Akira; Shimizu, Kanako

    2009-04-30

    The maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) in situ by danger signals plays a central role in linking innate and adaptive immunity. We previously demonstrated that the activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells by administration of alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer)-loaded tumor cells can act as a cellular adjuvant through the DC maturation. In the current study, we used allogeneic fibroblasts loaded with alpha-GalCer and transfected with antigen-encoding mRNA, thus combining the adjuvant effects of iNKT-cell activation with delivery of antigen to DCs in vivo. We found that these cells produce antigen protein and activate NK and iNKT cells. When injected into major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched mice, they elicited antigen-specific T-cell responses and provided tumor protection, suggesting that these immune responses depend on host DCs. In addition, antigen-expressing fibroblasts loaded with alpha-GalCer lead to a more potent T-cell response than those expressing NK cell ligands. Thus, glycolipid-loaded, mRNA-transfected allogeneic fibroblasts act as cellular vectors to provide iNKT-cell activation, leading to DC maturation and T-cell immunity. By harnessing the innate immune system and generating an adaptive immune response to a variety of antigens, this unique tool could prove clinically beneficial in the development of immunotherapies against malignant and infectious diseases. PMID:19164596

  4. Cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Puram, Sidharth V.; Bonni, Azad

    2013-01-01

    The proper formation and morphogenesis of dendrites is fundamental to the establishment of neural circuits in the brain. Following cell cycle exit and migration, neurons undergo organized stages of dendrite morphogenesis, which include dendritic arbor growth and elaboration followed by retraction and pruning. Although these developmental stages were characterized over a century ago, molecular regulators of dendrite morphogenesis have only recently been defined. In particular, studies in Drosophila and mammalian neurons have identified numerous cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis that include transcriptional regulators, cytoskeletal and motor proteins, secretory and endocytic pathways, cell cycle-regulated ubiquitin ligases, and components of other signaling cascades. Here, we review cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite patterning and discuss how the characterization of such crucial regulators advances our understanding of normal brain development and pathogenesis of diverse cognitive disorders. PMID:24255095

  5. Cell salvage for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Carless, Paul A; Henry, David A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Brown, Tamara; Fergusson, Dean A

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have prompted reconsideration of the use of allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and a range of techniques to minimise transfusion requirements. Objectives To examine the evidence for the efficacy of cell salvage in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes. Search methods We identified studies by searching CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2009), EMBASE (1980 to June 2009), the internet (to August 2009) and bibliographies of published articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials with a concurrent control group in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to cell salvage (autotransfusion) or to a control group who did not receive the intervention. Data collection and analysis Data were independently extracted and the risk of bias assessed. Relative risks (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. The primary outcomes were the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red cell transfusion and the amount of blood transfused. Other clinical outcomes are detailed in the review. Main results A total of 75 trials were included. Overall, the use of cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 38% (RR 0.62; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.70). The absolute reduction in risk (ARR) of receiving an allogeneic RBC transfusion was 21% (95% CI 15% to 26%). In orthopaedic procedures the RR of exposure to RBC transfusion was 0.46 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.57) compared to 0.77 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.86) for cardiac procedures. The use of cell salvage resulted in an average saving of 0.68 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (WMD −0.68; 95% CI −0.88 to −0.49). Cell salvage did not appear to impact adversely on clinical outcomes. Authors’ conclusions

  6. Cellular therapy following allogeneic stem-cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is the most effective approach for many patients with hematologic malignancies. Unfortunately, relapse remains the most common cause of death after allogeneic HSCT, and the prognosis of relapsed disease is poor for most patients. Induction of a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL), or graft-versus-tumor, effect through the use of donor leukocyte infusion (DLI), or donor lymphocyte infusion, has been remarkably successful for relapsed chronic myelogenous leukemia. Unfortunately, response to DLI in other hematologic malignancies is much less common and depends on many factors including histology, pace and extent of relapse, and time from HSCT to relapse. Furthermore, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is common after DLI and often limits successful immunotherapy. Ultimately, manipulations to minimize GVHD while preserving or enhancing GVL are necessary to improve outcomes for relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:23556106

  7. Dendritic web silicon for solar cell application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidensticker, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    The dendritic web process for growing long thin ribbon crystals of silicon and other semiconductors is described. Growth is initiated from a thin wirelike dendrite seed which is brought into contact with the melt surface. Initially, the seed grows laterally to form a button at the melt surface; when the seed is withdrawn, needlelike dendrites propagate from each end of the button into the melt, and the web portion of the crystal is formed by the solidification of the liquid film supported by the button and the bounding dendrites. Apparatus used for dendritic web growth, material characteristics, and the two distinctly different mechanisms involved in the growth of a single crystal are examined. The performance of solar cells fabricated from dendritic web material is indistinguishable from the performance of cells fabricated from Czochralski grown material.

  8. Actinomycosis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation despite penicillin prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Barraco, F; Labussière-Wallet, H; Valour, F; Ducastelle-Leprêtre, S; Nicolini, F-E; Thomas, X; Ferry, T; Dumitrescu, O; Michallet, M; Ader, F

    2016-08-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare chronic and multifaceted disease caused by Actinomyces species frequently mimicking malignancy or other chronic granulomatous lung diseases. We report 4 original presentations of actinomycosis arising under supposed penicillin prophylaxis in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. PMID:27203624

  9. Orchestration of transplantation tolerance by regulatory dendritic cell therapy or in situ targeting of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, Adrian E.; Thomson, Angus W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Extensive research in murine transplant models over the past two decades has convincingly demonstrated the ability of regulatory dendritic cells (DCreg) to promote long-term allograft survival. We review important considerations regarding the source of therapeutic DCreg (donor or recipient) and their mode of action, in situ targeting of DCreg, and optimal therapeutic regimens to promote DCreg function. Recent findings Recent studies have defined protocols and mechanisms whereby ex vivo-generated DCreg of donor or recipient origin subvert allogeneic T cell responses and promote long-term organ transplant survival. Particular interest has focused on how donor antigen (Ag) is acquired, processed and presented by autologous DCs, on the stability of DCreg, and on in situ targeting of DC to promote their tolerogenic function. New evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of DCreg in a clinically-relevant non-human primate organ transplant model and production of clinical grade DCreg support early evaluation of DCreg therapy in human graft recipients. Summary We discuss strategies currently used to promote DC tolerogenicity, including DCreg therapy and in situ targeting of DC, with a view to improved understanding of underlying mechanisms and identification of the most promising strategies for therapeutic application. PMID:24926700

  10. Lipid accumulation and dendritic cell dysfunction in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herber, Donna L.; Cao, Wei; Nefedova, Yulia; Novitskiy, Sergey V.; Nagaraj, Srinivas; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Corzo, Alex; Cho, Hyun Il; Celis, Esteban; Lennox, Briana; Knight, Stella C.; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Antonia, Scott; Fishman, Mayer; Ferris, Robert L.; Kagan, Valerian E.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2010-01-01

    Professional antigen presenting cells, dendritic cells (DC) are responsible for initiation and maintenance of immune responses. Here, we report that a substantial proportion of DCs in tumor-bearing mice and cancer patients have increased levels of triglycerides. Lipid accumulation in DCs was caused by increased uptake of extracellular lipids due to up-regulation of scavenger receptor A. DCs with high lipid content were not able to effectively stimulate allogeneic T cells or present tumor-associated antigens. DCs with high and normal lipid levels did not differ in expression of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules. However, lipid-laden DCs had reduced capacity to process antigens. Pharmacological normalization of lipid levels in DCs with an inhibitor of acetyl-CoA carboxylase restored the functional activity of DCs and substantially enhanced the effects of a cancer vaccine. These findings support the regulation of immune responses in cancer by manipulation of lipid levels in DCs. PMID:20622859

  11. Dendritic cell immunotherapy: clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Pietersz, Geoffrey A; Tsibanis, Anastasios; Tsikkinis, Annivas; Stojanovska, Lily; McKenzie, Ian FC; Vassilaros, Stamatis

    2014-01-01

    The use of tumour-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy studies is exacerbated by tolerance to these self-antigens. Tolerance may be broken by using ex vivo monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with self-antigens. Targeting tumour-associated antigens directly to DCs in vivo is an alternative and simpler strategy. The identification of cell surface receptors on DCs, and targeting antigens to DC receptors, has become a popular approach for inducing effective immune responses against cancer antigens. Many years ago, we demonstrated that targeting the mannose receptor on macrophages using the carbohydrate mannan to DCs led to appropriate immune responses and tumour protection in animal models. We conducted Phase I, I/II and II, clinical trials demonstrating the effectiveness of oxidised mannan-MUC1 in patients with adenocarcinomas. Here we summarise DC targeting approaches and their efficacy in human clinical trials. PMID:25505969

  12. Unique immunomodulatory effects of azelastine on dendritic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, S; Kietzmann, M; Stark, H; Bäumer, W

    2014-11-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis are among the most common inflammatory skin diseases in western countries, and antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells (DC) are key players in their pathophysiology. Histamine, an important mediator of allergic reactions, influences DC maturation and cytokine secretion, which led us to investigate the immunomodulatory potential of the well-known histamine H1 receptor antagonists: azelastine, olopatadine, cetirizine, and pyrilamine. Unlike other H1 antihistamines, azelastine decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-12 secretion from murine bone marrow-derived DC. This effect was independent of histamine receptors H1, H2, or H4 and may be linked to inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Moreover, only azelastine reduced proliferation of allogenic T cells in a mixed leukocyte reaction. We then tested topical application of the H1 antihistamines on mice sensitized against toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, a model of Th2-mediated allergic contact dermatitis. In contrast to the in vitro results, all investigated substances were efficacious in reducing allergic ear swelling. Azelastine has unique effects on dendritic cells and T cell interaction in vitro. However, this did not translate into superior in vivo efficacy for Th2-mediated allergic dermatitis, possibly due to the effects of the antihistamines on other cell types involved in skin inflammation. Future research will have to clarify whether these properties are relevant to in vivo models of allergic inflammation with a different T cell polarization. PMID:25119779

  13. Dendritic cells are stressed out in tumor.

    PubMed

    Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    A recently paper published in Cell reports that dendritic cells (DCs) are dysfunctional in the tumor environment. Tumor impairs DC function through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response and subsequent disruption of lipid metabolic homeostasis.

  14. Dendritic cells in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Kabel, P J; Voorbij, H A; van der Gaag, R D; Wiersinga, W M; de Haan, M; Drexhage, H A

    1987-01-01

    Dendritic cells form a morphologically distinct class of cells characterized by shape, reniform nucleus, absent to weak acid-phosphatase activity and strong Class II MHC determinant positivity. Functionally they are the most efficient cells in antigen presentation to T-lymphocytes which indicates their role in the initiation of an immune response. Using immunehistochemical techniques we studied the presence of dendritic cells in normal Wistar rat and human thyroids, in thyroids of BBW rats developing thyroid autoimmunity and in Graves' goitres. Dendritic cells could be identified in all thyroids studied and were positioned underneath the thyrocytes in between the follicles. Skin dendritic cells travel via lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, thus forming an antigen presenting cell system. It is likely that a similar cell system exists on the level of the thyroid for dendritic cells have also been detected in thyroid draining lymph nodes. In normal thyroid tissue of both human and rat dendritic cells were relatively scarce. During the initial phases of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BBW rat (before the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) numbers of thyroid dendritic cells increased. Intrathyroidal T-helper cells, B-cells or plasma cells could not be found. The thyroid draining lymph node contained large numbers of plasma cells. During the later stages of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BB/W rat (after the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) and in Graves' goitres dendritic cells were not only present in high number, but 20-30% were seen in contact with now-present intrathyroidal T-helper lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3475920

  15. Dendritic cells in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Kabel, P J; Voorbij, H A; van der Gaag, R D; Wiersinga, W M; de Haan, M; Drexhage, H A

    1987-01-01

    Dendritic cells form a morphologically distinct class of cells characterized by shape, reniform nucleus, absent to weak acid-phosphatase activity and strong Class II MHC determinant positivity. Functionally they are the most efficient cells in antigen presentation to T-lymphocytes which indicates their role in the initiation of an immune response. Using immunehistochemical techniques we studied the presence of dendritic cells in normal Wistar rat and human thyroids, in thyroids of BBW rats developing thyroid autoimmunity and in Graves' goitres. Dendritic cells could be identified in all thyroids studied and were positioned underneath the thyrocytes in between the follicles. Skin dendritic cells travel via lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, thus forming an antigen presenting cell system. It is likely that a similar cell system exists on the level of the thyroid for dendritic cells have also been detected in thyroid draining lymph nodes. In normal thyroid tissue of both human and rat dendritic cells were relatively scarce. During the initial phases of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BBW rat (before the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) numbers of thyroid dendritic cells increased. Intrathyroidal T-helper cells, B-cells or plasma cells could not be found. The thyroid draining lymph node contained large numbers of plasma cells. During the later stages of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BB/W rat (after the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) and in Graves' goitres dendritic cells were not only present in high number, but 20-30% were seen in contact with now-present intrathyroidal T-helper lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Allogeneic lymphocyte-licensed DCs expand T cells with improved antitumor activity and resistance to oxidative stress and immunosuppressive factors

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chuan; Yu, Di; Hillerdal, Victoria; Wallgren, AnnaCarin; Karlsson-Parra, Alex; Essand, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy of cancer is a treatment strategy where T cells are isolated, activated, in some cases engineered, and expanded ex vivo before being reinfused to the patient. The most commonly used T-cell expansion methods are either anti-CD3/CD28 antibody beads or the “rapid expansion protocol” (REP), which utilizes OKT-3, interleukin (IL)-2, and irradiated allogeneic feeder cells. However, REP-expanded or bead-expanded T cells are sensitive to the harsh tumor microenvironment and often short-lived after reinfusion. Here, we demonstrate that when irradiated and preactivated allosensitized allogeneic lymphocytes (ASALs) are used as helper cells to license OKT3-armed allogeneic mature dendritic cells (DCs), together they expand target T cells of high quality. The ASAL/DC combination yields an enriched Th1-polarizing cytokine environment (interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-12, IL-2) and optimal costimulatory signals for T-cell stimulation. When genetically engineered antitumor T cells were expanded by this coculture system, they showed better survival and cytotoxic efficacy under oxidative stress and immunosuppressive environment, as well as superior proliferative response during tumor cell killing compared to the REP protocol. Our result suggests a robust ex vivo method to expand T cells with improved quality for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26015949

  17. A phase I clinical study of vaccination of melanoma patients with dendritic cells loaded with allogeneic apoptotic/necrotic melanoma cells. Analysis of toxicity and immune response to the vaccine and of IL-10 -1082 promoter genotype as predictor of disease progression

    PubMed Central

    von Euw, Erika M; Barrio, María M; Furman, David; Levy, Estrella M; Bianchini, Michele; Peguillet, Isabelle; Lantz, Olivier; Vellice, Alejandra; Kohan, Abraham; Chacón, Matías; Yee, Cassian; Wainstok, Rosa; Mordoh, José

    2008-01-01

    Background Sixteen melanoma patients (1 stage IIC, 8 stage III, and 7 stage IV) were treated in a Phase I study with a vaccine (DC/Apo-Nec) composed of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with a mixture of apoptotic/necrotic allogeneic melanoma cell lines (Apo-Nec), to evaluate toxicity and immune responses. Also, IL-10 1082 genotype was analyzed in an effort to predict disease progression. Methods PBMC were obtained after leukapheresis and DCs were generated from monocytes cultured in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 in serum-free medium. Immature DCs were loaded with gamma-irradiated Apo-Nec cells and injected id without adjuvant. Cohorts of four patients were given four vaccines each with 5, 10, 15, or 20 × 106 DC/Apo-Nec cell per vaccine, two weeks apart. Immune responses were measured by ELISpot and tetramer analysis. Il-10 genotype was measured by PCR and corroborated by IL-10 production by stimulated PBMC. Results Immature DCs efficiently phagocytosed melanoma Apo-Nec cells and matured after phagocytosis as evidenced by increased expression of CD83, CD80, CD86, HLA class I and II, and 75.2 ± 16% reduction in Dextran-FITC endocytosis. CCR7 was also up-regulated upon Apo-Nec uptake in DCs from all patients, and accordingly DC/Apo-Nec cells were able to migrate in vitro toward MIP-3 beta. The vaccine was well tolerated in all patients. The DTH score increased significantly in all patients after the first vaccination (Mann-Whitney Test, p < 0.05). The presence of CD8+T lymphocytes specific to gp100 and Melan A/MART-1 Ags was determined by ELISpot and tetramer analysis in five HLA-A*0201 patients before and after vaccination; one patient had stable elevated levels before and after vaccination; two increased their CD8 + levels, one had stable moderate and one had negligible levels. The analysis of IL-10 promoter -1082 polymorphism in the sixteen patients showed a positive correlation between AA genotype, accompanied by lower in vitro IL-10 production by

  18. Neuroblastoma and dendritic cell function.

    PubMed

    Redlinger, Richard E; Mailliard, Robbie B; Barksdale, Edward M

    2004-02-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, remains a challenge for clinicians and investigators in pediatric surgical oncology. The absence of effective conventional therapies for most patients with neuroblastoma justifies the application of novel, biology-based, experimental approaches to the treatment of this deadly disease. The observation that some aggressive neuroblastomas, particularly in infants, may spontaneously regress suggested that immune-mediated mechanisms may be important in the biology of this disease. Advances in the understanding of the cognate interactions between T cells, antigen-presenting cells and tumors have demonstrated the sentinel role of dendritic cells (DC), the most potent antigen presenting cells, in initiating the cellular immune response to cancer. Until recently the function of DC in pediatric solid tumors, especially neuroblastoma, had not been extensively studied. This review discusses the role of DC in initiating and coordinating the immune response against cancer, the ability of neuroblastoma to induce DC dysregulation at multiple levels by inhibiting DC maturation and function, and the current vaccine strategies being designed to employ the unique ability of DC to promote neuroblastoma regression.

  19. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen presenting cells (APC) with a remarkable ability to take up antigens and stimulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted specific immune responses. Recent discoveries have shown that their role in initiating primary immune responses seems to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC.

  20. Heparan sulfate, an endogenous TLR4 agonist, promotes acute GVHD after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Todd V.; Lin, Liwen; Huang, Xiaopei; Cardona, Diana M.; Li, Zhiguo; Dredge, Keith; Chao, Nelson J.

    2012-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains the most common cause of nonrelapse-related morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Although T-cell depletion and intensive immunosuppression are effective in the control of GVHD, they are often associated with higher rates of infection and tumor recurrence. In this study, we showed that heparan sulfate (HS), an extracellular matrix component, can activate Toll-like receptor 4 on dendritic cells in vitro, leading to the enhancement of dendritic cell maturation and alloreactive T-cell responses. We further demonstrated in vivo that serum HS levels were acutely elevated at the onset of clinical GVHD in mice after allo-HSCT. Treatment with the serine protease inhibitor α1-antitrypsin decreased serum levels of HS, leading to a reduction in alloreactive T-cell responses and GVHD severity. Conversely, an HS mimetic that increased serum HS levels accelerated GVHD. In addition, in patients undergoing allo-HSCT for hematologic malignancies, serum HS levels were elevated and correlated with the severity of GVHD. These results identify a critical role for HS in promoting acute GVHD after allo-HSCT, and they suggest that modulation of HS release may have therapeutic potential for the control of clinical GVHD. PMID:22760779

  1. SHIPi Enhances Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sandra; Brooks, Robert; Gumbleton, Matthew; Park, Mi-Young; Russo, Christopher M.; Howard, Kyle T.; Chisholm, John D.; Kerr, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a highly effective procedure enabling long-term survival for patients with hematologic malignancy or heritable defects. Although there has been a dramatic increase in the success rate of HSCT over the last two decades, HSCT can result in serious, sometimes untreatable disease due to toxic conditioning regimens and Graft-versus-Host-Disease. Studies utilizing germline knockout mice have discovered several candidate genes that could be targeted pharmacologically to create a more favorable environment for transplant success. SHIP1 deficiency permits improved engraftment of hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells (HS-PCs) and produces an immunosuppressive microenvironment ideal for incoming allogeneic grafts. The recent development of small molecule SHIP1 inhibitors has opened a different therapeutic approach by creating transient SHIP1-deficiency. Here we show that SHIP1 inhibition (SHIPi) mobilizes functional HS-PC, accelerates hematologic recovery, and enhances donor HS-PC engraftment in both allogeneic and autologous transplant settings. We also observed the expansion of key cell populations known to suppress host-reactive cells formed during engraftment. Therefore, SHIPi represents a non-toxic, new therapeutic that has significant potential to improve the success and safety of therapies that utilize autologous and allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26052545

  2. Aspergillus Thyroiditis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ataca, Pinar; Atilla, Erden; Saracoglu, Pelin; Yilmaz, Gulden; Civriz Bozdag, Sinem; Toprak, Selami Kocak; Yuksel, Meltem Kurt; Ceyhan, Koray; Topcuoglu, Pervin

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus thyroiditis is a rare disorder detected in immunocompromised patients during disseminated infections. Early management is essential to prevent high mortality. A 61-year-old allogeneic stem cell male recipient presented with painful thyroid nodular enlargement. He had low TSH and low free T4 levels. The thyroid ultrasound showed a hypoechoic nodule; biopsy indicated suppurative Aspergillus thyroiditis. He was successfully treated by amphotericin B. PMID:26640727

  3. New frontiers in pediatric allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Talano, Julie-An M.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Symons, Heather J.; Militano, Olga; Shereck, Evan B.; Giller, Roger H.; Hancock, Laura; Morris, Erin; Cairo, Mitchell S.

    2015-01-01

    The inaugural meeting of “New Frontiers in Pediatric Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation” organized by the Pediatric Blood and Transplant Consortium (PBMTC) was held at the American Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Annual Meeting. This meeting provided an international platform for physicians and investigators active in the research and utilization of pediatric allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AlloSCT) in children and adolescents with malignant and non-malignant disease, to share information and develop future collaborative strategies. The primary objectives of the conference included: 1) to present advances in AlloSCT in pediatric ALL and novel pre- and post-immunotherapy; 2) to highlight new strategies in alternative allogeneic stem cell donor sources for children and adolescents with non-malignant hematological disorders; 3) to discuss timing of immune reconstitution after AlloSCT and methods of facilitating more rapid recovery of immunity; 4) to identify strategies of utilizing AlloSCT in pediatric myeloproliferative disorders (MPD); 5) to develop diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to hematological complications post pediatric AlloSCT; 6) to enhance the understanding of new novel cellular therapeutic approaches to pediatric malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders; and 7) to discuss optimizing drug therapy in pediatric recipients of AlloSCT. This paper will provide a brief overview of the conference. PMID:24820213

  4. Regulation of Th2 Cell Immunity by Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyeongjin; Cho, Minkyoung; Chung, Yeonseok

    2016-02-01

    Th2 cell immunity is required for host defense against helminths, but it is detrimental in allergic diseases in humans. Unlike Th1 cell and Th17 cell subsets, the mechanism by which dendritic cells modulate Th2 cell responses has been obscure, in part because of the inability of dendritic cells to provide IL-4, which is indispensable for Th2 cell lineage commitment. In this regard, immune cells other than dendritic cells, such as basophils and innate lymphoid cells, have been suggested as Th2 cell inducers. More recently, multiple independent researchers have shown that specialized subsets of dendritic cells mediate Th2 cell responses. This review will discuss the current understanding related to the regulation of Th2 cell responses by dendritic cells and other immune cells. PMID:26937227

  5. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses.

    PubMed

    Owens, Sean D; Kol, Amir; Walker, Naomi J; Borjesson, Dori L

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89%) were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection. PMID:27648075

  6. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89%) were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection. PMID:27648075

  7. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89%) were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection.

  8. Financial burden in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khera, Nandita; Chang, Yu-hui; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Slack, James; Beebe, Timothy; Roy, Vivek; Noel, Pierre; Fauble, Veena; Sproat, Lisa; Tilburt, Jon; Leis, Jose F; Mikhael, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Although allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an expensive treatment for hematological disorders, little is known about the financial consequences for the patients who undergo this procedure. We analyzed factors associated with its financial burden and its impact on health behaviors of allogeneic HCT recipients. A questionnaire was retrospectively mailed to 482 patients who underwent allogeneic HCT from January 2006 to June 2012 at the Mayo Clinic, to collect information regarding current financial concerns, household income, employment, insurance, out-of-pocket expenses, and health and functional status. A multivariable logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with financial burden and treatment nonadherence. Of the 268 respondents (56% response rate), 73% reported that their sickness had hurt them financially. All patients for whom the insurance information was available (missing, n = 13) were insured. Forty-seven percent of respondents experienced financial burden, such as household income decreased by >50%, selling/mortgaging home, or withdrawing money from retirement accounts. Three percent declared bankruptcy. Younger age and poor current mental and physical functioning increased the likelihood of financial burden. Thirty-five percent of patients reported deleterious health behaviors because of financial constraints. These patients were likely to be younger, have lower education, and with a longer time since HCT. Being employed decreased the likelihood of experiencing financial burden and treatment nonadherence due to concern about costs. A significant proportion of allogeneic HCT survivors experience financial hardship despite insurance coverage. Future research should investigate potential interventions to help at-risk patients and prevent adverse financial outcomes after this life-saving procedure.

  9. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy. PMID:27398454

  10. Alefacept and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    Thalassemia; Sickle Cell Disease; Glanzmann Thrombasthenia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic-granulomatous Disease; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Schwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Fanconi Anemia; Dyskeratosis-congenita; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia

  11. Suppression of zinc dendrites in zinc electrode power cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damjanovic, A.; Diggle, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    Addition of various tetraalkyl quarternary ammonium salts, to alkaline zincate electrolyte of cell, prevents formation of zinc dendrites during charging of zinc electrode. Electrode capacity is not impaired and elimination of dendrites prolongs cell life.

  12. Pig skin includes dendritic cell subsets transcriptomically related to human CD1a and CD14 dendritic cells presenting different migrating behaviors and T cell activation capacities.

    PubMed

    Marquet, Florian; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Maisonnasse, Pauline; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Urien, Céline; Bouguyon, Edwige; Jouneau, Luc; Bourge, Mickael; Simon, Gaëlle; Ezquerra, Angel; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Bonneau, Michel; Dalod, Marc; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Bertho, Nicolas

    2014-12-15

    Swine skin is one of the best structural models for human skin, widely used to probe drug transcutaneous passage and to test new skin vaccination devices. However, little is known about its composition in immune cells, and among them dendritic cells (DC), that are essential in the initiation of the immune response. After a first seminal work describing four different DC subpopulations in pig skin, we hereafter deepen the characterization of these cells, showing the similarities between swine DC subsets and their human counterparts. Using comparative transcriptomic study, classical phenotyping as well as in vivo and in vitro functional studies, we show that swine CD163(pos) dermal DC (DDC) are transcriptomically similar to the human CD14(pos) DDC. CD163(pos) DDC are recruited in inflamed skin, they migrate in inflamed lymph but they are not attracted toward CCL21, and they modestly activate allogeneic CD8 T cells. We also show that CD163(low) DDC are transcriptomically similar to the human CD1a(pos) DDC. CD163(low) DDC migrate toward CCL21, they activate allogeneic CD8 and CD4 T cells and, like their potential human lung counterpart, they skew CD4 T cells toward a Th17 profile. We thus conclude that swine skin is a relevant model for human skin vaccination.

  13. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Rezvani, Andrew; Storb, Rainer F

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a potentially curative procedure for a variety of hematologic malignancies. The field has evolved substantially over the past decade, with advances in patient and donor selection, stem cell sources, supportive care, prevention of complications and reduced-toxicity preparative regimens. As a result, the indications for HCT and the pool of eligible patients have expanded significantly. In this article, we provide an overview of the major aspects of allogeneic HCT, and focus specifically on areas of active research and on novel approaches to challenges in the field. Specifically, we will discuss approaches to reduce the toxicity of the preparative regimen, with the goal of increasing the safety and applicability of HCT. The availability of suitable donors may be an obstacle to wider application of HCT. We review three major approaches to broadening the donor pool: the use of HLA-mismatched unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood and HLA-haploidentical family donors. Graft-versus-host disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality after HCT. We review recent advances in the understanding of this phenomenon, and novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches that hold the promise of further improving the safety of the procedure. We conclude with a speculative outline of the next 5 years of research in the field of HCT. PMID:20871781

  14. Electrofusion of a weakly immunogenic neuroblastoma with dendritic cells produces a tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Orentas, R J; Schauer, D; Bin, Q; Johnson, B D

    2001-10-10

    The absence of surface costimulatory molecules explains in part the lack of an effective anti-tumor immune response in tumor-bearing animals, even though unique tumor antigens may be presented by class I MHC. We determined that the immunogenicity of a murine neuroblastoma, Neuro-2a, which lacks surface costimulatory molecules, could be increased by electrically induced fusion with dendritic cells. Electrofusion induced a higher level of cell fusion than polyethylene glycol, and tumor/dendritic cell heterokaryons expressed high levels of costimulatory molecules. While Neuro-2a was unable to induce the proliferation of syngeneic or allogeneic T cells in vitro, fused cells were able to induce T cell responses both in vitro and in vivo. When fused dendritic tumor cells were used as a cancer vaccine, immunized mice were significantly protected from challenge with Neuro-2a. We propose that electrofusion with patient-derived tumor and dendritic cells may provide a rapid means to produce patient-specific tumor vaccines.

  15. [Application of dendritic cells in clinical tumor therapy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Xian, Li-jian

    2002-04-01

    The active immunotherapy of dendritic cells is hot in tumor therapy research area. This article is a review of the source of dendritic cells, loading antigen, immunotherapy pathway, clinical application, choice of patients, and so on. It makes preparation for further research of dendritic cells. PMID:12452029

  16. Bortezomib inhibits bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liang, Yong; Zhang, Yanming; Wu, Depei; Liu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Graft versus-host disease (GVHD) severely limits the application of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in treating leukemia. Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical for the development. Here, we examined the effect of proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib on DCs in vitro. Primary cultured mouse DCs were treated with Bortezomib and their proliferation was observed. The expression of CD80 and CD86 and cytokine secretion of LPS-activated DCs was also quantified under Bortezomib. The ability of DCs to activate T cells was also measured by the mixed lymphocyte reaction assay. Finally the effect of Bortezomib on nuclear translocation of NF-κB was measured by EMSA. Bortezomib can inhibit the proliferation of DCs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also blocked the expression of co-receptors CD80 and CD86 and secretion of cytokines IL-12 and TNF-α in DCs treated with LPS. Mixed lymphocyte reaction assay suggested Bortezomib reduced the ability of DCs to activate T cells. Finally, we found Bortezomib can inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in DCs. Our findings indicated that Bortezomib blocked the functions of DCs in various aspects, and is a potential drug candidate for GVHD.

  17. Detecting Danger: The Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe; Cayzer, Steve

    The "Dendritic Cell Algorithm" (DCA) is inspired by the function of the dendritic cells of the human immune system. In nature, dendritic cells are the intrusion detection agents of the human body, policing the tissue and organs for potential invaders in the form of pathogens. In this research, an abstract model of dendritic cell (DC) behavior is developed and subsequently used to form an algorithm—the DCA. The abstraction process was facilitated through close collaboration with laboratory-based immunologists, who performed bespoke experiments, the results of which are used as an integral part of this algorithm. The DCA is a population-based algorithm, with each agent in the system represented as an "artificial DC". Each DC has the ability to combine multiple data streams and can add context to data suspected as anomalous. In this chapter, the abstraction process and details of the resultant algorithm are given. The algorithm is applied to numerous intrusion detection problems in computer security including the detection of port scans and botnets, where it has produced impressive results with relatively low rates of false positives.

  18. Characterization of chicken dendritic cell markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal and Natural Resources Institute, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD, USA. New mouse monoclonal antibodies which detect CD80 and CD83 were developed to characterize chicken dendritic cells (DCs). The characteristics of these molecules have been studied in human, swine, ovine, feline, and canine but not ...

  19. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  20. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, M J; Lazarus, H M; Carreras, J; Laport, G G; Cutler, C S; Wiernik, P H; Hale, G A; Maharaj, D; Gale, R P; Rowlings, P A; Freytes, C O; Miller, A M; Vose, J M; Maziarz, R T; Montoto, S; Maloney, D G; Hari, P N

    2014-11-01

    We describe outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome (MF/SS). Outcomes of 129 subjects with MF/SS reported to the Center for the International Blood and Marrow Transplant from 2000-2009. Median time from diagnosis to transplant was 30 (4-206) months and most subjects were with multiply relapsed/ refractory disease. The majority (64%) received non-myeloablative conditioning (NST) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). NST/RIC recipients were older in age compared with myeloablative recipients (median age 51 vs 44 years, P=0.005) and transplanted in recent years. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 and 5 years was 19% (95% confidence interval (CI) 12-27%) and 22% (95% CI 15-31%), respectively. Risk of disease progression was 50% (95% CI 41-60%) at 1 year and 61% (95% CI 50-71%) at 5 years. PFS at 1 and 5 years was 31% (95% CI 22-40%) and 17% (95% CI 9-26%), respectively. OS at 1 and 5 years was 54% (95% CI 45-63%) and 32% (95% CI 22-44%), respectively. Allogeneic HCT in MF/SS results in 5-year survival in approximately one-third of patients and of those, half remain disease-free. PMID:25068422

  1. Endocrinopathies after allogeneic and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Orio, Francesco; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90-99% of women and 60-90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40-50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  2. Secretory phospholipase A2 induces dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure; Agaugué, Sophie; Coutant, Frédéric; Masurel, Aurélie; Bezzine, Sofiane; Lambeau, Gérard; André, Patrice; Lotteau, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    High level of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity is found in serum and biological fluids during the acute phase response (APR). Extracellular PLA2 in fluids of patients with inflammatory diseases such as sepsis, acute pancreatitis or rheumatoid arthritis is also associated with propagation of inflammation. PLA2 activity is involved in the release of both pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators from phospholipids of cellular membranes or circulating lipoproteins. PLA2 may thus generate signals that influence immune responses. Here, group III secretory PLA2s were tested for their ability to promote generation of functionally mature human dendritic cells (DC). PLA2 treatment of differentiating monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 yielded cells with phenotypical and functional characteristics of mature DC. This maturation was dependent on the dose of PLA2 and PLA2-generated DC stimulated interferon gamma secretion by allogeneic T cells. The effects of PLA2 on DC maturation was mainly dependent on enzyme activity and correlated with the activation of NF-κB, AP-1 and NFAT. The data suggest that transient increase in PLA2 activity generates signals that promote transition of innate to adaptive immunity during the APR. PMID:15259027

  3. REDUCED INTENSITY CONDITIONING FOR ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION: CURRENT PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Mackinnon, Stephen; Childs, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after myeloablative conditioning is an effective therapy for patients with hematologic malignancies. In an attempt to extend this therapy to older patients or those with comorbidities, reduced intensity or truly nonmyeloablative regimens have been developed over the last decade. The principle underlying reduced intensity regimens is to provide some tumor kill with lessened regimen-related morbidity and mortality, then rely on graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects to eradicate remaining malignant cells, while nonmyeloablative regimens rely primarily on GVT effects. In this article, three representative approaches are described, demonstrating the clinical application for both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic malignancies. Current challenges include controlling graft-versus-host disease while allowing GVT to occur. In the future, clinical trials using reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative conditioning will be compared to myeloablative conditioning in selected malignancies to extend the application to standard risk patients. PMID:17222778

  4. Allogenic banking of dental pulp stem cells for innovative therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Chaubron, Franck; De Vos, John; Cuisinier, Frédéric J

    2015-08-26

    Medical research in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapy has brought encouraging perspectives for the use of stem cells in clinical trials. Multiple types of stem cells, from progenitors to pluripotent stem cells, have been investigated. Among these, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are mesenchymal multipotent cells coming from the dental pulp, which is the soft tissue within teeth. They represent an interesting adult stem cell source because they are recovered in large amount in dental pulps with non-invasive techniques compared to other adult stem cell sources. DPSCs can be obtained from discarded teeth, especially wisdom teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons. To shift from promising preclinical results to therapeutic applications to human, DPSCs must be prepared in clinical grade lots and transformed into advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP). As the production of patient-specific stem cells is costly and time-consuming, allogenic biobanking of clinical grade human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed DPSC lines provides efficient innovative therapeutic products. DPSC biobanks represent industrial and therapeutic innovations by using discarded biological tissues (dental pulps) as a source of mesenchymal stem cells to produce and store, in good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, DPSC therapeutic batches. In this review, we discuss about the challenges to transfer biological samples from a donor to HLA-typed DPSC therapeutic lots, following regulations, GMP guidelines and ethical principles. We also present some clinical applications, for which there is no efficient therapeutics so far, but that DPSCs-based ATMP could potentially treat.

  5. Allogenic banking of dental pulp stem cells for innovative therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Chaubron, Franck; De Vos, John; Cuisinier, Frédéric J

    2015-01-01

    Medical research in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapy has brought encouraging perspectives for the use of stem cells in clinical trials. Multiple types of stem cells, from progenitors to pluripotent stem cells, have been investigated. Among these, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are mesenchymal multipotent cells coming from the dental pulp, which is the soft tissue within teeth. They represent an interesting adult stem cell source because they are recovered in large amount in dental pulps with non-invasive techniques compared to other adult stem cell sources. DPSCs can be obtained from discarded teeth, especially wisdom teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons. To shift from promising preclinical results to therapeutic applications to human, DPSCs must be prepared in clinical grade lots and transformed into advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP). As the production of patient-specific stem cells is costly and time-consuming, allogenic biobanking of clinical grade human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed DPSC lines provides efficient innovative therapeutic products. DPSC biobanks represent industrial and therapeutic innovations by using discarded biological tissues (dental pulps) as a source of mesenchymal stem cells to produce and store, in good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, DPSC therapeutic batches. In this review, we discuss about the challenges to transfer biological samples from a donor to HLA-typed DPSC therapeutic lots, following regulations, GMP guidelines and ethical principles. We also present some clinical applications, for which there is no efficient therapeutics so far, but that DPSCs-based ATMP could potentially treat. PMID:26328017

  6. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Juliana Maria; Rumjanek, Vivian Mary

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies. PMID:27088097

  7. Antitumor immunomodulatory activity of allogenic bone marrow cells on TiNi scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokorev, O. V.; Hodorenko, V. N.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Gunther, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of modulation of anti-tumor response by allogenic bone marrow cell transplantation into porous TiNi-based scaffold. Transplantation of bone marrow cells into porous TiNi-based scaffold leads to antitumor (35%) and antimetastatic (55%) effects. The lifetime of tumor-bearing animals and implanted allogenic bone marrow cells in incubator of TiNi increases up to 60%. The possible mechanisms of the effect of allogenic cells on tumor process are the stimulation of endogenous effectors of antitumor immunity.

  8. Impact of dendritic size and dendritic topology on burst firing in pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    van Elburg, Ronald A J; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2010-05-13

    Neurons display a wide range of intrinsic firing patterns. A particularly relevant pattern for neuronal signaling and synaptic plasticity is burst firing, the generation of clusters of action potentials with short interspike intervals. Besides ion-channel composition, dendritic morphology appears to be an important factor modulating firing pattern. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, and the impact of morphology on burst firing remains insufficiently known. Dendritic morphology is not fixed but can undergo significant changes in many pathological conditions. Using computational models of neocortical pyramidal cells, we here show that not only the total length of the apical dendrite but also the topological structure of its branching pattern markedly influences inter- and intraburst spike intervals and even determines whether or not a cell exhibits burst firing. We found that there is only a range of dendritic sizes that supports burst firing, and that this range is modulated by dendritic topology. Either reducing or enlarging the dendritic tree, or merely modifying its topological structure without changing total dendritic length, can transform a cell's firing pattern from bursting to tonic firing. Interestingly, the results are largely independent of whether the cells are stimulated by current injection at the soma or by synapses distributed over the dendritic tree. By means of a novel measure called mean electrotonic path length, we show that the influence of dendritic morphology on burst firing is attributable to the effect both dendritic size and dendritic topology have, not on somatic input conductance, but on the average spatial extent of the dendritic tree and the spatiotemporal dynamics of the dendritic membrane potential. Our results suggest that alterations in size or topology of pyramidal cell morphology, such as observed in Alzheimer's disease, mental retardation, epilepsy, and chronic stress, could change neuronal burst firing and

  9. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response. PMID:27127520

  10. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell role in cutaneous malignancies.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Dana; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) correspond to a specialized dendritic cell population that exhibit plasma cell morphology, express CD4, CD123, HLA-DR, blood-derived dendritic cell antigen-2 (BDCA-2), and Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 within endosomal compartments. Through their production of type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, pDCs provide anti-viral resistance and link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. While lacking from normal skin, pDCs are usually recruited to the skin in several cutaneous pathologies where they appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Among the latter group, pDCs have the potential to induce anti-tumour immunity; however, the complex interaction of pDCs with tumor cells and their micro-environment appears to contribute to immunologic tolerance. In this review, we aim at highlighting the role played by pDCs in cutaneous malignancies with special emphasis on the underlying mechanisms.

  11. Osteogenic activity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) seeded on irradiated allogenic bone.

    PubMed

    Tohma, Yasuaki; Dohi, Yoshiko; Ohgushi, Hajime; Tadokoro, Mika; Akahane, Manabu; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2012-02-01

    Allogenic bone grafting, a technique used in orthopaedic surgery, has several problems, including low osteogenic activity. To overcome the problem, this study aimed to determine whether in vivo osteogenesis could be enhanced using allogenic irradiated bone grafts after seeding with autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). The allogenic bone cylinders were extracted from ACI rats and sterilized by irradiation. Donor BMSCs were obtained from fresh Fischer 344 (F344) rat bone marrow by cell culture. The allogenic bone with or without BMSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into syngeneic F344 rats. At 4 weeks after transplantation, high alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, bone-specific osteocalcin mRNA expression and newly formed bone were detected in the allogenic bone with BMSCs. The origin of the newly formed bone was derived from cultured donor BMSCs. However, none of these identifiers of osteogenesis were detected in either the fresh or the irradiated allogenic bone without BMSCs. These results indicate the availability of autologous BMSCs to heighten the osteogenic response of allogenic bone. Our present tissue-engineering method might contribute to a wide variety of allogenic bone grafting techniques in clinical settings.

  12. Regenerative stromal cell therapy in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Current impact and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Auletta, Jeffery J.; Cooke, Kenneth R.; Solchaga, Luis A.; Deans, Robert J.; Hof, Wouter van’t

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative stromal cell therapy (RSCT) has the potential to become a novel therapy for preventing and treating acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipient. However, enthusiasm for using RSCT in allogeneic HSCT has been tempered by limited clinical data and poorly-defined in vivo mechanisms of action. As a result, the full clinical potential of RSCT in supporting hematopoietic reconstitution and as treatment for GVHD remains to be determined. This manuscript reviews the immunomodulatory activity of regenerative stromal cells in pre-clinical models of allogeneic HSCT and emphasizes an emerging literature suggesting that microenvironment influences RSC activation and function. Understanding this key finding may ultimately define the proper niche for RSCT in allogeneic HSCT. In particular, mechanistic studies are needed to delineate the in vivo effects of RSCT in response to inflammation and injury associated with allogeneic HSCT and to define the relevant sites of RSC interaction with immune cells in the transplant recipient. Furthermore, development of in vivo imaging technology to correlate biodistribution patterns, desired RSC effect, and clinical outcome will be crucial to establishing dose-response effects and minimal biologic-dose thresholds needed to advance translational treatment strategies for complications like GVHD. PMID:20018250

  13. Mouse host unlicensed NK cells promote donor allogeneic bone marrow engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Maite; Sun, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exist as subsets based on expression of inhibitory receptors that recognize major histocompatibility complex I (MHCI) molecules. NK cell subsets bearing MHCI binding receptors for self-MHCI have been termed as “licensed” and exhibit a higher ability to respond to stimuli. In the context of bone marrow transplantation (BMT), host licensed-NK (L-NK) cells have also been demonstrated to be responsible for the acute rejection of allogeneic and MHCI-deficient BM cells (BMCs) in mice after lethal irradiation. However, the role of recipient unlicensed-NK (U-NK) cells has not been well established with regard to allogeneic BMC resistance. After NK cell stimulation, the prior depletion of host L-NK cells resulted in a marked increase of donor engraftment compared with the untreated group. Surprisingly, this increased donor engraftment was reduced after total host NK cell depletion, indicating that U-NK cells can actually promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment. Furthermore, direct coculture of U-NK cells with allogeneic but not syngeneic BMCs resulted in increased colony-forming unit cell growth in vitro, which was at least partially mediated by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production. These data demonstrate that host NK cell subsets exert markedly different roles in allogeneic BMC engraftment where host L- and U-NK cells reject or promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment, respectively. PMID:26738538

  14. Bullous pemphigoid after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Keisuke; Koike, Kazutoshi; Kobayashi, Chie; Iijima, Shigeruko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Tsuchida, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune skin disorder characterized by subepidermal blisters due to deposit of autoantibody against dermal basement membrane protein. It has been reported that BP can occur after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe a patient with BP having autoantibody against BP180 after unrelated-donor HSCT against T lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient was treated with steroid leading to complete resolution of BP, but T lymphoblastic leukemia progressed rapidly after steroid hormone treatment. Given that immunosuppressant may reduce graft-versus-tumor effect, immunomodulatory agents such as nicotinamide and tetracycline, erythromycin, and immunoglobulin may be appropriate as soon as typical blister lesions are seen after HSCT. PMID:26113316

  15. Interaction of Rotavirus with Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Narváez, Carlos F.; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that very few rotavirus (RV)-specific T cells that secrete gamma interferon circulate in recently infected and seropositive adults and children. Here, we have studied the interaction of RV with myeloid immature (IDC) and mature dendritic cells (MDC) in vitro. RV did not induce cell death of IDC or MDC and induced maturation of between 12 and 48% of IDC. Nonetheless, RV did not inhibit the maturation of IDC or change the expression of maturation markers on MDC. After treatment with RV, few IDC expressed the nonstructural viral protein NSP4. In contrast, a discrete productive viral infection was shown in MDC of a subset of volunteers, and between 3 and 46% of these cells expressed NSP4. RV-treated IDC secreted interleukin 6 (IL-6) (but not IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or transforming growth factor beta), and MDC released IL-6 and small amounts of IL-10 and IL-12p70. The patterns of cytokines secreted by T cells stimulated by staphylococcal enterotoxin B presented by MDC infected with RV or uninfected were comparable. The frequencies and patterns of cytokines secreted by memory RV-specific T cells evidenced after stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with RV were similar to those evidenced after stimulation of PBMC with RV-infected MDC. Finally, IDC treated with RV strongly stimulated naive allogeneic CD4+ T cells to secrete Th1 cytokines. Thus, although RV does not seem to be a strong maturing stimulus for DC, it promotes their capacity to prime Th1 cells. PMID:16282452

  16. Novel immunomodulatory effects of adiponectin on dendritic cell functions.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Julia Yuen Shan; Li, Daxu; Ho, Derek; Peng, Jiao; Xu, Aimin; Lamb, Jonathan; Chen, Yan; Tam, Paul Kwong Hang

    2011-05-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipocytokine with anti-inflammatory properties. Although it has been reported that ADN can inhibit the immunostimulatory function of monocytes and macrophages, little is known of its effect on dendritic cells (DC). Recent data suggest that ADN can regulate immune responses. DCs are uniquely specialised antigen presenting cells that play a central role in the initiation of immunity and tolerance. In this study, we have investigated the immuno- modulatory effects of ADN on DC functions. We found that ADN has only moderate effect on the differentiation of murine bone marrow (BM) derived DCs but altered the phenotype of DCs. The expression of major histocompatibilty complex class II (MHCII), CD80 and CD86 on ADN conditioned DCs (ADN-DCs) was lower than that on untreated cells. The production of IL-12p40 was also suppressed in ADN-DCs. Interestingly, ADN treated DCs showed an increase in the expression of the inhibitory molecule, programmed death-1 ligand (PDL-1) compared to untreated cells. In vitro co-culture of ADN-DCs with allogeneic T cells led to a decrease in T cell proliferation and reduction of IL-2 production. Concomitant with that, a higher percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) was detected in co-cultures of T cells and ADN-DCs. Blocking PD-1/PDL-1 pathway could partially restore T cell function. These findings suggest that the immunomodulatory effect of ADN on immune responses could be at least partially be mediated by its ability to alter DC function. The PD-1/PDL-1 pathway and the enhancement of Treg expansion are implicated in the immunomodulatory mechanisms.

  17. CD45 epitope mapping of human CD1a+ dendritic cells and peripheral blood dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Freudenthal, P. S.; Edinger, A.; Steinman, R. M.; Warnke, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors studied the pattern of leukocyte common antigen (CD45) epitope expression on dendritic cells in sections of human epidermis, tonsillar epithelium, dermatopathic lymph nodes, and in isolates from blood. The monoclonal antibodies (MAb) used were specific for all known CD45 epitopes, including the seven different CD45 common epitopes as well as the four known CD45R epitopes (two CD45RA, one CD45RB, and one CD45RO). Dendritic cells in all sites were uniformly reactive for the CD45 common epitopes tested except 2B11, which may recognize a CD45R rather than CD45 epitope. By single-label immunoperoxidase and double-label immunofluorescence epitope mapping of CD1a+ dendritic cells in tissue sections, it was generally difficult or impossible to detect expression of CD45RA, CD45RB, CD45RO, or 2B11. In blood dendritic cells, however, low levels of these CD45R epitopes were detected consistently using single-label immunoperoxidase staining of cytocentrifuge preparations. Monocytes were similar to blood dendritic cells except that the staining with MAb to CD45RO and 2B11 was slightly stronger. The authors conclude that dendritic cells differ from most subpopulations of lymphocytes in that CD45 common epitopes are readily detectable but the existing RA, RB, and RO epitopes are either undetectable or expressed at relatively low levels. These studies raise the possibility that CD1a+ dendritic cells may express a novel dominant CD45 isoform. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1711291

  18. Stromal Cells from Human Decidua Exert a Strong Inhibitory Effect on NK Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Canegallo, Francesca; Conte, Romana; Venturini, Pier Luigi; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Stromal cells (SC) are an important component of decidual tissues where they are in strict proximity with both NK and CD14+ myelomonocytic cells that play a role in the maintenance of pregnancy. In this study we analyzed whether decidual SC (DSC) could exert a regulatory role on NK and CD14+ cells that migrate from peripheral blood (PB) to decidua during pregnancy. We show that DSCs inhibit the IL15-mediated up-regulation of major activating NK receptors in PB-derived NK cells. In addition, the IL15-induced NK cell proliferation, cytolytic activity and IFN-γ production were severely impaired. DSCs sharply inhibited dendritic cells differentiation and their ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) mediated the inhibitory effect of DSCs. Our results strongly suggest an important role of DSCs in preventing potentially dangerous immune response, thus contributing to maintenance of pregnancy. PMID:24586479

  19. Lenalidomide, celecoxib, and azacitidine therapy for blastic plasmocytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Recio, Marta; Martinez-Serra, Jordi; Bento, Leyre; Ramos, Rafael; Gines, Jordi; Daumal, Jaime; Sampol, Antonia; Gutierrez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmocytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is characterized by aggressive behavior with a tendency for systemic dissemination and a predilection for skin, lymph nodes, soft tissues, peripheral blood, or bone marrow. It usually occurs in elderly patients with a mean age between 60 and 70 years. Despite initial response to chemotherapy, the disease regularly relapses with a short median overall survival. Better outcomes have been reported with high-dose acute leukemia-like induction chemotherapy followed by consolidation with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, elderly patients are not candidates for intensive therapy or allogeneic stem cell transplantation. So, new active and tolerable drugs are needed. Our case illustrates that one cycle of lenalidomide and celecoxib provides at least a partial cutaneous and hematologic response, but this regimen was discontinued due to toxicity and followed by a consolidation/maintenance phase with azacitidine, thus achieving a final complete response with a much higher than expected progression-free and overall survival in an elderly patient with comorbidities. This information may be useful in the design of treatment approaches for elderly patients with blastic plasmocytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. However, it should be confirmed in clinical trials as well as by optimizing the induction and extending the consolidation/maintenance period to avoid early relapses after discontinuation and improve progression-free survival. PMID:27660468

  20. Lenalidomide, celecoxib, and azacitidine therapy for blastic plasmocytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: a case report.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Recio, Marta; Martinez-Serra, Jordi; Bento, Leyre; Ramos, Rafael; Gines, Jordi; Daumal, Jaime; Sampol, Antonia; Gutierrez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmocytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is characterized by aggressive behavior with a tendency for systemic dissemination and a predilection for skin, lymph nodes, soft tissues, peripheral blood, or bone marrow. It usually occurs in elderly patients with a mean age between 60 and 70 years. Despite initial response to chemotherapy, the disease regularly relapses with a short median overall survival. Better outcomes have been reported with high-dose acute leukemia-like induction chemotherapy followed by consolidation with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, elderly patients are not candidates for intensive therapy or allogeneic stem cell transplantation. So, new active and tolerable drugs are needed. Our case illustrates that one cycle of lenalidomide and celecoxib provides at least a partial cutaneous and hematologic response, but this regimen was discontinued due to toxicity and followed by a consolidation/maintenance phase with azacitidine, thus achieving a final complete response with a much higher than expected progression-free and overall survival in an elderly patient with comorbidities. This information may be useful in the design of treatment approaches for elderly patients with blastic plasmocytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. However, it should be confirmed in clinical trials as well as by optimizing the induction and extending the consolidation/maintenance period to avoid early relapses after discontinuation and improve progression-free survival. PMID:27660468

  1. Lenalidomide, celecoxib, and azacitidine therapy for blastic plasmocytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Recio, Marta; Martinez-Serra, Jordi; Bento, Leyre; Ramos, Rafael; Gines, Jordi; Daumal, Jaime; Sampol, Antonia; Gutierrez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmocytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is characterized by aggressive behavior with a tendency for systemic dissemination and a predilection for skin, lymph nodes, soft tissues, peripheral blood, or bone marrow. It usually occurs in elderly patients with a mean age between 60 and 70 years. Despite initial response to chemotherapy, the disease regularly relapses with a short median overall survival. Better outcomes have been reported with high-dose acute leukemia-like induction chemotherapy followed by consolidation with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, elderly patients are not candidates for intensive therapy or allogeneic stem cell transplantation. So, new active and tolerable drugs are needed. Our case illustrates that one cycle of lenalidomide and celecoxib provides at least a partial cutaneous and hematologic response, but this regimen was discontinued due to toxicity and followed by a consolidation/maintenance phase with azacitidine, thus achieving a final complete response with a much higher than expected progression-free and overall survival in an elderly patient with comorbidities. This information may be useful in the design of treatment approaches for elderly patients with blastic plasmocytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. However, it should be confirmed in clinical trials as well as by optimizing the induction and extending the consolidation/maintenance period to avoid early relapses after discontinuation and improve progression-free survival.

  2. Twisting immune responses for allogeneic stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Zhong, Jiang F

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell-derived tissues and organs have the potential to change modern clinical science. However, rejection of allogeneic grafts by the host’s immune system is an issue which needs to be addressed before embryonic stem cell-derived cells or tissues can be used as medicines. Mismatches in human leukocyte class I antigens and minor histocompatibility antigens are the central factors that are responsible for various graft-versus-host diseases. Traditional strategies usually involve suppressing the whole immune systems with drugs. There are many side effects associated with these methods. Here, we discuss an emerging strategy for manipulating the central immune tolerance by naturally “introducing” donor antigens to a host so a recipient can acquire tolerance specifically to the donor cells or tissues. This strategy has two distinct stages. The first stage restores the thymic function of adult patients with sex steroid inhibitory drugs (LHRH-A), keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), interleukin 7 (IL-7) and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3). The second stage introduces hematopoietic stem cells and their downstream progenitors to the restored thymus by direct injection. Hematopoietic stem cells are used to introduce donor antigens because they have priority access to the thymus. We also review several clinical cases to explain this new strategy. PMID:20975985

  3. Oral chronic graft-versus-host disease: analysis of dendritic cells subpopulations*

    PubMed Central

    Botari, Clara Marino Espricigo; Nunes, Adauto José Ferreira; de Souza, Mair Pedro; Orti-Raduan, Érica Sinara Lenharo; Salvio, Ana Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    The graft-versus-host disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Aiming at contributing to the understanding of the role of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and natural killer cells in chronic graft-versus-host disease, we examined biopsies of jugal mucosa of 26 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who had undergone allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Half of these patients developed oral chronic graft-versus-host disease. Microscopic sections were immunohistochemically stained for anti-CD1a, anti-CD123 and anti-CD56. We calculated the number of immunostained cells in the corium per square millimeter and applied the Mann-Whitney test. Results showed a statistically significant increase of myeloid dendritic cells (CD1a+; p=0,02) and natural killer cells (CD56; p=0,04) in patients with oral chronic graft-versus-host disease. CD123 immunostaining showed no statistical difference between groups. It was concluded that myeloid dendritic cells and natural killer cells participate in the development of oral chronic graft-versus-host disease. PMID:25054751

  4. Toll like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Mike; Lee, Stephanie J; Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLR) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) we have investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs3764879, which is located on the X chromosome, was significantly associated with outcome at the Bonferroni corrected level P≤0.001. Male hemizygosity and female homozygosity for the minor allele were significantly associated with disease free survival (DFS) (hazard ratio (HR) 1.47 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.85); P=0.001). Further analysis stratified by donor sex due to confounding by sex, was suggestive for associations with overall survival (male donor: HR 1.41 (95% CI 1.09–1.83), P=0.010); female donor: (HR 2.78 (95% CI 1.43–5.41), P=0.003), DFS (male donor: HR 1.45 (95% CI 1.12–1.87), P=0.005; female donor: HR 2.34 (95% CI 1.18–4.65), P=0.015) and treatment related mortality (male donor: HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.09–2.04), P=0.012; female donor: HR 3.12 (95% CI 1.44–6.74), P=0.004). In conclusion our findings suggest that the minor allele of TLR8 rs3764879 of the donor is associated with outcome after myeloablative conditioned allogeneic HCT. PMID:25464115

  5. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Mike; Lee, Stephanie J; Müller, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLRs) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), we investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs3764879, which is located on the X chromosome, was significantly associated with outcome at the Bonferroni-corrected level P ≤ .001. Male hemizygosity and female homozygosity for the minor allele were significantly associated with disease-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.47 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.16 to 1.85]; P = .001). Further analysis stratified by donor sex due to confounding by sex was suggestive for associations with overall survival (male donor: HR, 1.41 [95% CI, 1.09 to 1.83], P = .010; female donor: HR, 2.78 [95% CI, 1.43 to 5.41], P = .003), disease-free survival (male donor: HR, 1.45 [95% CI, 1.12 to 1.87], P = .005; female donor: HR, 2.34 [95% CI, 1.18 to 4.65], P = .015), and treatment-related mortality (male donor: HR, 1.49 [95% CI, 1.09 to 2.04], P = .012; female donor: HR, 3.12 [95% CI, 1.44 to 6.74], P = .004). In conclusion, our findings suggest that the minor allele of TLR8 rs3764879 of the donor is associated with outcome after myeloablative conditioned allogeneic HCT. PMID:25464115

  6. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  7. Galectin-1 Regulates Tissue Exit of Specific Dendritic Cell Populations*

    PubMed Central

    Thiemann, Sandra; Man, Jeanette H.; Chang, Margaret H.; Lee, Benhur; Baum, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    During inflammation, dendritic cells emigrate from inflamed tissue across the lymphatic endothelium into the lymphatic vasculature and travel to regional lymph nodes to initiate immune responses. However, the processes that regulate dendritic cell tissue egress and migration across the lymphatic endothelium are not well defined. The mammalian lectin galectin-1 is highly expressed by vascular endothelial cells in inflamed tissue and has been shown to regulate immune cell tissue entry into inflamed tissue. Here, we show that galectin-1 is also highly expressed by human lymphatic endothelial cells, and deposition of galectin-1 in extracellular matrix selectively regulates migration of specific human dendritic cell subsets. The presence of galectin-1 inhibits migration of immunogenic dendritic cells through the extracellular matrix and across lymphatic endothelial cells, but it has no effect on migration of tolerogenic dendritic cells. The major galectin-1 counter-receptor on both dendritic cell populations is the cell surface mucin CD43; differential core 2 O-glycosylation of CD43 between immunogenic dendritic cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells appears to contribute to the differential effect of galectin-1 on migration. Binding of galectin-1 to immunogenic dendritic cells reduces phosphorylation and activity of the protein-tyrosine kinase Pyk2, an effect that may also contribute to reduced migration of this subset. In a murine lymphedema model, galectin-1−/− animals had increased numbers of migratory dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes, specifically dendritic cells with an immunogenic phenotype. These findings define a novel role for galectin-1 in inhibiting tissue emigration of immunogenic, but not tolerogenic, dendritic cells, providing an additional mechanism by which galectin-1 can dampen immune responses. PMID:26216879

  8. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Coco; Plantinga, Maud; Besseling, Paul; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has evolved into a potent curative treatment option for a variety of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The occurrence of complications and mortality after allo-HCT is, however, still high and is strongly associated with immune reconstitution (IR). Therefore, detailed information on IR through immunomonitoring is crucial to improve survival chances after HCT. To date, information about the reconstituting immune system after allo-HCT in pediatric patients is mostly derived from routine standard-of-care measurements. More profound knowledge on IR may provide tools to better predict and modulate adverse reactions and, subsequently, improve survival chances. Here, we provide an overview of IR (eg, immune cell subsets and circulating chemokines/cytokines) after allo-HCT in children, taking into account different cell sources and serotherapy, and discuss strategies to enhance immunomonitoring. We conclude that available IR data after allo-HCT contain limited information on immune cell families (mostly only generic T, B, and NK cells), which would improve with more detailed information on reconstituting cell subsets or effector cell functionality at earlier time points (<1 month). In addition, secretome data (eg, multiplex cytokine/chemokine profiles) could add to the understanding of IR mechanisms and cell functionality and may even provide (early) biomarkers for individual disease outcome, such as viral reactivity, graft-versus-host disease, or graft-versus-leukemia. The present data and suggestions for more detailed, standardized, and harmonized immunomonitoring in future (pediatric) allo-HCT studies will pave the path to "precision transplantation:" an individualized HCT approach (including conditioning), based on detailed information on IR and biomarkers, aiming to reduce transplantation related mortality and relapse, and subsequently improve survival chances.

  9. Dendritic Cells: Cellular Mediators for Immunological Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chun Yuen J.; Ysebaert, Dirk; Berneman, Zwi N.

    2013-01-01

    In general, immunological tolerance is acquired upon treatment with non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. This indiscriminate immunosuppression of the patient often causes serious side-effects, such as opportunistic infectious diseases. Therefore, the need for antigen-specific modulation of pathogenic immune responses is of crucial importance in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. In this perspective, dendritic cells (DCs) can have an important immune-regulatory function, besides their notorious antigen-presenting capacity. DCs appear to be essential for both central and peripheral tolerance. In the thymus, DCs are involved in clonal deletion of autoreactive immature T cells by presenting self-antigens. Additionally, tolerance is achieved by their interactions with T cells in the periphery and subsequent induction of T cell anergy, T cell deletion, and induction of regulatory T cells (Treg). Various studies have described, modulation of DC characteristics with the purpose to induce antigen-specific tolerance in autoimmune diseases, graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), and transplantations. Promising results in animal models have prompted researchers to initiate first-in-men clinical trials. The purpose of current review is to provide an overview of the role of DCs in the immunopathogenesis of autoimmunity, as well as recent concepts of dendritic cell-based therapeutic opportunities in autoimmune diseases. PMID:23762100

  10. Is there still a role for allogeneic stem-cell transplantation in multiple myeloma?

    PubMed Central

    Bensinger, William I.

    2007-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in survival for multiple myeloma patients through autologous stem-cell transplantation (SCT) and the introduction of novel drugs, the disease remains incurable for all but a small fraction of patients. Only allogeneic SCT is potentially curative, due in part to a graft-versus-myeloma effect. High transplant-related mortality with allogeneic SCT is currently the major limitation to wider use of this potentially curative modality. Mortality can be reduced through the use of lower-intensity conditioning regimens which allow engraftment of allogeneic stem cells, but this comes at a cost of higher rates of disease progression and relapse. Promising studies to improve outcomes of allogeneic transplants include the use of more intensive non-myeloablative conditioning regimens, tandem transplants, peripheral blood cells, graft engineering to improve the graft-versus-myeloma activity while reducing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), post-transplant maintenance, and targeted conditioning therapies such as bone-seeking radioisotopes. PMID:18070719

  11. Immunosuppressive human anti-CD83 monoclonal antibody depletion of activated dendritic cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Seldon, T A; Pryor, R; Palkova, A; Jones, M L; Verma, N D; Findova, M; Braet, K; Sheng, Y; Fan, Y; Zhou, E Y; Marks, J D; Munro, T; Mahler, S M; Barnard, R T; Fromm, P D; Silveira, P A; Elgundi, Z; Ju, X; Clark, G J; Bradstock, K F; Munster, D J; Hart, D N J

    2016-03-01

    Current immunosuppressive/anti-inflammatory agents target the responding effector arm of the immune response and their nonspecific action increases the risk of infection and malignancy. These effects impact on their use in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation and other forms of transplantation. Interventions that target activated dendritic cells (DCs) have the potential to suppress the induction of undesired immune responses (for example, graft versus host disease (GVHD) or transplant rejection) and to leave protective T-cell immune responses intact (for example, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunity). We developed a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3C12, specific for CD83, which is expressed on activated but not resting DC. The 3C12 mAb and an affinity improved version, 3C12C, depleted CD83(+) cells by CD16(+) NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and inhibited allogeneic T-cell proliferation in vitro. A single dose of 3C12C prevented human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-induced acute GVHD in SCID mouse recipients. The mAb 3C12C depleted CMRF-44(+)CD83(bright) activated DC but spared CD83(dim/-) DC in vivo. It reduced human T-cell activation in vivo and maintained the proportion of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) CD25(+) Treg cells and also viral-specific CD8(+) T cells. The anti-CD83 mAb, 3C12C, merits further evaluation as a new immunosuppressive agent in transplantation.

  12. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities. PMID:26486534

  13. [Human Herpesvirus-6 Encephalitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-07-01

    The reactivation of human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) is common after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), and it is sporadically associated with the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops around 2-6 weeks after allo-HCT, and it is characterized by short-term memory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows bilateral signal abnormalities in the limbic system. The incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis is reportedly 0-11.6% after bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and 4.9-21.4% after cord blood transplantation. The mortality of HHV-6 encephalitis is high, and survivors are often left with serious sequelae. Antiviral therapy using foscarnet or ganciclovir is recommended for the treatment of HHV-6 encephalitis, but the efficacy of the currently available treatment is insufficient once HHV-6 encephalitis has developed. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HHV-6 encephalitis and the establishment of preventative therapy are needed to overcome this disease.

  14. Spinal fluid lymphocytes responsive to autologous and allogeneic cells in multiple sclerosis and control individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, G; Kotilinek, L; Schwartz, M; Sternad, M

    1984-01-01

    Spinal fluid lymphocytes from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and controls were stimulated with either autologous non-T cells or with allogeneic non-T cells followed by stimulation with autologous non-T lymphocytes. Cells responding to these stimuli were cloned and their proliferative responses to autologous and allogeneic MS and normal non-T cells were measured. Large numbers of clones with specific patterns of reaction to both autologous and allogeneic cells were obtained from lymphocytes in MS cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but only occasionally from cells in control CSF. Patterns of responses among clones from a particular CSF were similar and often identical, which suggested that cells in MS CSF were relatively restricted in their specificities. Surface antigen phenotyping of the clones showed them to be predominantly OKT4+, with 13% OKT8+ and 11% OKT4+8+. Peripheral T cells that were stimulated and cultured in parallel with CSF cells were different in that they usually did not give rise to as many clones nor were their patterns of response similar. Many CSF clones were heteroclitic, that is they responded to particular allogeneic cells but not autologous cells. Lymphocytes in MS CSF thus appear to represent a selected population of cells with a high frequency of responsiveness to autologous and allogeneic antigens. Such responses may be evidence for immune regulation within the central nervous system or could represent responses to altered-self antigens. PMID:6237121

  15. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Mantle Cell Lymphoma: A Retrospective Analysis of 7 Patients.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Wolfgang; Wohlfarth, Philipp; Bojic, Marija; Schörgenhofer, Christian; Kalhs, Peter; Raderer, Markus; Rabitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by a poor prognosis. Many different therapeutic approaches including intensive chemotherapy as well as new targeted therapies are established. However, overall survival remains unsatisfying. As the sole curative option, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been described, but only a limited number of patients qualify for this procedure. We have retrospectively analyzed 7 patients with stage IV MCL undergoing allogeneic HSCT at our institution. A myeloablative regimen was used in 1 patient, while the other 6 patients received reduced-intensity conditioning. Four patients had an HLA-identical sibling, and the remaining 3 patients had an HLA-identical unrelated donor. One patient developed acute graft-versus-host disease (skin, grade III; intestine, grade II). Two patients died from transplant-related causes, 3 patients died due to progressive disease and the remaining 2 patients are still in complete remission 147 and 8 months after transplantation. Allogeneic HSCT offers a therapeutic treatment option for selected patients in a relapsed/refractory setting. The incorporation of novel agents has improved the outcome of patients with MCL. Thus, the role and optimal time point of allogeneic HSCT should be reevaluated in randomized trials.

  16. Functional Reconstitution of Natural Killer Cells in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Md Ashik; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Tey, Siok-Keen

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the first lymphocyte population to reconstitute following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and are important in mediating immunity against both leukemia and pathogens. Although NK cell numbers generally reconstitute within a month, the acquisition of mature NK cell phenotype and full functional competency can take 6 months or more, and is influenced by graft composition, concurrent pharmacologic immunosuppression, graft-versus-host disease, and other clinical factors. In addition, cytomegalovirus infection and reactivation have a dominant effect on NK cell memory imprinting following allogeneic HSCT just as it does in healthy individuals. Our understanding of NK cell education and licensing has evolved in the years since the “missing self” hypothesis for NK-mediated graft-versus-leukemia effect was first put forward. For example, we now know that NK cell “re-education” can occur, and that unlicensed NK cells can be more protective than licensed NK cells in certain settings, thus raising new questions about how best to harness graft-versus-leukemia effect. Here, we review current understanding of the functional reconstitution of NK cells and NK cell education following allogeneic HSCT, highlighting a conceptual framework for future research. PMID:27148263

  17. Early establishment of hematopoietic chimerism following allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in comparison with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, S; Zeng, W; Yamazaki, H; Wang, H; Takami, A; Sugimori, N; Miura, Y; Shiobara, S; Matsuda, T; Shinagawa, Y; Harada, M

    1999-04-01

    To characterize the process of the establishment of complete chimerism after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT), we determined the origin of leukocytes in peripheral blood (PB) obtained from 23 patients in the very early period after allo-PBSCT using amplification of mini- or microsatellite regions of genomic DNA. Donor-specific alleles were amplified from the PB obtained at day 8 post-transplant for 19 allo-PBSCT patients. Among the 19 patients, 12 showed only donor-specific alleles (complete chimerism) while 7 did both donor and host-specific alleles (mixed chimerism). Although donor specific alleles were amplified in 10 of 12 patients who received allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) similarly to allo-PBSCT, all of these ten showed mixed chimerism. When the chimeric state was examined in PB samples obtained serially at 2-3-day intervals post-transplant, host-specific alleles in allo-PBSCT patients were not detectable in the PB much earlier than those in allo-BMT patients. These findings indicate that the appearance of donor-derived cells associated with the disappearance of host-derived cells in the circulation occurs earlier after allo-PBSCT as compared with allo-BMT, leading to the rapid establishment of complete chimerism.

  18. Immune Monitoring Using mRNA-Transfected Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by mRNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA. PMID:27236804

  19. Macrophages, dendritic cells, and regression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Feig, Jonathan E; Feig, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and other cellular elements present in the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the focus of this review will be primarily on the macrophages and DCs. The role of these two cell types in atherosclerosis is discussed, with a particular emphasis on their involvement in atherosclerosis regression.

  20. [Dendritic cells and interaction with other cell types. Immune tolerance].

    PubMed

    Guerder, S

    2001-07-01

    T cell tolerance to self antigen is mainly established in the thymus were self-reactive T cells are deleted. Interdigitating dendritic cells and medulary epithelial cells are directly involved in the deletion process. Some self-reactive T cells escape, however this thymic censorship and enter the peripheral pool of naive T cells. Multiple mechanisms are also at play in the periphery to control this potentially armfull T cells, this include deletion and immune deviation.

  1. Homophilic Protocadherin Cell-Cell Interactions Promote Dendrite Complexity.

    PubMed

    Molumby, Michael J; Keeler, Austin B; Weiner, Joshua A

    2016-05-01

    Growth of a properly complex dendrite arbor is a key step in neuronal differentiation and a prerequisite for neural circuit formation. Diverse cell surface molecules, such as the clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs), have long been proposed to regulate circuit formation through specific cell-cell interactions. Here, using transgenic and conditional knockout mice to manipulate γ-Pcdh repertoire in the cerebral cortex, we show that the complexity of a neuron's dendritic arbor is determined by homophilic interactions with other cells. Neurons expressing only one of the 22 γ-Pcdhs can exhibit either exuberant or minimal dendrite complexity, depending only on whether surrounding cells express the same isoform. Furthermore, loss of astrocytic γ-Pcdhs, or disruption of astrocyte-neuron homophilic matching, reduces dendrite complexity cell non-autonomously. Our data indicate that γ-Pcdhs act locally to promote dendrite arborization via homophilic matching, and they confirm that connectivity in vivo depends on molecular interactions between neurons and between neurons and astrocytes.

  2. Characterization of murine lung dendritic cells: similarities to Langerhans cells and thymic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent accessory cells (AC) for the initiation of primary immune responses. Although murine lymphoid DC and Langerhans cells have been extensively characterized, DC from murine lung have been incompletely described. We isolated cells from enzyme-digested murine lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages that were potent stimulators of a primary mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). The AC had a low buoyant density, were loosely adherent and nonphagocytic. AC function was unaffected by depletion of cells expressing the splenic DC marker, 33D1. In addition, antibody and complement depletion of cells bearing the macrophage marker F4/80, or removal of phagocytic cells with silica also failed to decrease AC activity. In contrast, AC function was decreased by depletion of cells expressing the markers J11d and the low affinity interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R), both present on thymic and skin DC. AC function was approximately equal in FcR+ and FcR- subpopulations, indicating there was heterogeneity within the AC population. Consistent with the functional data, a combined two-color immunofluorescence and latex bead uptake technique revealed that lung cells high in AC activity were enriched in brightly Ia+ dendritic- shaped cells that (a) were nonphagocytic, (b) lacked specific T and B lymphocyte markers and the macrophage marker F4/80, but (c) frequently expressed C3biR, low affinity IL-2R, FcRII, and the markers NLDC-145 and J11d. Taken together, the functional and phenotypic data suggest the lung cells that stimulate resting T cells in an MLR and that might be important in local pulmonary immune responses are DC that bear functional and phenotypic similarity to other tissues DC, such as Langerhans cells and thymic DC. PMID:2162904

  3. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette-Guérin).

  4. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  5. Prevention of Allogeneic Cardiac Graft Rejection by Transfer of Ex Vivo Expanded Antigen-Specific Regulatory T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takasato, Fumika; Morita, Rimpei; Schichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Niimi, Masanori; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rate of graft survival has dramatically increased using calcineurin inhibitors, however chronic graft rejection and risk of infection are difficult to manage. Induction of allograft-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) is considered an ideal way to achieve long-term tolerance for allografts. However, efficient in vitro methods for developing allograft-specific Tregs which is applicable to MHC full-mismatched cardiac transplant models have not been established. We compared antigen-nonspecific polyclonal-induced Tregs (iTregs) as well as antigen-specific iTregs and thymus-derived Tregs (nTregs) that were expanded via direct and indirect pathways. We found that iTregs induced via the indirect pathway had the greatest ability to prolong graft survival and suppress angiitis. Antigen-specific iTregs generated ex vivo via both direct and indirect pathways using dendritic cells from F1 mice also induced long-term engraftment without using MHC peptides. In antigen-specific Treg transferred models, activation of dendritic cells and allograft-specific CTL generation were suppressed. The present study demonstrated the potential of ex vivo antigen-specific Treg expansion for clinical cell-based therapeutic approaches to induce lifelong immunological tolerance for allogeneic cardiac transplants. PMID:24498362

  6. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Waseem; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Davies, E.Graham; Davis, Jeffery; Duval, Michel; Eames, Gretchen; Farinha, Nuno; Filopovich, Alexandra; Fischer, Alain; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Gennery, Andrew; Heilmann, Carsten; Landais, Paul; Horwitz, Mitchell; Porta, Fulvio; Sedlacek, Petr; Seger, Reinhard; Slatter, Mary; Teague, Lochie; Eapen, Mary; Veys, Paul

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) is a rare primary immune disorder caused by defects of the CD18 β-integrin molecule on immune cells. The condition usually presents in early infancy and is characterised by deep tissue infections, leukocytosis with impaired formation of pus and delayed wound healing. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers the possibility of curative therapy, and with patient numbers at any individual centre being limited, we surveyed the transplant experience at 14 centres worldwide. PATIENTS & METHODS The course of 36 children with a confirmed diagnosis of LAD who underwent HSCT between 1993 and 2007 was retrospectively analysed. Data was collected by the registries of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID)/European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) RESULTS At median followup of 62 months (extending to 14 years) overall survival was 75%. Myeloablative conditioning regimens were used in 28 patients, and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) in 8 patients, with no deaths in this subgroup. Survival after matched family donor and unrelated donor transplants was similar, with 11/14 matched family donor and 12/14 unrelated donor recipients alive; mortality was greatest following haplo-identical transplants, where 4/8 children did not survive. Twenty seven transplant recipients are alive, with full donor engraftment in 17 cases, mixed multi-lineage chimerism in 7 patients, and mononuclear cell restricted chimerism in a further 3 cases. CONCLUSIONS HSCT offers long term benefit in LAD and should be considered as an early therapeutic option if a suitable HLA-matched stem cell donation is available. Reduced intensity conditioning was particularly safe, and mixed donor chimersim appears sufficient to prevent significant symptoms, although careful long term monitoring will be required for these patients. PMID

  7. Practice variation in physician referral for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pidala, J; Craig, B M; Lee, S J; Majhail, N; Quinn, G; Anasetti, C

    2013-01-01

    Hematological malignancy patients not referred by their primary hematologist/medical oncologist suffer disparate access to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). However, investigation into physician, system and patient factors relevant to this decision making is lacking. We surveyed a national randomized sample of practicing hematologists/medical oncologists identified through the AMA (American Medical Association) masterfile. A modified Dillman approach was utilized to encourage survey response. From 1200 surveyed, a total of 113 physicians responded. In all, 68% were male, 62% identified as White/non-Hispanic, 79% practiced in non-academic settings and 80% reported spending 75-100% of their professional effort in clinical care. Using clinical vignettes, we detected significantly increased odds for HCT non-referral according to age (age 60 vs 30, odds ratio (OR) 8.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.9-11.7, P<0.0001), insurance coverage (no coverage vs coverage, OR 6.9, 95% CI: 5.2-9.1, P<0.0001) and race (African-American vs Caucasian, OR 2.4, 95% CI: 1.9-2.9, P<0.0001). Physician (perception of HCT risks), system (insurance coverage) and patient (age, social support and co-morbid illness) factors were strongly endorsed by respondents as important determinants of their HCT referral practices. These data speak to important factors relevant to HCT referral practices, and highlight several opportunities for education and intervention to reduce current disparities.

  8. Psychosocial adjustment of pediatric patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Felder-Puig, R; Peters, C; Matthes-Martin, S; Lamche, M; Felsberger, C; Gadner, H; Topf, R

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the psychosocial adjustment of patients who had been treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in our clinic. Selection criteria for patients were to be aged 14-30 years at the time of the follow-up, to be at least 2 years post-SCT and to have a very good knowledge of German. Among 31 eligible patients, 26 participated (84% response rate). The patients were between 15 and 27 years old and were on average 7 years (range 2-13) post-SCT. Research instruments consisted of a demographic questionnaire and various subscales of established psychological measures for which data from a sample of bone cancer survivors and population norms were available. About 35% of patients showed high levels of anxiety, 62% appeared to be extremely sensitive and vulnerable, and 35% showed strong, unfulfilled needs in their love lives. In the other domains tested (self-esteem, family and peer relationships, school/vocational performance, etc), no noticeable differences were found between the subjects and comparable populations. There was no significant association between psychosocial outcome and demographic features or clinical data. Our results suggest that patients who underwent SCT in their childhood or adolescence are at risk of developing long-term emotional or social problems. Due to the retrospective design of our study and the small sample size, no predictive factors for psychosocial distress could be identified.

  9. Dyslipidemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Michelle L; Savani, Bipin N; Boord, Jeffrey B

    2010-08-26

    Currently, approximately 15,000 to 20,000 patients undergo allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) annually throughout the world, with the number of long-term survivors increasing rapidly. In long-term follow-up after transplantation, the focus of care moves beyond cure of the original disease to the identification and treatment of late effects after HSCT. One of the more serious complications is therapy-related cardiovascular disease. Long-term survivors after HSCT probably have an increased risk of premature cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular complications related to dyslipidemia and other risk factors account for a significant proportion of late nonrelapse morbidity and mortality. This review addresses the risk and causes of dyslipidemia and impact on cardiovascular complications after HSCT. Immunosuppressive therapy, chronic graft-versus-host disease, and other long-term complications influence the management of dyslipidemia. There are currently no established guidelines for evaluation and management of dyslipidemia in HSCT patients; in this review, we have summarized our suggested approach in the HSCT population.

  10. Allogeneic T cell responses are regulated by a specific miRNA-mRNA network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaping; Tawara, Isao; Zhao, Meng; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Toubai, Tomomi; Mathewson, Nathan; Tamaki, Hiroya; Nieves, Evelyn; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Reddy, Pavan

    2013-01-01

    Donor T cells that respond to host alloantigens following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) induce graft-versus-host (GVH) responses, but their molecular landscape is not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene (mRNA) expression and fine-tune the molecular responses of T cells. We stimulated naive T cells with either allogeneic or nonspecific stimuli and used argonaute cross-linked immunoprecipitation (CLIP) with subsequent ChIP microarray analyses to profile miR responses and their direct mRNA targets. We identified a unique expression pattern of miRs and mRNAs following the allostimulation of T cells and a high correlation between the expression of the identified miRs and a reduction of their mRNA targets. miRs and mRNAs that were predicted to be differentially regulated in allogeneic T cells compared with nonspecifically stimulated T cells were validated in vitro. These analyses identified wings apart-like homolog (Wapal) and synaptojanin 1 (Synj1) as potential regulators of allogeneic T cell responses. The expression of these molecular targets in vivo was confirmed in MHC-mismatched experimental BMT. Targeted silencing of either Wapal or Synj1 prevented the development of GVH response, confirming a role for these regulators in allogeneic T cell responses. Thus, this genome-wide analysis of miRNA-mRNA interactions identifies previously unrecognized molecular regulators of T cell responses. PMID:24216511

  11. The Role of Dendritic Cells in S. pneumoniae Transport to Follicular Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Heesters, Balthasar A; Carroll, Michael C

    2016-09-20

    Affinity-mature B cells require cognate antigen, retained by follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), for clonal selection within germinal centers. Studies on how FDCs in lymphoid tissues acquire antigen have relied primarily on model protein antigens. To examine delivery of intact bacteria to FDCs, we used inactivated Streptococcus pneumonia (SP). We found that both medullary macrophages and a subset of SIGN-R1-positive dendritic cells (DCs) in the lymph node capture SP from the draining afferent lymphatics. The presence of DCs is required for initial complement activation, opsonization of the bacteria, and efficient transport of SP to FDCs. Moreover, we observed a major role for transport of bacteria to FDCs by naive B cells via a CD21-dependent pathway. We propose a mechanism by which efficient transport of SP to FDCs is dependent on DCs for initial binding and activation of complement and either direct transport to FDCs or transfer to naive B cells. PMID:27653679

  12. Regulatory Dendritic Cells for Immunotherapy in Immunologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, John R.; Ma, Yanna; Churchman, Laura; Gordon, Sara A.; Dawicki, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    We recognize well the abilities of dendritic cells to activate effector T cell (Teff cell) responses to an array of antigens and think of these cells in this context as pre-eminent antigen-presenting cells, but dendritic cells are also critical to the induction of immunologic tolerance. Herein, we review our knowledge on the different kinds of tolerogenic or regulatory dendritic cells that are present or can be induced in experimental settings and humans, how they operate, and the diseases in which they are effective, from allergic to autoimmune diseases and transplant tolerance. The primary conclusions that arise from these cumulative studies clearly indicate that the agent(s) used to induce the tolerogenic phenotype and the status of the dendritic cell at the time of induction influence not only the phenotype of the dendritic cell, but also that of the regulatory T cell responses that they in turn mobilize. For example, while many, if not most, types of induced regulatory dendritic cells lead CD4+ naïve or Teff cells to adopt a CD25+Foxp3+ Treg phenotype, exposure of Langerhans cells or dermal dendritic cells to vitamin D leads in one case to the downstream induction of CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell responses, while in the other to Foxp3− type 1 regulatory T cells (Tr1) responses. Similarly, exposure of human immature versus semi-mature dendritic cells to IL-10 leads to distinct regulatory T cell outcomes. Thus, it should be possible to shape our dendritic cell immunotherapy approaches for selective induction of different types of T cell tolerance or to simultaneously induce multiple types of regulatory T cell responses. This may prove to be an important option as we target diseases in different anatomic compartments or with divergent pathologies in the clinic. Finally, we provide an overview of the use and potential use of these cells clinically, highlighting their potential as tools in an array of settings. PMID:24550907

  13. Developmental mechanisms that regulate retinal ganglion cell dendritic morphology

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ning

    2011-01-01

    One of the fundamental features of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is that dendrites of individual RGCs are confined to one or a few narrow strata within the inner plexiform layer (IPL), and each RGC synapses only with a small group of presynaptic bipolar and amacrine cells with axons/dendrites ramified in the same strata to process distinct visual features. The underlying mechanisms which control the development of this laminar-restricted distribution pattern of RGC dendrites have been extensively studied, and it is still an open question whether the dendritic pattern of RGCs is determined by molecular cues or by activity-dependent refinement. Accumulating evidence suggests that both molecular cues and activity-dependent refinement might regulate RGC dendrites in a cell subtype-specific manner. However, identification of morphological subtypes of RGCs before they have achieved their mature dendritic pattern is a major challenge in the study of RGC dendritic development. This problem is now being circumvented through the use of molecular markers in genetically engineered mouse lines to identify RGC subsets early during development. Another unanswered fundamental question in the study of activity-dependent refinement of RGC dendrites is how changes in synaptic activity lead to the changes in dendritic morphology. Recent studies have started to shed light on the molecular basis of activity-dependent dendritic refinement of RGCs by showing that some molecular cascades control the cytoskeleton reorganization of RGCs. PMID:21542137

  14. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells turn into foamy dendritic cells with IL-17A1[S

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Giulia; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Bissay, Nathalie; Debard, Cyrille; Daira, Patricia; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Proamer, Fabienne; Hanau, Daniel; Vidal, Hubert; Aricò, Maurizio; Delprat, Christine; Mahtouk, Karène

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. In the field of immunometabolism, we have studied the impact of IL-17A on the lipid metabolism of human in vitro-generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Microarrays and lipidomic analysis revealed an intense remodeling of lipid metabolism induced by IL-17A in DCs. IL-17A increased 2–12 times the amounts of phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters in DCs. Palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and oleic (18:ln-9c) acid were the main fatty acid chains present in DCs. They were strongly increased in response to IL-17A while their relative proportion remained unchanged. Capture of extracellular lipids was the major mechanism of lipid droplet accumulation, visualized by electron microscopy and Oil Red O staining. Besides this foamy phenotype, IL-17A induced a mixed macrophage-DC phenotype and expression of the nuclear receptor NR1H3/liver X receptor-α, previously identified in the context of atherosclerosis as the master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. These IL-17A-treated DCs were as competent as untreated DCs to stimulate allogeneic naive T-cell proliferation. Following this first characterization of lipid-rich DCs, we propose to call these IL-17A-dependent cells “foamy DCs” and discuss the possible existence of foamy DCs in atherosclerosis, a metabolic and inflammatory disorder involving IL-17A. PMID:25833686

  15. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Klechevsky, Eynav; Pedroza-Gonzales, Alexander; Matsui, Toshimichi; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon; Fay, Joseph; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immunity results from a complex interplay between the antigen-nonspecific innate immune system and the antigen-specific adaptive immune system. The cells and molecules of the innate system employ non-clonal recognition receptors including lectins, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors and helicases. B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system employ clonal receptors recognizing antigens or their derived peptides in a highly specific manner. An essential link between innate and adaptive immunity is provided by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs can induce such contrasting states as immunity and tolerance. The recent years have brought a wealth of information on the biology of DCs revealing the complexity of this cell system. Indeed, DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the type and quality of elicited immune responses. Here we summarize our recent studies aimed at a better understanding of the DC system to unravel the pathophysiology of human diseases and design novel human vaccines. PMID:20193020

  16. Preventive azithromycin treatment reduces noninfectious lung injury and acute graft-versus-host disease in a murine model of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sabarinath Venniyil; Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Mueller, Gunnar; Miklos, Sandra; Hager, Max; Spacenko, Elena; Karlsson, Fridrik J; Huber, Elisabeth; Kittan, Nicolai A; Hildebrandt, Gerhard C

    2015-01-01

    Noninfectious lung injury and acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Azithromycin is widely used in allogeneic HCT recipients for pulmonary chronic GVHD, although current data appear controversial. We induced GVHD and noninfectious lung injury in lethally irradiated B6D2F1 mice by transplanting bone marrow and splenic T cells from allogeneic C57BL/6 mice. Experimental groups were treated with oral azithromycin starting on day 14 until the end of week 6 or week 14 after transplantation. Azithromycin treatment resulted in improved survival and decreased lung injury; the latter characterized by improved pulmonary function, reduced peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cell infiltrates along with diminished collagen deposition, and a decrease in lung cytokine and chemokine expression. Azithromycin also improved intestinal GVHD but did not affect liver GVHD at week 6 early after transplantation. At week 14, azithromycin decreased liver GVHD but had no effect on intestinal GVHD. In vitro, allogeneic antigen-presenting cell (APC)- dependent T cell proliferation and cytokine production were suppressed by azithromycin and inversely correlated with relative regulatory T cell (Treg) expansion, whereas no effect was seen when T cell proliferation occurred APC independently through CD3/CD28-stimulation. Further, azithromycin reduced alloreactive T cell expansion but increased Treg expansion in vivo with corresponding downregulation of MHC II on CD11c(+) dendritic cells. These results demonstrate that preventive administration of azithromycin can reduce the severity of acute GVHD and noninfectious lung injury after allo-HCT, supporting further investigation in clinical trials.

  17. Human dendritic cells as targets of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Marovich, M; Grouard-Vogel, G; Louder, M; Eller, M; Sun, W; Wu, S J; Putvatana, R; Murphy, G; Tassaneetrithep, B; Burgess, T; Birx, D; Hayes, C; Schlesinger-Frankel, S; Mascola, J

    2001-12-01

    Dengue virus infections are an emerging global threat. Severe dengue infection is manifested as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, both of which can be fatal complications. Factors predisposing to complicated disease and pathogenesis of severe infections are discussed. Using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and ELISA techniques, we studied the cellular targets of dengue virus infection, at both the clinical (in vivo) and the laboratory (in vitro) level. Resident skin dendritic cells are targets of dengue virus infection as demonstrated in a skin biopsy from a dengue vaccine recipient. We show that factors influencing infection of monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells are different. Immature dendritic cells were found to be the cells most permissive for dengue infection and maybe early targets for infection. Immature dendritic cells exposed to dengue virus produce TNF-alpha protein. Some of these immature dendritic cells undergo TNF-alpha mediated maturation as a consequence of exposure to the dengue virus. PMID:11924831

  18. Allogeneic and autologous mode of stem cell transplantation in regenerative medicine: which way to go?

    PubMed

    Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Dutta, Susmita; Bhonde, Ramesh; Das, Anjan Kumar; Pal, Rajarshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a generic term covering different techniques. However there is argument over the pros and cons of autologous and allogeneic transplants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative therapy. Given that the MSCs have already been proven to be safe in patients, we hypothesize that allogeneic transplantation could be more effective and cost-effective as compared to autologous transplantation specifically in older subjects who are the likely victims of degenerative diseases. This analysis is based on the scientific logic that allogeneic stem cells extracted in large numbers from young and healthy donors could be physiologically, metabolically and genetically more stable. Therefore stem cells from young donors may be expected to exhibit higher vigor in secreting trophic factors leading to activation of host tissue-specific stem cells and also be more efficient in remodeling the micro-environmental niche of damaged tissue.

  19. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation without fluconazole and fluoroquinolone prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, D; Kreil, S; Nolte, F; Reinwald, M; Hofmann, W-K; Klein, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) and fluconazole prophylaxis is recommended for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). However, due to an uncertain scientific basis and the increasing emergence of resistant germs, this policy should be questioned. Therefore, FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis was omitted in alloHCT at our center. In this retrospective analysis, all consecutive patients (n = 63) who underwent first alloHCT at our institution from September 2010 to September 2013 were included. Patients neither received FQ nor fluconazole prophylaxis. Day 100 mortality, incidence of febrile neutropenia, bacterial infections, and invasive fungal diseases (IFD) were assessed. Sixteen patients who started conditioning under antimicrobial treatment/prophylaxis due to pre-existing neutropenia (3/16), IFD (12/16), or aortic valve replacement (1/16) were excluded from the analysis. Finally, 47 patients were transplanted without prophylaxis as intended. Day 100 mortality was 9 %. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 62 % (29/47); 17/47 patients (36 %) experienced a blood stream infection (BSI) with detection of Gram-positive bacteria in 14 patients, Gram-negative bacteria in five patients, and candida in one patient, respectively. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most frequently isolated Gram-positive bacteria; 12/21 isolated Gram-positive and 3/6 Gram-negative bacteria were FQ resistant. In 21 % (10/47) of the patients, IFD (1x proven, 1x probable, and 8x possible) were diagnosed. To conclude, all three criteria, day 100 mortality, the incidence of IFD, and BSI, are in the range of published data for patients transplanted with FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis. These data demonstrate that alloHCT is feasible without FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis.

  20. Dendritic cell control of tolerogenic responses

    PubMed Central

    Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Pulendran, Bali

    2011-01-01

    Summary One of the most fundamental problems in immunology is the seemingly schizophrenic ability of the immune system to launch robust immunity against pathogens, while acquiring and maintaining a state of tolerance to the body’s own tissues and the trillions of commensal microorganisms and food antigens that confront it every day. A fundamental role for the innate immune system, particularly dendritic cells (DCs), in orchestrating immunological tolerance has been appreciated, but emerging studies have highlighted the nature of the innate receptors and the signaling pathways that program DCs to a tolerogenic state. Furthermore, several studies have emphasized the major role played by cellular interactions, and the microenvironment in programming tolerogenic DCs. Here we review these studies and suggest that the innate control of tolerogenic responses can be viewed as different hierarchies of organization, in which DCs, their innate receptors and signaling networks, and their interactions with other cells and local microenvironments represent different levels of the hierarchy. PMID:21488899

  1. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B-cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerize Ags and present them polyvalently to B-cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B-cell receptors for Ag (BCRs). FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC periodicity, and FDC-Ag presentation combined with other soluble and membrane bound signals contributed by FDCs, like FDC-BAFF, -IL-6, and -C4bBP, are essential for the induction of the germinal center (GC) reaction, the maintenance of serological memory, and the remarkable ability of FDC-Ags to induce specific Ab responses in the absence of cognate T-cell help. On the other hand, FDCs play a negative role in several disease conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, HIV/AIDS, prion diseases, and follicular lymphomas. Compared to other accessory immune cells, FDCs have received little attention, and their functions have not been fully elucidated. This review gives an overview of FDC structure, and recapitulates our current knowledge on the immunoregulatory functions of FDCs in health and disease. A better understanding of FDCs should permit better regulation of Ab responses to suit the therapeutic manipulation of regulated and dysregulated immune responses. PMID:23049531

  2. Dendritic cells and immunity against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY T cells can reject established tumors when adoptively transferred into patients, thereby demonstrating the power of the immune system for cancer therapy. However, it has proven difficult to maintain adoptively transferred T cells in the long term. Vaccines have the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. However, clinical efficacy of current vaccines is limited, possibly because tumors skew the immune system by means of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, inflammatory type 2 T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), all of which prevent the generation of effector cells. To improve the clinical efficacy of cancer vaccines in patients with metastatic disease, we need to design novel and improved strategies that can boost adaptive immunity to cancer, help overcome Tregs and allow the breakdown of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. This can be achieved by exploiting the fast increasing knowledge about the dendritic cell (DC) system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets which respond differentially to distinct activation signals, (functional plasticity), both contributing to the generation of unique adaptive immune responses. We foresee that these novel cancer vaccines will be used as monotherapy in patients with resected disease, and in combination with drugs targeting regulatory/suppressor pathways in patients with metastatic disease. PMID:21158979

  3. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin−Sca-1+Kit+ cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte–related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation. PMID:27259979

  4. Harnessing Dendritic Cells to Generate Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy of cancer, i.e., transfer of T cells or antibodies, can lead to some objective clinical responses, thus demonstrating that the immune system can reject tumors. However, passive immunotherapy is not expected to yield memory T cells that might control tumor outgrowth. Active immunotherapy with dendritic cell (DCs) vaccines has the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. Clinical trials testing first generation DC vaccines pulsed with tumor antigens provided a proof-of-principle that therapeutic immunity can be elicited. Newer generation DC vaccines are build on the increased knowledge of the DC system including the existence of distinct DC subsets and their plasticity all leading to generation of distinct types of immunity. Rather than the quantity of IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T cells, we should aim at generating high quality high avidity poly-functional effector CD8+ T cells able to reject tumors and long-lived memory CD8+ T cells able to prevent relapse. PMID:19769741

  5. Melanin-producing dendritic cells and histogenesis of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Paul, E; Illig, L

    1976-12-15

    In a total of 70 malignant melanomas we searched for dendritic-branched fluorescent pigment cells. Hereby we found that dendritic-branched tumor cells are especially characteristic in cases of lentigo maligna. In the flat parts of these lesions, these cells are the predominant cell type. Dendrites in the pseudonests or nodular parts of lentigo maligna can only seldom be detected. The prevailing cell type in superficial spreading melanoma and in primary nodular melanoma is the round or oval unbranched tumor cell. In some cases of nodular melanoma, cells with short dendrites could be seen. In superficial spreading melanoma, dendritic tumor cells could be observed particularly in such tumor parts, in which the malignant cells were scattered between the keratinocytes. Melanocytes can evidently produce dendrites between cells of the sebaceous gland. In the marginal parts or in parts of regression of some superficial spreading melanomas, a great area of dendritic tumor cells could also be detected in the basal parts of the epidermis. Altogether, however, in superficial spreading melanoma and in nodular melanoma they occur only rarely. Dendritic-branched cells are also visible in lymph-node metastases of SSM and NM. The fact that the dendritic tumor cells can be observed in all 3 types of tumors (according to Clark and coworkers) gives a rise to a new discussion of the dualistic theory of melanoma-histogenesis of Mishima. Although this theory could not be disproved, up to now on the basis of the present results, an unitarian development of all types of mnelanoma from melanocytes seems to be possible.

  6. Dendritic Cells: A Spot on Sialic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Hélio J.; Lau, Joseph T. Y.; Videira, Paula A.

    2013-01-01

    Glycans decorating cell surface and secreted proteins and lipids occupy the juncture where critical host–host and host-pathogen interactions occur. The role of glycan epitopes in cell–cell and cell-pathogen adhesive events is already well-established, and cell surface glycan structures change rapidly in response to stimulus and inflammatory cues. Despite the wide acceptance that glycans are centrally implicated in immunity, exactly how glycans and their changes contribute to the overall immune response remains poorly defined. Sialic acids are unique sugars that usually occupy the terminal position of the glycan chains and may be modified by external factors, such as pathogens, or upon specific physiological cellular events. At cell surface, sialic acid-modified structures form the key fundamental determinants for a number of receptors with known involvement in cellular adhesiveness and cell trafficking, such as the Selectins and the Siglec families of carbohydrate recognizing receptors. Dendritic cells (DCs) preside over the transition from innate to the adaptive immune repertoires, and no other cell has such relevant role in antigen screening, uptake, and its presentation to lymphocytes, ultimately triggering the adaptive immune response. Interestingly, sialic acid-modified structures are involved in all DC functions, such as antigen uptake, DC migration, and capacity to prime T cell responses. Sialic acid content changes along DC differentiation and activation and, while, not yet fully understood, these changes have important implications in DC functions. This review focuses on the developmental regulation of DC surface sialic acids and how manipulation of DC surface sialic acids can affect immune-critical DC functions by altering antigen endocytosis, pathogen and tumor cell recognition, cell recruitment, and capacity for T cell priming. The existing evidence points to a potential of DC surface sialylation as a therapeutic target to improve and diversify DC

  7. Targeting dendritic cells in allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Novak, Natalija

    2006-05-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a well-established strategy for treating allergic diseases with the goal of inducing allergen-specific tolerance. Identified mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic effect of immunotherapy include a shift of T helper 2 (Th2)-type immune responses to a modified Th2 immune response, a change of the balance of IgE-producing B cells to the production of IgG subtypes, in addition to increased IL-10 and TGF-beta secretion and activation of the suppressive functions of regulatory T-cells. Dendritic cells (DCs), which as outposts of the immune system are capable of T-cell priming through efficient allergen uptake by IgE receptors expressed on their cell surface. Most of the hypotheses concerning the function of DCs as facilitators of allergen-specific tolerance in allergen immunotherapy remain speculative. Therefore, studies must focus on the functional changes of DCs under immunotherapy to close the gap of knowledge about their exact role. These experimental data should help confirm the hypothesis of DCs as efficient silencers and potential target cells and take advantage of the bivalent character and tolerogenic properties of DCs. PMID:16701146

  8. Tolerogenic IDO(+) Dendritic Cells Are Induced by PD-1-Expressing Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Cecilia Pessoa; Ferreira, Ana Carolina Franco; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; de Moraes, Cristiano Jacob; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident cells, rich in inflammatory mediators, involved in allergic reactions, and with an increasingly recognized role in immunomodulation. Dendritic cells (DCs), on the other hand, are central to the determination of immune response patterns, being highly efficient antigen-presenting cells that respond promptly to changes in their microenvironment. Here, we show that direct cell contact between immature monocyte-derived DCs (iDCs) and MC bends DCs toward tolerance induction. DCs that had direct contact with MC (MC-iDC) decreased HLA-DR but increased PD-L1 expression and stimulated regulatory T lymphocytes, which expresses FoxP3(+), secrete TGF-β and IL-10, and suppress the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated naïve T lymphocytes. Furthermore, MC-iDC expressed higher levels of indoleamine-2,3-deoxigenase (IDO), a phenomenon that was blocked by treatment of MC with anti-PD-1 or by the treatment of DCs with anti-PD-L1 or anti-PD-L2, but not by blocking of H1 and H2 histamine receptors on DCs. Contact with MC also increased phosphorylated STAT-3 levels in iDCs. When a STAT-3 inhibitor, JSI-124, was added to the DCs before contact with MC, the MC-iDC recovered their ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation and did not increase their IDO expression.

  9. Tolerogenic IDO+ Dendritic Cells Are Induced by PD-1-Expressing Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Cecilia Pessoa; Ferreira, Ana Carolina Franco; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; de Moraes, Cristiano Jacob; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident cells, rich in inflammatory mediators, involved in allergic reactions, and with an increasingly recognized role in immunomodulation. Dendritic cells (DCs), on the other hand, are central to the determination of immune response patterns, being highly efficient antigen-presenting cells that respond promptly to changes in their microenvironment. Here, we show that direct cell contact between immature monocyte-derived DCs (iDCs) and MC bends DCs toward tolerance induction. DCs that had direct contact with MC (MC-iDC) decreased HLA-DR but increased PD-L1 expression and stimulated regulatory T lymphocytes, which expresses FoxP3+, secrete TGF-β and IL-10, and suppress the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated naïve T lymphocytes. Furthermore, MC-iDC expressed higher levels of indoleamine-2,3-deoxigenase (IDO), a phenomenon that was blocked by treatment of MC with anti-PD-1 or by the treatment of DCs with anti-PD-L1 or anti-PD-L2, but not by blocking of H1 and H2 histamine receptors on DCs. Contact with MC also increased phosphorylated STAT-3 levels in iDCs. When a STAT-3 inhibitor, JSI-124, was added to the DCs before contact with MC, the MC-iDC recovered their ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation and did not increase their IDO expression. PMID:26834749

  10. Allogeneic adipose-derived stem cells promote survival of fat grafts in immunocompetent diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Bai, Xiaozhi; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yunchuan; Su, Linlin; Chang, Peng; Wang, Xujie; Han, Shichao; Gao, Jianxin; Hu, Xiaolong; Hu, Dahai; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2016-05-01

    Autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can protect fat grafts in cell-assisted lipotransfer (CAL). However, diabetes alters the intrinsic properties of ADSCs and impairs their function so that they lack these protective effects. We investigate whether allogeneic ADSCs from healthy donors could protect fat grafts in immunocompetent diabetic rats. Syngeniec adipose tissues and ADSCs were derived from diabetic Lewis (LEW) rats, whereas allogeneic ADSCs were from healthy brown-Norway rats. A grafted mixture containing 0.7 ml granule fat and 0.3 ml 6 × 10(6) allogeneic/syngeneic ADSCs was injected subcutaneously on the skulls of diabetic LEW rats. Fat samples were harvested to evaluate the levels of injury and vascularization as shown by perilipin A, CD34 and VEGF at 14 days. The immune response was evaluated with a lymphocytotoxicity test and the CD4/CD8 ratio in peripheral blood at 14 days. The volume retention of fat grafts was measured at 3 months. Healthy allogeneic ADSCs increased the expression levels of perilipin A, CD34 and VEGF at 14 days. The volume retention of fat grafts was improved by allogeneic ADSCs at 3 months. ADSCs were demonstrated to have low immunogenicity by the lymphocyte proliferation test and immunophenotype including MHC and co-stimulatory markers. The lymphocytotoxicity test and CD4/CD8 ratio indicated no obvious immune response elicited by allogeneic ADSCs. Thus, healthy allogeneic ADSCs can promote the survival of fat grafts in this immunocompetent diabetic rat model, with little or no obvious immune rejection.

  11. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  12. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy in mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Robin; Lievense, Lysanne A; Heuvers, Marlies E; Maat, Alexander P; Hendriks, Rudi W; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Hegmans, Joost P; Aerts, Joachim G

    2012-10-01

    Mesothelioma is a rare thoracic malignancy with a dismal prognosis. Current treatment options are scarce and clinical outcomes are rather disappointing. Due to the immunogenic nature of mesothelioma, several studies have investigated immunotherapeutic strategies to improve the prognosis of patients with mesothelioma. In the last decade, progress in knowledge of the modulation of the immune system to attack the tumor has been remarkable, but the optimal strategy for immunotherapy has yet to be unraveled. Because of their potent antigen-presenting capacity, dendritic cells are acknowledged as a promising agent in immunotherapeutic approaches in a number of malignancies. This review gives an update and provides a future perspective in which immunotherapy may improve the outcome of mesothelioma therapy.

  13. Cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer cells on U251 glioma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Wu, Tingting; Wan, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to observe the cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells on U251 glioma cells and to investigate their mechanism of action to establish an effective treatment strategy for neuroglioma. Cell survival curves, colony formation assays and karyotype analysis were performed to investigate the characteristics of U251 glioma cells. The present study demonstrated that natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D)‑major histocompatibility complex class I‑related chain A/B (MICA/B) interactions contributed to the cytotoxic effect of NK cells on K562 and U251 cells. In antibody‑blocking assays to inhibit NKG2D ligands, the cytotoxic activity was not completely attenuated, which suggested that other signaling pathways contribute to the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on tumor cells in addition to the NKG2D‑mediated activity. The present study identified that the expression levels of NKG2D ligands on the surface of target cells influenced the strength of the NK cell immune response. Furthermore, allogeneic NK cells were observed to kill glioma cells in vitro, and this anticancer activity is associated with the rate of NKG2D expression on the surface of glioma cells.

  14. Ontogeny of rat thymic dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, A; Varas, A; Alonso, L; Gómez de Moral, M; Zapata, A G

    1994-01-01

    In the present study we have combined various in vivo and in vitro approaches to analyse the appearance and development throughout ontogeny and postnatal life of the dendritic cell (DC) populations of rat thymus. The in situ ultrastructural study demonstrated immature interdigitating cells (IDC)/DC in the thymus of 17-day-old embryonic rats, but thymic stromal cell cultures from 16-day-old fetal rats seemed to contain DC precursors which, after several days in culture, produced strongly class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-positive, mature DC. According to morphology and class II MHC expression we also defined three different DC populations in the late embryonic rat thymus; two of them, which remained in the adult rat thymus, could represent distinct developmental stages within the IDC/DC lineage. The third cell subset might be involved in a massive process of negative selection, presumably occurring at the end of fetal life in the rat thymus. In supporting the existence of thymic DC subpopulations, we also demonstrated a differential expression of various cell markers, including CD4, CD8, CD25, adhesion molecules and the antigen recognized by OX44 monoclonal antibody (mAb), on thymic DC during both embryonic and adult life. Their possible significance for the attributed functions to thymic DC are discussed extensively. Images Figure 1 Figures 3-5 Figures 6-9 PMID:7913915

  15. DENDRITIC CELLS: ARE THEY CLINICALLY RELEVANT?

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Roberts, Lee; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Cancer vaccines have undergone a renaissance due to recent clinical trials showing promising immunological data and some clinical benefit to patients. Current trials exploiting dendritic cells (DCs) as vaccines have shown durable tumor regressions in a fraction of patients. Clinical efficacy of current vaccines is hampered by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, inflammatory type 2 T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), all of which prevent the generation of effector cells. To improve the clinical efficacy of DC vaccines, we need to design novel and improved strategies that can boost adaptive immunity to cancer, help overcome Tregs and allow the breakdown of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. This can be achieved by exploiting the fast increasing knowledge about the DC system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets. Critical to the design of better vaccines is the concept of distinct DC subsets and distinct DC activation pathways, all contributing to the generation of unique adaptive immune responses. Such novel DC vaccines will be used as monotherapy in patients with resected disease and in combination with antibodies and/or drugs targeting suppressor pathways and modulation of the tumor environment in patients with metastatic disease. PMID:20693842

  16. [Single nucleotide polymorphism and its application in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation--review].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Xia

    2004-12-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is the third genetic marker after restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and short tandem repeat. It represents the most density genetic variability in the human genome and has been widely used in gene location, cloning, and research of heredity variation, as well as parenthood identification in forensic medicine. As steady heredity polymorphism, single nucleotide polymorphism is becoming the focus of attention in monitoring chimerism and minimal residual disease in the patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The article reviews SNP heredity characterization, analysis techniques and its applications in allogeneic stem cell transplantation and other fields.

  17. Untreated or drug-treated tumor cells are differentially recognized by allogeneic lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    D'Atri, S; Romani, L; Bonmassar, E; Grohmann, U; Tricarico, M; Christmas, S E; Moore, M

    1994-07-01

    Murine tumor cells treated with triazene compounds (TZC), in vivo or in vitro, are capable of eliciting specific transplantation resistance in syngeneic hosts, and T-cell-mediated proliferative and cytotoxic responses, directed against novel drug-induced antigen(s). Since this phenomenon, referred to as chemical xenogenization (CX) could open up new perspectives in the immunochemotherapy of human neoplasias, it was of interest to investigate whether CX could also occur in human tumors. However, established human tumor cell lines along with fully immunocompetent autologous lymphocytes, are seldom available. Therefore studies were carried out to test whether parental or TZC-treated tumor cells could be differentially recognized by allogeneic lymphocytes. Experiments were performed in both human and murine models, using a lung adenocarcinoma line treated in vitro with TZC, or an established xenogenized mouse lymphoma, respectively. The results indicate that allogeneic cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) recognize specifically murine TZC-treated tumor cells. This was supported by the finding that antisera directed against the drug-treated cells abrogated the generation and the cytolytic activity of allogeneic CTL reactive against the TZC-treated tumor. In addition it was found that changes of the antigenic pattern of cell membrane recognizable by cloned allogeneic CTL occur in the TZC-treated human carcinoma cell line.

  18. Reconstruction of Beagle Hemi-Mandibular Defects with Allogenic Mandibular Scaffolds and Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, JinChao; Liu, HuaWei; Hu, Min; Yue, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Massive bone allografts are frequently used in orthopedic reconstructive surgery, but carry a high failure rate of approximately 25%. We tested whether treatment of graft with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can increase the integration of massive allografts (hemi-mandible) in a large animal model. Methods Thirty beagle dogs received surgical left-sided hemi-mandibular defects, and then divided into two equal groups. Bony defects of the control group were reconstructed using allografts only. Those of the experimental group were reconstructed using allogenic mandibular scaffold-loaded autologous MSCs. Beagles from each group were killed at4 (n = 4), 12 (n = 4), 24 (n = 4) or 48 weeks (n = 3) postoperatively. CT and micro-CT scans, histological analyses and the bone mineral density (BMD) of transplants were used to evaluate defect reconstruction outcomes. Results Gross and CT examinations showed that the autologous bone grafts had healed in both groups. At 48 weeks, the allogenic mandibular scaffolds of the experimental group had been completely replaced by new bone, which has a smaller surface area to that of the original allogenic scaffold, whereas the scaffold in control dogs remained the same size as the original allogenic scaffold throughout. At 12 weeks, the BMD of the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05), and all micro-architectural parameters were significantly different between groups (p<0.05). Histological analyses showed almost all transplanted allogeneic bone was replaced by new bone, principally fibrous ossification, in the experimental group, which differed from the control group where little new bone formed. Conclusions Our study demonstrated the feasibility of MSC-loaded allogenic mandibular scaffolds for the reconstruction of hemi-mandibular defects. Further studies are needed to test whether these results can be surpassed by the use of allogenic mandibular scaffolds loaded with a

  19. Role of dendritic cells in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Cuihua

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that bridge innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent work has elucidated the DC life cycle, including several important stages such as maturation, migration and homeostasis, as well as DC classification and subsets/locations, which provided etiological insights on the role of DCs in disease processes. DCs have a close relationship to endothelial cells and they interact with each other to maintain immunity. DCs are deposited in the atherosclerotic plaque and contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In addition, the necrotic cardiac cells induced by ischemia activate DCs by Toll-like receptors, which initiate innate and adaptive immune responses to renal, hepatic and cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Furthermore, DCs are involved in the acute/chronic rejection of solid organ transplantation and mediate transplant tolerance as well. Advancing our knowledge of the biology of DCs will aid development of new approaches to treat many cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, cardiac IRI and transplantation. PMID:21179302

  20. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Wen Jing; Ahl, Patricia Jennifer; Connolly, John Edward

    2016-01-01

    Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential. PMID:26980944

  1. Red blood cell-incompatible allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rowley, S D; Donato, M L; Bhattacharyya, P

    2011-09-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells from red cell-incompatible donors occurs in 30-50% of patients. Immediate and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions are expected complications of red cell-disparate transplantation and both ABO and other red cell systems such as Kidd and rhesus can be involved. The immunohematological consequences of red cell-incompatible transplantation include delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and delayed hemolysis from viable lymphocytes carried in the graft ('passenger lymphocytes'). The risks of these reactions, which may be abrupt in onset and fatal, are ameliorated by graft processing and proper blood component support. Red blood cell antigens are expressed on endothelial and epithelial tissues in the body and could serve to increase the risk of GvHD. Mouse models indicate that blood cell antigens may function as minor histocompatibility antigens affecting engraftment. Similar observations have been found in early studies of human transplantation for transfused recipients, although current conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens appear to overcome this affect. No deleterious effects from the use of red cell-incompatible hematopoietic grafts on transplant outcomes, such as granulocyte and platelet engraftments, the incidences of acute or chronic GvHD, relapse risk or OS, have been consistently demonstrated. Most studies, however, include limited number of patients, varying diagnoses and differing treatment regimens, complicating the detection of an effect of ABO-incompatible transplantation. Classification of patients by ABO phenotype ignoring the allelic differences of these antigens also may obscure the effect of red cell-incompatible transplantation on transplant outcomes. PMID:21897398

  2. In-Vitro Differentiation of Mature Dendritic Cells From Human Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Dirk; Soruri, Afsaneh; Schwartz, Peter; Peters, J. Hinrich

    1998-01-01

    Representing the most potent antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DC) can now be generated from human blood monocytes. We recently presented a novel protocol employing GM-CSF, IL-4, and IFN-γ to differentiate monocyte-derived DC in vitro. Here, such cells are characterized in detail. Cells in culture exhibited both dendritic and veiled morphologies, the former being adherent and the latter suspended. Phenotypically, they were CD1a-/dim, CD11a+, CD11b++, CD11c+, CD14dim/-, CD16a-/dim, CD18+, CD32dim/-, CD33+, CD40+, CD45R0+, CD50+, CD54+, CD64-/dim, CD68+, CD71+, CD80dim, CD86+/++, MHC class I++/+++ HLA-DR++/+++ HLA-DP+, and HLA-DQ+. The DC stimulated a strong allogeneic T-cell response, and further evidence for their autologous antigen-specific stimulation is discussed. Although resembling a mature CD 11c+CD45R0+ blood DC subset identified earlier, their differentiation in the presence of the Thl and Th2 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-4 indicates that these DC may conform to mature mucosal DC. PMID:9716903

  3. The Expression of GM-CSF and Osteopontin in Immunocompetent Cells Precedes the Odontoblast Differentiation Following Allogenic Tooth Transplantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kotaro; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Kenmotsu, Shin-ichi; Ohshima, Hayato

    2011-01-01

    Dental pulp elaborates both bone and dentin under pathological conditions such as tooth replantation/transplantation. This study aims to clarify the expression of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and osteopontin (OPN) in the process of reparative dentin formation by allogenic tooth transplantation using in situ hybridization for OPN and immunohistochemistry for GM-CSF and OPN at both levels of light and electron microscopes. Following the extraction of the mouse molar, the roots and pulp floor were resected and immediately allografted into the sublingual region. On days 1 to 3, immunocompetent cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells expressed both GM-CSF and OPN, and some of them were arranged along the pulp-dentin border and extended their cellular processes into the dentinal tubules. On days 5 to 7, tubular dentin formation commenced next to the preexisting dentin at the pulp horn where nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged. Until day 14, bone-like tissue formation occurred in the pulp chamber, where OPN-positive osteoblasts surrounded the bone matrix. These results suggest that the secretion of GM-CSF and OPN by immunocompetent cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells plays a role in the maturation of dendritic cells and the differentiation of odontoblasts, respectively, in the regenerated pulp tissue following tooth transplantation. PMID:21430263

  4. Isolation of Human Skin Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Merry; Jardine, Laura; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes with antigen-processing and antigen-presenting functions. DCs can be divided into distinct subsets by anatomical location, phenotype and function. In human, the two most accessible tissues to study leukocytes are peripheral blood and skin. DCs are rare in human peripheral blood (<1 % of mononuclear cells) and have a less mature phenotype than their tissue counterparts (MacDonald et al., Blood. 100:4512-4520, 2002; Haniffa et al., Immunity 37:60-73, 2012). In contrast, the skin covering an average total surface area of 1.8 m(2) has approximately tenfold more DCs than the average 5 L of total blood volume (Wang et al., J Invest Dermatol 134:965-974, 2014). DCs migrate spontaneously from skin explants cultured ex vivo, which provide an easy method of cell isolation (Larsen et al., J Exp Med 172:1483-1493, 1990; Lenz et al., J Clin Invest 92:2587-2596, 1993; Nestle et al., J Immunol 151:6535-6545, 1993). These factors led to the extensive use of skin DCs as the "prototype" migratory DCs in human studies. In this chapter, we detail the protocols to isolate DCs and resident macrophages from human skin. We also provide a multiparameter flow cytometry gating strategy to identify human skin DCs and to distinguish them from macrophages. PMID:27142012

  5. Brain dendritic cells: biology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    D’Agostino, Paul M.; Gottfried-Blackmore, Andres; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. In their quiescent and mature form, the presentation of self-antigens by DC leads to tolerance; whereas, antigen presentation by mature DC, after stimulation by pathogen-associated molecular patterns, leads to the onset of antigen-specific immunity. DC have been found in many of the major organs in mammals (e.g. skin, heart, lungs, intestines and spleen), while the brain has long been considered devoid of DC in the absence of neuroinflammation. Consequently, microglia, the resident immune cell of the brain, have been charged with many functional attributes commonly ascribed to DC. Recent evidence has challenged the notion that DC are either absent or minimal players in brain immune surveillance. This review will discuss the recent literature examining DC involvement within both the young and aged steady-state brain. We will also examine DC contributions during various forms of neuroinflammation resulting from neurodegenerative autoimmune disease, injury, and CNS infections. This review also touches upon DC trafficking between the central nervous system and peripheral immune compartments during viral infections, the new molecular technologies that could be employed to enhance our current understanding of brain DC ontogeny, and some potential therapeutic uses of DC within the CNS. PMID:22825593

  6. TLR3 Signaling Promotes the Induction of Unique Human BDCA-3 Dendritic Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Colletti, Nicholas J.; Liu, Hong; Gower, Adam C.; Alekseyev, Yuriy O.; Arendt, Christopher W.; Shaw, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (cDCs and pDCs) are the two populations of DCs that can be readily identified in human blood. Conventional DCs have been subdivided into CD1c+, or blood dendritic cells antigen (BDCA) 1 and CD141+, or BDCA-3, DCs, each having both unique gene expression profiles and functions. BDCA-3 DCs express high levels of toll-like receptor 3 and upon stimulation with Poly I:C secrete IFN-β, CXCL10, and IL-12p70. In this article, we show that activation of human BDCA-3 DCs with Poly I:C induces the expression of activation markers (CD40, CD80, and CD86) and immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT) 3 and 4. This Poly I:C stimulation results in four populations identifiable by flow cytometry based on their expression of ILT3 and ILT4. We focused our efforts on profiling the ILT4− and ILT4+ DCs. These ILT-expressing BDCA-3 populations exhibit similar levels of activation as measured by CD40, CD80, and CD86; however, they exhibit differential cytokine secretion profiles, unique gene signatures, and vary in their ability to prime allogenic naïve T cells. Taken together, these data illustrate that within a pool of BDCA-3 DCs, there are cells poised to respond differently to a given input stimulus with unique output of immune functions. PMID:27014268

  7. TLR3 Signaling Promotes the Induction of Unique Human BDCA-3 Dendritic Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Colletti, Nicholas J; Liu, Hong; Gower, Adam C; Alekseyev, Yuriy O; Arendt, Christopher W; Shaw, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (cDCs and pDCs) are the two populations of DCs that can be readily identified in human blood. Conventional DCs have been subdivided into CD1c(+), or blood dendritic cells antigen (BDCA) 1 and CD141(+), or BDCA-3, DCs, each having both unique gene expression profiles and functions. BDCA-3 DCs express high levels of toll-like receptor 3 and upon stimulation with Poly I:C secrete IFN-β, CXCL10, and IL-12p70. In this article, we show that activation of human BDCA-3 DCs with Poly I:C induces the expression of activation markers (CD40, CD80, and CD86) and immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT) 3 and 4. This Poly I:C stimulation results in four populations identifiable by flow cytometry based on their expression of ILT3 and ILT4. We focused our efforts on profiling the ILT4(-) and ILT4(+) DCs. These ILT-expressing BDCA-3 populations exhibit similar levels of activation as measured by CD40, CD80, and CD86; however, they exhibit differential cytokine secretion profiles, unique gene signatures, and vary in their ability to prime allogenic naïve T cells. Taken together, these data illustrate that within a pool of BDCA-3 DCs, there are cells poised to respond differently to a given input stimulus with unique output of immune functions.

  8. Whole-body UVB irradiation during allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is safe and decreases acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Marina; Karrer, Sigrid; Hoffmann, Petra; Gottfried, Eva; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Hahn, Joachim; Edinger, Matthias; Landthaler, Michael; Andreesen, Reinhard; Merad, Miriam; Holler, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    Depletion of host Langerhans cells (LCs) prevents cutaneous graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in mice. We analyzed whether UVB irradiation is tolerated during the course of human allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and whether depletion of LCs by broadband UVB could improve GvHD outcome. A total of 17 patients received six whole-body UVB irradiations with 75% of the individually determined minimal erythemal dose after conditioning with a reduced intensity protocol. LCs, dermal dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages were analyzed before and after UVB irradiation by immunohistochemical analysis. Circulating blood cells and serum factors were analyzed in parallel. In striking contrast to previous data, our irradiation protocol was well tolerated in all patients. UVB treatment decreased the number of LCs and also affected dermal DCs. UVB-treated patients also had significantly higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 serum levels and higher numbers of circulating CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Strikingly, nine out of nine patients with complete LC depletion (<1 LC per field) developed only grade I GvHD or no GvHD up to day 100. Our results strongly suggest that prophylactic UVB irradiation post transplant is safe and should be further explored as a clinical strategy to prevent acute (skin) GvHD.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of dendritic cell diversity.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Michaël; Allan, Rhys S; Belz, Gabrielle T

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration, and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These findings open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle - identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man - now sets the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  10. Mycobacterium avium subspecies impair dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Basler, Tina; Brumshagen, Christina; Beineke, Andreas; Goethe, Ralph; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic, granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. Dendritic cells (DC) of the gut are ideally placed to combat invading mycobacteria; however, little is known about their interaction with MAP. Here, we investigated the interaction of MAP and the closely related M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) with murine DC and the effect of infected macrophages on DC maturation. The infection of DC with MAP or MAA induced DC maturation, which differed to that of LPS as maturation was accompanied by higher production of IL-10 and lower production of IL-12. Treatment of maturing DC with supernatants from mycobacteria-infected macrophages resulted in impaired DC maturation, leading to a semi-mature, tolerogenic DC phenotype expressing low levels of MHCII, CD86 and TNF-α after LPS stimulation. Though the cells were not completely differentiated they responded with an increased IL-10 and a decreased IL-12 production. Using recombinant cytokines we provide evidence that the semi-mature DC phenotype results from a combination of secreted cytokines and released antigenic mycobacterial components of the infected macrophage. Our results indicate that MAP and MAA are able to subvert DC function directly by infecting and indirectly via the milieu created by infected macrophages.

  11. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 mediates allogeneic CD8(+) T cell-induced apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Jian, Zhang; Ping, Zou; Weiming, Li

    2009-12-01

    Vascular endothelial-cells injury plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and transplant-associated endothelial injury syndrome. Vascular endothelial cells are an exposed target tissue for immune-mediated injury during GVHD. Early endothelial injury syndromes share common features with acute GVHD. Chronic GVHD leads to a rarefaction of microvessels caused by the infiltration of alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this context, allogeneic reactive cytotoxic T cell may contribute to apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells. The involvement of proteinase-activated receptor (PAR-1) in regulation of apoptosis has been recently recognized in many cell types. We hypothesized that apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells induced by allogeneic cytotoxic T cell are mediated via the PAR-1. Allogeneic CD8(+) T cell, PAR-1 agonist peptide (SFLLRN) induced apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) as assessed by AnnexinV-FITC labeling. To ascertain the mechanism of endothelial apoptosis, we determined that allogeneic CD8(+) T cell, SFLLRN enhanced cleavage of caspase-3 and led to p38MAPK activation as assessed by Western blot. The effects of allogeneic CD8(+) T cell and SFLLRN on apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells were largely prevented by a cleavage-blocking anti-human PAR-1-antibody (ATAP2) and a specific inhibitor of p38MAPK. In concert, these observations provide strong evidence that allogeneic CD8(+) T cell induces apoptosis of human vascular endothelial cells through PAR-1-dependent modulation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway via alterations of p38MAPK and caspase-3. PMID:19082770

  12. A fatal case of acute HHV-6 myocarditis following allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Yvonne; Gottlieb, David J; Baewer, David; Blyth, Emily

    2015-11-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is an ubiquitous virus that can reactivate in immunocompromised hosts, resulting in diverse clinical sequelae. We describe a case of fatal acute HHV-6 myocarditis in a patient who underwent allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of biopsy proven HHV-6 myocarditis post-HSCT.

  13. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  14. Allogenous tendon stem/progenitor cells in silk scaffold for functional shoulder repair.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiliang; Chen, Jialin; Yin, Zi; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Huanhuan; Heng, Boon Chin; Chen, Weishan; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) were recently identified within tendon tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate TSPC-seeded knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold for functional shoulder repair. The multidifferentiation potential, proliferation, and immune properties of TSPCs were investigated in vitro, while the efficacy of TSPC-seeded knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffolds in promoting rotator cuff regeneration was evaluated in vivo within a rabbit model. TSPCs, which exhibited universal stem cell characteristics (i.e., clonogenicity, high proliferative capacity, and multidifferentiation potential), nonimmunogenicity, and immunosuppression, proliferated well on our scaffold in vitro. Implantation of allogenous TSPC-seeded scaffolds within a rabbit rotator cuff injury model did not elicit an immunological reaction, but instead increased fibroblastic cell ingrowth and reduced infiltration of lymphocytes within the implantation sites at 4 and 8 weeks postsurgery. After 12 weeks, the allogenous TSPC-treated group exhibited increased collagen deposition and had better structural and biomechanical properties compared to the control group. This study thus demonstrated that the allogenous TSPC-seeded knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold enhanced the efficacy of rotator cuff tendon regeneration by differentiating into tenocytes, and by secreting anti-inflammatory cytokines that prevent immunological rejection. Hence, allogenous TSPC-seeded knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffolds can be a clinically useful application for tendon tissue engineering.

  15. Immune responses to an encapsulated allogeneic islet {beta}-cell line in diabetic NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Sasha P. . E-mail: Sasha.Black@ca.crl.com; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Cui, Hong; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Weber, Collin J.; Safley, Susan A.

    2006-02-03

    Our goal is to develop effective islet grafts for treating type 1 diabetes. Since human islets are scarce, we evaluated the efficacy of a microencapsulated insulin-secreting conditionally transformed allogeneic {beta}-cell line ({beta}TC-tet) in non-obese diabetic mice treated with tetracycline to inhibit cell growth. Relatively low serum levels of tetracycline controlled proliferation of {beta}TC-tet cells without inhibiting effective control of hyperglycemia in recipients. There was no significant host cellular reaction to the allografts or host cell adherence to microcapsules, and host cytokine levels were similar to those of sham-operated controls. We conclude that encapsulated allogeneic {beta}-cell lines may be clinically relevant, because they effectively restore euglycemia and do not elicit a strong cellular immune response following transplantation. To our knowledge, this is First extensive characterization of the kinetics of host cellular and cytokine responses to an encapsulated islet cell line in an animal model of type 1 diabetes.

  16. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient. PMID:25674158

  17. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient.

  18. The effect of dendritic cells on the retinal cell transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Akio; Nagai, Takayuki; Mandai, Michiko Takahashi, Masayo; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2007-11-16

    The potential of bone marrow cell-derived immature dendritic cells (myeloid iDCs) in modulating the efficacy of retinal cell transplantation therapy was investigated. (1) In vitro, myeloid iDCs but not BMCs enhanced the survival and proliferation of embryonic retinal cells, and the expression of various neurotrophic factors by myeloid iDCs was confirmed with RT-PCR. (2) In subretinal transplantation, neonatal retinal cells co-transplanted with myeloid iDCs showed higher survival rate compared to those transplanted without myeloid iDCs. (3) CD8 T-cells reactive against donor retinal cells were significantly increased in the mice with transplantation of retinal cells alone. These results suggested the beneficial effects of the use of myeloid iDCs in retinal cell transplantation therapy.

  19. In vivo imaging of dendritic pruning in dentate granule cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J Tiago; Bloyd, Cooper W; Shtrahman, Matthew; Johnston, Stephen T; Schafer, Simon T; Parylak, Sarah L; Tran, Thanh; Chang, Tina; Gage, Fred H

    2016-06-01

    We longitudinally imaged the developing dendrites of adult-born mouse dentate granule cells (DGCs) in vivo and found that they underwent over-branching and pruning. Exposure to an enriched environment and constraint of dendritic growth by disrupting Wnt signaling led to increased branch addition and accelerated growth, which were, however, counteracted by earlier and more extensive pruning. Our results indicate that pruning is regulated in a homeostatic fashion to oppose excessive branching and promote a similar dendrite structure in DGCs. PMID:27135217

  20. Dendrites of rod bipolar cells sprout in normal aging retina

    PubMed Central

    Liets, Lauren C.; Eliasieh, Kasra; van der List, Deborah A.; Chalupa, Leo M.

    2006-01-01

    The aging nervous system is known to manifest a variety of degenerative and regressive events. Here we report the unexpected growth of dendrites in the retinas of normal old mice. The dendrites of many rod bipolar cells in aging mice were observed to extend well beyond their normal strata within the outer plexiform layer to innervate the outer nuclear layer where they appeared to form contacts with the spherules of rod photoreceptors. Such dendritic sprouting increased with age and was evident at all retinal eccentricities. These results provide evidence of retinal plasticity associated with normal aging. PMID:16880381

  1. Autologous is Superior to Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in Second Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Jennifer L. Holter; Rubinger, Morel; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Wang, Hai-Lin; Grigg, Andrew; Selby, George B.; Szer, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jacob M.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify favored choice of transplantation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission. PATIENTS We studied 294 acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients receiving allogeneic (n=232) or autologous (62) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in second complete remission (CR2) reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2006 including pre-HCT PML/RAR∝ status in 155 (49% of allogeneic and 66% of autologous). METHODS Patient characteristics and transplant characteristics including treatment related mortality, overall survival, and disease free survival were collected and analyzed for both univariate and multivariate outcomes. RESULTS With median follow-up of 115 (allogeneic) and 72 months (autologous), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) favored autologous 63% (49-75%) compared to allogeneic 50% (44-57%) (p=0.10) and overall survival (OS) 75% (63-85%) vs. 54% (48-61%) (p=.002) Multivariate analysis showed significantly worse DFS after allogeneic HCT (HR=1.88, 95% CI=1.16-3.06, p=0.011) and age >40 years (HR=2.30, 95% CI 1.44-3.67, p=0.0005). OS was significantly worse after allogeneic HCT (HR=2.66, 95%CI 1.52-4.65, p=0.0006; age >40 (HR=3.29, 95% CI 1.95-5.54, p<0.001) and CR1<12 months (HR=1.56 95% CI 1.07-2.26, p=0.021). Positive pre-HCT PML-RAR∝ status in 17/114 allogeneic and 6/41 autologous transplants did not influence relapse, treatment failure or survival in either group. The survival advantage for autografting was attributable to increased 3 years TRM: allogeneic 30%; autologous 2%, and GVHD. CONCLUSION We conclude that autologous HCT yields superior overall survival for APL in CR2. Long term DFS in autologous recipients, even with MRD+ grafts remains an important subject for further study. PMID:24691221

  2. Peripheral blood CD5-positive B lymphocytes (B-1a cells) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Veneri, Dino; Franchini, Massimo; de Sabata, Donata; Ledro, Silvia; Vella, Antonio; Ortolani, Riccardo; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Benedetti, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Background Only few data are available in literature regarding the reconstitution of B-1a cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation performed for haematological malignancies. Methods In this study we used flow cytometry to assess the reconstitution of the peripheral blood B-1a cell compartment after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Cytometric analyses were performed over time on 11 consecutive patients undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in our Haematology Unit and the results were compared with available data regarding B-1a cell reconstitution after allogeneic bone marrow stem cell transplantation. Results In spite of an earlier recovery of B-1a cells in the peripheral blood after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, the reconstitution of this B-cell subset was similar, regardless of the source of stem cells employed. Conclusions Further studies are necessary in order to clarify the origin of B-1a cells in humans in health and illness. PMID:19112737

  3. Naive Donor NK Cell Repertoires Associated with Less Leukemia Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Andreas T; Clancy, Trevor; Goodridge, Jodie P; Béziat, Vivien; Schaffer, Marie; Hovig, Eivind; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Ljungman, Per T; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2016-02-01

    Acute and latent human CMV cause profound changes in the NK cell repertoire, with expansion and differentiation of educated NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors. In this study, we addressed whether such CMV-induced imprints on the donor NK cell repertoire influenced the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hierarchical clustering of high-resolution immunophenotyping data covering key NK cell parameters, including frequencies of CD56(bright), NKG2A(+), NKG2C(+), and CD57(+) NK cell subsets, as well as the size of the educated NK cell subset, was linked to clinical outcomes. Clusters defining naive (NKG2A(+)CD57(-)NKG2C(-)) NK cell repertoires in the donor were associated with decreased risk for relapse in recipients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (hazard ratio [HR], 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03-0.27; p < 0.001). Furthermore, recipients with naive repertoires at 9-12 mo after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had increased disease-free survival (HR, 7.2; 95% CI: 1.6-33; p = 0.01) and increased overall survival (HR, 9.3; 95% CI: 1.1-77, p = 0.04). Conversely, patients with a relative increase in differentiated NK cells at 9-12 mo displayed a higher rate of late relapses (HR, 8.41; 95% CI: 6.7-11; p = 0.02), reduced disease-free survival (HR, 0.12; 95% CI: 0.12-0.74; p = 0.02), and reduced overall survival (HR, 0.07; 95% CI: 0.01-0.69; p = 0.02). Thus, our data suggest that naive donor NK cell repertoires are associated with protection against leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26746188

  4. Functional and phenotypic characterization of distinct porcine dendritic cells derived from peripheral blood monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Paillot, R; Laval, F; Audonnet, J-C; Andreoni, C; Juillard, V

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells that have an exquisite capacity to interact with T cells and modulate their responses. Little is known about porcine DCs despite the fact that they represent an important target in strategies that are aimed at modulating resistance to infection in pigs and may be of major importance in transplantation biology. We generated immature monocyte-derived porcine dendritic cells (MoDCs) directly from adherent peripheral blood cells treated with porcine granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). The cells were observed via electron microscopy and their phenotype was characterized using monoclonal antibodies. The functionality of the porcine MoDCs was demonstrated showing that the cells were capable of different specialized functions relevant to antigen capture and were potent stimulators in a primary allo-mixed leucocyte reaction. Treatment of the MoDCs with porcine cell line-derived necrotic factors resulted in the phenotypic and functional maturation of MoDCs. We confirmed also that monocyte-derived DCs were differentially regulated by cytokines, showing that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is able to redirect monocytic precursors into the differentiation pathway of Langerhans' cells presenting typical Birbeck granules. Interestingly, and in contrast to the human and murine model, we showed that the monocyte-derived porcine Langerhans'-type cells (MoLCs) were much more potent activators of allogeneic T cells than MoDCs obtained without TGF-β1. PMID:11328373

  5. Therapeutic vaccine generated by electrofusion of dendritic cells and tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, H; Shimizu, K; Lee, W; Kjaergaard, J; Parkhurst, M R; Cohen, P A; Shu, S

    2004-01-01

    Immunotherapy with fusion of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumour cells potentially confers the advantages of DC antigen-presenting functionality and a continuous source of unaltered tumour antigens. However, fusion using chemical or viral fusogens has been inefficient. We have recently developed a high throughput electrofusion technique with which very efficient fusion rates (15-54%) were observed in over 300 experiments, using a variety of murine and human tumour cell lines. The fused cells display a mature DC phenotype and express tumour-associated antigens. In two pre-clinical animal models (B16 melanoma transduced with the LacZ gene and the MCA 205 fibrosarcoma), a single vaccination of mice bearing tumours established in the lung, brain and skin resulted in tumour regression and prolongation of life. However, therapeutic efficacy required the administration of adjuvants such as IL-12 and OX-40R mAbs. Effective immunotherapy also required the delivery of fusion cells directly into lymphoid organs (spleen or lymph nodes). Using five defined human T cell lines derived from melanoma patients, allogeneic DCs of HLA-A2, HLA-DR4 and HLA-DR7 haplotypes fused with MART-1, gp100, tyrosinase and TRP-2 expressing 888 mel melanoma cells were analysed for their ability to stimulate specific cytokine (IFN-gamma and GM-CSF) secretion. DC-888 mel hybrids presented all tumour-associated epitopes to both CD4 and CD8 T cell lines in the context of MHC class II and I molecules, respectively. The therapeutic efficacy of a DC-tumour fusion vaccine is now being evaluated for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:15603192

  6. How Follicular Dendritic Cells Shape the B-Cell Antigenome

    PubMed Central

    Kranich, Jan; Krautler, Nike Julia

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are stromal cells residing in primary follicles and in germinal centers of secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs (SLOs and TLOs). There, they play a crucial role in B-cell activation and affinity maturation of antibodies. FDCs have the unique capacity to bind and retain native antigen in B-cell follicles for long periods of time. Therefore, FDCs shape the B-cell antigenome (the sum of all B-cell antigens) in SLOs and TLOs. In this review, we discuss recent findings that explain how this stromal cell type can arise in almost any tissue during TLO formation and, furthermore, focus on the mechanisms of antigen capture and retention involved in the generation of long-lasting antigen depots displayed on FDCs. PMID:27446069

  7. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, David

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory) of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Feasibility of combination allogeneic stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cellular therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) is overviewed focusing on bone marrow mononuclear cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. A case is made for the possibility of combining cell types, as well as for allogeneic use. We report the case of 29 year old male who suffered a crush fracture of the L1 vertebral body, lacking lower sensorimotor function, being a score A on the ASIA scale. Stem cell therapy comprised of intrathecal administration of allogeneic umbilical cord blood ex-vivo expanded CD34 and umbilical cord matrix MSC was performed 5 months, 8 months, and 14 months after injury. Cell administration was well tolerated with no adverse effects observed. Neuropathic pain subsided from intermittent 10/10 to once a week 3/10 VAS. Recovery of muscle, bowel and sexual function was noted, along with a decrease in ASIA score to "D". This case supports further investigation into allogeneic-based stem cell therapies for SCI. PMID:21070647

  9. Risk Assessment before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) most commonly affects patients older than 60 years. Outcomes of treatment of older AML patients have been poor. The advent of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens made allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) an available treatment option with curative intent for older AML patients. Because older patients are often excluded from clinical trials, little is known about the stratification of their risks before allogeneic HCT. While recent studies of RIC and allogeneic HCT have shown little impact of age on outcomes, other variables such as the recipient health status and the AML disease status and chromosomal aberrations have proven to be of prognostic significance. Here, we review recent studies of allogeneic HCT for older patients with AML with detailed evaluation of risk factors for relapse as well as non-relapse mortality. We have integrated the currently available information on transplant risks into a five-category risk-benefit system that could aid in the decision-making in this patient population. PMID:24083472

  10. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Combination with Hyaluronic Acid for the Treatment of Osteoarthritis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chiang, En-Rung; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Wang, Jung-Pan; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies may aid in the repair of articular cartilage defects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of intraarticular injection of allogeneic MSCs in an in vivo anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model of osteoarthritis in rabbits. Allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs were isolated and cultured under hypoxia (1% O2). After 8 weeks following ACLT, MSCs suspended in hyaluronic acid (HA) were injected into the knees, and the contralateral knees were injected with HA alone. Additional controls consisted of a sham operation group as well as an untreated osteoarthritis group. The tissues were analyzed by macroscopic examination as well as histologic and immunohistochemical methods at 6 and 12 weeks post-transplantation. At 6 and 12 weeks, the joint surface showed less cartilage loss and surface abrasion after MSC injection as compared to the tissues receiving HA injection alone. Significantly better histological scores and cartilage content were observed with the MSC transplantation. Furthermore, engraftment of allogenic MSCs were evident in surface cartilage. Thus, injection of the allogeneic MSCs reduced the progression of osteoarthritis in vivo.

  11. Optimal timing of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo G Della; Malcovati, Luca; Jackson, Christopher H; Pascutto, Cristiana; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Teresa van Lint, Maria; Falda, Michele; Bernardi, Massimo; Onida, Francesco; Guidi, Stefano; Iori, Anna Paola; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Angelucci, Emanuele; Oneto, Rosi; Ripamonti, Francesco; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bosi, Alberto; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents the only curative treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but involves non-negligible morbidity and mortality. Registry studies have shown that advanced disease stage at transplantation is associated with inferior overall survival. To define the optimal timing of allogeneic HSCT, we carried out a decision analysis by studying 660 patients who received best supportive care and 449 subjects who underwent transplantation. Risk assessment was based on both the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the World Health Organization classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS). We used a continuous-time multistate Markov model to describe the natural history of disease and evaluate the effect of allogeneic HSCT on survival. This model estimated life expectancy from diagnosis according to treatment policy at different risk stages. Relative to supportive care, estimated life expectancy increased when transplantation was delayed from the initial stages until progression to intermediate-1 IPSS-risk or to intermediate WPSS-risk stage, and then decreased for higher risks. Modeling decision analysis on WPSS versus IPSS allowed better estimation of the optimal timing of transplantation. These observations indicate that allogeneic HSCT offers optimal survival benefits when the procedure is performed before MDS patients progress to advanced disease stages. Am. J. Hematol. 88:581–588, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23606215

  12. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Combination with Hyaluronic Acid for the Treatment of Osteoarthritis in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, En-Rung; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Wang, Jung-Pan; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies may aid in the repair of articular cartilage defects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of intraarticular injection of allogeneic MSCs in an in vivo anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model of osteoarthritis in rabbits. Allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs were isolated and cultured under hypoxia (1% O2). After 8 weeks following ACLT, MSCs suspended in hyaluronic acid (HA) were injected into the knees, and the contralateral knees were injected with HA alone. Additional controls consisted of a sham operation group as well as an untreated osteoarthritis group. The tissues were analyzed by macroscopic examination as well as histologic and immunohistochemical methods at 6 and 12 weeks post-transplantation. At 6 and 12 weeks, the joint surface showed less cartilage loss and surface abrasion after MSC injection as compared to the tissues receiving HA injection alone. Significantly better histological scores and cartilage content were observed with the MSC transplantation. Furthermore, engraftment of allogenic MSCs were evident in surface cartilage. Thus, injection of the allogeneic MSCs reduced the progression of osteoarthritis in vivo. PMID:26915044

  13. Macrophages as APC and the dendritic cell myth.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2008-11-01

    Dendritic cells have been considered an immune cell type that is specialized for the presentation of Ag to naive T cells. Considerable effort has been applied to separate their lineage, pathways of differentiation, and effectiveness in Ag presentation from those of macrophages. This review summarizes evidence that dendritic cells are a part of the mononuclear phagocyte system and are derived from a common precursor, responsive to the same growth factors (including CSF-1), express the same surface markers (including CD11c), and have no unique adaptation for Ag presentation that is not shared by other macrophages.

  14. Avian dendritic cells: Phenotype and ontogeny in lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Nándor; Bódi, Ildikó; Oláh, Imre

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are critically important accessory cells in the innate and adaptive immune systems. Avian DCs were originally identified in primary and secondary lymphoid organs by their typical morphology, displaying long cell processes with cytoplasmic granules. Several subtypes are known. Bursal secretory dendritic cells (BSDC) are elongated cells which express vimentin intermediate filaments, MHC II molecules, macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), and produce 74.3+ secretory granules. Avian follicular dendritic cells (FDC) highly resemble BSDC, express the CD83, 74.3 and CSF1R molecules, and present antigen in germinal centers. Thymic dendritic cells (TDC), which express 74.3 and CD83, are concentrated in thymic medulla while interdigitating DC are found in T cell-rich areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Avian Langerhans cells are a specialized 74.3-/MHC II+ cell population found in stratified squamous epithelium and are capable of differentiating into 74.3+ migratory DCs. During organogenesis hematopoietic precursors of DC colonize the developing lymphoid organ primordia prior to immigration of lymphoid precursor cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the ontogeny, cytoarchitecture, and immunophenotype of avian DC, and offers an antibody panel for the in vitro and in vivo identification of these heterogeneous cell types.

  15. Prophylactic rituximab after allogeneic transplantation decreases B-cell alloimmunity with low chronic GVHD incidence

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Sally; Sahaf, Bita; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Chen, George L.; Jones, Carol D.; Lowsky, Robert; Shizuru, Judith A.; Johnston, Laura J.; Laport, Ginna G.; Weng, Wen-Kai; Benjamin, Jonathan E.; Schaenman, Joanna; Brown, Janice; Ramirez, Jessica; Zehnder, James L.; Negrin, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    B cells are involved in the pathogenesis of chronic GVHD (cGVHD). We hypothesized that prophylactic anti–B-cell therapy delivered 2 months after transplantation would decrease allogeneic donor B-cell immunity and possibly the incidence of cGVHD. Therefore, in the present study, patients with high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 22) and mantle-cell lymphoma (n = 13) received a total lymphoid irradiation of 80 cGy for 10 days and antithymocyte globulin 1.5 mg/kg/d for 5 days. Rituximab (375 mg/m2) was infused weekly on days 56, 63, 70, and 77 after transplantation. The incidence of acute GVHD was 6%. The cumulative incidence of cGVHD was 20%. Nonrelapse mortality was 3%. Rituximab treatment after allogeneic transplantation significantly reduced B-cell allogeneic immunity, with complete prevention of alloreactive H-Y Ab development in male patients with female donors (P = .01). Overall survival and freedom from progression at 4 years for chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients were 73% and 47%, respectively; for mantle-cell lymphoma patients, they were 69% and 53%, respectively. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00186628. PMID:22563089

  16. Fetal fibroblasts and keratinocytes with immunosuppressive properties for allogeneic cell-based wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Zuliani, Thomas; Saiagh, Soraya; Knol, Anne-Chantal; Esbelin, Julie; Dréno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Fetal skin heals rapidly without scar formation early in gestation, conferring to fetal skin cells a high and unique potential for tissue regeneration and scar management. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using fetal fibroblasts and keratinocytes to stimulate wound repair and regeneration for further allogeneic cell-based therapy development. From a single fetal skin sample, two clinical batches of keratinocytes and fibroblasts were manufactured and characterized. Tolerogenic properties of the fetal cells were investigated by allogeneic PBMC proliferation tests. In addition, the potential advantage of fibroblasts/keratinocytes co-application for wound healing stimulation has been examined in co-culture experiments with in vitro scratch assays and a multiplex cytokines array system. Based on keratin 14 and prolyl-4-hydroxylase expression analyses, purity of both clinical batches was found to be above 98% and neither melanocytes nor Langerhans cells could be detected. Both cell types demonstrated strong immunosuppressive properties as shown by the dramatic decrease in allogeneic PBMC proliferation when co-cultured with fibroblasts and/or keratinocytes. We further showed that the indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) activity is required for the immunoregulatory activity of fetal skin cells. Co-cultures experiments have also revealed that fibroblasts-keratinocytes interactions strongly enhanced fetal cells secretion of HGF, GM-CSF, IL-8 and to a lesser extent VEGF-A. Accordingly, in the in vitro scratch assays the fetal fibroblasts and keratinocytes co-culture accelerated the scratch closure compared to fibroblast or keratinocyte mono-cultures. In conclusion, our data suggest that the combination of fetal keratinocytes and fibroblasts could be of particular interest for the development of a new allogeneic skin substitute with immunomodulatory activity, acting as a reservoir for wound healing growth factors.

  17. T cells from the tumor microenvironment of patients with progressive myeloma can generate strong, tumor-specific cytolytic responses to autologous, tumor-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Krasovsky, Joseph; Olson, Kara

    2002-10-01

    Most untreated cancer patients develop progressive tumors. We tested the capacity of T lymphocytes from patients with clinically progressive, multiple myeloma to develop killer function against fresh autologous tumor. In this malignancy, it is feasible to reproducibly evaluate freshly isolated tumor cells and T cells from the marrow tumor environment. When we did this with seven consecutive patients, with all clinical stages of disease, we did not detect reactivity to autologous cancer cells. However, both cytolytic and IFN--producing responses to autologous myeloma were generated in six of seven patients after stimulation ex vivo with dendritic cells that had processed autologous tumor cells. The antitumor effectors recognized fresh autologous tumor but not nontumor cells in the bone marrow, myeloma cell lines, dendritic cells loaded with tumor-derived Ig, or allogeneic tumor. Importantly, these CD8+ effectors developed with similar efficiency by using T cells from both the blood and the bone marrow tumor environment. Therefore, even in the setting of clinical tumor progression, the tumor bed of myeloma patients contains T cells that can be activated readily by dendritic cells to kill primary autologous tumor.

  18. Murine Melanoma-Infiltrating Dendritic Cells Are Defective in Antigen Presenting Function Regardless of the Presence of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ataera, Haley; Hyde, Evelyn; Price, Kylie M.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Ronchese, Franca

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells are often ineffective at presenting tumor-derived antigen in vivo, a defect usually ascribed to the suppressive tumor environment. We investigated the effects of depleting CD4+CD25+ “natural” regulatory T cells (Treg) on the frequency, phenotype and function of total dendritic cell populations in B16.OVA tumors and in tumor-draining lymph nodes. Intraperitoneal injection of the anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody PC61 reduced Treg frequency in blood and tumors, but did not affect the frequency of tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells, or their expression of CD40, CD86 and MHCII. Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells from PC61-treated or untreated mice induced the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in vitro, but could not induce proliferation of OVA-specific OTI and OTII T cells unless specific peptide antigen was added in culture. Some proliferation of naïve, OVA-specific OTI T cells, but not OTII T cells, was observed in the tumor-draining LN of mice carrying B16.OVA tumors, however, this was not improved by PC61 treatment. Experiments using RAG1−/− hosts adoptively transferred with OTI and CD25-depleted OTII cells also failed to show improved OTI and OTII T cell proliferation in vivo compared to C57BL/6 hosts. We conclude that the defective presentation of B16.OVA tumor antigen by tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells and in the tumor-draining lymph node is not due to the presence of “natural” CD4+CD25+ Treg. PMID:21390236

  19. Investigation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell-based alveolar bone formation: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    De Kok, Ingeborg J; Peter, Susan J; Archambault, Michael; van den Bos, Christian; Kadiyala, Sudha; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2003-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based alveolar bone regeneration in a canine alveolar saddle defect model. MSCs were loaded onto hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) matrices. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) evaluation demonstrated greater than 75% MSC coverage of the HA/TCP porous surface prior to placement regardless of MSC donor. Matrices, 6 mm x 6 mm x 20 mm, with and without cells, were implanted for 4 and 9 weeks, then removed for histological evaluation of bone formation. Cell-free control matrices were compared with MSC-loaded matrices post implantation. Histomorphometrical analysis showed that equivalent amounts of new bone were formed within the pores of the matrices loaded with autologous MSCs or MSCs from an unrelated donor. Bone formation in the cell-free HA/TCP matrices was less extensive. There was no histologic evidence of an immunological response to autologous MSCs. Surprisingly, allogeneic MSC implantation also failed to provoke an immune response. Analysis of circulating antibody levels against MSCs supported the hypothesis that neither autologous nor allogeneic MSCs induced a systemic response by the host. Analysis of dye-labelled MSCs in histological sections confirmed that the MSCs persisted in the implants throughout the course of the experiment. At 9 weeks, labelled cells were present within the lacunae of newly formed bone. We conclude that autologous and allogeneic MSCs have the capacity to regenerate bone within craniofacial defects.

  20. Involvement of dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    López de Padilla, Consuelo M; Reed, Ann M

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that are specialized in the uptake of antigens and their transport from peripheral tissues to the lymphoid organs. Over the last decades, the properties of DCs have been intensely studied and much knowledge has been gained about the role of DCs in various diseases and health conditions where the immune system is involved, particularly in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Emerging clues in autoimmune diseases, suggest that dendritic cell dysregulation might be involved in the development of various autoimmune disorders in both adults and children. However, studies investigating a possible contribution of DCs in autoimmune diseases in the pediatric population alone are scanty. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current literature on the relevance of dendritic cells in the most common autoimmune conditions of childhood. PMID:17625003

  1. Dendritic cell SIRPα regulates homeostasis of dendritic cells in lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Washio, Ken; Kotani, Takenori; Saito, Yasuyuki; Respatika, Datu; Murata, Yoji; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Nishigori, Chikako; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα), an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that is expressed predominantly in myeloid lineage cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages, mediates cell-cell signaling. In the immune system, SIRPα is thought to be important for homeostasis of DCs, but it remains unclear whether SIRPα intrinsic to DCs is indeed indispensable for such functional role. Thus, we here generated the mice, in which SIRPα was specifically ablated in CD11c(+) DCs (Sirpa(Δ) (DC) ). Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice manifested a marked reduction of CD4(+) CD8α(-) conventional DCs (cDCs) in the secondary lymphoid organs, as well as of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Such reduction of cDCs in Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice was comparable to that apparent with the mice, in which SIRPα was systemically ablated. Expression of SIRPα in DCs was well correlated with that of either endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) or Epstein-Barr virus-induced molecule 2 (EBI2), both of which were also implicated in the regulation of DC homeostasis. Indeed, ESAM(+) or EBI2(+) cDCs were markedly reduced in the spleen of Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice. Thus, our results suggest that SIRPα intrinsic to CD11c(+) DCs is essential for homeostasis of cDCs in the secondary lymphoid organs and skin.

  2. Allogeneic Cell Therapy Bioprocess Economics and Optimization: Single-Use Cell Expansion Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Simaria, Ana S; Hassan, Sally; Varadaraju, Hemanthram; Rowley, Jon; Warren, Kim; Vanek, Philip; Farid, Suzanne S

    2014-01-01

    For allogeneic cell therapies to reach their therapeutic potential, challenges related to achieving scalable and robust manufacturing processes will need to be addressed. A particular challenge is producing lot-sizes capable of meeting commercial demands of up to 109 cells/dose for large patient numbers due to the current limitations of expansion technologies. This article describes the application of a decisional tool to identify the most cost-effective expansion technologies for different scales of production as well as current gaps in the technology capabilities for allogeneic cell therapy manufacture. The tool integrates bioprocess economics with optimization to assess the economic competitiveness of planar and microcarrier-based cell expansion technologies. Visualization methods were used to identify the production scales where planar technologies will cease to be cost-effective and where microcarrier-based bioreactors become the only option. The tool outputs also predict that for the industry to be sustainable for high demand scenarios, significant increases will likely be needed in the performance capabilities of microcarrier-based systems. These data are presented using a technology S-curve as well as windows of operation to identify the combination of cell productivities and scale of single-use bioreactors required to meet future lot sizes. The modeling insights can be used to identify where future R&D investment should be focused to improve the performance of the most promising technologies so that they become a robust and scalable option that enables the cell therapy industry reach commercially relevant lot sizes. The tool outputs can facilitate decision-making very early on in development and be used to predict, and better manage, the risk of process changes needed as products proceed through the development pathway. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 69–83. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23893544

  3. Distinct activation of primary human BDCA1(+) dendritic cells upon interaction with stressed or infected β cells.

    PubMed

    Schulte, B M; Kers-Rebel, E D; Bottino, R; Piganelli, J D; Galama, J M D; Engelse, M A; de Koning, E J P; Adema, G J

    2016-06-01

    Derailment of immune responses can lead to autoimmune type 1 diabetes, and this can be accelerated or even induced by local stress caused by inflammation or infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) shape both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we report on the responses of naturally occurring human myeloid BDCA1(+) DCs towards differentially stressed pancreatic β cells. Our data show that BDCA1(+) DCs in human pancreas-draining lymph node (pdLN) suspensions and blood-derived BDCA1(+) DCs both effectively engulf β cells, thus mimicking physiological conditions. Upon uptake of enterovirus-infected, but not mock-infected cells, BDCA1(+) DCs induced interferon (IFN)-α/β responses, co-stimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Notably, induction of stress in β cells by ultraviolet irradiation, culture in serum-free medium or cytokine-induced stress did not provoke strong DC activation, despite efficient phagocytosis. DC activation correlated with the amount of virus used to infect β cells and required RNA within virally infected cells. DCs encountering enterovirus-infected β cells, but not those incubated with mock-infected or stressed β cells, suppressed T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines and variably induced IFN-γ in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Thus, stressed β cells have little effect on human BDCA1(+) DC activation and function, while enterovirus-infected β cells impact these cells significantly, which could help to explain their role in development of autoimmune diabetes in individuals at risk.

  4. Prophylaxis and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Runzhe; Campbell, Jos L; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    Relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia remains a major cause of death in patients following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Several factors may affect the concurrence and outcome of relapse, which include graft-versus-host disease, minimal residual disease or intrinsic factors of the disease, and transplantation characteristics. The mainstay of relapse prevention and treatment is donor leukocyte infusions, targeted therapies, second transplantation, and other novel therapies. In this review, we mainly focus on addressing the impact of graft-versus-host disease on relapse and the prophylaxis and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapse following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We also make recommendations for critical strategies to prevent relapse after transplantation and challenges that must be addressed to ensure success. PMID:25709473

  5. Regulation of Dendritic Cell Function by Vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Barragan, Myriam; Good, Misty; Kolls, Jay K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies over the last two decades have revealed profound immunomodulatory aspects of vitamin D on various aspects of the immune system. This review will provide an overview of Vitamin D metabolism, a description of dendritic cell subsets, and highlight recent advances on the effects of vitamin D on dendritic cell function, maturation, cytokine production and antigen presentation. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, has important immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Specifically, the 1,25(OH)2D3-Vitamin D3 complex can affect the maturation and migration of many dendritic cell subsets, conferring a special immunoregulatory role as well as tolerogenic properties affecting cytokine and chemokine production. Furthermore, there have been many recent studies demonstrating the effects of Vitamin D on allergic disease and autoimmunity. A clear understanding of the effects of the various forms of Vitamin D will provide new opportunities to improve human health. PMID:26402698

  6. Fungemia Caused by Zygoascus hellenicus in an Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Mary E.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Pappas, Peter G.; Iqbal, Naureen; Arthington-Skaggs, Beth A.; Lee-Yang, Wendy; Smith, Maudy T.

    2004-01-01

    Zygoascus hellenicus (Candida hellenica) was isolated from a blood culture from a patient who had received an allogeneic stem cell transplant. The isolate displayed an antifungal susceptibility pattern of decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and itraconazole, high susceptibility to voriconazole, and low susceptibility to caspofungin. The organism was misidentified by a commercial yeast identification system. This is the first reported case of human infection with this rare ascomycetous yeast. PMID:15243118

  7. Voriconazole-Induced Periostitis Mimicking Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sweiss, Karen; Oh, Annie; Rondelli, Damiano; Patel, Pritesh

    2016-01-01

    Voriconazole is an established first-line agent for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). It is associated with the uncommon complication of periostitis. We report this complication in a 58-year-old female undergoing HSCT. She was treated with corticosteroids with minimal improvement. The symptoms related to periostitis can mimic chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients undergoing HSCT and clinicians should differentiate this from other diagnoses and promptly discontinue therapy.

  8. Voriconazole-Induced Periostitis Mimicking Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Annie; Rondelli, Damiano; Patel, Pritesh

    2016-01-01

    Voriconazole is an established first-line agent for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). It is associated with the uncommon complication of periostitis. We report this complication in a 58-year-old female undergoing HSCT. She was treated with corticosteroids with minimal improvement. The symptoms related to periostitis can mimic chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients undergoing HSCT and clinicians should differentiate this from other diagnoses and promptly discontinue therapy. PMID:27403356

  9. Allogeneic Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation after Nonmyeloablative Conditioning in Patients with T-Cell and Natural Killer-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Shustov, Andrei R.; Gooley, Theodore A.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Shizuru, Judith; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Sahebi, Firoozeh; McSweeney, Peter; Niederwieser, Dietger; Bruno, Benedetto; Storb, Rainer; Maloney, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Patients with T-cell (TCL) and natural killer-cell lymphomas (NKCL) have poor outcomes. This study examined the role of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after non-myeloablative conditioning in this setting. Seventeen patients with TCL or NKCL, including three patients in first complete remission, received allogeneic HCT after 2 Gy total-body irradiation and fludarabine. The median age was 57 (range, 18–73) years. The median number of prior therapies was 3 (range, 1–7), six patients (35%) had failed prior autologous HCT, and five patients (29%) had refractory disease at the time of allograft. Postgrafting immunosuppression was provided with mycophenolate mofetil with cyclosporine or tacrolimus. After a median follow-up of 3.3 (range, 0.3–8.0) years among surviving patients, the estimated probabilities of 3-year overall and progression-free survival were 59% and 53%, respectively, while the estimated probabilities of non-relapse mortality and relapse at three years were 19% and 26%, respectively. Sixty-five percent of patients developed grades 2–4 acute graft-versus-host disease and 53% of patients developed chronic graft-versus-host disease. Allogeneic HCT after non-myeloablative conditioning is a promising salvage option for selected patients TCL and NKCL. These results suggest that graft-versus-T-cell lymphoma activity is responsible for long-term disease control. PMID:20507311

  10. Adrenomedullin, a neuropeptide with immunoregulatory properties induces semi-mature tolerogenic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Rullé, Sandrine; Kioon, Marie-Dominique Ah; Asensio, Carine; Mussard, Julie; Ea, Hang-Korng; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Lioté, Frédéric; Falgarone, Géraldine

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in tolerance. Adrenomedullin (AM), a neuropeptide with anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects, may decrease T helper type 1 effector cells and induce regulatory T (Treg) cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate AM effects on murine dendritic cell (DC) maturation and functions. Bone marrow-derived DC were produced and stimulated with CpG motifs, lipopolysaccharide or AM for 24 hr. Then, DC maturation and expression of AM and AM receptors were evaluated. Compared with lipopolysaccharide-stimulated or CpG-stimulated DC, AM-stimulated DC had lower levels of co-stimulatory molecule expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. The AM induced high levels of interferon-γ but not of interleukin-10. Importantly, AM inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced maturation of DC. However, allogeneic T-cell stimulation and endocytic capacity of AM-stimulated DC were comparable to those of semi-mature and mature DC. Moreover, DC expressed AM and its receptors at a basal level, and AM receptor expression increased with DC maturation. The AM stimulation induced indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression, promoting Treg cell expansion. For the first time, we describe the DC maturation phenotype by a neuropeptide (AM). We have demonstrated that AM and its receptors are expressed in DC and that exogenous AM can modify the DC phenotype and functions and can induce a semi-mature DC phenotype with IDO expression. These results indicate close interactions among immune system regulation mechanisms and calcitonin-like peptides. PMID:22348691

  11. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). PMID:27000734

  12. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  13. Recombinant human interleukin-7 (CYT107) promotes T-cell recovery after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Jenna D.; Yuan, Jianda; Koehne, Guenther; Lechner, Lauren; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.; Young, James W.; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Zaidi, Bushra; Gallardo, Humilidad; Liu, Cailian; Rasalan, Teresa; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Croughs, Therese; Morre, Michel; Devlin, Sean M.; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Delays in immune recovery after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) are associated with increased risks of infection and relapse. IL-7 has a central role in T-cell development and survival and enhances immune recovery in murine models of allo-HSCT. We performed a phase 1 trial of r-hIL-7 (CYT107) in recipients of T-cell depleted allo-HSCTs. Twelve patients were treated with escalating doses of r-hIL-7 administered weekly for 3 weeks. The study drug was well tolerated with only one patient developing acute skin GVHD. At baseline, patients were profoundly lymphopenic. CYT107 induced a doubling in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The main effect of IL-7 was an expansion of effector memory T cells, the predominant subset identified in our patients. There was no significant effect on CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells, NK, or B cells. Importantly, we not only saw quantitative increases in T cells after a short course of IL-7 but also demonstrated an increase in functional T cells, including viral-specific T cells that recognize CMV. Enhanced TCR diversity was also observed after treatment. Our results indicate that r-hIL-7 can enhance immune recovery after a T cell–depleted allo-HSCT without causing significant GVHD or other serious toxicity (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00684008). PMID:23012326

  14. Cell-penetrating and neurotargeting dendritic siRNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Korbinian; Harder, Johannes; Halbach, Tobias; Willibald, Julian; Spada, Fabio; Gnerlich, Felix; Sparrer, Konstantin; Beil, Andreas; Möckl, Leonhard; Bräuchle, Christoph; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Carell, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    We report the development of dendritic siRNA nanostructures that are able to penetrate even difficult to transfect cells such as neurons with the help of a special receptor ligand. The nanoparticles elicit strong siRNA responses, despite the dendritic structure. An siRNA dendrimer directed against the crucial rabies virus (RABV) nucleoprotein (N protein) and phosphoprotein (P protein) allowed the suppression of the virus titer in neurons below the detection limit. The cell-penetrating siRNA dendrimers, which were assembled using click chemistry, open up new avenues toward finding novel molecules able to cure this deadly disease.

  15. Interleukin-2 gene-modified allogeneic tumor cells for treatment of relapsed neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bowman, L C; Grossmann, M; Rill, D; Brown, M; Zhong, W Y; Alexander, B; Leimig, T; Coustan-Smith, E; Campana, D; Jenkins, J; Woods, D; Brenner, M

    1998-06-10

    Tumor cells that have been genetically modified to express immunostimulatory genes will induce effective antitumor responses in a range of syngeneic animal models. For human applications, transduced autologous tumor cell lines are often difficult or impossible to prepare, so that there are strong incentives for substituting a standardized allogeneic tumor cell line. However, such lines may be inferior immunogens if they differ from host tumors in the antigens they express. We have evaluated the safety, immunostimulatory, and antitumor activity of an interleukin-2-secreting allogeneic neuroblastoma cell line in 12 children with relapsed stage IV neuroblastoma. They received two to four subcutaneous injections of cells in a dose-escalating schedule, up to a maximum of 10(8) cells per injection. There was induration and pruritus at the injection site, and skin biopsies revealed mild panniculitis with CD3+ cells surrounding scanty residual tumor cells. There was a limited but significant peripheral monocytosis. No patient showed any increase in direct cytotoxic effector function against the immunizing cell line, but 3 patients had a rise in the frequency of neuroblastoma-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor cells. One child had > 90% tumor response (PR), 7 had stable disease, and 4 had progressive disease in response to vaccine alone. Although these results offer some encouragement for the continued pursuit of allogeneic vaccine strategies in human cancer, the antitumor immune responses we observed are inferior to those obtained in an earlier immunization study using autologous neuroblastoma cells. Hence, we suggest that this earlier approach remains preferable, its difficulties notwithstanding.

  16. Measles virus interacts with human SLAM receptor on dendritic cells to cause immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Bumsuk; Arbour, Nathalie; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) infects dendritic cells (DCs) resulting in immunosuppression. Human DCs express two MV receptors: CD46 and human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (hSLAM); thus, the role played by either alone is unclear. Because wild-type (wt) MV uses hSLAM receptor preferentially, we dissected the molecular basis of MV–DC interaction and resultant immunosuppression through the hSLAM receptor by creating transgenic (tg) mice expressing hSLAM on DCs. After infection with wt MV, murine splenic DCs expressing hSLAM receptor had less B7-1, B7-2, CD40, MHC class I, and MHC class II molecules on their surfaces and displayed an increased rate of apoptosis when compared to uninfected DCs. Further, MV-infected DCs failed to stimulate allogeneic T cells and inhibited mitogen-dependent T-cell proliferation. Individual expression of human SLAM, interferon α/β receptor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and lymphotoxin-α or β from T cells was not required for MV-infected DCs to inhibit the proliferation of T cells. PMID:15193925

  17. A Multidrug-resistant Engineered CAR T Cell for Allogeneic Combination Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Julien; Guyot, Valérie; Marechal, Alan; Filhol, Jean-Marie; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe; Poirot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell represents a highly promising strategy to fight against multiple cancers. The clinical outcome of such therapies is intimately linked to the ability of effector cells to engraft, proliferate, and specifically kill tumor cells within patients. When allogeneic CAR T-cell infusion is considered, host versus graft and graft versus host reactions must be avoided to prevent rejection of adoptively transferred cells, host tissue damages and to elicit significant antitumoral outcome. This work proposes to address these three requirements through the development of multidrug-resistant T cell receptor αβ-deficient CAR T cells. We demonstrate that these engineered T cells displayed efficient antitumor activity and proliferated in the presence of purine and pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, currently used in clinic as preconditioning lymphodepleting regimens. The absence of TCRαβ at their cell surface along with their purine nucleotide analogues-resistance properties could prevent their alloreactivity and enable them to resist to lymphodepleting regimens that may be required to avoid their ablation via HvG reaction. By providing a basic framework to develop a universal T cell compatible with allogeneic adoptive transfer, this work is laying the foundation stone of the large-scale utilization of CAR T-cell immunotherapies. PMID:26061646

  18. Dendritic cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP gene generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes against ovarian cancer in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li; Kong, Beihua; Sheng, Xiugui; Sheu, Jim Jinn-Chyuan; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2010-04-09

    Recently, some studies have indicated that Rsf-1/HBXAP plays a role in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation that may contribute to tumorigenesis in ovarian cancer. The present study demonstrates that using dendritic cells (DCs) from human cord blood CD34{sup +} cells transduced with Rsf-1/HBXAP DNA plasmids by nucleofection generate specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against ovarian cancer in vitro. After transfection, DCs were analyzed for Rsf-1/HBXAP mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Then the DC phenotypes, T-cell stimulatory capacity, endocytic activity and migration capacity were explored by flow cytometry analysis, allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction, endocytosis and transwell chemotaxis assay, respectively. After transfection, Rsf-1/HBXAP expression was detected at mRNA and protein levels. Allogeneic T-cell proliferation induced by transfected DCs was obviously higher than non-transfected DCs, but the endocytosis capacity and migratory ability were not different. Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs could induce antigen-specific CTL and generate a very potent cytotoxicity to OVCAR3 cells. These data suggest that Rsf-1/HBXAP gene-transduced DCs may be a potential adjuvant immunotherapy for ovarian cancer in clinical applications.

  19. T Cell Motility as Modulator of Interactions with Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jens V.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the balance of costimulatory and inhibitory signals during interactions with dendritic cells (DCs) determines T cell transition from a naïve to an activated or tolerant/anergic status. Although many of these molecular interactions are well reproduced in reductionist in vitro assays, the highly dynamic motility of naïve T cells in lymphoid tissue acts as an additional lever to fine-tune their activation threshold. T cell detachment from DCs providing suboptimal stimulation allows them to search for DCs with higher levels of stimulatory signals, while storing a transient memory of short encounters. In turn, adhesion of weakly reactive T cells to DCs presenting peptides presented on major histocompatibility complex with low affinity is prevented by lipid mediators. Finally, controlled recruitment of CD8+ T cells to cognate DC–CD4+ T cell clusters shapes memory T cell formation and the quality of the immune response. Dynamic physiological lymphocyte motility therefore constitutes a mechanism to mitigate low avidity T cell activation and to improve the search for “optimal” DCs, while contributing to peripheral tolerance induction in the absence of inflammation. PMID:26579132

  20. Donor CD4 T Cell Diversity Determines Virus Reactivation in Patients After HLA-Matched Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, J; Seitz, V; Balzer, H; Gary, R; Lenze, D; Moi, S; Pasemann, S; Seegebarth, A; Wurdack, M; Hennig, S; Gerbitz, A; Hummel, M

    2015-01-01

    Delayed reconstitution of the T cell compartment in recipients of allogeneic stem cell grafts is associated with an increase of reactivation of latent viruses. Thereby, the transplanted T cell repertoire appears to be one of the factors that affect T cell reconstitution. Therefore, we studied the T cell receptor beta (TCRβ) gene rearrangements of flow cytometry–sorted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the peripheral blood of 23 allogeneic donors before G-CSF administration and on the day of apheresis. For this purpose, TCRβ rearrangements were amplified by multiplex PCR followed by high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Overall, CD4+ T cells displayed a significantly higher TCRβ diversity compared to CD8+ T cells irrespective of G-CSF administration. In line, no significant impact of G-CSF treatment on the TCR Vβ repertoire usage was found. However, correlation of the donor T cell repertoire with clinical outcomes of the recipient revealed that a higher CD4+ TCRβ diversity after G-CSF treatment is associated with lower reactivation of cytomegalovirus and Epstein–Barr virus. By contrast, no protecting correlation was observed for CD8+ T cells. In essence, our deep TCRβ analysis identifies the importance of the CD4+ T cell compartment for the control of latent viruses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25873100

  1. Culture and Identification of Mouse Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells and Their Capability to Induce T Lymphocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenguang; Li, Jia; Wu, Kun; Azhati, Baihetiya; Rexiati, Mulati

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to establish a culture method for mouse dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and observe their morphology at different growth stages and their ability to induce the proliferation of T lymphocytes. Material/Methods Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) were used in combination to induce differentiation of mouse bone marrow (BM) mononucleocytes into DCs. The derived DCs were then assessed for morphology, phenotype, and function. Results The mouse BM-derived mononucleocytes had altered cell morphology 3 days after induction by GM-CSF and IL-4 and grew into colonies. Typical dendrites appeared 8 days after induction. Many mature DCs were generated, with typical dendritic morphology observed under scanning electron microscopy. Expression levels of CD11c, a specific marker of BM-derived DCs, and of co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC-II were elevated in the mature DCs. Furthermore, the mature DCs displayed a strong potency in stimulating the proliferation of syngenic or allogenic T lymphocytes. Conclusions Mouse BM-derived mononucleocytes cultured in vitro can produce a large number of DCs, as well as immature DCs, in high purity. The described in vitro culture method lays a foundation for further investigations of anti-tumor vaccines. PMID:26802068

  2. Systemic Administration of Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Does Not Halt Osteoporotic Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuxin; Lin, Sien; Gu, Weidong; Liu, Yamei; Zhang, Jinfang; Chen, Lin; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have innate ability to self-renew and immunosuppressive functions, and differentiate into various cell types. They have become a promising cell source for treating many diseases, particular for bone regeneration. Osteoporosis is a common metabolic bone disorder with elevated systemic inflammation which in turn triggers enhanced bone loss. We hypothesize that systemic infusion of MSCs may suppress the elevated inflammation in the osteoporotic subjects and slow down bone loss. The current project was to address the following two questions: (1) Will a single dose systemic administration of allogenic MSCs have any effect on osteoporotic bone loss? (2) Will multiple administration of allogenic MSCs from single or multiple donors have similar effect on osteoporotic bone loss? 18 ovariectomized (OVX) rats were assigned into 3 groups: the PBS control group, MSCs group 1 (receiving 2x106 GFP-MSCs at Day 10, 46, 91 from the same donor following OVX) and MSCs group 2 (receiving 2x106 GFP-MSCs from three different donors at Day 10, 46, 91). Examinations included Micro-CT, serum analysis, mechanical testing, immunofluorescence staining and bone histomorphometry analysis. Results showed that BV/TV at Day 90, 135, BMD of TV and trabecular number at Day 135 in the PBS group were significantly higher than those in the MSCs group 2, whereas trabecular spacing at Day 90, 135 was significantly smaller than that in MSCs group 2. Mechanical testing data didn’t show significant difference among the three groups. In addition, the ELISA assay showed that level of Rantes in serum in MSCs group 2 was significantly higher than that of the PBS group, whereas IL-6 and IL-10 were significantly lower than those of the PBS group. Bone histomorphometry analysis showed that Oc.S/BS and Oc.N/BS in the PBS group were significant lower than those in MSCs group 2; Ob.S/BS and Ob.N/BS did not show significant difference among the three groups. The current study

  3. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Julie A.; McGuire, Travis C. . E-mail: mcguiret@vetmed.wsu.edu

    2005-05-10

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAV{sub WSU5} infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with {sup 51}Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection.

  4. Epidermal Viral Immunity Induced by CD8α+ Dendritic Cells But Not by Langerhans Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Rhys S.; Smith, Chris M.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; van Lint, Allison L.; Wakim, Linda M.; Heath, William R.; Carbone, Francis R.

    2003-09-01

    The classical paradigm for dendritic cell function derives from the study of Langerhans cells, which predominate within skin epidermis. After an encounter with foreign agents, Langerhans cells are thought to migrate to draining lymph nodes, where they initiate T cell priming. Contrary to this, we show here that infection of murine epidermis by herpes simplex virus did not result in the priming of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by Langerhans cells. Rather, the priming response required a distinct CD8α+ dendritic cell subset. Thus, the traditional view of Langerhans cells in epidermal immunity needs to be revisited to accommodate a requirement for other dendritic cells in this response.

  5. Cynomolgus Monkey Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Generated By Using Allogeneic Genes.

    PubMed

    Shimozawa, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that are potentially similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells can be artificially established by introduction into somatic cells of the transgenes POU5F1 (also known as Oct3/4), SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. In cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), iPS cells generated by using these four allogeneic transgenes should be an important resource for various types of biomedical research because the use of xenogeneic transgenes may cause complications. To establish such iPS cells, cynomolgus monkey somatic cells were infected with amphotropic retroviral vectors, which were derived from Plat-A cells, containing cDNA for the cynomolgus monkey genes POU5F1, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. As a result, iPS cells could be established from somatic cells from fetal liver and newborn skin of cynomolgus monkeys, similarly to the case for mouse and human somatic cells. PMID:25410287

  6. Infection-mimicking materials to program dendritic cells in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Omar A.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Cao, Lan; Dranoff, Glenn; Mooney, David J.

    2009-02-01

    Cancer vaccines typically depend on cumbersome and expensive manipulation of cells in the laboratory, and subsequent cell transplantation leads to poor lymph-node homing and limited efficacy. We propose that materials mimicking key aspects of bacterial infection may instead be used to directly control immune-cell trafficking and activation in the body. It is demonstrated that polymers can be designed to first release a cytokine to recruit and house host dendritic cells, and subsequently present cancer antigens and danger signals to activate the resident dendritic cells and markedly enhance their homing to lymph nodes. Specific and protective anti-tumour immunity was generated with these materials, as 90% survival was achieved in animals that otherwise die from cancer within 25days. These materials show promise as cancer vaccines, and more broadly suggest that polymers may be designed to program and control the trafficking of a variety of cell types in the body.

  7. Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Storb, Rainer; Storer, Barry E.; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Lange, Thoralf; Shizuru, Judith A.; Langston, Amelia A.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Bruno, Benedetto; Petersen, Finn B.; Maris, Michael B.; Agura, Edward; Yeager, Andrew; Bethge, Wolfgang; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Maloney, David G.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after high-dose conditioning regimens imposes prohibitively high risks of morbidity and mortality for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are older or have comorbid conditions. Here, we examined outcomes after nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT in such patients. Patients and Methods Two hundred seventy-four patients (median age, 60 years) with de novo or secondary AML underwent allogeneic HCT from related (n = 118) or unrelated donors (n = 156) after conditioning with 2 Gy of total-body irradiation (TBI) with or without fludarabine. A calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil were used for postgrafting immunosuppression. Results With a median follow-up of 38 months in surviving patients, the estimated overall survival at 5 years was 33%. The estimated 5-year relapse/progression and nonrelapse mortality rates were 42% and 26%, respectively. The cumulative incidences of grades 2, 3, and 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were 38%, 9%, and 5%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD at 5 years was 44%. Patients in first and second complete remission had better survival rates than patients with more advanced disease (37% and 34% v 18%, respectively). Patients with HLA-matched related or unrelated donors had similar survivals. Unfavorable cytogenetic risk status was associated with increased relapse and subsequent mortality. Chronic GVHD was associated with lower relapse risk. Conclusion Allogeneic HCT from related or unrelated donors after conditioning with low-dose TBI and fludarabine, relying almost exclusively on graft-versus-leukemia effects, can result in long-term remissions in older or medically infirm patients with AML. PMID:20439626

  8. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. III. Characterization of allogeneic bone marrow cell populations that increase allogeneic chimerism independently of graft-vs-host disease in mixed marrow recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Chester, C.H.; Sundt, T.M.; Romick, M.L.; Hoyles, K.A.; Sachs, D.H. )

    1989-12-01

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease vs failure of alloengraftment severely limit the success of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation as a therapeutic modality. We have recently used a murine bone marrow transplantation model involving reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with mixtures of allogeneic and syngeneic marrow to demonstrate that an allogeneic bone marrow subpopulation, removed by T cell depletion with rabbit anti-mouse brain serum and complement (RAMB/C), is capable of increasing levels of allogeneic chimerism. This effect was observed in an F1 into parent genetic combination lacking the potential for graft-vs-host disease, and radiation protection studies suggested that it was not due to depletion of stem cells by RAMB/C. We have now attempted to characterize the cell population responsible for increasing allogeneic chimerism in this model. The results indicate that neither mature T cells nor NK cells are responsible for this activity. However, an assay involving mixed marrow reconstitution in an Ly-5 congenic strain combination was found to be more sensitive to small degrees of stem cell depletion than radiation protection assays using three-fold titrations of bone marrow cells. Using this assay, we were able to detect some degree of stem cell depletion by treatment with RAMB/C, but not with anti-T cell mAb. Nevertheless, if the effects of alloresistance observed in this model are considered, the degree of stem cell depletion detected by such mixing studies in insufficient to account for the effects of RAMB/C depletion on levels of allogeneic chimerism, suggesting that another cell population with this property remains to be identified.

  9. Analysis of donor NK and T cells infused in patients undergoing MHC-matched allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pascal, V; Brunet, C; Pradel, V; Thirion, X; Andre, P; Faucher, C; Sampol, J; Dignat-George, F; Blaise, D; Vivier, E; Chabannon, C

    2002-11-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the percentages and absolute numbers of T cells, natural killer (NK) cells and NK cell subsets in cryopreserved samples of either bone marrow or blood non-T cell-depleted allogeneic MHC-matched hematopoietic grafts. Using flow cytometry, we found higher numbers of NK cells in aphereses than in bone marrow collections. We further investigated the distribution of NK cell subsets, defined by the cell surface expression of MHC class I-specific receptors, in these allogeneic grafts. The distribution of NK cell subsets from the two different origins were similar, with the exception of the CD158a/h(+) NK cell subset, whose size appeared to be smaller in bone marrow. The search for relations between the numbers of infused cells and post-transplantation events demonstrated that increasing numbers of infused T cells but not NK cells are related with decreased overall survival. Our study highlights the toxicity of infused T cells but not NK cells in allogeneic MHC-matched hematopoietic grafts. These data pave the way for further trials to investigate the effect of NK cell infusion in MHC-matched allogeneic transplantation, and in particular whether ex vivo NK cell expansion and activation may enhance the anti-tumoral effect of the procedure and decrease its morbidity.

  10. Dendritic Cell Apoptosis and the Pathogenesis of Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Sharon de T.; Silveira, Guilherme F.; Alves, Lysangela R.; dos Santos, Claudia Nunes Duarte; Bordignon, Juliano

    2012-01-01

    Dengue viruses and other members of the Flaviviridae family are emerging human pathogens. Dengue is transmitted to humans by Aedes aegypti female mosquitoes. Following infection through the bite, cells of the hematopoietic lineage, like dendritic cells, are the first targets of dengue virus infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key antigen presenting cells, sensing pathogens, processing and presenting the antigens to T lymphocytes, and triggering an adaptive immune response. Infection of DCs by dengue virus may induce apoptosis, impairing their ability to present antigens to T cells, and thereby contributing to dengue pathogenesis. This review focuses on general mechanisms by which dengue virus triggers apoptosis, and possible influence of DC-apoptosis on dengue disease severity. PMID:23202502

  11. TSLP in Epithelial Cell and Dendritic Cell Cross Talk

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that have the ability to sense infection and tissue stress, sample and present antigen to T lymphocytes, and instruct the initiation of different forms of immunity and tolerance. The functional versatility of DCs depends on their remarkable ability to translate collectively the information from the invading microbes, as well as their resident tissue microenvironments. Recent progress in understanding Toll-like receptor (TLR) biology has illuminated the mechanisms by which DCs link innate and adaptive antimicrobial immune responses. However, how tissue microenvironments shape the function of DCs has remained elusive. Recent studies of TSLP (thymic stromal lymphopoietin), an epithelial cell-derived cytokine that strongly activates DCs, provide strong evidence at a molecular level that epithelial cells/tissue microenvironments directly communicate with DCs, the professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. We review recent progress on how TSLP expressed within thymus and peripheral lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues regulates DC-mediated central tolerance, peripheral T cell homeostasis, and inflammatory Th2 responses. PMID:19231591

  12. How tolerogenic dendritic cells induce regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Roberto A.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery by Steinman and Cohn in 1973, dendritic cells (DCs) have become increasingly recognized for their crucial role as regulators of innate and adaptive immunity. DCs are exquisitely adept at acquiring, processing and presenting antigens to T cells. They also adjust the context (and hence the outcome) of antigen presentation in response to a plethora of environmental inputs that signal the occurence of pathogens or tissue damage. Such signals generally boost DC maturation, which promotes their migration from peripheral tissues into and within secondary lymphoid organs and their capacity to induce and regulate effector T cell responses. Conversely, more recent observations indicate that DCs are also crucial to ensure immunological peace. Indeed, DCs constantly present innocuous self and non-self antigens in a fashion that promotes tolerance, at least in part, through the control of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs are specialized T cells that exert their immuno-suppressive function through a variety of mechanisms affecting both DCs and effector cells. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between tolerogenic DCs and Tregs. PMID:21056730

  13. Effect of ovarian hormones on maturation of dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes in dogs

    PubMed Central

    WIJEWARDANA, Viskam; SUGIURA, Kikuya; WIJESEKERA, Daluthgamage Patsy H.; HATOYA, Shingo; NISHIMURA, Toshiya; KANEGI, Ryoji; USHIGUSA, Takahiro; INABA, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported that ovarian hormones affect the immune response against E. coli isolated from the dogs affected with pyometra. In order to investigate mechanisms underlying the immune modulation, we examined the effects of ovarian hormones on the generation of dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cell. DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMOs) using a cytokine cocktail. Both estrogen receptor and progesterone receptors were expressed by the PBMOs and immature DCs. When various ovarian hormones were added to the culture for the DC differentiation, progesterone significantly decreased the expression of DC maturation markers, such as CD1a, CD80 and CD86, on mature DCs. Conversely, the addition of estrogen to the cultures increased the expression of CD86, but not other maturation makers. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of progesterone did not stimulate allogeneic mononuclear cells in PB. Taken together, these results indicate that progesterone diminishes the maturation of DCs, leading to decreased immune responses against invading pathogens. PMID:25715707

  14. Effect of ovarian hormones on maturation of dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wijewardana, Viskam; Sugiura, Kikuya; Wijesekera, Daluthgamage Patsy H; Hatoya, Shingo; Nishimura, Toshiya; Kanegi, Ryoji; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Inaba, Toshio

    2015-07-01

    Previously, we reported that ovarian hormones affect the immune response against E. coli isolated from the dogs affected with pyometra. In order to investigate mechanisms underlying the immune modulation, we examined the effects of ovarian hormones on the generation of dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cell. DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMOs) using a cytokine cocktail. Both estrogen receptor and progesterone receptors were expressed by the PBMOs and immature DCs. When various ovarian hormones were added to the culture for the DC differentiation, progesterone significantly decreased the expression of DC maturation markers, such as CD1a, CD80 and CD86, on mature DCs. Conversely, the addition of estrogen to the cultures increased the expression of CD86, but not other maturation makers. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of progesterone did not stimulate allogeneic mononuclear cells in PB. Taken together, these results indicate that progesterone diminishes the maturation of DCs, leading to decreased immune responses against invading pathogens. PMID:25715707

  15. Curdlan activates dendritic cells through dectin-1 and toll-like receptor 4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Sook; Park, Ki Hwan; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Ji Sung; Kim, Yong Guk; Lee, Jae Hee; Kim, Ki Hun; Yun, Jieun; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2016-10-01

    Curdlan, a β-1,3-glucan isolated from Alcaligenes faecalis, is an agonist of dectin-1 in various immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs). However, whether curdlan also activates DCs through other receptors remains unknown. In this study, we found that curdlan activates DCs through dectin-1 and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Curdlan increased the expression levels of surface molecules (CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC-I/II), the production of cytokines (IL-12, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-β), migration toward MIP-3β, and allogeneic T cell stimulation activity of DCs. Curdlan increased the phosphorylation of Syk, Raf-1, Akt, MAPKs, IKK, and NF-κB p65 in DCs. However, curdlan only slightly activated DCs transfected with small interfering RNAs against dectin-1 or TLR4 and C3H/HeJ DCs, which have non-functional TLR4, in comparison with control DCs. Curdlan increased antitumor activity of DCs in a syngeneic tumor model. In summary, our data show that curdlan activates DCs through dectin-1 and TLR4 signaling and the combination of curdlan and DCs efficiently inhibit tumor growth in mice.

  16. Increasing the efficacy of antitumor glioma vaccines by photodynamic therapy and local injection of allogeneic glioma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Peng, Qian; Madsen, Steen J.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Immunotherapy of brain tumors involves the stimulation of an antitumor immune response. This type of therapy can be targeted specifically to tumor cells thus sparing surrounding normal brain. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier, the brain is relatively isolated from the systemic circulation and, as such, the initiation of significant immune responses is more limited than other types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to show that the efficacy of tumor primed antigen presenting macrophage vaccines could be increased by: (1) PDT of the priming tumor cells, and (2) injection of allogeneic glioma cells directly into brain tumors. Experiments were conducted in an in vivo brain tumor model using Fisher rats and BT4C (allogeneic) and F98 (syngeneic) glioma cells. Preliminary results showed that vaccination alone had significantly less inhibitory effect on F98 tumor growth compared to the combination of vaccination and allogeneic cell (BT4C) injection.

  17. Classification and clinical behavior of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms according to their maturation-associated immunophenotypic profile

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Lourdes; López, Antonio; Vidriales, Belén; Caballero, María Dolores; Rodrigues, António Silva; Ferreira, Silvia Inês; Lima, Margarida; Almeida, Sérgio; Valverde, Berta; Martínez, Pilar; Ferrer, Ana; Candeias, Jorge; Ruíz-Cabello, Francisco; Buadesa, Josefa Marco; Sempere, Amparo; Villamor, Neus

    2015-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare subtype of leukemia/lymphoma, whose diagnosis can be difficult to achieve due to its clinical and biological heterogeneity, as well as its overlapping features with other hematologic malignancies. In this study we investigated whether the association between the maturational stage of tumor cells and the clinico-biological and prognostic features of the disease, based on the analysis of 46 BPDCN cases classified into three maturation-associated subgroups on immunophenotypic grounds. Our results show that blasts from cases with an immature plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) phenotype exhibit an uncommon CD56− phenotype, coexisting with CD34+ non-pDC tumor cells, typically in the absence of extramedullary (e.g. skin) disease at presentation. Conversely, patients with a more mature blast cell phenotype more frequently displayed skin/extramedullary involvement and spread into secondary lymphoid tissues. Despite the dismal outcome, acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type therapy (with central nervous system prophylaxis) and/or allogeneic stem cell transplantation appeared to be the only effective therapies. Overall, our findings indicate that the maturational profile of pDC blasts in BPDCN is highly heterogeneous and translates into a wide clinical spectrum -from acute leukemia to mature lymphoma-like behavior-, which may also lead to variable diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26056082

  18. A Comparison between Growth Morphology of "Eutectic" Cells/Dendrites and Single-Phase Cells/Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Raj, S. V.; Locci, I. E.

    2003-01-01

    Directionally solidified (DS) intermetallic and ceramic-based eutectic alloys with an in-situ composite microstructure containing finely distributed, long aspect ratio, fiber, or plate reinforcements are being seriously examined for several advanced aero-propulsion applications. In designing these alloys, additional solutes need to be added to the base eutectic composition in order to improve heir high-temperature strength, and provide for adequate toughness and resistance to environmental degradation. Solute addition, however, promotes instability at the planar liquid-solid interface resulting in the formation of two-phase eutectic "colonies." Because morphology of eutectic colonies is very similar to the single-phase cells and dendrites, the stability analysis of Mullins and Sekerka has been extended to describe their formation. Onset of their formation shows a good agreement with this approach; however, unlike the single-phase cells and dendrites, there is limited examination of their growth speed dependence of spacing, morphology, and spatial distribution. The purpose of this study is to compare the growth speed dependence of the morphology, spacing, and spatial distribution of eutectic cells and dendrites with that for the single-phase cells and dendrites.

  19. Effects of T-Cell Depletion on Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Outcomes in AML Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Gabriela Soriano; Perales, Miguel-Angel

    2015-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality associated with conventional allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). The use of T-cell depletion significantly reduces this complication. Recent prospective and retrospective data suggest that, in patients with AML in first complete remission, CD34+ selected grafts afford overall and relapse-free survival comparable to those observed in recipients of conventional grafts, while significantly decreasing GVHD. In addition, CD34+ selected grafts allow older patients, and those with medical comorbidities or with only HLA-mismatched donors to successfully undergo transplantation. Prospective data are needed to further define which groups of patients with AML are most likely to benefit from CD34+ selected grafts. Here we review the history of T-cell depletion in AML, and techniques used. We then summarize the contemporary literature using CD34+ selection in recipients of matched or partially mismatched donors (7/8 or 8/8 HLA-matched), and provide a summary of the risks and benefits of using T-cell depletion. PMID:26239251

  20. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells for Regulatory T Cell Induction in Man

    PubMed Central

    Raker, Verena K.; Domogalla, Matthias P.; Steinbrink, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized professional antigen-presenting cells that regulate immune responses, maintaining the balance between tolerance and immunity. Mechanisms via which they can promote central and peripheral tolerance include clonal deletion, the inhibition of memory T cell responses, T cell anergy, and induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). These properties have led to the analysis of human tolerogenic DCs as a therapeutic strategy for the induction or re-establishment of tolerance. In recent years, numerous protocols for the generation of human tolerogenic DCs have been developed and their tolerogenic mechanisms, including induction of Tregs, are relatively well understood. Phase I trials have been conducted in autoimmune disease, with results that emphasize the feasibility and safety of treatments with tolerogenic DCs. Therefore, the scientific rationale for the use of tolerogenic DCs therapy in the fields of transplantation medicine and allergic and autoimmune diseases is strong. This review will give an overview on efforts and protocols to generate human tolerogenic DCs with focus on IL-10-modulated DCs as inducers of Tregs and discuss their clinical applications and challenges faced in further developing this form of immunotherapy. PMID:26617604

  1. The regulation of allogeneic human cells and tissue products as biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kazuo; Tsuyuki, Kenichiro; Watanabe, Natsumi; Kasanuki, Hiroshi; Yamato, Masayuki

    2013-04-01

    The current definition of biomaterials differs vastly from it of just a decade ago. According to advancing technologies, it encompasses unpredictable materials such as engineered human cells and tissue. These biomaterials also have to be approved to use in health care business by regulatory authority, which are defined as drug, medical device, or biologics in the regulation. This Leading Opinion Paper addresses the regulatory issues of engineered human cells and tissue products using allogeneic cells that should have a great possibility to develop therapeutics for life-threating diseases or orphan diseases. Six allogeneic human cells and tissue products derived from neonatal or infant fibroblasts and/or keratinocytes were approved as medical devices or biologics in the United States as well as a hematopoietic cell product. For five of the seven products, well-controlled comparative clinical trials were conducted as pre-approval evaluation followed by post-approval evaluation. Although these products avoid a sterilization process usually used for medical devices, no serious malfunction that would lead to class 1 recall was reported. This article would provide insight for development of the engineered human cells and tissue.

  2. Dendritic Cell Regulation by Cannabinoid-Based Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Mattias; Chen, Puran; Hammarfjord, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the cannabinoid system was discovered. Studies in experimental models and in humans have produced promising results using cannabinoid-based drugs for the treatment of obesity and cancer, as well as neuroinflammatory and chronic inflammatory diseases. Moreover, as we discuss here, additional studies also indicates that these drugs have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties including modulation of immune cell function. Thus, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies against inflammatory disorders. At least two types of cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid 1 and cannabinoid 2 receptors are expressed on immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC). Dendritic cells are recognized for their critical role in initiating and maintaining immune responses. Therefore, DC are potential targets for cannabinoid-mediated modulation. Here, we review the effects of cannabinoids on DC and provide some perspective concerning the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for the treatment of human diseases involving aberrant inflammatory processes.

  3. Variation of dorsal horn cell dendritic spread with map scale.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Millecchia, R; Culberson, J L; Gladfelter, W; Covalt-Dunning, D

    1996-10-21

    Cells in laminae III, IV, and V of cat dorsal horn were injected with horseradish peroxidase or neurobiotin. Dorsal views of the dendritic domains were constructed in order to measure their lengths, widths, areas, and length/width ratios in the horizontal plane (the plane of the somatotopic map). Dendritic domain width and area in the horizontal plane were negatively correlated with fractional distance between the medial and lateral edges of the dorsal horn. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that dendritic domain width varies with map scale, which is maximal in the medial dorsal horn. This is similar to the variation in widths of primary afferent bouton distributions. The parallel variation of dorsal horn cell dendritic domain width and primary afferent bouton distribution width with map scale suggests that there is a causal relation between morphology and map scale in the dorsal horn representation of the hindlimb. This variation of adult morphology with map scale must reflect mechanisms responsible for the assembly of receptive fields. PMID:8906504

  4. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal-placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+)CD1a(-) phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  5. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  6. CD86 (B70/B7-2) on endothelial cells co-stimulates allogeneic CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Seino, K; Azuma, M; Bashuda, H; Fukao, K; Yagita, H; Okumura, K

    1995-08-01

    In vascularized organ transplantation, vascular endothelial cells (EC) confronting recipient T cells are potentially significant APC initiating cellular immune responses that lead to rejection. In the present study, we studied the ability of human EC to stimulate allogeneic T cells and the co-stimulatory molecules involved in this response. On both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC), MHC class I, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and CD86 were constitutively expressed as assessed by flow cytometry. After IFN-gamma treatment, MHC class II expression was induced, and MHC class I and ICAM-1 were up-regulated. In contrast, the expression of CD86 was unchanged and CD80 was undetectable even after IFN-gamma treatment. Highly purified CD4+ T cells proliferated in response to IFN-gamma-treated allogeneic HUVEC and MVEC, and this response was efficiently blocked by mAb to MHC class II, ICAM-1 and CD86. Furthermore, the addition of anti-CD86 mAb to the primary culture with allogeneic EC resulted in the induction of alloantigen-specific anergy. These results suggest that CD86 expressed on EC plays a critical role in initiating cellular immune responses to vascularized allografts and would be an important target for immune intervention.

  7. Successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for GATA2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cuellar-Rodriguez, Jennifer; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Hsu, Amy P.; Zerbe, Christa S.; Calvo, Katherine R.; Wilder, Jennifer; Kurlander, Roger; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Holland, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    We performed nonmyeloablative HSCT in 6 patients with a newly described genetic immunodeficiency syndrome caused by mutations in GATA2—a disease characterized by nontuberculous mycobacterial infection, monocytopenia, B- and NK-cell deficiency, and the propensity to transform to myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myelogenous leukemia. Two patients received peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from matched-related donors, 2 received PBSCs from matched-unrelated donors, and 2 received stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB) donors. Recipients of matched-related and -unrelated donors received fludarabine and 200 cGy of total body irradiation (TBI); UCB recipients received cyclophosphamide in addition to fludarabine and TBI as conditioning. All patients received tacrolimus and sirolimus posttransplantation. Five patients were alive at a median follow-up of 17.4 months (range, 10-25). All patients achieved high levels of donor engraftment in the hematopoietic compartments that were deficient pretransplantation. Adverse events consisted of delayed engraftment in the recipient of a single UCB, GVHD in 4 patients, and immune-mediated pancytopenia and nephrotic syndrome in the recipient of a double UCB transplantation. Nonmyeloablative HSCT in GATA2 deficiency results in reconstitution of the severely deficient monocyte, B-cell, and NK-cell populations and reversal of the clinical phenotype. Registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00923364. PMID:21816832

  8. [Effect of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Jin; Zheng, Hui-Fei; Fu, Zheng-Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Based on the representative articles in recent years, the different mechanisms of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are summarized. Decitabine improves the expression of WT1 gene to stimulate specific cytotoxic T cells which can enhance graft versus leukemia effect (GVL) and improve the expression of FOXP3 gene to stimulate regulatory T cells so as to inhibit the acute graft versus host disease (GVHD). Through the above-mentimed mechanisms, decitabine can improve both therapeutic effect and quality of life in the patients with AML after allogeneic HSCT.

  9. Allogeneic Th1 cells home to host bone marrow and spleen and mediate IFNγ-dependent aplasia.

    PubMed

    Chewning, Joseph H; Zhang, Weiwei; Randolph, David A; Swindle, C Scott; Schoeb, Trenton R; Weaver, Casey T

    2013-06-01

    Bone marrow graft failure and poor graft function are frequent complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and result in significant morbidity and mortality. Both conditions are associated with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), although the mechanism remains undefined. Here we show, in 2 distinct murine models of GVHD (complete MHC- and class II-disparate) that mimic human peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, that Th1 CD4(+) cells induce bone marrow failure in allogeneic recipients. Bone marrow failure after transplantation of allogeneic naïve CD4(+) T cells was associated with increased CD4(+) Th1 cell development within bone marrow and lymphoid tissues. Using IFNγ-reporter mice, we found that Th1 cells generated during GVHD induced bone marrow failure after transfers into secondary recipients. Homing studies demonstrated that transferred Th1 cells express CXCR4, which was associated with accumulation within bone marrow and spleen. Allogeneic Th1 cells were activated by radiation-resistant host bone marrow cells and induced bone marrow failure through an IFNγ-dependent mechanism. Thus, allogeneic Th1 CD4(+) cells generated during GVHD traffic to hematopoietic sites and induce bone marrow failure via IFNγ-mediated toxicity. These results have important implications for prevention and treatment of bone marrow graft failure after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  10. In Vivo Proof of Concept of Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Allogeneic Suicide Gene-modified Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leboeuf, Céline; Mailly, Laurent; Wu, Tao; Bour, Gaetan; Durand, Sarah; Brignon, Nicolas; Ferrand, Christophe; Borg, Christophe; Tiberghien, Pierre; Thimme, Robert; Pessaux, Patrick; Marescaux, Jacques; Baumert, Thomas F.; Robinet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy based on alloreactivity has completed clinical proof of concept against hematological malignancies. However, the efficacy of alloreactivity as a therapeutic approach to treat solid tumors is unknown. Using cell culture and animal models, we aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells as a cell-based therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), for which treatment options are limited. Allogeneic killer cells from healthy donors were isolated, expanded, and phenotypically characterized. Antitumor cytotoxic activity and safety were studied using a panel of human or murine HCC cell lines engrafted in immunodeficient or immunocompetent mouse models. Human allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells (aSGMKCs) exhibit a high, rapid, interleukin-2–dependent, and non–major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted in vitro cytotoxicity toward human hepatoma cells, mainly mediated by natural killer (NK) and NK-like T cells. In vivo evaluation of this cell therapy product demonstrates a marked, rapid, and sustained regression of HCC. Preferential liver homing of effector cells contributed to its marked efficacy. Calcineurin inhibitors allowed preventing rejection of allogeneic lymphocytes by the host immune system without impairing their antitumor activity. Our results demonstrate proof of concept for aSGMKCs as immunotherapy for HCC and open perspectives for the clinical development of this approach. PMID:24445938

  11. Iodine-131-metaiodobenzylguanidine therapy with reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation in recurrent neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroka; Manabe, Atsushi; Aoyama, Chiaki; Kamiya, Takahiro; Kato, Itaru; Takusagawa, Ayako; Ogawa, Chitose; Ozawa, Miwa; Hosoya, Ryota; Yokoyama, Kunihiko

    2008-03-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, and iodine-131-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) therapy is a new approach for grade IV neuroblastoma. We describe the case history of a 3-year-old girl with recurrent neuroblastoma who received MIBG therapy with reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation (RIST) because of an extensive bone marrow involvement. The post-transplant course was uneventful and complete chimerism was obtained. Neither acute nor chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was observed. The patient remained in remission for 3 months after RIST until the second relapse. MIBG therapy combined with RIST warrants further trials.

  12. Relapse of lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: management strategies and outcome.

    PubMed

    Wudhikarn, Kitsada; Brunstein, Claudio G; Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J; Cao, Qing; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    The outcome and management of relapsed lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is difficult. Therapeutic options may include donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI), reduction of immunosuppression (RIS), chemotherapy, radiation, immunotherapy, second HCT, and experimental treatments, but reported data contrasting the response and efficacy of these salvage treatments are limited. We describe the treatments, response, prognosis, and long-term survival of 72 patients with relapse of lymphoma after allogeneic HCT. Between 1991 and 2007, 227 lymphoma patients underwent allogeneic HCT. Of these, 72 (32%) developed relapse/progression after their HCT at a median of 99 days (0-1898 days); 37 had early (<100 days) post-HCT relapse. Forty-four had non-Hodgkin lymphoma (7 mantle cell, 5 indolent, 15 diffuse large B cell, 4 Burkitt's, and 13 T/Natural Killer cell), and 28 patients had Hodgkin lymphoma. At the time of HCT, 62 patients were in remission (22 in complete [CR] and 40 in partial [PR]), 1 had stable whereas 9 had progressive disease. Seventeen cases received myeloablative and 55 received a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. At relapse, most patients had generalized lymphadenopathy, extranodal organ involvement, and advanced disease. Five patients received no intervention for the post-HCT relapse. Immunosuppressive treatment was reduced or withdrawn as the first-line therapy in 58 patients (80.5%); 47 were treated using combinations of conventional chemotherapy (n = 22), rituximab (n = 27), interferon (IFN) (n = 1), DLI (n = 7), second HCT (n = 2), local radiation (n = 23), and other therapy (n = 6). Thirty-eight patients had an objective response (CR in 30, PR in 8), and 2 had stable disease (SD). At the post-HCT relapse, favorable prognostic factors for survival after HCT included good ECOG performance status (0-2), normal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), early stage disease (stage I-III), isolated extranodal organ involvement, and later relapse

  13. Selection of Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Asmita; Anasetti, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Because MDS predominantly affects an older population, age-associated comorbidities can preclude patients from cure. HSCT is associated with the risk of morbidity and mortality; however, with safer conditioning regimens and improved supportive care, eligible patients with an appropriately matched donor can receive this therapy without exclusion by older age alone. We discuss the role of improved MDS prognostic scoring systems and molecular testing for selection for HSCT, and review the pre-HSCT tolerability assessment required for this advanced aged population. PMID:27521324

  14. Dendritic cell-based vaccines in the setting of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: CD34+ cell-depleted mobilized peripheral blood can serve as a source of potent dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, D; Perrin, M; Hoffmann, S; Chang, A E; Ratanatharathorn, V; Uberti, J; McDonagh, K T; Mulé, J J

    1998-11-01

    We are investigating the use of tumor-pulsed dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines in the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. In the current study, we evaluated the feasibility of obtaining both CD34+ hematopoietic stem/ progenitor cells (HSCs) and functional DCs from the same leukapheresis collection in adequate numbers for both peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) and immunization purposes, respectively. Leukapheresis collections of mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from normal donors receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (for allogeneic PBSCT) and from intermediate grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or multiple myeloma patients receiving cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF (for autologous PBSCT). High enrichment of CD34+ HSCs was obtained using an immunomagnetic bead cell separation device. After separation, the negative fraction of mobilized PBMCs from normal donors and cancer patients contained undetectable levels of CD34+ HSCs by flow cytometry. This fraction of cells was then subjected to plastic adherence, and the adherent cells were cultured for 7 days in GM-CSF (100 ng/ml) and interleukin 4 (50 ng/ml) followed by an additional 7 days in GM-CSF, interleukin 4, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (10 ng/ml) to generate DCs. Harvested DCs represented yields of 4.1+/-1.4 and 5.8+/-5.4% of the initial cells plated from the CD34+ cell-depleted mobilized PBMCs of normal donors and cancer patients, respectively, and displayed a high level expression of CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, and CD11c but not CD14. This phenotypic profile was similar to that of DCs derived from non-CD34+ cell-depleted mobilized PBMCs. DCs generated from CD34+ cell-depleted mobilized PBMCs elicited potent antitetanus as well as primary allogeneic T-cell proliferative responses in vitro, which were equivalent to DCs derived from non-CD34+ cell-depleted mobilized PBMCs. Collectively, these results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining both DCs and

  15. Chimerism of bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Miura, Yasuo; Yoshioka, Satoshi; Yao, Hisayuki; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Maekawa, Taira; Ichinohe, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been extensively used as a transplantable cell source for regenerative medicine and immunomodulatory therapy. Specifically in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), co-transplantation or post-transplant infusion of MSCs derived from bone marrow (BM) of non-self donors has been implicated in accelerating hematopoietic recovery, ameliorating graft-vs.-host disease, and promoting tissue regeneration. However, irrespective of the use of MSC co-administration, post-transplant chimerism of BM-derived MSCs after allogeneic HSCT has been reported to remain of host origin, suggesting that the infused donor MSCs are immunologically rejected or not capable of long-term engraftment in the host microenvironment. Also, hematopoietic cell allografts currently used for HSCT do not seem to contain sufficient amount of MSCs or their precursors to reconstitute host BM microenvironment. Since the toxic conditioning employed in allo-HSCT may impair the function of host MSCs to maintain hematopoietic/regenerative stem cell niches and to provide a local immunomodulatory milieu, we propose that new directions for enhancing immunohematopoietic reconstitution and tissue repair after allogeneic HSCT include the development of strategies to support functional replenishment of residual host MSCs or to support more efficient engraftment of infused donor MSCs. Future areas of research should include in vivo tracking of infused MSCs and detection of their microchimeric presence in extra-marrow sites as well as in BM.

  16. The Inflammatory Cytokine IL-21 is Expressed by Splenic Neutrophils in Response to Transplantation of Allogeneic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John S.; Hardin, Debra L.; Glass, Judy F.; Dziba, Joshua; Campion, Jeffrey; Brown, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that GR-1 neutrophil/monocytes rose dramatically in the spleen, peaked by day 7 and declined through day 14. This period corresponded to the peak of acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease (aGVHD) in BALB/c mice transplanted with allogeneic donor cells. We now asked: what cytokines did these splenic neutrophil/monocytes express on day 7 and 14 post transplant? BALB/c mice were transplanted with allogeneic B6 or syngeneic BALB/c donor cells. Long term survival was recorded through day 31. Other groups were sacrificed on days 3, 5, 7, 14, 21 and 31 days post transplant to record the total number of cells in the spleens and their phenotypes. Neutrophils were isolated from the spleens of mice transplanted with B6 and BALB/c cells on days 7 and 14. Daily body weight demonstrated a transient drop in the syngeneic transplants on day 2 but a much greater drop with its nadir at day 7 and never fully recovering through 31 days. CD8/CD4 T lymphocytes peaked in the spleen on day 5 and were followed on day 7 by GR-I cells in all of the allogeneic transplants. In syngeneic transplants this early rise in lymphocytes did not occur and GR-1 cells peaked on day 14. Highly purified neutrophils were isolated in two separate experiments from the spleens on days 7 and 14 post transplant. In both experiments day 7 allogeneic neutrophils expressed significantly elevated levels of Interleukin-21 (IL-21) mRNA whereas the day 7 and 14 syngeneic cells expressed lower but significant levels of TNFα. Intracellular IL-21 was demonstrated in the allogeneic neutrophils on day 7 before and after in vitro stimulation. In conclusion Purified neutrophils isolated from the spleen on day 7, the early peak of allogeneic transplantation a GVHD, express high levels of IL-21 message and intracellular IL-21. PMID:27774526

  17. Matrine derivate MASM suppresses LPS-induced phenotypic and functional maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Qi, Yang; Xu, Wei-Heng; Liu, Ying; Qiu, Lie; Wang, Ke-Qi; Hu, Hong-Gang; He, Zhi-Gao; Zhang, Jun-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation process is a crucial step for the development of T cell immune responses and immune tolerance. In this study, we evaluated MASM, a novel derivative of the natural compound matrine that possesses a significant anti-inflammatory and immune-regulating property, for its efficacy to inhibit lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Here we show that MASM profoundly suppresses LPS-induced phenotypic and functional DC maturation. MASM inhibited LPS-induced expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in a concentration-dependent manner. MASM also attenuated LPS-induced IL-12p70, TNF-α, IL-6 and NO release of DCs. The MASM-treated DCs were highly efficient at antigen capture via mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis but showed weak stimulatory capacity for allogeneic T cell proliferation. Furthermore, MASM inhibited LPS-induced PI3K/Akt, MAPK and NF-κB pathways. These novel findings provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of MASM in impacting on the DCs.

  18. A general principle governs vision-dependent dendritic patterning of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Ping; Sun, Jin Hao; Tian, Ning

    2014-10-15

    Dendritic arbors of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) collect information over a certain area of the visual scene. The coverage territory and the arbor density of dendrites determine what fraction of the visual field is sampled by a single cell and at what resolution. However, it is not clear whether visual stimulation is required for the establishment of branching patterns of RGCs, and whether a general principle directs the dendritic patterning of diverse RGCs. By analyzing the geometric structures of RGC dendrites, we found that dendritic arbors of RGCs underwent a substantial spatial rearrangement after eye-opening. Light deprivation blocked both the dendritic growth and the branch patterning, suggesting that visual stimulation is required for the acquisition of specific branching patterns of RGCs. We further showed that vision-dependent dendritic growth and arbor refinement occurred mainly in the middle portion of the dendritic tree. This nonproportional growth and selective refinement suggest that the late-stage dendritic development of RGCs is not a passive stretching with the growth of eyes, but rather an active process of selective growth/elimination of dendritic arbors of RGCs driven by visual activity. Finally, our data showed that there was a power law relationship between the coverage territory and dendritic arbor density of RGCs on a cell-by-cell basis. RGCs were systematically less dense when they cover larger territories regardless of their cell type, retinal location, or developmental stage. These results suggest that a general structural design principle directs the vision-dependent patterning of RGC dendrites.

  19. Rapamycin has suppressive and stimulatory effects on human plasmacytoid dendritic cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Boor, P P C; Metselaar, H J; Mancham, S; van der Laan, L J W; Kwekkeboom, J

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) are involved in innate immunity by interferon (IFN)-α production, and in adaptive immunity by stimulating T cells and inducing generation of regulatory T cells (Treg). In this study we studied the effects of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition by rapamycin, a commonly used immunosuppressive and anti-cancer drug, on innate and adaptive immune functions of human PDC. A clinically relevant concentration of rapamycin inhibited Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7-induced IFN-α secretion potently (−64%) but TLR-9-induced IFN-α secretion only slightly (−20%), while the same concentration suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production by TLR-7-activated and TLR-9-activated PDC with similar efficacy. Rapamycin inhibited the ability of both TLR-7-activated and TLR-9-activated PDC to stimulate production of IFN-γ and interleukin (IL)-10 by allogeneic T cells. Surprisingly, mTOR-inhibition enhanced the capacity of TLR-7-activated PDC to stimulate naive and memory T helper cell proliferation, which was caused by rapamycin-induced up-regulation of CD80 expression on PDC. Finally, rapamycin treatment of TLR-7-activated PDC enhanced their capacity to induce CD4+forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)+ regulatory T cells, but did not affect the generation of suppressive CD8+CD38+lymphocyte activation gene (LAG)-3+ Treg. In general, rapamycin inhibits innate and adaptive immune functions of TLR-stimulated human PDC, but enhances the ability of TLR-7-stimulated PDC to stimulate CD4+ T cell proliferation and induce CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cell generation. PMID:23968562

  20. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  1. Dextromethorphan inhibits activations and functions in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN- γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF- κ B translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  2. Targeting Dendritic Cells in vivo for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Caminschi, Irina; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Heath, William Ross

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that recognize cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC) for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumor immunity elicited using this immunization strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialization of DC subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumor CD4 and CD8 T cell responses that can recognize tumor-specific antigens. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress toward targeting human DC in vivo. PMID:22566899

  3. Hematopoietic stem cells from NOD mice exhibit autonomous behavior and a competitive advantage in allogeneic recipients.

    PubMed

    Chilton, Paula M; Rezzoug, Francine; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Fugier-Vivier, Isabelle; Ratajczak, Janina; Kucia, Magda; Huang, Yiming; Tanner, Michael K; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2005-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be cured by transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from disease-resistant donors. Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice have a number of features that distinguish them as bone marrow transplant recipients that must be understood prior to the clinical application of chimerism to induce tolerance. In the present studies, we characterized NOD HSCs, comparing their engraftment characteristics to HSCs from disease-resistant strains. Strikingly, NOD HSCs are significantly enhanced in engraftment potential compared with HSCs from disease-resistant donors. Unlike HSCs from disease-resistant strains, they do not require graft-facilitating cells to engraft in allogeneic recipients. Additionally, they exhibit a competitive advantage when coadministered with increasing numbers of syngeneic HSCs, produce significantly more spleen colony-forming units (CFU-Ss) in vivo in allogeneic recipients, and more granulocyte macrophage-colony-forming units (CFU-GMs) in vitro compared with HSCs from disease-resistant controls. NOD HSCs also exhibit significantly enhanced chemotaxis to a stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) gradient and adhere significantly better on primary stroma. This enhanced engraftment potential maps to the insulin-dependent diabetes locus 9 (Idd9) locus, and as such the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family as well as ski/sno genes may be involved in the mechanism underlying the autonomy of NOD HSCs. These findings may have important implications to understand the evolution of autoimmune disease and impact on potential strategies for cure. PMID:15522953

  4. Some aspects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: advances and controversy

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Olga; Blau, Igor Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous group of myeloid disorders. MDS remains a disease of elderly patients; moreover, the incidence of high risk MDS is proportionally greater in elderly patients, with increased frequency of secondary acute myeloid leukemia, as well as adverse cytogenetic abnormalities. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a therapeutic approach with known curative potential for patients with MDS that allows the achievement of long-term disease control. Numerous controversies still exist regarding transplantation in MDS: timing of transplantation, disease status at transplantation and comorbidity, conditioning intensity, pretransplant therapy, and stem cell source. Various transplant modalities of different intensities and alternative donor sources are now in use. Current advances in transplant technology are allowing the consideration of older patients. This should result in a greater number of older patients benefiting from this potentially curative treatment modality. Despite advances in transplantation technology, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality associated with this approach. Nevertheless, with the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning and thereby reduced early mortality, transplant numbers in MDS patients have significantly increased. Moreover, recent new developments with innovative drugs, including hypomethylating agents, have extended the therapeutic alternatives for MDS patients. Hypomethylating agents allow the delay of allogeneic stem cell transplantation by serving as an effective and well-tolerated means to reduce disease burden. PMID:25506229

  5. Epidermal cells are the primary phagocytes in the fragmentation and clearance of degenerating dendrites in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hui; Wang, Denan; Franc, Nathalie C.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh-Nung

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY During developmental remodeling, neurites destined for pruning often degenerate on-site. Physical injury also induces degeneration of neurites distal to the injury site. Prompt clearance of degenerating neurites is important for maintaining tissue homeostasis and preventing inflammatory responses. Here we show that in both dendrite pruning and dendrite injury of Drosophila sensory neurons, epidermal cells rather than hemocytes are the primary phagocytes in clearing degenerating dendrites. Epidermal cells act via Draper-mediated recognition to facilitate dendrite degeneration and to engulf and degrade degenerating dendrites. Using multiple dendritic membrane markers to trace phagocytosis, we show that two members of the CD36 family, croquemort (crq) and debris buster (dsb), act at distinct stages of phagosome maturation for dendrite clearance. Our finding reveals the physiological importance of coordination between neurons and their surrounding epidermis, for both dendrite fragmentation and clearance. PMID:24412417

  6. Targeting human dendritic cells in situ to improve vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Kartik; Dhodapkar, Kavita M.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) provide a critical link between innate and adaptive immunity. The potent antigen presenting properties of DCs makes them a valuable target for the delivery of immunogenic cargo. Recent clinical studies describing in situ DC targeting with antibodymediated targeting of DC receptor through DEC-205 provide new opportunities for the clinical application of DC-targeted vaccines. Further advances with nanoparticle vectors which can encapsulate antigens and adjuvants within the same compartment and be targeted against diverse DC subsets also represent an attractive strategy for targeting DCs. This review provides a brief summary of the rationale behind targeting dendritic cells in situ, the existing pre-clinical and clinical data on these vaccines and challenges faced by the next generation DC-targeted vaccines. PMID:25072116

  7. Computer Tomography Imaging Findings of Abdominal Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Chuan-Miao; Zhang, Xin-Ke; Chen, Rui-Ying; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Lv, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a neoplasm that arises from follicular dendritic cells. FDCSs originating in the abdomen are extremely rare. Clinically, they often mimic a wide variety of other abdominal tumors, and correct preoperative diagnosis is often a challenging task. To date, only scattered cases of abdominal FDCS have been reported and few data are available on their radiological features. Here we present the computer tomography imaging findings of 5 patients with surgically and pathologically demonstrated abdominal FDCS. An abdominal FDCS should be included in the differential diagnosis when single or multiple masses with relatively large size, well- or ill-defined borders, complex internal architecture with marked internal necrosis and/or focal calcification, and heterogeneous enhancement with “rapid wash-in and slow wash-out” or “progressive enhancement” enhancement patterns in the solid component are seen. PMID:26735543

  8. Receptor-Dependent Coronavirus Infection of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Brian C.; Hemmila, Erin M.; Beauchemin, Nicole; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2004-01-01

    In several mammalian species, including humans, coronavirus infection can modulate the host immune response. We show a potential role of dendritic cells (DC) in murine coronavirus-induced immune modulation and pathogenesis by demonstrating that the JAW SII DC line and primary DC from BALB/c mice and p/p mice with reduced expression of the murine coronavirus receptor, murine CEACAM1a, are susceptible to murine coronavirus infection by a receptor-dependent pathway. PMID:15113927

  9. Dendritic web-type solar cell mini-modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five minimodules composed of dendritic web solar cells with nominal glass size of 12 by 40 cm were provided for study. The modules were identical with respect to design, materials, and manufacturing and assembly processes to full scale modules. The modules were also electrically functional. These minimodules were fabricated to provide test vehicle for environmental testing and to assess reliability of process and design procedures. The module design and performance are outlined.

  10. Modulatory effects on dendritic cells by human herpesvirus 6

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Rasmus; Svensson, Mattias; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B are β-herpesviruses approaching 100% seroprevalance worldwide. These viruses are involved in several clinical syndromes and have important immunomodulatory effects. Dendritic cells (DC) are key players in innate and adaptive immunity. Accordingly, DC are implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including infections. In this review the effects of HHV-6 infection on DC will be discussed. PMID:25983728

  11. Role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in breast cancer bone dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2013-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) have been observed as breast cancer disseminates to the bone. The selective depletion of pDC in mice led to a total abrogation of bone metastasis as well as to an increase in TH1 antitumor response, suggesting that pDC may be considered as a potential therapeutic target for metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23526329

  12. Immune Reconstitution and Graft-Versus-Host Reactions in Rat Models of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zinöcker, Severin; Dressel, Ralf; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Dickinson, Anne M.; Rolstad, Bent

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) extends the lives of thousands of patients who would otherwise succumb to hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemias and lymphomas, aplastic anemia, and disorders of the immune system. In alloHCT, different immune cell types mediate beneficial graft-versus-tumor (GvT) effects, regulate detrimental graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), and are required for protection against infections. Today, the “good” (GvT effector cells and memory cells conferring protection) cannot be easily separated from the “bad” (GvHD-causing cells), and alloHCT remains a hazardous medical modality. The transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells into an immunosuppressed patient creates a delicate environment for the reconstitution of donor blood and immune cells in co-existence with host cells. Immunological reconstitution determines to a large extent the immune status of the allo-transplanted host against infections and the recurrence of cancer, and is critical for long-term protection and survival after clinical alloHCT. Animal models continue to be extremely valuable experimental tools that widen our understanding of, for example, the dynamics of post-transplant hematopoiesis and the complexity of immune reconstitution with multiple ways of interaction between host and donor cells. In this review, we discuss the rat as an experimental model of HCT between allogeneic individuals. We summarize our findings on lymphocyte reconstitution in transplanted rats and illustrate the disease pathology of this particular model. We also introduce the rat skin explant assay, a feasible alternative to in vivo transplantation studies. The skin explant assay can be used to elucidate the biology of graft-versus-host reactions, which are known to have a major impact on immune reconstitution, and to perform genome-wide gene expression studies using controlled combinations of minor and major histocompatibility between the donor and the recipient

  13. Induction and identification of rabbit peripheral blood derived dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Yang, FuYuan; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study a method of the induction of dendritic cells (DCs) from rabbit peripheral blood. Methods: Peripheral blood cells were removed from rabbit, filtered through nylon mesh. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood cells by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation (density of 1.077g/cm3).To obtain DCs, PBMC were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, 50U/mL penicillin and streptomycin, referred to subsequently as complete medium, at 37°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere for 4 hours. Nonadherent cells were aspirated, adherent cells were continued incubated in complete medium, supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 50ng/ml),and interleukin 4 (IL-4, 50ng/ml) for 9 days. Fluorescein labeled antibodies(anti-CD14, anti-HLA-DR, anti-CD86) were used to sign cells cultured for 3,6,9 days respectively, Then flow cytometry was performed. Results: Ratio of anti-HLA-DR and anti-CD86 labeled cells increased with induction time extension, in contrast with anti-CD14. Conclusion: Dendritic cells can be effectively induced by the method of this experiment, cell maturation status increased with induction time extension.

  14. Bone Marrow GvHD after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Szyska, Martin; Na, Il-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow is the origin of all hematopoietic lineages and an important homing site for memory cells of the adaptive immune system. It has recently emerged as a graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) target organ after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), marked by depletion of both hematopoietic progenitors and niche-forming cells. Serious effects on the restoration of hematopoietic function and immunological memory are common, especially in patients after myeloablative conditioning therapy. Cytopenia and durable immunodeficiency caused by the depletion of hematopoietic progenitors and destruction of bone marrow niches negatively influence the outcome of alloHSCT. The complex balance between immunosuppressive and cell-depleting treatments, GvHD and immune reconstitution, as well as the desirable graft-versus-tumor (GvT) effect remains a great challenge for clinicians. PMID:27066008

  15. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) induced by Leishmania infection of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Donovan, M J; Tripathi, V; Favila, M A; Geraci, N S; Lange, M C; Ballhorn, W; McDowell, M A

    2012-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in regulating immunity, establishing immunologically privileged tissue microenvironments and maintaining homoeostasis. It is becoming increasingly clear that one key mechanism that mediates many DC functions is production of the immunomodulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). For pathogens that cause chronic infection, exploitation of host DCs is a solution to establish and persist within a host. Leishmania parasites cause a range of clinical manifestations, all involving chronic infection, and are proficient at avoiding immune responses. We demonstrate here that infection of human myeloid-derived DC with L. major and L. donovani induces IDO expression using a mechanism that involves autocrine or paracrine stimulation with a DC-secreted factor. Leishmania-induced IDO suppresses allogeneic and tetanus toxoid-specific lymphocyte proliferation, an inhibition that is reversed with the IDO inhibitor, 1-methyl tryptophan (1-MT). Furthermore, IDO expression by human DC does not require live Leishmania infection, as parasite lysates also up-regulate IDO mRNA production. Our data suggest that one mechanism Leishmania parasites utilize to circumvent immune clearance may be to promote the induction of IDO among host DC within the infection microenvironment.

  16. Activating Receptor NKG2D Targets RAE-1-Expressing Allogeneic Neural Precursor Cells in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Jason G.; Plaisted, Warren C.; Maciejewski, Sonia M.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Walsh, Craig M.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched mouse neural precursor cells (NPCs) into mice persistently infected with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) results in rapid rejection that is mediated, in part, by T cells. However, the contribution of the innate immune response to allograft rejection in a model of viral-induced neurological disease has not been well defined. Herein, we demonstrate that the natural killer (NK) cell-expressing activating receptor NKG2D participates in transplanted allogeneic NPC rejection in mice persistently infected with JHMV. Cultured NPCs derived from C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice express the NKG2D ligand retinoic acid early precursor transcript (RAE)-1 but expression was dramatically reduced upon differentiation into either glia or neurons. RAE-1+ NPCs were susceptible to NK cell-mediated killing whereas RAE-1- cells were resistant to lysis. Transplantation of C57BL/6-derived NPCs into JHMV-infected BALB/c (H-2d) mice resulted in infiltration of NKG2D+CD49b+ NK cells and treatment with blocking antibody specific for NKG2D increased survival of allogeneic NPCs. Further, transplantation of differentiated RAE-1- allogeneic NPCs into JHMV-infected BALB/c mice resulted in enhanced survival, highlighting a role for the NKG2D:RAE-1 signaling axis in allograft rejection. We also demonstrate that transplantation of allogeneic NPCs into JHMV-infected mice resulted in infection of the transplanted cells suggesting that these cells may be targets for infection. Viral infection of cultured cells increased RAE-1 expression, resulting in enhanced NK cell-mediated killing through NKG2D recognition. Collectively, these results show that in a viral-induced demyelination model, NK cells contribute to rejection of allogeneic NPCs through an NKG2D signaling pathway. PMID:24898518

  17. Digital PCR to assess hematopoietic chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Tanja; Böhme, Manja U; Kröger, Nicolaus; Fehse, Boris

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of hematopoietic chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation represents a crucial method to evaluate donor-cell engraftment. Whereas sensitivity of classical approaches for chimerism monitoring is limited to ≥1%, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based techniques readily detect one patient cell in >1,000 donor cells, thus facilitating application of chimerism assessment as a surrogate for minimal residual disease. However, due to methodologic specificities, qPCR combines its high sensitivity with limited resolution power in the state of mixed chimerism (e.g., >10% patient cells). Our aim was to overcome this limitation by employing a further development of qPCR, namely digital PCR (dPCR), for chimerism analysis. For proof-of-principle, we established more than 10 dPCR assays detecting Indel polymorphisms or Y-chromosome sequences and tested them on artificial cell mixtures and patient samples. Employing artificial cell mixtures, we found that dPCR allows exact quantification of chimerism over several orders of magnitude. Digital PCR results proved to be highly reproducible (deviation <5%), particularly in the "difficult" range of mixed chimerism. Excellent performance of the new assays was confirmed by analysis of multiple retrospective blood samples from patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, in comparison with established qPCR (14 patients) and short-tandem repeat PCR (4 patients) techniques. Finally, dPCR is easy to perform, needs only small amounts of DNA for chimerism assessment (65 ng corresponds to a sensitivity of approximately 0.03%), and does not require the use of standard curves and replicate analysis. In conclusion, dPCR represents a very promising method for routine chimerism monitoring.

  18. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678. PMID:25587040

  19. New bone formation by allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in a patient with perinatal hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Mika; Kanai, Rie; Taketani, Takeshi; Uchio, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2009-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can show osteogenic differentiation capability when implanted in vivo, as well as cultured in vitro; therefore we attempted to use allogeneic MSCs for an 8-month-old patient with hypophosphatasia. MSCs were obtained by culture expansion of fresh marrow from the patient's father. Some of the MSCs were further cultured under osteogenic conditions on a culture dish or porous hydroxyapatite ceramics, resulting in cultured osteoblasts and osteogenic constructs, respectively. The MSCs and osteoblasts were injected into the patient, and the constructs were implanted locally. After traditional bone marrow transplantation, the MSCs, osteoblasts, and osteogenic constructs were used for treatment and to improve the patient's respiratory condition and skeletal abnormality. The condition worsened again, and an MSC booster shot was administered. At the same time, the construct was retrieved. The respiratory condition improved, and the retrieved construct showed de novo bone derived from both donor and patient cells. We demonstrated the importance of allogeneic MSC transplantation for hypophosphatasia and the constructs as an alternative to bone fragments that provided further osteogenic capability in the patient. PMID:19446101

  20. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678.

  1. A Critical Role for the TLR4/TRIF Pathway in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Rejection by Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Ziqiang; Hussain, Lala-Rukh; Huang, Yiming; Ding, Chuanlin; Bozulic, Larry D.; Wen, Yujie; Ildstad, Suzanne T.

    2013-01-01

    We show for the first time that signaling through the TLR4/TRIF pathway plays a critical role in allogeneic bone marrow cell (BMC) rejection. This appears to be unique to BMC as organ allografts are rejected mainly via MyD88 signaling. Using T or T/B cell-deficient mice, we found that BMC allorejection occurred early before T cell activation and was T and B cell-independent, suggesting an effector role for innate immune cells in BMC rejection. We further demonstrated the innate immune signaling in BMC allorejection by showing superior engraftment in mice deficient in TRIF or TLR4 but not MyD88 or TLR3. The restored cytotoxicity in TRIF deficient recipients transferred with wildtype F4/80+ or NK1.1+ cells suggests TRIF signaling dependence on macrophages or NK cells in early BMC rejection. Production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and TRIF relevant chemokine MCP-1 was significantly increased early after bone marrow transplantation. In vivo specific depletion of macrophages or NK innate immune cells in combination with anti-CD154/rapamycin resulted in additive-enhanced allogeneic engraftment. The requirement for irradiation was completely eliminated when both macrophages and NK cells were depleted in combination with anti-CD154/rapamycin to target T and B cells, supporting the hypothesis that two barriers involving innate and adaptive immunity exist in mediating rejection of allogeneic BMC. In summary, our results clearly demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for innate immunity in BMC allorejection via signaling through a unique MyD88-independent TLR4/TRIF mechanism. These findings may have direct clinical impact on strategies for conditioning recipients for stem cell transplantation. PMID:23146386

  2. Role of B70/B7-2 in CD4+ T-cell immune responses induced by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fagnoni, F F; Takamizawa, M; Godfrey, W R; Rivas, A; Azuma, M; Okumura, K; Engleman, E G

    1995-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APC). However, the molecular basis underlying this activity remains incompletely understood. To address this question, we generated murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against human peripheral blood-derived DC. One such antibody, designated IT209, stained differentiated DC and adherent monocytes, but failed to stain freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The antigen recognized by IT209 was identified as B70 (B7-2; also recently identified as CD86). Using this mAb we studied the role of B70 in CD4+ T-cell activation by DC in vitro. IT209 partly inhibited the proliferative response of CD4+ T cells to allogeneic DC and to recall antigens, such as tetanus toxoid (TT) and purified protein derivative (PPD) of tuberculin, presented by autologous DC. More importantly, the mAb had a potent inhibitory effect on the primary response of CD4+ T cells to autologous DC pulsed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp160 or keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). Adherent monocytes, despite their expression of B70, failed to induce T-cell responses to these antigens. IT209-mediated inhibition of CD4+ T-cell responses was equivalent to that produced by anti-CD25 mAb, whereas an anti-CD80 mAb was only marginally inhibitory and did not augment the effect of IT209. These findings indicate that the B70 antigen plays an important role in DC-dependent CD4+ T-cell activation, particularly in the induction of primary CD4+ T-cell responses to soluble antigens. However, since activated monocytes, despite their expression of B70, failed to prime naive T cells to these antigens, our results suggest that additional molecules contribute to the functions of DC in CD4+ T-cell activation.

  3. Role of B70/B7-2 in CD4+ T-cell immune responses induced by dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fagnoni, F F; Takamizawa, M; Godfrey, W R; Rivas, A; Azuma, M; Okumura, K; Engleman, E G

    1995-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APC). However, the molecular basis underlying this activity remains incompletely understood. To address this question, we generated murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against human peripheral blood-derived DC. One such antibody, designated IT209, stained differentiated DC and adherent monocytes, but failed to stain freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The antigen recognized by IT209 was identified as B70 (B7-2; also recently identified as CD86). Using this mAb we studied the role of B70 in CD4+ T-cell activation by DC in vitro. IT209 partly inhibited the proliferative response of CD4+ T cells to allogeneic DC and to recall antigens, such as tetanus toxoid (TT) and purified protein derivative (PPD) of tuberculin, presented by autologous DC. More importantly, the mAb had a potent inhibitory effect on the primary response of CD4+ T cells to autologous DC pulsed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp160 or keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). Adherent monocytes, despite their expression of B70, failed to induce T-cell responses to these antigens. IT209-mediated inhibition of CD4+ T-cell responses was equivalent to that produced by anti-CD25 mAb, whereas an anti-CD80 mAb was only marginally inhibitory and did not augment the effect of IT209. These findings indicate that the B70 antigen plays an important role in DC-dependent CD4+ T-cell activation, particularly in the induction of primary CD4+ T-cell responses to soluble antigens. However, since activated monocytes, despite their expression of B70, failed to prime naive T cells to these antigens, our results suggest that additional molecules contribute to the functions of DC in CD4+ T-cell activation. PMID:7558137

  4. Suppressing The Growth Of Dendrites In Secondary Li Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Evan D.; Perrone, David E.; Shen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed technique for suppressing growth of lithium dendrites in rechargeable lithium electrochemical power cells involves periodic interruption of steady charging current with short, high-current discharge pulses. Technique applicable to lithium cells of several different types, including Li/TiS(2), Li/NbSe(3), Li/CoO(2), Li/MoS(2), Li/Vo(x), and Li/MnO(2). Cells candidates for use in spacecraft, military, communications, automotive, and other applications in which high-energy-density rechargeable batteries needed.

  5. Acellular allogeneic nerve grafting combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for the repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects: biomechanics and validation of mathematical models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-jun; Zhao, Bao-lin; Lv, Hao-ze; Qin, Zhi-gang; Luo, Min

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft used in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be an effective treatment for long-segment sciatic nerve defects. To test this, we established rabbit models of 30 mm sciatic nerve defects, and treated them using either an autograft or a chemically decellularized allogeneic nerve graft with or without simultaneous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. We compared the tensile properties, electrophysiological function and morphology of the damaged nerve in each group. Sciatic nerves repaired by the allogeneic nerve graft combined with stem cell transplantation showed better recovery than those repaired by the acellular allogeneic nerve graft alone, and produced similar results to those observed with the autograft. These findings confirm that a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells is an effective method of repairing long-segment sciatic nerve defects. PMID:27651781

  6. Acellular allogeneic nerve grafting combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for the repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects: biomechanics and validation of mathematical models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-jun; Zhao, Bao-lin; Lv, Hao-ze; Qin, Zhi-gang; Luo, Min

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft used in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be an effective treatment for long-segment sciatic nerve defects. To test this, we established rabbit models of 30 mm sciatic nerve defects, and treated them using either an autograft or a chemically decellularized allogeneic nerve graft with or without simultaneous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. We compared the tensile properties, electrophysiological function and morphology of the damaged nerve in each group. Sciatic nerves repaired by the allogeneic nerve graft combined with stem cell transplantation showed better recovery than those repaired by the acellular allogeneic nerve graft alone, and produced similar results to those observed with the autograft. These findings confirm that a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells is an effective method of repairing long-segment sciatic nerve defects.

  7. Dendritic Cells Differentiated from Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Monocytes Exhibit Tolerogenic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) is rich in diverse hematopoietic stem cells that are competent to differentiate into various cell types with immunological compatibility at transplantation. Thus, UCB is a potential source for the preparation of dendritic cells (DCs) to be used for cell therapy against inflammatory disorders or cancers. However, the immunological properties of UCB-derived DCs are not fully characterized. In this study, we investigated the phenotypes and functions of UCB monocyte-derived DCs (UCB-DCs) in comparison with those of adult peripheral blood (APB) monocyte-derived DCs (APB-DCs). UCB-DCs contained less CD1a(+) DCs, which is known as immunostimulatory DCs, than APB-DCs. UCB-DCs exhibited lower expression of CD80, MHC proteins, and DC-SIGN, but higher endocytic activity, than APB-DCs. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of UCB-DCs minimally augmented the expression of maturation markers and production of interleukin (IL)-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, but potently expressed IL-10. When UCB-DCs were cocultured with CD14(+) cell-depleted allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells, they weakly induced the proliferation, surface expression of activation markers, and interferon (IFN)-γ production of T lymphocytes compared with APB-DCs. UCB possessed higher levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than APB, which might be responsible for tolerogenic phenotypes and functions of UCB-DCs. Indeed, APB-DCs prepared in the presence of PGE2 exhibited CD1a(-)CD14(+) phenotypes with tolerogenic properties, including weak maturation, impaired IL-12 production, and negligible T lymphocyte activation as UCB-DCs did. Taken together, we suggest that UCB-DCs have tolerogenic properties, which might be due to PGE2 highly sustained in UCB.

  8. Encephalitozoon intestinalis Inhibits Dendritic Cell Differentiation through an IL-6-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Carmen E.; Zorro, Maria M.; Sierra, Jelver; Gilchrist, Katherine; Botero, Jorge H.; Baena, Andres; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R.

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of intracellular pathogens causing self-limited and severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, respectively. A cellular type 1 adaptive response, mediated by IL-12, IFNγ, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells has been shown to be essential for host resistance, and dendritic cells (DC) play a key role at eliciting anti-microsporidial immunity. We investigated the in vitro response of DC and DC precursors/progenitors to infection with Encephalitozoon intestinalis (Ei), a common agent of human microsporidosis. Ei-exposed DC cultures up-regulated the surface expression of MHC class II and the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, only when high loads of spores were used. A vigorous secretion of IL-6 but not of IL-1β or IL-12p70 was also observed in these cultures. Ei-exposed DC cultures consisted of immature infected and mature bystander DC, as assessed by MHC class II and costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that intracellular Ei spores deliver inhibitory signals in DC. Moreover, Ei selectively inhibited the secretion of IL-12p70 in LPS-stimulated DC. Whereas Ei-exposed DC promoted allogeneic naïve T cell proliferation and IL-2 and IFNγ secretion in DC-CD4+ T cell co-cultures, separated co-cultures with bystander or infected DCs showed stimulation or inhibition of IFNγ secretion, respectively. When DC precursors/progenitors were exposed to Ei spores, a significant inhibition of DC differentiation was observed without shifting the development toward cells phenotypically or functionally compatible with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Neutralization experiments demonstrated that this inhibitory effect is IL-6-dependent. Altogether this investigation reveals a novel potential mechanism of immune escape of microsporidian parasites through the modulation of DC differentiation and maturation. PMID:26870700

  9. Encephalitozoon intestinalis Inhibits Dendritic Cell Differentiation through an IL-6-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carmen E; Zorro, Maria M; Sierra, Jelver; Gilchrist, Katherine; Botero, Jorge H; Baena, Andres; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of intracellular pathogens causing self-limited and severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, respectively. A cellular type 1 adaptive response, mediated by IL-12, IFNγ, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells has been shown to be essential for host resistance, and dendritic cells (DC) play a key role at eliciting anti-microsporidial immunity. We investigated the in vitro response of DC and DC precursors/progenitors to infection with Encephalitozoon intestinalis (Ei), a common agent of human microsporidosis. Ei-exposed DC cultures up-regulated the surface expression of MHC class II and the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, only when high loads of spores were used. A vigorous secretion of IL-6 but not of IL-1β or IL-12p70 was also observed in these cultures. Ei-exposed DC cultures consisted of immature infected and mature bystander DC, as assessed by MHC class II and costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that intracellular Ei spores deliver inhibitory signals in DC. Moreover, Ei selectively inhibited the secretion of IL-12p70 in LPS-stimulated DC. Whereas Ei-exposed DC promoted allogeneic naïve T cell proliferation and IL-2 and IFNγ secretion in DC-CD4+ T cell co-cultures, separated co-cultures with bystander or infected DCs showed stimulation or inhibition of IFNγ secretion, respectively. When DC precursors/progenitors were exposed to Ei spores, a significant inhibition of DC differentiation was observed without shifting the development toward cells phenotypically or functionally compatible with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Neutralization experiments demonstrated that this inhibitory effect is IL-6-dependent. Altogether this investigation reveals a novel potential mechanism of immune escape of microsporidian parasites through the modulation of DC differentiation and maturation.

  10. Immunoregulatory properties of rapamycin-conditioned monocyte-derived dendritic cells and their role in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In efforts to minimize the chronic administration of immunosuppression (IS) drugs in transplantation and autoimmune disease, various cell-based tolerogenic therapies, including the use of regulatory or tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDC) have been developed. These DC-based therapies aim to harness the inherent immunoregulatory potential of these professional antigen-presenting cells. In this short review, we describe both the demonstrated tolerogenic properties, and current limitations of rapamycin-conditioned DC (RAPA-DC). RAPA-DC are generated through inhibition of the integrative kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) by the immunosuppressive macrolide rapamycin during propagation of monocyte-derived DC. Consistent with the characteristics of tolDC, murine RAPA-DC display resistance to phenotypic maturation induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli; exhibit the ability to migrate to secondary lymphoid tissue (important for ‘cross-presentation’ of antigen to T cells), and enrich for naturally-occurring CD4+ regulatory T cells. In rodent models, delivery of recipient-derived RAPA-DC pulsed with donor antigen prior to organ transplantation can prolong allogeneic heart-graft survival indefinitely, especially when combined with a short course of IS. These encouraging data support ongoing efforts to develop RAPA-DC for clinical testing. When compared to murine RAPA-DC however, human RAPA-DC have proven only partially resistant to maturation triggered by pro-inflammatory cytokines, and display heterogeneity in their impact on effector T-cell expansion and function. In total, the evidence suggests the need for more in-depth studies to better understand the mechanisms by which mTOR controls human DC function. These studies may facilitate the development of RAPA-DC therapy alone or together with agents that preserve/enhance their tolerogenic properties as clinical immunoregulatory vectors. PMID:23369601

  11. Encephalitozoon intestinalis Inhibits Dendritic Cell Differentiation through an IL-6-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carmen E; Zorro, Maria M; Sierra, Jelver; Gilchrist, Katherine; Botero, Jorge H; Baena, Andres; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of intracellular pathogens causing self-limited and severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, respectively. A cellular type 1 adaptive response, mediated by IL-12, IFNγ, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells has been shown to be essential for host resistance, and dendritic cells (DC) play a key role at eliciting anti-microsporidial immunity. We investigated the in vitro response of DC and DC precursors/progenitors to infection with Encephalitozoon intestinalis (Ei), a common agent of human microsporidosis. Ei-exposed DC cultures up-regulated the surface expression of MHC class II and the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, only when high loads of spores were used. A vigorous secretion of IL-6 but not of IL-1β or IL-12p70 was also observed in these cultures. Ei-exposed DC cultures consisted of immature infected and mature bystander DC, as assessed by MHC class II and costimulatory molecules expression, suggesting that intracellular Ei spores deliver inhibitory signals in DC. Moreover, Ei selectively inhibited the secretion of IL-12p70 in LPS-stimulated DC. Whereas Ei-exposed DC promoted allogeneic naïve T cell proliferation and IL-2 and IFNγ secretion in DC-CD4+ T cell co-cultures, separated co-cultures with bystander or infected DCs showed stimulation or inhibition of IFNγ secretion, respectively. When DC precursors/progenitors were exposed to Ei spores, a significant inhibition of DC differentiation was observed without shifting the development toward cells phenotypically or functionally compatible with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Neutralization experiments demonstrated that this inhibitory effect is IL-6-dependent. Altogether this investigation reveals a novel potential mechanism of immune escape of microsporidian parasites through the modulation of DC differentiation and maturation. PMID:26870700

  12. EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL-2-quenching dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Lu, Erick; Yi, Tangsheng; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of T cells carrying the CD4 antigen; they are important in supporting plasma cell and germinal centre responses. The initial induction of Tfh cell properties occurs within the first few days after activation by antigen recognition on dendritic cells, although how dendritic cells promote this cell-fate decision is not fully understood. Moreover, although Tfh cells are uniquely defined by expression of the follicle-homing receptor CXCR5 (refs 1, 2), the guidance receptor promoting the earlier localization of activated T cells at the interface of the B-cell follicle and T zone has been unclear. Here we show that the G-protein-coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183) and its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol mediate positioning of activated CD4 T cells at the interface of the follicle and T zone. In this location they interact with activated dendritic cells and are exposed to Tfh-cell-promoting inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) ligand. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine that has multiple influences on T-cell fate, including negative regulation of Tfh cell differentiation. We demonstrate that activated dendritic cells in the outer T zone further augment Tfh cell differentiation by producing membrane and soluble forms of CD25, the IL-2 receptor α-chain, and quenching T-cell-derived IL-2. Mice lacking EBI2 in T cells or CD25 in dendritic cells have reduced Tfh cells and mount defective T-cell-dependent plasma cell and germinal centre responses. These findings demonstrate that distinct niches within the lymphoid organ T zone support distinct cell fate decisions, and they establish a function for dendritic-cell-derived CD25 in controlling IL-2 availability and T-cell differentiation.

  13. N-3-(oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone promotes the induction of regulatory T-cells by preventing human dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youqiang; Zhou, Huayou; Zhang, Yunyan; Huang, Bin; Qu, Pinghua; Zeng, Jianming; E, Shunmei; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    N-3-(Oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (C12) is a small bacterial signaling molecule secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), which activates mammalian cells through TLR4-independent mechanisms. C12 acts as an immunosuppressant and it has been shown to modulate murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cell-mediated T-helper 2 (Th2) cell polarizations in vitro. In the present study, we initially examined the impact of C12 on the maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-DCs) and the induction of regulatory T-cells (iTregs) in culture. Our findings demonstrate that C12-treated Mo-DCs failed to undergo lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced maturation. At the molecular level, C12 blocked the upregulation of surface molecules, including CD11c, HLA-DR, CD40, and CD80, and it switched to an interleukin (IL)-10high, IL-12p70low phenotype. Moreover, C12 selectively inhibited the capacity of Mo-DCs to stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic CD4+ T-cells. Otherwise, the C12-treated Mo-DCs promoted the generation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+-induced regulatory T-cells (iTregs) and enhanced their IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β production associated with reduced interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-12p70 production. These findings provide new insights towards understanding the persistence of chronic inflammation in PA infection. PMID:25749498

  14. A problem-solving education intervention in caregivers and patients during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bevans, Margaret; Wehrlen, Leslie; Castro, Kathleen; Prince, Patricia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Soeken, Karen; Zabora, James; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in informal caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. Patient/caregiver teams attended three 1-hour problem-solving education sessions to help cope with problems during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Primary measures included the Cancer Self-Efficacy Scale-transplant and Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Active caregivers reported improvements in self-efficacy (p < 0.05) and distress (p < 0.01) post-problem-solving education; caregiver responders also reported better health outcomes such as fatigue. The effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation caregivers supports its inclusion in future interventions to meet the multifaceted needs of this population.

  15. Altered phenotype and function of dendritic cells in children with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Angelini, F; Del Duca, E; Piccinini, S; Pacciani, V; Rossi, P; Manca Bitti, M L

    2005-11-01

    The importance of dendritic cells (DC) in the activation of T cells and in the maintenance of self-tolerance is well known. We investigated whether alterations in phenotype and function of DC may contribute to the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Mature DC (mDC) from 18 children with T1DM and 10 age-matched healthy children were tested. mDC, derived from peripheral blood monocytes cultured for 6 days in presence of interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for the last 24 h, were phenotyped for the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules B7.1 and B7.2. In six patients and six controls allogenic mixed leucocyte reaction (AMLR) was performed using mDC and cord blood-derived naive T cells at a DC/T naive ratio of 1 : 200. Proliferation was assessed on day 7 by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Mature DC derived from patients showed, compared with controls, a reduced expression of B7.1 [mean of fluorescence intensity (MFI): 36.2 +/- 14.3 versus 72.9 +/- 34.5; P = 0.004] and B7.2 (MFI: 122.7 +/- 67.5 versus 259.6 +/- 154.1; P = 0.02). We did not find differences in the HLA-DR expression (P = 0.07). Moreover, proliferative response of allogenic naive T cells cultured with mDC was impaired in the patients (13471 +/- 9917.2 versus 40976 +/- 24527.2 cpm, P = 0.04). We also measured IL-10 and IL-12 concentration in the supernatant of DC cultures. Interestingly, we observed in the patients a sevenfold higher level of IL-10 (P = 0.07) and a ninefold lower level of IL-12 (P = 0.01). Our data show a defect in the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules and an impairment of DC priming function, events that might contribute to T1DM pathogenesis. PMID:16232222

  16. Altered phenotype and function of dendritic cells in children with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, F; Del Duca, E; Piccinini, S; Pacciani, V; Rossi, P; Manca Bitti, ML

    2005-01-01

    The importance of dendritic cells (DC) in the activation of T cells and in the maintenance of self-tolerance is well known. We investigated whether alterations in phenotype and function of DC may contribute to the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Mature DC (mDC) from 18 children with T1DM and 10 age-matched healthy children were tested. mDC, derived from peripheral blood monocytes cultured for 6 days in presence of interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for the last 24 h, were phenotyped for the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules B7·1 and B7·2. In six patients and six controls allogenic mixed leucocyte reaction (AMLR) was performed using mDC and cord blood-derived naive T cells at a DC/T naive ratio of 1 : 200. Proliferation was assessed on day 7 by [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Mature DC derived from patients showed, compared with controls, a reduced expression of B7·1 [mean of fluorescence intensity (MFI): 36·2 ± 14·3 versus 72·9 ± 34·5; P = 0·004] and B7·2 (MFI: 122·7 ± 67·5 versus 259·6 ± 154·1; P = 0·02). We did not find differences in the HLA-DR expression (P = 0·07). Moreover, proliferative response of allogenic naive T cells cultured with mDC was impaired in the patients (13471 ± 9917·2 versus 40976 ± 24527·2 cpm, P = 0·04). We also measured IL-10 and IL-12 concentration in the supernatant of DC cultures. Interestingly, we observed in the patients a sevenfold higher level of IL-10 (P = 0·07) and a ninefold lower level of IL-12 (P = 0·01). Our data show a defect in the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules and an impairment of DC priming function, events that might contribute to T1DM pathogenesis. PMID:16232222

  17. T Cell Receptor Excision Circle (TREC) Monitoring after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation; a Predictive Marker for Complications and Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Gaballa, Ahmed; Sundin, Mikael; Stikvoort, Arwen; Abumaree, Muhamed; Uzunel, Mehmet; Sairafi, Darius; Uhlin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a well-established treatment modality for a variety of malignant diseases as well as for inborn errors of the metabolism or immune system. Regardless of disease origin, good clinical effects are dependent on proper immune reconstitution. T cells are responsible for both the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect against malignant cells and protection against infections. The immune recovery of T cells relies initially on peripheral expansion of mature cells from the graft and later on the differentiation and maturation from donor-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The formation of new T cells occurs in the thymus and as a byproduct, T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) are released upon rearrangement of the T cell receptor. Detection of TRECs by PCR is a reliable method for estimating the amount of newly formed T cells in the circulation and, indirectly, for estimating thymic function. Here, we discuss the role of TREC analysis in the prediction of clinical outcome after allogeneic HSCT. Due to the pivotal role of T cell reconstitution we propose that TREC analysis should be included as a key indicator in the post-HSCT follow-up. PMID:27727179

  18. Transplantation of islet cells across major histocompatibility barriers after total lymphoid irradiation and infusion of allogeneic bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, L.D.; Scharp, D.W.; Lacy, P.E.; Slavin, S.

    1982-08-01

    Diabetic Lewis rats (AgB1/L) were evaluated as recipients of allogeneic Wistar-Furth (AgB2/2) isolated adult islets without the use of standard recipient immunosuppression. One group was treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and Wistar-Furth bone marrow cell reconstitution to proven chimerism prior to islet transplantation. This group returned to a prediabetic state following Wistar-Furth islet transplantation without any evidence of rejection for 100 days posttransplant. A second group of Lewis rats received only TLI without bone marrow treatment. They gave a varying result following islet transplantation with one recipient showing evidence of prolonged islet survival. A third chimeric control group did not receive isolated islets and did not alter their diabetic state. A fourth group was not given TLI nor donor bone marrow cells and uniformly rejected their allogeneic islets by 7 days. Thus, allogeneic adult islets will survive across major rat histocompatibility barriers using TLI and donor bone marrow chimerism as the only form of immunosuppression.

  19. Toward eliminating HLA class I expression to generate universal cells from allogeneic donors

    PubMed Central

    Torikai, Hiroki; Reik, Andreas; Soldner, Frank; Warren, Edus H.; Yuen, Carrie; Zhou, Yuanyue; Crossland, Denise L.; Huls, Helen; Littman, Nicholas; Zhang, Ziying; Tykodi, Scott S.; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Holmes, Michael C.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Champlin, Richard E.; Gregory, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term engraftment of allogeneic cells necessitates eluding immune-mediated rejection, which is currently achieved by matching for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression, immunosuppression, and/or delivery of donor-derived cells to sanctuary sites. Genetic engineering provides an alternative approach to avoid clearance of cells that are recognized as “non-self” by the recipient. To this end, we developed designer zinc finger nucleases and employed a “hit-and-run” approach to genetic editing for selective elimination of HLA expression. Electro-transfer of mRNA species coding for these engineered nucleases completely disrupted expression of HLA-A on human T cells, including CD19-specific T cells. The HLA-Aneg T-cell pools can be enriched and evade lysis by HLA-restricted cytotoxic T-cell clones. Recognition by natural killer cells of cells that had lost HLA expression was circumvented by enforced expression of nonclassical HLA molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases can eliminate HLA-A expression from embryonic stem cells, which broadens the applicability of this strategy beyond infusing HLA-disparate immune cells. These findings establish that clinically appealing cell types derived from donors with disparate HLA expression can be genetically edited to evade an immune response and provide a foundation whereby cells from a single donor can be administered to multiple recipients. PMID:23741009

  20. Influence of organophosphate poisoning on human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Marina; Koppe, Franziska; Stenger, Bernhard; Brochhausen, Christoph; Schmidt, Annette; Steinritz, Dirk; Thiermann, Horst; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Pohl, Christine

    2013-12-01

    Organophosphourus compounds (OPC, including nerve agents and pesticides) exhibit acute toxicity by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. Lung affections are frequent complications and a risk factor for death. In addition, epidemiological studies reported immunological alterations after OPC exposure. In our experiments we investigated the effects of organophosphourus pesticides dimethoate and chlorpyrifos on dendritic cells (DC) that are essential for the initial immune response, especially in the pulmonary system. DC, differentiated from the monocyte cell line THP-1 by using various cytokines (IL-4, GM-CSF, TNF-α, Ionomycin), were exposed to organophosphourus compounds at different concentrations for a 24h time period. DC were characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence using typical dendritic cell markers (e.g., CD11c, CD209 and CD83). After OPC exposure we investigated cell death, the secretion profile of inflammatory mediators, changes of DC morphology, and the effect on protein kinase signalling pathways. Our results revealed a successful differentiation of THP-1 into DC. OPC exposure caused a significant concentration-dependent influence on DC: Dendrites of the DC were shortened and damaged, DC-specific cell surface markers (i.e., CD83and CD209) decreased dramatically after chlorpyrifos exposure. Interestingly, the effects caused by dimethoate were in general less pronounced. The organophosphourus compounds affected the release of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1ß and IL-8. The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly down regulated. Protein kinases like the Akt family or ERK, which are essential for cell survival and proliferation, were inhibited by both OPC. These findings indicate that the tested organophosphourus compounds induced significant changes in cell morphology, inhibited anti-inflammatory cytokines and influenced important protein signalling pathways which are involved in regulation of apoptosis. Thus our results highlight

  1. The Treatment of Dyslipidemia in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Bernard L.; Choi, Sung Won; Byersdorfer, Craig Alan; Cronin, Simon; Frame, David G.

    2015-01-01

    As survival rates in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) continue to improve, attention to long-term complications, including cardiovascular disease, become a major concern. Cardiovascular disease and dyslipidemia are a common, yet often overlooked occurrence post-HSCT that results in significant morbidity and mortality. There is also increasing evidence that several anti-hyperlipidemia medications, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in particular, may have a role in modulating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, factors such as drug-drug interactions, adverse effect profiles, and the relative efficacy in lowering cholesterol and triglyceride levels must be taken into account when choosing safe and effective lipid lowering therapy in this setting. This review seeks to provide guidance to the clinician in the management of dyslipidemia in the allogeneic HSCT population, taking into account the recently published ACC/AHA guidelines on hyperlipidemia management, special considerations in this challenging population, and the evidence for each agent’s potential role in modulating GVHD. PMID:25459644

  2. Second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for Patients with Fanconi anemia and Bone Marrow Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ayas, Mouhab; Eapen, Mary; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Carreras, Jeanette; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Alter, Blanche P.; Anderlini, Paolo; Battiwalla, Minoo; Bierings, Marc; Buchbinder, David K.; Bonfim, Carmem; Camitta, Bruce M.; Fasth, Anders L.; Gale, Robert Peter; Lee, Michelle A.; Lund, Troy C.; Myers, Kasiani C.; Olsson, Richard F.; Page, Kristin M.; Prestidge, Tim D.; Radhi, Mohamed; Shah, Ami J.; Schultz, Kirk R.; Wirk, Baldeep; Wagner, John E.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only salvage option for those for develop graft failure after their first HCT. Data on outcomes after second HCT in Fanconi anemia (FA) are scarce. We report outcomes after second allogeneic HCT for FA (n=81). The indication for second HCT was graft failure after the first HCT. Transplants occurred between 1990 and 2012. The timing of second transplantation predicted subsequent graft failure and survival. Graft failure was high when the second transplant occurred less than 3 months from the first. The 3-month probability of graft failure was 69% when the interval between first and second transplant was less than 3 months compared to 23% when the interval was longer (p<0.001). Consequently, survival rates were substantially lower when the interval between first and second transplant was less than 3 months, 23% at 1-year compared to 58%, when the interval was longer (p=0.001). The corresponding 5-year probabilities of survival were 16% and 45%, respectively (p=0.006). Taken together, these data suggest that fewer than half of FA patients undergoing a second HCT for graft failure are long-term survivors. There is an urgent need to develop strategies to lower graft failure after first HCT. PMID:26116087

  3. Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Fanconi Anemia and Bone Marrow Failure.

    PubMed

    Ayas, Mouhab; Eapen, Mary; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Carreras, Jeanette; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Alter, Blanche P; Anderlini, Paolo; Battiwalla, Minoo; Bierings, Marc; Buchbinder, David K; Bonfim, Carmem; Camitta, Bruce M; Fasth, Anders L; Gale, Robert Peter; Lee, Michelle A; Lund, Troy C; Myers, Kasiani C; Olsson, Richard F; Page, Kristin M; Prestidge, Tim D; Radhi, Mohamed; Shah, Ami J; Schultz, Kirk R; Wirk, Baldeep; Wagner, John E; Deeg, H Joachim

    2015-10-01

    A second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the sole salvage option for individuals who develop graft failure after their first HCT. Data on outcomes after second HCT in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) are scarce. Here we report outcomes after second allogeneic HCT for FA (n = 81). The indication for second HCT was graft failure after the first HCT. Transplantations were performed between 1990 and 2012. The timing of the second HCT predicted subsequent graft failure and survival. Graft failure was high when the second HCT was performed less than 3 months from the first. The 3-month probability of graft failure was 69% when the interval between the first HCT and second HCT was less than 3 months, compared with 23% when the interval was longer (P < .001). Consequently, the 1-year survival rate was substantially lower when the interval between the first and second HCTs was less than 3 months compared with longer (23% vs 58%; P = .001). The corresponding 5-year probability of survival was 16% and 45%, respectively (P = .006). Taken together, these data suggest that fewer than one-half of patients with FA undergoing a second HCT for graft failure are long-term survivors. There is an urgent need to develop strategies to reduce the rate of graft failure after first HCT. PMID:26116087

  4. Racial differences in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes among African Americans and whites.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, B K; Rybicki, L; Sekeres, M; Kalaycio, M; Hanna, R; Sobecks, R; Dean, R; Duong, H; Hill, B T; Bolwell, B; Copelan, E

    2015-06-01

    The impact of race on outcome has been identified in a number of cancers, with African Americans having poorer survival compared with whites. We conducted a study to investigate the association of race with allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) outcomes. We identified 789 patients (58 African Americans and 731 whites) who underwent allogeneic HCT for hematologic disorders. There were no significant differences between African Americans and white patients in gender, performance status or comorbidity score. However, African Americans were younger than whites (median 40 years versus 47 years, P=0.003) and were more likely to be in remission at HCT (74% versus 57%, P=0.011), to have an HLA-mismatched donor (36% versus 14%, P<0.001), to have positive donor or recipient CMV serostatus (90% versus 69%, P<0.001) and to have received a cord blood transplant (21% versus 6%, P<0.001). In univariate analysis, African Americans had worse overall survival (OS) (HR 1.41, P=0.026) compared with whites, with no significant differences in acute or chronic GvHD, non-CMV infection or relapse. However, after adjusting for several transplant and disease-related factors in multivariate analysis, the OS difference between African Americans and whites became nonsignificant (HR 1.27, P=0.18). These results suggest that race in and of itself does not lead to worse survival post HCT.

  5. Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Incidence, risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yakushijin, K; Atsuta, Y; Doki, N; Yokota, A; Kanamori, H; Miyamoto, T; Ohwada, C; Miyamura, K; Nawa, Y; Kurokawa, M; Mizuno, I; Mori, T; Onizuka, M; Taguchi, J; Ichinohe, T; Yabe, H; Morishima, Y; Kato, K; Suzuki, R; Fukuda, T

    2016-03-01

    This retrospective study was conducted in Japan to determine the incidence, risk factors and outcomes of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Among 4290 patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT between 1999 and 2010, 462 were diagnosed with SOS according to the Seattle criteria (cumulative incidence, 10.8%). The cumulative incidence of SOS diagnosed by the modified Seattle criteria was 9.3%. Of 462 patients, 107 met the Baltimore criteria and 168 had severe SOS with renal and/or respiratory failure. The median onset for SOS was 12 days after HSCT (range, -2-30). Overall survival at day 100 was 32% for SOS and 15% for severe SOS. Multivariate analyses showed that significant independent risk factors for SOS were the number of HSCTs, age, performance status, hepatitis C virus-seropositivity, advanced disease status and myeloablative regimen. SOS was highly associated with overall mortality (hazard ratio, 2.09; P<0.001). Our retrospective survey showed that the cumulative incidence of SOS in Japan was 10.8%, similar to that previously reported in Western countries, and that the overall survival of patients who developed SOS was low. Furthermore, several risk factors were identified. Preventive and therapeutic strategies for high-risk SOS patients must be established to improve overall survival. PMID:26595082

  6. Venous Thromboembolism after Allogeneic Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Azık, Fatih; Gürlek Gökçebay, Dilek; Tavil, Betül; Işık, Pamir; Tunç, Bahattin; Uçkan, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in children who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has high morbidity. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence of VTE in allogeneic pediatric HSCT recipients and the contribution of pretransplant prothrombotic risk factors to thrombosis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 92 patients between April 2010 and November 2012 undergoing allogeneic HSCT who had completed 100 days post-HSCT. Before HSCT, coagulation profiles; acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors including FV G1691A (factor V Leiden), prothrombin G20210A, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, and MTHFR A1298C mutations; and serum homocysteine and lipoprotein (a), plasma antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S levels were obtained from all patients. Results: In the screening of thrombophilia, 8 patients (9%) were heterozygous for factor V Leiden, 5 (6%) were homozygous for MTHFR 677TT, 12 (14%) were homozygous for MTHFR 1298CC, and 2 (2%) were heterozygous for prothrombin G20210A mutation. We observed VTE in 5 patients (5.4%); a prothrombotic risk factor was found in 3 out of these 5 patients, while 4 out of 5 patients had central venous catheters. It was determined there was no significant relationship between VTE and inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Conclusion: VTE after HSCT seems to be a low-frequency event that may be due to low-dose, low-molecular-weight heparin prophylaxis, and the role of inherited prothrombotic risk factors cannot be entirely excluded without a prospective study. PMID:25912774

  7. Specially modified stromal and immune microenvironment in injected bone marrow following intrabone transplantation facilitates allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell engraftment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Su, Yingjun; Chen, Jianwu; Song, Yajuan; Zhuang, Ran; Xiao, Bo; Guo, Shuzhong

    2016-07-01

    For allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the first key step is the engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barrier. Intrabone bone marrow transplantation (IBBMT) could replace more recipient stromal cells with donor cells and facilitate allogeneic organ transplantation compared with the conventional intravenous approach. However, it remains unknown whether and how IBBMT reconstructs the immune microenvironment for allogeneic HSCs. We explored where the BM microenvironment changes by determining BM stromal cell chimerism and measuring the change in CXCL-12 expression and regulatory T cells in recipient BM. We found that most stromal cells were replaced by allogeneic cells in the injected BM, with higher expression of immune regulatory cytokines (interleukin-10) compared with the contralateral BM and the intravenous group BM. This difference was independent of injury caused by intrabone injection. Consistent with the microenvironment modification, the allogeneic the engraftment rate and reconstitution capacity of HSCs were enhanced in the injected BM compared with the contralateral BM and intravenous group BM. Surgical removal of the injected bone at 7 days rather than 21 days reduced the levels of allogeneic granulocytes and HSCs in the peripheral blood. In conclusion, IBBMT specially modifies stromal cells in the injected BM which provide immune protective cues that improve the engraftment of allogeneic HSCs in an early period. PMID:27090963

  8. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. PMID:27338097

  9. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD.

  10. Classification of dendritic cell phenotypes from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The selection of relevant genes for sample classification is a common task in many gene expression studies. Although a number of tools have been developed to identify optimal gene expression signatures, they often generate gene lists that are too long to be exploited clinically. Consequently, researchers in the field try to identify the smallest set of genes that provide good sample classification. We investigated the genome-wide expression of the inflammatory phenotype in dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are a complex group of cells that play a critical role in vertebrate immunity. Therefore, the prediction of the inflammatory phenotype in these cells may help with the selection of immune-modulating compounds. Results A data mining protocol was applied to microarray data for murine cell lines treated with various inflammatory stimuli. The learning and validation data sets consisted of 155 and 49 samples, respectively. The data mining protocol reduced the number of probe sets from 5,802 to 10, then from 10 to 6 and finally from 6 to 3. The performances of a set of supervised classification models were compared. The best accuracy, when using the six following genes --Il12b, Cd40, Socs3, Irgm1, Plin2 and Lgals3bp-- was obtained by Tree Augmented Naïve Bayes and Nearest Neighbour (91.8%). Using the smallest set of three genes --Il12b, Cd40 and Socs3-- the performance remained satisfactory and the best accuracy was with Support Vector Machine (95.9%). These data mining models, using data for the genes Il12b, Cd40 and Socs3, were validated with a human data set consisting of 27 samples. Support Vector Machines (71.4%) and Nearest Neighbour (92.6%) gave the worst performances, but the remaining models correctly classified all the 27 samples. Conclusions The genes selected by the data mining protocol proposed were shown to be informative for discriminating between inflammatory and steady-state phenotypes in dendritic cells. The robustness of the data mining

  11. Directing dendritic cell immunotherapy towards successful cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2010-01-01

    The use of dendritic cells (DCs) for tumor immunotherapy represents a powerful approach for harnessing the patient's own immune system to eliminate tumor cells. However, suboptimal conditions for generating potent immunostimulatory DCs, as well as the induction of tolerance and suppression mediated by the tumors and its microenvironment have contributed to limited success. Combining DC vaccines with new approaches that enhance immunogenicity and overcome the regulatory mechanisms underlying peripheral tolerance may be the key to achieving effective and durable anti-tumor immune responses that translate to better clinical outcomes. PMID:20473346

  12. Nutritional status of patients submitted to transplantation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Érika Elias; Guerra, Daiane Cristina; Baluz, Kátia; de Resende Furtado, Wander; da Silva Bouzas, Luis Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the nutritional status of adult patients submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at two different time points (admission and discharge). Methods A retrospective, descriptive and quantitative study was performed based on clinical, laboratory and nutritional data obtained from medical records of adult patients of both genders submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a bone marrow transplantation reference center in Rio de Janeiro in the period from 2010 to 2013. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software (version 22.0). Results Sixty-four patients were evaluated. The mean age was 42.1 ± 3.2 years and the most prevalent disease was acute myeloid leukemia (39%). There was a high prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms including nausea (100%), vomiting (97%) and mucositis (93%). Between admission and discharge there was a significant decrease in the median weight (−2.5 kg; 71.5 vs. 68.75 kg; p-value < 0.001), body mass index (−0.9 kg/m2; 24.8 vs. 24.4 kg/m2; p-value < 0.001), and serum albumin levels (−0.2 g/dL; 3.7 vs. 3.6 g/dL; p-value = 0.024). The survival time after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation correlated negatively with C-reactive protein at discharge (CC = −0.72; p-value < 0.001) and positively with serum albumin levels (CC = 0.56; p-value = 0.004) and with high total protein level at discharge (CC = 0.53; p-value = 0.006). Conclusion Our results suggest that patients submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have compromised nutritional status during the hospital stay for transplantation. PMID:25453651

  13. The Role of Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Leona; Maloney, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Hodgkin lymphoma are usually cured by primary therapy using chemotherapy alone or combined modality therapy with external beam radiation. Patients who do not experience a complete remission or those who experience relapse may by salvaged by high-dose therapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Success of this approach is largely dependent on the tumor being sensitive to salvage chemotherapy before transplant. More studies are showing the predictive value of functional imaging in this setting. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has greater risk of nonrelapse mortality and is generally reserved for patients who experience relapse post-ASCT, but may provide long-term survival for some patients through graft-versus-tumor immune effects. PMID:21917627

  14. Conditioning with α-emitter based radioimmunotherapy in canine allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Chen, Yun; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    With the introduction of nonmyeloablative conditioning, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has become a viable treatment option for patients who due to age or comorbidities are ineligible for high dose conditioning. However, relapse and toxicities are still major problems in HCT. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT)-based conditioning is a promising approach that has the ability to specifically target radiation to hematopoietic cells. The most widely investigated isotopes are the β-emitters, but because of long path lengths and low linear energy transfer, α-emitters which have more favorable physical characteristics, might prove to be a better alternative. In the current study we have investigated the efficacy and safety of α-emitter based RIT as the only form of conditioning in a preclinical model of canine allogeneic HCT. PMID:22772070

  15. Disseminated toxoplasmosis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a seronegative recipient.

    PubMed

    Osthoff, M; Chew, E; Bajel, A; Kelsey, G; Panek-Hudson, Y; Mason, K; Szer, J; Ritchie, D; Slavin, M

    2013-02-01

    Toxoplasmosis is increasingly diagnosed after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. In the majority of cases, reactivation of latent disease secondary to impaired cellular and humoral immunity after HSCT is believed to be the main pathogenetic mechanism. Hence, primary toxoplasmosis is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of infections after HSCT in a recipient who is seronegative for Toxoplasma gondii pre-transplant. We herein report a seronegative patient with acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed primary disseminated toxoplasmosis 5 months after HSCT from a seronegative unrelated donor. A review of all reported cases of primary toxoplasmosis after HSCT revealed significantly increased morbidity and mortality. Patients with negative pre-transplant Toxoplasma serology should therefore be considered at risk for toxoplasmosis after allogeneic HSCT. Possible prevention and monitoring strategies for seronegative recipients are reviewed and discussed in detail.

  16. Induction with azacytidine followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Garelius, Hege; Grund, Sofia; Stockelberg, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We have used a hypomethylating agent instead of conventional chemotherapy to induce remission in a young Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia to avoid severe myelosuppression and blood product support. The treatment was consolidated with reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This could be an alternative when transfusions must be avoided. PMID:25984306

  17. Induction with azacytidine followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Garelius, Hege; Grund, Sofia; Stockelberg, Dick

    2015-05-01

    We have used a hypomethylating agent instead of conventional chemotherapy to induce remission in a young Jehovah's Witness with acute monocytic leukemia to avoid severe myelosuppression and blood product support. The treatment was consolidated with reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This could be an alternative when transfusions must be avoided. PMID:25984306

  18. Emerging Influence of the Intestinal Microbiota during Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Control the Gut and the Body Will Follow.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Melissa D; Auletta, Jeffery J; Jenq, Robert R

    2015-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota has many critical roles in maintaining gastrointestinal epithelial and gastrointestinal systemic immune homeostasis. This review provides insight into how allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and its associated complications and supportive care therapies affect the microbiota. Additionally, the review discusses how preservation and restoration of the microbiota might be advantageous in decreasing HCT-related morbidity and mortality.

  19. Lactobacillus rhamnosus meningitis following recurrent episodes of bacteremia in a child undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Robin, Frédéric; Paillard, Catherine; Marchandin, Hélène; Demeocq, François; Bonnet, Richard; Hennequin, Claire

    2010-11-01

    We report a case of meningitis due to Lactobacillus rhamnosus in a child undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute leukemia. Four episodes of bacteremia involving strains with pulsotypes identical to that of the cerebrospinal fluid isolate preceded meningitis. After several courses of clindamycin, no relapse occurred during the patient follow-up.

  20. Targeting Antigens to Dendritic Cell Receptors for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Thalhammer, Theresia; Tzakos, Andreas G.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized antigen presenting cells of the immune system which play a key role in regulating immune responses. Depending on the method of antigen delivery, DCs stimulate immune responses or induce tolerance. As a consequence of the dual function of DCs, DCs are studied in the context of immunotherapy for both cancer and autoimmune diseases. In vaccine development, a major aim is to induce strong, specific T-cell responses. This is achieved by targeting antigen to cell surface molecules on DCs that efficiently channel the antigen into endocytic compartments for loading onto MHC molecules and stimulation of T-cell responses. The most attractive cell surface receptors, expressed on DCs used as targets for antigen delivery for cancer and other diseases, are discussed. PMID:24228179

  1. Macrophages and dendritic cells: the usual suspects in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kassiteridi, Christina; Monaco, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the leading cause of death worldwide, is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disease, which, clinically manifests from early lipid-rich lesions to plaque rupture and/or thrombosis in the arterial wall. The myeloid cell compartment, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is long known to contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. However their complex phenotypic heterogeneity hampers our full understanding of their role. Here, we review the biological and functional versatility of the myeloid cells in atherosclerosis. Several distinct subsets of macrophages and myeloid cells have been identified in atherosclerotic plaques, including subsets that are specific to atherosclerosis itself. Our ability to target them therapeutically is still limited. The challenge for the future will be the definition of treatments that target specific myeloid subsets to prevent the activation of pro-atherogenic myeloid cell subsets while preserving the anti-atherogenic and repairable function of myeloid cells.

  2. Differential function of dendritic cells isolated from blood and lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, S; Coates, J P; Kimber, I; Knight, S C

    1994-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) isolated from the lymph nodes or spleens of mice and pulsed with contact sensitizers or protein antigens stimulate primary proliferative responses by syngeneic T cells and responses to alloantigens in the mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR). Using enriched human peripheral blood DC, we attempted to stimulate primary immune responses to contact sensitizers by autologous lymphocytes in vitro. No significant proliferation above background levels or CD69 expression (an early activation antigen on lymphocytes) was detected despite using a wide range of donors, chemicals, antigens and cell concentrations. Culture of DC for up to 5 days in vitro in the presence of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-conditioned culture supernatants, or recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) also failed to induce primary proliferative responses to contact sensitizers. Comparisons were made between blood and lymph node DC from mice to explore whether the lack of stimulation was the result of differences between mouse and human DC or between DC isolated from different tissues. DC from lymph nodes stimulated primary responses to contact sensitizers in both blood and lymph node lymphocytes whereas blood DC did not stimulate responses. Both lymph node and blood DC stimulated an allogeneic MLR, although blood DC were less efficient than those from lymph node. The data show that DC from different tissues exhibit variable functional activity. DC from blood and lymph nodes were examined to determine whether surface antigen expression is related to functional activity. Murine blood DC expressed similar levels of LFA-1, LECAM-1 and CD44 compared with lymph node DC but lower levels of MHC class II, B7 and ICAM-1. These results may therefore have important implications for antigen processing and presentation in cells from different tissue compartments. PMID:7835950

  3. Successful semiallogeneic and allogeneic bone marrow reconstitution of lethally irradiated adult mice mediated by neonatal spleen cells

    SciTech Connect

    LaFace, D.M.; Peck, A.B.

    1987-11-01

    Spleens of fetal/newborn mice less than 3-4 days of age contain a naturally occurring cell population capable of suppressing T-dependent and T-independent immune responses of third-party adult cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have utilized newborn spleen cells to prevent acute graft-versus-host (GVH) disease in lethally irradiated adult hosts reconstituted with semiallogeneic or even allogeneic bone marrow cells. Pretreatment of reconstituting cell populations with newborn spleen cells reduced the incidence of GVH disease from 100% to 20% in semiallogeneic and from 100% to 40% in allogeneic combinations. Long-term-surviving reconstituted hosts proved immunologically unresponsive to both donor and host histocompatibility antigens, yet possessed a fully chimeric lymphoid system responsive to T and B cell mitogens, as well as unrelated third-party alloantigens.

  4. Absence of STAT1 in donor-derived plasmacytoid dendritic cells results in increased STAT3 and attenuates murine GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Nasholm, Nicole M.; Chien, Christopher D.; Larabee, Shannon M.; Qin, Haiying; Song, Young K.; Klover, Peter J.; Hennighausen, Lothar; Khan, Javed; Fry, Terry J.

    2014-01-01

    Selective targeting of non-T cells, including antigen-presenting cells (APCs), is a potential strategy to prevent graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) but to maintain graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects. Because type I and II interferons signal through signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1), and contribute to activation of APCs after allogeneic bone marrow transplant (alloBMT), we examined whether the absence of STAT1 in donor APCs could prevent GVHD while preserving immune competence. Transplantation of STAT1−/− bone marrow (BM) prevented GVHD induced by STAT1+/+ T cells, leading to expansion of B220+ cells and regulatory T cells. STAT1−/− BM also preserved GVT activity and enhanced overall survival of tumor-challenged mice in the setting of GVHD. Furthermore, recipients of allogeneic STAT1−/− BM demonstrated increased CD9−Siglec Hhi plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), and depletion of pDCs after STAT1−/− BM transplantation prevented GVHD resistance. STAT1−/− pDCs were found to produce decreased free radicals, IFNα, and interleukin (IL)-12, and increased IL-10. Additionally, STAT1−/− pDCs that were isolated after alloBMT showed increased gene expression of S100A8 and S100A9, and transplantation of S100A9−/− BM reduced GVHD-free survival. Finally, elevated STAT3 was found in STAT1−/− pDCs isolated after alloBMT. We conclude that interfering with interferon signaling in APCs such as pDCs provides a novel approach to regulate the GVHD/GVT axis. PMID:25079358

  5. Low immunogenicity of allogeneic human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Miyoung; Jeong, Sang Young; Ha, Jueun; Kim, Miyeon; Jin, Hye Jin; Kwon, Soon-Jae; Chang, Jong Wook; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Yang, Yoon Sun; Kim, Jae-Sung; Jeon, Hong Bae

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challenge in vitro. • Humanized NSG mice were established using human UCB CD34+ cells. • Repeated intravenous hUCB-MSC injection into mice did not lead to immune responses and adverse events. • Allogeneic hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Evaluation of the immunogenicity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an allogeneic setting during therapy has been hampered by lack of suitable models due to technical and ethical limitations. Here, we show that allogeneic human umbilical cord blood derived-MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challenge in vitro. To confirm these properties in vivo, a humanized mouse model was established by injecting isolated hUCB-derived CD34+ cells intravenously into immunocompromised NOD/SCID IL2γnull (NSG) mice. After repeated intravenous injection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) or MRC5 cells into these mice, immunological alterations including T cell proliferation and increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and human IgG levels, were observed. In contrast, hUCB-MSC injection did not elicit these responses. While lymphocyte infiltration in the lung and small intestine and reduced survival rates were observed after hPBMC or MRC5 transplantation, no adverse events were observed following hUCB-MSC introduction. In conclusion, our data suggest that allogeneic hUCB-MSCs have low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo, and are therefore “immunologically safe” for use in allogeneic clinical applications.

  6. Immune Heterogeneity in Neuroinflammation: Dendritic Cells in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are critical to an integrated immune response and serve as the key link between the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Under steady state conditions, brain DC’s act as sentinels, continually sampling their local environment. They share this function with macrophages derived from the same basic hemopoietic (bone marrow-derived) precursor and with parenchymal microglia that arise from a unique non-hemopoietic origin. While multiple cells may serve as antigen presenting cells (APCs), dendritic cells present both foreign and self-proteins to naïve T cells that, in turn, carry out effector functions that serve to protect or destroy. The resulting activation of the adaptive response is a critical step to resolution of injury or infection and is key to survival. In this review we will explore the critical roles that DCs play in the brain’s response to neuroinflammatory disease with emphasis on how the brain’s microenvironment impacts these actions. PMID:23114889

  7. [Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: the novel Eldorado for antiviral therapy?].

    PubMed

    Smith, Nikaïa; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) represent the first line of host defense against viruses and are an essential link between innate and adaptive immunity. The antiviral factor IFN-α is massively produced by pDCs in response to HIV infection and induces the expression of cellular genes that interfere with viral replication (ISG). Indeed, type I IFN produced by pDCs has a direct anti-viral activity against HIV and has important adjuvant function on other immune cell-types, such as T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the role of type I IFN in HIV disease is complex and may depend on the stage of the disease. The immunologic hallmark of HIV infection is a status of chronic and progressive immune activation, which drives the immune system to exhaustion and leads to severe immunodeficiency. There is now strong evidence that chronic activation of pDCs may promote HIV pathogenesis and have an impact on adaptive T-cell response. Thus, targeting pDCs and type I IFN may open new therapeutic strategies for chronically activated HIV patients. PMID:26514383

  8. Treatment of severe post-traumatic bone defects with autologous stem cells loaded on allogeneic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, Ettore; Murena, Luigi; Cherubino, Paolo; Falvo, Daniele A; Rossi, Antonio; Baj, Andreina; Toniolo, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells may differentiate into angiogenic and osteoprogenitor cells. The effectiveness of autologous pluripotent mesenchymal cells for treating bone defects has not been investigated in humans. We present a case series to evaluate the rationale of using nucleated cells from autologous bone marrow aspirates in the treatment of severe bone defects that failed to respond to traditional treatments. Ten adult patients (mean age, 49.6-years-old) with severe bone defects were included in this study. Lower limb bone defects were >or=5 cm3 in size, and upper limb defects .or=2 cm3. Before surgery, patients were tested for antibodies to common pathogens. Treatment consisted of bone allogeneic scaffold enriched with bone marrow nucleated cells harvested from the iliac crest and concentrated using an FDA-approved device. Postsurgery clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. To assess viability, morphology, and immunophenotype, bone marrow nucleated cells were cultured in vitro, tested for sterility, and assayed for the possible replication of adventitious (contaminating) viruses. In 9 of 10 patients, both clinical and radiographic healing of the bone defect along with bone graft integration were observed (mean time, 5.6 months); one patient failed to respond. No post-operative complications were observed. Bone marrow nucleated cells were enriched 4.49-fold by a single concentration step, and these enriched cells were free of microbial contamination. The immunophenotype of adherent cells was compatible with that of mesenchymal stem cells. We detected the replication of Epstein-Barr virus in 2/10 bone marrow cell cultures tested. Hepatitis B virus, cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, and endogenous retrovirus HERV-K replication were not detected. Overall, 470 to 1,150 million nucleated cells were grafted into each patient. This case series, with a mean follow-up of almost 2 years, demonstrates that an allogeneic bone scaffold

  9. Generation of tumor immunity by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells correlates with dendritic cell maturation stage.

    PubMed

    Labeur, M S; Roters, B; Pers, B; Mehling, A; Luger, T A; Schwarz, T; Grabbe, S

    1999-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BmDC) are potent APC and can promote antitumor immunity in mice when pulsed with tumor Ag. This study aimed to define the culture conditions and maturation stages of BmDC that enable them to optimally function as APC in vivo. BmDC cultured under various conditions (granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF) or GM-CSF plus IL-4 alone or in combination with Flt3 ligand, TNF-alpha, LPS, or CD40 ligand (CD40L)) were analyzed morphologically, phenotypically, and functionally and were tested for their ability to promote prophylactic and/or therapeutic antitumor immunity. Each of the culture conditions generated typical BmDC. Whereas cells cultured in GM-CSF alone were functionally immature, cells incubated with CD40L or LPS were mature BmDC, as evident by morphology, capacity to internalize Ag, migration into regional lymph nodes, IL-12 secretion, and alloantigen or peptide Ag presentation in vitro. The remaining cultures exhibited intermediate dendritic cell maturation. The in vivo Ag-presenting capacity of BmDC was compared with respect to induction of both protective tumor immunity and immunotherapy of established tumors, using the poorly immunogenic squamous cell carcinoma, KLN205. In correspondence to their maturation stage, BmDC cultured in the presence of CD40L exhibited the most potent immunostimulatory effects. In general, although not entirely, the capacity of BmDC to induce an antitumor immune response in vivo correlated to their degree of maturation. The present data support the clinical use of mature, rather than immature, tumor Ag-pulsed dendritic cells as cancer vaccines and identifies CD40L as a potent stimulus to enhance their in vivo Ag-presenting capacity.

  10. Investigating Evolutionary Conservation of Dendritic Cell Subset Identity and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Bertho, Nicolas; Hosmalin, Anne; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Dalod, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T-cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks, and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization, and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation, and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes, and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types, organs, and

  11. Investigating Evolutionary Conservation of Dendritic Cell Subset Identity and Functions.

    PubMed

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Bertho, Nicolas; Hosmalin, Anne; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Dalod, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T-cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks, and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization, and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation, and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes, and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types, organs, and

  12. Efficacy of immune suppression tapering in treating relapse after reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kekre, Natasha; Kim, Haesook T; Thanarajasingam, Gita; Armand, Philippe; Antin, Joseph H; Cutler, Corey; Nikiforow, Sarah; Ho, Vincent T; Koreth, John; Alyea, Edwin P; Soiffer, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    For patients who relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation while still on immune suppression, there is anecdotal evidence that tapering the immune suppression may result in graft-versus-tumor activity. We reviewed the medical records of all patients with documented histological or radiographic disease recurrence within 1 year of stem cell transplantation while on immune suppression at our institution. The median time to relapse was 110 days (range, 18-311) after transplant. Among 123 patients with relapse treated with immune suppression tapering without chemotherapy, radiation, or donor lymphocyte infusion, 34 responded (33/101 reduced intensity conditioning transplant and 1/22 myeloablative conditioning transplant, 32.7% and 4.5% respectively; P=0.007). The median time to response after initiation of immune suppression tapering was 82 days (range, 16-189). Thirty-three patients (97.1%) had development or progression of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease as a consequence of immune suppression tapering, at a median time of 39 days (range, 16-98). Six patients subsequently relapsed late after initial response to immune suppression tapering at a median time of 2 years (range, 0.9-3.8). The median overall survival from immune suppression tapering for responders was 5.1 years (range, 1.9-not estimable). When clinically feasible, immune suppression tapering alone in patients who relapse early after reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation can produce durable remissions, but is almost always associated with graft-versus-host disease.

  13. Regulation of Intestinal Immune System by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune cells survey antigenic materials beneath our body surfaces and provide a front-line response to internal and external danger signals. Dendritic cells (DCs), a subset of innate immune cells, are critical sentinels that perform multiple roles in immune responses, from acting as principal modulators to priming an adaptive immune response through antigen-specific signaling. In the gut, DCs meet exogenous, non-harmful food antigens as well as vast commensal microbes under steady-state conditions. In other instances, they must combat pathogenic microbes to prevent infections. In this review, we focus on the function of intestinal DCs in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. Specifically, we describe how intestinal DCs affect IgA production from B cells and influence the generation of unique subsets of T cell. PMID:25713503

  14. Radiation tolerance of boron doped dendritic web silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.

    1980-01-01

    The potential of dendritic web silicon for giving radiation hard solar cells is compared with the float zone silicon material. Solar cells with n(+)-p-P(+) structure and approximately 15% (AMl) efficiency were subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation. Radiation tolerance of web cell efficiency was found to be at least as good as that of the float zone silicon cell. A study of the annealing behavior of radiation-induced defects via deep level transient spectroscopy revealed that E sub v + 0.31 eV defect, attributed to boron-oxygen-vacancy complex, is responsible for the reverse annealing of the irradiated cells in the temperature range of 150 to 350 C.

  15. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin; Hoss, Mareike; Wong, John Erik; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  16. Building on Dendritic Cell Subsets to Improve Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Zurawski, Gerard; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY T cells can reject established tumors when adoptively transferred into patients, thereby demonstrating that the immune system can be harnessed for cancer therapy. However, such passive immunotherapy is unlikely to maintain memory T cells that might control tumor outgrowth on the long term. Active immunotherapy with vaccines has the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. Vaccines act through dendritic cells (DCs) which induce, regulate and maintain T cell immunity. Clinical trials testing first generation DC vaccines pulsed with tumor antigens provided a proof-of-principle that therapeutic immunity can be elicited. The increased knowledge of the DC system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets is leading to new trials which aim at improved immune and clinical outcomes. PMID:20226644

  17. Synergistic effects of combined immunosuppressive modulation. I. Unresponsiveness to dendritic cell-depleted renal allografts in dogs exposed to total-lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, F.T.; Meek, A.; Miura, S.; Hayashi, R.; Arnold, A.N.; Strober, S.

    1988-04-01

    Attenuation of the allogeneic stimulus provided by dendritic cells (DC) was achieved by irradiation of the donors, followed by their reconstitution with bone marrow from the prospective DLA-identical recipient. Following long-term (131-187 days) recovery free of graft-versus-host (GVH) disease, the chimeric kidneys were placed into the corresponding recipients; such allografts were rejected at 55, 55, and 60 days, respectively. Four other recipients were conditioned with 1750-1790 cgy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and were then given a similar chimeric kidney from the corresponding partner. These allografts currently survive for 296, 295, 290, and 252 days, respectively. A third group of four dogs was exposed to TLI prior to transplantation of a normal DLA-identical kidney. These grafts were rejected at 20, 42, 46, and 242 days, respectively. Thirteen DLA-identical renal allografts transplanted into normal dogs survived for 13-38 days (mean survival time = 28.6 days). Depletion of allogeneic DC alone, or TLI alone, produced relative prolongations in allograft survival in canine recipients. Combined use of these two modalities, however, resulted in long-term allogeneic unresponsiveness in the recipients.

  18. Interaction of Salmonella Typhimurium with Dendritic Cells Derived from Pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Raffaella; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Andrews, Robert; Abdellah, Zarah; Fairchild, Paul J.; Dougan, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Using an in vitro differentiation protocol we isolated cells with the properties of dendritic cells (DCs) from immunologically refractive pluripotent murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs). These ES-derived dendritic cells (ESDCs) expressed cytokines and were able to present antigen to a T cell line. Infection of ESDCs with Salmonella Typhimurium stimulated the expression of immune cell markers and thousands of murine genes, many associated with the immune response. Consequently, this system provides a novel in vitro model, amenable to genetic modification, for monitoring host/pathogen interactions. PMID:23284947

  19. Gangliosides inhibit the development from monocytes to dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    WÖLFL, M; BATTEN, W Y; POSOVSZKY, C; BERNHARD, H; BERTHOLD, F

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) development and function is critical in the initiation phase of any antigen-specific immune response against tumours. Impaired function of DC is one explanation as to how tumours escape immunosurveillance. In the presence of various soluble tumour-related factors DC precursors lose their ability to differentiate into mature DC and to activate T cells. Gangliosides are glycosphingolipids shed by tumours of neuroectodermal origin such as melanoma and neuroblastoma. In this investigation we address the question of whether gangliosides suppress the development and function of monocyte-derived DC in vitro. In the presence of gangliosides, the monocytic DC precursors showed increased adherence, cell spreading and a reduced number of dendrites. The expression of MHC class II molecules, co-stimulatory molecules and the GM-CSF receptor (CD116) on the ganglioside-treated DC was significantly reduced. Furthermore, the function of ganglioside-treated DC was impaired as observed in endocytosis, chemotactic and T cell proliferation assays. In contrast to monocytic DC precursors, mature DC were unaffected even when higher doses of gangliosides were added to the culture. With regard to their carbohydrate structure, five different gangliosides (GM2, GM3, GD2, GD3, GT1b), which are typically shed by melanoma and neuroblastoma, were tested for their ability to suppress DC development and function. Suppression was induced by GM2, but not by the other gangliosides. These data suggest that certain gangliosides impair DC precursors, implying a possible mechanism for tumour escape. PMID:12452834

  20. Resistivity and thickness effects in dendritic web silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Hwang, J. M.; Greggi, J.; Campbell, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    The decrease of minority carrier lifetime as resistivity decreases in dendritic-web silicon solar cells is addressed. This variation is shown to be consistent with the presence of defect levels in the bandgap which arise from extended defects in the web material. The extended defects are oxide precipitates (SiOx) and the dislocation cores they decorate. Sensitivity to this background distribution of defect levels increases with doping because the Fermi level moves closer to the majority carrier band edge. For high-resistivity dendritic-web silicon, which has a low concentration of these extended defects, cell efficiencies as high as 16.6 percent (4 sq cm, 40 ohm-cm boron-doped base, AM1.5 global, 100 mW/sq cm, 25 C JPL LAPSS1 measurement) and a corresponding electron lifetime of 38 microsec have been obtained. Thickness effects occur in bifacial cell designs and in designs which use light trapping. In some cases, the dislocation/precipitate defect can be passivated through the full thickness of web cells by hydrogen ion implantation.

  1. Bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells infiltrate allogeneic and syngeneic transplants.

    PubMed

    Fan, Z; Enjoji, K; Tigges, J C; Toxavidis, V; Tchipashivili, V; Gong, W; Strom, T B; Koulmanda, M

    2014-12-01

    Lineage (CD3e, CD11b, GR1, B220 and Ly-76) negative hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) infiltrate islet allografts within 24 h posttransplantation. In fact, lineage(negative) Sca-1(+) cKit(+) ("LSK") cells, a classic signature for HSCs, were also detected among these graft infiltrating cells. Lineage negative graft infiltrating cells are functionally multi-potential as determined by a standard competitive bone marrow transplant (BMT) assay. By 3 months post-BMT, both CD45.1 congenic, lineage negative HSCs/HPCs and classic "LSK" HSCs purified from islet allograft infiltrating cells, differentiate and repopulate multiple mature blood cell phenotypes in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow and thymus of CD45.2 hosts. Interestingly, "LSK" HSCs also rapidly infiltrate syngeneic islet transplants as well as allogeneic cardiac transplants and sham surgery sites. It seems likely that an inflammatory response, not an adaptive immune response to allo-antigen, is responsible for the rapid infiltration of islet and cardiac transplants by biologically active HSCs/HPCs. The pattern of hematopoietic differentiation obtained from graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs, cells that are recovered from inflammatory sites, as noted in the competitive BMT assay, is not precisely the same as that of intramedullary HSCs. This does not refute the obvious multi-lineage potential of graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs.

  2. Effects of titanium(iv) ions on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Erwin Ph; Mhawi, Amir; Clode, Peta; Saunders, Martin; Filgueira, Luis

    2009-03-01

    Orthopaedic metal implants composed of titanium are routinely used in bone fracture repair and for joint replacement therapies. A considerable fraction of implant recipients are unable to benefit due to implant failure resulting from aseptic loosening, while others may experience cutaneous sensitivity to titanium after implantation. An adaptive immune reactivity towards titanium ions, originating from the biocorrosion of the implants, could play a role. As an initiator of the adaptive immune response, dendritic cells (DC) were studied for uptake and characteristics after titanium exposure. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy showed uptake of titanium(iv) (Ti(iv)) ions by DCs in vitro and co-localisation with phosphorus-rich cell structures of the DC membranes (phospholipids), cytoplasm (ribosomes and phosphorylated proteins) and the nucleus (DNA). DC maturation and function were investigated by measuring cell surface marker expression by flow cytometry. After exposure, DCs showed a decrease in MHC class II (HLA-DR), co-stimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80 & CD86) and chemokine receptors (CCR) 6 and CCR7 but an increase in CCR4 after Ti(iv) treatment. However, Ti(iv) treated DCs had an increased stimulatory capacity towards allogenic lymphocytes. A Ti(iv) concentration dependant increase of IL-12p70 was observed amidst decrease of the other measured cytokines (TGF-β1 and TGF-β2). Hence, Ti(iv) alters DC properties, resulting in an enhanced T lymphocyte reactivity and deviation towards a Th1 type immune response. This effect may be responsible for the inflammatory side effects of titanium implants seen in patients.

  3. The glycoprotein-hormones activin A and inhibin A interfere with dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Segerer, Sabine E; Müller, Nora; Brandt, Jens van den; Kapp, Michaela; Dietl, Johannes; Reichardt, Holger M; Rieger, Lorenz; Kämmerer, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    Background Pregnancy represents an exclusive situation in which the immune and the endocrine system cooperate to prevent rejection of the embryo by the maternal immune system. While immature dendritic cells (iDC) in the early pregnancy decidua presumably contribute to the establishment of peripheral tolerance, glycoprotein-hormones of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family including activin A (ActA) and inhibin A (InA) are candidates that could direct the differentiation of DCs into a tolerance-inducing phenotype. Methods To test this hypothesis we generated iDCs from peripheral-blood-monocytes and exposed them to TGF-beta1, ActA, as well as InA and Dexamethasone (Dex) as controls. Results Both glycoprotein-hormones prevented up-regulation of HLA-DR during cytokine-induced DC maturation similar to Dex but did not influence the expression of CD 40, CD 83 and CD 86. Visualization of the F-actin cytoskeleton confirmed that the DCs retained a partially immature phenotype under these conditions. The T-cell stimulatory capacity of DCs was reduced after ActA and InA exposure while the secretion of cytokines and chemokines was unaffected. Conclusion These findings suggest that ActA and InA interfere with selected aspects of DC maturation and may thereby help preventing activation of allogenic T-cells by the embryo. Thus, we have identified two novel members of the TGF-beta superfamily that could promote the generation of tolerance-inducing DCs. PMID:18460206

  4. Neutrophil extracellular traps downregulate lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Lorena; Bignon, Alexandre; Gueguen, Claire; de Chaisemartin, Luc; Gorges, Roseline; Sandré, Catherine; Mascarell, Laurent; Balabanian, Karl; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Pallardy, Marc; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) play a central role in inflammation and participate in its control, notably by modulating dendritic cell (DC) functions via soluble mediators or cell-cell contacts. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released by PMN could play a role in this context. To evaluate NET effects on DC maturation, we developed a model based on monocyte-derived DC (moDC) and calibrated NETs isolated from fresh human PMN. We found that isolated NETs alone had no discernable effect on moDC. In contrast, they downregulated LPS-induced moDC maturation, as shown by decreased surface expression of HLA-DR, CD80, CD83, and CD86, and by downregulated cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-23), with no increase in the expression of tolerogenic DC genes. Moreover, the presence of NETs during moDC maturation diminished the capacity of these moDC to induce T lymphocyte proliferation in both autologous and allogeneic conditions, and modulated CD4(+) T lymphocyte polarization by promoting the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) and reducing that of Th1 and Th17 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-17). Interestingly, the expression and activities of the lymphoid chemokine receptors CCR7 and CXCR4 on moDC were not altered when moDC matured in the presence of NETs. Together, these findings reveal a new role for NETs in adaptive immune responses, modulating some moDC functions and thereby participating in the control of inflammation.

  5. Comparative evaluation of techniques for the manufacturing of dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Dohnal, Alexander Michael; Graffi, Sebastian; Witt, Volker; Eichstill, Christina; Wagner, Dagmar; Ul-Haq, Sidrah; Wimmer, Doris; Felzmann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Manufacturing procedures for cellular therapies are continuously improved with particular emphasis on product safety. We previously developed a dendritic cell (DC) cancer vaccine technology platform that uses clinical grade lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-y for the maturation of monocyte derived DCs. DCs are frozen after 6 hrs exposure at a semi-mature stage (smDCs) retaining the capacity to secret interleukin (IL)-12 and thus support cytolytic T-cell responses, which is lost at full maturation. We compared closed systems for monocyte enrichment from leucocyte apheresis products from healthy individuals using plastic adherence, CD14 selection, or CD2/19 depletion with magnetic beads, or counter flow centrifugation (elutriation) using a clinical grade in comparison to a research grade culture medium for the following DC generation. We found that elutriation was superior compared to the other methods showing 36 ± 4% recovery, which was approximately 5-fold higher as the most frequently used adherence protocol (8 ± 1%), and a very good purity (92 ± 5%) of smDCs. Immune phenotype and IL-12 secretion (adherence: 1.4 ± 0.4; selection: 20 ± 0.6; depletion: 1 ±0.5; elutriation: 3.6 ± 1.5 ng/ml) as well as the potency of all DCs to stimulate T cells in an allogeneic mixed leucocyte reaction did not show statistically significant differences. Research grade and clinical grade DC culture media were equally potent and freezing did not impair the functions of smDCs. Finally, we assessed the functional capacity of DC cancer vaccines manufactured for three patients using this optimized procedure thereby demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing DC cancer vaccines that secret IL-12 (9.4 ± 6.4 ng/ml). We conclude that significant steps were taken here towards clinical grade DC cancer vaccine manufacturing. PMID:18363835

  6. Molecular Basis for Ebolavirus VP35 Suppression of Human Dendritic Cell Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Benjamin; Mulder, Lubbertus C. F.; Martinez, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) VP35 is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding protein that inhibits RIG-I signaling and alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) responses by both dsRNA-binding-dependent and -independent mechanisms. VP35 also suppresses dendritic cell (DC) maturation. Here, we define the pathways and mechanisms through which VP35 impairs DC maturation. Wild-type VP35 (VP35-WT) and two well-characterized VP35 mutants (F239A and R322A) that independently ablate dsRNA binding and RIG-I inhibition were delivered to primary human monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) using a lentivirus-based expression system. VP35-WT suppressed not only IFN-α/β but also proinflammatory responses following stimulation of MDDCs with activators of RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling, including RIG-I activators such as Sendai virus (SeV) or 5′-triphosphate RNA, or MDA5 activators such as encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) or poly(I·C). The F239A and R322A mutants exhibited greatly reduced suppression of IFN-α/β and proinflammatory cytokine production following treatment of DCs with RLR agonists. VP35-WT also blocked the upregulation of DC maturation markers and the stimulation of allogeneic T cell responses upon SeV infection, whereas the mutants did not. In contrast to the RLR activators, VP35-WT and the VP35 mutants impaired IFN-β production induced by Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) or TLR4 agonists but failed to inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production induced by TLR2, TLR3, or TLR4 agonists. Furthermore, VP35 did not prevent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of surface markers of MDDC maturation and did not prevent LPS-triggered allogeneic T cell stimulation. Therefore, VP35 is a general antagonist of DC responses to RLR activation. However, TLR agonists can circumvent many of the inhibitory effects of VP35. Therefore, it may be possible to counteract EBOV immune evasion by using treatments that bypass the VP35-imposed block to DC maturation. IMPORTANCE The VP35

  7. Nectin-1 spots as a novel adhesion apparatus that tethers mitral cell lateral dendrites in a dendritic meshwork structure of the developing mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takahito; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Maruo, Tomohiko; Mandai, Kenji; Kimura, Kazushi; Kayahara, Tetsuro; Wang, Shujie; Itoh, Yu; Sai, Kousyoku; Mori, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku; Mizoguchi, Akira; Takai, Yoshimi

    2015-08-15

    Mitral cells project lateral dendrites that contact the lateral and primary dendrites of other mitral cells and granule cell dendrites in the external plexiform layer (EPL) of the olfactory bulb. These dendritic structures are critical for odor information processing, but it remains unknown how they are formed. In immunofluorescence microscopy, the immunofluorescence signal for the cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 was concentrated on mitral cell lateral dendrites in the EPL of the developing mouse olfactory bulb. In electron microscopy, the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were symmetrically localized on the plasma membranes at the contacts between mitral cell lateral dendrites, which showed bilateral darkening without dense cytoskeletal undercoats characteristic of puncta adherentia junctions. We named the contacts where the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were symmetrically accumulated "nectin-1 spots." The nectin-1 spots were 0.21 μm in length on average and the distance between the plasma membranes was 20.8 nm on average. In 3D reconstruction of serial sections, clusters of the nectin-1 spots formed a disc-like structure. In the mitral cell lateral dendrites of nectin-1-knockout mice, the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were undetectable and the plasma membrane darkening was electron-microscopically normalized, but the plasma membranes were partly separated from each other. The nectin-1 spots were further identified between mitral cell lateral and primary dendrites and between mitral cell lateral dendrites and granule cell dendritic spine necks. These results indicate that the nectin-1 spots constitute a novel adhesion apparatus that tethers mitral cell dendrites in a dendritic meshwork structure of the developing mouse olfactory bulb.

  8. Alterations in Memory and Impact on Academic Outcomes in Children Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lajiness-O'Neill, R; Hoodin, F; Kentor, R; Heinrich, K; Colbert, A; Connelly, J A

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of late effects following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), a curative treatment for pediatric leukemia, is high: 79% of HCT recipients experience chronic medical conditions. The few extant studies of cognitive late effects have focused on intelligence and are equivocal about HCT neurotoxicity. In an archival study of 30 children (mean transplant age = 6 years), we characterize neuropsychological predictors of academic outcomes. Mean intellectual and academic abilities were average, but evidenced extreme variability, particularly on measures of attention and memory: ∼25% of the sample exhibited borderline performance or lower. Medical predictors of outcome revealed paradoxically better memory associated with more severe acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and associated with steroid treatment. Processing speed and memory accounted for 69% and 61% of variance in mathematics and reading outcomes, respectively. Thus, our findings revealed neurocognitive areas of vulnerability in processing speed and memory following HCT that contribute to subsequent academic difficulties. PMID:26319492

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of viral diseases in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viral infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic stem cell hematopoietic transplantation (allo-HSCT). Although most viral infections present with asymptomatic or subclinical manifestations, viruses may result in fatal complications in severe immunocompromised recipients. Reactivation of latent viruses, such as herpesviruses, is frequent during the immunosuppression that occurs with allo-HSCT. Viruses acquired from community, such as the respiratory and gastrointestinal viruses, are also important pathogens of post-transplant viral diseases. Currently, molecular diagnostic methods have replaced or supplemented traditional methods, such as viral culture and antigen detection, in diagnosis of viral infections. The utilization of polymerase chain reaction facilitates the early diagnosis. In view of lacking efficacious agents for treatment of viral diseases, prevention of viral infections is extremely valuable. Application of prophylactic strategies including preemptive therapy reduces viral infections and diseases. Adoptive cellular therapy for restoring virus-specific immunity is a promising method in the treatment of viral diseases. PMID:24341630

  10. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  11. Disentangling the complexity of the skin dendritic cell network.

    PubMed

    Henri, Sandrine; Guilliams, Martin; Poulin, Lionel Franz; Tamoutounour, Samira; Ardouin, Laurence; Dalod, Marc; Malissen, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Using 'knockin' mice to track and ablate dendritic cells (DCs) expressing notably the langerin (Cd207) gene, it has been possible to identify five DC subsets within the skin and to assess whether functional specialization exists among them. The present review summarizes recent information concerning the phenotype and the function of these five DC subsets before and after their migration to cutaneous draining lymph nodes. Moreover, it integrates this information into a unifying model that emphasizes the similarities that exist among the mouse DC subsets that are found in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues.

  12. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients.

  13. The Known Unknowns of the Human Dendritic Cell Network

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Mélanie; Segura, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) initiate and orient immune responses and comprise several subsets that display distinct phenotypes and properties. Most of our knowledge of DC subsets biology is based on mouse studies. In the past few years, the alignment of the human DC network with the mouse DC network has been the focus of much attention. Although comparative phenotypic and transcriptomic analysis have shown a high level of homology between mouse and human DC subsets, significant differences in phenotype and function have also been evidenced. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the human DC network and discuss some remaining gaps and future challenges of the human DC field. PMID:25852695

  14. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  15. Comparison of autogenic and allogenic bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells for repair of segmental bone defects in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Udehiya, Rahul Kumar; Amarpal; Aithal, H P; Kinjavdekar, P; Pawde, A M; Singh, Rajendra; Taru Sharma, G

    2013-06-01

    Autogenic and allogenic bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) were compared for repair of bone gap defect in rabbits. BM-MSCs were isolated from bone marrow aspirates and cultured in vitro for allogenic and autogenic transplantation. A 5mm segmental defect was created in mid-diaphysis of the radius bone. The defect was filled with hydroxyapatite alone, hydroxyapatite with autogeneic BM-MSCs and hydroxyapatite with allogenic BM-MSCs in groups A, B and C, respectively. On an average 3.45×10(6) cells were implanted at each defect site. Complete bridging of bone gap with newly formed bone was faster in both treatment groups as compared to control group. Histologically, increased osteogenesis, early and better reorganization of cancellous bone and more bone marrow formation were discernible in treatment groups as compared to control group. It was concluded that in vitro culture expanded allogenic and autogenic BM-MSCs induce similar, but faster and better healing as compared to control.

  16. Functional Identification of Dendritic Cells in the Teleost Model, Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Bassity, Elizabeth; Clark, Theodore G.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are specialized antigen presenting cells that bridge innate and adaptive immunity in mammals. This link between the ancient innate immune system and the more evolutionarily recent adaptive immune system is of particular interest in fish, the oldest vertebrates to have both innate and adaptive immunity. It is unknown whether dendritic cells co-evolved with the adaptive response, or if the connection between innate and adaptive immunity relied on a fundamentally different cell type early in evolution. We approached this question using the teleost model organism, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), with the aim of identifying dendritic cells based on their ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Adapting mammalian protocols for the generation of dendritic cells, we established a method of culturing highly motile, non-adherent cells from trout hematopoietic tissue that had irregular membrane processes and expressed surface MHCII. When side-by-side mixed leukocyte reactions were performed, these cells stimulated greater proliferation than B cells or macrophages, demonstrating their specialized ability to present antigen and therefore their functional homology to mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were then further analyzed to determine if they exhibited other features of mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were found to have many of the hallmarks of mammalian DCs including tree-like morphology, the expression of dendritic cell markers, the ability to phagocytose small particles, activation by toll-like receptor-ligands, and the ability to migrate in vivo. As in mammals, trout dendritic cells could be isolated directly from the spleen, or larger numbers could be derived from hematopoietic tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. PMID:22427987

  17. Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in primary dendritic cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Langhoff, E; Terwilliger, E F; Bos, H J; Kalland, K H; Poznansky, M C; Bacon, O M; Haseltine, W A

    1991-01-01

    The ability of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to replicate in primary blood dendritic cells was investigated. Dendritic cells compose less than 1% of the circulating leukocytes and are nondividing cells. Highly purified preparations of dendritic cells were obtained using recent advances in cell fractionation. The results of these experiments show that dendritic cells, in contrast to monocytes and T cells, support the active replication of all strains of HIV-1 tested, including T-cell tropic and monocyte/macrophage tropic isolates. The dendritic cell cultures supported much more virus production than did cultures of primary unseparated T cells, CD4+ T cells, and adherent as well as nonadherent monocytes. Replication of HIV-1 in dendritic cells produces no noticeable cytopathic effect nor does it decrease total cell number. The ability of the nonreplicating dendritic cells to support high levels of replication of HIV-1 suggests that this antigen-presenting cell population, which is also capable of supporting clonal T-cell growth, may play a central role in HIV pathogenesis, serving as a source of continued infection of CD4+ T cells and as a reservoir of virus infection. Images PMID:1910172

  18. Janus kinase-2 inhibition induces durable tolerance to alloantigen by human dendritic cell–stimulated T cells yet preserves immunity to recall antigen

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Brian C.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Curran, Shane A.; St Angelo, Erin T.; Koppikar, Priya; Heller, Glenn; Levine, Ross L.

    2011-01-01

    Janus kinase-2 (JAK2) conveys receptor-binding signals by several inflammatory cytokines, including IL-6, via phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). We demonstrate that selective JAK2 inhibition by TG101348 during initial encounters between human T cells and allogeneic monocyte-derived dendritic cells induces durable, profound, and specific T-cell tolerance upon reexposure to the same alloantigens. Subsequent responses by nonalloreactive T cells to stimulation de novo by a pathogenic nominal antigen remain intact. TG101348 also suppresses primed T-cell responses when present only during alloantigen restimulation. TG101348 ablates IL-6/JAK2–mediated phosphorylation of STAT3, but has no off-target effects on IL-2 or IL-15/JAK3/pSTAT5-dependent signaling, which sustain the responses of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and other effector T cells. JAK2 inhibition preserves Treg numbers and thereby enhances the ratio of CD4+ Tregs to CD8+CD25+ effector T cells in favor of Tregs. JAK2 inhibition also reduces the production of IL-6 and TNF-α in allogeneic MLRs, impairing the activation of central and effector memory T cells as well as the expansion of responder Th1 and Th17 cells. While we have reported the limitations of isolated IL-6R-α inhibition on dendritic cell–stimulated alloreactivity, we demonstrate here that JAK2 represents a relevant biologic target for controlling GVHD or allograft rejection without broader immune impairment. PMID:21917753

  19. Isolation and characterization of migratory human skin dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Richters, C D; Hoekstra, M J; van Baare, J; Du Pont, J S; Hoefsmit, E C; Kamperdijk, E W

    1994-01-01

    A method is described to isolate and characterize human skin dendritic cells (DC). This method is based on the migratory capacities of these cells. The cells migrated 'spontaneously' out of split-skin explants into the medium during a 24-h culture period and contained up to 75% CD1a+ cells. After removal of co-migrated T cells and macrophages, the highly enriched (> 95% CD1a+) DC showed potent allo-antigen-presenting capacities. About 25% of the CD1a+ cells were also positive for the dermal DC marker CD1b, whereas only 15-20% of the cells contained Birbeck granules, the characteristic cell organelle of the epidermal Langerhans cell. Before culture, CD1a+ DC were observed on cryostat sections not only in the epidermis but also in the dermis. After culture, the number of CD1a+ cells in both epidermis and dermis had decreased. Not all the cells had migrated during the culture period; some CD1a+ cells could still be detected in the epidermis and dermis after culture. Thus, using this method, potent allo-stimulating CD1a+ cells, migrating from both epidermis and dermis, can be obtained without the use of enzymes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7955541

  20. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens. PMID:23426134

  1. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens.

  2. Modulation of dendritic cell maturation and function by B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Hermine, Olivier; Tough, David F; Kaveri, Srini V

    2005-07-01

    Investigating the signals that regulate the function of dendritic cells (DC), the sentinels of the immune system, is critical to understanding the role of DC in the regulation of immune responses. Accumulating lines of evidence indicate that in addition to innate stimuli and T cell-derived signals, B lymphocytes exert a profound regulatory effect in vitro and in vivo on the Ag-presenting function of DC. The identification of B cells as a cellular source of cytokines, chemokines, and autoantibodies that are critically involved in the process of maturation, migration, and function of DC provides a rationale for immunotherapeutic intervention of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions by targeting B cells. Conversely, efficient cross-presentation of Ags by DC pulsed with immune complexes provides an alternative approach in the immunotherapy of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:15972625

  3. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis and apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The induction of specific CD8+ Tlymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. This process is however, often sub-optimal, in part due to tumor-induced DC dysfunction. Instead of DC that can become mature and activated and have a potent antigen-presenting and immune stimulating phenotype, immature dendritic cells (iDC) are often found in tumors and are part of an immunosuppressive milieu including regulatory T-cells and immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL10. We here report on the use of a potent DC activating agent, an oligonucleotide (ODN) that contains a non-methylated CpG motif and acts as an agonist of toll like receptor (TLR) 9. TLR activation is a danger signal to notify the immune system of the presence of invading pathogens. CpG-ODN (but not scrambled non-CpG ODN) increased bone-marrow DC activation after exposure to PDT-killed tumor cells, and significantly increased tumor response to PDT and mouse survival after peri-tumoral administration. CpG may be a valuable immunoadjuvant to PDT especially for tumors that produce DC dysfunction.

  4. Spatiotemporal profile of dendritic outgrowth from newly born granule cells in the adult rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Lee A; Upadhyaya, Pooja; Ribak, Charles E

    2007-05-29

    Neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus occurs in the subgranular zone where newborn neurons (NNs) migrate a short distance into the granule cell layer and extend their rudimentary apical dendritic processes upon a radial glial scaffold. Using doublecortin (DCX) immunocytochemistry, these growing dendrites can be visualized because dendritic growth cones, including filipodia and lamellipodia, are labeled in both light and electron microscopic preparations. To study the rate of dendritic outgrowth of newborn dentate granule cells, single injections of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) with different survival times were combined with double immunolabeling for BrdU and DCX. At the earliest time points (4 and 12 h after BrdU injections), a rudimentary process can be observed to emanate from BrdU/DCX double-labeled cells. By 48 h the dendrites first appeared in the molecular layer. By 96 h after BrdU injection, these apical dendrites extended into the middle of the molecular layer where they ramified. The calculated rate of dendritic growth for NNs was about 15 microm per day for the first 3 days, and then a doubling in length occurred at 4 and 5 days that coincided with a retraction of the basal dendrite. In addition, electron microscopy of DCX-labeled apical dendrites showed that they were much thinner (1/4 to 1/3 the size) in diameter than unlabeled, mature apical dendrites and that they had developing synapses on them in the molecular layer.

  5. Neisseria gonorrhoeae suppresses dendritic cell-induced, antigen-dependent CD4 T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weiyan; Ventevogel, Melissa S; Knilans, Kayla J; Anderson, James E; Oldach, Laurel M; McKinnon, Karen P; Hobbs, Marcia M; Sempowski, Gregory D; Duncan, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the second most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen worldwide. Diseases associated with N. gonorrhoeae cause localized inflammation of the urethra and cervix. Despite this inflammatory response, infected individuals do not develop protective adaptive immune responses to N. gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae is a highly adapted pathogen that has acquired multiple mechanisms to evade its host's immune system, including the ability to manipulate multiple immune signaling pathways. N. gonorrhoeae has previously been shown to engage immunosuppressive signaling pathways in B and T lymphocytes. We have now found that N. gonorrhoeae also suppresses adaptive immune responses through effects on antigen presenting cells. Using primary, murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and lymphocytes, we show that N. gonorrhoeae-exposed dendritic cells fail to elicit antigen-induced CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation. N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a number of secreted and dendritic cell surface proteins with immunosuppressive properties, particularly Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1). We also show that N. gonorrhoeae is able to inhibit dendritic cell- induced proliferation of human T-cells and that human dendritic cells upregulate similar immunosuppressive molecules. Our data suggest that, in addition to being able to directly influence host lymphocytes, N. gonorrhoeae also suppresses development of adaptive immune responses through interactions with host antigen presenting cells. These findings suggest that gonococcal factors involved in host immune suppression may be useful targets in developing vaccines that induce protective adaptive immune responses to this pathogen.

  6. Hepatic stellate cells undermine the allostimulatory function of liver myeloid dendritic cells via STAT3-dependent induction of IDO

    PubMed Central

    Sumpter, Tina L.; Dangi, Anil; Matta, Benjamin M.; Huang, Chao; Stolz, Donna B.; Vodovotz, Yoram; Thomson, Angus W.; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical for hepatic wound repair and tissue remodeling. They also produce cytokines and chemokines that may contribute to the maintenance of hepatic immune homeostasis and the inherent tolerogenicity of the liver. The functional relationship between HSCs and the professional migratory APCs in the liver, i.e. dendritic cells (DCs), has not been evaluated. Here, we report that murine liver DCs co-localize with HSCs in vivo under normal, steady-state conditions, and cluster with HSCs in vitro. In vitro, HSCs secrete high levels of DC chemoattractants, such as MIP1α and MCP-1, as well as cytokines that modulate DC activation, including TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β. Culture of HSCs with conventional liver myeloid (m) DCs resulted in increased IL-6 and IL-10 secretion compared to that of either cell population alone. Co-culture also resulted in enhanced expression of co-stimulatory (CD80, CD86) and co-inhibitory (B7-H1) molecules on mDCs. HSC-induced mDC maturation required cell-cell contact and could be blocked, in part, by neutralizing MIP1α or MCP-1. HSC-induced mDC maturation was dependent on activation of STAT3 in mDCs and in part on HSC-secreted IL-6. Despite up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules, mDCs conditioned by HSCs demonstrated impaired ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation, which was independent of B7-H1, but dependent upon HSC-induced STAT3 activation and subsequent up-regulation of IDO. In conclusion, by promoting IDO expression, HSCs may act as potent regulators of liver mDCs and function to maintain hepatic homeostasis and tolerogenicity. PMID:22962681

  7. Dendritic cells generated from the blood of patients with multiple myeloma are phenotypically and functionally identical to those similarly produced from healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, S; Gooding, R P; Apperley, J F; Goldschmidt, H; Samson, D

    1997-09-01

    Using a combination of GM-CSF, SCF, flk-2/flt-3 ligand, and IL-4, dendritic cells (DC) have been generated in vitro from the adherent fraction of mononuclear cells isolated from the blood of patients with MM. Analysis of cell yield showed no significant difference in DC yield (numbers or percentage of leucocytes) or total number of leucocytes generated in myeloma cultures compared to similar cultures prepared using mononuclear cells from the blood of healthy donors. The mean number of DC produced after 10d of culture were 8.19 x 10(5) and 9.87 x 10(5) cells (41% and 51% of all leucocytes) for the myeloma and normal cultures respectively. Flow cytometry investigation of phenotypic markers including CD1a, HLA-DR, CD80 (BB1/B7.1) and CD86 (B70/B7.2), and functional status (stimulatory potential in allogeneic mixed leucocyte reactions (MLR)) confirmed the generation of cells phenotypically identified as cultured DC. In addition, these cells were more effective than PBMC at stimulating allogeneic PBMC proliferation. These data demonstrate no difference between DC generated from patients with MM and healthy donors. This study was considered a prerequisite for future investigations directed towards developing effective immunotherapies for myeloma.

  8. A multifunctional core-shell nanoparticle for dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Cheong, Taek-Chin; Min, Ji Hyun; Wu, Jun Hua; Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Daehong; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Sanguk; Kim, Young Keun; Seong, Seung-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires tumour antigens to be delivered efficiently into dendritic cells and their migration to be monitored in vivo. Nanoparticles have been explored as carriers for antigen delivery, but applications have been limited by the toxicity of the solvents used to make nanoparticles, and by the need to use transfection agents to deliver nanoparticles into cells. Here we show that an iron oxide-zinc oxide core-shell nanoparticle can deliver carcinoembryonic antigen into dendritic cells while simultaneously acting as an imaging agent. The nanoparticle-antigen complex is efficiently taken up by dendritic cells within one hour and can be detected in vitro by confocal microscopy and in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Mice immunized with dendritic cells containing the nanoparticle-antigen complex showed enhanced tumour antigen specific T-cell responses, delayed tumour growth and better survival than controls.

  9. Antibody-Functionalized Peptidic Membranes for Neutralization of Allogeneic Skin Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Liu, Wen; Bagia, Christina; Zhang, Shaojuan; Bai, Mingfeng; Janjic, Jelena M.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gawalt, Ellen S.; Meng, Wilson S.

    2014-01-01

    We report herein application of an in situ material strategy to attenuate allograft T cell responses in a skin transplant mouse model. Functionalized peptidic membranes were used to impede trafficking of donor antigen-presenting cells (dAPCs) from skin allografts in recipient mice. Membranes formed by self-assembling peptides (SAPs) presenting antibodies were found to remain underneath grafted skins for up to 6 days. At the host-graft interface, dAPCs were targeted by using a monoclonal antibody that binds to a class II MHC molecule (IAd) expressed exclusively by donor cells. Using a novel cell labeling near-infrared nanoemulsion, we found more dAPCs remained in allografts treated with membranes loaded with aI-Ad than without. In vitro, dAPCs released from skin explants were found adsorbed preferentially on aI-Ad membranes. Recipient T cells from these mice produced lower concentrations of interferon-gamma cultured ex vivo with donor cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the strategy has the potential to alter the natural course of rejection immune mechanisms in stringent allogeneic models. PMID:25117952

  10. Short Course of Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide and Bortezomib for Graft-versus-Host Disease Prevention after Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation Is Feasible and Yields Favorable Results: A Phase I Study.

    PubMed

    Al-Homsi, Ahmad-Samer; Cole, Kelli; Bogema, Marlee; Duffner, Ulrich; Williams, Stephanie; Mageed, Aly

    2015-07-01

    An effective graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) preventative approach that preserves the graft-versus-tumor effect after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains elusive. Standard GVHD prophylactic regimens suppress T cells indiscriminately and are suboptimal. Conversely, post-transplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide selectively destroys proliferating alloreactive T cells, allows the expansion of regulatory T cells, and induces long-lasting clonal deletion of intrathymic antihost T cells. It has been successfully used to prevent GVHD after allogeneic HSCT. Bortezomib has antitumor activity on a variety of hematological malignancies and exhibits a number of favorable immunomodulatory effects that include inhibition of dendritic cells. Therefore, an approach that combines post-transplantation cyclophosphamide and bortezomib seems attractive. Herein, we report the results of a phase I study examining the feasibility and safety of high-dose post-transplantation cyclophosphamide in combination with bortezomib in patients undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood HSCT from matched siblings or unrelated donors after reduced-intensity conditioning. Cyclophosphamide was given at a fixed dose (50 mg/kg on days +3 and +4). Bortezomib dose was started at .7 mg/m2, escalated up to 1.3 mg/m2, and was administered on days 0 and +3. Patients receiving grafts from unrelated donors also received rabbit antithymocyte globulin. The combination was well tolerated and allowed prompt engraftment in all patients. The incidences of acute GVHD grades II to IV and grades III and IV were 20% and 6.7%, respectively. With a median follow-up of 9.1 months (range, 4.3 to 26.7), treatment-related mortality was 13.5% with predicted 2-year disease-free survival and overall survival of 55.7% and 68%, respectively. The study suggests that the combination of post-transplantation cyclophosphamide and bortezomib is feasible and may offer an effective and practical GVHD prophylactic

  11. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines.

  12. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines. PMID:25828520

  13. Collagen Induces Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Signaling through Osteoclast-Associated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Heidi S.; Nitze, Louise M.; Zeuthen, Louise H.; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J.; Hamilton, John A.; Berchtold, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB–dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR–collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs. PMID:25725106

  14. Collagen induces maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by signaling through osteoclast-associated receptor.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Heidi S; Nitze, Louise M; Zeuthen, Louise H; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Hamilton, John A; Berchtold, Martin W; Panina, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB-dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR-collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs.

  15. Rapamycin augments human DC IL-12p70 and IL-27 secretion to promote allogeneic Type1 polarization modulated by NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, C.; Turnquist, H. R.; Castillo-Rama, M.; Zahorchak, A. F.; Shapiro, R.; Thomson, A. W.; Metes, D.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin kinase inhibitor (mTORi) rapamycin (RAPA) use in transplantation can lead to inflammatory complications in some patients. Our goal was to better understand how mTORi-exposed human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) stimulated with pro-inflammatory cytokines shape T cell allo-immunity. RAPA-conditioned-DC (RAPA-DC) displayed a more immature phenotype than untreated, control (CTRL)-DC. However, subsequent exposure of RAPA-DC to an inflammatory cytokine cocktail (ICC) plus IFN-γ induced a mature Type-1 promoting phenotype, consisting of elevated HLA-DR and co-stimulatory molecules, augmented IL-12p70 and IL-27 production, but decreased IL-10 secretion compared to CTRL-DC. Co-culture of mature (m) RAPA-DC with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in significantly increased Type-1 (IFN-γ) responses by T cells. Moreover, NK cells acted as innate modulators that conveyed activating cell-to-cell contact signals in addition to helper (IFN-γ) and/or regulatory (IL-10) soluble cytokines. We conclude that production of IL12-p70, IL-27, and low IL-10 by RAPA-DC allowed us to elucidate how these cytokines as well as NK-DC interaction shapes T cell allo-immunity. Thus, lack of inhibitory NK cell function during allo-specific T cell activation by human ICC+IFN-γ-stimulated RAPA-DC may represent an unwanted effector mechanism that may underlie RAPA-induced inflammatory events in transplant patients undergoing microbial infection or allograft rejection. PMID:24034707

  16. Current Role of Autologous and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Relapsed and Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Luca; Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Mazza, Rita; Santoro, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is a relatively rare disease, with approximately 9,200 estimated new cases and 1,200 estimated deaths per year in the United States. First-line chemo-radiotherapy leads to cure rates approaching 80% in patients with advanced-stage disease. However, 25 to 30% of these patients are not cured with chemotherapy alone (i.e., the ABVD regimen) and show either primary refractoriness to chemotherapy, early disease relapse or late disease relapse. Second-line salvage high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) have an established role in the management of refractory/relapsed cHL, leading to durable responses in approximately 50% of relapsed patients and a minority of refractory patients. However, due to the poor responses to second-line salvage chemotherapy and dismal long-term disease control of primary refractory and early relapsed patients, their treatment represents an unmet medical need. Allogeneic SCT represents, by far, the only strategy with a curative potential for these patients; however, as discussed in this review, it’s role in cHL remains controversial. Despite a general consensus that early relapsed and primary refractory patients represent a clinical challenge requiring effective treatments to achieve long-term disease control, there has been no consensus on the optimal therapy that should be offered to these patients. This review will briefly discuss the clinical results and the main issues regarding autologous SCT as well as the current role of allogeneic SCT. PMID:25745542

  17. Graft-Versus-Host Disease and Graft-Versus-Tumor Effects After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Storer, Barry E.; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Blume, Karl; Niederwieser, Dietger; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Petersen, Finn B.; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Agura, Edward D.; Hari, Parameswaran; Bruno, Benedetto; McSweeney, Peter A.; Maris, Michael B.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Langston, Amelia A.; Bethge, Wolfgang; Vindeløv, Lars; Franke, Georg-Nikolaus; Laport, Ginna G.; Yeager, Andrew M.; Hübel, Kai; Deeg, H. Joachim; Georges, George E.; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Martin, Paul J.; Mielcarek, Marco; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Maloney, David G.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We designed a minimal-intensity conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies unable to tolerate high-intensity regimens because of age, serious comorbidities, or previous high-dose HCT. The regimen allows the purest assessment of graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects apart from conditioning and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) not augmented by regimen-related toxicities. Patients and Methods Patients received low-dose total-body irradiation ± fludarabine before HCT from HLA-matched related (n = 611) or unrelated (n = 481) donors, followed by mycophenolate mofetil and a calcineurin inhibitor to aid engraftment and control GVHD. Median patient age was 56 years (range, 7 to 75 years). Forty-five percent of patients had comorbidity scores of ≥ 3. Median follow-up time was 5 years (range, 0.6 to 12.7 years). Results Depending on disease risk, comorbidities, and GVHD, lasting remissions were seen in 45% to 75% of patients, and 5-year survival ranged from 25% to 60%. At 5 years, the nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rate was 24%, and the relapse mortality rate was 34.5%. Most NRM was a result of GVHD. The most significant factors associated with GVHD-associated NRM were serious comorbidities and grafts from unrelated donors. Most relapses occurred early while the immune system was compromised. GVT effects were comparable after unrelated and related grafts. Chronic GVHD, but not acute GVHD, further increased GVT effects. The potential benefit associated with chronic GVHD was outweighed by increased NRM. Conclusion Allogeneic HCT relying on GVT effects is feasible and results in cures of an appreciable number of malignancies. Improved results could come from methods that control progression of malignancy early after HCT and effectively prevent GVHD. PMID:23478054

  18. Late Mortality and Causes of Death among Long-Term Survivors after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Atsuta, Yoshiko; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Nakasone, Hideki; Kurosawa, Saiko; Oshima, Kumi; Sakai, Rika; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Takahashi, Satoshi; Mori, Takehiko; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Fukuda, Takahiro; Kanamori, Heiwa; Morishima, Yasuo; Kato, Koji; Yabe, Hiromasa; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Yamashita, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    We sought to assess the late mortality risks and causes of death among long-term survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). The cases of 11,047 relapse-free survivors of a first HCT at least 2 years after HCT were analyzed. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated and specific causes of death were compared with those of the Japanese population. Among relapse-free survivors at 2 years, overall survival percentages at 10 and 15 years were 87% and 83%, respectively. The overall risk of mortality was significantly higher compared with that of the general population. The risk of mortality was significantly higher from infection (SMR = 57.0), new hematologic malignancies (SMR = 2.2), other new malignancies (SMR = 3.0), respiratory causes (SMR = 109.3), gastrointestinal causes (SMR = 3.8), liver dysfunction (SMR = 6.1), genitourinary dysfunction (SMR = 17.6), and external or accidental causes (SMR = 2.3). The overall annual mortality rate showed a steep decrease from 2 to 5 years after HCT; however, the decrease rate slowed after 10 years but was still higher than that of the general population at 20 years after HCT. SMRs in the earlier period of 2 to 4 years after HCT and 5 years or longer after HCT were 16.1 and 7.4, respectively. Long-term survivors after allogeneic HCT are at higher risk of mortality from various causes other than the underlying disease that led to HCT. Screening and preventive measures should be given a central role in reducing the morbidity and mortality of HCT recipients on long-term follow-up.

  19. Toxoplasmosis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation--a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Busemann, Christoph; Ribback, Silvia; Zimmermann, Kathrin; Sailer, Verena; Kiefer, Thomas; Schmidt, Christian A; Schulz, Katrin; Steinmetz, Ivo; Dombrowski, Frank; Dölken, Gottfried; Krüger, William H

    2012-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a rare but possibly underestimated complication following allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a high mortality rate. One reason might be the limitation of the diagnostic instruments relying mainly on imaging and molecular-based techniques. In this report, we present three cases of toxoplasmosis identified among 155 allograft recipients treated at Greifswald University Hospital. Widely disseminated toxoplasmosis was detected post-mortem in two patients allografted for high-risk multiple myeloma. Clinical signs suspicious for toxoplasmosis occurred after days +32 and +75, respectively. In one case, serology and conventional Toxoplasma gondii PCR, targeting the B1 gene, revealed negative results, while in the other patient, toxoplasmosis was not investigated. Both patients received pentamidine for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PcP) prophylaxis. The third patient, a 68-year-old woman allografted for AML, developed cerebral toxoplasmosis from day +395 after allogeneic SCT with typical signs in magnetic resonance tomography. Toxoplasma DNA was amplified from one of two samples of cerebrospinal fluid. The patient died of disseminated toxoplasmosis despite immediate initiation of therapy. Retrospective comparative testing of clinical specimens by the conventional T. gondii PCR and by a real-time PCR targeting a 529-bp genomic fragment suggests a higher sensitivity of the latter method in our patients. In conclusion, we suggest a rigorous real-time PCR monitoring for high-risk patients or patients with signs of infections suspicious for toxoplasmosis, even though low-copy results are presently difficult to interpret. Our reported cases might also encourage the use of trimethoprim-sufmethoxazole instead of pentamidine for PcP prophylaxis in those patients.

  20. Polysialylation controls dendritic cell trafficking by regulating chemokine recognition.

    PubMed

    Kiermaier, Eva; Moussion, Christine; Veldkamp, Christopher T; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; de Vries, Ingrid; Williams, Larry G; Chaffee, Gary R; Phillips, Andrew J; Freiberger, Friedrich; Imre, Richard; Taleski, Deni; Payne, Richard J; Braun, Asolina; Förster, Reinhold; Mechtler, Karl; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Volkman, Brian F; Sixt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The addition of polysialic acid to N- and/or O-linked glycans, referred to as polysialylation, is a rare posttranslational modification that is mainly known to control the developmental plasticity of the nervous system. Here we show that CCR7, the central chemokine receptor controlling immune cell trafficking to secondary lymphatic organs, carries polysialic acid. This modification is essential for the recognition of the CCR7 ligand CCL21. As a consequence, dendritic cell trafficking is abrogated in polysialyltransferase-deficient mice, manifesting as disturbed lymph node homeostasis and unresponsiveness to inflammatory stimuli. Structure-function analysis of chemokine-receptor interactions reveals that CCL21 adopts an autoinhibited conformation, which is released upon interaction with polysialic acid. Thus, we describe a glycosylation-mediated immune cell trafficking disorder and its mechanistic basis. PMID:26657283

  1. Clinical view on the importance of dendritic cells in asthma.

    PubMed

    Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2013-10-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation and may lead to airway remodeling in uncontrolled cases. Genetic predisposition to an atopic phenotype plays a major component in the pathophysiology of asthma. However, with tremendous role of epigenetic factors and environmental stimuli in precipitating an immune response, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are complicated. Dendritic cells are principal antigen-presenting cells and initiators of the immune response in allergic asthma. Their phenotype, guided by multiple factors may dictate the immune reaction to an allergic or tolerogenic response. Involvement of the local cytokine milieu, microbiome and interplay between immune cells add dimension to the fate of immune response. In addition to allergen exposure, these factors modulate DC phenotype and function. In this article, integration of many factors and pathways associated with the recruitment and activation of DCs in the pathophysiology of allergic asthma is presented in a clinical and translational manner.

  2. Prognostic utility of routine chimerism testing at 2 to 6 months after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mossallam, Ghada I; Kamel, Azza M; Storer, Barry; Martin, Paul J

    2009-03-01

    The utility of routine chimerism analysis as a prognostic indicator of subsequent outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with myeloablative conditioning regimens remains controversial. To address this controversy, routine chimerism test results at 2 to 6 months after HCT with myeloablative conditioning regimens were evaluated for association with subsequent risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse, and overall mortality. Only 70 of 1304 patients (5%) had < 95% donor-derived cells in the marrow. Low donor chimerism in the marrow occurred more often in patients with low-risk diseases compared with those with higher-risk diseases and was significantly associated with a reduced risk of chronic GVHD. Among 673 patients evaluated, 164 (24%) had < 85% donor-derived T cells in the blood. Low donor T cell chimerism was more frequent in patients with low-risk diseases compared with those with higher-risk diseases, in those who received conditioning with busulfan compared with those who received conditioning with total body irradiation, and in those with lower-grade acute GVHD. Low donor T cell chimerism in the blood was significantly associated with a reduced risk of chronic GVHD but not with a reduced risk of relapse, NRM, or overall mortality. Routine testing of chimerism in the marrow and blood at 2 to 6 months after HCT with myeloablative conditioning regimens may be helpful in documenting engraftment in clinical trials, but provides only limited prognostic information in clinical practice.

  3. Antitumor effects of HSV-TK-engineered donor lymphocytes after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara; Marktel, Sarah; Zappone, Elisabetta; Servida, Paolo; Bernardi, Massimo; Pescarollo, Alessandra; Bondanza, Attilio; Peccatori, Jacopo; Rossini, Silvano; Magnani, Zulma; Salomoni, Monica; Benati, Claudia; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Callegaro, Luciano; Corradini, Paolo; Bregni, Marco; Traversari, Catia; Bordignon, Claudio

    2007-06-01

    The extensive exploitation of the antitumor effect of donor lymphocytes infused after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is limited by the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). To overcome this limitation, we investigated the therapeutic potential of donor lymphocytes engineered with the suicide gene thymidine kinase of herpes simplex virus (TK) in 23 patients experiencing recurrence of hematologic malignancies after allo-HSCT. Long-term follow-up of infused patients included analysis of engraftment of genetically engineered lymphocytes, in vivo assessment of antitumor effect, and control of GvHD by ganciclovir. All 17 patients evaluable for engraftment and graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) had circulating TK(+) cells detectable beginning at a median time of 18 days. Eleven patients (65%) experienced a substantial clinical benefit resulting in 6 (35%) complete remissions and 5 (29%) partial responses. The antitumor effect tightly correlated with the in vivo expansion of TK(+) cells. Seven patients received ganciclovir, resulting in elimination of TK(+) cells and effective and selective treatment of GvHD. Immunization against HSV-TK was observed in 7 patients but did not preclude an effective GvL. These data validate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of TK(+) cells in the context of allografting and represent the basis for a broader application of this technology. PMID:17327416

  4. Chimerism of allogeneic mesenchymal cells in bone marrow, liver, and spleen after mesenchymal stem cells infusion.

    PubMed

    Meleshko, Alexander; Prakharenia, Irina; Kletski, Semen; Isaikina, Yanina

    2013-12-01

    Although an infusion of culture-expanded MSCs is applied in clinic to improve results of HSCs transplantation and for a treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, homing, and engraftment potential of culture-expanded MSC in humans is still obscure. We report two female patients who received allogeneic BM transplantation as a treatment of hematological diseases and a transplantation of MSCs from third-party male donors. Both patients died within one yr of infectious complications. Specimens of paraffin-embedded blocks of tissues from transplanted patients were taken. The aim of the study was to estimate possible homing and engraftment of allogeneic BM-derived MSCs in some tissues/organs of recipient. Sensitive real-time quantitative PCR analysis was applied with SRY gene as a target. MSC chimerism was found in BM, liver, and spleen of both patients. We conclude that sensitive RQ-PCR analysis is acceptable for low-level chimerism evaluation even in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens.

  5. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  6. CT findings associated with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung W; Jeong, Katherine; Sokol, Lubomir

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematologic malignancy that is frequently misdiagnosed. We present a case of a 53-year-old man diagnosed with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with extensive computed tomography (CT) findings and provide an imaging focused review of this uncommon malignancy. PMID:27504192

  7. Increased maternal T cell microchimerism in the allogeneic fetus during LPS-induced preterm labor in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wegorzewska, Marta; Le, Tom; Tang, Qizhi; MacKenzie, Tippi C

    2014-01-01

    Fetal surgery is a promising strategy to treat fetuses with severe congenital abnormalities but its clinical applications are often limited by preterm labor. In normal pregnancy, multiple mechanisms protect the semi-allogeneic fetus from attack by maternal T cells. Maternal microchimerism (the presence of maternal cells in the fetus) has been suggested to be one mechanism of maternal-fetal tolerance in that it exposes the fetus to non-inherited maternal antigens and leads to the generation of fetal regulatory T cells that can suppress a maternal T cell response. Preterm labor may represent a breakdown of this robust tolerance network. We hypothesized that during inflammation-associated preterm labor, maternal leukocytes cross the maternal-fetal interface and enter the fetal circulation. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that during preterm labor in mice, the percentage of maternal microchimerism in fetal blood increased and the frequency of fetuses with high levels of trafficking (greater than 0.5%) also increased. Finally, we showed that the maternal leukocytes trafficking into the fetus are primarily Gr-1+ cells in both syngeneic and allogeneic pregnancy, while T cell trafficking into the fetus specifically increases during allogeneic pregnancies. Our results demonstrate that trafficking of maternal leukocytes during pregnancy is altered during preterm labor. Such alterations may be clinically significant in affecting maternal-fetal tolerance. PMID:25779065

  8. Haploidentical Natural Killer Cells Infused before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Myeloid Malignancies: A Phase I Trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dean A; Denman, Cecele J; Rondon, Gabriela; Woodworth, Glenda; Chen, Julianne; Fisher, Tobi; Kaur, Indreshpal; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Cao, Kai; Ciurea, Stefan; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E

    2016-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for high-risk myeloid malignancies, but relapse remains the major post-transplantation cause of treatment failure. Alloreactive natural killer (NK) cells mediate a potent antileukemic effect and may also enhance engraftment and reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Haploidentical transplantations provide a setting in which NK cell alloreactivity can be manipulated, but they are associated with high rates of GVHD. We performed a phase I study infusing escalating doses of NK cells from an HLA haploidentical-related donor-selected for alloreactivity when possible-as a component of the preparative regimen for allotransplantation from a separate HLA-identical donor. The goal of infusing third-party alloreactive NK cells was to augment the antileukemic effect of the transplantation without worsening GVHD and, thus, improve the overall outcome of hematopoietic transplantation. Twenty-one patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or chronic myelogenous leukemia refractory or beyond first remission received a preparative regimen with busulfan and fludarabine followed by infusion of apheresis-derived, antibody-selected, and IL-2-activated NK cells. Doses were initially based on total nucleated cell (TNC) content and later based on CD56(+) cells to reduce variability. CD56(+) content ranged from .02 to 8.32 × 10(6)/kg. IL-2, .5 × 10(6) units/m(2) subcutaneously was administered daily for 5 days in the final cohort (n = 10). CD3(+) cells in the NK cell product were required to be < 10(5)/kg. Median relapse-free, overall, and GVHD-free/relapse-free survival for all patients enrolled was 102, 233, and 89 days, respectively. Five patients are alive, 5 patients died of transplantation-related causes, and 11 patients died of relapse. Despite the small sample size, survival was highly associated with CD56(+) cells delivered (P = .022) and development of

  9. The dendritic cell side of the immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Verboogen, Danielle R J; Dingjan, Ilse; Revelo, Natalia H; Visser, Linda J; ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-02-01

    Immune responses are initiated by the interactions between antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells (DCs), with responder cells, such as T cells, via a tight cellular contact interface called the immunological synapse. The immunological synapse is a highly organized subcellular structure that provides a platform for the presentation of antigen in major histocompatibility class I and II complexes (MHC class I and II) on the surface of the APC to receptors on the surface of the responder cells. In T cells, these contacts lead to highly polarized membrane trafficking that results in the local release of lytic granules and in the delivery and recycling of T cell receptors at the immunological synapse. Localized trafficking also occurs at the APC side of the immunological synapse, especially in DCs where antigen loaded in MHC class I and II is presented and cytokines are released specifically at the synapse. Whereas the molecular mechanisms underlying polarized membrane trafficking at the T cell side of the immunological synapse are increasingly well understood, these are still very unclear at the APC side. In this review, we discuss the organization of the APC side of the immunological synapse. We focus on the directional trafficking and release of membrane vesicles carrying MHC molecules and cytokines at the immunological synapses of DCs. We hypothesize that the specific delivery of MHC and the release of cytokines at the immunological synapse mechanistically resemble that of lytic granule release from T cells. PMID:26741354

  10. The diverging roles of dendritic cells in kidney allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Cucchiari, David; Ponticelli, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a family of antigen presenting cells that play a paramount role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity. In murine models several subtypes of DCs have been identified, including classical DCs, monocyte-derived DCs, and plasmacytoid DCs. Quiescent, immature DCs and some subtypes of plasmacytoid cells favor the expression of regulatory T cells, but in an inflammatory milieu DCs become mature and after intercepting the antigen migrate to lymphatic system where they present the antigen to naïve T cells. Transplant rejection largely depends on the phenotype and maturation of DCs. The ischemia-reperfusion injury causes the release of endogenous molecules that are recognized as danger signals by the pattern recognition receptor of the innate immunity with subsequent activation of inflammatory cells and mediators. In this environment DCs become mature and migrate to lymphonodes where they present the alloantigen to T cells and direct their differentiation towards Th1 and Th17 effector cells. On the other hand, manipulation of DCs may favor T cell differentiation towards tolerant Th2 and T regulators (Treg). Experimental studies in murine models showed the possibility of inducing an operational tolerance by injecting immature tolerogenic DCs. Recently, such a possibility has been also confirmed in primates. Although manipulation of DCs may represent an important step ahead in kidney transplantation, a number of technical and ethical issues should be solved before its clinical application.

  11. Primary Graft Failure after Myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Richard F.; Logan, Brent R.; Chaudhury, Sonali; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Gupta, Vikas; Ho, Vincent T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Ringdén, Olle T.H.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Schriber, Jeffrey R.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after primary graft failure (PGF) remain poor. Here we present a large retrospective analysis (n=23,272) which investigates means to prevent PGF and early detection of patients at high risk. In patients with hematologic malignancies, who underwent their first myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, PGF was reported in 1,278 (5.5%), and there was a marked difference in PGFs using peripheral blood stem cell compared to bone marrow grafts (2.5 vs. 7.3%; P<0.001). A 4-fold increase of PGF was observed in myeloproliferative disorders compared to acute leukemia (P<0.001). Other risk factors for PGF included recipient age below 30, HLA-mismatch, male recipients of female donor grafts, ABO-incompatibility, busulfan/cyclophosphamide conditioning, and cryopreservation. In bone marrow transplants, total nucleated cell doses ≤2.4 × 108/kg were associated with PGF (OR 1.39; P<0.001). The use of tacrolimus-based immunosuppression and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were associated with decreased PGF risk. These data, allow clinicians to do more informed choices with respect to graft source, donor selection, conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens to reduce the risk of PGF. Moreover, a novel risk score determined on day 21 post-transplant may provide the rationale for an early request for additional hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:25772027

  12. Merocytic dendritic cells break T cell tolerance to beta cell antigens in NOD mouse diabetes1

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Jonathan D; Ondr, Jennifer K; Opoka, Robert J; Garcia, Zacharias; Janssen, Edith M

    2010-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the breach of central and peripheral tolerance results in autoreactive T cells destroying insulin-producing, pancreatic beta cells. Herein, we identify a critical sub-population of dendritic cells responsible for mediating both the cross-presentation of islet antigen to CD8+ T cells and the direct presentation of beta cell antigen to CD4+ T cells. These cells, termed merocytic dendritic cells (mcDC), are more numerous in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, and when antigen-loaded rescue CD8+ T cells from peripheral anergy and deletion, while stimulating islet-reactive CD4+ T cells. When purified from the pancreatic lymph nodes of overtly diabetic NOD mice, mcDC break peripheral T cell tolerance to beta cells in vivo and induce rapid onset T1D in young NOD mouse. Thus, the mcDC subset appears to represent the long-sought APC responsible for breaking peripheral tolerance to beta cell antigen in vivo. PMID:20644171

  13. Cochlin produced by follicular dendritic cells promotes antibacterial innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Py, Bénédicte F; Gonzalez, Santiago F; Long, Kai; Kim, Mi-Sung; Kim, Young-A; Zhu, Hong; Yao, Jianhua; Degauque, Nicolas; Villet, Régis; Ymele-Leki, Patrick; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Pier, Gerald B; Carroll, Michael C; Yuan, Junying

    2013-05-23

    Cochlin, an extracellular matrix protein, shares homologies with the Factor C, a serine protease found in horseshoe crabs, which is critical for antibacterial responses. Mutations in the COCH gene are responsible for human DFNA9 syndrome, a disorder characterized by neurodegeneration of the inner ear that leads to hearing loss and vestibular impairments. The physiological function of cochlin, however, is unknown. Here, we report that cochlin is specifically expressed by follicular dendritic cells and selectively localized in the fine extracellular network of conduits in the spleen and lymph nodes. During inflammation, cochlin was cleaved by aggrecanases and secreted into blood circulation. In models of lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, Coch(-/-) mice show reduced survival linked to defects in local cytokine production, recruitment of immune effector cells, and bacterial clearance. By producing cochlin, FDCs thus contribute to the innate immune response in defense against bacteria. PMID:23684986

  14. Dendritic Cells and Their Multiple Roles during Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Kelly N. S.; Chagas, Daniele C. G.; Sulczewski, Fernando B.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, efficiently presenting antigens to T cells. This ability relies on the presence of numerous surface and intracellular receptors capable of sensing microbial components as well as inflammation and on a very efficient machinery for antigen presentation. In this way, DCs sense the presence of a myriad of pathogens, including Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of malaria. Despite many efforts to control this infection, malaria is still responsible for high rates of morbidity and mortality. Different groups have shown that DCs act during Plasmodium infection, and data suggest that the phenotypically distinct DCs subsets are key factors in the regulation of immunity during infection. In this review, we will discuss the importance of DCs for the induction of immunity against the different stages of Plasmodium, the outcomes of DCs activation, and also what is currently known about Plasmodium components that trigger such activation. PMID:27110574

  15. Dendritic cell maturation and cross-presentation: timing matters!

    PubMed

    Alloatti, Andrés; Kotsias, Fiorella; Magalhaes, Joao Gamelas; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    As a population, dendritic cells (DCs) appear to be the best cross-presenters of internalized antigens on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules in the mouse. To do this, DCs have developed a number of unique and dedicated means to control their endocytic and phagocytic pathways: among them, the capacity to limit acidification of their phagosomes, to prevent proteolytic degradation, to delay fusion of phagosomes to lysosomes, to recruit ER proteins to phagosomes, and to export phagocytosed antigens to the cytosol. The regulation of phagocytic functions, and thereby of antigen processing and presentation by innate signaling, represents a critical level of integration of adaptive and innate immune responses. Understanding how innate signals control antigen cross-presentation is critical to define effective vaccination strategies for CD8(+) T-cell responses.

  16. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells delineate immunogenicity of influenza vaccine subtypes.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Aoshi, Taiki; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Kumagai, Yutaro; Kobiyama, Kouji; Tougan, Takahiro; Sakurai, Kazuo; Coban, Cevayir; Horii, Toshihiro; Akira, Shizuo; Ishii, Ken J

    2010-03-31

    A variety of different vaccine types are available for H1N1 influenza A virus infections; however, their immunological mechanisms of action remain unclear. Here, we show that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and type I interferon (IFN)-mediated signaling delineate the immunogenicity of live attenuated virus, inactivated whole-virus (WV), and split-virus vaccines. Although Toll-like receptor 7 acted as the adjuvant receptor for the immunogenicity of both live virus and WV vaccines, the requirement for type I IFN production by pDCs for the immunogenicity of the vaccines was restricted to WV. A split vaccine commonly used in humans failed to immunize naïve mice, but a pDC-activating adjuvant could restore immunogenicity. In blood from human adults, however, split vaccine alone could recall memory T cell responses, underscoring the importance of this adjuvant pathway for primary, but not secondary, vaccination. PMID:20424013

  17. Metabolic reprogramming in macrophages and dendritic cells in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Beth; O'Neill, Luke AJ

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pro-inflammatory stimuli causes them to undergo a metabolic switch towards glycolysis and away from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), similar to the Warburg effect in tumors. However, it is only recently that the mechanisms responsible for this metabolic reprogramming have been elucidated in more detail. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays an important role under conditions of both hypoxia and normoxia. The withdrawal of citrate from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been shown to be critical for lipid biosynthesis in both macrophages and DCs. Interference with this process actually abolishes the ability of DCs to activate T cells. Another TCA cycle intermediate, succinate, activates HIF-1α and promotes inflammatory gene expression. These new insights are providing us with a deeper understanding of the role of metabolic reprogramming in innate immunity. PMID:26045163

  18. Optimizing Dendritic Cell-Based Approaches for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Jashodeep; Terhune, Julia H.; Lowenfeld, Lea; Cintolo, Jessica A.; Xu, Shuwen; Roses, Robert E.; Czerniecki, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells uniquely suited for cancer immunotherapy. They induce primary immune responses, potentiate the effector functions of previously primed T-lymphocytes, and orchestrate communication between innate and adaptive immunity. The remarkable diversity of cytokine activation regimens, DC maturation states, and antigen-loading strategies employed in current DC-based vaccine design reflect an evolving, but incomplete, understanding of optimal DC immunobiology. In the clinical realm, existing DC-based cancer immunotherapy efforts have yielded encouraging but inconsistent results. Despite recent U.S. Federal and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of DC-based sipuleucel-T for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, clinically effective DC immunotherapy as monotherapy for a majority of tumors remains a distant goal. Recent work has identified strategies that may allow for more potent “next-generation” DC vaccines. Additionally, multimodality approaches incorporating DC-based immunotherapy may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25506283

  19. Pivotal Functions of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Systemic Autoimmune Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei

    2014-04-22

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) were initially identified as the prominent natural type I interferon-producing cells during viral infection. Over the past decade, the aberrant production of interferon α/β by pDCs in response to self-derived molecular entities has been critically implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and recognized as a general feature underlying other autoimmune diseases. On top of imperative studies on human pDCs, the functional involvement and mechanism by which the pDC-interferon α/β pathway facilitates the progression of autoimmunity have been unraveled recently from investigations with several experimental lupus models. This article reviews correlating information obtained from human in vitro characterization and murine in vivo studies and highlights the fundamental and multifaceted contribution of pDCs to the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune manifestation.

  20. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, Shawna A.; Montpetit, Alison J.; Lockey, R.F.; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2008-09-26

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14{sup +} monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant.

  1. Dendritic cells and cytokines in immune rejection of cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrantini, Maria; Capone, Imerio; Belardelli, Filippo

    2008-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in linking innate and adaptive immunity and, thus, in the generation of a protective immune response against both infectious diseases and tumors. The ability of DCs to prime and expand an immune response is regulated by signals acting through soluble mediators, mainly cytokines and chemokines. Understanding how cytokines influence DC functions and orchestrate the interactions of DCs with other immune cells is strictly instrumental to the progress in cancer immunotherapy. Herein, we will illustrate how certain cytokines and immune stimulating molecules can induce and sustain the antitumor immune response by acting on DCs. We will also discuss these cytokine-DC interactions in the light of clinical results in cancer patients. PMID:18054517

  2. Mechanisms of Dendritic Cell Lysosomal Killing of Cryptococcus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Camaron R.; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L.; Wozniak, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death.

  3. Primary proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell responses to HIV induced in vitro by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Macatonia, S E; Patterson, S; Knight, S C

    1991-01-01

    In earlier studies, primary proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses to influenza virus were produced in vitro by using mouse dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with virus or viral peptide as the stimulus for syngeneic T cells in 20-microliters hanging-drop cultures. We have now adapted this system for producing primary responses with cells from non-immune donors to produce primary proliferative and CTL responses to human immunodeficiency virus I (HIV) and to HIV peptides in vitro using cells from normal human peripheral blood. All donors in this study were laboratory personnel with no history of HIV infection. DC enriched from peripheral blood were exposed to HIV in vitro and small numbers were added to T lymphocytes in 20-microliters hanging drops. Proliferative responses to virus-infected DC were obtained after 3 days in culture. After 6 days, CTL were obtained that killed virus-infected autologous--but not allogeneic--phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated blast cells. Proliferative and CTL responses were obtained using cells from 14 random donors expressing a spectrum of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) types but the CTL, once produced, showed killing restricted by the MHC class I type. Treatment of cultures with monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD4-positive cells at the beginning of culture blocked the development of both proliferative and CTL responses, but treatment after 5 days had no effect on the CTL activity. Treatment with MCA to CD8-positive cells at the beginning of culture did not block proliferation significantly, but treatment either before or after the 5-day culture period blocked CTL responses. Collaboration between proliferating CD4-positive cells and CD8-positive cells may thus be required to produce CTL of the CD8 phenotype. DC exposed to HIV also produced CTL that killed autologous blast cells pulsed with gp120 envelope glycoprotein. However, DC infected with whole virus did not produce CTL that lysed target cells pulsed with a synthetic

  4. Dendritic and Langerhans cells respond to Aβ peptides differently: implication for AD immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jiang; Lin, Xiaoyang; Morgan, David; Gordon, Marcia; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zhen-Hai; Li, Hai-Ning; He, Lan-Jie; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Cao, Chuanhai

    2015-01-01

    Both wild-type and mutated beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides can elicit an immune response when delivered subcutaneously. However, only mutated forms of Aβ can sensitize dendritic cells when administered intravenously or intraperitoneally. To understand the role of mutation and delivery routes in creating immune responses, and the function of dendritic cells as therapeutic agents, we used fluorescent-conjugated WT Aβ1-40 (WT40) and artificially mutated Aβ1-40 (22W40) peptides to treat dendritic and Langerhans cells from young and/or old mice at different time points. The cell types were analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify differences in function and antigen presentation, and Luminex and Western blots for cell activation and associated mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that the artificial mutant, 22W40, enhanced dendritic cell's phagocytosis and antigen presentation better than the WT40. Interestingly, Langerhans cells were more effective at early presentation. The artificial mutant 22W40 increased CD8α+ dendritic cells, CD8+ T-cells, and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with self-lymphocytes and dendritic cells from aged mice (30-month-old). Here, the 22W40 mutant peptide has been found to be potent enough to activate DCs, and that dendritic cell-based therapy may be a more effective treatment for age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). PMID:26473448

  5. Immunological Characterization of Whole Tumour Lysate-Loaded Dendritic Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ottobrini, Luisa; Biasin, Mara; Borelli, Manuela; Lucignani, Giovanni; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dendritic cells play a key role as initiators of T-cell responses, and even if tumour antigen-loaded dendritic cells can induce anti-tumour responses, their efficacy has been questioned, suggesting a need to enhance immunization strategies. Matherials & Methods We focused on the characterization of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with whole tumour lysate (TAA-DC), as a source of known and unknown antigens, in a mouse model of breast cancer (MMTV-Ras). Dendritic cells were evaluated for antigen uptake and for the expression of MHC class I/II and costimulatory molecules and markers associated with maturation. Results Results showed that antigen-loaded dendritic cells are characterized by a phenotypically semi-mature/mature profile and by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and T-cell priming. Activated dendritic cells stimulated T-cell proliferation and induced the production of high concentrations of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ but only low levels of IL-10, indicating their ability to elicit a TH1-immune response. Furthermore, administration of Antigen loaded-Dendritic Cells in MMTV-Ras mice evoked a strong anti-tumour response in vivo as demonstrated by a general activation of immunocompetent cells and the release of TH1 cytokines. Conclusion Data herein could be useful in the design of antitumoral DC-based therapies, showing a specific activation of immune system against breast cancer. PMID:26795765

  6. Suppressive effect of β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin on activated dendritic cells in an imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhao, Jingxia; Zhang, Lu; Di, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Lin, Yan; Zeng, Zuping; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin, a main component of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, on activated dendritic cells (DCs) in a psoriasis mouse model. Methods: BALB/c mice were used to establish the animal model for psoriasis-like skin lesion; alkannin at 10 mg/kg (high), 5 mg/kg (medium), 2.5 mg/kg (low), respectively, were intragastrically administered. Psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) was used to evaluate the skin lesions. Histological changes, the thickness of epidermis, and the quantity of interleukin (IL)-23 in skin lesion were measured. In in vitro experiments, mononuclear cells in peripheral blood from healthy people were isolated, and monocytes were obtained. DCs with a mature state in differentiation and function were obtained through in vitro induction with several cytokines, and identified by flow cytometry. The influence of DCs on proliferation of allogenic lymphocytes was analyzed. The influence of alkannin on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression of pro-inflammatory factors by mature DCs was evaluated using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Mice treated with alkannin at varying concentration showed obvious remission in psoriasis-like skin lesion compared to control group, with decreased PASI score, obviously reduced vertical thickness of epidermis. Besides, alkannin treatment decreased the expression of IL-23 in skin lesion. Alkannin (12.5 μg/mL) suppressed the ability of DCs to stimulate the proliferation of allogenic lymphocytes, and suppressed the expression and secretion of IL-6, IL-12 p40, IL-23, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA and proteins, respectively. Conclusions: β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin could suppress the function of activated DCs in imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model. PMID:26261548

  7. CTLA4 blockade with ipilimumab to treat relapse of malignancy after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bashey, Asad; Medina, Bridget; Corringham, Sue; Pasek, Mildred; Carrier, Ewa; Vrooman, Linda; Lowy, Israel; Solomon, Scott R; Morris, Lawrence E; Holland, H Kent; Mason, James R; Alyea, Edwin P; Soiffer, Robert J; Ball, Edward D

    2009-02-12

    Relapse of malignancy after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) remains a therapeutic challenge. Blockade of the CTLA4 molecule can effectively augment antitumor immunity mediated by autologous effector T cells. We have assessed the safety and preliminary efficacy of a neutralizing, human anti-CTLA4 monoclonal antibody, ipilimumab, in stimulating the graft-versus-malignancy (GVM) effect after allo-HCT. Twenty-nine patients with malignancies that were recurrent or progressive after allo-HCT, received ipilimumab as a single infusion at dose cohorts between 0.1 and 3.0 mg/kg. Dose-limiting toxicity was not encountered, and ipilimumab did not induce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or graft rejection. Organ-specific immune adverse events (IAE) were seen in 4 patients (grade 3 arthritis, grade 2 hyperthyroidism, recurrent grade 4 pneumonitis). Three patients with lymphoid malignancy developed objective disease responses following ipilimumab: complete remission (CR) in 2 patients with Hodgkin disease and partial remission (PR) in a patient with refractory mantle cell lymphoma. At the 3.0 mg/kg dose, active serum concentrations of ipilimumab were maintained for more than 30 days after a single infusion. Ipilimumab, as administered in this clinical trial, does not induce or exacerbate clinical GVHD, but may cause organ-specific IAE and regression of malignancy. This study is registered at (http://clinicaltrials.gov) under NCI protocol ID P6082.

  8. Immunological Basis of Bone Marrow Failure after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Masouridi-Levrat, Stavroula; Simonetta, Federico; Chalandon, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow failure (BMF) syndromes are severe complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). In this paper, we distinguish two different entities, the graft failure (GF) and the poor graft function (PGF), and we review the current understanding of the interactions between the immune and hematopoietic compartments in these conditions. We first discuss how GF occurs as the result of classical alloreactive immune responses mediated by residual host cellular and humoral immunity persisting after conditioning and prevented by host and donor regulatory T cells. We next summarize the current knowledge about the contribution of inflammatory mediators to the development of PGF. In situations of chronic inflammation complicating allo-HSCT, such as graft-versus-host disease or infections, PGF seems to be essentially the result of a sustained impairment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) self-renewal and proliferation caused by inflammatory mediators, such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α, and of induction of apoptosis through the Fas/Fas ligand pathway. Interestingly, the production of inflammatory molecules leads to a non-MHC restricted, bystander inhibition of hematopoiesis, therefore, representing a promising target for immunological interventions. Finally, we discuss immune-mediated impairment of bone marrow microenvironment as a potential mechanism hampering hematopoietic recovery. Better understanding of immunological mechanisms responsible for BMF syndromes after allo-HSCT may lead to the development of more efficient immunotherapeutic interventions. PMID:27695456

  9. Immunological Basis of Bone Marrow Failure after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Masouridi-Levrat, Stavroula; Simonetta, Federico; Chalandon, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow failure (BMF) syndromes are severe complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). In this paper, we distinguish two different entities, the graft failure (GF) and the poor graft function (PGF), and we review the current understanding of the interactions between the immune and hematopoietic compartments in these conditions. We first discuss how GF occurs as the result of classical alloreactive immune responses mediated by residual host cellular and humoral immunity persisting after conditioning and prevented by host and donor regulatory T cells. We next summarize the current knowledge about the contribution of inflammatory mediators to the development of PGF. In situations of chronic inflammation complicating allo-HSCT, such as graft-versus-host disease or infections, PGF seems to be essentially the result of a sustained impairment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) self-renewal and proliferation caused by inflammatory mediators, such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α, and of induction of apoptosis through the Fas/Fas ligand pathway. Interestingly, the production of inflammatory molecules leads to a non-MHC restricted, bystander inhibition of hematopoiesis, therefore, representing a promising target for immunological interventions. Finally, we discuss immune-mediated impairment of bone marrow microenvironment as a potential mechanism hampering hematopoietic recovery. Better understanding of immunological mechanisms responsible for BMF syndromes after allo-HSCT may lead to the development of more efficient immunotherapeutic interventions.

  10. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T.; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-01-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials. PMID:27247754

  11. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3-4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  12. Increasing chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is associated with longer survival time.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaowen; Alatrash, Gheath; Ning, Jing; Jakher, Haroon; Stafford, Patricia; Zope, Madhushree; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Jones, Roy B; Champlin, Richard E; Thall, Peter F; Andersson, Borje S

    2014-08-01

    Donor chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is commonly used to predict overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Because chimerism is observed at 1 or more times after allo-SCT and not at baseline, if chimerism is in fact associated with OS or DFS, then the occurrence of either disease progression or death informatively censors (terminates) the observed chimerism process. This violates the assumptions underlying standard statistical regression methods for survival analysis, which may lead to biased conclusions. To assess the association between the longitudinal post-allo-SCT donor chimerism process and OS or DFS, we analyzed data from 195 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (n = 157) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 38) who achieved complete remission after allo-SCT following a reduced-toxicity conditioning regimen of fludarabine/intravenous busulfan. Median follow-up was 31 months (range, 1.1 to 105 months). Fitted joint longitudinal-survival time models showed that a binary indicator of complete (100%) donor chimerism and increasing percent of donor T cells were significantly associated with longer OS, whereas decreasing percent of donor T cells was highly significantly associated with shorter OS. Our analyses illustrate the usefulness of modeling repeated post-allo-SCT chimerism measurements as individual longitudinal processes jointly with OS and DFS to estimate their relationships.

  13. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-06-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials.

  14. Dynamic Imaging of Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Trafficking to Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kraitchman, Dara L.; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Gilson, Wesley D.; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Kedziorek, Dorota; Walczak, Piotr; Paul Segars, W.; Chen, Hunter H.; Fritzges, Danielle; Izbudak, Izlem; Young, Randell G.; Marcelino, Michelle; Pittenger, Mark F.; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Boston, Raymond C.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Wahl, Richard L.; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Background Recent results from animal studies suggest that stem cells may be able to home to sites of myocardial injury to assist in tissue regeneration. However, the histological interpretation of postmortem tissue, on which many of these studies are based, has recently been widely debated. Methods and Results With the use of the high sensitivity of a combined single-photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT scanner, the in vivo trafficking of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) colabeled with a radiotracer and MR contrast agent to acute myocardial infarction was dynamically determined. Redistribution of the labeled MSCs after intravenous injection from initial localization in the lungs to nontarget organs such as the liver, kidney, and spleen was observed within 24 to 48 hours after injection. Focal and diffuse uptake of MSCs in the infarcted myocardium was already visible in SPECT/CT images in the first 24 hours after injection and persisted until 7 days after injection and was validated by tissue counts of radioactivity. In contrast, MRI was unable to demonstrate targeted cardiac localization of MSCs in part because of the lower sensitivity of MRI. Conclusions Noninvasive radionuclide imaging is well suited to dynamically track the biodistribution and trafficking of mesenchymal stem cells to both target and nontarget organs. PMID:16129797

  15. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3–4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  16. Cytomegalovirus shapes long-term immune reconstitution after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Itzykson, Raphael; Robin, Marie; Moins-Teisserenc, Helene; Delord, Marc; Busson, Marc; Xhaard, Aliénor; de Fontebrune, Flore Sicre; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Toubert, Antoine; Socié, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Immune reconstitution after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a dynamic and complex process depending on the recipient and donor characteristics, on the modalities of transplantation, and on the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease. Multivariate methods widely used for gene expression profiling can simultaneously analyze the patterns of a great number of biological variables on a heterogeneous set of patients. Here we use these methods on flow cytometry assessment of up to 25 lymphocyte populations to analyze the global pattern of long-term immune reconstitution after transplantation. Immune patterns were most distinct from healthy controls at six months, and had not yet fully recovered as long as two years after transplant. The two principal determinants of variability were linked to the balance of B and CD8+ T cells and of natural killer and B cells, respectively. Recipient’s cytomegalovirus serostatus, cytomegalovirus replication, and chronic graft-versus-host disease were the main factors shaping the immune pattern one year after transplant. We identified a complex signature of under- and over-representation of immune populations dictated by recipient’s cytomegalovirus seropositivity. Finally, we identified dimensions of variance in immune patterns as significant predictors of long-term non-relapse mortality, independently of chronic graft-versus-host disease. PMID:25261095

  17. Stromal cells from term fetal membrane are highly suppressive in allogeneic settings in vitro.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, H; Erkers, T; Nava, S; Ruhm, S; Westgren, M; Ringdén, O

    2012-03-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) have immunosuppressive properties and have been used to treat steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in stem cell transplant patients. Cells with similar capacities can also be found in term placental tissue. We have isolated stromal cells from term fetal membrane (FMSCs), umbilical cords (UCSCs) and placental villi (PVSCs) as well as from bone marrow and compared their immunoregulatory capacity in allogeneic settings. We found that FMSCs and UCSCs suppressed proliferation significantly in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs), whereas PVSCs showed inconsistent suppressive effects. When added to MLR cultures, FMSCs suppressed the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17, whereas UCSCs and PVSCs promoted the production of IL-17 instead. Secretion of IL-10 was increased after addition of FMSCs and UCSCs. In this setting, BM-MSCs had no significant effect on secretion of IFN-γ, IL-17 or IL-10 in MLR cultures. When analysing the expression of adhesion markers, we noted that FMSCs expressed the highest levels of CD29 (β1), CD49d (α4) and CD54 (ICAM-1) compared to the other types of stromal cells. Thus, our data indicate that stromal cells isolated from term fetal membrane have great immunosuppressive capacity in terms of proliferation and production of proinflammatory cytokines from alloreactive T cells, and also promote anti-inflammatory IL-10. They express high levels of integrins that may be of importance in homing to inflamed tissues. Fetal membrane may provide a valuable source of cells with immunosuppressive properties and could possibly be used for treatment of acute GVHD and other inflammatory disorders.

  18. Time-Lapse Retinal Ganglion Cell Dendritic Field Degeneration Imaged in Organotypic Retinal Explant Culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas V.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Cone-Kimball, Elizabeth; Jefferys, Joan; Quigley, Harry A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an ex vivo organotypic retinal explant culture system suitable for multiple time-point imaging of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dendritic arbors over a period of 1 week, and capable of detecting dendrite neuroprotection conferred by experimental treatments. Methods Thy1-YFP mouse retinas were explanted and maintained in organotypic culture. Retinal ganglion cell dendritic arbors were imaged repeatedly using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Maximal projection z-stacks were traced by two masked investigators and dendritic fields were analyzed for characteristics including branch number, size, and complexity. One group of explants was treated with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) added to the culture media. Changes in individual dendritic fields over time were detected using pair-wise comparison testing. Results Retinal ganglion cells in mouse retinal explant culture began to degenerate after 3 days with 52.4% surviving at 7 days. Dendritic field parameters showed minimal change over 8 hours in culture. Intra- and interobserver measurements of dendrite characteristics were strongly correlated (Spearman rank correlations consistently > 0.80). Statistically significant (P < 0.001) dendritic tree degeneration was detected following 7 days in culture including: 40% to 50% decreases in number of branch segments, number of junctions, number of terminal branches, and total branch length. Scholl analyses similarly demonstrated a significant decrease in dendritic field complexity. Treatment of explants with BDNF+CNTF significantly attenuated dendritic field degeneration. Conclusions Retinal explant culture of Thy1-YFP tissue provides a useful model for time-lapse imaging of RGC dendritic field degeneration over a course of several days, and is capable of detecting neuroprotective amelioration of dendritic pruning within individual RGCs. PMID:26811145

  19. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koido, Shigeo; Hara, Eiichi; Homma, Sadamu; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived costimulatory molecules. DCs/tumor fusion vaccine stimulates potent antitumor immunity in the animal tumor models. In the human studies, T cells stimulated by DC/tumor fusion cells are effective in lysis of tumor cells that are used as the fusion partner. In the clinical trials, clinical and immunological responses were observed in patients with advanced stage of malignant tumors after being vaccinated with DC/tumor fusion cells, although the antitumor effect is not as vigorous as in the animal tumor models. This review summarizes recent advances in concepts and techniques that are providing new impulses to DCs/tumor fusions-based cancer vaccination. PMID:20182533

  20. Uptake and intracellular trafficking of superantigens in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ganem, María B; De Marzi, Mauricio C; Fernández-Lynch, María J; Jancic, Carolina; Vermeulen, Mónica; Geffner, Jorge; Mariuzza, Roy A; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial superantigens (SAgs) are exotoxins produced mainly by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes that can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS). According to current paradigm, SAgs interact directly and simultaneously with T cell receptor (TCR) on the T cell and MHC class II (MHC-II) on the antigen-presenting cell (APC), thereby circumventing intracellular processing to trigger T cell activation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional APCs that coat nearly all body surfaces and are the most probable candidate to interact with SAgs. We demonstrate that SAgs are taken up by mouse DCs without triggering DC maturation. SAgs were found in intracellular acidic compartment of DCs as biologically active molecules. Moreover, SAgs co-localized with EEA1, RAB-7 and LAMP-2, at different times, and were then recycled to the cell membrane. DCs loaded with SAgs are capable of triggering in vitro lymphocyte proliferation and, injected into mice, stimulate T cells bearing the proper TCR in draining lymph nodes. Transportation and trafficking of SAgs in DCs might increase the local concentration of these exotoxins where they will produce the highest effect by promoting their encounter with both MHC-II and TCR in lymph nodes, and may explain how just a few SAg molecules can induce the severe pathology associated with TSS. PMID:23799083

  1. Uptake and Intracellular Trafficking of Superantigens in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Lynch, María J.; Jancic, Carolina; Vermeulen, Mónica; Geffner, Jorge; Mariuzza, Roy A.; Fernández, Marisa M.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial superantigens (SAgs) are exotoxins produced mainly by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes that can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS). According to current paradigm, SAgs interact directly and simultaneously with T cell receptor (TCR) on the T cell and MHC class II (MHC-II) on the antigen-presenting cell (APC), thereby circumventing intracellular processing to trigger T cell activation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional APCs that coat nearly all body surfaces and are the most probable candidate to interact with SAgs. We demonstrate that SAgs are taken up by mouse DCs without triggering DC maturation. SAgs were found in intracellular acidic compartment of DCs as biologically active molecules. Moreover, SAgs co-localized with EEA1, RAB-7 and LAMP-2, at different times, and were then recycled to the cell membrane. DCs loaded with SAgs are capable of triggering in vitro lymphocyte proliferation and, injected into mice, stimulate T cells bearing the proper TCR in draining lymph nodes. Transportation and trafficking of SAgs in DCs might increase the local concentration of these exotoxins where they will produce the highest effect by promoting their encounter with both MHC-II and TCR in lymph nodes, and may explain how just a few SAg molecules can induce the severe pathology associated with TSS. PMID:23799083

  2. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products.

  3. Acupoint Injection of Autologous Stromal Vascular Fraction and Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Treat Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Camila; Silveira, Maiele Dornelles; Selbach, Isabel; da Silva, Ariel Silveira; Braga, Luisa Maria Gomes de Macedo; Camassola, Melissa; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells isolated from adipose tissue show great therapeutic potential in veterinary medicine, but some points such as the use of fresh or cultured cells and route of administration need better knowledge. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF, n = 4) or allogeneic cultured adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs, n = 5) injected into acupuncture points in dogs with hip dysplasia and weak response to drug therapy. Canine ASCs have proliferation and differentiation potential similar to ASCs from other species. After the first week of treatment, clinical evaluation showed marked improvement compared with baseline results in all patients treated with autologous SVF and three of the dogs treated with allogeneic ASCs. On days 15 and 30, all dogs showed improvement in range of motion, lameness at trot, and pain on manipulation of the joints, except for one ASC-treated patient. Positive results were more clearly seen in the SVF-treated group. These results show that autologous SVF or allogeneic ASCs can be safely used in acupoint injection for treating hip dysplasia in dogs and represent an important therapeutic alternative for this type of pathology. Further studies are necessary to assess a possible advantage of SVF cells in treating joint diseases. PMID:25180040

  4. Prevention of rejection of allogeneic endothelial cells in a biohybrid lung by silencing HLA-class I expression.

    PubMed

    Wiegmann, Bettina; Figueiredo, Constança; Gras, Christiane; Pflaum, Michael; Schmeckebier, Sabrina; Korossis, Sotirios; Haverich, Axel; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    Variability in Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) remains a hurdle to the application of allogeneic cellular products. Due to insufficient autologous endothelial cell harvesting for the biohybrid lung, allogeneic human cord blood derived endothelial cells (HCBEC) were used for the endothelialization of poly-4-methyl-1-pentene (PMP) gas exchange membranes. Therefore, HLA class I expression was silenced stably in HCBECs to prevent rejection. The capacity of HLA class I-silenced HCBEC to abrogate allogeneic immune responses, their functional properties and suitability for endothelialization of PMP membranes were investigated. Delivery of β2-microglobulin (β2m)-specific shRNAs reduced β2m mRNA levels by up to 90% and caused a knockdown of HLA class I expression by up to 85%. HLA-silenced HCBEC abrogated T-cell responses and escaped antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The EC phenotype and cytokine secretion profiles between HLA-expressing or -silenced HCBEC remained unaltered. EC specific activation (e.g. ICAM) and thrombogenic markers (e.g. thrombomodulin) remained unaffected by HLA-silencing, but their expression was upregulated by TNFα-stimulation. Furthermore, HLA-silenced HCBECs showed high proliferation rates and built an EC monolayer onto PMP membranes. This study represents a new therapeutic concept in the field of cell and organ transplantation and may bring the bioartificial lung as an alternative to lung transplantation closer to reality.

  5. Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum induces immune responses to cancer testis antigen NY-ESO-1 and maturation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Mobergslien, Anne; Vasovic, Vlada; Mathiesen, Geir; Fredriksen, Lasse; Westby, Phuong; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Peng, Qian; Sioud, Mouldy

    2015-01-01

    Given their safe use in humans and inherent adjuvanticity, Lactic Acid Bacteria may offer several advantages over other mucosal delivery strategies for cancer vaccines. The objective of this study is to evaluate the immune responses in mice after oral immunization with Lactobacillus (L) plantarum WCFS1 expressing a cell-wall anchored tumor antigen NY-ESO-1. And to investigate the immunostimulatory potency of this new candidate vaccine on human dendritic cells (DCs). L. plantarum displaying NY-ESO-1 induced NY-ESO-1 specific antibodies and T-cell responses in mice. By contrast, L. plantarum displaying conserved proteins such as heat shock protein-27 and galectin-1, did not induce immunity, suggesting that immune tolerance to self-proteins cannot be broken by oral administration of L. plantarum. With respect to immunomodulation, immature DCs incubated with wild type or L. plantarum-NY-ESO-1 upregulated the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and secreted a large amount of interleukin (IL)-12, TNF-α, but not IL-4. Moreover, they upregulated the expression of immunosuppressive factors such as IL-10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Although L. plantarum-matured DCs expressed inhibitory molecules, they stimulated allogeneic T cells in-vitro. Collectively, the data indicate that L. plantarum-NY-ESO-1 can evoke antigen-specific immunity upon oral administration and induce DC maturation, raising the potential of its use in cancer immunotherapies.

  6. Altered heme-mediated modulation of dendritic cell function in sickle cell alloimmunization

    PubMed Central

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Liu, Yunfeng; Shi, Patricia; Mitchell, W. Beau; Cohen, Devin; Chou, Stella T.; Manwani, Deepa; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Transfusions are the main treatment for patients with sickle cell disease. However, alloimmunization remains a major life-threatening complication for these patients, but the mechanism underlying pathogenesis of alloimmunization is not known. Given the chronic hemolytic state characteristic of sickle cell disease, resulting in release of free heme and activation of inflammatory cascades, we tested the hypothesis that anti-inflammatory response to heme is compromised in alloimmunized sickle patients, increasing their risk of alloimmunization. Heme-exposed monocyte-derived dendritic cells from both non-alloimmunized sickle patients and healthy donors inhibited priming of pro-inflammatory CD4+ type 1 T cells, and exhibited significantly reduced levels of the maturation marker CD83. In contrast, in alloimmunized patients, heme did not reverse priming of pro-inflammatory CD4+ cells by monocyte-derived dendritic cells or their maturation. Furthermore, heme dampened NF-κB activation in non-alloimmunized, but not in alloimmunized monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Heme-mediated CD83 inhibition depended on Toll-like receptor 4 but not heme oxygenase 1. These data suggest that extracellular heme limits CD83 expression on dendritic cells in non-alloimmunized sickle patients through a Toll-like receptor 4-mediated pathway, involving NF-κB, resulting in dampening of pro-inflammatory responses, but that in alloimmunized patients this pathway is defective. This opens up the possibility of developing new therapeutic strategies to prevent sickle cell alloimmunization. PMID:27229712

  7. Altered heme-mediated modulation of dendritic cell function in sickle cell alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Liu, Yunfeng; Shi, Patricia; Mitchell, W Beau; Cohen, Devin; Chou, Stella T; Manwani, Deepa; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-09-01

    Transfusions are the main treatment for patients with sickle cell disease. However, alloimmunization remains a major life-threatening complication for these patients, but the mechanism underlying pathogenesis of alloimmunization is not known. Given the chronic hemolytic state characteristic of sickle cell disease, resulting in release of free heme and activation of inflammatory cascades, we tested the hypothesis that anti-inflammatory response to heme is compromised in alloimmunized sickle patients, increasing their risk of alloimmunization. Heme-exposed monocyte-derived dendritic cells from both non-alloimmunized sickle patients and healthy donors inhibited priming of pro-inflammatory CD4(+) type 1 T cells, and exhibited significantly reduced levels of the maturation marker CD83. In contrast, in alloimmunized patients, heme did not reverse priming of pro-inflammatory CD4(+) cells by monocyte-derived dendritic cells or their maturation. Furthermore, heme dampened NF-κB activation in non-alloimmunized, but not in alloimmunized monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Heme-mediated CD83 inhibition depended on Toll-like receptor 4 but not heme oxygenase 1. These data suggest that extracellular heme limits CD83 expression on dendritic cells in non-alloimmunized sickle patients through a Toll-like receptor 4-mediated pathway, involving NF-κB, resulting in dampening of pro-inflammatory responses, but that in alloimmunized patients this pathway is defective. This opens up the possibility of developing new therapeutic strategies to prevent sickle cell alloimmunization.

  8. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  9. Modulation of dendritic cell function by Trichomonas vaginalis-derived secretory products.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Ji; Lee, Jong-Joo; Nam, Young Hee; Kim, Tae-Gyun; Chung, Youn Wook; Kim, Mikyoung; Choi, Ye-Eun; Shin, Myeong Heon; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo

    2015-02-01

    Trichomoniasis caused by the parasitic protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the world. Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that initiate immune responses by directing the activation and differentiation of naïve T cells. In this study, we analyzed the effect of Trichomonas vaginalis-derived Secretory Products on the differentiation and function of dendritic cells. Differentiation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in the presence of T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Products resulted in inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced maturation of dendritic cells, down-regulation of IL-12, and up-regulation of IL-10. The protein components of T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Products were shown to be responsible for altered function of bone marrow- derived dendritic cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that IL-12 expression was regulated at the chromatin level in T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Productstreated dendritic cells. Our results demonstrated that T. vaginalis- derived Secretory Products modulate the maturation and cytokine production of dendritic cells leading to immune tolerance.

  10. Human XCR1+ Dendritic Cells Derived In Vitro from CD34+ Progenitors Closely Resemble Blood Dendritic Cells, Including Their Adjuvant Responsiveness, Contrary to Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Sreekumar; Ollion, Vincent; Colletti, Nicholas; Chelbi, Rabie; Montanana-Sanchis, Frédéric; Liu, Hong; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Sanchez, Cindy; Savoret, Juliette; Perrot, Ivan; Doffin, Anne-Claire; Fossum, Even; Bechlian, Didier; Chabannon, Christian; Bogen, Bjarne; Asselin-Paturel, Carine; Shaw, Michael; Soos, Timothy; Caux, Christophe; Valladeau-Guilemond, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDC) have been used in the clinic with moderately encouraging results. Mouse XCR1+ DC excel at cross-presentation, can be targeted in vivo to induce protective immunity, and share characteristics with XCR1+ human DC. Assessment of the immunoactivation potential of XCR1+ human DC is hindered by their paucity in vivo and by their lack of a well-defined in vitro counterpart. We report in this study a protocol generating both XCR1+ and XCR1− human DC in CD34+ progenitor cultures (CD34-DC). Gene expression profiling, phenotypic characterization, and functional studies demonstrated that XCR1− CD34-DC are similar to canonical MoDC, whereas XCR1+ CD34-DC resemble XCR1+ blood DC (bDC). XCR1+ DC were strongly activated by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid but not LPS, and conversely for MoDC. XCR1+ DC and MoDC expressed strikingly different patterns of molecules involved in inflammation and in cross-talk with NK or T cells. XCR1+ CD34-DC but not MoDC efficiently cross-presented a cell-associated Ag upon stimulation by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid or R848, likewise to what was reported for XCR1+ bDC. Hence, it is feasible to generate high numbers of bona fide XCR1+ human DC in vitro as a model to decipher the functions of XCR1+ bDC and as a potential source of XCR1+ DC for clinical use. PMID:25009205

  11. Characteristics of mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells and therapeutic comparisons between syngeneic and allogeneic adipose tissue-derived stem cell transplantation in experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Wha; Shin, Il Seob; Park, So Young; Yoon, Eun Ji; Kang, Sung Keun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we found that the intravenous administration of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells was a promising therapeutic option for autoimmune thyroiditis even when the cells were transplanted into a xenogeneic model without an immunosuppressant. Therefore, we explored the comparison between the therapeutic effects of syngeneic and allogeneic adipose tissue-derived stem cells on an experimental autoimmune thyroiditis mouse model. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with porcine thyroglobulin. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells derived from C57BL/6 mice (syngeneic) or BALB/c mice (allogeneic) or saline as a vehicle control were administered intravenously four times weekly. Blood and tissue samples were collected 1 week after the last transplantation. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells from mice were able to differentiate into multiple lineages in vitro; however, mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells did not have immunophenotypes identical to those from humans. Syngeneic and allogeneic administrations of adipose tissue-derived stem cells reduced thyroglobulin autoantibodies and the inflammatory immune response, protected against lymphocyte infiltration into the thyroid, and restored the Th1/Th2 balance without any adverse effects. However, different humoral immune responses were observed for infused cells from different stem cell sources. The strongest humoral immune response was induced by xenogeneic transplantation, followed by allogeneic and syngeneic administration, in that order. The stem cells were mostly found in the spleen, not the thyroid. This migration might be because the stem cells primarily function in systemic immune modulation, due to being given prior to disease induction. In this study, we confirmed that there were equal effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells in treating autoimmune thyroiditis between syngeneic and allogeneic transplantations.

  12. Dendritic cell targeted vaccines: Recent progresses and challenges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengfei; Liu, Xinsheng; Sun, Yuefeng; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Yongguang

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to be a set of morphology, structure and function of heterogeneous professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), as well as the strongest functional antigen presenting cells, which can absorb, process and present antigens. As the key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses, DCs are at the center of the immune system and capable of interacting with both B cells and T cells, thereby manipulating the humoral and cellular immune responses. DCs provide an essential link between the innate and adaptive immunity, and the strong immune activation function of DCs and their properties of natural adjuvants, make them a valuable target for antigen delivery. Targeting antigens to DC-specific endocytic receptors in combination with the relevant antibodies or ligands along with immunostimulatory adjuvants has been recently recognized as a promising strategy for designing an effective vaccine that elicits a strong and durable T cell response against intracellular pathogens and cancer. This opinion article provides a brief summary of the rationales, superiorities and challenges of existing DC-targeting approaches.

  13. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: development, functions, and role in atherosclerotic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specialized subset of DCs that links innate and adaptive immunity. They sense viral and bacterial pathogens and release high levels of Type I interferons (IFN-I) in response to infection. pDCs were shown to contribute to inflammatory responses in the steady state and in pathology. In atherosclerosis, pDCs are involved in priming vascular inflammation and atherogenesis through production of IFN-I and chemokines that attract inflammatory cells to inflamed sites. pDCs also contribute to the proinflammatory activation of effector T cells, cytotoxic T cells, and conventional DCs. However, tolerogenic populations of pDCs are found that suppress atherosclerosis-associated inflammation through down-regulation of function and proliferation of proinflammatory T cell subsets and induction of regulatory T cells with potent immunomodulatory properties. Notably, atheroprotective tolerogenic DCs could be induced by certain self-antigens or bacterial antigens that suggests for great therapeutic potential of these DCs for development of DC-based anti-atherogenic vaccines. PMID:25120492

  14. Rat monocyte-derived dendritic cells function and migrate in the same way as isolated tissue dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Richters, C D; Mayen, I; Havenith, C E G; Beelen, R H J; Kamperdijk, E W A

    2002-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and are therefore useful to induce immune responses against tumor cells in patients. DC can be generated in vitro from monocytes using GM-CSF and IL-4, the so-called monocyte-derived DC (MoDC). To achieve antitumor responses, MoDC must be able to migrate to the draining lymph nodes after injection to induce cytotoxic T cells. Therefore, we studied migration of MoDC in a rat model. Functional rat MoDC were generated from PVG-RT7B rats and injected subcutaneously into PVG rats. These rat strains differ only at one epitope of the leukocyte-common antigen, which can be recognized by the antibody His 41. The advantage is that migrated cells can be detected in the draining lymph nodes by staining sections with His 41+; thus, migration is not influenced by labeling procedures. Rat MoDC migrated to the T-cell areas of the draining lymph nodes, just as isolated Langerhans cells or spleen DC do. In contrast, monocytes also migrated to the B-cell areas and the medulla. PMID:11927643

  15. Impaired Tumor Antigen Processing by Immunoproteasome-expressing CD40-Activated B cells and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen S.; Zeng, Wanyong; Sasada, Tetsuro; Su, Mei; Choi, Jaewon; Drakoulakos, Donna; Kang, Yoon-Joong; Brusic, Vladimir; Wu, Catherine; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2012-01-01

    Professional APCs, such as dendritic cells, are routinely used in vitro for the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for tumor antigens. In addition to dendritic cells, CD40-activated B cells and variant K562 leukemic cells can be readily transfected with nucleic acids for in vitro and in vivo antigen presentation. However, the expression of immunoproteasome components in dendritic cells may preclude display of tumor antigens such as Mart1/MelanA. Here, we use three target epitopes, two derived from tumor antigens [Mart126–34 (M26) and Cyp1B1239–247 (Cyp239)] and one derived from the Influenza A viral antigen [FluM158–66 (FluM58)], to demonstrate that CD40-activated B cells, like dendritic cells, have a limited capability to process certain tumor antigens. In contrast, the K562 HLA-A*0201 transfectant efficiently processes and presents M26 and Cyp239 as well as the influenza FluM58 epitopes to T cells. These results demonstrate that the choice of target APC for gene transfer of tumor antigens may be limited by the relative efficacy of proteasome components to process certain tumor epitopes. Importantly, K562 can be exploited as an artificial APC, efficient in processing both M26 and Cyp239 epitopes and presumably, by extension, other relevant tumor antigens. PMID:21400024

  16. Successful treatment of small cell variant anaplastic large cell lymphoma with allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Rie; Mouri, Fumihiko; Nomura, Kei; Nakamura, Takayuki; Oku, Eijiro; Morishige, Satoshi; Takata, Yuka; Seki, Ritsuko; Osaki, Koichi; Hashiguchi, Michitoshi; Yoshimoto, Koji; Ohshima, Koichi; Nagafuji, Koji; Okamura, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The small cell variant of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) presents in a nearly identical manner to the more common ALK(+) primary ALCL, with the exception that it is more frequently associated with leukemic involvement, and the prognosis has been reported to be poor. We report a 40-year-old Japanese male who was diagnosed with small cell variant ALCL with peripheral blood involvement stage IVB, age-adjusted international prognostic index 3. Conventional cytogenetics of the bone marrow aspirate specimen showed abnormal metaphases with the following karyotype: 47, XY, +X, t(2;5)(p23;q35). The patient was treated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia-oriented intensive chemotherapy. He underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from his HLA-DR1 locus mismatch sister. Prior to transplant, the patient had residual lymphadenopathy considered to be in partial remission. As of August 2012, the patient has achieved 18 months of continuous complete remission (CCR), with a Karnofsky score of 100 %. We have identified a total of seven cases of small cell variant ALCL treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in the literature. Of these, no relapse was reported, and four patients were CCR more than 1 year. Allogeneic HSCT appears to represent a promising treatment option for small cell variant ALCL. PMID:23264126

  17. Atovaquone for Prophylaxis of Toxoplasmosis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mendorf, Alexander; Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Langebrake, Claudia; Rohde, Holger; Ayuk, Francis; Regier, Marc; Christopeit, Maximilian; Zabelina, Tatjana; Bacher, Adelbert; Stübig, Thomas; Wolschke, Christine; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis and infections by other opportunistic agents such as Pneumocystis jirovecii constitute life-threatening risks for patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been well established for post-transplant toxoplasmosis and pneumocystis prophylaxis, but treatment may be limited due to toxicity. We explored atovaquone as an alternative and compared it with TMP-SMX regarding toxicity and efficacy during the first 100 days after transplantation in 155 consecutive adult stem cell recipients. Eight patients with a prior history of TMP-SMX intolerance received atovaquone as first-line prophylaxis. TMP-SMX was used for 141 patients as first-line strategy, but 13 patients (9.2%) were later switched to atovaquone due to TMP-SMX toxicity or gastrointestinal symptoms. No active toxoplasmosis or active P. jirovecii infection developed under continued prophylaxis with either TMP-SMX or atovaquone. However, for reasons of TMP-SMX and/or atovaquone toxicity, 7 patients were unable to tolerate any efficacious toxoplasmosis prophylaxis and therefore obtained inhalative pentamidine as P. jirovecii prophylaxis but no toxoplasmosis prophylaxis. Importantly, 2 of these patients developed severe toxoplasmosis. In summary, atovaquone appears as a valid alternative for at least some post-transplant patients who cannot tolerate TMP-SMX. This should be further confirmed by multicenter trials. PMID:25968483

  18. WU and KI Polyomaviruses in Respiratory Samples from Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Angela P.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Wright, Nancy L.; Englund, Janet A.; Corey, Lawrence; Boeckh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Data are limited regarding 2 new human polyomaviruses, KI polyomavirus (KIPyV) and WU polyomavirus (WUPyV), in immunocompromised patients. We used real-time PCR to test for these and 12 respiratory viruses in 2,732 nasal wash samples collected during the first year after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation from 222 patients. Specimens were collected weekly until day 100; then at least every 3 months. One year after hematopoietic cell transplantation, the cumulative incidence estimate was 26% for KIPyV and 8% for WUPyV. Age <20 years predicted detection of KIPyV (hazard ratio [HR] 4.6) and WUPyV (HR 4.4), and detection of a respiratory virus in the previous 2 weeks predicted KIPyV detection (HR 3.4). Sputum production and wheezing were associated with detection of KIPyV in the past week and WUPyV in the past month. There were no associations with polyomavirus detection and acute graft versus host disease, cytomegalovirus reactivation, neutropenia, lymphopenia, hospitalization, or death. PMID:23017213

  19. Relapse risk in patients with malignant diseases given allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Christoph; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Mielcarek, Marco; Maris, Michael B; Blume, Karl G; Niederwieser, Dietger; Chauncey, Thomas R; Forman, Stephen J; Agura, Edward; Leis, Jose F; Bruno, Benedetto; Langston, Amelia; Pulsipher, Michael A; McSweeney, Peter A; Wade, James C; Epner, Elliot; Bo Petersen, Finn; Bethge, Wolfgang A; Maloney, David G; Storb, Rainer

    2007-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies depends on graft-versus-tumor effects for eradication of cancer. Here, we estimated relapse risks according to disease characteristics. Between 1997 and 2006, 834 consecutive patients (median age, 55 years; range, 5-74 years) received related (n = 498) or unrelated (n = 336) HCT after 2 Gy total body irradiation alone (n = 171) or combined with fludarabine (90 mg/m(2); n = 663). Relapse rates per patient year (PY) at risk, corrected for follow-up and competing nonrelapse mortality, were calculated for 29 different diseases and stages. The overall relapse rate per PY was 0.36. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) in remission (CR), low-grade or mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (CR + partial remission [PR]), and high-grade NHL-CR had the lowest rates (0.00-0.24; low risk). In contrast, patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had rates of more than 0.52 (high risk). Patients with lymphoproliferative diseases not in CR (except Hodgkin lymphoma and high-grade NHL) and myeloid malignancies in CR had rates of 0.26-0.37 (standard risk). In conclusion, patients with low-grade lymphoproliferative disorders experienced the lowest relapse rates, whereas patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had high relapse rates after nonmyeloablative HCT. The latter might benefit from cytoreductive treatment before HCT.

  20. Relapse risk in patients with malignant diseases given allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Christoph; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Mielcarek, Marco; Maris, Michael B.; Blume, Karl G.; Niederwieser, Dietger; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Forman, Stephen J.; Agura, Edward; Leis, Jose F.; Bruno, Benedetto; Langston, Amelia; Pulsipher, Michael A.; McSweeney, Peter A.; Wade, James C.; Epner, Elliot; Bo Petersen, Finn; Bethge, Wolfgang A.; Maloney, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies depends on graft-versus-tumor effects for eradication of cancer. Here, we estimated relapse risks according to disease characteristics. Between 1997 and 2006, 834 consecutive patients (median age, 55 years; range, 5-74 years) received related (n = 498) or unrelated (n = 336) HCT after 2 Gy total body irradiation alone (n = 171) or combined with fludarabine (90 mg/m2; n = 663). Relapse rates per patient year (PY) at risk, corrected for follow-up and competing nonrelapse mortality, were calculated for 29 different diseases and stages. The overall relapse rate per PY was 0.36. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) in remission (CR), low-grade or mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (CR + partial remission [PR]), and high-grade NHL-CR had the lowest rates (0.00-0.24; low risk). In contrast, patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had rates of more than 0.52 (high risk). Patients with lymphoproliferative diseases not in CR (except Hodgkin lymphoma and high-grade NHL) and myeloid malignancies in CR had rates of 0.26-0.37 (standard risk). In conclusion, patients with low-grade lymphoproliferative disorders experienced the lowest relapse rates, whereas patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had high relapse rates after nonmyeloablative HCT. The latter might benefit from cytoreductive treatment before HCT. PMID:17595333

  1. A 16 Month Survey of Cyclosporine Utilization Evaluation in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli Ardakani, Maria; Tafazoli, Ali; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid; Hajifathali, Abbas; Dadashzadeh, Simin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a life threatening reaction in the stem cell transplantation process. Nowadays Cyclosporine is the most commonly utilized agent for GVHD prophylaxis and it has a major role in successful transplantation. Cyclosporine has been applied for many years in this field but it could be stated that currently no general consensus is available for its optimal method of administration. Conditions related to cyclosporine administration and possible related adverse reactions observed closely in our patients with the aim of constructing a comprehensive practice guideline in the future. Patients and Methods: Allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients who have been taking cyclosporine were monitored during and after their hospitalization while recording all observations on predefined questionnaires on the basis of periodic clinical and laboratory examinations for a 16 month period. Results: Mean recorded duration of infusions was 1.44 ± 0.68 h and by twice daily administration, means intravenous and oral dose was 101.85 ± 22.03 mg and 219.28 ± 63.9 mg, respectively. A mean CsA trough level after about 12 h of specified unique doses was 223 ± 65 ng/mL. We found hypertension, nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in about 14, 20, 48, and 94 percent of patients. Conclusions: This study proposed that permanent guidance of healthcare team according to a fixed and standard method of cyclosporine administration routine with using efficient facilities and protocols would be helpful considerably for an optimal pharmacotherapy.

  2. Role of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lussana, Federico; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease, due to the expression of different biological and clinical risk factors, for which allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is an effective consolidation therapy. The non-relapse mortality of alloHSCT remains significantly higher compared with that of conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, one of the main challenges in the care of ALL is to establish a more precise prognostic definition to select patients who could take advantage from an alloHSCT. Currently, the use of minimal residual disease following induction and early consolidation therapy has improved the prognostic accuracy in defining ALL risk class. In Philadelphia-positive ALL, the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors pre and post alloHSCT appears to improve outcomes significantly and, in the absence of specially designed clinical trials, alloHSCT remains the most effective post-remission therapy. Nowadays, alloHSCT can be performed according to various modalities encompassing the use of different conditioning regimens, as well as distinct donors and stem cell source, with a significant accessibility to transplant. PMID:25408851

  3. A 16 Month Survey of Cyclosporine Utilization Evaluation in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli Ardakani, Maria; Tafazoli, Ali; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid; Hajifathali, Abbas; Dadashzadeh, Simin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a life threatening reaction in the stem cell transplantation process. Nowadays Cyclosporine is the most commonly utilized agent for GVHD prophylaxis and it has a major role in successful transplantation. Cyclosporine has been applied for many years in this field but it could be stated that currently no general consensus is available for its optimal method of administration. Conditions related to cyclosporine administration and possible related adverse reactions observed closely in our patients with the aim of constructing a comprehensive practice guideline in the future. Patients and Methods: Allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients who have been taking cyclosporine were monitored during and after their hospitalization while recording all observations on predefined questionnaires on the basis of periodic clinical and laboratory examinations for a 16 month period. Results: Mean recorded duration of infusions was 1.44 ± 0.68 h and by twice daily administration, means intravenous and oral dose was 101.85 ± 22.03 mg and 219.28 ± 63.9 mg, respectively. A mean CsA trough level after about 12 h of specified unique doses was 223 ± 65 ng/mL. We found hypertension, nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in about 14, 20, 48, and 94 percent of patients. Conclusions: This study proposed that permanent guidance of healthcare team according to a fixed and standard method of cyclosporine administration routine with using efficient facilities and protocols would be helpful considerably for an optimal pharmacotherapy. PMID:27610174

  4. Treosulfan, cyclophosphamide and antithymocyte globulin for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in acquired severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Giebel, Sebastian; Wojnar, Jerzy; Krawczyk-Kulis, Malgorzata; Markiewicz, Miroslaw; Wylezoł, Iwona; Seweryn, Marek; Holowiecka-Goral, Aleksandra; Holowiecki, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    To reduce the risk of graft rejection after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) for patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia (SAA), we introduced an intensified preparative regimen consisting of treosulfan 10 g/m2/d on days -7, -6, cyclophosphamide 40 mg/kg/d on days -5, -4, -3, -2 and anti-thymocyte globulin 2 mg/kg/d on days -3, -2, -1. Six patients with the history of multiple transfusions were treated with alloHCT from either HLA-identical sibling (n=3) or an unrelated volunteer (n=3). Each, bone marrow and peripheral blood was used as a source of stem cells in three cases. All patients engrafted and achieved complete donor chimerism. None of the patients experienced severe organ toxicity. No severe acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) was observed; two patients experienced extensive chronic GVHD. At the median follow-up of 14.5 (13-27) months all patients remained alive and disease-free. Our observation indicates that treosulfan + cyclophosphamide + antithymocyte globulin conditioning is well-tolerated and allows stable engraftment in acquired SAA. PMID:17494286

  5. Atovaquone for Prophylaxis of Toxoplasmosis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mendorf, Alexander; Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Langebrake, Claudia; Rohde, Holger; Ayuk, Francis; Regier, Marc; Christopeit, Maximilian; Zabelina, Tatjana; Bacher, Adelbert; Stübig, Thomas; Wolschke, Christine; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis and infections by other opportunistic agents such as Pneumocystis jirovecii constitute life-threatening risks for patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been well established for post-transplant toxoplasmosis and pneumocystis prophylaxis, but treatment may be limited due to toxicity. We explored atovaquone as an alternative and compared it with TMP-SMX regarding toxicity and efficacy during the first 100 days after transplantation in 155 consecutive adult stem cell recipients. Eight patients with a prior history of TMP-SMX intolerance received atovaquone as first-line prophylaxis. TMP-SMX was used for 141 patients as first-line strategy, but 13 patients (9.2%) were later switched to atovaquone due to TMP-SMX toxicity or gastrointestinal symptoms. No active toxoplasmosis or active P. jirovecii infection developed under continued prophylaxis with either TMP-SMX or atovaquone. However, for reasons of TMP-SMX and/or atovaquone toxicity, 7 patients were unable to tolerate any efficacious toxoplasmosis prophylaxis and therefore obtained inhalative pentamidine as P. jirovecii prophylaxis but no toxoplasmosis prophylaxis. Importantly, 2 of these patients developed severe toxoplasmosis. In summary, atovaquone appears as a valid alternative for at least some post-transplant patients who cannot tolerate TMP-SMX. This should be further confirmed by multicenter trials.

  6. Ex Vivo Expanded Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells With Bone Marrow Transplantation Improved Osteogenesis in Infants With Severe Hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Takeshi; Oyama, Chigusa; Mihara, Aya; Tanabe, Yuka; Abe, Mariko; Hirade, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Bo, Ryosuke; Kanai, Rie; Tadenuma, Taku; Michibata, Yuko; Yamamoto, Soichiro; Hattori, Miho; Katsube, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Hiroe; Sasao, Mari; Oda, Yasuaki; Hattori, Koji; Yuba, Shunsuke; Ohgushi, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Patients with severe hypophosphatasia (HPP) develop osteogenic impairment with extremely low alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, resulting in a fatal course during infancy. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into various mesenchymal lineages, including bone and cartilage. The efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for congenital skeletal and storage disorders is limited, and therefore we focused on MSCs for the treatment of HPP. To determine the effect of MSCs on osteogenesis, we performed multiple infusions of ex vivo expanded allogeneic MSCs for two patients with severe HPP who had undergone bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from asymptomatic relatives harboring the heterozygous mutation. There were improvements in not only bone mineralization but also muscle mass, respiratory function, and mental development, resulting in the patients being alive at the age of 3. After the infusion of MSCs, chimerism analysis of the mesenchymal cell fraction isolated from bone marrow in the patients demonstrated that donor-derived DNA sequences existed. Adverse events of BMT were tolerated, whereas those of MSC infusion did not occur. However, restoration of ALP activity was limited, and normal bony architecture could not be achieved. Our data suggest that multiple MSC infusions, following BMT, were effective and brought about clinical benefits for patients with lethal HPP. Allogeneic MSC-based therapy would be useful for patients with other congenital bone diseases and tissue disorders if the curative strategy to restore clinically normal features, including bony architecture, can be established.

  7. Tissue-Related Hypoxia Attenuates Proinflammatory Effects of Allogeneic PBMCs on Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bobyleva, Polina I.; Andreeva, Elena R.; Gornostaeva, Aleksandra N.; Buravkova, Ludmila B.

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose tissue-stromal derived cells (ASCs) are considered a perspective tool for regenerative medicine. Depending on the application mode ASC/allogeneic immune cell interaction can occur in the systemic circulation under plenty high concentrations of O2 and in target tissues at lower O2 levels. Here we examined the effects of allogeneic PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) on ASCs under ambient (20%) oxygen and “physiological” hypoxia (5% O2). As revealed with microarray analysis ASCs under 20% O2 were more affected by activated PBMCs, which was manifested in differential expression of more than 300 genes, whereas under 5% O2 only 140 genes were changed. Altered gene pattern was only partly overlapped at different O2 conditions. Under O2 ASCs retained their proliferative and differentiative capacities, mesenchymal phenotype, and intracellular organelle' state. ASCs were proinflammatory activated on transcription level that was confirmed by their ability to suppress activation and proliferation of mitogen-stimulated PBMCs. ASC/PBMCs interaction resulted in anti-inflammatory shift of paracrine mediators in conditioning medium with significant increase of immunosuppressive LIF level. Our data indicated that under both ambient and tissue-related O2 ASCs possessed immunosuppressive potential and maintained functional activity. Under “physiological” hypoxia ASCs were less susceptible to “priming” by allogeneic mitogen-activated PBMCs. PMID:26880965

  8. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells license dendritic cells to potentiate memory TH2 cell responses.

    PubMed

    Halim, Timotheus Y F; Hwang, You Yi; Scanlon, Seth T; Zaghouani, Habib; Garbi, Natalio; Fallon, Padraic G; McKenzie, Andrew N J

    2016-01-01

    Rapid activation of memory CD4(+) T helper 2 (TH2) cells during allergic inflammation requires their recruitment into the affected tissue. Here we demonstrate that group 2 innate lymphoid (ILC2) cells have a crucial role in memory TH2 cell responses, with targeted depletion of ILC2 cells profoundly impairing TH2 cell localization to the lungs and skin of sensitized mice after allergen re-challenge. ILC2-derived interleukin 13 (IL-13) is critical for eliciting production of the TH2 cell-attracting chemokine CCL17 by IRF4(+)CD11b(+)CD103(-) dendritic cells (DCs). Consequently, the sentinel function of DCs is contingent on ILC2 cells for the generation of an efficient memory TH2 cell response. These results elucidate a key innate mechanism in the regulation of the immune memory response to allergens.

  9. Follicular dendritic cells and human immunodeficiency virus infectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Sonya L.; Tew, J. Grant; Tew, John G.; Szakal, Andras K.; Burton, Gregory F.

    1995-10-01

    LARGE amounts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) localize on follicular dendritic cells (FDC) in the follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues following viral infection1,2. During clinical latency, active viral infection occurs primarily at these sites3,4. As HIV on FDC is in the form of immune complexes5, some of which may be formed with neutralizing antibody, we investigated whether HIV on FDC is infectious. We report here that HIV on FDC is highly infectious. Furthermore, FDC can convert neutralized HIV into an infectious form even in the presence of a vast excess of neutralizing antibody. Thus FDC may provide a mechanism whereby HIV infection can continue in the presence of neutralizing antibody.

  10. Increased plasmacytoid dendritic cells in Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Zhong; Feng, Xun-Gang; Wang, Qian; Xing, Chun-Ye; Shi, Qi-Guang; Kong, Qing-Xia; Cheng, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Yong; Hao, Yan-Lei; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-06-15

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a post-infectious autoimmune disease. Dendritic cells (DCs) can recognize the pathogen and modulate the host immune response. Exploring the role of DCs in GBS will help our understanding of the disease development. In this study, we aimed to analyze plasmacytoid and conventional DCs in peripheral blood of patients with GBS at different stages of the disease: acute phase as well as early and late recovery phases. There was a significant increase of plasmacytoid DCs in the acute phase (p=0.03 vs healthy donors). There was a positive correlation between percentage of plasmacytoid DCs and the clinical severity of patients with GBS (r=0.61, p<0.001). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry confirmed the aberrant plasmacytoid DCs in GBS. Thus, plasmacytoid DCs may participate in the development of GBS.

  11. Designing vaccines based on biology of human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Mellman, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The effective vaccines developed against a variety of infectious agents, including polio, measles and Hepatitis B, represent major achievements in medicine. These vaccines, usually composed of microbial antigens, are often associated with an adjuvant that activates dendritic cells (DCs). Many infectious diseases are still in need of an effective vaccine including HIV, malaria, hepatitis C and tuberculosis. In some cases, the induction of cellular rather than humoral responses may be more important as the goal is to control and eliminate the existing infection rather than to prevent it. Our increased understanding of the mechanisms of antigen presentation, particularly with the description of DC subsets with distinct functions, as well as their plasticity in responding to extrinsic signals, represent opportunities to develop novel vaccines. In addition, we foresee that this increased knowledge will permit us to design vaccines that will reprogram the immune system to intervene therapeutically in cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:21029958

  12. Caspases regulate VAMP-8 expression and phagocytosis in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yong Hou Sunny; Cai, Deyu Tarika; Huang, Dachuan; Wang, Cheng Chun; Wong, Siew Heng

    2009-09-18

    During an inflammation and upon encountering pathogens, immature dendritic cells (DC) undergo a maturation process to become highly efficient in presenting antigens. This transition from immature to mature state is accompanied by various physiological, functional and morphological changes including reduction of caspase activity and inhibition of phagocytosis in the mature DC. Caspases are cysteine proteases which play essential roles in apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that VAMP-8, (a SNARE protein of the early/late endosomes) which has been shown previously to inhibit phagocytosis in DC, is a substrate of caspases. Furthermore, we identified two putative conserved caspase recognition/cleavage sites on the VAMP-8 protein. Consistent with the up-regulation of VAMP-8 expression upon treatment with caspase inhibitor (CI), immature DC treated with CI exhibits lower phagocytosis activity. Thus, our results highlight the role of caspases in regulating VAMP-8 expression and subsequently phagocytosis during maturation of DC.

  13. Intracellular Regulation of Cross-Presentation during Dendritic Cell Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Claudia S.; Grotzke, Jeff; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of different maturation stimuli on the ability of mature dendritic cells (DCs) to cross-present newly acquired particulate antigens. Cross-presentation was impaired in DCs matured by treatment with TNF-α, CpG and LPS, but was less affected upon CD40L-induced maturation. The difference could not be explained by decreased antigen uptake or translocation into the cytosol, but decreased cross-presentation ability did correlate with increased phagosomal/lysosomal acidification. Nevertheless, intra-phagosomal degradation of OVA was not increased in matured samples, suggesting that decreasing phagosomal pH may also regulate cross-presentation by a mechanism other than enhancing degradation. PMID:24098562

  14. Functional RNA delivery targeted to dendritic cells by synthetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Kenneth C; Bassi, Isabelle; Démoulins, Thomas; Thomann-Harwood, Lisa J; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential to many aspects of immune defense development and regulation. They provide important targets for prophylactic and therapeutic delivery. While protein delivery has had considerable success, RNA delivery is still expanding. Delivering RNA molecules for RNAi has shown particular success and there are reports on successful delivery of mRNA. Central, therein, is the application of cationic entities. Following endocytosis of the delivery vehicle for the RNA, cationic entities should promote vesicular membrane perturbation, facilitating cytosolic release. The present review explains the diversity of DC function in immune response development and control. Promotion of delivered RNA cytosolic release is discussed, relating to immunoprophylactic and therapeutic potential, and DC endocytic machinery is reviewed, showing how DC endocytic pathways influence the handling of internalized material. The potential advantages for application of replicating RNA are presented and discussed, in consideration of their value and development in the near future.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Induction of Tolerant and Tolerogenic Intestinal Dendritic Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steimle, Alex; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    How does the host manage to tolerate its own intestinal microbiota? A simple question leading to complicated answers. In order to maintain balanced immune responses in the intestine, the host immune system must tolerate commensal bacteria in the gut while it has to simultaneously keep the ability to fight pathogens and to clear infections. If this tender equilibrium is disturbed, severe chronic inflammatory reactions can result. Tolerogenic intestinal dendritic cells fulfil a crucial role in balancing immune responses and therefore creating homeostatic conditions and preventing from uncontrolled inflammation. Although several dendritic cell subsets have already been characterized to play a pivotal role in this process, less is known about definite molecular mechanisms of how intestinal dendritic cells are converted into tolerogenic ones. Here we review how gut commensal bacteria interact with intestinal dendritic cells and why this bacteria-host cell interaction is crucial for induction of dendritic cell tolerance in the intestine. Hereby, different commensal bacteria can have distinct effects on the phenotype of intestinal dendritic cells and these effects are mainly mediated by impacting toll-like receptor signalling in dendritic cells. PMID:26981546

  16. Dendritic cell vaccination in glioblastoma after fluorescence-guided resection

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Ricardo Diez; de Cerio, Ascension Lopez-Diaz; Inoges, Susana; Tejada, Sonia; Pastor, Fernando; Villanueva, Helena; Gallego, Jaime; Espinos, Jaime; Aristu, Javier; Idoate, Miguel Angel; Andreu, Enrique; Bendandi, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether the addition of a customized, active immunotherapy to standard of care including fluorescence-guided surgery, may provide hints of an improved survival for patients with poor-prognosis, incurable glioblastoma multiform. METHODS: Preliminary to our ongoing, phase-II clinical trial, we conducted a small pilot study enrolling five consecutive patients with resectable glioblastoma. In terms of Recursive Partitioning Analysis, four patients were class V and one was class IV. In all five cases, fluorescence-guided surgery was employed, followed by rapid steroid discontinuation. Patients were then treated with a combination of standard radio-chemotherapy with temozolomide and tumor lysate-pulsed, mature dendritic cell-based vaccinations. RESULTS: Though all five patients ultimately progressed, with any further treatment left to the sole decision of the treating oncologist, active immunotherapy was very well tolerated and induced specific immune responses in all three patients for whom enough material was available for such an assessment. Median progression-free survival was 16.1 mo. Even more important, median and mean overall survival were 27 mo and 26 mo, respectively. Three patients have died with an overall survival of 9 mo, 27 mo and 27.4 mo, while the other two are still alive at 32 mo and 36 mo, the former receiving treatment with bevacizumab, while the latter has now been off therapy for 12 mo. Four of five patients were alive at two years. CONCLUSION: Active immunotherapy with tumor lysate-pulsed, autologous dendritic cells is feasible, safe, well tolerated and biologically efficacious. A phase-II study is ongoing to possibly improve further on our very encouraging clinical results. PMID:23293753

  17. Patients' perception of health-related quality of life during the first year after autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Andersson, I; Ahlberg, K; Stockelberg, D; Persson, L-O

    2011-05-01

    Little attention has been paid to examine health-related quality of life (HRQoL) the first year post-transplant, despite that this period is crucial for returning to normal life and functioning and to prevent delayed psychosocial adjustment. The purpose of the present study was to describe HRQoL after autologous versus allogeneic stem cell transplantations during the first year post-transplant. The allogeneic group was further divided into two groups: allogeneic stem cell transplantation after reduced intensive conditioning and allogeneic stem cell transplantation after myeloablative conditioning. All together 202 patients were enrolled in the study. HRQoL was assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the treatment-specific module High-Dose Chemotherapy (HDC-19). The questionnaires were filled out at six occasions (from inclusion to 12 months after transplantation). The reduced intensive conditioning group seemed to recover in the same way as the autologous group and these two groups were closer in their scoring compared with the myeloablative conditioning group. One month after the transplantation there were no significant differences in change scores between the autologous and reduced intensive conditioning group, and 1 year after the transplantation levels of symptoms and functioning were back to baseline or better. The myeloablative conditioning group, who perceived more symptoms and lower levels of functioning during the whole period, was still impaired in 10 out of 29 scales 1 year after the transplantation and no significant improvements compared with baseline were observed for this group.

  18. Role of Dendritic Cells in the Pathogenesis of Whipple's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schinnerling, Katina; Geelhaar-Karsch, Anika; Allers, Kristina; Friebel, Julian; Conrad, Kristina; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Kühl, Anja A.; Erben, Ulrike; Ignatius, Ralf; Schneider, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of Tropheryma whipplei-stuffed macrophages in the duodenum, impaired T. whipplei-specific Th1 responses, and weak secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12) are hallmarks of classical Whipple's disease (CWD). This study addresses dendritic cell (DC) functionality during CWD. We documented composition, distribution, and functionality of DC ex vivo or after in vitro maturation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and by immunohistochemistry in situ. A decrease in peripheral DC of untreated CWD patients compared to healthy donors was due to reduced CD11chigh myeloid DC (M-DC). Decreased maturation markers CD83, CD86, and CCR7, as well as low IL-12 production in response to stimulation, disclosed an immature M-DC phenotype. In vitro-generated monocyte-derived DC from CWD patients showed normal maturation and T cell-stimulatory capacity under proinflammatory conditions but produced less IL-12 and failed to activate T. whipplei-specific Th1 cells. In duodenal and lymphoid tissues, T. whipplei was found within immature DC-SIGN+ DC. DC and proliferating lymphocytes were reduced in lymph nodes of CWD patients compared to levels in controls. Our results indicate that dysfunctional IL-12 production by DC provides suboptimal conditions for priming of T. whipplei-specific T cells during CWD and that immature DC carrying T. whipplei contribute to the dissemination of the bacterium. PMID:25385798

  19. Antihelminthic niclosamide modulates dendritic cells activation and function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Shan; Li, Yi-Rong; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chen, Ying-Che; Chu, Chiang-Liang; Pan, I-Hong; Wu, Yu-Shan; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) link the sensing of the environment by the innate immune system to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. Accordingly, DCs are considered to be a major target in the development of immunomodulating compounds. In this study, the effect of niclosamide, a Food and Drug Administration-approved antihelminthic drug, on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine bone marrow-derived DCs was examined. Our experimental results show that niclosamide reduced the pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression of LPS-activated DCs. In addition, niclosamide also affected the expression of MHC and costimulatory molecules and influenced the ability of the cells to take up antigens. Therefore, in mixed cell cultures composed of syngeneic OVA-specific T cells and DCs, niclosamide-treated DCs showed a decreased ability to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Furthermore, intravenous injection of niclosamide also attenuated contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice during sensitization with 2,4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene. Blocking the LPS-induced activation of MAPK-ERK, JNK and NF-κB may contribute to the inhibitory effect of niclosamide on DC activation. Collectively, our findings suggest that niclosamide can manipulate the function of DCs. These results provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of niclosamide and suggest that it may be useful for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders or DC-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:24561310

  20. Generation of Humanized Mice for Analysis of Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yasuyuki; Ellegast, Jana M; Manz, Markus G

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into severe immunocompromised newborn mice allows the development of a human hemato-lymphoid system (HHLS) including dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo. Therefore, it can be a powerful tool to study human DC subsets, residing in different lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. We have recently generated novel mouse strains called human cytokine knock-in mice in which human versions of several cytokines are knocked into Rag2(-/-)γC(-/-) strains. In addition, human SIRPα, which is a critical factor to prevent donor cell to be eliminated by host macrophages, is expressed as transgene. These mice efficiently support human myeloid cell development and, indeed, allow the analysis of three major subsets of human DC lineages, plasmacytoid DCs and CD1c(+) and CD141(+) classical DCs. Moreover, these strains also support cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood CD34(+) cell engraftment and subsequent DC development. Here we describe our standard methods to characterize DCs developed in human cytokine knock-in mice.

  1. Ginseng Berry Extract Promotes Maturation of Mouse Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Cho, Si-Young; Xiang, Gao; Min, Kyung-Jin; Yu, Qing; Jin, Jun-O

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng extract has been shown to possess certain anti-virus, anti-tumor and immune-activating effects. However, the immunostimulatory effect of ginseng berry extract (GB) has been less well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effect of GB on the activation of mouse dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and in vivo. GB treatment induced up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules in bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs). Interestingly, GB induced a higher degree of co-stimulatory molecule up-regulation than ginseng root extract (GR) at the same concentrations. Moreover, in vivo administration of GB promoted up-regulation of CD86, MHC class I and MHC class II and production of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α in spleen DCs. GB also promoted the generation of Th1 and Tc1 cells. Furthermore, Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88) signaling pathway were essential for DC activation induced by GB. In addition, GB strongly prompted the proliferation of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Finally, GB induced DC activation in tumor-bearing mice and the combination of OVA and GB treatment inhibited B16-OVA tumor cell growth in C57BL/6 mice. These results demonstrate that GB is a novel tumor therapeutic vaccine adjuvant by promoting DC and T cell activation. PMID:26090808

  2. Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells restore cardiac function in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy via trilineage differentiating capacity

    PubMed Central

    Quevedo, Henry C.; Hatzistergos, Konstantinos E.; Oskouei, Behzad N.; Feigenbaum, Gary S.; Rodriguez, Jose E.; Valdes, David; Pattany, Pradip M.; Zambrano, Juan P.; Hu, Qinghua; McNiece, Ian; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism(s) underlying cardiac reparative effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) remain highly controversial. Here we tested the hypothesis that MSCs regenerate chronically infarcted myocardium through mechanisms comprising long-term engraftment and trilineage differentiation. Twelve weeks after myocardial infarction, female swine received catheter-based transendocardial injections of either placebo (n = 4) or male allogeneic MSCs (200 million; n = 6). Animals underwent serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and in vivo cell fate was determined by co-localization of Y-chromosome (Ypos) cells with markers of cardiac, vascular muscle, and endothelial lineages. MSCs engrafted in infarct and border zones and differentiated into cardiomyocytes as ascertained by co-localization with GATA-4, Nkx2.5, and α-sarcomeric actin. In addition, Ypos MSCs exhibited vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell differentiation, contributing to large and small vessel formation. Infarct size was reduced from 19.3 ± 1.7% to 13.9 ± 2.0% (P < 0.001), and ejection fraction (EF) increased from 35.0 ± 1.7% to 41.3 ± 2.7% (P < 0.05) in MSC but not placebo pigs over 12 weeks. This was accompanied by increases in regional contractility and myocardial blood flow (MBF), particularly in the infarct border zone. Importantly, MSC engraftment correlated with functional recovery in contractility (R = 0.85, P < 0.05) and MBF (R = 0.76, P < 0.01). Together these findings demonstrate long-term MSC survival, engraftment, and trilineage differentiation following transplantation into chronically scarred myocardium. MSCs are an adult stem cell with the capacity for cardiomyogenesis and vasculogenesis which contribute, at least in part, to their ability to repair chronically scarred myocardium. PMID:19666564

  3. Risk-adjusted outcome measurement in pediatric allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Pötschger, Ulrike; Bergmann, Kirsten; Frommlet, Florian; Brannath, Werner; Bauer, Peter; Klingebiel, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to define a risk score for 1-year treatment-related mortality (TRM) in children undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation as a basis for risk-adjusted outcome assessment. We analyzed 1364 consecutive stem cell transplants performed in 24 German and Austrian centers between 1998 and 2003. Five well-established risk factors were tested by multivariate logistic regression for predictive power: patient age, disease status, donor other than matched sibling donor, T cell depletion (TCD), and preceding stem cell transplantation. The risk score was defined by rounding the parameter estimates of the significant risk factors to the nearest integer. Crossvalidation was performed on the basis of 5 randomly extracted equal-sized parts from the database. Additionally, the score was validated for different disease entities and for single centers. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant correlation of TRM with 3 risk factors: age >10 years, advanced disease, and alternative donor. The parameter estimates were 0.76 for age, 0.73 for disease status, and 0.97 for donor type. Rounding the estimates resulted in a score with 1 point for each risk factor. One-year TRM (overall survival [OS]) were 5% (89%) with a score of 0, 18% (74%) with 1, 28% (54%) with 2, and 53% (27%) with 3 points. Crossvalidation showed stable results with a good correlation between predicted and observed mortality but moderate discrimination. The score seems to be a simple instrument to estimate the expected mortality for each risk group and for each center. Measuring TRM risk-adjusted and the comparison between expected and observed mortality may be an additional tool for outcome assessment in pediatric stem cell transplantation. PMID:18275900

  4. Allogeneic Transplantation of Periodontal Ligament-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Sheets in Canine Critical-Size Supra-Alveolar Periodontal Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Tsumanuma, Yuka; Iwata, Takanori; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Washio, Kaoru; Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that induces the destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, followed by tooth loss. Although several approaches have been applied to periodontal regeneration, complete periodontal regeneration has not been accomplished. Tissue engineering using a combination of cells and scaffolds is considered to be a viable alternative strategy. We have shown that autologous transplantation of periodontal ligament-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (PDL-MSC) sheets regenerates periodontal tissue in canine models. However, the indications for autologous cell transplantation in clinical situations are limited. Therefore, this study evaluated the safety and efficacy of allogeneic transplantation of PDL-MSC sheets using a canine horizontal periodontal defect model. Canine PDL-MSCs were labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and were cultured on temperature-responsive dishes. Three-layered cell sheets were transplanted around denuded root surfaces either autologously or allogeneically. A mixture of β-tricalcium phosphate and collagen gel was placed on the bone defects. Eight weeks after transplantation, dogs were euthanized and subjected to microcomputed tomography and histological analyses. RNA and DNA were extracted from the paraffin sections to verify the presence of EGFP at the transplantation site. Inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Periodontal regeneration was observed in both the autologous and the allogeneic transplantation groups. The allogeneic transplantation group showed particularly significant regeneration of newly formed cementum, which is critical for the periodontal regeneration. Serum levels of inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera showed little difference between the autologous and allogeneic groups. EGFP amplicons were detectable in the paraffin sections of the allogeneic group. These results suggest that

  5. Allogeneic Transplantation of Periodontal Ligament-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Sheets in Canine Critical-Size Supra-Alveolar Periodontal Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Tsumanuma, Yuka; Iwata, Takanori; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Washio, Kaoru; Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that induces the destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, followed by tooth loss. Although several approaches have been applied to periodontal regeneration, complete periodontal regeneration has not been accomplished. Tissue engineering using a combination of cells and scaffolds is considered to be a viable alternative strategy. We have shown that autologous transplantation of periodontal ligament-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (PDL-MSC) sheets regenerates periodontal tissue in canine models. However, the indications for autologous cell transplantation in clinical situations are limited. Therefore, this study evaluated the safety and efficacy of allogeneic transplantation of PDL-MSC sheets using a canine horizontal periodontal defect model. Canine PDL-MSCs were labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and were cultured on temperature-responsive dishes. Three-layered cell sheets were transplanted around denuded root surfaces either autologously or allogeneically. A mixture of β-tricalcium phosphate and collagen gel was placed on the bone defects. Eight weeks after transplantation, dogs were euthanized and subjected to microcomputed tomography and histological analyses. RNA and DNA were extracted from the paraffin sections to verify the presence of EGFP at the transplantation site. Inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Periodontal regeneration was observed in both the autologous and the allogeneic transplantation groups. The allogeneic transplantation group showed particularly significant regeneration of newly formed cementum, which is critical for the periodontal regeneration. Serum levels of inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera showed little difference between the autologous and allogeneic groups. EGFP amplicons were detectable in the paraffin sections of the allogeneic group. These results suggest

  6. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part I.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J

    2016-05-01

    Although immunosuppressive treatments and target concentration intervention (TCI) have significantly contributed to the success of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), there is currently no consensus on the best immunosuppressive strategies. Compared with solid organ transplantation, alloHCT is unique because of the potential for bidirectional reactions (i.e. host-versus-graft and graft-versus-host). Postgraft immunosuppression typically includes a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and a short course of methotrexate after high-dose myeloablative conditioning, or a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil after reduced-intensity conditioning. There are evolving roles for the antithymyocyte globulins (ATGs) and sirolimus as postgraft immunosuppression. A review of the pharmacokinetics and TCI of the main postgraft immunosuppressants is presented in this two-part review. All immunosuppressants are characterized by large intra- and interindividual pharmacokinetic variability and by narrow therapeutic indices. It is essential to understand immunosuppressants' pharmacokinetic properties and how to use them for individualized treatment incorporating TCI to improve outcomes. TCI, which is mandatory for the calcineurin inhibitors and sirolimus, has become an integral part of postgraft immunosuppression. TCI is usually based on trough concentration monitoring, but other approaches include measurement of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) over the dosing interval or limited sampling schedules with maximum a posteriori Bayesian personalization approaches. Interpretation of pharmacodynamic results is hindered by the prevalence of studies enrolling only a small number of patients, variability in the allogeneic graft source and variability in postgraft immunosuppression. Given the curative potential of alloHCT, the pharmacodynamics of these immunosuppressants deserves to be explored in depth. Development of

  7. Post-allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) changes in inorganic salivary components.

    PubMed

    Boer, C C; Correa, M E P; Tenuta, L M A; Souza, C A; Vigorito, A C

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have considered the qualitative and quantitative assessment of salivary flow, as well the biochemical components of saliva, as possible biomarkers that might contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGHVD) in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively the inorganic salivary status at different periods of allogeneic HSCT. Saliva collection and oral examination were performed prior to the HSCT, ​between days 8 and 10, days 80 and 100, and at the cGVHD onset. Concentrations of calcium (Ca), phosphate (Pi), chloride (Cl), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), and sodium (Na) were performed using colorimetric reactions and atomic absorption. Fifty-five consecutive patients undergoing first allogeneic HSCT were included in this study. Between days 8 and 10, the salivary flow rate was significantly higher (p = 0.05), Pi concentration was decreased (p = 0.007), and Na and Cl were increased (p = 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively), compared with the baseline. Salivary flow rate during the same period showed a negative correlation with Pi concentration (p = 0.02) and a positive correlation with Na and Cl concentrations (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively). The salivary flow rate was decreased between days 80 and 100 (p = 0.02) and Na, Cl, and K concentrations were increased (p = 0.03, p = 0.02, and p = 0.003, respectively). Salivary flow rate showed a negative correlation with Na and Cl (p = 0.01 and p = 0.013, respectively). At cGVHD onset, the salivary flow rate showed no statistical difference compared with the other studied periods. A trend was observed in the higher Na concentration compared with the baseline (p = 0.06) and Pi concentration presented a significant decrease (p = 0.004). Ca and Mg concentrations showed no changes during all evaluation periods. The present study showed changes in inorganic

  8. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part I.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J

    2016-05-01

    Although immunosuppressive treatments and target concentration intervention (TCI) have significantly contributed to the success of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), there is currently no consensus on the best immunosuppressive strategies. Compared with solid organ transplantation, alloHCT is unique because of the potential for bidirectional reactions (i.e. host-versus-graft and graft-versus-host). Postgraft immunosuppression typically includes a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and a short course of methotrexate after high-dose myeloablative conditioning, or a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil after reduced-intensity conditioning. There are evolving roles for the antithymyocyte globulins (ATGs) and sirolimus as postgraft immunosuppression. A review of the pharmacokinetics and TCI of the main postgraft immunosuppressants is presented in this two-part review. All immunosuppressants are characterized by large intra- and interindividual pharmacokinetic variability and by narrow therapeutic indices. It is essential to understand immunosuppressants' pharmacokinetic properties and how to use them for individualized treatment incorporating TCI to improve outcomes. TCI, which is mandatory for the calcineurin inhibitors and sirolimus, has become an integral part of postgraft immunosuppression. TCI is usually based on trough concentration monitoring, but other approaches include measurement of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) over the dosing interval or limited sampling schedules with maximum a posteriori Bayesian personalization approaches. Interpretation of pharmacodynamic results is hindered by the prevalence of studies enrolling only a small number of patients, variability in the allogeneic graft source and variability in postgraft immunosuppression. Given the curative potential of alloHCT, the pharmacodynamics of these immunosuppressants deserves to be explored in depth. Development of

  9. Tumor-derived death receptor 6 modulates dendritic cell development.

    PubMed

    DeRosa, David C; Ryan, Paul J; Okragly, Angela; Witcher, Derrick R; Benschop, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    Studies in murine models of cancer as well as in cancer patients have demonstrated that the immune response to cancer is often compromised. This paradigm is viewed as one of the major mechanisms of tumor escape. Many therapies focus on employing the professional antigen presenting dendritic cells (DC) as a strategy to overcome immune inhibition in cancer patients. Death receptor 6 (DR6) is an orphan member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF21). It is overexpressed on many tumor cells and DR6(-/-) mice display altered immunity. We investigated whether DR6 plays a role in tumorigenesis by negatively affecting the generation of anti-tumor activity. We show that DR6 is uniquely cleaved from the cell surface of tumor cell lines by the membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14, which is often overexpressed on tumor cells and is associated with malignancy. We also demonstrate that >50% of monocytes differentiating into DC die when the extracellular domain of DR6 is present. In addition, DR6 affects the cell surface phenotype of the resulting immature DC and changes their cytokine production upon stimulation with LPS/IFN-gamma. The effects of DR6 are mostly amended when these immature DC are matured with IL-1beta/TNF-alpha, as measured by cell surface phenotype and their ability to present antigen. These results implicate MMP-14 and DR6 as a mechanism tumor cells can employ to actively escape detection by the immune system by affecting the generation of antigen presenting cells.

  10. Romidepsin used as monotherapy in sequence with allogeneic stem cell transplant in a patient with peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Finn, Nicholas; Larouche, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the field, a clear treatment algorithm for most peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) subtypes remains to be defined. Generating reliable randomized data for this type of pathology remains a challenge because of the relative rarity of the disease and the heterogeneity of subtypes. Newer agents, such as the class-I selective histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin, have demonstrated efficacy and manageable toxicity in the relapsed and refractory setting. Whether novel agents should be used in conjunction with more conventional cytotoxic therapies or in sequence with a transplant strategy is unknown at this time. Here we report the successful use of romidepsin monotherapy as a bridge to allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a patient who had previously relapsed after several lines of conventional cytotoxic therapy for PTCL. Romidepsin provided the patient with sufficient disease control to proceed to transplantation while remaining in complete remission.

  11. Weight Loss and Decrease of Body Mass Index during Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Are Common Events with Limited Clinical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Christina T.; Wischumerski, Isabel; Rust, Christian; Fiegl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Weight loss in cancer patients has been attributed with significant morbidity and mortality. During allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), oral nutrition is often hampered and hence total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is necessary. We therefore investigated the course of weight during stem cell transplantation and the clinical consequences of weight change. Methods 180 consecutive patients who received allogeneic SCT between January 2010 and December 2011 at our center were analyzed for weight loss, laboratory and clinical parameters. Results During SCT, a median decrease of 6.6% of body mass index (BMI) was observed for the whole population (from 25.3 at admission to 23.6 at discharge), and a 1.6fold increase of malnutrition despite use of TPN (28.3% to 45.0%). 55.6% of patients experienced a significant weight loss of ≥5% with a median decrease of 9.2% in BMI. Serum levels of albumin, total protein and cholesterol rapidly decreased during conditioning therapy. After a median of 2.4 years, the median BMI was still only 23.4 (not different from discharge). However, we did not observe a meaningful difference in side effects and survival between patients that did or did not lose weight. Conclusion Weight loss is commonly observed during allogeneic SCT despite TPN, but the clinical consequences thereof seem limited: we observed no significant impact on patients with a decrease ≥ 5% in BMI on transplant outcome, side effects or survival. PMID:26683031

  12. Relationship between RANTES and dendritic cells in ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wertel, Iwona; Tarkowski, Rafal; Bednarek, Wieslawa; Kotarski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate RANTES levels in the peritoneal fluid (PF) and plasma of patients with ovarian cancer (n=73), serous cystadenoma (n=32) or normal controls (n=9). RANTES levels were correlated to myeloid and lymphoid dendritic cells (DCs). RANTES levels were evaluated using the ELISA assay. DCs were quantified using flow cytometry. The PF and plasma RANTES concentrations were elevated in the ovarian cancer (OVC) patients when compared to the patients with benign tumor (the reference group). Plasma levels of RANTES were higher in OVC patients compared with the reference group and with the controls. There were no significant differences in the plasma RANTES levels based on tumor stage, grade or histology. Women with serous cystadenocarcinoma, clear cell carcinoma and endometrioid cystadenocarcinoma had significantly higher PF RANTES levels than patients with undifferentiated carcinoma. Women with clear cell carcinoma and patients with endometrioid cystadenocarcinoma had higher PF RANTES levels than women with mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. We concluded that RANTES production in the peritoneal cavities of OVC patients depends on the histological type of the tumor cells.

  13. CXCR4 engagement promotes dendritic cell survival and maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Kabashima, Kenji Sugita, Kazunari; Shiraishi, Noriko; Tamamura, Hirokazu; Fujii, Nobutaka; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2007-10-05

    It has been reported that human monocyte derived-dendritic cells (DCs) express CXCR4, responsible for chemotaxis to CXCL12. However, it remains unknown whether CXCR4 is involved in other functions of DCs. Initially, we found that CXCR4 was expressed on bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs). The addition of specific CXCR4 antagonist, 4-F-Benzoyl-TN14003, to the culture of mouse BMDCs decreased their number, especially the mature subset of them. The similar effect was found on the number of Langerhans cells (LCs) but not keratinocytes among epidermal cell suspensions. Since LCs are incapable of proliferating in vitro, these results indicate that CXCR4 engagement is important for not only maturation but also survival of DCs. Consistently, the dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced, antigen-specific in vitro proliferation of previously sensitized lymph node cells was enhanced by CXCL12, and suppressed by CXCR4 antagonist. These findings suggest that CXCL12-CXCR4 engagement enhances DC maturation and survival to initiate acquired immune response.

  14. Targeting dendritic cell function during systemic autoimmunity to restore tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan P; Vega, Fabián; Llanos, Carolina; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags), current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs) during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders. PMID:25229821

  15. Dendritic Cells as Pharmacological Tools for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Anguille, Sébastien; Smits, Evelien L; Bryant, Christian; Van Acker, Heleen H; Goossens, Herman; Lion, Eva; Fromm, Phillip D; Hart, Derek N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Berneman, Zwi N

    2015-10-01

    Although the earliest—rudimentary—attempts at exploiting the immune system for cancer therapy can be traced back to the late 18th Century, it was not until the past decade that cancer immunotherapeutics have truly entered mainstream clinical practice. Given their potential to stimulate both adaptive and innate antitumor immune responses, dendritic cells (DCs) have come under intense scrutiny in recent years as pharmacological tools for cancer immunotherapy. Conceptually, the clinical effectiveness of this form of active immunotherapy relies on the completion of three critical steps: 1) the DCs used as immunotherapeutic vehicles must properly activate the antitumor immune effector cells of the host, 2) these immune effector cells must be receptive to stimulation by the DCs and be competent to mediate their antitumor effects, which 3) requires overcoming the various immune-inhibitory mechanisms used by the tumor cells. In this review, following a brief overview of the pivotal milestones in the history of cancer immunotherapy, we will introduce the reader to the basic immunobiological and pharmacological principles of active cancer immunotherapy using DCs. We will then discuss how current research is trying to define the optimal parameters for each of the above steps to realize the full clinical potential of DC therapeutics. Given its high suitability for immune interventions, acute myeloid leukemia was chosen here to showcase the latest research trends driving the field of DC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Targeting Dendritic Cell Function during Systemic Autoimmunity to Restore Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan P.; Vega, Fabián; Llanos, Carolina; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags), current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs) during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders. PMID:25229821

  17. Targeting dendritic cell function during systemic autoimmunity to restore tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan P; Vega, Fabián; Llanos, Carolina; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-09-16

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic<