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Sample records for allogeneic hct recipients

  1. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  2. Financial burden in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khera, Nandita; Chang, Yu-hui; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Slack, James; Beebe, Timothy; Roy, Vivek; Noel, Pierre; Fauble, Veena; Sproat, Lisa; Tilburt, Jon; Leis, Jose F; Mikhael, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Although allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an expensive treatment for hematological disorders, little is known about the financial consequences for the patients who undergo this procedure. We analyzed factors associated with its financial burden and its impact on health behaviors of allogeneic HCT recipients. A questionnaire was retrospectively mailed to 482 patients who underwent allogeneic HCT from January 2006 to June 2012 at the Mayo Clinic, to collect information regarding current financial concerns, household income, employment, insurance, out-of-pocket expenses, and health and functional status. A multivariable logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with financial burden and treatment nonadherence. Of the 268 respondents (56% response rate), 73% reported that their sickness had hurt them financially. All patients for whom the insurance information was available (missing, n = 13) were insured. Forty-seven percent of respondents experienced financial burden, such as household income decreased by >50%, selling/mortgaging home, or withdrawing money from retirement accounts. Three percent declared bankruptcy. Younger age and poor current mental and physical functioning increased the likelihood of financial burden. Thirty-five percent of patients reported deleterious health behaviors because of financial constraints. These patients were likely to be younger, have lower education, and with a longer time since HCT. Being employed decreased the likelihood of experiencing financial burden and treatment nonadherence due to concern about costs. A significant proportion of allogeneic HCT survivors experience financial hardship despite insurance coverage. Future research should investigate potential interventions to help at-risk patients and prevent adverse financial outcomes after this life-saving procedure.

  3. Population Pharmacokinetics and Dose Optimization of Mycophenolic Acid in HCT Recipients Receiving Oral Mycophenolate Mofetil

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Mager, D E; Sandmaier, B M; Maloney, D G; Bemer, M J; McCune, J S

    2012-01-01

    We sought to create a population pharmacokinetic model for total mycophenolic acid (MPA), to study the effects of different covariates on MPA pharmacokinetics, to create a limited sampling schedule (LSS) to characterize MPA exposure (i.e., area under the curve or AUC) with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation, and to simulate an optimized dosing scheme for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. 4,496 MPA concentration-time points from 408 HCT recipients were analyzed retrospectively using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling approach. MPA pharmacokinetics was characterized with a two-compartment model with first-order elimination and a time-lagged first-order absorption process. Concomitant cyclosporine and serum albumin were significant covariates. The median MPA clearance and volume of the central compartment were 24.2 L/hr and 36.4 L, respectively, for a 70 kg patient receiving tacrolimus with a serum albumin of 3.4 g/dL. Dosing simulations indicated that higher oral MMF doses are needed with concomitant cyclosporine, which increases MPA clearance by 33.8%. The optimal LSS was immediately before and at 0.25, 1.25, 2, and 4hr after oral MMF administration. MPA AUC in an individual HCT recipient can be accurately estimated using a five-sample LSS and maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation. PMID:23382105

  4. Population pharmacokinetics and dose optimization of mycophenolic acid in HCT recipients receiving oral mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Mager, D E; Sandmaier, B M; Maloney, D G; Bemer, M J; McCune, J S

    2013-04-01

    We sought to create a population pharmacokinetic model for total mycophenolic acid (MPA), to study the effects of different covariates on MPA pharmacokinetics, to create a limited sampling schedule (LSS) to characterize MPA exposure (i.e., area under the curve or AUC) with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation, and to simulate an optimized dosing scheme for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. Four thousand four hundred ninety-six MPA concentration-time points from 408 HCT recipients were analyzed retrospectively using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling approach. MPA pharmacokinetics was characterized with a two-compartment model with first-order elimination and a time-lagged first-order absorption process. Concomitant cyclosporine and serum albumin were significant covariates. The median MPA clearance (CL) and volume of the central compartment were 24.2 L/hour and 36.4 L, respectively, for a 70 kg patient receiving tacrolimus with a serum albumin of 3.4 g/dL. Dosing simulations indicated that higher oral MMF doses are needed with concomitant cyclosporine, which increases MPA CL by 33.8%. The optimal LSS was immediately before and at 0.25 hours, 1.25 hours, 2 hours, and 4 hours after oral mycophenolate mofetil administration. MPA AUC in an individual HCT recipient can be accurately estimated using a five-sample LSS and maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation.

  5. Population pharmacokinetics and dose optimization of mycophenolic acid in HCT recipients receiving oral mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Mager, D E; Sandmaier, B M; Maloney, D G; Bemer, M J; McCune, J S

    2013-04-01

    We sought to create a population pharmacokinetic model for total mycophenolic acid (MPA), to study the effects of different covariates on MPA pharmacokinetics, to create a limited sampling schedule (LSS) to characterize MPA exposure (i.e., area under the curve or AUC) with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation, and to simulate an optimized dosing scheme for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. Four thousand four hundred ninety-six MPA concentration-time points from 408 HCT recipients were analyzed retrospectively using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling approach. MPA pharmacokinetics was characterized with a two-compartment model with first-order elimination and a time-lagged first-order absorption process. Concomitant cyclosporine and serum albumin were significant covariates. The median MPA clearance (CL) and volume of the central compartment were 24.2 L/hour and 36.4 L, respectively, for a 70 kg patient receiving tacrolimus with a serum albumin of 3.4 g/dL. Dosing simulations indicated that higher oral MMF doses are needed with concomitant cyclosporine, which increases MPA CL by 33.8%. The optimal LSS was immediately before and at 0.25 hours, 1.25 hours, 2 hours, and 4 hours after oral mycophenolate mofetil administration. MPA AUC in an individual HCT recipient can be accurately estimated using a five-sample LSS and maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation. PMID:23382105

  6. Association of fludarabine pharmacokinetic/dynamic biomarkers with donor chimerism in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Jeannine S.; Mager, Donald E.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Heimfeld, Shelly

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Fludarabine monophosphate (fludarabine) is an integral component of many reduced-intensity conditioning regimens for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Fludarabine’s metabolite, 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-2-fluoroadenine (F-ara-A), undergoes cellular uptake and activation to form the active cytotoxic metabolite fludarabine triphosphate (F-ara-ATP), which inhibits cellular DNA synthesis in CD4+ and CD8+ cells. In this study, we evaluated whether fludarabine-based pharmacologic biomarkers were associated with clinical outcomes in HCT recipients. Methods Participants with hematologic diseases were conditioned with fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic HCT and post-grafting immunosuppression. After fludarabine administration, we evaluated pharmacological biomarkers for fludarabine – F-ara-A area under the curve (AUC) and the ratio of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ cells (CD4+/CD8+ ratio) after fludarabine administration – in 102 patients; F-ara-ATP accumulation rate in enriched CD4+ and CD8+ cells was evaluated in 34 and 36 patients, respectively. Results Interpatient variability in the pharmacological biomarkers was high, ranging from 3.7-fold (F-ara-A AUC) to 39-fold (F-ara-ATP in CD8+ cells). Circulating CD8+ cells were more sensitive to fludarabine administration. A population pharmacokinetic-based sampling schedule successfully allowed for estimation of F-ara-A AUC in this outpatient population. There was poor correlation between the F-ara-AUC and the F-ara-ATP accumulation rate in CD4+ (R2=0.01) and CD8+ cells (R2=0.00). No associations were seen between the four biomarkers and clinical outcomes (day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), neutrophil nadirs, cytomegalovirus reactivation, chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality). Conclusions Considerable interpatient variability exists in pharmacokinetic and fludarabine-based biomarkers, but these biomarkers

  7. Identification and utilization of donor and recipient genetic variants to predict survival after HCT: are we ready for primetime?

    PubMed

    Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Clay, Alyssa; McCarthy, Philip L; Zhu, Qianqian; Preus, Leah; Pasquini, Marcelo; Onel, Kenan; Hahn, Theresa

    2015-03-01

    Overall survival following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has improved over the past two decades through better patient selection and advances in HLA typing, supportive care, and infection prophylaxis. Nonetheless, mortality rates are still unsatisfactory and transplant-related mortality remains a major cause of death after unrelated allogeneic HCT. Since there are no known pre-HCT, non-HLA biologic predictors of survival following transplant, for over a decade, scientists have been investigating the role of non-HLA germline genetic variation in survival and treatment-related mortality after HCT. Variation in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has the potential to impact chemotherapy, radiation, and immune responses, leading to different post-HCT survival outcomes. In this paper, we address the current knowledge of the contribution of genetic variation to survival following HCT and discuss study design and methodology for investigating HCT survival on a genomic scale.

  8. Identification and utilization of donor and recipient genetic variants to predict survival after HCT: are we ready for primetime?

    PubMed

    Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Clay, Alyssa; McCarthy, Philip L; Zhu, Qianqian; Preus, Leah; Pasquini, Marcelo; Onel, Kenan; Hahn, Theresa

    2015-03-01

    Overall survival following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has improved over the past two decades through better patient selection and advances in HLA typing, supportive care, and infection prophylaxis. Nonetheless, mortality rates are still unsatisfactory and transplant-related mortality remains a major cause of death after unrelated allogeneic HCT. Since there are no known pre-HCT, non-HLA biologic predictors of survival following transplant, for over a decade, scientists have been investigating the role of non-HLA germline genetic variation in survival and treatment-related mortality after HCT. Variation in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has the potential to impact chemotherapy, radiation, and immune responses, leading to different post-HCT survival outcomes. In this paper, we address the current knowledge of the contribution of genetic variation to survival following HCT and discuss study design and methodology for investigating HCT survival on a genomic scale. PMID:25700678

  9. Atorvastatin for the Prophylaxis of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing HLA-Matched Related Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (allo-HCT).

    PubMed

    Efebera, Yvonne A; Geyer, Susan; Andritsos, Leslie; Vasu, Sumithira; Jaglowski, Samantha; Bingman, Anissa; Blum, William; Klisovic, Rebecca; Hofmeister, Craig C; Benson, Don M; Penza, Sam; Elder, Patrick; Cortright, Katie; Kitzler, Rhonda; Coombes, Kevin; O'Donnell, Lynn; Daneault, Beth; Bradbury, Hillary; Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Xilin; Garman, Sabrina; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Yu, Xueyan; Hofstetter, Jessica; Yu, Jianhua; Garzon, Ramiro; Scrape, Scott R; Lozanski, Gerard; Devine, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Statins possess potent immunomodulatory effects that may play a role in preventing acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). We performed a phase II study of atorvastatin for aGVHD prophylaxis when given to allo-HCT recipients and their HLA-matched sibling donors. Atorvastatin (40 mg/day) was administered to sibling donors, beginning 14 days before the anticipated start of stem cell collection. Allo-HCT recipients (n = 40) received atorvastatin (40 mg/day) in addition to standard aGVHD prophylaxis. The primary endpoint was cumulative incidence of grades II to IV aGVHD at day 100. Atorvastatin was well tolerated, with no attributable grades III to IV toxicities in donors or their recipients. Day 100 and 180 cumulative incidences of grades II to IV aGVHD were 30% (95% confidence interval [CI], 17% to 45%) and 40% (95% CI, 25% to 55%), respectively. One-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 43% (95% CI, 32% to 69%). One-year nonrelapse mortality and relapse incidences were 5.5% (95% CI, .9% to 16.5%) and 38% (95% CI, 18% to 47%), respectively. One-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 54% (95% CI, 38% to 71%) and 82% (95% CI, 69% to 94%). One-year GVHD-free, relapse-free survival was 27% (95% CI, 16% to 47%). These results did not differ from our historical control subjects (n = 96). Although safe and tolerable, the addition of atorvastatin did not appear to provide any benefit to standard GVHD prophylaxis alone.

  10. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (IMPDH) ACTIVITY IN MMF-TREATED HCT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Boeckh, Michael J.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Risler, Linda J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) at five time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic/dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory Emax model with an IC50 = 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, non-relapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic/dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  11. Adefovir is effective to promote development of immunity to donor origin hepatitis B virus in an allogeneic transplant recipient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yaşar, D G; Suyanı, E; Özenirler, S; Sucak, G T

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis B infection is a serious health problem in endemic areas particularly among immunocompromised patients. The more profound immunosuppression in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HCT) can lead to more complicated hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related events. Despite the high risk of recipient infection allogeneic HCT donors with HBV infection are not excluded in the absence of an alternative donor. A 25 year-old man with severe aplastic anemia underwent allogeneic HCT from his HLA-identical sibling. The patient was hepatitis B naive and had normal liver function tests. However the donor had hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg) positivity, and collected stem cells were positive for HBV DNA (1 × 10(4) copies/mL). Lamivudine was initiated to treat the patient prior to transplantation. Forty days after the HCT, the patient displayed hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb), and hepatitis B e antibody (HBeAb), with HBV-DNA negativity. Cyclosporine was tapered and finally stopped at day + 256. On day +368, 112 days after the cessation of cyclosporine HBV reactivation was detected with an HBV-DNA level of 10 × 10(4) copies/mL despite lamivudine. After demonstration of the YMDD mutation, adefovir dipivoxil was combined with lamivudine. The HBV-DNA became negative; AST ALT levels decreased to normal levels after a month of combination therapy. In conclusion adefovir was effective to treat lamivudine-resistant HBV infection in an allogeneic HCT recipient. PMID:23498831

  12. Risk Factors and Impact of non-Aspergillus mold infections (NAMI) following Allogeneic HCT: A CIBMTR Infection & Immune Reconstitution analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riches, Marcie L.; Trifilio, Steven; Chen, Min; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Langston, Amelia; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Martino, Rodrigo; Maziarz, Richard T.; Papinicolou, Genofeva A.; Wingard, John R.; Young, Jo-Anne H.; Bennett, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Risk factors for non-Aspergillus mold infection (NAMI) and the impact on transplant outcome are poorly assessed in the current era of antifungal agents. Outcomes of 124 patients receiving allogeneic HCT diagnosed with either mucormycosis [n=72] or fusariosis [n=52] between days 0-365 after HCT are described and compared to a control cohort (n=11856). Patients with NAMI had more advanced disease [mucormycois 25%, fusariosis 23%, controls 18%; p = 0.004] and were more likely to have a KPS<90% at HCT [mucormycosis 42%, fusariosis 38%, controls 28%; p=0.048]. The 1-year survival after HCT was 22% (15–29%) for cases and was significantly inferior compared to controls [65%(64–65%); p < 0.001]. Survival from infection was similarly dismal regardless of mucormycosis [15% (8-25%)] and fusariosis [21% (11-33%)]. In multivariable analysis, NAMI was associated with a 6-fold higher risk of death (p<0.0001) regardless of the site or timing of infection. Risk factors for mucormycosis include preceding acute GVHD, prior aspergillus infection, and older age. For fusariosis, increased risks including receipt of cord blood, prior CMV infection, and transplant prior to May 2002. In conclusion, NAMI occurs infrequently, is associated with high mortality, and appears with similar frequency in the current antifungal era. PMID:26524262

  13. Systematic Nutritional Support in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Shigeo; Einsele, Hermann; Savani, Bipin N; Kapp, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become an established treatment modality for various hematological diseases. However, in allogeneic HSCT, patients often suffer from severe gastrointestinal complications caused by the conditioning regimen and acute/chronic graft-versus-host disease, which requires support by multidisciplinary nutritional support teams (NST). In addition, pretransplantation nutritional status can affect the clinical outcome after allogeneic HSCT. Therefore, it is important to refer the patient to a NST when becoming aware of nutritional problems before allogeneic HSCT. It is also important to follow nutritional status over the long term, as patients often suffer from various nutritional problems, such as malnutrition and metabolic syndrome, even late after allogeneic HSCT. In summary, NST can contribute to the improvement of nutritional status and possibly prognosis at every stage before and after allogeneic HSCT. Here, we aim to give a comprehensive overview of current understanding about nutritional support in allogeneic HSCT and try to provoke a constructive discussion to stimulate further investigation.

  14. Functional distance between recipient and donor HLA-DPB1 determines nonpermissive mismatches in unrelated HCT.

    PubMed

    Crivello, Pietro; Heinold, Andreas; Rebmann, Vera; Ottinger, Hellmut D; Horn, Peter A; Beelen, Dietrich W; Fleischhauer, Katharina

    2016-07-01

    The role of HLA amino acid (AA) polymorphism for the outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is controversial, in particular for HLA class II. Here, we investigated this question in nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 T-cell epitope (TCE) mismatches reflected by numerical functional distance (FD) scores, assignable to all HLA-DPB1 alleles based on the combined impact of 12 polymorphic AAs. We calculated the difference in FD scores (ΔFD) of mismatched HLA-DPB1 alleles in patients and their 10/10 HLA-matched unrelated donors of 379 HCTs performed at our center for acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Receiver-operator curve-based stratification into 2 ΔFD subgroups showed a significantly higher percentage of nonpermissive TCE mismatches for ΔFD >2.665, compared with ΔFD ≤2.665 (88% vs 25%, P < .0001). In multivariate analysis, ΔFD >2.665 was significantly associated with overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.87; P < .021) and event-free survival (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.05-1.82; P < .021), compared with ΔFD ≤2.665. These associations were stronger than those observed for TCE mismatches. There was a marked but not statistically significant increase in the hazards of relapse and nonrelapse mortality in the high ΔFD subgroup, whereas no differences were observed for acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. Seven nonconservative AA substitutions in peptide-binding positions had a significantly stronger impact on ΔFD compared with 5 others (P = .0025), demonstrating qualitative differences in the relative impact of AA polymorphism in HLA-DPB1. The novel concept of ΔFD sheds new light onto nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatches in unrelated HCT. PMID:27162243

  15. Hematopoietic stem cells from NOD mice exhibit autonomous behavior and a competitive advantage in allogeneic recipients.

    PubMed

    Chilton, Paula M; Rezzoug, Francine; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Fugier-Vivier, Isabelle; Ratajczak, Janina; Kucia, Magda; Huang, Yiming; Tanner, Michael K; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2005-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be cured by transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from disease-resistant donors. Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice have a number of features that distinguish them as bone marrow transplant recipients that must be understood prior to the clinical application of chimerism to induce tolerance. In the present studies, we characterized NOD HSCs, comparing their engraftment characteristics to HSCs from disease-resistant strains. Strikingly, NOD HSCs are significantly enhanced in engraftment potential compared with HSCs from disease-resistant donors. Unlike HSCs from disease-resistant strains, they do not require graft-facilitating cells to engraft in allogeneic recipients. Additionally, they exhibit a competitive advantage when coadministered with increasing numbers of syngeneic HSCs, produce significantly more spleen colony-forming units (CFU-Ss) in vivo in allogeneic recipients, and more granulocyte macrophage-colony-forming units (CFU-GMs) in vitro compared with HSCs from disease-resistant controls. NOD HSCs also exhibit significantly enhanced chemotaxis to a stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) gradient and adhere significantly better on primary stroma. This enhanced engraftment potential maps to the insulin-dependent diabetes locus 9 (Idd9) locus, and as such the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family as well as ski/sno genes may be involved in the mechanism underlying the autonomy of NOD HSCs. These findings may have important implications to understand the evolution of autoimmune disease and impact on potential strategies for cure. PMID:15522953

  16. Disseminated toxoplasmosis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a seronegative recipient.

    PubMed

    Osthoff, M; Chew, E; Bajel, A; Kelsey, G; Panek-Hudson, Y; Mason, K; Szer, J; Ritchie, D; Slavin, M

    2013-02-01

    Toxoplasmosis is increasingly diagnosed after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. In the majority of cases, reactivation of latent disease secondary to impaired cellular and humoral immunity after HSCT is believed to be the main pathogenetic mechanism. Hence, primary toxoplasmosis is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of infections after HSCT in a recipient who is seronegative for Toxoplasma gondii pre-transplant. We herein report a seronegative patient with acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed primary disseminated toxoplasmosis 5 months after HSCT from a seronegative unrelated donor. A review of all reported cases of primary toxoplasmosis after HSCT revealed significantly increased morbidity and mortality. Patients with negative pre-transplant Toxoplasma serology should therefore be considered at risk for toxoplasmosis after allogeneic HSCT. Possible prevention and monitoring strategies for seronegative recipients are reviewed and discussed in detail.

  17. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage: retrospective review of clinical outcome in allogeneic transplant recipients treated with aminocaproic acid.

    PubMed

    Wanko, Sam O; Broadwater, Gloria; Folz, Rodney J; Chao, Nelson J

    2006-09-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is often fatal. Standard therapy with high-dose corticosteroid is not always effective. There is paucity of data in the literature about other potentially useful agents, such as aminocaproic acid (Amicar) in the post-transplantation setting. We retrospectively reviewed our data on 115 consecutive patients who underwent HSCT and had pulmonary complications, with the aim of determining the overall clinical outcome in recipients of allogeneic transplants and in the subgroup of these patients who were treated with concomitant Solu-Medrol and aminocaproic acid. Aminocaproic acid was added at the discretion of the attending physician. We identified 14 allogeneic transplant recipients (median age, 41 years) with 15 episodes of DAH who were treated with Solu-Medrol (250 mg to 1 g intravenously per day). Of these, 8 patients also received concomitant aminocaproic acid at 1000 mg intravenously every 6 hours. Failure to improve was the most common reason for adding aminocaproic acid. The incidence of DAH was 12.2% (10.3% in myeloablative versus 1.9% in nonmyeloablative recipients). The overall 100-day DAH mortality and median transplantation survival were 60% and 99 days, respectively. Among the subset of patients treated with the combination of Solu-Medrol and aminocaproic acid, we observed a 100-day DAH mortality and median transplantation survival of 44% and 167 days, respectively, compared with 83% and 96.5 days in those treated with Solu-Medrol alone. The median time to DAH was 40.5 days, and the median time to death was 53 days in the combined treatment group compared with 29.5 days in those treated with steroid alone. There were no significant differences in coagulation parameters between subsets. Infections (yeast, respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and parainfluenza) were isolated and treated from 6 diagnostic bronchial alveolar lavage samples and were

  18. Immune transfer studies in canine allogeneic marrow graft donor-recipient pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse-Wilde, H.; Krumbacher, K.; Schuening, F.D.; Doxiadis, I.; Mahmoud, H.K.; Emde, C.; Schmidt-Weinmar, A.; Schaefer, U.W.

    1986-07-01

    Transfer of immunity occurring with bone marrow grafting was studied using the dog as a preclinical model. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed between DLA-identical beagle litter-mates. The donors were immunized with tetanus toxoid (TT) or sheep red blood cells (SRBC), and their humoral response was monitored by hemagglutination. The recipients of bone marrow from TT-immunized donors showed a marked increase of antibody titer one week posttransplantation, while in the recipients of marrow from SRBC immunized donors the antibody titers were considerably lower. Within the following 60 days the antibody titers in both groups diminished gradually to pregrafting levels. Control experiments in which cell-free plasma from donors immunized with TT and SRBC respectively was transfused indicated that the initial rise of specific antibody titers after marrow grafting is likely to be due to a passive transfer of humoral immunity. A single challenge of these marrow graft recipients with the respective antigen 15-18 weeks posttransplantation led to a secondary type of humoral immune response. It could be demonstrated that transfer of memory against TT or SRBC was independent from the actual antibody titer and the time of vaccination of the donor. One dog was immunized with TT after serving as marrow donor. When the donor had shown an antibody response, a peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) transfusion was given to his chimera. Subsequent challenge of the latter resulted in a secondary type of specific antibody response. This indicates that specific cellular-bound immunological memory can be transferred after BMT from the donor to his allogeneic bone marrow chimera by transfusion of peripheral blood leukocytes. The data may be of importance in clinical BMT to protect patients during the phase of reduced immune reactivity by transfer of memory cells.

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of viral diseases in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viral infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic stem cell hematopoietic transplantation (allo-HSCT). Although most viral infections present with asymptomatic or subclinical manifestations, viruses may result in fatal complications in severe immunocompromised recipients. Reactivation of latent viruses, such as herpesviruses, is frequent during the immunosuppression that occurs with allo-HSCT. Viruses acquired from community, such as the respiratory and gastrointestinal viruses, are also important pathogens of post-transplant viral diseases. Currently, molecular diagnostic methods have replaced or supplemented traditional methods, such as viral culture and antigen detection, in diagnosis of viral infections. The utilization of polymerase chain reaction facilitates the early diagnosis. In view of lacking efficacious agents for treatment of viral diseases, prevention of viral infections is extremely valuable. Application of prophylactic strategies including preemptive therapy reduces viral infections and diseases. Adoptive cellular therapy for restoring virus-specific immunity is a promising method in the treatment of viral diseases. PMID:24341630

  20. Risk factors for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mani, S; Rybicki, L; Jagadeesh, D; Mossad, S B

    2016-05-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections in recent times. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) confers increased risk for CDI because of prolonged hospital stay, immunosuppression, the need to use broad-spectrum antibiotics and a complex interplay of preparative regimen and GvHD-induced gut mucosal damage. Our study evaluated risk factors (RF) for recurrent CDI in HSCT recipients given the ubiquity of traditional RF for CDI in this population. Of the 499 allogeneic HSCT recipients transplanted between 2005 and 2012, 61 (12%) developed CDI within 6 months before transplant or 2 years after transplant and were included in the analysis. Recurrent CDI occurred in 20 (33%) patients. One year incidence of CDI recurrence was 31%. Multivariable analyses identified the number of antecedent antibiotics other than those used to treat CDI as the only significant RF for recurrence (hazard ratio 1.96, 95% confidence interval 1.09-3.52, P=0.025). Most recurrences occurred within 6 months of the first CDI, and the recurrence of CDI was associated with a trend for increased risk of mortality. This prompts the need for further investigation into secondary prophylaxis to prevent recurrent CDI. PMID:26726944

  1. Use of leflunomide in an allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipient with refractory cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Avery, R K; Bolwell, B J; Yen-Lieberman, B; Lurain, N; Waldman, W J; Longworth, D L; Taege, A J; Mossad, S B; Kohn, D; Long, J R; Curtis, J; Kalaycio, M; Pohlman, B; Williams, J W

    2004-12-01

    Ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is an emerging problem in transplant recipients. Foscarnet resistance and cidofovir resistance have also been described, but no previous reports have suggested treatment regimens for patients with CMV refractory to all three of these drugs. Leflunomide, an immunosuppressive drug used in rheumatoid arthritis and in rejection in solid-organ transplantation, has been reported to have novel anti-CMV activity. However, its clinical utility in CMV treatment has not been described previously. We report an allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipient who developed CMV infection refractory to sequential therapy with ganciclovir, foscarnet, and cidofovir. The patient was ultimately treated with a combination of leflunomide and foscarnet. Both phenotypic and genotypic virologic analysis was performed on sequential CMV isolates. The patient's high CMV-DNA viral load became undetectable on leflunomide and foscarnet, but the patient, who had severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) of the liver, expired with progressive liver failure and other complications. We concluded that leflunomide is a new immunosuppressive agent with anti-CMV activity, which may be useful in the treatment of multiresistant CMV. However, the toxicity profile of leflunomide in patients with underlying GVHD remains to be defined. PMID:15489872

  2. Attenuation of Hepatic Graft-versus-host Disease in Allogeneic Recipients of MyD88-deficient Donor Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Young; Lee, Young-Kwan; Lee, Sung-Eun; Ju, Ji-Min; Park, Gyeongsin; Choi, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is characterized by selective damage to the liver, the skin, and the gastrointestinal tract. Following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, donor bone marrow (BM) cells repopulate the immune system of the recipient. We previously demonstrated that the acute intestinal GVHD (iGVHD) mortality rate was higher in MyD88-deficient BM recipients than that in the control BM recipients. In the present study, the role of MyD88 (expressed by donor BM) in the pathophysiology of hepatic GVHD (hGVHD) was examined. Unlike iGVHD, transplantation with MyD88-deficient T-cell depleted (TCD) BM attenuated hGVHD severity and was associated with low infiltration of T cells into the liver of the recipients. Moreover, GVHD hosts, transplanted with MyD88-deficient TCD BM, exhibited markedly reduced expansion of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in the liver. Adoptive injection of the MDSC from wild type mice, but not MyD88-deficient mice, enhanced hepatic T cell infiltration in the MyD88-deficient TCD BM recipients. Pre-treatment of BM donors with LPS increased MDSC levels in the liver of allogeneic wild type BM recipients. In conclusion, hGVHD and iGVHD may occur through various mechanisms based on the presence of MyD88 in the non-T cell compartment of the allograft. PMID:26140044

  3. Chimerism in DNA of buccal swabs from recipients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations: implications for forensic DNA testing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Burkhard; Parson, Roswitha; Clausen, Johannes; Berger, Cordula; Nachbaur, David; Parson, Walther

    2013-01-01

    We attempted to quantitatively determine the chimeric state in a total of 162 buccal swabs from 77 adult recipients aged 19-74 (median 50 years) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation by estimating the chimeric recipient/donor DNA ratios through analysis of 15 autosomal short tandem repeat markers. From each individual between one and nine, buccal swabs were taken at known time intervals after transplantation, ranging from 17 to 3,361 days (median 394 days). In buccal cells, the determined recipient/donor DNA ratios turned out to be highly variable between individuals and also within an individual. Relative donor chimerism levels (%Ch) between 0 and 100 % were detected with maximal frequencies between 10 and 30 %. Blood was always found to show the donor's genotype while hair samples in all cases gave the recipient's genotype. We examine chimerism levels with respect to age, gender, and posttransplantation period and discuss the results in the context of forensic identity testing.

  4. A 16 Month Survey of Cyclosporine Utilization Evaluation in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli Ardakani, Maria; Tafazoli, Ali; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid; Hajifathali, Abbas; Dadashzadeh, Simin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a life threatening reaction in the stem cell transplantation process. Nowadays Cyclosporine is the most commonly utilized agent for GVHD prophylaxis and it has a major role in successful transplantation. Cyclosporine has been applied for many years in this field but it could be stated that currently no general consensus is available for its optimal method of administration. Conditions related to cyclosporine administration and possible related adverse reactions observed closely in our patients with the aim of constructing a comprehensive practice guideline in the future. Patients and Methods: Allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients who have been taking cyclosporine were monitored during and after their hospitalization while recording all observations on predefined questionnaires on the basis of periodic clinical and laboratory examinations for a 16 month period. Results: Mean recorded duration of infusions was 1.44 ± 0.68 h and by twice daily administration, means intravenous and oral dose was 101.85 ± 22.03 mg and 219.28 ± 63.9 mg, respectively. A mean CsA trough level after about 12 h of specified unique doses was 223 ± 65 ng/mL. We found hypertension, nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in about 14, 20, 48, and 94 percent of patients. Conclusions: This study proposed that permanent guidance of healthcare team according to a fixed and standard method of cyclosporine administration routine with using efficient facilities and protocols would be helpful considerably for an optimal pharmacotherapy.

  5. A 16 Month Survey of Cyclosporine Utilization Evaluation in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli Ardakani, Maria; Tafazoli, Ali; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid; Hajifathali, Abbas; Dadashzadeh, Simin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a life threatening reaction in the stem cell transplantation process. Nowadays Cyclosporine is the most commonly utilized agent for GVHD prophylaxis and it has a major role in successful transplantation. Cyclosporine has been applied for many years in this field but it could be stated that currently no general consensus is available for its optimal method of administration. Conditions related to cyclosporine administration and possible related adverse reactions observed closely in our patients with the aim of constructing a comprehensive practice guideline in the future. Patients and Methods: Allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients who have been taking cyclosporine were monitored during and after their hospitalization while recording all observations on predefined questionnaires on the basis of periodic clinical and laboratory examinations for a 16 month period. Results: Mean recorded duration of infusions was 1.44 ± 0.68 h and by twice daily administration, means intravenous and oral dose was 101.85 ± 22.03 mg and 219.28 ± 63.9 mg, respectively. A mean CsA trough level after about 12 h of specified unique doses was 223 ± 65 ng/mL. We found hypertension, nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in about 14, 20, 48, and 94 percent of patients. Conclusions: This study proposed that permanent guidance of healthcare team according to a fixed and standard method of cyclosporine administration routine with using efficient facilities and protocols would be helpful considerably for an optimal pharmacotherapy. PMID:27610174

  6. Safety of Live Attenuated High-Titer Varicella-Zoster Virus Vaccine in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takahiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Kawano, Yutaka; Mori, Makiko; Arakawa, Yuki; Kato, Motohiro; Hanada, Ryoji

    2016-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients have a high risk of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections. Although VZV vaccination may be beneficial in preventing VZV infections, data on safety and efficacy of VZV vaccines in HSCT recipients, particularly of zoster vaccine, are limited. We report our experience with the use of a single dose of an Oka strain high-titer zoster-equivalent varicella vaccine in pediatric allogeneic HSCT recipients. We administered the high-titer VZV vaccine to 31 pediatric allogeneic HSCT recipients without vaccine-type VZV infections. One patient developed varicella due to wild-type VZV 13 days after vaccination. No zoster developed after vaccination during a median follow-up period of 4.8 years from vaccination. No other adverse effects were observed. Eighteen of the 31 patients (58.1%) were seropositive after vaccination. Seventeen patients were vaccinated within 24 months after HSCT; the seropositivity of these patients did not significantly differ from that of patients vaccinated > 24 months after HSCT. VZV vaccination may be a safe and beneficial approach in preventing VZV infections after HSCT.

  7. Donor and recipient sex in allogeneic stem cell transplantation: what really matters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haesook T.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Woolfrey, Ann E.; St. Martin, Andrew; Chen, Junfang; Saber, Wael; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Armand, Philippe; Eapen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether and how recipient-donor sex affects transplantation outcomes of 11,797 patients transplanted between 2008 and 2010. Thirty-seven percent were male recipients with male donors, 21% male recipients with female donors, 25% female recipients with male donors, and 17% female recipients with female donors. In multivariable analyses, male recipients had inferior overall survival and progression-free survival compared to females regardless of donor sex, with an 11% relative increase in the hazard of death (P<0.0001) and a 10% relative increase in the hazard of death or relapse (P<0.0001). The detrimental effect of male recipients varied by donor sex. For male recipients with male donors, there was a 12% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of relapse compared with female recipients with male donors (P=0.0036) and male recipients with female donors (P=0.0037). For male recipients with female donors, there was a 19% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of non-relapse mortality compared with male recipients with male donors (P<0.0001) and a 22% relative increase compared with female recipients with male donors (P=0.0003). In addition, male recipients with female donors showed a 21% relative increase in the subdistribution hazard of chronic graft-versus-host disease (P<0.0001) compared with female recipients with male donors. Donor sex had no effect on outcomes for female recipients. Transplantation of grafts from male and female donors was associated with inferior overall survival and progression-free survival in male recipients with differing patterns of failure. Recipient sex is an important prognostic factor independent of donor sex. PMID:27354023

  8. Recipient leukocyte infusion enhances the local and systemic graft-versus-neuroblastoma effect of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Willems, Leen; Fevery, Sabien; Sprangers, Ben; Rutgeerts, Omer; Lenaerts, Caroline; Ibrahimi, Abdelilah; Gijsbers, Rik; Van Gool, Stefaan; Waer, Mark; Billiau, An D

    2013-11-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and donor leukocyte infusion (DLI) may hold potential as a novel form of immunotherapy for high-risk neuroblastoma. DLI, however, carries the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Recipient leukocyte infusion (RLI) induces graft-versus-leukemia responses without GvHD in mice and is currently being explored clinically. Here, we demonstrate that both DLI and RLI, when given to mixed C57BL/6→A/J radiation chimeras carrying subcutaneous Neuro2A neuroblastoma implants, can slow the local growth of such tumors. DLI provoked full donor chimerism and GvHD; RLI produced graft rejection but left mice healthy. Flow cytometric studies showed that the chimerism of intratumoral leukocytes paralleled the systemic chimerism. This was associated with increased CD8/CD4 ratios, CD8+ T-cell IFN-γ expression and NK-cell Granzyme B expression within the tumor, following both DLI and RLI. The clinically safe anti-tumor effect of RLI was further enhanced by adoptively transferred naïve recipient-type NK cells. In models of intravenous Neuro2A tumor challenge, allogeneic chimeras showed superior overall survival over syngeneic chimeras. Bioluminescence imaging in allogeneic chimeras challenged with luciferase-transduced Neuro2A cells showed both DLI and RLI to prolong metastasis-free survival. This is the first experimental evidence that RLI can safely produce a local and systemic anti-tumor effect against a solid tumor. Our data indicate that RLI may provide combined T-cell and NK-cell reactivity effectively targeting Neuro2A neuroblastoma.

  9. Reduction and repopulation of recipient T4+ and T8+ T-lymphocytes in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Gratama, J.W.; van den Bergh, R.L.; Naipal, A.; D'Amaro, J.; Zwaan, F.E.; Jansen, J.; de Gast, G.C.

    1986-02-01

    In eight recipients of allogeneic bone marrow grafts who had sex-mismatched donors, the reduction and subsequent repopulation of T4+ and T8+ T-lymphocytes of recipient origin were studied. The origin of the donor-recipient T4+ and T8+ T cells was studied using quinacrine staining of Y chromatin combined with T-cell typing for T4 and T8. Following chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation (BMT), T cells reached their nadir at a median of five (range 1-8) days after BMT. T8+ T cells decreased at a faster rate from the peripheral blood than T4+ T cells. The first T cells that appeared in the circulation at day 12 were predominantly T4+, and a large number of them were of recipient origin. Thereafter, they gradually decreased, and the numbers of T cells of donor origin increased. In the patients who had no or only minor complications, T4+ and T8+ T cells of donor origin repopulated the blood at similar rates. This pattern, however, was modified by severe graft-versus-host disease or by cytomegalovirus infection.

  10. Toward minimal conditioning protocols for allogeneic chimerism in tolerance resistant recipients.

    PubMed

    Al-Adra, David P; Anderson, Colin C

    2013-01-01

    Mixed chimerism is a promising approach toward generating donor-specific immunological tolerance. However, chimerism induction can be toxic; therefore, there is an effort to develop non-myeloablative, minimal intensity protocols that can generate chimerism without the toxic side effects. Recently, with the goal of creating a minimalistic chimerism induction protocol in the tolerance resistant non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model, we identified pre-existing T cells as cells that resist fully allogeneic chimerism. With monoclonals targeting NOD T cells, we showed that long-term chimerism and tolerance toward donor islets could be established. However, this promising new protocol relied on the administration of a single dose of anti-CD40 ligand, which is not clinically applicable. In refining protocols to move even closer to clinical utility, we report here initial success at generating fully allogeneic mixed chimerism in NOD mice by adding cyclophosphamide to the conditioning regimen in place of anti-CD40 ligand antibodies.

  11. Fungemia Caused by Zygoascus hellenicus in an Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Mary E.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Pappas, Peter G.; Iqbal, Naureen; Arthington-Skaggs, Beth A.; Lee-Yang, Wendy; Smith, Maudy T.

    2004-01-01

    Zygoascus hellenicus (Candida hellenica) was isolated from a blood culture from a patient who had received an allogeneic stem cell transplant. The isolate displayed an antifungal susceptibility pattern of decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and itraconazole, high susceptibility to voriconazole, and low susceptibility to caspofungin. The organism was misidentified by a commercial yeast identification system. This is the first reported case of human infection with this rare ascomycetous yeast. PMID:15243118

  12. Tuberculin skin test positivity in pediatric allogeneic BMT recipients and donors in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tavil, Betul; Gulhan, Bora; Ozcelik, Ugur; Cetin, Mualla; Tezcan, Ilhan; Tuncer, Murat; Uckan, Duygu

    2007-06-01

    The preliminary study was performed to determine the frequency of tuberculin skin test (TST) positivity among 26 patients and their donors screened by TST to investigate whether tuberculin positivity of a recipient or donor influenced the rate of tuberculosis disease, transplant-related events, and to evaluate the effectiveness of isoniazide (INAH) prophylaxis administered to those with positive TST. The frequency of TST positivity was 23% (n = 6) among recipients and also 23% (n = 6) among donors. Two recipients and five donors with positive TST received INAH prophylaxis for six months. Our use of INAH prophylaxis in transplant patients was very conservative because of the risk of drug interaction. The transplantation procedure was not postponed for either recipient or donor TST positivity. Despite the high frequency of tuberculosis in our country, we have not detected any case of tuberculosis in our center, either among the purified protein derivative-screened (n = 26) or non-screened (n = 128) patients except for disseminated tuberculosis infection because of BCG vaccination in two patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. In conclusion, TST positivity in either recipient or donor may not be a contraindication for bone marrow transplantation and the procedure may not be postponed. Pretransplantation TST screening may be needed in countries where tuberculosis is common in the general population.

  13. Financial Impact of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation on Patients and Families over 2-years: Results from a Multicenter Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Denzen, Ellen M.; Thao, Viengneesee; Hahn, Theresa; Lee, Stephanie J.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Ammi, Monique; Drexler, Rebecca; Flesch, Susan; James, Heather; Omondi, Nancy; Murphy, Elizabeth; Pederson, Kate; Majhail, Navneet S.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a procedure that can significantly influence the socioeconomic wellbeing of patients, caregivers and their families. Among 30 allogeneic HCT recipients and their caregivers enrolled on a pilot study evaluating the feasibility of studying financial impact of HCT, 16 agreed to participate in the long-term phase, completed a baseline questionnaire and received phone interviews at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months post-HCT. Analyses showed that by 2-years post-HCT, 54% of patients who previously contributed to household earnings had not returned to work and 80% of patients/caregivers reported transplant as having moderate to great impact on household income. However, patients’ level of confidence in their ability to meet household financial obligations increased from baseline to 2-years. A relatively large proportion of patients reported inability to pay for medical care through this time period. Case studies demonstrated patient individual perception of financial impact of HCT varies considerably, regardless of actual income. We demonstrate the feasibility of conducting a study to evaluate financial impact of allogeneic HCT through 2-years post-transplantation. Some patients/caregivers continue to experience significant long-term financial burden after this procedure. Our study lays the foundation for a larger evaluation of patient/caregiver financial burden associated with HCT. PMID:27088381

  14. WU and KI Polyomaviruses in Respiratory Samples from Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Angela P.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Wright, Nancy L.; Englund, Janet A.; Corey, Lawrence; Boeckh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Data are limited regarding 2 new human polyomaviruses, KI polyomavirus (KIPyV) and WU polyomavirus (WUPyV), in immunocompromised patients. We used real-time PCR to test for these and 12 respiratory viruses in 2,732 nasal wash samples collected during the first year after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation from 222 patients. Specimens were collected weekly until day 100; then at least every 3 months. One year after hematopoietic cell transplantation, the cumulative incidence estimate was 26% for KIPyV and 8% for WUPyV. Age <20 years predicted detection of KIPyV (hazard ratio [HR] 4.6) and WUPyV (HR 4.4), and detection of a respiratory virus in the previous 2 weeks predicted KIPyV detection (HR 3.4). Sputum production and wheezing were associated with detection of KIPyV in the past week and WUPyV in the past month. There were no associations with polyomavirus detection and acute graft versus host disease, cytomegalovirus reactivation, neutropenia, lymphopenia, hospitalization, or death. PMID:23017213

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of digestive cryptosporidiosis in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients: a prospective single centre study.

    PubMed

    Legrand, F; Grenouillet, F; Larosa, F; Dalle, F; Saas, P; Millon, L; Deconinck, E; Rohrlich, P S

    2011-06-01

    Digestive cryptosporidiosis (DC) can mimic GVHD after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), thus requiring a reduction of immunosuppressive drugs and a specific therapy, whereas GVHD requires an intensification of immunosuppression. We systematically searched for cryptosporidiosis by light microscopy, immunochromatography and PCR in HSCT recipients who presented with at least one episode of diarrhoea. Of 115 consecutive patients allografted between July 2006 and November 2008, we analysed stools in 52 of 56 patients meeting these criteria. We identified Cryptosporidium parvum in 5 of the 52 patients (9.6%) at a median of 503 days (range 20-790) after HSCT. In those five patients, the median CD4+ cell and B lymphocyte counts were 60/mm3 (0-234) and 0/mm3 (0-96), respectively. Two patients died of invasive fungal infections. In the other three patients, diarrhoea disappeared after a median of 5 weeks following onset of bitherapy with azithromycine and nitazoxanide; they were still alive 433, 380 and 1179 days after the DC diagnosis. DC is probably under diagnosed after HSCT because it is difficult to detect during the asymptomatic phase. Early bitherapy and reduction of immunosuppression seem efficacious. In our series, DC has a seasonal pattern and is promoted by profound T lymphopenia.

  16. Risk Assessment before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) most commonly affects patients older than 60 years. Outcomes of treatment of older AML patients have been poor. The advent of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens made allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) an available treatment option with curative intent for older AML patients. Because older patients are often excluded from clinical trials, little is known about the stratification of their risks before allogeneic HCT. While recent studies of RIC and allogeneic HCT have shown little impact of age on outcomes, other variables such as the recipient health status and the AML disease status and chromosomal aberrations have proven to be of prognostic significance. Here, we review recent studies of allogeneic HCT for older patients with AML with detailed evaluation of risk factors for relapse as well as non-relapse mortality. We have integrated the currently available information on transplant risks into a five-category risk-benefit system that could aid in the decision-making in this patient population. PMID:24083472

  17. Late Mortality and Causes of Death among Long-Term Survivors after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Atsuta, Yoshiko; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Nakasone, Hideki; Kurosawa, Saiko; Oshima, Kumi; Sakai, Rika; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Takahashi, Satoshi; Mori, Takehiko; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Fukuda, Takahiro; Kanamori, Heiwa; Morishima, Yasuo; Kato, Koji; Yabe, Hiromasa; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Yamashita, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    We sought to assess the late mortality risks and causes of death among long-term survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). The cases of 11,047 relapse-free survivors of a first HCT at least 2 years after HCT were analyzed. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated and specific causes of death were compared with those of the Japanese population. Among relapse-free survivors at 2 years, overall survival percentages at 10 and 15 years were 87% and 83%, respectively. The overall risk of mortality was significantly higher compared with that of the general population. The risk of mortality was significantly higher from infection (SMR = 57.0), new hematologic malignancies (SMR = 2.2), other new malignancies (SMR = 3.0), respiratory causes (SMR = 109.3), gastrointestinal causes (SMR = 3.8), liver dysfunction (SMR = 6.1), genitourinary dysfunction (SMR = 17.6), and external or accidental causes (SMR = 2.3). The overall annual mortality rate showed a steep decrease from 2 to 5 years after HCT; however, the decrease rate slowed after 10 years but was still higher than that of the general population at 20 years after HCT. SMRs in the earlier period of 2 to 4 years after HCT and 5 years or longer after HCT were 16.1 and 7.4, respectively. Long-term survivors after allogeneic HCT are at higher risk of mortality from various causes other than the underlying disease that led to HCT. Screening and preventive measures should be given a central role in reducing the morbidity and mortality of HCT recipients on long-term follow-up.

  18. Alterations in Memory and Impact on Academic Outcomes in Children Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lajiness-O'Neill, R; Hoodin, F; Kentor, R; Heinrich, K; Colbert, A; Connelly, J A

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of late effects following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), a curative treatment for pediatric leukemia, is high: 79% of HCT recipients experience chronic medical conditions. The few extant studies of cognitive late effects have focused on intelligence and are equivocal about HCT neurotoxicity. In an archival study of 30 children (mean transplant age = 6 years), we characterize neuropsychological predictors of academic outcomes. Mean intellectual and academic abilities were average, but evidenced extreme variability, particularly on measures of attention and memory: ∼25% of the sample exhibited borderline performance or lower. Medical predictors of outcome revealed paradoxically better memory associated with more severe acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and associated with steroid treatment. Processing speed and memory accounted for 69% and 61% of variance in mathematics and reading outcomes, respectively. Thus, our findings revealed neurocognitive areas of vulnerability in processing speed and memory following HCT that contribute to subsequent academic difficulties. PMID:26319492

  19. Long-term survival outcomes of reduced-intensity allogeneic or autologous transplantation in relapsed grade 3 follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Bacher, Ulrike; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kröger, Nicolaus M.; Hari, Parameswaran N.; Ku, Grace H.; Ayala, Ernesto; Chen, Andy I.; Chen, Yi-Bin; Cohen, Jonathon B.; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Martino, Rodrigo; Mussetti, Alberto; Savani, Bipin N.; Schouten, Harry C.; Usmani, Saad Z.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Wirk, Baldeep; Smith, Sonali M.; Sureda, Anna; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Grade-3 follicular lymphoma (FL) has aggressive clinical behavior. To evaluate the optimal first transplantation approach in relapsed/refractory grade-3 FL patients, we compared the long-term outcomes after allogeneic (allo-) vs. autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT) in the rituximab-era. A total of 197 patients undergoing first RIC allo-HCT or first auto-HCT during 2000-2012 were included. Rituximab-naïve patients were excluded. Allo-HCT recipients were younger; more heavily pretreated, and had a longer interval between diagnosis and HCT. The 5-year probabilities of non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse/progression, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for auto-HCT vs. allo-HCT groups were 4% vs. 27% (p<0.001); 61% vs. 20% (p<0.001); 36% vs. 51% (p=0.07) and 59% vs. 54% (p=0.7), respectively. On multivariate analysis auto-HCT was associated with reduced risk of NRM (RR=0.20; p=0.001). Within the first 11months post-HCT auto- and allo-HCT had similar risks of relapse/progression and PFS. Beyond 11months, auto-HCT was associated with higher risk of relapse/progression (RR=21.3; p=0.003) and inferior PFS (RR=3.2; p=0.005). In the first 24 months post-HCT, auto-HCT was associated with improved OS (RR=0.42; p=0.005), but in long-time survivors (beyond 24 months) it was associated with inferior OS (RR=3.6; p=0.04). RIC allo-HCT as the first transplant approach can provide improved PFS and OS, in long-term survivors. PMID:26437062

  20. Autologous is Superior to Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in Second Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Jennifer L. Holter; Rubinger, Morel; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Wang, Hai-Lin; Grigg, Andrew; Selby, George B.; Szer, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jacob M.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify favored choice of transplantation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission. PATIENTS We studied 294 acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients receiving allogeneic (n=232) or autologous (62) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in second complete remission (CR2) reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2006 including pre-HCT PML/RAR∝ status in 155 (49% of allogeneic and 66% of autologous). METHODS Patient characteristics and transplant characteristics including treatment related mortality, overall survival, and disease free survival were collected and analyzed for both univariate and multivariate outcomes. RESULTS With median follow-up of 115 (allogeneic) and 72 months (autologous), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) favored autologous 63% (49-75%) compared to allogeneic 50% (44-57%) (p=0.10) and overall survival (OS) 75% (63-85%) vs. 54% (48-61%) (p=.002) Multivariate analysis showed significantly worse DFS after allogeneic HCT (HR=1.88, 95% CI=1.16-3.06, p=0.011) and age >40 years (HR=2.30, 95% CI 1.44-3.67, p=0.0005). OS was significantly worse after allogeneic HCT (HR=2.66, 95%CI 1.52-4.65, p=0.0006; age >40 (HR=3.29, 95% CI 1.95-5.54, p<0.001) and CR1<12 months (HR=1.56 95% CI 1.07-2.26, p=0.021). Positive pre-HCT PML-RAR∝ status in 17/114 allogeneic and 6/41 autologous transplants did not influence relapse, treatment failure or survival in either group. The survival advantage for autografting was attributable to increased 3 years TRM: allogeneic 30%; autologous 2%, and GVHD. CONCLUSION We conclude that autologous HCT yields superior overall survival for APL in CR2. Long term DFS in autologous recipients, even with MRD+ grafts remains an important subject for further study. PMID:24691221

  1. CD56dimCD57+NKG2C+ NK cell expansion is associated with reduced leukemia relapse after reduced intensity HCT.

    PubMed

    Cichocki, F; Cooley, S; Davis, Z; DeFor, T E; Schlums, H; Zhang, B; Brunstein, C G; Blazar, B R; Wagner, J; Diamond, D J; Verneris, M R; Bryceson, Y T; Weisdorf, D J; Miller, J S

    2016-02-01

    We have recently described a specialized subset of human natural killer (NK) cells with a CD56(dim)CD57(+)NKG2C(+) phenotype that expand specifically in response to cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients and exhibit properties characteristic of adaptive immunity. We hypothesize that these cells mediate relapse protection and improve post-HCT outcomes. In 674 allogeneic HCT recipients, we found that those who reactivated CMV had lower leukemia relapse (26% (17-35%), P=0.05) and superior disease-free survival (DFS) (55% (45-65%) P=0.04) 1 year after reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) compared with CMV seronegative recipients who experienced higher relapse rates (35% (27-43%)) and lower DFS (46% (38-54%)). This protective effect was independent of age and graft-vs-host disease and was not observed in recipients who received myeloablative regimens. Analysis of the reconstituting NK cells demonstrated that CMV reactivation is associated with both higher frequencies and greater absolute numbers of CD56(dim)CD57(+)NKG2C(+) NK cells, particularly after RIC HCT. Furthermore, expansion of these cells at 6 months posttransplant independently trended toward a lower 2-year relapse risk. Together, our data suggest that the protective effect of CMV reactivation on posttransplant relapse is in part driven by adaptive NK cell responses. PMID:26416461

  2. Pre-treatment of allogeneic bone marrow recipients with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 transiently enhances hematopoietic chimerism without promoting donor-specific skin allograft tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhanzhuo; Xu, Xin; Weiss, Ido D; Jacobson, Orit; Murphy, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    Hematopoietic chimerism established by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is known to promote donor-specific organ allograft tolerance; however, clinical application is limited by the need for toxic host conditioning and "megadoses" of donor bone marrow cells. A potential solution to this problem has been suggested by the observation that recipient bone marrow mobilization by the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 promotes chimerism in congenic bone marrow transplantation experiments in mice. Here we report that a single subcutaneous dose of 10 mg/kg AMD3100 in recipient C57BL/6 mice was able to enhance hematopoietic chimerism when complete MHC-mismatched BALB/c donor bone marrow cells were transplanted 1h after drug dosing. However, levels of chimerism measured 30 days post-transplantation were not sustained when mice were reexamined on day 90 post-transplantation. Moreover, transient chimerism induced by this protocol did not support robust donor-specific skin allograft tolerance. Using the same transient immunosuppression protocol, we confirmed that "megadoses" of donor bone marrow cells could induce durable chimerism associated with donor-specific skin allograft tolerance without AMD3100 pre-treatment. We conclude that in this protocol AMD3100 pretreatment may empty bone marrow niches that become reoccupied by allogeneic donor hematopoietic progenitor cells but not by true long-lived donor hematopoietic stem cells, resulting in short-lived chimerism and failure to support durable donor-specific allograft tolerance.

  3. High prevalence of potential drug interactions affecting mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetics in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Jaklič, Alenka; Collins, Carol J.; Mrhar, Aleš; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Locatelli, Igor; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) exposure is associated with clinical outcomes in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Various drug interaction studies, predominantly in healthy volunteers or solid organ transplant recipients, have identified medications which impact MPA pharmacokinetics. Recipients of nonmyeloablative HCT, however, have an increased burden of comorbidities, potentially increasing the number of concomitant medications and potential drug interactions (PDI) affecting MPA exposure. Thus, we sought to be the first to characterize these PDI in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Materials and methods: We compiled PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics and characterized the prevalence of PDI in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. A comprehensive literature evaluation of four databases and PubMed was conducted to identify medications with PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. Subsequently, a retrospective medication review was conducted to characterize the cumulative PDI burden, defined as the number of PDI for an individual patient over the first 21 days after allogeneic graft infusion, in 84 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Results: Of the 187 concomitant medications, 11 (5.9%) had a PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. 87% of 84 patients had one PDI, with a median cumulative PDI burden of 2 (range 0 – 4). The most common PDI, in descending order, were cyclosporine, omeprazole and pantoprazole. Conclusion: Only a minority of medications (5.9%) have a PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. However, the majority of nonmyeloablative HCT recipients had a PDI, with cyclosporine and the proton pump inhibitors being the most common. A better understanding of PDI and their management should lead to safer medication regimens for nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:23782584

  4. Lenalidomide Maintenance for High Risk Multiple Myeloma after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alsina, Melissa; Becker, Pamela S.; Zhong, Xiaobo; Adams, Alexia; Hari, Parameswaran; Rowley, Scott; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Vesole, David H.; Logan, Brent; Weisdorf, Daniel; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Popplewell, Leslie L.; McClune, Brian; Bensinger, William; Riches, Marcie; Giralt, Sergio A.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) with reduced intensity conditioning is an appealing option for patients with high risk multiple myeloma (MM). However, progression after alloHCT remains a challenge. Maintenance therapy after alloHCT may offer additional disease control and allow time for a graft-versus-myeloma effect. The primary objective of this clinical trial was to determine the tolerability and safety profile of maintenance lenalidomide (LEN) given on days 1–21 of 28 days cycles, with intra-patient dose escalation during 12 months/cycles after alloHCT. Thirty alloHCT recipients (median age 54 years) with high risk MM were enrolled at 8 centers between 2009–2012. The median time from alloHCT to LEN initiation was 96 days (66–171 days). Eleven patients (37%) completed maintenance and 10 mg daily was the most commonly delivered dose (44%).Most common reasons for discontinuation were aGVHD (37%) and disease progression (37%). Cumulative incidence of grades III–IV acute GVHD from time of initiation of Len was 17%. Outcomes at 18 months after initiation of maintenance were MM progression, 28%; transplant related mortality, 11%; and progression-free and overall survival, 63% and 78%, respectively. The use of LEN post alloHCT is feasible at lower doses, although associated with a 38% incidence of aGVHD. Survival outcomes observed in this high risk MM population warrant further study of this approach. PMID:24769014

  5. Estimating Demand and Unmet Need for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in the United States Using Geographic Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Besse, Kelsey L.; Preussler, Jaime M.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Denzen, Ellen M.; Lill, Michael C.; Chell, Jeffrey W.; Senneka, Mary K.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Williams, Eric P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an increasingly used therapy for many patients with hematologic malignancies and other marrow failure or immune system disorders. The purpose of this study was to quantify and visualize both the demand and unmet need for HCT. Methods: HCT use for 2012 was described using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research registry. Potential demand for HCT was calculated using 2012 SEER data and published literature for HCT-treatable conditions. Point locations of transplant centers were geocoded using geographic information system (GIS) software; Thiessen polygons were created to establish adult (age 20 to 74 years) and pediatric (age 0 to 19 years) market areas. Market-area population estimates were calculated using 2012 population estimates by age aggregated by census block. Results: US market areas for HCTs were identified separately for transplant centers treating adult (n = 62) and pediatric patients (n = 52). Overall HCT demand among adults was 16,096, with an unmet need for HCTs of 10,276 patients. For pediatric patients, the total demand was 4,561, with an unmet need of 3,213 potential recipients. Evaluation of adult and pediatric market areas indicated that the largest unmet needs tended to be in areas with large populations. Conclusion: Market-area maps and statistics developed using GIS will help communicate the unmet need for HCT, inform policy, and assist transplant centers in planning for the anticipated growth in HCT use. PMID:25784576

  6. Patient education in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant: what patients wish they had known about quality of life.

    PubMed

    Jim, H S L; Quinn, G P; Gwede, C K; Cases, M G; Barata, A; Cessna, J; Christie, J; Gonzalez, L; Koskan, A; Pidala, J

    2014-02-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but patient education is often overlooked. The aim of the current qualitative study was to examine education regarding post-HCT QOL from the patient's perspective. Allogeneic HCT recipients participated in one of four focus groups. Participants were asked to recall what they had been told about post-HCT QOL as they were preparing for transplant, how their QOL differed from what they expected and how to educate future patients about post-HCT QOL. Verbatim transcripts were coded for both a priori and emergent themes using content analysis. A total of 24 patients participated (54% female, mean age 51, range 23-73 years). Participants frequently expressed the desire for additional education regarding post-HCT QOL, particularly late complications. They noted that late complications were often unexpected, had a profound impact on their QOL and threatened their ongoing sense of recovery. They emphasized that the timing, content and format of education regarding QOL should be flexible to meet their diverse needs. Findings from the current study draw attention to the importance of patient education regarding post-HCT QOL as well as additional QOL research designed with patient education in mind.

  7. Patient education in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant: What patients wish they had known about quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather S.L.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Gwede, Clement K.; Cases, Mallory G.; Barata, Anna; Cessna, Julie; Christie, Juliette; Gonzalez, Luis; Koskan, Alexis; Pidala, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but patient education is often overlooked. The goal of the current qualitative study was to examine education regarding post-HCT QOL from the patient’s perspective. Allogeneic HCT recipients participated in one of four focus groups. Participants were asked to recall what they had been told about post-HCT QOL as they were preparing for transplant, how their QOL differed from what they expected, and how to educate future patients about post-HCT QOL. Verbatim transcripts were coded for both a priori and emergent themes using content analysis. A total of 24 patients participated (54% female, mean age 51, range 23-73). Participants frequently expressed the desire for additional education regarding post-HCT QOL, particularly late complications. They noted that late complications were often unexpected, had a profound impact on their QOL, and threatened their ongoing sense of recovery. They emphasized that the timing, content, and format of education regarding QOL should be flexible to meet their diverse needs. Findings from the current study draw attention to the importance of patient education regarding post-HCT QOL as well as additional QOL research designed with patient education in mind. PMID:24121210

  8. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, M J; Lazarus, H M; Carreras, J; Laport, G G; Cutler, C S; Wiernik, P H; Hale, G A; Maharaj, D; Gale, R P; Rowlings, P A; Freytes, C O; Miller, A M; Vose, J M; Maziarz, R T; Montoto, S; Maloney, D G; Hari, P N

    2014-11-01

    We describe outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome (MF/SS). Outcomes of 129 subjects with MF/SS reported to the Center for the International Blood and Marrow Transplant from 2000-2009. Median time from diagnosis to transplant was 30 (4-206) months and most subjects were with multiply relapsed/ refractory disease. The majority (64%) received non-myeloablative conditioning (NST) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). NST/RIC recipients were older in age compared with myeloablative recipients (median age 51 vs 44 years, P=0.005) and transplanted in recent years. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 and 5 years was 19% (95% confidence interval (CI) 12-27%) and 22% (95% CI 15-31%), respectively. Risk of disease progression was 50% (95% CI 41-60%) at 1 year and 61% (95% CI 50-71%) at 5 years. PFS at 1 and 5 years was 31% (95% CI 22-40%) and 17% (95% CI 9-26%), respectively. OS at 1 and 5 years was 54% (95% CI 45-63%) and 32% (95% CI 22-44%), respectively. Allogeneic HCT in MF/SS results in 5-year survival in approximately one-third of patients and of those, half remain disease-free. PMID:25068422

  9. Plasma Elevations of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Receptor-1 at Day 7 Post Allogeneic Transplant Correlate with Graft Versus Host Disease Severity and Overall Survival in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kitko, Carrie L.; Paczesny, Sophie; Yanik, Gregory; Braun, Thomas; Jones, Dawn; Whitfield, Joel; Choi, Sung W.; Hutchinson, Raymond J.; Ferrara, James L. M.; Levine, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is known to play a role in the pathogenesis of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD), a cause of significant morbidity and treatment-related mortality (TRM) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). We measured the concentration of TNF-Receptor-1 (TNFR1) in the plasma of HCT recipients as a surrogate marker for TNF-α both prior to transplant and at day 7 in 82 children who underwent a myeloablative allogeneic HCT at the University of Michigan between 2000 and 2005. GVHD grade II-IV developed in 49% of patients at a median of 20 days after HCT. Increases in TNFR1 level at day 7 post HCT, expressed as ratios compared to pre-transplant baseline, correlated with severity of GVHD (p=0.02). In addition, day 7 TNFR1 ratios > 2.5 baseline were associated with inferior 1 year overall survival (51% vs 74%, p=0.04). As an individual biomarker, TNFR1 lacks sufficient precision to be used as a predictor for the development of GVHD. However, increases in the concentration of TNFR1, which are detectable up to two weeks in advance of clinical manifestations of GVHD, correlate with survival in pediatric HCT patients. PMID:18541194

  10. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice after total lymphoid irradiation: influence of breeding conditions and strain of recipient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waer, M.; Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.; Vandeputte, M.

    1984-02-01

    Different groups of C57BL/ka or BALB/c mice received a dose of 34 Gy or 42 Gy of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) before bone marrow transplantation with 30 x 10/sup 6/ BALB/c or C57BL nucleated bone marrow cells, respectively. BALB/c mice that were not bred in specific pathogen-free conditions before TLI showed a high morbidity and mortality rate after 34 Gy of TLI and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation as compared with BALB/c or C57BL that were bred in pathogen-free conditions before irradiation. Many of the conventionally bred BALB/c mice had clinical and histologic signs of graft-vs-host disease after TLI and allogeneic bone marrow infusion. Although leucocytosis and lymphocytosis and the immunologic competence as measured with in vitro tests were equally depressed after 34 Gy TLI in BALB/c and C57BL mice, chimerism was nevertheless significantly easier to obtain in BALB/c mice. The incidence of chimerism after TLI could be enhanced in C57BL mice by increasing the total radiation dose from 34 to 42 Gy. This augmentation of chimerism was paralleled by the induction of more suppressor cells after 42 Gy of TLI in C57BL mice.

  11. Racial differences in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes among African Americans and whites.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, B K; Rybicki, L; Sekeres, M; Kalaycio, M; Hanna, R; Sobecks, R; Dean, R; Duong, H; Hill, B T; Bolwell, B; Copelan, E

    2015-06-01

    The impact of race on outcome has been identified in a number of cancers, with African Americans having poorer survival compared with whites. We conducted a study to investigate the association of race with allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) outcomes. We identified 789 patients (58 African Americans and 731 whites) who underwent allogeneic HCT for hematologic disorders. There were no significant differences between African Americans and white patients in gender, performance status or comorbidity score. However, African Americans were younger than whites (median 40 years versus 47 years, P=0.003) and were more likely to be in remission at HCT (74% versus 57%, P=0.011), to have an HLA-mismatched donor (36% versus 14%, P<0.001), to have positive donor or recipient CMV serostatus (90% versus 69%, P<0.001) and to have received a cord blood transplant (21% versus 6%, P<0.001). In univariate analysis, African Americans had worse overall survival (OS) (HR 1.41, P=0.026) compared with whites, with no significant differences in acute or chronic GvHD, non-CMV infection or relapse. However, after adjusting for several transplant and disease-related factors in multivariate analysis, the OS difference between African Americans and whites became nonsignificant (HR 1.27, P=0.18). These results suggest that race in and of itself does not lead to worse survival post HCT.

  12. Expansion of recipient-derived antiviral T cells may influence donor chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Borchers, S; Weissinger, E M; Pabst, B; Ganzenmueller, T; Dammann, E; Luther, S; Diedrich, H; Ganser, A; Stadler, M

    2013-12-01

    Donor chimerism (DC) analysis is an important marker in the hematopoietic stem cell transplant follow-up. Here, we present evidence for a possible relationship of infectious complications and declines in DC. We analyzed the DC in patients experiencing cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation. In addition, in some patients chimerism analyses of T-cell subsets were performed. CMV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CMV-CTL) were monitored using human leukocyte antigen-restricted multimer staining. Interestingly, CMV reactivation was accompanied by changes in DC in 11 of 67 patients transplanted. For example, DC declined in a cord blood recipient, in both total leukocytes and CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets upon CMV reactivation. The latter was controlled after only 5 days through expanding CMV-CTL of 96% recipient origin, according to chimerism analysis of CMV-CTL (enriched beyond 50%). In another patient, transplanted after reduced-intensity conditioning from a DQB1 mismatched, CMV seronegative donor, incipient CMV reactivation was completely aborted by CMV-CTL of recipient origin. However, at the same time, mixed chimerism dropped from 51% to 0% donor type, resulting in late graft rejection. Our data indicate that chimerism analyses in subset populations lead to a better understanding of declining total leukocyte chimerism. Furthermore, recipient-derived CMV-CTL may be able to control CMV reactivation after reduced-intensity conditioning. We speculate that autologous CMV-CTL may be instrumental to overcome recurrent CMV reactivations, especially in patients transplanted from CMV-seronegative donors. In addition, the expansion of recipient-derived CMV-CTL may contribute to both, graft failure or to conversion to full DC.

  13. Efficacy and Safety of a Preemptive Antiviral Therapy Strategy Based on Combined Virological and Immunological Monitoring for Active Cytomegalovirus Infection in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, David; Amat, Paula; de la Cámara, Rafael; López, Javier; Vázquez, Lourdes; Serrano, David; Nieto, José; Rovira, Monserrat; Piñana, José Luis; Giménez, Estela; Solano, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preemptive antiviral therapy for active cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients (Allo-SCT) results in overtreatment and a high rate of recurrences. Monitoring of CMV-specific T-cell immunity may help to individualize treatments and minimize these problems. Methods. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, matched comparison-group study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel strategy that consisted of interrupting anti-CMV therapy upon CMV DNAemia clearance and concurrent detection of phosphoprotein 65/immediate-early-1-specific interferon-γ-producing CD8+ T cells at levels of >1 cell/µL (within 30 days after the initiation of therapy). Immunological monitoring was performed on days +7, +14, +21, and +28 after treatment initiation. The primary endpoint was the cumulative incidence of recurrent DNAemia within 2 months after treatment cessation. Secondary endpoints were the length of antiviral treatment courses and the incidence of hematological toxicity. Results. Sixty-one patients were enrolled in the study group. Fifty-six patients were included in the matched-control group. Eleven patients (18%) fulfilled the criteria for antiviral treatment interruption. The cumulative incidence of recurrent CMV DNAemia was significantly lower (P = .02) in these patients than in patients in the comparative groups. Likewise, the length of antiviral treatment courses was significantly shorter in these patients than that in patients in the matched-control group (P = .003). No significant differences in the incidence of hematological toxicity was observed between the comparative groups. Conclusions. Our data support the clinical utility of combining immunological and virological monitoring for the management of CMV infection in a subset of Allo-SCT recipients. PMID:27419179

  14. Early recipient chimerism testing in the T- and NK-cell lineages for risk assessment of graft rejection in pediatric patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Breuer, S; Preuner, S; Fritsch, G; Daxberger, H; Koenig, M; Poetschger, U; Lawitschka, A; Peters, C; Mann, G; Lion, T; Matthes-Martin, S

    2012-03-01

    Timely diagnosis of impending graft rejection is crucial for effective therapeutic intervention after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). We have investigated the predictive potential of early leukocyte subset-specific chimerism for graft loss in children undergoing SCT. In total, 192 pediatric patients transplanted for the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases after reduced-intensity or myeloablative conditioning were investigated. Surveillance of lineage-specific chimerism was initiated upon first appearance of leukocyte counts amenable to cell sorting. Graft rejection occurred in 23 patients between 24 and 492 days post-transplant (median 63 days). The first chimerism analysis of T and NK cells performed at a median of 20 days after SCT identified three different risk groups that were independent from the conditioning regimen: recipient chimerism (RC) levels in T cells below 50% indicated a very low risk of rejection (1.4%), whereas high levels of RC (>90%) both in T and NK cells heralded graft loss in the majority of patients (90%) despite therapeutic interventions. RC >50% in T cells and ≤90% in NK cells defined an intermediate-risk group in which timely immunotherapy frequently prevented rejection. Early assessment of T- and NK-cell chimerism can therefore be instrumental in the risk assessment and therapeutic management of imminent graft rejection.

  15. Enumeration of NKG2C+ natural killer cells early following allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients does not allow prediction of the occurrence of cytomegalovirus DNAemia.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Estela; Solano, Carlos; Amat, Paula; de la Cámara, Rafael; Nieto, José; López, Javier; Garcia-Noblejas, Ana; Navarro, David

    2015-09-01

    The role of Natural killer (NK) cells in the control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients has not been precisely characterized. The current study is aimed at investigating the potential role of NK cells expressing the activating receptor NKG2C in affording protection against the development of CMV DNAemia in patients exhibiting detectable CMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses early following transplantation. A total of 61 nonconsecutive patients were included in the study. Peripheral levels of CD56(bright) CD16(-/low) and CD56(dim) CD16(+) NKG2C(+) NK cells and CMV pp65/IE-1-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T-cells were enumerated by flow cytometry at days +30 and +60 after transplant. Neither the absolute number of NKG2C(+) NK cells, nor that of CD56(bright) CD16(-/low) and CD56(dim) CD16(+) NKG2C(+) NK-cell subsets at day 30 differed significantly between patients with or without subsequent CMV DNAemia. No significant correlation was found between levels of both NKG2C(+) NK-cell populations and the peak CMV DNA load within subsequent episodes of CMV DNAemia. The data indicate that enumeration of NKG2C(+) NK cells early after transplant is unlikely to be helpful in identifying those patients at highest risk of developing CMV DNAemia. Moreover, the data do not support a direct implication of NKG2C(+) NK cells in preventing the development of CMV DNAemia.

  16. Allogeneic unrelated bone marrow transplantation from older donors results in worse prognosis in recipients with aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Takenaka, Katsuto; Sugita, Junichi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Uchida, Naoyuki; Iwato, Koji; Kobayashi, Naoki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Ishiyama, Ken; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Mori, Takehiko; Teshima, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is an essential therapy for acquired aplastic anemia and prognosis has recently improved. However, engraftment failure and graft-versus-host disease are potential fatal complications. Various risk factors for poor prognosis have been identified, such as patient age and human-leukocyte antigen disparity, but the relationship between donor age and prognosis is still unknown. Therefore, we performed a cohort study to compare the prognosis of unrelated bone marrow transplantation from younger and older donors using the registry database in Japan. We evaluated 427 patients (age 16–72 years) with aplastic anemia who underwent bone marrow transplantation from younger (≤39 years, n=281) or older (≥40 years, n=146) unrelated donors. Overall survival of the older donor group was significantly inferior to that of the younger donor group (adjusted hazard ratio 1.64; 95% confidence interval 1.15–2.35; P<0.01). The incidence of fatal infection was significantly higher in the older donor group (13.7% vs. 7.5%; P=0.03). Primary engraftment failure and acute graft-versus-host disease were significantly more frequent in the older donor group (9.7% vs. 5.0%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.30; P=0.01, and 27.1% vs. 19.7%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.56; P=0.03, respectively). Acute graft-versus-host disease was related to a worse prognosis in the whole cohort. This study showed the inferiority of older donors in aplastic anemia; thus, donor age should be considered when multiple donors are available. A large-scale prospective study is warranted to establish a better donor selection algorithm for bone marrow transplantation in aplastic anemia. PMID:26858357

  17. Allogeneic unrelated bone marrow transplantation from older donors results in worse prognosis in recipients with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Takenaka, Katsuto; Sugita, Junichi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Uchida, Naoyuki; Iwato, Koji; Kobayashi, Naoki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Ishiyama, Ken; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Mori, Takehiko; Teshima, Takanori

    2016-05-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is an essential therapy for acquired aplastic anemia and prognosis has recently improved. However, engraftment failure and graft-versus-host disease are potential fatal complications. Various risk factors for poor prognosis have been identified, such as patient age and human-leukocyte antigen disparity, but the relationship between donor age and prognosis is still unknown. Therefore, we performed a cohort study to compare the prognosis of unrelated bone marrow transplantation from younger and older donors using the registry database in Japan. We evaluated 427 patients (age 16-72 years) with aplastic anemia who underwent bone marrow transplantation from younger (≤39 years, n=281) or older (≥40 years, n=146) unrelated donors. Overall survival of the older donor group was significantly inferior to that of the younger donor group (adjusted hazard ratio 1.64; 95% confidence interval 1.15-2.35; P<0.01). The incidence of fatal infection was significantly higher in the older donor group (13.7% vs. 7.5%; P=0.03). Primary engraftment failure and acute graft-versus-host disease were significantly more frequent in the older donor group (9.7% vs. 5.0%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.30; P=0.01, and 27.1% vs. 19.7%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.56; P=0.03, respectively). Acute graft-versus-host disease was related to a worse prognosis in the whole cohort. This study showed the inferiority of older donors in aplastic anemia; thus, donor age should be considered when multiple donors are available. A large-scale prospective study is warranted to establish a better donor selection algorithm for bone marrow transplantation in aplastic anemia. PMID:26858357

  18. A pilot study of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis in childhood and adolescent allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Bessmertny, Olga; Harrison, Lauren; Cheung, Ying-Kuen; Van de Ven, Carmella; del Toro, Gustavo; Garvin, James; George, Diane; Bradley, M Brigid; Wolownik, Karen; Wischhover, Cheryl; Levy, Joseph; Skerrett, Donna; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2004-04-01

    Tacrolimus (FK506)/mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been demonstrated to be an effective salvage therapy for steroid-resistant chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), but its effectiveness as prophylaxis for acute GVHD (aGVHD) is unknown. We investigated the safety and efficacy of FK506/MMF in preventing aGVHD and sparing the use of methotrexate and methylprednisolone in childhood and adolescent allogeneic stem cell transplant (AlloSCT) recipients. Thirty-four childhood and adolescent patients (median age, 7 years; range, 0.5-21 years; 24 males and 10 females) undergoing 37 AlloSCTs for malignant (n = 22) and nonmalignant (n = 12) disorders received FK506 (0.03 mg/kg/d by continuous intravenous infusion) and MMF (15 mg/kg per dose orally or intravenously twice daily). Stem cell sources included 22 umbilical cord blood donors (21 unrelated and 1 related), 6 related bone marrow donors, and 9 related peripheral blood donors. Malignant diagnoses included 7 acute lymphoblastic leukemias, 3 acute myeloid leukemias, 1 acute promyelocytic leukemia, 2 non-Hodgkin lymphomas, 4 Hodgkin diseases, 3 chronic myeloid leukemias, and 2 neuroblastomas; nonmalignant diagnoses included 2 beta-thalassemias, 1 sickle cell disease, 4 aplastic anemias, 1 Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, 1 Hurler syndrome, 2 hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytoses, and 1 myelodysplastic syndrome. The probability of developing grade > or =II aGVHD was 45.4% +/- 9.7% (7 related bone marrow/related peripheral blood; 5 umbilical cord blood), and for chronic GVHD it was 38.1% +/- 19.7%. FK506/MMF was well tolerated. Three patients had grade III to IV neurotoxicity (disorientation and leukoencephalopathy); 4 patients developed grade III to IV nephrotoxicity (all received concomitant nephrotoxins). Patients who achieved target mycophenolic acid levels (1.0-3.5 microg/mL) before day +30 had a significantly reduced incidence of developing grade >/=II aGVHD (16.7% +/- 15.2% versus 100%; P <.02). These results suggest that FK

  19. Lenalidomide maintenance for high-risk multiple myeloma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alsina, Melissa; Becker, Pamela S; Zhong, Xiaobo; Adams, Alexia; Hari, Parameswaran; Rowley, Scott; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Vesole, David H; Logan, Brent; Weisdorf, Daniel; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Popplewell, Leslie L; McClune, Brian; Bensinger, William; Riches, Marcie; Giralt, Sergio A; Pasquini, Marcelo C

    2014-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) with reduced-intensity conditioning is an appealing option for patients with high-risk multiple myeloma (MM). However, progression after alloHCT remains a challenge. Maintenance therapy after alloHCT may offer additional disease control and allow time for a graft-versus-myeloma effect. The primary objective of this clinical trial was to determine the tolerability and safety profile of maintenance lenalidomide (LEN) given on days 1 to 21 of 28 days cycles, with intrapatient dose escalation during 12 months/cycles after alloHCT. Thirty alloHCT recipients (median age, 54 years) with high-risk MM were enrolled at 8 centers between 2009 and 2012. The median time from alloHCT to LEN initiation was 96 days (range, 66 to 171 days). Eleven patients (37%) completed maintenance and 10 mg daily was the most commonly delivered dose (44%). Most common reasons for discontinuation were acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (37%) and disease progression (37%). Cumulative incidence of grades III to IV acute GVHD from time of initiation of LEN was 17%. Outcomes at 18 months after initiation of maintenance were MM progression, 28%; transplantation-related mortality, 11%; and progression-free and overall survival, 63% and 78%, respectively. The use of LEN after alloHCT is feasible at lower doses, although it is associated with a 38% incidence of acute GVHD. Survival outcomes observed in this high-risk MM population warrant further study of this approach. PMID:24769014

  20. Immune Reconstitution and Graft-Versus-Host Reactions in Rat Models of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zinöcker, Severin; Dressel, Ralf; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Dickinson, Anne M.; Rolstad, Bent

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) extends the lives of thousands of patients who would otherwise succumb to hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemias and lymphomas, aplastic anemia, and disorders of the immune system. In alloHCT, different immune cell types mediate beneficial graft-versus-tumor (GvT) effects, regulate detrimental graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), and are required for protection against infections. Today, the “good” (GvT effector cells and memory cells conferring protection) cannot be easily separated from the “bad” (GvHD-causing cells), and alloHCT remains a hazardous medical modality. The transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells into an immunosuppressed patient creates a delicate environment for the reconstitution of donor blood and immune cells in co-existence with host cells. Immunological reconstitution determines to a large extent the immune status of the allo-transplanted host against infections and the recurrence of cancer, and is critical for long-term protection and survival after clinical alloHCT. Animal models continue to be extremely valuable experimental tools that widen our understanding of, for example, the dynamics of post-transplant hematopoiesis and the complexity of immune reconstitution with multiple ways of interaction between host and donor cells. In this review, we discuss the rat as an experimental model of HCT between allogeneic individuals. We summarize our findings on lymphocyte reconstitution in transplanted rats and illustrate the disease pathology of this particular model. We also introduce the rat skin explant assay, a feasible alternative to in vivo transplantation studies. The skin explant assay can be used to elucidate the biology of graft-versus-host reactions, which are known to have a major impact on immune reconstitution, and to perform genome-wide gene expression studies using controlled combinations of minor and major histocompatibility between the donor and the recipient

  1. Adaptive Natural Killer Cell and Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor-Expressing T Cell Responses are Induced by Cytomegalovirus and Are Associated with Protection against Cytomegalovirus Reactivation after Allogeneic Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary B; Cooley, Sarah A; Cichocki, Frank; Felices, Martin; Wangen, Rose; Luo, Xianghua; DeFor, Todd E; Bryceson, Yenan T; Diamond, Don J; Brunstein, Claudio; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Horowitz, Amir; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Parham, Peter; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivates in >30% of CMV-seropositive patients after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Previously, we reported an increase of natural killer (NK) cells expressing NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in response to CMV reactivation after HCT. These NK cells persist after the resolution of infection and display "adaptive" or memory properties. Despite these findings, the differential impact of persistent/inactive versus reactivated CMV on NK versus T cell maturation after HCT from different graft sources has not been defined. We compared the phenotype of NK and T cells from 292 recipients of allogeneic sibling (n = 118) or umbilical cord blood (UCB; n = 174) grafts based on recipient pretransplantation CMV serostatus and post-HCT CMV reactivation. This cohort was utilized to evaluate CMV-dependent increases in KIR-expressing NK cells exhibiting an adaptive phenotype (NKG2C(+)CD57(+)). Compared with CMV-seronegative recipients, those who reactivated CMV had the highest adaptive cell frequencies, whereas intermediate frequencies were observed in CMV-seropositive recipients harboring persistent/nonreplicating CMV. The same effect was observed in T cells and CD56(+) T cells. These adaptive lymphocyte subsets were increased in CMV-seropositive recipients of sibling but not UCB grafts and were correlated with lower rates of CMV reactivation (sibling 33% versus UCB 51%; P < .01). These data suggest that persistent/nonreplicating recipient CMV induces rapid production of adaptive NK and T cells from mature cells from sibling but not UCB grafts. These adaptive lymphocytes are associated with protection from CMV reactivation. PMID:26055301

  2. Adaptive Natural Killer Cell and Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor-Expressing T Cell Responses are Induced by Cytomegalovirus and Are Associated with Protection against Cytomegalovirus Reactivation after Allogeneic Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary B; Cooley, Sarah A; Cichocki, Frank; Felices, Martin; Wangen, Rose; Luo, Xianghua; DeFor, Todd E; Bryceson, Yenan T; Diamond, Don J; Brunstein, Claudio; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Horowitz, Amir; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Parham, Peter; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivates in >30% of CMV-seropositive patients after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Previously, we reported an increase of natural killer (NK) cells expressing NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in response to CMV reactivation after HCT. These NK cells persist after the resolution of infection and display "adaptive" or memory properties. Despite these findings, the differential impact of persistent/inactive versus reactivated CMV on NK versus T cell maturation after HCT from different graft sources has not been defined. We compared the phenotype of NK and T cells from 292 recipients of allogeneic sibling (n = 118) or umbilical cord blood (UCB; n = 174) grafts based on recipient pretransplantation CMV serostatus and post-HCT CMV reactivation. This cohort was utilized to evaluate CMV-dependent increases in KIR-expressing NK cells exhibiting an adaptive phenotype (NKG2C(+)CD57(+)). Compared with CMV-seronegative recipients, those who reactivated CMV had the highest adaptive cell frequencies, whereas intermediate frequencies were observed in CMV-seropositive recipients harboring persistent/nonreplicating CMV. The same effect was observed in T cells and CD56(+) T cells. These adaptive lymphocyte subsets were increased in CMV-seropositive recipients of sibling but not UCB grafts and were correlated with lower rates of CMV reactivation (sibling 33% versus UCB 51%; P < .01). These data suggest that persistent/nonreplicating recipient CMV induces rapid production of adaptive NK and T cells from mature cells from sibling but not UCB grafts. These adaptive lymphocytes are associated with protection from CMV reactivation.

  3. Design and Validation of an Augmented Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index Comprising Pretransplant Ferritin, Albumin, and Platelet Count for Prediction of Outcomes after Allogeneic Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Jennifer E; Storer, Barry E; Armand, Philippe; Raimondi, Roberto; Gibson, Christopher; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Oneto, Rosi; Bruno, Benedetto; Martin, Paul J; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storb, Rainer; Sorror, Mohamed L

    2015-08-01

    Pretransplant values of serum ferritin, albumin, and peripheral blood counts were previously suggested to provide prognostic information about hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes. Whether these "biomarkers" have prognostic value independent of each other and the HCT-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) is unknown. We analyzed data from 3917 allogeneic HCT recipients at multiple sites in the United States and Italy using multivariate models including each biomarker and the HCT-CI. Data from all sites were then randomly divided into a training set (n = 2352) to develop weights for the relevant biomarkers to be added to the HCT-CI scores and a validation set (n = 1407) to validate an augmented HCT-CI compared with the original index. Multivariate analysis with data from one site showed that ferritin, albumin, and platelets-not neutrophils or hemoglobin-were independently associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and decreased overall survival. Findings were validated in data from the other sites. Subsequently, in a training set from all sites, ferritin >2500 mg/dL (hazard ratio [HR], 1.69); albumin 3 to 3.5 g/dL (HR, 1.61) and <3.0 g/dL (HR, 2.27); and platelets 50 to <100,000 (HR, 1.28), 20 to <50,000 (HR, 1.29), and <20,000 (HR, 1.55) were statistically significantly associated with NRM. Weights were assigned to these laboratory values following the same equation used to design the original index. In the validation set, the addition of the biomarkers to the original index to develop an augmented HCT-CI resulted in a statistically significant increase in a higher c-statistic estimate for prediction of NRM (P = .0007). Ferritin, albumin, and platelet counts are important prognostic markers that further refine the discriminative power of the HCT-CI for transplant outcomes.

  4. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. III. Characterization of allogeneic bone marrow cell populations that increase allogeneic chimerism independently of graft-vs-host disease in mixed marrow recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Chester, C.H.; Sundt, T.M.; Romick, M.L.; Hoyles, K.A.; Sachs, D.H. )

    1989-12-01

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease vs failure of alloengraftment severely limit the success of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation as a therapeutic modality. We have recently used a murine bone marrow transplantation model involving reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with mixtures of allogeneic and syngeneic marrow to demonstrate that an allogeneic bone marrow subpopulation, removed by T cell depletion with rabbit anti-mouse brain serum and complement (RAMB/C), is capable of increasing levels of allogeneic chimerism. This effect was observed in an F1 into parent genetic combination lacking the potential for graft-vs-host disease, and radiation protection studies suggested that it was not due to depletion of stem cells by RAMB/C. We have now attempted to characterize the cell population responsible for increasing allogeneic chimerism in this model. The results indicate that neither mature T cells nor NK cells are responsible for this activity. However, an assay involving mixed marrow reconstitution in an Ly-5 congenic strain combination was found to be more sensitive to small degrees of stem cell depletion than radiation protection assays using three-fold titrations of bone marrow cells. Using this assay, we were able to detect some degree of stem cell depletion by treatment with RAMB/C, but not with anti-T cell mAb. Nevertheless, if the effects of alloresistance observed in this model are considered, the degree of stem cell depletion detected by such mixing studies in insufficient to account for the effects of RAMB/C depletion on levels of allogeneic chimerism, suggesting that another cell population with this property remains to be identified.

  5. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients.

  6. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  7. Preventive azithromycin treatment reduces noninfectious lung injury and acute graft-versus-host disease in a murine model of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sabarinath Venniyil; Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Mueller, Gunnar; Miklos, Sandra; Hager, Max; Spacenko, Elena; Karlsson, Fridrik J; Huber, Elisabeth; Kittan, Nicolai A; Hildebrandt, Gerhard C

    2015-01-01

    Noninfectious lung injury and acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Azithromycin is widely used in allogeneic HCT recipients for pulmonary chronic GVHD, although current data appear controversial. We induced GVHD and noninfectious lung injury in lethally irradiated B6D2F1 mice by transplanting bone marrow and splenic T cells from allogeneic C57BL/6 mice. Experimental groups were treated with oral azithromycin starting on day 14 until the end of week 6 or week 14 after transplantation. Azithromycin treatment resulted in improved survival and decreased lung injury; the latter characterized by improved pulmonary function, reduced peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cell infiltrates along with diminished collagen deposition, and a decrease in lung cytokine and chemokine expression. Azithromycin also improved intestinal GVHD but did not affect liver GVHD at week 6 early after transplantation. At week 14, azithromycin decreased liver GVHD but had no effect on intestinal GVHD. In vitro, allogeneic antigen-presenting cell (APC)- dependent T cell proliferation and cytokine production were suppressed by azithromycin and inversely correlated with relative regulatory T cell (Treg) expansion, whereas no effect was seen when T cell proliferation occurred APC independently through CD3/CD28-stimulation. Further, azithromycin reduced alloreactive T cell expansion but increased Treg expansion in vivo with corresponding downregulation of MHC II on CD11c(+) dendritic cells. These results demonstrate that preventive administration of azithromycin can reduce the severity of acute GVHD and noninfectious lung injury after allo-HCT, supporting further investigation in clinical trials.

  8. Allogeneic Splenocyte Transfer and Lipopolysaccharide Inhalations Induce Differential T Cell Expansion and Lung Injury: A Novel Model of Pulmonary Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jesse; Kelly, Francine L.; Nelson, Margaret E.; Garantziotis, Stavros; Foster, W. Michael; Palmer, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary GVHD (pGVHD) is an important complication of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) and is thought to be a consequence of the HCT conditioning regimen, allogeneic donor cells, and posttransplant lung exposures. We have previously demonstrated that serial inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposures potentiate the development of pGVHD after murine allogeneic HCT. In the current study we hypothesized that allogeneic lymphocytes and environmental exposures alone, in the absence of a pre-conditioning regimen, would cause features of pGVHD and would lead to a different T cell expansion pattern compared to syngeneic cells. Methods Recipient Rag1−/− mice received a transfer of allogeneic (Allo) or syngeneic (Syn) spleen cells. After 1 week of immune reconstitution, mice received 5 daily inhaled LPS exposures and were sacrificed 72 hours after the last LPS exposure. Lung physiology, histology, and protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were assessed. Lung cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Both Allo and Syn mice that undergo LPS exposures (AlloLPS and SynLPS) have prominent lymphocytic inflammation in their lungs, resembling pGVHD pathology, not seen in LPS-unexposed or non-transplanted controls. Compared to SynLPS, however, AlloLPS have significantly increased levels of BAL protein and enhancement of airway hyperreactivity, consistent with more severe lung injury. This injury in AlloLPS mice is associated with an increase in CD8 T cells and effector CD4 T cells, as well as a decrease in regulatory to effector CD4 T cell ratio. Additionally, cytokine analysis is consistent with a preferential Th1 differentiation and upregulation of pulmonary CCL5 and granzyme B. Conclusions Allogeneic lymphocyte transfer into lymphocyte-deficient mice, followed by LPS exposures, causes features of pGVHD and lung injury in the absence of a pre-conditioning HCT regimen. This lung disease associated with an expansion of allogeneic effector T cells

  9. Allogeneic Marrow Transplantation in Patients With Severe Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Richard A.; McSweeney, Peter A.; Nelson, J. Lee; Wener, Mark; Georges, George E.; Langston, Amelia A.; Shulman, Howard; Sullivan, Keith M.; Lee, Julie; Henstorf, Gretchen; Storb, Rainer; Furst, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after myeloablative conditioning in patients with severe systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods Eligibility criteria for the study included SSc patients with features indicative of a poor prognosis. The myeloablative conditioning regimen included busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and antithymocyte globulin. Prophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) consisted of cyclosporine and methotrexate. Bone marrow was transplanted from HLA-identical siblings. Results Two patients with diffuse cutaneous SSc and lung involvement who were refractory to conventional immunosuppressive treatment were enrolled in the study. In patient 1, there were no complications related to the conditioning regimen, and GVHD did not develop after transplantation. At 5 years after HCT, there was nearly complete resolution of the scleroderma and marked improvement in physical functioning. Internal organ function improved (lung) or remained stable. On examination of serial skin biopsy samples, there was resolution of the dermal fibrosis. Patient 2 experienced skin toxicity from the conditioning regimen and hypertensive crisis that was likely related to high-dose corticosteroids given for treatment of GVHD. Although this patient experienced an improvement in scleroderma and overall functioning, a fatal opportunistic infection developed 17 months after HCT. Conclusion Allogeneic HCT may result in sustained remission of SSc. GVHD and opportunistic infections are the major risks associated with allogeneic HCT for SSc, as for allogeneic HCT in general. PMID:16732546

  10. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy in patients with iron overload after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Krahl, Rainer; Jaekel, Nadja; Niederwieser, Dietger; Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Excess body iron could persist for years after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with possible deleterious sequels. An iron depletive therapy with phlebotomy seems rational. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy without erythropoietin support in non-thalassemic adult patients with iron overload after HCT and the impact of pre- and post-HCT hemochromatosis (HFE) genotype on iron mobilization were investigated. Patients and methods: Phlebotomy was initiated in 61 recipients of allografts due to hematologic malignancies (median age 48 years) after a median of 18 months. The prephlebotomy median serum ferritin (SF) was 1697ng/ml and the median number of blood transfusions 28 units. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT)/aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphates (AP), and bilirubin were elevated in 55.7%, 64% and 11.5% patients respectively. HFE-genotype was elucidated by polymerase chain reaction using hybridization probes and melting curve analysis. Results: Phlebotomy was well-tolerated irrespective of age or conditioning. A negative iron balance in 80% of patients (median SF 1086 ng/ml) and a rise in hemoglobin were observed (p<0.0001). Higher transfusional burden and SF were associated with a greater iron mobilization per session (p=0.02). In 58% of patients, a plateau after an initial steady decline in SF was followed by a second decline under further phlebotomy. The improvement in ALT (p=0.002), AST (p=0.03), AP (p=0.01), and bilirubin (p<0.0001) did not correlate with the decline in SF. Mutant HFE-gene variants were detected in 14/55 (25%) pre-HCT and 22/55 (40%) patients post-HCT. Overall, dissimilar pre- and posttransplantational HFE-genotypes were detected in 20/55 (40%) patients. Posttransplantational mutant HFE variants correlated with a slower decline in SF (p=0.007). Conclusions: Phlebotomy is a convenient therapy of iron overload in survivors of HCT. A negative iron balance and a rise in hemoglobin were observed in the majority of

  11. Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Fanconi Anemia and Bone Marrow Failure.

    PubMed

    Ayas, Mouhab; Eapen, Mary; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Carreras, Jeanette; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Alter, Blanche P; Anderlini, Paolo; Battiwalla, Minoo; Bierings, Marc; Buchbinder, David K; Bonfim, Carmem; Camitta, Bruce M; Fasth, Anders L; Gale, Robert Peter; Lee, Michelle A; Lund, Troy C; Myers, Kasiani C; Olsson, Richard F; Page, Kristin M; Prestidge, Tim D; Radhi, Mohamed; Shah, Ami J; Schultz, Kirk R; Wirk, Baldeep; Wagner, John E; Deeg, H Joachim

    2015-10-01

    A second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the sole salvage option for individuals who develop graft failure after their first HCT. Data on outcomes after second HCT in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) are scarce. Here we report outcomes after second allogeneic HCT for FA (n = 81). The indication for second HCT was graft failure after the first HCT. Transplantations were performed between 1990 and 2012. The timing of the second HCT predicted subsequent graft failure and survival. Graft failure was high when the second HCT was performed less than 3 months from the first. The 3-month probability of graft failure was 69% when the interval between the first HCT and second HCT was less than 3 months, compared with 23% when the interval was longer (P < .001). Consequently, the 1-year survival rate was substantially lower when the interval between the first and second HCTs was less than 3 months compared with longer (23% vs 58%; P = .001). The corresponding 5-year probability of survival was 16% and 45%, respectively (P = .006). Taken together, these data suggest that fewer than one-half of patients with FA undergoing a second HCT for graft failure are long-term survivors. There is an urgent need to develop strategies to reduce the rate of graft failure after first HCT. PMID:26116087

  12. Who is fit for allogeneic transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    The use of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has expanded progressively, facilitated by the increasing availability of unrelated donors and cord blood, and the inclusion of older patients as transplantation candidates. Indications remain diagnosis-dependent. As novel nontransplantation modalities have been developed concurrently, many patients come to HCT only when no longer responding to such therapy. However, patients with refractory or advanced disease frequently relapse after HCT, even with high-dose conditioning, and more so with reduced-intensity regimens as used for patients of older age or with comorbid conditions. Thus, patients with high-risk malignancies who have substantial comorbidities or are of advanced age are at high risk of both relapse and nonrelapse mortality and should probably not be transplanted. Being in remission or at least having shown responsiveness to pre-HCT therapy is generally associated with increased transplantation success. In addition, to handle the stress associated with HCT, patients need a good social support system and a secure financial net. They must be well informed, not only about the transplantation process, but also about expected or potential post-HCT events, including graft-versus-host disease and delayed effects that may become manifest only years after HCT. PMID:20702782

  13. Utility of the Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Interferon-γ-Release Assay to Predict the Risk of Cytomegalovirus Infection in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Lior; Shah, Dimpy P; Ariza-Heredia, Ella J; Azzi, Jacques M; Siddiqui, Hala K; Ghantoji, Shasank S; Marsh, Lisa Y; Michailidis, Lamprinos; Makedonas, George; Rezvani, Katy; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Chemaly, Roy F

    2016-06-01

    The ability to distinguish allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients at risk for cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation from those who are not is central for optimal CMV management strategies. Interferon γ (IFN-γ) produced by CMV-challenged T cells may serve as an immune marker differentiating these 2 populations. We prospectively monitored 63 CMV-seropositive allo-HCT recipients with a CMV-specific enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay and for CMV infection from the period before transplantation to day 100 after transplantation. Assay results above certain thresholds (50 spots per 250 000 cells for immediate early 1 or 100 spots per 250 000 cells for phosphoprotein 65) identified patients who were protected against CMV infection as long as they had no graft-versus-host disease and/or were not receiving systemic corticosteroids. Based on the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model, the only significant factor for preventing CMV reactivation was a CMV-specific ELISPOT response above the determined thresholds (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, .05-.97; P = .046). Use of this assay as an additional tool for managing allo-HCT recipients at risk for CMV reactivation needs further validation in future studies. Application of this new approach may reduce the duration and intensity of CMV monitoring and the duration of prophylaxis or treatment with antiviral agents in those who have achieved CMV-specific immune reconstitution. PMID:26908740

  14. Utility of the Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Interferon-γ–Release Assay to Predict the Risk of Cytomegalovirus Infection in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nesher, Lior; Shah, Dimpy P.; Ariza-Heredia, Ella J.; Azzi, Jacques M.; Siddiqui, Hala K.; Ghantoji, Shasank S.; Marsh, Lisa Y.; Michailidis, Lamprinos; Makedonas, George; Rezvani, Katy; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Chemaly, Roy F.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to distinguish allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients at risk for cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation from those who are not is central for optimal CMV management strategies. Interferon γ (IFN-γ) produced by CMV-challenged T cells may serve as an immune marker differentiating these 2 populations. We prospectively monitored 63 CMV-seropositive allo-HCT recipients with a CMV-specific enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay and for CMV infection from the period before transplantation to day 100 after transplantation. Assay results above certain thresholds (50 spots per 250 000 cells for immediate early 1 or 100 spots per 250 000 cells for phosphoprotein 65) identified patients who were protected against CMV infection as long as they had no graft-versus-host disease and/or were not receiving systemic corticosteroids. Based on the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model, the only significant factor for preventing CMV reactivation was a CMV-specific ELISPOT response above the determined thresholds (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, .05–.97; P = .046). Use of this assay as an additional tool for managing allo-HCT recipients at risk for CMV reactivation needs further validation in future studies. Application of this new approach may reduce the duration and intensity of CMV monitoring and the duration of prophylaxis or treatment with antiviral agents in those who have achieved CMV-specific immune reconstitution. PMID:26908740

  15. Plasma metabolomics profiling for the prediction of cytomegalovirus DNAemia and analysis of virus–host interaction in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Monleón, Daniel; Giménez, Estela; Muñoz-Cobo, Beatriz; Morales, José Manuel; Solano, Carlos; Amat, Paula; Navarro, David

    2015-11-01

    Metabolomics analysis of biofluids is increasingly being recognized as a useful tool for the diagnosis and management of a number of infectious diseases. Here we showed that plasma metabolomics profiling by untargeted 1H nuclear magnetic resonance may allow the anticipation of the occurrence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNAemia in allogeneic stem cell transplant. For this purpose, key discriminatory metabolites were total glutathione, taurine, methylamine, trimethylamine N-oxide and lactate, all of which were upregulated in patients eventually developing CMV DNAemia. The overall classification accuracy (predictability) of the projection to latent structure discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model in cross-validation technical replicates was 73 %. Increased levels of alanine, lactate and total fatty acids, and a shift in the fatty acid profile towards unsaturated species, were observed in patients with detectable CMV DNA in plasma. The classification accuracy of this PLS-DA model in cross-validation technical replicates was 81 %. Plasma metabolomics profiling may prove useful for identifying patients at highest risk for CMV DNAemia thus allowing early inception of antiviral therapy.

  16. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Rezvani, Andrew; Storb, Rainer F

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a potentially curative procedure for a variety of hematologic malignancies. The field has evolved substantially over the past decade, with advances in patient and donor selection, stem cell sources, supportive care, prevention of complications and reduced-toxicity preparative regimens. As a result, the indications for HCT and the pool of eligible patients have expanded significantly. In this article, we provide an overview of the major aspects of allogeneic HCT, and focus specifically on areas of active research and on novel approaches to challenges in the field. Specifically, we will discuss approaches to reduce the toxicity of the preparative regimen, with the goal of increasing the safety and applicability of HCT. The availability of suitable donors may be an obstacle to wider application of HCT. We review three major approaches to broadening the donor pool: the use of HLA-mismatched unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood and HLA-haploidentical family donors. Graft-versus-host disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality after HCT. We review recent advances in the understanding of this phenomenon, and novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches that hold the promise of further improving the safety of the procedure. We conclude with a speculative outline of the next 5 years of research in the field of HCT. PMID:20871781

  17. Effect of Conditioning Regimen Intensity on CMV Infection in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamae, Hirohisa; Kirby, Katharine A.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Norasetthada, Lalita; Maloney, David G.; Maris, Michael B.; Davis, Chris; Corey, Lawrence; Storb, Rainer; Boeckh, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Nonmyeloablative conditioning is less toxic and results in initial establishment of mixed hematopoietic T cell chimerism for up to half a year with prolonged presence of host T cell immunity. In this study, we examined whether this translates into differences in the risks and/or severity of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and disease. We analyzed data from 537 nonmyeloablative (NM-HCT) and contemporaneous 2489 myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplant (M-HCT) recipients. In CMV seropositive recipients, no difference in the overall hazards of CMV infection at any level [adjusted hazard ratio (adj. HR) 0.9, 95% confidence interval (95%CI): 0.7-1.0, P=0.14] was noted; however, NM-HCT was associated with a lower risk of high-grade CMV infection (adj. HR 0.7, 95%CI: 0.5-0.9, P=0.02). CMV disease rates were similar between the groups during the first 100 days after HCT but NM-HCT recipients had an increased risk of late CMV disease (adj. HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.4). The increased risk of late CMV disease after NM-HCT was pronounced during the earlier years of the study period but not detectable in more recent years. Contrary to earlier reports, survival following CMV disease was not reduced after NM-HCT when compared to M-HCT recipients. These results suggest that residual host cells after NM-HCT reduce progression to higher CMV viral load in NM-HCT recipients; however, this effect does not appear to protect against serious complications of CMV. Therefore, CMV prevention strategies in NM-HCT recipients should be similar to those used in M-HCT recipients. PMID:19450754

  18. Immunogenicity, Safety, and Tolerability of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Followed by 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine in Recipients of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Aged ≥2 Years: An Open-Label Study

    PubMed Central

    Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per; Juergens, Christine; Maertens, Johan; Selleslag, Dominik; Sundaraiyer, Vani; Giardina, Peter C.; Clarke, Keri; Gruber, William C.; Scott, Daniel A.; Schmoele-Thoma, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Background. Life-threatening Streptococcus pneumoniae infections often occur after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT); vaccination is important for prevention. Methods. In an open-label study, patients (n = 251) 3–6 months after allogeneic HSCT received 3 doses of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) at 1-month intervals, a fourth dose 6 months later, and 1 dose of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) 1 month later. Immunogenicity at prespecified time points and vaccine safety were assessed. Results. In the evaluable immunogenicity population (N = 216; mean age, 37.8 years), geometric mean fold rises (GMFRs) of immunoglobulin G geometric mean concentrations from baseline to postdose 3 showed significant increases in antibody levels across all PCV13 serotypes (GMFR range, 2.99–23.85; 95% confidence interval lower limit, >1); there were significant declines over the next 6 months, significant increases from predose 4 to postdose 4 (GMFR range, 3.00–6.97), and little change after PPSV23 (GMFR range, 0.86–1.12). Local and systemic reactions were more frequent after dose 4. Six patients experienced serious adverse events possibly related to PCV13 (facial diplegia, injection-site erythema and pyrexia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and suspected lack of vaccine efficacy after dose 3 leading to pneumococcal infection), PCV13 and PPSV23 (Guillain-Barré syndrome), or PPSV23 (cellulitis). There were 14 deaths, none related to study vaccines. Conclusions. A 3-dose PCV13 regimen followed by a booster dose may be required to protect against pneumococcal disease in HSCT recipients. Dose 4 was associated with increased local and systemic reactions, but the overall safety profile of a 4-dose regimen was considered acceptable. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00980655. PMID:25870329

  19. Analysis of cytokine production and V beta T-cell receptor subsets in irradiated recipients receiving portal or peripheral venous reconstitution with allogeneic bone marrow cells, with or without additional anti-cytokine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynski, R M; Chen, Z; Zeng, H; Gorczynski, L; Terzioglu, E

    1998-01-01

    Irradiated (800 rads) AKR mice received intravenous (i.v.) reconstitution with a mixture of B10.BR T-depleted bone marrow cells and spleen cells. Only in groups of mice treated additionally with i.v. cyclophosphamide (Cy; 150 mg/kg), 24 hr before transplantation, was long-term (> 60% at 50 days) survival seen. In mice receiving only irradiation all animals died by 30 days post-transplantation. Histological changes consistent with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were seen in the liver of reconstituted mice at 30 days, along with an organ-specific increase in V beta 3 T-cell receptor-positive (TCR+) cells. No such increase in V beta 3 TCR+ cells was seen in the spleen from the same mice. These data are consistent with a tissue antigen-driven expansion of V beta 3 TCR+ cells associated with GVHD in the liver in this model. When we analysed cytokine production in vitro from CD3+ cells restimulated with 'host' (AKR) antigen-presenting cells (APC), we found a transition in cytokine production from preferential synthesis of type-1 cytokines [interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)] at early times (day 15) post-reconstitution to increased production of type-2 cytokines [IL-4, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and IL-10] at later times (day 30) post-reconstitution in Cy-treated recipients. Animals not receiving Cy did not show this 'switch' in cytokine production at later time points. We have observed a similar polarization in cytokine production, along with increased graft survival, in recipients of vascularized and non-vascularized allografts after portal venous (p.v.), but not i.v., pretransplant donor-specific immunization. We next studied AKR mice receiving 800 rads and subsequently reconstituted with B10.BR stem cells via the p.v. route. Again these mice showed prolonged survival (> 50% at 50 days), with polarization to IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-beta on restimulation of CD3+ cells in vitro at 30 days post-transplant and increased V beta 3 TCR+ cells

  20. Reduced Intensity Allogeneic Transplant In Patients Older Than 55 Years: Unrelated Umbilical Cord Blood Is Safe And Effective For Patients Without A Matched Related Donor

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet S; Brunstein, Claudio G; Tomblyn, Marcie; Thomas, Avis J; Miller, Jeffrey S; Arora, Mukta; Kaufman, Dan S; Burns, Linda J; Slungaard, Arne; McGlave, Philip B; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    The lower morbidity and mortality of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have allowed allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in older patients. Unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been investigated as an alternative stem cell source to suitably HLA matched related (MRD) and adult volunteer unrelated donors. We hypothesized that RIC HCT using UCB would be safe and efficacious in older patients and compared the transplant related mortality (TRM) and overall survival of RIC HCT in patients older than 55 years using either MRD (n=47) or, in patients with no 5/6 or 6/6 HLA compatible related donors, UCB (n=43). RIC regimen consisted of total-body irradiation (200 cGy) and either cyclophosphamide and fludarabine (n=69), or busulfan and fludarabine (n=16) or busulfan and cladribine (n=5). The median age of MRD and UCB cohorts was 58 (range, 55-70) and 59 (range, 55-69) years, respectively. AML/MDS (50%) was the most common diagnosis. All MRD grafts were 6 of 6 HLA matched to the recipient. Among patients undergoing UCB HCT, 88% received two UCB units to optimize cell dose and 93% received 1-2 HLA mismatched grafts. The median followup for survivors was 27 (range, 12-61) months. The 3-year probabilities of progression-free survival (30% vs. 34%, p=0.98) and overall survival (43% vs. 34%, p=0.57) were similar for recipients of MRD and UCB. The cumulative incidence of grade 2-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (42% vs. 49%, p=0.20) and TRM at 180-days (23% vs. 28%, p=0.36) were comparable. However, UCB recipients had a lower incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease at 1-year (40% vs. 17%, p=0.02). On multivariate analysis, graft type had no impact on TRM or survival and HCT comorbidity index score was the only factor independently predictive for these endpoints. Our study supports the use of HLA mismatched UCB as an alternative graft source for older patients who need a transplant but do not have a MRD. The use of RIC and UCB extends the

  1. Emerging Influence of the Intestinal Microbiota during Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Control the Gut and the Body Will Follow.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Melissa D; Auletta, Jeffery J; Jenq, Robert R

    2015-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota has many critical roles in maintaining gastrointestinal epithelial and gastrointestinal systemic immune homeostasis. This review provides insight into how allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and its associated complications and supportive care therapies affect the microbiota. Additionally, the review discusses how preservation and restoration of the microbiota might be advantageous in decreasing HCT-related morbidity and mortality.

  2. Comparison of chimerism and minimal residual disease monitoring for relapse prediction after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Terwey, Theis Helge; Hemmati, Philipp Georg; Nagy, Marion; Pfeifer, Heike; Gökbuget, Nicola; Brüggemann, Monika; Le Duc, Tanja Melinh; le Coutre, Philipp; Dörken, Bernd; Arnold, Renate

    2014-10-01

    Little data are available on the relative merits of chimerism and minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring for relapse prediction after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). We performed a retrospective analysis of serial chimerism assessments in 101 adult HCT recipients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and of serial MRD assessments in a subgroup of 22 patients. All patients had received myeloablative conditioning. The cumulative incidence of relapse was significantly higher in the patients with increasing mixed chimerism (in-MC) compared with those with complete chimerism, low-level MC, and decreasing MC, but the sensitivity of in-MC detection with regard to relapse prediction was only modest. In contrast, MRD assessment was highly sensitive and specific. Patients with MRD positivity after HCT had the highest incidence of relapse among all prognostic groups analyzed. The median time from MRD positivity to relapse was longer than the median time from detection of in-MC, but in some cases in-MC preceded MRD positivity. We conclude that MRD assessment is a powerful prognostic tool that should be included in the routine post-transplantation monitoring of patients with ALL, but chimerism analysis may provide additional information in some cases. Integration of these tools and clinical judgment should allow optimal decision making with regard to post-transplantation therapeutic interventions.

  3. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch increases mortality after myeloablative unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stephanie J.; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Spellman, Stephen; Wang, Hai-Lin; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Dehn, Jason; Fernandez Viña, Marcelo; Gratwohl, Alois; Gupta, Vikas; Hanna, Rabi; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hurley, Carolyn K.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kassim, Adetola A.; Nishihori, Taiga; Mueller, Carlheinz; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Prasad, Vinod; Robinson, James; Saber, Wael; Schultz, Kirk R.; Shaw, Bronwen; Storek, Jan; Wood, William A.; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Anasetti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    We examined current outcomes of unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to determine the clinical implications of donor-recipient HLA matching. Adult and pediatric patients who had first undergone myeloablative-unrelated bone marrow or peripheral blood HCT for acute myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome between 1999 and 2011 were included. All had high-resolution typing for HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1. Of the total (n = 8003), cases were 8/8 (n = 5449), 7/8 (n = 2071), or 6/8 (n = 483) matched. HLA mismatch (6-7/8) conferred significantly increased risk for grades II to IV and III to IV acute graft vs host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, transplant-related mortality (TRM), and overall mortality compared with HLA-matched cases (8/8). Type (allele/antigen) and locus (HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1) of mismatch were not associated with overall mortality. Among 8/8 matched cases, HLA-DPB1 and -DQB1 mismatch resulted in increased acute GVHD, and HLA-DPB1 mismatch had decreased relapse. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 allele mismatch was associated with higher TRM compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch or HLA-DPB1 match and increased overall mortality compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch in 8/8 (and 10/10) matched cases. Full matching at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 is required for optimal unrelated donor HCT survival, and avoidance of nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatches in otherwise HLA-matched pairs is indicated. PMID:25161269

  4. Barriers to accessing health care for hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients living in rural areas: perspectives from healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Moore, Heather K; Santibañez, Martha E Burton; Denzen, Ellen M; Carr, Diane W; Murphy, Elizabeth A

    2013-08-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a curative therapy for patients with malignant and nonmalignant bone marrow disorders. Life after transplantation can vary significantly among HCT recipients, who deal with a variety of physical and emotional issues. This presents numerous challenges, particularly for rural recipients who are required to travel long distances to access specialized HCT care. The objective of this study was to better understand barriers to providing care for HCT recipients living in rural areas. This study uses a cross-sectional design to collect primary data via an Internet survey of HCT healthcare providers. The authors analyzed factors restricting post-HCT care and whether having standard post-transplantation care instructions influenced the resources provided to distant-to-care recipients. Respondents reported limited transportation, coordination of care, and distance to facility as major barriers to post-HCT care, regardless of the number of distant-to-care recipients treated annually. HCT centers with standard post-transplantation care instructions were more likely to provide visits from social workers and medical leave resources to distant-to-care recipients. These instructions may improve recipient and local provider ability to make informed decisions regarding post-HCT care. The findings will help guide the development of programs and resources targeted to recipients of HCT who are distant to care.

  5. ABO mismatch is associated with increased non-relapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Aaron C.; Wang, Zhiyu; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Wong, Ruby M.; Lai, Tze; Negrin, Robert S.; Grumet, Carl; Logan, Brent R.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Spellman, Stephen R.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Miklos, David B.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated ABO associated outcomes in 1,737 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) at Stanford University between January 1986 and July 2011. Grafts were 61% ABO matched, 18% major mismatched (MM), 17% minor MM, and 4% bidirectional MM. Median follow-up was 6 years. In multivariate analysis, OS was inferior in minor MM HCT (median 2.1 vs 6.3 years; HR 1.56; 95%CI 1.19-2.05; p=0.001) in comparison with ABO matched grafts. ABO minor MM was associated with an increase in early NRM (18% vs 13%; HR 1.48, 95%CI 1.06-2.06; p=0.02). In an independent Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) analysis of 435 lymphoma patients receiving mobilized peripheral blood grafts, impairment of OS (HR 1.55; 95%CI 1.07 – 2.25; p=0.021) and increased NRM (HR 1.72; 95%CI 1.11 – 2.68; p=0.03) was observed in recipients of ABO minor MM grafts. A second independent analysis of a CIBMTR dataset including 5,179 patients with AML and MDS identified a non-significant trend toward decreased OS in recipients of ABO minor MM grafts and also found ABO major MM to be significantly associated with decreased OS (HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.08 – 1.31, p<0.001) and increased NRM (HR 1.23, 95%CI 1.08 – 1.4, p=0.002). ABO minor and major MM are risk factors for worse transplant outcomes, although the associated hazards may not be uniform across different transplant populations. Further study is warranted to determine which patient populations are at greatest risk, and whether this risk can be modified by anti-B-cell therapy or other peri-transplant treatments. PMID:25572032

  6. Relapse of lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: management strategies and outcome.

    PubMed

    Wudhikarn, Kitsada; Brunstein, Claudio G; Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J; Cao, Qing; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    The outcome and management of relapsed lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is difficult. Therapeutic options may include donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI), reduction of immunosuppression (RIS), chemotherapy, radiation, immunotherapy, second HCT, and experimental treatments, but reported data contrasting the response and efficacy of these salvage treatments are limited. We describe the treatments, response, prognosis, and long-term survival of 72 patients with relapse of lymphoma after allogeneic HCT. Between 1991 and 2007, 227 lymphoma patients underwent allogeneic HCT. Of these, 72 (32%) developed relapse/progression after their HCT at a median of 99 days (0-1898 days); 37 had early (<100 days) post-HCT relapse. Forty-four had non-Hodgkin lymphoma (7 mantle cell, 5 indolent, 15 diffuse large B cell, 4 Burkitt's, and 13 T/Natural Killer cell), and 28 patients had Hodgkin lymphoma. At the time of HCT, 62 patients were in remission (22 in complete [CR] and 40 in partial [PR]), 1 had stable whereas 9 had progressive disease. Seventeen cases received myeloablative and 55 received a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. At relapse, most patients had generalized lymphadenopathy, extranodal organ involvement, and advanced disease. Five patients received no intervention for the post-HCT relapse. Immunosuppressive treatment was reduced or withdrawn as the first-line therapy in 58 patients (80.5%); 47 were treated using combinations of conventional chemotherapy (n = 22), rituximab (n = 27), interferon (IFN) (n = 1), DLI (n = 7), second HCT (n = 2), local radiation (n = 23), and other therapy (n = 6). Thirty-eight patients had an objective response (CR in 30, PR in 8), and 2 had stable disease (SD). At the post-HCT relapse, favorable prognostic factors for survival after HCT included good ECOG performance status (0-2), normal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), early stage disease (stage I-III), isolated extranodal organ involvement, and later relapse

  7. Effects of T-Cell Depletion on Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Outcomes in AML Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Gabriela Soriano; Perales, Miguel-Angel

    2015-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality associated with conventional allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). The use of T-cell depletion significantly reduces this complication. Recent prospective and retrospective data suggest that, in patients with AML in first complete remission, CD34+ selected grafts afford overall and relapse-free survival comparable to those observed in recipients of conventional grafts, while significantly decreasing GVHD. In addition, CD34+ selected grafts allow older patients, and those with medical comorbidities or with only HLA-mismatched donors to successfully undergo transplantation. Prospective data are needed to further define which groups of patients with AML are most likely to benefit from CD34+ selected grafts. Here we review the history of T-cell depletion in AML, and techniques used. We then summarize the contemporary literature using CD34+ selection in recipients of matched or partially mismatched donors (7/8 or 8/8 HLA-matched), and provide a summary of the risks and benefits of using T-cell depletion. PMID:26239251

  8. Second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for Patients with Fanconi anemia and Bone Marrow Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ayas, Mouhab; Eapen, Mary; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Carreras, Jeanette; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Alter, Blanche P.; Anderlini, Paolo; Battiwalla, Minoo; Bierings, Marc; Buchbinder, David K.; Bonfim, Carmem; Camitta, Bruce M.; Fasth, Anders L.; Gale, Robert Peter; Lee, Michelle A.; Lund, Troy C.; Myers, Kasiani C.; Olsson, Richard F.; Page, Kristin M.; Prestidge, Tim D.; Radhi, Mohamed; Shah, Ami J.; Schultz, Kirk R.; Wirk, Baldeep; Wagner, John E.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only salvage option for those for develop graft failure after their first HCT. Data on outcomes after second HCT in Fanconi anemia (FA) are scarce. We report outcomes after second allogeneic HCT for FA (n=81). The indication for second HCT was graft failure after the first HCT. Transplants occurred between 1990 and 2012. The timing of second transplantation predicted subsequent graft failure and survival. Graft failure was high when the second transplant occurred less than 3 months from the first. The 3-month probability of graft failure was 69% when the interval between first and second transplant was less than 3 months compared to 23% when the interval was longer (p<0.001). Consequently, survival rates were substantially lower when the interval between first and second transplant was less than 3 months, 23% at 1-year compared to 58%, when the interval was longer (p=0.001). The corresponding 5-year probabilities of survival were 16% and 45%, respectively (p=0.006). Taken together, these data suggest that fewer than half of FA patients undergoing a second HCT for graft failure are long-term survivors. There is an urgent need to develop strategies to lower graft failure after first HCT. PMID:26116087

  9. Long-term oral complications of allogeneic haematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Hull, K M; Kerridge, I; Schifter, M

    2012-02-01

    This study assessed the incidence of long-term oral complications in 88 survivors of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Patients examined were between 6 months and 6 years post-HCT and aged from 19 to 65 years. Subjects were investigated for both the subjective and objective features of long-term adverse oral effects of HCT. The most common oral symptoms reported were xerostomia (44%, n=39) and reduction in taste (20%, n=18). Only a minority of patients (15%) reported that oral disease had a significant adverse impact upon their quality of life. The majority of patients (53%) had clinical markers of oral chronic GVHD (cGVHD). The most frequently identified feature was salivary hypofunction, with 34% of subjects demonstrating a reduction in stimulated saliva. Oral mucosal changes consistent with cGVHD affected 21% of subjects. Oral cGVHD commonly occurs after allogeneic HCT, often coexists with cutaneous, hepatic or ocular cGVHD and may lead to debilitating symptoms. Transplant type and pre-existing acute GVHD are the major risk factors for oral cGVHD. The identification of risk factors specific for oral cGVHD may allow clinicians some foresight into identifying patients at high risk of developing oral cGVHD and encourage attention to education, regular oral surveillance and rigorous preventative oral health strategies both pre- and post-transplant. PMID:21441960

  10. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Coco; Plantinga, Maud; Besseling, Paul; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has evolved into a potent curative treatment option for a variety of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The occurrence of complications and mortality after allo-HCT is, however, still high and is strongly associated with immune reconstitution (IR). Therefore, detailed information on IR through immunomonitoring is crucial to improve survival chances after HCT. To date, information about the reconstituting immune system after allo-HCT in pediatric patients is mostly derived from routine standard-of-care measurements. More profound knowledge on IR may provide tools to better predict and modulate adverse reactions and, subsequently, improve survival chances. Here, we provide an overview of IR (eg, immune cell subsets and circulating chemokines/cytokines) after allo-HCT in children, taking into account different cell sources and serotherapy, and discuss strategies to enhance immunomonitoring. We conclude that available IR data after allo-HCT contain limited information on immune cell families (mostly only generic T, B, and NK cells), which would improve with more detailed information on reconstituting cell subsets or effector cell functionality at earlier time points (<1 month). In addition, secretome data (eg, multiplex cytokine/chemokine profiles) could add to the understanding of IR mechanisms and cell functionality and may even provide (early) biomarkers for individual disease outcome, such as viral reactivity, graft-versus-host disease, or graft-versus-leukemia. The present data and suggestions for more detailed, standardized, and harmonized immunomonitoring in future (pediatric) allo-HCT studies will pave the path to "precision transplantation:" an individualized HCT approach (including conditioning), based on detailed information on IR and biomarkers, aiming to reduce transplantation related mortality and relapse, and subsequently improve survival chances.

  11. Donor-Recipient Matching for KIR Genotypes Reduces Chronic GVHD and Missing Inhibitory KIR Ligands Protect against Relapse after Myeloablative, HLA Matched Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Rehan Mujeeb; Kemp, Taylor J.; Dharmani-Khan, Poonam; Lewis, Victor; Rajalingam, Raja; Berka, Noureddine; Storek, Jan; Masood Khan, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Background Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can be curative for many hematologic diseases. However, complications such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and relapse of primary malignancy remain significant and are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Effects of killer Ig-like receptors (KIR)-influenced NK cells on HCT outcomes have been extensively pursued over the last decade. However, the relevance of the reported algorithms on HLA matched myeloablative HCT with rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used for GVHD prophylaxis remains elusive. Here we examined the role of KIR and KIR-ligands of donor-recipient pairs in modifying the outcomes of ATG conditioned HLA matched sibling and unrelated donor HCT Methods and Findings The study cohort consisted of 281 HLA matched sibling and unrelated donor-recipient pairs of first allogeneic marrow or blood stem cell transplantation allocated into ‘discovery’ (135 pairs) and ‘validation’ (146 pairs) cohorts. High resolution HLA typing was obtained from the medical charts and KIR gene repertoires were obtained by a Luminex® based SSO method. All surviving patients were followed-up for a minimum of two years. KIR and HLA class I distributions of HCT pairs were stratified as per applicable definitions and were tested for their association with cause specific outcomes [acute GVHD grade II-IV (aGVHD), chronic GVHD needing systemic therapy (cGVHD) and relapse] using a multivariate competing risks regression model as well as with survival outcomes [relapse-free survival (RFS), cGVHD & relapse free survival (cGRFS) and overall survival (OS)] by multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. A significant association between KIR genotype mismatching (KIR-B/x donor into KIR-AA recipient or vice versa) and cGVHD was found in both discovery (p = 0.001; SHR = 2.78; 95%CI: 1.50–5.17) and validation cohorts (p = 0.005; SHR = 2.61; 95%CI: 1.33–5.11). High incidence of cGVHD associated

  12. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Estey, Elihu

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of the elderly and the numbers of these patients are increasing. Patients ≥60 years of age continue to have poor prognosis. Preliminary results suggest benefit from reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in selected patients 60-80 years of age. However, although patients in this age range comprise >50% of those with AML, they currently constitute only 17% of those offered HCT. In the absence of prospective randomized studies comparing HCT and chemotherapy, the decision to recommend HCT rests on retrospective analyses of the risks of relapse and nonrelapse mortality after each approach. There is strong evidence that pre-HCT comorbidities can predict HCT-related morbidity and mortality. Age alone does not appear predictive and, particularly if the risk of relapse with chemotherapy is high, should not be the sole basis for deciding against HCT. Use of geriatric assessment tools, inflammatory biomarkers, and genetic polymorphism data may further aid in predicting nonrelapse mortality after HCT. Disease status and pretreatment cytogenetics with FLT3-TID, NPM-1, and CEBP-α status are the main factors predicting relapse and these are likely to be supplemented by incorporation of other molecular markers and the level of minimal residual disease after chemotherapy. HLA-matched related and unrelated donor grafts seem preferable to those from other donor sources. Donor age is of no clear significance. Models combining comorbidities with AML risk factors are useful in risk assessment before HCT. In this chapter, we integrated information on AML-specific, HCT-specific, and patient-specific risk factors into a risk-adapted approach to guide decisions about HCT versus no HCT.

  13. The effects of imatinib mesylate treatment before allogeneic transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oehler, Vivian G.; Gooley, Ted; Snyder, David S.; Johnston, Laura; Lin, Allen; Cummings, Carrie C.; Chu, Su; Bhatia, Ravi; Forman, Stephen J.; Negrin, Robert S.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Radich, Jerald P.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of imatinib mesylate (IM) treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) on subsequent allogeneic transplantation is uncertain. To better understand this relationship, we retrospectively compared 145 patients with CML receiving IM for a minimum of 3 months before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to 231 patients with CML who did not. IM treatment was associated with no increase in early hepatotoxicity or engraftment delay after HCT compared with the historical cohort. In addition, there was no statistically significant difference in the IM-treated cohort compared with the historical cohort with regard to overall survival, disease-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality. For chronic-phase (CP) patients, IM response prior to HCT was associated with post-HCT outcome. Patients who underwent transplantation in CP with a suboptimal response or a loss of response on IM had a statistically significant higher hazard of mortality when compared with CP patients who achieved a complete cytogenetic response (CCR) or major cytogenetic response (MCR) on IM (HR = 5.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-25.05, P = .03). These data indicate that pre-HCT IM is not associated with increased transplant-related morbidity (TRM) or poorer outcomes. However, patients with a suboptimal or loss of IM response before HCT do worse, suggesting a more aggressive disease course for these patients. PMID:17062727

  14. Practice variation in physician referral for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pidala, J; Craig, B M; Lee, S J; Majhail, N; Quinn, G; Anasetti, C

    2013-01-01

    Hematological malignancy patients not referred by their primary hematologist/medical oncologist suffer disparate access to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). However, investigation into physician, system and patient factors relevant to this decision making is lacking. We surveyed a national randomized sample of practicing hematologists/medical oncologists identified through the AMA (American Medical Association) masterfile. A modified Dillman approach was utilized to encourage survey response. From 1200 surveyed, a total of 113 physicians responded. In all, 68% were male, 62% identified as White/non-Hispanic, 79% practiced in non-academic settings and 80% reported spending 75-100% of their professional effort in clinical care. Using clinical vignettes, we detected significantly increased odds for HCT non-referral according to age (age 60 vs 30, odds ratio (OR) 8.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.9-11.7, P<0.0001), insurance coverage (no coverage vs coverage, OR 6.9, 95% CI: 5.2-9.1, P<0.0001) and race (African-American vs Caucasian, OR 2.4, 95% CI: 1.9-2.9, P<0.0001). Physician (perception of HCT risks), system (insurance coverage) and patient (age, social support and co-morbid illness) factors were strongly endorsed by respondents as important determinants of their HCT referral practices. These data speak to important factors relevant to HCT referral practices, and highlight several opportunities for education and intervention to reduce current disparities.

  15. Management of respiratory viral infections in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dimpy P; Ghantoji, Shashank S; Mulanovich, Victor E; Ariza-heredia, Ella J; Chemaly, Roy F

    2012-01-01

    Advances in stem cell transplantation procedures and the overall improvement in the clinical management of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients over the past 2 decades have led to an increase in survival duration, in part owing to better strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant complications, including opportunistic infections. However, post-HCT infections remain a concern for HCT recipients, particularly infections caused by community respiratory viruses (CRVs), which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. These viruses can potentially cause lower respiratory tract illness, which is associated with a higher mortality rate among HCT recipients. Clinical management of CRV infections in HCT recipients includes supportive care and antiviral therapy, especially in high-risk individuals, when available. Directed antiviral therapy is only available for influenza infections, where successful use of neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir or zanamivir) and/or M2 inhibitors (amantadine or rimantadine) has been reported. Data on the successful use of ribavirin, with or without immunomodulators, for respiratory syncytial virus infections in HCT recipients has emerged over the past 2 decades but is still controversial at best because of a lack of randomized controlled trials. Because of the lack of directed antiviral therapy for most of these viruses, prevention should be emphasized for healthcare workers, patients, family, and friends and should include the promotion of the licensed inactivated influenza vaccine for HCT recipients, when indicated. In this review, we discuss the clinical management of respiratory viruses in this special patient population, focusing on commercially available antivirals, adjuvant therapy, and novel drugs under investigation, as well as on available means for prevention. PMID:23226621

  16. Actinomycosis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation despite penicillin prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Barraco, F; Labussière-Wallet, H; Valour, F; Ducastelle-Leprêtre, S; Nicolini, F-E; Thomas, X; Ferry, T; Dumitrescu, O; Michallet, M; Ader, F

    2016-08-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare chronic and multifaceted disease caused by Actinomyces species frequently mimicking malignancy or other chronic granulomatous lung diseases. We report 4 original presentations of actinomycosis arising under supposed penicillin prophylaxis in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. PMID:27203624

  17. Persistent CMV infection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a CMV-seronegative donor-to-positive recipient constellation: Development of multidrug resistance in the absence of anti-viral cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Herling, Marco; Schröder, L; Awerkiew, Sabine; Chakupurakal, Geothy; Holtick, Udo; Kaiser, Rolf; Pfister, Herbert; Scheid, Christof; Di Cristanziano, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of persistent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) with discordant and high-risk (D-/R+) constellation of CMV serostatus. Despite the use of different and innovative antiviral strategies, viral replication could not be suppressed successfully promoting a protracted CMV colitis associated with severe gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease (GI GVHD). We illustrate that the development of multidrug viral resistance, the failure to mount a CMV-specific cellular immune response, as confirmed by QuantiFERON(®)-CMV (Qiagen) assay, and the refractory GVHD requiring prolonged immunosuppression were the main factors contributing to persistent viral replication and the fulminant unfavorable course.

  18. Significance of Persistent Cytogenetic Abnormalities at Myeloablative Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in First Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Betul; Popat, Uday; Rondon, Gabriella; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Abruzzo, Lynn; Andersson, Borje S.; Bashir, Qaiser; Chen, Julianne; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa F.; Koca, Ebru; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H.; Champlin, Richard; de Lima, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Risk stratification is important to identify acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients that might benefit from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) in first complete remission (CR1). We retrospectively studied 150 AML patients with diagnostic cytogenetic abnormalities receiving myeloablative allo-HCT in CR1 to determine the prognostic impact of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at allo-HCT. Three risk groups were identified: First group of patients with favorable/intermediate cytogenetics at diagnosis (n=49) and the second group with unfavorable cytogenetics at diagnosis but without the presence of persistent abnormal clone at allo-HCT (n=83) had similar 3-year leukemia free survival (LFS) of 58%-60% despite increased 3-year relapse incidence (RI) of 32.3% observed in the second risk group versus 16.8% in the first group. Third group of patients with unfavorable cytogenetics at diagnosis and persistence of that clone at allo-HCT (n=15) represented the worst prognostic group with 3-year RI of 57.5% and 3-year LFS of 29.2%. These data suggest that AML patients with unfavorable cytogenetics at diagnosis and persistence of abnormal clone at allo-HCT have high risk of relapse after allo-HCT. These patients should be considered for clinical trials designed to optimize conditioning regimens and/or to use preemptive strategies in the post-transplant setting to decrease the relapse incidence. PMID:22982533

  19. High-throughput allogeneic antibody detection using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jed; Sahaf, Bita; Perloff, Spenser; Schoenrock, Kelsi; Wu, Fang; Nakasone, Hideki; Coller, John; Miklos, David

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have traditionally been used to detect alloantibodies in patient plasma samples post hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT); however, protein microarrays have the potential to be multiplexed, more sensitive, and higher throughput than ELISAs. Here, we describe the development of a novel and sensitive microarray method for detection of allogeneic antibodies against minor histocompatibility antigens encoded on the Y chromosome, called HY antigens. Six microarray surfaces were tested for their ability to bind recombinant protein and peptide HY antigens. Significant allogeneic immune responses were determined in male patients with female donors by considering normal male donor responses as baseline. HY microarray results were also compared with our previous ELISA results. Our overall goal was to maximize antibody detection for both recombinant protein and peptide epitopes. For detection of HY antigens, the Epoxy (Schott) protein microarray surface was both most sensitive and reliable and has become the standard surface in our microarray platform. PMID:26902899

  20. Testing results for the HCT-1400 switch

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeberling, R.F.; Wheeler, R.B.

    1996-07-01

    The High Current Thyristor (HCT)-1400 was characterized for switching performance. This is a Soviet switching device that has recently become available to the U.S. community. Substantial claims have been made regarding the performance of this switch. In particular, the switch was claimed to be able to switch high currents, with very short risetime without any significant jitter. This is an independent evaluation of the high current thyristor.

  1. Present and Future of Allogeneic Natural Killer Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Okjae; Jung, Mi Young; Hwang, Yu Kyeong; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the antitumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions. PMID:26089823

  2. Clinical guide to fertility preservation in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, S; Savani, BN; Chow, EJ; Gilleece, MH; Halter, J; Jacobsohn, DA; Pidala, J; Quinn, GP; Cahn, J-Y; Jakubowski, AA; Kamani, NR; Lazarus, HM; Rizzo, JD; Schouten, HC; Socie, G; Stratton, P; Sorror, ML; Warwick, AB; Wingard, JR; Loren, AW; Majhail, NS

    2014-01-01

    With broadening indications, more options for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and improvement in survival, the number of long-term HCT survivors is expected to increase steadily. Infertility is a frequent problem that long-term HCT survivors and their partners face and it can negatively impact on the quality of life. The most optimal time to address fertility issues is before the onset of therapy for the underlying disease; however, fertility preservation should also be addressed before HCT in all children and patients of reproductive age, with referral to a reproductive specialist for patients interested in fertility preservation. In vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo cryopreservation, oocyte cryopreservation and ovarian tissue banking are acceptable methods for fertility preservation in adult women/pubertal females. Sperm banking is the preferred method for adult men/pubertal males. Frequent barriers to fertility preservation in HCT recipients may include the perception of lack of time to preserve fertility given an urgency to move ahead with transplant, lack of patient–physician discussion because of several factors (for example, time constraints, lack of knowledge), inadequate access to reproductive specialists, and costs and lack of insurance coverage for fertility preservation. There is a need to raise awareness in the medical community about fertility preservation in HCT recipients. PMID:24419521

  3. Brentuximab vedotin is associated with improved progression-free survival after allogeneic transplantation for Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Robert; Palmer, Joycelynne M.; Tsai, Ni-Chun; Thomas, Sandra H.; Siddiqi, Tanya; Popplewell, Leslie; Farol, Len; Nademanee, Auayporn; Forman, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that BV enabled successful reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (RIC-alloHCT) in patients with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma, after a median follow-up of 14.4 months. We now provide an updated report on 21 patients who were treated from 2009–2012 with BV prior to RIC-alloHCT with a uniform fludarabine/melphalan conditioning regimen and donor source after a median follow-up of 29.9 months. We have also retrospectively compared the patient characteristics and outcomes of these BV pre-treated patients to 23 patients who received fludarabine/melphalan RIC-alloHCT without prior BV, in the time period before the drug was available (2003–2009, pre-BV era). Patients who were treated with BV prior to RIC-alloHCT had a lower median HCT-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) and a reduced number of peri-transplant toxicities. There were also improvements in 2-year PFS (59.3% versus 26.1%) and cumulative incidence of relapse/progression (23.8% versus 56.5%). PMID:25008328

  4. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part II.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J; Long-Boyle, Janel

    2016-05-01

    Part I of this article included a pertinent review of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), the role of postgraft immunosuppression in alloHCT, and the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of the calcineurin inhibitors and methotrexate. In this article (Part II), we review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of mycophenolic acid (MPA), sirolimus, and the antithymocyte globulins (ATG). We then discuss target concentration intervention (TCI) of these postgraft immunosuppressants in alloHCT patients, with a focus on current evidence for TCI and on how TCI may improve clinical management in these patients. Currently, TCI using trough concentrations is conducted for sirolimus in alloHCT patients. Several studies demonstrate that MPA plasma exposure is associated with clinical outcomes, with an increasing number of alloHCT patients needing TCI of MPA. Compared with MPA, there are fewer pharmacokinetic/dynamic studies of rabbit ATG and horse ATG in alloHCT patients. Future pharmacokinetic/dynamic research of postgraft immunosuppressants should include '-omics'-based tools: pharmacogenomics may be used to gain an improved understanding of the covariates influencing pharmacokinetics as well as proteomics and metabolomics as novel methods to elucidate pharmacodynamic responses.

  5. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part II.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J; Long-Boyle, Janel

    2016-05-01

    Part I of this article included a pertinent review of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), the role of postgraft immunosuppression in alloHCT, and the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of the calcineurin inhibitors and methotrexate. In this article (Part II), we review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of mycophenolic acid (MPA), sirolimus, and the antithymocyte globulins (ATG). We then discuss target concentration intervention (TCI) of these postgraft immunosuppressants in alloHCT patients, with a focus on current evidence for TCI and on how TCI may improve clinical management in these patients. Currently, TCI using trough concentrations is conducted for sirolimus in alloHCT patients. Several studies demonstrate that MPA plasma exposure is associated with clinical outcomes, with an increasing number of alloHCT patients needing TCI of MPA. Compared with MPA, there are fewer pharmacokinetic/dynamic studies of rabbit ATG and horse ATG in alloHCT patients. Future pharmacokinetic/dynamic research of postgraft immunosuppressants should include '-omics'-based tools: pharmacogenomics may be used to gain an improved understanding of the covariates influencing pharmacokinetics as well as proteomics and metabolomics as novel methods to elucidate pharmacodynamic responses. PMID:26620047

  6. Allogenous tooth fragment reattachment

    PubMed Central

    Maitin, Nitin; Maitin, Shipra; Rastogi, Khushboo; Bhushan, Rajarshi

    2013-01-01

    Coronal fractures of the anterior teeth are a common form of dental trauma and its sequelae may impair the establishment and accomplishment of an adequate treatment plan. Among the various treatment options, reattachment of a crown fragment obtained from a previously extracted tooth is a conservative treatment that should be considered for crown fractures of anterior teeth. This article reports reattachment of an allogenous tooth fragment in a fractured maxillary lateral incisor in a 38-year-old patient. It is suggested that allogenous reattachment in a fractured anterior tooth serves to be a better alternative and should be further researched. Aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of a fractured complicated anterior crown using allogenous tooth fragment is a better alternative to other more conventional treatment options. PMID:23845684

  7. Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Storb, Rainer; Storer, Barry E.; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Lange, Thoralf; Shizuru, Judith A.; Langston, Amelia A.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Bruno, Benedetto; Petersen, Finn B.; Maris, Michael B.; Agura, Edward; Yeager, Andrew; Bethge, Wolfgang; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Maloney, David G.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after high-dose conditioning regimens imposes prohibitively high risks of morbidity and mortality for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are older or have comorbid conditions. Here, we examined outcomes after nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT in such patients. Patients and Methods Two hundred seventy-four patients (median age, 60 years) with de novo or secondary AML underwent allogeneic HCT from related (n = 118) or unrelated donors (n = 156) after conditioning with 2 Gy of total-body irradiation (TBI) with or without fludarabine. A calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil were used for postgrafting immunosuppression. Results With a median follow-up of 38 months in surviving patients, the estimated overall survival at 5 years was 33%. The estimated 5-year relapse/progression and nonrelapse mortality rates were 42% and 26%, respectively. The cumulative incidences of grades 2, 3, and 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were 38%, 9%, and 5%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD at 5 years was 44%. Patients in first and second complete remission had better survival rates than patients with more advanced disease (37% and 34% v 18%, respectively). Patients with HLA-matched related or unrelated donors had similar survivals. Unfavorable cytogenetic risk status was associated with increased relapse and subsequent mortality. Chronic GVHD was associated with lower relapse risk. Conclusion Allogeneic HCT from related or unrelated donors after conditioning with low-dose TBI and fludarabine, relying almost exclusively on graft-versus-leukemia effects, can result in long-term remissions in older or medically infirm patients with AML. PMID:20439626

  8. Functional hyposplenism following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, R J; Iqbal, A; Gates, A; Toghill, P J; Russell, N H

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the incidence of functional hyposplenism in a group of patients who had undergone allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). METHODS--Splenic function was assessed by counting the number of gluteraldehyde fixed red blood cells containing pits or indentations as examined by interference phase microscopy. Normal values are < 2% whereas splenectomy patients have values of 25 to 40%. RESULTS--Twenty eight BMT recipients (17 men, 11 women) were studied at varying periods post-transplant and the results compared with 20 healthy volunteers and 10 patients who had undergone splenectomy or had splenic atrophy because of haematological conditions. Of the 28 BMT recipients, one had undergone a prior splenectomy; of the remaining 27 patients, four (15%) had evidence of functional hyposplenism with between 5.0 and 34.0% pitted cells. Of these four patients, one had active extensive chronic graft versus host disease (GvHD) which has been previously reported to be associated with functional hyposplenism following transplantation. Only one of the four patients had peripheral blood red cell changes typical of hyposplenism. CONCLUSION--These results confirm that extensive chronic GvHD is associated with hyposplenism. Intermediate degrees of functional hyposplenism may also occur following BMT in the absence of chronic GvHD and in the absence of haematological features of hyposplenism on routine blood films. This may be of significance in mediating the susceptibility to infection with encapsulating bacteria seen following allogeneic BMT. PMID:7730489

  9. Conditioning with α-emitter based radioimmunotherapy in canine allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Chen, Yun; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    With the introduction of nonmyeloablative conditioning, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has become a viable treatment option for patients who due to age or comorbidities are ineligible for high dose conditioning. However, relapse and toxicities are still major problems in HCT. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT)-based conditioning is a promising approach that has the ability to specifically target radiation to hematopoietic cells. The most widely investigated isotopes are the β-emitters, but because of long path lengths and low linear energy transfer, α-emitters which have more favorable physical characteristics, might prove to be a better alternative. In the current study we have investigated the efficacy and safety of α-emitter based RIT as the only form of conditioning in a preclinical model of canine allogeneic HCT. PMID:22772070

  10. Pushing the envelope—nonmyeloablative and reduced intensity preparative regimens for allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pingali, SR; Champlin, RE

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) was originally developed to allow delivery of myeloablative doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. With better understanding of disease pathophysiology, the graft vs malignancy (GVM) effect of allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation and toxicities associated with myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimens, the focus shifted to developing less toxic conditioning regimens to reduce treatment-related morbidity without compromising survival. Although HCT with MAC is preferred to reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) for most patients ≤ 60 years with AML/myelodysplastic syndrome and ALL, RIC and nonmyeloablative (NMA) regimens allow HCT for many otherwise ineligible patients. Reduced intensity preparative regimens have produced high rates of PFS for diagnoses, which are highly sensitive to GVM. Relapse of the malignancy is the major cause of treatment failure with RIC/NMA HCT. Incorporation of novel agents like bortezomib or lenalidomide, addition of cellular immunotherapy and use of targeted radiation therapies could further improve outcome. In this review, we discuss commonly used RIC/NMA regimens and promising novel regimens. PMID:25985053

  11. Allogeneic Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation after Nonmyeloablative Conditioning in Patients with T-Cell and Natural Killer-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Shustov, Andrei R.; Gooley, Theodore A.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Shizuru, Judith; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Sahebi, Firoozeh; McSweeney, Peter; Niederwieser, Dietger; Bruno, Benedetto; Storb, Rainer; Maloney, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Patients with T-cell (TCL) and natural killer-cell lymphomas (NKCL) have poor outcomes. This study examined the role of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after non-myeloablative conditioning in this setting. Seventeen patients with TCL or NKCL, including three patients in first complete remission, received allogeneic HCT after 2 Gy total-body irradiation and fludarabine. The median age was 57 (range, 18–73) years. The median number of prior therapies was 3 (range, 1–7), six patients (35%) had failed prior autologous HCT, and five patients (29%) had refractory disease at the time of allograft. Postgrafting immunosuppression was provided with mycophenolate mofetil with cyclosporine or tacrolimus. After a median follow-up of 3.3 (range, 0.3–8.0) years among surviving patients, the estimated probabilities of 3-year overall and progression-free survival were 59% and 53%, respectively, while the estimated probabilities of non-relapse mortality and relapse at three years were 19% and 26%, respectively. Sixty-five percent of patients developed grades 2–4 acute graft-versus-host disease and 53% of patients developed chronic graft-versus-host disease. Allogeneic HCT after non-myeloablative conditioning is a promising salvage option for selected patients TCL and NKCL. These results suggest that graft-versus-T-cell lymphoma activity is responsible for long-term disease control. PMID:20507311

  12. Aspergillus Thyroiditis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ataca, Pinar; Atilla, Erden; Saracoglu, Pelin; Yilmaz, Gulden; Civriz Bozdag, Sinem; Toprak, Selami Kocak; Yuksel, Meltem Kurt; Ceyhan, Koray; Topcuoglu, Pervin

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus thyroiditis is a rare disorder detected in immunocompromised patients during disseminated infections. Early management is essential to prevent high mortality. A 61-year-old allogeneic stem cell male recipient presented with painful thyroid nodular enlargement. He had low TSH and low free T4 levels. The thyroid ultrasound showed a hypoechoic nodule; biopsy indicated suppurative Aspergillus thyroiditis. He was successfully treated by amphotericin B. PMID:26640727

  13. Surgical technique for allogeneic uterus transplantation in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Hideaki; Kisu, Iori; Kato, Yojiro; Yamada, Yohei; Matsubara, Kentaro; Emoto, Katsura; Adachi, Masataka; Matoba, Yusuke; Umene, Kiyoko; Nogami, Yuya; Banno, Kouji; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Itagaki, Iori; Kawamoto, Ikuo; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Itoh, Yasushi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Saiki, Yoko; Sato, Shin-ichi; Nakagawa, Kenshi; Shiina, Takashi; Aoki, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    No study has reported an animal model of uterus transplantation (UTx) using cynomolgus macaques. We aimed to establish a surgical technique of allogeneic UTx assuming the recovery of a uterus from a deceased donor in cynomolgus macaques. Four allogeneic UTxs were performed in female cynomolgus macaques. Donor surgeries comprised en bloc recovery of organs with iliac vessels on both sides, and/or abdominal aorta/vena cava after sufficient perfusion from one femoral artery or external iliac artery. Before perfusion, 150 mL of whole blood was obtained from the donor for subsequent blood transfusion to the recipient. Four uterine grafts were orthotopically transplanted to recipients. End-to-side anastomosis was performed to the iliac vessels on one side in case 1 and iliac vessels on both sides in case 2; aorto-aorto/cavo-caval anastomosis was performed in cases 3 and 4. Arterial blood flow of the uterine grafts was determined by intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography. ICG angiography results showed sufficient blood flow to all uterine grafts, and anaemia did not progress. Under appropriate immune suppression, all recipients survived for more than 90 days post-transplantation, without any surgical complications. We describe a surgical technique for allogeneic UTx in cynomolgus macaques. PMID:27786258

  14. Allogeneic transplantation with myeloablative FluBu4 conditioning improves survival compared to reduced intensity FluBu2 conditioning for acute myeloid leukemia in remission.

    PubMed

    Magenau, John M; Braun, Thomas; Reddy, Pavan; Parkin, Brian; Pawarode, Attaphol; Mineishi, Shin; Choi, Sung; Levine, John; Li, Yumeng; Yanik, Gregory; Kitko, Carrie; Churay, Tracey; Frame, David; Riwes, Mary Mansour; Harris, Andrew; Bixby, Dale; Couriel, Daniel R; Goldstein, Steven C

    2015-06-01

    The optimal intensity of conditioning for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains undefined. Traditionally, myeloablative conditioning regimens improve disease control, but at the risk of greater nonrelapse mortality. Because fludarabine with myeloablative doses of intravenous busulfan using pharmacokinetic monitoring has excellent tolerability, we reasoned that this regimen would limit relapse without substantially elevating toxicity when compared to reduced intensity conditioning. We retrospectively analyzed 148 consecutive AML patients in remission receiving T cell replete HCT conditioned with fludarabine and intravenous busulfan at doses defined as reduced (6.4 mg/kg; FluBu2, n = 63) or myeloablative (12.8 mg/kg; FluBu4, n = 85). Early and late nonrelapse mortality (NRM) was similar among FluBu4 and FluBu2 recipients, respectively (day + 100: 4 vs 0 %; 5 years: 19 vs 22 %; p = 0.54). NRM did not differ between FluBu4 and FluBu2 in patients >50 years of age (24 vs 22 %, p = 0.75). Relapse was lower in recipients of FluBu4 (5 years: 30 vs 49 %; p = 0.04), especially in patients with poor risk cytogenetics (22 vs 59 %; p = 0.02) and those >50 years of age (28 vs 51 %; p = 0.02). Overall survival favored FluBu4 recipients at 5 years (53 vs 34 %, p = 0.02), a finding confirmed in multivariate analysis (HR: 0.57; 95 % CI: 0.34-0.95; p = 0.03). These data suggest that myeloablative FluBu4 may provide equivalent NRM, reduced relapse, and improved survival compared to FluBu2, emphasizing the importance of busulfan dose in conditioning for AML.

  15. CT60 single-nucleotide polymorphism as a surrogate marker for donor lymphocyte infusion outcome after allogeneic cell transplantation for acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Y; Bertz, H; Spyridonidis, A; Spyroupoulou-Vlachou, M; Porzelius, C; Finke, J

    2012-03-01

    The benefit of survival at the expense of new GVHD after DLI for acute leukemia following human allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) remains a matter of controversy. The detection of biological markers predicting this outcome would be an enormous breakthrough. The purpose of this study was the analysis of CT60 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the CTLA-4 T-regulatory gene as a surrogate marker for DLI outcome in this difficult setting. Using Pyrosequencing, we genotyped the alleles of the CT60 SNP of 79 DLI donors and correlated them with the post-DLI outcome of their matching recipients. The presence of a donor 'AA' or 'AG' CT60 genotype vs a 'GG' genotype was an independent factor for remaining in complete chimerism/remission post-DLI (odds ratio (OR) 2.61 vs 0.42, respectively, P=0.05). Further, in cases with evident post-DLI allo-reactivity the importance of an 'AA' or 'AG' vs a 'GG' genotype gained significance for ongoing complete chimerism (OR 4.35 vs 0.32, P=0.03). Neither alterations in cumulative DLI dose nor any other clinical parameter significantly weakened the importance of CT60 SNP. Our results provide evidence for the necessity of genotyping CT60 SNP prior to DLI administration in patients with acute leukemia. PMID:21552305

  16. Classifying Cytogenetics in Patients with AML in Complete Remission Undergoing Allogeneic Transplantation: A CIBMTR Study

    PubMed Central

    Armand, Philippe; Kim, Haesook T.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Perez, Waleska S.; Dal Cin, Paola S.; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Waller, Edmund K.; Litzow, Mark R.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Artz, Andrew S.; Gupta, Vikas; Savani, Bipin N.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Schouten, Harry C.; Finke, Jürgen; Ball, Edward D.; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Cutler, Corey S.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Antin, Joseph H.; Isola, Luis M.; Di Bartolomeo, Paolo; Camitta, Bruce M.; Miller, Alan M.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith; Sierra, Jorge; Savoie, M. Lynn; Halter, Joerg; Stiff, Patrick J.; Nabhan, Chadi; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Bunjes, Donald W.; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Devine, Steven M.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Bornhauser, Martin; Lewis, Victor A.; Marks, David I.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Cytogenetics play a major role in determining the prognosis of patients with AML. However, the existing cytogenetics classifications were developed on chemotherapy-treated patients and may not be optimal for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We studied 821 adult patients reported to the CIBMTR who underwent HCT for AML in first or second CR between 1999 and 2004. We compared the ability of the 6 existing classifications to stratify patients by overall survival (OS). We then defined a new schema specifically applicable to HCT patients using this patient cohort. Under this CIBMTR schema, inv(16) is favorable, complex karyotype (4+ abnormalities) is adverse, and all other classified abnormalities are intermediate in predicting survival after HCT (5y OS 64%, 18%, and 50%, respectively, p=0.0001). This schema stratified patients into 3 groups with similar non-relapse mortality, but significantly different incidences of relapse, overall and leukemia-free survival. It applied to patients regardless of their disease status (CR1 or CR2), donor type (MRD or URD), or conditioning intensity (myeloablative or reduced intensity). This transplantation-specific classification could be adopted for prognostication purposes and to stratify patients with AML and karyotypic abnormalities entering HCT clinical trials. PMID:21810400

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation without fluconazole and fluoroquinolone prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, D; Kreil, S; Nolte, F; Reinwald, M; Hofmann, W-K; Klein, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) and fluconazole prophylaxis is recommended for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). However, due to an uncertain scientific basis and the increasing emergence of resistant germs, this policy should be questioned. Therefore, FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis was omitted in alloHCT at our center. In this retrospective analysis, all consecutive patients (n = 63) who underwent first alloHCT at our institution from September 2010 to September 2013 were included. Patients neither received FQ nor fluconazole prophylaxis. Day 100 mortality, incidence of febrile neutropenia, bacterial infections, and invasive fungal diseases (IFD) were assessed. Sixteen patients who started conditioning under antimicrobial treatment/prophylaxis due to pre-existing neutropenia (3/16), IFD (12/16), or aortic valve replacement (1/16) were excluded from the analysis. Finally, 47 patients were transplanted without prophylaxis as intended. Day 100 mortality was 9 %. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 62 % (29/47); 17/47 patients (36 %) experienced a blood stream infection (BSI) with detection of Gram-positive bacteria in 14 patients, Gram-negative bacteria in five patients, and candida in one patient, respectively. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most frequently isolated Gram-positive bacteria; 12/21 isolated Gram-positive and 3/6 Gram-negative bacteria were FQ resistant. In 21 % (10/47) of the patients, IFD (1x proven, 1x probable, and 8x possible) were diagnosed. To conclude, all three criteria, day 100 mortality, the incidence of IFD, and BSI, are in the range of published data for patients transplanted with FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis. These data demonstrate that alloHCT is feasible without FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis.

  18. Graft-Versus-Host Disease and Graft-Versus-Tumor Effects After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Storer, Barry E.; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Blume, Karl; Niederwieser, Dietger; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Petersen, Finn B.; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Agura, Edward D.; Hari, Parameswaran; Bruno, Benedetto; McSweeney, Peter A.; Maris, Michael B.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Langston, Amelia A.; Bethge, Wolfgang; Vindeløv, Lars; Franke, Georg-Nikolaus; Laport, Ginna G.; Yeager, Andrew M.; Hübel, Kai; Deeg, H. Joachim; Georges, George E.; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Martin, Paul J.; Mielcarek, Marco; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Maloney, David G.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We designed a minimal-intensity conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies unable to tolerate high-intensity regimens because of age, serious comorbidities, or previous high-dose HCT. The regimen allows the purest assessment of graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects apart from conditioning and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) not augmented by regimen-related toxicities. Patients and Methods Patients received low-dose total-body irradiation ± fludarabine before HCT from HLA-matched related (n = 611) or unrelated (n = 481) donors, followed by mycophenolate mofetil and a calcineurin inhibitor to aid engraftment and control GVHD. Median patient age was 56 years (range, 7 to 75 years). Forty-five percent of patients had comorbidity scores of ≥ 3. Median follow-up time was 5 years (range, 0.6 to 12.7 years). Results Depending on disease risk, comorbidities, and GVHD, lasting remissions were seen in 45% to 75% of patients, and 5-year survival ranged from 25% to 60%. At 5 years, the nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rate was 24%, and the relapse mortality rate was 34.5%. Most NRM was a result of GVHD. The most significant factors associated with GVHD-associated NRM were serious comorbidities and grafts from unrelated donors. Most relapses occurred early while the immune system was compromised. GVT effects were comparable after unrelated and related grafts. Chronic GVHD, but not acute GVHD, further increased GVT effects. The potential benefit associated with chronic GVHD was outweighed by increased NRM. Conclusion Allogeneic HCT relying on GVT effects is feasible and results in cures of an appreciable number of malignancies. Improved results could come from methods that control progression of malignancy early after HCT and effectively prevent GVHD. PMID:23478054

  19. Human histology of allogeneic block grafts for alveolar ridge augmentation: case report.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Thiago; Neiva, Rodrigo; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2009-12-01

    Autogenous bone grafts obtained from the mandibular symphysis or ramus are the primary donor sites for harvesting bone in the oral cavity to correct ridge deficiencies. Although such bone grafts can be successful, several concerns remain, such as donor site morbidity, nerve paresthesia, devitalization of natural teeth, and postoperative complications (eg, swelling, discomfort, and pain). To avoid these concerns and overcome the limited amount of autogenous intraoral bone for grafting, allogeneic block grafts were introduced. The purposes of this paper were to introduce allogeneic block grafts, demonstrate the integration of these allogeneic block grafts into the recipient site by detailed histology, and describe the step-by-step surgical technique of how this graft was used in a patient. A literature search was conducted to identify papers related to allogeneic block grafting, and papers were reviewed and summarized. The advantages and disadvantages of allogeneic block grafting were presented based on the literature and the authors' experience. One patient treated with allogeneic block graft was illustrated. The histologic evidence obtained from this patient indicated good bone remodeling and significant amount of new bone formation. The literature and clinical experience have shown that allogeneic block grafts can be used successfully to augment deficient ridges. PMID:20072743

  20. Survival improvements in adolescents and young adults after myeloablative allogeneic transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wood, William A; Lee, Stephanie J; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Ballen, Karen K; Buchbinder, David K; Dehn, Jason; Freytes, Cesar O; Lazarus, Hillard M; Lemaistre, Charles F; Mehta, Paulette; Szwajcer, David; Joffe, Steven; Majhail, Navneet S

    2014-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs, ages 15 to 40 years) with cancer have not experienced survival improvements to the same extent as younger and older patients. We compared changes in survival after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) among children (n = 981), AYAs (n = 1218), and older adults (n = 469) who underwent transplantation over 3 time periods: 1990 to 1995, 1996 to 2001, and 2002 to 2007. Five-year survival varied inversely with age group. Survival improved over time in AYAs and paralleled that seen in children; however, overall survival did not change over time for older adults. Survival improvements were primarily related to lower rates of early treatment-related mortality in the most recent era. For all cohorts, relapse rates did not change over time. A subset of 222 AYAs between the ages of 15 and 25 at 46 pediatric or 49 adult centers were also analyzed to describe differences by center type. In this subgroup, there were differences in transplantation practices among pediatric and adult centers, although HCT outcomes did not differ by center type. Survival for AYAs undergoing myeloablative allogeneic HCT for ALL improved at a similar rate as survival for children. PMID:24607554

  1. High-dose total body irradiation and myeloablative conditioning before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: time to rethink?

    PubMed

    Mohty, Mohamad; Malard, Florent; Savani, Bipin N

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade, the care of patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) has significantly improved, leading to a decrease in deaths related to allo-HCT as well as improved long-term survival. However, for many patients, long-term survivorship is associated with a substantial burden of chronic morbidities. Indeed, malignant and nonmalignant late complications after allo-HCT are numerous and usually multifactorial, with all organs and tissues a potential target. In many cases, these long-term side effects are associated with the use of high-dose total body irradiation, myeloablative conditioning regimens, and the onset of chronic graft-versus-host disease. It appears to be essential to change the natural history of these late effects. This requires the introduction of improved conditioning regimens and the development of lifelong monitoring controls, patient counseling, and preventative treatment measures. This approach will allow us to pursue our efforts to improve patient outcome.

  2. Ph+ ALL patients in first complete remission have similar survival after reduced intensity and myeloablative allogeneic transplantation: impact of tyrosine kinase inhibitor and minimal residual disease.

    PubMed

    Bachanova, V; Marks, D I; Zhang, M-J; Wang, H; de Lima, M; Aljurf, M D; Arellano, M; Artz, A S; Bacher, U; Cahn, J-Y; Chen, Y-B; Copelan, E A; Drobyski, W R; Gale, R P; Greer, J P; Gupta, V; Hale, G A; Kebriaei, P; Lazarus, H M; Lewis, I D; Lewis, V A; Liesveld, J L; Litzow, M R; Loren, A W; Miller, A M; Norkin, M; Oran, B; Pidala, J; Rowe, J M; Savani, B N; Saber, W; Vij, R; Waller, E K; Wiernik, P H; Weisdorf, D J

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is uncertain. We analyzed 197 adults with Ph+ ALL in first complete remission; 67 patients receiving RIC were matched with 130 receiving myeloablative conditioning (MAC) for age, donor type and HCT year. Over 75% received pre-HCT tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), mostly imatinib; 39% (RIC) and 49% (MAC) were minimal residual disease (MRD)(neg) pre-HCT. At a median 4.5 years follow-up, 1-year transplant-related mortality (TRM) was lower in RIC (13%) than MAC (36%; P=0.001) while the 3-year relapse rate was 49% in RIC and 28% in MAC (P=0.058). Overall survival (OS) was similar (RIC 39% (95% confidence interval (CI) 27-52) vs 35% (95% CI 27-44); P=0.62). Patients MRD(pos) pre-HCT had higher risk of relapse with RIC vs MAC (hazard ratio (HR) 1.97; P=0.026). However, patients receiving pre-HCT TKI in combination with MRD negativity pre-RIC HCT had superior OS (55%) compared with a similar MRD population after MAC (33%; P=0.0042). In multivariate analysis, RIC lowered TRM (HR 0.6; P=0.057), but absence of pre-HCT TKI (HR 1.88; P=0.018), RIC (HR 1.891; P=0.054) and pre-HCT MRD(pos) (HR 1.6; P=0.070) increased relapse risk. RIC is a valid alternative strategy for Ph+ ALL patients ineligible for MAC and MRD(neg) status is preferred pre-HCT.

  3. Ph+ ALL patients in first complete remission have similar survival after reduced intensity and myeloablative allogeneic transplantation: Impact of tyrosine kinase inhibitor and minimal residual disease

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Marks, David I.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Wang, Hailin; de Lima, Marcos; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Arellano, Martha; Artz, Andrew S.; Bacher, Ulrike; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Chen, Yi-Bin; Copelan, Edward A.; Drobyski, William R.; Gale, Robert Peter; Greer, John P; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A.; Kebriaei, Partow; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Lewis, Ian D.; Lewis, Victor A.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Litzow, Mark R.; Loren, Alison W.; Miller, Alan M.; Norkin, Maxim; Oran, Betul; Pidala, Joseph; Rowe, Jacob M.; Savani, Bipin N.; Saber, Wael; Vij, Ravi; Waller, Edmund K.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is uncertain. We analyzed 197 adults with Ph+ ALL in first complete remission; 67 patients receiving RIC were matched with 130 receiving myeloablative conditioning (MAC) for age, donor type, and HCT year. Over 75% received pre-HCT tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), mostly imatinib; 39% (RIC) and 49% (MAC) were MRDneg pre-HCT. At a median 4.5 years follow-up, 1-year transplant-related mortality (TRM) was lower in RIC (13%) than MAC (36%;p=0.001) while the 3-year relapse rate was 49% in RIC and 28% in MAC (p=0.058). Overall survival was similar (RIC 39% [95% CI:27–52] vs. 35% [95% CI:270–44];p=0.62). Patients MRDpos pre-HCT had higher risk of relapse with RIC versus MAC (HR 1.97;p=0.026). However, patients receiving pre-HCT TKI in combination with MRD negativity pre-RIC HCT had superior OS (55%) compared to a similar MRDneg population after MAC (33%; p=0.0042). In multivariate analysis, RIC lowered TRM (HR 0.6; p=0.057), but absence of pre-HCT TKI (HR 1.88;p=0.018), RIC (HR 1.891;p=0.054) and pre-HCT MRDpos (HR 1.6; p=0.070) increased relapse risk. RIC is a valid alternative strategy for Ph+ ALL patients ineligible for MAC and MRDneg status is preferred pre-HCT. PMID:23989431

  4. Toll like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Mike; Lee, Stephanie J; Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLR) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) we have investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs3764879, which is located on the X chromosome, was significantly associated with outcome at the Bonferroni corrected level P≤0.001. Male hemizygosity and female homozygosity for the minor allele were significantly associated with disease free survival (DFS) (hazard ratio (HR) 1.47 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.85); P=0.001). Further analysis stratified by donor sex due to confounding by sex, was suggestive for associations with overall survival (male donor: HR 1.41 (95% CI 1.09–1.83), P=0.010); female donor: (HR 2.78 (95% CI 1.43–5.41), P=0.003), DFS (male donor: HR 1.45 (95% CI 1.12–1.87), P=0.005; female donor: HR 2.34 (95% CI 1.18–4.65), P=0.015) and treatment related mortality (male donor: HR 1.49 (95% CI 1.09–2.04), P=0.012; female donor: HR 3.12 (95% CI 1.44–6.74), P=0.004). In conclusion our findings suggest that the minor allele of TLR8 rs3764879 of the donor is associated with outcome after myeloablative conditioned allogeneic HCT. PMID:25464115

  5. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Mike; Lee, Stephanie J; Müller, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLRs) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), we investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs3764879, which is located on the X chromosome, was significantly associated with outcome at the Bonferroni-corrected level P ≤ .001. Male hemizygosity and female homozygosity for the minor allele were significantly associated with disease-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.47 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.16 to 1.85]; P = .001). Further analysis stratified by donor sex due to confounding by sex was suggestive for associations with overall survival (male donor: HR, 1.41 [95% CI, 1.09 to 1.83], P = .010; female donor: HR, 2.78 [95% CI, 1.43 to 5.41], P = .003), disease-free survival (male donor: HR, 1.45 [95% CI, 1.12 to 1.87], P = .005; female donor: HR, 2.34 [95% CI, 1.18 to 4.65], P = .015), and treatment-related mortality (male donor: HR, 1.49 [95% CI, 1.09 to 2.04], P = .012; female donor: HR, 3.12 [95% CI, 1.44 to 6.74], P = .004). In conclusion, our findings suggest that the minor allele of TLR8 rs3764879 of the donor is associated with outcome after myeloablative conditioned allogeneic HCT. PMID:25464115

  6. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant for acute myeloid leukemia: Current state in 2013 and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kanate, Abraham S; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of high-grade myeloid neoplasms of the elderly with variable outcomes. Though remission-induction is an important first step in the management of AML, additional treatment strategies are essential to ensure long-term disease-free survival. Recent pivotal advances in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of AML have allowed for a risk-adapted approach in its management based on relapse-risk. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents an effective therapeutic strategy in AML providing the possibility of cure with potent graft-versus-leukemia reactions, with a demonstrable survival advantage in younger patients with intermediate- or poor-risk cytogenetics. Herein we review the published data regarding the role of allo-HCT in adults with AML. We searched MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE/Ovid. In addition, we searched reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings and ongoing trial databases. We discuss the role of allo-HCT in AML patients stratified by cytogenetic- and molecular-risk in first complete remission, as well as allo-HCT as an option in relapsed/refractory AML. Besides the conventional sibling and unrelated donor allografts, we review the available data and recent advances for alternative donor sources such as haploidentical grafts and umbilical cord blood. We also discuss conditioning regimens, including reduced intensity conditioning which has broadened the applicability of allo-HCT. Finally we explore recent advances and future possibilities and directions of allo-HCT in AML. Practical therapeutic recommendations have been made where possible based on available data and expert opinion. PMID:24772235

  7. Survival of AML patients relapsing after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: a CIBMTR study

    PubMed Central

    Bejanyan, Nelli; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Logan, Brent R.; Wang, Hai-Lin; Devine, Steven M.; de Lima, Marcos; Bunjes, Donald W.; Zhang, Mei-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) remains a major therapeutic challenge. We studied outcomes of 1788 AML patients relapsing after alloHCT (1990–2010) during first or second complete remission (CR) to identify factors associated with longer post-relapse survival. Median time of post HCT relapse was 7 months (mo; range, 1–177). At relapse, 1231 patients (69%) received intensive therapy, including chemotherapy (CT) alone (n=660), donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI)±CT (n=202; %), or 2nd alloHCT±CT ±DLI (n=369), with subsequent CR rates of 29%. Median follow-up after relapse was 39 mo (range, <1–193). Survival for all patients was 23% at 1 year post-relapse; however, 3-yr overall survival correlated with time from HCT to relapse (4% for relapse during 1–6 mo period, 12% during 6 mo-2 yr, 26% during 2–3 yr, and 38% for ≥3 yr). In multivariable analysis, lower mortality was significantly associated with longer time from alloHCT to relapse (RR 0.55 for 6 mo-2 yr, RR 0.39 for 2–3 yr, and RR 0.28 for ≥3 yr; p<0.0001) and a 1st HCT using reduced-intensity conditioning (RR=0.77; 95% CI 0.66–0.88, p=0.0002). In contrast, inferior survival was associated with age >40 yr (RR=1.42, 95% CI 1.24–1.64; p<0.0001), active GVHD at relapse (RR=1.25, 95% CI 1.13–1.39; p<0.0001), adverse cytogenetics (RR=1.37, 95% CI 1.09–1.71; p=0.0062), mismatched URD (RR=1.61, 95% CI 1.22–2.13; p=0.0008), and use of cord blood for 1st HCT (RR=1.23, 95% CI 1.06–1.42; p=0.0078). AML relapse after alloHCT predicted poor survival; however, patients who relapsed ≥6 mo after their initial alloHCT had better survival and may benefit from intensive therapy such as 2nd alloHCT±DLI. PMID:25460355

  8. Regenerative stromal cell therapy in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Current impact and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Auletta, Jeffery J.; Cooke, Kenneth R.; Solchaga, Luis A.; Deans, Robert J.; Hof, Wouter van’t

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative stromal cell therapy (RSCT) has the potential to become a novel therapy for preventing and treating acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipient. However, enthusiasm for using RSCT in allogeneic HSCT has been tempered by limited clinical data and poorly-defined in vivo mechanisms of action. As a result, the full clinical potential of RSCT in supporting hematopoietic reconstitution and as treatment for GVHD remains to be determined. This manuscript reviews the immunomodulatory activity of regenerative stromal cells in pre-clinical models of allogeneic HSCT and emphasizes an emerging literature suggesting that microenvironment influences RSC activation and function. Understanding this key finding may ultimately define the proper niche for RSCT in allogeneic HSCT. In particular, mechanistic studies are needed to delineate the in vivo effects of RSCT in response to inflammation and injury associated with allogeneic HSCT and to define the relevant sites of RSC interaction with immune cells in the transplant recipient. Furthermore, development of in vivo imaging technology to correlate biodistribution patterns, desired RSC effect, and clinical outcome will be crucial to establishing dose-response effects and minimal biologic-dose thresholds needed to advance translational treatment strategies for complications like GVHD. PMID:20018250

  9. [Human Herpesvirus-6 Encephalitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-07-01

    The reactivation of human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) is common after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), and it is sporadically associated with the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops around 2-6 weeks after allo-HCT, and it is characterized by short-term memory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows bilateral signal abnormalities in the limbic system. The incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis is reportedly 0-11.6% after bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and 4.9-21.4% after cord blood transplantation. The mortality of HHV-6 encephalitis is high, and survivors are often left with serious sequelae. Antiviral therapy using foscarnet or ganciclovir is recommended for the treatment of HHV-6 encephalitis, but the efficacy of the currently available treatment is insufficient once HHV-6 encephalitis has developed. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HHV-6 encephalitis and the establishment of preventative therapy are needed to overcome this disease.

  10. Relapse risk in patients with malignant diseases given allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Christoph; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Mielcarek, Marco; Maris, Michael B; Blume, Karl G; Niederwieser, Dietger; Chauncey, Thomas R; Forman, Stephen J; Agura, Edward; Leis, Jose F; Bruno, Benedetto; Langston, Amelia; Pulsipher, Michael A; McSweeney, Peter A; Wade, James C; Epner, Elliot; Bo Petersen, Finn; Bethge, Wolfgang A; Maloney, David G; Storb, Rainer

    2007-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies depends on graft-versus-tumor effects for eradication of cancer. Here, we estimated relapse risks according to disease characteristics. Between 1997 and 2006, 834 consecutive patients (median age, 55 years; range, 5-74 years) received related (n = 498) or unrelated (n = 336) HCT after 2 Gy total body irradiation alone (n = 171) or combined with fludarabine (90 mg/m(2); n = 663). Relapse rates per patient year (PY) at risk, corrected for follow-up and competing nonrelapse mortality, were calculated for 29 different diseases and stages. The overall relapse rate per PY was 0.36. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) in remission (CR), low-grade or mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (CR + partial remission [PR]), and high-grade NHL-CR had the lowest rates (0.00-0.24; low risk). In contrast, patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had rates of more than 0.52 (high risk). Patients with lymphoproliferative diseases not in CR (except Hodgkin lymphoma and high-grade NHL) and myeloid malignancies in CR had rates of 0.26-0.37 (standard risk). In conclusion, patients with low-grade lymphoproliferative disorders experienced the lowest relapse rates, whereas patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had high relapse rates after nonmyeloablative HCT. The latter might benefit from cytoreductive treatment before HCT.

  11. Relapse risk in patients with malignant diseases given allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Christoph; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Mielcarek, Marco; Maris, Michael B.; Blume, Karl G.; Niederwieser, Dietger; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Forman, Stephen J.; Agura, Edward; Leis, Jose F.; Bruno, Benedetto; Langston, Amelia; Pulsipher, Michael A.; McSweeney, Peter A.; Wade, James C.; Epner, Elliot; Bo Petersen, Finn; Bethge, Wolfgang A.; Maloney, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies depends on graft-versus-tumor effects for eradication of cancer. Here, we estimated relapse risks according to disease characteristics. Between 1997 and 2006, 834 consecutive patients (median age, 55 years; range, 5-74 years) received related (n = 498) or unrelated (n = 336) HCT after 2 Gy total body irradiation alone (n = 171) or combined with fludarabine (90 mg/m2; n = 663). Relapse rates per patient year (PY) at risk, corrected for follow-up and competing nonrelapse mortality, were calculated for 29 different diseases and stages. The overall relapse rate per PY was 0.36. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) in remission (CR), low-grade or mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (CR + partial remission [PR]), and high-grade NHL-CR had the lowest rates (0.00-0.24; low risk). In contrast, patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had rates of more than 0.52 (high risk). Patients with lymphoproliferative diseases not in CR (except Hodgkin lymphoma and high-grade NHL) and myeloid malignancies in CR had rates of 0.26-0.37 (standard risk). In conclusion, patients with low-grade lymphoproliferative disorders experienced the lowest relapse rates, whereas patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had high relapse rates after nonmyeloablative HCT. The latter might benefit from cytoreductive treatment before HCT. PMID:17595333

  12. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T.; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-01-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials. PMID:27247754

  13. Erythropoietin therapy after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: a prospective, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Aurélie; Baron, Frédéric; Willems, Evelyne; Seidel, Laurence; Hafraoui, Kaoutar; Vanstraelen, Gaetan; Bonnet, Christophe; Beguin, Yves

    2014-07-01

    We conducted a prospective randomized trial to assess hemoglobin (Hb) response to recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) therapy after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Patients (N = 131) were randomized (1:1) between no treatment (control arm) or erythropoietin at 500 U/kg per week (EPO arm). Patients were also stratified into 3 cohorts: patients undergoing myeloablative HCT with rhEPO to start on day (D)28, patients given nonmyeloablative HCT (NMHCT) with rhEPO to start on D28, and patients also given NMHCT but with rhEPO to start on D0. The proportion of complete correctors (ie, Hb ≥13 g/dL) before D126 posttransplant was 8.1% in the control arm (median not reached) and 63.1% in the EPO arm (median, 90 days) (P < .001). Hb levels were higher and transfusion requirements decreased (P < .001) in the EPO arm, but not during the first month in the nonmyeloablative cohort starting rhEPO on D0. There was no difference in rates of thromboembolic events or other complications between the 2 arms. This is the first randomized trial to demonstrate that rhEPO therapy hastens erythroid recovery and decreases transfusion requirements when started one month after allogeneic HCT. There was no benefit to start rhEPO earlier after NMHCT.

  14. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-06-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials.

  15. Prospective Validation of the Predictive Power of the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comorbidity Index: A CIBMTR® Study

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Logan, Brent R.; Zhu, Xiaochun; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Cooke, Kenneth R.; McCarthy, Philip L; Ho, Vincent T.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2015-01-01

    Prospective validation of the hematopoietic cell transplantation-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) using contemporary patients treated with HCT across the Unites States is necessary to confirm its widespread applicability. We performed a prospective observational study including all patients (8115 recipients of allogeneic and 11,652 recipients of autologous HCT) who underwent first HCT that was reported to the CIBMTR between 2007 and 2009. In proportional hazards models, increased HCT-CI scores were independently associated with increases in hazard ratios for NRM (p<0.0001) and overall mortality (p<0.0001) among recipients of allogeneic HCT. HCT-CI Scores of ≥3 were uniformly associated with higher risks for outcomes in both allogeneic and autologous HCT, and all subgroups regardless of diagnoses, age, and conditioning intensity. Recipients of allogeneic HCT with scores of 1–2 who were aged <18 or were treated with lower intensity conditioning regimens had similar outcomes compared to those with score 0. Higher risks for overall mortality, but not for NRM, were observed among recipients of autologous HCT with scores of 1–2 versus 0. Our results confirm the validity the HCT-CI in both allogeneic and autologous HCT. The index should be used as a valid standard-of-care health measure in counseling patients for HCT, in clinical trial design, and in adjusting outcome analyses. PMID:25862591

  16. Sleep disruption in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients: prevalence, severity, and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Jim, Heather S L; Evans, Bryan; Jeong, Jiyeon M; Gonzalez, Brian D; Johnston, Laura; Nelson, Ashley M; Kesler, Shelli; Phillips, Kristin M; Barata, Anna; Pidala, Joseph; Palesh, Oxana

    2014-10-01

    Sleep disruption is common among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, with over 50% of recipients experiencing sleep disruption pre-transplant, with up to 82% of patients experiencing moderate to severe sleep disruption during hospitalization for transplant and up to 43% after transplant. These rates of sleep disruption are substantially higher than what we see in the general population. Although sleep disruption can be distressing to patients and contribute to diminished quality of life, it is rarely discussed during clinical visits. The goal of the current review is to draw attention to sleep disruption and disorders (ie, insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome) as a clinical problem in HCT in order to facilitate patient education, intervention, and research. We identified 35 observational studies published in the past decade that examined sleep disruption or disorders in HCT. Most studies utilized a single item measure of sleep, had small sample size, and included heterogeneous samples of patients. Six studies of the effects of psychosocial and exercise interventions on sleep in HCT have reported no significant improvements. These results highlight the need for rigorous observational and interventional studies of sleep disruption and disorders in HCT recipients..

  17. Mouse host unlicensed NK cells promote donor allogeneic bone marrow engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Maite; Sun, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exist as subsets based on expression of inhibitory receptors that recognize major histocompatibility complex I (MHCI) molecules. NK cell subsets bearing MHCI binding receptors for self-MHCI have been termed as “licensed” and exhibit a higher ability to respond to stimuli. In the context of bone marrow transplantation (BMT), host licensed-NK (L-NK) cells have also been demonstrated to be responsible for the acute rejection of allogeneic and MHCI-deficient BM cells (BMCs) in mice after lethal irradiation. However, the role of recipient unlicensed-NK (U-NK) cells has not been well established with regard to allogeneic BMC resistance. After NK cell stimulation, the prior depletion of host L-NK cells resulted in a marked increase of donor engraftment compared with the untreated group. Surprisingly, this increased donor engraftment was reduced after total host NK cell depletion, indicating that U-NK cells can actually promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment. Furthermore, direct coculture of U-NK cells with allogeneic but not syngeneic BMCs resulted in increased colony-forming unit cell growth in vitro, which was at least partially mediated by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production. These data demonstrate that host NK cell subsets exert markedly different roles in allogeneic BMC engraftment where host L- and U-NK cells reject or promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment, respectively. PMID:26738538

  18. Brentuximab vedotin enables successful reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Joycelynne M.; Thomas, Sandra H.; Tsai, Ni-Chun; Farol, Len; Nademanee, Auayporn; Forman, Stephen J.; Gopal, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    Brentuximab vedotin induces an overall response rate of 75% in patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma, but its impact on future allogeneic transplantation (allo-HCT) is not known. We retrospectively examined the records of 18 patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma who were treated on brentuximab vedotin clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of subsequent reduced-intensity allo-HCT. Seventeen patients had previous autologous transplant; 6 were in complete remission, and 8 were in partial remission before allo-HCT with 12 grafts from unrelated or mismatched donors. The 1-year overall survival was 100%, progression-free survival was 92.3%, and nonrelapse mortality was 0% (median follow-up, 14 months). The incidence of acute GVHD was 27.8% and chronic GVHD was 56.3%. Brentuximab vedotin before reduced-intensity allo-HCT does not appear to adversely affect engraftment, GVHD, or survival and may provide sufficient disease control to enable reduced-intensity allo-HCT. PMID:22611160

  19. Assessing the Influence of Different Comorbidities Indexes on the Outcomes of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Gustavo Machado; Bittencourt, Henrique; Rezende, Suely Meireles

    2015-01-01

    Although the application of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-specific Comorbidity Index (HCT-CI) has enabled better prediction of transplant-related mortality (TRM) in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants (AHSCT), data from developing countries are scarce. This study prospectively evaluated the HCT-CI and the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation (ACE-27), in its original and in a modified version, as predictors of post-transplant complications in adults undergoing a first related or unrelated AHSCT in Brazil. Both bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) as graft sources were included. We analyzed the cumulative incidence of granulocyte and platelet recovery, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, relapse and transplant-related mortality, and rates of event-free survival and overall survival. Ninety-nine patients were assessed. Median age was 38 years (18–65 years); HCT-CI ≥ 3 accounted for only 8% of cases; hematologic malignancies comprised 75.8% of the indications for AHSCT. There was no association between the HCT-CI or the original or modified ACE-27 with TRM or any other studied outcomes after AHSCT. These results show that, in the population studied, none of the comorbidity indexes seem to be associated with AHSCT outcomes. A significantly low frequency of high-risk (HCT-CI ≥ 3) in this Brazilian population might justify these results. PMID:26394228

  20. Dendritic Cell Therapy in an Allogeneic-Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Setting: An Effective Strategy toward Better Disease Control?

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Maud; de Haar, Colin; Nierkens, Stefan; Boelens, Jaap Jan

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a last treatment resort and only potentially curative treatment option for several hematological malignancies resistant to chemotherapy. The induction of profound immune regulation after allogeneic HCT is imperative to prevent graft-versus-host reactions and, at the same time, allow protective immune responses against pathogens and against tumor cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells that are essential in regulating this balance and are of major interest as a tool to modulate immune responses in the complex and challenging phase of immune reconstitution early after allo-HCT. This review focuses on the use of DC vaccination to prevent cancer relapses early after allo-HCT. It describes the role of host and donor-DCs, various vaccination strategies, different DC subsets, antigen loading, DC maturation/activation, and injection sites and dose. At last, clinical trials using DC vaccination post-allo-HCT and the future perspectives of DC vaccination in combination with other cancer immunotherapies are discussed. PMID:24904573

  1. New frontiers in pediatric allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Talano, Julie-An M.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Symons, Heather J.; Militano, Olga; Shereck, Evan B.; Giller, Roger H.; Hancock, Laura; Morris, Erin; Cairo, Mitchell S.

    2015-01-01

    The inaugural meeting of “New Frontiers in Pediatric Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation” organized by the Pediatric Blood and Transplant Consortium (PBMTC) was held at the American Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Annual Meeting. This meeting provided an international platform for physicians and investigators active in the research and utilization of pediatric allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AlloSCT) in children and adolescents with malignant and non-malignant disease, to share information and develop future collaborative strategies. The primary objectives of the conference included: 1) to present advances in AlloSCT in pediatric ALL and novel pre- and post-immunotherapy; 2) to highlight new strategies in alternative allogeneic stem cell donor sources for children and adolescents with non-malignant hematological disorders; 3) to discuss timing of immune reconstitution after AlloSCT and methods of facilitating more rapid recovery of immunity; 4) to identify strategies of utilizing AlloSCT in pediatric myeloproliferative disorders (MPD); 5) to develop diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to hematological complications post pediatric AlloSCT; 6) to enhance the understanding of new novel cellular therapeutic approaches to pediatric malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders; and 7) to discuss optimizing drug therapy in pediatric recipients of AlloSCT. This paper will provide a brief overview of the conference. PMID:24820213

  2. Elevated fluoride levels and periostitis in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients receiving long-term voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Tarlock, Katherine; Johnson, Darren; Cornell, Cathy; Parnell, Shawn; Meshinchi, Soheil; Baker, K Scott; Englund, Janet A

    2015-05-01

    Azole therapy is widely utilized in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients for the treatment of aspergillus. Complications of voriconazole treatment related to its elevated fluoride content have been described in adults, including reports of symptomatic skeletal fluorosis. We review fluoride levels, clinical, and laboratory data in five pediatric HCT recipients on long-term voriconazole therapy, all found to have elevated serum fluoride levels. Two patients had toxic fluoride levels, one infant had symptoms of significant pain with movement and radiographs confirmed skeletal fluorosis. Monitoring fluoride levels in children, especially with skeletal symptoms, should be considered in patients on long-term voriconazole.

  3. Highly Elevated Serum Hepcidin in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia prior to and after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Does This Protect from Excessive Parenchymal Iron Loading?

    PubMed Central

    Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Westerman, Mark; Krahl, Rainer; Leiblein, Sabine; Liebert, Uwe Gerd; Hehme, Marianne; Teupser, Daniel; Niederwieser, Dietger; Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin

    2011-01-01

    Hepcidin is upregulated by inflammation and iron. Inherited (HFE genotype) and treatment-related factors (blood units (BU), Iron overload) affecting hepcidin (measured by C-ELISA) were studied in 42 consecutive patients with AML prior to and after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Results. Elevated serum ferritin pre- and post-HCT was present in all patients. Median hepcidin pre- and post-HCT of 358 and 398 ng/mL, respectively, were elevated compared to controls (median 52 ng/mL) (P < .0001). Liver and renal function, prior chemotherapies, and conditioning had no impact on hepcidin. Despite higher total BU after HCT compared to pretransplantation (P < .0005), pre- and posttransplant ferritin and hepcidin were similar. BU influenced ferritin (P = .001) and hepcidin (P = .001). No correlation of pre- or posttransplant hepcidin with pretransplant ferritin was found. HFE genotype did not influence hepcidin. Conclusions. Hepcidin is elevated in AML patients pre- and post-HCT due to transfusional iron-loading suggesting that hepcidin synthesis remains intact despite chemotherapy and HCT. PMID:21687645

  4. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Most hematological malignancies occur in older patients. Until recently these patients and those with comorbidities were not candidates for treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation because they were unable to tolerate the heretofore used high-dose conditioning regimens. The finding that many of the cures achieved with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation were due to graft-versus-tumor effects led to the development of less toxic and well-tolerated reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative regimens. These regimens enabled allogeneic engraftment, thereby setting the stage for graft-versus-tumor effects. This review summarizes the encouraging early results seen with the new regimens and discusses the two hurdles that need to be overcome for achieving even greater success, disease relapse and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27132278

  5. Mixed allogeneic reconstitution (A+B----A) to induce donor-specific transplantation tolerance. Permanent acceptance of a simultaneous donor skin graft

    SciTech Connect

    Ildstad, S.T.; Wren, S.M.; Oh, E.; Hronakes, M.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Mixed allogeneic reconstitution, in which a mixture of T-cell-depleted bone marrow of syngeneic host and allogeneic donor type is transplanted into a lethally irradiated recipient (A+B----A), results in mixed lymphopoietic chimerism with engraftment of a mixture of both host and donor bone marrow elements. Recipients are specifically tolerant to donor both in vitro and in vivo. Donor-specific skin grafts survive indefinitely when they are placed after full bone marrow repopulation at 28 days, while third-party grafts are rapidly rejected. To determine whether a delay of a month or more for full bone marrow repopulation is required before a donor-specific graft can be placed, we have now examined whether tolerance induction can be achieved if a graft is placed at the time of bone marrow transplantation. Permanent acceptance of donor-specific B10.BR skin grafts occurred when mixed allogeneic chimerism (B10+B10.BR----B10) was induced and a simultaneous allogeneic donor graft placed. In vitro, mixed reconstituted recipients were specifically tolerant to the B10.BR donor lymphoid cells but fully reactive to MHC-disparate third-party (BALB/c; H-2dd) when assessed by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) assays. These data therefore indicate that a donor-specific graft placed at the time of mixed allogeneic reconstitution is permanently accepted without rejection. To determine whether an allogeneic skin graft alone without allogeneic bone marrow would be sufficient to induce tolerance, syngeneic reconstitution (B10----B10) was carried out, and a simultaneous B10.BR allogeneic skin graft placed. Although skin grafts were prolonged in all recipients, all grafts rejected when full lymphopoietic repopulation occurred at 28 days.

  6. Transplantation tolerance in primates after total lymphoid irradiation and allogeneic bone marrow injection

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, J.A.; Hill, R.R.H.; Myburgh, J.A.; Browde, S.

    1980-08-01

    After total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), allogeneic bone marrow (BM) injection, and organ transplantation in baboons, there is a prolonged period of reduced lymphocyte proliferative responsiveness to polyclonal mitogens and allogeneic lymphocytes. The effect observed is greater with the use of fractionated TLI than after single doses of irradiation. Suppressor cell activity can be demonstrated in vitro in most animals by inhibition of mixed lymphocyte reactivity (MLR) by mitomycin-treated recipient lymphocytes harvested after TLI, with or without allogeneic BM injection, and organ transplantation. Preliminary data suggest the presence of both donor-specific and nondonor-specific suppression, although other interpretations are possible, and suppressor phenomena may not be responsible for the transplantation tolerance observed.

  7. Specially modified stromal and immune microenvironment in injected bone marrow following intrabone transplantation facilitates allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell engraftment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Su, Yingjun; Chen, Jianwu; Song, Yajuan; Zhuang, Ran; Xiao, Bo; Guo, Shuzhong

    2016-07-01

    For allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the first key step is the engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barrier. Intrabone bone marrow transplantation (IBBMT) could replace more recipient stromal cells with donor cells and facilitate allogeneic organ transplantation compared with the conventional intravenous approach. However, it remains unknown whether and how IBBMT reconstructs the immune microenvironment for allogeneic HSCs. We explored where the BM microenvironment changes by determining BM stromal cell chimerism and measuring the change in CXCL-12 expression and regulatory T cells in recipient BM. We found that most stromal cells were replaced by allogeneic cells in the injected BM, with higher expression of immune regulatory cytokines (interleukin-10) compared with the contralateral BM and the intravenous group BM. This difference was independent of injury caused by intrabone injection. Consistent with the microenvironment modification, the allogeneic the engraftment rate and reconstitution capacity of HSCs were enhanced in the injected BM compared with the contralateral BM and intravenous group BM. Surgical removal of the injected bone at 7 days rather than 21 days reduced the levels of allogeneic granulocytes and HSCs in the peripheral blood. In conclusion, IBBMT specially modifies stromal cells in the injected BM which provide immune protective cues that improve the engraftment of allogeneic HSCs in an early period. PMID:27090963

  8. Increased risk of breast cancer among survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: a report from the FHCRC and the EBMT-Late Effect Working Party

    PubMed Central

    Rovo, Alicia; Leisenring, Wendy; Locasciulli, Anna; Flowers, Mary E. D.; Tichelli, Andre; Sanders, Jean E.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Socie, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    As risk for secondary breast cancer is elevated among cancer survivors treated with conventional therapy, we sought to determine the risk among 3337 female 5-year survivors who underwent an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center or at one of 82 centers reporting to the European Bone Marrow Transplant Registry. Risk was calculated using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), and risk factors were evaluated with a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model. Fifty-two survivors developed breast cancer at a median of 12.5 (range: 5.7-24.8) years following HCT (SIR = 2.2). Twenty-five–year cumulative incidence was 11.0%, higher among survivors who received total body irradiation (TBI) (17%) than those who did not receive TBI (3%). In multivariable analysis, increased risk was associated with longer time since transplantation (hazard ratio [HR] for 20+ years after transplantation = 10.8), use of TBI (HR = 4.0), and younger age at transplantation (HR = 9.5 for HCT < 18 years). Hazard for death associated with breast cancer was 2.5 (95% CI: 1.1-5.8). We conclude that female survivors of allogeneic HCT are at increased risk of breast cancer and should be educated about the need for regular screening. PMID:17911386

  9. Impact of Pretransplantation (18)F-fluorodeoxy Glucose-Positron Emission Tomography Status on Outcomes after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Laport, Ginna G; Akpek, Görgün; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Nishihori, Taiga; Agura, Edward; Armand, Philippe; Jaglowski, Samantha M; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cashen, Amanda F; Cohen, Jonathon B; D'Souza, Anita; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Holmberg, Leona A; Inwards, David J; Kanate, Abraham S; Lazarus, Hillard M; Malone, Adriana K; Munker, Reinhold; Mussetti, Alberto; Norkin, Maxim; Prestidge, Tim D; Rowe, Jacob M; Satwani, Prakash; Siddiqi, Tanya; Stiff, Patrick J; William, Basem M; Wirk, Baldeep; Maloney, David G; Smith, Sonali M; Sureda, Anna M; Carreras, Jeanette; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-09-01

    Assessment with (18)F-fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for lymphoma may be prognostic for outcomes. Patients with chemotherapy-sensitive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) undergoing allogeneic HCT reported to the Center of International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Registry between 2007 and 2012 were included. Pre-HCT PET status (positive versus negative) was determined by the reporting transplantation centers. We analyzed 336 patients; median age was 55 years and 60% were males. Follicular lymphoma (n = 104) was more common than large cell (n = 85), mantle cell (n = 69), and mature natural killer or T cell lymphoma (n = 78); two thirds of the cohort received reduced-intensity conditioning; one half had unrelated donor grafts. Patients underwent PET scanning a median of 1 month (range, .07 to 2.83 months) before HCT; 159 were PET positive and 177 were PET negative. At 3 years, relapse/progression, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in PET-positive versus PET-negative groups were 40% versus 26%; P = .007; 43% versus 47%; P = .47; and 58% versus 60%; P = .73, respectively. On multivariate analysis, a positive pretransplantation PET was associated with an increased risk of relapse/progression (risk ratio [RR], 1.86; P = .001) but was not associated with increased mortality (RR, 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI], .96 to 1.7; P = .08), therapy failure (RR, 1.32; 95% CI, .95 to 1.84; P = .10), or nonrelapse mortality (RR, .75; 95% CI, .48 to 1.18; P = .22). PET status conferred no influence on graft-versus-host disease. A positive PET scan before HCT is associated with increased relapse risk but should not be interpreted as a barrier to a successful allograft. PET status does not appear to predict survival after allogeneic HCT for NHL. PMID:25983043

  10. Impact of Pretransplantation (18)F-fluorodeoxy Glucose-Positron Emission Tomography Status on Outcomes after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Laport, Ginna G; Akpek, Görgün; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Nishihori, Taiga; Agura, Edward; Armand, Philippe; Jaglowski, Samantha M; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cashen, Amanda F; Cohen, Jonathon B; D'Souza, Anita; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Holmberg, Leona A; Inwards, David J; Kanate, Abraham S; Lazarus, Hillard M; Malone, Adriana K; Munker, Reinhold; Mussetti, Alberto; Norkin, Maxim; Prestidge, Tim D; Rowe, Jacob M; Satwani, Prakash; Siddiqi, Tanya; Stiff, Patrick J; William, Basem M; Wirk, Baldeep; Maloney, David G; Smith, Sonali M; Sureda, Anna M; Carreras, Jeanette; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-09-01

    Assessment with (18)F-fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for lymphoma may be prognostic for outcomes. Patients with chemotherapy-sensitive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) undergoing allogeneic HCT reported to the Center of International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Registry between 2007 and 2012 were included. Pre-HCT PET status (positive versus negative) was determined by the reporting transplantation centers. We analyzed 336 patients; median age was 55 years and 60% were males. Follicular lymphoma (n = 104) was more common than large cell (n = 85), mantle cell (n = 69), and mature natural killer or T cell lymphoma (n = 78); two thirds of the cohort received reduced-intensity conditioning; one half had unrelated donor grafts. Patients underwent PET scanning a median of 1 month (range, .07 to 2.83 months) before HCT; 159 were PET positive and 177 were PET negative. At 3 years, relapse/progression, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in PET-positive versus PET-negative groups were 40% versus 26%; P = .007; 43% versus 47%; P = .47; and 58% versus 60%; P = .73, respectively. On multivariate analysis, a positive pretransplantation PET was associated with an increased risk of relapse/progression (risk ratio [RR], 1.86; P = .001) but was not associated with increased mortality (RR, 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI], .96 to 1.7; P = .08), therapy failure (RR, 1.32; 95% CI, .95 to 1.84; P = .10), or nonrelapse mortality (RR, .75; 95% CI, .48 to 1.18; P = .22). PET status conferred no influence on graft-versus-host disease. A positive PET scan before HCT is associated with increased relapse risk but should not be interpreted as a barrier to a successful allograft. PET status does not appear to predict survival after allogeneic HCT for NHL.

  11. Impact of Pretransplantation 18F-fluorodeoxy Glucose—Positron Emission Tomography Status on Outcomes after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J.; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Laport, Ginna G.; Akpek, Görgün; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Nishihori, Taiga; Agura, Edward; Armand, Philippe; Jaglowski, Samantha M.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Cashen, Amanda F.; Cohen, Jonathon B.; D'Souza, Anita; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Holmberg, Leona A.; Inward, David J.; Kanate, Abraham S.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Malone, Adriana K.; Munker, Reinhold; Mussetti, Alberto; Norkin, Maxim; Prestidge, Tim D.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Satwani, Prakash; Siddiqi, Tanya; Stiff, Patrick J.; William, Basem M.; Wirk, Baldeep; Maloney, David G.; Smith, Sonali M.; Sureda, Anna M.; Carreras, Jeanette; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Assessment with 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG)—positron emission tomography (PET) before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for lymphoma may be prognostic for outcomes. Patients with chemotherapy-sensitive non—Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) undergoing allogeneic HCT reported to the Center of International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Registry between 2007 and 2012 were included. Pre-HCT PET status (positive versus negative) was determined by the reporting transplantation centers. We analyzed 336 patients; median age was 55 years and 60% were males. Follicular lymphoma (n = 104) was more common than large cell (n = 85), mantle cell (n = 69), and mature natural killer or T cell lymphoma (n = 78); two thirds of the cohort received reduced-intensity conditioning; one half had unrelated donor grafts. Patients underwent PET scanning a median of 1 month (range, .07 to 2.83 months) before HCT; 159 were PET positive and 177 were PET negative. At 3 years, relapse/progression, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in PET-positive versus PET-negative groups were 40% versus 26%; P = .007; 43% versus 47%; P = .47; and 58% versus 60%; P = .73, respectively. On multivariate analysis, a positive pretransplantation PET was associated with an increased risk of relapse/progression (risk ratio [RR], 1.86; P = .001) but was not associated with worse OS (RR, 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI], .96 to 1.7; P = .08), PFS (RR, 1.32; 95% CI, .95 to 1.84; P = .10), or nonrelapse mortality (RR, .75; 95% CI, .48 to 1.18; P = .22). PET status conferred no influence on graft-versus-host disease. A positive PET scan before HCT is associated with increased relapse risk but should not be interpreted as a barrier to a successful allograft. PET status does not appear to predict survival after allogeneic HCT for NHL. PMID:25983043

  12. Late mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and functional status of long-term survivors: report from the Bone Marrow Transplant Survivor Study.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Smita; Francisco, Liton; Carter, Andrea; Sun, Can-Lan; Baker, K Scott; Gurney, James G; McGlave, Philip B; Nademanee, Auayporn; O'Donnell, Margaret; Ramsay, Norma K C; Robison, Leslie L; Snyder, David; Stein, Anthony; Forman, Stephen J; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2007-11-15

    We assessed late mortality in 1479 individuals who had survived 2 or more years after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Median age at HCT was 25.9 years and median length of follow-up was 9.5 years. The conditional survival probability at 15 years from HCT was 80.2% (SE = 1.9%) for those who were disease-free at entry into the cohort, and the relative mortality was 9.9 (95% confidence interval, 8.7-11.2). Relative mortality decreased with time from HCT, but remained significantly elevated at 15 years after HCT (standardized mortality ratio = 2.2). Relapse of primary disease (29%) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD: 22%) were the leading causes of premature death. Nonrelapse-related mortality was increased among patients older than 18 years at HCT (18-45 years: relative risk [RR] = 1.7; 46+ years: RR = 3.7) and among those with cGVHD (RR = 2.7), and was lower among patients who received methotrexate for GVHD prophylaxis (RR = 0.5). HCT survivors were more likely to report difficulty in holding jobs (odds ratio [OR] = 13.9), and in obtaining health (OR = 7.1) or life (OR = 9.9) insurance compared with siblings. This study demonstrates that mortality rates remain twice as high as that of the general population among 15-year survivors of HCT, and that the survivors face challenges affecting their health and well-being.

  13. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part I.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J

    2016-05-01

    Although immunosuppressive treatments and target concentration intervention (TCI) have significantly contributed to the success of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), there is currently no consensus on the best immunosuppressive strategies. Compared with solid organ transplantation, alloHCT is unique because of the potential for bidirectional reactions (i.e. host-versus-graft and graft-versus-host). Postgraft immunosuppression typically includes a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and a short course of methotrexate after high-dose myeloablative conditioning, or a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil after reduced-intensity conditioning. There are evolving roles for the antithymyocyte globulins (ATGs) and sirolimus as postgraft immunosuppression. A review of the pharmacokinetics and TCI of the main postgraft immunosuppressants is presented in this two-part review. All immunosuppressants are characterized by large intra- and interindividual pharmacokinetic variability and by narrow therapeutic indices. It is essential to understand immunosuppressants' pharmacokinetic properties and how to use them for individualized treatment incorporating TCI to improve outcomes. TCI, which is mandatory for the calcineurin inhibitors and sirolimus, has become an integral part of postgraft immunosuppression. TCI is usually based on trough concentration monitoring, but other approaches include measurement of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) over the dosing interval or limited sampling schedules with maximum a posteriori Bayesian personalization approaches. Interpretation of pharmacodynamic results is hindered by the prevalence of studies enrolling only a small number of patients, variability in the allogeneic graft source and variability in postgraft immunosuppression. Given the curative potential of alloHCT, the pharmacodynamics of these immunosuppressants deserves to be explored in depth. Development of

  14. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part I.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J

    2016-05-01

    Although immunosuppressive treatments and target concentration intervention (TCI) have significantly contributed to the success of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), there is currently no consensus on the best immunosuppressive strategies. Compared with solid organ transplantation, alloHCT is unique because of the potential for bidirectional reactions (i.e. host-versus-graft and graft-versus-host). Postgraft immunosuppression typically includes a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and a short course of methotrexate after high-dose myeloablative conditioning, or a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil after reduced-intensity conditioning. There are evolving roles for the antithymyocyte globulins (ATGs) and sirolimus as postgraft immunosuppression. A review of the pharmacokinetics and TCI of the main postgraft immunosuppressants is presented in this two-part review. All immunosuppressants are characterized by large intra- and interindividual pharmacokinetic variability and by narrow therapeutic indices. It is essential to understand immunosuppressants' pharmacokinetic properties and how to use them for individualized treatment incorporating TCI to improve outcomes. TCI, which is mandatory for the calcineurin inhibitors and sirolimus, has become an integral part of postgraft immunosuppression. TCI is usually based on trough concentration monitoring, but other approaches include measurement of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) over the dosing interval or limited sampling schedules with maximum a posteriori Bayesian personalization approaches. Interpretation of pharmacodynamic results is hindered by the prevalence of studies enrolling only a small number of patients, variability in the allogeneic graft source and variability in postgraft immunosuppression. Given the curative potential of alloHCT, the pharmacodynamics of these immunosuppressants deserves to be explored in depth. Development of

  15. CTLA4 blockade with ipilimumab to treat relapse of malignancy after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bashey, Asad; Medina, Bridget; Corringham, Sue; Pasek, Mildred; Carrier, Ewa; Vrooman, Linda; Lowy, Israel; Solomon, Scott R; Morris, Lawrence E; Holland, H Kent; Mason, James R; Alyea, Edwin P; Soiffer, Robert J; Ball, Edward D

    2009-02-12

    Relapse of malignancy after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) remains a therapeutic challenge. Blockade of the CTLA4 molecule can effectively augment antitumor immunity mediated by autologous effector T cells. We have assessed the safety and preliminary efficacy of a neutralizing, human anti-CTLA4 monoclonal antibody, ipilimumab, in stimulating the graft-versus-malignancy (GVM) effect after allo-HCT. Twenty-nine patients with malignancies that were recurrent or progressive after allo-HCT, received ipilimumab as a single infusion at dose cohorts between 0.1 and 3.0 mg/kg. Dose-limiting toxicity was not encountered, and ipilimumab did not induce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or graft rejection. Organ-specific immune adverse events (IAE) were seen in 4 patients (grade 3 arthritis, grade 2 hyperthyroidism, recurrent grade 4 pneumonitis). Three patients with lymphoid malignancy developed objective disease responses following ipilimumab: complete remission (CR) in 2 patients with Hodgkin disease and partial remission (PR) in a patient with refractory mantle cell lymphoma. At the 3.0 mg/kg dose, active serum concentrations of ipilimumab were maintained for more than 30 days after a single infusion. Ipilimumab, as administered in this clinical trial, does not induce or exacerbate clinical GVHD, but may cause organ-specific IAE and regression of malignancy. This study is registered at (http://clinicaltrials.gov) under NCI protocol ID P6082.

  16. Process of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation decision making for older adults.

    PubMed

    Randall, J; Keven, K; Atli, T; Ustun, C

    2016-05-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) may be the only curative option for some older adults with hematologic malignancies, and its associated risks of significant morbidity and mortality warrant a clear, informed decision-making process. As older adults have not been transplanted routinely until recent years, younger people have been the prototypical group around whom the current process has developed. Yet, this process is applied to older adults who have different considerations than younger patients when making their transplant decision. Older adults do not have the open-ended lives of younger patients and are entitled to consider how to spend their remaining time. They also possess maturity and experience, and with proper knowledge, they can make informed choices rather than moving forward in the transplant process unaware. Notably, older patients face similar problems with the informed decision-making process in nephrology. Strategies such as providing education about alloHCT gradually and repeatedly during induction, presenting recent knowledge from the literature in plain language, and utilizing a team approach to patient education may help older adults make the best decision about transplant in light of their situation and values. Understanding when and how older adults decide on alloHCT is an important first step to further exploring this problem. PMID:26457910

  17. Prognostic utility of routine chimerism testing at 2 to 6 months after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mossallam, Ghada I; Kamel, Azza M; Storer, Barry; Martin, Paul J

    2009-03-01

    The utility of routine chimerism analysis as a prognostic indicator of subsequent outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with myeloablative conditioning regimens remains controversial. To address this controversy, routine chimerism test results at 2 to 6 months after HCT with myeloablative conditioning regimens were evaluated for association with subsequent risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse, and overall mortality. Only 70 of 1304 patients (5%) had < 95% donor-derived cells in the marrow. Low donor chimerism in the marrow occurred more often in patients with low-risk diseases compared with those with higher-risk diseases and was significantly associated with a reduced risk of chronic GVHD. Among 673 patients evaluated, 164 (24%) had < 85% donor-derived T cells in the blood. Low donor T cell chimerism was more frequent in patients with low-risk diseases compared with those with higher-risk diseases, in those who received conditioning with busulfan compared with those who received conditioning with total body irradiation, and in those with lower-grade acute GVHD. Low donor T cell chimerism in the blood was significantly associated with a reduced risk of chronic GVHD but not with a reduced risk of relapse, NRM, or overall mortality. Routine testing of chimerism in the marrow and blood at 2 to 6 months after HCT with myeloablative conditioning regimens may be helpful in documenting engraftment in clinical trials, but provides only limited prognostic information in clinical practice.

  18. Performance status and comorbidity predict transplant-related mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Artz, Andrew S; Pollyea, Daniel A; Kocherginsky, Masha; Stock, Wendy; Rich, Elizabeth; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Zimmerman, Todd; Smith, Sonali; Godley, Lucy; Thirman, Michael; Daugherty, Christopher; Extermann, Martine; Larson, Richard; van Besien, Koen

    2006-09-01

    Comorbidity measurements have recently been used to improve estimation of tolerance to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We sought to determine the independent effect of comorbidity and performance status on HCT outcome and to devise a simple risk classification system for transplant-related mortality. We analyzed 105 consecutively enrolled patients who underwent HCT and received reduced intensity conditioning with fludarabine, melphalan, and alemtuzumab. Comorbid conditions were tabulated using 2 scales, the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and the Kaplan-Feinstein Scale (KFS). Comorbid conditions were found in 47% of patients by the KFS and in 27% by the CCI (P < .001). Using the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (PS) scale, 34% had a PS score >0 (range, 0-2). A simple scale combining the KFS and PS enabled separation of high- from low-risk patients, with 6-month cumulative incidences 50% and 15%, respectively for transplant-related mortality (P = .001) and enhanced prognostic power over the CCI alone (P = .018). Prospective studies evaluating more comprehensive functional and comorbidity measurements are warranted.

  19. Risk factors for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus bacteremia and its influence on survival after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tavadze, M; Rybicki, L; Mossad, S; Avery, R; Yurch, M; Pohlman, B; Duong, H; Dean, R; Hill, B; Andresen, S; Hanna, R; Majhail, N; Copelan, E; Bolwell, B; Kalaycio, M; Sobecks, R

    2014-10-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) is a well-known infectious complication among immunocompromised patients. We performed a retrospective analysis to identify risk factors for the development of VRE bacteremia (VRE-B) within 15 months after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) and to determine its prognostic importance for other post-transplant outcomes. Eight hundred consecutive adult patients who underwent alloHCT for hematologic diseases from 1997 to 2011 were included. Seventy-six (10%) developed VRE-B at a median of 46 days post transplant. Year of transplant, higher HCT comorbidity score, a diagnosis of ALL, unrelated donor and umbilical cord blood donor were all significant risk factors on multivariable analysis for the development of VRE-B. Sixty-seven (88%) died within a median of 1.1 months after VRE-B, but only four (6%) of these deaths were attributable to VRE. VRE-B was significantly associated with worse OS (hazard ratio 4.28, 95% confidence interval 3.23-5.66, P<0.001) in multivariable analysis. We conclude that the incidence of VRE-B after alloHCT has increased over time and is highly associated with mortality, although not usually attributable to VRE infection. Rather than being the cause, this may be a marker for a complicated post-transplant course. Strategies to further enhance immune reconstitution post transplant and strict adherence to infection prevention measures are warranted. PMID:25111516

  20. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. II. Requirement for allogeneic T cells in the reconstituting bone marrow inoculum for subsequent resistance to breaking of tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Sheard, M.A.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-08-01

    The ability of normal recipient-type lymphocytes to break tolerance in long-term allogenic radiation chimeras has been investigated. Reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with a mixture of syngeneic and allogeneic T cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) has previously been shown to lead to mixed chimerism and permanent, specific tolerance to donor and host alloantigen (3-5). If allogeneic T cells are not depleted from the reconstituting inoculum, complete allogeneic chimerism results; however, no clinical evidence for GVHD is observed, presumably due to the protective effect provided by syngeneic TCD BM. This model has now been used to study the effects of allogenic T cells administered in reconstituting BM inocula on stability of long-term tolerance. We have attempted to break tolerance in long-term chimeras originally reconstituted with TCD or non-TCD BM by challenging them with inocula containing normal, nontolerant recipient strain lymphocytes. tolerance was broken with remarkable ease in recipients of mixed marrow inocula in which both original BM components were TCD. In contrast, tolerance in chimeras originally reconstituted with non-TCD allogeneic BM was not affected by such inocula. Susceptibility to loss of chimerism and tolerance was not related to initial levels of chimerism per se, but rather to T cell depletion of allogeneic BM, since chimeras reconstituted with TCD allogeneic BM alone (mean level of allogeneic chimerism 98%) were as susceptible as mixed chimeras to the tolerance-breaking effects of such inocula. The possible contribution of GVH reactivity to this resistance was investigated using an F1 into parent strain combination. In these animals, the use of non-TCD F1 BM inocula for reconstitution did not lead to resistance to the tolerance-breaking effects of recipient strain splenocytes.

  1. Long-term survival and late effects among one-year survivors of second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christine N; Majhail, Navneet S; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Frangoul, Haydar A; Hayashi, Robert J; Hsu, Jack W; Kamble, Rammurti T; Kasow, Kimberly A; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M; Loren, Alison W; Marks, David I; Maziarz, Richard T; Mehta, Paulette; Myers, Kasiani C; Norkin, Maxim; Pidala, Joseph A; Porter, David L; Reddy, Vijay; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Steinberg, Amir; Wall, Donna A; Warwick, Anne B; Wood, William A; Yu, Lolie C; Jacobsohn, David A; Sorror, Mohamed L

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the outcomes of patients who survived disease-free for 1 year or more after a second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for relapsed acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes between 1980 and 2009. A total of 1285 patients received a second allogeneic transplant after disease relapse; among these, 325 were relapse free at 1 year after the second HCT. The median time from first to second HCT was 17 and 24 months for children and adults, respectively. A myeloablative preparative regimen was used in the second transplantation in 62% of children and 45% of adult patients. The overall 10-year conditional survival rates after second transplantation in this cohort of patients who had survived disease-free for at least 1 year was 55% in children and 39% in adults. Relapse was the leading cause of mortality (77% and 54% of deaths in children and adults, respectively). In multivariate analyses, only disease status before second HCT was significantly associated with higher risk for overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.71 for patients with disease not in complete remission before second HCT, P < .01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in 43% and 75% of children and adults after second transplantation. Chronic GVHD was the leading cause of nonrelapse mortality, followed by organ failure and infection. The cumulative incidence of developing at least 1 of the studied late effects within 10 years after second HCT was 63% in children and 55% in adults. The most frequent late effects in children were growth disturbance (10-year cumulative incidence, 22%) and cataracts (20%); in adults they were cataracts (20%) and avascular necrosis (13%). Among patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes who receive a second allogeneic HCT for relapse and survive disease free for at least 1 year, many can be expected to survive long term. However, they continue to be at risk for relapse and nonrelapse morbidity and mortality. Novel

  2. Long-term Survival and Late Effects among 1-year Survivors of Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Relapsed Acute Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christine N.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Hsu, Jack W.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kasow, Kimberly A.; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Loren, Alison W.; Marks, David I.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Mehta, Paulette; Myers, Kasiani C.; Norkin, Maxim; Pidala, Joseph A.; Porter, David L.; Reddy, Vijay; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Schouten, Harry C.; Steinberg, Amir; Wall, Donna A.; Warwick, Anne B.; Wood, William A.; Yu, Lolie C.; Jacobsohn, David A.; Sorror, Mohamed L.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the outcomes of patients who survived disease-free for 1-year or more following second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for relapsed acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes between 1980 and 2009. A total of 1285 patients received a second allogeneic transplant following disease relapse; among these 325 survived relapse-free at 1-year after the second HCT. The median time from first to second HCT was 17 and 24 months for children and adults, respectively. A myeloablative preparative regimen was used in the second transplant in 62% of children and 45% of adult patients. The overall 10-year conditional survival rates after second transplantation in this cohort of patients who had survived disease-free for at least one year were 55% in children and 39% in adults. Relapse was the leading cause of mortality (77% and 54% of deaths in children and adults, respectively). In multivariate analyses, only disease status prior to second HCT was significantly associated with higher risk for overall mortality (HR 1.71 for patients with disease not in complete remission prior to second HCT, P<0.01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in 43% and 75% of children and adults following second transplant. Chronic GVHD was the leading cause of non-relapse mortality followed by organ failure and infection. The cumulative incidence of developing at least one of the studied late effects at 10-years after second HCT was 63% in children and 55% in adults. The most frequent late effects in children were growth disturbance (10-year cumulative incidence 22%) and cataracts (20%), and in adults were cataracts (20%) and avascular necrosis (13%). Among patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes who receive a second allogeneic HCT for relapse and survive disease-free for at least 1-year, many can be expected to survive long term. However, they continue to be at risk for relapse and non-relapse morbidity and mortality. Novel approaches

  3. Toxoplasmosis in cord blood transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Bautista, G; Ramos, A; Forés, R; Regidor, C; Ruiz, E; de Laiglesia, A; Navarro, B; Bravo, J; Portero, F; Sanjuan, I; Fernández, M N; Cabrera, R

    2012-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a devastating opportunistic infection that can affect immunocompromised patients such as cord blood transplantation (CBT) recipients. The clinical characteristics of 4 toxoplasmosis CBT patients treated at our institution are reviewed, together with 5 cases collected from the literature. The rate of toxoplasmosis in our hospital was 6% in CBT recipients and 0.2% in other types of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (P < 0.001). Five patients (56%) presented disseminated toxoplasmosis and 4 patients (44%) had localized infection in the central nervous system. In 5 of the 9 patients considered (56%), cytomegalovirus viral replication had been detected before the clinical onset of toxoplasmosis. Seven patients (78%) had previously developed graft-versus-host disease. All patients who exhibited disseminated disease died due to Toxoplasma infection. Pre-transplant serology was positive in 1 patient, negative in 3 patients, and not performed in another. Only 1 of these 5 patients with disseminated disease had received Toxoplasma prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole. It could be concluded that mortality in CBT patients with disseminated toxoplasmosis is unacceptably high. The negative results of serology in the majority of these cases, and its unspecific clinical presentation, makes diagnosis exceedingly difficult. Better diagnostic tests and prophylaxis strategy are needed in CBT recipients.

  4. Gut microbiota and allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weilin; Xu, Shaoyan; Ren, Zhigang; Jiang, Jianwen; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-08-23

    The latest high-throughput sequencing technologies show that there are more than 1000 types of microbiota in the human gut. These microbes are not only important to maintain human health, but also closely related to the occurrence and development of various diseases. With the development of transplantation technologies, allogeneic transplantation has become an effective therapy for a variety of end-stage diseases. However, complications after transplantation still restrict its further development. Post-transplantation complications are closely associated with a host's immune system. There is also an interaction between a person's gut microbiota and immune system. Recently, animal and human studies have shown that gut microbial populations and diversity are altered after allogeneic transplantations, such as liver transplantation (LT), small bowel transplantation (SBT), kidney transplantation (KT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HTCT). Moreover, when complications, such as infection, rejection and graft versus host disease (GVHD) occur, gut microbial populations and diversity present a significant dysbiosis. Several animal and clinical studies have demonstrated that taking probiotics and prebiotics can effectively regulate gut microbiota and reduce the incidence of complications after transplantation. However, the role of intestinal decontamination in allogeneic transplantation is controversial. This paper reviews gut microbial status after transplantation and its relationship with complications. The role of intervention methods, including antibiotics, probiotics and prebiotics, in complications after transplantation are also discussed. Further research in this new field needs to determine the definite relationship between gut microbial dysbiosis and complications after transplantation. Additionally, further research examining gut microbial intervention methods to ameliorate complications after transplantation is warranted. A better understanding of the

  5. Specific allogeneic unresponsiveness in the adult host: present-day experimental models

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, F.T.; Bachvaroff, R.J.; Cronkite, E.; Chanana, A.; Sato, T.; Asari, H.; Waltzer, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a long-term intensive effort to apply the induction of adult allogensic unresponsiveness to the transplantation problem, two techniques to control the variability in the persistence of immunologically competent postthymic cells iin the treated host and/or the inoculum of autologous marrow returned to the host after irradiation are described. The first consisted of exposing the peripheral blood of prospective recipients to a 5-week course of extra-corporeal irradiation (ECIB), the other of exposing the stored autologous marrow scheduled to repopulate a given recipient to methyl-prednisolone (MPd) and DNase prior to renifusion into the recipient. Serial analysis of bone marrow cell samples at various intervals before and after treatment was undertaken. The significance of the disappearance of a particular population of nonnuclear cells from the samples, and the association of such disappearance with increased success in the induction of allogeneic unresponsiveness is discussed. (ACR)

  6. A Pilot Pharmacologic Biomarker Study in HLA-Haploidentical Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Sorror, Mohamed; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; O’Donnell, Paul V.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Eleven patients diagnosed with various hematologic malignancies receiving an HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) participated in an ancillary biomarker trial. The goal of the trial was to evaluate potential pharmacologic biomarkers pertinent to the conditioning regimen (fludarabine monophosphate (fludarabine) and cyclophosphamide (CY)) or postgrafting immunosuppression (CY and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)) in these patients. METHODS We characterized the interpatient variability of nine pharmacologic biomarkers. The biomarkers evaluated were relevant to fludarabine (i.e., area under the curve (AUC) of 2-fluoro-ara-A or F-ara-A); CY (i.e., AUCs of CY and four of its metabolites); and MMF (i.e., total mycophenolic acid (MPA) AUC, unbound MPA AUC, and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity). RESULTS Interpatient variability in the pharmacologic biomarkers was high. Among those related to HCT conditioning, the interpatient variability ranged from 1.5-fold (CY AUC) to 4.0-fold (AUC of carboxyethlphosphoramide mustard, a metabolite of CY). Among biomarkers evaluated as part of postgrafting immunosuppression, the interpatient variability ranged from 1.7-fold (CY AUC) to 4.9-fold (IMPDH area under the effect curve). There was a moderate correlation (R2=0.441) of within-patient 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide formation clearance. CONCLUSIONS Considerable interpatient variability exists in the pharmacokinetic and drug-specific biomarkers potentially relevant to clinical outcomes in HLA-haploidentical HCT recipients. Pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to optimize the conditioning regimen and postgrafting immunosuppression administered to HLA-haploidentical HCT recipients. PMID:23907443

  7. Multicenter biologic assignment trial comparing reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant to hypomethylating therapy or best supportive care in patients aged 50 to 75 with intermediate-2 and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network #1102 study rationale, design, and methods.

    PubMed

    Saber, Wael; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Sekeres, Mikkael; Logan, Brent; Lewis, Moira; Mendizabal, Adam; Leifer, Eric; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Horowitz, Mary M; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Cutler, Corey S

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens made it possible to offer allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) to older patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, the relative risks and benefits of alloHCT compared with novel nontransplant therapies continue to be the source of considerable uncertainty. We will perform a prospective biologic assignment trial to compare RIC alloHCT with nontransplant therapies based on donor availability. Primary outcome is 3-year overall survival. Secondary outcomes include leukemia-free survival, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness. Four hundred patients will be enrolled over roughly 3 years. Planned subgroup analyses will evaluate key biologic questions, such as the impact of age and response to hypomethylating agents on treatment effects. Findings from this study potentially may set a new standard of care for older MDS patients who are considered candidates for alloHCT.

  8. Radiolabeled antibodies directed at CD45 for conditioning prior to allogeneic transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Zeller, Jill

    2012-01-01

    While allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) may offer the best chance of cure for patients suffering from aggressive hematological malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome, successful outcomes for the subgroup of patients with high-risk disease remain disappointing and lag behind those of lower-risk patients. Because relatively high rates of relapse are an important contributor to these poor outcomes, efforts have explored approaches to increase the cytotoxic effects of treatment. Relapse rates have been shown to improve with the addition of increased doses of total body irradiation (TBI) and/or the introduction of additional chemotherapy to a HCT conditioning regimen. However, the increase in TBI dose and/or additional chemotherapy has also been associated with a significant increase in life-threatening toxicities, resulting in no change in overall survival. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been employed as an adjunct to HCT where targeted delivery of radiation may allow for further escalation of therapy to reduce relapse with minimal toxicity. In this review we describe these efforts, including the benefits of escalating the dose of radiation to sites of hematologic disease prior to HCT, the various cellular targets for antibody-mediated delivery of radiation, as well as the rationale for incorporation of various radionuclides such as alpha emitters and beta emitters into the preparative regimen prior to HCT. Lastly, newer novel approaches such as pretargeted RIT (PRIT) are described as a method to further increase delivery of targeted radiation to hematological tissues while sparing noninvolved organs. PMID:23556108

  9. PHYSICIAN PERCEPTIONS AND PRACTICE PATTERNS REGARDING FERTILITY PRESERVATION IN HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Loren, Alison W.; Brazauskas, Ruta; Chow, Eric J.; Gilleece, Maria; Halter, Joerg; Jacobsohn, David A.; Joshi, Sarita; Pidala, Joseph; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Wang, Zhiwei; Apperley, Jane F.; Burns, Linda J.; Hale, Gregory A.; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon M.; Kamble, Rammurti; Lazarus, Hillard; McCarthy, Philip L; Reddy, Vijay; Warwick, Anne B.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Duncan, Christine; Socie, Gerard; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Wingard, John R.; Majhail, Navneet S.

    2013-01-01

    Physician practice variation may be a barrier to informing hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients about fertility preservation (FP) options. We surveyed HCT physicians in the United States to evaluate FP knowledge, practices, perceptions and barriers. Of the 1035 physicians invited, 185 completed a 29-item web-survey. Most respondents demonstrated knowledge of FP issues and discussed and felt comfortable discussing FP. However, only 55% referred patients to an infertility specialist. Most did not provide educational materials to patients and only 35% felt that available materials were relevant for HCT. Notable barriers to discussing FP included perception that patients were too ill to delay transplant (63%), patients were already infertile from prior therapy (92%) and time constraints (41%). Pediatric HCT physicians and physicians with access to an infertility specialist were more likely to discuss FP and to discuss FP even when prognosis was poor. On analyses that considered physician demographics, knowledge and perceptions as predictors of referral for FP, access to an infertility specialist and belief that patients were interested in FP were observed to be significant. We highlight variation in HCT physician perceptions and practices regarding FP. Physicians are generally interested in discussing fertility issues with their patients but lack educational materials. PMID:23419436

  10. Allogeneic transplantation for primary myelofibrosis with BM, peripheral blood or umbilical cord blood: an analysis of the JSHCT

    PubMed Central

    Murata, M; Nishida, T; Taniguchi, S; Ohashi, K; Ogawa, H; Fukuda, T; Mori, T; Kobayashi, H; Nakaseko, C; Yamagata, N; Morishima, Y; Nagamura-Inoue, T; Sakamaki, H; Atsuta, Y; Suzuki, R; Naoe, T

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether a difference in donor source affects the outcome of transplantation for patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a retrospective study was conducted using the national registry data on patients who received first allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with related BM (n=19), related PBSCs (n=25), unrelated BM (n=28) or unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB; n=11). The 5-year OS rates after related BM, related PBSC and unrelated BM transplantation were 63%, 43% and 41%, respectively, and the 2-year OS rate after UCB transplantation was 36%. On multivariate analysis, the donor source was not a significant factor for predicting the OS rate. Instead, performance status (PS) ⩾2 (vs PS 0–1) predicted a lower OS (P=0.044), and RBC transfusion ⩾20 times before transplantation (vs transfusion ⩽9 times) showed a trend toward a lower OS (P=0.053). No advantage of nonmyeloablative preconditioning regimens in terms of decreasing nonrelapse mortality or increasing OS was found. Allogeneic HCT, and even unrelated BM and UCB transplantation, provides a curative treatment for PMF patients. PMID:24270391

  11. Allogeneic Th1 cells home to host bone marrow and spleen and mediate IFNγ-dependent aplasia.

    PubMed

    Chewning, Joseph H; Zhang, Weiwei; Randolph, David A; Swindle, C Scott; Schoeb, Trenton R; Weaver, Casey T

    2013-06-01

    Bone marrow graft failure and poor graft function are frequent complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and result in significant morbidity and mortality. Both conditions are associated with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), although the mechanism remains undefined. Here we show, in 2 distinct murine models of GVHD (complete MHC- and class II-disparate) that mimic human peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, that Th1 CD4(+) cells induce bone marrow failure in allogeneic recipients. Bone marrow failure after transplantation of allogeneic naïve CD4(+) T cells was associated with increased CD4(+) Th1 cell development within bone marrow and lymphoid tissues. Using IFNγ-reporter mice, we found that Th1 cells generated during GVHD induced bone marrow failure after transfers into secondary recipients. Homing studies demonstrated that transferred Th1 cells express CXCR4, which was associated with accumulation within bone marrow and spleen. Allogeneic Th1 cells were activated by radiation-resistant host bone marrow cells and induced bone marrow failure through an IFNγ-dependent mechanism. Thus, allogeneic Th1 CD4(+) cells generated during GVHD traffic to hematopoietic sites and induce bone marrow failure via IFNγ-mediated toxicity. These results have important implications for prevention and treatment of bone marrow graft failure after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  12. Donor non-specific MICA antibodies in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sapák, Michal; Chreňová, Silvia; Tirpáková, Jana; Žilinská, Zuzana; Ďurmanová, Vladimíra; Shawkatová, Ivana; Jakuš, Vladimír; Kuba, Daniel; Buc, Milan

    2014-02-01

    Despite recent advances in solid organ transplantations, an antibody mediated rejection caused by donor specific antibodies is still a major problem in kidney graft survival. Besides HLA-induced humoral response, antibodies against MICA antigens have recently attracted attention because of their possible role in graft rejection. The aim of our study was to establish whether renal recipients produce antibodies against MICA molecules due to the transplantation and if they are specific for MICA antigens of the donors. MICA antibody screening was performed in 124 kidney recipient sera. 22 sera, that were found to be MICA antibody positive, were further examined for MICA antibody profiles and compared with donor MICA alleles. The analysis of MICA antibody positive sera showed mostly more complex reactivity patterns. A significant fraction of patient sera (59%) reacted not only with the donor MICA antigens, but also with other MICA patterns. A match between antibody specificities and MICA antigens was observed in 41% of renal recipients only. On the other hand, as much as in 36% of recipient sera were detected antibodies against their own MICA molecules. We did not prove a complete correlation between the recipient MICA antibody specificities and MICA antigens of the donor. We assume that MICA antibody induction occurs not only due to the allogeneic stimulation itself but also due to other factors that need to be elucidated.

  13. How do I manage hyperglycemia/post-transplant diabetes mellitus after allogeneic HSCT.

    PubMed

    Fuji, S; Rovó, A; Ohashi, K; Griffith, M; Einsele, H; Kapp, M; Mohty, M; Majhail, N S; Engelhardt, B G; Tichelli, A; Savani, B N

    2016-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients frequently develop glucose intolerance and post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM). The clinical importance of PTDM and its detrimental impact on HSCT outcomes are under-recognized. After allo-HSCT, various mechanisms can contribute to the development of PTDM. Here we review information about hyperglycemia and PTDM after allo-HSCT as well as PTDM after solid organ transplantation and describe ways to manage hyperglycemia/PTDM after allogeneic HSCT. Taking into consideration a lack of well-established evidence in the field of allo-HSCT, more studies should be conducted in the future, which will require closer multidisciplinary collaboration between hematologists, endocrinologists and nutritionists. PMID:27042848

  14. Chimerism of allogeneic mesenchymal cells in bone marrow, liver, and spleen after mesenchymal stem cells infusion.

    PubMed

    Meleshko, Alexander; Prakharenia, Irina; Kletski, Semen; Isaikina, Yanina

    2013-12-01

    Although an infusion of culture-expanded MSCs is applied in clinic to improve results of HSCs transplantation and for a treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, homing, and engraftment potential of culture-expanded MSC in humans is still obscure. We report two female patients who received allogeneic BM transplantation as a treatment of hematological diseases and a transplantation of MSCs from third-party male donors. Both patients died within one yr of infectious complications. Specimens of paraffin-embedded blocks of tissues from transplanted patients were taken. The aim of the study was to estimate possible homing and engraftment of allogeneic BM-derived MSCs in some tissues/organs of recipient. Sensitive real-time quantitative PCR analysis was applied with SRY gene as a target. MSC chimerism was found in BM, liver, and spleen of both patients. We conclude that sensitive RQ-PCR analysis is acceptable for low-level chimerism evaluation even in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens.

  15. Immune responses to an encapsulated allogeneic islet {beta}-cell line in diabetic NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Sasha P. . E-mail: Sasha.Black@ca.crl.com; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Cui, Hong; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Weber, Collin J.; Safley, Susan A.

    2006-02-03

    Our goal is to develop effective islet grafts for treating type 1 diabetes. Since human islets are scarce, we evaluated the efficacy of a microencapsulated insulin-secreting conditionally transformed allogeneic {beta}-cell line ({beta}TC-tet) in non-obese diabetic mice treated with tetracycline to inhibit cell growth. Relatively low serum levels of tetracycline controlled proliferation of {beta}TC-tet cells without inhibiting effective control of hyperglycemia in recipients. There was no significant host cellular reaction to the allografts or host cell adherence to microcapsules, and host cytokine levels were similar to those of sham-operated controls. We conclude that encapsulated allogeneic {beta}-cell lines may be clinically relevant, because they effectively restore euglycemia and do not elicit a strong cellular immune response following transplantation. To our knowledge, this is First extensive characterization of the kinetics of host cellular and cytokine responses to an encapsulated islet cell line in an animal model of type 1 diabetes.

  16. Allogeneic anorectal transplantation in rats: technical considerations and preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Flavio H. F.; Waisberg, Daniel R.; Seid, Victor E.; Costa, Anderson C. L.; Chaib, Eleazar; Baptista, Rachel Rossini; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Lanchotte, Cinthia; Cruz, Ruy J.; Araki, Jun; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Carneiro

    2016-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a challenging condition with numerous available treatment modalities. Success rates vary across these modalities, and permanent colostomy is often indicated when they fail. For these cases, a novel potential therapeutic strategy is anorectal transplantation (ATx). We performed four isogeneic (Lewis-to-Lewis) and seven allogeneic (Wistar-to-Lewis) ATx procedures. The anorectum was retrieved with a vascular pedicle containing the aorta in continuity with the inferior mesenteric artery and portal vein in continuity with the inferior mesenteric vein. In the recipient, the native anorectal segment was removed and the graft was transplanted by end-to-side aorta-aorta and porto-cava anastomoses and end-to-end colorectal anastomosis. Recipients were sacrificed at the experimental endpoint on postoperative day 30. Surviving animals resumed normal body weight gain and clinical performance within 5 days of surgery. Isografts and 42.9% of allografts achieved normal clinical evolution up to the experimental endpoint. In 57.1% of allografts, signs of immunological rejection (abdominal distention, diarrhea, and anal mucosa inflammation) were observed three weeks after transplantation. Histology revealed moderate to severe rejection in allografts and no signs of rejection in isografts. We describe a feasible model of ATx in rats, which may allow further physiological and immunologic studies. PMID:27488366

  17. Safety and Efficacy of Transplantation with Allogeneic Skin Tumors to Treat Chemically-Induced Skin Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jianhua; Ge, Chunlei; Dong, Suwei; Li, Zhen; Li, Ruilei; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Mei; Chen, Yun; Zou, Yingying; Qian, Zhongyi; Yang, Lei; Yang, Jinyan; Zhu, Zhitao; Liu, Zhimin; Song, Xin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transplantation with allogeneic cells has become a promising modality for cancer therapy, which can induce graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect. This study was aimed at assessing the safety, efficacy, and tissue type GVT (tGVT) response of transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat chemically-induced skin tumors in mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS FVB/N and ICR mice were exposed topically to chemicals to induce skin tumors. Healthy ICR mice were transplanted with allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to test the safety. The tumor-bearing ICR mice were transplanted with, or without, allogeneic skin tumors to test the efficacy. The body weights (BW), body condition scores (BCS), tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, overall survival, and serum cytokines were measured longitudinally. RESULTS Transplantation with no more than 0.03 g allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to healthy ICR mice was safe. After transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat tumor-bearing mice, it inhibited the growth of tumors slightly at early stage, accompanied by fewer metastatic tumors at 24 days after transplantation (21.05% vs. 47.37%), while there were no statistically significant differences in the values of BW, BCS, tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, and overall survival between the transplanted and non-transplanted groups. The levels of serum interleukin (IL)-2 were significantly reduced in the controls (P<0.05), but not in the recipients, which may be associated with the tGVT response. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors is a safe treatment in mice, which can induce short-term tGVT response mediated by IL-2. PMID:27587310

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Transplantation with Allogeneic Skin Tumors to Treat Chemically-Induced Skin Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jianhua; Ge, Chunlei; Dong, Suwei; Li, Zhen; Li, Ruilei; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Mei; Chen, Yun; Zou, Yingying; Qian, Zhongyi; Yang, Lei; Yang, Jinyan; Zhu, Zhitao; Liu, Zhimin; Song, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background Transplantation with allogeneic cells has become a promising modality for cancer therapy, which can induce graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect. This study was aimed at assessing the safety, efficacy, and tissue type GVT (tGVT) response of transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat chemically-induced skin tumors in mice. Material/Methods FVB/N and ICR mice were exposed topically to chemicals to induce skin tumors. Healthy ICR mice were transplanted with allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to test the safety. The tumor-bearing ICR mice were transplanted with, or without, allogeneic skin tumors to test the efficacy. The body weights (BW), body condition scores (BCS), tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, overall survival, and serum cytokines were measured longitudinally. Results Transplantation with no more than 0.03 g allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to healthy ICR mice was safe. After transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat tumor-bearing mice, it inhibited the growth of tumors slightly at early stage, accompanied by fewer metastatic tumors at 24 days after transplantation (21.05% vs. 47.37%), while there were no statistically significant differences in the values of BW, BCS, tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, and overall survival between the transplanted and non-transplanted groups. The levels of serum interleukin (IL)-2 were significantly reduced in the controls (P<0.05), but not in the recipients, which may be associated with the tGVT response. Conclusions Our results suggest that transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors is a safe treatment in mice, which can induce short-term tGVT response mediated by IL-2. PMID:27587310

  19. A potential role for B cells in suppressed immune responses in cord blood transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Beaudette-Zlatanova, Britte C.; Le, Phong T.; Knight, Katherine L.; Zhang, Shubin; Zakrzewski, Sandra; Parthasarathy, Mala; Stiff, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated immune reconstitution in 58 adults who received hematopoietic stem cell transplants from allogeneic siblings (allosib), matched unrelated donors (MUD), or cord blood (CB) at 90-day intervals for one year post-transplant. CB recipients had a higher incidence of infections in the first 100 days compared to allosib and MUD recipients. The number of circulating T cells was lower in CB recipients compared to MUD recipients at 90 days and compared to allosib recipients at 180 days. Spectratype analysis of the TCR Vβ complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) of patient lymphocytes revealed that the TCR repertoire remained poorly diversified even at 360 days in nearly all patients. In contrast, the number of circulating B cells was significantly elevated in CB recipients compared to allosib recipients throughout the first year post-transplant and compared to MUD recipients at 9-12 months. Spectratype analysis of the B cell receptor VH CDR3 showed that the B cell repertoire was diversified in most patients by 90 days. CD5pos B cells from assayed CB recipients expressed intracellular IL-10 early post-transplant. Our data suggest that B cells, in addition to T cells, may play a role in impaired immune responses in CB transplant patients. PMID:22732699

  20. [Kinetic study of splenocytes after allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Hua; Zhou, Fan; Dou, Li-Ping; Wang, Li-Li; Wang, Xin-Rong; Li, Li; Yu, Li

    2010-08-01

    The study was purposed to understand immunological reconstitution of peripheral immune organs after transplantation, through establishing allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation model and detecting the kinetic change of splenocytes after transplantation. C57BL/6 mice were donors, BALB/c mice were recipients. Recipient mice were divided into irradiation group (R), irradiation plus inoculating bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNC) group (B), and irradiation plus inoculating bone marrow mononuclear cells and spleno-MNC group (S). After transplantation, the mice were examined daily for the symptoms such as weight, hunched posture, activity, ruffled fur, diarrhea, and survival. Blood routine test was done once a week, splenocyte was counted and CD3, CD4, CD8, B220, CD11c positive cell relative count was detected by FACS on day 2, 7, 14, 27, 60 after transplantation, Liver, skin and intestine were biopsied for histopathological examination before dying. The results indicated that 89% mice in S group died of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) during day 6 to 78. The spleno-mononuclear cell count quickly decreased and reached to lowest level on day 2, then gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 14; CD8 and B220 positive cells decreased to lowest level on day 12, in which CD8(+) cells quickly recovered and reached to level of pretransplantation, but the B220(+) recovered most slowly and sustained to be with low level, then gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 60; CD3 and CD4 positive cells decreased relatively slowly, and reached to lowest level on day 14, then both gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 60; CD11c positive cell count changed unstrikingly except day 14. It is concluded that when C57BL/6 mice are donors, and BALB/c mice are recipients treated with irradiation of 7.5 Gy and inoculated with 1 x 10⁷ bone marrow MNC and 1 x 10⁷ spleno-MNC, allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation model

  1. Transplantation of islet cells across major histocompatibility barriers after total lymphoid irradiation and infusion of allogeneic bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, L.D.; Scharp, D.W.; Lacy, P.E.; Slavin, S.

    1982-08-01

    Diabetic Lewis rats (AgB1/L) were evaluated as recipients of allogeneic Wistar-Furth (AgB2/2) isolated adult islets without the use of standard recipient immunosuppression. One group was treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and Wistar-Furth bone marrow cell reconstitution to proven chimerism prior to islet transplantation. This group returned to a prediabetic state following Wistar-Furth islet transplantation without any evidence of rejection for 100 days posttransplant. A second group of Lewis rats received only TLI without bone marrow treatment. They gave a varying result following islet transplantation with one recipient showing evidence of prolonged islet survival. A third chimeric control group did not receive isolated islets and did not alter their diabetic state. A fourth group was not given TLI nor donor bone marrow cells and uniformly rejected their allogeneic islets by 7 days. Thus, allogeneic adult islets will survive across major rat histocompatibility barriers using TLI and donor bone marrow chimerism as the only form of immunosuppression.

  2. Early vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) bacteremia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is associated with a rapidly deteriorating clinical course.

    PubMed

    Avery, R; Kalaycio, M; Pohlman, B; Sobecks, R; Kuczkowski, E; Andresen, S; Mossad, S; Shamp, J; Curtis, J; Kosar, J; Sands, K; Serafin, M; Bolwell, B

    2005-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal (VRE) infection is a growing threat. We studied the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of early-onset VRE bacteremia in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. We carried out a chart review of 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients from 1997-2003, including preparative regimen, diagnosis, status of disease, graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis, antimicrobial therapy, and survival. VRE bacteremia developed in 12/281 (4.3%) recipients; 10 (3.6%) were within 21 days of transplant. Diagnoses were acute leukemia (7), NHL (2), and MDS (1). In all, 70% had refractory/relapsed disease; 30% were in remission. In total, 50% had circulating blasts. Nine of 10 had matched unrelated donors (7/9 with CD8+ T-cell depletion). The average time to positive VRE cultures was 15 days; average WBC was 0.05, and 80% had concomitant infections. Despite treatment, all patients died within 73 days of VRE bacteremia. Intra-abdominal complications were common. Causes of death included bacterial or fungal infection, multiorgan failure, VOD, ARDS, and relapse. A total of 60% of patients engrafted neutrophils, but none engrafted platelets. Early VRE bacteremia after allogeneic bone marrow transplant is associated with a rapidly deteriorating clinical course, although not always directly due to VRE. Early VRE may be a marker for the critical condition of these high-risk patients at the time of transplant. PMID:15640812

  3. Long-Term Outcomes Among Older Patients Following Nonmyeloablative Conditioning and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Advanced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Franke, Georg N.; Laport, Ginna G.; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Agura, Edward; Maziarz, Richard T.; Langston, Amelia; Hari, Parameswaran; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Bethge, Wolfgang; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Bruno, Benedetto; Maris, Michael B.; Yeager, Andrew; Petersen, Finn Bo; Vindeløv, Lars; McSweeney, Peter A.; Hübel, Kai; Mielcarek, Marco; Georges, George E.; Niederwieser, Dietger; Blume, Karl G.; Maloney, David G.; Storb, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Context A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbidities. Objective To describe outcomes of patients ≥ 60 years. Design, Setting, and Participants From 1998 to 2008, 372 patients, 60–75 years old were enrolled in prospective clinical HCT trials at 18 collaborating institutions using conditioning with low-dose total body irradiation alone or combined with fludarabine 90 mg/m2 before related (n=184) or unrelated (n=188) donor transplants. Post-grafting immunosuppression included mycophenolate mofetil and a calcineurin inhibitor. Main Outcome Measures Overall and progression-free survivals were estimated by Kaplan-Meier method. Cumulative incidence estimates were calculated for acute and chronic GVHD, toxicities, achievement of full donor chimerism, complete remission, relapse, and non-relapse mortality. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated from Cox regression models. Results Overall, 5-year cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality and relapse were 27% (95% CI, 22%–32%) and 41% (95% CI, 36%–46%), respectively, leading to overall and progression-free 5-year survivals of 35% (95% CI, 30%–40%) and 32% (95% CI, 27%–37%), respectively. These outcomes were not statistically significantly different when stratified by age groups. Furthermore, increasing age was not associated with increases in acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or organ toxicities. In multivariate models, HCT-CI scores of 1–2 [HR, 1.58 (95% CI,1.08–2.31)] and ≥3 [HR, 1.97 (95% CI,1.38–2.80)] were associated with worse survival compared to HCT-CI score of 0 (overall P = 0.003). Similarly, standard relapse risk [HR, 1.67 (95% CI, 1.10–2.54)] and high relapse risk [HR, 2.22 (95% CI, 1.43–3.43)] were associated with worse survival compared to low relapse risk (overall P = 0.0008). Conclusion Among patients aged 60

  4. Outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative or myeloablative conditioning regimens for treatment of lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Storer, Barry E.; Maloney, David G.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Martin, Paul J.; Storb, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    Allogeneic conventional hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can be curative treatment for lymphoid malignancies, but it has been characterized by high nonrelapse mortality (NRM). Here, we compared outcomes among patients with lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia given either nonmyeloablative (n = 152) or myeloablative (n = 68) conditioning. Outcomes were stratified by the HCT-specific comorbidity index. Patients in the nonmyeloablative group were older, had more previous treatment and more comorbidities, more frequently had unrelated donors, and more often had malignancy in remission compared with patients in the myeloablative group. Patients with indolent versus aggressive malignancies were equally distributed among both cohorts. After HCT, patients without comorbidities both in the nonmyeloablative and myeloablative cohorts had comparable NRM (P = .74), overall survival (P = .75), and progression-free survival (P = .40). No significant differences were observed (P = .91, P = .89, and P = .40, respectively) after adjustment for pretransplantation variables. Patients with comorbidities experienced lower NRM (P = .009) and better survival (P = .04) after nonmyeloablative conditioning. These differences became more significant (P < .001 and .007, respectively) after adjustment for other variables. Further, nonmyeloablative patients with comorbidities had favorable adjusted progression-free survival (P = .01). Patients without comorbidities could be enrolled in prospective randomized studies comparing different conditioning intensities. Younger patients with comorbidities might benefit from reduced conditioning intensity. PMID:17916744

  5. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Acute Myeloid Leukemia: No Impact of Pre-transplant Extramedullary Disease on Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sagun D.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Wang, Hai-Lin; Akpek, Görgün; Copelan, Edward A.; Freytes, César; Gale, Robert Peter; Hamadani, Mehdi; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F.; Reshef, Ran; Ritchie, David S.; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Seber, Adriana; Shea, Thomas C.; Tallman, Martin S.; Wirk, Baldeep; Bunjes, Donald W.; Devine, Steven M.; de Lima, Marcos; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Uy, Geoffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of extramedullary disease (EMD) in AML on the outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) is unknown. Using data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) we compared the outcomes of patients who had EMD of AML at any time prior to transplant to a cohort of AML patients without EMD. We reviewed data AML from 9,797 patients including 814 with EMD from 310 reporting centers and 44 different countries who underwent alloHCT between and 1995–2010. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS) after alloHCT. Secondary outcomes included leukemia-free survival (LFS), relapse rate, and treatment-related mortality (TRM). In a multivariate analysis, the presence of EMD did not affect either OS (HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.91–1.09), LFS (0.98, 0.89–1.09), TRM (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.80–1.16, p=0.23) or relapse (RR =1.03, 95% CI, 0.92–1.16; p=0.62). Furthermore, the outcome of patients with EMD was not influenced by the location, timing of EMD, or intensity of conditioning regimen. The presence of EMD in AML does not affect transplant outcomes and should not be viewed as an independent adverse prognostic feature. PMID:25915806

  6. MODIFYING LIGNIN IN CONIFERS: THE ROLE OF HCT DURING TRACHEARY ELEMENT FORMATION IN PINUS RADIATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA: shikimate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT) is involved in the production of methoxylated monolignols that are precursors to guaiacyl and syringyl lignin in angiosperm species. We identified and cloned a putative HCT gene from Pinus radiata, a coniferous gymnosperm, ...

  7. Assuring Quality in Promoting Generic Skills in the Higher College of Technology (HCT), Muscat: Challenges & Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Holi Ibrahim Holi

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores EFL teachers' perceptions in relation to the pedagogical and conceptual challenges that they face in promoting generic skills in the Higher College of Technology (HCT), Muscat, in the context of post foundation level provision. A questionnaire was administered to 17 EFL teachers at HCT, at post foundation levels to investigate…

  8. Treosulfan, cyclophosphamide and antithymocyte globulin for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in acquired severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Giebel, Sebastian; Wojnar, Jerzy; Krawczyk-Kulis, Malgorzata; Markiewicz, Miroslaw; Wylezoł, Iwona; Seweryn, Marek; Holowiecka-Goral, Aleksandra; Holowiecki, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    To reduce the risk of graft rejection after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) for patients with acquired severe aplastic anemia (SAA), we introduced an intensified preparative regimen consisting of treosulfan 10 g/m2/d on days -7, -6, cyclophosphamide 40 mg/kg/d on days -5, -4, -3, -2 and anti-thymocyte globulin 2 mg/kg/d on days -3, -2, -1. Six patients with the history of multiple transfusions were treated with alloHCT from either HLA-identical sibling (n=3) or an unrelated volunteer (n=3). Each, bone marrow and peripheral blood was used as a source of stem cells in three cases. All patients engrafted and achieved complete donor chimerism. None of the patients experienced severe organ toxicity. No severe acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) was observed; two patients experienced extensive chronic GVHD. At the median follow-up of 14.5 (13-27) months all patients remained alive and disease-free. Our observation indicates that treosulfan + cyclophosphamide + antithymocyte globulin conditioning is well-tolerated and allows stable engraftment in acquired SAA. PMID:17494286

  9. Production of donor-derived offspring by allogeneic transplantation of spermatogonia in the yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata).

    PubMed

    Morita, Tetsuro; Kumakura, Naoki; Morishima, Kagayaki; Mitsuboshi, Toru; Ishida, Masashi; Hara, Takashi; Kudo, Satomi; Miwa, Misako; Ihara, Shoko; Higuchi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Yutaka; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2012-06-01

    Although the yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata) is the fish most commonly farmed in Japan, breeding of this species has not yet started. This is primarily due to the lack of sufficiently sophisticated methods for manipulating gametogenesis, which makes it difficult to collect gametes from specific dams and sires. If it were possible to produce large numbers of surrogate fish by transplanting germ cells isolated from donor individuals harboring desirable genetic traits, then the probability of acquiring gametes carrying the donor-derived haplotype would increase, and breeding programs involving this species might increase as a result. As a first step, we established a method for the allogeneic transplantation of yellowtail spermatogonia and the production of donor-derived offspring. Donor cells were collected from immature (10-month-old) yellowtail males with testes containing abundant type A spermatogonia, labeled with PKH26 fluorescent dye, and transferred into the peritoneal cavities of 8-day-old larvae. Fluorescence observation at 28 days post-transplantation revealed that PKH26-labeled cells were incorporated into recipients' gonads. To assess whether donor-derived spermatogonia could differentiate into functional gametes in the allogeneic recipient gonads, gametes collected from nine male and four female adult recipients were fertilized with wild-type eggs and milt. Analysis of microsatellite DNA markers confirmed that some of the first filial (F(1)) offspring were derived from donor fish, with the average contribution of donor-derived F(1) offspring being 66% and the maximum reaching 99%. These findings confirmed that our method was effective for transplanting yellowtail spermatogonia into allogeneic larvae to produce donor-derived offspring. PMID:22460666

  10. Generation of a cord blood-derived Wilms Tumor 1 dendritic cell vaccine for AML patients treated with allogeneic cord blood transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de Haar, Colin; Plantinga, Maud; Blokland, Nina JG; van Til, Niek P; Flinsenberg, Thijs WH; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Smits, Evelien L; Boon, Louis; Spel, Lotte; Boes, Marianne; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The poor survival rates of refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients after haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) requires the development of additional immune therapeutic strategies. As the elicitation of tumor-antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is associated with reduced relapses and enhanced survival, enhanced priming of these CTLs using an anti-AML vaccine may result in long-term immunity against AML. Cord blood (CB), as allogeneic HCT source, may provide a unique setting for such post-HCT vaccination, considering its enhanced graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effects and population of highly responsive naïve T cells. It is our goal to develop a powerful and safe immune therapeutic strategy composed of CB-HCT followed by vaccination with CB CD34+-derived dendritic cells (DCs) presenting the oncoprotein Wilms Tumor-1 (WT1), which is expressed in AML-blasts in the majority of patients. Here, we describe the optimization of a clinically applicable DC culture protocol. This two-step protocol consisting of an expansion phase followed by the differentiation toward DCs, enables us to generate sufficient cord blood-derived DCs (CBDCs) in the clinical setting. At the end of the culture, the CBDCs exhibit a mature surface phenotype, are able to migrate, express tumor antigen (WT1) after electroporation with mRNA encoding the full-length WT1 protein, and stimulate WT1-specific T cells. PMID:26451309

  11. Oral Complications in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients: The Role of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Haverman, T. M.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.; Rademacher, W. M. H.; Vokurka, S.; Epstein, J. B.; Huisman, C.; Hazenberg, M. D.; de Soet, J. J.; de Lange, J.; Rozema, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is widely used as a potentially curative treatment for patients with various hematological malignancies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and congenital immune deficiencies. The prevalence of oral complications in both autologous and allogeneic HSCT recipients remains high, despite advances in transplant medicine and in supportive care. Frequently encountered oral complications include mucositis, infections, oral dryness, taste changes, and graft versus host disease in allogeneic HSCT. Oral complications are associated with substantial morbidity and in some cases with increased mortality and may significantly affect quality of life, even many years after HSCT. Inflammatory processes are key in the pathobiology of most oral complications in HSCT recipients. This review article will discuss frequently encountered oral complications associated with HSCT focusing on the inflammatory pathways and inflammatory mediators involved in their pathogenesis. PMID:24817792

  12. Anti-thymocyte globulin-induced hyperbilirubinemia in patients with myelofibrosis undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ecsedi, Matyas; Schmohl, Jörg; Zeiser, Robert; Drexler, Beatrice; Halter, Jörg; Medinger, Michael; Duyster, Justus; Kanz, Lothar; Passweg, Jakob; Finke, Jürgen; Bethge, Wolfgang; Lengerke, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) remains the only curative treatment option for myelofibrosis (MF) despite the emergence of novel targeted therapies. To reduce graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), current allo-HCT protocols often include in vivo T lymphocyte depletion using polyclonal anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG). Shortly after ATG administration, an immediate inflammatory response with fever, chills, and laboratory alterations such as cytopenias, elevation of serum C-reactive protein, bilirubin, and transaminases can develop. Here, we explore whether MF patients, who commonly exhibit extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver, might be particularly susceptible to ATG-induced liver toxicity. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed 130 control and 94 MF patients from three transplant centers treated with or without ATG during the allo-HCT conditioning regimen. Indeed, hyperbilirubinemia was found in nearly every MF patient treated with ATG (MF-ATG 54/60 = 90 %) as compared to non-ATG treated MF (MF-noATG 15/34 = 44.1 %, p < 0.001) and respectively ATG-treated non-MF patients of the control group (control-ATG, 43/77 = 56 %, p < 0.001). In contrast, transaminases were only inconsistently elevated. Hyperbilirubinemia was in most cases self-limiting and not predictive of increased incidence of non-relapse mortality, hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) or liver GvHD. In sum, awareness of this stereotypic bilirubin elevation in MF patients treated with ATG provides a relatively benign explanation for hyperbilirubinemia occurring in these patients during the early transplant. However, attention to drug levels of biliary excreted drugs is warranted, since altered bile flow may influence their clearance and enhance toxicity (e.g., busulfan, antifungal agents). PMID:27480090

  13. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Munker, Reinhold; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Hai Lin; de Lima, Marcos; Khoury, Hanna J; Gale, Robert Peter; Maziarz, Richard T; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Weisdorf, Daniel; Saber, Wael

    2016-06-01

    Acute biphenotypic leukemias or mixed phenotype acute leukemias (MPAL) are rare and considered high risk. The optimal treatment and the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) are unclear. Most prior case series include only modest numbers of patients who underwent transplantation. We analyzed the outcome of 95 carefully characterized alloHCT patients with MPAL reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1996 and 2012. The median age was 20 years (range, 1 to 68). Among the 95 patients, 78 were in first complete remission (CR1) and 17 were in second complete remission (CR2). Three-year overall survival (OS) of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 57 to 76), leukemia-free survival of 56% (95% CI, 46 to 66), relapse incidence of 29% (95% CI, 20 to 38), and nonrelapse mortality of 15% (95% CI, 9 to 23) were encouraging. OS was best in younger patients (<20 years), but no significant differences were observed between those 20 to 40 years of age and those who were 40 years or older. A matched-pair analysis showed similar outcomes comparing MPAL cases to 375 acute myelogenous leukemia or 359 acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases. MPAL patients had more acute and a trend for more chronic graft-versus-host disease. No difference was observed between patients who underwent transplantation in CR1 versus those who underwent transplantation in CR2. AlloHCT is a promising treatment option for pediatric and adult patients with MPAL with encouraging long-term survival. PMID:26903380

  14. Longitudinal analysis of antibody response to immunization in paediatric survivors after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Hartford, Christine M.; Pei, Deqing; Posner, Meredith J.; Yang, Jie; Hayden, Randall T.; Srinivasan, Ashok; Triplett, Brandon M.; McCulllers, Jon A.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Leung, Wing

    2011-01-01

    Summary The long-term antibody responses to re-immunization in recipients of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) have not been well studied. We prospectively and longitudinally evaluated the antibody responses to 8 vaccine antigens (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, and poliovirus) and assessed the factors associated with negative titres in 210 allo-HSCT recipients at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Antibody responses lasting for more than 5 years after immunization were observed in most patients for tetanus (95.7%), rubella (92.3%), poliovirus (97.9%), and, in diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP) recipients, diphtheria (100%). However, responses to pertussis (25.0%), measles (66.7%), mumps (61.5%), hepatitis B (72.9%), and diphtheria in tetanus-diphtheria (Td) recipients (48.6%) were less favourable, with either only transient antibody responses or persistently negative titres. Factors associated with vaccine failure were older age at immunization; lower CD3, CD4 or CD19 counts; higher IgM concentrations; positive recipient cytomegalovirus serology; negative titres before immunization; acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease; and radiation during preconditioning. These response patterns and clinical factors can be used to formulate re-immunization and monitoring strategies. Patients at risk for vaccine failure should have long-term follow-up; those with loss of antibody response or no seroconversion should receive booster immunizations. PMID:22017512

  15. T-bet Promotes Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease by Regulating Recipient Hematopoietic Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianing; Wu, Yongxia; Nguyen, Hung; Heinrichs, Jessica; Schutt, Steven; Liu, Yuejun; Liu, Chen; Jin, Junfei; Anasetti, Claudio; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Beyond its critical role in T cells, T-bet regulates the functions of APCs including dendritic cells and B cells, as well as NK cells. Given that recipient APCs are essential for priming allogeneic T cells and recipient NK or T cells are able to reject allogeneic donor cells, we evaluated the role of T-bet on the host in acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) using murine models of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. T-bet(-/-) recipients developed significantly milder GVHD than their wild type counterparts in MHC-mismatched or CD4-dependent minor histocompatibility Ag-mismatched models. Allogeneic donor T cells, in particular, CD4 subset, significantly reduced IFN-γ production, proliferation and migration, and caused less injury in liver and gut of T-bet(-/-) recipients. We further observed that T-bet on recipient hematopoietic cells was primarily responsible for the donor T cell response and pathogenicity in GVHD. T-bet(-/-) dendritic cells expressed higher levels of Trail, whereas they produced lower levels of IFN-γ and IL-12/23 p40, as well as chemokine CXCL9, resulting in significantly higher levels of apoptosis, less priming, and infiltration of donor T cells. Meanwhile, NK cells in T-bet(-/-) hosts partially contribute to the decreased donor T cell proliferation. Furthermore, although T-bet on hematopoietic cells was required for GVHD development, it was largely dispensable for the graft-versus-leukemia effect. Taken together with our previous findings, we propose that T-bet is a potential therapeutic target for the control of GVHD through regulating donor T cells and recipient hematopoietic cells. PMID:26903480

  16. 21 CFR 1271.22 - How and where do I register and submit an HCT/P list?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How and where do I register and submit an HCT/P... Listing § 1271.22 How and where do I register and submit an HCT/P list? (a) You must use Form FDA 3356 for: (1) Establishment registration, (2) HCT/P listings, and (3) Updates of registration and HCT/P...

  17. Characterization of sphere-forming HCT116 clones by whole RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eunkyung; Oh, Inkyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine CD133+ cells defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) in colon cancer, we examined whether CD133+ clones in HCT116 demonstrate known features of CSCs like sphere-forming ability, chemodrug-resistance, and metastatic potential. Methods Magnetic cell isolation and cell separation demonstrated that <1% of HCT116 cells expressed CD133, with the remaining cells being CD133- clones. In colon cancer cells, radioresistance is also considered a CSC characteristic. We performed clonogenic assay using 0.4 Gy γ-irradiation. Results Interestingly, there were no differences between HCT116 parental and HCT116 CD133+ clones when the cells comprised 0.5% of the total cells, and CD133- clone demonstrated radiosensitive changes compared with parental and CD133+ clones. Comparing gene expression profiles between sphere-forming and nonforming culture conditions of HCT116 subclones by whole RNA sequencing failed to obtain specific genes expressed in CD133+ clones. Conclusion Despite no differences of gene expression profiles in monolayer attached culture conditions of each clone, sphere-forming conditions of whole HCT116 subclones, parental, CD133+, and CD133- increased 1,761 coding genes and downregulated 1,384 genes related to CSCs self-renewal and survival. Thus, spheroid cultures of HCT116 cells could be useful to expand colorectal CSCs rather than clonal expansion depending on CD133 expressions. PMID:27073788

  18. Pharmacist’s Role in Improving Medication Safety for Patients in an Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Ambulatory Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Lina; Akada, Keith; Messner, Hans; Kuruvilla, John; Wright, Janice; Seki, Jack T

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), supported by complex drug regimens, are vulnerable to drug therapy problems (DTPs) at interfaces of care after discharge from hospital and may benefit from timely pharmacy interventions and education. Objective: To determine the effect on medication safety of, as well as potential barriers to, incorporating a pharmacist in the multidisciplinary team of an allo-HCT clinic. Methods: Two pharmacists rotated to attend the allo-HCT clinic of a tertiary care, university-affiliated cancer centre between January and June 2010 (coverage for 1 of 3 clinic days per week). For every patient who was seen by a pharmacist, all discharge medications were reconciled from the inpatient ward to the clinic. The pharmacists’ primary task was to perform medication reconciliation and to identify and resolve DTPs. The pharmacists also provided medication education to patients and pharmacy consultations to clinic staff. Working with the outpatient pharmacy, the pharmacists helped to clarify prescriptions and drug coverage issues. Medication discrepancies identified and interventions performed by the pharmacists were recorded and were later graded for clinical significance by a panel of clinicians. Patient and staff satisfaction surveys were conducted at random during the study period. Barriers to the flow of patient care and other operational issues were documented. Results: The 2 pharmacists saw a total of 35 patients over 100 visits. They identified a total of 50 medication discrepancies involving 17 (49%) of the patients and 70 DTPs involving 23 (66%) of the patients. Thirty-one of the 70 DTPs resulted directly from a medication discrepancy. Twenty (95%) of the 21 unintentional medication discrepancies and 7 (70%) of the 10 undocumented intentional medication discrepancies were graded as clinically significant or moderately significant. Satisfaction surveys completed by patients and clinic staff

  19. 21 CFR 1271.21 - When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and... Listing § 1271.21 When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates? (a) You must register and submit a list of every HCT/P that your establishment manufactures within 5 days after...

  20. 21 CFR 1271.21 - When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and... Listing § 1271.21 When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates? (a) You must register and submit a list of every HCT/P that your establishment manufactures within 5 days after...

  1. 21 CFR 1271.25 - What information is required for establishment registration and HCT/P listing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... registration and HCT/P listing? 1271.25 Section 1271.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... HCT/P listing? (a) Your establishment registration Form FDA 3356 must include: (1) The legal name(s... registration and HCT/P listing form is true and accurate, to the best of his or her knowledge. (b) Your...

  2. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. I. Evidence for a donor cell population which increases allogeneic chimerism but which lacks the potential to produce GVHD

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Sheard, M.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-10-01

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) and failure of alloengraftment present major obstacles to the application of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) across complete MHC barriers. The addition of syngeneic T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) to untreated fully allogeneic marrow inocula in lethally irradiated mice has been previously shown to provide protection from GVHD. We have used this model to study the effects of allogeneic T cells on levels of chimerism in recipients of mixed marrow inocula. The results indicate that T cells in allogeneic BM inocula eliminate both coadministered recipient-strain and radioresistant host hematopoietic elements to produce complete allogeneic chimerism without clinical GVHD. To determine the role of GVH reactivity in this phenomenon, we performed similar studies in an F1 into parent combination, in which the genetic potential for GVHD is lacking. The presence of T cells in F1 marrow inocula led to predominant repopulation with F1 lymphocytes in such chimeras, even when coadministered with TCD-recipient-strain BM. These results imply that the ability of allogeneic BM cells removed by T cell depletion to increase levels of allochimerism may be mediated by a population which is distinct from that which produces GVHD. These results may have implications for clinical BM transplantation.

  3. 21 CFR 1271.265 - Receipt, predistribution shipment, and distribution of an HCT/P.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... evaluate each incoming HCT/P for the presence and significance of microorganisms and inspect for damage and... section. You must document these activities. Documentation must include: (1) Identification of the...

  4. 21 CFR 1271.265 - Receipt, predistribution shipment, and distribution of an HCT/P.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... evaluate each incoming HCT/P for the presence and significance of microorganisms and inspect for damage and... section. You must document these activities. Documentation must include: (1) Identification of the...

  5. 21 CFR 1271.265 - Receipt, predistribution shipment, and distribution of an HCT/P.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... evaluate each incoming HCT/P for the presence and significance of microorganisms and inspect for damage and... section. You must document these activities. Documentation must include: (1) Identification of the...

  6. 21 CFR 1271.265 - Receipt, predistribution shipment, and distribution of an HCT/P.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... evaluate each incoming HCT/P for the presence and significance of microorganisms and inspect for damage and... section. You must document these activities. Documentation must include: (1) Identification of the...

  7. 21 CFR 1271.265 - Receipt, predistribution shipment, and distribution of an HCT/P.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... evaluate each incoming HCT/P for the presence and significance of microorganisms and inspect for damage and... section. You must document these activities. Documentation must include: (1) Identification of the...

  8. Donor CD4 T Cell Diversity Determines Virus Reactivation in Patients After HLA-Matched Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, J; Seitz, V; Balzer, H; Gary, R; Lenze, D; Moi, S; Pasemann, S; Seegebarth, A; Wurdack, M; Hennig, S; Gerbitz, A; Hummel, M

    2015-01-01

    Delayed reconstitution of the T cell compartment in recipients of allogeneic stem cell grafts is associated with an increase of reactivation of latent viruses. Thereby, the transplanted T cell repertoire appears to be one of the factors that affect T cell reconstitution. Therefore, we studied the T cell receptor beta (TCRβ) gene rearrangements of flow cytometry–sorted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the peripheral blood of 23 allogeneic donors before G-CSF administration and on the day of apheresis. For this purpose, TCRβ rearrangements were amplified by multiplex PCR followed by high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Overall, CD4+ T cells displayed a significantly higher TCRβ diversity compared to CD8+ T cells irrespective of G-CSF administration. In line, no significant impact of G-CSF treatment on the TCR Vβ repertoire usage was found. However, correlation of the donor T cell repertoire with clinical outcomes of the recipient revealed that a higher CD4+ TCRβ diversity after G-CSF treatment is associated with lower reactivation of cytomegalovirus and Epstein–Barr virus. By contrast, no protecting correlation was observed for CD8+ T cells. In essence, our deep TCRβ analysis identifies the importance of the CD4+ T cell compartment for the control of latent viruses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25873100

  9. Five-Year Follow-Up of Patients With Advanced Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treated With Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation After Nonmyeloablative Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Maris, Michael; Shizuru, Judith; Maziarz, Richard; Agura, Edward; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; McSweeney, Peter A.; Wade, James C.; Bruno, Benedetto; Langston, Amelia; Radich, Jerald; Niederwieser, Dietger; Blume, Karl G.; Storb, Rainer; Maloney, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose We reported encouraging early results of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning in 64 patients who had advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here, we have extended the follow-up to a median of 5 years and have included data on an additional 18 patients. Patients and Methods Eighty-two patients, age 42 to 72 years, who had fludarabine-refractory CLL were conditioned with 2 Gy total-body irradiation alone or combined with fludarabine followed by HCT from related (n = 52) or unrelated (n = 30) donors. Results Complete remission (CR) and partial remission were achieved in 55% and 15% of patients, respectively. Higher CR rates were noted after unrelated HCT (67% v 48%). The 5-year incidences of nonrelapse mortality (NRM), progression/relapse, overall survival, and progression-free survival were 23%, 38%, 50%, and 39%, respectively. Among 25 patients initially reported in CR, 8% relapsed and 8% died as a result of NRM, whereas 84% have remained alive and in CR. Among 14 responding patients who were tested and who had molecular eradication of their disease, two died as a result of NRM, two relapsed, and 10 have remained negative. At 5 years, 76% of living patients were entirely well, whereas 24% continued to receive immunosuppression for chronic graft-versus-host disease; the median performance status in each group was 100% and 90%, respectively. Lymphadenopathy ≥ 5 cm, but not cytogenetic abnormalities at HCT, predicted relapse. In a risk-stratification model, patients who had lymphadenopathy less than 5 cm and no comorbidities had a 5-year OS of 71%. Conclusion Nonmyeloablative HCT resulted in a median survival of 5 years for patients who had fludarabine-refractory CLL with sustained remissions and in the continued resolution of chronic graft-versus-host disease in surviving patients. PMID:18794548

  10. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Waseem; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Davies, E.Graham; Davis, Jeffery; Duval, Michel; Eames, Gretchen; Farinha, Nuno; Filopovich, Alexandra; Fischer, Alain; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Gennery, Andrew; Heilmann, Carsten; Landais, Paul; Horwitz, Mitchell; Porta, Fulvio; Sedlacek, Petr; Seger, Reinhard; Slatter, Mary; Teague, Lochie; Eapen, Mary; Veys, Paul

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) is a rare primary immune disorder caused by defects of the CD18 β-integrin molecule on immune cells. The condition usually presents in early infancy and is characterised by deep tissue infections, leukocytosis with impaired formation of pus and delayed wound healing. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers the possibility of curative therapy, and with patient numbers at any individual centre being limited, we surveyed the transplant experience at 14 centres worldwide. PATIENTS & METHODS The course of 36 children with a confirmed diagnosis of LAD who underwent HSCT between 1993 and 2007 was retrospectively analysed. Data was collected by the registries of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID)/European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) RESULTS At median followup of 62 months (extending to 14 years) overall survival was 75%. Myeloablative conditioning regimens were used in 28 patients, and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) in 8 patients, with no deaths in this subgroup. Survival after matched family donor and unrelated donor transplants was similar, with 11/14 matched family donor and 12/14 unrelated donor recipients alive; mortality was greatest following haplo-identical transplants, where 4/8 children did not survive. Twenty seven transplant recipients are alive, with full donor engraftment in 17 cases, mixed multi-lineage chimerism in 7 patients, and mononuclear cell restricted chimerism in a further 3 cases. CONCLUSIONS HSCT offers long term benefit in LAD and should be considered as an early therapeutic option if a suitable HLA-matched stem cell donation is available. Reduced intensity conditioning was particularly safe, and mixed donor chimersim appears sufficient to prevent significant symptoms, although careful long term monitoring will be required for these patients. PMID

  11. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E; Boeckh, Michael J; Bemer, Meagan J; Phillips, Brian R; Risler, Linda J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-08-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) at 5 time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic-dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory maximum effect model with an IC50 of 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, nonrelapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic-dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker.

  12. A limited sampling schedule to estimate mycophenolic Acid area under the concentration-time curve in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Bemer, Meagan J; Salinger, David H; Vicini, Paolo; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Nash, Richard; McCune, Jeannine S

    2012-11-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a key component of postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. The plasma area under the curve (AUC) of its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid (MPA), is associated with MMF efficacy and toxicity. This study developed a population pharmacokinetic model of MPA in HCT recipients and created limited sampling schedules (LSSs) to enable individualized pharmacotherapy. A retrospective evaluation of MPA concentration-time data following a 2-hour MMF intravenous (IV) infusion was conducted in 77 HCT recipients. The final model consisted of 1 and 2 compartments for MMF and MPA pharmacokinetics, respectively. The mean estimated values (coefficient of variation, %) for total systemic clearance, distributional clearance, and central and peripheral compartment volumes of MPA were 36.9 L/h (34.5%), 15.3 L/h (80.4%), 11.9 L (71.7%), and 182 L (127%), respectively. No covariates significantly explained variability among individuals. Optimal LSSs were derived using a simulation approach based on the scaled mean squared error. A 5-sample schedule of 2, 2.5, 3, 5, and 6 hours from the start of the infusion precisely estimated MPA AUC(0-12 h) for Q12-hour IV MMF. A comparable schedule (2, 2.5, 3, 4, and 6 hours) similarly estimated MPA AUC(0-8) (h) for Q8-hour dosing.

  13. A Limited Sampling Schedule to Estimate Mycophenolic Acid Area Under the Concentration-Time Curve in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Salinger, David H.; Vicini, Paolo; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Nash, Richard; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2011-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a key component of post-grafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. The plasma area under the curve (AUC) of its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid (MPA), is associated with MMF efficacy and toxicity. This study developed a population pharmacokinetic model of MPA in HCT recipients and created limited sampling schedules (LSS) to enable individualized pharmacotherapy. A retrospective evaluation of MPA concentration-time data following a 2 hr MMF intravenous (IV) infusion was conducted in 77 HCT recipients. The final model consisted of one and two compartments for MMF and MPA pharmacokinetics, respectively. The mean estimated values (coefficient of variation, %) for total systemic clearance, distributional clearance, and central and peripheral compartment volumes of MPA were 36.9 L/h (34.5%), 15.3 L/h (80.4%), 11.9 L (71.7%), and 182 L (127%), respectively. No covariates significantly explained variability among individuals. Optimal LSS were derived using a simulation approach based on the scaled mean squared error. A five-sample schedule of 2, 2.5, 3, 5, and 6 hr from the start of the infusion precisely estimated MPA AUC0–12 hr for Q12 hr IV MMF. A comparable schedule (2, 2.5, 3, 4 and 6 hr) similarly estimated MPA AUC0–8hr for Q8 hr dosing. PMID:22174435

  14. A limited sampling schedule to estimate mycophenolic Acid area under the concentration-time curve in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Bemer, Meagan J; Salinger, David H; Vicini, Paolo; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Nash, Richard; McCune, Jeannine S

    2012-11-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a key component of postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. The plasma area under the curve (AUC) of its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid (MPA), is associated with MMF efficacy and toxicity. This study developed a population pharmacokinetic model of MPA in HCT recipients and created limited sampling schedules (LSSs) to enable individualized pharmacotherapy. A retrospective evaluation of MPA concentration-time data following a 2-hour MMF intravenous (IV) infusion was conducted in 77 HCT recipients. The final model consisted of 1 and 2 compartments for MMF and MPA pharmacokinetics, respectively. The mean estimated values (coefficient of variation, %) for total systemic clearance, distributional clearance, and central and peripheral compartment volumes of MPA were 36.9 L/h (34.5%), 15.3 L/h (80.4%), 11.9 L (71.7%), and 182 L (127%), respectively. No covariates significantly explained variability among individuals. Optimal LSSs were derived using a simulation approach based on the scaled mean squared error. A 5-sample schedule of 2, 2.5, 3, 5, and 6 hours from the start of the infusion precisely estimated MPA AUC(0-12 h) for Q12-hour IV MMF. A comparable schedule (2, 2.5, 3, 4, and 6 hours) similarly estimated MPA AUC(0-8) (h) for Q8-hour dosing. PMID:22174435

  15. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E; Boeckh, Michael J; Bemer, Meagan J; Phillips, Brian R; Risler, Linda J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-08-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) at 5 time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic-dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory maximum effect model with an IC50 of 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, nonrelapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic-dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  16. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3-4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  17. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3–4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field. PMID:27570526

  18. The Challenge of Respiratory Virus Infections in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Boeckh, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory virus infections in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. While respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumonvirus, parainfluenzaviruses, and influenza viruses are well known for their potential to cause fatal pneumonia, information is emerging only recently on the significance of the newly discovered viruses such as human coronaviruses NL63 and HKU1, and human bocavirus. Lymphopenia seems to be the most recent risk factors for progression to lower respiratory tract disease. Airflow obstruction is another complication of respiratory virus infections after HCT, and data to date indicate this complication may occur following parainfluenza virus and RSV infection. Infection control procedures are key for prevention. Unfortunately, there are no randomized treatment studies, which make the interpretation of the literature on interventions difficult. This article reviews the spectrum of pathogens, epidemiology, risk factors and clinical manifestations of infection, as well as recent advances in diagnostic and clinical management. PMID:18785968

  19. Twisting immune responses for allogeneic stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Zhong, Jiang F

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell-derived tissues and organs have the potential to change modern clinical science. However, rejection of allogeneic grafts by the host’s immune system is an issue which needs to be addressed before embryonic stem cell-derived cells or tissues can be used as medicines. Mismatches in human leukocyte class I antigens and minor histocompatibility antigens are the central factors that are responsible for various graft-versus-host diseases. Traditional strategies usually involve suppressing the whole immune systems with drugs. There are many side effects associated with these methods. Here, we discuss an emerging strategy for manipulating the central immune tolerance by naturally “introducing” donor antigens to a host so a recipient can acquire tolerance specifically to the donor cells or tissues. This strategy has two distinct stages. The first stage restores the thymic function of adult patients with sex steroid inhibitory drugs (LHRH-A), keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), interleukin 7 (IL-7) and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3). The second stage introduces hematopoietic stem cells and their downstream progenitors to the restored thymus by direct injection. Hematopoietic stem cells are used to introduce donor antigens because they have priority access to the thymus. We also review several clinical cases to explain this new strategy. PMID:20975985

  20. Sequential measurement of peripheral blood allogeneic microchimerism levels and association with pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    McSherry, C; Jackson, A; Hertz, M I; Bolman, R M; Savik, K; Reinsmoen, N L

    1996-12-27

    We have shown in lung recipients that high levels of peripheral blood allogeneic microchimerism at 12 to 18 months posttransplant correlated with donor antigen-specific hyporeactivity (i.e., decreased proliferative response to donor antigen in MLC while response to 3rd-party cells remains unchanged); both parameters correlated with an obliterative bronchiolitis (OB)-free state. We have expanded these studies to determine any association of sequential microchimerism levels with concomitant clinical events. In this preliminary study of 7 lung recipients, we used limiting-dilution PCR to quantify peripheral blood microchimerism at serial timepoints ranging from 3 to >48 months posttransplant. These levels were compared with a variety of immunologic and clinical parameters: acute rejection, CMV infection, OB, donor antigen-specific hyporeactivity, and pulmonary function. Pulmonary function was measured per the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation: "current FEV1/ baseline FEV1" (FEV1: forced expiratory volume in 1 second). Of the clinical parameters, the association between microchimerism and pulmonary function was the most striking. We observed dynamic patterns of peripheral microchimerism, which reflected the general rise and fall of FEV1. In all 7 recipients, chimerism and FEV1 were high very early posttransplant, then dropped at various rates and to various degrees. After its initial decline, microchimerism increased with FEV1 for the 1 hyporesponsive recipient; for the other 6 recipients, both values declined. These results illustrate, for the first time, that the fluctuation of peripheral blood microchimerism levels is associated with the recipient's clinical condition. PMID:8990369

  1. Gallic acid induced apoptotic events in HCT-15 colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Aruna Priyadharshni; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Mandal, Mahitosh; Supriyanto, Eko; Muhamad, Ida Idayu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory action of diet-derived phenolic compound gallic acid (GA) against HCT-15 colon cancer cells. METHODS: The antiproliferative effect of GA against colon cancer cells was determined by performing thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The colony forming ability of GA treated colon cancer cells was evaluated using the colony forming assay. The cell cycle changes induced by GA in HCT-15 cells were analyzed by propidium iodide staining. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential of HCT-15 exposed to GA was assessed using 2’,7’-dichlorfluorescein-diacetate and rhodamine-123 respectively, with the help of flow cytometry. Morphological changes caused by GA treatment in the colon cancer cells were identified by scanning electron microscope and photomicrograph examination. Apoptosis was confirmed using flow cytometric analysis of GA treated HCT-15 cells after staining with Yo-Pro-1. RESULTS: MTT assay results illustrated that GA has an inhibitory effect on HCT-15 cells with IC50 value of 740 μmol/L. A time-dependent inhibition of colony formation was evident with GA treatment. Cell cycle arrest was evident from the accumulation of GA treated HCT-15 cells at sub-G1 phase (0.98 ± 1.03 vs 58.01 ± 2.05) with increasing exposure time. Flow cytometric analysis of GA treated HCT-15 cells depicted early events associated with apoptosis like lipid layer breakage and fall in mitochondrial membrane potential apart from an increase in the generation of ROS which were in a time dependent manner. SEM and photomicrograph images of the GA-treated cells displayed membrane blebbing and cell shrinking characteristics of apoptosis. Further apoptosis confirmation by Yo-Pro-1 staining also showed the time-dependent increase of apoptotic cells after treatment. CONCLUSION: These results show that GA induced ROS dependent apoptosis and inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells. PMID:27099438

  2. Nitronaproxen: AZD 3582, HCT 3012, Naproxen Nitroxybutylester, NO-Naproxen.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Nitronaproxen [AZD 3582, HCT 3012, naproxen nitroxybutylester, NO-naproxen] is a naproxen derivative with similar anti-inflammatory activity to the parent compound, but with less gastrointestinal toxicity. It is the first of a new class of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs known as cyclo-oxygenase-inhibiting nitric oxide donators (CINODs), which are under development by NicOx. The better gastrointestinal tolerability of nitronaproxen appears to be due to its release of nitric oxide (NO) and the consequent maintenance of tissue perfusion and integrity. Nitronaproxen is in phase III clinical development for the treatment of osteoarthritis and is available for licensing. AstraZeneca had been a worldwide licensee for nitronaproxen and other CINODs. However, the results of phase II clinical trials of nitronaproxen did not fulfill AstraZeneca's strategic commercial criteria for further investment and NicOx reacquired rights following AstraZeneca's decision to discontinue its involvement in 2003. NicOx was surprised by AstraZeneca's decision, and remained fully convinced of the potential of nitronaproxen. NicOx is seeking new partners for development of compounds of the CINOD class. Nitronaproxen is in a phase III clinical trial for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. The 13-week trial completed enrolment of 820 patients from 120 clinical sites in the US in May 2006. The study is designed to confirm that nitronaproxen is superior to placebo and is as effective as naproxen in relieving signs and symptoms of OA. The study will also seek to show that nitronaproxen has no adverse effect on blood pressure. An additional trial has begun that is employing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to provide a description of the blood pressure effect of nitronaproxen over a 24-hour period in hypertensive subjects. This US trial will enrol approximately 120 volunteers with stable essential hypertension. The volunteers will not have osteoarthritis but will be between

  3. DNA profiling in peripheral blood, buccal swabs, hair follicles and semen from a patient following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation

    PubMed Central

    LI, YA-TING; XIE, MING-KUN; WU, JIN

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells transplantation (allo-PBSCT) or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) have been widely used to treat patients exhibiting certain severe illnesses. However, previous studies have shown that the biological materials of allo-PBSCT or allo-BMT recipients may not constitute credible materials for personal identification. In the present study, four types of commonly used samples were collected from a male individual following gender-matched allo-BMT. Autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) and Y-STR markers analysis, based on polymerase chain reaction, were used to evaluate the chimerism status. The results showed that the blood sample were all donor type, the buccal swab sample were mixed chimerism, and the sperm and hair follicle samples maintained a recipient origin of 100%. In conclusion, identical results were obtained by the two methods and it was confirmed that DNA extracted from hair follicles and sperm can be used as a reference for the pre-transplant genotype DNA profile of the recipient in the gender-match allo-BMT or -PBSCT. PMID:25279149

  4. 21 CFR 1271.65 - How do I store an HCT/P from a donor determined to be ineligible, and what uses of the HCT/P are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How do I store an HCT/P from a donor determined to be ineligible, and what uses of the HCT/P are not prohibited? 1271.65 Section 1271.65 Food and Drugs... TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.65 How do I store an HCT/P from a donor determined to...

  5. 21 CFR 1271.65 - How do I store an HCT/P from a donor determined to be ineligible, and what uses of the HCT/P are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How do I store an HCT/P from a donor determined to be ineligible, and what uses of the HCT/P are not prohibited? 1271.65 Section 1271.65 Food and Drugs... TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.65 How do I store an HCT/P from a donor determined to...

  6. Phase 2 clinical trial of rapamycin-resistant donor CD4+ Th2/Th1 (T-Rapa) cells after low-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Daniel H.; Mossoba, Miriam E.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Halverson, David C.; Stroncek, David; Khuu, Hahn M.; Hakim, Frances T.; Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Leitman, Susan F.; Mariotti, Jacopo; Gea-Banacloche, Juan C.; Sportes, Claude; Hardy, Nancy M.; Hickstein, Dennis D.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Rowley, Scott; Goy, Andre; Donato, Michele; Korngold, Robert; Pecora, Andrew; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Gress, Ronald E.; Bishop, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    In experimental models, ex vivo induced T-cell rapamycin resistance occurred independent of T helper 1 (Th1)/T helper 2 (Th2) differentiation and yielded allogeneic CD4+ T cells of increased in vivo efficacy that facilitated engraftment and permitted graft-versus-tumor effects while minimizing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). To translate these findings, we performed a phase 2 multicenter clinical trial of rapamycin-resistant donor CD4+ Th2/Th1 (T-Rapa) cells after allogeneic-matched sibling donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for therapy of refractory hematologic malignancy. T-Rapa cell products, which expressed a balanced Th2/Th1 phenotype, were administered as a preemptive donor lymphocyte infusion at day 14 post-HCT. After T-Rapa cell infusion, mixed donor/host chimerism rapidly converted, and there was preferential immune reconstitution with donor CD4+ Th2 and Th1 cells relative to regulatory T cells and CD8+ T cells. The cumulative incidence probability of acute GVHD was 20% and 40% at days 100 and 180 post-HCT, respectively. There was no transplant-related mortality. Eighteen of 40 patients (45%) remain in sustained complete remission (range of follow-up: 42-84 months). These results demonstrate the safety of this low-intensity transplant approach and the feasibility of subsequent randomized studies to compare T-Rapa cell-based therapy with standard transplantation regimens. This trial was registered at www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials as #NCT 00077480. PMID:23426943

  7. Establishment of Definitions and Review Process for Consistent Adjudication of Cause-Specific Mortality After Allogeneic Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Preus, Leah; Zhu, Xiaochun; Hansen, John A.; Martin, Paul J.; Yan, Li; Liu, Song; Spellman, Stephen; Tritchler, David; Clay, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials commonly use adjudication committees to refine endpoints, but observational research or genome-wide association studies rarely do. Our goals were to establish definitions of cause-specific death after unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (URD-HCT), estimate discordance between reported and adjudicated cause-specific death, and identify factors contributing to inconsistency in cause-specific deathdetermination. A consensus panel adjudicated cause-specific deathin 1,484 patients who died within 1 year after HCT, derived from 3,532 acute leukemia or myelodysplasia patients after URD-HCT 2000-2011 reported by 151 U.S. transplant centers to CIBMTR. Deaths were classified as disease-related (DRM) or transplant-related (TRM). The panel agreed with >99% of deaths reported by centers as DRM and 80% reported as TRM. Year of transplant (cohort effect) and disease status significantly influenced agreement between panel and centers. Sensitivity analysis of deaths <100 days post-transplant yielded lowest agreement between the panel and centers for myelodysplastic syndrome patients. Standard pre-defined criteria for adjudicating cause-specific deathled to consistent application to similar clinical scenarios and clearer delineation of cause-specific deathcategories. Other studies of competing events like cancer-specific vs treatment-related mortality would benefit from our results. Our detailed algorithm should result in more consistent reporting of cause-specific deathby centers. PMID:26028504

  8. Evaluation of immunomodulatory treatment based on conventional and lineage-specific chimerism analysis in patients with myeloid malignancies after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeiser, R; Spyridonidis, A; Wäsch, R; Ihorst, G; Grüllich, C; Bertz, H; Finke, J

    2005-05-01

    Both conventional chimerism analysis (CCA) and lineage-specific chimerism analysis (LCA) have potential pitfalls as diagnostic means for the detection of minimal residual disease after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (aHCT). Therefore, the present study examines the results of both methods in order to determine how predictive consecutive evaluations were, with respect to the risk that the patient would relapse during post-transplant follow-up and with respect to responsiveness to immunomodulatory treatment. A total of 168 individuals with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 137) and myelo dysplastic syndrome (n = 31) were investigated with CCA and LCA at mean intervals of 24 days (range: 11-116). The median follow-up after myeloablative aHCT was 22 months (range: 4-49). Of 168 patients, 65 experienced a clinical relapse after aHCT. CCA and LCA were comparatively sensitive and specific for relapse at the intervals of chimerism testing employed in this study. Of 32 patients, 10 who were offered donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) treatment for increasing (n = 29) or stable (n = 3) mixed chimerism (MC) achieved at least transitory CC. The observation that all patients with increasing MC relapsed despite DLI treatment (54%) or withdrawal of immune suppression (24%) indicates that novel strategies to deal with rapidly evolving relapse in AML patients, such as shortening of chimerism monitoring intervals, need to be evaluated.

  9. EBV-negative aggressive B-cell lymphomas of donor origin after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Federmann, Birgit; Bonzheim, Irina; Schittenhelm, Jens; Quintanilla-Martínez, Leticia; Mankel, Barbara; Vogel, Wichard; Faul, Christoph; Bethge, Wolfgang; Fend, Falko

    2016-11-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) develop as a consequence of iatrogenic immunosuppression, and the majority is associated with EBV. PTLD after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) are rare. Most cases are donor-derived, reflecting immune reconstitution by malignant transformed donor cells, and are EBV-positive. We report three unusual cases of aggressive EBV-negative PTLD of monomorphic type after allo-HCT. All cases were of donor origin and arose with long latency, 4-12 years after HCT. The patients had a history of severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) resulting in prolonged immunosuppression before the diagnosis of lymphoma. In one case, the temporal evolution of the malignant clone was analyzed by clone-specific PCR targeting the immunoglobulin heavy chain rearrangement. A tumor-specific product was already detected 3 years before lymphoma development. This indicates that chronic antigenic stimulation and reduced immune surveillance, may promote the outgrowth of premalignant donor-derived clones after acquisition of additional genetic alterations.

  10. Cyclophosphamide followed by intravenous targeted busulfan for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: pharmacokinetics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Andrew R.; McCune, Jeannine S.; Storer, Barry E.; Batchelder, Ami; Kida, Aiko; Deeg, H. Joachim; McDonald, George B.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted busulfan/cyclophosphamide (TBU/CY) for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) carries a high risk of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) in patients transplanted for myelofibrosis. We tested the hypothesis that reversing the sequence of administration (from TBU/CY to CY/TBU) will reduce SOS and day +100 non-relapse mortality (NRM). We enrolled 51 patients with myelofibrosis (n=20), acute myeloid leukemia (AML, n=20), or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, n=11) in a prospective trial of CY/TBU conditioning for HCT. Cyclophosphamide 60 mg/kg/day IV for two days was followed by daily IV BU for four days, targeted to a concentration at steady state (Css) of 800–900 ng/mL. CY/TBU-conditioned patients had higher exposure to CY (p<0.0001) and lower exposure to 4-hydroxyCY (p<0.0001) compared to TBU/CY-conditioned patients. Clinical outcomes were compared with controls (n=271) conditioned with TBU/CY for the same indications. In patients with myelofibrosis, CY/TBU conditioning was associated with a significantly reduced incidence of SOS (0% vs. 30% after TBU/CY, p=0.006), while SOS incidence was low in both cohorts with AML/MDS. Day +100 mortality was significantly lower in the CY/TBU cohort (2% vs. 13%, p=0.01). CY/TBU conditioning markedly impacted CY pharmacokinetics and was associated with significantly lower incidences of SOS and day +100 mortality, suggesting that CY/TBU is superior to TBU/CY as conditioning for patients with myelofibrosis. PMID:23583825

  11. Total Lymphoid Irradiatione—Antithymocyte Globulin Conditioning and Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Jonathan; Chhabra, Saurabh; Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Lavori, Philip; Laport, Ginna G.; Arai, Sally; Johnston, Laura; Miklos, David B.; Shizuru, Judith A.; Weng, Wen-Kai; Negrin, Robert S.; Lowsky, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo HCT) is the only curative therapy for the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), but treatment toxicity has been a barrier to its more widespread use. The nonmyeloablative regimen of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) permits the establishment of donor hematopoiesis necessary for the graft-versus-malignancy effect and is protective against acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), but it has minimal direct cytotoxicity against myeloid diseases. We explored the use of TLI-ATG conditioning to treat 61 patients with allo HCT for MDS (n = 32), therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (n = 15), MPN (n = 9), and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (n = 5). The median age of all patients was 63 years (range, 50 to 73). The cumulative incidence of aGVHD grades II to IV was 14% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4% to 23%) and for grades III to IV, 4% (95% CI, 0 to 9%), and it did not differ between patients who received allografts from related or unrelated donors. The cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 100 days, 12 months, and 36 months was 0%, 7%, and 11%. Overall survival and progression-free survival were 41% (95% CI, 29% to 53%) and 35% (95% CI, 23% to 48%), respectively. The safety and tolerability of TLI-ATG, as exemplified by its low NRM, provides a foundation for further risk-adapted or prophylactic interventions to prevent disease progression. PMID:24607552

  12. Fatal human metapneumovirus and influenza B virus coinfection in an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, C; Mossad, S B

    2012-10-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infection can occur in all age groups with significant morbidity and mortality. Coinfection with influenza virus occurs mainly with influenza type A and all reported cases recovered completely. We report the case of a 61-year-old man who had hematopoietic stem cell transplant for myelodysplastic syndrome. He was admitted to hospital for septic shock and neutropenia, and blood culture was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. He rapidly developed respiratory failure and required ventilator support. His respiratory culture grew P. aeruginosa and hMPV. His course was complicated by persistent shock requiring vasopressor support, and repeat nasopharyngeal swab was positive for influenza type B and hMPV. His condition rapidly deteriorated, his family elected comfort care, and the patient died shortly thereafter. Coinfection with hMPV and influenza virus type B may have a poor outcome and can be fatal, especially in immunocompromised patients. PMID:22823898

  13. Low CD34 Dose is Associated with Poor Survival after Reduced Intensity Conditioning Allogeneic Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Törlén, Johan; Ringdén, Olle; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Batiwalla, Minoo; Chen, Junfang; Erkers, Tom; Ho, Vincent; Kebriaei, Partow; Keever-Taylor, Carolyn; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Laughlin, Mary J.; Lill, Michael; O’Brien, Tracey; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Rocha, Vanderson; Savani, Bipin N.; Szwajcer, David; Valcarcel, David; Eapen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Reduced intensity conditioning/non-myeloablative conditioning regimens are increasingly used in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Reports have shown CD34+ dose to be important for transplant-outcome using myeloablative conditioning. The role of CD34+ dose of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) has not been previously analyzed in a large population undergoing reduced intensity conditioning/non-myeloablative HCT. We studied 1,054 patients aged 45–75 years, with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) transplanted between 2002 and 2011. Results of multivariate analysis showed that PBPC from HLA-matched siblings containing <4 × 106 CD34+/kg were associated with higher non-relapse mortality (HR 2.03, p=0.001), overall mortality (HR 1.48, p=0.008), and lower neutrophil (OR 0.76, p=0.03) and platelet (OR 0.76, p=0.03) recovery. PBPC from unrelated donors with CD34+ dose <6 × 106 CD34+/kg were also associated with higher non-relapse (HR 1.38, p=0.02) and overall mortality (HR 1.20, p=0.05). In contrast to reports after myeloablative HCT, CD34+ dose did not affect relapse or graft-versus-host disease with either donor type. An upper cell dose limit was not associated with adverse outcomes. These data suggest that PBPC CD34+ dose >4 × 106 CD34+/kg and >6 × 106 CD34+/kg are optimal for HLA-matched sibling and unrelated donor HCT, respectively. PMID:24892261

  14. Anti-asialo GM1 antiserum treatment of lethally irradiated recipients before bone marrow transplantation: Evidence that recipient natural killer depletion enhances survival, engraftment, and hematopoietic recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberghien, P.; Longo, D.L.; Wine, J.W.; Alvord, W.G.; Reynolds, C.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are reported to have an important role in the resistance of lethally irradiated recipients to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Therefore, we investigated the effects of recipient NK depletion on survival, chimerism, and hematopoietic reconstitution after lethal irradiation and the transplantation of limiting amounts of T-cell-deficient bone marrow (BM). When administered before BMT, anti-asialo GM1 (ASGM1) antiserum treatment, effective in depleting in vivo NK activity, was associated with a marked increase in survival in 3 of 3 allogeneic combinations (BALB/c into C3H/HeN, C57B1/6, or C3B6F1). This enhanced survival was independent of the susceptibility of each recipient strain to accept BALB/c BM. Moreover, recipient anti-ASGM1 treatment was also effective in increasing survival in recipients of syngeneic BM, suggesting that NK cells can adversely affect engraftment independent of genetically controlled polymorphic cell surface determinants. Analysis of chimerism in surviving animals 2 months post-BMT showed that recipient NK depletion significantly increased the level of donor engraftment when high doses of BM were transplanted. These studies also demonstrated that anti-ASGM1 pretreatment mainly resulted in an increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis in the second and third week after irradiation. Anti-ASGM1 treatment also dramatically accelerated the rate of appearance of donor-derived cells with a higher level of donor-cell engraftment apparent at a time when the differences in survival between NK-depleted and control BMT recipients became significant. Peripheral cell counts were also affected by NK depletion, with significantly enhanced platelet and red blood cell recovery and a moderate increase in granulocyte recovery.

  15. A radio-resistant perforin-expressing lymphoid population controls allogeneic T cell engraftment, activation, and onset of graft-versus-host disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joanne E; Harvey, Michael; Gherardin, Nicholas A; Koldej, Rachel; Huntington, Nicholas; Neeson, Paul; Trapani, Joseph A; Ritchie, David S

    2015-02-01

    Immunosuppressive pretransplantation conditioning is essential for donor cell engraftment in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The role of residual postconditioning recipient immunity in determining engraftment is poorly understood. We examined the role of recipient perforin in the kinetics of donor cell engraftment. MHC-mismatched BMT mouse models demonstrated that both the rate and proportion of donor lymphoid cell engraftment and expansion of effector memory donor T cells in both spleen and BM were significantly increased within 5 to 7 days post-BMT in perforin-deficient (pfn(-/-)) recipients, compared with wild-type. In wild-type recipients, depletion of natural killer (NK) cells before BMT enhanced donor lymphoid cell engraftment to that seen in pfn(-/-) recipients. This demonstrated that a perforin-dependent, NK-mediated, host-versus-graft (HVG) effect limits the rate of donor engraftment and T cell activation. Radiation-resistant natural killer T (NKT) cells survived in the BM of lethally irradiated mice and may drive NK cell activation, resulting in the HVG effect. Furthermore, reduced pretransplant irradiation doses in pfn(-/-) recipients permitted long-term donor lymphoid cell engraftment. These findings suggest that suppression of perforin activity or selective depletion of recipient NK cells before BMT could be used to improve donor stem cell engraftment, in turn allowing for the reduction of pretransplant conditioning.

  16. Subanalgesic doses of dexketoprofen and HCT-2037 (nitrodexketoprofen) enhance fentanyl antinociception in monoarthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, Gema; Herrero, Juan F

    2005-02-01

    Subanalgesic doses of the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) dexketoprofen trometamol and nitroparacetamol (NCX-701) enhance mu-opiate fentanyl effect in acute nociception. It is not known if a similar combination of drugs is effective in situations of spinal cord sensitization. The aim of this study was to assess if the enhancement of fentanyl antinociception can be observed in carrageenan-induced monoarthritis, when combined with dexketoprofen (DKT) or nitrodexketoprofen (HCT-2037). Withdrawal reflexes were recorded as single motor units in male Wistar rats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose. Fentanyl was studied alone and in the presence of 0.4, 0.8 micromol/kg of DKT or 0.3 micromol/kg of HCT-2037. In responses to noxious mechanical stimulation, the ID50 of fentanyl was enhanced twofold by 0.8 micromol/kg DKT and more than fourfold by HCT-2037 and no significant recovery was observed 45 min later. DKT 0.4 micromol/kg was, however, very little effective. The opioid antagonist naloxone did not reverse the effect. Enhancement of fentanyl effect on wind-up was only observed with HCT-2037 but not with DKT. We conclude that the combined administration of subanalgesic doses of dexketoprofen derivatives, specially its nitroderivative, and the mu-opiate fentanyl is an effective antinociceptive therapy in situations of articular inflammation involving a naloxone-independent mechanism of action.

  17. Effect of selective T cell depletion of host and/or donor bone marrow on lymphopoietic repopulation, tolerance, and graft-vs-host disease in mixed allogeneic chimeras (B10 + B10. D2----B10)

    SciTech Connect

    Ildstad, S.T.; Wren, S.M.; Bluestone, J.A.; Barbieri, S.A.; Stephany, D.; Sachs, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with a mixture of T cell-depleted syngeneic plus T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow (B10 + B10.D2----B10) leads to the induction of mixed lymphopoietic chimerism, excellent survivals, specific in vivo transplantation tolerance to subsequent donor strain skin grafts, and specific in vitro unresponsiveness to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements as assessed by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) proliferative and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) cytotoxicity assays. When B10 recipient mice received mixed marrow inocula in which the syngeneic component had not been T cell depleted, whether or not the allogeneic donor marrow was treated, they repopulated exclusively with host-type cells, promptly rejected donor-type skin allografts, and were reactive in vitro to the allogeneic donor by CML and MLR assays. In contrast, T cell depletion of the syngeneic component of the mixed marrow inocula resulted in specific acceptance of allogeneic donor strain skin grafts. Such animals were specifically unreactive to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements in vitro by CML and MLR, but were reactive to third party. When both the syngeneic and allogeneic marrow were T cell depleted, variable percentages of host- and donor-type lymphoid elements were detected in the mixed reconstituted host. When only the syngeneic bone marrow was T cell depleted, animals repopulated exclusively with donor-type cells. Although these animals had detectable in vitro anti-host (B10) reactivity by CML and MLR and reconstituted as fully allogeneic chimeras, they exhibited excellent survival and had no in vivo evidence for graft-vs-host disease. Experiments in which untreated donor spleen cells were added to the inocula in this last group suggest that the presence of T cell-depleted syngeneic bone marrow cells diminishes graft-vs-host disease and the mortality from it.

  18. Inositol Pyrophosphate Profiling of Two HCT116 Cell Lines Uncovers Variation in InsP8 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chunfang; Wilson, Miranda S. C.; Jessen, Henning J.; Saiardi, Adolfo; Shears, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    The HCT116 cell line, which has a pseudo-diploid karotype, is a popular model in the fields of cancer cell biology, intestinal immunity, and inflammation. In the current study, we describe two batches of diverged HCT116 cells, which we designate as HCT116NIH and HCT116UCL. Using both gel electrophoresis and HPLC, we show that HCT116UCL cells contain 6-fold higher levels of InsP8 than HCT116NIH cells. This observation is significant because InsP8 is one of a group of molecules collectively known as ‘inositol pyrophosphates’ (PP-InsPs)—highly ‘energetic’ and conserved regulators of cellular and organismal metabolism. Variability in the cellular levels of InsP8 within divergent HCT116 cell lines could have impacted the phenotypic data obtained in previous studies. This difference in InsP8 levels is more remarkable for being specific; levels of other inositol phosphates, and notably InsP6 and 5-InsP7, are very similar in both HCT116NIH and HCT116UCL lines. We also developed a new HPLC procedure to record 1-InsP7 levels directly (for the first time in any mammalian cell line); 1-InsP7 comprised <2% of total InsP7 in HCT116NIH and HCT116UCL lines. The elevated levels of InsP8 in the HCT116UCL lines were not due to an increase in expression of the PP-InsP kinases (IP6Ks and PPIP5Ks), nor to a decrease in the capacity to dephosphorylate InsP8. We discuss how the divergent PP-InsP profiles of the newly-designated HCT116NIH and HCT116UCL lines should be considered an important research opportunity: future studies using these two lines may uncover new features that regulate InsP8 turnover, and may also yield new directions for studying InsP8 function. PMID:27788189

  19. Venous Thromboembolism after Allogeneic Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Azık, Fatih; Gürlek Gökçebay, Dilek; Tavil, Betül; Işık, Pamir; Tunç, Bahattin; Uçkan, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in children who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has high morbidity. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence of VTE in allogeneic pediatric HSCT recipients and the contribution of pretransplant prothrombotic risk factors to thrombosis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 92 patients between April 2010 and November 2012 undergoing allogeneic HSCT who had completed 100 days post-HSCT. Before HSCT, coagulation profiles; acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors including FV G1691A (factor V Leiden), prothrombin G20210A, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, and MTHFR A1298C mutations; and serum homocysteine and lipoprotein (a), plasma antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S levels were obtained from all patients. Results: In the screening of thrombophilia, 8 patients (9%) were heterozygous for factor V Leiden, 5 (6%) were homozygous for MTHFR 677TT, 12 (14%) were homozygous for MTHFR 1298CC, and 2 (2%) were heterozygous for prothrombin G20210A mutation. We observed VTE in 5 patients (5.4%); a prothrombotic risk factor was found in 3 out of these 5 patients, while 4 out of 5 patients had central venous catheters. It was determined there was no significant relationship between VTE and inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Conclusion: VTE after HSCT seems to be a low-frequency event that may be due to low-dose, low-molecular-weight heparin prophylaxis, and the role of inherited prothrombotic risk factors cannot be entirely excluded without a prospective study. PMID:25912774

  20. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products.

  1. Influence of Previous Inflammatory Bowel Disease on the Outcome of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Matched-Pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rabian, Florence; Porcher, Raphael; Sicre de Fontbrune, Flore; Lioure, Bruno; Laplace, Anne; Nguyen, Stephanie; Tabrizi, Reza; Vigouroux, Stephane; Tomowiak, Cécile; Maillard, Nathalie; Suarez, Felipe; Delage, Jeremy; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Socié, Gérard

    2016-09-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are associated with increased risk of hematologic malignancies. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) could be a curative strategy in this setting, but has been thought to be associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (NRM). We conducted a national French retrospective analysis of patients with IBD who underwent allogeneic HSCT for hematologic malignancies and were matched with 3 controls according to recipient, donor, and transplant characteristics. Between 2004 and 2015, 18 patients with IBD underwent allogeneic HSCT. With a median follow-up of 33 months for the patients with IBD and 57 months for controls, the cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 39% for the patients with IBD and 40% for controls (hazard ratio [HR], 1.10; P = .82). The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD at 48 months was 52% for the patients with IBD and 43% for controls (HR, 0.92; P = .89). Nonrelapse mortality at 48 months was 19% for the patients with IBD and 11% for controls (HR, 4.93; P = .067). Overall survival at 48 months was 59% for the patients with IBD and 60% for matched controls (HR, 1.35; P = .56). In conclusion, IBD should not be considered a contraindication for transplantation, and its impact on comorbidity indexes should be reduced. PMID:27246370

  2. CD86 (B70/B7-2) on endothelial cells co-stimulates allogeneic CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Seino, K; Azuma, M; Bashuda, H; Fukao, K; Yagita, H; Okumura, K

    1995-08-01

    In vascularized organ transplantation, vascular endothelial cells (EC) confronting recipient T cells are potentially significant APC initiating cellular immune responses that lead to rejection. In the present study, we studied the ability of human EC to stimulate allogeneic T cells and the co-stimulatory molecules involved in this response. On both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC), MHC class I, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and CD86 were constitutively expressed as assessed by flow cytometry. After IFN-gamma treatment, MHC class II expression was induced, and MHC class I and ICAM-1 were up-regulated. In contrast, the expression of CD86 was unchanged and CD80 was undetectable even after IFN-gamma treatment. Highly purified CD4+ T cells proliferated in response to IFN-gamma-treated allogeneic HUVEC and MVEC, and this response was efficiently blocked by mAb to MHC class II, ICAM-1 and CD86. Furthermore, the addition of anti-CD86 mAb to the primary culture with allogeneic EC resulted in the induction of alloantigen-specific anergy. These results suggest that CD86 expressed on EC plays a critical role in initiating cellular immune responses to vascularized allografts and would be an important target for immune intervention.

  3. Naive Donor NK Cell Repertoires Associated with Less Leukemia Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Andreas T; Clancy, Trevor; Goodridge, Jodie P; Béziat, Vivien; Schaffer, Marie; Hovig, Eivind; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Ljungman, Per T; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2016-02-01

    Acute and latent human CMV cause profound changes in the NK cell repertoire, with expansion and differentiation of educated NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors. In this study, we addressed whether such CMV-induced imprints on the donor NK cell repertoire influenced the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hierarchical clustering of high-resolution immunophenotyping data covering key NK cell parameters, including frequencies of CD56(bright), NKG2A(+), NKG2C(+), and CD57(+) NK cell subsets, as well as the size of the educated NK cell subset, was linked to clinical outcomes. Clusters defining naive (NKG2A(+)CD57(-)NKG2C(-)) NK cell repertoires in the donor were associated with decreased risk for relapse in recipients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (hazard ratio [HR], 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.03-0.27; p < 0.001). Furthermore, recipients with naive repertoires at 9-12 mo after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had increased disease-free survival (HR, 7.2; 95% CI: 1.6-33; p = 0.01) and increased overall survival (HR, 9.3; 95% CI: 1.1-77, p = 0.04). Conversely, patients with a relative increase in differentiated NK cells at 9-12 mo displayed a higher rate of late relapses (HR, 8.41; 95% CI: 6.7-11; p = 0.02), reduced disease-free survival (HR, 0.12; 95% CI: 0.12-0.74; p = 0.02), and reduced overall survival (HR, 0.07; 95% CI: 0.01-0.69; p = 0.02). Thus, our data suggest that naive donor NK cell repertoires are associated with protection against leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26746188

  4. Risk-factor analysis of poor graft function after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yang; Song, Jiayin; Jiang, Zujun; Li, Yonghua; Gao, Yang; Xu, Wenning; Lu, Ziyuan; Wang, Yaochun; Xiao, Haowen

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the main risk factors for poor graft function (PGF) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), to allow the improvement of transplantation outcomes through preventive measures. Clinical data for 124 patients who received allo-HSCT were analyzed retrospectively. There were 83 males (66.9%) and 41 females (33.1%) with a median age of 28 years (4-60 years). The median follow-up time was 7 months (1-116 months). Factors analyzed included age, gender, disease diagnosis, source of hematopoietic stem cells, donor type, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, conditioning regimen, numbers of infused mononuclear cells and CD34(+) cells, donor-recipient sex and blood-type matching, prophylactic treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), grades of GVHD, Epstein-Barr virus or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders and hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Data were analyzed by univariate and multivariate conditional logistic regression analyses. Among the 124 patients who underwent allo-HSCT, 15 developed PGF (12.1%). Univariate logistic regression analysis identified age, donor-recipient blood type and CMV infection (in 30 days) as potential risk factors for PGF. Multivariate analysis of factors with P<0.1 in univariate analysis showed that age, donor-recipient blood type and CMV infection (in 30 days) were significant risk factors for PGF. Patients were divided into subgroups based on age <20, 20-30, 30-40, and >40 years. The risk of PGF increased 2.747-fold (odds ratio (OR)=2.625, 95% confidence interval: 1.411-5.347) for each increment in age level. Patients with mismatched blood type (OR=4.051) or CMV infection (OR=9.146) had an increased risk of PGF. We conclude that age, donor-recipient blood-type matching and CMV infection are major risk factors for PGF after allo-HSCT.

  5. A Critical Role for the TLR4/TRIF Pathway in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Rejection by Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Ziqiang; Hussain, Lala-Rukh; Huang, Yiming; Ding, Chuanlin; Bozulic, Larry D.; Wen, Yujie; Ildstad, Suzanne T.

    2013-01-01

    We show for the first time that signaling through the TLR4/TRIF pathway plays a critical role in allogeneic bone marrow cell (BMC) rejection. This appears to be unique to BMC as organ allografts are rejected mainly via MyD88 signaling. Using T or T/B cell-deficient mice, we found that BMC allorejection occurred early before T cell activation and was T and B cell-independent, suggesting an effector role for innate immune cells in BMC rejection. We further demonstrated the innate immune signaling in BMC allorejection by showing superior engraftment in mice deficient in TRIF or TLR4 but not MyD88 or TLR3. The restored cytotoxicity in TRIF deficient recipients transferred with wildtype F4/80+ or NK1.1+ cells suggests TRIF signaling dependence on macrophages or NK cells in early BMC rejection. Production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and TRIF relevant chemokine MCP-1 was significantly increased early after bone marrow transplantation. In vivo specific depletion of macrophages or NK innate immune cells in combination with anti-CD154/rapamycin resulted in additive-enhanced allogeneic engraftment. The requirement for irradiation was completely eliminated when both macrophages and NK cells were depleted in combination with anti-CD154/rapamycin to target T and B cells, supporting the hypothesis that two barriers involving innate and adaptive immunity exist in mediating rejection of allogeneic BMC. In summary, our results clearly demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for innate immunity in BMC allorejection via signaling through a unique MyD88-independent TLR4/TRIF mechanism. These findings may have direct clinical impact on strategies for conditioning recipients for stem cell transplantation. PMID:23146386

  6. Changes in Subcellular Localization of Visfatin in Human Colorectal HCT-116 Carcinoma cell Line After Cytochalasin-B Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Skonieczna, M.; Bułdak, Ł; Matysiak, N.; Mielańczyk, Ł; Wyrobiec, G.; Kukla, M.; Michalski, M.; Żwirska-Korczala, K.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the expression and subcellular localization of visfatin in HCT-116 colorectal carcinoma cells after cytokinesis failure using Cytochalasin B (CytB) and the mechanism of apoptosis of cells after CytB. We observed translocation of visfatin’s antigen in cytB treated colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells from cytosol to nucleus. Statistical and morphometric analysis revealed significantly higher area-related numerical density visfatin-bound nano-golds in the nuclei of cytB-treated HCT-116 cells compared to cytosol. Reverse relation to visfatin subcellular localization was observed in un-treated HCT-116 cells. The total amount of visfatin protein and visfatin mRNA level in HCT-116 cells was also decreased after CytB treatment. Additionally, CytB significantly decreased cell survival, increased levels of G2/M fractions, induced bi-nuclei formation as well as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in HCT-116 cells. CytB treatment showed cytotoxic effect that stem from oxidative stress and is connected with the changes in the cytoplasmic/nuclear amount of visfatin in HCT-116 cells. PMID:25308845

  7. 21 CFR 1271.37 - Will establishment registrations and HCT/P listings be available for inspection, and how do I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Will establishment registrations and HCT/P... § 1271.37 Will establishment registrations and HCT/P listings be available for inspection, and how do I... provided. The following information submitted under the HCT/P requirements is illustrative of the type...

  8. Infections Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed; Al-Jasser, Asma Marzouq; Alsaleh, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infections are uncommon in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These infections are 10–40 times commoner in recipients of stem cell transplantation than in the general population but they are 10 times less in stem cell transplantation recipients compared to solid organ transplant recipients. The incidence of M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation ranges between <1 and 16% and varies considerably according to the type of transplant and the geographical location. Approximately 80% of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients have been reported in patients receiving allografts. Several risk factors predispose to M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and these are related to the underlying medical condition and its treatment, the pre-transplant conditioning therapies in addition to the transplant procedure and its own complications. These infections can develop as early as day 11 and as late as day 3337 post-transplant. The course may become rapidly progressive and the patient may develop life-threatening complications. The diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in stem cell transplant recipients is usually made on clinical grounds, cultures obtained from clinical specimens, tissues biopsies in addition to serology and molecular tests. Unfortunately, a definitive diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infections in these patients may occasionally be difficult to be established. However, M. tuberculosis infections in transplant recipients usually respond well to treatment with anti-tuberculosis agents provided the diagnosis is made early. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in recipients of stem cell transplantation living in endemic areas and presenting with compatible clinical and radiological manifestations. High mortality rates are associated with infections caused by multidrug

  9. Cytotoxic effect of fucoidan extracted from Sargassum cinereum on colon cancer cell line HCT-15.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Sivasankara Narayani; Shanmugam, Saravanan; Subramanian, Bharathiraja; Jaganathan, Ravindran

    2016-10-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the antioxidant and cytotoxicity activity against HCT-15 of fucoidan from Sargassum cinereum. Purification of fucoidan was done by DEAE cellulose and dialysis. Physicochemical characterization of fucoidan was analysed by calorimetric assay, FT-IR, HPLC and NMR. The extracted fucoidan contains 65.753% of fucose and 3.7±1.54% of sulphate respectively. HPLC results showed that the fucoidan contains the monosaccharide composition such as fucose, galactose, mannose and xylose. Antioxidant effect of fucoidan in Sargassum Cinereum was determined by DPPH. The maximum DPPH activity was found at the concentration of 100μg, where as the crude extract showed the scavenging activity was 63.58±0.56%. Cytotoxicity effect was done by MTT assay. Fucoidan extract caused about 50% of cell death after 24h of incubation with 75±0.9037μg/ml against HCT-15.

  10. Cytotoxic effect of fucoidan extracted from Sargassum cinereum on colon cancer cell line HCT-15.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Sivasankara Narayani; Shanmugam, Saravanan; Subramanian, Bharathiraja; Jaganathan, Ravindran

    2016-10-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the antioxidant and cytotoxicity activity against HCT-15 of fucoidan from Sargassum cinereum. Purification of fucoidan was done by DEAE cellulose and dialysis. Physicochemical characterization of fucoidan was analysed by calorimetric assay, FT-IR, HPLC and NMR. The extracted fucoidan contains 65.753% of fucose and 3.7±1.54% of sulphate respectively. HPLC results showed that the fucoidan contains the monosaccharide composition such as fucose, galactose, mannose and xylose. Antioxidant effect of fucoidan in Sargassum Cinereum was determined by DPPH. The maximum DPPH activity was found at the concentration of 100μg, where as the crude extract showed the scavenging activity was 63.58±0.56%. Cytotoxicity effect was done by MTT assay. Fucoidan extract caused about 50% of cell death after 24h of incubation with 75±0.9037μg/ml against HCT-15. PMID:27370748

  11. Hct-A Is a New Actinoporin Family from the Heteractis Crispa Sea Anemone

    PubMed Central

    Leichenko, E. V.; Monastirnaya, M. M.; Zelepuga, E. A.; Tkacheva, E. S.; Isaeva, M. P.; Likhatskaya, G. N.; Anastyuk, S. D.; Kozlovskaya, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    Several new actinoporin isoforms with molecular weights of 18995.5 to 19398.7 Da exhibiting a high hemolytic activity were isolated from the tropical sea anemone Heteractis crispa using a combination of liquid chromatography techniques. The actinoporins were demonstrated to occur as mono-, di-, and trimers in aqueous solutions. The sequences of the genes encoding actinoporins were identified, and the amino acid sequences of the new polypeptides belonging to the Hct-A actinoporin family were obtained. The new acinoporins differ in their isoelectric points, the number and localization of charged amino acid residues at the functionally important N-terminal fragment of the molecule, as well as in the charge of a tetrapeptide (amino acid residues 74–77) involved in an electrostatic interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane. A recombinant actinoporin, rHct-A2, with a molecular weight of 19141 Da, pI of 9.64, and hemolytic activity of 4.0 × 104 HU/mg, was obtained. The conductivity of the ion channels formed by rHct-A2 in the BLM was demonstrated to be similar to that of the native actinoporin from H. crispa. The obtained data expand knowledge on the structural and functional relationships of actinoporins and contribute to our understanding of the functioning mechanism of these molecules, which is the basis for the development of compounds with a high biomedical potential. Currently, they are considered as models for obtaining antitumor, antibacterial, and cardiac-stimulating agents. PMID:25558399

  12. Effect of select medium supplements on in vitro development of Cryptosporidium andersoni in HCT-8 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Chen, Sheng-xia; Jiang, Xu-gan; Shen, Yu-juan; Lu, Zhao-xi; Tu, Guo-hua; Fu, Xing-li; Cao, Jian-ping

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of fetal calf serum (FCS), glucose, ascorbic acid, calcium pantothenate, folic acid, and insulin on the growth of Cryptosporidium andersoni in human colon tumor (HCT-8) cells. After being incubated for 48 h, the proliferation of parasites was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, and the development of C. andersoni was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ten percent FCS was the best concentration for C. andersoni culture. Glucose, ascorbic acid, and insulin had a significant effect on the growth of C. andersoni when added into 10% FCS RPMI 1640. Calcium pantothenate had no significant effect and folic acid had the inhibited effect. We also observed the stages of trophozoite, macrogamont, microgamont, type I meront, type II meront, and sporozoite of C. andersoni in HCT-8 cells by TEM. Our results indicated that the best medium for C. andersoni was 10% FCS RPMI 1640 medium containing 50 mM glucose, 50 microg/ml ascorbic acid, and 0.3 U/ml insulin. Real-time PCR could provide a quick and precise technique to determine the proliferation of parasites. Cultivation of C. andersoni in HCT-8 cells will facilitate the study of interactions between parasites and host cells as well as provide a reliable system for evaluating anticryptosporidial compound efficacy. PMID:19641939

  13. Methylsulfonylmethane Induces p53 Independent Apoptosis in HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karabay, Arzu Zeynep; Koc, Asli; Ozkan, Tulin; Hekmatshoar, Yalda; Sunguroglu, Asuman; Aktan, Fugen; Buyukbingol, Zeliha

    2016-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is an organic sulfur-containing compound which has been used as a dietary supplement for osteoarthritis. MSM has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as exhibit apoptotic or anti-apoptotic effects depending on the cell type or activating stimuli. However, there are still a lot of unknowns about the mechanisms of actions of MSM. In this study, MSM was tested on colon cancer cells. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that MSM inhibited cell viability and increased apoptotic markers in both HCT-116 p53 +/+ and HCT-116 p53 −/− colon cancer cells. Increased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fragmentation and caspase-3 activity by MSM also supported these findings. MSM also modulated the expression of various apoptosis-related genes and proteins. Moreover, MSM was found to increase c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylation in both cell lines, dose-dependently. In conclusion, our results show for the first time that MSM induces apoptosis in HCT-116 colon cancer cells regardless of their p53 status. Since p53 is defective in >50% of tumors, the ability of MSM to induce apoptosis independently of p53 may offer an advantage in anti-tumor therapy. Moreover, the remarkable effect of MSM on Bim, an apoptotic protein, also suggests its potential use as a novel chemotherapeutic agent for Bim-targeted anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27428957

  14. Methylsulfonylmethane Induces p53 Independent Apoptosis in HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Karabay, Arzu Zeynep; Koc, Asli; Ozkan, Tulin; Hekmatshoar, Yalda; Sunguroglu, Asuman; Aktan, Fugen; Buyukbingol, Zeliha

    2016-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is an organic sulfur-containing compound which has been used as a dietary supplement for osteoarthritis. MSM has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as exhibit apoptotic or anti-apoptotic effects depending on the cell type or activating stimuli. However, there are still a lot of unknowns about the mechanisms of actions of MSM. In this study, MSM was tested on colon cancer cells. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that MSM inhibited cell viability and increased apoptotic markers in both HCT-116 p53 +/+ and HCT-116 p53 -/- colon cancer cells. Increased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fragmentation and caspase-3 activity by MSM also supported these findings. MSM also modulated the expression of various apoptosis-related genes and proteins. Moreover, MSM was found to increase c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylation in both cell lines, dose-dependently. In conclusion, our results show for the first time that MSM induces apoptosis in HCT-116 colon cancer cells regardless of their p53 status. Since p53 is defective in >50% of tumors, the ability of MSM to induce apoptosis independently of p53 may offer an advantage in anti-tumor therapy. Moreover, the remarkable effect of MSM on Bim, an apoptotic protein, also suggests its potential use as a novel chemotherapeutic agent for Bim-targeted anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27428957

  15. 21 CFR 1271.65 - How do I store an HCT/P from a donor determined to be ineligible, and what uses of the HCT/P are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND... first-degree or second-degree blood relative; (ii) The HCT/P consists of reproductive cells or...

  16. 21 CFR 1271.65 - How do I store an HCT/P from a donor determined to be ineligible, and what uses of the HCT/P are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND... first-degree or second-degree blood relative; (ii) The HCT/P consists of reproductive cells or...

  17. 21 CFR 1271.65 - How do I store an HCT/P from a donor determined to be ineligible, and what uses of the HCT/P are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do I store an HCT/P from a donor determined to be ineligible, and what uses of the HCT/P are not prohibited? 1271.65 Section 1271.65 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD...

  18. Primary Graft Failure after Myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Richard F.; Logan, Brent R.; Chaudhury, Sonali; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Gupta, Vikas; Ho, Vincent T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Ringdén, Olle T.H.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Schriber, Jeffrey R.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after primary graft failure (PGF) remain poor. Here we present a large retrospective analysis (n=23,272) which investigates means to prevent PGF and early detection of patients at high risk. In patients with hematologic malignancies, who underwent their first myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, PGF was reported in 1,278 (5.5%), and there was a marked difference in PGFs using peripheral blood stem cell compared to bone marrow grafts (2.5 vs. 7.3%; P<0.001). A 4-fold increase of PGF was observed in myeloproliferative disorders compared to acute leukemia (P<0.001). Other risk factors for PGF included recipient age below 30, HLA-mismatch, male recipients of female donor grafts, ABO-incompatibility, busulfan/cyclophosphamide conditioning, and cryopreservation. In bone marrow transplants, total nucleated cell doses ≤2.4 × 108/kg were associated with PGF (OR 1.39; P<0.001). The use of tacrolimus-based immunosuppression and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were associated with decreased PGF risk. These data, allow clinicians to do more informed choices with respect to graft source, donor selection, conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens to reduce the risk of PGF. Moreover, a novel risk score determined on day 21 post-transplant may provide the rationale for an early request for additional hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:25772027

  19. Toward eliminating HLA class I expression to generate universal cells from allogeneic donors

    PubMed Central

    Torikai, Hiroki; Reik, Andreas; Soldner, Frank; Warren, Edus H.; Yuen, Carrie; Zhou, Yuanyue; Crossland, Denise L.; Huls, Helen; Littman, Nicholas; Zhang, Ziying; Tykodi, Scott S.; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Holmes, Michael C.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Champlin, Richard E.; Gregory, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term engraftment of allogeneic cells necessitates eluding immune-mediated rejection, which is currently achieved by matching for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression, immunosuppression, and/or delivery of donor-derived cells to sanctuary sites. Genetic engineering provides an alternative approach to avoid clearance of cells that are recognized as “non-self” by the recipient. To this end, we developed designer zinc finger nucleases and employed a “hit-and-run” approach to genetic editing for selective elimination of HLA expression. Electro-transfer of mRNA species coding for these engineered nucleases completely disrupted expression of HLA-A on human T cells, including CD19-specific T cells. The HLA-Aneg T-cell pools can be enriched and evade lysis by HLA-restricted cytotoxic T-cell clones. Recognition by natural killer cells of cells that had lost HLA expression was circumvented by enforced expression of nonclassical HLA molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases can eliminate HLA-A expression from embryonic stem cells, which broadens the applicability of this strategy beyond infusing HLA-disparate immune cells. These findings establish that clinically appealing cell types derived from donors with disparate HLA expression can be genetically edited to evade an immune response and provide a foundation whereby cells from a single donor can be administered to multiple recipients. PMID:23741009

  20. Antibody-Functionalized Peptidic Membranes for Neutralization of Allogeneic Skin Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Liu, Wen; Bagia, Christina; Zhang, Shaojuan; Bai, Mingfeng; Janjic, Jelena M.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gawalt, Ellen S.; Meng, Wilson S.

    2014-01-01

    We report herein application of an in situ material strategy to attenuate allograft T cell responses in a skin transplant mouse model. Functionalized peptidic membranes were used to impede trafficking of donor antigen-presenting cells (dAPCs) from skin allografts in recipient mice. Membranes formed by self-assembling peptides (SAPs) presenting antibodies were found to remain underneath grafted skins for up to 6 days. At the host-graft interface, dAPCs were targeted by using a monoclonal antibody that binds to a class II MHC molecule (IAd) expressed exclusively by donor cells. Using a novel cell labeling near-infrared nanoemulsion, we found more dAPCs remained in allografts treated with membranes loaded with aI-Ad than without. In vitro, dAPCs released from skin explants were found adsorbed preferentially on aI-Ad membranes. Recipient T cells from these mice produced lower concentrations of interferon-gamma cultured ex vivo with donor cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the strategy has the potential to alter the natural course of rejection immune mechanisms in stringent allogeneic models. PMID:25117952

  1. Transmission of an expanding donor-derived del(20q) clone through allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without the development of a hematologic neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Vania; Porter, David; Luskin, Marlise R; Bagg, Adam; Morrissette, Jennifer J D

    2015-12-01

    Donor cell leukemia is a rare complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), which may result from the development of a new malignancy in previously healthy donor cells after transplant into the recipient, or it may derive from the transmission of an occult leukemia from donor to recipient. We report a case of donor derived 20q11.2 deletion in a male patient who received an allogeneic HSCT from his HLA-identical sister for the treatment of his chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Bone marrow cells from the donor were found to contain the 20q deletion that expanded over time, but which was absent in her peripheral blood cells. Although cases of donor cell leukemia after HSCT have been reported, in this case there has been no evidence of an associated hematologic neoplasm in either the donor or recipient. Pre-transplant donor bone marrow evaluations are not practical or warranted, however the finding of new cytogenetic abnormalities after transplant mandates a thorough evaluation of the donor.

  2. Relation between the increase of circulating CD3+ CD57+ lymphocytes and T cell dysfunction in recipients of bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, M; Balboa, M A; Fernández-Rañada, J M; Figuera, A; Torres, A; Iriondo, A; López-Botet, M

    1990-01-01

    Some patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT) persistently present increased proportions of circulating CD57+ T cells. We analysed the cell surface phenotype in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 69 allogeneic and 11 autologous BMT recipients. In parallel samples from 49 patients, the proliferative response to T cell mitogens was assessed, either in the presence or absence of exogenous interleukin-2 (IL-2). PBMC samples from long-term allogeneic BMT patients with increased proportions of CD57+ cells displayed significantly (P less than 0.001) lower proliferative responses, compared with samples from patients with normal proportions of CD57+ cells and from healthy subjects. Elimination of the CD57+ population by C'-dependent lysis did not normalize the proliferative response. After positive selection by cell sorting, CD57+ cells responded poorly, but in the presence of IL-2 the proliferation appeared to be similar to that displayed by the CD57- subset and still suboptimal compared with normal controls. These data suggest that the hyporesponsiveness to mitogenic stimuli in the presence of exogenous IL-2 of PBMC from allogeneic BMT recipients cannot be simply attributed either to the putative suppressor activity of CD57+ cells, or to a poor proliferative capacity of this subset. Supporting this notion we report that PBMC from long-term autologous BMT recipients containing high proportions of CD57+ T cells respond normally to T cell mitogens. PMID:1698579

  3. p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} deficiency induces mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ae Jeong; Jee, Hye Jin; Song, Naree; Kim, Minjee; Jeong, Seon-Young; Yun, Jeanho

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells exhibited an increase in mitochondrial mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression levels of PGC-1{alpha} and AMPK were upregulated in p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proliferation of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells in galactose medium was significantly impaired. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21 may play a role in maintaining proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function. -- Abstract: p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression. However, the role of p21 in mitochondrial function remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the effect of p21 deficiency on mitochondrial function in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. We found that there was a significant increase in the mitochondrial mass of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells, as measured by 10-N-nonyl-acridine orange staining, as well as an increase in the mitochondrial DNA content. In contrast, p53{sup -/-} cells had a mitochondrial mass comparable to that of wild-type HCT116 cells. In addition, the expression levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis regulators PGC-1{alpha} and TFAM and AMPK activity were also elevated in p21{sup -/-} cells, indicating that p21 deficiency induces the rate of mitochondrial biogenesis through the AMPK-PGC-1{alpha} axis. However, the increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in p21{sup -/-} cells did not accompany an increase in the cellular steady-state level of ATP. Furthermore, p21{sup -/-} cells exhibited significant proliferation impairment in galactose medium, suggesting that p21 deficiency induces a defect in the mitochondrial respiratory chain in HCT116 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of p21 results in an aberrant increase in the mitochondrial mass and in mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 cells, indicating that p21 is required to maintain proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function.

  4. 21 CFR 1271.21 - When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates? 1271.21 Section 1271.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Listing § 1271.21 When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates? (a) You must register...

  5. 21 CFR 1271.21 - When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates? 1271.21 Section 1271.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... Listing § 1271.21 When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates? (a) You must register...

  6. Tandem Autologous versus Single Autologous Transplantation Followed by Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Multiple Myeloma: Results from the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) 0102 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Amrita; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Logan, Brent; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Vesole, David H.; Alyea, Edwin; Antin, Joseph H.; Comenzo, Raymond; Goodman, Stacey; Hari, Parameswaran; Laport, Ginna; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H.; Rowley, Scott; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Somlo, George; Vogl, Dan T.; Weisdorf, Daniel; Ewell, Marian; Wu, Juan; Geller, Nancy L.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Giralt, Sergio; Maloney, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) improves survival in patients with multiple myeloma, but disease progression remains a challenge. Allogeneic HCT (alloHCT) has the potential to reduce disease progression through graft-versus-myeloma effects. The aim of the BMT CTN 0102 trial was to compare outcomes of autologous HCT (autoHCT) followed by alloHCT with non-myeloablative conditioning (auto-allo) to tandem autoHCT (auto-auto) in patients with standard risk myeloma. Patients in the auto-auto arm were randomized to one year of thalidomide and dexamethasone (Thal-Dex) maintenance therapy or observation (Obs). Methods Patients with multiple myeloma within 10 months from initiation of induction therapy were classified as standard (SRD) or high risk (HRD) disease based on cytogenetics and beta-2-microglobulin levels. Assignment to auto-allo HCT was based on availability of an HLA-matched sibling donor. Primary endpoint was three-year progression-free survival (PFS) according to intent-to-treat analysis. Results 710 patients were enrolled completed a minimum of 3-year follow up. Among 625 SRD patients, 189 and 436 were assigned to auto-allo and auto-auto, respectively. Seventeen percent (33/189) of SR patients in the auto-allo arm and 16% (70/436) in the auto-auto arm did not receive a second transplant. Thal-Dex was not completed in 77% (168/217) of assigned patients. PFS and overall survival (OS) did not differ between the Thal-Dex (49%, 80%) and Obs (41%, 81%) cohorts and these two arms were pooled for analysis. Three year PFS was 43% and 46% (p=0·671) and three-year OS was 77% and 80 % (p=0·191) with auto-allo and auto-auto, respectively. Corresponding progression/relapse rates were 46% and 50% (p=0·402); treatment-related mortality rates were 11% and 4% (p<0·001), respectively. Auto/allo patients with chronic graft-vs-host disease had a decreased risk of relapse. Most common grade 3 to 5 adverse events in auto-allo was hypebilirubenemia

  7. Comparison of conventional and molecular detection of respiratory viruses inhematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Kuypers, J.; Campbell, A.P.; Cent, A.; Corey, L; Boeckh, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Sensitive detection of respiratory viruses is important for early diagnosis of infection in patients following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). To evaluate the relative sensitivity of respiratory virus detection in specimens from HCT recipients, we compared the results of conventional and quantitative molecular methods. Methods We tested 688 nasal wash samples collected prospectively from 131 patients during the first 100 days after HCT by viral culture, fluorescent antibody staining (FA), and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for detection of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus types A (FluA) and B (FluB), and parainfluenza virus types 1 (PIV1) and 3 (PIV3). Testing for human metapneumovirus (MPV) was performed only by PCR. Data regarding 10 respiratory symptoms were collected with each sample. Results By any method 37 specimens were positive for a respiratory virus; 34 were positive by PC, 15 by culture, and 6 by FA. Four specimens were positive by all 3 methods (3 RSV, 1 FluA). One specimen was positive for PIV1, and 2 were positive for rhinovirus by culture alone. Specimens positive by PCR alone included 2 RSV, 2 PIV1, 8 PIV3, and 8 MPV. In 10 specimens positive for RSV, PIV, or influenza virus collected from patients reporting no respiratory symptoms, 9, 4, and 1 specimen were positive by PCR, culture, and FA respectively. Overall, specimens positive only by PCR had significantly fewer viral copies/mL (mean log10=4.32) than specimens positive by both PCR and culture (mean log10=5.75; p=0.002) or PCR and FA (mean log10=6.83; p<0.001). Conclusions FA testing alone did not detect a significant proportion of respiratory virus positive samples in HCT recipients, especially in patients with no respiratory symptoms and patients with PIV detection. PCR increased the yield of positive specimens 2 times relative to culture and more than 4 times relative to FA. Detection of respiratory

  8. Cancer in the Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Jeremy R.; Webster, Angela C.; Wong, Germaine

    2013-01-01

    Malignancy has become one of the three major causes of death after transplantation in the past decade and is thus increasingly important in all organ transplant programs. Death from cardiovascular disease and infection are both decreasing in frequency from a combination of screening, prophylaxis, aggressive risk factor management, and interventional therapies. Cancer, on the other hand, is poorly and expensively screened for; risk factors are mostly elusive and/or hard to impact on except for the use of immunosuppression itself; and finally therapeutic approaches to the transplant recipient with cancer are often nihilistic. This article provides a review of each of the issues as they come to affect transplantation: cancer before wait-listing, cancer transmission from the donor, cancer after transplantation, outcomes of transplant recipients after a diagnosis of cancer, and the role of screening and therapy in reducing the impact of cancer in transplant recipients. PMID:23818517

  9. Allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplantation for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hurd, D D

    1987-12-01

    Current results show that 50% of young patients with ANLL who undergo allogeneic BMT experience prolonged DFS and may be cured. Encouraging results with high-dose chemo/radiotherapy and autologous BMT are likewise being reported. In addition, some studies using intensive postremission treatment without BMT have shown results comparable to many transplant series. As better ways of preventing GVHD are found, the morbidity and mortality of allogeneic BMT should be reduced and the benefits of transplantation for curing patients with ANLL should be increased. However, the applicability of allogeneic BMT will remain limited due to the availability of compatible donors whether related or unrelated. Further studies are needed in the use of postremission intensive therapy with and without autologous bone marrow support. However, results to date should engender the same degree of enthusiastic optimism that followed the early reports of improved outcome with allogeneic BMT when applied to first remission patients. PMID:3321445

  10. Clinical significance of the administration of cytarabine or thiotepa in addition to total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Masatsugu; Hagihara, Maki; Kawasaki, Rika; Yamazaki, Etsuko; Koharazawa, Hideyuki; Taguchi, Jun; Tomita, Naoto; Fujimaki, Katsumichi; Sakai, Rika; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Shin; Maruta, Atsuo; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Kanamori, Heiwa

    2015-10-01

    A multicenter retrospective study was performed to determine the significance of adding cytarabine (CA) or thiotepa (TT) in the context of total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide (CY). A total of 322 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) were distributed to the following three groups: TBI/CY (n = 75), TBI/CY/CA (n = 77), and TBI/CY/TT (n = 170). In the TBI/CY/TT group, 164 of patients (96 %) received HCT during the previous year (2000-2005). Multivariate analysis revealed that the TBI/CY/TT group demonstrated a trend of poorer survival rate than the TBI/CY group, [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.49, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.99-2.24, P = 0.055] with a higher non-relapse mortality (NRM) (HR = 2.34, 95 % CI 1.35-4.06, P = 0.002) rates, while TBI/CY/CA group demonstrated similar outcomes. Even in the subgroup analyses of disease type or disease risk, the outcomes with intensified conditioning regimens were not superior to those with TBI/CY. In conclusion, although the significant bias has to be carefully considered, the clinical benefit of adding CA or TT to the TBI/CY regimen was not demonstrated.

  11. Availability of Cord Blood Extends Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Access to Racial and Ethnic Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Juliet N.; Byam, Courtney E.; Kernan, Nancy A.; Lee, Sinda S.; Hawke, Rebecca M.; Doshi, Kathleen A.; Wells, Deborah S.; Heller, Glenn; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Young, James W.; van den Brink., Marcel R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic transplant access can be severely limited for patients of racial and ethnic minorities without suitable sibling donors. Whether cord blood (CB) transplantation can extend transplant access due to the reduced stringency of required HLA-match is not proven. We prospectively evaluated availability of unrelated donors (URD) and CB according to patient ancestry in 553 patients without suitable sibling donors. URDs had priority if adequate donors were available. Otherwise ≥ 4/6 HLA-matched CB grafts were chosen utilizing double units to augment graft dose. Patients had highly diverse ancestries including 35% non-Europeans. In 525 patients undergoing combined searches, 10/10 HLA-matched URDs were identified in 53% of those with European ancestry, but only 21% of patients with non-European origins (p < 0.001). However, the majority of both groups had 5–6/6 CB units. The 269 URD transplant recipients were predominantly European, with non-European patients accounting for only 23%. By contrast, 56% of CB transplant recipients had non-European ancestries (p < 0.001). Of 26 patients without any suitable stem cell source, 73% had non-European ancestries (p < 0.001). Their median weight was significantly higher than CB transplant recipients (p < 0.001), partially accounting for their lack of a CB graft. Availability of CB significantly extends allo-transplant access, especially in non-European patients, and has the greatest potential to provide a suitable stem cell source regardless of race or ethnicity. Minority patients in need of allografts, but without suitable matched sibling donors, should be referred for combined URD and CB searches to optimize transplant access. PMID:20800103

  12. RCT photometry and HCT spectroscopy of blazar candidates in the Kepler field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, Michael T.; Goyal, A.; Jose, J.

    2014-01-01

    The results of photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 9 blazar candidates in the Kepler field of view are presented. These sources were identified as blazar candidates based on their position in the so-called WISE blazar strip. Finding charts and comparison sequences were created using the NOMAD database. R band photometric monitoring was begun in spring 2013 with the Robotically Controlled Telescope(RCT), and spectroscopic observations of 7 of the sources were obtained with the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT) in September, 2013. Light curves for all 9 sources and preliminary spectroscopic classifications for the 7 sources with spectra will be presented.

  13. Effect of intrasplenic injection of allogeneic bone marrow cells on the survival of lethally X-irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, M.; Miyazaki, T.; Okabe, M.; Sakurada, K.; Musashi, M.; Kawamura, K.; Hatakeyama, M.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation chimeras in mice were induced by intrasplenic injection of allogeneic bone marrow cells instead of intravenous injection. Interestingly, the survival time in X-irradiated BALB/c mice inoculated intrasplenically (i.s.) with bone marrow cells from C3H/He mice was markedly prolonged as compared with that in X-irradiated BALB/c mice inoculated i.v. with bone marrow cells from C3H/He mice. However, when C57BL/6 mice were used as donors, a significant difference between i.s. injection and i.v. injection has not been found in survival time at 60 days after X irradiation. On the contrary, when bone marrow cells from BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice were injected into X-irradiated C3H/He mice, i.s. injection gave longer survival days to recipients than did i.v. injection. Based on testing their chimerism, it was suggested that lymphoid cells of donor origin were predominantly identified in almost all BALB/c or C3H/He recipients which were inoculated i.s. with bone marrow cells from C57BL/6 mice. However, somewhat incomplete chimerism was observed when the C3H/He to BALB/c donor-recipient combination was used and vice versa.

  14. The EuroChimerism concept for a standardized approach to chimerism analysis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lion, T; Watzinger, F; Preuner, S; Kreyenberg, H; Tilanus, M; de Weger, R; van Loon, J; de Vries, L; Cavé, H; Acquaviva, C; Lawler, M; Crampe, M; Serra, A; Saglio, B; Colnaghi, F; Biondi, A; van Dongen, J J M; van der Burg, M; Gonzalez, M; Alcoceba, M; Barbany, G; Hermanson, M; Roosnek, E; Steward, C; Harvey, J; Frommlet, F; Bader, P

    2012-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is becoming an increasingly important approach to treatment of different malignant and non-malignant disorders. There is thus growing demand for diagnostic assays permitting the surveillance of donor/recipient chimerism posttransplant. Current techniques are heterogeneous, rendering uniform evaluation and comparison of diagnostic results between centers difficult. Leading laboratories from 10 European countries have therefore performed a collaborative study supported by a European grant, the EuroChimerism Concerted Action, with the aim to develop a standardized diagnostic methodology for the detection and monitoring of chimerism in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Following extensive analysis of a large set of microsatellite/short tandem repeat (STR) loci, the EuroChimerism (EUC) panel comprising 13 STR markers was established with the aim to optimally meet the specific requirements of quantitative chimerism analysis. Based on highly stringent selection criteria, the EUC panel provides multiple informative markers in any transplant setting. The standardized STR-PCR tests permit detection of donor- or recipient-derived cells at a sensitivity ranging between 0.8 and 1.6%. Moreover, the EUC assay facilitates accurate and reproducible quantification of donor and recipient hematopoietic cells. Wide use of the European-harmonized protocol for chimerism analysis presented will provide a basis for optimal diagnostic support and timely treatment decisions.

  15. BK Virus Nephropathy in Heart Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Alin; Pilichowska, Monika; Boucher, Helen; Kiernan, Michael; DeNofrio, David; Inker, Lesley A

    2015-06-01

    Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN) has become an important cause of kidney failure in kidney transplant recipients. PVAN is reported to affect 1% to 7% of kidney transplant recipients, leading to premature transplant loss in approximately 30% to 50% of diagnosed cases. PVAN occurring in the native kidneys of solid-organ transplant recipients other than kidney only recently has been noted. We report 2 cases of PVAN in heart transplant recipients, which brings the total of reported cases to 7. We briefly review the literature on the hypothesized causes of PVAN in kidney transplant recipients and comment on whether these same mechanisms also may cause PVAN in other solid-organ transplant recipients. PVAN should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating worsening kidney function. BK viremia surveillance studies of nonkidney solid-organ recipients should be conducted to provide data to assist the transplantation community in deciding whether regular monitoring of nonkidney transplant recipients for BK viremia is indicated.

  16. Toxoplasmosis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation--a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Busemann, Christoph; Ribback, Silvia; Zimmermann, Kathrin; Sailer, Verena; Kiefer, Thomas; Schmidt, Christian A; Schulz, Katrin; Steinmetz, Ivo; Dombrowski, Frank; Dölken, Gottfried; Krüger, William H

    2012-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a rare but possibly underestimated complication following allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a high mortality rate. One reason might be the limitation of the diagnostic instruments relying mainly on imaging and molecular-based techniques. In this report, we present three cases of toxoplasmosis identified among 155 allograft recipients treated at Greifswald University Hospital. Widely disseminated toxoplasmosis was detected post-mortem in two patients allografted for high-risk multiple myeloma. Clinical signs suspicious for toxoplasmosis occurred after days +32 and +75, respectively. In one case, serology and conventional Toxoplasma gondii PCR, targeting the B1 gene, revealed negative results, while in the other patient, toxoplasmosis was not investigated. Both patients received pentamidine for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PcP) prophylaxis. The third patient, a 68-year-old woman allografted for AML, developed cerebral toxoplasmosis from day +395 after allogeneic SCT with typical signs in magnetic resonance tomography. Toxoplasma DNA was amplified from one of two samples of cerebrospinal fluid. The patient died of disseminated toxoplasmosis despite immediate initiation of therapy. Retrospective comparative testing of clinical specimens by the conventional T. gondii PCR and by a real-time PCR targeting a 529-bp genomic fragment suggests a higher sensitivity of the latter method in our patients. In conclusion, we suggest a rigorous real-time PCR monitoring for high-risk patients or patients with signs of infections suspicious for toxoplasmosis, even though low-copy results are presently difficult to interpret. Our reported cases might also encourage the use of trimethoprim-sufmethoxazole instead of pentamidine for PcP prophylaxis in those patients.

  17. Racial disparities in hematopoietic cell transplantation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Majhail, N S; Nayyar, S; Santibañez, M E Burton; Murphy, E A; Denzen, E M

    2012-11-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a highly specialized, expensive and resource-intense medical procedure that can be associated with racial disparities. We review the prevailing literature on racial disparities in HCT in the United States and describe areas for future research and interventions. We discuss the complexity of interpreting race as a biological and social determinant of disease in biomedical research, especially as it relates to HCT. In the United States, race is often a surrogate for socioeconomic, education and health insurance status. We also discuss some of the nuances to consider while reviewing the literature on racial disparities. Disparities by race exist in three areas related to HCT: donor availability, access to HCT and outcomes of HCT. African-Americans/Blacks have a lower likelihood of finding an unrelated donor. Race and ethnicity definitions are country-specific and reconciling race data can represent significant challenges to unrelated donor registries worldwide. African-Americans/Blacks do not have the same access to autologous and allogeneic HCT as Whites. Racial disparities in outcomes of HCT are more prevalent among allogeneic HCT than autologous HCT recipients. More research is required to understand the biological, social, cultural, medical and financial aspects of race that may influence access to HCT and survival after transplantation. Better understanding of racial disparities will minimize inequities, inform health policy, guide development of interventions targeted to eliminate disparities and ensure equitable access to HCT for all populations.

  18. 34 CFR 84.660 - Recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recipient. 84.660 Section 84.660 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.660 Recipient. Recipient means any individual, corporation,...

  19. 31 CFR 20.660 - Recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recipient. 20.660 Section 20.660 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.660 Recipient. Recipient means any...

  20. 40 CFR 725.420 - Recipient microorganisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recipient microorganisms. 725.420... CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS General Exemptions for New Microorganisms § 725.420 Recipient microorganisms. The following recipient microorganisms are eligible for...

  1. 40 CFR 725.420 - Recipient microorganisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recipient microorganisms. 725.420... CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS General Exemptions for New Microorganisms § 725.420 Recipient microorganisms. The following recipient microorganisms are eligible for...

  2. 10 CFR 607.660 - Recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recipient. 607.660 Section 607.660 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 607.660 Recipient. Recipient means any individual, corporation,...

  3. 5 CFR 1315.15 - Grant recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Grant recipients. 1315.15 Section 1315.15 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES PROMPT PAYMENT § 1315.15 Grant recipients. Recipients of Federal assistance may pay interest penalties if so specified in their contracts...

  4. 5 CFR 1315.15 - Grant recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Grant recipients. 1315.15 Section 1315.15 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES PROMPT PAYMENT § 1315.15 Grant recipients. Recipients of Federal assistance may pay interest penalties if so specified in their contracts...

  5. 5 CFR 1315.15 - Grant recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Grant recipients. 1315.15 Section 1315.15 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES PROMPT PAYMENT § 1315.15 Grant recipients. Recipients of Federal assistance may pay interest penalties if so specified in their contracts...

  6. 5 CFR 1315.15 - Grant recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Grant recipients. 1315.15 Section 1315.15 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES PROMPT PAYMENT § 1315.15 Grant recipients. Recipients of Federal assistance may pay interest penalties if so specified in their contracts...

  7. 5 CFR 1315.15 - Grant recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Grant recipients. 1315.15 Section 1315.15 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES PROMPT PAYMENT § 1315.15 Grant recipients. Recipients of Federal assistance may pay interest penalties if so specified in their contracts...

  8. 40 CFR 725.420 - Recipient microorganisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recipient microorganisms. 725.420... CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS General Exemptions for New Microorganisms § 725.420 Recipient microorganisms. The following recipient microorganisms are eligible for...

  9. 40 CFR 725.420 - Recipient microorganisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recipient microorganisms. 725.420... CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS General Exemptions for New Microorganisms § 725.420 Recipient microorganisms. The following recipient microorganisms are eligible for...

  10. 45 CFR 630.660 - Recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recipient. 630.660 Section 630.660 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.660 Recipient. Recipient means...

  11. 45 CFR 630.660 - Recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recipient. 630.660 Section 630.660 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.660 Recipient. Recipient means...

  12. 45 CFR 630.660 - Recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recipient. 630.660 Section 630.660 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.660 Recipient. Recipient means...

  13. 10 CFR 603.510 - Recipient qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recipient qualifications. 603.510 Section 603.510 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Recipient Qualification § 603.510 Recipient qualifications. Prior to award of a TIA,...

  14. 28 CFR 83.660 - Recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recipient. 83.660 Section 83.660 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.660 Recipient. Recipient means any individual, corporation, partnership, association, unit...

  15. 45 CFR 630.660 - Recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recipient. 630.660 Section 630.660 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.660 Recipient. Recipient means...

  16. 45 CFR 630.660 - Recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recipient. 630.660 Section 630.660 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.660 Recipient. Recipient means...

  17. [Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Affects U0126-Induced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cell Line (HCT116)].

    PubMed

    Ljujic, M; Mijatovic, S; Bulatovic, M Z; Mojic, M; Maksimovic-Ivanic, D; Radojkovic, D; Topic, A

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), an acute phase protein, is the principal circulatory anti-protease. This multifunctional protein is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. Although AAT was recognised as a potential tumour marker, its role in cancer biology remains unknown. Given that it has been demonstrated that AAT has an anti-apoptotic property against non-malignant cells, we aimed to investigate whether AAT affects apoptosis in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116). The presence of AAT in the HCT116 cell culture antagonized cytotoxicity of blockers of MEK1/2, PI3K/Akt pathways as well as NF-κB. The dominantly recovered cell viability was observed in the co-treatment with MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. In addition, it was revealed that AAT almost completely abolished U0126-induced apoptosis through maintenance of the autophagy process. Our study revealed for the first time that the observed cyto-protection triggered by AAT was accompanied by sustained autophagy which opposed apoptosis. These results may contribute to understanding of the role of AAT in cancer development and evaluation of efficacy of cancer therapy.

  18. Secreted human adipose leptin decreases mitochondrial respiration in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, p<0.05) and maximal (50%, p<0.05) OCR and gene expression of mitochondrial proteins and Bax without affecting cell viability or expression of glycolytic enzymes. Similar changes could be recapitulated by incubating cells with leptin, whereas, leptin-receptor specific antagonist inhibited the reduced OCR induced by conditioned media from obese subjects. We conclude that secreted products from the adipose tissue of obese subjects inhibit mitochondrial respiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues.

  19. Relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, A John; Battiwalla, Minoo

    2012-01-01

    Since allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) represents an intensive curative treatment for high-risk malignancies, its failure to prevent relapse leaves few options for successful salvage treatment. While many patients have a high early mortality from relapse, some respond and have sustained remissions, and a minority has a second chance of cure with appropriate therapy. The prognosis for relapsed hematological malignancies after SCT depends on four factors: the time elapsed from SCT to relapse (with relapses occurring within 6 months having the worst prognosis), the disease type (with chronic leukemias and some lymphomas having a second possibility of cure with further treatment), the disease burden and site of relapse (with better treatment success if disease is treated early), and the conditions of the first transplant (with superior outcome for patients where there is an opportunity to increase either the alloimmune effect, the specificity of the antileukemia effect with targeted agents or the intensity of the conditioning in a second transplant). These features direct treatments toward either modified second transplants, chemotherapy, targeted antileukemia therapy, immunotherapy or palliative care. PMID:21083034

  20. Induction of autophagy by dimethyl cardamonin is associated with proliferative arrest in human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 and LOVO cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyeonseok; Kim, Young-Joo; Amor, Evangeline C; Lee, Jong Wha; Kim, Han-Cheon; Kim, Hee Ju; Yang, Hyun Ok

    2011-09-01

    Dimethyl cardamonin (2',4'-dihydroxy-6'-methoxy-3',5'-dimethylchalcone; DMC) is a naturally occurring chalcone, and it is the major compound isolated from the leaves of Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & L.M. Perry (Myrtaceae). Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of DMC on cell proliferation, cell-cycle distribution, and programmed cell death in cultures of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 and LOVO cells. Results showed that DMC inhibited HCT116 and LOVO cell proliferation and induced G(2) /M cell cycle arrest, which was associated with the conversion of microtubule associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-I-LC3-II, an autophagosome marker, and the incorporation of monodansylcadaverine (MDC), a marker for the acidic compartment of autolysosomes or acidic vesicular organelles. The treatment of HCT116 and LOVO cells using a combination of DMC with an autophagy inhibitor, such as 3-methyladenine (3-MA), beclin 1 siRNA, or atg5 siRNA, suppressed the effect of DMC-mediated anti-proliferation. These results imply that DMC can suppress colorectal carcinoma HCT116 and LOVO cell proliferation through a G(2) /M phase cell-cycle delay, and can induce autophagy, the hallmark of Type II programmed cell death (PCD). Taken together, our results suggest that DMC may be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for HCT116 and LOVO colorectal carcinoma cells.

  1. Tracheal reconstruction with a composite graft: fascial flap-wrapped allogenic aorta with external cartilage-ring support

    PubMed Central

    Wurtz, Alain; Hysi, Ilir; Kipnis, Eric; Zawadzki, Christophe; Hubert, Thomas; Jashari, Ramadan; Copin, Marie-Christine; Jude, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Animal and clinical studies have demonstrated the feasibility of tracheal replacement by silicone-stented allogenic aortas. In clinical trials, however, this graft did not show mature cartilage regeneration into the grafts as was observed in animal models. To solve this issue, we investigated tracheal replacement with a composite graft based on a fascial flap-wrapped allogenic aorta with external cartilage-ring support in a rabbit model. METHODS Seven male 'Géant des Flandres' and 'New Zealand' rabbits served as donors of aortas and cartilage rings, respectively. Nineteen female 'New Zealand' rabbits were used as recipients. First, in nine animals, neoangiogenesis of the composite graft following a wrap using a pedicled lateral thoracic fascial flap and implantation under the skin of the chest wall was investigated. Animal sacrifice was scheduled at regular intervals up to 38 days. Second, 10 animals underwent tracheal replacement with the composite graft after a 7-to-9 day revascularization period, and were followed-up to death. Macroscopic and microscopic examinations were used to study the morphology, stiffness and viability of the construct. RESULTS There was one operative death after tracheal replacement. The first group of animals was found to have a satisfactory tubular morphology and stiffness of their construct associated with preserved histological structure of cartilages and moderate to severe aortic ischaemic lesions. In the group of rabbits having undergone tracheal replacement, the anatomical results were characterized by a discrepancy between the severity of ischaemic lesions involving both allogenic aorta and cartilage rings and the satisfactory biomechanical characteristics of the graft in 7 of 10 animals, probably due to cartilage calcification deposits associated with inflammatory scar tissue ensuring the stiffness of the construct. CONCLUSIONS Our investigations demonstrate the feasibility of the replacement of circumferential

  2. Quality of life, social challenges, and psychosocial support for long-term survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Hsu, Jack W; Wingard, John R

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades quality of life (QoL) and the social challenges of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) survivors have been emerging as subjects of extensive research and are now considered as very important aspects in the pretransplant evaluation and management of allo-HSCT recipients. Recognition of QoL challenges in allo-HSCT survivors allows timely interventions leading to improvement of post-transplant outcomes. It needs to be recognized that long-lasting life changes associated with survivorship after allo-HSCT also significantly affect QoL of partners of allo-HSCT survivors. Currently, resources should be focused on how research findings can be used by patients, their partners, and physicians to optimize QoL and psychosocial adjustment.

  3. Second Cancer Risk and Late Mortality in Adult Australians Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vajdic, Claire M; Mayson, Eleni; Dodds, Anthony J; O'Brien, Tracey; Wilcox, Leonie; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Le Marsney, Renate; Daniels, Benjamin; Ashton, Lesley J

    2016-05-01

    We quantified the risk of second cancer and late mortality in a population-based Australian cohort of 3273 adult (≥15 years) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (1992 to 2007). Most recipients received nonradiation-based conditioning and a peripheral blood graft from a matched related donor. Using record linkage with death and cancer registries, 79 second cancers were identified a median of 3.5 years after transplantation. The competing-risk adjusted cumulative incidence of second cancers was 3.35% (95% CI, 2.59 to 4.24) at 10 years, and the cancer risk relative to the matched general population was 2.10 (95% CI, 1.65 to 2.56). We observed an excess risk of melanoma and lip, tongue, esophagus, and soft tissue cancers. Cancer risk relative to the general population was elevated for those transplanted for lymphoma, some leukemia subtypes, and severe aplastic anemia, recipients who developed chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and irrespective of radiation-based conditioning or stem cell source. In those alive 2 years after transplantation (n = 1463), the cumulative incidence of late mortality was 22.2% (95% CI, 19.7 to 24.9) at 10 years, and the risk of death relative to the matched general population was 13.8 (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.6). In multivariable modeling, risk of late death was reduced for females compared with males and those transplanted for chronic myeloid leukemia compared with acute myeloid leukemia; risk was increased for recipients with discordant sex donors, cGVHD, those undergoing second transplants, and disease relapse. Adults undergoing allogeneic transplantation have unique cancer and mortality risk profiles that continue to warrant prevention and surveillance activities targeted at high-risk subgroups.

  4. Demodicosis in Renal Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Chovatiya, R J; Colegio, O R

    2016-02-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients have an increased incidence of skin infections resulting from immunosuppression. Common pathogens include herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Gram-positive bacteria and dermatophytes; however, the contribution of multicellular parasitic organisms to dermatologic disease in this population remains less studied. Demodex folliculorum and brevis are commensal mites that reside on human skin. Proliferation of Demodex mites, or demodicosis, is associated with rosacea and rosacea-like disorders, particularly in immunocompromised populations, although their ability to cause disease is still the subject of debate. We present a case series of four renal transplant recipients with the singular chief complaint of acne rosacea who we diagnosed with demodicosis. Although one of the four patients showed complete resolution following initial antiparasitic therapy, the other three required subsequent antibacterial treatment to fully resolve their lesions. We suggest that demodicosis may be more prevalent than once thought in solid organ transplant recipients and showed that Demodex-associated acne rosacea can be effectively treated in this population. PMID:26431451

  5. Lipids in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hüsing, Anna; Kabar, Iyad; Schmidt, Hartmut H

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is very common after liver transplantation and can be observed in up to 71% of patients. The etiology of lipid disorders in these patients is multifactorial, with different lipid profiles observed depending on the immunosuppressive agents administered and the presence of additional risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and nutrition. Due to recent improvements in survival of liver transplant recipients, the prevention of cardiovascular events has become more important, especially as approximately 64% of liver transplant recipients present with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Management of dyslipidemia and of other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, has therefore become essential in these patients. Treatment of hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation consists of life style modification, modifying the dose or type of immunosuppressive agents and use of lipid lowering agents. At the start of administration of lipid lowering medications, it is important to monitor drug-drug interactions, especially between lipid lowering agents and immunosuppressive drugs. Furthermore, as combinations of various lipid lowering drugs can lead to severe side effects, such as myopathies and rhabdomyolysis, these combinations should therefore be avoided. To our knowledge, there are no current guidelines targeting the management of lipid metabolism disorders in liver transplant recipients. This paper therefore recommends an approach of managing lipid abnormalities occurring after liver transplantation. PMID:27022213

  6. Lipids in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Hüsing, Anna; Kabar, Iyad; Schmidt, Hartmut H

    2016-03-28

    Hyperlipidemia is very common after liver transplantation and can be observed in up to 71% of patients. The etiology of lipid disorders in these patients is multifactorial, with different lipid profiles observed depending on the immunosuppressive agents administered and the presence of additional risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and nutrition. Due to recent improvements in survival of liver transplant recipients, the prevention of cardiovascular events has become more important, especially as approximately 64% of liver transplant recipients present with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Management of dyslipidemia and of other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, has therefore become essential in these patients. Treatment of hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation consists of life style modification, modifying the dose or type of immunosuppressive agents and use of lipid lowering agents. At the start of administration of lipid lowering medications, it is important to monitor drug-drug interactions, especially between lipid lowering agents and immunosuppressive drugs. Furthermore, as combinations of various lipid lowering drugs can lead to severe side effects, such as myopathies and rhabdomyolysis, these combinations should therefore be avoided. To our knowledge, there are no current guidelines targeting the management of lipid metabolism disorders in liver transplant recipients. This paper therefore recommends an approach of managing lipid abnormalities occurring after liver transplantation. PMID:27022213

  7. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adult acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission - a review from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Sengsayadeth, Salyka; Savani, Bipin N.; Blaise, Didier; Malard, Florent; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common indication for an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. The introduction of reduced intensity conditioning has expanded the recipient pool for transplantation, which has importantly made transplant an option for the more commonly affected older age groups. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplantation is currently the standard of care for patients with intermediate or high-risk acute myeloid leukemia and is now most often employed in older patients and those with medical comorbidities. Despite being curative for a significant proportion of patients, post-transplant relapse remains a challenge in the reduced intensity conditioning setting. Herein we discuss the studies that demonstrate the feasibility of reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplants, compare the outcomes of reduced intensity conditioning versus chemotherapy and conventional myeloablative conditioning regimens, describe the optimal donor and stem cell source, and consider the impact of post-remission consolidation, comorbidities, center experience, and more intensive (reduced toxicity conditioning) regimens on outcomes. Additionally, we discuss the need for further prospective studies to optimize transplant outcomes. PMID:26130513

  8. Recipient Myd88 Deficiency Promotes Spontaneous Resolution of Kidney Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Lerret, Nadine M; Li, Ting; Wang, Jiao-Jing; Kang, Hee-Kap; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Xueqiong; Jie, Chunfa; Kanwar, Yashpal S; Abecassis, Michael M; Luo, Xunrong; Zhang, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    The myeloid differentiation protein 88 (MyD88) adapter protein is an important mediator of kidney allograft rejection, yet the precise role of MyD88 signaling in directing the host immune response toward the development of kidney allograft rejection remains unclear. Using a stringent mouse model of allogeneic kidney transplantation, we demonstrated that acute allograft rejection occurred equally in MyD88-sufficient (wild-type [WT]) and MyD88(-/-) recipients. However, MyD88 deficiency resulted in spontaneous diminution of graft infiltrating effector cells, including CD11b(-)Gr-1(+) cells and activated CD8 T cells, as well as subsequent restoration of near-normal renal graft function, leading to long-term kidney allograft acceptance. Compared with T cells from WT recipients, T cells from MyD88(-/-) recipients failed to mount a robust recall response upon donor antigen restimulation in mixed lymphocyte cultures ex vivo. Notably, exogenous IL-6 restored the proliferation rate of T cells, particularly CD8 T cells, from MyD88(-/-) recipients to the proliferation rate of cells from WT recipients. Furthermore, MyD88(-/-) T cells exhibited diminished expression of chemokine receptors, specifically CCR4 and CXCR3, and the impaired ability to accumulate in the kidney allografts despite an otherwise MyD88-sufficient environment. These results provide a mechanism linking the lack of intrinsic MyD88 signaling in T cells to the effective control of the rejection response that results in spontaneous resolution of acute rejection and long-term graft protection.

  9. Crocin, the main active saffron constituent, mitigates dichlorvos-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Intidhar; Boussabbeh, Manel; Kantaoui, Hiba; Bacha, Hassen; Abid-Essefi, Salwa

    2016-08-01

    The protective effects of Crocin (CRO), a carotenoid with wide spectrum of pharmacological effects, against the cytotoxicity and the apoptosis produced by exposure to Dichlorvos (DDVP) in HCT116 cells were investigated in this work. The cytotoxicity was monitored by cell viability, ROS generation, antioxidant enzymes activities, malondialdehyde (MDA) production and DNA fragmentation. The apoptosis was assessed through the measurement of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and caspases activation. The results indicated that pretreatment of HCT116 cells with CRO, 2h prior to DDVP exposure, significantly increased the survival of cells, inhibited the ROS generation, modulated the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and reduced the MDA level. The reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA fragmentation and caspases activation were also inhibited by CRO. These findings suggest that CRO can protect HCT116 cells from DDVP-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. PMID:27470340

  10. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can

  11. Cellular therapy following allogeneic stem-cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is the most effective approach for many patients with hematologic malignancies. Unfortunately, relapse remains the most common cause of death after allogeneic HSCT, and the prognosis of relapsed disease is poor for most patients. Induction of a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL), or graft-versus-tumor, effect through the use of donor leukocyte infusion (DLI), or donor lymphocyte infusion, has been remarkably successful for relapsed chronic myelogenous leukemia. Unfortunately, response to DLI in other hematologic malignancies is much less common and depends on many factors including histology, pace and extent of relapse, and time from HSCT to relapse. Furthermore, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is common after DLI and often limits successful immunotherapy. Ultimately, manipulations to minimize GVHD while preserving or enhancing GVL are necessary to improve outcomes for relapse after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:23556106

  12. Functionally Active HIV-Specific T Cells that Target Gag and Nef Can Be Expanded from Virus-Naïve Donors and Target a Range of Viral Epitopes: Implications for a Cure Strategy after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shabnum; Lam, Sharon; Cruz, Conrad Russell; Wright, Kaylor; Cochran, Christina; Ambinder, Richard F; Bollard, Catherine M

    2016-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can potentially cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by eliminating infected recipient cells, particularly in the context of technologies that may confer HIV resistance to these stem cells. But, to date, the Berlin patient remains the only case of HIV cure despite multiple attempts to eradicate infection with HSCT. One approach to improve this is to administer virus-specific T cells, a strategy that has proven success in preventing other infections after transplantation. Although we have reported that broadly HIV-specific T cells can be expanded from HIV+ patients, allogeneic transplantations only contain virus-naïve T cells. Modifying this approach for the allogeneic setting requires a robust, reproducible platform that can expand HIV-specific cells from the naïve pool. Hence, we hypothesized that HIV-specific T cells could be primed ex vivo from seronegative individuals to effectively target HIV. Here, we show that ex vivo-primed and expanded HIV-specific T cells released IFNγ in response to HIV antigens and that these cells have enhanced ability to suppress replication in vitro. This is the first demonstration of ex vivo priming and expansion of functional, multi-HIV antigen-specific T cells from HIV-negative donors, which has implications for use of allogeneic HSCT as a functional HIV cure. PMID:26721209

  13. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) depress allogeneic natural cytotoxicity by earthworm coelomocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.M.; Cooper, E.L.; Eyambe, G.S.; Goven, A.J.; Fitzpatrick, L.C.; Venables, B.J. |

    1995-10-01

    Coelomocytes of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris caused significant spontaneous allogeneic cytotoxicity in a 24-h trypan blue assay, but not in an assay using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Allogeneic cytotoxicity assays using cells from worms exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) suggest that PCBs can suppress a natural killing (NK-like) reaction. The implications of this work are twofold: understanding the evolution of natural killing (NK-like) activity and providing preliminary information on how spontaneous killing, a component of cellular immunity, may be compromised by pollutants.

  14. Anti-bacterial immunity to Listeria monocytogenes in allogeneic bone marrow chimera in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Onoe, K.; Good, R.A.; Yamamoto, K.

    1986-06-01

    Protection and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.) were studied in allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow chimeras. Lethally irradiated AKR (H-2k) mice were successfully reconstituted with marrow cells from C57BL/10 (B10) (H-2b), B10 H-2-recombinant strains or syngeneic mice. Irradiated AKR mice reconstituted with marrow cells from H-2-compatible B10.BR mice, (BR----AKR), as well as syngeneic marrow cells, (AKR----AKR), showed a normal level of responsiveness to the challenge stimulation with the listeria antigens when DTH was evaluated by footpad reactions. These mice also showed vigorous activities in acquired resistance to the L.m. By contrast, chimeric mice that had total or partial histoincompatibility at the H-2 determinants between donor and recipient, (B10----AKR), (B10.AQR----AKR), (B10.A(4R)----AKR), or (B10.A(5R)----AKR), were almost completely unresponsive in DTH and antibacterial immunity. However, when (B10----AKR) H-2-incompatible chimeras had been immunized with killed L.m. before challenge with live L.m., these mice manifested considerable DTH and resistance to L.m. These observations suggest that compatibility at the entire MHC between donor and recipient is required for bone marrow chimeras to be able to manifest DTH and protection against L.m. after a short-term immunization schedule. However, this requirement is overcome by a preceding or more prolonged period of immunization with L.m. antigens. These antigens, together with marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells, can then stimulate and expand cell populations that are restricted to the MHC (H-2) products of the donor type.

  15. Silica network improve the effect of fludarabine and paclitaxel on HCT8 cell line.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Georgeta; Anghel, Adrian Gabriel; Badea, Mihaela; Bordei, Emanoil; Crantea, Georgiana; Gavrilă, Raluca Ionela; Grecu, Alexandru; Jercan, Denisa Ana-Maria; Nicolae, Bogdan Cristian; Vochiţoaia, Greta Cristina; Tchinda, Kuete; Holban, Alina Maria; Bleotu, Coralia; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the potential of silica network to sensitize tumor cells and stimulate antitumor toxicity of fludarabine (FLU) and paclitaxel (PAC) against HCT8 cells. SiO₂, SiO₂/FLU and SiO₂/PAC nanostructured materials were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, InfraRed Microscopy and in vitro biological assays. When using SiO₂/PAC, it can be observed that the cytostatic effect of PAC is boosted only at high concentrations of this material. On the other hand, in the case of SiO₂/FLU, data showed an enhancement in the cytostatic activity of FLU by up to 25%, also when using this nanomaterial in low doses. These data represent preliminary study on the impact on silica nano-networks in targeted delivery and controlled release of antitumor drugs and they may be efficiently used for future biomedical applications in cancer therapy.

  16. Columbianadin Inhibits Cell Proliferation by Inducing Apoptosis and Necroptosis in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji In; Hong, Ji-Young; Choi, Jae Sue; Lee, Sang Kook

    2016-05-01

    Columbianadin (CBN), a natural coumarin from Angelica decursiva (Umbelliferae), is known to have various biological activities including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In this study, the anti-proliferative mechanism of actions mediated by CBN was investigated in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells. CBN effectively suppressed the growth of colon cancer cells. Low concentration (up to 25 µM) of CBN induced apoptosis, and high concentration (50 µM) of CBN induced necroptosis. The induction of apoptosis by CBN was correlated with the modulation of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, Bim and Bid, and the induction of necroptosis was related with RIP-3, and caspase-8. In addition, CBN induced the accumulation of ROS and imbalance in the intracellular antioxidant enzymes such as SOD-1, SOD-2, catalase and GPx-1. These findings demonstrate that CBN has the potential to be a candidate in the development of anti-cancer agent derived from natural products.

  17. Suppression of lentivirus-mediated transgenic dendritic cells in graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y J; Chen, W R; Li, D P; Song, L X; Wu, J Q; Zhang, P; Li, Z Y; Huang, Y H

    2015-01-01

    We determined whether genetically engineered immature dendritic cells (imDCs) mediated by lentiviral vectors alleviate acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) in mice. We introduced the mouse chemokine receptor 7 (Ccr7) gene into the bone marrow-derived imDCs of C57BL/6 mice to construct genetically engineered imDCs. A 1:1 mixture of bone marrow and spleen cells from the donors was injected into the recipients, which were divided into four groups: radiation, transplantation, empty vector, and transgenic imDC groups. Symptoms, clinical scores, GVHD pathological changes, and survival times and rates of recipients were recorded; secretion of IFN-γ and IL-4, and allogeneic chimerism rates were detected. The survival time of the transgenic imDC group (27.5 ± 7.55 days) was significantly longer than in the other three groups (P < 0.01). The GVHD score of the imDC group mice was significantly lower than in the transplantation and empty vector groups (P < 0.05), which meant that mice in the transgenic imDC group had the lightest pathology damage in the target organs. In the transplantation group, IFN-γ increased while IL-4 decreased. In contrast, IFN-γ decreased and IL-4 increased in both empty vector and trans-imDC groups, and the difference was significant in the latter (P < 0.01). Thirty days or more following transplantation, the allogeneic chimerism rate was still 95-100%, suggesting complete donor type implantation. Ccr7 transfection into imDCs suppressed occurrence and severity of acute GVHD after allo-BMT in mice; the mechanism might be associated with IFN-γ decrease and IL-4 increase. PMID:26436385

  18. Clients’ perceptions and satisfaction with HIV counselling and testing: A cross-sectional study in 56 HCT sites in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Matseke, Gladys; Mohlabane, Neo

    2016-01-01

    Background Client satisfaction serves as a predictor for acceptance of HIV counselling and testing (HCT) services. Therefore, the study of clients’ perception and satisfaction may offer insights on how to improve HCT programmes. Aim and setting The aim of this study was to assess clients’ satisfaction with HCT as well as describe perceived barriers to and facilitators of HIV testing by HCT clients in South Africa. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted through interviews with 498 clients purposefully selected at the end of an HCT visit at 56 HCT sites throughout the country. Results All the 498 study participants had tested for HIV with 98.8% receiving their results. Most (88.2%) reported testing for HIV before. The vast majority (75.5%) of clients reported that they had decided to be tested for HIV by themselves. High levels of satisfaction with HCT service (89.8%), low levels (27.7%) of difficulty in making the decision to have an HIV test and high levels of perceived confidentiality (94.6%) of the HIV test results were reported in this study. The most cited perceived barrier to HIV testing was lack of awareness about the HCT service (98%), while staff attitudes (37%), confidentiality (29.6%) and privacy (23.6%) were perceived facilitators. In multivariate logistic regression, staff attitude was significantly associated with client satisfaction (p < 0.05). Conclusion High levels of client satisfaction with HCT services were observed. Various barriers to and facilitators of – including staff attitude – HCT were identified which can help guide the improvement of HCT services in South Africa. PMID:27608674

  19. Factors associated with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) among patients in a population-based study of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Smith, Angela R; Warlick, Erica D; Roesler, Michelle A; Poynter, Jenny N; Richardson, Michaela; Nguyen, Phuong; Cioc, Adina; Hirsch, Betsy; Ross, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by dysplastic changes in the bone marrow, ineffective erythropoiesis, and an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Treatment planning for patients with MDS is a complex process, and we sought to better characterize hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes and the factors that play into decision-making regarding referral of adults with MDS for definitive therapy with HCT. Patients enrolled in a population-based study of MDS between April 2010 and January 2013 who underwent HCT within the first year after enrollment were included in this analysis. Age- and risk-matched MDS patient controls also enrolled during that time period were used as a comparison. Survival was significantly better in the HCT group (48 vs. 21 %, log-rank p value 0.009). Non-HCT patients were more likely to have comorbidities, and HCT patients were more likely to have a college degree and an income >$80,000. All three of these variables were independently associated with HCT, but none impacted survival. Patients with MDS in our study who underwent HCT had better survival than a comparable group of patients who did not undergo HCT. With refined treatment techniques, more patients may be able to be considered for this therapy. More work needs to be done to determine why education and income appear to impact the decision to pursue HCT, but these factors may impact referral to an academic center where aggressive therapy like HCT is more likely to be considered.

  20. Chimerism testing and detection of minimal residual disease after allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation using the bioView (Duet) combined morphological and cytogenetical analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, A; Nagler, A; Kaplinsky, C; Reichart, M; Avigdor, A; Hardan, I; Yeshurun, M; Daniely, M; Zilberstein, Y; Amariglio, N; Brok-Simoni, F; Rechavi, G; Trakhtenbrot, L

    2002-08-01

    Recurrent disease remains a major obstacle to cure after allogeneic transplantation. Various methods have been developed to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) after transplantation to identify patients at risk for relapse. Chimerism tests differentiate recipient and donor cells and are used to identify MRD when there are no other disease-specific markers. The detection of MRD does not always correlate with relapse risk. Chimerism testing may also identify normal hematopoietic cells or other cells not contributing to relapse. In this study we report our initial experience with a novel system that provides combined morphological and cytogenetical analysis on the same cells. This system allows rapid automatic scanning of a large number of cells, thus increasing the sensitivity of detection of small recipient population. The clinical significance of MRD detection is improved by identifying the morphology of recipient cells. Identification of recipient characteristics within blasts predicts overt relapse in leukemia patients and precedes it by a few weeks to months. Identification within mature hematopoietic cells may not be closely associated with relapse. The system also allows chimerism testing after sex-mismatched transplants, within cellular subsets, with no need for sorting of cells. The system merits further study in larger scale trials.

  1. 21 CFR 1271.420 - HCT/Ps offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... recipient for reproductive use. (d) This section does not apply to peripheral blood stem/progenitor cells... peripheral blood stem/progenitor cells may present an unreasonable risk of communicable disease transmission...) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS,...

  2. 21 CFR 1271.420 - HCT/Ps offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... recipient for reproductive use. (d) This section does not apply to peripheral blood stem/progenitor cells... peripheral blood stem/progenitor cells may present an unreasonable risk of communicable disease transmission...) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS,...

  3. 21 CFR 1271.420 - HCT/Ps offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... recipient for reproductive use. (d) This section does not apply to peripheral blood stem/progenitor cells... peripheral blood stem/progenitor cells may present an unreasonable risk of communicable disease transmission...) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS,...

  4. 21 CFR 1271.420 - HCT/Ps offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... recipient for reproductive use. (d) This section does not apply to peripheral blood stem/progenitor cells... peripheral blood stem/progenitor cells may present an unreasonable risk of communicable disease transmission...) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS,...

  5. 21 CFR 1271.420 - HCT/Ps offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... recipient for reproductive use. (d) This section does not apply to peripheral blood stem/progenitor cells... peripheral blood stem/progenitor cells may present an unreasonable risk of communicable disease transmission...) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS,...

  6. Atovaquone for Prophylaxis of Toxoplasmosis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mendorf, Alexander; Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Langebrake, Claudia; Rohde, Holger; Ayuk, Francis; Regier, Marc; Christopeit, Maximilian; Zabelina, Tatjana; Bacher, Adelbert; Stübig, Thomas; Wolschke, Christine; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis and infections by other opportunistic agents such as Pneumocystis jirovecii constitute life-threatening risks for patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been well established for post-transplant toxoplasmosis and pneumocystis prophylaxis, but treatment may be limited due to toxicity. We explored atovaquone as an alternative and compared it with TMP-SMX regarding toxicity and efficacy during the first 100 days after transplantation in 155 consecutive adult stem cell recipients. Eight patients with a prior history of TMP-SMX intolerance received atovaquone as first-line prophylaxis. TMP-SMX was used for 141 patients as first-line strategy, but 13 patients (9.2%) were later switched to atovaquone due to TMP-SMX toxicity or gastrointestinal symptoms. No active toxoplasmosis or active P. jirovecii infection developed under continued prophylaxis with either TMP-SMX or atovaquone. However, for reasons of TMP-SMX and/or atovaquone toxicity, 7 patients were unable to tolerate any efficacious toxoplasmosis prophylaxis and therefore obtained inhalative pentamidine as P. jirovecii prophylaxis but no toxoplasmosis prophylaxis. Importantly, 2 of these patients developed severe toxoplasmosis. In summary, atovaquone appears as a valid alternative for at least some post-transplant patients who cannot tolerate TMP-SMX. This should be further confirmed by multicenter trials. PMID:25968483

  7. Macrophage function in murine allogeneic bone marrow radiation chimeras in the early phase after transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Roesler, J.; Baccarini, M.; Vogt, B.; Lohmann-Matthes, M.L. )

    1989-08-01

    We tested several of the functions of macrophages (M phi) in the early phase after allogeneic bone marrow transfer to get information about this important aspect of the nonspecific immune system in the T-cell-deficient recipient. On days 3-5 after transfer, the number of M phi was reduced in the spleen, liver, lungs, and peritoneal cavity (Pe). The phagocytosis of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) by these M phi was normal or even enhanced, as in the case of Pe-M phi. Already on days 8-12 after transfer, the number of M phi in spleen and liver exceeded that of controls, whereas the number was still reduced in lungs and Pe. We examined their ability to kill P815 tumor cells, to produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), to phagocytose SRBC, to produce reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in vitro and to kill Listeria monocytogenes in vivo. Most functions were normal and often even enhanced, depending on the organ origin, but the ability of Pe-M phi to produce ROI was reduced. Proliferative response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and killing of YAC-1 tumor cells revealed a high frequency of macrophage precursor cells in the spleen and liver and a high natural killer (NK) activity in the liver. Altogether, enhanced nonspecific immune function, especially preactivated M phi, may enable chimeras to survive attacks by opportunistic pathogens.

  8. Recombinant human interleukin-7 (CYT107) promotes T-cell recovery after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Jenna D.; Yuan, Jianda; Koehne, Guenther; Lechner, Lauren; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.; Young, James W.; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Zaidi, Bushra; Gallardo, Humilidad; Liu, Cailian; Rasalan, Teresa; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Croughs, Therese; Morre, Michel; Devlin, Sean M.; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Delays in immune recovery after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) are associated with increased risks of infection and relapse. IL-7 has a central role in T-cell development and survival and enhances immune recovery in murine models of allo-HSCT. We performed a phase 1 trial of r-hIL-7 (CYT107) in recipients of T-cell depleted allo-HSCTs. Twelve patients were treated with escalating doses of r-hIL-7 administered weekly for 3 weeks. The study drug was well tolerated with only one patient developing acute skin GVHD. At baseline, patients were profoundly lymphopenic. CYT107 induced a doubling in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The main effect of IL-7 was an expansion of effector memory T cells, the predominant subset identified in our patients. There was no significant effect on CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells, NK, or B cells. Importantly, we not only saw quantitative increases in T cells after a short course of IL-7 but also demonstrated an increase in functional T cells, including viral-specific T cells that recognize CMV. Enhanced TCR diversity was also observed after treatment. Our results indicate that r-hIL-7 can enhance immune recovery after a T cell–depleted allo-HSCT without causing significant GVHD or other serious toxicity (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00684008). PMID:23012326

  9. Atovaquone for Prophylaxis of Toxoplasmosis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mendorf, Alexander; Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Langebrake, Claudia; Rohde, Holger; Ayuk, Francis; Regier, Marc; Christopeit, Maximilian; Zabelina, Tatjana; Bacher, Adelbert; Stübig, Thomas; Wolschke, Christine; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis and infections by other opportunistic agents such as Pneumocystis jirovecii constitute life-threatening risks for patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been well established for post-transplant toxoplasmosis and pneumocystis prophylaxis, but treatment may be limited due to toxicity. We explored atovaquone as an alternative and compared it with TMP-SMX regarding toxicity and efficacy during the first 100 days after transplantation in 155 consecutive adult stem cell recipients. Eight patients with a prior history of TMP-SMX intolerance received atovaquone as first-line prophylaxis. TMP-SMX was used for 141 patients as first-line strategy, but 13 patients (9.2%) were later switched to atovaquone due to TMP-SMX toxicity or gastrointestinal symptoms. No active toxoplasmosis or active P. jirovecii infection developed under continued prophylaxis with either TMP-SMX or atovaquone. However, for reasons of TMP-SMX and/or atovaquone toxicity, 7 patients were unable to tolerate any efficacious toxoplasmosis prophylaxis and therefore obtained inhalative pentamidine as P. jirovecii prophylaxis but no toxoplasmosis prophylaxis. Importantly, 2 of these patients developed severe toxoplasmosis. In summary, atovaquone appears as a valid alternative for at least some post-transplant patients who cannot tolerate TMP-SMX. This should be further confirmed by multicenter trials.

  10. Cytomegalovirus shapes long-term immune reconstitution after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Itzykson, Raphael; Robin, Marie; Moins-Teisserenc, Helene; Delord, Marc; Busson, Marc; Xhaard, Aliénor; de Fontebrune, Flore Sicre; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Toubert, Antoine; Socié, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Immune reconstitution after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a dynamic and complex process depending on the recipient and donor characteristics, on the modalities of transplantation, and on the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease. Multivariate methods widely used for gene expression profiling can simultaneously analyze the patterns of a great number of biological variables on a heterogeneous set of patients. Here we use these methods on flow cytometry assessment of up to 25 lymphocyte populations to analyze the global pattern of long-term immune reconstitution after transplantation. Immune patterns were most distinct from healthy controls at six months, and had not yet fully recovered as long as two years after transplant. The two principal determinants of variability were linked to the balance of B and CD8+ T cells and of natural killer and B cells, respectively. Recipient’s cytomegalovirus serostatus, cytomegalovirus replication, and chronic graft-versus-host disease were the main factors shaping the immune pattern one year after transplant. We identified a complex signature of under- and over-representation of immune populations dictated by recipient’s cytomegalovirus seropositivity. Finally, we identified dimensions of variance in immune patterns as significant predictors of long-term non-relapse mortality, independently of chronic graft-versus-host disease. PMID:25261095

  11. LIGNIFICATION IN TRANSGENICS DEFICIENT IN P-COUMARATE 3-HYDROXYLASE (C3H) AND THE ASSOCIATED HYDROXYCINNAMOYL TRANSFERASE (HCT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects on lignification of downregulating most of the genes for enzymes on the monolignol biosynthetic pathway have been reasonably well studied in angiosperms. The exception to this is the crucial hydroxylase, cinnamate 3-hydroxylase (C3H), and its associated hydroxycinnamyl transferase (HCT),...

  12. 21 CFR 1271.25 - What information is required for establishment registration and HCT/P listing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What information is required for establishment registration and HCT/P listing? 1271.25 Section 1271.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS...

  13. 21 CFR 1271.25 - What information is required for establishment registration and HCT/P listing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What information is required for establishment registration and HCT/P listing? 1271.25 Section 1271.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS...

  14. 21 CFR 1271.25 - What information is required for establishment registration and HCT/P listing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What information is required for establishment registration and HCT/P listing? 1271.25 Section 1271.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS...

  15. 21 CFR 1271.21 - When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When do I register, submit an HCT/P list, and submit updates? 1271.21 Section 1271.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES,...

  16. 21 CFR 1271.25 - What information is required for establishment registration and HCT/P listing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What information is required for establishment registration and HCT/P listing? 1271.25 Section 1271.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN...

  17. Studies of allogeneic bone marrow and spleen cell transplantation in a murine model using ultraviolet-B light

    SciTech Connect

    Pamphilon, D.H.; Alnaqdy, A.A.; Godwin, V.; Preece, A.W.; Wallington, T.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation inhibits alloreactive and mitogen-induced responses and might reduce both graft-versus-host and host-versus-graft reactions after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We have studied proliferative responses to mitogens and reactivity in mixed lymphocyte culture after irradiation with ultraviolet (UV)-B light using splenocytes from Balb/c (H-2d) and CBA (H-2k) mice. Response to mitogens and in MLC was strongly inhibited by 20 J/m{sup 2} and abolished at 50 J/m{sup 2}. Clonogenic cell recovery (CFU-GM; CFU-S) after UV-B irradiation was also reduced. When bone marrow and spleen cells were transplanted from parent (Balb/c) animals into F1 hybrid (Balb/c X CBA) recipients, all animals died with features indicative of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in 34 days. If the grafts were first irradiated with 100 J/m{sup 2} of UV-B at a mean wavelength of 310 nm, then 76% survived to day 80 when they were killed and shown to have normal marrow cellularity. The remainder died in marrow aplasia or of GVHD. H-2 typing in a group of surviving recipients showed either donor hematopoiesis only (8 of 15), mixed allogeneic chimerism (5 of 15), or recipient type hematopoiesis (2 of 15). Higher doses (200 to 300 J/m{sup 2}) were detrimental to survival with 88% of recipients dying in marrow aplasia. Syngeneic BMT in Balb/c mice showed slower hematopoietic reconstitution when the grafts were first irradiated with 100 J/m{sup 2}. After BMT from Balb/c to CBA mice all recipients of unirradiated grafts died within 54 days. By contrast, after graft irradiation with 100 J/m{sup 2} survival of recipient animals to day 80 was 59%. If these grafts were treated with 50 J/m{sup 2} survival was only 26% with an increase in deaths due to GVHD. Hematopoiesis at day 80 in a group of survivors studied by Ig heavy chain allotyping indicated donor type hematopoiesis in 6 of 10 (50 J/m{sup 2}) and 2 of 9 (100 J/m{sup 2}).

  18. 7 CFR 621.14 - Recipient responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 621.14 Recipient responsibility. Leadership in arrangements for other needed Federal, State, and local... NRCS policy and procedures, the requesting agency has leadership responsibility for developing...

  19. 7 CFR 621.14 - Recipient responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 621.14 Recipient responsibility. Leadership in arrangements for other needed Federal, State, and local... NRCS policy and procedures, the requesting agency has leadership responsibility for developing...

  20. 7 CFR 621.14 - Recipient responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 621.14 Recipient responsibility. Leadership in arrangements for other needed Federal, State, and local... NRCS policy and procedures, the requesting agency has leadership responsibility for developing...

  1. [T lymphocyte receptors after allogenic bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Vilmer, E; Schumpp, M; Sigaux, F; Boiron, M; Bensussan, A

    1988-01-01

    Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, prominent expansion of peripheral T cells (40%) bearing gamma T cell receptor was observed in some patients. Biochemical, functional and molecular analyses were performed to characterize this T cell receptor and to understand its role in the immunodeficient state after transplantation.

  2. Diagnostic value of tolerance-related gene expression measured in the recipient alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dong-Gyun; Park, Youn-Hee; Kim, Sung-Eun; Jeong, Seong-Hee; Kim, Song-Cheol

    2013-08-01

    The efficient development of tolerance-inducing therapies and safe reduction of immunosuppression should be supported by early diagnosis and prediction of tolerance in transplantation. Using mouse models of donor-specific tolerance to allogeneic skin and islet grafts we tested whether measurement of tolerance-related gene expression in their alloantigen-reactive peripheral T cell fraction efficiently reflected the tolerance status of recipients. We found that Foxp3, Nrn1, and Klrg1 were preferentially expressed in conditions of tolerance compared with rejection or unmanipulated controls if their expression is measured in CD69(+) T cells prepared from coculture of recipient peripheral T cells and donor antigen-presenting cells. The same pattern of gene expression was observed in recipients grafted with either skin or islets, recipients of different genetic origins, and even those taking immunosuppressive drugs. These findings suggest that the expression of tolerance-related genes in the alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction could be used to detect tolerance in the clinic. PMID:23778261

  3. Tolerance of Organ Transplant Recipients to Physical Activity during a High-Altitude Expedition: Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro

    PubMed Central

    van Adrichem, Edwin J.; Siebelink, Marion J.; Rottier, Bart L.; Dilling, Janneke M.; Kuiken, Greetje; van der Schans, Cees P.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is generally unknown to what extent organ transplant recipients can be physically challenged. During an expedition to Mount Kilimanjaro, the tolerance for strenuous physical activity and high-altitude of organ transplant recipients after various types of transplantation was compared to non-transplanted controls. Methods Twelve organ transplant recipients were selected to participate (2 heart-, 2 lung-, 2 kidney-, 4 liver-, 1 allogeneic stem cell- and 1 small bowel-transplantation). Controls comprised the members of the medical team and accompanying family members (n = 14). During the climb, cardiopulmonary parameters and symptoms of acute mountain sickness were recorded twice daily. Capillary blood analyses were performed three times during the climb and once following return. Results Eleven of the transplant participants and all controls began the final ascent from 4700 meters and reached over 5000 meters. Eight transplant participants (73%) and thirteen controls (93%) reached the summit (5895m). Cardiopulmonary parameters and altitude sickness scores demonstrated no differences between transplant participants and controls. Signs of hyperventilation were more pronounced in transplant participants and adaptation to high-altitude was less effective, which was related to a decreased renal function. This resulted in reduced metabolic compensation. Conclusion Overall, tolerance to strenuous physical activity and feasibility of a high-altitude expedition in carefully selected organ transplant recipients is comparable to non-transplanted controls. PMID:26606048

  4. Cell salvage for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Carless, Paul A; Henry, David A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Brown, Tamara; Fergusson, Dean A

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have prompted reconsideration of the use of allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and a range of techniques to minimise transfusion requirements. Objectives To examine the evidence for the efficacy of cell salvage in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes. Search methods We identified studies by searching CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2009), EMBASE (1980 to June 2009), the internet (to August 2009) and bibliographies of published articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials with a concurrent control group in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to cell salvage (autotransfusion) or to a control group who did not receive the intervention. Data collection and analysis Data were independently extracted and the risk of bias assessed. Relative risks (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. The primary outcomes were the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red cell transfusion and the amount of blood transfused. Other clinical outcomes are detailed in the review. Main results A total of 75 trials were included. Overall, the use of cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 38% (RR 0.62; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.70). The absolute reduction in risk (ARR) of receiving an allogeneic RBC transfusion was 21% (95% CI 15% to 26%). In orthopaedic procedures the RR of exposure to RBC transfusion was 0.46 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.57) compared to 0.77 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.86) for cardiac procedures. The use of cell salvage resulted in an average saving of 0.68 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (WMD −0.68; 95% CI −0.88 to −0.49). Cell salvage did not appear to impact adversely on clinical outcomes. Authors’ conclusions

  5. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans, gomisins J and N inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Chul Young; Nho, Chu Won

    2012-11-16

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the possible molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway and the induction of G0/G1-phase arrest by gomisins J and N, derived from the fruits of S. chinensis, in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N disrupted the binding of {beta}-catenin to specific DNA sequences, TBE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the HCT116 cell proliferation through G0/G1 phase arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the expression of Cyc D1, a Wnt/{beta}-catenin target gene. -- Abstract: Here, we report that gomisin J and gomisin N, dibenzocyclooctadiene type lignans isolated from Schisandra chinensis, inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in HCT116 cells. Gomisins J and N appear to inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction between {beta}-catenin and its specific target DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) rather than by altering the expression of the {beta}-catenin protein. Gomisins J and N inhibit HCT116 cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase arrest induced by gomisins J and N appears to be caused by a decrease in the expression of Cyclin D1, a representative target gene of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway, as well as Cdk2, Cdk4, and E2F-1. Therefore, gomisins J and N, the novel Wnt/{beta}-catenin inhibitors discovered in this study, may serve as potential agents for the prevention and treatment of human colorectal cancers.

  6. Isolation and characterization of alborixin from Streptomyces scabrisporus: A potent cytotoxic agent against human colon (HCT-116) cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aabid Manzoor; Wani, Abubakar; Qazi, Parvaiz H; Rehman, Shakeel-U; Mushtaq, Saleem; Ali, Shiekh Abid; Hussain, Aehtesham; Shah, Aiyatullah; Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Makhdoomi, Ubaid Sharif; Hamid, Abid; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-08-25

    The ethyl acetate extract from the fermentation broth of an actinomycete strain, identified as Streptomyces scabrisporus isolated from soil of Kashmir Himalayas - India, exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against a panel of human cancer cell lines. The active fraction subjected to column chromatography led to the isolation of pharmacologically potent anticancer compound whose structure was established to be alborixin on the basis of spectral data analysis. The compound exhibited antiproliferative activity against panel of cell lines N2a, MCF-7, MiaPaca-2, PC-3, HCT-116, MDA-MB-231, HL-60 and A-549 cells with IC50 of 9.7, 15.4, 7.2, 8.1, 3.2, 9.7, 7.5 and 11.5 μM respectively. Alborixin displayed the maximum cytotoxic activity against HCT-116 human colon carcinoma cells and therefore further studies were carried on this cell line. Alborixin decreased the clonogenic potential of HCT-116 cells in a dose dependent manner. It induced apoptotic cell death in HCT116 cells that were confirmed by Flow cytometric analysis of Annexin V/PI staining and microscopic examination of cellular morphology through DAPI-stained cells. Biochemical evidence of apoptosis came from elevating the intracellular ROS level that was accompanied by mitochondrial membrane potential loss, decreasing the expression profile of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, whereas it augments cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP-1, activates caspase-8 and 9 with concomitant increase in expression of proapoptotic protein Bax in a dose dependent manner. These results indicate that alborixin obtained from Streptomyces scabrisporus IIIM55 induces apoptotic cell death in colon cancer cells HCT-116 and can be further evaluated for its potential as an anticancer agent. PMID:27378626

  7. Antiviral T cell competence and restriction specificity of mixed allogeneic (P1 + P2----P1) irradiation chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Rueedi, E.S.; Sykes, M.; Ildstad, S.T.; Chester, C.H.; Althage, A.; Hengartner, H.; Sachs, D.H.; Zinkernagel, R.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Mixed irradiation bone marrow chimeras were prepared by reconstituting lethally irradiated C57BL/10 (B10) or B10.D2 mice with T cell-depleted bone marrow cells of B10 plus B10.D2 origin. These chimeras were healthy and survived well under conventional housing conditions and after experimental laboratory infections. Of a total of 17 chimeras tested, 2 died spontaneously or from the injected virus. Twelve of fifteen chimeras mounted a measurable cytotoxic T cell response to virus. Despite approximately equal percentages of B10 and B10.D2 lymphocytes in chimeras, cytotoxic T cell responses to vaccinia virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus were mediated variably by either syngeneic or allogeneic donor lymphocytes; thus the H-2 type of effector T cells frequently did not correspond to the 50:50 distribution of spleen or peripheral blood lymphocytes. Cytotoxic responses were restricted exclusively to recipient H-2 type. All mixed chimeras examined were able to mount a good IgG response to vesicular stomatitis virus. These results confirm previous data suggesting that such mixed chimeras are healthy and immunocompetent and demonstrate strict recipient-determined restriction specificity of effector T cells; they also suggest that if T help is necessary for induction of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, it does not require host-restricted interactions between helper T cells and precursor cytotoxic T cells.

  8. Hypercoagulability in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Sandesh; Lockridge, Joseph B; Langewisch, Eric D; Norman, Douglas J; Kujovich, Jody L

    2016-04-01

    Thrombosis remains an important complication after kidney transplantation. Outcomes for graft and deep vein thrombosis are not favorable. The majority of early kidney transplant failure in adults is due to allograft thrombosis. Risk stratification, early diagnosis, and appropriate intervention are critical to the management of thrombotic complications of transplant. In patients with end-stage renal disease, the prevalence of acquired risk factors for thrombosis is significantly high. Because of hereditary and acquired risk factors, renal transplant recipients manifest features of a chronic prothrombotic state. Identification of hereditary thrombotic risk factors before transplantation may be a useful tool for selecting appropriate candidates for thrombosis prophylaxis immediately after transplantation. Short-term anticoagulation may be appropriate for all patients after kidney transplantation.

  9. Malignancy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Penn, I

    1996-01-01

    Immunosuppressed organ allograft recipients have a 3-4 fold increased risk of developing cancer, but the chance of developing certain malignancies is increased several hundredfold. With the exception of skin cancers, most of the common neoplasms seen in the general population are not increased in incidence in organ allograft recipients. Instead, there is a higher frequency of relatively rare tumors including lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, other sarcomas, vulvar and perineal carcinomas, renal and hepatobiliary carcinomas. Tumors appear after a relatively short time post-transplantation. The earliest is Kaposi's sarcoma, which appears after an average of 22 months post-transplantation, and the latest are vulvar and perineal carcinomas, which present after an average of 113 months post-transplantation. Unusual features of lymphomas are: (a) high incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas; (b) high frequency of Epstein-Barr virus-related lesions; (c) frequent involvement of extra-nodal sites; (d) marked predilection for the brain; and (e) frequent allograft involvement. Skin cancers also present unusual features: (a) remarkably high frequency of Kaposi's sarcoma; (b) reversal of the ratio of basal to squamous cell carcinomas seen in the general population; (c) young age of the patients; and (d) high incidence of multiple tumors, which occur in 43% of patients. Vulvar and perineal cancers occur at a much younger age than in the general population. Probably, multiple factors play a role in the etiology of the cancers. Immunodeficiency per se and infection with oncogenic viruses may be major influences. Other factors possibly playing a role include direct damage to DNA by various immunosuppressive agents; possibly synergistic effects of these treatments with carcinogens; and genetic factors influencing susceptibility or resistance to development of malignancy. PMID:18417907

  10. 7 CFR 248.6 - Recipient eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recipient eligibility. 248.6 Section 248.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS WIC FARMERS' MARKET NUTRITION PROGRAM (FMNP) Recipient Eligibility §...

  11. 7 CFR 248.6 - Recipient eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recipient eligibility. 248.6 Section 248.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS WIC FARMERS' MARKET NUTRITION PROGRAM (FMNP) Recipient Eligibility §...

  12. 40 CFR 35.583 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Eligible recipients. 35.583 Section 35.583 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Water Pollution Control (sections 106 and 518) § 35.583 Eligible recipients. A...

  13. 40 CFR 725.420 - Recipient microorganisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recipient microorganisms. 725.420 Section 725.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS General Exemptions for New Microorganisms § 725.420 Recipient...

  14. 40 CFR 35.583 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eligible recipients. 35.583 Section 35.583 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Water Pollution Control (sections 106 and 518) § 35.583 Eligible recipients. A...

  15. 40 CFR 7.85 - Recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... summarizing the complaint or setting forth the basis for the belief that discrimination may exist. (c) Self-evaluation. Each recipient must conduct a self-evaluation of its administrative policies and practices, to.... When conducting the self-evaluation, the recipient shall consult with interested and involved...

  16. 7 CFR 248.6 - Recipient eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recipient eligibility. 248.6 Section 248.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS WIC FARMERS' MARKET NUTRITION PROGRAM (FMNP) Recipient Eligibility §...

  17. 7 CFR 248.6 - Recipient eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Recipient eligibility. 248.6 Section 248.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS WIC FARMERS' MARKET NUTRITION PROGRAM (FMNP) Recipient Eligibility §...

  18. 7 CFR 248.6 - Recipient eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Recipient eligibility. 248.6 Section 248.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS WIC FARMERS' MARKET NUTRITION PROGRAM (FMNP) Recipient Eligibility §...

  19. 47 CFR 54.630 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Eligible recipients. 54.630 Section 54.630 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.630 Eligible recipients. (a) Rural health care...

  20. 40 CFR 35.583 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eligible recipients. 35.583 Section 35.583 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Water Pollution Control (sections 106 and 518) § 35.583 Eligible recipients. A...

  1. 40 CFR 35.134 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligible recipients. 35.134 Section 35.134 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... recipients. (a) Eligible agencies. All State agencies (including environmental, health, agriculture,...

  2. 40 CFR 35.134 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eligible recipients. 35.134 Section 35.134 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... recipients. (a) Eligible agencies. All State agencies (including environmental, health, agriculture,...

  3. 40 CFR 35.134 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eligible recipients. 35.134 Section 35.134 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... recipients. (a) Eligible agencies. All State agencies (including environmental, health, agriculture,...

  4. 40 CFR 35.583 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eligible recipients. 35.583 Section 35.583 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Water Pollution Control (sections 106 and 518) § 35.583 Eligible recipients. A...

  5. Concurrent Detection of Circulating Minor Histocompatibility Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cells in SCT Recipients by Combinatorial Encoding MHC Multimers

    PubMed Central

    Broen, Kelly; Greupink-Draaisma, Annelies; Woestenenk, Rob; Schaap, Nicolaas

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is a potentially curative treatment for patients with hematologic malignancies. Its therapeutic effect is largely dependent on recognition of minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) by donor-derived CD8+ T cells. Therefore, monitoring of multiple MiHA-specific CD8+ T cell responses may prove to be valuable for evaluating the efficacy of allogeneic SCT. In this study, we investigated the use of the combinatorial encoding MHC multimer technique to simultaneously detect MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood of SCT recipients. Feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by applying dual-color encoding MHC multimers for a set of 10 known MiHA. Interestingly, single staining using a fluorochrome- and Qdot-based five-color combination showed comparable results to dual-color staining for most MiHA-specific CD8+ T cell responses. In addition, we determined the potential value of combinatorial encoding MHC multimers in MiHA identification. Therefore, a set of 75 candidate MiHA peptides was predicted from polymorphic genes with a hematopoietic expression profile and further selected for high and intermediate binding affinity for HLA-A2. Screening of a large cohort of SCT recipients resulted in the detection of dual-color encoded CD8+ T cells following MHC multimer-based T cell enrichment and short ex vivo expansion. Interestingly, candidate MiHA-specific CD8+ T cell responses for LAG3 and TLR10 derived polymorphic peptides could be confirmed by genotyping of the respective SNPs. These findings demonstrate the potency of the combinatorial MHC multimer approach in the monitoring of CD8+ T cell responses to known and potential MiHA in limited amounts of peripheral blood from allogeneic SCT recipients. PMID:21731686

  6. Cdh1/Hct1-APC is essential for the survival of postmitotic neurons.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Angeles; Bolaños, Juan P; Moreno, Sergio

    2005-09-01

    Cell division at the end of mitosis and G1 is controlled by Cdh1/Hct1, an activator of the E3-ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex (APC) that promotes the ubiquitylation and degradation of mitotic cyclins and other substrates. Cdh1-APC is active in postmitotic neurons, where it regulates axonal growth and patterning in the developing brain. However, it remains unknown whether Cdh1-APC is involved in preventing cell-cycle progression in terminally differentiated neurons. To address this issue, we used the small hairpin RNA strategy to deplete Cdh1 in postmitotic neurons. We observed that Cdh1 silencing rapidly triggered apoptotic neuronal death. To investigate the underlying mechanism, we focused on cyclin B1, a major Cdh1-APC substrate. Our results demonstrate that Cdh1 is required to prevent the accumulation of cyclin B1 in terminally differentiated neurons. Moreover, by keeping cyclin B1 low, Cdh1 prevented these neurons from entering an aberrant S phase that led to apoptotic cell death. These results provide an explanation for the mechanism of cyclin B1 reactivation that occurs in the brain of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide derived from marine peroxy sesquiterpenoids induces apoptosis in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Haruna; Taira, Junsei; Ueda, Katsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the isolates of the peroxy sesquiterpenoids (1-3) from the Okinawan soft coral, Sinularia sp., indicated cytotoxicity in HCT116 colon cancer cells. The apoptotic cells with a nuclear condensation were detected in the presence of these compounds, then the caspase 3/7 activity was induced, indicating that the compounds have a potential antitumor activity by apoptosis-induction. The cells treated with these compounds were generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), indicating that the ROS is related to the induction of apoptosis. The ROS production reduced in the presence of catalase or trolox, indicating that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is generated through a certain free radical reaction derived from the compound. In fact, the accumulation of intracellular H2O2 was also confirmed in the presence of these compounds. Based on all the results, this study proposed the apoptosis-inducing mechanism due to the compounds that the H2O2 produced involving free radical reactions derived from cleavage of the end or hydro-peroxide in the molecule induced cell death.

  8. Columbianadin Inhibits Cell Proliferation by Inducing Apoptosis and Necroptosis in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji In; Hong, Ji-Young; Choi, Jae Sue; Lee, Sang Kook

    2016-01-01

    Columbianadin (CBN), a natural coumarin from Angelica decursiva (Umbelliferae), is known to have various biological activities including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In this study, the anti-proliferative mechanism of actions mediated by CBN was investigated in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells. CBN effectively suppressed the growth of colon cancer cells. Low concentration (up to 25 μM) of CBN induced apoptosis, and high concentration (50 μM) of CBN induced necroptosis. The induction of apoptosis by CBN was correlated with the modulation of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, Bim and Bid, and the induction of necroptosis was related with RIP-3, and caspase-8. In addition, CBN induced the accumulation of ROS and imbalance in the intracellular antioxidant enzymes such as SOD-1, SOD-2, catalase and GPx-1. These findings demonstrate that CBN has the potential to be a candidate in the development of anti-cancer agent derived from natural products. PMID:27098859

  9. Hydrogen peroxide derived from marine peroxy sesquiterpenoids induces apoptosis in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Haruna; Taira, Junsei; Ueda, Katsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the isolates of the peroxy sesquiterpenoids (1-3) from the Okinawan soft coral, Sinularia sp., indicated cytotoxicity in HCT116 colon cancer cells. The apoptotic cells with a nuclear condensation were detected in the presence of these compounds, then the caspase 3/7 activity was induced, indicating that the compounds have a potential antitumor activity by apoptosis-induction. The cells treated with these compounds were generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), indicating that the ROS is related to the induction of apoptosis. The ROS production reduced in the presence of catalase or trolox, indicating that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is generated through a certain free radical reaction derived from the compound. In fact, the accumulation of intracellular H2O2 was also confirmed in the presence of these compounds. Based on all the results, this study proposed the apoptosis-inducing mechanism due to the compounds that the H2O2 produced involving free radical reactions derived from cleavage of the end or hydro-peroxide in the molecule induced cell death. PMID:27575468

  10. In situ Proteomic Profiling of Curcumin Targets in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Wong, Yin Kwan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    To date, the exact targets and mechanism of action of curcumin, a natural product with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, remain elusive. Here we synthesized a cell permeable curcumin probe (Cur-P) with an alkyne moiety, which can be tagged with biotin for affinity enrichment, or with a fluorescent dye for visualization of the direct-binding protein targets of curcumin in situ. iTRAQTM quantitative proteomics approach was applied to distinguish the specific binding targets from the non-specific ones. In total, 197 proteins were confidently identified as curcumin binding targets from HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Gene Ontology analysis showed that the targets are broadly distributed and enriched in the nucleus, mitochondria and plasma membrane, and they are involved in various biological functions including metabolic process, regulation, response to stimulus and cellular process. Ingenuity Pathway AnalysisTM (IPA) suggested that curcumin may exert its anticancer effects over multiple critical biological pathways including the EIF2, eIF4/p70S6K, mTOR signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction pathways. Functional validations confirmed that curcumin downregulates cellular protein synthesis, and induces autophagy, lysosomal activation and increased ROS production, thus leading to cell death. PMID:26915414

  11. Efficient natural defense mechanisms against Listeria monocytogenes in T and B cell-deficient allogeneic bone marrow radiation chimeras. Preactivated macrophages are the main effector cells in an early phase after bone marrow transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Roesler, J.; Groettrup, E.B.; Baccarini, M.; Lohmann-Mattes, M.L. )

    1989-09-01

    Radiation chimeras in the early phase after bone marrow transplantation are a good model to study the efficiency of the body's nonspecific defense system represented by macrophages (M phi), polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), and NK cells. These cell types are present in large numbers in spleen and liver at that time, whereas the specific immune system represented by T and B cells is functionally deficient. We previously reported enhanced activities in vitro of M phi (and PMN) from recipient animals in an early phase after allogeneic bone marrow transfer. We here demonstrate that these activities result in enhanced spontaneous resistance against Listeria monocytogenes in vivo: CFU of L. monocytogenes in spleen and liver 48 h after infection were about 1 or 2 to 4 log steps less than in untreated control mice of donor or host haplotype. This enhanced resistance decreased over the 4-mo period after marrow transfer. Preactivated M phi were identified as the most important effector cells. Isolated from spleen and peritoneal cavity, they performed enhanced killing of phagocytosed Listeria. Such preactivated M phi occurred in recipient animals after transfer of allogeneic but not of syngeneic bone marrow. The precise mechanism of M phi activation in the allogeneic radiation chimera in the complete absence of any detectable T cell function is not clear at present. However, these preactivated M phi display an important protective effect against L. monocytogenes: chimeras could eliminate Listeria without acquisition of positive delayed-type sensitivity when infected with 10(3) bacteria. An inoculum of 5 . 10(3) L. monocytogenes resulted either in prolonged survival compared with normal mice of the recipient haplotype or in definitive survival accompanied by a positive delayed-type sensitivity.

  12. The influence of interleukin 7 receptor α chain haplotypes on outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Broux, Bieke; Shamim, Zaiba; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Michael; Stinissen, Piet; Ryder, Lars Peter; Müller, Klaus; Hellings, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Summary We investigated the influence of IL-7 receptor α chain (IL-7Rα) gene haplotypes in donors on the outcome of haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Unlike the association between single donor SNPs and HCT outcome found previously, only trends towards association were found here, due to “dilution” of SNPs into haplotypes. PMID:25352021

  13. RasGAP-derived peptide GAP159 enhances cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HCT116 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Shenghua; He, Hongwei; Zhang, Caixia; Chen, Yi; Yu, Dongke; Chen, Jianhua; Shao, Rongguang

    2014-01-01

    To increase the efficacy of currently used anti-cancer genotoxins, one of the current efforts is to find agents that can sensitize cancer cells to genotoxins so that the efficacious doses of genotoxins can be lowered to reduce deleterious side-effects. In this study, we reported that a synthetic RasGAP-derived peptide GAP159 could enhance the effect of chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin (CDDP) in human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. Our results showed that GAP159 significantly increased the CDDP-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HCT116 cells. This synergistic effect was associated with the inhibitions of phospho-AKT, phospho-ERK and NF-κB. In mouse colon tumor CT26 animal models, GAP159 combined with CDDP significantly suppressed CT26 tumor growth, and GAP159 alone showed slight inhibitory effect. Our data suggests that co-treatment of GAP159 and chemotherapeutics will become a potential therapeutic strategy for colon cancers. PMID:26579374

  14. Isoreserpine promotes {beta}-catenin degradation via Siah-1 up-regulation in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Jungsug; Song, Taeyun; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Jeong, Yongsu; Shin, Jae-Gook; Oh, Sangtaek

    2009-09-25

    Aberrant accumulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells is a frequent early event during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that decrease the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, we performed cell-based chemical screening using genetically engineered HEK293 reporter cells to detect compounds that inhibit TOPFlash reporter activity, which was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium. We found that isoreserpine promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin by up-regulation of Siah-1 in HEK293 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Moreover, isoreserpine repressed the expression of {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, resulting in the suppression of HCT116 cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that isoreserpine can potentially be used as a chemotherapeutic agent against colon cancer.

  15. The incidence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell recipients post-first and post-second hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ibrahim; Teruya, Jun; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Krance, Robert

    2015-06-01

    The reported incidence of post-allogeneic HSCT AIHA was between 4.4% and 6% following a single transplant. Cord blood transplantation, T-cell depletion, and chronic GvHD are significantly associated with post-transplant AIHA. During an 11-yr period, data for 500 pediatric HSCT recipients were eligible for evaluation of the incidence of AIHA post-first and post-second transplants. Demographic, transplant, and post-transplant-related variables were analyzed. Twelve of 500 (2.4%) recipients at a median of 273 days and seven of 72 (9.7%) recipients at a median of 157 days developed AIHA post-first and post-second HSCT, respectively. Post-first HSCT, none of the MRD recipients developed AIHA (0/175 MRD vs. 12/325 other donors, p = 0.04). Four of 12 required a second HSCT to control the AIHA. After the second HSCT, MUD was significantly associated with the development of AIHA. No other variables were associated with the post-second transplant AIHA. The incidence of AIHA post-first and post-second HSCT was less than the reported. The increased incidence of AIHA among recipients of second HSCT is most likely due to the profound immune dysregulation. A much larger, prospective study would be needed to evaluate the incidence, complications, and management of post-transplant AIHA.

  16. Aspirin inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F.; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin-mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT-29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin-acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  17. 21 CFR 1271.22 - How and where do I register and submit an HCT/P list?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How and where do I register and submit an HCT/P list? 1271.22 Section 1271.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR...

  18. Pancytopenia after allogeneic bone marrow transplant due to copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hudspeth, Michelle; Turner, Amy; Miller, Nicole; Lazarchick, John

    2014-05-01

    Pancytopenia occurring 1 year or later after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation typically prompts a primary consideration for relapse. We present the case of a 15-year old-girl who underwent transplantation for therapy-related myelodysplasia secondary to Ewing sarcoma treatment who developed pancytopenia with myelodysplasia 1 year after transplant due to copper deficiency. Copper deficiency is an important consideration in the evaluation of pancytopenia and myelodysplasia in pediatric patients.

  19. Adipocytokines in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Kristof; Nagaraju, Shankar Prasad; Rhee, Connie M.; Mathe, Zoltan; Molnar, Miklos Z.

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, perceptions about the role of body fat have changed. Adipocytes modulate endocrine and immune homeostasis by synthesizing hundreds of hormones, known as adipocytokines. Many studies have been investigating the influences and effects of these adipocytokines and suggest that they are modulated by the nutritional and immunologic milieu. Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) are a unique and relevant population in which the function of adipocytokines can be examined, given their altered nutritional and immune status and subsequent dysregulation of adipocytokine metabolism. In this review, we summarize the recent findings about four specific adipocytokines and their respective roles in KTRs. We decided to evaluate the most widely described adipocytokines, including leptin, adiponectin, visfatin and resistin. Increasing evidence suggests that these adipocytokines may lead to cardiovascular events and metabolic changes in the general population and may also increase mortality and graft loss rate in KTRs. In addition, we present findings on the interrelationship between serum adipocytokine levels and nutritional and immunologic status, and mechanisms by which adipocytokines modulate morbidity and outcomes in KTRs. PMID:27274819

  20. Infections in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Romero, Fabian A; Razonable, Raymund R

    2011-04-27

    Liver transplantation is a standard life-saving procedure for the treatment of many end-stage liver diseases. The success of this procedure may be limited by infectious complications. In this article, we review the contemporary state of infectious complications during the post-operative period, with particular emphasis on those that occur most commonly during the first 6 mo after liver transplantation. Bacteria, and less commonly Candida infections, remain the predominant pathogens during the immediate post-operative period, especially during the first month, and infections caused by drug-resistant strains are emerging. Infections caused by cytomegalovirus and Aspergillus sp. present clinically during the "opportunistic" period characterized by intense immunosuppression. As newer potent immunosuppressive therapies with the major aim of reducing allograft rejection are developed, one potential adverse effect is an increase in certain infections. Hence, it is essential for liver transplant centers to have an effective approach to prevention that is based on predicted infection risk, local antimicrobial resistance patterns, and surveillance. A better understanding of the common and most important infectious complications is anticipated to lead to improvements in quality of life and survival of liver transplant recipients.

  1. Cannabidiol for the Prevention of Graft-versus-Host-Disease after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Results of a Phase II Study.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Moshe; Shpilberg, Ofer; Herscovici, Corina; Shargian, Liat; Dreyer, Juliet; Peck, Anat; Israeli, Moshe; Levy-Assaraf, Maly; Gruenewald, Tsipora; Mechoulam, Raphael; Raanani, Pia; Ram, Ron

    2015-10-01

    Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is a major obstacle to successful allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic ingredient of Cannabis sativa, possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. We hypothesized that CBD may decrease GVHD incidence and severity after alloHCT. We conducted a phase II study. GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine and a short course of methotrexate. Patients transplanted from an unrelated donor were given low-dose anti-T cell globulin. CBD 300 mg/day was given orally starting 7 days before transplantation until day 30. Forty-eight consecutive adult patients undergoing alloHCT were enrolled. Thirty-eight patients (79%) had acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome and 35 patients (73%) were given myeloablative conditioning. The donor was either an HLA-identical sibling (n = 28), a 10/10 matched unrelated donor (n = 16), or a 1-antigen-mismatched unrelated donor (n = 4). The median follow-up was 16 months (range, 7 to 23). No grades 3 to 4 toxicities were attributed to CBD. None of the patients developed acute GVHD while consuming CBD. In an intention-to-treat analysis, we found that the cumulative incidence rates of grades II to IV and grades III to IV acute GVHD by day 100 were 12.1% and 5%, respectively. Compared with 101 historical control subjects given standard GVHD prophylaxis, the hazard ratio of developing grades II to IV acute GVHD among subjects treated with CBD plus standard GVHD prophylaxis was .3 (P = .0002). Rates of nonrelapse mortality at 100 days and at 1 year after transplantation were 8.6% and 13.4%, respectively. Among patients surviving more than 100 days, the cumulative incidences of moderate-to-severe chronic GVHD at 12 and 18 months were 20% and 33%, respectively. The combination of CBD with standard GVHD prophylaxis is a safe and promising strategy to reduce the incidence of acute GVHD. A randomized double-blind controlled study is warranted

  2. Electron spin resonance analysis of heme-nitrosyl and reduced iron-sulfur centered complexes in allogeneic, heterotopic cardiac transplants: effects of treatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, A L; Roza, A M; Adams, M B; Seibel, R; Moore-Hilton, G; Kalyanaraman, B; Pieper, G M

    1998-07-15

    Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) prolongs allograft survival suggesting a role for nitric oxide (.NO) in allograft rejection. Induction of iNOS is regulated by the oxidant-sensitive, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) in many cell types. In the present study using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we evaluated whether pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), a metal chelator and antioxidant, might limit .NO production during the development of rejection in cardiac allografts. We performed either isogeneic (Lewis to Lewis) or allogeneic (Wistar-Furth to Lewis) heterotopic abdominal cardiac transplantation. Allograft recipients received daily injections of PDTC or aminoguanidine (a known inhibitor of iNOS). At postoperative days 4 or 6, grafted and native hearts of transplant recipients were flushed with cardioplegic solution to remove blood contamination. ESR data of allografts revealed a triplet nitrogen signal (aN=17.5 G) and centered at g=2.012 and an additional broad signal at g=2.08. This signal was not seen in either isografts or native hearts of either isograft or allograft recipients. Based upon these parameters, these signals are attributed to nitrosomyoglobin. This signal was inhibited by treatment with aminoguanidine or PDTC. Under these conditions, PDTC also prolonged graft survival from 6.6+/-0.2 to 11.7+/-0.3 days. Thus, it is conceivable that nitrosylmyoglobin formation precedes rejection in cardiac allografts and inhibition of nitrosomyoglobin with agents such as PDTC contribute to improved graft survival. PMID:9667497

  3. Transcriptome analysis of Cronobacter sakazakii ATCC BAA-894 after interaction with human intestinal epithelial cell line HCT-8.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chun-e; Du, Xin-jun; Li, Ping; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens that are responsible for infections including severe meningitis, septicemia, and necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates and infants. To date, questions still remain regarding the mechanisms of pathogenicity and virulence determinants for each bacterial strain. In this study, we established an in vitro model for Cronobacter sakazakii ATCC BAA-894 infection of HCT-8 human colorectal epithelial cells. The transcriptome profile of C. sakazakii ATCC BAA-894 after interaction with HCT-8 cells was determined using high-throughput whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)). Gene expression profiles indicated that 139 genes were upregulated and 72 genes were downregulated in the adherent C. sakazakii ATCC BAA-894 strain on HCT-8 cells compared to the cultured bacteria in the cell-free medium. Expressions of some flagella genes and virulence factors involved in adherence were upregulated. High osmolarity and osmotic stress-associated genes were highly upregulated, as well as genes responsible for the synthesis of lipopolysaccharides and outer membrane proteins, iron acquisition systems, and glycerol and glycerophospholipid metabolism. In sum, our study provides further insight into the mechanisms underlying C. sakazakii pathogenesis in the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26481623

  4. Cell specific apoptosis by RLX is mediated by NFκB in human colon carcinoma HCT-116 cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to chemotherapy represents a major obstacle in correcting colorectal carcinomas (CRC). Inspite of recent advances in the treatment of metastatic disease, the prognosis of the patients remains poor. RLX, a vasicinone analogue has been reported to possess potent bronchodilator, anti-asthmatic and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its anti-cancer activity is unknown. Results Here, we report for the first time that RLX has anti-cancer property against panel of human cancer cell lines and most potent activity was found against HCT-116 cells with IC50 value of 12 μM and have further investigated the involvement of NFκB and caspase-3 in RLX action in CRC apoptosis. Following RLX and BEZ-235 treatment in HCT-116, we observed significant down-regulation of NFκB (1 to 0.1 fold) and up-regulation of caspase-3 (1 to 2 fold) protein expressions. Additionally, morphological studies revealed membrane blebbing, cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and finally apoptosis in HCT-116 cells. Conclusions Overall, these findings indicate that RLX is a potent small molecule which triggers apoptosis, and promising potential candidate to be a chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:25303828

  5. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses.

    PubMed

    Owens, Sean D; Kol, Amir; Walker, Naomi J; Borjesson, Dori L

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89%) were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection. PMID:27648075

  6. Allogeneic Antigen Composition for Preparing Universal Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Balashova, Elena E.

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that tumors induce specific changes to the surface of human endothelial cells thereby providing the basis for designing endothelial cell-based vaccines that directly target antigens expressed by the tumor endothelium. The present report extends these studies in vitro by investigating the efficacy of allogeneic antigens with regard to their ability to target immune responses against the tumor vasculature since alloantigens simplify vaccine development and implementation in clinical practice. We demonstrated that allogeneic SANTAVAC (Set of All Natural Target Antigens for Vaccination Against Cancer), which presents a specifically prepared composition of cell surface antigens from tumor-stimulated endothelial cells, allows targeting of the tumor vasculature with efficacy of 17, where efficacy represents the killing rate of target cells before normal cells are adversely affected, and efficacy of 60, where efficacy represents the fold decrease in the number of target cells and directly relates to tumor growth arrest. These data suggest that allogeneic SANTAVAC may be considered an antigenic composition that following administration in the presence of respective adjuvants may be clinically tested as a therapeutic or prophylactic universal cancer vaccine without adverse side effects to the normal vasculature. PMID:27781211

  7. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89%) were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection. PMID:27648075

  8. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89%) were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection.

  9. Acute phase serum proteins in syngeneic and allogeneic mouse pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Waites, G T; Bell, A M; Bell, S C

    1983-01-01

    The levels of two murine acute phase proteins, serum amyloid P component (SAP) and haptoglobin, have been measured in the serum of C57BL/10 female mice during syngeneic and allogeneic pregnancy. Both syngeneic and allogeneic pregnancy resulted in alterations in the levels of these proteins as compared to those observed in virgin females. Syngeneic mating resulted in an increase in concentration of both proteins during the final 3 days of pregnancy. During allogeneic pregnancy, SAP levels, after a transient increase on day 4, rose from days 6-8 and, after remaining relatively stable, increased from day 12 to reach maximum levels on day 18 of pregnancy. Levels fell dramatically during the immediate post-partum period. In contrast, although levels of haptoglobin also increased from days 6-8, for the remainder of pregnancy these increased levels remained stable. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the mechanisms of regulation of acute phase reactants and the immunological relationship between the mother and fetus. PMID:6409477

  10. SHIPi Enhances Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sandra; Brooks, Robert; Gumbleton, Matthew; Park, Mi-Young; Russo, Christopher M.; Howard, Kyle T.; Chisholm, John D.; Kerr, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a highly effective procedure enabling long-term survival for patients with hematologic malignancy or heritable defects. Although there has been a dramatic increase in the success rate of HSCT over the last two decades, HSCT can result in serious, sometimes untreatable disease due to toxic conditioning regimens and Graft-versus-Host-Disease. Studies utilizing germline knockout mice have discovered several candidate genes that could be targeted pharmacologically to create a more favorable environment for transplant success. SHIP1 deficiency permits improved engraftment of hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells (HS-PCs) and produces an immunosuppressive microenvironment ideal for incoming allogeneic grafts. The recent development of small molecule SHIP1 inhibitors has opened a different therapeutic approach by creating transient SHIP1-deficiency. Here we show that SHIP1 inhibition (SHIPi) mobilizes functional HS-PC, accelerates hematologic recovery, and enhances donor HS-PC engraftment in both allogeneic and autologous transplant settings. We also observed the expansion of key cell populations known to suppress host-reactive cells formed during engraftment. Therefore, SHIPi represents a non-toxic, new therapeutic that has significant potential to improve the success and safety of therapies that utilize autologous and allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26052545

  11. Human Biomarker Discovery and Predictive Models for Disease Progression for Idiopathic Pneumonia Syndrome Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation*

    PubMed Central

    Schlatzer, Daniela M.; Dazard, Jean-Eudes; Ewing, Rob M.; Ilchenko, Serguei; Tomcheko, Sara E.; Eid, Saada; Ho, Vincent; Yanik, Greg; Chance, Mark R.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the only curative therapy for many malignant and nonmalignant conditions. Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS) is a frequently fatal complication that limits successful outcomes. Preclinical models suggest that IPS represents an immune mediated attack on the lung involving elements of both the adaptive and the innate immune system. However, the etiology of IPS in humans is less well understood. To explore the disease pathway and uncover potential biomarkers of disease, we performed two separate label-free, proteomics experiments defining the plasma protein profiles of allogeneic SCT patients with IPS. Samples obtained from SCT recipients without complications served as controls. The initial discovery study, intended to explore the disease pathway in humans, identified a set of 81 IPS-associated proteins. These data revealed similarities between the known IPS pathways in mice and the condition in humans, in particular in the acute phase response. In addition, pattern recognition pathways were judged to be significant as a function of development of IPS, and from this pathway we chose the lipopolysaccaharide-binding protein (LBP) protein as a candidate molecular diagnostic for IPS, and verified its increase as a function of disease using an ELISA assay. In a separately designed study, we identified protein-based classifiers that could predict, at day 0 of SCT, patients who: 1) progress to IPS and 2) respond to cytokine neutralization therapy. Using cross-validation strategies, we built highly predictive classifier models of both disease progression and therapeutic response. In sum, data generated in this report confirm previous clinical and experimental findings, provide new insights into the pathophysiology of IPS, identify potential molecular classifiers of the condition, and uncover a set of markers potentially of interest for patient stratification as a basis for individualized therapy. PMID:22337588

  12. Effects of select medium supplements on in vitro development of Cryptosporidium parvum in HCT-8 cells.

    PubMed

    Upton, S J; Tilley, M; Brillhart, D B

    1995-02-01

    Surface-sterilized oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum were applied to subconfluent monolayers of human adenocarcinoma (HCT-8) cells grown on coverslips in six-well cluster plates. Parasite-infected cultures were then incubated in RPMI 1640 with 10% fetal bovine serum, 15 mM HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid) buffer, and antibiotics at 37 degrees C in a 5% CO2-95% air incubator for 2 h to allow sporozoites to excyst and enter cells. After cultures were washed free of debris, fresh cell culture media containing select supplements were added and cultures were reincubated. Parasite growth was assessed 66 h later by counting the number of parasite developmental stages in 25 random x 100 oil fields by Nomarski interference-contrast microscopy. Four vitamin supplements, calcium pantothenate, L-ascorbic acid, folic acid, and 4-(para)-aminobenzoic acid, each resulted in a significant increase in parasite numbers in vitro. The addition of insulin and the sugars glucose, galactose, and maltose also had a positive effect on parasite growth, although the effect was less pronounced than with any of the vitamins. Using the above information, we developed a supplemental medium formulation consisting of RPMI 1640 with 10% fetal bovine serum, 15 mM HEPES, 50 mM glucose, and 35 micrograms of ascorbic acid, 1.0 micrograms of folic acid, 4.0 micrograms of 4-aminobenzoic acid, 2.0 micrograms of calcium pantothenate, 0.1 U of insulin, 100 U of penicillin G, 100 micrograms of streptomycin, and 0.25 microgram of amphotericin B (Fungizone) per ml (pH 7.4). The growth of c. parvum in this medium was found to be enhanced approximately 10-fold compared with that in control medium without additional glucose, insulin, or vitamins. PMID:7714194

  13. Types of Cancer Associated with Transplant Recipients

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal population. Cancer due to suppression of the immune system Transplant recipients have an increased risk of developing ... growth of white blood cells in the body's immune system. There are several treatment options that will require ...

  14. When donor families and organ recipients meet.

    PubMed

    Clayville, L

    1999-06-01

    Medical decisions about organ donation and transplantation are considered by a growing number of individuals. The complex issue of whether and to what extent organ recipients and donor families should interact or communicate has gained increasing public awareness, thereby creating an area of major ethical and legal concern for the transplant community. Communication issues have traditionally been decided by transplant coordinators and guided by personal beliefs, agency guidelines, and organizational policies. Organizations are often inconsistent in their practices, and this in turn causes frustration and confusion for both donor families and transplant recipients. This study explored how the experience of meeting the recipient(s) of a loved one's organ affected the grieving process of donor families and altered their lives. The information from this study might be useful to transplant professionals to develop guidelines and policies that lessen the confusion and frustration felt by those involved with the transplant process.

  15. 21 CFR 1271.10 - Are my HCT/P's regulated solely under section 361 of the PHS Act and the regulations in this part...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... not have a systemic effect and is not dependent upon the metabolic activity of living cells for its primary function; or (ii) The HCT/P has a systemic effect or is dependent upon the metabolic activity...

  16. 21 CFR 1271.10 - Are my HCT/P's regulated solely under section 361 of the PHS Act and the regulations in this part...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... not have a systemic effect and is not dependent upon the metabolic activity of living cells for its primary function; or (ii) The HCT/P has a systemic effect or is dependent upon the metabolic activity...

  17. Cytomegalovirus infection in transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo*, Luiz Sergio; Pierrotti, Lígia Camera; Abdala, Edson; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo; Strabelli, Tânia Mara Varejão; Campos, Silvia Vidal; Ramos, Jéssica Fernandes; Latif, Acram Zahredine Abdul; Litvinov, Nadia; Maluf, Natalya Zaidan; Filho, Helio Hehl Caiaffa; Pannuti, Claudio Sergio; Lopes, Marta Heloisa; dos Santos, Vera Aparecida; da Cruz Gouveia Linardi, Camila; Yasuda, Maria Aparecida Shikanai; de Sousa Marques, Heloisa Helena

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infection is a frequent complication after transplantation. This infection occurs due to transmission from the transplanted organ, due to reactivation of latent infection, or after a primary infection in seronegative patients and can be defined as follows: latent infection, active infection, viral syndrome or invasive disease. This condition occurs mainly between 30 and 90 days after transplantation. In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in particular, infection usually occurs within the first 30 days after transplantation and in the presence of graft-versus-host disease. The major risk factors are when the recipient is cytomegalovirus seronegative and the donor is seropositive as well as when lymphocyte-depleting antibodies are used. There are two methods for the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection: the pp65 antigenemia assay and polymerase chain reaction. Serology has no value for the diagnosis of active disease, whereas histology of the affected tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage analysis are useful in the diagnosis of invasive disease. Cytomegalovirus disease can be prevented by prophylaxis (the administration of antiviral drugs to all or to a subgroup of patients who are at higher risk of viral replication) or by preemptive therapy (the early diagnosis of viral replication before development of the disease and prescription of antiviral treatment to prevent the appearance of clinical disease). The drug used is intravenous or oral ganciclovir; oral valganciclovir; or, less frequently, valacyclovir. Prophylaxis should continue for 90 to 180 days. Treatment is always indicated in cytomegalovirus disease, and the gold-standard drug is intravenous ganciclovir. Treatment should be given for 2 to 3 weeks and should be continued for an additional 7 days after the first negative result for viremia. PMID:26222822

  18. Utilization of collaborative practice agreements between physicians and pharmacists as a mechanism to increase capacity to care for hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Merten, Julianna A; Shapiro, Jamie F; Gulbis, Alison M; Rao, Kamakshi V; Bubalo, Joseph; Lanum, Scott; Engemann, Ashley Morris; Shayani, Sepideh; Williams, Casey; Leather, Helen; Walsh-Chocolaad, Tracey

    2013-04-01

    Survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has improved and the number of allogeneic HSCTs performed annually in the United States is expected to reach 10,000 by 2015. The National Marrow Donor Program created the System Capacity Initiative to formulate mechanisms to care for the growing number of HSCT recipients. One proposed method to increase capacity is utilization of pharmacists to manage drug therapy via collaborative practice agreements (CPAs). Pharmacists have managed drug therapy in oncology patients with CPAs for decades; however, there are limited HSCT centers that employ this practice. Engaging in collaborative practice and billing agreements with credentialed pharmacists to manage therapeutic drug monitoring, chronic medical conditions, and supportive care in HSCT recipients may be cost-effective and enable physicians to spend more time on new or more complex patients. The goal of this paper is to provide a framework for implementation of a CPA and address how it may improve HSCT program capacity. PMID:23419976

  19. Production of good manufacturing practice-grade cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and adenovirus to prevent or treat viral infections post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Sili, Uluhan; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F; Gee, Adrian P; Huls, Helen; Heslop, Helen E; Bollard, Catherine M; Rooney, Cliona M

    2012-01-01

    Infections with a range of common community viruses remain a major cause of mortality and morbidity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. T cells specific for cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and adenoviruses can safely prevent and infections with these three most common culprits, but the manufacture of individual T cell lines for each virus would be prohibitive in terms of time and cost. We have demonstrated that T cells specific for all three viruses can be manufactured in a single culture using monocytes and EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), both transduced with an adenovirus vector expressing pp65 of CMV, as antigen-presenting cells. Trivirus-specific T cell lines produced from healthy stem cell donors could prevent and treat infections with all three viruses, not only in the designated recipient, but in unrelated, partially-HLA-matched third party recipients. We now provide the details and logistics of T cell manufacture.

  20. Transplantation resistance of drug-treated hybrid or allogeneic mice against murine lymphomas. I. Immunopharmacology studies.

    PubMed

    Bonmassar, A; Riccardi, C; Rivosecchi-Merletti, P; Goldin, A; Bonmassar, E

    1980-12-15

    Sequential treatment of mice with non-lethal doses of 5(3,3'-dimethyl-l-triazeno)-imidazole-4-carboxamide (DTIC) and cyclophosphamide (Cy) was found to produce long-term inhibition of endogenous cell proliferation in the spleen and profound impairment of classical allograft responses, similar to that detectable in lethally irradiated mice. Studies were carried out with drug-treated (i.e. treated with DTIC + Cy) conventional or nude mice inoculated with lymphoma cells homozygous for the H-2b or H-2d haplotype. Transplantation resistance in various tumour-host combinations was studied in terms of survival times after tumor challenge or lymphoma cell proliferation in spleen and liver, measured by the uptake of DNA precursor 125I-labelled 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine ([125I]dUrd). The results of in vivo transplantation immunity tests or in vitro tests of generation of cytotoxic lymphocytes confirmed that classical T-dependent allograft responses were abrogated by drug treatment of H-2-incompatible hosts. However, localized resistance against lymphoma graft, mainly at spleen level, was found in drug-treated hybrid mice, or conventional and "nude" allogeneic recipients, as judged by [123I]dUrd uptake inhibition. Resistance presumably regulated, at least in part by the Hh (hemopoietic histocompatibility) system, was abrogated by pretreatment with carrageenan, an antimacrophage agent. In addition, treatment with DTIC + Cy did not abrogate NK activity of mice when the in vitro cytotoxicity test was conducted 5 h after Cy administration, i.e. at the time used for tumor challenge in vivo. It was concluded that selected immunological functions (i.e., antilymphoma natural resistance insensitive to DTIC + Cy, called drug-resistant inhibition of tumors, DRIT) possibly of non-T origin, similar to those detectable in lethally-irradiated mice, can be retained by hosts subjected to high doses of certain anti-tumor agents.

  1. Fetal Liver-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Engraftment After Allogeneic In Utero Transplantation into Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Rafael; Martínez-González, Itziar; Rosal, Marta; Nadal, Marga; Petriz, Jordi; Gratacós, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal transplantation of genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) might benefit prevention or treatment of early-onset genetic disorders due to the cells' intrinsic regenerative potential plus the acquired advantage from therapeutic transgene expression. However, a thorough assessment of the safety, accessibility, and behavior of these MSCs in the fetal environment using appropriate animal models is required before we can advance toward a clinical application. We have recently shown that fetal rabbit liver MSCs (fl-MSCs) have superior growth rate, clonogenic capability, and in vitro adherence and differentiation abilities compared with adult rabbit bone marrow MSCs. In this follow-up study, we report safe and widespread distribution of recombinant pSF-EGFP retrovirus-transduced fl-MSCs (EGFP+-fl-MSCs) in neonatal rabbit tissues at 10 days after fetal allogeneic transplantation through both intrahepatic and intra-amniotic administration. Conversely, a more restricted biodistribution pattern according to the route of administration was apparent in the young rabbits intervened at 16 weeks after fetal EGFP+-fl-MSC transplantation. Furthermore, the presence of these cells in the recipients' tissues, tracked with the reporter provirus, was inversely related to the developmental stage of the fetuses at the time of intervention. Long-term engraftment was confirmed both by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on touch tissue imprints using a chromosome Y-specific BAC probe, and by immunohistochemical localization of EGFP expression. Finally, there was no evidence of immune responses against the transplanted EGFP+-fl-MSCs or the EGFP transgenic product in the treated young rabbits. Thus, cell transplantation approaches using genetically engineered fetal MSCs may prove particularly valuable to frontier medical treatments for congenital birth defects in perinatology. PMID:21495909

  2. Mannose-binding lectin levels and major infections in a cohort of very long-term survivors after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Osthoff, Michael; Rovó, Alicia; Stern, Martin; Danner, Doris; Gratwohl, Alois; Tichelli, André; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2010-01-01

    Background Life-threatening infections are a major cause of death after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Complement Mannose-binding lectin is a key component of innate immunity. Functional deficiency of mannose-binding lectin due to genetic polymorphism is frequent. Previous reports showed conflicting results with respect to the influence of functional mannose-binding lectin deficiency on infectious risk after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The aim of this study was to clarify the impact of low mannose-binding lectin levels on infectious risk in a unique cohort of very long-term survivors after stem cell transplantation. Design and Methods Incidence of major infections was evaluable in 43 out of 44 very long-term survivors (over ten years) and studied retrospectively in relation to mannose-binding lectin serum concentrations. Results Recipients with mannose-binding lectin levels below 1,000 ng/mL were at increased risk to suffer from one or more major infections (P=0.002) during entire follow up. Infectious susceptibility was increased after neutrophil recovery, particularly until 24 months (Hazard Ratio 3.4) with sustained effects afterwards (Hazard Ratio 2.9). Mannose-binding lectin serum concentrations below 1,000 ng/mL were independently associated with major infections after neutrophil recovery (P=0.009). In subgroup analyses occurrence of severe herpes virus infections in particular was associated with significantly lower mannose-binding lectin levels (P=0.02). Conclusions Our findings indicate that low mannose-binding lectin levels may predict markedly increased susceptibility to severe infections with sustained effects even late after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Determinations of mannose-binding lectin status should therefore be included into pre-transplantation risk assessment. PMID:20418242

  3. Favorable impact of natural killer cell reconstitution on chronic graft-versus-host disease and cytomegalovirus reactivation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kheav, Vissal David; Busson, Marc; Scieux, Catherine; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Maki, Guitta; Haas, Philippe; Mazeron, Marie-Christine; Carmagnat, Maryvonnick; Masson, Emeline; Xhaard, Aliénor; Robin, Marie; Ribaud, Patricia; Dulphy, Nicolas; Loiseau, Pascale; Charron, Dominique; Socié, Gérard; Toubert, Antoine; Moins-Teisserenc, Hélène

    2014-12-01

    Natural killer cells are the first lymphocyte subset to reconstitute, and play a major role in early immunity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Cells expressing the activating receptor NKG2C seem crucial in the resolution of cytomegalovirus episodes, even in the absence of T cells. We prospectively investigated natural killer-cell reconstitution in a cohort of 439 adult recipients who underwent non-T-cell-depleted allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 2005 and 2012. Freshly collected blood samples were analyzed 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after transplantation. Data were studied with respect to conditioning regimen, source of stem cells, underlying disease, occurrence of graft-versus-host disease, and profiles of cytomegalovirus reactivation. In multivariate analysis we found that the absolute numbers of CD56(bright) natural killer cells at month 3 were significantly higher after myeloablative conditioning than after reduced intensity conditioning. Acute graft-versus-host disease impaired reconstitution of total and CD56(dim) natural killer cells at month 3. In contrast, high natural killer cell count at month 3 was associated with a lower incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease, independently of a previous episode of acute graft-versus-host disease and stem cell source. NKG2C(+)CD56(dim) and total natural killer cell counts at month 3 were lower in patients with reactivation of cytomegalovirus between month 0 and month 3, but expanded greatly afterwards. These cells were also less numerous in patients who experienced later cytomegalovirus reactivation between month 3 and month 6. Our results advocate a direct role of NKG2C-expressing natural killer cells in the early control of cytomegalovirus reactivation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  4. [18F]FHBG PET/CT Imaging of CD34-TK75 Transduced Donor T Cells in Relapsed Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients: Safety and Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Eissenberg, Linda G; Rettig, Michael P; Ritchey, Julie K; Prior, Julie L; Schwarz, Sally W; Frye, Jennifer; White, Brian S; Fulton, Robert S; Ghobadi, Armin; Cooper, Matthew L; Couriel, Daniel R; Seegulam, Muhammad Esa; Piwnica-Worms, David; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Cornetta, Kenneth; DiPersio, John F

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is a first-in-man attempt to both genetically modify T cells with an imagable suicide gene and track these transduced donor T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients using noninvasive positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) imaging. A suicide gene encoding a human CD34-Herpes Simplex Virus-1-thymidine kinase (CD34-TK75) fusion enabled enrichment of retrovirally transduced T cells (TdT), control of graft-versus-host disease and imaging of TdT migration and expansion in vivo in mice and man. Analysis confirmed that CD34-TK75-enriched TdT contained no replication competent γ-retrovirus, were sensitive to ganciclovir, and displayed characteristic retroviral insertion sites (by targeted sequencing). Affinity-purified CD34-TK75+-selected donor T cells (1.0–13 × 105)/kg were infused into eight patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Six patients also were administered 9-[4-(18F)fluoro-3-hydroxymethyl-butyl]guanine ([18F]FHBG) to specifically track the genetically modified donor T cells by PET/CT at several time points after infusion. All patients were assessed for graft-versus-host disease, response to ganciclovir, circulating TdT cells (using both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and [18F]FHBG PET/CT imaging), TdT cell clonal expansion, and immune response to the TdT. This phase 1 trial demonstrated that genetically modified T cells and [18F]FHBG can be safely infused in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25807290

  5. Favorable impact of natural killer cell reconstitution on chronic graft-versus-host disease and cytomegalovirus reactivation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kheav, Vissal David; Busson, Marc; Scieux, Catherine; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Maki, Guitta; Haas, Philippe; Mazeron, Marie-Christine; Carmagnat, Maryvonnick; Masson, Emeline; Xhaard, Aliénor; Robin, Marie; Ribaud, Patricia; Dulphy, Nicolas; Loiseau, Pascale; Charron, Dominique; Socié, Gérard; Toubert, Antoine; Moins-Teisserenc, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer cells are the first lymphocyte subset to reconstitute, and play a major role in early immunity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Cells expressing the activating receptor NKG2C seem crucial in the resolution of cytomegalovirus episodes, even in the absence of T cells. We prospectively investigated natural killer-cell reconstitution in a cohort of 439 adult recipients who underwent non-T-cell-depleted allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 2005 and 2012. Freshly collected blood samples were analyzed 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after transplantation. Data were studied with respect to conditioning regimen, source of stem cells, underlying disease, occurrence of graft-versus-host disease, and profiles of cytomegalovirus reactivation. In multivariate analysis we found that the absolute numbers of CD56bright natural killer cells at month 3 were significantly higher after myeloablative conditioning than after reduced intensity conditioning. Acute graft-versus-host disease impaired reconstitution of total and CD56dim natural killer cells at month 3. In contrast, high natural killer cell count at month 3 was associated with a lower incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease, independently of a previous episode of acute graft-versus-host disease and stem cell source. NKG2C+CD56dim and total natural killer cell counts at month 3 were lower in patients with reactivation of cytomegalovirus between month 0 and month 3, but expanded greatly afterwards. These cells were also less numerous in patients who experienced later cytomegalovirus reactivation between month 3 and month 6. Our results advocate a direct role of NKG2C-expressing natural killer cells in the early control of cytomegalovirus reactivation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25085354

  6. [Cloning and expression analysis of a hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferasegene(IiHCT) from Isatis indigotica].

    PubMed

    Dong, Hong-ran; Yang, Jian; Huang, Lu-qi; Jia, Jing-ming; Tang, Jin-fu

    2015-11-01

    Based on the transcriptome data, we cloned the open reading frame of IiHCT gene from Isatis indigotica, and then performed bioinformatic analysis of the sequence. Further, we detected expression pattern in specific organs and hairy roots treated methyl jasmonate( MeJA) by RT-PCR. The IiHCT gene contains a 1 290 bp open reading frame( ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 430 amino acids. The predicted isoelectric point( pI) was 5.7, a calculated molecular weight was about 47.68 kDa. IiHCT was mainly expressed in stem and undetectable in young root, leaf and flower bud. After the treatment of MeJA, the relative expression level of IiHCT increased rapidly. The expression level of IiHCT was the highest at 4 h and maintained two fold to control during 24 h. In this study, cloning of IiHCT laid the foundation for illustrating the biosynthesis mechanism of phenylpropanoids in I. indigotica. PMID:27071247

  7. 40 CFR 35.9055 - Evaluation of recipient performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaluation of recipient performance. 35... Evaluation of recipient performance. The Regional Administrator will oversee each recipient's performance... schedule for evaluation in the assistance agreement and will evaluate recipient performance and...

  8. 14 CFR 1274.940 - Changes in recipient's membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Changes in recipient's membership. 1274.940... AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.940 Changes in recipient's membership. Changes in Recipient's Membership July 2002 The Recipient shall notify the cognizant...

  9. 43 CFR 17.337 - Remedial action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Investigation, Conciliation, and Enforcement Procedures § 17.337 Remedial action by recipients. Where DOI finds... DOI may require to overcome the effects of the discrimination. If another recipient exercises control over the recipient that has discriminated, DOI may require both recipients to take remedial action....

  10. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a blast-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patient with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae tricuspid valve endocarditis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kantarcioglu, Bulent; Bekoz, Huseyin Saffet; Olgun, Fatih Erkam; Cakal, Beytullah; Arkan, Burak; Turkoglu, Halil; Mert, Ali; Sargin, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the occurrence of blastic transformation is rare. Treatment outcome is generally poor. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is the only potentially curative treatment option for advanced-phase CML. Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) isolates are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies. Infection and colonization by these multiresistant bacteria may represent a challenge in SCT recipients for the management of post-transplantation complications, as well as for the eligibility to receive a transplant in patients who acquire the pathogen prior to the procedure. We herein report the case of a blast-phase CML patient with a highly resistant, CRKP-associated tricuspid valve endocarditis, who was treated with a combination of systemic antimicrobial therapy and surgical valve repair, and subsequently underwent a successful allo-SCT.

  11. Real-time qPCR for chimerism assessment in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants from unrelated adult and double umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Frankfurt, Olga; Zitzner, Jennifer R; Tambur, Anat R

    2015-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the standard therapy for patients with various malignant hematologic disorders. A successful treatment results in complete engraftment of donor cells in the absence of the patient's own hematopoietic system. Chimerism analysis, aimed at determining the coexistence of genetically different cell populations, is considered a useful method to measure treatment success. A new, qPCR based, commercially available chimerism assay was recently introduced. Here we report our results of comparing STR with qPCR-based chimerism analysis, and assessment of sensitivity and reproducibility of the qPCR chimerism assay. A specific emphasis is put on analyzing chimerism in recipients of double cord blood transplantation. We conclude that the qPCR chimerism assay for engraftment monitoring is a reliable and sensitive assay. Advantages and limitations of the assay in its current format are summarized.

  12. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a blast-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patient with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae tricuspid valve endocarditis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kantarcioglu, Bulent; Bekoz, Huseyin Saffet; Olgun, Fatih Erkam; Cakal, Beytullah; Arkan, Burak; Turkoglu, Halil; Mert, Ali; Sargin, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the occurrence of blastic transformation is rare. Treatment outcome is generally poor. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is the only potentially curative treatment option for advanced-phase CML. Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) isolates are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies. Infection and colonization by these multiresistant bacteria may represent a challenge in SCT recipients for the management of post-transplantation complications, as well as for the eligibility to receive a transplant in patients who acquire the pathogen prior to the procedure. We herein report the case of a blast-phase CML patient with a highly resistant, CRKP-associated tricuspid valve endocarditis, who was treated with a combination of systemic antimicrobial therapy and surgical valve repair, and subsequently underwent a successful allo-SCT. PMID:27699025

  13. Differential Effect of MyD88 Signal in Donor T Cells on Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect and Graft-versus-Host Disease after Experimental Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Young; Ryu, Da-Bin; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Gyeongsin; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2015-11-01

    Despite the presence of toll like receptor (TLR) expression in conventional TCRαβ T cells, the direct role of TLR signaling via myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) within T lymphocytes on graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unknown. In the allo-SCT model of C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) → B6D2F1 (H-2(b/d)), recipients received transplants of wild type (WT) T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) and splenic T cells from either WT or MyD88 deficient (MyD88KO) donors. Host-type (H-2(d)) P815 mastocytoma or L1210 leukemia cells were injected either subcutaneously or intravenously to generate a GVHD/GVL model. Allogeneic recipients of MyD88KO T cells demonstrated a greater tumor growth without attenuation of GVHD severity. Moreover, GVHD-induced GVL effect, caused by increasing the conditioning intensity was also not observed in the recipients of MyD88KO T cells. In vitro, the absence of MyD88 in T cells resulted in defective cytolytic activity to tumor targets with reduced ability to produce IFN-γ or granzyme B, which are known to critical for the GVL effect. However, donor T cell expansion with effector and memory T-cell differentiation were more enhanced in GVHD hosts of MyD88KO T cells. Recipients of MyD88KO T cells experienced greater expansion of Foxp3- and IL4-expressing T cells with reduced INF-γ producing T cells in the spleen and tumor-draining lymph nodes early after transplantation. Taken together, these results highlight a differential role for MyD88 deficiency on donor T-cells, with decreased GVL effect without attenuation of the GVHD severity after experimental allo-SCT.

  14. Clinical Outcomes Associated With Respiratory Virus Detection Before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Angela P.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Englund, Janet A.; Farney, Robert M.; Minerich, Elisa L.; Kuypers, Jane; Corey, Lawrence; Boeckh, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background. The management of respiratory virus infections prior to hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is difficult. We examined whether respiratory virus detection before HCT influenced the requirement for bronchoscopy, hospitalization, and overall survival following HCT. Methods. Pre-HCT and weekly post-HCT nasal washes were collected through day 100 from patients with and without symptoms. Samples were tested by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses 1–4, influenza A and B, human metapneumovirus, adenovirus, and human rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, and bocavirus. Results. Of 458 patients, 116 (25%) had respiratory viruses detected pre-HCT. Overall, patients with viruses detected pre-HCT had fewer days alive and out of the hospital and lower survival at day 100 (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3–4.5; P = .007) than patients with negative samples; this risk was also present with rhinovirus alone (aHR for mortality, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2–5.5; P = .01). No difference in bronchoscopy incidence was seen in patients with and without respiratory viruses (aHR, 1.3; 95% CI, .8–2.0; P = .32). In symptomatic patients, those with respiratory viruses detected had increased overall mortality compared with patients without viruses detected (unadjusted HR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.0–12.1; P = .05); among asymptomatic patients, detection of respiratory viruses was not associated with increased mortality. Conclusions. These data support routine testing for respiratory viruses among symptomatic patients before HCT, and delay of transplant with virus detection when feasible, even for detection of rhinovirus alone. Further study is needed to address whether asymptomatic patients should undergo screening for respiratory virus detection before HCT. PMID:25847977

  15. Risk assessment of relapse by lineage-specific monitoring of chimerism in children undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Preuner, Sandra; Peters, Christina; Pötschger, Ulrike; Daxberger, Helga; Fritsch, Gerhard; Geyeregger, Rene; Schrauder, André; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Bader, Peter; Ebell, Wolfram; Eckert, Cornelia; Lang, Peter; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Schrum, Johanna; Kremens, Bernhard; Ehlert, Karoline; Albert, Michael H.; Meisel, Roland; Lawitschka, Anita; Mann, Georg; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Güngör, Tayfun; Holter, Wolfgang; Strahm, Brigitte; Gruhn, Bernd; Schulz, Ansgar; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Lion, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is required as rescue therapy in about 20% of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the relapse rates are considerable, and relapse confers a poor outcome. Early assessment of the risk of relapse is therefore of paramount importance for the development of appropriate measures. We used the EuroChimerism approach to investigate the potential impact of lineage-specific chimerism testing for relapse-risk analysis in 162 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a multicenter study based on standardized transplantation protocols. Within a median observation time of 4.5 years, relapses have occurred in 41/162 patients at a median of 0.6 years after transplantation (range, 0.13–5.7 years). Prospective screening at defined consecutive time points revealed that reappearance of recipient-derived cells within the CD34+ and CD8+ cell subsets display the most significant association with the occurrence of relapses with hazard ratios of 5.2 (P=0.003) and 2.8 (P=0.008), respectively. The appearance of recipient cells after a period of pure donor chimerism in the CD34+ and CD8+ leukocyte subsets revealed dynamics indicative of a significantly elevated risk of relapse or imminent disease recurrence. Assessment of chimerism within these lineages can therefore provide complementary information for further diagnostic and, potentially, therapeutic purposes aiming at the prevention of overt relapse. This study was registered at clinical.trials.gov with the number NC01423747. PMID:26869631

  16. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Are Targets for Allogeneic and Autologous Natural Killer (NK) Cells and Killing Is Partly Mediated by the Activating NK Receptor DNAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Sebastian; Cyganek, Lukas; Elsner, Leslie; Hübscher, Daniela; Walter, Lutz; Streckfuss-Bömeke, Katrin; Guan, Kaomei; Dressel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) could be used to generate autologous cells for therapeutic purposes, which are expected to be tolerated by the recipient. However, iPSC-derived grafts are at risk of giving rise to teratomas in the host, if residuals of tumorigenic cells are not rejected by the recipient. We have analyzed the susceptibility of hiPSC lines to allogeneic and autologous natural killer (NK) cells. IL-2-activated, in contrast to resting NK cells killed hiPSC lines efficiently (P=1.69x10-39). Notably, the specific lysis of the individual hiPSC lines by IL-2-activated NK cells was significantly different (P=1.72x10-6) and ranged between 46 % and 64 % in 51Cr-release assays when compared to K562 cells. The hiPSC lines were killed by both allogeneic and autologous NK cells although autologous NK cells were less efficient (P=8.63x10-6). Killing was partly dependent on the activating NK receptor DNAM-1 (P=8.22x10-7). The DNAM-1 ligands CD112 and CD155 as well as the NKG2D ligands MICA and MICB were expressed on the hiPSC lines. Low amounts of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I proteins, which serve as ligands for inhibitory and activating NK receptors were also detected. Thus, the susceptibility to NK cell killing appears to constitute a common feature of hiPSCs. Therefore, NK cells might reduce the risk of teratoma formation even after autologous transplantations of pluripotent stem cell-derived grafts that contain traces of pluripotent cells. PMID:25950680

  17. Osteogenic activity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) seeded on irradiated allogenic bone.

    PubMed

    Tohma, Yasuaki; Dohi, Yoshiko; Ohgushi, Hajime; Tadokoro, Mika; Akahane, Manabu; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2012-02-01

    Allogenic bone grafting, a technique used in orthopaedic surgery, has several problems, including low osteogenic activity. To overcome the problem, this study aimed to determine whether in vivo osteogenesis could be enhanced using allogenic irradiated bone grafts after seeding with autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). The allogenic bone cylinders were extracted from ACI rats and sterilized by irradiation. Donor BMSCs were obtained from fresh Fischer 344 (F344) rat bone marrow by cell culture. The allogenic bone with or without BMSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into syngeneic F344 rats. At 4 weeks after transplantation, high alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, bone-specific osteocalcin mRNA expression and newly formed bone were detected in the allogenic bone with BMSCs. The origin of the newly formed bone was derived from cultured donor BMSCs. However, none of these identifiers of osteogenesis were detected in either the fresh or the irradiated allogenic bone without BMSCs. These results indicate the availability of autologous BMSCs to heighten the osteogenic response of allogenic bone. Our present tissue-engineering method might contribute to a wide variety of allogenic bone grafting techniques in clinical settings.

  18. Recipient myeloid-derived immunomodulatory cells induce PD-1 ligand-dependent donor CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell proliferation and donor-recipient immune tolerance after murine nonmyeloablative bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Marie; Abdelsamed, Hossam A; Seth, Aman; Ong, Taren; Vogel, Peter; Pillai, Asha B

    2013-12-01

    We showed previously that nonmyeloablative total lymphoid irradiation/rabbit anti-thymocyte serum (TLI/ATS) conditioning facilitates potent donor-recipient immune tolerance following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) across MHC barriers via recipient invariant NKT (iNKT) cell-derived IL-4-dependent expansion of donor Foxp3(+) naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTregs). In this study, we report a more specific mechanism. Wild-type (WT) BALB/c (H-2(d)) hosts were administered TLI/ATS and BMT from WT or STAT6(-/-) C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) donors. Following STAT6(-/-) BMT, donor nTregs demonstrated no loss of proliferation in vivo, indicating that an IL-4-responsive population in the recipient, rather than the donor, drives donor nTreg proliferation. In graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) target organs, three recipient CD11b(+) cell subsets (Gr-1(high)CD11c(-), Gr-1(int)CD11c(-), and Gr-1(low)CD11c(+)) were enriched early after TLI/ATS + BMT versus total body irradiation/ATS + BMT. Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells induced potent H-2K(b+)CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nTreg proliferation in vitro in 72-h MLRs. Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells were reduced significantly in STAT6(-/-) and iNKT cell-deficient Jα18(-/-) BALB/c recipients after TLI/ATS + BMT. Depletion of CD11b(+) cells resulted in severe acute GVHD, and adoptive transfer of WT Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells to Jα18(-/-) BALB/c recipients of TLI/ATS + BMT restored day-6 donor Foxp3(+) nTreg proliferation and protection from CD8 effector T cell-mediated GVHD. Blockade of programmed death ligand 1 and 2, but not CD40, TGF-β signaling, arginase 1, or iNOS, inhibited nTreg proliferation in cocultures of recipient-derived Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells with donor nTregs. Through iNKT-dependent Th2 polarization, myeloid-derived immunomodulatory dendritic cells are expanded after nonmyeloablative TLI/ATS conditioning and allogeneic BMT, induce PD-1 ligand-dependent donor nTreg proliferation, and maintain potent graft-versus-host immune tolerance.

  19. Iron depletion in HCT116 cells diminishes the upregulatory effect of phenethyl isothiocyanate on heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Bolloskis, Michael P; Carvalho, Fabiana P; Loo, George

    2016-04-15

    Some of the health-promoting properties of cruciferous vegetables are thought to be partly attributed to isothiocyanates. These phytochemicals can upregulate the expression of certain cytoprotective stress genes, but it is unknown if a particular nutrient is involved. Herein, the objective was to ascertain if adequate iron is needed for enabling HCT116 cells to optimally express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when induced by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). PEITC increased HO-1 expression and also nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which is a transcription factor known to activate the HO-1 gene. However, in HCT116 cells that were made iron-deficient by depleting intracellular iron with deferoxamine (DFO), PEITC was less able to increase HO-1 expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. These suppressive effects of DFO were overcome by replenishing the iron-deficient cells with the missing iron. To elucidate these findings, it was found that PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation can be inhibited with thiol antioxidants (glutathione and N-acetylcysteine). Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) and a superoxide scavenger (Tiron) each inhibited PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation. In doing so, diphenyleneiodonium was the most potent and also inhibited nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2. Collectively, the results imply that the HO-1 upregulation by PEITC involves an iron-dependent, oxidant signaling pathway. Therefore, it is concluded that ample iron is required to enable PEITC to fully upregulate HO-1 expression in HCT116 cells. As such, it is conceivable that iron-deficient individuals may not reap the full health benefits of eating PEITC-containing cruciferous vegetables that via HO-1 may help protect against multiple chronic diseases. PMID:26945724

  20. Cytotoxic and apoptotic activities of Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.) Bl. tuber extracts against human colon carcinoma cell line HCT-15

    PubMed Central

    Ansil, P.N.; Wills, P.J.; Varun, R.; Latha, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide and is the third most common form of malignancy in both men and women. Several possible colon cancer chemopreventive agents are found in edible plants. Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.) Blume (family: Araceae) is a tuber crop, largely cultivated throughout the plains of India for using its corm as food. This tuber has also been traditionally used for the treatment of abdominal tumors, liver diseases, piles etc. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose-dependent cytotoxic and apoptosis inducing effects of the sub fractions of A. campanulatus tuber methanolic extract (ACME) viz. petroleum ether fraction (PEF), chloroform fraction (CHF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) and methanolic fraction (MEF) on the colon cancer cell line, HCT-15. Antiproliferative effects of the sub fractions of ACME were studied by MTT assay. Apoptotic activity was assessed by DAPI, Annexin V-FITC and JC-1 fluorescent staining. The chemotherapeutic drug, 5-flurouracil (5-FU) was used as positive drug control. The sub fractions of ACME significantly inhibited the proliferation of HCT-15 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the extracts were found to induce apoptosis and were confirmed by DAPI, Annexin V-FITC and JC-1 fluorescent staining. A pronounced results of cytotoxic and apoptotic activities were observed in the cells treated with 5-FU and CHF, whereas, EAF and MEF treated cells exhibited a moderate result and the least effect was observed in PEF treated cells. Our results suggested that, among the sub fractions of ACME, CHF had potent cytotoxic and apoptotic activity and thus it could be explored as a novel target for anticancer drug development. Furthermore, these findings confirm that the sub fractions of ACME dose-dependently suppress the proliferation of HCT-15 cells by inducing apoptosis. PMID:25473360

  1. Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit D inhibits proliferation of HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojun; Zheng, Bo'an; Chai, Rui

    2014-12-12

    Dysregulation of protein synthesis is emerging as a major contributory factor in cancer development. eIF3D (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit D) is one member of the eIF3 (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3) family, which is essential for initiation of protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells. Acquaintance with eIF3D is little since it has been identified as a dispensable subunit of eIF3 complex. Recently, eIF3D was found to embed somatic mutations in human colorectal cancers, indicating its importance for tumour progression. To further probe into its action in colon cancer, we utilized lentivirus-mediated RNA interference to knock down eIF3D expression in one colon cancer cell line HCT116. Knockdown of eIF3D in HCT116 cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that depletion of eIF3D led to cell-cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, and induced an excess accumulation of HCT116 cells in the sub-G1 phase representing apoptotic cells. Signalling pathways responsible for cell growth and apoptosis have also been found altered after eIF3D silencing, such as AMPKα (AMP-activated protein kinase alpha), Bad, PRAS40 [proline-rich Akt (PKB) substrate of 40 kDa], SAPK (stress-activated protein kinase)/JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase), GSK3β and PARP [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase]. Taken together, these findings suggest that eIF3D might play an important role in colon cancer progression.

  2. Combination of Albendazole and 2-Methoxyestradiol significantly improves the survival of HCT-116 tumor-bearing nude mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Albendazole (ABZ) is a microtubule-targeting anthelmintic with a remarkable activity against a variety of human cancer cells. In this study, we examined if the antitumor activity of ABZ could be enhanced by its combination with other microtubule-binding agents. Methods The interactions between ABZ and microtubule-binding agents, paclitaxel, vinblastine, colchicine, and 2-methoxyestradiol were characterized using median effect analysis method in HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells and DU145 prostate cancer cell line. The mechanism underlying the synergistic interaction related to tubulin polymerization and apoptosis was then investigated. Finally, the effect of the combination therapy on the survival of HCT-116 tumor-bearing nude mice was evaluated. Results Among the tested drugs, a synergistic anti-proliferative effect was observed with the combination of low concentrations of ABZ plus colchicine and ABZ plus 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME). Exploring the mechanism of the interaction between ABZ and 2ME revealed that the combination therapy synergistically activated the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Consistent with in vitro results, the combination of low concentration of ABZ with 2ME prolonged the survival of mice-bearing HCT-116 tumors. High concentration of ABZ in combination with 2ME, however, proved to be less effective than ABZ alone. Conclusions The combination of low doses of ABZ and 2ME has shown promising results in our pre-clinical model. Additionally, the finding that the combination of two microtubule-binding agents that share the same binding site can act synergistically may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment. PMID:23432760

  3. Cytotoxic and apoptotic activities of Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.) Bl. tuber extracts against human colon carcinoma cell line HCT-15.

    PubMed

    Ansil, P N; Wills, P J; Varun, R; Latha, M S

    2014-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide and is the third most common form of malignancy in both men and women. Several possible colon cancer chemopreventive agents are found in edible plants. Amorphophallus campanulatus (Roxb.) Blume (family: Araceae) is a tuber crop, largely cultivated throughout the plains of India for using its corm as food. This tuber has also been traditionally used for the treatment of abdominal tumors, liver diseases, piles etc. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose-dependent cytotoxic and apoptosis inducing effects of the sub fractions of A. campanulatus tuber methanolic extract (ACME) viz. petroleum ether fraction (PEF), chloroform fraction (CHF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) and methanolic fraction (MEF) on the colon cancer cell line, HCT-15. Antiproliferative effects of the sub fractions of ACME were studied by MTT assay. Apoptotic activity was assessed by DAPI, Annexin V-FITC and JC-1 fluorescent staining. The chemotherapeutic drug, 5-flurouracil (5-FU) was used as positive drug control. The sub fractions of ACME significantly inhibited the proliferation of HCT-15 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the extracts were found to induce apoptosis and were confirmed by DAPI, Annexin V-FITC and JC-1 fluorescent staining. A pronounced results of cytotoxic and apoptotic activities were observed in the cells treated with 5-FU and CHF, whereas, EAF and MEF treated cells exhibited a moderate result and the least effect was observed in PEF treated cells. Our results suggested that, among the sub fractions of ACME, CHF had potent cytotoxic and apoptotic activity and thus it could be explored as a novel target for anticancer drug development. Furthermore, these findings confirm that the sub fractions of ACME dose-dependently suppress the proliferation of HCT-15 cells by inducing apoptosis. PMID:25473360

  4. Iron depletion in HCT116 cells diminishes the upregulatory effect of phenethyl isothiocyanate on heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Bolloskis, Michael P; Carvalho, Fabiana P; Loo, George

    2016-04-15

    Some of the health-promoting properties of cruciferous vegetables are thought to be partly attributed to isothiocyanates. These phytochemicals can upregulate the expression of certain cytoprotective stress genes, but it is unknown if a particular nutrient is involved. Herein, the objective was to ascertain if adequate iron is needed for enabling HCT116 cells to optimally express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when induced by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). PEITC increased HO-1 expression and also nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which is a transcription factor known to activate the HO-1 gene. However, in HCT116 cells that were made iron-deficient by depleting intracellular iron with deferoxamine (DFO), PEITC was less able to increase HO-1 expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. These suppressive effects of DFO were overcome by replenishing the iron-deficient cells with the missing iron. To elucidate these findings, it was found that PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation can be inhibited with thiol antioxidants (glutathione and N-acetylcysteine). Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) and a superoxide scavenger (Tiron) each inhibited PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation. In doing so, diphenyleneiodonium was the most potent and also inhibited nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2. Collectively, the results imply that the HO-1 upregulation by PEITC involves an iron-dependent, oxidant signaling pathway. Therefore, it is concluded that ample iron is required to enable PEITC to fully upregulate HO-1 expression in HCT116 cells. As such, it is conceivable that iron-deficient individuals may not reap the full health benefits of eating PEITC-containing cruciferous vegetables that via HO-1 may help protect against multiple chronic diseases.

  5. Coronary artery calcification in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Sylvia E; Mensah, Korlei; Weinstein, Rachel B; Bellamy, Scarlett L; Rader, Daniel J

    2005-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in renal transplant recipients. Although renal transplant recipients frequently undergo cardiac functional tests prior to surgery, coronary atherosclerosis can remain undetected. Coronary artery calcification (CAC), an early marker of atherosclerosis can be quantified using EBCT. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent and characteristics of CAC at the time of renal transplantation. We evaluated 79 consecutive incident asymptomatic renal transplant recipients. Patients were mostly White (62%), male (54%) and had a deceased donor renal transplant (61%). The mean age was 47 (12.1) years. Sixty-five percentage of subjects had CAC. The mean CAC score was 331.5 (562.4) with a median of 43.3. Older age, presence of diabetes, not having a preemptive transplant, deceased donor transplantation and hypercholesterolemia were significantly associated with presence of CAC univariately. Median CAC scores were significantly increased in subjects with diabetes (127.8 vs. 28.9, p=0.05), exposed to dialysis (102.9 vs. 3.7, p<0.001) and deceased donor recipients (169.7 vs. 7.5, p=0.02). Using multiple logistic regression, age and time on dialysis were significantly associated with the presence of CAC at the time of transplant. In summary, CAC is prevalent in patients undergoing kidney transplant. CAC may be a method to identify renal transplant recipients at increased risk for future cardiovascular events. PMID:15996243

  6. Delayed onset of gastrointestinal disease in the recipients of bone marrow transplants: a variant graft-versus-host reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serota, F.T.; Rosenberg, H.K.; Rosen, J.; Koch, P.A.; August, C.S.

    1982-07-01

    The report describes a subacute syndrome consisting of anorexia, mouth ulcers, abdominal pain, and diarrhea which occurred in three allogenic transplant recipients which appears to be distinct from the usual patterns of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The patient with myelomonocytic leukemia was treated with cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg) i.v. 4 and 3 days before and total body X irradiation to 800 rad 1 day before transplantation. The radiation was administered from a 6-Mev source at least 3.5 m from the patient via opposing lateral fields. The patients were maintained in the protected environment until their absolute neutrophil counts (ANC) became greater than 1000/mm/sup 3/. All blood products were irradiated (1500 rad) prior to transfusion. Methotrexate was administered weekly for 100 days to prevent GVHD. (JMT)

  7. ECIL guidelines for preventing Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with haematological malignancies and stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Johan; Cesaro, Simone; Maschmeyer, Georg; Einsele, Hermann; Donnelly, J Peter; Alanio, Alexandre; Hauser, Philippe M; Lagrou, Katrien; Melchers, Willem J G; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Matos, Olga; Bretagne, Stéphane; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    The 5th European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-5) meeting aimed to establish evidence-based recommendations for the prophylaxis of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in non-HIV-infected patients with an underlying haematological condition, including allogeneic HSCT recipients. Recommendations were based on the grading system of the IDSA. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole given 2-3 times weekly is the drug of choice for the primary prophylaxis of PCP in adults ( A-II: ) and children ( A-I: ) and should be given during the entire period at risk. Recent data indicate that children may benefit equally from a once-weekly regimen ( B-II: ). All other drugs, including pentamidine, atovaquone and dapsone, are considered second-line alternatives when trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is poorly tolerated or contraindicated. The main indications of PCP prophylaxis are ALL, allogeneic HSCT, treatment with alemtuzumab, fludarabine/cyclophosphamide/rituximab combinations, >4 weeks of treatment with corticosteroids and well-defined primary immune deficiencies in children. Additional indications are proposed depending on the treatment regimen. PMID:27550992

  8. Preclinical study of treatment response in HCT-116 cells and xenografts with (1) H-decoupled (31) P MRS.

    PubMed

    Darpolor, Moses M; Kennealey, Peter T; Le, H Carl; Zakian, Kristen L; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Rizwan, Asif; Chen, Jin-Hong; Sambol, Elliot B; Schwartz, Gary K; Singer, Samuel; Koutcher, Jason A

    2011-11-01

    The topoisomerase I inhibitor, irinotecan, and its active metabolite SN-38 have been shown to induce G(2) /M cell cycle arrest without significant cell death in human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-116). Subsequent treatment of these G(2) /M-arrested cells with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, induced these cells to undergo apoptosis. The goal of this study was to develop a noninvasive metabolic biomarker for early tumor response and target inhibition of irinotecan followed by flavopiridol treatment in a longitudinal study. A total of eleven mice bearing HCT-116 xenografts were separated into two cohorts where one cohort was administered saline and the other treated with a sequential course of irinotecan followed by flavopiridol. Each mouse xenograft was longitudinally monitored with proton ((1) H)-decoupled phosphorus ((31) P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) before and after treatment. A statistically significant decrease in phosphocholine (p = 0.0004) and inorganic phosphate (p = 0.0103) levels were observed in HCT-116 xenografts following treatment, which were evidenced within twenty-four hours of treatment completion. Also, a significant growth delay was found in treated xenografts. To discern the underlying mechanism for the treatment response of the xenografts, in vitro HCT-116 cell cultures were investigated with enzymatic assays, cell cycle analysis, and apoptotic assays. Flavopiridol had a direct effect on choline kinase as measured by a 67% reduction in the phosphorylation of choline to phosphocholine. Cells treated with SN-38 alone underwent 83 ± 5% G(2) /M cell cycle arrest compared to untreated cells. In cells, flavopiridol alone induced 5 ± 1% apoptosis while the sequential treatment (SN-38 then flavopiridol) resulted in 39 ± 10% apoptosis. In vivo (1) H-decoupled (31) P MRS indirectly measures choline kinase activity. The decrease in phosphocholine may be a potential indicator of early tumor response to

  9. Development of Tumor-Reactive T Cells After Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Tetsuya; Hudecek, Michael; Kostic, Ana; Bleakley, Marie; Warren, Edus H.; Maloney, David; Storb, Rainer; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Allogeneic NM-HSCT can result in durable remission of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It is thought that the efficacy of NM-HSCT is mediated by recognition of tumor cells by T cells in the donor stem cell graft. We evaluated the development of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for CLL after NM-HSCT to determine if their presence correlated with antitumor efficacy. Experimental Design Peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from twelve transplant recipients at intervals after NM-HSCT were stimulated in vitro with CLL cells. Polyclonal T cell lines and CD8+ T cell clones were derived from these cultures and evaluated for lysis of donor and recipient target cells including CLL. The presence and specificity of responses was correlated with clinical outcomes. Results Eight of the 12 patients achieved remission or a major antitumor response and all eight developed CD8+ and CD4+ T cells specific for antigens expressed by CLL. A clonal analysis of the CD8+ T cell response identified T cells specific for multiple minor histocompatibility (H) antigens expressed on CLL in six of the responding patients. A significant fraction of the CD8+ T cell response in some patients was also directed against non-shared tumor-specific antigens. By contrast, CLL-reactive T cells were not detected in the four patients who had persistent CLL after NM-HSCT, despite the development of GVHD. Conclusions The development of a diverse T cell response specific for minor H and tumor-associated antigens expressed by CLL predicts an effective GVL response after NM-HSCT. PMID:19567591

  10. [Migration and distribution of allogeneic T lymphocytes in organs of graft-versus-host disease mouse model].

    PubMed

    Wen, Hong-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Min; Zhou, Hong; Xia, Rong; Qiu, Hui-Ying; Gao, Lei; Hu, Xiao-Xia

    2006-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the migration and distribution processes of allogeneic donor T lymphocytes in the organs of recipient mice. GVHD model was established by transfusion of the splenocytes of eGFP transgeneic C57BL/6 mice together with born marrow cells harvested from C57BL/6 mice into BALB/c mice underwent 8.0 Gy total body irradiation. The migration and homing of eGFP(+) cells were tracked by stereo-fluorescent microscopy or inverted fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed on supernatants from the tissue homogenates to detect the amount of MIP-1alpha. The results indicated that GVHD clinical manifestation and pathological changes of organs appeared on day 8 post transplantation. eGFP-positive donor T cells in recipient organs were observed by inverted fluorescence microscope in frozen section, or by stereo-fluorescence microscopy in living organs, such as liver, spleen, skin, lungs, bowels, and tongue. The highest expression of MIP-1alpha was on day 7 post transplantation in the liver (491.3 +/- 32.1 pg/ml), and day 3 post transplantation in the spleen (881.5 +/- 45.2 pg/ml), respectively (P < 0.05). It is concluded that GVHD was induced by splenocytes of eGFP transgeneic C57BL/6 mice. eGFP(+) cells in the organs can be observed by fluorescent microscopy. In this GVHD model, donor T cells proliferate and infiltrate in liver, skin, bowels, as well as lungs and tongue. MIP-1alpha may be in relation with the infiltration of T lymphocytes in liver and spleen.

  11. Recipient gene duplication during generalized transduction.

    PubMed

    Stodolsky, M

    1974-11-01

    An Hfr13 Delta(proA-lac) deletion recipient, -Delta(proA-lac)-F-purE(+)-, has been utilized in a study of the origins of duplications formed during chromosome fragment integration. Among the Pro(-)Lac(+) transductants, some have duplications spanning the F locus. These transductants are, or segregate, strains with F' episomes carrying genes of the duplication. Some of the duplications include purE(+), a gene which is not coinherited with lac(+) during bacteriophage P1-mediated transduction. Thus recipient genes have been duplicated during recombinant formation. Crossing-over models including replication steps provide a basis for explaining the duplication process.

  12. Antibodies to BK virus in children prior to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Benjamin L; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Hester, Jeff; Goebel, Jens; Davies, Stella M; Jodele, Sonata

    2015-09-01

    BK virus (BKV) is associated with kidney and bladder disease after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) but less is known about the seroprevalence of pre-transplant antibodies to BKV in children. We measured BKV IgG antibody titers in 36 children before HCT. BKV IgG antibodies were detected in all 36 patients, with 28/36 (77.8%) developing BK viremia in the first 100 days. Pre-HCT BKV IgG antibody titers >1:40,960 were protective against later BK viremia ≥10,000 copies/ml. The seroprevalence of antibodies to BKV is high in children undergoing HCT and post-transplant BK viremia, which is associated with bladder and kidney injury, is common.

  13. Superior osteogenesis in transplanted allogeneic canine skull following chemical sterilization

    SciTech Connect

    Prolo, D.J.; Pedrotti, P.W.; Burres, K.P.; Oklund, S.

    1982-08-01

    Sterilization of allogeneic bone increases the availability of this tissue for supplanting skeletal defects and effecting fusions. The optimal sterilant destroys micro-organisms, preserves the physical and chemical integrity of bone and possibly even reduces immunogenicity. Cortical bone of skull heals slowly and is variably resorbed. Of 36 dogs, spontaneous regeneration in 72 paired 20 mm defects was constant but always incomplete, and restored only about one third of the cross-sectional area of the defect at six months. The repair in defects replaced with canine allogeneic bony disc, sterilized with ethylene oxide (n . 9), gamma irradiation (n . 7), or methanol/chloroform/iodoacetic acid (n . 7) and then lyophilizedd, was compared with repair in defects filled with aseptically procured lyophilized only (n . 23) discs from the same donor. Criteria for evaluation of implants at six months included volume of defect filled, radiodensity, extent of fusion around circumference, revascularization, and remodeling. Bony discs sterilized with methanol/chloroform/iodoacetic acid remodeled at a superior rate (p less than 0.01). Radiation sterilization resulted in diminished density and inferentially reduced protection of the brain (p less than 0.025). Ethylene oxide, lyophilized implants, and implants lyophilized only produced comparable repair. Whereas an acceptable cranioplasty was achieved in 86% of methanol/chloroform/iodoacetic acid, lyophilize implants, all other alloimplants served an osteoconductive function with a successful repair occurring in 56% to 58%.

  14. Decellularized allogeneic intervertebral disc: natural biomaterials for regenerating disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhijun; Chen, Kai; Shan, Zhi; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Mo, Jian; Ma, Jianjun; Xu, Wenbing; Qin, An; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with back pain and disc herniation. This study established a modified protocol for intervertebral disc (IVD) decellularization and prepared its extracellular matrix (ECM). By culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)(3, 7, 14 and 21 days) and human degenerative IVD cells (7 days) in the ECM, implanting it subcutaneously in rabbit and injecting ECM microparticles into degenerative disc, the biological safety and efficacy of decellularized IVD was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that cellular components can be removed completely after decellularization and maximally retain the structure and biomechanics of native IVD. We revealed that allogeneic ECM did not evoke any apparent inflammatory reaction in vivo and no cytotoxicity was found in vitro. Moreover, IVD ECM can induce differentiation of MSCs into IVD-like cells in vitro. Furthermore, allogeneic ECM microparticles are effective on the treatment of rabbit disc degeneration in vivo. In conclusion, our study developed an optimized method for IVD decellularization and we proved decellularized IVD is safe and effective for the treatment of degenerated disc diseases. PMID:26933821

  15. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  16. Endocrinopathies after allogeneic and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Orio, Francesco; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90-99% of women and 60-90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40-50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  17. Organ procurement organization compliance with 21 CFR 1271: a challenge for allogeneic pancreatic islet cell transplantation programs.

    PubMed

    Winters, J L; Tran, S A; Gastineau, D A; Padley, D J; Dean, P G; Kudva, Y C

    2009-06-01

    In order to protect tissue recipients, the Food and Drug Administration drafted Title 21, Section 1271 of the Code of Federal Regulations 1271 (21 CFR 1271) to address infectious disease risk. These regulations apply to tissues but not vascularized organs. Pancreatic islet cells are regulated under 21 CFR 1271. These regulations require qualification of suppliers of critical materials and services with regard to 21 CFR 1271 compliance. As part of supplier qualification, all organ procurement organizations (OPOs) in the United States were sent a questionnaire covering the key components of these regulations. Of the 57 OPOs, 29 (51%) were in compliance based upon survey results. Twelve (21%) were not compliant in one or more areas. All indicated plans to become compliant. The remaining 15 (27%) either failed or refused to complete the survey, some indicating 21 CFR 1271 did not apply to OPOs. Using 2006 data, OPOs compliant with 21 CFR 1271 recovered 50% of the organs procured in the United States. These findings represent a challenge for allogeneic islet cell transplant programs whose raw material must comply with 21 CFR 1271. OPOs should work toward understanding and complying with 21 CFR 1271. Regulatory agencies should work toward enhancing safety of the pancreas supply by facilitating compliance through harmonization of requirements.

  18. Immunosuppressive Effects of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells on Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Rats Following Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nevruz, Oral; Avcu, Ferit; Ural, A. Uğur; Pekel, Aysel; Dirican, Bahar; Safalı, Mükerrem; Akdağ, Elvin; Beyzadeoğlu, Murat; İde, Tayfun; Sengül, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major obstacle to successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT). While multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) demonstrate alloresponse in vitro and in vivo, they also have clinical applications toward prevention or treatment of GVHD. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of MSCs to prevent or treat GVHD in a rat BMT model. Materials and Methods: The GVHD model was established by transplantation of Sprague Dawley rats’ bone marrow and spleen cells into lethally irradiated (950 cGy) SDxWistar rat recipients. A total of 49 rats were randomly assigned to 4 study and 3 control groups administered different GVHD prophylactic regimens including MSCs. After transplantation, clinical GVHD scores and survival status were monitored. Results: All irradiated and untreated control mice with GVHD died. MSCs inhibited lethal GVHD as efficiently as the standard GVHD prophylactic regimen. The gross and histopathological findings of GVHD and the ratio of CD4/CD8 expression decreased. The subgroup given MSCs displayed higher in vivo proportions of CD25+ T cells and plasma interleukin-2 levels as compared to conventional GVHD treatment after allo-BMT. Conclusion: Our results suggest that clinical use of MSCs in both prophylaxis against and treatment of established GVHD is effective. This study supports the use of MSCs in the prophylaxis and treatment of GVHD after allo-BMT; however, large scale studies are needed. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385804

  19. G-CSF and Exenatide Might Be Associated with Increased Long-Term Survival of Allogeneic Pancreatic Islet Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Eduardo; Messinger, Shari; Mantero, Alejandro; Padilla-Téllez, Nathalia D.; Baidal, David A.; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Ricordi, Camillo; Inverardi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Background Allogeneic human islet transplantation is an effective therapy for the treatment of patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). The low number of islet transplants performed worldwide and the different transplantation protocols used limit the identification of the most effective therapeutic options to improve the efficacy of this approach. Methods We present a retrospective analysis on the data collected from 44 patients with T1D who underwent islet transplantation at our institute between 2000 and 2007. Several variables were included: recipient demographics and immunological characteristics, donor and transplant characteristics, induction protocols, and additional medical treatment received. Immunosuppression was induced with anti-CD25 (Daclizumab), alone or in association with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) treatments (Etanercept or Infliximab), or with anti-CD52 (Alemtuzumab) in association with anti-TNF-α treatments (Etanercept or Infliximab). Subsets of patients were treated with Filgrastim for moderate/severe neutropenia and/or Exenatide for post prandial hyperglycemia. Results The analysis performed indicates a negative association between graft survival (c-peptide level ≥ 0.3 ng/ml) and islet infusion volume, with the caveat that, the progressive reduction of infusion volumes over the years has been paralleled by improved immunosuppressive protocols. A positive association is instead suggested between graft survival and administration of Exenatide and Filgrastim, alone or in combination. Conclusion This retrospective analysis may be of assistance to further improve long-term outcomes of protocols for transplant of islets and other organs. PMID:27285580

  20. High incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma independent of HPV infection after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, M H; Chang, P M; Li, W Y; Hsiao, L T; Hong, Y C; Liu, C Y; Gau, J P; Liu, J H; Chen, P M; Chiou, T J; Tzeng, C H

    2011-04-01

    Hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) is a well-recognized therapeutic procedure to prolong life and cure patients with life-threatening hematological malignancies; however, the risk of developing secondary carcinoma may increase in long-term survivors. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for secondary squamous carcinoma after HSCT. Between 1984 and 2004, 170 allogeneic HSCT recipients aged >15 years, who had survived for >5 years were enrolled. Demographic data and the characteristics of secondary carcinoma were collected and analyzed for the determination of the incidence and risk of developing secondary carcinoma. Eight patients developed secondary carcinoma, including five oral squamous cell carcinomas, one esophageal, one gastric and one ovarian carcinoma, but no cutaneous carcinomas were detected at a median follow-up of 14.1 years (range, 5.1-23.3 years) after HSCT. The accrual 10-year cumulative incidence of secondary carcinoma was 2.89%. In univariate and multivariate analyses, chronic GVHD and age >40 years at the time of HSCT were both significant risk factors independently associated with the development of secondary carcinoma. Thus, the occurrence of secondary carcinoma is one of the late complications in patients undergoing HSCT. Oral squamous cell carcinoma was more common in our patients after HSCT, indicating the need for lifelong surveillance of the oral cavity. Moreover, because of the relatively long latency in developing secondary carcinoma, extended follow-up is required for a thorough understanding of the incidence and characteristics of secondary carcinoma after HSCT. PMID:20622906

  1. Translation inhibition of the developmental cycle protein HctA by the small RNA IhtA is conserved across Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Jeremiah; Rao, Geeta Vittal; Runac, Justin; Hackstadt, Ted; Grieshaber, Scott S; Grieshaber, Nicole A

    2012-01-01

    The developmental cycle of the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 is controlled in part by the small non-coding RNA (sRNA), IhtA. All Chlamydia alternate in a regulated fashion between the infectious elementary body (EB) and the replicative reticulate body (RB) which asynchronously re-differentiates back to the terminal EB form at the end of the cycle. The histone like protein HctA is central to RB:EB differentiation late in the cycle as it binds to and occludes the genome, thereby repressing transcription and translation. The sRNA IhtA is a critical component of this regulatory loop as it represses translation of hctA until late in infection at which point IhtA transcription decreases, allowing HctA expression to occur and RB to EB differentiation to proceed. It has been reported that IhtA is expressed during infection by the human pathogens C. trachomatis serovars L2, D and L2b and C. pneumoniae. We show in this work that IhtA is also expressed by the animal pathogens C. caviae and C. muridarum. Expression of HctA in E. coli is lethal and co-expression of IhtA relieves this phenotype. To determine if regulation of HctA by IhtA is a conserved mechanism across pathogenic chlamydial species, we cloned hctA and ihtA from C. trachomatis serovar D, C. muridarum, C. caviae and C. pneumoniae and assayed for rescue of growth repression in E. coli co-expression studies. In each case, co-expression of ihtA with the cognate hctA resulted in relief of growth repression. In addition, expression of each chlamydial species IhtA rescued the lethal phenotype of C. trachomatis serovar L2 HctA expression. As biolayer interferometry studies indicate that IhtA interacts directly with hctA message for all species tested, we predict that conserved sequences of IhtA are necessary for function and/or binding.

  2. Enhanced Efficacy of Artemisinin Loaded in Transferrin-Conjugated Liposomes versus Stealth Liposomes against HCT-8 Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Leto, Isabella; Coronnello, Marcella; Righeschi, Chiara; Bergonzi, Maria Camilla; Mini, Enrico; Bilia, Anna Rita

    2016-08-19

    Artemisinin (ART) is a unique sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Artemisia annua that is well known for antimalarial properties and was recently reported as a promising anticancer drug. The aim of our work was to develop a novel nanocarrier for enhanced ART delivery and activation in cancer tissues, because transferrin receptors are largely expressed in cancer cells and the iron content is higher than in normal cells. ART was loaded in transferrin-conjugated liposomes (ART-L-Tf), and the performance was compared with ART loaded in stealth liposomes (ART-L). All of the liposomes were fully characterized in terms of size, drug-entrapment efficiency, transferrin coupling moieties, and stability. Both cell uptake and cytotoxicity studies of the developed nanocarriers were tested in the HCT-8 cell line, selected among several cell lines because of transferrin receptor overexpression. The results confirmed the enhanced delivery of ART-L-Tf in comparison with ART-L in the targeting of the HCT-8 cell line and an improved cytotoxicity as a result of the presence of iron ions, which resulted in concomitant synergism derived from the increased expression of transferrin receptors on the surface of the tumor cells.

  3. Down-regulation of UDP-glucose dehydrogenase affects glycosaminoglycans synthesis and motility in HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tsung-Pao; Pan, Yun-Ru; Fu, Chien-Yu; Chang, Hwan-You

    2010-10-15

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes oxidation of UDP-glucose to yield UDP-glucuronic acid, a precursor of hyaluronic acid (HA) and other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in extracellular matrix. Although association of extracellular matrix with cell proliferation and migration has been well documented, the importance of UGDH in these behaviors is not clear. Using UGDH-specific small interference RNA to treat HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells, a decrease in both mRNA and protein levels of UGDH, as well as the cellular UDP-glucuronic acid and GAG production was observed. Treatment of HCT-8 cells with either UGDH-specific siRNA or HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone effectively delayed cell aggregation into multicellular spheroids and impaired cell motility in both three-dimensional collagen gel and transwell migration assays. The reduction in cell aggregation and migration rates could be restored by addition of exogenous HA. These results indicate that UGDH can regulate cell motility through the production of GAG. The enzyme may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention of colorectal cancers.

  4. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 is overexpressed in colonic adenocarcinomas and promotes migration and invasion of HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Haiyun; Makizumi, Ryouji; Ravikumar, T.S.; Dong Huali; Yang Wancai; Yang, W.-L. . E-mail: wlyang@nshs.edu

    2007-03-10

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), a member of the TGF-{beta} superfamily, is involved in development, morphogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Dysregulation of BMP signaling has been suggested in tumorigenesis. In an analysis of human colon normal mucosa and tumors at different stages by immunohistochemistry, we observed that the intensity of BMP-4 staining in late-adenocarcinomas was stronger than that in normal mucosa and adenomas, while there was no difference in the staining of its receptors (BMPR-IA and BMPR-II) at all stages. The up-regulation of BMP-4 was further validated in another panel of tumor tissues by real-time RT-PCR, showing that BMP-4 mRNA levels in primary colonic carcinomas with liver metastasis were significantly higher than that in the matched normal mucosa. In order to understand the functional relevance of BMP-4 expression in colon cancer progression, BMP-4-overexpressing cell clones were generated from HCT116 cells. Overexpression of BMP-4 did not affect the HCT116 cell growth. The cells overexpressing BMP-4 became resistant to serum-starvation-induced apoptosis and exhibited enhanced migration and invasion characteristics. Overexpression of BMP-4 changed cell morphology to invasive spindle phenotype and induced the expression and activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). These results indicate that BMP-4 confers invasive phenotype during progression of colon cancer.

  5. Phytochemical investigation of Gynura bicolor leaves and cytotoxicity evaluation of the chemical constituents against HCT 116 cells.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Wuen Yew; Tan, Hooi Poay; Ling, Sui Kiong; Abdul Wahab, Norhanom; Sim, Kae Shin

    2016-01-01

    Gynura bicolor (Compositae) is a popular vegetable in Asia and believed to confer a wide range of benefits including anti-cancer. Our previous findings showed that the ethyl acetate extract of G. bicolor possessed cytotoxicity and induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death in human colon carcinoma cells (HCT 116). A combination of column chromatography had been used to purify chemical constituents from the ethyl acetate and water extract of G. bicolor leaves. Eight chemical constituents 5-p-trans-coumaroylquinic acid (I), 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (II), rutin (III), kampferol-3-O-rutinoside (IV), 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (V), kampferol-3-O-glucoside (VI), guanosine (VII) and chlorogenic acid (VIII) were isolated from G. bicolor grown in Malaysia. To our best knowledge, all chemical constituents were isolated for the first time from G. bicolor leaves except rutin (III). 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (V), guanosine (VII) and chlorogenic acid (VIII) demonstrated selective cytotoxicity (selective index>3) against HCT 116 cancer cells compared to CCD-18Co human normal colon cells. PMID:25738869

  6. Enhanced Efficacy of Artemisinin Loaded in Transferrin-Conjugated Liposomes versus Stealth Liposomes against HCT-8 Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Leto, Isabella; Coronnello, Marcella; Righeschi, Chiara; Bergonzi, Maria Camilla; Mini, Enrico; Bilia, Anna Rita

    2016-08-19

    Artemisinin (ART) is a unique sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Artemisia annua that is well known for antimalarial properties and was recently reported as a promising anticancer drug. The aim of our work was to develop a novel nanocarrier for enhanced ART delivery and activation in cancer tissues, because transferrin receptors are largely expressed in cancer cells and the iron content is higher than in normal cells. ART was loaded in transferrin-conjugated liposomes (ART-L-Tf), and the performance was compared with ART loaded in stealth liposomes (ART-L). All of the liposomes were fully characterized in terms of size, drug-entrapment efficiency, transferrin coupling moieties, and stability. Both cell uptake and cytotoxicity studies of the developed nanocarriers were tested in the HCT-8 cell line, selected among several cell lines because of transferrin receptor overexpression. The results confirmed the enhanced delivery of ART-L-Tf in comparison with ART-L in the targeting of the HCT-8 cell line and an improved cytotoxicity as a result of the presence of iron ions, which resulted in concomitant synergism derived from the increased expression of transferrin receptors on the surface of the tumor cells. PMID:26999297

  7. Prolonged sulforaphane treatment activates survival signaling in nontumorigenic NCM460 colon cells but apoptotic signaling in tumorigenic HCT116 colon cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Trujillo, Olivia N; Moyer, Mary P; Botnen, James H

    2011-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring chemopreventive agent; the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon cancer and normal cells. In this study, we demonstrated that SFN (15 μmol/L) exposure (72 h) inhibited cell proliferation by up to 95% in colon cancer cells (HCT116) and by 52% in normal colon mucosa-derived (NCM460) cells. Our data also showed that SFN exposure (5 and 10 μmol/L) led to the reduction of G1 phase cell distribution and an induction of apoptosis in HCT116 cells, but to a much lesser extent in NCM460 cells. Furthermore, the examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling status revealed that SFN upregulated the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in NCM460 cells but not in HCT116 cells. In contrast, SFN enhanced the phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and decreased cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-Myc) expression in HCT116 cells but not NCM460 cells. Taken together, the activation of survival signaling in NCM460 cells and apoptotic signaling in HCT116 cells may play a critical role in SFN's stronger potential of inhibiting cell proliferation in colon cancer cells than in normal colon cells.

  8. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, plays common and different roles in cancerous colon HCT116 cell and noncancerous NCM460 colon cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Briske-Anderson, Mary; Wu, Min; Moyer, Mary P

    2012-01-01

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer action, and differential chemopreventive effects of methylselenol on cancerous and noncancerous cells may play an important role. In this study, the submicromolar concentrations of methylselenol were generated by incubating methionase with seleno-L methionine, and colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells and noncancerous colon NCM460 cells were exposed to methylselenol. Methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in S-phase and an induction of apoptosis in HCT116, but to a much lesser extent in NCM460 colon cells. Similarly, the examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-Myc) signaling status revealed that methylselenol inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and the expression of c-Myc in HCT116 cells, but also to a lesser extent in NCM460 cells. The other finding is that methylselenol inhibits sarcoma kinase phosphorylation in HCT116 cells. In contrast, methylselenol upregulated the phosphorylation of sarcoma and focal adhesion kinase survival signals in the noncancerous NCM460 cells. Collectively, methylselenol's stronger potential of inhibiting cell proliferation/survival signals in the cancerous HCT116 cells when compared with that in noncancerous NCM460 cells may partly explain the potential of methylselenol's anticancer action.

  9. Herbal Formulation C168 Attenuates Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in HCT 116 Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells: Role of Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Lek Mun; Chan, Kok Meng; Hamid, Asmah; Latip, Jalifah; Rajab, Nor Fadilah

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal formulations has gained scientific interest, particularly in cancer treatment. In this study, the herbal formulation of interest, denoted as C168, is a mixture of eight genera of plants. This study aims to investigate the antiproliferative effect of C168 methanol extract (CME) on various cancer cells and its underlying mechanism of action on the most responsive cell line, namely, HCT 116 cells. CME exerted antiproliferative activities on HCT 116 colorectal carcinoma cells and HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells but not on CCD-841-CoN normal colon epithelial cells, Jurkat E6.1 lymphoblastic leukemic cells, and V79-4 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts. Further investigation on HCT 116 cells showed that CME induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Treatment of CME induced oxidative stress in HCT 116 cells by increasing the superoxide anion level and decreasing the intracellular glutathione. CME also increased tail moment value and H2AX phosphorylation in HCT 116 cells, suggesting DNA damage as an early signal of CME induced apoptosis. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in CME-treated cells also indicated the involvement of mitochondria in CME induced apoptosis. This study indicated the selectivity of CME toward colon cancer cells with the involvement of oxidative damage as its possible mechanism of action. PMID:26884792

  10. Early establishment of hematopoietic chimerism following allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in comparison with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, S; Zeng, W; Yamazaki, H; Wang, H; Takami, A; Sugimori, N; Miura, Y; Shiobara, S; Matsuda, T; Shinagawa, Y; Harada, M

    1999-04-01

    To characterize the process of the establishment of complete chimerism after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT), we determined the origin of leukocytes in peripheral blood (PB) obtained from 23 patients in the very early period after allo-PBSCT using amplification of mini- or microsatellite regions of genomic DNA. Donor-specific alleles were amplified from the PB obtained at day 8 post-transplant for 19 allo-PBSCT patients. Among the 19 patients, 12 showed only donor-specific alleles (complete chimerism) while 7 did both donor and host-specific alleles (mixed chimerism). Although donor specific alleles were amplified in 10 of 12 patients who received allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) similarly to allo-PBSCT, all of these ten showed mixed chimerism. When the chimeric state was examined in PB samples obtained serially at 2-3-day intervals post-transplant, host-specific alleles in allo-PBSCT patients were not detectable in the PB much earlier than those in allo-BMT patients. These findings indicate that the appearance of donor-derived cells associated with the disappearance of host-derived cells in the circulation occurs earlier after allo-PBSCT as compared with allo-BMT, leading to the rapid establishment of complete chimerism.

  11. Securing recipiency in workplace meetings: Multimodal practices.

    PubMed

    Ford, Cecilia E; Stickle, Trini

    2012-02-01

    As multiparty interactions with single courses of coordinated action, workplace meetings place particular interactional demands on participants who are not primary speakers (e.g. not chairs) as they work to initiate turns and to interactively coordinate with displays of recipiency from co-participants. Drawing from a corpus of 26 hours of videotaped workplace meetings in a midsized US city, this article reports on multimodal practices - phonetic, prosodic, and bodily-visual - used for coordinating turn transition and for consolidating recipiency in these specialized speech exchange systems. Practices used by self-selecting non-primary speakers as they secure turns in meetings include displays of close monitoring of current speakers' emerging turn structure, displays of heightened interest as current turns approach possible completion, and turn initiation practices designed to pursue and, in a fine-tuned manner, coordinate with displays of recipiency on the parts of other participants as well as from reflexively constructed 'target' recipients. By attending to bodily-visual action, as well as phonetics and prosody, this study contributes to expanding accounts for turn taking beyond traditional word-based grammar (i.e. lexicon and syntax). PMID:24976789

  12. 24 CFR 84.41 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 84.41 Section 84.41 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards §...

  13. 24 CFR 84.41 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 84.41 Section 84.41 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards §...

  14. 24 CFR 84.41 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 84.41 Section 84.41 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards §...

  15. 24 CFR 84.41 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 84.41 Section 84.41 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards §...

  16. 24 CFR 84.41 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 84.41 Section 84.41 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban... EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards §...

  17. 20 CFR 634.3 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Eligible recipients. 634.3 Section 634.3 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR MARKET INFORMATION PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE IV, PART E OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Comprehensive Labor Market...

  18. 20 CFR 634.3 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Eligible recipients. 634.3 Section 634.3 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR MARKET INFORMATION PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE IV, PART E OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Comprehensive Labor Market...

  19. 20 CFR 435.41 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 435.41 Section 435.41 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR... procurements entered into in support of an award or other agreement. This includes disputes, claims,...

  20. 14 CFR 1260.141 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Recipient responsibilities. 1260.141 Section 1260.141 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE... Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations Procurement Standards §...

  1. 14 CFR 1260.141 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 1260.141 Section 1260.141 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND... Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations Procurement Standards §...

  2. 14 CFR 1260.141 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 1260.141 Section 1260.141 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND... Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations Procurement Standards §...

  3. 14 CFR 1260.141 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 1260.141 Section 1260.141 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND... Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations Procurement Standards §...

  4. 7 CFR 25.602 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Eligible recipients. 25.602 Section 25.602 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES Round II and... made to the lead managing entities on behalf of the Round II rural empowerment zones and Round...

  5. 7 CFR 25.602 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible recipients. 25.602 Section 25.602 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES Round II and... made to the lead managing entities on behalf of the Round II rural empowerment zones and Round...

  6. 7 CFR 25.602 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Eligible recipients. 25.602 Section 25.602 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES Round II and... made to the lead managing entities on behalf of the Round II rural empowerment zones and Round...

  7. 7 CFR 25.602 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Eligible recipients. 25.602 Section 25.602 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES Round II and... made to the lead managing entities on behalf of the Round II rural empowerment zones and Round...

  8. 7 CFR 25.602 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible recipients. 25.602 Section 25.602 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES Round II and... made to the lead managing entities on behalf of the Round II rural empowerment zones and Round...

  9. Bacillary angiomatosis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Cline, M S; Cummings, O W; Goldman, M; Filo, R S; Pescovitz, M D

    1999-01-27

    A case of bacillary angiomatosis infection presenting as a skin nodule in a renal transplant recipient was found. The patient was taking cyclosporine, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil at the time of presentation. The bacillary angiomatosis responded to 6 months of therapy with oral erythromycin.

  10. 47 CFR 54.630 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.630 Eligible recipients. (a) Rural health care provider site—individual and consortium. Under the Healthcare Connect Fund... or through a consortium. For purposes of the Healthcare Connect Fund, a “consortium” is a group...

  11. 40 CFR 7.85 - Recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recipients. 7.85 Section 7.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL ASSISTANCE FROM THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Requirements for Applicants...

  12. 47 CFR 54.501 - Eligible recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICE Universal Service Support for Schools and Libraries § 54.501 Eligible recipients. (a) Schools. (1... discounts under this subpart. (b) Libraries. (1) Only libraries eligible for assistance from a State library administrative agency under the Library Services and Technology Act (Pub. L. 104-208) and not excluded...

  13. 40 CFR 7.85 - Recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recipients. 7.85 Section 7.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL ASSISTANCE FROM THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Requirements for Applicants...

  14. 40 CFR 7.85 - Recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recipients. 7.85 Section 7.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL ASSISTANCE FROM THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Requirements for Applicants...

  15. 20 CFR 435.41 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 435.41 Section 435.41 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT...

  16. 45 CFR 74.41 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 74.41 Section 74.41 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE... disputes, claims, protests of award, source evaluation or other matters of a contractual nature....

  17. Peculiarities of tuberculosis in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Bappa

    2013-01-01

    Renal transplant is becoming increasingly available in developing countries. Significant advances have been made globally since the first successful kidney transplant in 1954, with the advent of newer, more effective and more selective immunosuppressants. As a result, allograft and patient survival has increased, leaving infection and malignancy as major challenges. The incidence rate of tuberculsis in renal transplant recipients is directly proportional to the prevalence in the general population with the developing countries having the highest rates. The objective of this paper is to review the existing literature on post renal transplant tuberculosis with a view to highlighting its peculiarities compared to tuberculosis in the general population. Several databases (Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane data base, Google Scholar and AJOL) were searched for articles using the key words Tuberculosis (MESH), Renal (OR Kidney), AND transplant. Hand search was also made of reference list of retrieved articles. Full text of relevant original articles were retrieved and appraised. Several studies have demonstrated increased risk of tuberculosis in renal transplant recipients, especially in developing countries. Tuberculosis in renal transplant recipients has peculiarities such as difficulty in diagnosing latent TB, atypical presentations, increased risk of dissemination, increased mortality and interactions of anti-Tb drugs with transplant medications. Clinicians managing renal transplant recipients especially in developing countries should have a high index of suspicion for TB and be aware of its peculiarities in this patient population. PMID:24005585

  18. Successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for GATA2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cuellar-Rodriguez, Jennifer; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Hsu, Amy P.; Zerbe, Christa S.; Calvo, Katherine R.; Wilder, Jennifer; Kurlander, Roger; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Holland, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    We performed nonmyeloablative HSCT in 6 patients with a newly described genetic immunodeficiency syndrome caused by mutations in GATA2—a disease characterized by nontuberculous mycobacterial infection, monocytopenia, B- and NK-cell deficiency, and the propensity to transform to myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myelogenous leukemia. Two patients received peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from matched-related donors, 2 received PBSCs from matched-unrelated donors, and 2 received stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB) donors. Recipients of matched-related and -unrelated donors received fludarabine and 200 cGy of total body irradiation (TBI); UCB recipients received cyclophosphamide in addition to fludarabine and TBI as conditioning. All patients received tacrolimus and sirolimus posttransplantation. Five patients were alive at a median follow-up of 17.4 months (range, 10-25). All patients achieved high levels of donor engraftment in the hematopoietic compartments that were deficient pretransplantation. Adverse events consisted of delayed engraftment in the recipient of a single UCB, GVHD in 4 patients, and immune-mediated pancytopenia and nephrotic syndrome in the recipient of a double UCB transplantation. Nonmyeloablative HSCT in GATA2 deficiency results in reconstitution of the severely deficient monocyte, B-cell, and NK-cell populations and reversal of the clinical phenotype. Registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00923364. PMID:21816832

  19. Donor Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization-Containing Protein 2 (NOD2) Single Nucleotide Polymorphism 13 Is Associated with Septic Shock after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grube, Matthias; Brenmoehl, Julia; Rogler, Gerhard; Hahn, Joachim; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst

    2015-08-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) and toll-like receptor (TLR) 5 genes have been recently associated with the incidence and outcome of infections. In this study, we analyzed 38 patients with septic shock after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for an association of SNPs within NOD2 and TLR5 genes, with susceptibility to septic shock. One hundred twenty-seven transplant recipients unaffected by any infectious complications were used as controls. We found a significant association between the presence of donor NOD2 SNP13 (3016_3017insC) and the incidence of septic shock (P = .002). In multivariate analysis, donor NOD2 SNP13 appeared as an independent risk factor for the incidence of septic shock after allo-SCT. No association was found for recipient SNPs (NOD2 and TLR5) and donor NOD2 SNP8, SNP12, and TLR5-Stop SNP. Our results suggest that NOD2 SNP13 has an impact on the pathophysiology of severe infectious complications and is an independent risk factor for the development of septic shock after allo-SCT.

  20. Antitumor immunomodulatory activity of allogenic bone marrow cells on TiNi scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokorev, O. V.; Hodorenko, V. N.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Gunther, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of modulation of anti-tumor response by allogenic bone marrow cell transplantation into porous TiNi-based scaffold. Transplantation of bone marrow cells into porous TiNi-based scaffold leads to antitumor (35%) and antimetastatic (55%) effects. The lifetime of tumor-bearing animals and implanted allogenic bone marrow cells in incubator of TiNi increases up to 60%. The possible mechanisms of the effect of allogenic cells on tumor process are the stimulation of endogenous effectors of antitumor immunity.

  1. [Immunosuppressives to prevent rejection reactions after allogeneic corneal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Lapp, T; Maier, P; Birnbaum, F; Schlunck, G; Reinhard, T

    2014-03-01

    In order to prevent rejection of an allogeneic corneal transplant after perforating (high risk) keratoplasty, active agents from different classes of pharmacological substances are used, as with solid organ transplantation. In addition to glucocorticoids, antiproliferative agents, small molecule inhibitors and antibodies, those belonging to the group of macrolides with their many derivatives represent an interesting class of substances in this context. As a supplement to cyclosporin A (CSA) the most successful macrolide in transplantation medicine, animal experiments are currently being carried out to test newer macrolide derivatives, such as sanglifehrin A (SFA). This overview describes the classes of drugs and modes of action of currently administered standard medications in the clinical routine and new developments are presented.

  2. REDUCED INTENSITY CONDITIONING FOR ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION: CURRENT PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Mackinnon, Stephen; Childs, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after myeloablative conditioning is an effective therapy for patients with hematologic malignancies. In an attempt to extend this therapy to older patients or those with comorbidities, reduced intensity or truly nonmyeloablative regimens have been developed over the last decade. The principle underlying reduced intensity regimens is to provide some tumor kill with lessened regimen-related morbidity and mortality, then rely on graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects to eradicate remaining malignant cells, while nonmyeloablative regimens rely primarily on GVT effects. In this article, three representative approaches are described, demonstrating the clinical application for both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic malignancies. Current challenges include controlling graft-versus-host disease while allowing GVT to occur. In the future, clinical trials using reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative conditioning will be compared to myeloablative conditioning in selected malignancies to extend the application to standard risk patients. PMID:17222778

  3. A Unique Case of Allogeneic Fat Grafting Between Brothers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Samuel; Edelson, Richard L.; Sumpio, Brandon; Kwei, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We present a case of a 65-year-old man with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma treated with radiation therapy and an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant from his human leukocyte antigen-matched brother. Engraftment was successful, but the patient went on to develop painful, radiation-induced ulcers. The ulcers were fat-allografted using liposuctioned fat from his brother because of the patient’s unique chimeric state. Postprocedure follow-up revealed epithelialization of the ulcer sites and significant improvement in neuropathic pain. Our unique case study supports the use of fat grafting for its restorative purposes and for its ability to alleviate chronic neuropathic pain. Additionally, it appears that our case provides a basis of a general approach to the treatment of radiation-induced ulcers in chimeric patients with lymphoid malignancies. PMID:27757347

  4. Bullous pemphigoid after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Keisuke; Koike, Kazutoshi; Kobayashi, Chie; Iijima, Shigeruko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Tsuchida, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune skin disorder characterized by subepidermal blisters due to deposit of autoantibody against dermal basement membrane protein. It has been reported that BP can occur after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe a patient with BP having autoantibody against BP180 after unrelated-donor HSCT against T lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient was treated with steroid leading to complete resolution of BP, but T lymphoblastic leukemia progressed rapidly after steroid hormone treatment. Given that immunosuppressant may reduce graft-versus-tumor effect, immunomodulatory agents such as nicotinamide and tetracycline, erythromycin, and immunoglobulin may be appropriate as soon as typical blister lesions are seen after HSCT. PMID:26113316

  5. Allogeneic transplantation in the UK: an aggregation of marginal gains?

    PubMed

    Thomson, Kirsty J; Peggs, Karl S

    2013-10-01

    A number of advances in clinical practice that are considered routine in modern allogeneic transplant programmes lack definitive supporting evidence, partly because they may offer modest incremental benefits that are difficult to demonstrate in a statistically robust manner given the relatively small cohorts of patients who undergo such procedures. Nevertheless, these marginal gains probably contribute therapeutically meaningful overall benefit, particularly when aggregated. We review the evidence for a number of these practices in terms of impact on transplant outcomes, with particular reference to the setting of T cell depletion as widely practiced in the United Kingdom, including high resolution tissue typing, surveillance for and therapy of infectious complications, chimerism-directed immune modulation and more sensitive monitoring for residual or progressive disease.

  6. 42 CFR 121.7 - Identification of organ recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Identification of organ recipient. 121.7 Section... DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.7 Identification of organ recipient. (a) List of potential transplant recipients. (1) An OPTN member procuring an organ shall operate the...

  7. 42 CFR 121.7 - Identification of organ recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Identification of organ recipient. 121.7 Section... DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.7 Identification of organ recipient. (a) List of potential transplant recipients. (1) An OPTN member procuring an organ shall operate the...

  8. 42 CFR 121.7 - Identification of organ recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Identification of organ recipient. 121.7 Section... DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.7 Identification of organ recipient. (a) List of potential transplant recipients. (1) An OPTN member procuring an organ shall operate the...

  9. 34 CFR 75.590 - Evaluation by the recipient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaluation by the recipient. 75.590 Section 75.590 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Evaluation § 75.590 Evaluation by the recipient. A recipient shall submit a...

  10. 45 CFR 617.14 - Remedial action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedial action by recipients. 617.14 Section 617.14 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... the effects of the discrimination. If another recipient exercises control over the recipient that...

  11. 45 CFR 617.14 - Remedial action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial action by recipients. 617.14 Section 617.14 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... the effects of the discrimination. If another recipient exercises control over the recipient that...

  12. 45 CFR 617.14 - Remedial action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedial action by recipients. 617.14 Section 617.14 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... the effects of the discrimination. If another recipient exercises control over the recipient that...

  13. 45 CFR 617.14 - Remedial action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedial action by recipients. 617.14 Section 617.14 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... the effects of the discrimination. If another recipient exercises control over the recipient that...

  14. 45 CFR 617.14 - Remedial action by recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remedial action by recipients. 617.14 Section 617.14 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... the effects of the discrimination. If another recipient exercises control over the recipient that...

  15. 34 CFR 110.24 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 110.24..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Duties of ED Recipients § 110.24 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) As...

  16. 29 CFR 35.26 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 35.26 Section 35.26 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR....26 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) In order to assess a recipient's compliance with...

  17. 29 CFR 35.26 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 35.26 Section 35.26 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR....26 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) In order to assess a recipient's compliance with...

  18. 34 CFR 110.24 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 110.24..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Duties of ED Recipients § 110.24 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) As...

  19. 29 CFR 35.26 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 35.26 Section 35.26 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR....26 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) In order to assess a recipient's compliance with...

  20. 29 CFR 35.26 - Recipient assessment of age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recipient assessment of age distinctions. 35.26 Section 35.26 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR....26 Recipient assessment of age distinctions. (a) In order to assess a recipient's compliance with...