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Sample records for allograft rejection model1

  1. REJECTION OF ASCITES TUMOR ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Berke, Gideon; Sullivan, Karen A.; Amos, Bernard

    1972-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells (PEC), obtained after the rejection of EL4 leukemia by BALB/c mice, are much more effective in the specific in vitro destruction of 51Cr-labeled EL4 cells than are spleen, thymus, lymph node, or peripheral blood lymphocytes. The presence of a large number of effector cells at the site of graft rejection is reflected in the potent cytolytic activity seen in vitro. Effector cells temporarily lose cytolytic reactivity when treated with trypsin but regain reactivity with time. This recovery occurs in normal as well as in immune serum. The destructive reactivity of PEC is increased when macrophages are removed. The remaining population of nonadherent PEC is composed primarily of small- to medium-sized lymphocytes. Complex tissue culture media are not needed, but there is a definite requirement for serum. The required serum component is heat stable, nondialyzable, and is not consumed during the reaction. The use of an ascites allograft system made these observations possible and permitted the isolation of those host cells intimately associated with rejection. PMID:5025438

  2. Renal allograft rejection: sonography and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Cohen, W.N.

    1980-07-01

    A total of 30 renal allograft patients who had sonographic B scanning and radionuclide studies of the transplant was studied as to whether: (1) the allograft rejection was associated with any consistent and reliable sonographic features and (2) the sonograms complemented the radionuclide studies. Focal areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistent sonographic finding in chymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistens sonographic finding in allograft rejection. This was observed in most of the patients exhibiting moderate or severe rejection, but was frequently absent with mild rejection. Areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were not seen during episodes of acute tubular necrosis. Therefore, sonography showing zones of decreased parenchymal echogenicity was complementary to radionuclide studies in the diagnosis of allograft rejection versus acute tubular necrosis. Corticomedullary demarcation was difficult to interpret because of technical variables, and was inconsistently related to rejection in this series.

  3. [Tubulointerstitial rejection of renal allografts].

    PubMed

    Malušková, Jana; Honsová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Tubulo-intersticial rejection represents T-cell mediated rejection of kidney allografts with the morphology of immune-mediated interstitial nephritis. Diagnosis is dependent on the histopathological evaluation of a graft biopsy sample. The key morphological features are interstitial inflammatory infiltrate and damage to tubular epithelial cell which in severe cases can result in the ruptures of the tubular basement membranes. The differential diagnosis of tubulo-interstitial rejection includes acute interstitial nephritis and viral inflammatory kidney diseases, mainly polyomavirus nephropathy.

  4. Mechanisms of allograft rejection of corneal endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Y.; Silverstein, A.M.; Prendergast, R.A.

    1982-07-01

    The local intraocular graft-vs.-host (GVH) reaction, involving the destruction of the corneal endothelial cells of the rabbit host by sensitized donor lymphoid cells, has been used to study the mechanism of corneal allograft rejection. Pretreatment of donor cells with a specific mouse monoclonal hybridoma anti-T cell antibody and complement suppresses the destructive reaction, suggesting that a cellular-immune mechanism is primarily involved. Pretreatment of donor cells with mitomycin-C completely abolishes the local GVH reaction, indicating that the effector lymphocytes must undergo mitosis within the eye before they can engage in target cell destruction. Finally, studies of the local GVH reaction in irradiated leukopenic recipients or in preinflamed rabbit eyes suggest that host leukocytes may contribute nonspecifically to enhance the destructive process. These studies show that the local ocular GVH reaction may provide a useful model for the study of the mechanisms involved in the rejection of corneal allografts.

  5. Allorecognition by T Lymphocytes and Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Jose; Paster, Joshua; Benichou, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of donor antigens by recipient T cells in secondary lymphoid organs initiates the adaptive inflammatory immune response leading to the rejection of allogeneic transplants. Allospecific T cells become activated through interaction of their T cell receptors with intact allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on donor cells (direct pathway) and/or donor peptides presented by self-MHC molecules on recipient antigen-presenting cells (APCs) (indirect pathway). In addition, recent studies show that alloreactive T cells can also be stimulated through recognition of allogeneic MHC molecules displayed on recipient APCs (MHC cross-dressing) after their transfer via cell–cell contact or through extracellular vesicles (semi-direct pathway). The specific allorecognition pathway used by T cells is dictated by intrinsic and extrinsic factors to the allograft and can influence the nature and magnitude of the alloresponse and rejection process. Consequently, various organs and tissues such as skin, cornea, and solid organ transplants are recognized differently by pro-inflammatory T cells through these distinct pathways, which may explain why these grafts are rejected in a different fashion. On the other hand, the mechanisms by which anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells (Tregs) recognize alloantigen and promote transplantation tolerance are still unclear. It is likely that thymic Tregs are activated through indirect allorecognition, while peripheral Tregs recognize alloantigens in a direct fashion. As we gain insights into the mechanisms underlying allorecognition by pro-inflammatory and Treg cells, novel strategies are being designed to prevent allograft rejection in the absence of ongoing immunosuppressive drug treatment in patients. PMID:28018349

  6. Utility of sentinel flaps in assessing facial allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kueckelhaus, Maximilian; Fischer, Sebastian; Lian, Christine G; Bueno, Ericka M; Marty, Francisco M; Tullius, Stefan G; Pribaz, Julian J; Murphy, George J; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsies are critical for histologic evaluation of rejection and proper treatment after facial allotransplantation. Many facial allografts provide only limited skin area, and frequent biopsies may also compromise aesthetic outcome. Sentinel flaps, recovered as free fasciocutaneous radial forearm flaps, have been used for remote-site rejection monitoring. They maintain their axial blood supply, similar to facial allografts. The correlation between facial allografts and sentinel flaps in cases of rejection is presented. The authors analyzed the experience of the Boston team's use of four sentinel flaps. Rejection was evaluated and results were compared for each time point. Sentinel flaps were used as functional flaps whenever possible. Results showed a reliable correlation between biopsy specimens taken from the facial allograft and sentinel flaps. During severe rejection episodes in 100 percent of biopsy pairs, both sites displayed a similar grade of rejection. In one case, clinical findings suggested rejection in the facial allograft but were unraveled as rosacea, because clinically there was no rejection displayed in the sentinel flap. The sentinel flap shows a reliable correlation to the facial allograft in cases of severe rejection, therefore providing a valuable tool for rejection monitoring in facial allotransplantation. Advantages of using these flaps include the avoidance of further surgical procedures to the primary vascularized composite allotransplant, additional use of the sentinel flap to repair damaged nonfacial sites, and its utility as both a clinical and histopathologic barometer of rejection and predictor of the potential existence of facial dermatitis unrelated to rejection. Therapeutic, IV.

  7. Adenovirus Interstitial Nephritis and Rejection in an Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Storsley, Leroy

    2011-01-01

    Viral infections are an important complication of solid organ transplantation. Although polyoma is the virus that most commonly infects the renal allograft, adenoviral infections are also reported. We describe the clinical and pathologic findings in a patient with adenoviral infection associated with acute rejection of the renal allograft. The pathologic findings of adenovirus infection usually include a granulomatous interstitial nephritis, which is helpful in distinguishing from acute rejection. We discuss the differential diagnosis and pathophysiology of allograft viral infections and concomitant rejection. PMID:21436288

  8. Late Failing Heart Allografts: Pathology of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy and Association With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Toquet, C; Rouvier, P; Beuscart, T; Bories, M C; Varnous, S; Guillemain, R; Pattier, S; Suberbielle, C; Leprince, P; Lefaucheur, C; Jouven, X; Bruneval, P; Duong Van Huyen, J P

    2016-01-01

    In heart transplantation, there is a lack of robust evidence of the specific causes of late allograft failure. We hypothesized that a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts may be associated with antibody-mediated injury and immune-mediated coronary arteriosclerosis. We included all patients undergoing a retransplantation for late terminal heart allograft failure in three referral centers. We performed an integrative strategy of heart allograft phenotyping by assessing the heart vascular tree including histopathology and immunohistochemistry together with circulating donor-specific antibodies. The main analysis included 40 explanted heart allografts patients and 402 endomyocardial biopsies performed before allograft loss. Overall, antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 19 (47.5%) failing heart allografts including 16 patients (40%) in whom unrecognized previous episodes of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection occurred 4.5 ± 3.5 years before allograft loss. Explanted allografts with evidence of antibody-mediated rejection demonstrated higher endothelitis and microvascular inflammation scores (0.89 ± 0.26 and 2.25 ± 0.28, respectively) compared with explanted allografts without antibody-mediated rejection (0.42 ± 0.11 and 0.36 ± 0.09, p = 0.046 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Antibody-mediated injury was observed in 62.1% of failing allografts with pure coronary arteriosclerosis and mixed (arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis) pattern, while it was not observed in patients with pure coronary atherosclerosis (p = 0.0076). We demonstrate that antibody-mediated rejection is operating in a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts and is associated with severe coronary arteriosclerosis. Unrecognized subclinical antibody-mediated rejection episodes may be observed years before allograft failure.

  9. Cell-Free DNA and Active Rejection in Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Roy D; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Poggio, Emilio D; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Langone, Anthony J; Sood, Puneet; Matas, Arthur J; Mehta, Shikha; Mannon, Roslyn B; Sharfuddin, Asif; Fischbach, Bernard; Narayanan, Mohanram; Jordan, Stanley C; Cohen, David; Weir, Matthew R; Hiller, David; Prasad, Preethi; Woodward, Robert N; Grskovic, Marica; Sninsky, John J; Yee, James P; Brennan, Daniel C

    2017-07-01

    Histologic analysis of the allograft biopsy specimen is the standard method used to differentiate rejection from other injury in kidney transplants. Donor-derived cell-free DNA (dd-cfDNA) is a noninvasive test of allograft injury that may enable more frequent, quantitative, and safer assessment of allograft rejection and injury status. To investigate this possibility, we prospectively collected blood specimens at scheduled intervals and at the time of clinically indicated biopsies. In 102 kidney recipients, we measured plasma levels of dd-cfDNA and correlated the levels with allograft rejection status ascertained by histology in 107 biopsy specimens. The dd-cfDNA level discriminated between biopsy specimens showing any rejection (T cell-mediated rejection or antibody-mediated rejection [ABMR]) and controls (no rejection histologically), P<0.001 (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve [AUC], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.61 to 0.86). Positive and negative predictive values for active rejection at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 61% and 84%, respectively. The AUC for discriminating ABMR from samples without ABMR was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.97). Positive and negative predictive values for ABMR at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 44% and 96%, respectively. Median dd-cfDNA was 2.9% (ABMR), 1.2% (T cell-mediated types ≥IB), 0.2% (T cell-mediated type IA), and 0.3% in controls (P=0.05 for T cell-mediated rejection types ≥IB versus controls). Thus, dd-cfDNA may be used to assess allograft rejection and injury; dd-cfDNA levels <1% reflect the absence of active rejection (T cell-mediated type ≥IB or ABMR) and levels >1% indicate a probability of active rejection. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. Total lymphoid irradiation for treatment of intractable cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, S.A.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Stinson, E.B. )

    1991-03-01

    The ability of postoperative total lymphoid irradiation to reverse otherwise intractable cardiac allograft rejection was examined in a group of 10 patients in whom conventional rejection therapy (including pulsed steroids and monoclonal or polyclonal anti-T-cell antibody therapy) had failed to provide sustained freedom from rejection. Follow-up periods range from 73 to 1119 days since the start of total lymphoid irradiation. No patient died or sustained serious morbidity because of the irradiation. Three patients have had no further rejection (follow-up periods, 105 to 365 days). Two patients died--one in cardiogenic shock during the course of total lymphoid irradiation, the other with recurrent rejection caused by noncompliance with his medical regimen. Total lymphoid irradiation appears to be a safe and a moderately effective immunosuppressive modality for 'salvage' therapy of cardiac allograft rejection unresponsive to conventional therapy.

  11. Mechanisms involved in antibody- and complement-mediated allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has become critical clinically because this form of rejection is usually unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, and therefore, it has been recognized as a major cause of allograft loss. Our group developed experimental animal models of vascularized organ transplantation to study pathogenesis of antibody- and complement-mediated endothelial cell injury leading to graft rejection. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft rejection resulting from activation of complement by C1q- and MBL (mannose-binding lectin)-dependent pathways and interactions with a variety of effector cells, including macrophages and monocytes through Fcγ receptors and complement receptors. PMID:20135240

  12. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  13. Imaging mouse lung allograft rejection with 1H MRI

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinbang; Huang, Howard J.; Wang, Xingan; Wang, Wei; Ellison, Henry; Thomen, Robert P.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Woods, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that longitudinal, non-invasive monitoring via MRI can characterize acute cellular rejection (ACR) in mouse orthotopic lung allografts. Methods Nineteen Balb/c donor to C57BL/6 recipient orthotopic left lung transplants were performed, further divided into control-Ig vs anti-CD4/anti-CD8 treated groups. A two-dimensional multi-slice gradient-echo pulse sequence synchronized with ventilation was used on a small-animal MR scanner to acquire proton images of lung at post-operative days 3, 7 and 14, just before sacrifice. Lung volume and parenchymal signal were measured, and lung compliance was calculated as volume change per pressure difference between high and low pressures. Results Normalized parenchymal signal in the control-Ig allograft increased over time, with statistical significance between day 14 and day 3 post transplantation (0.046→0.789, P < 0.05), despite large inter-mouse variations; this was consistent with histopathologic evidence of rejection. Compliance of the control-Ig allograft decreased significantly over time (0.013→0.003, P < 0.05), but remained constant in mice treated with anti-CD4/anti-CD8 antibodies. Conclusion Lung allograft rejection in individual mice can be monitored by lung parenchymal signal changes and by lung compliance through MRI. Longitudinal imaging can help us better understand the time course of individual lung allograft rejection and response to treatment. PMID:24954886

  14. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E.; Padera, Robert F.; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D’Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J.; Perrella, Mark A.; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O.; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  15. Lung allograft rejection in the rat. V. Inhaled stimuli aggravate the rejection response

    SciTech Connect

    Prop, J.; Jansen, H.M.; Wildevuur, C.R.; Nieuwenhuis, P.

    1985-07-01

    Responses to inhaled stimuli in lung allografts might intensify the rejection response against the grafts. Therefore, the authors investigated the rejection of lung allografts in rats exposed to various degrees of stimuli via the airways. A group of these rats was selectively decontaminated to eliminate infection of the graft. Stimuli provided were intrabronchially injected purified protein derivative in sensitized rats and dust inhaled from sawdust used as bedding in the cages. Both intrabronchially injected purified protein derivative and stimuli inhaled from sawdust were found to aggravate lung allograft rejection, thus shortening mean graft survival from 32 to 11 days. Selective decontamination did prolong lung graft survival (p less than 0.05) because it lowered the overall immune reactivity of the recipient rats. For clinical lung transplantation, these observations suggest that patients should be selectively decontaminated and protected against inhalation of exogenous stimuli during a rejection episode.

  16. B Lymphocytes Differentially Influence Acute and Chronic Allograft Rejection in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    DiLillo, David J.; Griffiths, Robert; Seshan, Surya V.; Magro, Cynthia M.; Ruiz, Phillip; Coffman, Thomas M.; Tedder, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    The relative contributions of B lymphocytes and plasma cells during allograft rejection remain unclear. Therefore, the effects of B cell depletion on acute cardiac rejection, chronic renal rejection, and skin graft rejection were compared using CD20 or CD19 mAbs. Both CD20 and CD19 mAbs effectively depleted mature B cells, while CD19 mAb treatment depleted plasmablasts and some plasma cells. B cell depletion did not affect acute cardiac allograft rejection, although CD19 mAb treatment prevented allograft-specific IgG production. Strikingly, CD19 mAb treatment significantly reduced renal allograft rejection and abrogated allograft-specific IgG development, while CD20 mAb treatment did not. By contrast, B cell depletion exacerbated skin allograft rejection and augmented the proliferation of adoptively transferred alloantigen-specific CD4+ T cells, demonstrating that B cells can also negatively regulate allograft rejection. Thereby, B cells can either positively or negatively regulate allograft rejection depending on the nature of the allograft and the intensity of the rejection response. Moreover, CD19 mAb may represent a new approach for depleting both B cells and plasma cells to concomitantly impair T cell activation, inhibit the generation of new allograft-specific Abs, or reduce preexisting allograft-specific Ab levels in transplant patients. PMID:21248259

  17. Autoantibodies to Vimentin Cause Accelerated Rejection of Cardiac Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Leong, Hon-Sing; McCormack, Ann; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Holder, Angela; Rose, Marlene L.

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune responses to vimentin occur after solid organ transplantation, but their pathogenic effects are unclear. The aim of these studies was to investigate the effects of vimentin preimmunization on allogeneic and isografted hearts in a murine transplant model. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with murine vimentin in complete Freund’s adjuvant resulted in anti-vimentin antibodies and vimentin-reactive Th-1 cells. Transplantation of 129/sv hearts into vimentin-immunized C57BL/6 recipients resulted in accelerated rejection (8.4 ± 1.5 days; n = 18), compared with hen egg lysozyme-immunized C57BL/6 (13.3 ± 2.2 days; n = 10; P < 0.0001, log-rank test). In contrast, isografts continued to beat beyond 90 days. Immunohistochemical analysis of allografts from vimentin/complete Freund’s adjuvant mice demonstrated increased numbers of T cells and enhanced microvascular deposition of C3d, CD41, and P-selectin compared with controls. Antibodies were necessary for accelerated rejection, shown by the fact that vimentin-immunized B-cell-deficient IgH6 mice did not show accelerated rejection of 129/sv allografts, but rejection was restored by adoptive transfer of serum containing anti-vimentin antibodies. Eluates from donor hearts placed in vimentin/complete Freund’s adjuvant recipients contained anti-vimentin antibodies, shown by Western blotting. Confocal imaging of rejected hearts demonstrated presence of vimentin and C3d on apoptosed leukocytes, endothelial cells, and platelet/leukocyte conjugates. These results demonstrate that autoantibodies to vimentin, in conjunction with the alloimmune response, have a pathogenic role in allograft rejection. PMID:17392180

  18. The composition of the microbiota modulates allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yuk Man; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Stefka, Andrew T.; Molinero, Luciana L.; Theriault, Betty; Aquino-Michaels, Keston; Sivan, Ayelet S.; Nagler, Cathryn R.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Chong, Anita S.; Bartman, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation is the only cure for end-stage organ failure, but without immunosuppression, T cells rapidly reject allografts. While genetic disparities between donor and recipient are major determinants of the kinetics of transplant rejection, little is known about the contribution of environmental factors. Because colonized organs have worse transplant outcome than sterile organs, we tested the influence of host and donor microbiota on skin transplant rejection. Compared with untreated conventional mice, pretreatment of donors and recipients with broad-spectrum antibiotics (Abx) or use of germ-free (GF) donors and recipients resulted in prolonged survival of minor antigen–mismatched skin grafts. Increased graft survival correlated with reduced type I IFN signaling in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and decreased priming of alloreactive T cells. Colonization of GF mice with fecal material from untreated conventional mice, but not from Abx-pretreated mice, enhanced the ability of APCs to prime alloreactive T cells and accelerated graft rejection, suggesting that alloimmunity is modulated by the composition of microbiota rather than the quantity of bacteria. Abx pretreatment of conventional mice also delayed rejection of major antigen–mismatched skin and MHC class II–mismatched cardiac allografts. This study demonstrates that Abx pretreatment prolongs graft survival, suggesting that targeting microbial constituents is a potential therapeutic strategy for enhancing graft acceptance. PMID:27322054

  19. Cellular requirements for the rejection of skin allografts in rats.

    PubMed

    Lubaroff, D M

    1973-08-01

    The role of bone marrow-derived cells in the rejection of skin allografts in rats was investigated. Lewis rats, rendered tolerant of BN antigens and bearing healthy grafts, were thymectomized, irradiated with 900 rad, and injected with varying doses of either normal isologous bone marrow, normal lymph node cells, and/or lymph node cells presensitized to BN antigens. In some experiments rats were also adoptively sensitized to tuberculin. Results showed that, although necessary for the elicitation of tuberculin skin reactions, bone marrow cells are not needed for the rejection of previously tolerated skin allografts. Rats receiving lymph node cells alone rejected their grafts in about 6-7 days. In addition, rats injected with bone marrow alone also rejected their grafts, although significantly later than did lymph node cell recipients, indicating that rat marrow contains a population of cells capable of reacting to transplantation antigens. These cells were found capable of reacting to major transplantation antigens but not minor as they were ineffective in causing the rejection of Ag-B compatible Fischer skin grafts. From experiments utilizing bone marrow from neonatally thymectomized donors and cells treated with an antiserum to rat T cells, these competent cells in the marrow were shown to be thymus derived.

  20. Differential expression of microRNAs during allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Wei, L; Wang, M; Qu, X; Mah, A; Xiong, X; Harris, A G C; Phillips, L K; Martinez, O M; Krams, S M

    2012-05-01

    MicrorRNA are small noncoding RNA molecules that regulate the posttranscriptional expression of target genes. In addition to being involved in many biologic processes, microRNAs are important regulators in innate and adaptive immune responses. Distinct sets of expressed microRNAs are found in different cell types and tissues and aberrant expression of microRNAs is associated with many disease states. MicroRNA expression was examined in a model of heterotopic heart transplantation by microarray analyses and a unique profile was detected in rejecting allogeneic transplants (BALB/c → C57BL/6) as compared to syngeneic transplants (C57BL/6 → C57BL/6). The microRNA miR-182 was significantly increased in rejecting cardiac allografts and in mononuclear cells that infiltrate the grafts. Forkhead box (FOX) proteins are a family of important transcription factors and FOXO1 is a target of miR-182. As miR-182 increases after transplant, there is a concomitant posttranscriptional decrease in FOXO1 expression in heart allografts that is localized to both the cardiomyocytes and CD3(+) T cells. The microRNA miR-182 is significantly increased in both peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma during graft rejection suggesting potential as a biomarker of graft status. Our results identify microRNAs that may regulate alloimmune responses and graft outcomes.

  1. Injury-induced allograft rejection: A rendezvous with evolution.

    PubMed

    Land, Walter G

    2013-01-01

    Modern immunology, in many ways, is based on three major paradigms: the clonal selection theory, the pattern recognition theory, and the danger/injury theory. The last theory holds that any cell stress and tissue injury, including allograft injury, via induction of damage-associated molecular patterns, induces immunity, including alloimmunity, leading to allograft rejection. On the other hand, the concept precludes that non-self per se induces immunity as proposed by the two former theories. Recently, the danger/injury model has gained considerable acceptance by immunologists, in particular as promoted by new insights into the function of the mammalian gut microbiota, representing a huge assemblage of non-self. Harboring microbiota by hosts is characterized by the fact that harmless noninjurious commensal microbes are protected by innate immunity-based tolerance, whereas intestinal injury-causing pathogenic microbes are immunologically attacked. Plausibility and validity of the danger/injury concept is stringently supported by observations of similar phenomena across the tree of life: the ability of the immune system to discriminate between harmful life-threatening non-self to induce immunity and harmless beneficial non-self to induce tolerance has apparently emerged during evolution. Immune defense responses to injuring/injured non-self (e.g., as reflected by plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses on one hand, and allograft rejection on the other hand) as well as immunity-controlled protection of beneficial non-self (e.g., as reflected by microbiota and the fetus of placental mammals) are processes in the interest of evolution and, thus, evolved under pressure across the phylogenetic tree.

  2. Bone marrow-derived T lymphocytes responsible for allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Senjanovic, M.; Marusic, M.

    1984-08-01

    Lethally irradiated mice reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow cells were grafted with allogeneic skin grafts 6-7 weeks after irradiation and reconstitution. Mice with intact thymuses rejected the grafts whereas the mice thymectomized before irradiation and reconstitution did not. Thymectomized irradiated mice (TIR mice) reconstituted with bone marrow cells from donors immune to the allografts rejected the grafts. Bone marrow cells from immunized donors, pretreated with Thy 1.2 antibody and C', did not confer immunity to TIR recipients. To determine the number of T lymphocytes necessary for the transfer of immunity by bone marrow cells from immunized donors, thymectomized irradiated mice were reconstituted with nonimmune bone marrow cells treated with Thy 1.2 antibody and C' and with various numbers of splenic T lymphocytes from nonimmune and immune donors. Allogeneic skin graft rejection was obtained with 10(6) nonimmune or 10(4) immune T cells. The effect of immune T cells was specific: i.e., immune T cells accelerated only rejection of the relevant skin grafts whereas against a third-party skin grafts acted as normal T lymphocytes.

  3. High Fat Diet-induced Obesity Enhances Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Molinero, Luciana L; Yin, Dengping; Lei, Kevin; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity promotes a state of low-grade inflammation that exacerbates chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. In transplantation, the survival of organs transplanted into obese patients is reduced compared to allografts in lean recipients. However, whether this is due to increased alloimmunity remains to be addressed conclusively. Methods We used a mouse model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and assessed immune responses to allogeneic stimulation in vitro, allogeneic splenocyte immunization in vivo, and allogeneic heart transplantation. Results Our results indicate that HFD altered the composition and phenotype of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that led to their enhanced capacity to stimulate T cells. Immunization with allogeneic splenocytes in vivo resulted in increased alloreactivity, as determined by IFNγ production. Moreover, cardiac allograft rejection in HFD mice was modestly accelerated compared to aged-matched control animals fed a low fat diet (LFD), correlating with enhanced alloreactive T cell function. Conclusions Our results highlight the increased alloresponse triggered by HFD-induced obesity and its negative impact on transplant outcome. PMID:27007226

  4. High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Enhances Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Molinero, Luciana L; Yin, Dengping; Lei, Yuk Man; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-05-01

    Obesity promotes a state of low-grade inflammation that exacerbates chronic inflammatory diseases, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. In transplantation, the survival of organs transplanted into obese patients is reduced compared with allografts in lean recipients. However, whether this is due to increased alloimmunity remains to be addressed conclusively. We used a mouse model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and assessed immune responses to allogeneic stimulation in vitro, allogeneic splenocyte immunization in vivo, and allogeneic heart transplantation. Our results indicate that HFD altered the composition and phenotype of splenic antigen-presenting cells that led to their enhanced capacity to stimulate T cells. Immunization with allogeneic splenocytes in vivo resulted in increased alloreactivity, as determined by IFNγ production. Moreover, cardiac allograft rejection in HFD mice was modestly accelerated compared to aged-matched control animals fed a low-fat diet, correlating with enhanced alloreactive T cell function. Our results highlight the increased alloresponse triggered by HFD-induced obesity and its negative impact on transplant outcome.

  5. Is Duplex-Ultrasound a useful tool in defining rejection episodes in composite tissue allograft transplants?

    PubMed

    Loizides, Alexander; Kronberger, Irmgard-Elisabeth; Plaikner, Michaela; Gruber, Hannes

    2015-12-01

    Immunologic reactions in transplanted organs are in more or less all allograft patients detectable: clear parameters exist as e.g. in renal transplants where the clearance power reduces by rejection. On the contrary, in composite tissue allografts clear and objective indicators stating a rejection episode lack. We present the case of a hand-transplanted subject with signs of acute transplant rejection diagnosed by means of Duplex Ultrasound and confirmed by biopsy.

  6. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  7. Role of Memory T Cells in Allograft Rejection and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Benichou, Gilles; Gonzalez, Bruno; Marino, Jose; Ayasoufi, Katayoun; Valujskikh, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Memory T cells are characterized by their low activation threshold, robust effector functions, and resistance to conventional immunosuppression and costimulation blockade. Unlike their naïve counterparts, memory T cells reside in and recirculate through peripheral non-lymphoid tissues. Alloreactive memory T cells are subdivided into different categories based on their origins, phenotypes, and functions. Recipients whose immune systems have been directly exposed to allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules display high affinity alloreactive memory T cells. In the absence of any prior exposure to allogeneic MHC molecules, endogenous alloreactive memory T cells are regularly generated through microbial infections (heterologous immunity). Regardless of their origin, alloreactive memory T cells represent an essential element of the allograft rejection process and a major barrier to tolerance induction in clinical transplantation. This article describes the different subsets of alloreactive memory T cells involved in transplant rejection and examine their generation, functional properties, and mechanisms of action. In addition, we discuss strategies developed to target deleterious allospecific memory T cells in experimental animal models and clinical settings. PMID:28293238

  8. Differential gene expression pattern in biopsies with renal allograft pyelonephritis and allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Oghumu, Steve; Nori, Uday; Bracewell, Anna; Zhang, Jianying; Bott, Cherri; Nadasdy, Gyongyi M.; Brodsky, Sergey V.; Pelletier, Ronald; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Nadasdy, Tibor; Satoskar, Anjali A.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating acute pyelonephritis (APN) from acute rejection (AR) in renal allograft biopsies can sometimes be difficult because of overlapping clinical and histologic features, lack of positive urine cultures, and variable response to antibiotics. We wanted to study differential gene expression between AR and APN using biopsy tissue. Thirty-three biopsies were analyzed using NanoString multiplex platform and PCR (6 transplant baseline biopsies, 8 AR, 15 APN [8 culture positive, 7 culture negative], and 4 native pyelonephritis [NP]). Additional 22 biopsies were tested by PCR to validate the results. CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and IDO1 were the top differentially expressed genes, upregulated in AR. Lactoferrin (LTF) and CXCL1 were higher in APN and NP. No statistically significant difference in transcript levels was seen between culture-positive and culture-negative APN biopsies. Comparing the overall mRNA signature using Ingenuity pathway analysis, interferon-gamma emerged as the dominant upstream regulator in AR and allograft APN, but not in NP (which clustered separately). Our study suggests that chemokine pathways in graft APN may differ from NP and in fact resemble AR, due to a component of alloreactivity, resulting in variable response to antibiotic treatment. Therefore, cautious addition of steroids might help in resistant cases of graft APN. PMID:27352120

  9. Memory CD4 T Cells Induce Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Allografts.

    PubMed

    Gorbacheva, Victoria; Fan, Ran; Fairchild, Robert L; Baldwin, William M; Valujskikh, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Despite advances in immunosuppression, antibody-mediated rejection is a serious threat to allograft survival. Alloreactive memory helper T cells can induce potent alloantibody responses and often associate with poor graft outcome. Nevertheless, the ability of memory T cells to elicit well characterized manifestations of antibody-mediated rejection has not been tested. We investigated helper functions of memory CD4 T cells in a mouse model of renal transplantation. Whereas the majority of unsensitized C57Bl/6 recipients spontaneously accepted fully MHC-mismatched A/J renal allografts, recipients containing donor-reactive memory CD4 T cells rapidly lost allograft function. Increased serum creatinine levels, high serum titers of donor-specific alloantibody, minimal T cell infiltration, and intense C4d deposition in the grafts of sensitized recipients fulfilled all diagnostic criteria for acute renal antibody-mediated rejection in humans. IFNγ neutralization did not prevent the renal allograft rejection induced by memory helper T cells, and CD8 T cell depletion at the time of transplantation or depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells also did not prevent the renal allograft rejection induced by memory helper T cells starting at day 4 after transplantation. However, B cell depletion inhibited alloantibody generation and significantly extended allograft survival, indicating that donor-specific alloantibodies (not T cells) were the critical effector mechanism of renal allograft rejection induced by memory CD4 T cells. Our studies provide direct evidence that recipient T cell sensitization may result in antibody-mediated rejection of renal allografts and introduce a physiologically relevant animal model with which to investigate mechanisms of antibody-mediated rejection and novel therapeutic approaches for its prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. Effect of a stable prostacyclin analogue on canine renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Tobimatsu, M; Ueda, Y; Toyoda, K; Saito, S; Konomi, K

    1987-01-01

    The effect of OP-41483 (Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Osaka, Japan), a stable prostacyclin analogue, on canine renal allograft rejection was investigated. Administration for 4 days after transplantation significantly increased renal cortical blood flow and urine output when compared with untreated dogs with renal allografts. Serum creatinine levels remained relatively low during postoperative days 1-4. Mean animal survival time was prolonged. Vascular lesions and mononuclear cell infiltration were greatly diminished in biopsy specimens removed on day 4. This stable prostacyclin analogue provided a degree of protection against canine renal allograft rejection. Images Figs. 1A and B. PMID:3545109

  11. Spleen tyrosine kinase contributes to acute renal allograft rejection in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Ramessur Chandran, Sharmila; Tesch, Greg H; Han, Yingjie; Woodman, Naomi; Mulley, William R; Kanellis, John; Blease, Kate; Ma, Frank Y; Nikolic-Paterson, David J

    2015-01-01

    Kidney allografts induce strong T-cell and antibody responses which mediate acute rejection. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is expressed by most leucocytes, except mature T cells, and is involved in intracellular signalling following activation of the Fcγ-receptor, B-cell receptor and some integrins. A role for Syk signalling has been established in antibody-dependent native kidney disease, but little is known of Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Sprague–Dawley rats underwent bilateral nephrectomy and received an orthotopic Wistar renal allograft. Recipient rats were treated with a Syk inhibitor (CC0482417, 30 mg/kg/bid), or vehicle, from 1 h before surgery until being killed 5 days later. Vehicle-treated recipients developed severe allograft failure with marked histologic damage in association with dense leucocyte infiltration (T cells, macrophages, neutrophils and NK cells) and deposition of IgM, IgG and C3. Immunostaining identified Syk expression by many infiltrating leucocytes. CC0482417 treatment significantly improved allograft function and reduced histologic damage, although allograft injury was still clearly evident. CC0482417 failed to prevent T-cell infiltration and activation within the allograft. However, CC0482417 significantly attenuated acute tubular necrosis, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and thrombosis of peritubular capillaries. In conclusion, this study identifies a role for Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Syk inhibition may be a useful addition to T-cell-based immunotherapy in renal transplantation. PMID:25529862

  12. Sensitivity of scintigraphy with /sup 111/In-lymphocytes for detection of cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, S.B.; Eisen, H.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R.; Bolman, R.M. 3d.

    1988-12-01

    We recently demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasive detection of cardiac allograft rejection after administration of indium-111-labeled lymphocytes. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the technique, as well as its value for delineating the severity of rejection, we studied 16 dogs with heterotopic thoracic cardiac allografts. Five animals were evaluated while exposed to immunosuppressive agents. Animals were scanned sequentially after administration of 100-400 microCi of indium-111-labeled autologous lymphocytes. Myocardial lymphocyte infiltration was expressed as the indium excess (IE), defined as the ratio of indium activity of the transplant or native heart compared with that in blood. Scintigraphic results were compared with characteristics of simultaneously obtained endomyocardial biopsies. Among 17 biopsy documented episodes of rejection, 16 were detected scintigraphically. Among 18 biopsies with no evidence of rejection, scintigraphy was uniformly negative. Thus, the sensitivity and specificity of scintigraphy were 94 and 100%, respectively. Biopsies graded as showing no rejection were associated with an IE of 0.3 +/- 0.5 (+/- SD); those graded as mild, 2.8 +/- 1.7; those as moderate, 10.7 +/- 7.2; and those graded as indicative of severe rejection, 14.2 +/- 4.5. Thus, scintigraphy with indium-111-labeled lymphocytes sensitively and specifically detects cardiac allograft rejection and delineates the intensity of the rejection process. It should be useful clinically for assessing potential allograft rejection noninvasively.

  13. B cell-mediated antigen presentation is required for the pathogenesis of acute cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Noorchashm, Hooman; Reed, Amy J; Rostami, Susan Y; Mozaffari, Raha; Zekavat, Ghazal; Koeberlein, Brigitte; Caton, Andrew J; Naji, Ali

    2006-12-01

    Acute allograft rejection requires the activation of alloreactive CD4 T cells. Despite the capacity of B cells to act as potent APCs capable of activating CD4 T cells in vivo, their role in the progression of acute allograft rejection was unclear. To determine the contribution of B cell APC function in alloimmunity, we engineered mice with a targeted deficiency of MHC class II-mediated Ag presentation confined to the B cell compartment. Cardiac allograft survival was markedly prolonged in these mice as compared to control counterparts (median survival time, >70 vs 9.5 days). Mechanistically, deficient B cell-mediated Ag presentation disrupted both alloantibody production and the progression of CD4 T cell activation following heart transplantation. These findings demonstrate that indirect alloantigen presentation by recipients' B cells plays an important role in the efficient progression of acute vascularized allograft rejection.

  14. Detection and measurement of tubulitis in renal allograft rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, John B.; Chen, Qi; Jin, Jesse S.; Wang, Yung; Yong, James L. C.

    1997-04-01

    Tubulitis is one of the most reliable signs of acute renal allograft rejection. It occurs when mononuclear cells are localized between the lining tubular epithelial cells with or without disruption of the tubular basement membrane. It has been found that tubulitis takes place predominantly in the regions of the distal convoluted tubules and the cortical collecting system. The image processing tasks are to find the tubule boundaries and to find the relative location of the lymphocytes and epithelial cells and tubule boundaries. The requirement for accuracy applies to determining the relative locations of the lymphocytes and the tubule boundaries. This paper will show how the different sizes and grey values of the lymphocytes and epithelial cells simplify their identification and location. Difficulties in finding the tubule boundaries image processing will be illustrated. It will be shown how proximate location of epithelial cells and the tubule boundary leads to distortion in determination of the calculated boundary. However, in tubulitis the lymphocytes and the tubule boundaries are proximate.In these cases the tubule boundary is adequately resolved and the image processing is satisfactory to determining relativity in location. An adaptive non-linear anisotropic diffusion process is presented for image filtering and segmentation. Multi-layer analysis is used to extract lymphocytes and tubulitis from images. This paper will discuss grading of tissue using the Banff system. The ability to use computer to use computer processing will be argued as obviating problems of reproducability of values for this classification. This paper will also feature discussion of alternative approaches to image processing and provide an assessment of their capability for improving the identification of the tubule boundaries.

  15. Reepithelialization of orthotopic tracheal allografts prevents rejection after withdrawal of immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; Govindaraj, Satish; Chaboki, Houtan; Cleven, Heidi; Fedorova, Elena; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Mayer, Lloyd

    2005-04-01

    Prior work has demonstrated that immunosuppressed orthotopic tracheal allografts undergo progressive reepithelialization over a 48-day period with recipient-derived tracheal epithelium. We hypothesized that reepithelialization of tracheal allografts would prevent rejection after withdrawal of immunosuppression. BALB/c murine tracheal grafts were transplanted orthotopically into either syngeneic or allogeneic C57/BL6 recipients. The recipients were either not immunosuppressed, immunosuppressed with cyclosporine A (10 mg/kg per day) continuously, or immunosuppressed for 48 days and then withdrawn from immunosuppression. The grafts were assessed for acute and chronic rejection 10 days and 50 days after immunosuppression withdrawal. The immunosuppressed allograft recipients maintained a ciliated epithelium acutely and chronically after immunosuppression withdrawal. Ten days after immunosuppression withdrawal, there was a mild cellular infiltrate, which resolved 50 days after withdrawal. Electron microscopy, lymphocyte subpopulation assays, and lamina propria analysis demonstrated that immunosuppression withdrawal did not result in tracheal allograft rejection. In vitro and in vivo assessments did not demonstrate evidence of systemic or local immune tolerance. We conclude that reepithelialization of orthotopic tracheal allografts with recipient-derived mucosa prevents rejection of allograft segments. Tracheal transplantation may require only transient immunosuppression, which can be withdrawn after tracheal reepithelialization.

  16. Endogenous Memory CD8 T Cells Directly Mediate Cardiac Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Su, C. A.; Iida, S.; Abe, T.; Fairchild, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Differences in levels of environmentally induced memory T cells that cross-react with donor MHC molecules are postulated to account for the efficacy of allograft tolerance inducing strategies in rodents versus their failure in nonhuman primates and human transplant patients. Strategies to study the impact of donor-reactive memory T cells on allografts in rodents have relied on the pre-transplant induction of memory T cells cross-reactive with donor allogeneic MHC molecules through recipient viral infection, priming directly with donor antigen, or adoptive transfer of donor-antigen primed memory T cells. Each approach accelerates allograft rejection and confers resistance to tolerance induction, but also biases the T cell repertoire to strong donor-reactivity. The ability of endogenous memory T cells within unprimed mice to directly reject an allograft is unknown. Here we show a direct association between increased duration of cold ischemic allograft storage and numbers and enhanced functions of early graft infiltrating endogenous CD8 memory T cells. These T cells directly mediate rejection of allografts subjected to prolonged ischemia and this rejection is resistant to costimulatory blockade. These findings recapitulate the clinically significant impact of endogenous memory T cells with donor reactivity in a mouse transplant model in the absence of prior recipient priming. PMID:24502272

  17. Role of T Cell-Specific NF-κB in Islet Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Porras, Delia Lozano; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Ping; Molinero, Luciana L; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Background Pancreatic islet transplantation has the potential to cure Type 1 Diabetes (T1D), a chronic lifelong disease, but its clinical applicability is limited by allograft rejection. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is a transcription factor important for survival and differentiation of T cells. In this study, we tested whether NF-κB in T cells is required for the rejection of islet allografts. Methods Mice expressing a super-repressor form of NF-κB selectively in T cell (IκBαΔN-Tg mice) with or without the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-xL, or mice with impaired TCR-and BCR-driven NF-κB activity (CARMA1-KO mice) were rendered diabetic and transplanted with islet allografts. Secondary skin transplantation in long-term acceptors of islet allografts was used to test for development of donor-specific tolerance. Immune infiltration of the transplanted islets was examined by immunofluorescence. TCR-transgenic CD4+ T cells were used to follow T cell priming and differentiation. Results Islet allograft survival was prolonged in IκBαΔN-Tg mice, although the animals did not develop donor-specific tolerance. Reduced NF-κB activity did not prevent T cell priming or differentiation but rather reduced survival of activated T cells, as transgenic expression of Bcl-xL restored islet allograft rejection in IκBαΔN-Tg mice. Abolishing TCR- and BCR-driven activation of NF-κB selectively via CARMA1 deficiency prevented T cell priming and islet allograft rejection. Conclusions Our data suggest that T cell-NF-κB plays an important role in the rejection of islet allografts. Targeting NF-κB selectively in lymphocytes appears a promising approach to facilitate acceptance of transplanted islets. PMID:22437847

  18. MRI Investigation of Macrophages in Acute Cardiac Allograft Rejection after Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yijen L.; Ye, Qing; Eytan, Danielle F.; Liu, Li; Rosario, Bedda L.; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Yeh, Fang-Cheng; van Rooijen, Nico; Ho, Chien

    2013-01-01

    Background Current immunosuppressive therapy after heart transplantation either generally suppresses the recipient’s entire immune system or is mainly targeting T-lymphocytes. Monocytes/macrophages are recognized as a hallmark of acute allograft rejection, but the roles that they play are not well characterized in vivo, because the tools for accessing in-situ macrophage infiltration are lacking. In this study, we utilize MRI to investigate the role of macrophages in acute heart allograft rejection by cellular and functional MRI with selectively depleted systemic macrophages without affecting other leukocyte population and to explore the possibility that macrophages could be an alternative therapeutic target. Methods and Results A rodent heterotopic working heart-lung transplantation model was employed for studying acute allograft rejection. Systemic macrophages were selectively depleted by treating recipient animals with clodronate-liposomes. Macrophage infiltration in the graft hearts was monitored by cellular MRI with in-vivo ultra-small iron-oxide particles (USPIO) labeling. Graft heart function was evaluated by tagging MRI, followed by strain analysis. Clodronate-liposome-treatment depletes circulating monocytes/macrophages in transplant recipients, and both cellular MRI and pathological examinations indicate a significant reduction in macrophage accumulation in the rejecting allograft hearts. In clodronate-liposome-treated group, allograft hearts exhibit preserved tissue integrity, partially reverse functional deterioration, and prolong graft survival, compared to untreated controls. Conclusions Cardiac cellular and functional MRI is a powerful tool to explore the roles of targeted immune cells in vivo. Our results indicate that macrophages are essential in acute cardiac allograft rejection, and selective depletion of macrophages with clodronate-liposomes protects hearts against allograft rejection, suggesting a potential therapeutic avenue. Our findings

  19. Quantifying renal allograft loss following early antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Orandi, B J; Chow, E H K; Hsu, A; Gupta, N; Van Arendonk, K J; Garonzik-Wang, J M; Montgomery, J R; Wickliffe, C; Lonze, B E; Bagnasco, S M; Alachkar, N; Kraus, E S; Jackson, A M; Montgomery, R A; Segev, D L

    2015-02-01

    Unlike antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) with clinical features, it remains unclear whether subclinical AMR should be treated, as its effect on allograft loss is unknown. It is also uncertain if AMR's effect is homogeneous across donor (deceased/live) and (HLA/ABO) antibody types. We compared 219 patients with AMR (77 subclinical, 142 clinical) to controls matched on HLA/ABO-compatibility, donor type, prior transplant, panel reactive antibody (PRA), age and year. One and 5-year graft survival in subclinical AMR was 95.9% and 75.7%, compared to 96.8% and 88.4% in matched controls (p = 0.0097). Subclinical AMR was independently associated with a 2.15-fold increased risk of graft loss (95% CI: 1.19-3.91; p = 0.012) compared to matched controls, but not different from clinical AMR (p = 0.13). Fifty three point two percent of subclinical AMR patients were treated with plasmapheresis within 3 days of their AMR-defining biopsy. Treated subclinical AMR patients had no difference in graft loss compared to matched controls (HR 1.73; 95% CI: 0.73-4.05; p = 0.21), but untreated subclinical AMR patients did (HR 3.34; 95% CI: 1.37-8.11; p = 0.008). AMR's effect on graft loss was heterogeneous when stratified by compatible deceased donor (HR = 4.73; 95% CI: 1.57-14.26; p = 0.006), HLA-incompatible deceased donor (HR = 2.39; 95% CI: 1.10-5.19; p = 0.028), compatible live donor (no AMR patients experienced graft loss), ABO-incompatible live donor (HR = 6.13; 95% CI: 0.55-67.70; p = 0.14) and HLA-incompatible live donor (HR = 6.29; 95% CI: 3.81-10.39; p < 0.001) transplant. Subclinical AMR substantially increases graft loss, and treatment seems warranted.

  20. Analysis of the mechanism of allograft rejection and cell-mediated immunity. I. Accelerated rejection of tumour allografts without augmented cytotoxicity in the spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nanishi, F; Nomoto, K; Taniguchi, K; Kubo, C

    1980-01-01

    While immunization with allogeneic spleen cells did not generate positive cytotoxic activity, it produced accelerated rejection of subsequent tumour grafts carrying the same H-2 antigen. No augmented generation of cytotoxicity was detectable by 51Cr-release assay in the host spleen cells, even in the presence of accelerated rejection of tumour allografts. However, augmented cytotoxicity was generated in mixed lymphocyte culture and in peritoneal lymphocytes after an intraperitoneal boost. These results indicate that while immunization with allogeneic spleen cells does not generate mature cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) detectable by the present assay, it may produce premature CTL that rapidly differentiate into mature CTL after direct contact with antigen at the site of graft rejection. The inability to generate a high degree of cytotoxicity in the spleen cells may be ascribed to the early development of CTL at the rejection site. The relationship between accelerated rejection of allogeneic tumour grafts and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions is also discussed. PMID:7419243

  1. Monocyte procoagulant activity and plasminogen activator. Role in human renal allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.H.; Cardella, C.J.; Schulman, J.; Levy, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    Currently the mechanism of renal allograft rejection is not well understood. This study was designed to determine whether induction of monocyte procoagulant activity (MCPA) is important in the pathogenesis of renal allograft rejection. The MPCA assay was performed utilizing a one stage clotting assay both in normal and in factor-VII-deficient plasma. There was no increase in spontaneous MPCA in 20 patients with endstage renal failure and in 10 patients following abdominal or orthopedic operation, as compared with 20 normal controls. MPCA was assessed daily in 18 patients who had received renal allografts. Rejection episodes (RE) were predicted on the basis of persistent elevation in MPCA as compared with pretransplant levels. Rejection was diagnosed clinically and treated on the basis of standard criteria. Treated RE were compared with those predicted by elevated MPCA, and 3 patients were assessed as having no RE by MPCA and by standard criteria. In 8 RE, MPCA correlated temporally with RE (same day) when compared with standard criteria. In 12 RE, MPCA was predictive of rejection preceding standard criteria by at least 24 hr. There were 7 false-positive predictions on the basis of MPCA; however, there was only 1 false negative. MPCA was shown to be a prothrombinase by its dependence only on prothrombin and fibrinogen for full activity. MPCA may be important in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection, and additionally it may be a useful adjunct in the clinical management of this disease.

  2. Hyperlipidemia Promotes Anti-Donor Th17 Responses That Accelerate Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, J.; Bagley, J.; Iacomini, J.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia occurs in 95% of organ transplant recipients, however its effect on organ allograft rejection has not been investigated. We found that induction of hyperlipidemia in mice caused a significant acceleration of rejection of cardiac allografts. Accelerated rejection was associated with an aggressive T cell infiltrate that mediated significant tissue damage as well as increased serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17. Hyperlipidemic mice had an increased number of Th17 cells in their periphery and rejecting allografts from hyperlipidemic mice contained significant numbers of IL-17 producing T cells that were not detectable in transplants harvested from controls. Neutralization or genetic ablation of IL-17 prolonged survival of cardiac allografts transplanted into hyperlipidemic recipients, suggesting that IL-17 production promotes accelerated rejection. Analysis of alloreactive T cell frequencies directly ex vivo in naïve mice revealed that the frequency of donor reactive IL-17 producing cells in hyperlipidemic was increased prior to antigen exposure, suggesting that hyperlipidemia was sufficient to alter T cell alloreactivity and promote anti-donor Th17 responses on first exposure to antigen. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia alters rejection by altering the types of T cell subsets that respond to donor antigen by promoting Th17 biased anti-donor reactivity. PMID:26079335

  3. Identification of microRNAs involved in acute rejection and spontaneous tolerance in murine hepatic allografts

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Miwa; Chen, Jiajie; Fujino, Masayuki; Kitazawa, Yusuke; Sugioka, Atsushi; Zhong, Liang; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2014-01-01

    Graft acceptance without the need for immunosuppressive drugs is the ultimate goal of transplantation therapy. In murine liver transplantation, allografts are accepted across major histocompatibility antigen complex barriers without the use of immunosuppressive drugs and constitute a suitable model for research on immunological rejection and tolerance. MicroRNA (miRNA) has been known to be involved in the immunological responses. In order to identify mRNAs in spontaneous liver allograft tolerance, miRNA expression in hepatic allografts was examined using this transplantation model. According to the graft pathological score and function, miR-146a, 15b, 223, 23a, 27a, 34a and 451 were upregulated compared with the expression observed in the syngeneic grafts. In contrast, miR-101a, 101b and 148a were downregulated. Our results demonstrated the alteration of miRNAs in the allografts and may indicate the role of miRNAs in the induction of tolerance after transplantation. Furthermore, our data suggest that monitoring the graft expression of novel miRNAs may allow clinicians to differentiate between rejection and tolerance. A better understanding of the tolerance inducing mechanism observed in murine hepatic allografts may provide a therapeutic strategy for attenuating allograft rejection. PMID:25323448

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of allograft rejection in heart-lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Reitz, B A; Gaudiani, V A; Hunt, S A; Wallwork, J; Billingham, M E; Oyer, P E; Baumgartner, W A; Jamieson, S W; Stinson, E B; Shumway, N E

    1983-03-01

    Six patients received heart-lung transplants between March, 1981, and January, 1982. There were four women and two men between 26 and 45 years of age, three with primary pulmonary hypertension and three with congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension (Eisenmenger's syndrome). Immunosuppression was primarily with cyclosporin-A, with additional corticosteroid, azathioprine, and rabbit antihuman thymocyte globulin. Six episodes of allograft rejection in four patients (10, 11, 21, 24, 53, and 86 days after transplantation) were detected by means of transvenous endomyocardial biopsy. All patients experienced pulmonary edema early after transplantation (reimplantation response), and two patients required mechanical ventilatory support for allograft rejection at 10 and 11 days. Treatment of rejection consisted of intravenous methylprednisolone (four episodes) or augmented oral prednisone (two episodes), with resolution. No episode thought to be pulmonary rejection has occurred in the absence of cardiac findings. Four patients are alive from 6 to 15 months after transplantation and are functionally normal. Early experience with heart-lung transplantation suggests (1) that allograft rejection can be detected by cardiac findings and successfully treated by augmented corticosteroids, (2) that lung rejection does not occur in the absence of cardiac findings, (3) that the frequency and severity of rejection episodes are not greater than with standard cardiac transplantation, and (4) that the frequency of rejection episodes is highest within the first 60 days after transplantation.

  5. Raised serum levels of cachectin/tumor necrosis factor alpha in renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay was used for monitoring serum levels of endogenous cachectin/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) in 10 renal transplant recipients. Acute allograft rejections were associated with marked elevations of circulating TNF. The peak levels of TNF (median 140 pg/ml) were in the same concentration range as previously reported in parasitic infections. The results show that the release of TNF into circulation is an early event in renal allograft rejection and that raised levels of TNF in man can also be induced by noninfectious stimuli. PMID:3309124

  6. [Neurologic complications induced by the treatment of the acute renal allograft rejection with the monoclonal antibody OKT3].

    PubMed

    Fernández, O; Romero, F; Bravo, M; Burgos, D; Cabello, M; González-Molina, M

    1993-10-01

    The treatment of the acute renal allograft rejection with the monoclonal antibody orthoclone OKT3 produces both systemic and neurologic alterations. In a series of 21 patients with an acute renal allograft rejection treated with this monoclonal antibody, 20 with a renal allograft transplantation and one with a renal and pancreatic allograft transplantation, 29% referred headache associated with fever and vomiting, and 14.2% presented severe neurological alterations induced by the treatment. We stress the need to know these secondary effects to differentiate them from other central nervous system disorders, particularly those of infectious origin.

  7. Comparison of galectin expression signatures in rejected and accepted murine corneal allografts.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Satoshi; Chen, Wei-Sheng; Cao, Zhiyi; Kenyon, Kenneth R; Yamaguchi, Takefumi; Omoto, Masashiro; Hamrah, Pedram; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2015-06-01

    Although members of the galectin family of carbohydrate-binding proteins are thought to play a role in the immune response and regulation of allograft survival, little is known about the galectin expression signature in failed corneal grafts. The aim of this study was to compare the galectin expression pattern in accepted and rejected murine corneal allografts. Using BALB/c mice as recipients and C57BL/6 mice as donors, a total of 57 transplants were successfully performed. One week after transplantation, the grafts were scored for opacity by slit-lamp microscopy. Opacity scores of 3+ or greater on postoperative week 4 were considered rejected. Grafted corneas were harvested on postoperative week 4, and their galectin expressions were analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. As determined by the Western blot analyses, galectins-1, 3, 7, 8 and 9 were expressed in normal corneas. Although in both accepted and rejected grafts, expression levels of the 5 lectins were upregulated compared with normal corneas, there were distinct differences in the expression levels of galectins-8 and 9 between accepted and rejected grafts, as both the Western blot and immunofluorescence staining revealed that galectin-8 is upregulated, whereas galectin-9 is downregulated in the rejected grafts compared with the accepted grafts. Our findings that corneal allograft rejection is associated with increased galectin-8 expression and reduced galectin-9 expression, support the hypothesis that galectin-8 may reduce graft survival, whereas galectin-9 may promote graft survival. As a potential therapeutic intervention, inhibition of galectin-8 and/or treatment with exogenous galectin-9 may enhance corneal allograft survival rates.

  8. Comparison of galectin expression signatures in rejected and accepted murine corneal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Kenneth R; Yamaguchi, Takefumi; Omoto, Masashiro; Hamrah, Pedram; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although members of the galectin family of carbohydrate-binding proteins are thought to play a role in the immune response and regulation of allograft survival, little is known about the galectin expression signature in failed corneal grafts. The goal of this study is to compare the galectin expression pattern in accepted and rejected murine corneal allografts. Method Using BALB/c mice as recipients and C57BL/6 mice as donors, a total of 57 transplants were successfully performed. One week after transplantation, the grafts were scored for opacity by slit-lamp microscopy. Opacity scores of 3+ or greater on postoperative week 4 were considered rejected. Grafted corneas were harvested on postoperative week 4, and their galectin expression was analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Result As determined by Western blot analyses, galectins-1, -3, -7, -8 and -9 were expressed in normal corneas. Although in both accepted and rejected grafts, expression levels of the five lectins were upregulated compared to normal corneas, there were distinct differences in the expression levels of galectins-8 and -9 between accepted and rejected grafts, as both Western blot and immunofluorescence staining revealed galectin-8 is upregulated, whereas galectin-9 is downregulated in rejected grafts compared to accepted grafts. Conclusion Our findings that corneal allograft rejection is associated with an increased galectin-8 expression and a reduced galectin-9 expression, support the hypothesis that galectin-8 may reduce graft survival, whereas galectin-9 may promote graft survival. As a potential therapeutic intervention, inhibition of galectin-8 and/or treatment with exogenous galectin-9 may enhance corneal allograft survival rates. PMID:25961492

  9. Use of indium-111-labeled cells in measurement of cellular dynamics of experimental cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.; Wang, T.; Fawwaz, R.; Satake, K.; Nowygrod, R.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    This study evaluates the kinetics and utility of infused indium-111-labeled cells in detecting rejection in ACI to Lewis rat heart allografts. Syngeneic leukocytes, lymph node lymphocytes, and platelets were isolated and labeled with indium-111 (/sup 111/In) oxine, respectively, and were infused i.v. into Lewis rats carrying beating ACI or syngeneic hearts from post-transplant days 0 to 6. Recipients were imaged serially at 24 hr after infusion of labeled cells followed by excision of both native and transplanted hearts for direct isotope count. Labeled leukocytes accumulative progressively in the allograft with the scan becoming positive by post-transplant day 4. The ratio of allograft to native heart isotope counts rose from 1.25 on day 1 to 10.07 (P less than 0.0001) on day 7. The Lewis recipients infused with labeled lymphocytes showed a positive scan on days 6 and 7 whereas the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose from 0.97 on day 1 to 5.33 (P less than 0.001) on day 7. Recipients infused with /sup 111/In-labeled platelets showed a positive scan on days 5 to 7 and the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose sharply from 2.56 on day 4 to 16.98 (P less than 0.005) on day 7. Syngeneic heart grafts failed to demonstrate significant accumulation of any of the labeled cell population. These studies confirm the importance of nonlymphocytic cells in cellular rejection, evaluate the kinetics of graft invasion by the various cell types, and suggest that the techniques used afford a method for a safe and an early detection of allograft rejection.

  10. Detection of rejection of canine orthotopic cardiac allografts with indium-111 lymphocytes and gamma scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Eisen, H.J.; Rosenbloom, M.; Laschinger, J.C.; Saffitz, J.E.; Cox, J.L.; Sobel, B.E.; Bolman, R.M. III; Bergmann, S.R.

    1988-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting canine heterotopic cardiac allograft rejection scintigraphically after administration of 111In lymphocytes. To determine whether the approach is capable of detecting rejection in orthotopic cardiac transplants in which labeled lymphocytes circulating in the blood pool may reduce sensitivity, the present study was performed in which canine orthotopic cardiac transplants were evaluated in vivo. Immunosuppression was maintained with cyclosporine A (10-20 mg/kg/day) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) for 2 wk after transplantation. Subsequently, therapy was tapered. Five successful allografts were evaluated scintigraphically every 3 days after administration of 100-350 microCi 111In autologous lymphocytes. Correction for labeled lymphocytes circulating in the blood pool, but not actively sequestered in the allografts was accomplished by administering 3-6 mCi 99mTc autologous erythrocytes and employing a previously validated blood-pool activity correction technique. Cardiac infiltration of labeled lymphocytes was quantified as percent indium excess (%IE), scintigraphically detectable 111In in the transplant compared with that in blood, and results were compared with those of concomitantly performed endomyocardial biopsy. Scintigraphic %IE for hearts not undergoing rejection manifest histologically was 0.7 +/- 0.4. Percent IE for rejecting hearts was 6.8 +/- 4.0 (p less than 0.05). Scintigraphy detected each episode of rejection detected by biopsy. Scintigraphic criteria for rejection (%IE greater than 2 s.d. above normal) were not manifest in any study in which biopsies did not show rejection. Since scintigraphic results with 111In-labeled lymphocytes were concordant with biopsy results in orthotopic cardiac transplants, noninvasive detection of graft rejection in patients should be attainable with the approach developed.

  11. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Arterialised Venous Allografts Is Inhibited by Immunosuppression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Martin; Oliverius, Martin; Kuhn, Stephanie; Feldbrügge, Linda; Krenzien, Felix; Hau, Hans-Michael; Wiltberger, Georg; Schmelzle, Moritz; Jonas, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Objectives and Design We determined in a rat model (1) the presence and dynamics of alloantibodies recognizing MHC complexes on quiescent Brown-Norway (BN) splenic cells in the sera of Lewis (LEW) recipients of Brown-Norway iliolumbar vein grafts under tacrolimus immunosuppression; and (2) the presence of immunoglobulins in the wall of acute rejected vein allografts. Materials and Methods Flow cytometry was used for the analysis of day 0, 14 and 30 sera obtained from Lewis recipients of isogeneic iliolumbar vein grafts (group A) or Brown-Norway grafts (group B, C) for the presence of donor specific anti-MHC class I and II antibodies. Tacrolimus 0.2 mg/kg daily was administered from day 1 to day 30 (group C). Histology was performed on day 30. Results Sera obtained preoperatively and on day 30 were compared in all groups. The statistically significant decrease of anti MHC class I and II antibody binding was observed only in allogenic non-immunosuppressed group B (splenocytes: MHC class I - day 0 (93%±7% ) vs day 30 (66%±7%), p = 0.02, MHC class II - day 0 (105%±3% ) vs day 30 (83%±5%), p = 0.003; B-cells: MHC class I - day 0 (83%±5%) vs day 30 (55%±6%), p = 0.003, MHC class II - day 0 (101%±1%) vs day 30 (79%±6%), p = 0.006; T-cells: MHC class I - day 0 (71%±7%) vs day 30 (49%±5%), p = 0.04). No free clusters of immunoglobulin G deposition were detected in any experimental group. Conclusion Arterialized venous allografts induce strong donor-specific anti-MHC class I and anti-MHC class II antibody production with subsequent immune-mediated destruction of these allografts with no evidence of immunoglobulin G deposition. Low-dose tacrolimus suppress the donor-specific antibody production. PMID:24618652

  12. Chronic lung allograft rejection and airway microvasculature: is HIF-1 the missing link?

    PubMed

    Wilkes, David S

    2011-06-01

    Chronic lung allograft rejection, known as obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), is the leading cause of death in lung transplant patients. Although OB pathogenesis is not fully understood, in this issue of the JCI, Jiang and colleagues report that tissue hypoxia resulting in dysfunctional airway microvasculature precedes the airway fibrosis characteristic of OB. In addition, a relative deficiency of allograft endothelial cell-derived HIF-1α contributes to this process. Data showing that overexpressing HIF-1α restores the microvascular airway normoxia and prevents airway fibrosis highlight a novel role for vascular biology in OB pathogenesis.

  13. Renal allograft recovery subsequent to apparent hyperacute rejection based on clinical, scintigraphic, and pathologic criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, G.A.; Sandler, M.P.; Partain, C.L.

    1983-02-01

    An unusual case is described in which in spite of clinical, scintigraphic and histologic findings strongly supportive of a diagnosis of hyperacute rejection, recovery of renal function occurred. These findings are in contrast to the current literature in which it is generally accepted that a renal allograft showing neither pertechnetate transit nor hippurate concentration warrants allograft nephrectomy irrespective of the etiology. Scintigraphic evaluation included both dynamic studies after a bolus administration of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate and serial renogram collections after the intravenous administration of /sup 131/I Hippuran.

  14. Pepsin, a biomarker of gastric aspiration in lung allografts: a putative association with rejection.

    PubMed

    Stovold, Rachel; Forrest, Ian A; Corris, Paul A; Murphy, Desmond M; Smith, Jaclyn A; Decalmer, Sam; Johnson, Gail E; Dark, John H; Pearson, Jeffrey P; Ward, Chris

    2007-06-15

    Human lung transplantation is a therapeutic option for selected patients with advanced cardiopulmonary disease, but long-term survival is limited by chronic rejection. Persistent acute rejection and gastric aspiration have been implicated as risk factors but there is little or no evidence to date that they are associated. We have tested the hypothesis that pepsin, a marker of gastric aspiration, is present in lung transplant recipients, and that high levels are associated with biopsy-diagnosed acute rejection and/or bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Levels of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) pepsin were measured by ELISA in 36 lung transplant recipients, 4 normal volunteers, and 17 subjects with unexplained chronic cough. Our primary finding was that, compared with control subjects, BAL pepsin levels were elevated in stable lung transplant recipients, subjects with acute rejection, and subjects with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Our secondary finding was that the highest levels were found in recipients with acute vascular rejection grade > or = A2 (median, 11.2; range, 5.4 - 51.7 ng/ml; normal median, 1.1; range, 0-2.3 ng/ml; p = 0.004). We have shown that elevated levels of pepsin, a biomarker of gastric aspiration, are consistently identified in the BAL of lung allografts. The highest levels were seen in patients with > or = grade A2 acute rejection. This provides further evidence supporting the possible role of aspiration in the development of overall allograft injury.

  15. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Human Orthotopic Liver Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. Jake; Jaffe, Ron; Tzakis, A.; Ramsey, Glenn; Todo, S.; Belle, Steven; Esquivel, Carlos; Shapiro, Ron; Markus, Bernd; Mroczek, Elizabeth; Van Thiel, D. H.; Sysyn, Greg; Gordon, Robert; Makowka, Leonard; Starzl, Tom

    1988-01-01

    A clinicopathologic analysis of liver transplantation across major ABO blood group barriers was carried out 1) to determine if antibody-mediated (humoral) rejection was a cause of graft failure and if humoral rejection can be identified, 2) to propose criteria for establishing the diagnosis, and 3) to describe the clinical and pathologic features of humoral rejection. A total of 51 (24 primary) ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) liver grafts were transplanted into 49 recipients. There was a 46% graft failure rate during the first 30 days for primary ABO-I grafts compared with an 11% graft failure rate for primary ABO compatible (ABO-C), crossmatch negative, age, sex and priority-matched control patients (P < 0.02). A similarly high early graft failure rate (60%) was seen for nonprimary ABO-I grafts during the first 30 days. Clinically, the patients experienced a relentless rise in serum transaminases, hepatic failure, and coagulopathy during the first weeks after transplant. Pathologic examination of ABO-I grafts that failed early demonstrated widespread areas of geographic hemorrhagic necrosis with diffuse intraorgan coagulation. Prominent arterial deposition of antibody and complement components was demonstrated by immunoflourescent staining. Elution studies confirmed the presence of tissue-bound, donor-specific isoagglutinins within the grafts. No such deposition was seen in control cases. These studies confirm that antibody mediated rejection of the liver occurs and allows for the development of criteria for establishing the diagnosis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:3046369

  16. Antimyosin monoclonal antibodies for early detection of cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, A.; Fritsch, S.; Kemkes, B.M.; Kugler, C.; Angermann, C.; Spes, C.; Anthuber, M.; Weiler, A.; Wenke, K.; Gokel, J.M. )

    1990-11-01

    Sixty-eight indium 111-labeled antimyosin Fab-DTPA imaging studies (0.5 mg intravenously with a radioactivity of 65 to 75 MBq) were executed on 37 of 116 patients undergoing heart transplantation to assess diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility. As controls, 21 patients with cardiomyopathy (n = 8), unstable angina (n = 9), and myocardial infarction (n = 4) were selected. After 48 hours, single photon emission computed tomographic images were evaluated visually, and heart/lung ratios were measured, using the region of interest technique. They were compared with echocardiographic and endomyocardial biopsy results. In 40 studies a heart/lung ratio less than or equal to 1.6 corresponded to a negative biopsy result in 98% (40/41). Echocardiography enabled correct identification of 95% of the patients with normal biopsy findings. In 91% (22/24) a positive biopsy finding correlated with a heart/lung ratio greater than 1.6 including 20 mild rejections, but in only 64%, with an increase in wall thickness and/or decrease of fractional diameter shortening seen on echocardiogram. In addition, the various stages of rejection episodes determined the amount of the heart-lung ratio. There was a significant relationship between the histologic findings and the antimyosin uptake. In 13 patients a second investigation was performed after rejection therapy. All patients had a negative biopsy result, and the heart/lung ratio decreased to normal ranges (less than or equal to 1.6). Five antimyosin antibody studies were excluded, as in these cases, negative uptake results were found during rejection therapy with high-dose steroids. The overall sensitivity was calculated at 93% and the specificity at 98%.

  17. ABO-compatible Liver Allograft Antibody-mediated Rejection: an update

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, Anthony J.; Zeevi, Adriana; O’Leary, Jacqueline G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Liver allograft antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) studies have lagged behind parallel efforts in kidney and heart because of a comparative inherent hepatic resistance to AMR. Three developments, however, have increased interest: 1) solid phase antibody testing enabled more precise antibody characterization; 2) increased expectations for long-term, morbidity-free survival; and 3) immunosuppression minimization trials. Recent Findings Two overlapping liver allograft AMR phenotypic expressions are beginning to emerge: acute and chronic AMR. Acute AMR usually occurs within the several weeks after transplantation and characterized clinically by DSA persistence, allograft dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and hypocomplementemia. Acute AMR appears histopathologically similar to acute AMR in other organs: diffuse microvascular endothelial cell hypertrophy, C4d deposits, neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and macrophage-mediated microvasculitis/capillaritis, along with liver-specific ductular reaction, centrilobular hepatocyte swelling and hepatocanalicular cholestasis often combined with T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR). Chronic AMR is less well-defined, but strongly linked to serum class II DSA and associated with late-onset acute TCMR, fibrosis, chronic rejection and decreased survival. Unlike acute AMR, chronic AMR is a slowly evolving insult with a number of potential manifestations, but most commonly appears as low-grade lymphoplasmacytic portal and perivenular inflammation accompanied by unusual fibrosis patterns and variable microvascular C4d deposition; capillaritis is more difficult to identify than in acute AMR. Summary More precise DSA characterization, increasing expectations for long-term survival, and immunosuppression weaning precipitated a re-emergence of liver allograft AMR interest. Pathophysiological similarities exist between heart, kidney, and liver allografts, but liver-specific considerations may prove critical to our ultimate understanding of all

  18. Treatment of steroid-resistant acute renal allograft rejection with alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogen, M W F; Hesselink, D A; van Son, W J; Weimar, W; Hilbrands, L B

    2013-01-01

    Steroid-resistant renal allograft rejections are commonly treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin (RATG), but alemtuzumab could be an effective, safe and more convenient alternative. Adult patients with steroid-resistant renal allograft rejection treated with alemtuzumab (15-30 mg s.c. on 2 subsequent days) from 2008 to 2012 (n = 11) were compared to patients treated with RATG (2.5-4.0 mg/kg bodyweight i.v. for 10-14 days; n = 20). We assessed treatment-failure (graft loss, lack of improvement of graft function or need for additional anti-rejection treatment), infections during the first 3 months after treatment and infusion-related side effects. In both groups, the median time-interval between rejection and transplantation was 2 weeks, and approximately 75% of rejections were classified as Banff-IIA or higher. Three alemtuzumab-treated patients (27%) experienced treatment failure, compared to eight RATG treated patients (40%, p = 0.70). There was no difference in the incidence of infections. There were mild infusion-related side-effects in three alemtuzumab-treated patients (27%), and more severe infusion-related side effects in 17 RATG-treated patients (85%, p = 0.013). Drug related costs of alemtuzumab-treatment were lower than of RATG-treatment (€1050 vs. €2024; p < 0.01). Alemtuzumab might be an effective therapy for steroid-resistant renal allograft rejections. In contrast to RATG, alemtuzumab is nearly devoid of infusion-related side-effects. These data warrant a prospective trial. © Copyright 2012 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Prolonged ischemia elicits acute allograft rejection involved in CXCR3 activation in rat kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xun-feng; Song, Bin; Duan, Ji-hui; Hu, Zhan-dong; Cui, Zi-lin; Gu, Chuan

    2015-10-01

    Acute rejection is a major obstacle in patients with prolonged ischemia in deceased-donor renal transplantation. Chemokines and their receptors play a critical role in leukocyte trafficking, resulting in allograft rejection; therefore, the role of chemokine receptor CXCR3 in acute rejection induced by prolonged ischemia in rat kidney transplantation models was evaluated. Syngeneic and allogeneic renal transplantations were performed. For cold ischemia, grafts were stored in 4.0°C University of Wisconsin solution for 12 or 16 h. Serum and renal tissues were harvested 7.0 d after surgery and serum TNF-α, IL-6, and renal function were measured. Graft histology was stained with periodic acid-Schiff and immunohistochemical staining and further evaluated for signs of acute rejection. CXCR3 proteins were quantified by Western blot. The transplanted rats were divided into 4 groups as follows: iso-12-h = isogeneic transplant with 12-h CIT graft; iso-16-h = isogeneic kidney transplant with 16-h CIT graft; allo-12-h = allogeneic renal transplant with 12-h CIT graft; allo-16 h = allogeneic renal transplant with 16-h CIT graft; and 16 h+T = allogeneic 16-h CIT graft received tacrolimus. Prolonged cold ischemia time (CIT; 16 h) enhanced acute glomerular damage, interstitial inflammation, and tubulointerstitial cellular infiltration in allografts with and without immunosuppressant tacrolimus; but it was not apparent in the isografts. The expression of CXCR3 protein and the proportion of CXCR3-positive cells were significantly higher in the allo-16 h and 16 h +T groups than that in the allo-12 h group 7d post-surgery. CIT triggered acute rejection in allogeneic, but not in isogeneic, kidney transplants, accompanied by an elevation of leukocyte recruitment and damaged graft function. The upregulated expression of chemokine receptor CXCR3 promoted inflammatory infiltration and acute allograft rejection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hyaluronan Contributes to Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome and Stimulates Lung Allograft Rejection through Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingan; Sugimoto, Seichiro; Kennedy, Vanessa E.; Zhang, Helen L.; Pavlisko, Elizabeth N.; Kelly, Fran L.; Huang, Howard; Kreisel, Daniel; Palmer, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Although innate immunity is increasingly recognized to contribute to lung allograft rejection, the significance of endogenous innate ligands, such as hyaluronan (HA) fragments, in clinical or experimental lung transplantation is uncertain. Objectives: To determine if HA is associated with clinical bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) in lung transplant recipients, and evaluate the effect of low- or high-molecular-weight HA on experimental lung allograft rejection, including dependence on innate signaling pathways or effector cells. Methods: HA concentrations were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage and plasma samples from lung recipients with or without established BOS. BOS and normal lung tissues were assessed for HA localization and expression of HA synthases. Murine orthotopic lung recipients with established tolerance were treated with low- or high-molecular-weight HA under varied experimental conditions, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2/4 and myeloid differentiation protein 88 deficiency and neutrophil depletion. Measurements and Main Results: HA localized within areas of intraluminal small airways fibrosis in BOS lung tissue. Moreover, transcripts for HA synthase enzymes were significantly elevated in BOS versus normal lung tissues and both lavage fluid and plasma HA concentrations were increased in recipients with BOS. Treatment with low-molecular-weight HA abrogated tolerance in murine orthotopic lung recipients in a TLR2/4- and myeloid differentiation protein 88–dependent fashion and drove expansion of alloantigen-specific T lymphocytes. Additionally, TLR-dependent signals stimulated neutrophilia that promoted rejection. In contrast, high-molecular-weight HA attenuated basal allograft inflammation. Conclusions: These data suggest that accumulation of HA could contribute to BOS by directly activating innate immune signaling pathways that promote allograft rejection and neutrophilia. PMID:24471427

  1. Inflammatory triggers of acute rejection of organ allografts.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daniel N; Kreisel, Daniel; Fullerton, James N; Gilroy, Derek W; Goldstein, Daniel R

    2014-03-01

    Solid organ transplantation is a vital therapy for end stage diseases. Decades of research have established that components of the adaptive immune system are critical for transplant rejection, but the role of the innate immune system in organ transplantation is just emerging. Accumulating evidence indicates that the innate immune system is activated at the time of organ implantation by the release of endogenous inflammatory triggers. This review discusses the nature of these triggers in organ transplantation and also potential mediators that may enhance inflammation resolution after organ implantation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Inflammatory triggers of acute rejection of organ allografts

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Daniel N.; Kreisel, Daniel; Fullerton, James N.; Gilroy, Derek W.; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Solid organ transplantation is a vital therapy for end stage diseases. Decades of research has established that the components of the adaptive immune system are critical for transplant rejection, but the role of the innate immune system in organ transplantation is just emerging. Accumulating evidence indicates that the innate immune system is activated at the time of organ implantation by the release of endogenous inflammatory triggers. This review discusses the nature of these triggers in organ transplantation and also potential mediators that may enhance inflammation resolution after organ implantation. PMID:24517430

  3. Immunoglobulin therapy for plasma cell-rich rejection in the renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Adrogue, Horacio E; Soltero, Liliana; Land, Geoffrey A; Ramanathan, Venkataraman; Truong, Luan D; Suki, Wadi N

    2006-08-27

    Plasma cell-rich acute rejection (PCAR) is associated with poor allograft outcome in renal transplantation. Previous studies report a graft half-life of six months after a single PCAR episode. However, the management of this condition is unclear. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy, by virtue of its immunomodulating properties, and its influence on B-cell maturation into plasma cells, may be a good candidate for reversing this type of rejection. We report four episodes of PCAR in two patients who responded well to IVIG with improvement in renal function.

  4. Alpha-1-antitrypsin for the improvement of autoimmunity and allograft rejection in beta cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian; Liao, Yu-Ting; Jian, You-Qiang; Zhang, Xiao-Dan; Wei, Pei; Qi, Hui; Deng, Chun-Yan; Li, Fu-Rong

    2013-02-01

    Islet transplantation offers hope for patients with type 1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease. However, islet transplant recipients must overcome two obstacles in both allograft rejection and autoimmune reaction. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (a1-proteinase inhibitor, AAT) possesses anti-inflammatory properties, reduces cytokine-mediated islet damage, and induces specific immune tolerance. In this study, an insulinoma cell line, NIT-1, was transfected with human AAT (hAAT), named NIT-hAAT, and was transplanted to the left renal subcapsular spaces of 7-week-old female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice (n=22). Cyclophosphamide(CY) was administered to synchronize and accelerate the development of diabetes. Thus, the immunosuppressive and cytoprotective activity of hAAT in β-cell transplantation was investigated. NIT-hAAT has immunomodulatory properties, which delay the onset of autoimmune diabetes, reduce diabetes incidence, inhibit insulitis and β-cell apoptosis, and dampen transplant site inflammation. We propose that NIT-hAAT has a dual function by improving islet autoimmunity and protecting transplanted β-cells from allograft rejection. However, the low expression of hAAT in vivo results in the inability of NIT-hAAT to induce long-term specific immune tolerance and to completely block allograft rejection.

  5. Sinusoidal endotheliitis as a histological parameter for diagnosing acute liver allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yu; Dong, Kun; Zhang, Yu-Guo; Michel, René P; Marcus, Victoria; Wang, Yu-Yue; Chen, Yu; Gao, Zu-Hua

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigated the feasibility of using sinusoidal endotheliitis (SE) as a histological marker for liver allograft rejection. METHODS We compared the histological features of 88 liver allograft biopsies with acute cellular rejection (ACR) and 59 cases with no evidence of ACR. SE was scored as: (1) focal linear lifting up of the endothelial cells by lymphocytes with no obvious damage to adjacent hepatocytes; (2) focal disruption of the endothelial lining by a cluster of subendothelial lymphocytes (a group of > 3 lymphocytes); and (3) severe confluent endotheliitis with hemorrhage and adjacent hepatocyte loss. RESULTS The sensitivity and specificity of SE was 81% and 85%, respectively. Using SE as the only parameter, the positive predictive value for ACR (PPV) was 0.89, whereas the negative predictive value for ACR (NPV) was 0.75. The correlation between RAI and SE was moderate (R = 0.44, P < 0.001) (Figure 3A), whereas it became strong (R = 0.65, P < 0.001) when correlating SE with the venous endotheliitis activity index only. CONCLUSION Our data suggest that SE scoring could be a reliable and reproducible supplemental parameter to the existing Banff schema for diagnosing acute liver allograft rejection. PMID:28223723

  6. Nitration and Inactivation of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Chronic Rejection of Human Renal Allografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan-Crow, L. A.; Crow, John P.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Beckman, Joseph S.; Thompson, John A.

    1996-10-01

    Inflammatory processes in chronic rejection remain a serious clinical problem in organ transplantation. Activated cellular infiltrate produces high levels of both superoxide and nitric oxide. These reactive oxygen species interact to form peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant that can modify proteins to form 3-nitrotyrosine. We identified enhanced immunostaining for nitrotyrosine localized to tubular epithelium of chronically rejected human renal allografts. Western blot analysis of rejected tissue demonstrated that tyrosine nitration was restricted to a few specific polypeptides. Immunoprecipitation and amino acid sequencing techniques identified manganese superoxide dismutase, the major antioxidant enzyme in mitochondria, as one of the targets of tyrosine nitration. Total manganese superoxide dismutase protein was increased in rejected kidney, particularly in the tubular epithelium; however, enzymatic activity was significantly decreased. Exposure of recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase to peroxynitrite resulted in a dose-dependent (IC50 = 10 μ M) decrease in enzymatic activity and concomitant increase in tyrosine nitration. Collectively, these observations suggest a role for peroxynitrite during development and progression of chronic rejection in human renal allografts. In addition, inactivation of manganese superoxide dismutase by peroxynitrite may represent a general mechanism that progressively increases the production of peroxynitrite, leading to irreversible oxidative injury to mitochondria.

  7. Noninvasive assessment of treatment of cardiac allograft rejection with indium-111-labeled lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbloom, M.; Eisen, H.J.; Laschinger, J.; Saffitz, J.E.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R.; Bolman, R.M. III

    1988-09-01

    We have shown previously that cardiac allograft rejection can be detected noninvasively with gamma scintigraphy after administration of indium-111 (111In)-labeled lymphocytes. To determine whether this technique could be used to monitor salvage immunosuppressive therapy in reversing rejection, 5 dogs were studied after thoracic heterotopic cardiac transplantation. Initial postoperative immunosuppression was maintained with cyclosporine (10-20 mg/kg/day) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) for 7 days after transplantation and then discontinued. Scintigraphy after administration of labeled lymphocytes was performed during initial immunosuppression and every 3 days after its termination. Endomyocardial biopsies were obtained on each day scintigraphy was performed. Once scintigraphic criteria for rejection were met (111In-lymphocyte uptake greater than mean +/- 2SD of normal myocardium), animals were treated with high dose methylprednisolone and cyclosporine. Myocardial 111In-lymphocyte activity compared with that in blood was 0.7 +/- 0.8 during initial immunosuppression, increased to 5.7 +/- 3.5 after termination of therapy (P less than 0.01), and diminished with salvage immunosuppressive therapy to 0.5 +/- 0.8 (P = NS compared with native hearts or allografts during initial immunosuppression). Scintigraphy accurately predicted all but one episode of biopsy-documented rejection and accurately detected reversal of rejection during salvage. Thus, scintigraphy with 111In-labeled lymphocytes should facilitate noninvasive monitoring of antirejection therapy in patients.

  8. AS2553627, a novel JAK inhibitor, prevents chronic rejection in rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Inami, Masamichi; Morio, Hiroki; Okuma, Kenji; Ito, Misato; Noto, Takahisa; Shirakami, Shohei; Hirose, Jun; Morokata, Tatsuaki

    2017-02-05

    Janus family kinases (JAKs) are essential molecules for cytokine responses and attractive targets for the treatment of transplant rejection and autoimmune diseases. Several JAK inhibitors have shown demonstrable effects on acute rejection in experimental cardiac transplant models. However, little is known about the potential benefits of JAK inhibitors on chronic rejection outcomes such as vasculopathy and fibrosis. Here, we examined the pharmacological profile of a novel JAK inhibitor, AS2553627, and explored its therapeutic potential in chronic rejection as well as acute rejection in a rat cardiac transplant model. AS2553627 potently inhibited JAK kinases but showed no inhibition of other kinases, including TCR-associated molecules. The compound also suppressed proliferation of IL-2 stimulated human and rat T cells. In a rat cardiac transplant model, oral administration of AS2553627 alone or co-administration with a sub-therapeutic dose of tacrolimus effectively prolonged cardiac allograft survival, suggesting the efficacy in treating acute rejection. To evaluate the effect on chronic rejection, recipient rats were administered a therapeutic dose of tacrolimus for 90 days. In combination with tacrolimus, AS2553627 significantly reduced cardiac allograft vasculopathy and fibrosis that tacrolimus alone did not inhibit. AS2553627 at the effective dose in rat transplantation models did not significantly reduce reticulocyte counts in peripheral whole blood after in vivo erythropoietin administration, indicating a low risk for anemia. These results suggest that AS2553627 may be a therapeutic candidate for the prevention of not only acute but also chronic rejection in cardiac transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Confocal Scanning Microscopy in Assessment of Cardiac Allograft Rejection--A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    White, R; Crossman, D J; Isaacson, M; Gibbs, H; Ruygrok, P N

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac allograft rejection is typically diagnosed on the basis of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histology of endomyocardial biopsies. This diagnosis is made based on the degree of immune cell infiltrate and associated myocyte damage. However, considerable variability in rejection grading between pathologists can occur. Confocal microscopy provides high contrast and high resolution imaging that has the potential to provide detailed views of pathological features of allograft rejection. In this pilot study we sought to determine if confocal microscopy could be used to detect features of cardiac rejection. This was achieved by collection of additional sample at 30 biopsy procedures from 15 heart transplant patients. Routine pathological grading of H&E histology identified 5 gradings of 0R, 21 gradings of 1R, and 3 gradings of 2R. From these gradings, 3 samples for 0R, 9 samples for 1R, and 3 samples for 2R were imaged by confocal microscopy. This was achieved by fluorescently labeling sections with DAPI, wheat germ agglutinin, and phalloidin, to visualize the cell nuclei, cell border and extracellular matrix, and muscle cell actin, respectively. Labeling with these fluorescent markers was of high contrast. However, we did note variability in DAPI and phalloidin labeling of tissue sections. Confocal imaging of these labels revealed the following features at high resolution: perivascular and/or interstitial infiltrate, myocyte damage, and Quilty lesions. In particular increased detail of damaged myocytes reveals distortion in myofilament organization that could be exploited to distinguish between 1R and 2R grades. In conclusion, confocal microscopy provided high contrast and resolution imaging of cardiac biopsies that could be explored further to aid assessment of cardiac allograft rejection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. MicroRNA-10b downregulation mediates acute rejection of renal allografts by derepressing BCL2L11

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaoyou; Dong, Changgui; Jiang, Zhengyao; Wu, William K.K.; Chan, Matthew T.V.; Zhang, Jie; Li, Haibin; Qin, Ke; Sun, Xuyong

    2015-04-10

    Kidney transplantation is the major therapeutic option for end-stage kidney diseases. However, acute rejection could cause allograft loss in some of these patients. Emerging evidence supports that microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation is implicated in acute allograft rejection. In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to profile miRNA expression in normal and acutely rejected kidney allografts. Among 75 identified dysregulated miRNAs, miR-10b was the most significantly downregulated miRNAs in rejected allografts. Transfecting miR-10b inhibitor into human renal glomerular endothelial cells recapitulated key features of acute allograft rejection, including endothelial cell apoptosis, release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor α, interferon-γ, and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2) and chemotaxis of macrophages whereas transfection of miR-10b mimics had opposite effects. Downregulation of miR-10b directly derepressed the expression of BCL2L11 (an apoptosis inducer) as revealed by luciferase reporter assay. Taken together, miR-10b downregulation mediates many aspects of disease pathogenicity of acute kidney allograft rejection. Restoring miR-10b expression in glomerular endothelial cells could be a novel therapeutic approach to reduce acute renal allograft loss. - Highlights: • miR-10b was the most downregulated microRNAs in acutely rejected renal allografts. • miR-10b downregulation triggered glomerular endothelial cell apoptosis. • miR-10b downregulation induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • miR-10b downregulation derepressed its pro-apoptotic target BCL2L11.

  11. Medicinal herbs Fructus corni and Semen cuscutae suppress allograft rejection via distinct immune mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Feifei; Liang, Chun-Lin; Jin, Xiao-Wei; Su, Zi-Ren; Dai, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    Achieving long-term allograft survival without continuous global immunosuppression is highly desirable because constant immunosuppression causes severe side effects. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been utilized to treat numerous diseases for centuries. To seek novel immunosuppressive agents, we investigated several Chinese herbal formulas that have been shown to be effective in treating autoimmune diseases. C57BL/6 mice were transplanted with a skin graft from Balb/C donors and treated orally with the TCM. IL-12-expressing dendritic cells and CD4+FoxP3+ Tregs were quantified by flow cytometer while intragraft IL-12 gene expression was measured by real-time PCR. Here we identified a unique TCM, San Si formula, which contains three herbs: Fructus corni (FC), Fructus ligustri lucidi (FLL) and Semen cuscutae (SC). We found that either SC or FC, but not FLL, significantly prolonged skin allograft survival while SC plus FC or San Si formula further delayed allograft rejection compared to SC or FC alone. SC and FC, which did not contain cyclosporine and rapamycin, reduced graft-infiltrating T cells and suppressed their proliferation. Importantly, it was SC, but not FC, that induced CD4+FoxP3+ Tregs in recipients. Tregs induced by SC were also more potent in suppression. In contrast, FC repressed both intracellular IL-12 expression by intragraft DCs and IFNγ expression by graft-infiltrating T cells. Moreover, FC inhibited intragraft IL-12 gene expression. Depleting Tregs and providing exogenous IL-12 completely reversed allograft survival induced by SC plus FC. Thus, SC and FC synergistically suppress allograft rejection via distinct mechanisms. PMID:27256977

  12. 2016 Comprehensive Update of the Banff Working Group on Liver Allograft Pathology: Introduction of Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Demetris, A J; Bellamy, C; Hübscher, S G; O'Leary, J; Randhawa, P S; Feng, S; Neil, D; Colvin, R B; McCaughan, G; Fung, J J; Del Bello, A; Reinholt, F P; Haga, H; Adeyi, O; Czaja, A J; Schiano, T; Fiel, M I; Smith, M L; Sebagh, M; Tanigawa, R Y; Yilmaz, F; Alexander, G; Baiocchi, L; Balasubramanian, M; Batal, I; Bhan, A K; Bucuvalas, J; Cerski, C T S; Charlotte, F; de Vera, M E; ElMonayeri, M; Fontes, P; Furth, E E; Gouw, A S H; Hafezi-Bakhtiari, S; Hart, J; Honsova, E; Ismail, W; Itoh, T; Jhala, N C; Khettry, U; Klintmalm, G B; Knechtle, S; Koshiba, T; Kozlowski, T; Lassman, C R; Lerut, J; Levitsky, J; Licini, L; Liotta, R; Mazariegos, G; Minervini, M I; Misdraji, J; Mohanakumar, T; Mölne, J; Nasser, I; Neuberger, J; O'Neil, M; Pappo, O; Petrovic, L; Ruiz, P; Sağol, Ö; Sanchez Fueyo, A; Sasatomi, E; Shaked, A; Shiller, M; Shimizu, T; Sis, B; Sonzogni, A; Stevenson, H L; Thung, S N; Tisone, G; Tsamandas, A C; Wernerson, A; Wu, T; Zeevi, A; Zen, Y

    2016-06-07

    The Banff Working Group on Liver Allograft Pathology reviewed and discussed literature evidence regarding antibody-mediated liver allograft rejection at the 11th (Paris, France, June 5-10, 2011), 12th (Comandatuba, Brazil, August 19-23, 2013), and 13th (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, October 5-10, 2015) meetings of the Banff Conference on Allograft Pathology. Discussion continued online. The primary goal was to introduce guidelines and consensus criteria for the diagnosis of liver allograft antibody-mediated rejection and provide a comprehensive update of all Banff Schema recommendations. Included are new recommendations for complement component 4d tissue staining and interpretation, staging liver allograft fibrosis, and findings related to immunosuppression minimization. In an effort to create a single reference document, previous unchanged criteria are also included.

  13. Sleep influences the immune response and the rejection process alters sleep pattern: Evidence from a skin allograft model in mice.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Francieli Silva; Andersen, Monica Levy; Guindalini, Camila; Araujo, Leandro Pires; Lopes, José Daniel; Tufik, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    Sleep generally regulates immune functions in a supportive manner and can affect parameters that are directly involved in the rejection process. The first objective was to assess whether sleep deprivation (SD) or sleep restriction (SR) affects the allograft rejection process in mice. The second objective was to investigate whether the rejection process itself modulates the sleep pattern of allografted mice. Adult BALB/c and C57BL/6J male mice were used as the donors and recipients, respectively, except for the syngeneic group (ISOTX), which received skin from mice of the same strain (C57BL/6J). The recipients were randomly assigned to either one of two control groups - TX (allogenic) or ISOTX (syngeneic) - which underwent stereotaxic surgery to enable sleep recording prior to the allograft but were not sleep deprived; one of two paradoxical sleep deprived groups - SDTX and TXSD - which underwent 72h of continuous SD either before or after the allograft respectively, and one of two sleep restricted groups - SRTX and TXSR - which underwent 21h of SD and 3h of sleep for 15days either before or after the allograft respectively. The skin allograft was inspected daily to determine the survival time, expected as 8.0±0.4days in this transplant model under no treatment. The sleep pattern was controlled throughout the rejection process in the SD and SR groups. Draining lymph nodes, spleen, blood and skin grafts were harvested on the 5th day after transplantation for evaluation of the immune parameters related to allograft rejection. In the control groups, we observed a reduction in paradoxical sleep throughout the entire allograft rejection process. Acute and chronic experimental sleep loss in the SD and SR groups produced marked alterations in the immune response. Both SD and SR prolonged allograft survival compared to the non-sleep-deprived group. There were reductions in the following parameters involved in the allograft rejection under sleep loss: CD4(+) and CD8(+) T

  14. Recent patents on immunoregulatory DNA vaccines for autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Shabahang, Shahrokh; Li, Alice F; Escher, Alan

    2010-06-01

    The goal of immunoregulatory DNA vaccination is the antigen- and tissue-specific suppression of pathological inflammation that underlies immune-mediated inflammatory disorders like autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection. Recent patents and patent applications have applied immunoregulatory DNA vaccines in rodent model systems and human clinical trials using plasmid DNA coding for autoantigens such as insulin and glutamic acid decarboxylase for type 1 diabetes, myelin-associated proteins for multiple sclerosis, and heat-sock protein 60 for rheumatoid arthritis. In these cases, the objective is to induce a homeostatic-like regulatory immune response to suppress pathological inflammation. In addition, patent applications have disclosed the use of DNA vaccines encoding the pro-inflammatory MIF cytokine and the CD25 IL-2 receptor subunit to interfere with the inflammatory process. Approaches have also been taken to improve DNA vaccination efficacy, including covalent modification of plasmid DNA, engineering secretion of vaccine-encoded antigen, and co-delivery of DNA coding for anti-inflammatory cytokines, a mutant co-stimulatory molecule, a growth factor, or a pro-apoptotic protein. Furthermore, a patent application has disclosed the use of a DNA vaccine previously shown to treat successfully an autoimmune disease to prolong allograft survival. Taken together, these patents and patent applications indicate a promising bench-to-bedside potential for immunoregulatory DNA vaccination applied to autoimmune diseases and allograft rejection.

  15. Key role for CD4 T cells during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, A.; Wang, J.; Pelletier, R.P.; Nadasdy, T.; Brodsky, S.; Roy, S.; Lodder, M.; Bobek, D.; Mofatt-Bruce, S.; Fairchild, R.L.; Henry, M.L.; Hadley, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    We utilized mouse models to elucidate the immunologic mechanisms of functional graft loss during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts (mixed AMR), in which humoral and cellular responses to the graft occur concomitantly. Although the majority of T cells in the graft at the time of rejection were CD8 T cells with only a minor population of CD4 T cells, depletion of CD4 but not CD8 cells prevented acute graft loss during mixed AMR. CD4 depletion eliminated anti-donor alloantibodies and conferred protection from destruction of renal allografts. ELISPOT revealed that CD4 T effectors responded to donor alloantigens by both the direct and indirect pathways of allorecognition. In transfer studies, CD4 T effectors primed to donor alloantigens were highly effective at promoting acute graft dysfunction, and exhibited the attributes of effector T cells. Laser capture microdissection and confirmatory immunostaining studies revealed that CD4 T cells infiltrating the graft produced effector molecules with graft destructive potential. Bioluminescent imaging confirmed that CD4 T effectors traffic to the graft site in immune replete hosts. These data document that host CD4 T cells can promote acute dysfunction of renal allografts by directly mediating graft injury in addition to facilitating anti-donor alloantibody responses. PMID:24410909

  16. Nerve Regeneration in Rat Limb Allografts: Evaluation of Acute Rejection Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; MacEwan, Matthew R.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Farber, Scott; Newton, Piyaraj; Tung, Thomas H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Successful nerve regeneration is critical to the functional success of composite tissue allografts (CTA). The present study was designed to characterize the effect of acute rejection on nerve regeneration and functional recovery in the setting of orthotopic limb transplantation. Methods A rat orthotopic limb transplantation model was used to evaluate the effects of acute rejection on nerve regeneration and motor recovery. Continuous administration of FK506 (Full suppression), administration of FK506 for the first 8 of 12 weeks (Late rejection), or delayed administration of FK506 / dexamethasone following noticeable rejection (Early rejection) was used to preclude or induce rejection following limb transplantation. Twelve weeks postoperatively, nerve regeneration was assessed via histomorphometric analysis of explanted sciatic nerve, and motor recovery was assessed via evoked muscle force measurement in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Results A single episode of acute rejection that occurs immediately or late after reconstruction does not significantly alter the number of regenerating axonal fibers. Acute rejection occurring late after reconstruction adversely affects EDL muscle function in CTA. Conclusion Collected data reinforces that adequate immunosuppressant administration in cases of allogeneic limb transplantation ensures levels of nerve regeneration and motor functional recovery equivalent to that of syngeneic transplants. Prompt rescue following acute rejection was further demonstrated not to significantly affect nerve regeneration and functional recovery post-operatively. However, instances of acute rejection that occur late after reconstruction affect graft function. In total, the present study begins to characterize the effect of immunosuppression regimens on nerve regeneration and motor recovery in the setting of CTA. PMID:23542267

  17. Analysis of leukocyte activation during acute rejection of pulmonary allografts in noninfected and cytomegalovirus-infected rats.

    PubMed

    Steinmüller, C; Steinhoff, G; Bauer, D; You, X M; Denzin, H; Franke-Ullmann, G; Hausen, B; Bruggemann, C; Wagner, T O; Lohmann-Matthes, M L; Emmendörffer, A

    1997-01-01

    After human lung transplantation acute rejection and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections may occur, probably contributing to the development of chronic rejection. We established a model of subacute allograft rejection in rats to analyze leukocyte activation and effects of a CMV infection. Histoincompatible lung transplants (BN/LEW) without immunosuppression (group A) and lungs of initially immunosuppressed animals (group B) were analyzed. The production of inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, nitric oxides) and the expression of MHC class II antigens by alveolar and lung tissue macrophages were significantly enhanced during the alloresponse. In recipients without immunosuppression (group A) allograft necrosis was detected by day 6, whereas group B allografts were fully rejected by day 25. In allografts of immunosuppressed, CMV-infected animals (group C) the CMV infection was clearly aggravated and the number of activated lung tissue macrophages was increased when compared with noninfected allografts or isografts. The subacute model provides the advantage of allowing us to study mechanisms of acute rejection without the effects of reperfusion injury. Furthermore these findings underline the role of inflammatory mediators produced by macrophages during rejection.

  18. Gene expression profiling and cardiac allograft rejection monitoring: is IMAGE just a mirage?

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Parameshwar, Jayan

    2010-06-01

    The search for an effective non-invasive monitoring technique for cardiac allograft rejection eluded us until the discovery and validation of a commercially available gene-based peripheral blood bio-signature signal. The Invasive Monitoring Attenuation through Gene Expression (IMAGE) trial tested the hypothesis of cardiac biopsy minimization using this gene-based panel in stable, low-risk survivors, late after cardiac transplantation and demonstrated non-inferiority of this strategy. We present a clinician's critical perspective on this important effort and outline the key caveats and highlights for the potential way forward in using these results. Furthermore, we contend that it may not be necessary to replace an invasive cardiac biopsy strategy with anything other than better standardized clinical and functional allograft vigilance in low-risk survivors. Copyright 2010 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Morphologic and immunohistochemical findings in antibody-mediated rejection of the cardiac allograft.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Fishbein, Michael C

    2012-12-01

    The recognition and acceptance of the entity of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organs has been slow to develop. Greatest acceptance and most information relates to cardiac transplantation. AMR is thought to represent antibody/complement mediated injury to the microvasculature of the graft that can result in allograft dysfunction, allograft loss, accelerated graft vasculopathy, and increased mortality. The morphologic hallmark is microvascular injury with immunoglobulin and complement deposition in capillaries, accumulation of intravascular macrophages, and in more severe cases, microvascular hemorrhage and thrombosis, with inflammation and edema of the affected organ. Understanding of the pathogenesis of AMR, criteria and methods for diagnosis, and treatment strategies are still in evolution, and will be addressed in this review.

  20. Serum neopterin as an indicator of increased risk of renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Carey, B Sean; Jain, Rashmi; Adams, Claire L; Wong, Kam Yim; Shaw, Steve; Tse, Wai Yee; Kaminski, Edward R

    2013-03-01

    Acute rejection remains associated with poor graft outcome. An early predictor of acute renal transplant rejection is the long sought after goal for transplant immunologists. In this study we measured levels of serum neopterin at day 5 post-transplant in a cohort of 216 consecutive renal allograft recipients, and compared this with serum creatinine and acute rejection episodes during the first year post transplant. We compared serum neopterin in recipients from living donors (LD), donors after brain death (DBD) and donors after cardiac death (DCD). In all cases higher neopterin levels were correlated with acute rejection in the first year post transplant, but this was only significant in recipients of DCD kidneys who suffered acute cellular or vascular rejection (p=0.04, odds ratio 1.08, 95% CI 1.003-1.012). The neopterin/creatinine ratio, which takes into account the effect of kidney function on circulating neopterin levels, was significantly higher for all recipients who suffered biopsy proven cellular or vascular rejection in the first year post transplant, compared to all other patients (p=0.001, for an increase of 0.1, odds ratio=1.64, 95% CI 1.21-2.20). The ability to use non-invasive biomarkers in the transplant recipient has the potential to increase transplant survival for these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 19F MRI Detection of Acute Allograft Rejection with In Vivo Perfluorocarbon Labeling of Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hitchens, T. Kevin; Ye, Qing; Eytan, Danielle F.; Janjic, Jelena M.; Ahrens, Eric T.; Ho, Chien

    2010-01-01

    Current diagnosis of organ rejection following transplantation relies on tissue biopsy, which is not ideal due to sampling limitations and risks associated with the invasive procedure. We have previously shown that cellular MRI of iron-oxide labeled immune-cell infiltration can provide a non-invasive measure of rejection status by detecting areas of hypointensity on T2*-weighted images. In the current study, we tested the feasibility of using a fluorine-based cellular tracer agent to detect macrophage accumulation in rodent models of acute allograft rejection by fluorine-19 (19F) MRI and MRS. This study used two rat models of acute rejection, including abdominal heterotopic cardiac transplant and orthotopic kidney transplant models. Following in vivo labeling of monocytes and macrophages with a commercially available agent containing perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether, we observed 19F-signal intensity in the organs experiencing rejection by 19F MRI, and conventional 1H MRI was used for anatomical context. Immunofluorescense and histology confirmed macrophage labeling. These results are consistent with our previous studies and show the complementary nature of the two cellular imaging techniques. With no background signal, 19F MRI/MRS can provide unambiguous detection of fluorine labeled cells, and may be a useful technique for detecting and quantifying rejection grade in patients. PMID:21305593

  2. Deficiency of C4 from donor or recipient mouse fails to prevent renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Zhou, Wuding; Farrar, Conrad A; Hargreaves, Roseanna E G; Sheerin, Neil S; Sacks, Steven H

    2006-04-01

    Complement effector products generated in the transplanted kidney are known to mediate transplant rejection, but which of the three main activation pathways of complement trigger this response is unclear. Here we assessed the role of the classical and lectin pathways by studying the common component C4 in mouse kidney transplant rejection. We transplanted wild-type or C4-null H-2(b) donor kidneys into H-2(k) or H-2(d) recipients, or vice-versa, to assess the roles of donor kidney and recipient expression of complement. Intragraft C4 gene expression rose substantially during rejection. However, we found no significant association between graft acceptance and the presence of C4 in either the donor kidney or recipient mouse. At the time of rejection, we found no significant differences in alloantibody response in the different groups. Tubular deposition of C3 to C9 occurred regardless of the absence or presence of C4 in either the donor or recipient mouse, indicating that C4 was dispensable for complement activation at this site. These data suggest that complement activation and renal allograft rejection are independent of the classical and lectin pathways in these models, implying that in the absence of these pathways the alternative pathway is the main trigger for complement-mediated rejection.

  3. [Antibody-mediated rejection of renal allograft and the update Banff classification 2013].

    PubMed

    Honsová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The view on the role of donor-specific antibodies in organ transplantation has been changed during the last several decades. Today, it is considered that the majority of cases of the late renal allograft dysfunction and loss are caused by the presence of donor-specific antibodies to HLA antigens. The real breakthrough in the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection was represented by the discovery of C4d, which enabled the determination of the diagnostic criteria of acute and later chronic antibody-mediated rejection. Although detection of C4d has been the cornerstone in the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection for over 10 years, it has become clear that some cases with similar morphological and clinical features do not have detectable C4d. Outcomes of key studies concerning presence of donor specific antibodies and morphological features in the graft biopsy samples resulted in the modification of Banff classification of 2013, which includes integrating C4d negative antibody-mediated rejection and also that acute vascular rejection (v1, v2) can be a part of the antibody-mediated rejection.

  4. PDL1 is required for peripheral transplantation tolerance and protection from chronic allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsunori; Albin, Monica J; Yuan, Xueli; Yamaura, Kazuhiro; Habicht, Antje; Murayama, Takaya; Grimm, Martin; Waaga, Ana Maria; Ueno, Takuya; Padera, Robert F; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Shin, Tahiro; Blazar, Bruce R; Rothstein, David M; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Najafian, Nader

    2007-10-15

    The PD-1:PDL pathway plays an important role in regulating alloimmune responses but its role in transplantation tolerance is unknown. We investigated the role of PD-1:PDL costimulatory pathway in peripheral and a well established model of central transplantation tolerance. Early as well as delayed blockade of PDL1 but not PDL2 abrogated tolerance induced by CTLA4Ig in a fully MHC-mismatched cardiac allograft model. Accelerated rejection was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of IFN-gamma-producing alloreactive T cells and expansion of effector CD8(+) T cells in the periphery, and a decline in the percentage of Foxp3(+) graft infiltrating cells. Similarly, studies using PDL1/L2-deficient recipients confirmed the results with Ab blockade. Interestingly, while PDL1-deficient donor allografts were accepted by wild-type recipients treated with CTLA4Ig, the grafts developed severe chronic rejection and vasculopathy when compared with wild-type grafts. Finally, in a model of central tolerance induced by mixed allogeneic chimerism, engraftment was not abrogated by PDL1/L2 blockade. These novel data demonstrate the critical role of PDL1 for induction and maintenance of peripheral transplantation tolerance by its ability to alter the balance between pathogenic and regulatory T cells. Expression of PDL1 in donor tissue is critical for prevention of in situ graft pathology and chronic rejection.

  5. Inhibition of chronic rejection by antibody induced vascular accommodation in fully allogeneic heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Semiletova, Natalya V; Shen, Xiu-Da; Baibakov, Boris; Feldman, Daniel M; Mukherjee, Kaushik; Frank, Jonathan M; Stepkowski, Stainslaw M; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Ghobrial, Rafik M

    2005-12-15

    The potential role of altered antibody responses as an effector protective mechanism to induce graft accommodation has been widely investigated in xenogeneic responses. Here we investigate the protective effects of antibody binding to vascular endothelium in a fully mismatched allogeneic model of heart transplantation. ACI recipients of WF cardiac grafts were treated either with allochimeric [alpha1h ]-RT1.A class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) extracts (1 mg/rat, p.v. day 0) or high dose of CsA (10 mg/kg/day, p.o., day 0-6). Cardiac allografts were evaluated at 100 days posttransplant by immunohistology for evidence of chronic rejection and/or vascular accommodation. Activation of apoptotic or antiapoptotic mechanisms was verified by DNA fragmentation (TUNEL) analysis. Allochimeric therapy resulted in inhibition of chronic rejection, absence of neointimal formation and induction of vascular accommodation of fully allogeneic WF hearts in ACI hosts. Such accommodation was evident by IgG and IgM vascular endothelial binding and marked reduction of DNA fragmentation. In contrast, CsA therapy resulted in marked neointimal proliferation, without evidence of vascular accommodation. Immunohistochemical analysis failed to demonstrate vascular endothelial antibody binding. Further, severe chronic rejection following CsA treatment was accompanied by marked DNA fragmentation. Alteration of humoral immunity induces vascular accommodation in allogeneic transplantation. Vascular accommodation is the underlying mechanism for inhibition allograft vasculopathy following allochimeric MHC class I therapy.

  6. The value of needle renal allograft biopsy. I. A retrospective study of biopsies performed during putative rejection episodes.

    PubMed Central

    Matas, A J; Sibley, R; Mauer, M; Sutherland, D E; Simmons, R L; Najarian, J S

    1983-01-01

    Following renal transplantation, immunosuppression is usually increased to treat presumed rejection episodes. However, a) many conditions mimic rejection in the post-transplant period, and b) many rejection episodes are irreversible. As increased immunosuppressive therapy is associated with an increased risk of infection, it would be ideal to limit antirejection therapy to only the rejection episodes that are reversible. The role of percutaneous allograft biopsy was studied as an aid to decide which patients to treat for rejection, to limit unnecessary immunosuppression and to predict allograft survival. One hundred thirty-five patients with suspected rejection underwent 206 allograft biopsies without complication. Two hundred four biopsies were available for study. Biopsies were coded on a 1-4 scale (minimal, mild, moderate, severe) for acute and chronic tubulointerstitial infiltrate and vascular rejection, as well as no rejection (e.g., recurrence of original disease). Treatment decisions were made on the basis of the biopsy combined with clinical data. All patients have been followed two years and outcome correlated with biopsy findings (death, nephrectomy, and return to dialysis defined as kidney loss). The results were the following: 1) biopsies represented changes within the kidney. Of 16 kidneys removed within one month of biopsy, no nephrectomy specimen showed less rejection than that seen on biopsy. 2) Eighty-one biopsies (39.7%) led to tapering or not increasing immunosuppression (either no rejection, minimal rejection, or irreversible changes). 3) Kidneys having either severe acute or chronic vascular rejection (less than 30% function at three months) had significantly (p less than 0.05) decreased survival three to 24 months postbiopsy than those with minimal or mild vascular rejection or tubulointerstitial infiltrate (83% function at three months). 4) Kidneys with moderate chronic vascular rejection and those with severe acute tubulointerstitial

  7. Corticosteroid-loaded biodegradable nanoparticles for prevention of corneal allograft rejection in rats.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qing; Xu, Qingguo; Boylan, Nicholas J; Lamb, Nicholas W; Emmert, David G; Yang, Jeh-Chang; Tang, Li; Heflin, Tom; Alwadani, Saeed; Eberhart, Charles G; Stark, Walter J; Hanes, Justin

    2015-03-10

    Immunologic graft rejection is one of the main causes of short and long-term graft failure in corneal transplantation. Steroids are the most commonly used immunosuppressive agents for postoperative management and prevention of corneal graft rejection. However, steroids delivered in eye drops are rapidly cleared from the surface of the eye, so the required frequency of dosing for corneal graft rejection management can be as high as once every 2h. Additionally, these eye drops are often prescribed for daily use for 1 year or longer, which can result in poor patient compliance and steroid-related side effects. Here, we report a biodegradable nanoparticle system composed of Generally Regarded as Safe (GRAS) materials that can provide sustained release of corticosteroids to prevent corneal graft rejection following subconjunctival injection provided initially during transplant surgery. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) exhibited a size of 200 nm, 8 wt.% drug loading, and sustained drug release over 15 days in vitro under sink conditions. DSP-loaded nanoparticles provided sustained ocular drug levels for at least 7 days after subconjunctival administration in rats, and prevented corneal allograft rejection over the entire 9-week study when administered weekly. In contrast, control treatment groups that received weekly injections of either placebo nanoparticles, saline, or DSP in solution demonstrated corneal graft rejection accompanied by severe corneal edema, neovascularization and opacity that occurred in ≤ 4 weeks. Local controlled release of corticosteroids may reduce the rate of corneal graft rejection, perhaps especially in the days immediately following surgery when risk of rejection is highest and when typical steroid eye drop administration requirements are particularly onerous.

  8. Intragraft Toll-like receptor profiling in acute renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Dessing, Mark C; Bemelman, Frederike J; Claessen, Nike; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C

    2010-12-01

    Experimental studies have shown potential for Toll-like receptor (TLR) profiling in renal allograft in predicting renal outcome after transplantation. Our goal was to determine if profiling of TLR1-10 and TLR-related genes could be used as a prognostic value for renal function and late clinical outcome after transplantation. TLR1-10, CD14, MD-2 and negative regulators Toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP) and single immunoglobulin domain IL-1R-related receptor were analysed in 36 biopsies from renal transplant recipients with acute rejection (AR) and in 14 biopsies from renal transplant recipients without rejection (NR). Analysis was performed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. TLR (-related) genes were correlated to Banff'07 classification, cellular influx, response to conventional anti-rejection therapy, renal function 12 and 24 months after rejection and graft loss. mRNA levels of most TLRs were significantly higher in acute rejection while TOLLIP mRNA level was decreased. mRNA levels of TLR1/2/4/7/8 were highly accurate in distinguishing AR from NR. TLR mRNA levels correlated to inflammatory parameters according to the Banff'07 classification and to cellular influx. Elevated mRNA level of TLR3 in acute rejection was independent from infiltrating leukocytes. TLR (-related) genes were not correlated with response to conventional anti-rejection therapy. Splice variant TLR4r3 was associated with poor renal function 24 months after transplantation, and TLR1 appeared to be associated with graft loss. The elevated mRNA levels of several TLRs in association with reduced mRNA levels of TOLLIP in renal transplant biopsies of patients with acute rejection indicate a pro-inflammatory state, which may contribute to uncontrolled inflammation.

  9. Noninvasive assessment for acute allograft rejection in a rat lung transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hiroaki; Zhao, Xiangdong; Chen, Fengshi; Fujinaga, Takuji; Shoji, Tsuyoshi; Bando, Toru; Wada, Hiromi; Date, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract After lung transplantation, early detection of acute allograft rejection is important not only for timely and optimal treatment, but also for the prediction of chronic rejection which is a major cause of late death. Many biological and immunological approaches have been developed to detect acute rejection; however, it is not well known whether lung mechanics correlate with disease severity, especially with pathological rejection grade. In this study, we examined the relationship between lung mechanics and rejection grade development in a rat acute rejection model using the forced oscillation technique, which provides noninvasive assessment of lung function. To this end, we assessed lung resistance and elastance (RL and EL) from implanted left lung of these animals. The perivascular/interstitial component of rejection severity grade (A‐grade) was also quantified from histological images using tissue fraction (TF; tissue + cell infiltration area/total area). We found that TF, RL, and EL increased according to A‐grade. There was a strong positive correlation between EL at the lowest frequency (Elow; EL at 0.5 Hz) and TF (r2 = 0.930). Furthermore, the absolute difference between maximum value of EL (Emax) and Elow (Ehet; Emax − Elow) showed the strong relationship with standard deviation of TF (r2 = 0.709), and A‐grade (Spearman's correlation coefficients; rs = 0.964, P < 0.0001). Our results suggest that the dynamic elastance as well as its frequency dependence have the ability to predict A‐grade. These indexes should prove useful for noninvasive detection and monitoring the progression of disease in acute rejection. PMID:25524280

  10. Corneal Immunosuppressive Mechanisms, Anterior Chamber-Associated Immune Deviation (ACAID) and Their Role in Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Treacy, Oliver; Fahy, Gerry; Ritter, Thomas; O'Flynn, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most frequently performed transplant procedure in humans. Human leukocyte antigen matching, while imperative for other types of organ transplants, is usually not performed before cornea transplantation. With the use of topical steroid immunosuppressants, which are subsequently tailed off to almost zero, most corneal transplants will not be rejected in recipients with low risk of graft rejection. This phenomenon has been described as immune privilege by Medawar many years ago. However, this immune privilege is relative and can be easily eroded, e.g. by postoperative nonspecific inflammation or other causes of corneal or ocular inflammation. Interestingly, corneas that are at high risk of rejection have a higher failure rate than other organs. Considerable progress has been made in recent years to provide a better understanding of corneal immune privilege. This chapter will review current knowledge on ocular immunosuppressive mechanisms including anterior chamber-associated immune deviation and discuss their role(s) in corneal allograft rejection. Ultimately, this evolving information will be of benefit in developing therapeutic strategies to prevent corneal transplant rejection.

  11. Immunological analogy between allograft rejection, recurrent abortion and pre-eclampsia - the same basic mechanism?

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Jacek R

    2006-07-01

    There are still controversies concerning the role of immunological mechanisms engaged both in recurrent abortions (RA) and pre-eclampsia (PE). According to some opinions, recurrent miscarriage is comparable to organ-specific autoimmune disease. Analysis of immune reactions shows that graft rejection shares many similar mechanisms with RA and PE. This fact allows us to conclude that rejection of transplanted alloantigenic organs and pregnancy loss have probably the same evolutionary origin. Subsets and functions of immunocompetent cells (T CD4, suppressor gammadeltaT, cytotoxic T CD8, Treg, Tr1, uterine NK cells), over-activation of innate immunity (activation of NK cytotoxic cells, macrophages, neutrophils and complement), changes of Th1/Th2 cytokine balance (IL-2, IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, IFNgamma, TNFalpha vs. IL-4, IL-10, TGFbeta), importance of HLA-G molecule, CD200/CD200R interaction, over-expression of adhesion molecules, fgl2 prothrombinase activation and stimulation of IDO and HO expression, all suggest that RA and PE are syndromes of fetal allograft rejection, and not organ-specific autoimmune diseases. According to that supposition, an analogy might exist between acute graft rejection and recurrent abortion, and between chronic graft rejection and pre-eclampsia.

  12. Renal allograft rejection: possible involvement of lymphokine-activated killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, J A; Forsythe, J L; Proud, G; Taylor, R M

    1989-01-01

    Human renal allograft tissue was recovered at transplant nephrectomy from three patients with irreversible loss of graft function. This tissue was disaggregated and separated into two fractions on the basis of particle size. Fraction 1 contained glomeruli and developed a mixed outgrowth containing adherent epithelial and mesangial cells after a limited period of culture. Fraction 2 contained fragments of renal tubules and produced monolayers of tubular epithelial cells during culture. A population of lymphoid cells was observed to grow from the primary disaggregate into medium supplemented with recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2). After culture for 5 days these lymphoid cells were predominantly CD3-positive and carried both class II major histocompatibility antigens (MHC) and the CD25 IL-2 receptor. Culture of peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells with IL-2 caused the generation of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells; these cells were able to lyse both glomerular and tubular cells grown from nephrectomy tissue without showing MHC antigen restriction. The lymphoid cells grown from renal allograft tissue showed a similar lytic potential for both renal cells prepared from the same nephrectomy specimen and from third party renal tissue. It is possible that any LAK cells formed within a renal allograft by the action of IL-2 may contribute to the tissue destruction observed during graft rejection. Images Figure 2 PMID:2661417

  13. Tacrolimus confers lower acute rejection rates and better renal allograft survival compared to cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Mahmoud; Kadian, Manish; Srinivas, Titte; Taber, David; Posadas Salas, Maria Aurora

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the impact of tacrolimus (FK) and cyclosporine (CYA) on acute rejection and graft survival and to assess the predominant causes of graft loss between patients receiving these two calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). METHODS Retrospective review of 1835 patients who received a kidney transplant (KTX) between 1999-2012. Patients were grouped based on initial CNI utilized: 1195 in FK group, 640 in CYA group. Data on baseline characteristics, clinical outcomes, and causes of graft loss in both groups were analyzed. RESULTS Cumulative acute rejection rates were 14% in the FK vs 24% in the CYA group. Despite more marginal donor characteristics in the FK group, these patients had better graft survival rates compared to the CYA group. Three and five year graft survival rates were 88% and 84% respectively in the FK group compared to 79% and 70% respectively in the CYA group (P < 0.001). After multivariate analysis, which controlled for confounders, FK use was a strong predictor for lower acute rejection rates [odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95%CI: 0.45-0.79] and better renal allograft survival (OR 0.740, 95%CI: 0.58-0.94). Death with a functioning graft was the most common cause of graft loss in both groups. Common causes of death included cardiovascular disease, infections, and malignancies. Chronic allograft nephropathy was also found to be an important cause of graft loss, being more prevalent in the CYA group. CONCLUSION The use of FK-based maintenance immunosuppression therapy is associated with a significantly lower rate of acute rejection and better graft survival compared to CYA-based regimen. Individualizing immunosuppression through risk-stratified CNI choice may lead to improved outcomes across all spectra of KTX patients. PMID:28058220

  14. Genetic Polymorphism of Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 (IRF5) Correlates with Allograft Acute Rejection of Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; Wei, Bajin; Dai, Yifan; Zhang, Min; Wu, Jian; Xu, Xiao; Jiang, Guoping; Zheng, Shusen; Zhou, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background Although liver transplantation is one of the most efficient curative therapies of end stage liver diseases, recipients may suffer liver graft loss opst-operation. IRF-5, a member of Interferon Regulatory Factors, functions as a key regulator in TLR4 cascade, and is capable of inducing inflammatory cytokines. Although TLR4 has been proved to contribute to acute allograft rejection, including after liver transplantation, the correlation between IRF5 gene and acute rejection has not been elucidated yet. Methods The study enrolled a total of 289 recipients, including 39 females and 250 males, and 39 recipients developed acute allograft rejection within 6 months post-transplantation. The allograft rejections were diagnosed by liver biopsies. Genome DNA of recipients was extracted from pre-operative peripheral blood. Genotyping of IRF-5, including rs3757385, rs752637 and rs11761199, was performed, followed by SNP frequency and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium analysis. Results The genetic polymorphism of rs3757385 was found associated with acute rejection. G/G homozygous individuals were at higher risk of acute rejection, with a P value of 0.042 (OR = 2.34 (1.07–5.10)). Conclusions IRF5, which transcriptionally activates inflammatory cytokines, is genetically associated with acute rejection and might function as a risk factor for acute rejection of liver transplantations. PMID:24788560

  15. Gene-based bio-signature patterns and cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Uber, Patricia A; Benitez, Roberto M

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians have long awaited an alternative to invasive endomyocardial biopsy for surveillance of cardiac transplant rejection. Transcriptional signals in peripheral blood mononuclear cells allow for the development of multigene-based panels that can inform on the presence or absence of immunologic quiescence. The informative genes represent several biologic pathways, including T-cell activation (PDCD1), T-cell migration (ITGA4), and mobilization of hematopoietic precursors (WDR40A and microRNA gene family cMIR), and steroid-responsive genes such as IL1R2, the decoy receptor for interleukin 2. The greatest value may include the ability to inform on the potential of future proclivity for rejection, allowing patients to be stratified into low, intermediate, or high risk subsets for future rejection. In these individuals, this knowledge may allow clinicians to use tailored approaches to immunosuppression, thereby avoiding adverse pharmacologic effects in low-risk patients while improving rejection outcomes in those at high risk for future allograft compromise. Despite these advances, clinical entrenchment of gene-based pharmacotherapy in cardiac transplantation will require independent replication and validation of investigational findings.

  16. T-cell immune response cDNA 7 in allograft rejection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Utku, Nalân; Heinemann, Thomas; Milford, Edgar L

    2007-05-01

    The membrane protein T-cell immune response cDNA 7 (TIRC7) is transiently expressed in subsets of lymphocytes following antigen stimulation. The importance of TIRC7 in immune activation is demonstrated by the effect of antibodies directed against extracellular domains of TIRC7. In vitro targeting of TIRC7 inhibits proliferation and cytokine expression in human, mouse and rat lymphocytes, and these inhibitory effects have been associated with induction of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 mRNA and protein in the presence of TIRC7 antibodies. In vivo, anti-TIRC7 antibodies prevent kidney transplant rejection in rats and heart allograft rejection in mice. Treatment with an anti-TIRC7 antibody as monotherapy or in combination with TNFalpha blockade inhibits disease progression in collagen-induced arthritis. TIRC7 expression decreases in the peripheral blood of humans who have undergone cardiac transplant prior to clinical rejection, and is therefore a promising noninvasive tool for the prediction of rejection. Thus, targeting of TIRC7 may lead to the development of specific and effective therapeutic and diagnostic approaches by unifying relevant cellular and molecular responses in T- and B-cell subsets, and represents a promising new pathway for immune regulation in transplantation and autoimmune disease.

  17. Immune Responses to Tissue-Restricted Nonmajor Histocompatibility Complex Antigens in Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Ankit

    2017-01-01

    Chronic diseases that result in end-stage organ damage cause inflammation, which can reveal sequestered self-antigens (SAgs) in that organ and trigger autoimmunity. The thymus gland deletes self-reactive T-cells against ubiquitously expressed SAgs, while regulatory mechanisms in the periphery control immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs. It is now established that T-cells reactive to SAgs present in certain organs (e.g., lungs, pancreas, and intestine) are incompletely eliminated, and the dysregulation of peripheral immuneregulation can generate immune responses to SAgs. Therefore, chronic diseases can activate self-reactive lymphocytes, inducing tissue-restricted autoimmunity. During organ transplantation, donor lymphocytes are tested against recipient serum (i.e., cross-matching) to detect antibodies (Abs) against donor human leukocyte antigens, which has been shown to reduce Ab-mediated hyperacute rejection. However, primary allograft dysfunction and rejection still occur frequently. Because donor lymphocytes do not express tissue-restricted SAgs, preexisting Abs against SAgs are undetectable during conventional cross-matching. Preexisting and de novo immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs (i.e., autoimmunity) play a major role in rejection. In this review, we discuss the evidence that supports autoimmunity as a contributor to rejection. Testing for preexisting and de novo immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs and treatment based on immune responses after organ transplantation may improve short- and long-term outcomes after transplantation. PMID:28164137

  18. Inhibition of αvβ6 promotes acute renal allograft rejection in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Lo, D J; Farris, A B; Song, M; Leopardi, F; Anderson, D J; Strobert, E A; Ramakrishnan, S; Turgeon, N A; Mehta, A K; Turnbull, B; Maroni, B; Violette, S M; Kirk, A D

    2013-12-01

    The integrin αvβ6 activates latent transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) within the kidney and may be a target for the prevention of chronic allograft fibrosis after kidney transplantation. However, TGF-β also has known immunosuppressive properties that are exploited by calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs); thus, the net benefit of αvβ6 inhibition remains undetermined. To assess the acute impact of interference with αvβ6 on acute rejection, we tested a humanized αvβ6-specific monoclonal antibody (STX-100) in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled nonhuman primate renal transplantation study to evaluate whether αvβ6 blockade alters the risk of acute rejection during CNI-based immunosuppression. Rhesus monkeys underwent renal allotransplantation under standard CNI-based maintenance immunosuppression; 10 biopsy-confirmed rejection-free animals were randomized to receive weekly STX-100 or placebo. Animals treated with STX-100 experienced significantly decreased rejection-free survival compared to placebo animals (p = 0.049). Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed αvβ6 ligand presence, and αvβ6 staining intensity was lower in STX-100-treated animals (p = 0.055), indicating an apparent blockade effect of STX-100. LAP, LTBP-1 and TGF-β were all decreased in animals that rejected on STX-100 compared to those that rejected on standard immunosuppression alone, suggesting a relevant effect of αvβ6 blockade on local TGF-β. These data caution against the use of αvβ6 blockade to achieve TGF-β inhibition in kidney transplantation.

  19. CD8 T-cell recognition of acquired alloantigen promotes acute allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Simon J. F.; Ali, Jason M.; Wlodek, Elizabeth; Negus, Marg C.; Harper, Ines G.; Chhabra, Manu; Qureshi, M. Saeed; Mallik, Mekhola; Bolton, Eleanor; Bradley, J. Andrew; Pettigrew, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive CD8 T-cell immunity is the principal arm of the cellular alloimmune response, but its development requires help. This can be provided by CD4 T cells that recognize alloantigen “indirectly,” as self-restricted allopeptide, but this process remains unexplained, because the target epitopes for CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition are “unlinked” on different cells (recipient and donor antigen presenting cells (APCs), respectively). Here, we test the hypothesis that the presentation of intact and processed MHC class I alloantigen by recipient dendritic cells (DCs) (the “semidirect” pathway) allows linked help to be delivered by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells for generating destructive cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses. We show that CD8 T-cell–mediated rejection of murine heart allografts that lack hematopoietic APCs requires host secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT). SLT is necessary because within it, recipient dendritic cells can acquire MHC from graft parenchymal cells and simultaneously present it as intact protein to alloreactive CD8 T cells and as processed peptide alloantigen for recognition by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells. This enables delivery of essential help for generating cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses that cause rapid allograft rejection. In demonstrating the functional relevance of the semidirect pathway to transplant rejection, our findings provide a solution to a long-standing conundrum as to why SLT is required for CD8 T-cell allorecognition of graft parenchymal cells and suggest a mechanism by which indirect-pathway CD4 T cells provide help for generating effector cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses at late time points after transplantation. PMID:26420874

  20. Modification of alternative messenger RNA splicing of fibroblast growth factor receptors in human cardiac allografts during rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, X M; Frist, W H; Yeoh, T K; Miller, G G

    1994-01-01

    Accelerated coronary atherosclerosis in cardiac transplants (cardiac allograft vasculopathy, CAV) is characterized by coronary intimal hyperplasia. Acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is a potent mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, and its expression is increased in cardiac allografts, suggesting it may play a role in the pathogenesis of CAV. The activity of aFGF is dependent on binding to transmembrane receptors. To investigate whether receptors for aFGF are also induced after transplantation, polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze expression of four receptors for aFGF (FGFR1-FGFR4). Expression of mRNA encoding extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains of FGFR1 was increased 35-fold in cardiac allografts compared with normal hearts and was predominantly present in cardiac myocytes and vascular structures. Alternatively spliced mRNA that encodes transmembrane forms of FGFR1, which contain the signal-transducing tyrosine kinase domains, was induced in allografts during rejection, in infiltrating cells, vascular structures, and myocytes. In vitro experiments showed that differential expression of FGF receptor isoforms was induced by aFGF, and also by IL-6 and TGF-beta, which are expressed in cardiac allografts during rejection. The results show that expression of both aFGF and its receptors is altered in cardiac allografts and suggest that these events are important in the pathogenesis of CAV. Images PMID:7521891

  1. Knockdown of toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathways ameliorate bone graft rejection in a mouse model of allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Shen, Po-Chuan; Wu, Po-Ting; Jou, I-Ming; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li; Wang, Chrong-Reen; Chong, Hao-Earn; Chuang, Shu-Han; Peng, Jia-Shiou; Chen, Shih-Yao

    2017-01-01

    Non-union occurring in structural bone grafting is a major problem in allograft transplantation because of impaired interaction between the host and graft tissue. Activated toll-like receptor (TLR) induces inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and triggers cell-mediated immune responses. The TLR-mediated signal pathway is important for mediating allograft rejection. We evaluated the effects of local knockdown of the TLR4 signaling pathway in a mouse segmental femoral graft model. Allografts were coated with freeze-dried lentiviral vectors that encoded TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) short-hairpin RNA (shRNA), which were individually transplanted into the mice. They were assessed morphologically, radiographically, and histologically for tissue remodeling. Union occurred in autografted but not in allografted mice at the graft and host junctions after 4 weeks. TLR4 and MyD88 expression was up-regulated in allografted mice. TLR4 and MyD88 shRNAs inhibited TLR4 and MyD88 expression, which led to better union in the grafted sites. More regulatory T-cells in the draining lymph nodes suggested inflammation suppression. Local inhibition of TLR4 and MyD88 might reduce immune responses and ameliorate allograft rejection. PMID:28393847

  2. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-09-03

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation.

  3. Antibodies directed against antigens on the endothelium of peritubular capillaries in patients with rejecting renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Paul, L C; van Es, L A; van Rood, J J; van Leeuwen, A; de la Rivière, G B; de Graeff, J

    1979-03-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the humoral immune response against endothelial antigens of the donor kidney in human renal allograft recipients. Sera from 61 transplant recipients who received 62 grafts were studied for the presence of circulating endothelial antibodies (CEAb) using an indirect immunofluorescence technique with a pretransplant biopsy of the graft as a substrate. IgG antibodies directed against the endothelium of peritubular capillaries were found in the sera of 6 of the 10 patients with graft rejection within 7 weeks after transplantation, whereas these antibodies were not found in the absence of rejection (P less than 0.001). Immunofluorescence studies of post-transplant biopsies showed IgG along the endothelium of peritubular capillaries only in the grafts of patients with CEAb. Eluates from these grafts contained IgG antibodies that bound to the endothelium of the donor as shown by the indirect immunofluorescence technique. Absorption of endothelial antibody (EAb)-positive sera with human platelets or Wistar strain rat erythrocytes showed that the EAb were not directed against serologically defined HLA antigens or against heterophile antigens on rat erythrocytes. We conclude from this study that the presence of antibodies directed against endothelial antigens is associated with poor graft prognosis and that these antibodies may be responsible for the rejection process.

  4. Follicular Helper T (Tfh) Cells in Autoimmune Diseases and Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yun-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Production of high affinity antibodies for antigens is a critical component for the immune system to fight off infectious pathogens. However, it could be detrimental to our body when the antigens that B cells recognize are of self-origin. Follicular helper T, or Tfh, cells are required for the generation of germinal center reactions, where high affinity antibody-producing B cells and memory B cells predominantly develop. As such, Tfh cells are considered as targets to prevent B cells from producing high affinity antibodies against self-antigens, when high affinity autoantibodies are responsible for immunopathologies in autoimmune disorders. This review article provides an overview of current understanding of Tfh cells and discusses it in the context of animal models of autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections for generation of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:27574501

  5. A high isoflavone soy protein diet and intravenous genistein delay rejection of rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Timothy P; Liesen, Daniel A; Mann, Paul C; Rolando, Lori; Banz, William J

    2002-08-01

    Genistein, a soy isoflavone, has in vitro immunosuppressive properties. We investigated whether genistein or dietary soy protein containing isoflavones could influence the outcome of rat cardiac allografts. Lewis rats were fed a diet with protein from high isoflavone soy protein fraction (HIS), casein (CAS) or casein with isoflavones added (CI) starting 1 wk before heart transplants from Wistar Furth donors, and continuing throughout the study. HIS-fed rats had significantly prolonged time to rejection compared with CAS- and CI-fed recipients (10.8 +/- 2.62 vs. 7.18 +/- 0.75 and 7.22 +/- 0.44 d, P < 0.001). Intravenous genistein [20mg/(kg. d) for 14 d] significantly prolonged heart survival compared with controls and dissolvent-treated recipients (23.2 +/- 7.4 vs. 8.4 +/- 1.3 and 11.4+/3.6 d, P < 0.0005), and had an additive effect when given to heart recipients also receiving low dose cyclosporine for 7 d (30.8 +/- 2.3 vs. 23.4 +/- 2.4 d, P < 0.005). Concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocytes, isolated from Lewis rats given intraperitoneal genistein for 7 d, had decreased production of interferon gamma compared with controls or dimethyl sulfoxide-treated groups (22.6 +/- 9.9 vs 149 +/- 105 and 154 +/- 103 micro g/L, P < 0.05). In conclusion, a high isoflavone soy diet and intravenous genistein, but not isoflavone extract alone, delay rejection of rat cardiac allografts, with an additive effect in cyclosporine-treated rats. In addition, intraperitoneal genistein has immunosuppressive properties in vivo.

  6. Chronic cardiac allograft rejection: critical role of ED-A(+) fibronectin and implications for targeted therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Neri, Dario; Berndt, Alexander

    2012-03-01

    Chronic cardiac allograft rejection is characterized by cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and cardiac interstitial fibrosis (CIF) causing severe long-term complications after heart transplantation and determining allograft function and patients' prognosis. Until now, there have been no sufficient preventive or therapeutic strategies. CAV and CIF are accompanied by changes in the extracellular matrix, including re-expression of the fetal fibronectin splice variant known as ED-A(+) fibronectin. This molecule has been shown to be crucial for the development of myofibroblasts (MyoFbs) as the main cell type in CIF and for the activation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) as the main cell type in CAV. Relevant re-expression and protein deposition of ED-A(+) fibronectin has been demonstrated in animal models of chronic rejection, with spatial association to CAV and CIF, and a quantitative correlation to the rejection grade. The paper by Booth et al published in this issue of The Journal of Pathology could prove for the first time the functional importance of ED-A(+) fibronectin for the development of CIF as a main component of chronic cardiac rejection. Thus, promising conclusions for the development of new diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic strategies for chronic cardiac rejection focusing on ED-A(+) fibronectin can be suggested.

  7. Allergic Conjunctivitis Renders CD4+ T Cells Resistant to T Regulatory Cells and Exacerbates Corneal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Nancy J.; Chen, Peter W.; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic diseases rob corneal allografts of immune privilege and increase immune rejection. Corneal allograft rejection in BALB/c allergic hosts was analyzed using a short ragweed (SWR) pollen model of allergic conjunctivitis. Allergic conjunctivitis did not induce exaggerated T cell responses to donor C57BL/6 (B6) alloantigens or stimulate cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Allergic conjunctivitis did affect T regulatory cells (Tregs) that support graft survival. Exogenous IL-4, but not IL-5 or IL-13, prevented Treg suppression of CD4+ effector T cells isolated from naïve mice. However, mice with allergic conjunctivitis developed Tregs that suppressed CD4+ effector T cell proliferation. In addition, IL-4 did not inhibit Treg suppression of IL-4Rα−/− CD4+ T cell responses, suggesting that IL-4 rendered effector T cells resistant to Tregs. SRW-sensitized IL-4Rα−/− mice displayed the same 50% graft survival as non-allergic WT mice, that was significantly less than the 100% rejection that occurred in allergic WT hosts, supporting the role of IL-4 in the abrogation of immune privilege. Moreover, exacerbation of corneal allograft rejection in allergic mice was reversed by administering anti-IL-4 antibody. Thus, allergy-induced exacerbation of corneal graft rejection is due to the production of IL-4, which renders effector T cells resistant to Treg suppression of alloimmune responses. PMID:23489547

  8. Clinicopathological study of expression of lymphatic vessels in renal allograft biopsy after treatment for acute rejection.

    PubMed

    Oka, K; Namba, Y; Ichimaru, N; Moriyama, T; Kyo, M; Kokado, Y; Imai, E; Takahara, S

    2009-12-01

    Lymph vessel expression is related to inflammatory cell infiltration, around renal tubules in acute rejection episodes (ARE) of transplanted kidneys. However, there is little information on the lymph vessels after treatment of an ARE, particularly in relation to renal function and histological findings. We investigated 13 cases of ARE diagnosed by kidney transplant biopsy performed from 1997 to 2005 within 3 years of transplantation. Treatment of the ARE lead to an improved serum creatinine level in all cases. There was neither an ABO-incompatible nor an acute humoral rejection case. Lymphatic vessels in re-biopsies were examined using immunohistochemical staining with D2-40 antibody that detected lymphatic endothelium. Re-biopsy cases in which the baseline creatinine had increased by more than 20% despite treatment were considered the severe group; the others, as the stable group. The relation between lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and renal function was examined using Banff scores. LVD was significantly higher in the severe than the stable group. The expression of lymph vessels versus the Banff score showed a direct relation: greater Banff scores showed higher expressions of lymph vessels. The expression of lymph vessels in renal allograft specimens after treatment of an ARE was related to deterioration of renal function and inflammatory cell invasion. We plan a further examination of the relationship between the expression of lymph vessels and long-term prognosis.

  9. Donor Liver Small Droplet Macrovesicular Steatosis Is Associated With Increased Risk for Recipient Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Tak; Jen, Kuang-Yu; Wang, Dongliang; Tavakol, Mehdi; Roberts, John P; Gill, Ryan M

    2017-03-01

    Although donor livers with <30% large droplet macrovesicular steatosis (MaS) and/or small droplet MaS (irrespective of percentage) are considered safe to use, this consensus is based on variable definitions of MaS subtypes and/or without a reproducible scoring system. We analyzed 134 donor liver biopsies from allografts transplanted at University of California at San Francisco between 2000 and 2015 to determine whether large and/or small droplet MaS is a risk factor for poor outcomes. Large droplet MaS was defined as a fat droplet occupying greater than one half of an individual hepatocyte, with nuclear displacement, and scored as the percentage of total parenchymal area replaced by large fat droplets on ×40 magnification. Small droplet MaS was defined as 1 to several discrete fat droplets, each occupying less than one half of an individual hepatocyte, and scored as the percentage of remaining hepatocytes (ie, hepatocytes not occupied by large fat droplets) containing small fat droplets on ×200 magnification (ie, small droplet MaS is the percentage of "remaining hepatocytes" with small fat droplets, and "remaining hepatocytes" is defined as 100% minus percent large droplet MaS). Thus, total MaS equals the sum of large and small droplet MaS, which cannot exceed 100%. Electronic medical records were reviewed to determine outcomes. There was an increased risk for acute cellular rejection (hazard ratio=2.5, P=0.0108) and bile duct loss suggestive of chronic ductopenic rejection (hazard ratio=2.4, P=0.0130) in donor livers with ≥30% small droplet MaS. Large droplet MaS (up to 60%) was not associated with adverse outcomes. Patient survival was not adversely affected by steatosis. Excellent agreement on the estimation of large (weighted κ=0.682) and small droplet MaS (weighted κ=0.780) was achieved. Our approach to donor steatosis scoring can identify liver allograft recipients at increased risk for rejection and highlights the importance of distinguishing between

  10. CD256 can be found in antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection tissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyan; He, Xiaozhou; Zhao, Wei; Guo, Hui; Shi, Qianqian; Zhu, Yibei; Zhang, Xueguang

    2012-01-01

    CD256 and CD257 belong to the TNFSF (Tumor necrosis factor superfamily), share closest homology structure, and can form functional heterotrimers. They may be involved in the progression of SLE (Systemic lupus erythematosus), RA (Rheumatoid arthritis), and other autoimmune disorders. In this present study, CD256 and some related molecules were detected and were investigated regarding the potential role of the CD256 signal during the development of renal allograft rejection. In 2009, 46 cases of renal allografts were collected, excised for evaluation of dysfunction, and 10 renal protocol biopsies with normal renal function were controlled. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining was applied to detect CD256, CD257, C4d, CD138 and other related molecules. HistoQuest Analysis software and SPSS16.0 were used to read and analyse the results. Pathological diagnosis was made according to Banff 2005 guidelines: antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) 15 cases, T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) 16 cases, and 15 unknown aetiology cases (UAC). IHC results showed that CD256, CD257, and receptors for B cell activating factor receptor (BAFF-R), B cell maturation antigen (BCMA), and transmembrane activator calcium modulator, and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) were expressed on the membrane/cytoplasm of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) in the ABMR and TCMR group, while these molecules were not or weakly expressed in UAC and protocol biopsies. CD257 strong staining could be seen in ABMR, CD256 strong staining in both BCMR and TCMR, and there was statistical significance compared with other groups (p < 0.05). The receptors BAFF-R, BCMA, and TACI all strongly stained in ABMR, TACI also stained strongly in TCMR, and there was statistical significance compared with other groups (p < 0.05). The CD138+ molecule could be found in the renal interstitium and membrane/cytoplasm of RTEC, the CD138 mean expression in ABMR was statistically higher than other groups (p < 0.05). The correlation

  11. Interleukin-6, A Cytokine Critical to Mediation of Inflammation, Autoimmunity and Allograft Rejection: Therapeutic Implications of IL-6 Receptor Blockade.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stanley C; Choi, Jua; Kim, Irene; Wu, Gordon; Toyoda, Mieko; Shin, Bonga; Vo, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    The success of kidney transplants is limited by the lack of robust improvements in long-term survival. It is now recognized that alloimmune responses are responsible for the majority of allograft failures. Development of novel therapies to decrease allosensitization is critical. The lack of new drug development in kidney transplantation necessitated repurposing drugs initially developed in oncology and autoimmunity. Among these is tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor [IL-6R]) which holds promise for modulating multiple immune pathways responsible for allograft injury and loss. Interleukin-6 is a cytokine critical to proinflammatory and immune regulatory cascades. Emerging data have identified important roles for IL-6 in innate immune responses and adaptive immunity. Excessive IL-6 production is associated with activation of T-helper 17 cell and inhibition of regulatory T cell with attendant inflammation. Plasmablast production of IL-6 is critical for initiation of T follicular helper cells and production of high-affinity IgG. Tocilizumab is the first-in-class drug developed to treat diseases mediated by IL-6. Data are emerging from animal and human studies indicating a critical role for IL-6 in mediation of cell-mediated rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, and chronic allograft vasculopathy. This suggests that anti-IL-6/IL-6R blockade could be effective in modifying T- and B-cell responses to allografts. Initial data from our group suggest anti-IL-6R therapy is of value in desensitization and prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection. In addition, human trials have shown benefits in treatment of graft versus host disease in matched or mismatched stem cell transplants. Here, we explore the biology of IL-6/IL-6R interactions and the evidence for an important role of IL-6 in mediating allograft rejection.

  12. Allograft rejection mediated by memory T cells is resistant to regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jaeseok; Brook, Matthew O; Carvalho-Gaspar, Manuela; Zhang, Jidong; Ramon, Hilda E; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Wood, Kathryn J; Turka, Laurence A; Jones, Nick D

    2007-12-11

    Alloreactive memory T cells may be refractory to many of the tolerance-inducing strategies that are effective against naive T cells and thus present a significant barrier to long-term allograft survival. Because CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical elements of many approaches to successful induction/maintenance of transplantation tolerance, we used MHC class I and II alloreactive TCR-transgenic models to explore the ability of antigen-specific Tregs to control antigen-specific memory T cell responses. Upon coadoptive transfer into RAG-1(-/-) mice, we found that Tregs effectively suppressed the ability of naive T cells to reject skin grafts, but neither antigen-unprimed nor antigen-primed Tregs suppressed rejection by memory T cells. Interestingly, different mechanisms appeared to be active in the ability of Tregs to control naive T cell-mediated graft rejection in the class II versus class I alloreactive models. In the former case, we observed decreased early expansion of effector cells in lymphoid tissue. In contrast, in the class I model, an effect of Tregs on early proliferation and expansion was not observed. However, at a late time point, significant differences in cell numbers were seen, suggesting effects on responding T cell survival. Overall, these data indicate that the relative resistance of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) alloreactive memory T cells to regulation may mediate resistance to tolerance induction seen in hosts with preexisting alloantigen-specific immunity and further indicate the multiplicity of mechanisms by which Tregs may control alloimmune responses in vivo.

  13. Biological mechanism analysis of acute renal allograft rejection: integrated of mRNA and microRNA expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shi-Ming; Zhao, Xia; Zhao, Xue-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Ying; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhu, Yu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Renal transplantation is the preferred method for most patients with end-stage renal disease, however, acute renal allograft rejection is still a major risk factor for recipients leading to renal injury. To improve the early diagnosis and treatment of acute rejection, study on the molecular mechanism of it is urgent. Methods: MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profile and mRNA expression profile of acute renal allograft rejection and well-functioning allograft downloaded from ArrayExpress database were applied to identify differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs and DE mRNAs. DE miRNAs targets were predicted by combining five algorithm. By overlapping the DE mRNAs and DE miRNAs targets, common genes were obtained. Differentially co-expressed genes (DCGs) were identified by differential co-expression profile (DCp) and differential co-expression enrichment (DCe) methods in Differentially Co-expressed Genes and Links (DCGL) package. Then, co-expression network of DCGs and the cluster analysis were performed. Functional enrichment analysis for DCGs was undergone. Results: A total of 1270 miRNA targets were predicted and 698 DE mRNAs were obtained. While overlapping miRNA targets and DE mRNAs, 59 common genes were gained. We obtained 103 DCGs and 5 transcription factors (TFs) based on regulatory impact factors (RIF), then built the regulation network of miRNA targets and DE mRNAs. By clustering the co-expression network, 5 modules were obtained. Thereinto, module 1 had the highest degree and module 2 showed the most number of DCGs and common genes. TF CEBPB and several common genes, such as RXRA, BASP1 and AKAP10, were mapped on the co-expression network. C1R showed the highest degree in the network. These genes might be associated with human acute renal allograft rejection. Conclusions: We conducted biological analysis on integration of DE mRNA and DE miRNA in acute renal allograft rejection, displayed gene expression patterns and screened out genes and TFs that may

  14. Biological mechanism analysis of acute renal allograft rejection: integrated of mRNA and microRNA expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi-Ming; Zhao, Xia; Zhao, Xue-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Ying; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhu, Yu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the preferred method for most patients with end-stage renal disease, however, acute renal allograft rejection is still a major risk factor for recipients leading to renal injury. To improve the early diagnosis and treatment of acute rejection, study on the molecular mechanism of it is urgent. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profile and mRNA expression profile of acute renal allograft rejection and well-functioning allograft downloaded from ArrayExpress database were applied to identify differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs and DE mRNAs. DE miRNAs targets were predicted by combining five algorithm. By overlapping the DE mRNAs and DE miRNAs targets, common genes were obtained. Differentially co-expressed genes (DCGs) were identified by differential co-expression profile (DCp) and differential co-expression enrichment (DCe) methods in Differentially Co-expressed Genes and Links (DCGL) package. Then, co-expression network of DCGs and the cluster analysis were performed. Functional enrichment analysis for DCGs was undergone. A total of 1270 miRNA targets were predicted and 698 DE mRNAs were obtained. While overlapping miRNA targets and DE mRNAs, 59 common genes were gained. We obtained 103 DCGs and 5 transcription factors (TFs) based on regulatory impact factors (RIF), then built the regulation network of miRNA targets and DE mRNAs. By clustering the co-expression network, 5 modules were obtained. Thereinto, module 1 had the highest degree and module 2 showed the most number of DCGs and common genes. TF CEBPB and several common genes, such as RXRA, BASP1 and AKAP10, were mapped on the co-expression network. C1R showed the highest degree in the network. These genes might be associated with human acute renal allograft rejection. We conducted biological analysis on integration of DE mRNA and DE miRNA in acute renal allograft rejection, displayed gene expression patterns and screened out genes and TFs that may be related to acute renal allograft

  15. Effects of Foxp3 gene modified dendritic cells on mouse corneal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yu-Bo; Hu, Lian-Na; Liu, Yong; Han, Gen-Cheng; Guo, Hui-Ling; Luo, Ling; Wang, Li-Qiang; Li, Yan; Huang, Yi-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Foxp3 gene modified dendritic cells (Foxp3 + DC) on allogeneic T cells proliferation and to study the effect of Foxp3 + DC on corneal allograft rejection. Methods: Lentivirus-Foxp3 was transfected into DC2.4 cells, as Foxp3 + DC cells. 42 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into: Group A (n = 6), normal group; Group B (n = 12), Group C (n = 12) and Group D (n = 12), allograft groups, were treated with normal saline, DC2.4, Foxp3 + DC by intraperitoneal injection, respectively. Results: Compared with the control group, Foxp3 protein in the Foxp3 + DC cells increased significantly (P < 0.05); the expressions of CD80 and CD86 immunophenotypes of Foxp3 + DC cells decreased significantly (P < 0.05); IL-12 secretion reduced (P < 0.05), but IL-10 secretion was promoted (P < 0.05). The average transplant survival time in Group B was (14.833 ± 1.472) d, and Group C and Group D led to a statistically significant prolongation of transplant survival to (17.667 ± 1.366, 23.000 ± 2.000) d (P < 0.05) respectively. 14 d after transplantation, as compared with Group C and D, the expressions of IFN-γ in grafts markedly increased in Group B. 14 d after transplantation, as compared with Group B, the expressions of Foxp3 mRNA, IDO mRNA in grafts decreased remarkably in Group C and D (P < 0.05); as compared with Group C, the expressions of Foxp3 mRNA, IDO mRNA in grafts decreased remarkably in Group D (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Foxp3 + DC cells reduce the expression of costimulatory factors, reduce the secretion of IL-12, promote IL-10 production and inhibit the stimulation of alloreactive T cell proliferation response capacity. Foxp3 + DC cells play important roles in inhibiting corneal allograft immune response and prolonging graft survival time. PMID:26064298

  16. Banff schema for grading pancreas allograft rejection: working proposal by a multi-disciplinary international consensus panel.

    PubMed

    Drachenberg, C B; Odorico, J; Demetris, A J; Arend, L; Bajema, I M; Bruijn, J A; Cantarovich, D; Cathro, H P; Chapman, J; Dimosthenous, K; Fyfe-Kirschner, B; Gaber, L; Gaber, O; Goldberg, J; Honsová, E; Iskandar, S S; Klassen, D K; Nankivell, B; Papadimitriou, J C; Racusen, L C; Randhawa, P; Reinholt, F P; Renaudin, K; Revelo, P P; Ruiz, P; Torrealba, J R; Vazquez-Martul, E; Voska, L; Stratta, R; Bartlett, S T; Sutherland, D E R

    2008-06-01

    Accurate diagnosis and grading of rejection and other pathological processes are of paramount importance to guide therapeutic interventions in patients with pancreas allograft dysfunction. A multi-disciplinary panel of pathologists, surgeons and nephrologists was convened for the purpose of developing a consensus document delineating the histopathological features for diagnosis and grading of rejection in pancreas transplant biopsies. Based on the available published data and the collective experience, criteria for the diagnosis of acute cell-mediated allograft rejection (ACMR) were established. Three severity grades (I/mild, II/moderate and III/severe) were defined based on lesions known to be more or less responsive to treatment and associated with better- or worse-graft outcomes, respectively. The features of chronic rejection/graft sclerosis were reassessed, and three histological stages were established. Tentative criteria for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection were also characterized, in anticipation of future studies that ought to provide more information on this process. Criteria for needle core biopsy adequacy and guidelines for pathology reporting were also defined. The availability of a simple, reproducible, clinically relevant and internationally accepted schema for grading rejection should improve the level of diagnostic accuracy and facilitate communication between all parties involved in the care of pancreas transplant recipients.

  17. Evaluation of oxidative stress markers for the early diagnosis of allograft rejection in feline renal allotransplant recipients with normal renal function

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to identify oxidative damage to renal allografts during graft rejection by evaluating changes in oxidative markers and plasma lactate levels in feline renal allotransplant recipients. Heterotopic renal allotransplantations were performed between 8 adult feline cross-matched donors. Following 14 d of immunosuppression, the drugs were discontinued to allow allograft rejection. Baseline and serial postoperative evaluations of serum creatinine, plasma lactate, plasma thiobarbituate reactive substances (TBARS), plasma creatol, urine creatol, and renal sonographic cross-sectional area were performed. When sonographic evaluation revealed the absence of blood flow to the allograft, the rejected kidney was nephrectomized and evaluated histopathologically. Allograft rejection occurred in all cats by day 26. A significant elevation in body temperature occurred during the rejection period. No significant change was observed between any of the time periods for plasma TBARS, creatol, or urine creatol. There was a significant decrease in plasma lactate levels throughout the study. Markers of oxidative stress from venous blood did not reflect renal allograft rejection in cats with a normally functioning native kidney. Renal allograft rejection may be associated with significant increases in body temperature and warrants further investigation. PMID:15532882

  18. Evaluation of oxidative stress markers for the early diagnosis of allograft rejection in feline renal allotransplant recipients with normal renal function.

    PubMed

    Halling, Krista B; Ellison, Gary W; Armstrong, Don; Aoyagi, Kasumi; Detrisac, Carol J; Graham, John P; Newell, Susan P; Martin, Frank G; Van Gilder, James M

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify oxidative damage to renal allografts during graft rejection by evaluating changes in oxidative markers and plasma lactate levels in feline renal allotransplant recipients. Heterotopic renal allotransplantations were performed between 8 adult feline cross-matched donors. Following 14 d of immunosuppression, the drugs were discontinued to allow allograft rejection. Baseline and serial postoperative evaluations of serum creatinine, plasma lactate, plasma thiobarbituate reactive substances (TBARS), plasma creatol, urine creatol, and renal sonographic cross-sectional area were performed. When sonographic evaluation revealed the absence of blood flow to the allograft, the rejected kidney was nephrectomized and evaluated histopathologically. Allograft rejection occurred in all cats by day 26. A significant elevation in body temperature occurred during the rejection period. No significant change was observed between any of the time periods for plasma TBARS, creatol, or urine creatol. There was a significant decrease in plasma lactate levels throughout the study. Markers of oxidative stress from venous blood did not reflect renal allograft rejection in cats with a normally functioning native kidney. Renal allograft rejection may be associated with significant increases in body temperature and warrants further investigation.

  19. Inducible expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase attenuates acute rejection of tissue-engineered lung allografts in rats.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Ammar; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Toolabi, LadanTeimoori; Ghanbari, Hossein; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2016-01-15

    Lung disease remains one of the principal causes of death worldwide and the incidence of pulmonary diseases is increasing. Complexity in treatments and shortage of donors leads us to develop new ways for lung disease treatment. One promising strategy is preparing engineered lung for transplantation. In this context, employing new immunosuppression strategies which suppresses immune system locally rather than systemic improves transplant survival. This tends to reduce the difficulties in transplant rejection and the systemic impact of the use of immunosuppressive drugs which causes side effects such as serious infections and malignancies. In our study examining the immunosuppressive effects of IDO expression, we produced rat lung tissues with the help of decellularized tissue, differentiating medium and rat mesenchymal stem cells. Transduction of these cells by IDO expressing lentiviruses provided inducible and local expression of this gene. To examine immunosuppressive properties of IDO expression by these tissues, we transplanted these allografts into rats and, subsequently, evaluated cytokine expression and histopathological properties. Expression of inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα were significantly downregulated in IDO expressing allograft. Moreover, acute rejection score of this experimental group was also lower comparing other two groups and mRNA levels of FOXP3, a regulatory T cell marker, upregulated in IDO expressing group. However, infiltrating lymphocyte counting did not show significant difference between groups. This study demonstrates that IDO gene transfer into engineered lung allograft tissues significantly attenuates acute allograft damage suggesting local therapy with IDO as a strategy to reduce the need for systemic immunosuppression and, thereby, its side effects.

  20. FK506 “RESCUE” FOR RESISTANT REJECTION OF RENAL ALLOGRAFTS UNDER PRIMARY CYCLOSPORINE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION1

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Mark L.; Shapiro, Ron; Vivas, Carlos A.; Scantlebury, Velma P.; Rhandhawa, Parmjeet; Carrieri, Giuseppe; McCauley, Jerry; Demetris, A.J.; Tzakis, Andreas; Fung, John J.; Simmons, Richard L.; Hakala, Thomas R.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-seven patients with ongoing acute rejection on initial CsA therapy were converted to FK506 to attempt graft salvage. Fifty-nine patients had undergone primary transplantation and 18 had been retransplanted; there were 52 cadaveric and 25 living-donor transplants. The indications for conversion to FK506 were ongoing, biopsy-confirmed rejection in all patients, including vascular rejection in 20. The median interval to rescue was 2 months (range 2 weeks to 36 months) after transplantation. Sixty-one of the 77 patients (79%) had already received one or more courses of an antilymphocyte preparation (OKT3: n=33; ALG or ATG: n=l; OKT3+ALG/ATG: n=27). Of the 77 patients, 57 (74%) have been successfully rescued and still have functioning grafts with a mean follow-up of 14 months, with a mean serum creatinine of 2.35±0.97 mg/dl. Eighteen patients were already dialysis-dependent at the time of conversion to FK506; of these, 9 (50%) were successfully salvaged and have a mean serum creatinine of 2.3 mg/dl. Of the 61 patients previously treated with antilymphocyte preparations, 48 (79%) were rescued. In those salvaged, prednisone doses have been lowered from 22.2±7.2 mg/day preconversion to 7.5±5.6 mg/day postconversion, and 12 patients are on FK506 monotherapy. In nondiabetics, mean serum glucose was 101.4±20.5 mg/dl preconversion and 93.2±22 postconversion (P=0.07), uric acid 7.3±2.3 and 7.1±1.5 mg/dl (P=0.53), and triglycerides 199.2±101.6 and 167.2±106.4 mg/dl (P=0.06). Cholesterol levels were significantly lower following FK conversion (207.7±46.5 mg/dl pre. vs. 188.3±39.7 post., P=0.007). FK506 is capable of salvaging renal allografts with ongoing acute rejection on CsA therapy, even when antilymphocyte preparations have been ineffective. PMID:7512293

  1. Expression of cytokine genes in human cardiac allografts: correlation of IL-6 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) with histological rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, X M; Frist, W H; Yeoh, T K; Miller, G G

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines may play critical roles in allograft rejection. Currently, a clear pattern of cytokine production that correlates with rejection has not emerged. Our preliminary studies suggested a trend toward increased IL-6 and TGF-beta gene expression in cardiac allografts during rejection. We have extended these studies using reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT/PCR) to detect the expression of IL-6, TGF-beta, and T cell receptor beta chain constant region (TCR-beta) genes in 21 additional consecutive myocardial biopsies obtained from six heart transplant patients and from five pre-transplant donor hearts. Cytokine gene expression was compared with histological diagnosis of rejection. There was strong correlation between IL-6 as well as TGF-beta gene expression, and histological rejection (6/8 biopsies with versus 0/7 without rejection (P = 0.006) and 7/9 biopsies with versus 0/7 without rejection (P = 0.003) respectively). Neither IL-6 nor TGF-beta transcripts were detected in any pre-transplant donor heart. TCR-beta chain mRNA was found in all allograft biopsies regardless of the presence of rejection, but was absent in pre-transplant donor hearts. Our results indicate that expression of IL-6 and TGF-beta is highly correlated with allograft rejection and thus may play an important role in regulation of cardiac allograft rejection. T cell infiltration of allografted myocardium is invariably detected by PCR regardless of histological rejection. The long-term functional significance of these cells in transplanted hearts needs further investigation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8370174

  2. Natural killer cells play a critical role in mediating inflammation and graft failure during antibody-mediated rejection of kidney allografts

    PubMed Central

    Kohei, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya; Dvorina, Nina; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M.; Fairchild, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    While the incidence of antibody-mediated kidney graft rejection has increased, the key cellular and molecular participants underlying this graft injury remain unclear. Rejection of kidney allografts in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR5 is dependent on production of donor-specific antibody. Here we determine if cells expressing cytotoxic function contributed to antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection in these recipients. Wild type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5−/− and B6.CD8−/−/CCR5−/− mice were transplanted with complete MHC mismatched A/J kidney grafts and intra-graft inflammatory components were followed to rejection. B6.CCR5−/− and B6.CD8−/−/CCR5−/− recipients rejected kidney allografts by day 35 whereas 65% of allografts in wild type recipients survived past day 80 post-transplant. Rejected allografts in wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5−/− and B6.CD8−/−/CCR5−/− recipients expressed high levels of VCAM-1 and MMP7 mRNA that was associated with high serum titers of donor-specific antibody. High levels of perforin and granzyme B mRNA expression peaked on day 6 post-transplant in allografts in all recipients, but were absent in isografts. Depletion of natural killer cells in B6.CD8−/−/CCR5−/− recipients reduced this expression to background levels and promoted the long-term survival of 40% of the kidney allografts. Thus, natural killer cells have a role in increased inflammation during antibody-mediated kidney allograft injury and in rejection of the grafts. PMID:27165816

  3. Natural killer cells play a critical role in mediating inflammation and graft failure during antibody-mediated rejection of kidney allografts.

    PubMed

    Kohei, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya; Dvorina, Nina; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M; Fairchild, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    While the incidence of antibody-mediated kidney graft rejection has increased, the key cellular and molecular participants underlying this graft injury remain unclear. Rejection of kidney allografts in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR5 is dependent on production of donor-specific antibody. Here we determine if cells expressing cytotoxic function contributed to antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection in these recipients. Wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) mice were transplanted with complete MHC-mismatched A/J kidney grafts, and intragraft inflammatory components were followed to rejection. B6.CCR5(-/-) and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients rejected kidney allografts by day 35, whereas 65% of allografts in wild-type recipients survived past day 80 post-transplant. Rejected allografts in wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients expressed high levels of VCAM-1 and MMP7 mRNA that was associated with high serum titers of donor-specific antibody. High levels of perforin and granzyme B mRNA expression peaked on day 6 post-transplant in allografts in all recipients, but were absent in isografts. Depletion of natural killer cells in B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients reduced this expression to background levels and promoted the long-term survival of 40% of the kidney allografts. Thus, natural killer cells have a role in increased inflammation during antibody-mediated kidney allograft injury and in rejection of the grafts.

  4. The imbalance between Treg and Th17 cells caused by FTY720 treatment in skin allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Commodaro, Alessandra Gonçalves; Pedregosa, Juliana Figueredo; Peron, Jean Pierre; Brandão, Wesley; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Bueno, Valquiria

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: FTY720 modulates CD4+T cells by the augmentation of regulatory T cell activity, secretion of suppressive cytokines and suppression of IL-17 secretion by Th17 cells. To further understand the process of graft rejection/acceptance, we evaluated skin allograft survival and associated events after FTY720 treatment. METHODS: F1 mice (C57BL/6xBALB/c) and C57BL/6 mice were used as donors for and recipients of skin transplantation, respectively. The recipients were transplanted and either not treated or treated with FTY720 by gavage for 21 days to evaluate the allograft survival. In another set of experiments, the immunological evaluation was performed five days post-transplantation. The spleens, axillary lymph nodes and skin allografts of the recipient mice were harvested for phenotyping (flow cytometry), gene expression (real-time PCR) and cytokine (Bio-Plex) analysis. RESULTS: The FTY720 treatment significantly increased skin allograft survival, reduced the number of cells in the lymph nodes and decreased the percentage of Tregs at this site in the C57BL/6 recipients. Moreover, the treatment reduced the number of graft-infiltrating cells and the percentage of CD4+ graft-infiltrating cells. The cytokine analysis (splenocytes) showed decreased levels of IL-10, IL-6 and IL-17 in the FTY720-treated mice. We also observed a decrease in the IL-10, IL-6 and IL-23 mRNA levels, as well as an increase in the IL-27 mRNA levels, in the splenocytes of the treated group. The FTY720-treated mice exhibited increased mRNA levels of IL-10, IL-27 and IL-23 in the skin graft. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated prolonged but not indefinite skin allograft survival by FTY720 treatment. This finding indicates that the drug did not prevent the imbalance between Tr1 and Th17 cells in the graft that led to rejection. PMID:22892927

  5. Genetic or Pharmaceutical Blockade of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase P110δ Prevents Chronic Rejection of Heart Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Marlene L.; McCormack, Ann M.; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Marelli-Berg, Federica M.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic rejection is the major cause of long-term heart allograft failure, characterized by tissue infiltration by recipient T cells with indirect allospecificity. Phosphoinositol-3-kinase p110δ is a key mediator of T cell receptor signaling, regulating both T cell activation and migration of primed T cells to non-lymphoid antigen-rich tissue. We investigated the effect of genetic or pharmacologic inactivation of PI3K p110δ on the development of chronic allograft rejection in a murine model in which HY-mismatched male hearts were transplanted into female recipients. We show that suppression of p110δ activity significantly attenuates the development of chronic rejection of heart grafts in the absence of any additional immunosuppressive treatment by impairing the localization of antigen-specific T cells to the grafts, while not inducing specific T cell tolerance. p110δ pharmacologic inactivation is effective when initiated after transplantation. Targeting p110δ activity might be a viable strategy for the treatment of heart chronic rejection in humans. PMID:22479345

  6. Analysis of Sera of Recipients with Allograft Rejection Indicates That Keratin 1 Is the Target of Anti-Endothelial Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuli; Hu, Juan; Luo, Weiguang; Luo, Qizhi; Guo, Jing; Tian, Fang; Ming, Yingzi

    2017-01-01

    Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECAs) are usually directed against the surface antigens on the vascular endothelial cells. Clinical studies suggest a pathogenic role for nonhuman leukocyte antigen in antibody-mediated rejection; however, the antigens on the donor vascular endothelium that serve as the first-line targets for an immune response during allograft rejection have not been fully identified. Here, we used immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify antigens from the sera of kidney transplant recipients who were experiencing antibody-mediated rejection. Keratin 1 (KRT1) was identified as a novel antigenic target expressed on endothelial cells. To validate our finding, we produced recombinant proteins representing the three most common alleles of KRT1. The serum used for immunoprecipitation showed a strong reaction to KRT1 recombinants in western blot and ELISA. In the kidney transplant cohort, more AECA-positive recipients than AECA-negative recipients had KRT1 antibodies (32.2% versus 11.9%, p = 0.002). Sera from 255 renal recipients were tested by ELISA. Of the 77 recipients with deteriorating graft function (serum creatinine > 120 μmol/L), 23 had anti-KRT1 antibodies. KRT1-IgG positivity was, therefore, associated with a higher risk of kidney transplant rejection (29.9% (23/77) versus 16.9% (30/178), p = 0.0187). A better understanding of this antigenic target will improve long-term allograft survival. PMID:28265584

  7. Development of injury in a rat model of chronic renal allograft rejection: effect of dietary protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Bombas, A; Stein-Oakley, A N; Baxter, K; Thomson, N M; Jablonski, P

    1999-01-01

    Non-allogeneic factors such as increased nephron "workload" may contribute to chronic renal allograft rejection. Reducing dietary protein from 20% to 8% was tested in a model of chronic rejection: Dark Agouti kidney to Albino Surgery recipient, "tolerised" by previous donor blood transfusions. Survival, weight gain, serum creatinine concentration and creatinine clearance were similar for both groups at all times. Urinary protein was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the low-protein (LP) group 1 month after transplantation. After 3 and 6 months, both groups demonstrated mild chronic rejection. After 6 months, tubular atrophy was significantly (P < 0.05) less in the LP group and interstitial fibrosis was marginally reduced. Glomerular hypertrophy, glomerular sclerosis, tubular dilatation, leucocyte infiltration, adhesion molecule expression and TGF-beta1 mRNA expression were similarly increased in both groups. Thus, reducing dietary protein to 8% lowered urinary protein, but did not significantly affect the development of chronic rejection in renal allografts beyond affording a degree of protection from tubulointerstitial damage.

  8. OKT3 therapy in addition to tacrolimus is associated with improved long-term function in patients with steroid refractory renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Patschan, Daniel; Kribben, Andreas; Pietruck, Frank; Lutz, Jens; Binek, Matthias; Philipp, Thomas; Heemann, Uwe; Witzke, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term allograft salvage rates of patients with steroid refractory allograft rejection after kidney transplantation and to identify factors indicating a successful outcome. Fifty patients with continuing rejection after high-dose steroids were included in the study. Baseline immunosuppression was switched from cyclosporine to tacrolimus in all patients. Twenty patients additionally received OKT3 as antirejection therapy. Patients having received a cadaveric renal transplant in 1995, excluding patients with steroid resistant rejection, were chosen as a control cohort. Patient survival rates were 96% (n = 48) and 90% (n = 45) and allograft survival rates were 66% (n = 33) and 62% (n = 31) after 5 and 7 years following steroid refractory renal allograft rejection. Graft survival within the control cohort was 73% after 5 years and 69% after 7 years. Creatinine clearance increased from 20 +/- 15 ml/min/1.73 m2 at the start of tacrolimus therapy to 37 +/- 29 ml/min/1.73 m2 and to 32 +/- 26 ml/min/1.73 m2 after 5 and 7 years. OKT3 treatment predicted successful rescue therapy (p = 0.005 and p = 0.04 after 5 and 7 years). Our data indicate a reasonable graft survival in steroid refractory renal allograft rejection using tacrolimus. OKT3 treatment in addition to tacrolimus therapy may be beneficial for long-term allograft survival. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Antibody response against perlecan and collagen types IV and VI in chronic renal allograft rejection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Simone A; van Dixhoorn, Mieneke G A; Borrias, Maria C; Benediktsson, Hallgrimur; van Veelen, Peter A; van Kooten, Cees; Paul, Leendert C

    2002-04-01

    Chronic rejection is the leading cause of late renal transplant failure. Various structural lesions are observed in grafts undergoing chronic rejection including glomerular basement membrane (GBM) duplications. The well-established Fisher (F344) to Lewis (LEW) rat renal transplant model for chronic rejection was used to assess the presence and role of the humoral immune response against graft antigens during chronic rejection. LEW recipients of F344 allografts develop transplant glomerulopathy and produce IgG1 antibodies directed against F344 GBM preparations that are detectable 3 weeks after transplantation. Glomerular IgG1 deposition was observed that in vitro co-localized with a rabbit anti-rat GBM antiserum in rejecting F344 grafts; elution experiments of isolated glomeruli yielded IgG1 antibodies reactive in vitro with F344 GBM, but not LEW GBM. Prevention of acute rejection by transient treatment of the recipients with cyclosporin A completely abrogated the production of anti-GBM antibodies. Using proteomic techniques we identified the antigens recognized by the LEW posttransplant sera as being the heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan and the alpha1 chain of collagen type VI in association with the alpha5 chain of collagen type IV. In conclusion, LEW recipients of F344 kidney grafts produce IgG1 antibodies against donor type perlecan and alpha1(VI)/alpha5(IV) collagen and develop transplant glomerulopathy. These data implicate an important role for the humoral immune response in the development of glomerulopathy during chronic rejection.

  10. Late antibody-mediated rejection after heart transplantation: Mortality, graft function, and fulminant cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Coutance, Guillaume; Ouldamar, Salima; Rouvier, Philippe; Saheb, Samir; Suberbielle, Caroline; Bréchot, Nicolas; Hariri, Sarah; Lebreton, Guillaume; Leprince, Pascal; Varnous, Shaida

    2015-08-01

    Late antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) after heart transplantation is suspected to be associated with a poor short-term prognosis. A retrospective single-center observational study was performed. Late AMR was defined as AMR occurring at least 1 year after heart transplantation. The study included all consecutive patients with proven and treated late acute AMR at the authors' institution between November 2006 and February 2013. The aim was to analyze the prognosis after late AMR, including mortality, recurrence of AMR, left ventricular ejection fraction, and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Selected endomyocardial biopsy specimens obtained before AMR were also blindly reviewed to identify early histologic signs of AMR. The study included 20 patients treated for late AMR. Despite aggressive immunosuppressive therapies (100% of patients received intravenous methylprednisolone, 90% received intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIg],85% received plasmapheresis, 45% received rituximab), the prognosis remained poor. Survival after late AMR was 80% at 1 month, 60% at 3 months, and 50% at 1 year. All early deaths (<3 months, n = 8) were directly attributable to graft dysfunction or to complication of the intense immunosuppressive regimen. Among survivors at 3 months (n = 12), histologic persistence or recurrence of AMR, persistent left ventricular dysfunction, and fulminant CAV were common (33%, 33%, and 17% of patients). Microvascular inflammation was detected in at least 1 biopsy specimen obtained before AMR in 13 patients (65%). Prognosis after late AMR is poor despite aggressive immunosuppressive therapies. Fulminant CAV is a common condition in these patients. Microvascular inflammation is frequent in endomyocardial biopsy specimens before manifestation of symptomatic AMR. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Microscope Strategy to Improve Risk Stratification in Early Antibody-Mediated Kidney Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Vernerey, Dewi; Chang, Jessica; Hidalgo, Luis G.; Beuscart, Thibaut; Verine, Jerome; Aubert, Olivier; Dubleumortier, Sébastien; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the leading cause of kidney allograft loss. We investigated whether the addition of gene expression measurements to conventional methods could serve as a molecular microscope to identify kidneys with ABMR that are at high risk for failure. We studied 939 consecutive kidney recipients at Necker Hospital (2004–2010; principal cohort) and 321 kidney recipients at Saint Louis Hospital (2006–2010; validation cohort) and assessed patients with ABMR in the first 1 year post-transplant. In addition to conventional features, we assessed microarray-based gene expression in transplant biopsy specimens using relevant molecular measurements: the ABMR Molecular Score and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcript set. The main outcomes were kidney transplant loss and progression to chronic transplant injury. We identified 74 patients with ABMR in the principal cohort and 54 patients with ABMR in the validation cohort. Conventional features independently associated with failure were donor age and humoral histologic score (g+ptc+v+cg+C4d). Adjusting for conventional features, ABMR Molecular Score (hazard ratio [HR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 3.58; P=0.001) and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcripts (HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 9.16; P<0.05) independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. The results were replicated in the independent validation group. Adding a gene expression assessment to a traditional risk model improved the stratification of patients at risk for graft failure (continuous net reclassification improvement, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.46; P<0.001; integrated discrimination improvement, 0.16; P<0.001). Compared with conventional assessment, the addition of gene expression measurement in kidney transplants with ABMR improves stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss. PMID:24700874

  12. Treatment of Acute Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection With Cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Waiser, Johannes; Duerr, Michael; Budde, Klemens; Rudolph, Birgit; Wu, Kaiyin; Bachmann, Friederike; Halleck, Fabian; Schönemann, Constanze; Lachmann, Nils

    2017-10-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is a major risk for renal allograft survival. Throughout decades, cyclophosphamide treatment has been proven to be effective in patients with antibody-associated autoimmune diseases. We investigated whether cyclophosphamide combined with plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulins is an option for patients with AMR. Between March 2013 and November 2015, we initiated treatment of 13 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven acute AMR with intravenous cyclophosphamide pulses (15 mg/kg adapted to age and renal function) at 3-week intervals, PPH (6×), and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (1.5 g/kg). Treatment was completed after 6 cyclophosphamide pulses or in case of return to baseline serum creatinine together with reduction of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) below 500 mean fluorescence intensity. Eleven of 13 patients completed treatment. Median follow-up was 18 (12-44) months. At the end of follow-up, graft survival was 77% (10/13). The 3 graft losses were caused at least in part by nonadherence and premature termination of treatment. Serum creatinine increased from 1.7±0.4 mg/dL at 3 months before diagnosis to 3.7±2.4 mg/dL at diagnosis (P = 0.01), and decreased to 2.1 ± 0.7 mg/dL at 3 months after diagnosis (P = 0.01). In 7 (64%) of 11 patients, who completed treatment, DSA decreased, in 4 (36%) of 11 DSA were below 500 mean fluorescence intensity after treatment. Dose reductions had to be performed in 3 of 13 patients for leukopenia. We observed 14 hospitalizations in 9 of 13 patients. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic report on cyclophosphamide-based treatment of acute AMR based on modern diagnostics. Treatment was effective and relatively safe. Future studies will show, whether cyclophosphamide proves to be a valuable alternative for the treatment of AMR.

  13. Molecular microscope strategy to improve risk stratification in early antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Vernerey, Dewi; Chang, Jessica; Hidalgo, Luis G; Beuscart, Thibaut; Verine, Jerome; Aubert, Olivier; Dubleumortier, Sébastien; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe; Halloran, Philip F

    2014-10-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the leading cause of kidney allograft loss. We investigated whether the addition of gene expression measurements to conventional methods could serve as a molecular microscope to identify kidneys with ABMR that are at high risk for failure. We studied 939 consecutive kidney recipients at Necker Hospital (2004-2010; principal cohort) and 321 kidney recipients at Saint Louis Hospital (2006-2010; validation cohort) and assessed patients with ABMR in the first 1 year post-transplant. In addition to conventional features, we assessed microarray-based gene expression in transplant biopsy specimens using relevant molecular measurements: the ABMR Molecular Score and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcript set. The main outcomes were kidney transplant loss and progression to chronic transplant injury. We identified 74 patients with ABMR in the principal cohort and 54 patients with ABMR in the validation cohort. Conventional features independently associated with failure were donor age and humoral histologic score (g+ptc+v+cg+C4d). Adjusting for conventional features, ABMR Molecular Score (hazard ratio [HR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 3.58; P=0.001) and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcripts (HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 9.16; P<0.05) independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. The results were replicated in the independent validation group. Adding a gene expression assessment to a traditional risk model improved the stratification of patients at risk for graft failure (continuous net reclassification improvement, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.46; P<0.001; integrated discrimination improvement, 0.16; P<0.001). Compared with conventional assessment, the addition of gene expression measurement in kidney transplants with ABMR improves stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss.

  14. Reflectance confocal microscopy as a useful diagnostic tool for monitoring of skin containing vascularized composite allograft rejection: A preliminary study on rats.

    PubMed

    Zor, Fatih; Karagoz, Huseyin; Erdemir, Asli Turgut; Karslioglu, Yildirim; Acikel, Cengiz Han; Kapaj, Rezarta; Guzey, Serbulent; Gurel, Mehmet Salih; Isik, Selcuk; Siemionow, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Vascularized composite allografts can undergo immune-mediated rejection, and skin biopsies are needed for monitoring of the transplant. However it is an invasive method, and requires processing time and pathological assessment. The purpose of this study is to use a new noninvasive monitoring method of the reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) to determine severity of the allograft rejection on rats. Five groin flap allotransplantation were performed between 10 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine A was given to the recipients during 10 days after surgery and was ended at the 10th postoperative days to allow acute transplant rejection. Following cessation of CsA, concomitant RCM evaluation and skin biopsy was performed every other day from each animal until total rejection of the allograft. Complete rejection of the allograft took nearly about 10 days and 4 or 5 RCM evaluation and skin biopsy was performed from each rat during this period. A total of 17 specimens were evaluated. A scoring system was developed based on the RCM findings. Skin biopsies were evaluated according to the Banff 2007 working classification criteria. RCM evaluation revealed epidermal irregularity and collagen destruction, however mild perivascular inflammation and degeneration of the basal epidermal layer were observed in early and late rejection period respectively with histopathologic evaluation. High correlation was found between the RCM scores and histopathologic grading. The RCM may be the useful tool to reduce the need for skin biopsy for monitoring of the skin containing vascularized composite allograft. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Patterns of De Novo Allo B Cells and Antibody Formation in Chronic Cardiac Allograft Rejection After Alemtuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kwun, J.; Oh, B. C.; Gibby, A. C.; Ruhil, R.; Lu, V. T.; Kim, D. W.; Page, E. K.; Bulut, O. P.; Song, M. Q.; Farris, A. B.; Kirk, A. D.; Knechtle, S. J.; Iwakoshi, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    Even though the etiology of chronic rejection (CR) is multifactorial, donor specific antibody (DSA) is considered to have a causal effect on CR development. Currently the antibody-mediated mechanisms during CR are poorly understood due to lack of proper animal models and tools. In a clinical setting, we previously demonstrated that induction therapy by lymphocyte depletion, using alemtuzumab (anti-human CD52), is associated with an increased incidence of serum alloantibody, C4d deposition and antibody-mediated rejection in human patients. In this study, the effects of T cell depletion in the development of antibody-mediated rejection were examined using human CD52 transgenic (CD52Tg) mice treated with alemtuzumab. Fully mismatched cardiac allografts were transplanted into alemtuzumab treated CD52Tg mice and showed no acute rejection while untreated recipients acutely rejected their grafts. However, approximately half of long-term recipients showed increased degree of vasculopathy, fibrosis and perivascular C3d depositions at posttransplant day 100. The development of CR correlated with DSA and C3d deposition in the graft. Using novel tracking tools to monitor donor-specific B cells, alloreactive B cells were shown to increase in accordance with DSA detection. The current animal model could provide a means of testing strategies to understand mechanisms and developing therapeutic approaches to prevent chronic rejection. PMID:22759336

  16. Nanoparticle Enhanced MRI Scanning to Detect Cellular Inflammation in Experimental Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Alam, S. R.; Tse, G. H.; Stirrat, C.; MacGillivray, T. J.; Lennen, R. J.; Jansen, M. A.; Newby, D. E.; Marson, L.; Henriksen, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated whether ultrasmall paramagnetic particles of iron oxide- (USPIO-) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect experimental chronic allograft damage in a murine renal allograft model. Materials and Methods. Two cohorts of mice underwent renal transplantation with either a syngeneic isograft or allograft kidney. MRI scanning was performed prior to and 48 hours after USPIO infusion using T2∗-weighted protocols. R2∗ values were calculated to indicate the degree of USPIO uptake. Native kidneys and skeletal muscle were imaged as reference tissues and renal explants analysed by histology and electron microscopy. Results. R2∗ values in the allograft group were higher compared to the isograft group when indexed to native kidney (median 1.24 (interquartile range: 1.12 to 1.36) versus 0.96 (0.92 to 1.04), P < 0.01). R2∗ values were also higher in the allograft transplant when indexed to skeletal muscle (6.24 (5.63 to 13.51)) compared to native kidney (2.91 (1.11 to 6.46) P < 0.05). Increased R2∗ signal in kidney allograft was associated with macrophage and iron staining on histology. USPIO were identified within tissue resident macrophages on electron microscopy. Conclusion. USPIO-enhanced MRI identifies macrophage. PMID:25954516

  17. The ratio of circulating regulatory T cells (Tregs)/Th17 cells is associated with acute allograft rejection in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Min; Liu, Zhen-Wen; Ren, Wei-Guo; Shi, Yan-Chao; Sun, Yan-Ling; Wang, Hong-Bo; Jin, Lei; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Shi, Ming

    2014-01-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and Th17 cells are known to be involved in the alloreactive responses in organ transplantation, but little is known about the relationship between Tregs and Th17 cells in the context of liver alloresponse. Here, we investigated whether the circulating Tregs/Th17 ratio is associated with acute allograft rejection in liver transplantation. In present study, thirty-eight patients who received liver transplant were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups: acute allograft rejection group (Gr-AR) (n = 16) and stable allograft liver function group (Gr-SF) (n = 22). The frequencies of circulating Tregs and circulating Th17 cells, as well as Tregs/Th17 ratio were determined using flow cytometry. The association between Tregs/Th17 ratio and acute allograft rejection was then analyzed. Our results showed that the frequency of circulating Tregs was significantly decreased, whereas the frequency of circulating Th17 cells was significantly increased in liver allograft recipients who developed acute rejection. Tregs/Th17 ratio had a negative correlation with liver damage indices and the score of rejection activity index (RAI) after liver transplantation. In addition, the percentages of CTLA-4(+), HLA-DR(+), Ki67(+), and IL-10(+) Tregs were higher in Gr-SF group than in Gr-AR group. Our results suggested that the ratio of circulating Tregs/Th17 cells is associated with acute allograft rejection, thus the ratio may serve as an alternative marker for the diagnosis of acute rejection.

  18. Long-Term Tolerance to Kidney Allografts after Induced Rejection of Donor Hematopoietic Chimerism in a Preclinical Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Scott S.; Mathes, David W.; Georges, George E.; Kuhr, Christian S.; Chang, Jeff; Butts, Tiffany M.; Storb, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Background Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation provides a reliable method for inducing tolerance towards solid organ grafts. However, this procedure can result in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) thereby limiting its application. Here we test the hypothesis that mixed chimerism can be intentionally reverted to host hematopoiesis without rejection of a kidney graft. Methods Recipient dogs were given 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) before and a short course of immunosuppression after marrow infusion from dog leukocyte antigen-identical littermates. All dogs achieved stable mixed chimerism. After a mean of 20 weeks, one cohort of dogs received kidney transplants from their respective marrow donors. Subsequently, recipients were reconditioned with 2 Gy TBI and given autologous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilized leukocytes (recipient leukocyte infusion) that had been collected before marrow transplant. Results Dogs receiving a second TBI and recipient leukocyte infusion without a kidney transplant rejected their donor hematopoietic graft within 3 weeks. Dogs that received kidney grafts, followed by a second TBI and recipient leukocyte infusion, rejected their marrow graft without rejecting their transplanted kidneys for periods greater than one year. Conclusion Mixed chimerism may be clinically reverted to 100% recipient without rejection of a kidney allograft. This finding may have application towards minimizing the risk of GVHD in solid organ transplant patients given hematopoietic cell transplantation from HLA-identical donors. PMID:22929594

  19. Association of high HLA-E expression during acute cellular rejection and numbers of HLA class I leader peptide mismatches with reduced renal allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Guberina, Hana; Rebmann, Vera; Wagner, Bettina; da Silva Nardi, Fabiola; Dziallas, Phillip; Dolff, Sebastian; Bienholz, Anja; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Heinemann, Falko M; Witzke, Oliver; Zoet, Yvonne M; Claas, Frans H J; Horn, Peter A; Kribben, Andreas; Doxiadis, Ilias I N

    2017-03-01

    Non-classical Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E preferentially presents leader peptides derived from classical HLA-class I molecules. HLA-E can trigger opposed immune responses by interacting with inhibitory NKG2A or by activating NKG2C receptors on NK and T-cells. We studied the impact of HLA-E on renal allograft survival during acute cellular rejection. HLA-E expression was up-regulated in acute cellular rejection (ACR) biopsies (n=12) compared to biopsies from 13 renal allografts with no rejection-signs. HLA-E up-regulation was correlated with numbers of HLA-class I leader peptide mismatches (p=0.04). CD8+ and CD56+ infiltrating cells correlated with HLA-E expression (p<0.0001 and p=0.0009, respectively). Activating NKG2C receptor dominated on effector cells in biopsies and peripheral blood during ACR potentially allowing HLA-E-mediated immune activation. Moreover, HLA-E expression correlated with deterioration in renal allograft function (p<0.008) and reduced allograft survival (p=0.002). Our findings provide evidence that during renal allograft rejection HLA-E along with high numbers of mismatched HLA-class I leader peptides might represent additional targets for immune-activating responses.

  20. Splenic microenvironment and self recognition as factors in allograft rejection in rats. A study using indium-111-labeled cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pollak, R.; Blanchard, J.M.; Lazda, V.A.

    1986-11-01

    Splenectomy facilitates organ allograft survival in some rat strains, and in weak donor-recipient histoincompatible pairs. We have found using a heart spleen twin graft model, using ACI rats as recipients and Lewis rats as donors, that the transplanted heart will survive in most recipients after delayed host splenectomy. The presence of a viable mass of splenic tissue will allow rejection to proceed only when the transplanted spleen is of host origin, and not when it comes from the donor (i.e., when it is allogeneic). The use of 111In-labeled cells has allowed us to show that lymphocyte traffic and trapping is markedly altered in the transplanted allogeneic spleens, when compared with control transplanted syngeneic spleens. Thus, despite the presence of the splenic ''microenvironment,'' cardiac allograft rejection does not occur in the absence of syngeneic splenic tissue. We conclude that the role of the spleen in the immune response is to facilitate the recognition of self and the acquisition of alloreactivity in weak responder rat strains and donor-recipient pairs.

  1. Anti-rejection effect of ethanol extract of Poria cocos wolf in rats after cardiac allograft implantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-wei; Liu, Hong-yu; Xia, Qiu-ming; Li, Jun-quan; Lü, Hang; Zhang, Qing-hua; Yao, Zhi-fa

    2004-06-01

    A living fetus within the maternal uterus provides an example of allogene tolerance in mammals. Poria cocos Wolf is the main component of many Chinese medicinal combination drugs that have therapeutic effects on recurrent spontaneous abortion and that can maintain pregnancy until delivery. It was hypothesized that this herbal medicine can also prolong allograft survival after organ transplantation. Here, in an in vivo study, we report the anti-rejection effect of the ethanol extract of Poria cocos Wolf (EEPCW) in rats after cardiac allograft implantation. Ten normal rats were healthy controls. Eighty rats receiving homologous heart transplants were divided into 4 groups of 20 rats each based on type of treatment: olive oil 8 ml.kg(-1).d(-1), EEPCW 25 mg.kg(-1).d(-1), EEPCW 50 mg.kg(-1).d(-1) or cyclosporin A 5 mg.kg(-1).d(-1). Allograft survival was observed in 10 rats from each group. On the seventh day post transplantation, pathological lesions and percentages of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ lymphocytes and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in peripheral blood were assessed in another 10 rats from each group and in 10 normal rats. The survival time of donor hearts in the two EEPCW groups was significantly prolonged, to (15.9 +/- 2.4) days and (30.0 +/- 0.0) days, respectively, compared with (6.7 +/- 0.8) days in the control group. Pathological lesions in the two EEPCW groups were also less severe, and the percentages of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ lymphocytes and CD4+/CD8+ ratio were significantly lower in the EEPCW groups. Acute rejection of heart transplants and cellular immune reaction can be effectively suppressed using the EEPCW. Taking advantage of novel immunosuppressants derived from Chinese medicinal herbs used to treat abnormal pregnancy provides a hopeful road for future research and treatment in organ transplantation.

  2. Soluble BAFF Cytokine Levels and Antibody-Mediated Rejection of the Kidney Allograft.

    PubMed

    Slavcev, Antonij; Brozova, Jitka; Slatinska, Janka; Sekerkova, Zuzana; Honsova, Eva; Skibova, Jelena; Striz, Ilja; Viklicky, Ondrej

    2016-12-01

    The B-cell activating factor (BAFF) cytokine has important functions for the survival and maturation of B lymphocytes, which implies that this cytokine might play a role in the development of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) after kidney transplantation. In our study, we compared the concentrations of the soluble BAFF cytokine in kidney graft recipients with AMR and patients without rejection with the goal of testing the hypothesis whether BAFF level measurement might be useful as a diagnostic marker of AMR. The study included a cohort of 19 high-risk patients with diagnosed AMR and 17 control patients free of rejection. BAFF was measured in all patients before transplantation, during the rejection episodes, and three months after transplantation in patients free of rejection using the Luminex technique. Before transplantation, the serum concentrations of BAFF in patients with AMR and kidney recipients without rejection did not significantly differ. After transplantation, however, BAFF levels were significantly lower in patients with AMR and also in patients with concurrent humoral and cellular rejection compared with patients without rejection (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). No correlation was found between BAFF and the production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) before and after transplantation. Patients experiencing AMR and simultaneous cellular and AMR had significantly lower concentrations of BAFF in comparison with patients free of rejection.

  3. Association of Local Intrapulmonary Production of Antibodies Specific to Donor Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I With the Progression of Chronic Rejection of Lung Allografts.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Ei; Motoyama, Hideki; Sato, Masaaki; Aoyama, Akihiro; Menju, Toshi; Shikuma, Kei; Sowa, Terumasa; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Saito, Masao; Takahagi, Akihiro; Tanaka, Satona; Takahashi, Mamoru; Ohata, Keiji; Kondo, Takeshi; Hijiya, Kyoko; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection may lead to chronic lung allograft dysfunction, but antibody-mediated rejection may develop in the absence of detectable donor-specific antibody (DSA) in recipient serum. This study investigated whether humoral immune responses develop not only systemically but locally within rejected lung allografts, resulting in local production of DSA. Lewis rats received orthotopic left lung transplantation from Lewis (syngeneic control) or Brown-Norway (major histocompatibility complex-mismatched allogeneic) donor rats. Rats that underwent allogeneic lung transplantation were subsequently administered cyclosporine until day 14 (short immunosuppression) or day 35 (long immunosuppression). The lung grafts and spleens of recipient animals were tissue cultured for 4 days, and the titer of antibody against donor major histocompatibility complex molecules was assayed by flow cytometry. Explanted lung grafts were also evaluated pathologically. By day 98, DSA titers in supernatants of lung graft (P = 0.0074) and spleen (P = 0.0167) cultures, but not serum, from the short immunosuppression group were significantly higher than titers in syngeneic controls. Cultures and sera from the long immunosuppression group showed no production of DSA. Microscopically, the lung grafts from the short immunosuppression group showed severe bronchiole obliteration and parenchymal fibrosis, along with lymphoid aggregates containing T and B cells, accompanying plasma cells. These findings suggestive of local humoral immune response were not observed by days 28 and 63. DSA can be locally produced in chronically rejected lung allografts, along with intragraft immunocompetent cells. Clinical testing of DSA in serum samples alone may underestimate lung allograft dysfunction.

  4. Adenosine triphosphate-competitive mTOR inhibitors: a new class of immunosuppressive agents that inhibit allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Rosborough, B R; Raïch-Regué, D; Liu, Q; Venkataramanan, R; Turnquist, H R; Thomson, A W

    2014-09-01

    The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is inhibited clinically to suppress T cell function and prevent allograft rejection. mTOR is the kinase subunit of two mTOR-containing complexes, mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and 2. Although mTORC1 is inhibited by the macrolide immunosuppressant rapamycin (RAPA), its efficacy may be limited by its inability to block mTORC1 completely and its limited effect on mTORC2. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-competitive mTOR inhibitors are an emerging class of mTOR inhibitors that compete with ATP at the mTOR active site and inhibit any mTOR-containing complex. Since this class of compounds has not been investigated for their immunosuppressive potential, our goal was to determine the influence of a prototypic ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor on allograft survival. AZD8055 proved to be a potent suppressor of T cell proliferation. Moreover, a short, 10-day course of the agent successfully prolonged murine MHC-mismatched, vascularized heart transplant survival. This therapeutic effect was associated with increased graft-infiltrating regulatory T cells and reduced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ production. These studies establish for the first time, that ATP-competitive mTOR inhibition can prolong organ allograft survival and warrant further investigation of this next generation mTOR inhibitors. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. The Effect of Histological CD20-Positive B Cell Infiltration in Acute Cellular Rejection on Kidney Transplant Allograft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Wang, Rending; Wang, Huiping; Huang, Hongfeng; Peng, Wenhan; Qiu, Wenxian; Zhou, Jingyi

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is controversial whether lymphocyte infiltration exhibited in biopsy specimens is associated with transplant outcomes. This study focused on the effect of CD20-positive B cell infiltration in biopsy specimens from allografts with acute cellular rejection (ACR) in a Chinese population. Methods. Altogether, 216 patients transplanted from Sep. 2001 to Dec. 2014 with biopsy-proved ACR (Banff I or Banff II) were included in the analysis. Biopsies were immunostained for CD20 and C4d. Baseline information, serum creatinine and GFR before and after treatment, steroid resistance, response to treatment, graft loss, and survival were analyzed. Results. Eighty-three patients were classified into CD20-negative group, and 133 patients were classified into CD20-positive group. Significantly more CD20-negative patients (49/83, 59.0%) received steroid plus antibody therapy compared with the CD20-positive group (52/133, 39.1%) (P = 0.004). The response to treatment for ACR did not differ between these two groups. The CD20-positive group had less graft loss (18.8% versus 32.5%, P = 0.022) and a better graft survival rate. Further exploration of the infiltration degree suggested that it tended to be positively related to graft survival, but this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion. CD20-positive B cell infiltration in renal allograft biopsies with ACR is associated with less steroid resistance and better graft survival. The presence of CD20-positive B cells is protective for renal allografts. PMID:28058267

  6. Non-invasive approaches for the diagnosis of acute cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher A; Fildes, James E; Ray, Simon G; Doran, Helen; Yonan, Nizar; Williams, Simon G; Schmitt, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Despite modern immunosuppressive regimes, acute rejection remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in heart transplant recipients. Clinical features are unreliable, and therefore, screening is performed in order to detect rejection, and hence, augment immunosuppressive therapy, at an early stage, with the aim of reducing short- and long-term sequelae. Histological analysis of right ventricular myocardial tissue obtained at endomyocardial biopsy remains the 'gold standard' surveillance technique; however 'biopsy-negative' rejection occurs in up to 20% of patients, the procedure is associated with uncommon but potentially serious complications and it is expensive. Non-invasive screening would, conceivably, be safer, more tolerable and cheaper, and could potentially allow more comprehensive monitoring. The evidence for non-invasive methods of diagnosing acute rejection, including assessment of myocardial deformation, myocardial tissue characterisation, electrophysiological monitoring, visualisation of cellular and molecular components of rejection and peripheral monitoring of immune activation, is reviewed.

  7. Relationship between European Mitochondrial Haplogroups and Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection in Patients with Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    JIMÉNEZ-SOUSA, María Angeles; TAMAYO, Eduardo; GUZMÁN-FULGENCIO, María; FERNÁNDEZ-RODRÍGUEZ, Amanda; HEREDIA-RODRIGUEZ, María; GARCÍA-ÁLVAREZ, Mónica; BERMEJO-MARTIN, Jesús F; PINEDA-TENOR, Daniel; RUIZ-GRANADO, Patricia; ALVAREZ-FUENTE, Elisa; GÓMEZ-SANCHEZ, Esther; GÓMEZ-HERRERAS, José I; RESINO, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA variants may contribute to differences in mitochondrial function, leading to an altered immune system. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between mtDNA haplogroups and the development of chronic allograft dysfunction in patients with kidney transplant. A retrospective observational study was carried out on 261 patients who received kidney transplant (114 had stable transplant and 147 patients developed chronic allograft dysfunction). DNA samples were genotyped for 14 mtDNA polymorphisms by using Sequenom's MassARRAY platform (San Diego, CA, USA). Only European white patients within the N macro-cluster were included. Patients with haplogroups V (odds ratio (OR)=0.32; p=0.037) and J (OR=0.36; p=0.038) showed lower odds for developing CRAD than patients with haplogroup H. After adjusting for the most significant variables, haplogroups V and J tended to statistical significance (p=0.091 and p=0.067 respectively). This is a preliminary study in which mtDNA haplogroups seem to be implicated in susceptibility or protection for developing chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:25170295

  8. Significance and Suppression of Redundant IL17 Responses in Acute Allograft Rejection by Bioinformatics Based Drug Repositioning of Fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Homare; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Gong, Yongquan; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advanced immunosuppression, redundancy in the molecular diversity of acute rejection (AR) often results in incomplete resolution of the injury response. We present a bioinformatics based approach for identification of these redundant molecular pathways in AR and a drug repositioning approach to suppress these using FDA approved drugs currently available for non-transplant indications. Two independent microarray data-sets from human renal allograft biopsies (n = 101) from patients on majorly Th1/IFN-y immune response targeted immunosuppression, with and without AR, were profiled. Using gene-set analysis across 3305 biological pathways, significant enrichment was found for the IL17 pathway in AR in both data-sets. Recent evidence suggests IL17 pathway as an important escape mechanism when Th1/IFN-y mediated responses are suppressed. As current immunosuppressions do not specifically target the IL17 axis, 7200 molecular compounds were interrogated for FDA approved drugs with specific inhibition of this axis. A combined IL17/IFN-y suppressive role was predicted for the antilipidemic drug Fenofibrate. To assess the immunregulatory action of Fenofibrate, we conducted in-vitro treatment of anti-CD3/CD28 stimulated human peripheral blood cells (PBMC), and, as predicted, Fenofibrate reduced IL17 and IFN-γ gene expression in stimulated PMBC. In-vivo Fenofibrate treatment of an experimental rodent model of cardiac AR reduced infiltration of total leukocytes, reduced expression of IL17/IFN-y and their pathway related genes in allografts and recipients’ spleens, and extended graft survival by 21 days (p<0.007). In conclusion, this study provides important proof of concept that meta-analyses of genomic data and drug databases can provide new insights into the redundancy of the rejection response and presents an economic methodology to reposition FDA approved drugs in organ transplantation. PMID:23437201

  9. Protective function of pirfenidone and everolimus on the development of chronic allograft rejection after experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    von Suesskind-Schwendi, M; Heigel, E; Pfaehler, S; Haneya, A; Schmid, C; Hirt, S W; Lehle, K

    2016-07-01

    Long-term survival of lung allografts is limited by chronic rejection (CR). Oxidative stress (OxS) plays a central role in the development of CR. We investigated the influence of pirfenidone (alone or in combination with everolimus) on OxS and CR. A rat model of left lung allo-transplantation (F344-to-WKY) was used to evaluate the effects of pirfenidone alone [0,85% in chow from postoperative day (POD) -3 to 20/60] and in combination with everolimus [2,5 mg/kg bw daily from POD 7 to 20/60]. Allografts of non-treated animals, everolimus treated animals and right, non-transplanted lungs were used as references. Immunohistology of myeloperoxidase (MPO), haemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), iron and platelet-derived-growth-factor-receptor-alpha (PDGFR-a) were performed. On POD 20, all groups showed severe acute rejection (ISHLT A3-4/B1R-B2R). Groups treated with pirfenidone showed a lower interstitial inflammatory infiltration and a lower participation of highly fibrotic degenerated vessels (ISHLT-D2R). In the long term follow up (POD 60), pirfenidone alone significantly reduced chronic airway rejection (ISHLT-C; p≤0.05), interstitial fibrosis (IF; p≤0.05), content of collagen (p≤0.05), expression of PDGFR-a (p≤0.05) and the deposition of iron (p≤0.05). All groups treated with pirfenidone showed a high expression of the cytoprotective enzyme HO-1 (p≤0.05). The additional application of everolimus resulted in a significant decrease of chronic airway rejection (ISHLT-C; p≤0.05), vasculopathy (ISHLT; p≤0.05) and IF (p≤0.05). In conclusion, early application of pirfenidone inhibited the progression of CR by its anti-fibrotic and anti-oxidative properties. The additional application of an m-TOR-inhibitor increased the anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone which resulted in a reduction of CR after experimental LTx.

  10. Structural and functional evolution of jejunal allograft rejection in rats and the ameliorating effects of cyclosporine therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Madara, J L; Kirkman, R L

    1985-01-01

    We assessed the structural and functional evolution of small intestinal transplant rejection in a rat model by use of 1-micron section, electron microscopic, and in vitro electrophysiologic techniques to study jejunal mucosa 3, 6, and 9 d posttransplantation. The earliest structural abnormalities detected in jejunal loops transplanted from Lewis X Brown Norway F1 hybrids into Lewis rats occurred within 3 d posttransplantation and consisted of focal endothelial cell injury of the microvasculature and focal injury of crypt epithelial cells. Both alterations were associated with adjacent infiltration of large lymphoid cells, and both markedly progressed and became rather diffuse over the following 6 d. In contrast, villus absorptive cells were not markedly altered in structure until the 9th postoperative day. As compared with host jejuna, allograft jejunal epithelium demonstrated multiple functional abnormalities. Transepithelial resistance declined progressively by days 6 and 9 (both P less than 0.05), although baseline transepithelial spontaneous potential difference was only affected at day 9 (P less than 0.01). Stimulated absorption by allograft jejuna, as assessed by measuring electrical response to mucosal glucose, was not significantly diminished until day 9 (P less than 0.05). In contrast, stimulated secretion assessed by measurement of electrical response to serosal theophylline was diminished by day 6 (P less than .01). These data suggest that the earliest epithelial injury during rejection, as judged both structurally and functionally, occurs in the crypt and is paralleled by endothelial injury at the level of the microvasculature. Thus, the primary targets for rejection are most likely endothelial cells and crypt epithelial cells. In contrast, structural and functional impairment of villus epithelium is detectable only at substantially later times during rejection and are most likely secondary processes related to either ischemia produced by microvascular

  11. The amelioration of composite tissue allograft rejection by TIM-3-modified dendritic cell: Regulation of the balance of regulatory and effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaojun; Zheng, Zhao; Zhu, Xiongxiang; Han, Juntao; Dong, Maolong; Tao, Ke; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Yunchuan; Hu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    T cell-dependent immune responses play a central role in allograft rejection. Exploring ways to disarm alloreactive T cells represents a potential strategy to promote long-term allograft acceptance and survival. T cell Ig domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3) has previously been demonstrated as a central regulator of T helper 1 (Th1) responses and immune tolerance. Hence, TIM-3 may be an important molecule for decreasing immunological rejection during composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA). In this study, BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were chosen as the experimental animals. The effects of TIM-3 on allograft rejection were explored using TIM-3-modified mature dendritic cells (TIM-3 mDCs). A laser speckle blood flow (LSBF) imager was used to evaluate blood distribution of the BALB/c mice. ELISA, MTT, ELISPOT assays and flow cytometry analysis were carried out for further researches. We found that TIM-3 could obviously prolong the survival time of the transplanted limbs. And TIM-3 could mitigate the immune response and thus enhance immune tolerance after CTA. Also, TIM-3 can induce lymphocyte hyporesponsiveness, including facilitating lymphocyte apoptosis, decreasing lymphocyte proliferation, and influencing the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, TIM-3 overexpression could induce CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells (Tregs), which recalibrate the effector and regulatory arms of the alloimmune response. In summary, we concluded that TIM-3 can mitigate allograft rejection and thus enhance immune tolerance by inducing lymphocyte hyporesponsiveness and increasing the number of Tregs of the alloimmune response. TIM-3 may be a potential therapeutic molecule for allograft rejection in CTA.

  12. Urinary C-X-C Motif Chemokine 10 Independently Improves the Noninvasive Diagnosis of Antibody–Mediated Kidney Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Rabant, Marion; Amrouche, Lucile; Lebreton, Xavier; Aulagnon, Florence; Benon, Aurélien; Sauvaget, Virginia; Bonifay, Raja; Morin, Lise; Scemla, Anne; Delville, Marianne; Martinez, Frank; Timsit, Marc Olivier; Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Legendre, Christophe; Terzi, Fabiola

    2015-01-01

    Urinary levels of C-X-C motif chemokine 9 (CXCL9) and CXCL10 can noninvasively diagnose T cell–mediated rejection (TCMR) of renal allografts. However, performance of these molecules as diagnostic/prognostic markers of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is unknown. We investigated urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels in a highly sensitized cohort of 244 renal allograft recipients (67 with preformed donor–specific antibodies [DSAs]) with 281 indication biopsy samples. We assessed the benefit of adding these biomarkers to conventional models for diagnosing/prognosing ABMR. Urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels, normalized to urine creatinine (Cr) levels (CXCL9:Cr and CXCL10:Cr) or not, correlated with the extent of tubulointerstitial (i+t score; all P<0.001) and microvascular (g+ptc score; all P<0.001) inflammation. CXCL10:Cr diagnosed TCMR (area under the curve [AUC]=0.80; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68 to 0.92; P<0.001) and ABMR (AUC=0.76; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.82; P<0.001) with high accuracy, even in the absence of tubulointerstitial inflammation (AUC=0.70; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.79; P<0.001). Although mean fluorescence intensity of the immunodominant DSA diagnosed ABMR (AUC=0.75; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.82; P<0.001), combining urinary CXCL10:Cr with immunodominant DSA levels improved the diagnosis of ABMR (AUC=0.83; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.89; P<0.001). At the time of ABMR, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio was independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. In conclusion, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio associates with tubulointerstitial and microvascular inflammation of the renal allograft. Combining the urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio with DSA monitoring significantly improves the noninvasive diagnosis of ABMR and the stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss. PMID:25948873

  13. Urinary C-X-C Motif Chemokine 10 Independently Improves the Noninvasive Diagnosis of Antibody-Mediated Kidney Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rabant, Marion; Amrouche, Lucile; Lebreton, Xavier; Aulagnon, Florence; Benon, Aurélien; Sauvaget, Virginia; Bonifay, Raja; Morin, Lise; Scemla, Anne; Delville, Marianne; Martinez, Frank; Timsit, Marc Olivier; Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Legendre, Christophe; Terzi, Fabiola; Anglicheau, Dany

    2015-11-01

    Urinary levels of C-X-C motif chemokine 9 (CXCL9) and CXCL10 can noninvasively diagnose T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) of renal allografts. However, performance of these molecules as diagnostic/prognostic markers of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is unknown. We investigated urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels in a highly sensitized cohort of 244 renal allograft recipients (67 with preformed donor-specific antibodies [DSAs]) with 281 indication biopsy samples. We assessed the benefit of adding these biomarkers to conventional models for diagnosing/prognosing ABMR. Urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels, normalized to urine creatinine (Cr) levels (CXCL9:Cr and CXCL10:Cr) or not, correlated with the extent of tubulointerstitial (i+t score; all P<0.001) and microvascular (g+ptc score; all P<0.001) inflammation. CXCL10:Cr diagnosed TCMR (area under the curve [AUC]=0.80; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68 to 0.92; P<0.001) and ABMR (AUC=0.76; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.82; P<0.001) with high accuracy, even in the absence of tubulointerstitial inflammation (AUC=0.70; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.79; P<0.001). Although mean fluorescence intensity of the immunodominant DSA diagnosed ABMR (AUC=0.75; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.82; P<0.001), combining urinary CXCL10:Cr with immunodominant DSA levels improved the diagnosis of ABMR (AUC=0.83; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.89; P<0.001). At the time of ABMR, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio was independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. In conclusion, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio associates with tubulointerstitial and microvascular inflammation of the renal allograft. Combining the urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio with DSA monitoring significantly improves the noninvasive diagnosis of ABMR and the stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss.

  14. Antibody-Mediated Rejection Due to Preexisting versus De Novo Donor-Specific Antibodies in Kidney Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Olivier; Loupy, Alexandre; Hidalgo, Luis; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Higgins, Sarah; Viglietti, Denis; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Halloran, Philip F

    2017-03-02

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) can occur in patients with preexisting anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies (DSA) or in patients who develop de novo DSA. However, how these processes compare in terms of allograft injury and outcome has not been addressed. From a cohort of 771 kidney biopsy specimens from two North American and five European centers, we performed a systematic assessment of clinical and biologic parameters, histopathology, circulating DSA, and allograft gene expression for all patients with ABMR (n=205). Overall, 103 (50%) patients had preexisting DSA and 102 (50%) had de novo DSA. Compared with patients with preexisting DSA ABMR, patients with de novo DSA ABMR displayed increased proteinuria, more transplant glomerulopathy lesions, and lower glomerulitis, but similar levels of peritubular capillaritis and C4d deposition. De novo DSA ABMR was characterized by increased expression of IFNγ-inducible, natural killer cell, and T cell transcripts, but less expression of AKI transcripts compared with preexisting DSA ABMR. The preexisting DSA ABMR had superior graft survival compared with the de novo DSA ABMR (63% versus 34% at 8 years after rejection, respectively; P<0.001). After adjusting for clinical, histologic, and immunologic characteristics and treatment, we identified de novo DSA ABMR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.82 compared with preexisting DSA ABMR; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.07 to 3.08; P=0.03); low eGFR (<30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) at diagnosis (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.48 to 7.23; P<0.001); ≥0.30 g/g urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (HR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.47 to 4.09; P<0.001); and presence of cg lesions (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.34 to 3.79; P=0.002) as the main independent determinants of allograft loss. Our findings support the transplant of kidneys into highly sensitized patients and should encourage efforts to monitor patients for de novo DSA.

  15. Severing corneal nerves in one eye induces sympathetic loss of immune privilege and promotes rejection of future corneal allografts placed in either eye

    PubMed Central

    Paunicka, Kathryn J.; Mellon, Jessamee; Robertson, Danielle; Petroll, Matthew; Brown, Joseph R.; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2015-01-01

    Less than 10% of corneal allografts undergo rejection even though HLA matching is not performed. However, second corneal transplants experience a three-fold increase in rejection, which is not due to prior sensitization to histocompatibility antigens shared by the first and second transplants since corneal grafts are selected at random without histocompatibility matching. Using a mouse model of penetrating keratoplasty we found that 50% of the initial corneal transplants survived, yet 100% of the subsequent corneal allografts (unrelated to the first graft) placed in the opposite eye underwent rejection. The severing of corneal nerves that occurs during surgery induced substance P (SP) secretion in both eyes, which disabled T regulatory cells that are required for allograft survival. Administration of an SP antagonist restored immune privilege and promoted graft survival. Thus, corneal surgery produces a sympathetic response that permanently abolishes immune privilege of subsequent corneal allografts, even those placed in the opposite eye and expressing a completely different array of foreign histocompatibility antigens from the first corneal graft. PMID:25872977

  16. Evaluation of OKT3 monoclonal antibody and anti-thymocyte globulin in the treatment of steroid-resistant acute allograft rejection in pediatric renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Mochon, M; Kaiser, B; Palmer, J A; Polinsky, M; Flynn, J T; Caputo, G C; Baluarte, H J

    1993-06-01

    We reviewed the effectiveness of Muromonab-CD3 (OKT3) and anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) in the treatment of corticosteroid-resistant acute renal allograft rejection in 49 transplanted children. Reversal of rejection was successful in 22 of 23 patients (96%) treated with OKT3 and 21 of 26 (81%) treated with ATG (P = NS). Re-rejection episodes occurred within 1 month of cessation of therapy in 9 of 22 patients treated with OKT3 but only in 2 of 21 who received ATG (P < 0.05). In the patients with re-rejection, 7 of the 9 patients originally given OKT3 and 1 of the 2 who received ATG responded to a repeat course of high-dose corticosteroids; thus, at 1 month post treatment, the incidence of graft loss due to initial rejection or re-rejection was 13% for the OKT3 and 23% for the ATG group (P = NS). Graft survival was similar at 6 months: 82% for OKT3- and 73% for ATG-treated patients (P = NS); 100% patient survival was noted in both groups. Mean calculated creatinine clearance prior to, during, and at 1 and 6 months post rejection was similar in the OKT3- and ATG-treated groups. Neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred more frequently in the ATG group, but there was no significant difference in infectious complications. Two patients developed high (> or = 1:1,000) OKT3 antibody titers. In our experience, children with corticosteroid-resistant acute renal allograft rejection treated with OKT3 and ATG had similar allograft survival and level of renal function at 1 and 6 months, and number of infectious complications post therapy.

  17. Myocardial Gene Expression Profiling to Predict and Identify Cardiac Allograft Acute Cellular Rejection: The GET-Study

    PubMed Central

    Bodez, Diane; Hocini, Hakim; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Tisserand, Pascaline; Benhaiem, Nicole; Barau, Caroline; Kharoubi, Mounira; Guellich, Aziz; Guendouz, Soulef; Radu, Costin; Couetil, Jean-Paul; Ghaleh, Bijan; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Teiger, Emmanuel; Hittinger, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Aims Serial invasive endomyocardial biopsies (EMB) remain the gold standard for acute cellular rejection (ACR) diagnosis. However histological grading has several limitations. We aimed to explore the value of myocardial Gene Expression Profiling (GEP) for diagnosing and identifying predictive biomarkers of ACR. Methods A case-control study nested within a retrospective heart transplant patients cohort included 126 patients with median (IQR) age 50 (41–57) years and 111 (88%) males. Among 1157 EMB performed, 467 were eligible (i.e, corresponding to either ISHLT grade 0 or ≥3A), among which 36 were selected for GEP according to the grading: 0 (CISHLT, n = 13); rejection ≥3A (RISHLT, n = 13); 0 one month before ACR (BRISHLT, n = 10). Results We found 294 genes differentially expressed between CISHLT and RISHLT, mainly involved in immune activation, and inflammation. Hierarchical clustering showed a clear segregation of CISHLT and RISHLT groups and heterogeneity of GEP within RISHLT. All EMB presented immune activation, but some RISHLT EMB were strongly subject to inflammation, whereas others, closer to CISHLT, were characterized by structural modifications with lower inflammation level. We identified 15 probes significantly different between BRISHLT and CISHLT, including the gene of the muscular protein TTN. This result suggests that structural alterations precede inflammation in ACR. Linear Discriminant Analysis based on these 15 probes was able to identify the histological status of every 36 samples. Conclusion Myocardial GEP is a helpful method to accurately diagnose ACR, and predicts rejection one month before its histological occurrence. These results should be considered in cardiac allograft recipients’ care. PMID:27898719

  18. Use of radionuclide imaging in the early diagnosis and treatment of renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, S R; Mattern, W D; Staab, E; Johnson, G

    1975-01-01

    Data are presented on the clinical application of radionuclide imaging to evaluate changes in cadaver transplant function in the immediate postoperative period. The method uses orthoiodohippuric acid (hippuran) administered IV, with scintillation imaging, and curve analysis by a digital computer. An initial study is always obtained 24 hours after transplantation. Serial studies are then obtained, as needed, to interpret the clinical course. Selected cases are presented which illustrate the use of this protocol in various clinical settings. In the oliguric patient serial studies have been of particular value. They have identified ATN so that over-enthusiastic treatment for rejection could be avoided. They have also identified acute rejection complicating ATN so that high dose steroid therapy could be administered appropriately. In the non-oliguric patient they have frequently contributed to the early diagnosis of acute rejection, and they have been useful in monitoring the effect and duration of treatment for severe rejection crisis. It is concluded that radionuclide imaging studies, when carefully applied and interpreted, are a valuable adjunct to the management of patients in this complex clinical setting. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:1093490

  19. Pulmonary capillaritis: a possible histologic form of acute pulmonary allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B; Zamora, M; Fullerton, D; Weill, D; Tuder, R; Grover, F; Schwarz, M I

    1998-04-01

    Acute rejection after lung transplantation occurs commonly and is usually characterized histologically by a perivascular mononuclear infiltrate. We report five cases of pulmonary capillaritis with a histologic appearance distinct from typical rejection, occurring in patients ranging in age from 18 to 45 years, with a variety of underlying diseases including alpha1 antitrypsin deficiency, pulmonary hypertension, cystic fibrosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Four of the five patients had alveolar hemorrhage histologically, and two had frank hemoptysis. Time of onset ranged from 3 weeks to many months after transplantation. Three cases were fulminant, and there were two deaths. In only one case, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bronchitis, could infection be established. All were treated with intensification of immunosuppressive therapy. Plasmapheresis was carried out in two cases and coincided with temporary improvement, but its efficacy was questionable because of concurrent immunosuppressive therapy. Two had recurrent biopsy-proven acute rejection within 6 weeks of treatment, and one had recurrent severe pulmonary hemorrhage that abated with total lymphoid irradiation. Our experience suggests that pulmonary capillaritis in lung transplant recipients can be an acute, fatal illness with the potential for recurrence in the survivors. We speculate that it represents a form of acute vascular rejection. Early pathologic diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressive therapy are recommended. Although a humoral component was not documented, the possible response to plasmapheresis requires continued evaluation.

  20. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Tear Fluid in a Rat Penetrating Keratoplasty Model With Acute Corneal Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feifei; Xu, Jianjiang; Jin, Hong; Tan, Jianwen; Zhang, Chaoran

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to develop a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying acute corneal allograft rejection by identifying differentially expressed tear proteins at defined stages and discovering potentially important proteins involved in the process. The isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2DLC-MS/MS) technique was used to identify tear proteins showing significant alterations in a rat penetrating keratoplasty model at different time points. Bioinformatics technology was applied to analyze the significant proteins, and a potential protein was verified by Western blotting. A total of 269 proteins were quantified, and 118 proteins were considered to be significantly altered by at least 2.0- or 0.5-fold. For gene ontology annotations, the top enrichments were neurological disease, free radical scavenging, cell death and survival, and cell movement. For pathway analyses, the top enrichments were LXR/RXR activation, acute phase response signaling, clathrin-mediated endocytosis signaling, and coagulation system. Coronin-1A was verified as a potential protein involved in the early stage of acute corneal allograft rejection. This study first demonstrates that tear proteomics is a powerful tool for better understanding of the mechanisms underlying acute corneal rejection, and that coronin-1A in tears might be closely related to allograft rejection.

  1. Transient blockade of Delta-like Notch ligands prevents allograft rejection mediated by cellular and humoral mechanisms in a mouse model of heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Sherri; Feng, Jiane; Chung, Jooho; Radojcic, Vedran; Sandy, Ashley R.; Friedman, Ann; Shelton, Amy; Yan, Minhong; Siebel, Christian W.; Bishop, D. Keith; Maillard, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Rejection remains a major clinical challenge limiting allograft survival after solid organ transplantation. Both cellular and humoral immunity contribute to this complication, with increased recognition of antibody-mediated damage during acute and chronic rejection. Using a mouse model of MHC-mismatched heart transplantation, we report markedly protective effects of Notch inhibition, dampening both T cell and antibody-driven rejection. T cell-specific pan-Notch blockade prolonged heart allograft survival and decreased IFNγ and IL-4 production by alloreactive T cells, especially when combined with depletion of recipient CD8+ T cells. These effects were associated with decreased infiltration by conventional T cells and an increased proportion of regulatory T cells in the graft. Transient administration of neutralizing antibodies specific for Delta-like1/4 (Dll1/4) Notch ligands in the peri-transplant period led to prolonged acceptance of allogeneic hearts, with superior outcome over Notch inhibition only in T cells. Systemic Dll1/4 inhibition decreased T cell cytokines and graft infiltration, but also germinal center B cell and plasmablast numbers as well as production of donor-specific alloantibodies and complement deposition in the transplanted hearts. Dll1 or Dll4 inhibition alone provided partial protection. Thus, pathogenic signals delivered by Dll1/4 Notch ligands early after transplantation promote organ rejection through several complementary mechanisms. Transient interruption of theses signals represents a new attractive therapeutic strategy to enhance long-term allograft survival. PMID:25687759

  2. The severity of acute cellular rejection defined by Banff classification is associated with kidney allograft outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaiyin; Budde, Klemens; Lu, Huber; Schmidt, Danilo; Liefeldt, Lutz; Glander, Petra; Neumayer, Hans Helmut; Rudolph, Birgit

    2014-06-15

    It is unclear if the severity or the timing of acute cellular rejection (ACR) defined by Banff classification 2009 is associated with graft survival. Borderline changes, TCMR I (interstitial rejection), and TCMR II/III (vascular rejection) were defined as low, moderate, and high ACR severity, respectively. Approximately 270 patients who had at least one episode of ACR were enrolled, 270 biopsies were chosen which showed the highest ACR severity of each patient and were negative for donor-specific antibodies (DSA), C4d, and microcirculation changes (MC). Six months were used as the cutoff to define early and late ACR; 370 patients without biopsy posttransplantation were recruited in the control group. Up to 8-year posttransplantation, death-censored graft survival (DCGS) rates of control, borderline, TCMR I, and TCMR II/III groups were 97.6%, 93.3%, 79.6%, and 73.6% (log rank test, P<0.001); the control group had significantly higher DCGS rate than the three ACR groups (each pairwise comparison yields P<0.05). The DCGS rate of late ACR was significantly lower compared with early ACR (63.6% vs. 87.4%, P<0.001). Intimal arteritis (Banff v-lesion) was an independent histologic risk factor correlated with long-term graft loss regardless of the timing of ACR. The v-lesions with minimal or high-grade tubulitis displayed similar graft survival (72.7% vs. 72.9%, P=0.96). All types of ACR affect long-term graft survival. Vascular or late ACR predict poorer graft survival; the extent of tubulointerstitial inflammation (TI) is of no prognostic significance for vascular rejection.

  3. Fast and slow methylators: do racial differences influence risk of allograft rejection?

    PubMed

    Chocair, P R; Duley, J A; Sabbaga, E; Arap, S; Simmonds, H A; Cameron, J S

    1993-06-01

    A catabolic route for azathioprine involving methylation by thiopurine methyltransferase has been directly implicated in the drug's immunosuppressive efficacy. Since ethnic differences in thiopurine methyltransferase activity have been reported in a study of Lapps, this study compared the distribution of thiopurine methyltransferase activity in erythrocyte lysates from 134 healthy, randomly selected subjects living in Brazil, comprising 39 blacks (i.e. Afro-Brazilians), 33 white subjects, 30 mixed-race subjects, and 32 Brazilian-residing Japanese subjects. The results demonstrated bimodality of thiopurine methyltransferase activity compatible with genetic polymorphism in the white, black and mixed-race groups, but not in the Japanese, who were homogeneously 'fast methylators' (high thiopurine methyltransferase activity). Thiopurine methyltransferase activity was generally higher in Brazilian males than females, and some individuals in the black and mixed-race groups had very high activity. Azathioprine-immunosuppressed transplant patients with thiopurine methyltransferase activity above 35 pmol/h/mgHb have previously been shown to have significantly poorer outcomes. Using this thiopurine methyltransferase value as the cut-off point between 'poor responders' and 'good responders' to azathioprine, 65% of the Japanese, 59% of the black subjects, and 63% of the mixed-race subjects fell into the 'poor responder' category, compared with only 42% of the white group. Interestingly, this approximately 20% difference in azathioprine response corresponds to the racial differences seen in allograft survival.

  4. Local Tacrolimus (FK506) Delivery for Prevention of Acute Rejection in the Nonhuman Primate Delayed Mixed Chimerism Vascularized Composite Allograft Tolerance Induction Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    optimizing a fabrication method, and developing characterization methods to test the pharmacokinetics after drug loading. To this end, the team...planned for testing the PLDS in a small animal model as well as a non-human primate model. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Drug delivery, immunosuppression...delivery of tacrolimus (a potent immunosuppressive drug ) to prevent acute rejection episodes of vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) in non-human

  5. Molecular Assessment of Microcirculation Injury in Formalin-Fixed Human Cardiac Allograft Biopsies With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Afzali, B; Chapman, E; Racapé, M; Adam, B; Bruneval, P; Gil, F; Kim, D; Hidalgo, L; Campbell, P; Sis, B; Duong Van Huyen, J P; Mengel, M

    2017-02-01

    Precise diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in cardiac allograft endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) remains challenging. This study assessed molecular diagnostics in human EMBs with AMR. A set of 34 endothelial, natural killer cell and inflammatory genes was quantified in 106 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded EMBs classified according to 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) criteria. The gene set expression was compared between ISHLT diagnoses and correlated with donor-specific antibody (DSA), endothelial injury by electron microscopy (EM) and prognosis. Findings were validated in an independent set of 57 EMBs. In the training set (n = 106), AMR cases (n = 70) showed higher gene set expression than acute cellular rejection (ACR; n = 21, p < 0.001) and controls (n = 15, p < 0.0001). Anti-HLA DSA positivity was associated with higher gene set expression (p = 0.01). Endothelial injury by electron microscopy strongly correlated with gene set expression, specifically in AMR cases (r = 0.62, p = 0.002). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for diagnosing AMR showed greater accuracy with gene set expression (area under the curve [AUC] = 79.88) than with DSA (AUC = 70.47) and C4d (AUC = 70.71). In AMR patients (n = 17) with sequential biopsies, increasing gene set expression was associated with inferior prognosis (p = 0.034). These findings were confirmed in the validation set. In conclusion, biopsy-based molecular assessment of antibody-mediated microcirculation injury has the potential to improve diagnosis of AMR in human cardiac transplants.

  6. NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) Mouse Model of Human Skin Transplantation and Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Racki, Waldemar J.; Covassin, Laurence; Brehm, Michael; Pino, Stephen; Ignotz, Ronald; Dunn, Raymond; Laning, Joseph; Graves, Susannah K.; Rossini, Aldo A.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Transplantation of human skin on immunodeficient mice that support engraftment with functional human immune systems would be an invaluable tool for investigating mechanisms involved in wound healing and transplantation. NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) readily engraft with human immune systems but human skin graft integrity is poor. In contrast, human skin graft integrity is excellent on CB17-scid bg (SCID.bg) mice, but they engraft poorly with human immune systems. Methods Human skin grafts transplanted onto immunodeficient NSG, SCID.bg, and other immunodeficient strains were evaluated for graft integrity, preservation of graft endothelium and their ability to be rejected following engraftment of allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Results Human skin transplanted onto NSG mice develops an inflammatory infiltrate, consisting predominately of host Gr1+ cells, that is detrimental to the survival of human endothelium in the graft. Treatment of graft recipients with anti-Gr1 antibody reduces this cellular infiltrate, preserves graft endothelium, and promotes wound healing, tissue development and graft remodeling. Excellent graft integrity of the transplanted skin includes multilayered stratified human epidermis, well developed human vasculature, human fibroblasts and passenger leukocytes. Injection of unfractionated, CD4 or CD8 allogeneic human PBMC induces a rapid destruction of the transplanted skin graft. Conclusions NSG mice treated with anti-Gr1 antibody provide a model optimized for both human skin graft integrity and engraftment of a functional human immune system. This model provides the opportunity to investigate mechanisms orchestrating inflammation, wound healing, revascularization, tissue remodeling, and allograft rejection and can provide guidance for improving outcomes following clinical transplantation. PMID:20134397

  7. Acute Kidney Allograft Rejection Precipitated by Lenalidomide Treatment for Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lum, Erik L; Huang, Edmund; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Pham, Thu; Danovitch, Gabriel

    2017-02-09

    Patients who develop malignancy after kidney transplantation typically undergo a reduction in immunosuppression and referral to an oncologist for chemotherapeutic considerations for the management of their malignancy. Traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy agents can result in kidney transplant injury, but the decision about which agents to be used has largely been determined by oncologists without the involvement of nephrologists. More recently, several classes of drugs with immunomodulatory actions have been approved for the treatment of cancer, including multiple myeloma. Activation of the immune system against malignant cells may have unintended consequences in solid-organ transplant recipients, who require suppression of the immune system to avoid transplant rejection. In this report, we present a case of acute kidney transplant rejection in a 65-year-old woman following administration of the newer immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide for the treatment of multiple myeloma. A greater awareness of the mechanisms of newly introduced chemotherapy agents and discussion with the treating oncologist and patient are paramount in caring for patients who develop malignancy following transplantation.

  8. A Higher Risk of Acute Rejection of Human Kidney Allografts Can Be Predicted from the Level of CD45RC Expressed by the Recipients’ CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Laurence; Bernard, Isabelle; Chabod, Marianne; Augusto, Jean-François; Lauwers-Cances, Valerie; Cristini, Christelle; Cuturi, Maria-Cristina; Subra, Jean-François; Saoudi, Abdelhadi

    2013-01-01

    Although transplantation is the common treatment for end-stage renal failure, allograft rejection and marked morbidity from the use of immunosuppressive drugs remain important limitations. A major challenge in the field is to identify easy, reliable and noninvasive biomarkers allowing the prediction of deleterious alloreactive immune responses and the tailoring of immunosuppressive therapy in individuals according to the rejection risk. In this study, we first established that the expression of the RC isoform of the CD45 molecule (CD45RC) on CD4 and CD8 T cells from healthy individuals identifies functionally distinct alloreactive T cell subsets that behave differently in terms of proliferation and cytokine secretion. We then investigated whether the frequency of the recipients CD45RC T cell subsets before transplantation would predict acute graft rejection in a cohort of 89 patients who had undergone their first kidney transplantation. We showed that patients exhibiting more than 54.7% of CD8 CD45RChigh T cells before transplantation had a 6 fold increased risk of acute kidney graft rejection. In contrast, the proportions of CD4 CD45RC T cells were not predictive. Thus, a higher risk of acute rejection of human kidney allografts can be predicted from the level of CD45RC expressed by the recipients’ CD8 T cells. PMID:23894540

  9. Monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG/CXCL9) is derived from both donor and recipient sources during rejection of class II major histocompatibility complex disparate skin allografts.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Michael B; Shimoda, Naohiko; Amano, Hiroyuki; Rosenblum, Joshua M; Kish, Danielle D; Farber, Joshua M; Fairchild, Robert L

    2009-06-01

    Chemokines, including monokine induced by interferon-gamma (Mig/CXCL9), are produced both in allografts and during the direct T-cell infiltration that mediates graft rejection. Neither the specific production nor contribution of allograft donor versus recipient Mig in allograft rejection is currently known. C57BL/6 mice with a targeted deletion in the Mig gene were used as both skin allograft donors and recipients in a class II major histocompatibility complex-mismatched graft model to test the requirement for donor- versus recipient-derived Mig for acute rejection. B6.Mig(-/-) allografts had a 10-day prolonged survival in B6.H-2(bm12) recipients when compared with wild-type C57BL/6 allograft donors, and B6.H-2(bm12) skin allografts had a 5-day prolonged survival in B6.Mig(-/-) versus wild-type recipients. Transplantation of B6.Mig(-/-) skin grafts onto B6.H-2(bm12).Mig(-/-) recipients resulted in further prolonged allograft survival with more than 30% of the grafts surviving longer than 60 days. Prolonged allograft survival was also associated with delayed cellular infiltration into grafts but not with altered T-cell proliferative responses to donor stimulators. Immunohistochemical staining of allograft sections indicated that Mig is produced by both donor- and recipient-derived sources, but Mig from each of these sources appeared in different areas of the allograft tissue. These results therefore demonstrate the synergy of donor- and recipient-derived Mig in promoting T-cell infiltration into allografts.

  10. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR–HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants. PMID:28066408

  11. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  12. C1q binding is not an independent risk factor for kidney allograft loss after an acute antibody-mediated rejection episode: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Moktefi, Anissa; Parisot, Juliette; Desvaux, Dominique; Canoui-Poitrine, Florence; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Peltier, Julie; Audard, Vincent; Kofman, Tomek; Suberbielle, Caroline; Lang, Philippe; Rondeau, Eric; Grimbert, Philippe; Matignon, Marie

    2017-03-01

    After kidney transplantation, C4d is an incomplete marker of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and C1q-binding donor-specific antibodies (DSA) have been associated with allograft survival. However, the impact on allograft survival of C1q+ DSA after clinical AMR has not been studied yet. We analysed retrospectively in clinical AMR C4d staining and C1q-binding impact on allograft survival. We compared clinical, histological and serological features of C4d- and C4d+ AMR, C1q+ and C1q- DSA AMR and analysed C4d and C1q-binding impact on allograft survival. Among 500 for-cause kidney allograft biopsies, 48 fulfilled AMR criteria. C4d+ AMR [N = 18 (37.5%)] have significantly higher number class I DSA (P = 0.02), higher microvascular score (P = 0.02) and more transplant glomerulopathy (P = 0.04). C1q+ AMR [N = 20 (44%)] presented with significantly more class I and class II DSA (P = 0.005 and 0.04) and C4d+ staining (P = 0.01). Graft losses were significantly higher in the C4d+ group (P = 0.04) but similar in C1q groups. C4d+ but not C1q+ binding was an independent risk factor for graft loss [HR = 2.65; (1.11-6.34); P = 0.028]. In our cohort of clinical AMR, C4d+ staining but not C1q+ binding is an independent risk factor for graft loss. Allograft loss and patient survival were similar in C1q+ and C1q- AMR.

  13. Interruption of OX40L signaling prevents costimulation blockade–resistant allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Kitchens, William H.; Dong, Ying; Mathews, David V.; Breeden, Cynthia P.; Strobert, Elizabeth; Fuentes, Maria E.; Larsen, Christian P.; Ford, Mandy L.

    2017-01-01

    The potential of costimulation blockade to serve as a novel transplant immunosuppression strategy has been explored for over 20 years, culminating in the recent clinical approval of belatacept for renal transplant patients. Despite improving long-term graft function and survival compared with calcineurin inhibitors, clinical acceptance of belatacept has been hindered by elevated rates of acute rejection. We examined the signaling pathways required to activate costimulation blockade–resistant alloreactive T cells and identified the OX40/OX40L secondary costimulatory pathway as a promising target. We next sought to improve the clinical efficacy of traditional costimulation blockade using belatacept by coupling it with anti-OX40L. Using a murine transplant model, we demonstrate that combined blockade enhances the suppression of alloreactive T cell proliferation and effector functions including both cytokine release and cytotoxic degranulation. We also show that anti-OX40L may be particularly useful in targeting alloreactive memory T cell responses that are relatively unaffected by traditional costimulation blockade regimens. Finally, we translated this therapy to a clinically relevant nonhuman primate renal transplant model, validating the efficacy of this regimen in a potentially novel steroid- and calcineurin inhibitor–free immunosuppression regimen. PMID:28289708

  14. Interruption of OX40L signaling prevents costimulation blockade-resistant allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kitchens, William H; Dong, Ying; Mathews, David V; Breeden, Cynthia P; Strobert, Elizabeth; Fuentes, Maria E; Larsen, Christian P; Ford, Mandy L; Adams, Andrew B

    2017-03-09

    The potential of costimulation blockade to serve as a novel transplant immunosuppression strategy has been explored for over 20 years, culminating in the recent clinical approval of belatacept for renal transplant patients. Despite improving long-term graft function and survival compared with calcineurin inhibitors, clinical acceptance of belatacept has been hindered by elevated rates of acute rejection. We examined the signaling pathways required to activate costimulation blockade-resistant alloreactive T cells and identified the OX40/OX40L secondary costimulatory pathway as a promising target. We next sought to improve the clinical efficacy of traditional costimulation blockade using belatacept by coupling it with anti-OX40L. Using a murine transplant model, we demonstrate that combined blockade enhances the suppression of alloreactive T cell proliferation and effector functions including both cytokine release and cytotoxic degranulation. We also show that anti-OX40L may be particularly useful in targeting alloreactive memory T cell responses that are relatively unaffected by traditional costimulation blockade regimens. Finally, we translated this therapy to a clinically relevant nonhuman primate renal transplant model, validating the efficacy of this regimen in a potentially novel steroid- and calcineurin inhibitor-free immunosuppression regimen.

  15. Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection: Improving Step by Step

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, Michael; Schönemann, Constanze; Pruß, Axel; Budde, Klemens; Waiser, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the past years we stepwise modified our immunosuppressive treatment regimen for patients with antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Here, we describe three consecutive groups treated with different regimens. From 2005 until 2008, we treated all patients with biopsy-proven ABMR with rituximab (500 mg), low-dose (30 g) intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), and plasmapheresis (PPH, 6x) (group RLP, n = 12). Between 2009 and June 2010, patients received bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2, 4x) together with low-dose IVIG and PPH (group BLP, n = 11). In July 2010, we increased the IVIG dose and treated all subsequent patients with bortezomib, high-dose IVIG (1.5 g/kg), and PPH (group BHP, n = 11). Graft survival at three years after treatment was 73% in group BHP as compared to 45% in group BLP and 25% in group RLP. At six months after treatment median serum creatinine was 2.1 mg/dL, 2.9 mg/dL, and 4.2 mg/dL in groups BHP, BLP, and RLP, respectively (p = 0.02). Following treatment, a significant decrease of donor-specific HLA antibody (DSA) mean fluorescence intensity from 8467 ± 6876 to 5221 ± 4711 (p = 0.01) was observed in group BHP, but not in the other groups. Our results indicate that graft survival, graft function, and DSA levels could be improved along with stepwise modifications to our treatment regimen, that is, the introduction of bortezomib and high-dose IVIG treatment. PMID:28255562

  16. Polymorphisms in genes related to the complement system and antibody-mediated cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Marrón-Liñares, Grecia M; Núñez, Lucía; Crespo-Leiro, María G; Barge-Caballero, Eduardo; Pombo, Jorge; Paniagua-Martin, María Jesús; Suarez-Fuentetaja, Natalia; Cid, Javier; Grille-Cancela, Zulaika; Muñiz-Garcia, Javier; Tan, Carmela D; Rodríguez, E Rene; Vázquez-Rodríguez, José Manuel; Hermida-Prieto, Manuel

    2017-07-15

    Heart transplantation (HT) is a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage heart failure. One of the main problems after HT is the humoral response termed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Complement activation plays a key role in AMR contributing to graft damage. The aim of this study was to analyze genetic variants in genes related to the complement pathways that could be associated with the development of AMR. Analysis of 51 genes related to the complement pathway was performed by next-generation sequencing in 46 HT recipients, 23 with and 23 without AMR. Statistical analysis was performed with SNPstats and R. We identified 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1 in the mannose-binding lectin 2 gene (p.Gly54Asp-MBL2) and 1 in the complement factor properdin gene (p.Asn428(p=)-CFP), that showed significant association with the absence and development of AMR, respectively. Moreover, the presence of the rare allele in p.Gly54Asp-MBL2 control patients correlated with an immunodeficiency of mannose-binding lectin (6.24 ng/ml vs 207.50 ng/ml, p < 0.01), whereas the presence of the rare allele p.Asn428(p=)-CFP in patients with AMR correlated with higher levels of properdin protein (14.65 μg/ml vs 10.77 μg/ml, p < 0.05). AMR is a complex phenotype affected by many recipient factors. Variants in p.Gly54Asp-MBL2 and p.Asn428(p=)-CFP genes, encoding mannose-binding lectin 2 and properdin, may influence the risk of AMR. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Complement Inhibition for Prevention and Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Jordan, S C; Choi, J; Kahwaji, J; Vo, A

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic interventions aimed at the human complement system are recognized as potentially important strategies for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases because there is often evidence of complement-mediated injury according to pathologic assessments. In addition, there are a large number of potential targets, both soluble and cell bound, that might offer potential for new drug development, but progress in this area has met with significant challenges. Currently, 2 drugs are approved aimed at inhibition of complement activation. The first option is eculizumab (anti-C5), which is approved for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab has also been studied in human transplantation for the treatment and prevention of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Initial data from uncontrolled studies suggested a significant benefit of eculizumab for the prevention of ABMR in highly HLA-sensitized patients, but a subsequent randomized, placebo-controlled trial failed to meet its primary endpoint. Anecdotal data, primarily from case studies, showed benefits in treating complement-mediated ABMR. A second approved complement-inhibiting therapy is C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), which is approved for use in patients with hereditary angioedema, a condition caused by mutations in the gene that codes for C1-INH. A recent placebo-controlled trial of C1-INH for prevention of ABMR in HLA-sensitized patients found that the drug was safe, with evidence for inhibition of systemic complement activation and complement-activating donor-specific antibodies. Other drugs are now under development.

  18. Th-17 Alloimmune Responses in Renal Allograft Biopsies From Recipients of Kidney Transplants Using Extended Criteria Donors During Acute T Cell-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Matignon, M; Aissat, A; Canoui-Poitrine, F; Grondin, C; Pilon, C; Desvaux, D; Saadoun, D; Barathon, Q; Garrido, M; Audard, V; Rémy, P; Lang, P; Cohen, J; Grimbert, P

    2015-10-01

    Although renal transplantation using expanded criteria donors has become a common practice, immune responses related to immunosenescence in those kidney allografts have not been studied yet in humans. We performed a retrospective molecular analysis of the T cell immune response in 43 kidney biopsies from patients with acute T cell-mediated rejection including 25 from recipients engrafted with a kidney from expanded criteria donor and 18 from recipients grafted with optimal kidney allograft. The clinical, transplant and acute T cell-mediated rejection characteristics of both groups were similar at baseline. The expression of RORγt, Il-17 and T-bet mRNA was significantly higher in the elderly than in the optimal group (p = 0.02, p = 0.036, and p = 0.01, respectively). Foxp3 mRNA levels were significantly higher in elderly patients experiencing successful acute T cell-mediated rejection reversal (p = 0.03). The presence of IL-17 mRNA was strongly associated with nonsuccessful reversal in elderly patients (p = 0.008). Patients with mRNA IL17 expression detection and low mRNA Foxp3 expression experienced significantly more treatment failure (87.5%) than patients with no mRNA IL17 expression and/or high mRNA Foxp3 expression (26.7%; p = 0.017). Our study suggests that the Th17 pathway is involved in pathogenesis and prognosis of acute T cell-mediated rejection in recipients of expanded criteria allograft.

  19. Rituximab in Combination With Bortezomib, Plasmapheresis, and High-Dose IVIG to Treat Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Waiser, Johannes; Duerr, Michael; Schönemann, Constanze; Rudolph, Birgit; Wu, Kaiyin; Halleck, Fabian; Budde, Klemens; Lachmann, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Background Current treatment strategies for antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection (AMR) are not sufficiently effective. In most centers, “standard of care” treatment includes plasmapheresis (PPH) and IVIG preparations. Since several years, modern therapeutics targeting B cells and plasma cells have become available. We investigated, whether combined administration of rituximab and bortezomib in addition to PPH and high-dose IVIG is useful. Methods Between November 2011 and January 2013, we treated 10 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven AMR with rituximab (500 mg), bortezomib (4× 1.3 mg/m2), PPH (6×), and high-dose IVIG (1.5 g/kg) (group A). This group was compared with a group of 11 consecutive patients treated with an identical regimen without rituximab between July 2010 and November 2011 (group B). Results Median follow-up was 41(33-46) months in group A and 55(47-63) months in group B. At 40 months after treatment, graft survival was 60% in group A and 64% in group B, respectively (P = 0.87). Before and after treatment, serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and proteinuria were not different between groups. A significant reduction in donor-specific HLA antibody mean fluorescence intensity was observed in group A (25.2%, P = 0.046) and B (38.3%, P = 0.01) at 3 months posttreatment. In group A, more patients suffered from side effects compared with group B (infections: 70% vs 18%, P = 0.02). Conclusions The addition of rituximab to bortezomib, PPH, and high-dose IVIG did not further improve graft survival. Instead, we observed an increase of side effects. Therefore, combined administration of bortezomib and rituximab in addition to PPH and IVIG should be regarded with caution. PMID:27819032

  20. Triptolide inhibits CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated acute rejection and prolongs cardiac allograft survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shuiwei; Lv, Dingliang

    2017-10-01

    There have been numerous investigations into the immunosuppressive effects of triptolide; however, its inhibitory effects on memory T cells remain to be elucidated. Using a cluster of differentiation (CD)4(+) memory T-cell transfer model, the aim of the present study was to determine the inhibitory effects of triptolide on CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated acute rejection and to determine the potential underlying mechanisms. At 4 weeks after skin transplantation, mouse cervical heart transplantation was performed following the transfer of CD4(+) memory T cells. Mice were divided into two groups: A Control [normal saline, 30 ml/kg/day; intraperitoneal injection (ip)] and a triptolide group (triptolide, 3 mg/kg/day; ip). Graft survival, pathological examination and the corresponding International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) scores were assessed 5 days following heart transplantation, and levels of interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-10 and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in cardiac grafts and peripheral blood were assessed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and ELISA. The duration of cardiac graft survival in the triptolide group was significantly increased compared with the control group (14.3±0.4 vs. 5.3±0.2 days; P<0.001). Further pathological examinations revealed that the infiltration of inflammatory cells and myocardial damage in the cardiac grafts was notably reduced by triptolide, and the corresponding ISHLT scores in the triptolide group were significantly lower than those of the control group (grade 2.08±0.15 vs. 3.67±0.17; P<0.001). In addition, triptolide was able to significantly reduce IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion (P<0.01), significantly increase TGF-β1 secretion in the cardiac grafts and peripheral blood (P<0.01) and increase IL-10 secretion in the cardiac grafts. Therefore, the present study suggests that triptolide inhibits CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated acute rejection and

  1. RNA Profiling in Human and Murine Transplanted Hearts: Identification and Validation of Therapeutic Targets for Acute Cardiac and Renal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Van Aelst, L. N. L.; Summer, G.; Li, S.; Gupta, S. K.; Heggermont, W.; De Vusser, K.; Carai, P.; Naesens, M.; Van Cleemput, J.; Van de Werf, F.; Vanhaecke, J.; Thum, T.; Waer, M.; Papageorgiou, A.‐P.; Schroen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute cellular rejection (ACR) is the adverse response of the recipient's immune system against the allogeneic graft. Using human surveillance endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) manifesting ACR and murine allogeneic grafts, we profiled implicated microRNAs (miRs) and mRNAs. MiR profiling showed that miR‐21, ‐142‐3p, ‐142‐5p, ‐146a, ‐146b, ‐155, ‐222, ‐223, and ‐494 increased during ACR in humans and mice, whereas miR‐149‐5p decreased. mRNA profiling revealed 70 common differentially regulated transcripts, all involved in immune signaling and immune‐related diseases. Interestingly, 33 of 70 transcripts function downstream of IL‐6 and its transcription factor spleen focus forming virus proviral integration oncogene (SPI1), an established target of miR‐155, the most upregulated miR in human EMBs manifesting rejection. In a mouse model of cardiac transplantation, miR‐155 absence and pharmacological inhibition attenuated ACR, demonstrating the causal involvement and therapeutic potential of miRs. Finally, we corroborated our miR signature in acute cellular renal allograft rejection, suggesting a nonorgan specific signature of acute rejection. We concluded that miR and mRNA profiling in human and murine ACR revealed the shared significant dysregulation of immune genes. Inflammatory miRs, for example miR‐155, and transcripts, in particular those related to the IL‐6 pathway, are promising therapeutic targets to prevent acute allograft rejection. PMID:26249758

  2. Two-Stage, In Silico Deconvolution of the Lymphocyte Compartment of the Peripheral Whole Blood Transcriptome in the Context of Acute Kidney Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Casey P.; Balshaw, Robert; Ng, Raymond T.; Wilson-McManus, Janet E.; Keown, Paul; McMaster, Robert; McManus, Bruce M.; Landsberg, David; Isbel, Nicole M.; Knoll, Greg; Tebbutt, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    Acute rejection is a major complication of solid organ transplantation that prevents the long-term assimilation of the allograft. Various populations of lymphocytes are principal mediators of this process, infiltrating graft tissues and driving cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Understanding the lymphocyte-specific biology associated with rejection is therefore critical. Measuring genome-wide changes in transcript abundance in peripheral whole blood cells can deliver a comprehensive view of the status of the immune system. The heterogeneous nature of the tissue significantly affects the sensitivity and interpretability of traditional analyses, however. Experimental separation of cell types is an obvious solution, but is often impractical and, more worrying, may affect expression, leading to spurious results. Statistical deconvolution of the cell type-specific signal is an attractive alternative, but existing approaches still present some challenges, particularly in a clinical research setting. Obtaining time-matched sample composition to biologically interesting, phenotypically homogeneous cell sub-populations is costly and adds significant complexity to study design. We used a two-stage, in silico deconvolution approach that first predicts sample composition to biologically meaningful and homogeneous leukocyte sub-populations, and then performs cell type-specific differential expression analysis in these same sub-populations, from peripheral whole blood expression data. We applied this approach to a peripheral whole blood expression study of kidney allograft rejection. The patterns of differential composition uncovered are consistent with previous studies carried out using flow cytometry and provide a relevant biological context when interpreting cell type-specific differential expression results. We identified cell type-specific differential expression in a variety of leukocyte sub-populations at the time of rejection. The tissue-specificity of these differentially

  3. [Role of dentritic epidermal T lymphocytes in immune rejection of skin allograft in mice and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hua; Yan, Rongshuai; Liu, Meisi; Zhou, Junyi; Tan, Jianglin; Zhang, Xiaorong; Hu, Xiao-hong; Huang, Yong; He, Weifeng; Wu, Jun; Luo, Gaoxing

    2015-04-01

    To explore the role of dentritic epidermal T lymphocytes ( DETCs) in immune rejection of skin allograft in mice and its related mechanism. Methods (1) Full-thickness skin was harvested from back of one male wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mouse. Epithelial cells were isolated for detection of the expression of DETCs and their phenotype with flow cytometer. Another male WT C57BL/6 mouse was used to harvest full-thickness skin from the back. Epidermis was isolated for observation of the morphological characteristics of DETCs with immunofluorescence technology. (2) Four male green fluorescence protein (GFP)-marked C57BL/6 mice, 7 female WT C57BL/6 mice (group WT), and 7 female ybT lymphocytes 8 gene knock-out (GK) C57BL/6 mice (group GK) were used. Full-thickness skin in the size of 1.4 cm x 1.4 cm on the back of mice in groups WT and GK were excised, and the wounds were transplanted with full-thickness skin in the size of 1.2 cm x 1.2 cm obtained from male GFP-marked C57BL/6 mice. The survival time of skin grafts was affirmed with small animal in vivo imager and naked eyes and recorded. (3) Two male WT C57BL/6 mice were used to isolate epithelial cells. Cells were inoculated into 48-well plate and divided into activation group (A) and control group (C) according to the random number table, with 4 wells in each group. Cells in group A were treated with 10 pL concanavalin A in the concentration of 2 microg/mL for 24 hours, while those in group C with PBS in the same volume as that in group A. The expression of interferon y in DETCs was detected with flow cytometer. (4) Four male GFP-marked C57BL/6 mice were used as donors. Fourteen female WT C57BL/6 mice were used as receptors and divided into interferon gamma neutralizing group (IN) and control group (C) according to the random number table, with 7 mice in each group. The skin transplantation model of C57BL/6 male to C57BL/6 female was established as in part (2). Before surgery and 72 hours after, mice in group IN were

  4. Mitomycin C-treated antigen-presenting cells as a tool for control of allograft rejection and autoimmunity: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Terness, Peter; Kleist, Christian; Simon, Helmut; Sandra-Petrescu, Flavius; Ehser, Sandra; Chuang, Jing-Jing; Mohr, Elisabeth; Jiga, Lucian; Greil, Johann; Opelz, Gerhard

    2009-07-01

    Cells have been previously used in experimental models for tolerance induction in organ transplantation and autoimmune diseases. One problem with the therapeutic use of cells is standardization of their preparation. We discuss an immunosuppressive strategy relying on cells irreversibly transformed by a chemotherapeutic drug. Dendritic cells (DCs) of transplant donors pretreated with mitomycin C (MMC) strongly prolonged rat heart allograft survival when injected into recipients before transplantation. Likewise, MMC-DCs loaded with myelin basic protein suppressed autoreactive T cells of MS patients in vitro and prevented experimental autoimmune encephalitis in mice. Comprehensive gene microarray analysis identified genes that possibly make up the suppressive phenotype, comprising glucocorticoid leucine zipper, immunoglobulin-like transcript 3, CD80, CD83, CD86, and apoptotic genes. Based on these findings, a hypothetical model of tolerance induction by MMC-treated DCs is delineated. Finally, we describe the first clinical application of MMC-treated monocyte-enriched donor cells in an attempt to control the rejection of a haploidentical stem cell transplant in a sensitized recipient and discuss the pros and cons of using MMC-treated antigen-presenting cells for tolerance induction. Although many questions remain, MMC-treated cells are a promising clinical tool for controlling allograft rejection and deleterious immune responses in autoimmune diseases.

  5. Effects of complement inhibition with soluble complement receptor-1 on vascular injury and inflammation during renal allograft rejection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pratt, J R; Hibbs, M J; Laver, A J; Smith, R A; Sacks, S H

    1996-12-01

    Complement is both an effector of the humoral immune response and a stimulator of leukocyte activation. To examine the influence of complement on the allograft response, we inhibited complement using recombinant human soluble complement receptor-1 (sCR1; TP10), in an unsensitized model of rat renal allograft rejection. Lewis to DA renal transplant recipients were treated daily with 25 mg/kg sCR1 or saline and sacrificed on days 1 to 5 after transplant. Transplanted organs were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for leukocyte subset markers and for the third component of complement, C3, and membrane attack complex deposition. A second set of recipients was followed from day 5 to day 9 to assess graft survival. sCR1-treated recipients displayed > 90% inhibition of plasma complement activity and a marked reduction in tissue C3 and membrane attack complex deposition. Inactivation of complement reduced the vascular injury such that there was almost complete sparing of vascular damage in day 5 sCR1-treated rats. There was a significant reduction in infiltrating leukocytes by day 5 after transplant, and complement inhibition delayed the time to reach a histologically defined end point of graft survival from 5 days in controls to 9 days in the sCR1-treated group. These results imply that the vascular and cell-mediated injury arises, in part, from complement activation. The partial inhibition of these injuries by sCR1 may have functional implications for strategies to inhibit allograft rejection.

  6. [Implantation of FK506 drug delivery system into the anterior chamber for inhibiting corneal rejection in high risk rabbit corneal allograft].

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-yun; Liu, Ting; Xie, Li-xin; Wang, Shen-guo

    2006-04-01

    To study the effects of a biodegradable FK506 drug delivery system (DDS) on the inhibition of corneal rejection, to measure the concentration of FK506 in the aqueous humor and to study the relationship between intraocular concentration of FK506 and its immunosuppressive effects on corneal rejection. Corneal neo-vascularization was induced by 5 - 0 silk sutures in 68 New Zealand rabbits to establish a high risk corneal transplantation model. A unilateral 7 mm diameter central penetrating corneal transplantation was performed with 7.5 mm diameter grafts from health New Zealand rabbit donors. Grafted rabbits were randomized into five groups as follows: Group A: untreated control animals; Group B: DDS anterior chamber recipients without drug; Group C: 1 mg cyclosporine DDS anterior chamber recipients; Group D: 0.1% FK506-olive oil drop recipients; Group E: 0.5 mg FK506 DDS anterior chamber recipients. Grafts were examined with a slit lamp every other day and clinical conditions were scored for up to 28 weeks. The aqueous humor and cornea of Group D and Group E were collected, and the concentration of FK506 was determined. The expression of cytokines IL-2R alpha, MCP-1, Fas and FasL mRNA was detected with in situ hybridization method. The median survival time was (17.9 +/- 4.7) d in Group A (untreated corneal allograft), (20.0 +/- 3.7) d in Group B, (56.3 +/- 8.8) d in Group C, (78.1 +/- 7.2) d in Group D, and over 180 d in Group E. Statistically significant difference (F = 926.37, P = 0.0000) in the survival time of allograft has been found between Group E and other groups. The concentration of FK506 in aqueous humor was (15.7 +/- 2.6) ng/ml in Group E at one week and remained stable for at least 24 weeks, much higher than that in Group D (<0.3 ng/ml). The concentration of FK506 in cornea was also higher in Group E than that in Group D. The expression of cytokines IL-2R alpha and MCP-1 mRNA was detected, but the expression of Fas and FasL mRNA was not detected in Group

  7. Targeted delivery of interleukin-10 to chronic cardiac allograft rejection using a human antibody specific to the extra domain A of fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Doll, Fabia; Grün, Katja; Richter, Petra; Köse, Nilay; Ziffels, Barbara; Schubert, Harald; Figulla, Hans R; Jung, Christian; Gummert, Jan; Renner, André; Neri, Dario; Berndt, Alexander

    2015-09-15

    Management of chronic rejection is challenging since there are not sufficient preventive or therapeutic strategies. The rejection process leads to overexpression of ED-A(+) fibronectin (ED-A(+) Fn). The human antibody F8, specific to ED-A(+) Fn, may serve as a vehicle for targeted delivery of bioactive payloads, e.g. interleukin 10 (IL-10). The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of the fusion protein F8-interleukin-10 (F8-IL10) in the process of chronic rejection development. A heterotopic rat heart transplantation model was used to induce chronic rejection. For therapeutic interventions, the immunocytokines F8-humanIL10 (DEKAVIL), F8-ratIL10 as well as KSF-humanIL10 (irrelevant antigen-specificity) were used. Treatment was performed weekly for 10 weeks starting at day 7 after transplantation (1mg/animal). In the cardiac allografts, treatment with F8-huIL10 or F8-ratIL10 was associated with increased heart weights, a higher grade of chronic rejection, increased CIF, higher protein expression levels of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), an augmented infiltration with inflammatory cells (CD4+, CD8+ and CD68+ cells) and higher serum levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to the control groups. All observed treatment effects are transplantation-specific since the F8 antibody is specific to ED-A(+) Fn that is not expressed in healthy hearts. A clear targeting effect of F8-huIL10 as well as F8-ratIL10 could be proven. Against that background, a further study is needed to address the question, if F8-IL10 treatment is capable to reduce CAV and CIF starting at a time point when chronic rejection has fully developed (therapeutic approach). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential role for competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and intracellular cytokine staining as diagnostic tools for the assessment of intragraft cytokine profiles in rejecting and nonrejecting heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Spriewald, B M; Hara, M; Bushell, A; Jenkins, S; Morris, P J; Wood, K J

    2000-11-01

    The early and reliable diagnosis of allograft rejection is a difficult task and the assessment of cytokine expression in the grafts can be a helpful parameter. We have compared competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with intracellular cytokine staining by flow cytometry as tools to measure cytokine expression in rejecting and nonrejecting murine cardiac allografts. Both techniques gave comparable results for cytokine expression in rejecting allografts and syngeneic controls. Grafts from mice pretreated with anti-CD4 antibody and donor-specific blood transfusion showed a marked reduction in cytokine expression, as assessed by competitive RT-PCR, even though a cellular infiltrate was present in the graft. In contrast, the cytokine production measured by intracellular cytokine staining of the isolated graft-infiltrating cells was high and exceeded even that of the rejecting allografts. We conclude that intracellular cytokine staining of graft-infiltrating leukocytes by flow cytometry does not necessarily reflect accurately the cytokine milieu in the graft. This technique might therefore have a limited clinical application in contrast to competitive RT-PCR for the differentiation between graft acceptance and graft rejection.

  9. Interleukin-1α Activity in Necrotic Endothelial Cells Is Controlled by Caspase-1 Cleavage of Interleukin-1 Receptor-2: IMPLICATIONS FOR ALLOGRAFT REJECTION.

    PubMed

    Burzynski, Laura C; Humphry, Melanie; Bennett, Martin R; Clarke, Murray C H

    2015-10-09

    Inflammation is a key instigator of the immune responses that drive atherosclerosis and allograft rejection. IL-1α, a powerful cytokine that activates both innate and adaptive immunity, induces vessel inflammation after release from necrotic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Similarly, IL-1α released from endothelial cells (ECs) damaged during transplant drives allograft rejection. However, IL-1α requires cleavage for full cytokine activity, and what controls cleavage in necrotic ECs is currently unknown. We find that ECs have very low levels of IL-1α activity upon necrosis. However, TNFα or IL-1 induces significant levels of active IL-1α in EC necrotic lysates without alteration in protein levels. Increased activity requires cleavage of IL-1α by calpain to the more active mature form. Immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assays show that IL-1α associates with interleukin-1 receptor-2, and this association is decreased by TNFα or IL-1 and requires caspase activity. Thus, TNFα or IL-1 treatment of ECs leads to caspase proteolytic activity that cleaves interleukin-1 receptor-2, allowing IL-1α dissociation and subsequent processing by calpain. Importantly, ECs could be primed by IL-1α from adjacent damaged VSMCs, and necrotic ECs could activate neighboring normal ECs and VSMCs, causing them to release inflammatory cytokines and up-regulate adhesion molecules, thus amplifying inflammation. These data unravel the molecular mechanisms and interplay between damaged ECs and VSMCs that lead to activation of IL-1α and, thus, initiation of adaptive responses that cause graft rejection. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  11. De novo expression of fetal ED-A(+) fibronectin and B (+) tenascin-C splicing variants in human cardiac allografts: potential impact for targeted therapy of rejection.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Matusiak-Brückner, Monika; Richter, Petra; Grün, Katja; Ziffels, Barbara; Neri, Dario; Maschek, Hansjörg; Schulz, Uwe; Pfeil, Alexander; Jung, Christian; Figulla, Hans R; Gummert, Jan; Berndt, Alexander; Renner, André

    2014-10-01

    Management of acute and especially chronic rejection after human cardiac transplantation is still challenging. Chronic rejection, represented by allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and cardiac interstitial fibrosis (CIF) is known to cause severe long-term complications. Rejection associated tissue-remodelling entails the reoccurrence of fetal variants of Fibronectin (Fn) and Tenascin-C (Tn-C), which are virtually absent in adult human organs. In a rat model, an extensive re-expression could be demonstrated for ED-A(+) Fn with spatial association to CAV and CIF. Thus, it is of great interest to investigate the cardiac tissue expression and distribution in human samples. From 48 heart transplanted patients, 64 tissue specimens derived from right ventricular biopsies were available. Histopathological analysis was performed according to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) guidelines for the detection of acute rejection. By immunohistochemistry, protein expression of ED-A(+) Fn, B(+) Tn-C, alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD31 and CD45 was assessed and analysed semiquantitatively. Co-localisation studies were performed by means of immunofluorescence double labelling. Histopathological analysis of the 64 samples revealed different ISHLT grades (0R in 36 cases, 1R in 20 cases and 2R in 8 cases). There was a distinct and quantitatively relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C in most samples. Semi-quantitative evaluation did not show any correlation to the acute rejection grade for all markers. Interestingly, significant correlations to the extent of inflammation could be shown for ED-A(+) Fn (r = 0.442, p = 0.000) and B(+) Tn-C (r = 0.408, p = 0.001) as well as between both proteins (r = 0.663, p = 0.000). A spatial association of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C to CAV and CIF could be demonstrated. A relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C following human heart transplantation could be demonstrated with spatial association to

  12. Left ventricular longitudinal strain by speckle-tracking echocardiography is associated with treatment-requiring cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Sera, Fusako; Kato, Tomoko S; Farr, Maryjane; Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Marboe, Charles C; Di Tullio, Marco R; Mancini, Donna; Homma, Shunichi

    2014-05-01

    Noninvasive detection of rejection is a major objective in the management of heart transplant recipients. To investigate the utility of 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (2D-STE), we retrospectively evaluated 160 sets of endomyocardial biopsies and echocardiograms from 59 asymptomatic heart transplant recipients. Conventional International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation grade 1B or higher rejection was considered as treatment-requiring rejection (group R), whereas International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation grade 0 or 1A was classified as group Non-R. Left ventricular global longitudinal strain (GLS), global circumferential strain, and global radial strain were assessed by 2D-STE. Twenty-five specimens were classified into group R. GLS was significantly associated with treatment-requiring rejection, whereas neither global radial strain nor global circumferential strain were. Lower GLS remained significantly associated with an increased risk of treatment-requiring rejection (odds ratio, 1.15 [95% CI, 1.01-1.30]; P=0.03) even in multivariate analysis. GLS with the absolute value of less than 14.8% showed sensitivity and specificity of 64% and 63%, respectively, for detection of treatment-requiring rejection. The 2D-STE-derived left ventricular GLS was associated with treatment-requiring rejection. Two-dimensional STE might be useful as a noninvasive supplemental tool for monitoring heart transplant recipients for possible treatment-requiring rejection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. In vivo downregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses in corneal allograft rejection by HC-HA/PTX3 complex purified from amniotic membrane.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Tan, Yaohong; Duffort, Stephanie; Perez, Victor L; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2014-03-19

    Heavy chain-hyaluronic acid (HC-HA)/PTX3 purified from human amniotic membrane (AM) was previously observed to suppress inflammatory responses in vitro. We now examine whether HC-HA/PTX3 is able to exert a similar effect in vivo, using murine models for keratitis and corneal allograft rejection. The in vitro effect of HC-HA/PTX3 was tested using OTII ovalbumin (OVA) transgenic, purified CD4(+) T cells, or IFN-γ/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Cytokine production was measured by ELISA, while cell surface markers and cell proliferation were determined by flow cytometry. In vivo effects of HC-HA/PTX3 were analyzed by quantifying the recruitment of enhanced green fluorescence-labeled macrophages and by measuring the expression of arginase 1 (Arg-1), IL-10, and IL-12 in LPS-induced keratitis in the macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (Mafia) mouse. The effect of corneal allograft survival in a complete major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched mouse model was assessed by grading corneal opacification. In vitro studies demonstrated that HC-HA/PTX3 significantly enhanced the expansion of FOXP3 T cells and suppressed cell proliferation and protein expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, CD25, and CD69 in activated CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, immobilized HC-HA/PTX3 significantly upregulated IL-10 gene expression but downregulated that of IL-12 and IL-23 in activated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, in vivo subconjunctival injection of HC-HA/PTX3 significantly prolonged corneal allograft survival, suppressed macrophage infiltration, and promoted M2 polarization by upregulating Arg-1 and IL-10 but downregulating IL-12. HC-HA/PTX3 can suppress inflammatory responses in vivo by modulating both innate and adaptive immunity of macrophages and CD4(+) T cells.

  14. In Vivo Downregulation of Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses in Corneal Allograft Rejection by HC-HA/PTX3 Complex Purified From Amniotic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    He, Hua; Tan, Yaohong; Duffort, Stephanie; Perez, Victor L.; Tseng, Scheffer C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Heavy chain–hyaluronic acid (HC-HA)/PTX3 purified from human amniotic membrane (AM) was previously observed to suppress inflammatory responses in vitro. We now examine whether HC-HA/PTX3 is able to exert a similar effect in vivo, using murine models for keratitis and corneal allograft rejection. Methods. The in vitro effect of HC-HA/PTX3 was tested using OTII ovalbumin (OVA) transgenic, purified CD4+ T cells, or IFN-γ/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Cytokine production was measured by ELISA, while cell surface markers and cell proliferation were determined by flow cytometry. In vivo effects of HC-HA/PTX3 were analyzed by quantifying the recruitment of enhanced green fluorescence–labeled macrophages and by measuring the expression of arginase 1 (Arg-1), IL-10, and IL-12 in LPS-induced keratitis in the macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (Mafia) mouse. The effect of corneal allograft survival in a complete major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched mouse model was assessed by grading corneal opacification. Results. In vitro studies demonstrated that HC-HA/PTX3 significantly enhanced the expansion of FOXP3 T cells and suppressed cell proliferation and protein expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, CD25, and CD69 in activated CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, immobilized HC-HA/PTX3 significantly upregulated IL-10 gene expression but downregulated that of IL-12 and IL-23 in activated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, in vivo subconjunctival injection of HC-HA/PTX3 significantly prolonged corneal allograft survival, suppressed macrophage infiltration, and promoted M2 polarization by upregulating Arg-1 and IL-10 but downregulating IL-12. Conclusions. HC-HA/PTX3 can suppress inflammatory responses in vivo by modulating both innate and adaptive immunity of macrophages and CD4+ T cells. PMID:24519420

  15. Reduction of chronic rejection of renal allografts by anti-transforming growth factor-β antibody therapy in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qiunong; Li, Shuyuan; Gao, Sihai; Chen, Huifang; Nguan, Christopher Y C; Du, Caigan

    2013-07-15

    There is no effective treatment for chronic rejection (CR) that largely limits long-term survival of kidney transplants. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is a fibrogenic factor for tissue fibrosis. This study was to test the efficacy of an anti-TGF-β antibody in preventing the CR of renal allografts in a preclinical model. Male Lewis rats (RT1¹) were orthotopically transplanted with donor kidneys from male Fischer 344 (RT11v1) rats and were treated with either anti-TGF-β or a control antibody. The CR of renal allografts was assessed by semiquantitative histological analyses, and intragraft cytokines and fibrosis-related genes ware examined by PCR arrays. Compared with the control antibody, anti-TGF-β antibody treatment significantly reduced recipients' proteinuria (P = 0.0002), and CR in renal transplants, which was indicated by the fewer injured renal tubules, glomeruli, and interlobular arterioles or arteries, and by less mononuclear cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis in the anti-TGF-β antibody-treated group (P < 0.05), but not significantly attenuate the ratios of different infiltrating leukocytes. These pathological changes were associated with downregulation of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and proinflammatory cytokines, or with upregulation of anti-fibrotic HGF, BMP5, and BMP7. The therapeutic effect of the anti-TGF-β antibody was further confirmed by its prevention of graft dysfunction, indicated by lower levels of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen or higher creatinine clearance in anti-TGF-β antibody-treated recipients compared with those in control recipients (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the anti-TGF-β antibody (1D11) treatment significantly reduces CR of renal allografts in rats, suggesting the therapeutic potential of this antibody therapy for treating CR of kidney transplants in patients.

  16. Accelerated acute allograft rejection accompanied by enhanced T-cell proliferation and attenuated Treg function in RBP-J deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tao; Zhang, Ping; Feng, Lei; Ji, Gang; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Zheng, Min-Hua; Qin, Hong-Yan; Chen, Dong-Li; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Han, Hua

    2011-02-01

    Acute allograft rejection (AAR) involves both the innate and the adaptive immune systems. As a critical pathway in peripheral T-cell differentiation and function, Notch signaling is potentially involved in the modulation of AAR, but its role in alloimmune responses has not been fully addressed. By using fully MHC-mismatched allograft transplantation model and T-cell specific RBP-J deficient mice, we examined the role of Notch/RBP-J pathway in alloimmune responses in vivo. AAR was significantly accelerated in RBP-J deficient mice compared with the wild-type controls, as demonstrated by the marked reduction in graft survival. The reduction in graft survival was associated with augmented alloantigen specific T-cell proliferation and increased number of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells in the RBP-J deficient recipient mice. Furthermore, although the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs was intact in RBP-J knockout recipients, their ability to suppress Teff responses in vitro was significantly dampened. These findings suggest that Notch/RBP-J pathway may attenuate AAR by suppressing in vivo expansion of alloreactive T-cell proliferation and facilitating CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg suppression ability, indicating that Notch pathway could be exploited to limit T-cell-mediated AAR. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Oxygen free-radical scavengers and immune destruction of murine islets in allograft rejection and multiple low-dose streptozocin-induced insulitis.

    PubMed

    Mendola, J; Wright, J R; Lacy, P E

    1989-03-01

    We examined the effects of desferrioxamine (DFX), a potent inhibitor of the formation of oxygen-derived hydroxyl radicals, and nicotinamide (NIC), a poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase inhibitor and a weak free-radical scavenger, on two models of immune destruction of murine islets [i.e., allograft rejection and multiple low-dose streptozocin (STZ)-induced insulitis]. Freshly isolated or low-temperature-cultured BALB/cJ islets were transplanted beneath the kidney capsules of C57BL/6J recipients. The recipients were treated with NIC alone (500 mg.kg-1.day-1), DFX alone (4.2 mg/day x 14 days), or NIC + DFX. Only recipients treated with NIC + DFX, receiving cultured islets, showed a mean graft survival time significantly longer than control mice receiving freshly isolated or cultured islets. Control CD-1 mice treated with multiple low doses of STZ developed insulitis and diabetes. Treatment with NIC alone, DFX alone, or NIC + DFX decreased the severity of hyperglycemia relative to the controls. Treatment with DFX alone was more effective than NIC alone or NIC + DFX. Only the group treated with DFX alone had a lower incidence of diabetes (mean plasma glucose level greater than 200 mg/dl) than the controls after 4 wk. Histologically, islets from control mice showed severe insulitis, islet destruction, and absence of stainable insulin, whereas islets from DFX-treated mice showed only mild peri-insulitis and a relative preservation of beta-cell granulation. Our study showed that NIC and DFX partially protect islets from immune destruction in allograft rejection and in low-dose STZ-induced insulitis. Apparently, hydroxyl radicals play important roles in both of these models.

  18. Longitudinal Tracking of Recipient Macrophages in a Rat Chronic Cardiac Allograft Rejection Model With Noninvasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Micrometer-Sized Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Wu, Yijen L.; Foley, Lesley M.; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Eytan, Danielle F.; Shirwan, Haval; Ho, Chien

    2008-01-01

    Background Long-term survival of heart transplants is hampered by chronic rejection (CR). Studies indicate the involvement of host macrophages in the development of CR; however, the precise role of these cells in CR is unclear. Thus, it is important to develop noninvasive techniques to serially monitor the movement and distribution of recipient macrophages in chronic cardiac allograft rejection in vivo. Methods and Results We have employed a rat heterotopic working-heart CR model for a magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Twenty-one allograft (PVG.1U→PVG.R8) and 9 isograft (PVG.R8→PVG.R8) transplantations were performed. Recipient macrophages are labeled via intravenous injection of micron-sized paramagnetic iron oxide particles (0.9 μm in diameter) at a dose of 4.5 mg Fe per rat 1 day before transplantation. Serial in vivo magnetic resonance images were acquired for up to 16 weeks. The migration of labeled recipient cells in our CR model, in which cardiac CR is evident at 3 weeks and most extensive by 16 weeks after transplantation, can be assessed with the use of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging for >100 days after a single micron-sized paramagnetic iron oxide injection. The location and distribution of labeled recipient cells were confirmed with magnetic resonance microscopy and histology. Conclusions This approach may improve our understanding of the immune cells involved in CR and the management of heart transplantation. Moreover, this study demonstrates the feasibility of noninvasively observing individual targeted cells over long time periods by serial in vivo magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:18591438

  19. Influence of HLA disparity, immunosuppressive regimen used, and type of kidney allograft on production of anti-HLA class-I antibodies after transplant and occurrence of rejection.

    PubMed

    Abdelnoor, Alexander M; Ajib, Rola; Chakhtoura, Marita; Daouk, Majida; Medawar, Walid; Uwaydah, Marwan; Sawah, Sarah I; Khauli, Raja B

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effects of HLA disparity, immunosuppressive regimen used, and the type of kidney allograft on production of anti-HLA antibodies after transplant and the occurrence of rejection episodes. Five living-unrelated donors and 4 living-related donors kidney recipients received quadruple therapy (including sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil). Fifteen living-unrelated donors and 19 living-related donors received triple therapy (excluding sirolimus). A single bolus of 4 to 6 mg/kg rabbit anti-human T-lymphocyte immune serum was included with both regimens. Recipients were studied over a 3-year period. Human leukocyte antigen profiles were determined by DNA (SSP) typing, and anti-HLA class-I antibodies were determined by the complement-dependent microcytotoxicity assay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of HLA disparity did not appear to affect anti-HLA antibody production or the occurrences of rejection episodes. None of the patients who received quadruple therapy developed anti-HLA class-I antibodies. Two living-unrelated donors and 2 living-related donors recipients who received triple therapy developed anti-HLA class-I antibodies. One of the 2 living-unrelated donors antibody-positive patients rejected the kidney and returned to dialysis, and the other patient has normal graft function 3 years after the transplant. The 2 living-related donors patients with normal graft function were antibody-positive 1 year after the transplant but were antibody-negative at 2 and 3 years after transplant. Sirolimus appeared to inhibit production of antibodies after transplant. Moreover, use of present day immunosuppressive agents diminishes the role of HLA matching in relation to the occurrence of rejection episodes.

  20. Bortezomib-containing regimen for primary treatment of early antibody-mediated cardiac allograft rejection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gazdic, Tomas; Svobodova, Eva; Kubanek, Milos; Kment, Martin; Pagacova, Libuse; Viklicky, Ondrej; Malek, Ivan; Kautzner, Josef

    2015-06-01

    Evidence regarding the use of bortezomib-containing schemes in primary treatment of antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients is scarce. This case report presents the clinical experience with upstream use of bortezomib in primary treatment of early antibody-mediated rejection in an adult heart transplant recipient. Two cycles of bortezomib together with methylprednisolone, immunoadsorption, rituximab, and supplementary doses of intravenous immunoglobulin G reversed signs of heart failure, production of donor-specific antibodies, and findings of antibody-mediated rejection in biopsy. This treatment regimen was tolerated with only mild hematologic toxicity and proved to be successful during a 12-month follow-up. Primary treatment with a bortezomib-containing regimen appears to be a new therapeutic option for severe antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients. However, the efficacy and safety of this treatment need to be tested in prospective trials.

  1. Late acute liver allograft rejection; a study of its natural history and graft survival in the current era.

    PubMed

    Thurairajah, Prem H; Carbone, Marco; Bridgestock, Hannah; Thomas, Philip; Hebbar, Srisha; Gunson, Bridget K; Shah, Tahir; Neuberger, James

    2013-04-15

    Late acute rejection (LAR) after liver transplantation is often associated with poor clinical outcomes. We reviewed our experience of managing LAR in the current era to determine its natural history. A database of 970 consecutive adult liver transplants was reviewed retrospectively. LAR was defined as histologically proven acute cellular rejection occurring more than 90 days after transplantation. The incidence of LAR was 11%, with a mean time of 565 days (median, 311 days; range, 90-2922 days) after transplantation. The highest rates for LAR were in seronegative hepatitis (17%), primary biliary cirrhosis (16%), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (13%) with an odds ratio of 2.3, 2.1, and 1.8, respectively. Logistic regression showed that younger recipients, primary biliary cirrhosis, and previous graft loss were independent predictors of LAR (P<0.001). Mean trough whole blood tacrolimus levels were at their lowest levels 1 week before the diagnosis of rejection (5.5 ng/mL; SD, 2.6) compared with levels of 7.7 ng/mL 4 weeks before rejection, showing a clear temporal relation. Graft survival was worse in those with LAR (P<0.01), whereas the best graft survival was among early acute rejection cases (85% 10-year survival; P<0.01). Poor response to treatment correlated with the development of ductopenic rejection (r=0.3; P<0.01). Approximately half with early ductopenic rejection eventually died (n=15). LAR continues to provide a risk to patient and graft survival: understanding risk factors may allow an improvement in monitoring and early intervention and so prevent early graft loss.

  2. The value of serum neopterin, interferon-gamma levels and interleukin-12B polymorphisms in predicting acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Chin, G K; Adams, C L; Carey, B S; Shaw, S; Tse, W-Y; Kaminski, E R

    2008-01-01

    Acute rejection remains a poor predictor of graft outcome. In this study, we measured serum levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and neopterin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the 3′ untranslated region of the interleukin (IL)-12 B gene (1188 A/C) to determine whether either of these factors could predict acute rejection in renal transplantation. Significantly higher early post-transplant neopterin levels (days 5–7; 35·7 versus 19·9 nmol/l) were observed in recipients who subsequently rejected their grafts. Post-transplant neopterin levels showed a strong positive correlation with 1-month creatinine levels (Spearman's correlation 0·62, P < 0·001), suggesting macrophage activation early after transplantation. Pretransplant neopterin and IFN-γ levels and the IL-12B gene SNP did not predict acute rejection in this small retrospective study. The ability to predict acute rejection non-invasively early after transplantation could lead to individual tailoring of immunosuppressive regimens and perhaps lead eventually to longer graft survival. PMID:18341612

  3. Ultra-Localization of Foxp3+ T Cells within Renal Allografts Shows Infiltration of Tubules Mimicking Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kathryn; Moxham, Victoria; Karegli, Julieta; Phillips, Richard; Sacks, Steven H.; Wong, Wilson

    2007-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are monitored for rejection by measurement of serum creatinine and graft biopsies. Biopsy samples are evaluated according to the Banff classification, which states that infiltration of tubules by mononuclear cells is an indicator of acute rejection. However, regulatory T cells play a crucial role in the overall immune response and are also present within transplanted tissue. We hypothesize that infiltration of mononuclear cells within kidney grafts is not always associated with rejection, especially if a high proportion of this infiltrate is regulatory T cells. Using a life-sustaining mouse kidney transplant model, we found that mononuclear cell tubular infiltration can occur in both rejecting and tolerant grafts. However, tolerant kidney grafts demonstrated a higher and sustained level of Foxp3+ regulatory cells. Importantly, a significant proportion of these cells were found within tubules. In cases in which graft function was normal, these cells were not harmful to the kidney and could be said to be mimicking, rather than causing, rejection. PMID:17991712

  4. Combination of monoclonal antibodies with DST inhibits accelerated rejection mediated by memory T cells to induce long-lived heart allograft acceptance in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Chen, Jibing; Dai, Helong; Peng, Yuanzheng; Wang, Feng; Xia, Junjie; Thorlacius, Henrik; Zhu, Qi; Qi, Zhongquan

    2011-08-30

    Donor-reactive memory T cells mediated accelerated rejection is known as a barrier to the survival of transplanted organs. We investigated the combination of different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and donor-specific transfusion (DST) in memory T cells-based adoptive mice model. In the presence of donor-reactive memory T cells, the mean survival time (MST) of grafts in the anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST group was 49.8d. Adding anti-CD44/CD70 mAbs to anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST treatment. The MST was more than 100 d (MST>100 d). Compared with anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST group, anti-CD40L/LFA-1/CD44/CD70/DST group notably reduced the expansion of memory T cells, enhanced the proportion of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and suppressed donor-specific responses. Our data suggest that anti-CD40L/LFA-1/CD44/CD70mAbs and DST can synergistically inhibit accelerated rejection mediated by memory T cells to induce long-lived heart allograft acceptance in mice.

  5. Phase I and phase II safety and efficacy trial of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ISIS 2302) for the prevention of acute allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Barry D; Stepkowski, Stanislaw; Kilic, Murat; Katz, Steven M; Van Buren, Charles T; Welsh, Maria S; Tami, Joseph A; Shanahan, William R

    2004-09-27

    ISIS 2302, an antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits the expression of human intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, was evaluated in combination with a cyclosporine (CsA)-prednisone (Pred) regimen first in a phase I safety and pharmacokinetic study and then in a phase II assessment of prophylaxis of acute rejection episodes in deceased donor renal allografts. Both phase I and phase II trials were double-blinded and placebo-controlled, including 17 stable and 39 de novo patients, respectively, in time-lagged, ascending-dose regimens. Each study compared the outcomes of 8 alternate-day intravenous infusions of four ISIS 2302 dose levels (0.05, 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg) versus placebo (3:1 ratio). Patients were followed for 34 days (phase I) or 6 months (phase II). All transplant patients were followed for 3 years. ISIS 2302 produced no evident toxicity; a significant, dose-related increase in activated partial thromboplastin time was accompanied by a trend toward a decreased platelet count. ISIS 2302 did not alter the pharmacokinetic behavior of CsA. At 6 months, the rates of acute rejection episodes were 38.1% in the ISIS 2302 group versus 20.0% in the placebo group. Three-year graft survivals were similar. The mean creatinine values at 1, 2, and 3 years for all ISIS dose groups combined versus placebo over 3 years showed no significant differences. ISIS 2302 did not evoke side-effects and produced slightly improved renal function. However, in this pilot study, it did not further reduce the rate of acute rejection episodes or increase graft survival compared to a concentration-controlled CsA-Pred regimen.

  6. Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Nonhuman Primate Renal Allografts: Validation of Human Histological and Molecular Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Adam, B A; Smith, R N; Rosales, I A; Matsunami, M; Afzali, B; Oura, T; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, T; Colvin, R B; Mengel, M

    2017-04-26

    Molecular testing represents a promising adjunct for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Here, we apply a novel gene expression platform in sequential formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples from nonhuman primate (NHP) renal transplants. We analyzed 34 previously described gene transcripts related to AMR in humans in 197 archival NHP samples, including 102 from recipients that developed chronic AMR, 80 from recipients without AMR, and 15 normal native nephrectomies. Three endothelial genes (VWF, DARC, and CAV1), derived from 10-fold cross-validation receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, demonstrated excellent discrimination between AMR and non-AMR samples (area under the curve = 0.92). This three-gene set correlated with classic features of AMR, including glomerulitis, capillaritis, glomerulopathy, C4d deposition, and DSAs (r = 0.39-0.63, p < 0.001). Principal component analysis confirmed the association between three-gene set expression and AMR and highlighted the ambiguity of v lesions and ptc lesions between AMR and T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR). Elevated three-gene set expression corresponded with the development of immunopathological evidence of rejection and often preceded it. Many recipients demonstrated mixed AMR and TCMR, suggesting that this represents the natural pattern of rejection. These data provide NHP animal model validation of recent updates to the Banff classification including the assessment of molecular markers for diagnosing AMR. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  7. Comparative study of the role of professional versus semiprofessional or nonprofessional antigen presenting cells in the rejection of vascularized organ allografts.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, J B; Ansari, A A

    1995-12-01

    The immune systems of transplant recipients are progressively challenged with exposure to the multiple lineages of donor cells that comprise the vascularized organ allograft. Each lineage of such donor tissue constitutively expresses or can be induced to express varying densities of MHC antigens ranging from no expression of MHC to MHC class I only to both MHC class I and class II. In addition, the cell surface expression of a diverse assortment of costimulatory and cell adhesion molecules also varies in density in a tissue specific fashion within the allograft. The MHC class I/II molecules displayed on the donor cells contain within their clefts a constellation of processed protein antigens in the form of peptides derived from intracellular and to some extent extracellular sources. Therefore, the potential for each cell lineage to induce alloactivation and serve as a target for allospecific immune responses is dependent on the diversity and density of peptide-bearing MHC molecules, costimulatory molecules, and cell adhesion molecules. In addition, the T cell receptor repertoire of the recipient also contributes to the magnitude of the allogeneic response. Consequently, the variety of clinical outcomes following organ transplantation even with the institution of potent immunosuppressive (drug) therapies is not surprising, as it appears reasonable for such therapies to influence the allogeneic response against distinct lineages differentially. Our failure to prevent chronic human allograft rejection may therefore be due to our limited appreciation of the full spectrum of alloactivating experiences encountered by host T cells as they interact with donor cells of diverse tissue lineages. Investigations by our laboratory of the immunopathogenesis of chronic cardiac allograft rejection have revealed an intrinsic inability of human cardiac myocytes to process and present antigens, not only for primary but also for secondary alloimmune responses. One obvious explanation

  8. Investigation of Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (KIR) and HLA Genotypes to Predict the Occurrence of Acute Allograft Rejection after Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Davood; Nafar, Mohsen; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Abdolvahabi, Razieh; Lesan Pezeshki, Mahboob; Razaghi, Efat; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar

    2017-06-01

    After kidney transplantation, natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role in triggering the immune response to the allogeneic grafts primarily by their killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). This process may be one mechanism that contributes to graft rejection. In this study, we have evaluated whether acute rejection after kidney transplantation was associated with predicted NK cell alloreactivity based on KIR gene and ligand along with KIR/HLA compound genotype analysis. After kidney transplantation, natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role in triggering the immune response to the allogeneic grafts primarily by their killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). This process may be one mechanism that contributes to graft rejection. In this study, we have evaluated whether acute rejection after kidney transplantation was associated with predicted NK cell alloreactivity based on KIR gene and ligand along with KIR/HLA compound genotype analysis. DNA from 65 patients with biopsy-proven acute kidney allograft rejection (AKAR), 61 clinically stable graft function (SGF) recipients and 176 healthy subjects were identified for the presence or absence of 10 variable KIR genes (both activating and inhibitory receptors) and their HLA ligands using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) assay. Although no significant difference in the frequency of individual KIR genes, was found the gene content, and the haplotypic distribution between the three categories were detected, the frequency of the KIR3DL1+HLA-Bw4*A allele combination was significantly lower in AKAR patients compared to SGF recipients (p=0.004, OR=0.34, CI=0.16-0.72) and healthy subjects (p=0.019, OR=0.47, CI=0.25-0.89). Kaplan-Meier survival test showed that the KIR3DL1+HLA-Bw4*A allele combination could be considered protective for AKAR (p=0.04 by log-rank). The results of this study suggest that KIR/HLA polymorphism may be a genetic susceptibility factor to alloreactivity

  9. Monitoring Pharmacologically Induced Immunosuppression by Immune Repertoire Sequencing to Detect Acute Allograft Rejection in Heart Transplant Patients: A Proof-of-Concept Diagnostic Accuracy Study

    PubMed Central

    Valantine, Hannah A.; Penland, Lolita; Luikart, Helen; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Khush, Kiran K.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background It remains difficult to predict and to measure the efficacy of pharmacological immunosuppression. We hypothesized that measuring the B-cell repertoire would enable assessment of the overall level of immunosuppression after heart transplantation. Methods and Findings In this proof-of-concept study, we implemented a molecular-barcode-based immune repertoire sequencing assay that sensitively and accurately measures the isotype and clonal composition of the circulating B cell repertoire. We used this assay to measure the temporal response of the B cell repertoire to immunosuppression after heart transplantation. We selected a subset of 12 participants from a larger prospective cohort study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01985412) that is ongoing at Stanford Medical Center and for which enrollment started in March 2010. This subset of 12 participants was selected to represent post-heart-transplant events, with and without acute rejection (six participants with moderate-to-severe rejection and six without). We analyzed 130 samples from these patients, with an average follow-up period of 15 mo. Immune repertoire sequencing enables the measurement of a patient’s net state of immunosuppression (correlation with tacrolimus level, r = −0.867, 95% CI −0.968 to −0.523, p = 0.0014), as well as the diagnosis of acute allograft rejection, which is preceded by increased immune activity with a sensitivity of 71.4% (95% CI 30.3% to 94.9%) and a specificity of 82.0% (95% CI 72.1% to 89.1%) (cell-free donor-derived DNA as noninvasive gold standard). To illustrate the potential of immune repertoire sequencing to monitor atypical post-transplant trajectories, we analyzed two more patients, one with chronic infections and one with amyloidosis. A larger, prospective study will be needed to validate the power of immune repertoire sequencing to predict rejection events, as this proof-of-concept study is limited to a small number of patients who were selected based on several

  10. The inferior impact of antibody-mediated rejection on the clinical outcome of kidney allografts that develop de novo thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaiyin; Budde, Klemens; Schmidt, Danilo; Neumayer, Hans-Hellmut; Lehner, Lukas; Bamoulid, Jamal; Rudolph, Birgit

    2016-02-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) can induce and develop thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) in renal allografts. A definitive AMR (dAMR) co-presents three diagnostic features. A suspicious AMR (sAMR) is designated when one of the three features is missing. Thirty-two TMA cases overlapping with AMR (AMR+ TMA) were studied, which involved 14 cases of sAMR+ TMA and 18 cases of dAMR+ TMA. Thirty TMA cases free of AMR features (AMR- TMA) were enrolled as control group. The ratio of complete response to treatment was similar between AMR- TMA and AMR+ TMA group (23.3% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.33), or between sAMR+ TMA and dAMR+ TMA group (14.3% vs. 11.1%, p = 0.79). At eight yr post-transplantation, the death-censored graft survival (DCGS) rate of AMR- TMA group was 62.8%, which was significantly higher than 28.0% of AMR+ TMA group (p = 0.01), but similar between sAMR+ TMA and dAMR+ TMA group (30.0% vs. 26.7%, p = 0.92). Overall, the intimal arteritis and the broad HLA (Human leukocyte antigens) mismatches were closely associated with over time renal allograft failure. The AMR+ TMA has inferior long-term graft survival, but grafts with sAMR+ TMA or dAMR+ TMA have similar characteristics and clinical courses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Effect of Yunnan-cobra venom factor in overcoming acute humoral rejection after allograft cardiac transplantation in presensitized recipients: experiment with rats].

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Chen, Gang; Guo, Hui; Wang, Da-wei; Xie, Lin; Wang, Shu-sen; Wang, Wan-yu; Xiong, Yu-liang; Chen, Shi

    2006-06-06

    To investigate the effect of Yunnan-cobra venom factor (Y-CVF) in overcoming acute humoral rejection after allograft cardiac transplantation in presensitized recipients. Fifteen Lewis rats received the transplantation of full-thickness skin graft of BN rats three times so as to be presensitized. Fifteen pairs of Lewis rat, as recipients of heart, and BN rat, as heart donors, were randomly divided into 2 groups: experimental group (n = 8), and control group (n = 7). The Lewis rats in the experimental group received heart transplantation of the heart of the BN rat 7 approximately 10 days after the third skin transplantation, and were injected with Y-CVF 80 microg/kg 24 hours before the heart transplantation. The Lewis rat in the control group received only the heart transplantation without Y-CVF injection. Blood samples were collected from all rats before pre-sensitization and 7 days after the third skin transplantation so as to determine the titer of anti-BN rat lymphocyte antibody. 0 and 24 hours, and 6 and 8 days after Y-CVF injection blood samples were collected from the Lewis rats to determine the total complement activity with the complement activity before Y-CVF injection defined as 100%. The survival time of the transplanted heart was observed. After the transplanted hearts stopped to beat, they were resected and underwent HE staining and microscopy. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the deposition of IgG and complement 3 (C3). The titer of anti-BN rat lymphocyte antibody was 0 before the pre-sensitization, and increased to 1:1028 - 1:2056 7 days after the third skin pre-sensitization. The serum total complement activity of the Lewis rats decreased to 0 twenty-four hours after the Y-CVF injection, recovered to 2.01% - 15.41% 6 days after, and returned to the normal level (89.61% - 109.46%) 8 days after. The mean survival time of the transplanted hearts of the control group was 12.71 +/- 13.94 hours (with a range of 1.5 - 15 hours), significantly

  12. The Pentostatin Plus Cyclophosphamide (PC) Non-myeloablative Regimen Induces Durable Host T Cell Functional Deficits and Prevents Murine Marrow Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Mariotti, Jacopo; Taylor, Justin; Massey, Paul R.; Ryan, Kaitlyn; Foley, Jason; Buxhoeveden, Nicole; Felizardo, Tania C.; Amarnath, Shoba; Mossoba, Miriam E.; Fowler, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    In this manuscript, we characterize for the first time an animal model of non-myeloablative bone marrow transplantation (BMT) using the purine analog pentostatin [P]. Other cohorts of mice received a distinct purine analog, fludarabine [F], which we and others have previously evaluated in non-myeloablative murine models. In this project, we have characterized pentostatin for its ability to: (1) operate synergistically with cyclophosphamide [C] to induce host T cell depletion; (2) induce host T cell suppression, as defined by modulation of cytokine secretion in vitro and abrogation of host-versus-graft reactivity (HVGR) in vivo; (3) constrain host T cell recovery post-chemotherapy; and (4) prevent the rejection of T-cell depleted (TCD), fully MHC mismatched bone marrow allografts. Relative to single-agent regimens, combination PC or FC regimens worked synergistically to deplete host CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; PC and FC regimens were developed that yielded similar levels of host T cell and myeloid cell depletion. In the setting of these generally comparable states of host T and myeloid cell depletion, the PC regimen was found to be highly immune suppressive, as evidenced by reduced host T cell capacity to: (1) secrete IL-2 and IFN-γ in vitro; (2) mediate HVGR in vivo; and (3) recover numerically and functionally during a two-week observation period post-chemotherapy. Finally, using B6 hosts treated with the 14-day chemotherapy regimens, the PC regimen more consistently prevented the rejection of BALB/c TCD-allografts than the FC regimen (rate of alloengraftment, 14/15 [93%] of PC-treated recipients vs. 8/14 [57%] of FC-treated recipients; p<0.05); similar results were observed using an 8-day conditioning regimen. These data suggest that host T cell suppression, distinct from T cell depletion, may therefore represent a critical determinant of engraftment after purine analog-based regimens and may also be preferentially attained by use of pentostatin. PMID:21130889

  13. Sex Related Differences in the Risk of Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Subsequent Allograft Vasculopathy Post-Heart Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grupper, Avishay; Nestorovic, Emilija M.; Daly, Richard C.; Milic, Natasa M.; Joyce, Lyle D.; Stulak, John M.; Joyce, David L.; Edwards, Brooks S.; Pereira, Naveen L.; Kushwaha, Sudhir S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregnancies may result in antibodies against HLA, a risk factor for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and subsequent cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) after heart transplantation (HTx). The aim of this study was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of AMR events and subsequent risk of CAV among HTx recipients. Methods The study comprised 160 patients (51 [32%] women) who underwent HTx in 2008 to 2014. The cumulative effect of AMR events was calculated by AMR score (sum of myocardial biopsy grading divided by number of biopsies taken during 3 years post-HTx). Results Females had higher levels of anti-HLA I antibodies pre-HTx compared to males which was associated with a history of pregnancies, total number of children and with a higher AMR score at 6 months post-HTx (P < 0.05). Women demonstrated a significant increase in the total incidence of AMR events (27 vs. 7%, P = 0.001) and in AMR scores at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months post-HTx compared to men (P < 0.05). There were no differences in cellular rejection between the groups. A history of AMR events was associated with a significantly increased risk of severe CAV onset (hazard ratio, 7.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-31.5; P = 0.012). Conclusions Women are at higher risk for AMR post-HTx which subsequently increases their risk for CAV. Females recipients may benefit from closer surveillance to identify AMR at an earlier stage post-HTx, and targeted immunosuppressive therapy to attenuate the development of CAV. PMID:27795988

  14. Immuno-histological assessment of sub-clinical acute and borderline rejection in renal allograft recipients: Data from a transplant center in India.

    PubMed

    Badwal, Sonia; Kumar, Arun; Hooda, A K; Varma, P P

    2015-11-01

    This single-center study was carried out on living related and unrelated renal transplant recipients (RTRs) to evaluate the usefulness of surveillance biopsies in monitoring stable renal allografts using immuno-histological markers for immune-activation. This is a prospective, longitudinal study. Protocol biopsies of 60 RTRs with stable graft function were evaluated at three, six and 12 months post-transplant. Immuno-histological evaluation was carried out using immune-activation markers (perforins, granzyme and interleukin-2R), phenotypic markers (CD-3 and CD-20), viral markers and C4d. The demographic and clinical profile was recorded for each patient. All cases of acute sub-clinical rejection (SCR) were treated and borderline SCR cases were followed-up without treatment. SCR at three and six months post-transplant was evident in 16.7% and 3.7% of RTRs, respectively. Positive statistical association of SCR was seen with HLA-DR mismatches, whereas patients receiving induction therapy and tacrolimus-based immunosuppression exhibited a lower incidence of SCR. T cell phenotype with persistent expression of immune-activation markers exhibited positive statistical association with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy at 12-month follow-up biopsy. The mean creatinine levels were significantly lower in the protocol biopsy group than the non-protocol biopsy group. No significant difference was found between the mean creatinine levels of the SCR group after treatment and the non-SCR cases within the protocol biopsy group. Early treatment of sub-clinical acute rejection leads to better functional outcomes. However, persistent immune-activation is associated with chronicity and may have implications on long-term graft survival.

  15. [Time course of morphological changes in humoral renal allograft rejection in ABO incompatibility between donor and recipient].

    PubMed

    Morozova, M M; Kozmin, L D; Fedorov, D N; Kaabak, M M; Babenko, N N

    2013-01-01

    One hundred and five biopsy specimens taken in different periods after 34 ABO-incompatible mismatched related kidney transplantations were examined to establish the patterns of humoral activity from the morphological changes and expression of C4d deposits in the peritubular capillaries. Severe reversible forms of acute humoral rejection (AHR) (2 patients) and minimal morphological manifestations (13 patients) were observed in the biopsy specimens taken as long as 2 months later in Group 1 (C4d+). In the early period, the minimal manifestations of AHR did not cause organ dysfunction; but in the late period, 5 of them developed chronic humoral rejection in persistent humoral activity; 4 grafts were removed 531,720, 1019, and 1252 days later. Group 2 (C4d-) (n = 19) showed no graft losses or significant chronic changes; the late minimal manifestations of AHR had no impact on the duration of organ function in 3 recipients. The timely detection of early humoral activity and minimal manifestations of AHR is needed for the measures taken to reduce a risk for late function loss of the grafted organ.

  16. Antagonism of antiviral and allogeneic activity of a human public CTL clonotype by a single altered peptide ligand: implications for allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Lauren K.; Green, Katherine J.; Beddoe, Travis; Clements, Craig S.; Miles, John J.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Zernich, Danielle; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Burrows, Scott R.

    2010-06-30

    Alloreactive T lymphocytes are central mediators of graft-versus-host disease and allograft rejection. A public CTL clonotype with specificity for the alloantigens HLA-B*4402 and B*4405 is often expanded to large numbers in healthy HLA-B*0801{sup +} individuals, driven by cross-reactive stimulation with the common, persistent herpesvirus EBV. Since such alloreactive memory CTL expansions have the potential to influence transplantation outcome, altered peptide ligands (APLs) of the target HLA-B*0801-binding EBV peptide, FLRGRAYGL, were screened as specific antagonists for this immunodominant clonotype. One APL, FLRGRFYGL, exerted powerful antagonism of a prototypic T cell clone expressing this immunodominant TCR when costimulated with target cells presenting HLA-B*0801{sup FLRGRAYGL}. Significantly, this APL also reduced the lysis of allogeneic target cells expressing HLA-B*4402 by up to 99%. The affinities of the agonist and antagonist complexes for the public TCR, measured using solution and solid-phase assays, were 8 and 138 {micro}M, respectively. Surprisingly, the half-life of the agonist and antagonist complexes was similar, yet the association rate for the antagonist complex was significantly slower. These observations were further supported by structural studies that suggested a large conformational hurdle was required to ligate the immunodominant TCR to the HLA-B*0801 antagonist complex. By defining an antagonist APL against an immunodominant alloreactive TCR, these findings raise the prospect of exploiting such peptides to inhibit clinical alloreactivity, particularly against clonal T cell expansions that react with alloantigens.

  17. [Combined rapamycin eye drop in nanometer vector and poly (lactic acid) wafers of cyclosporine A effectively prevents high-risk corneal allograft rejection in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Sun, Hui-Min; Li, Xiao-Rong; Yuan, Xu-Bo; Wang, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Shu-Xian; Tian, En-Jiang; Yuan, Jia-Qin

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the combined effect of topical rapamycin (RAPA) eye drop in nanometer vector and poly (lactic acid) (PLA) wafers of cyclosporine A (CsA) in the prevention of acute allograft rejection after rabbit corneal transplantation. Methods It was an experimental study. RAPA was incorporated into the nanometer particles and CsA was incorporated into PLA wafers. A was syngeneic control whose both donor and recipient are New Zealand rabbit. Gray donor corneas were implanted into the 102 recipients of New Zealand albino rabbits with corneal neovascularization who were randomly divided into B, C, D, E, F, G 6 groups to receive the different types of therapy: B was no therapy control; C was eye drop of nanometer vector but no RAPA twice a day, 28 days; D was PLA wafers in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes but no drugs; E was 0.5% RAPA eye drop of nanometer vector twice a day, 28 days; F was PLA wafers of CsA in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes; G was PLA wafers of CsA in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes and 0.5% RAPA eye drop of nanometer vector eye drop twice a day for 28 days together. Postoperative evaluation included slit-lamp biomicroscopy, histopathology and immunohistology, Cytokines related with neovascularization and immunosuppression in the corneal tissue by RT-PCR. The graft survival was assessed by One-Way ANOVA and q test. Corneal allograft survival time: A (100.00 +/- 0.00), B (8.44 +/- 1.24), C (8.89 +/- 2.57), D (8.56 +/- 2.30), E (43.11 +/- 5.58), F (43.67 +/- 9.54), G (72.00 +/- 15.34) d. Group G led to a statistically significant prolongation of transplant survival and was superior than group E and F which was a statistical prolongation compared with group B, C and D (qGE = 11.42, qGF = 11.24, qEB = 13.64, qEC = 13.38, qED = 13.46, qFB = 13.82, qFC = 13.56, qFD = 13.64; P < 0.01). Immunohistopathologically, the grafts were subjected to an immune response contained a dense infiltrate of neutrophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the group B

  18. Multiparametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance surveillance of acute cardiac allograft rejection and characterisation of transplantation-associated myocardial injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher A; Naish, Josephine H; Shaw, Steven M; Yonan, Nizar; Williams, Simon G; Clark, David; Bishop, Paul W; Ainslie, Mark P; Borg, Alex; Coutts, Glyn; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Ray, Simon G; Schmitt, Matthias

    2014-07-20

    Serial surveillance endomyocardial biopsies are performed in patients who have recently undergone heart transplantation in order to detect acute cardiac allograft rejection (ACAR) before symptoms occur, however the biopsy process is associated with a number of limitations. This study aimed to prospectively and longitudinally evaluate the performance of multiparametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for detecting and monitoring ACAR in the early phase post-transplant, and characterize graft recovery following transplantation. All patients receiving a heart transplant at a single UK centre over a period of 25 months were approached within one month of transplantation. Multiparametric CMR was prospectively performed on the same day as biopsy on four separate occasions (6 weeks, 10 weeks, 15 weeks and 20 weeks post-transplant). CMR included assessment of global and regional ventricular function, myocardial tissue characterization (T1 mapping, T2 mapping, extracellular volume, LGE) and pixel-wise absolute myocardial blood flow quantification. CMR parameters were compared with biopsy findings. As is standard, grade 2R or higher ACAR was considered significant. 88 CMR-matched biopsies were performed in 22 patients. Eight (9%) biopsies in 5 patients demonstrated significant ACAR. Significant ACAR was associated with a reduction in circumferential strain (-12.7±2.5% vs. -13.7±3.6%, p=0.047) but there was considerable overlap between groups. Whilst trends were observed between ACAR and proposed CMR markers of oedema, particularly after adjusting for primary graft dysfunction, differences were not significant. Significant improvements were seen in markers of graft structure and contractility, oedema and microvascular function over the period studied, although few parameters normalised. This study provides novel insight into the myocardial injury associated with transplantation, and its recovery, however multiparametric CMR was not able to accurately detect ACAR

  19. Impact of Tacrolimus Compared With Cyclosporin on the Incidence of Acute Allograft Rejection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Gathogo, Esther; Harber, Mark; Bhagani, Sanjay; Levy, Jeremy; Jones, Rachael; Hilton, Rachel; Davies, Graham; Post, Frank A

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplantation (KT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients has transformed the management of end-stage kidney disease in this population. Although favourable outcomes have been reported, patients experience high rates of acute allograft rejection (AR). We examined factors associated with AR in the first year after KT, with particular emphasis on the choice of calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) immunosuppressive therapy. We conducted a national observational cohort study of HIV/KT in the United Kingdom. Patients were included if HIV positive at KT, transplanted in the United Kingdom between January 2005 and December 2013, and did not experience primary graft failure. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate host/graft survival and cumulative incidence of biopsy proven AR. Logrank tests were used to compare survival, and Cox proportional hazard models to examine factors associated with AR. Our study analyzed the incidence of AR in the first year after KT in 78 HIV-positive patients of whom 31 initiated cyclosporin (CsA) and 47 tacrolimus (Tac) based immunosuppression. AR was observed in 28 patients (36%) after a median of 2.6 (interquartile range, 0.5-5.9) months. The cumulative incidence of AR at 1 year was 58% and 21% among patients on CsA and Tac, respectively (P =0.003). Choice of CNI was the only factor significantly associated with AR (hazard ratio for Tac vs CsA 0.25 [95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.57], P = 0.001). Subtherapeutic CNI concentrations were common in the first 12 weeks after KT. Our data suggest that Tac may be the preferred CNI for use in KT in people living with HIV.

  20. A ROLE FOR ANTIBODIES TO HLA, COLLAGEN-V AND K-α1-TUBULIN IN ANTIBODY MEDIATED REJECTION AND CARDIAC ALLOGRAFT VASCULOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Dilip S.; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Bash, Haseeb Ilias; Phelan, Donna; Moazami, Nader; Ewald, Gregory A.; Mohanakumar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background We determined role of donor specific antibodies (DSA) and antibodies (Abs) to self-antigens, collagen-V (Col-V) and K-α1-Tubulin (KAT) in pathogenesis of acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) following human heart transplantation (HTx). Methods 137 HTx recipients - 60 early period (≤ 12months) and 77 late period (> 12months) patients were enrolled. Circulating DSA was determined using LUMINEX. Abs against Col-I, II, IV, V and KAT were measured using ELISA. Frequency of CD4+T helper cells (CD4+Th) secreting IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-10 or IL-17 specific to self-antigens were determined using ELISPOT. Results A significant association between AMR and DSA was demonstrated. Development of DSA in AMR patients correlated well with the development of auto-Abs to Col-V(AMR(+): 383±72μg/mL, AMR(−): 172±49μg/mL, p=0.033) and KAT (AMR(+): 252±49μg/mL, AMR(−): 61±21μg/mL, p=0.014). Patients who developed AMR demonstrated increased frequencies of CD4+Th secreting IFN-γ and IL-5 with reduction in IL-10 specific for Col-V/KAT. Patients diagnosed with CAV also developed DSA and auto-Abs to Col-V (CAV(+): 835±142μg/mL, CAV(−): 242±68μg/mL, p=0.025) and KAT (CAV(+): 768±206μg/mL, CAV(−): 196±72μg/mL, p=0.001) with increased frequencies of CD4+Th secreting IL-17 with reduction in IL-10 specific for Col-V/KAT. Conclusions Development of Abs to HLA and self-antigens are associated with increases in CD4+Th secreting IFN-γ and IL-5 in AMR and IL-17 in CAV, with reduction in CD4+Th secreting IL-10 in both AMR and CAV. PMID:21383658

  1. Transforming growth factor-β activated long non-coding RNA ATB plays an important role in acute rejection of renal allografts and may impacts the postoperative pharmaceutical immunosuppression therapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiang; Chen, Yehui; Huang, Gang; Zhang, Zhi; Chen, Lizhong; Na, Ning

    2017-10-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are novel intracellular noncoding ribonucleotides regulating the genome and proteome. The lncRNA activated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) (lncRNA-ATB) was discovered as a prognostic factor in hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer, and colorectal cancer. However, little is known about the role of lncRNA-ATB in renal transplantation. This study aimed to assess lncRNA-ATB expression in renal transplant patients with acute kidney injury and explore its role in postoperative pharmaceutical immunosuppression therapy. We detected lncRNA-ATB expression in the kidney biopsies of a cohort of 72 patients with renal allograft rejection and 36 control transplant patients. lncRNA-ATB were overexpressed from lentiviral vectors in renal cells. We found that lncRNA-ATB was remarkably upregulated in patients with acute rejection compared with controls. Meanwhile, lncRNA-ATB could influence the kidney cell phenotypes and impact the nephrotoxicity of immunosuppressive drug. In conclusion, lncRNA-ATB are strongly altered in patients with acute rejection and may serve as a novel biomarker of acute kidney rejection, identifying patients with acute rejection and predicting loss of kidney function. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  2. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells delay islet allograft rejection via inhibiting islet-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in CD34+ stem cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang; Ma, Liang; Zhao, Min; Huang, Guocai; Mirenda, Vincenzo; Dorling, Anthony; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo.

  3. Ex Vivo Expanded Human Regulatory T Cells Delay Islet Allograft Rejection via Inhibiting Islet-Derived Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 Production in CD34+ Stem Cells-Reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fang; Ma, Liang; Zhao, Min; Huang, Guocai; Mirenda, Vincenzo; Dorling, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo. PMID:24594640

  4. Uptake of donor lymphocytes treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light by recipient dendritic cells induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells and down-regulates cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, De-Hua; Dou, Li-Ping; Wei, Yu-Xiang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Zou, Yi-Ping; Song, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-Yong; Shi, Bing-Yi

    2010-05-14

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy and has been demonstrated to be beneficial for graft-vs-host disease and solid-organ allograft rejection. ECP involves reinfusion of a patient's autologous peripheral blood leukocytes treated ex vivo with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light radiation (PUVA). Previous studies focused only on ECP treatment of recipient immune cells. Our study is the first to extend the target of ECP treatment to donor immune cells. The results of in vitro co-culture experiments demonstrate uptake of donor PUVA-treated splenic lymphocytes (PUVA-SPs) by recipient immature dendritic cells (DCs). Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SPs does not stimulate phenotype maturation of recipient DCs. In the same co-culture system, donor PUVA-SPs enhanced production of interleukin-10 and interferon-{gamma} by recipient DCs and impaired the subsequent capability of recipient DCs to stimulate recipient naive T cells. Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SP (PUVA-SP DCs) by recipient DCs shifted T-cell responses in favor of T helper 2 cells. Infusion of PUVA-SP DCs inhibited cardiac allograft rejection in an antigen-specific manner and induced CD4{sup +}CD25{sup high}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells. In conclusion, PUVA-SP DCs simultaneously deliver the donor antigen and the regulatory signal to the transplant recipient, and thus can be used to develop a novel DC vaccine for negative immune regulation and immune tolerance induction.

  5. Association of HLA-G promoter and 14-bp insertion-deletion variants with acute allograft rejection and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Misra, M K; Prakash, S; Kapoor, R; Pandey, S K; Sharma, R K; Agrawal, S

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the HLA-G 14-bp insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, acute allograft rejection (AR) and overall survival after renal transplantation was investigated in 300 ESRD patients and 302 age, sex and ethnicity-matched controls. Sequencing was performed to evaluate the impact of HLA-G promoter region single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whereas semi-quantitative PCR method was used to determine the probable HLA-G expression pattern among ESRD and AR cases. Further, soluble human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G (sHLA-G) expression levels were compared in AR vs non-AR cases in the light of HLA-G 14-bp I/D polymorphism. Increased risk was found for 14-bp D/D (deletion-DD) genotype and 14-bp D allele [DD: odds ratio (OR) = 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-2.06, P value = 0.0358; D: OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.03-1.62, P value = 0.0277], respectively for ESRD and CMV infection (DD: OR = 2.70, 95% CI = 1.45-5.05, P value = 0.0021; D: OR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.22-3.08, P value = 0.0052). Nearly fourfold (OR = 3.62, 95%CI = 1.61-8.14, p = 0.0039) risk was observed for 14-bp I/I (insertion-II) genotype for AR. Survival analysis showed increased overall survival (OS) (AR or death) for 14-bp D/D genotype. HLA-G promoter region sequencing was carried out among 60 ESRD patients and 100 normal controls which showed increased risk for -964 G>A, -725 C>G/T and -486 A>C SNPs. -964 G>A and -725 C>G/T SNPs showed risk association for AR patients. High level of HLA-G transcripts was observed among non-AR patients. Further soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) showed increased levels in ESRD patients (mean ± SEM; 62.16 ± 2.43 U/ml) as compared to controls (mean ± SEM; 21.06 ± 3.89 U/ml) (P = <0.0001). The 14-bp I/I, 14-bp I/D and 14-bp D/D genotypes showed significantly higher levels of sHLA-G among non-AR as

  6. Acute Rejection, Kidney Allograft Function, and Graft Survival in Patients with Circulating Pre-Transplant IgG Antibodies Directed Against Donor HLA-A, -B, or -C Locus Determined Antigens.

    PubMed

    Abuhelaiqa, Essa; Friedlander, Rex; Aull, Meredith; Putheti, Prabhakar; Sharma, Vijay; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Dadhania, Darshana

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between circulating pre-transplant immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -C locus determined antigens alone and acute rejection, kidney allograft function, and graft survival is not fully defined. Also, the impact of circulating pre-transplant IgG antibodies to donor HLA-C locus antigens alone on these outcomes has not been compared with the impact of circulating pre-transplant IgG antibodies to donor HLA-A or -B locus antigens. We conducted a retrospective review of records of 1252 kidney allograft recipients transplanted at our center between January 2010 and January 2016 to identify patients with circulating pre-transplant IgG antibodies directed at kidney donor HLA-A, -B, or -C locus determined antigens. Antibodies were detected and reported using the LABScreen Single Antigen Bead assay with microbeads coated with single HLA class I antigens. Pre-transplant and post-transplant data were collected and the graft outcomes of 16 kidney graft recipients with antibodies to HLA-C locus antigens were compared to the outcomes in 56 recipients with antibodies to HLA-A or -B locus determined antigens. The one-year acute rejection rate was 6% in those with donor-specific antibodies (DSA) to HLA-C locus antigens and 20% in those with DSA to HLA-A or -B locus antigens. The graft survival rate was 100% in those with DSA to HLA-C locus antigens and 95% in those with DSA to HLA-A or -B locus antigens. None of the numerical differences were statistically significant (p>0.05). The presence of circulating pre-transplant IgG antibodies directed at kidney donor HLA-C locus antigens alone may not be associated with an increased risk of acute rejection or a decreased graft survival rate. Our observations support the concept that circulating pre-transplant IgG antibodies directed at kidney donor HLA-C locus antigens alone do not negatively impact kidney allograft outcomes and that the mean fluorescence intensities of the antibodies

  7. Facial tissue allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Siemionow, M Z; Demir, Y; Sari, A; Klimczak, A

    2005-01-01

    A hemifacial allograft transplant model was used to investigate the rationale for development of functional tolerance across an MHC barrier. Thirty hemiface transplantations were performed in five groups of six Lewis (RT1(1)) rat recipients each. Isografts were performed in group 1. Transplants were obtained from semiallogenic LBN(RT1(1+n)) in group 2 and from fully allogenic ACI(RT1(a)) in group 3 donors, which served as allograft rejection controls. Group 4 grafts using LBN donors and group 5 using ACI donors in addition received CsA monotherapy (16 mg/kg/d for 1 week) and maintained at 2 mg/kg/d. Signs of graft rejection were sought daily. Isograft controls survived indefinitely. All nontreated allografts were rejected within 5 to 8 days posttransplant. Eighty-three percent of face-transplant recipients from LBN donors and 67% from ACI donors did not show any signs of rejection up to 270 days and 200 days, respectively. Flow cytometry at day 63 in LBN recipients showed the presence of donor-specific chimerism for MHC class I RT1(n) antigens, namely 3.39% CD4/RT1(n); 1.01% CD8/RT1(n) T-lymphocytes; and 3.54% CD45RA/RT1(n) B-lymphocytes. In ACI recipients the chimerism test revealed 10.55% CD4/RT1(a) and 4.59% of CD8/RT1(a) T-lymphocytes. MLR assay at day 160 posttransplant revealed suppressed responses against LBN donor antigens in group 4, but moderate reactivity to ACI donor antigens in group 5. Functional tolerance toward hemifacial allograft transplants induced across MHC barrier using a CsA monotherapy protocol was associated with the presence of donor-specific chimerism in T- and B-cell subpopulations.

  8. Renal allograft eosinophilia: An unusual presentation of sudden graft dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yuvaraj, A.; Ghosh, S.; Abraham, G.; Koshy, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of sudden allograft dysfunction 11 months after renal transplantation which presented as severe peripheral and allograft eosinophilia and was managed as a case of an acute cellular rejection with significant interstitial graft eosinophilic infiltration. Patient had partial response to antirejection therapy and eventually ended up in a chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:28356665

  9. Chronic liver allograft rejection: a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases interinstitutional study analyzing the reliability of current criteria and proposal of an expanded definition. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Liver Transplantation Database.

    PubMed

    Demetris, A J; Seaberg, E C; Batts, K P; Ferrell, L; Lee, R G; Markin, R; Detre, K M

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the inter and intrarater agreement for the histopathologic features and diagnosis of chronic rejection (CR) and several other important causes of late liver allograft dysfunction. On two occasions, five pathologists, experienced with liver transplantation, reviewed a set of 49 slides representing a range of diagnoses, without knowledge of the clinical history or liver injury test results. The readings were correlated with the original histopathologic diagnosis, liver injury tests, and clinicopathologic follow-up. Assessment of biopsy adequacy (kappa = 0.69) and portal tract counts (kappa = 0.79) showed good to excellent intrarater agreement, whereas interrater agreement for these variables was moderate to good, respectively (kappa = 0.44 and 0.65). Likewise, the intrarater agreement for the diagnosis of CR (kappa = 0.68), hepatitis (kappa = 0.77), and obstructive cholangiopathy (kappa = 0.55) showed good to excellent agreement, whereas the interrater agreement for these same diagnoses ranged from fair to good (kappa = 0.58, 0.46, and 0.25, respectively). In 18 specimens, there was a near unanimous diagnosis of CR across both readings. These biopsies were obtained at a median of 7.1 months (range, 42 days to 4.9 years) after transplantation, and the average number of portal tracts was 8.4 (range, 4-15). Interestingly, only 13 of these 18 specimens showed bile duct loss in >50% of the portal triads; the remaining cases showed atrophy/pyknosis of the biliary epithelium in a majority of small bile ducts. Clinicopathologic correlation showed that these 18 biopsies were obtained from 16 grafts from 15 patients, 14 of whom ultimately required retransplantation or died of or with CR, whereas two of the grafts/patients recovered. A high rate of sensitivity (92%) and a somewhat lower, but acceptable, rate of specificity (71% to 80%) was found for the diagnosis of CR. Chronic rejection and other causes of late liver allograft dysfunction can be

  10. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  11. The natural history of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Nankivell, Brian J; Borrows, Richard J; Fung, Caroline L-S; O'Connell, Philip J; Allen, Richard D M; Chapman, Jeremy R

    2003-12-11

    With improved immunosuppression and early allograft survival, chronic allograft nephropathy has become the dominant cause of kidney-transplant failure. We evaluated the natural history of chronic allograft nephropathy in a prospective study of 120 recipients with type 1 diabetes, all but 1 of whom had received kidney-pancreas transplants. We obtained 961 kidney-transplant-biopsy specimens taken regularly from the time of transplantation to 10 years thereafter. Two distinctive phases of injury were evident as chronic allograft nephropathy evolved. An initial phase of early tubulointerstitial damage from ischemic injury (P<0.05), prior severe rejection (P<0.01), and subclinical rejection (P<0.01) predicted mild disease by one year, which was present in 94.2 percent of patients. Early subclinical rejection was common (affecting 45.7 percent of biopsy specimens at three months), and the risk was increased by the occurrence of a prior episode of severe rejection and reduced by tacrolimus and mycophenolate therapy (both P<0.05) and gradually abated after one year. Both subclinical rejection and chronic rejection were associated with increased tubulointerstitial damage (P<0.01). Beyond one year, a later phase of chronic allograft nephropathy was characterized by microvascular and glomerular injury. Chronic rejection (defined as persistent subclinical rejection for two years or longer) was uncommon (5.8 percent). Progressive high-grade arteriolar hyalinosis with luminal narrowing, increasing glomerulosclerosis, and additional tubulointerstitial damage was accompanied by the use of calcineurin inhibitors. Nephrotoxicity, implicated in late ongoing injury, was almost universal at 10 years, even in grafts with excellent early histologic findings. By 10 years, severe chronic allograft nephropathy was present in 58.4 percent of patients, with sclerosis in 37.3 percent of glomeruli. Tubulointerstitial and glomerular damage, once established, was irreversible, resulting in

  12. A web-based pilot study of inter-pathologist reproducibility using the ISHLT 2004 working formulation for biopsy diagnosis of cardiac allograft rejection: the European experience.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Annalisa; Andersen, Claus Boegelund; Bartoloni, Giovanni; Black, Fiona; Bishop, Paul; Doran, Helen; Fedrigo, Marny; Fries, Jochen W U; Goddard, Martin; Goebel, Heike; Neil, Desley; Leone, Ornella; Marzullo, Andrea; Ortmann, Monika; Paraf, Francois; Rotman, Samuel; Turhan, Nesrin; Bruneval, Patrick; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Grigoletto, Francesco; Gasparetto, Alessio; Mencarelli, Roberto; Thiene, Gaetano; Burke, Margaret

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, at the European level and using digital technology, the inter-pathologist reproducibility of the ISHLT 2004 system and to compare it with the 1990 system We also assessed the reproducibility of the morphologic criteria for diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection detailed in the 2004 grading system. The hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections of 20 sets of endomyocardial biopsies were pre-selected and graded by two pathologists (A.A. and M.B.) and digitized using a telepathology digital pathology system (Aperio ImageScope System; for details refer to http://aperio.com/). Their diagnoses were considered the index diagnoses, which covered all grades of acute cellular rejection (ACR), early ischemic lesions, Quilty lesions, late ischemic lesions and (in the 2005 system) antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Eighteen pathologists from 16 heart transplant centers in 7 European countries participated in the study. Inter-observer reproducibility was assessed using Fleiss's kappa and Krippendorff's alpha statistics. The combined kappa value of all grades diagnosed by all 18 pathologists was 0.31 for the 1990 grading system and 0.39 for the 2005 grading system, with alpha statistics at 0.57 and 0.55, respectively. Kappa values by grade for 1990/2005, respectively, were: 0 = 0.52/0.51; 1A/1R = 0.24/0.36; 1B = 0.15; 2 = 0.13; 3A/2R = 0.29/0.29; 3B/3R = 0.13/0.23; and 4 = 0.18. For the 2 cases of AMR, 6 of 18 pathologists correctly suspected AMR on the hematoxylin-eosin slides, whereas, in each of 17 of the 18 AMR-negative cases a small percentage of pathologists (range 5% to 33%) overinterpreted the findings as suggestive for AMR. Reproducibility studies of cardiac biopsies by pathologists in different centers at the international level were feasible using digitized slides rather than conventional histology glass slides. There was a small improvement in interobserver agreement between pathologists of different European centers when moving from the

  13. Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived myeloid suppressor cell (MDSC) adoptive transfer in mouse models of autoimmunity and allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Drujont, Lucile; Carretero-Iglesia, Laura; Bouchet-Delbos, Laurence; Beriou, Gaelle; Merieau, Emmanuel; Hill, Marcelo; Delneste, Yves; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Louvet, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic use of immunoregulatory cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of uncontrolled immunity. During the last decade, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have emerged as novel key regulatory players in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, transplantation or autoimmunity. Recently, MDSC have been successfully generated in vitro from naive mouse bone marrow cells or healthy human PBMCs using minimal cytokine combinations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential of adoptive transfer of such cells to control auto- and allo-immunity in the mouse. Culture of bone marrow cells with GM-CSF and IL-6 consistently yielded a majority of CD11b+Gr1hi/lo cells exhibiting strong inhibition of CD8+ T cell proliferation in vitro. However, adoptive transfer of these cells failed to alter antigen-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity in vivo. Furthermore, MDSC could not prevent the development of autoimmunity in a stringent model of type 1 diabetes. Rather, loading the cells prior to injection with a pancreatic neo-antigen peptide accelerated the development of the disease. Contrastingly, in a model of skin transplantation, repeated injection of MDSC or single injection of LPS-activated MDSC resulted in a significant prolongation of allograft survival. The beneficial effect of MDSC infusions on skin graft survival was paradoxically not explained by a decrease of donor-specific T cell response but associated with a systemic over-activation of T cells and antigen presenting cells, prominently in the spleen. Taken together, our results indicate that in vitro generated MDSC bear therapeutic potential but will require additional in vitro factors or adjunct immunosuppressive treatments to achieve safe and more robust immunomodulation upon adoptive transfer.

  14. Immune mechanisms in organ allograft rejection. V. Pivotal role of the cytotoxic-suppressor T cell subset in the rejection of heart grafts bearing isolated class I disparities in the inbred rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, R.P.; Forbes, R.D.; Blackburn, J.H.; Marghesco, D.M.

    1985-11-01

    The cellular requirements for rejection of heart grafts bearing isolated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) subregion RT1A-encoded class I disparities was assessed by adoptive transfer. Sublethally irradiated (780 rads) (PVG X WF)F1 recipients of irradiated PVG-RT1r1 heart grafts were selectively reconstituted with spleen cells from syngeneic donors previously sensitized with two sequential PVG-RT1r1 skin grafts. PVG-RT1r1 heart grafts were rejected acutely in recipients reconstituted with 10 X 10(6) unfractionated immune spleen cells or inocula (5 X 10(6) cells) depleted of SIg+ cells, but additional depletion of cytotoxic T cells and their precursors resulted in marked prolongation of graft survival. Reducing the reconstituting inocula from 4 X 10(6) to 2.5 X 10(6) spleen cells prolonged graft survival to that observed in unreconstituted recipients. Additional studies were performed to define the immunologic basis for prolonged survival of PVG-RT1r1 heart grafts in homozygous PVG recipients. Although lymphoid cells of naive PVG failed to proliferate on coculture with irradiated PVG-RT1r1, bulk cultures yielding but weak and variable CTL generation, lymphoid cells from specifically sensitized PVG proliferated and generated greater cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity under identical conditions, strongly suggesting, therefore, that prolonged heart graft survival in this strain combination is related to low CTL precursor frequency.

  15. In vivo and in vitro hepatic phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electron microscopy in chronic ductopenic rejection of human liver allografts

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Robinson, S; Sargentoni, J; Bell, J; Thomas, E; Marcus, C; Changani, K; Saeed, N; Hodgson, H; Davidson, B; Burroughs, A; Rolles, K; Foster, C; Cox, I

    1998-01-01

    Background—In vivo hepatic phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides non-invasive information about phospholipid metabolism. 
Aims—To delineate MRS abnormalities in patients with chronic ductopenic rejection (CDR) and to characterise spectral changes by in vitro MRS and electron microscopy. 
Patients and methods—Sixteen liver transplant recipients (four with CDR; 12 with good graft function) and 29 controls (23healthy volunteers; six patients with biliary duct strictures) were studied with in vivo 31P MRS. Peak area ratios of phosphomonoesters (PME) and phosphodiesters (PDE), relative to nucleotide triphosphates (NTP) were measured. In vitro MRS and electron microscopy were performed on biopsy specimens from five patients with CDR, freeze clamped at retransplantation. Phosphoethanolamine (PE), phosphocholine (PC), glycerophosphorylethanolamine (GPE), and glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC) concentrations were measured. 
Results—The 12 patients with good graft function displayed no spectral abnormalities in vivo; the four patients with CDR showed significantly elevated PME:NTP (p<0.01) and PDE:NTP ratios (p<0.005). Patients with biliary strictures had significant differences in PME:NTP (p<0.01) from patients with CDR, but not in mean PDE:NTP. In vitro spectra from CDR patients showed elevated PE and PC, mirroring the in vivo changes in PME, but reduced GPE and GPC concentrations were observed, at variance with the in vivo PDE findings. On electron microscopy, there was no proliferation in hepatocyte endoplasmic reticulum. 
Conclusions—The increase in PME:NTP reflects altered phospholipid metabolism in patients with CDR, while the increase in PDE:NTP may represent a significant contribution from bile phospholipid. 

 Keywords: in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy; in vitro 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy; liver transplantation; chronic ductopenic rejection; electron microscopy; phospholipids PMID:9659173

  16. Computational Biology: Modeling Chronic Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stegall, Mark D.; Borrows, Richard

    2015-01-01

    New approaches are needed to develop more effective interventions to prevent long-term rejection of organ allografts. Computational biology provides a powerful tool to assess the large amount of complex data that is generated in longitudinal studies in this area. This manuscript outlines how our two groups are using mathematical modeling to analyze predictors of graft loss using both clinical and experimental data and how we plan to expand this approach to investigate specific mechanisms of chronic renal allograft injury. PMID:26284070

  17. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  18. Targeting Sirtuin-1 prolongs murine renal allograft survival and function.

    PubMed

    Levine, Matthew H; Wang, Zhonglin; Xiao, Haiyan; Jiao, Jing; Wang, Liqing; Bhatti, Tricia R; Hancock, Wayne W; Beier, Ulf H

    2016-05-01

    Current immunosuppressive medications used after transplantation have significant toxicities. Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells can prevent allograft rejection without compromising protective host immunity. Interestingly, inhibiting the class III histone/protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 can augment Foxp3(+) T-regulatory suppressive function through increasing Foxp3 acetylation. Here we determined whether Sirtuin-1 targeting can stabilize biological allograft function. BALB/c kidney allografts were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients with a CD4-conditional deletion of Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre)) or mice treated with a Sirtuin-1-specific inhibitor (EX-527), and the native kidneys removed. Blood chemistries and hematocrit were followed weekly. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients showed markedly longer survival and improved kidney function. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients exhibited donor-specific tolerance, accepted BALB/c, but rejected third-party C3H cardiac allografts. C57BL/6 recipients of BALB/c renal allografts that were treated with EX-527 showed improved survival and renal function at 1, but not 10 mg/kg/day. Pharmacologic inhibition of Sirtuin-1 also improved renal allograft survival and function with dosing effects having relevance to outcome. Thus, inhibiting Sirtuin-1 can be a useful asset in controlling T-cell-mediated rejection. However, effects on non-T cells that could adversely affect allograft survival and function merit consideration.

  19. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections among renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2015-02-01

    Bacteriuria is common among renal allograft recipients. It can be categorized into asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and urinary tract infection (UTI). However, in medical literature, the classifications of bacteriuria are often not clear or ASB is also classified as a UTI. This contributes to difficulties in interpretation of the incidence and risk factors of these two entities. In this review, we describe the epidemiology, risk factors, management and the impact on renal allograft function of these two entities separately according to the recent literature. Risk factors for ASB are not completely comparable to the risk factors of UTIs. Persistent ASB has been associated with development of acute rejection and allograft pyelonephritis. The available data suggest that treatment of ASB is not very effective. Prophylaxis with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole does not prevent UTIs such as allograft pyelonephritis. Blood stream infections and emphysematous allograft pyelonephritis are associated with renal allograft loss. ASB is the most common manifestation of bacteriuria after renal transplantation. More effective interventions are needed to prevent bacteriuria. Renal allograft recipients with persistent ASB should be closely monitored since they could be at risk for developing not only UTIs, such as allograft pyelonephritis, but also acute rejection.

  20. Primary integumentary allograft reactivity in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    George, J F; Howcroft, T K; Karp, R D

    1987-04-01

    Previous reports have failed to demonstrate integumentary allograft rejection in insects. We realized however, that these studies may not have fully appreciated the structure of the insect exoskeleton. Since the subcuticlar epidermal layer constitutes the only living tissue associated with insect integument, its destruction would indicate that the animal recognized and responded to the foreign tissue. Thus, we investigated allograft reactivity in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, by observing the fate of the epidermal portion of the integument. Each animal in a pair received a 3 X 4-mm integumentary allograft from its partner, as well as a 3 X 4-mm control autograft. The transplants were then examined histologically for signs of epidermal destruction at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10-70 days (in 10-day increments) posttransplantation. The results indicated that significant rejection of the allografts began by day 3, with peak reactivity occurring by day 7 when 92% of the grafts were scored as rejected. At later periods (greater than 20 days), the graft sites showed signs of repopulation by host epidermal cells. The allograft reaction was found to lag behind the xenograft reaction, which showed peak activity after only 1 day posttransplantation. Even so, allograft rejection in this insect occurred quite rapidly (as compared with some other invertebrates), and would appear to be due to a cytotoxic reaction against the epidermal layer.

  1. Can Skin Allograft Occasionally Act as a Permanent Coverage in Deep Burns? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Ezzatollah; Beiraghi-Toosi, Arash; Ahmadabadi, Ali; Tavousi, Seyed Hassan; Alipour Tabrizi, Arash; Fotuhi, Kazem; Jabbari Nooghabi, Mehdi; Manafi, Amir; Ahmadi Moghadam, Shokoofeh

    2017-01-01

    Skin allograft is the gold standard of wound coverage in patients with extensive burns; however, it is considered as a temporary wound coverage and rejection of the skin allograft is considered inevitable. In our study, skin allograft as a permanent coverage in deep burns is evaluated. Skin allograft survival was assessed in 38 patients from March 2009 to March 2014, retrospectively. Because of the lack of tissue specimen from the skin donors, patients with long skin allograft survival in whom the gender of donor and recipient of allograft was the same were excluded. Seven cases with skin allograft longevity and opposite gender in donor and recipient were finally enrolled. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test on the biopsy specimen from recipients and donors were undertaken. PCR on the biopsy specimen from recipients confirmed those specimens belong to the donors. All patients received allograft from the opposite sex. Two (28.57%) patients received allograft from their first-degree blood relatives, and in one (14.29%) case, the allograft was harvested from an alive individual with no blood relation. The rest were harvested from multiorgan donors. In eight months of follow up, no clinical evidence of graft rejection was noted. Long term persistence of skin allograft in patients is worthy of more attention. Further studies An increase in knowledge of factors influencing this longevity could realize the dream of burn surgeons to achieve a permanent coverage other than autograft for major burn patients.

  2. Mechanisms of chronic rejection in cardiothoracic transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Matthew J.; Madsen, Joren C.; Rosengard, Bruce R.; Allan, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in early post-transplantation survival rates, long-term patient and graft survival have remained poor, due in large part to the vexing problem of chronic allograft rejection. Attempts to combat this problem with intensification of immunosuppression have led to concomitant increases in the rates of fatal malignancies and infections. In cardiac transplantation, chronic rejection is manifested primarily by a disease entity known as cardiac allograft vasculopathy, an occlusive narrowing of the coronary vessels. In lung transplantation, chronic rejection is typified by obliterative bronchiolitis, an airflow limiting narrowing of the bronchioles. From an immunologic standpoint, chronic rejection is believed to be the end result of repeated immune and non-immune insults to the graft. This review examines the pathophysiology of heart and lung chronic, with emphasis on both immune and non-immune causes. PMID:17981771

  3. PECULIAR IMMUNOBIOLOGY OF BONE MARROW ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Cudkowicz, Gustavo; Bennett, Michael

    1971-01-01

    Mice are capable of rejecting H-2-incompatible bone marrow grafts after a single lethal exposure to X-rays. The onset of rejection begins 18–24 hr after transplantation and is completed by 96 hr. Maturation of this type of allograft reactivity does not occur until the 22nd day of life. In adult mice, the resistance to marrow allografts can be weakened by administration of cyclophosphamide or dead cultures of Corynebacterium parvum, but not heterologous anti-thymocyte serum. Sublethal exposures to X-rays 7 or 14 days before transplantation also weaken resistance. There is considerable interstrain variation in the ability of mice to resist allografts, even when H-2 differences between hosts and donor are kept identical. Although H-2 incompatibility is a necessary prerequisite for resistance, additional genetic factors influence the outcome of marrow allografts, presumably by controlling recognition. The regulator genes are determinant specific and the alleles for resistance or responder status appear to be dominant. The responder phenotype is expressed by hemopoietic cells and not by the environment. Accordingly, resistance is conferred to otherwise susceptible mice upon transfer of bone marrow cells but not of serum. The production and differentiation of effector cells for marrow graft rejection are thymus independent. In conclusion, bone marrow allografts elicit a particular transplantation reaction, previously unknown, in irradiated mice. Peculiar features of this reaction are the lack of proliferation of host lymphoid cells, tissue specificity, thymus independence, and regulation by genetic factors which apparently do not affect the fate of other grafts. PMID:4397663

  4. Allograft vasculopathy after allogeneic vascularized knee transplantation.

    PubMed

    Diefenbeck, Michael; Nerlich, Andreas; Schneeberger, Stefan; Wagner, Frithjof; Hofmann, Gunther O

    2011-01-01

    Composite tissue allotransplantation represents a new discipline in reconstructive surgery. Over the past 10 years, we have performed six human vascularized allogeneic knee transplantations. All of these grafts have been lost within the first 56 months. A histomorphologic assessment of the latest case resulted in the detection of diffuse concentric fibrous intimal thickening and occlusion of graft vessels. Findings are comparable with cardiac allograft vasculopathy. The lack of adequate tools for monitoring graft rejection might have allowed multiple untreated episodes of acute rejection, triggering myointimal proliferation and occlusion of graft vessels. Graft vasculopathy represents an obstacle to long-term vascularized bone and joint allograft survival, and adequate tools for monitoring need to be developed.

  5. Immunohistochemical Investigation of the Heart Allograft Myocardium (1991-1998).

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, Ludmila V.; Baranova, Flora S.; Khalimova, Zarema A.; Zaidenov, Vladimir A.; Kurenkova, Lubov G.; Kormer, Arkadiy Ya.; Khubutia, Anzor Sh.; Kupriyanova, Anna G.; Shumakov, Valeriy I.

    2000-04-01

    What is a contribution of the humoral (vascular) and mixed type of the rejection episodes to all the episodes of heart allograft rejection is not quite clear, though this factor is of considerable importance for the choice of the treatment methods. The hearts from recipients, as well as endomyocardial biopsies of the heart allografts and postmortem material were investigated with the aim to determine the immunopathological process. Overall, 420 samples from 80 patients were analyzed. Immunofluorescence examination of endomyocardial biopsy showed that in 8 from 44 patients with heart allograft in postoperative period for the first six weeks there were revealed the immunomorphological signs of the acute humoral rejection, manifested as fixation of immunoglobulins and complement in capillaries. Six of them exhibited rejection of mixed type. Most patients in the later postoperative period exhibited a discrete local fixation of immunoglobulins and complement in myocardium, that can be assessed as one of the compartments of the chronic rejection process. In cases of the secondary administration of serum preparations, the fixation of immune complexes was shown in sarcolemma and capillaries, and can be proposed as a sign of serum disease. Repeated acute rejection episodes of humoral or mixed types raised at the first six weeks after transplantation. In the period from 1-5 years after operation, patients displayed discrete deposits of the immunoglobulins and complement as part of the chronic rejection process.

  6. Macrophage-to-Myofibroblast Transition Contributes to Interstitial Fibrosis in Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Jun; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Hong-Feng; To, Ka-Fai; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Lan, Hui-Yao; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2017-02-16

    Interstitial fibrosis is an important contributor to graft loss in chronic renal allograft injury. Inflammatory macrophages are associated with fibrosis in renal allografts, but how these cells contribute to this damaging response is not clearly understood. Here, we investigated the role of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition in interstitial fibrosis in human and experimental chronic renal allograft injury. In biopsy specimens from patients with active chronic allograft rejection, we identified cells undergoing macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition by the coexpression of macrophage (CD68) and myofibroblast (α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) markers. CD68(+)/α-SMA(+) cells accounted for approximately 50% of the myofibroblast population, and the number of these cells correlated with allograft function and the severity of interstitial fibrosis. Similarly, in C57BL/6J mice with a BALB/c renal allograft, cells coexpressing macrophage markers (CD68 or F4/80) and α-SMA composed a significant population in the interstitium of allografts undergoing chronic rejection. Fate-mapping in Lyz2-Cre/Rosa26-Tomato mice showed that approximately half of α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts in renal allografts originated from recipient bone marrow-derived macrophages. Knockout of Smad3 protected against interstitial fibrosis in renal allografts and substantially reduced the number of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells. Furthermore, the majority of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells in human and experimental renal allograft rejection coexpressed the M2-type macrophage marker CD206, and this expression was considerably reduced in Smad3-knockout recipients. In conclusion, our studies indicate that macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition contributes to interstitial fibrosis in chronic renal allograft injury. Moreover, the transition of bone marrow-derived M2-type macrophages to myofibroblasts in the renal allograft is regulated via a Smad3-dependent mechanism.

  7. T-cell alloimmunity and chronic allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Safinia, Niloufar; Afzali, Behdad; Atalar, Kerem; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert I

    2010-12-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the standard treatment to improve both the quality of life and survival in patients with various end-stage organ diseases. The primary barrier against successful transplantation is recipient alloimmunity and the need to be maintained on immunosuppressive therapies with associated side effects. Despite such treatments in renal transplantation, after death with a functioning graft, chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) is the most common cause of late allograft loss. Recipient recognition of donor histocompatibility antigens, via direct, indirect, and semidirect pathways, is critically dependent on the antigen-presenting cell (APC) and elicits effector responses dominated by recipient T cells. In allograft rejection, the engagement of recipient and donor cells results in recruitment of T-helper (Th) cells of the Th1 and Th17 lineage to the graft. In cases in which the alloresponse is dominated by regulatory T cells (Tregs), rejection can be prevented and the allograft tolerated with minimum or no immunosuppression. Here, we review the pathways of allorecognition that underlie CAD and the T-cell effector phenotypes elicited as part of the alloresponse. Future therapies including depletion of donor-reactive lymphocytes, costimulation blockade, negative vaccination using dendritic cell subtypes, and Treg therapy are inferred from an understanding of these mechanisms of allograft rejection.

  8. Inducible nitric oxide synthase suppresses the development of allograft arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shears, L L; Kawaharada, N; Tzeng, E; Billiar, T R; Watkins, S C; Kovesdi, I; Lizonova, A; Pham, S M

    1997-01-01

    In cardiac transplantation, chronic rejection takes the form of an occlusive vasculopathy. The mechanism underlying this disorder remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role nitric oxide (NO) may play in the development of allograft arteriosclerosis. Rat aortic allografts from ACI donors to Wistar Furth recipients with a strong genetic disparity in both major and minor histocompatibility antigens were used for transplantation. Allografts collected at 28 d were found to have significant increases in both inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein as well as in intimal thickness when compared with isografts. Inhibiting NO production with an iNOS inhibitor increased the intimal thickening by 57.2%, indicating that NO suppresses the development of allograft arteriosclerosis. Next, we evaluated the effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on iNOS expression and allograft arteriosclerosis. CsA (10 mg/kg/d) suppressed the expression of iNOS in response to balloon-induced aortic injury. Similarly, CsA inhibited iNOS expression in the aortic allografts, associated with a 65% increase in intimal thickening. Finally, we investigated the effect of adenoviral-mediated iNOS gene transfer on allograft arteriosclerosis. Transduction with iNOS using an adenoviral vector suppressed completely the development of allograft arteriosclerosis in both untreated recipients and recipients treated with CsA. These results suggest that the early immune-mediated upregulation in iNOS expression partially protects aortic allografts from the development of allograft arteriosclerosis, and that iNOS gene transfer strategies may prove useful in preventing the development of this otherwise untreatable disease process. PMID:9329968

  9. Cholera toxin-induced tolerance to allografts in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuru, S; Taniguchi, M; Shinomiya, N; Fujisawa, H; Zinnaka, Y; Nomoto, K

    1987-01-01

    When C3H/HeN (C3H) mice were primed with viable C57BL/6 (B6) spleen cells and treated with cholera toxin (CT) on the same day, a profound tolerance to tumour allografts of B6 origin was induced. The tolerant state was sustained for as long as 6 weeks or more. Skin allografts of B6 were rejected by such tolerant C3H mice, although the survival times were prolonged very slightly. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes was reduced markedly in the tolerant mice, whereas delayed footpad reaction to B6 cells was maintained at the normal immune level or higher. There is a possibility that a T-cell subset responsible for delayed footpad reaction is resistant to CT-induced tolerance and participates in the rejection of skin allografts in tolerant mice. PMID:2438209

  10. Preventing Rejection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications work best. These medications work in different phases of the immune response to minimize side effects ... effective immunosuppression. Clinical immunosuppression usually occurs in three phases: induction, maintenance and anti-rejection. Reference and Publication ...

  11. Can Skin Allograft Occasionally Act as a Permanent Coverage in Deep Burns? A Pilot Study 

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Ezzatollah; Beiraghi-Toosi, Arash; Ahmadabadi, Ali; Tavousi, Seyed Hassan; Alipour Tabrizi, Arash; Fotuhi, Kazem; Jabbari Nooghabi, Mehdi; Manafi, Amir; Ahmadi Moghadam, Shokoofeh

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Skin allograft is the gold standard of wound coverage in patients with extensive burns; however, it is considered as a temporary wound coverage and rejection of the skin allograft is considered inevitable. In our study, skin allograft as a permanent coverage in deep burns is evaluated. METHODS Skin allograft survival was assessed in 38 patients from March 2009 to March 2014, retrospectively. Because of the lack of tissue specimen from the skin donors, patients with long skin allograft survival in whom the gender of donor and recipient of allograft was the same were excluded. Seven cases with skin allograft longevity and opposite gender in donor and recipient were finally enrolled. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test on the biopsy specimen from recipients and donors were undertaken. RESULTS PCR on the biopsy specimen from recipients confirmed those specimens belong to the donors. All patients received allograft from the opposite sex. Two (28.57%) patients received allograft from their first-degree blood relatives, and in one (14.29%) case, the allograft was harvested from an alive individual with no blood relation. The rest were harvested from multiorgan donors. In eight months of follow up, no clinical evidence of graft rejection was noted. CONCLUSION Long term persistence of skin allograft in patients is worthy of more attention. Further studies An increase in knowledge of factors influencing this longevity could realize the dream of burn surgeons to achieve a permanent coverage other than autograft for major burn patients.

  12. Prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts in the primate with total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Els, D.; Du Toit, L.B.; Weideman, A.; Davids, H.; van der Merwe, E.

    1987-09-01

    The prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts (PDA) by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and in combination with cyclosporine (CsA) was assessed in a well established total pancreatectomy, diabetic, primate transplantation model. Pancreatic transplantation was performed in 119 pancreatectomized baboons (Papio ursinus). Of a total of 109 allografts performed, 71 were segmental allografts (open duct drainage) and 38 PDA. Of 119 graft recipients, 10 received segmental pancreatic autografts. TLI and CsA administered separately to segmental allograft recipients resulted in modest allograft survival and indefinite graft survival was not observed. 8 of 17 (47%) segmental allograft recipients that received TLI and CsA had graft survival beyond 100 days, indicating highly significant pancreatic allograft survival. All long-term segmental allograft recipients were rendered normoglycemic (plasma glucose less than 8 mmol/L) by this immunosuppressive regimen. In contrast, poor results were observed in PDA recipients treated with TLI and CsA. Mean survival in 18 treated PDA recipients was 23.8 days, 8 survived longer than 20 days (44.4%), and 1 greater than 100 days (5.5%). Despite treatment, early rejection of the duodenum in PDA recipients frequently resulted in necrosis and perforation and contributed to a high morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that, in contrast to the significant prolongation of segmental allografts by TLI and CsA, poor immunosuppression was achieved by this regimen in PDA recipients and was associated with a high morbidity and mortality caused by early rejection of the duodenum.

  13. Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells prolong survival of corneal allograft in corneal allograft transplantation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing; Wang, Dajiang; Chen, Guoling; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Han

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate whether Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells could inhibit allograft rejection in corneal allograft transplantation mouse model. Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells were constructed by transfection of retroviral expression plasmid expressing Foxp3 into the sensi-Teff cells from a Balb/c mouse immunized by C57BL/6(H2b) mouse splenocytes. Balb/c mice were randomly divided into 5 groups: Four groups received tail vein injection of Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells, or Foxp3-expressing Teff cells, or Treg cells or no intervention 1 day prior to corneal allograft transplantation. C57BL/6(H2b) was the donor mouse. The last group received corneal autograft transplantation. Corneal allograft survival time and percentage of CD4(+) T cells were detected. ELISPOT and Footpad swelling test were used to measure IL-2 and IFN-γ, and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response, respectively. Mice that had received an injection of Foxp3-expressing sensitized T cells prior to an allograft corneal transplantation, showed significantly longer survival time of corneal allograft, decreased percentage of CD4(+) T cells, IL-2 and IFN-γ, and alleviated footpad swelling than the mice that had received either Foxp3-Teff or Treg cells. Foxp3-sensi-Teff cell treatment that prolongs corneal allograft survival in the mouse model, might partly through suppressing CD4(+) T cells, IL-2 and IFN-γ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Trafficking of donor-derived bone marrow correlates with chimerism and extension of composite allograft survival across MHC barrier.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, S; Ulusal, B G; Ulusal, A E; Izycki, D; Yoder, B; Siemionow, M

    2006-06-01

    We proposed to evaluate differences between recipient's immune response to vascularized skin and combined vascularized skin/bone allografts, under a 7-day alphabeta-TCR plus cyclosporine (CsA) treatment protocol. Thirty-six transplantations were performed in six groups: group I (isograft control-vascularized skin graft; n=6); group II (isograft control-combined vascularized skin/bone graft; n=6); group III (allograft rejection control group-vascularized skin graft; n=6); group IV (allograft rejection control-combined vascularized skin/bone graft; n=6); group V (allograft treatment-vascularized skin graft; n=6); and group VI (allograft treatment-combined vascularized skin/bone graft; n=6). Isograft transplantations were performed between Lewis rats and allografts were transplanted across the MHC barrier from Brown Norway to Lewis rats. In the allograft treatment group, a combined alphabeta-TCR+CsA protocol was applied for 7 days. All groups were compared clinically, immunologically and histologically. Statistical significance was determined with two-tailed Student's t test. Indefinite graft survival was achieved in the isograft control group (>300 days). Allograft rejection controls rejected within 5 to 9 days posttransplant; chimerism levels were undetectable (<.5%). Allografts under the alphabeta-TCR+CsA protocol had significantly extended survival when skin was combined with bone (61-125 days) compared to vascularized skin allografts (43-61 days). Lymphoid macrochimerism was significantly higher in group VI than group V. Histology confirmed skin and bone viability. Combined vascularized skin/bone allografts had higher and sustained levels of donor-specific chimerism and extended allograft survival.

  15. In vitro correlates of in vivo therapy with cyclosporine to immunosuppress rejection of heterotopic rat cardiac allografts across strong (RT-1) plus weak (non-RT-1) histocompatibility differences.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, S; Stepkowski, S M; Lawen, J G; Rutzky, L P; Kahan, B D

    1991-11-01

    This study correlated different oral cyclosporine doses with in vivo graft survival, blood and tissue drug levels, and in vitro immune performances. Wistar-Furth (WFu, RT-1u) hosts engrafted with heterotopic cardiac transplants from strongly histoincompatible Buffalo (BUF, RT-1b) rats were treated postoperatively with 14-day courses of different doses of CsA delivered per gavage. There was a graded prolongation of graft survival--namely, no effect at the 1.5 mg/kg dose; a modest effect at 3 mg/kg; a therapeutic effect at 5 mg/kg; and long-term unresponsiveness at 10 mg/kg. Whole blood, serum, and tissue CsA concentrations correlated with drug dose. On day 7 posttransplantation--that is, during the peak of the immune response of untreated recipients and midway during the period of daily CsA therapy--in vitro immune performances were examined in each experimental group. On the one hand, the mixed lymphocyte reaction of WFu host splenic T cells toward donor-type BUF stimulators poorly reflected the administered CsA dose. On the other hand, there was a good correlation between drug dose and both impaired cell-mediated lympholysis and reduced frequency of alloantigen-specific T cytotoxic cell precursors f(CTL)p. Animals treated with therapeutic doses of CsA showed different patterns of T cell-mediated lympholysis: 3 mg/kg did not prevent anti-BUF Tc cell sensitization; 5 mg/kg maintained f(CTL)p levels similar to the normal controls; and 10 mg/kg significantly reduced Tc clones against donor but not third-party targets. These data demonstrate that the fate of alloantigen-specific Tc clones activated in vivo depends upon the local drug concentration. Furthermore, the present studies suggest that CML and f(CTL)p afford useful in vitro indices of in vivo immunosuppression with CsA in rat cardiac allograft recipients.

  16. [The influence of HX- I on rabbit thyroid allografts].

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Shen, W; Tan, J; Du, C; Li, K; Huang, X

    1996-03-01

    We studied the anti-rejection effect of HX- I, a preparation of traditional Chinese herbs, on rabbit thyroid allografts. The transplantations were performed on 28 rabbits after total thyroidectomies. The grafting sites were in their pretrachial muscles. These animals were divided into four groups, namely, Group I: homografts: Group I: allografts without medication; Group II: allografts with dexamethason (0.25 mg/(kg.d) intramuscularly), and Group IV: allografts with HX-I water solution, (5g/(kg.d), peros). The medication lasted 28 days. Blood samples were drawn every week postoperatively. Serum T3 and T4 were tested by RIA. The grafts were removed for histopathological evaluation on the 28th day postoperatively. The histopathology of rejection and survival were scored and classified. On the 7th and 14th days, serum T3 and T4 levels were almost the same between groups. On the 21st and 28th days, the T3 and T4 levels were higher in Groups I and IV than those in Group II (P < 0.05). The histopathological findings were; in Group I, damaged follicles with much lymphocytes infiltration and fibrosis, and 6 cases being rejected; in Group II, two deaths and three cases with damaged thyroid tissue and much lymphocytes infiltration; in Group IV, three cases with damaged thyroid tissue and four intact grafts. Our results indicate that HX-I and dexamethason both can inhibit rejection in thyroid allografts in rabbits, but dexamethason has more side effects HX-I has many components and the machanism of its early anti-rejection effect is worthy of further study.

  17. Reversal of Diabetes by Islet Transplantation: Vulnerability of the Established Allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, K. M.; Prowse, S. J.; Lafferty, K. J.

    1981-09-01

    Nonspecific stimulation of the immune system of CBA mice carrying a functional BALB/c islet allograft failed to trigger graft rejection. Only three of six animals rejected their graft when injected intravenously with 105, 106, and 107 peritoneal cells of BALB/c origin over a 3-month period commencing 100 days after transplantation.

  18. Allograft immune response with sCR1 intervention.

    PubMed

    Pratt, J R; Hibbs, M J; Laver, A J; Smith, R A; Sacks, S H

    1996-03-01

    The deposition of complement (C) components on tissues of transplanted organs may induce many proinflammatory responses. The role of such C activation in allograft rejection is uncertain. We addressed this question by inhibiting C at the level of the C3 and C5 convertases, preventing C activation and progression of its cascade, using recombinant human soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) in an unsensitized rat renal allograft model. Fully MHC disparate Lewis to DA rat renal allograft recipients given 25 mg/kg sCR1 daily, with saline-treated allograft recipients as controls (n = 15 in each group), were sacrificed from day 1 to day 5 post-transplant, and examined histopathologically, and for the deposition of C3 and C5b-9 membrane attack complex (MAC), and for the presence of leucocyte antigen markers. Treated animals demonstrated a reduction in vascular injury and cellular infiltration, coincident with reduced C deposition. Flow cytometric analysis of leucocyte subpopulations in the spleen showed a reduction in activated (CD25 positive) B and T cells in treated animals, compared to saline treated controls. The results suggest that C inhibition with sCR1, in an unsensitized model of allograft rejection, was able to suppress the vascular and cell mediated components of tissue injury. The data support not only a role for C in antibody and possibly cell mediated cytotoxicity in the graft, but also suggest a role in the primary immune response leading to both T cell and B cell activation.

  19. Role of interleukin-17A in early graft rejection after orthotopic lung transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi-Rui; Wang, Li-Feng; Xia, Si-Si; Zhang, Ya-Mei; Xu, Jiang-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Background The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying lung allograft rejection remain poorly understood. We investigated the potential role of interleukin (IL)-17A in lung transplant rejection in a mouse model, because previous studies in clinical and rodent models have implicated IL-17A in both acute and chronic rejection. Methods To generate an orthotopic lung transplantation model, lungs from C57BL/6 or BALB/c mice were transplanted into C57BL/6 mice (isograft and allograft models, respectively). The effects of anti-IL-17A treatment in allograft recipients were investigated. The histological features and rejection status of isografts and allografts were assessed at 3, 7, and 28 days after transplantation, and differences in graft infiltrating cells and mRNA expression of relevant cytokines were quantified at 3 and 7 days after transplantation. Results As expected, isografts showed no obvious signs of rejection, whereas allografts exhibited minimal-to-mild rejection (grade A1–A2) by day 3 and moderate-to-severe rejection (grade A3–A4) by day 7, without evidence of obliterative bronchiolitis (OB). However, by 28 days, evidence of OB was observed in 67% (2/3) of allografts and severe rejection (grade A4) was observed in all. IL-17 mRNA expression in allografts was increased with rejection, and interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-6 mRNA expression levels followed a similar pattern. In contrast, IL-22 expression in allografts was only slightly increased. Antibody (Ab) neutralization of IL-17A diminished the signs of acute rejection at 7 days after transplantation in allografts, and this early protection was accompanied by a decrease in cellular stress according to histological evaluation, suggesting the involvement of IL-17A in the development of early post-transplantation lesions. Conclusions Our data indicate that IL-17A is important in the pathophysiology of allograft rejection, and neutralization of IL-17A is a potential therapeutic strategy to preventing lung

  20. Rejected applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review membership application materials (especially rejected applications) to the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) during its formative years (1947–1953). Methods: Detailed study of materials in the AAN Historical Collection. Results: The author identified 73 rejected applications. Rejected applicants (71 male, 2 female) lived in 25 states. The largest number was for the Associate membership category (49). These were individuals “in related fields who have made and are making contributions to the field of neurology.” By contrast, few applicants to Active membership or Fellowship status were rejected. The largest numbers of rejectees were neuropsychiatrists (19), neurosurgeons (16), and psychiatrists (14). Conclusion: The AAN, established in the late 1940s, was a small and politically vulnerable organization. A defining feature of the fledgling society was its inclusiveness; its membership was less restrictive than that of the older American Neurological Association. At the same time, the society needed to preserve its core as a neurologic society rather than one of psychiatry or neurosurgery. Hence, the balance between inclusiveness and exclusive identity was a difficult one to maintain. The Associate membership category, more than any other, was at the heart of this issue of self-definition. Associate members were largely practitioners of psychiatry or neurosurgery. Their membership was a source of consternation and was to be carefully been held in check during these critical formative years. PMID:24944256

  1. Immunomodulatory Strategies Directed Towards Tolerance of Vascularized Composite Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Sebastian G.; Villani, Vincenzo; Muraglia, Glenn M. La; Torabi, Radbeh; Leonard, David A.; Randolph, Mark A.; Colvin, Robert B.; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Madsen, Joren C.; Cetrulo, Curtis L.; Sachs, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Achieving tolerance of vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) would improve the risk-to-benefit ratio in patients who undergo this life-enhancing, though not life-saving, transplant. Kidney co-transplantation along with a short course of high-dose immunosuppression enables tolerance of heart allografts across a full MHC mismatch. In this study, we investigated whether tolerance of VCA across full MHC disparities could be achieved in animals already tolerant of heart and kidney allografts. Methods Miniature swine that were tolerant of heart and/or kidney allografts long-term underwent transplantation of myocutaneous VCA across the same MHC barrier. Prior to VCA transplant, Group 1 (n=3) underwent Class I-mismatched kidney transplantation; Group 2 (n=3) underwent two sequential Class I-mismatched kidney transplantations; Group 3 (n=2) underwent haploidentical MHC-mismatched heart/kidney transplantation; and Group 4 (n=2) underwent full MHC-mismatched heart/kidney transplantation. Results All three animals in Group 1 and two of three animals in Group 2 showed skin rejection ≤85 days; one animal in Group 2 showed prolonged skin survival >200 days. Animals in Groups 3 and 4 showed skin rejection ≤30 days and regained in vitro evidence of donor responsiveness. Conclusion This is the first pre-clinical study in which hearts, kidneys, and VCAs have been transplanted into the same recipient. Despite VCA rejection, tolerance of heart and kidney allografts was maintained. These results suggest that regulatory tolerance of skin is possible but not generally achieved by the same level of immunomodulation that is capable of inducing tolerance of heart and kidney allografts. Achieving tolerance of skin may require additional immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:25757218

  2. Kidney allograft pyelonephritis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Schwarzengrund.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenta; Nishio, Haruomi; Iwatani, Yuji; Yamada, Ryo; Okawa, Takao; Yamamoto, Takumi; Murakami, Masaaki; Matsuo, Yoko; Matsuo, Ken; Tanaka, Satoshi; Mori, Kiyoshi; Mori, Noriko

    2017-03-13

    Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) taking immunosuppressive drugs have a 20-fold greater risk of nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection than the healthy adult population. Among KTRs, the urinary tract is the most common site of infection. However, few cases of urinary tract infection caused by NTS have been documented in KTRs, and only one in Japan. Furthermore, it frequently induces acute allograft rejection with high mortality. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Schwarzengrund (S. Schwarzengrund) is now among the more common Salmonella serovars isolated in Japan and is likely to be invasive. We present a case of a 45-year old female with vesicoureteral reflux to her transplanted kidney who developed kidney allograft pyelonephritis caused by S. Schwarzengrund. She was admitted to our hospital with fever, urodynia, lower abdominal pain, gross hematuria, and cloudy urine. Urine cultures were positive for S. Schwarzengrund. Exposure to cats, especially stray cats, were identified as the most likely source. We administered antibiotics for 4 weeks (ceftriaxone then amoxicillin, each for 2 weeks) and educated her about pet safety. She experienced no recurrence of infection or clinical kidney allograft rejection for 3 months post-treatment. NTS should be considered as a possible pathogen of urinary tract infection among KTRs, especially in cases with animal exposure or structural urologic abnormalities. When the pathogen is NTS, appropriate antibiotics and treatment periods are essential for preventing recurrence and allograft rejection after the completion of treatment.

  3. Urine Proteomics to Detect Biomarkers for Chronic Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Luís F.; Solé-Gonzalez, Amanda; Kalko, Susana G.; Bañon-Maneus, Elisenda; Solé, Manel; Diekmann, Fritz; Gutierrez-Dalmau, Alex; Abian, Joaquin; Campistol, Josep M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite optimal immunosuppressive therapy, more than 50% of kidney transplants fail because of chronic allograft dysfunction. A noninvasive means to diagnose chronic allograft dysfunction may allow earlier interventions that could improve graft half-life. In this proof-of-concept study, we used mass spectrometry to analyze differences in the urinary polypeptide patterns of 32 patients with chronic allograft dysfunction (14 with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 18 with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection) and 18 control subjects (eight stable recipients and 10 healthy control subjects). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed good segregation of samples in groups corresponding mainly to the four biomedical conditions. Moreover, the composition of the proteome of the pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy group differed from that of the chronic active antibody-mediated rejection group, and an independent validation set confirmed these results. The 14 protein ions that best discriminated between these two groups correctly identified 100% of the patients with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 100% of the patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection. In summary, this study establishes a pattern for two histologic lesions associated with distinct graft outcomes and constitutes a first step to designing a specific, noninvasive diagnostic tool for chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:19056874

  4. Anti-IL-17 therapy restricts and reverses late-term corneal allo-rejection

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiao-Tang; Zobell, Stephanie; Jarosz, Jason G.; Stuart, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Corneal allograft rejection has been described as a Th1-mediated process involving IFN-γ production. However, recent evidence has also implicated IL-17 as being involved during acute corneal allograft responses. Our data supports those that maintain that IL-17 is involved in early acute corneal allograft acceptance. However, we decided to extend these studies to include a later phase of rejection in which there is a peak of IL-17 production that is >15 fold higher than seen during acute rejection that occurs >45 days post-engraftment at the onset of late-term rejection. We demonstrate that neutralizing IL-17A at this time significantly reduced corneal graft rejection. Surprisingly, when corneal grafts that are undergoing this later phase of rejection are treated with anti-IL17A there is a reversal of both opacity and neovascularization. When compared to the early phase of rejection, the cellular infiltrate is significantly less with a greatly reduced presence of Gr-1+ neutrophils with a relative increase in CD4+ T cells and macrophages. We went on to identify that the cells expressing IL-17 were CD4+ IL-17+ T cells and somewhat surprisingly, IL-17+ F4/80+ macrophages within the rejecting corneal allografts. Taken together, these findings describe a distinct late phase of corneal allograft rejection which is likely mediated by Th17 cells and that therapeutic neutralization of IL-17A reverses this rejection. This further suggests that IL-17 might serve as an excellent therapeutic target to reduce this form of corneal allograft rejection. PMID:25754737

  5. Radiation therapy for renal transplant rejection reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Peeples, W.J.; Wombolt, D.G.; El-Mahdi, A.M.; Turalba, C.I.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-four renal transplant patients were given radiation therapy for severe rejection phenomena. The 29 patients who had only one course of irradiation had a 52.3% successful function rate. Fifteen patients received from two to four courses of irradiation with an ultimate 60% rate of sustained function. Fifty patients who received only steroid and other medical management but no irradiation had a 60% rate of successful renal function. In the irradiation group, no patient whose creatinine level did not respond to radiation therapy maintained a functioning kidney. The data indicate that the overall successful function rate is maintained by radiation therapy in patients who show severe allograft rejection phenomena.

  6. Role of TDTH and Tc populations in organ graft rejection. I. Functional analysis of graft-infiltrating T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stepkowski, S.M.; Duncan, W.R.

    1986-10-01

    To analyze the role of T cell subpopulations in the rejection of organ allografts, we developed a new model for obtaining large numbers of graft infiltrating cells (GICs). We isolated W3/25+ Th/DTH and OX8+ Ts/c from vascularized, irradiated rat spleen allografts. W3/25+ GICs obtained from spleen allografts transplanted to normal recipients were highly effective in eliciting cardiac allograft rejection when transferred to sublethally irradiated recipients, however, the OX8+ subset was incapable of eliciting rejection. On the other hand, when OX8+ GICs were obtained from spleen allografts transplanted to previously immunized recipients, they were as efficient as the W3/25+ Th/DTH subset in eliciting cardiac allograft destruction. These results indicate that the W3/25+, OX8- T cell is required for the rejection of primary organ allografts, but that the rejection of a secondary allograft by an immune recipient may be mediated, independently, by both W3/25+ and OX8+ cells.

  7. Concentration of In-111-oxine-labeled autologous leukocytes in noninfected and nonrejecting renal allografts: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Isitman, A.T.; Kaufman, H.M.; Rao, S.A.; Knobel, J.; Hellman, R.S.; Zielonka, J.S.; Pelc, L.

    1984-02-01

    Autologous leukocytes labeled with In-111 oxine (ILL) concentrated in the renal allografts of eight patients for whom transplant rejection, infection, or acute tubular necrosis (ATN) could be excluded. All patients had good-to-adequate renal function at the time of ILL scintigraphy, and none developed rejection or renal transplant failure during a 1-mo follow-up period. It is concluded that normally functioning renal allografts without evidence of rejection, infection, or ATN often will concentrate ILL. When a baseline study is not available for comparison, this phenomenon limits the value of ILL scintigraphy as a diagnostic test for transplant rejection or infection.

  8. Incidence, risk factors, and the impact of allograft pyelonephritis on renal allograft function.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Geerlings, S E; Peters-Sengers, H; Idu, M M; Hodiamont, C J; Ten Berge, I J M; Bemelman, F J

    2016-10-01

    The impact of allograft pyelonephritis (AGPN) on renal allograft function is controversial. In this study, we evaluated the incidence, risk factors, and the impact of AGPN on renal allograft function. Retrospective cohort study in adult renal allograft recipients with 1-year follow-up after transplantation (Tx). Renal allograft function was evaluated by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (by Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula) and 24-h urine protein excretion. A total of 431 renal allograft recipients were analyzed; 57 (13.2%) developed AGPN within 1 year after Tx. Median time between Tx and AGPN was 50 days. Risk factors for AGPN were the presence of a urological catheter (odds ratio [OR] = 18.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.00-44.81, P < 0.001) and preceding asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) (OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.20-3.90, P = 0.009). In 72.7%, the causative microorganism of ASB was identical to that of the succeeding AGPN episode. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that experiencing AGPN did not decrease the eGFR (P = 0.61) nor did increased proteinuria (P = 0.29) 1 year after Tx. For the eGFR, an interaction was found between AGPN/bacteriuria (BU) and acute rejection (AR): the group experiencing BU preceding AR had significantly (P < 0.001) lower eGFR compared with the group that experienced only AR (21 mL/min/1.73 m(2) vs. 48 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ), as a result of increased prevalence of combined rejections within the BU group. Indwelling urological catheters and preceding ASB are associated with developing AGPN. An incident of AGPN itself does not impair renal allograft function 1 year after Tx. However, a relevant interaction occurs between BU and AR, in which the sequence of occurrence of these 2 events synergistically impairs the eGFR. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Gr-1intCD11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells accumulate in corneal allograft and improve corneal allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wungrak; Ji, Yong Woo; Ham, Hwa-Yong; Yeo, Areum; Noh, Hyemi; Jin, Su-Eon; Song, Jong Suk; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kim, Eung Kwon; Lee, Hyung Keun

    2016-12-01

    We identified the characteristics of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and investigated their mechanism of induction and their functional role in allograft rejection using a murine corneal allograft model. In mice, MDSCs coexpress CD11b and myeloid differentiation antigen Gr-1. Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells infiltrated allografted corneas between 4 d and 4 wk after surgery; however, the frequencies of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells were not different between accepted and rejected allografts or in peripheral blood or BM. Of interest, Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells, but not Gr-1(hi)CD11b(+) cells, infiltrated the accepted graft early after surgery and expressed high levels of immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10, TGF-β, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. This population remained until 4 wk after surgery. In vitro, only high dose (>100 ng/ml) of IFN-γ plus GM-CSF could induce immunosuppressive cytokine expression in Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells reduced T cell infiltration, which improved graft survival. In conclusion, high-dose IFN-γ in allograft areas is essential for development of Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) MDSCs in corneal allografts, and subtle environmental changes in the early period of the allograft can result in a large difference in graft survival.

  10. Prospective evaluation of renal allograft dysfunction with 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid renal scans

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.D.; Sagalowsky, A.I.; Lewis, S.E.; Gailiunas, P.; Helderman, J.H.; Dawidson, I.; Peters, P.C.

    1984-05-01

    A prospective, single-blinded study was done to determine the ability of serial 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans to diagnose renal allograft rejection. Among 28 transplant recipients 111 renal scans were obtained 1 day postoperatively and every 3 to 4 days thereafter for 3 weeks in all patients retaining an allograft. Computer-generated time-activity blood flow curves were analyzed semiquantitatively for the 1) interval between curve peaks of the allograft and iliac artery, 2) renal transit time and 3) renal washout of radionuclide. Excretory function was assessed by degree and interval to appearance of radionuclide in the calices and bladder. Deterioration of renal blood flow and excretion compared to the initial scan was considered rejection. Of 52 scans performed during clinical rejection 47 (90.4 per cent) were interpreted as showing rejection (sensitivity). Of 53 scans interpreted as showing rejection 47 (88.7 per cent) were positive for clinical rejection. The remaining 6 patients (initial false positive results) suffered clinical rejection within 24 to 72 hours. We conclude that 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid renal scans are useful in the differential diagnosis of renal allograft dysfunction.

  11. MicroRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers of heart transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Tible, Marion; Gay, Arnaud; Guillemain, Romain; Aubert, Olivier; Varnous, Shaida; Iserin, Franck; Rouvier, Philippe; François, Arnaud; Vernerey, Dewi; Loyer, Xavier; Leprince, Pascal; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Bruneval, Patrick; Loupy, Alexandre; Jouven, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Rejection is one of the major causes of late cardiac allograft failure and at present can only be diagnosed by invasive endomyocardial biopsies. We sought to determine whether microRNA profiling could serve as a non-invasive biomarker of cardiac allograft rejection. We included 113 heart transplant recipients from four referral French institutions (test cohort, n = 60, validation cohort, n = 53). In the test cohort, we compared patients with acute biopsy-proven allograft rejection (n = 30) to matched control patients without rejection (n = 30), by assessing microRNAs expression in the heart allograft tissue and patients concomitant serum using RNA extraction and qPCR analysis. Fourteen miRNAs were selected on the basis of their implication in allograft rejection, endothelial activation, and inflammation and tissue specificity. We identified seven miRNAs that were differentially expressed between normal and rejecting heart allografts: miR-10a, miR-21, miR-31, miR-92a, miR-142-3p miR-155, and miR-451 (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Four out of seven miRNAs also showed differential serological expression (miR-10a, miR-31, miR-92a, and miR-155) with strong correlation with their tissular expression. The receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that these four circulating miRNAs strongly discriminated patients with allograft rejection from patients without rejection: miR-10a (AUC = 0.975), miR-31 (AUC = 0.932), miR-92a (AUC = 0.989), and miR-155 (AUC = 0.998, P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). We confirmed in the external validation set that these four miRNAs highly discriminated patients with rejection from those without. The discrimination capability of the four miRNAs remained significant when stratified by rejection diagnosis (T-cell-mediated rejection or antibody-mediated rejection) and time post-transplant. This study demonstrates that a differential expression of miRNA occurs in rejecting allograft patients, not only at the tissue level but also in the

  12. The Role of Lymphoid Neogenesis in Allografts.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, H-M; Li, W; Gelman, A E; Krupnick, A S; Kreisel, D

    2016-04-01

    De novo induction of organized lymphoid aggregates at nonlymphoid sites has been observed in many chronic inflammatory conditions where foreign antigens such as infectious agents, autoantigens or alloantigens, persist. The prevailing opinion in the field of transplantation is that lymphoid neogenesis within allografts is detrimental to the establishment of immune tolerance. These structures, commonly referred to as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs), are thought to contribute to graft rejection by generating and propagating local alloimmune responses. However, recent studies have shown that TLOs rich in regulatory Foxp3(+) cells are present in long-term accepting allografts. The notion that TLOs can contribute to the local downregulation of immune responses has been corroborated in other chronic inflammation models. These findings suggest that contrary to previous suggestions that the induction of TLOs in allografts is necessarily harmful, the induction of "tolerogenic" TLOs may prove advantageous. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TLOs are induced and how they regulate immune responses with a particular focus on alloimmunity.

  13. The Role of Lymphoid Neogenesis in Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Hsao, Hsi-Min; Li, Wenjun; Gelman, Andrew E.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    De novo induction of organized lymphoid aggregates at non-lymphoid sites has been observed in many chronic inflammatory conditions where foreign antigens such as infectious agents, auto- or alloantigens, persist. The prevailing opinion in the field of transplantation is that lymphoid neogenesis within allografts is detrimental to the establishment of immune tolerance. These structures, commonly referred to as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs), are thought to contribute to graft rejection by generating and propagating local alloimmune responses. However, recent studies have shown that TLOs rich in regulatory Foxp3+ cells are present in long term accepting allografts. The notion that TLOs can contribute to the local downregulation of immune responses has been corroborated in other chronic inflammation models. These findings suggest that contrary to previous suggestions that the induction of TLOs in allografts is necessarily harmful, the induction of “tolerogenic” TLOs may prove advantageous. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TLOs are induced and how they regulate immune responses with a particular focus on alloimmunity. PMID:26614734

  14. Urine Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Human Kidney Allograft Status.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Schwartz, Joseph E; Sharma, Vijay K; Chen, Qiuying; Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana M; Ding, Ruchuang; Ikle, David N; Bridges, Nancy D; Williams, Nikki M; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Karoly, Edward D; Mohney, Robert P; Abecassis, Michael; Friedewald, John; Knechtle, Stuart J; Becker, Yolanda T; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham; Gross, Steven S; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis and prognostication of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft may help realize the full benefits of kidney transplantation. To investigate whether urine metabolites predict kidney allograft status, we determined levels of 749 metabolites in 1516 urine samples from 241 kidney graft recipients enrolled in the prospective multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-04 study. A metabolite signature of the ratio of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine in biopsy specimen-matched urine supernatants best discriminated acute cellular rejection biopsy specimens from specimens without rejection. For clinical application, we developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based assay that enabled absolute and rapid quantification of the 3-sialyllactose-to-xanthosine ratio in urine samples. A composite signature of ratios of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine and quinolinate to X-16397 and our previously reported urinary cell mRNA signature of 18S ribosomal RNA, CD3ε mRNA, and interferon-inducible protein-10 mRNA outperformed the metabolite signatures and the mRNA signature. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the composite metabolite-mRNA signature was 0.93, and the signature was diagnostic of acute cellular rejection with a specificity of 84% and a sensitivity of 90%. The composite signature, developed using solely biopsy specimen-matched urine samples, predicted future acute cellular rejection when applied to pristine samples taken days to weeks before biopsy. We conclude that metabolite profiling of urine offers a noninvasive means of diagnosing and prognosticating acute cellular rejection in the human kidney allograft, and that the combined metabolite and mRNA signature is diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection with very high accuracy.

  15. Effects of Lung Cotransplantation on Cardiac Allograft Tolerance Across a Full Major Histocompatibility Complex Barrier in Miniature Swine

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, M. L. L.; Spencer, P. J.; Michel, S. G.; La Muraglia, G. M.; O’Neil, M. J.; Mannon, E. C.; Leblang, C.; Rosales, I. A.; Colvin, R. B.; Sachs, D. H.; Allan, J. S.; Madsen, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    A 12-day course of high-dose tacrolimus induces tolerance of major histocompatibility complex– mismatched lung allografts in miniature swine but does not induce tolerance of heart allografts unless a kidney is cotransplanted. To determine whether lungs share with kidneys the ability to induce cardiac allograft tolerance, we investigated heart–lung co-transplantation using the same induction protocol. Hearts (n = 3), heart–kidneys (n=3), lungs (n=6), and hearts–lungs (n=3) were transplanted into fully major histocompatibility complex–mismatched recipients treated with high-dose tacrolimus for 12 days. Serial biopsy samples were used to evaluate rejection, and in vitro assays were used to detect donor responsiveness. All heart–kidney recipients and five of six lung recipients demonstrated long-term graft survival for longer than 272 days, while all heart recipients rejected their allografts within 35 days. Tolerant recipients remained free of alloantibody and showed persistent donor-specific unresponsiveness by cell-mediated lympholysis/mixed-lymphocyte reaction. In contrast, heart–lung recipients demonstrated rejection of both allografts (days 47, 55, and 202) and antidonor responsiveness in vitro. In contrast to kidneys, lung cotransplantation leads to rejection of both heart and lung allografts, indicating that lungs do not have the same tolerogenic capacity as kidneys. We conclude that cells or cell products present in kidney, but not heart or lung allografts, have a unique capacity to confer unresponsiveness on cotransplanted organs, most likely by amplifying host regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26469344

  16. Lung transplantation: chronic allograft dysfunction and establishing immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gracon, Adam S A; Wilkes, David S

    2014-08-01

    Despite significant medical advances since the advent of lung transplantation, improvements in long-term survival have been largely unrealized. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction, in particular obliterative bronchiolitis, is the primary limiting factor. The predominant etiology of obliterative bronchiolitis involves the recipient's innate and adaptive immune response to the transplanted allograft. Current therapeutic strategies have failed to provide a definitive treatment paradigm to improve long-term outcomes. Inducing immune tolerance is an emerging therapeutic strategy that abrogates allograft rejection, avoids immunosuppression, and improves long-term graft function. The aim of this review is to discuss the key immunologic components of obliterative bronchiolitis, describe the state of establishing immune tolerance in transplantation, and highlight those strategies being evaluated in lung transplantation.

  17. Diagnostic criteria of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Mosquera Reboredo, J M; Vázquez Martul, E

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of anti-donor antibody-mediated rejection or humoral rejection (ABMR) is one of the main discussions at the moment in kidney transplantation. The search for histopathological markers that help us to diagnose ABMR has been more problematic, in contrast to the histological expression of cellular or tubulointerstitial rejection. Although the relationship between post-transplant anti-donor antibodies and the allograft's prognosis has been a topic of discussion for a long time, led in the main by P.Terasaki, it was not until the beginning of 1990s when P. Halloran studied the humoral mechanisms of rejection in greater depth. Feutch described the importance of C4d deposits as a marker that shows a humoral mechanism of allograft rejection in 1993. As a result of many studies carried out, the Banff consensus group established some diagnostic histopathological criteria of acute (ABMR) in 2003. These have been modified slightly in later meetings of the group. Furthermore, in 2005 this same working group looked at the physiopathological mechanisms causing chronic allograft failure in more detail and established the criteria defining chronic humoral rejection. In this review, we are trying to update any useful histopathological criteria for diagnosing acute and chronic ABMR.

  18. Platonin improves survival of skin allografts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Ping; Lee, Jie-Jen; Chi, Chin-Wen; Chang, Kuo-Ming; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Platonin is an immunomodulator with NF-κB inhibitory activity. It not only inhibits interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production in sepsis, but also attenuates heatstroke reactions. In addition, platonin redirects differentiation of dendritic cells toward an intermediate stage of maturation. The study was designed to examine whether platonin can reduce acute graft rejection. A C57BL/6 to BALB/c mice skin transplantation model was used. Platonin was given intraperitoneally to transplant recipients at various doses. Skin grafts were submitted to histologic analysis. NF-κB DNA binding activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were determined in harvested draining lymph nodes. Leukocyte count, hepatic and renal functions were serially assessed. An array of serum cytokines was evaluated on d 1, 3, 5, and 7 after skin transplantation. Platonin resulted in significantly prolonged skin allograft survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Histologic changes in the skin allografts paralleled the gross appearance of rejection. Serum cytokine analysis shows that platonin significantly suppressed the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α. However, no significant changes occurred in the serum levels of Th1-type and Th2-type cytokines. NF-κB activity and iNOS expression were remarkably suppressed in draining lymph nodes. In terms of toxicity, there were no significant differences in body weight, leukocyte count, plasma alanine aminotransferase, or creatinine between the platonin-treated and control groups. Platonin effectively prolongs skin allograft survival without major toxicity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. LYMPHATIC INJURY AND REGENERATION IN CARDIAC ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Thing Rinda; Pathak, Arvind; Asano, Hiroshi; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Baldwin, William M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Severed donor heart lymphatics are not anastomosed to recipient lymphatics in cardiac transplantation. We evaluated the effects of cellular infiltrates of T cells and macrophages on the morphology of lymphatics in heart grafts. Methods: Dark Agouti (DA) hearts were transplanted to Lewis or control DA rats on sub-therapeutic doses of cyclosporin. Transplants were examined by immunohistology and quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy using LYVE-1 as a lymphatic marker and CD8 and CD68 as markers for cellular infiltration at selected intervals from 1 to 8 weeks post-transplantation. Results: Allograft inner myocardial lymphatic density decreased by more than 30-fold at 1 week, and recovered to only 15% of the native level at 8 weeks post-transplantation. In contrast, allograft lymphatics in and near the epicardium showed no significant density decline, but increased in size by more than 5-fold at 2 weeks, and sustained about a 3-fold increase at 8 weeks post-transplantation. Lymphatic changes correlated temporally with the extent of T cell and macrophage infiltration in allografts, which peaked at 2-3 weeks post-transplantation. When grafts were retransplanted from allogeneic to isogeneic recipients at 3 weeks post-transplantation, inner lymphatic density returned close to native level within 2 weeks after retransplantation. Conclusions: This is the first characterization of regional and morphological effects of immunological responses on heart lymphatics after transplantation. Elimination of alloimmune responses produces rapid restoration of inner lymphatic vessels, suggesting that lymphatics injured during rejection can recover when rejection is reversed during the post-transplantation course. PMID:20118845

  20. Assessment of Kidney Function After Allograft Transplantation by Texture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Abbasian Ardakani, Ali; Mohammadi, Afshin; Khalili Najafabad, Bahareh; Abolghasemi, Jamileh

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasonography is the preferable imaging technique for monitoring and assessing complications in kidney allograft transplants. Computer-aided diagnostic system based on texture analysis in ultrasonographic imaging is recommended to identify changes in kidney function after allograft transplantation. A total of 61 biopsy-proven kidney allograft recipients (11 rejected and 50 unrejected) were assessed by a computer-aided diagnostic system. Up to 270 statistical texture features were extracted as descriptors for each region of interest in each recipient. Correlations of texture features with serum creatinine level and differences between rejected and unrejected allografts were analyzed. An area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated for each significant texture feature. Linear discriminant analysis was employed to analyze significant features and increase discriminative power. Recipients were classified by the first nearest neighbor classifier. Fourteen texture features had a significant correlation with serum creatinine level and 16 were significantly different between the rejected and unrejected allografts, for which an area under the curve values were in the range of 0.575 for difference entropy S(4,0) to 0.676 for kurtosis. Using all 16 features, linear discriminant analysis indicated higher performance for classification of the two groups with an area under the curve of 0.975, which corresponded to a sensitivity of 90.9%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 98.0%. Texture analysis was a reliable method, with the potential for characterization, and can help physicians to diagnose kidney failure after transplantation on ultrasonographic imaging.

  1. TLR Signals Promote IL-6/IL-17-Dependent Transplant Rejection1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luqiu; Ahmed, Emily; Wang, Tongmin; Wang, Ying; Ochando, Jordi; Chong, Anita S.; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection has often been correlated with Th1 differentiation, whereas transplantation tolerance is frequently associated with induction of regulation. The discovery of the Th17 phenotype has prompted its scrutiny in transplant rejection. Although IL-17 has recently been observed in settings of acute allograft rejection and drives rejection in T-bet-deficient mice that have impaired type 1 T cell responses, there is little evidence of its requirement during acute rejection in wild-type animals. We and others have previously shown that TLR9 signaling by exogenous CpG at the time of transplantation is sufficient to abrogate anti-CD154-mediated acceptance of fully mismatched cardiac allografts. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which acute rejection occurs in this inflammatory context. Our results indicate that CpG targets recipient hematopoietic cells and that its pro-rejection effects correlate both with prevention of anti-CD154-mediated conversion of conventional CD4+ T cells into induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) and with the expression of IFN-γ and IL-17 by intra-graft CD4+ T cells. Moreover, the combined elimination of IL-6 and IL-17 signaling abrogated the ability of CpG to promote acute cardiac allograft rejection. Thus, pro-inflammatory signals at the time of transplantation can change the quality of the effector immune response and reveal a pathogenic function for IL-6 and IL-17 in wild-type recipients. PMID:19414775

  2. Expanding the antibody-mediated component of plasma cell-rich acute rejection: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Uppin, M. S.; Gudithi, S.; Taduri, G.; Prayaga, A. K.; Raju, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Renal allograft rejection is mediated by T-cells (T-cell mediated rejection) or by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) (antibody mediated rejection, ABMR). Plasma cell-rich acute rejection (PCAR) is a unique entity due to its peculiar morphology and poor prognostic behavior. All allograft biopsies done at our center from January 2013 to October 2014 were reviewed, and seven were identified with a diagnosis of PCAR with antibody mediated rejection (ABMR). The allograft biopsies were classified as per the Banff 2007 schema. Immunohistochemistry with C4d, SV 40, CD3, CD20, CD138, kappa and lambda light chain was performed. Total 210 allograft biopsies were performed in the study period of which seven biopsies (3.3%) were diagnosed as PCAR with ABMR. All these were late ABMRs (more than 6 months) with median posttransplant duration of 17 months. The allograft biopsy showed features of PCAR along with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and positive C4d. DSA was positive in six patients. All the patients were treated with standard therapeutic measures of acute cellular rejection (ACR) and ABMR including steroids, plasma exchange, rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins. All the patients had persistent graft dysfunction or graft loss on follow-up. PMID:27194831

  3. Kidney allograft survival in dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Lum, C.T.; Lewis, W.I.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is immunosuppressive and, in rodents, can induce a state where transplantation of allogenic bone marrow results in chimerism and permanent acceptance of organ allografts from the donor strain. Twelve splenectomized dogs were treated with TLI (150 rads per fraction, total dose 1950 to 3000 rads) before bilateral nephrectomy and renal allotransplantation. Eight dogs received bone marrow from the kidney donor. In 13 untreated control dogs renal allografts functioned for a mean +- (SE) of 4.7 +- 0.3 days. In the four TLI treated dogs who did not receive bone marrow the renal allografts functioned for 15 to 76 days (two dogs died with functioning grafts). In the eight TLI treated dogs who received donor bone marrow, two died immediately after transplantation, two rejected at 3 and 13 days, one died at 13 days with a functioning graft, and two have had the grafts function for longer than 500 days. Chimerism was not detected in the one dog tested. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to stimulation with phytohemaglutinin and in mixed lymphocyte culture was suppressed for at least one month after TLI. The results confirm the immunosuppressive effect of TLI. The absence of kidney rejection in two recipients of donor bone marrow show the potential of this approach to induce long-term immunologic unresponsiveness as to an organ allograft, but the outcome is unpredictable and further experiments are needed to define the optimal conditions for administration of TLI and bone marrow to the recipients.

  4. Significant prolongation of segmental pancreatic allograft survival in two species

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    A study was conducted to assess the suppression of segmental pancreatic allograft rejection by cyclosporine (CSA) alone in baboons and dogs, and subtotal marrow irradiation (TL1) alone and TL 1 in combination with CSA in baboons. Total pancreatectomy in the dog and primate provided a reliable diabetic model, induced an absolute deficiency of insulin and was uniformly lethal if not treated. Continuous administration of CSA in baboons resulted in modest allograft survival. As in baboons, dogs receiving CSA 25 mg/kg/d rendered moderate graft prolongation but a dose of 40 mg/kg/d resulted in significant graft survival (greater than 100 days) in 5 of 8 allograft recipients. Irradiation alone resulted in minimal baboon pancreatic allograft survival of 20 baboons receiving TL1 1,000 rad and CSA, 3 had graft survival greater than of 100 days. Of 15 baboons receiving TL1 800 rad and CSA, 6 had graft survival of greater than 100 days. In conclusion, CSA administration in dogs and TL1 in combination with CSA in baboons resulted in highly significant segmental pancreatic allograft survival.

  5. Lower kidney allograft survival in African-Americans compared to Hispanic-Americans with lupus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Suarez, M L; Contreras, G

    2017-10-01

    Background and objective African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans with lupus are the two most common minority groups who receive kidney transplants in the USA. It is unknown if African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans with lupus have similar outcomes after kidney transplantation. In this study, we assessed whether African-Americans compared to Hispanic-Americans have worse kidney allograft survival after risk factors of rejection and other prognostic factors were matched between both groups. Methods Out of 1816 African-Americans and 901 Hispanic-Americans with lupus, who received kidney transplants between 1987 and 2006 and had complete records in the UNOS program, 478 pairs were matched in 16 baseline predictors and follow-up time employing a predicted probability of group membership. The primary outcome was kidney allograft survival. Main secondary outcomes were rejection, allograft failure attributed to rejection, and mortality. Results Matched pairs were predominantly women (81%) with the mean age of 36 years. 96% were on dialysis before transplantation. 89% of recipients received kidneys from deceased donors and 15.5% from expanded criteria donors. 12% of recipients had zero HLA mismatch. African-Americans compared to Hispanic-Americans had lower cumulative allograft survival during 12-year follow-up ( p < 0.001). African-Americans compared to Hispanic-Americans had higher rates of rejection (10.4 vs 6.73 events/100 patients-years; p = 0.0002) and allograft failure attributed to rejection (6.31 vs 3.99; p = 0.0023). However, African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans had similar mortality rates (2.71 vs 2.31; p = 0.4269). Conclusions African-Americans compared to Hispanic-Americans with lupus had lower kidney allograft survival when recognized risk factors of rejection were matched between groups.

  6. Vascularized composite allograft-specific characteristics of immune responses.

    PubMed

    Issa, Fadi

    2016-06-01

    Vascularized composite allograft (VCA) transplantation, or reconstructive transplantation, has revolutionized the treatment of complex tissue and functional defects. Despite arriving during an age in which the immunology of solid organ transplant rejection has been investigated in much detail, these transplants have offered new perspectives from which to explore the immunobiology of transplantation. VCAs have a number of unique molecular, cellular, and architectural features which alter the character and intensity of the rejection response. While much is yet to be clarified, an understanding of these distinct mechanisms affords new possibilities for the control of immune responses in an effort to improve outcomes after VCA transplantation.

  7. Prevention of allograft tolerance by bacterial infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongmin; Chen, Luqiu; Ahmed, Emily; Ma, Lianli; Yin, Dengping; Zhou, Ping; Shen, Jikun; Xu, Honglin; Wang$, Chyung-Ru; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to certain viruses and parasites has been shown to prevent the induction of transplantation tolerance in mice, via generation of cross-reactive memory T cell responses or induction of bystander activation. Bacterial infections are common in the peri-operative period of solid organ allograft recipients in the clinic, and correlations between bacterial infections and acute allograft rejection have been reported. However, whether bacterial infections at the time of transplantation have any effect on the generation of transplantation tolerance remains to be established. We used the Gram-positive intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (LM) as a model pathogen, as its effects on immune responses are well described. Peri-operative LM infection prevented cardiac and skin allograft acceptance induced by anti-CD154 and donor-specific transfusion (DST) in mice. LM-mediated rejection was not due to the generation of cross-reactive T cells and was largely independent of signaling via MyD88, an adaptor for most toll-like receptors (TLRs), IL-1 and IL-18. Instead, transplant rejection following LM infection was dependent on the expression of the phagosome-lysing pore-former listeriolysin O (LLO) and on IFNα/βR signaling. Our results indicate that bacterial exposure at the time of transplantation can antagonize tolerogenic regimens by enhancing alloantigen-specific immune responses, independent from the generation of cross-reactive memory T cells. PMID:18424719

  8. Bortezomib for refractory antibody-mediated cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Peter M; Thorsgard, Marit; Maurer, David; Kim, Youngki; Alloway, Rita R; Woodle, E Steve

    2009-01-01

    This experience demonstrates that a bortezomib-based regimen provided effective therapy for late, refractory AMR in an adult heart transplant recipient and was well tolerated. This remarkably positive experience despite the refractory nature of the AMR episode argues strongly for continued evaluation of bortezomib use in this patient population.

  9. Kidney allograft survival of African American and Caucasian American recipients with lupus.

    PubMed

    Contreras, G; Li, H; Gonzalez-Suarez, M; Isakova, T; Scialla, J J; Pedraza, F; Mattiazzi, A; Diaz-Wong, R; Sageshima, J; Brito, Y; Guerra, G; Acevedo, B; Sajid Ali, A; Kershaw, T J; Chen, L; Burke, G W; Kupin, W; Ciancio, G; Roth, D

    2014-02-01

    African Americans with lupus who receive kidney transplants have high prevalence of predictors of allograft failure, which can explain their poor outcomes. Of 1223 African Americans and 1029 Caucasian Americans with lupus who received kidney transplants from deceased donors between 1987 and 2006 with complete records in the UNOS program, 741 pairs were matched in 16 predictors employing a predicted probability of group membership. The primary outcome was allograft failure. Main secondary outcomes were rejection, allograft failure due to rejection, and mortality. Matched pairs were predominantly women (82%) with a mean age of 39 years. Twenty-four percent of recipients received kidneys from expanded criteria donors. African Americans and Caucasian Americans matched well (p ≥ 0.05): donor age, gender and race; recipient age, gender, education and insurance; dialysis prior to transplant, kidneys from expanded criteria donors, cold ischemia time, history of prior kidney transplant, panel reactive antibodies, human leukocyte antigens mismatch, blood type compatibility, transplant Era, and follow-up time. Contrary to the unmatched cohort with significantly higher allograft failure rate (events per 100 patient-years) in African Americans compared to Caucasian Americans (10.49 vs 6.18, p<0.001), matched pairs had similar allograft failure rates (8.41 vs 7.81, p=0.418). Matched pairs also had similar rates of rejections (9.82 vs 9.39, p=0.602), allograft failure due to rejection (6.19 vs 5.71, p=0.453), and mortality (2.79 vs 3.52, p=0.097). In lupus recipients of kidney transplants from deceased donors, African American and Caucasian Americans have similar allograft failure rates when predictors are matched between groups.

  10. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products.

  11. Corneal graft rejection occurs despite Fas ligand expression and apoptosis of infiltrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K A; Standfield, S D; Smith, J R; Coster, D J

    2005-01-01

    Background/aims: Constitutive expression of Fas ligand (CD95L) protects the eye against cell mediated immune responses by inducing apoptosis in infiltrating Fas bearing T cells. This study was designed to examine Fas ligand expression on acutely rejecting rat corneal grafts and to investigate the kinetics of induction of apoptosis in infiltrating leucocytes. Methods: Orthotopic penetrating corneal transplantation was performed between genetically disparate inbred rats. Fas ligand expression and the phenotype of infiltrating leucocytes were examined by immunohistochemistry. Apoptotic nuclei were visualised in sections of normal rat cornea, rejecting allografts, and time matched isografts by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP biotin nick end labelling (TUNEL) and quantified by video image analysis. Staining with Hoechst dye 33258 was used to confirm the presence of apoptotic nuclei. Results: Fas ligand was expressed on corneal endothelial and epithelial cells during acute corneal graft rejection. At all time points examined, including as early as the fifth postoperative day, the cells infiltrating both corneal isografts and allografts were TUNEL positive. By the 15th postoperative day, over 90% of all nuclei, many of which were T cells, were apoptotic. Conclusion: Expression of Fas ligand is not downregulated on the cornea during allograft rejection and infiltrating leucocytes in both isografts and allografts die rapidly in situ. Despite the death of the cells believed to be responsible for rejection, isografts survive indefinitely whereas allografts are irreparably damaged. PMID:15834099

  12. The role of complement in antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stegall, Mark D; Chedid, Marcio F; Cornell, Lynn D

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have suggested that the complement system has an active role in both acute and chronic allograft rejection. These studies have been facilitated by improved techniques to detect antibody-mediated organ rejection, including immunohistological staining for C4d deposition in the allograft and solid-phase assays that identify donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) in the serum of transplant recipients. Studies with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against complement component C5, have shown that activation of the terminal complement pathway is necessary for the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection in recipients of living-donor kidney allografts who have high levels of DSAs. The extent to which complement activation drives chronic antibody-mediated injury leading to organ rejection is less clear. In chronic antibody-mediated injury, early complement activation might facilitate chemotaxis of inflammatory cells into the allograft in a process that later becomes somewhat independent of DSA levels and complement factors. In this Review, we discuss the different roles that the complement system might have in antibody-mediated allograft rejection, with specific emphasis on renal transplantation.

  13. Chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Vadivel, Nidyanandh; Tullius, Stefan G; Chandraker, Anil

    2007-07-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) remains the Achilles heel of renal transplantation. In spite of the significant strides achieved in one-year renal allograft survival with newer immunosuppressant strategies, the fate of long-term renal allograft survival remains unchanged. The number of renal transplant recipients returning to dialysis has doubled in the past decade. This is especially important since these patients pose a significantly increased likelihood of dying while on the waiting list for retransplantation, due to increasing disparity between donor organ availability versus demand and longer waiting time secondary to heightened immunologic sensitization from their prior transplants. In this review we analyze the latest literature in detail and discuss the definition, natural history, pathophysiology, alloantigen dependent and independent factors that play a crucial role in CAN and the potential newer therapeutic targets on the horizon. This article highlights the importance of early identification and careful management of all the potential contributing factors with particular emphasis on prevention rather than cure of CAN as the core management strategy.

  14. Postransplant lymphoproliferative disorder localized near the allograft in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kew, C E; Lopez-Ben, R; Smith, J K; Robbin, M L; Cook, W J; Gaston, R S; Deierhoi, M H; Julian, B A

    2000-03-15

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), a complication of immunosuppression, develops in approximately 1% of renal allograft recipients. Typically, PTLD is a proliferation of B-cells associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection; it is said to be most often a systemic disease. Involvement occasionally is localized near the allograft. This is a retrospective analysis of all cases of PTLD in recipients of 1474 renal transplants performed at University of Alabama at Birmingham between 1993 and 1997. Of 14 patients developing PTLD, 10 had disease localized near the allograft. The mean interval from transplantation to diagnosis was 221 +/- 70 days. All patients presented with renal dysfunction; an ultrasound examination revealed a hilar mass, with hydronephrosis in five and stenosis of renal vessels in eight. No patient had lymphadenopathy, according to computerized tomographic or magnetic resonance imaging findings. After reduction of immunosuppressive therapy, seven required a nephrectomy because of rejection, progressive dysfunction, or mass enlargement. Tissue recovered in four patients was consistent with PTLD; the tumors in the remaining three patients were unresectable and regressed. One patient died 1 month after a nephrectomy, and another died 4 years after surgery; neither had evidence of PTLD when they died. Three patients retain functional grafts without clinical or radiographical evidence of progression. All patients with disseminated disease died. In a large cohort of renal allograft recipients, PTLD affected 1%. Disease localized near the allograft was the most common variant. For most patients with localized disease, the outcome was graft loss, and the mortality was low. Localized PTLD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of allograft dysfunction in the 1st posttransplant year.

  15. Antibody-Mediated Rejection: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Jorge Carlos; Giusti, Sixto; Staffeld-Coit, Catherine; Bohorquez, Humberto; Cohen, Ari J.; Loss, George E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic antibody injury is a serious threat to allograft outcomes and is therefore the center of active research. In the continuum of allograft rejection, the development of antibodies plays a critical role. In recent years, an increased recognition of molecular and histologic changes has provided a better understanding of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), as well as potential therapeutic interventions. However, several pathways are still unknown, which accounts for the lack of efficacy of some of the currently available agents that are used to treat rejection. Methods: We review the current diagnostic criteria for AMR; AMR paradigms; and desensitization, treatment, and prevention strategies. Results: Chronic antibody-mediated endothelial injury results in transplant glomerulopathy, manifested as glomerular basement membrane duplication, double contouring, or splitting. Clinical manifestations of AMR include proteinuria and a rise in serum creatinine. Current strategies for the treatment of AMR include antibody depletion with plasmapheresis (PLEX), immunoadsorption (IA), immunomodulation with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and T cell– or B cell–depleting agents. Some treatment benefits have been found in using PLEX and IA, and some small nonrandomized trials have identified some benefits in using rituximab and the proteasome inhibitor-based therapy bortezomib. More recent histologic follow-ups of patients treated with bortezomib have not shown significant benefits in terms of allograft outcomes. Furthermore, no specific treatment approaches have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Other agents used for more difficult rejections include bortezomib and eculizumab (an anti-C5 monoclonal antibody). Conclusion: AMR is a fascinating field with ample opportunities for research and progress in the future. Despite the use of advanced techniques for the detection of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) or non-HLA donor-specific antibodies

  16. Minimizing the risk of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Wali, Ravinder K

    2009-04-27

    Chronic allograft nephropathy, now defined as interstital fibrosis and tubular atrophy not otherwise specified, is a near universal finding in transplant kidney biopsies by the end of the first decade posttransplantation. After excluding death with functioning graft, caused by cardiovascular disease or malignancy, chronic allograft nephropathy is the leading cause of graft failure. Original assumptions were that this was not a modifiable process but inexorable, likely due to past kidney injuries. However, newer understandings suggest that acute or subacute processes are involved, and with proper diagnosis, appropriate interventions can be instituted. Our method involved a review of the primary and secondary prevention trials in calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal. Some of the more important causes of progressive graft deterioration include subclinical cellular or humoral rejection, and chronic calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. Early graft biopsy, assessment of histology, and changes in immunosuppression may be some of the most important measures available to protect graft function. The avoidance of clinical inertia in pursuing subtle changes in graft function is critical. Modification in maintenance immunosuppression may benefit many patients with early evidence of graft deterioration.

  17. Complement component 3 deficiency prolongs MHC-II disparate skin allograft survival by increasing the CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells population

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Quan-you; Liang, Shen-ju; Li, Gui-qing; Lv, Yan-bo; Li, You; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Gui-lian; Zhang, Ke-qin

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that complement system contributes to allograft rejection. However, its underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Herein, we investigate the role of complement component 3 (C3) in a single MHC-II molecule mismatched murine model of allograft rejection using C3 deficient mice (C3−/−) as skin graft donors or recipients. Compared with C3+/+ B6 allografts, C3−/− B6 grafts dramatically prolonged survival in MHC-II molecule mismatched H-2bm12 B6 recipients, indicating that C3 plays a critical role in allograft rejection. Compared with C3+/+ allografts, both Th17 cell infiltration and Th1/Th17 associated cytokine mRNA levels were clearly reduced in C3−/− allografts. Moreover, C3−/− allografts caused attenuated Th1/Th17 responses, but increased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cell expression markedly in local intragraft and H-2bm12 recipients. Depletion of Treg cells by anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody (mAb) negated the survival advantages conferred by C3 deficiency. Our results indicate for the first time that C3 deficiency can prolong MHC-II molecule mismatched skin allograft survival, which is further confirmed to be associated with increased CD4+ CD25+ Treg cell population expansion and attenuated Th1/Th17 response. PMID:27641978

  18. International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working formulation of a standardized nomenclature for cardiac allograft vasculopathy-2010.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Dipchand, Anne; Ensminger, Stephan M; Hiemann, Nicola E; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Madsen, Joren; Parameshwar, Jayan; Starling, Randall C; Uber, Patricia A

    2010-07-01

    The development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains the Achilles heel of cardiac transplantation. Unfortunately, the definitions of cardiac allograft vasculopathy are diverse, and there are no uniform international standards for the nomenclature of this entity. This consensus document, commissioned by the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Board, is based on best evidence and clinical consensus derived from critical analysis of available information pertaining to angiography, intravascular ultrasound imaging, microvascular function, cardiac allograft histology, circulating immune markers, non-invasive imaging tests, and gene-based and protein-based biomarkers. This document represents a working formulation for an international nomenclature of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, similar to the development of the system for adjudication of cardiac allograft rejection by histology.

  19. Allograft biopsy findings in patients with small bowel transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jamie; Dawson, David W; Dry, Sarah; French, Samuel W; Naini, Bita V; Wang, Hanlin L

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we sought to determine the incidence of post-transplant complications including acute cellular rejection (ACR), infection, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in mucosal allograft biopsies in patients with small bowel transplant at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed pathology reports from 5675 small bowel allograft biopsies from 99 patients and analyzed the following: indications for biopsy, frequency and grade of ACR, the presence of infectious agents, results of workup for potential PTLD, results of C4d immunohistochemistry (IHC), features of chronic mucosal injury, and findings in concurrent native bowel biopsies. Findings from 42 allograft resection specimens were also correlated with prior biopsy findings. Indeterminate, mild, moderate, and severe ACR were seen in 276 (4.9%), 409 (7.2%), 100 (1.8%), and 207 (3.6%) of biopsies, respectively. Although ACR may show histologic overlap with mycophenolate mofetil toxicity, we found the analysis of concurrent native bowel biopsies to be helpful in this distinction. Adenovirus was the most common infectious agent seen (11%), and we routinely performed adenovirus IHC on biopsies. Eighteen patients (18%) developed PTLD, 83% of which were EBV associated, but only 28% of PTLD cases were diagnosed on mucosal allograft biopsies. C4d IHC did not correlate with the presence of donor-specific antibodies in limited cases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Prolonged cardiac allograft survival in mouse model after complement depletion with Yunnan cobra venom factor.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Wang, H-D; Zhu, X-X; Lan, G; Yang, K

    2009-12-01

    Activation of the complement system is the leading mechanism that causes antibody-mediated acute rejection and hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. The major cause of acute rejection in allogeneic transplantation is the T cell-mediated specific immune response. We studied the effects of complement on acute rejection after cardiac allotransplantation using complement depletion with cobra venom factor (CVF) in the mouse. The Balb/c-C57 mouse model of heterotopic cardiac allograft was used. The mice were divided into 2 groups, a control group and a CVF-treated group. After intravenous injection of CVF, the experimental group was observed for allograft survival time. Twelve mice from the control and experimental groups were sacrificed on days 3, 5, and 7 after the operation. The pathologic grade of acute rejection, deposition of C3 in tissue, extent of infiltration by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and expression of MHC-II, B7-1, and B7-2 were compared between the 2 groups. In the CVF-treated group, mean (SD) survival of the cardiac allograft was 26.2 (1.7) days, and in the control group was 8.4 (0.4) days (P < .01). Pathologic examination and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the grade of acute rejection, deposition of C3 in tissue, extent of infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and expression of MHC-II, B7-1, and B7-2 were significantly decreased in the CVF-treated group. Depletion of complement in the serum with CVF inhibits acute cardiac allograft rejection in the mouse.

  1. Inability of donor total body irradiation to prolong survival of vascularized bone allografts: Experimental study in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez del Pino, J.; Benito, M.; Randolph, M.A.; Weiland, A.J. )

    1990-07-01

    At the present time, the toxic side effects of recipient immunosuppression cannot be justified for human non-vital organ transplantation. Total body irradiation has proven effective in ablating various bone-marrow-derived and endothelial immunocompetent cellular populations, which are responsible for immune rejection against donor tissues. Irradiation at a dose of 10 Gy was given to donor rats six days prior to heterotopic transplantation of vascularized bone allografts to host animals. Another group of recipient rats also received a short-term (sixth to fourteenth day after grafting), low dose of cyclosporine. Total body irradiation was able merely to delay rejection of grafts across a strong histocompatibility barrier for one to two weeks, when compared to nonirradiated allografts. The combination of donor irradiation plus cyclosporine did not delay the immune response, and the rejection score was similar to that observed for control allografts. Consequently, allograft viability was quickly impaired, leading to irreversible bone damage. This study suggest that 10 Gy of donor total body irradiation delivered six days prior to grafting cannot circumvent the immune rejection in a vascularized allograft of bone across a strong histocompatibility barrier.

  2. Allograft pretreatment for the repair of sciatic nerve defects: green tea polyphenols versus radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng-hu; Zhen, Ping; Li, Shen-song; Liang, Xiao-yan; Gao, Ming-xuan; Tian, Qi; Li, Xu-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment of nerve allografts by exposure to irradiation or green tea polyphenols can eliminate neuroimmunogenicity, inhibit early immunological rejection, encourage nerve regeneration and functional recovery, improve tissue preservation, and minimize postoperative infection. In the present study, we investigate which intervention achieves better results. We produced a 1.0 cm sciatic nerve defect in rats, and divided the rats into four treatment groups: autograft, fresh nerve allograft, green tea polyphenol-pretreated (1 mg/mL, 4°C) nerve allograft, and irradiation-pretreated nerve allograft (26.39 Gy/min for 12 hours; total 19 kGy). The animals were observed, and sciatic nerve electrophysiology, histology, and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at 6 and 12 weeks after grafting. The circumference and structure of the transplanted nerve in rats that received autografts or green tea polyphenol-pretreated nerve allografts were similar to those of the host sciatic nerve. Compared with the groups that received fresh or irradiation-pretreated nerve allografts, motor nerve conduction velocity in the autograft and fresh nerve allograft groups was greater, more neurites grew into the allografts, Schwann cell proliferation was evident, and a large number of new blood vessels was observed; in addition, massive myelinated nerve fibers formed, and abundant microfilaments and microtubules were present in the axoplasm. Our findings indicate that nerve allografts pretreated by green tea polyphenols are equivalent to transplanting autologous nerves in the repair of sciatic nerve defects, and promote nerve regeneration. Pretreatment using green tea polyphenols is better than pretreatment with irradiation. PMID:25788934

  3. In situ expression of cytokines in human heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Van Hoffen, E; Van Wichen, D; Stuij, I; De Jonge, N; Klöpping, C; Lahpor, J; Van Den Tweel, J; Gmelig-Meyling, F; De Weger, R

    1996-12-01

    Although allograft rejection, the major complication of human organ transplantation, has been extensively studied, little is known about the exact cellular localization of the cytokine expression inside the graft during rejection. Therefore, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to study local cytokine mRNA and protein expression in human heart allografts, in relation to the phenotypical characteristics of the cellular infiltrate. Clear expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-9, and IL-10 and weak expression for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was detected in biopsies exhibiting high rejection grades (grade 3A/B). Also at lower grades of rejection, mRNA for IL-6 and IL-9 was present. Some mRNA for IL-1 beta, TNF-beta, and interferon (IFN)-gamma was detected in only a few biopsies. Using immunohistochemistry, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-10 protein was detected in biopsies with high rejection grades, whereas few cells expressed IL-6, IL-8, and IFN-gamma. In biopsies with lower grades of rejection, a weaker expression of these cytokines was observed. IL-4 was hardly detected in any of the biopsies. The level of IL-12 expression was equal in all biopsies. Although mRNA expression of several cytokines was expressed at a low level compared with the protein level of those cytokines, there was a good correlation between localization of cytokine mRNA and protein. Expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma was mainly detected in lymphocytes. IL-3, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 were not detected or not only detected in lymphocytes but also in other stromal elements (eg, macrophages). Macrophage production of IL-3 and IL-12 was confirmed by immunofluorescent double labeling with CD68. We conclude that cardiac allograft rejection is not simply regulated by T helper cell cytokine production, but other intragraft elements contribute considerably to this process.

  4. [Chronic rejection: Differences and similarities in various solid organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Suhling, H; Gottlieb, J; Bara, C; Taubert, R; Jäckel, E; Schiffer, M; Bräsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, chronic rejections after transplantation of the lungs, heart, liver, and kidney are described. Chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) plays an important role in all of these transplantations and has a significant influence on patient survival. The pathophysiological reasons for CAD varies greatly in the various organs.Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is the most important determinant of survival and quality of life after lung transplantation. Diagnosis is based on lung function, especially forced expiratory flow in 1 s (FEV1) decline. Prevention, early detection, and rapid treatment are extremely important. Azithromycin and extracorporeal photopheresis are commonly used for treatment because they usually positively influence the progression of lung remodeling.The expression for chronic rejection of the heart is cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Immunological and nonimmunological factors are important for its development. Due to limited therapeutic options, prevention is of utmost importance (administration of mTOR inhibitors and minimizing cardiovascular risk factors).The mid- and long-term survival rates after liver transplantation have hardly changed in recent decades, which is an indication of the difficulty in diagnosing chronic graft dysfunction. Chronic ductopenic rejection accounts for a small proportion of late graft dysfunction. Idiopathic posttransplant hepatitis and de novo autoimmune hepatitis are important in addition to recurrence of the underlying disease that led to transplantation.Chronic allograft nephropathy is the result of severe rejection which cumulates in increasing fibrosis with remodeling. The earliest possible diagnosis and therapy is currently the only option. Diagnosis is based on evidence of donor-specific antibodies and histological findings.

  5. The Potential of MicroRNAs as Novel Biomarkers for Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Kawakita, Satoru; Everly, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The control of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs, miR) influences many cellular functions, including cellular differentiation, cell proliferation, cell development, and functional regulation of the immune system. Recently, miRNAs have been detected in serum, plasma, and urine and circulating miR profiles have been associated with a variety of diseases. Rejection is one of the major causes of allograft failure and preventing and treating acute rejection are the central task for clinicians working with transplant patients. Invasive biopsies used in monitoring rejection are burdensome and risky to transplant patients. Novel and easily accessible biomarkers of acute rejection could make it possible to detect rejection earlier and make more fine-tuned calibration of immunosuppressive or new target treatment possible. In this review, we discuss whether circulating miRNA can serve as an early noninvasive diagnostic biomarker and an expression fingerprint of allograft rejection and transplant failure. Understanding the regulatory interplay of relevant miRNAs and the rejecting allograft will result in a better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of alloimmune injury. PMID:28191475

  6. Bacterial contamination of allografts.

    PubMed

    Barrios, R H; Leyes, M; Amillo, S; Oteiza, C

    1994-01-01

    The risk of bacterial infection through allogenic bone transplantation is one of the major problems facing tissue banks. The purpose of this study is to report the contamination rate in 987 grafts obtained under strictly aseptic conditions, between 1989 and 1992. The grafts were stored at -80 degrees C (cortical bone and tendons) and -40 degrees C (cancellous bone). The overall contamination rate was 6.6%, with Gram-positive bacteria responsible for 80% of the positive cultures. We discuss the sources of contamination, the most frequently isolated bacteria and the steps in the donation and transplantation procedures that help to reduce the risk of contamination. We conclude that the methods of acquisition, processing and storage of tissues are effective in making sterile allografts available.

  7. Bacterial contamination of allografts.

    PubMed

    Barrios, R H; Leyes, M; Amillo, S; Oteiza, C

    1994-01-01

    The risk of bacterial infection through allogeneic bone transplantation is one of the problems facing tissue banks. The purpose of this study is to report the contamination rate in 987 grafts obtained under strictly aseptic conditions, between 1989 and 1992. The grafts were stored at -80 degrees C (cortical bone and tendons) and -40 degrees C (cancellous bone). The overall contamination rate was 6.6%, with Gram-positive bacteria responsible for 80% of the positive cultures. We discuss the sources of contamination, the most frequently isolated bacteria and the steps in the donation and transplantation procedures that help to reduce the risk of contamination. We conclude that the methods of procurement, processing and storage of tissues are effective in making sterile allografts available.

  8. Immunohistological observations in rat kidney allografts after local steroid administration

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    In this report we investigated local regulatory mechanisms in graft rejection and their response to local immunosuppressive therapy. For this purpose local immunosuppression was induced in rat kidney allografts by intrarenal infusion of prednisolone. Intrarenal drug delivery resulted in high drug levels within the graft and low systemic drug levels. Systemic drug levels were by themselves not sufficiently immunosuppressive to induce graft survival, and local prednisolone levels within the graft proved to be responsible for prolongation of graft survival. During intrarenal drug delivery, systemic responsiveness to the renal allograft proved normal, since intrarenally treated grafts were infiltrated by MHC class II-positive host cells and, except for a somewhat lower percentage of macrophages, cellular infiltration in intrarenal treated grafts was comparable to untreated grafts. However, T cells and macrophages present in intrarenally treated grafts were not able to destroy the grafted tissue. Local immunosuppressive therapy resulted in inhibition of IL-2-R expression, absence of IFN-gamma, and prevention of MHC class II induction on grafted tissue. These observations strongly indicate the presence of local regulatory mechanisms in graft rejection. The experimental model described can be used for further analysis of these intragraft events. Moreover, the results demonstrate that local immunosuppressive therapy can contribute to effective inhibition of cellular immune response in graft rejection. PMID:3119756

  9. Lung rejection occurs in lung transplant recipients with blood chimerism.

    PubMed

    Knoop, C; Andrien, M; Defleur, V; Antoine, M; de Francquen, P; Goldman, M; Estenne, M

    1997-07-15

    It has been postulated that chimerism after transplantation might promote graft acceptance. In the present study, we prospectively assessed blood chimerism in 10 lung transplant recipients during the first posttransplant year and investigated whether chimerism was associated with an immunologically stable situation of the graft. The recipients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained before transplantation and at various time points during the first postoperative year. Donor cells were detected using nested polymerase chain reaction amplification of a donor-specific HLA-DRB1 allele. Clinical graft acceptance was determined by the number of rejection episodes. The incidence of blood chimerism was high during the first 3 postoperative months and then decreased over time. All patients experienced at least one acute rejection episode, and three patients developed chronic rejection. We, thus, conclude that rejection of the lung allograft may occur in the presence of blood chimerism.

  10. Primary vascularization of allografts governs their immunogenicity and susceptibility to tolerogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Cavit D.; Akiyama, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Katsunori; Shea, Susan; Connolly, Sarah E; Germana, Sharon; Winn, Henry J.; LeGuern, Christian; Tocco, Georges; Benichou, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of allograft primary vascularization on alloimmunity, rejection and tolerance in mice. First, we showed that fully allogeneic primarily vascularized and conventional skin transplants were rejected at the same pace. Remarkably, however, short-term treatment of mice with anti-CD40L antibodies achieved long-term survival of vascularized skin and cardiac transplants but not conventional skin grafts. Non-vascularized skin transplants triggered vigorous direct and indirect pro-inflammatory type 1 T cell responses (IL-2 and γIFN) while primarily-vascularized skin allografts failed to trigger a significant indirect alloresponse. Similar lack of indirect alloreactivity was also observed after placement of different vascularized organ transplants including hearts and kidneys while hearts placed under the skin (non-vascularized) triggers potent indirect alloresponses. Altogether, these results suggest that primary vascularization of allografts is associated with lack of indirect T cell alloreactivity. Finally, we show that long-term survival of vascularized skin allografts induced by anti-CD40L antibodies was associated with a combined lack of indirect alloresponse and a shift of the direct alloresponse towards a type 2 cytokine (IL-4, IL-10) secretion pattern but no activation/expansion of regulatory T cells. Therefore, primary vascularization of allografts governs their immunogenicity and tolerogenicity. PMID:23833234

  11. Expression of fibronectin splicing variants in organ transplantation: a differential pattern between rat cardiac allografts and isografts.

    PubMed Central

    Coito, A. J.; Brown, L. F.; Peters, J. H.; Kupiec-Weglinski, J. W.; van de Water, L.

    1997-01-01

    Allograft rejection is associated with infiltration of inflammatory cells and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. The extent to which diversity in the extracellular matrix regulates inflammatory cell function in transplants remains unclear. One group of extracellular matrix proteins, termed fibronectins (FNs), exhibits inherent diversity as a consequence of alternative splicing in three segments: EIIIA, EIIIB, or V. Although the EIIIA segment has documented functions in mesenchymal cell differentiation, neither this segment nor the EIIIB segment have been tested for effects specific to leukocyte functions. By contrast, the V region can include the CS-1 segment to which leukocytes may adhere through alpha 4 beta 1 integrins. In this study, we demonstrate that EIIIA+, EIIIB+, and V+ FN variants are synthesized, primarily by macrophages in distinct temporal and spatial patterns in two rat cardiac transplant models: either with antigenic challenge, allografts, or without challenge, isografts. The ratio of EIIIA inclusion into FN increases by day 1 in allografts and isografts and remains high until allografts are rejected (approximately 7 days) but falls to normal levels in tolerated isografts (day 6). EIIIB+ FN ratios in allografts peak later than do EIIIA+ FNs (day 4). EIIIB+ FN ratios remain relatively low in isografts. Interestingly, EIIIA+ and EIIIB+ FNs are deposited prominently in the myocardium of rejecting allografts in close association with infiltrating leukocytes, and FN expression and deposition are prominent at sites of infarction. By contrast, these FNs are largely restricted to the epicardium and to a lesser degree in the immediately adjacent myocardium in isografts. CS-1+ FNs increase in allografts and isografts at 3 hours after transplantation but are particularly prominent in allografts 1 to 3 days before rejection. Our data suggest that FN splicing variants have a differential role in the effector functions of leukocytes in allografts and

  12. Systemic overexpression of matricellular protein CCN1 exacerbates obliterative bronchiolitis in mouse tracheal allografts.

    PubMed

    Raissadati, Alireza; Nykänen, Antti I; Tuuminen, Raimo; Syrjälä, Simo O; Krebs, Rainer; Arnaudova, Ralica; Rouvinen, Eeva; Wang, Xiaomin; Poller, Wolfgang; Lemström, Karl B

    2015-12-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) involves airway epithelial detachment, fibroproliferation, and inflammation, resulting in chronic rejection and transplant failure. Cysteine-rich 61 (CCN1) is an integrin receptor antagonist with a context-dependent role in inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes. We used a mouse tracheal OB model to investigate the role of CCN1 in the development of lung allograft OB. C57Bl/6 mice received a systemic injection of CCN1-expressing adenoviral vectors 2 days prior to subcutaneous implantation of tracheal allografts from major MHC-mismatched BALB/c mice. We treated another group of tracheal allograft recipients with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide to dissect the role of αvβ3-integrin signaling in mediating CCN1 effects in tracheal allografts. Allografts were removed 4 weeks after transplantation and analyzed for luminal occlusion, inflammation, and vasculogenesis. CCN1 overexpression induced luminal occlusion (P < 0.05), fibroproliferation, and smooth muscle cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Selective activation of αvβ3-integrin receptor failed to mimic the actions of CCN1, and blocking failed to inhibit the effects of CCN1 in tracheal allografts. In conclusion, CCN1 exacerbates tracheal OB by enhancing fibroproliferation via an αvβ3-integrin-independent pathway. Further experiments are required to uncover its potentially harmful role in the development of OB after lung transplantation.

  13. Expression of growth arrest-specific gene 6 and its receptors in dysfunctional human renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian L; Hambly, Brett D; Bao, Shi S; Painter, Dorothy; Bishop, G Alex; Eris, Josette M

    2003-09-01

    Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and its receptors Rse, Axl and Mer have recently been found to be involved in a rat model of chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Thus, in this study we investigated the function of Gas6 and its receptors in human renal allograft dysfunction. Expression of Gas6 and its receptors was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Gas6 and its receptors were widely expressed in glomeruli, tubules and vessels of renal allografts. Gas6 expression was detected in normal-functioning allografts and was increased in acute rejection ( P<0.05), acute tubular necrosis ( P<0.05) and CAN ( P<0.01). Gas6 receptors were not upregulated in any of the allograft groups, except for the Axl receptor, which increased only in acute tubular necrosis ( P<0.01). Gas6 expression was also found to correspond with the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, a general marker of CAN ( r(2)=0.21, P<0.01). These findings suggest that Gas6, acting as a growth factor, is increased in the process of kidney allograft dysfunction and in CAN.

  14. A case of acute humoral rejection in liver transplantation: successful treatment with plasmapheresis and mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Rostron, Anthony; Carter, Vaughan; Mutunga, Mbithe; Cavanagh, Gary; O'Suilleabhain, Criostoir; Burt, Alistair; Jaques, Bryon; Talbot, David; Manas, Derek

    2005-11-01

    We present a case of a 23-year-old female who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLTx) for biliary atresia, 22 years after a failed Kasai operation. Unusually, her postoperative course was complicated by severe acute humoral rejection. In this case report, we discuss her management as well as the role of plasmapheresis in treating allograft dysfunction secondary to acute humoral rejection in liver transplant patients.

  15. Effector Mechanisms of Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Aurélie; Varey, Emilie; Anegon, Ignacio; Cuturi, Maria-Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Organ transplantation appears today to be the best alternative to replace the loss of vital organs induced by various diseases. Transplants can, however, also be rejected by the recipient. In this review, we provide an overview of the mechanisms and the cells/molecules involved in acute and chronic rejections. T cells and B cells mainly control the antigen-specific rejection and act either as effector, regulatory, or memory cells. On the other hand, nonspecific cells such as endothelial cells, NK cells, macrophages, or polymorphonuclear cells are also crucial actors of transplant rejection. Last, beyond cells, the high contribution of antibodies, chemokines, and complement molecules in graft rejection is discussed in this article. The understanding of the different components involved in graft rejection is essential as some of them are used in the clinic as biomarkers to detect and quantify the level of rejection. PMID:24186491

  16. Morphological changes on small-bowel fetal allografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Resende, Vanessa Contato Lopes; Montero, Edna Frasson de Souza; Leão, Jovelino Quintino De Souza; Manna, Mônica Cecília Bochetti; Koike, Márcia Kiyomi; Pedrosa, Marcelo Eduardo; Simões, Manuel De Jesus

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the early morphological development and acute rejection process in fetal intestine allografts. Grafts from C57BL/6 fetal intestines were implanted in an avascular form in BALB/C recipients. A syngeneic group of animals was used to compare the evolution. The allogeneic recipients were distributed in 6 groups, according to the day of sacrifice (3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 10th postoperational day (POD)) and the control group on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th POD. These grafts were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological evaluation, in agreement with the classification of Auber et al. (Chirurgie 123:122-130, 1998). Data showed a progressive development of the graft until POD 5. On POD 3 and 4, a top grade of development and an initial rejection were observed. From POD 5-7 and on POD 10, the acute rejection reaction was more important than the development process. The higher level of rejection was observed on POD 10, and it was similar to the 7th POD. Our results showed good graft development until POD 5. After that, the acute rejection response impeded analysis of the development process. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. High-Throughput Proteomic Approaches to the Elucidation of Potential Biomarkers of Chronic Allograft Injury (CAI)

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Hilary; Slyne, Jennifer; Frain, Helena; Slattery, Craig; Ryan, Michael P.; McMorrow, Tara

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the role of OMICs technologies, concentrating in particular on proteomics, in biomarker discovery in chronic allograft injury (CAI). CAI is the second most prevalent cause of allograft dysfunction and loss in the first decade post-transplantation, after death with functioning graft (DWFG). The term CAI, sometimes referred to as chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), describes the deterioration of renal allograft function and structure as a result of immunological processes (chronic antibody-mediated rejection), and other non-immunological factors such as calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) induced nephrotoxicity, hypertension and infection. Current methods for assessing allograft function are costly, insensitive and invasive; traditional kidney function measurements such as serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) display poor predictive abilities, while the current “gold-standard” involving histological diagnosis with a renal biopsy presents its own inherent risks to the overall health of the allograft. As early as two years post-transplantation, protocol biopsies have shown more than 50% of allograft recipients have mild CAN; ten years post-transplantation more than 50% of the allograft recipients have progressed to severe CAN which is associated with diminishing graft function. Thus, there is a growing medical requirement for minimally invasive biomarkers capable of identifying the early stages of the disease which would allow for timely intervention. Proteomics involves the study of the expression, localization, function and interaction of the proteome. Proteomic technologies may be powerful tools used to identify novel biomarkers which would predict CAI in susceptible individuals. In this paper we will review the use of proteomics in the elucidation of novel predictive biomarkers of CAI in clinical, animal and in vitro studies. PMID:28250402

  18. [Hand allografts: experience from Lyon team].

    PubMed

    Gazarian, A; Abrahamyan, D-O; Petruzzo, P; Kanitakis, J; Guigal, V; Garret, J; Rizzo, C; Durand, P-Y; Fredenucci, J-F; Streichenberger, T; Parmentier, H; Galewicz, T; Guillot, M; Sirigu, A; Burloux, G; Morelon, E; Braye, F; Badet, L; Martin, X; Dubernard, J-M; Eljaafari, A

    2007-10-01

    Hand allograft is a method in the stage of clinical experimentation, which is reserved in France for the treatment of bilateral traumatic amputees. This study reports the Lyon team experience, which is pioneer in this domain. Four patients (3 males and 1 female) underwent seven (one unilateral and three bilateral) hand transplantations from September 1998 to February 2007. The level of amputation was at the wrist or at the mid-forearm. Delay since hand loss ranged from 2.5 to 9 years. The surgical protocol was elaborated and planned case by case. All recipients received the same immunosuppressive treatment. Episodes of acute rejection were observed in the first 3 months after transplantation, which were easily managed after a few days increasing oral prednisone doses and applying topical immunosuppressants. Currently the patients receive the doses of immunosuppressants comparable to those in kidney-grafted patients. We have not registered any severe complication of immunosuppressive treatment up till now (7 years follow-up for the earliest graft). We performed analytical and functional clinical, as well as questionnaire evaluation of patients. The first case (unilateral graft) resulted in graft failure at 2 years due to non-compliance of the patient. The three bilateral graftees demonstrate a favorable evolution despite some immunological (hyperglycemia, serum sickness) and surgical (thrombosis, osteomyelitis, skin loss) complications, which could be managed. The middle and long-term follow-up evaluation revealed good to excellent sensorimotor recovery of 4 hands in both male recipients (4 and 7 years) with satisfactory social adaptation, higher or equal to those expected after post-traumatic replantations at the equivalent level and higher to those obtained with currently available myoelectric prosthesis. The last patient, a young female who has been grafted in February 2007, receives ongoing reeducation course and shows normal progress of functional restoration

  19. Adenohypophysitis in rat pituitary allografts

    PubMed Central

    Rotondo, Fabio; Quintanar-Stephano, Andres; Asa, Sylvia L; Lombardero, Matilde; Berczi, Istvan; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman

    2010-01-01

    The histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural alterations in 81 pituitary allografts from Lewis rats transplanted beneath the renal capsule of Wistar rats were investigated. Intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts were also examined. Recipient rats were sacrificed at various time points after transplantation. Two days after transplantation, the central portion of the allografts demonstrated ischaemic necrosis. A week later, massive mononuclear cell infiltrates consisting primarily of lymphocytes and to a lesser extent, macrophages, plasma cells and granulocytes became prominent. At about three to four weeks after transplantation, the mononuclear cell infiltrate diminished; the surviving adenohypophysial cells, mainly prolactin (PRL) cells, increased in number and necrosis was replaced by connective tissue. No histological changes were noted in the intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the surviving adenohypophysial cells were mainly PRL-producing cells. Electron microscopy revealed adenohypophysial cell destruction, a spectrum of inflammatory cells and, in late phase, accumulation of fibroblasts and collagen fibres. PRL cells were the prominent cell types; they increased in number. It appears that pituitary allografts are ‘foreign’ and evoke an immune response, suggesting that they may be used as an experimental animal model for morphological investigation of the development and progression of adenohypophysitis, a rare disease occurring mainly in young women often associated with pregnancy. PMID:20586813

  20. Osteochondral Allograft of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Rosso, Federica; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are being recognized as an increasingly common injury. They are most commonly located postero-medially or antero-laterally, while centrally located lesions are uncommon. Large osteochondral lesions have significant biomechanical consequences and often require resurfacing with osteochondral autograft transfer, mosaicplasty, autologous chondrocyte implantation (or similar methods) or osteochondral allograft transplantation. Allograft procedures have become popular due to inherent advantages over other resurfacing techniques. Cartilage viability is one of the most important factors for successful clinical outcomes after transplantation of osteochondral allografts and is related to storage length and intra-operative factors. While there is abundant literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation in the knee, there are few papers about this procedure in the talus. Failure of non-operative management, initial debridement, curettage or microfractures are an indication for resurfacing. Patients should have a functional ankle motion, closed growth plates, absence of cartilage lesions on the tibial side. This paper reviews the published literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation of the talus focusing on indications, pre-operative planning, surgical approaches, postoperative management, results and complications of this procedure. PMID:25328456

  1. Significance of Anti-HLA Antibodies on Adult and Pediatric Heart Allograft Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mangiola, Massimo; Marrari, Marilyn; Feingold, Brian; Zeevi, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    As methods for human leukocyte antigens (HLA) antibody detection have evolved and newer solid phase assays are much more sensitive, the last 15 years has seen a renewed focus on the importance of HLA antibodies in solid organ transplant rejection. However, there is still much controversy regarding the clinical significance of antibody level as depicted by the mean fluorescence intensity of a patient’s neat serum. Emerging techniques, including those that identify antibody level and function, show promise for the detection of individuals at risk of allograft rejection, determination of the effectiveness of desensitization prior to transplant, and for monitoring treatment of rejection. Here, we review current publications regarding the relevance of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) in adult and pediatric heart transplantation (HT) with graft survival, development of antibody-mediated rejection and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). The negative impact of DSA on patient and allograft survival is evident in adult and pediatric HT recipients. Many questions remain regarding the most appropriate frequency of assessment of pre- and posttransplant DSA as well as the phenotype of DSA memory vs. true de novo antibody using large multicenter adult and pediatric cohorts and state-of-the-art methodologies for DSA detection and characterization. PMID:28191005

  2. Studies Introducing Costimulation Blockade for Vascularized Composite Allografts in Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, AM; Samy, KP; Farris, AB; Leopardi, FV; Song, M; Stempora, L; Strobert, EA; Jenkins, JA; Kirk, AD; Cendales, LC

    2016-01-01

    Vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) are technically feasible. Similar to other organ transplants, VCAs are hampered by the toxicity and incomplete efficacy associated with conventional immunosuppression. Complications attributable to calcineurin inhibitors remain prevalent in the clinical cases reported to date, and these loom particularly large given the non-lifesaving nature of VCAs. Additionally, acute rejection remains almost ubiquitous, albeit controllable with current agents. Costimulation blockade offers the potential to provide prophylaxis from rejection without the adverse consequences of calcineurin-based regimens. In this study, we used a non-human-primate model of VCA in conjunction with immunosuppressive regimens containing combinations of B7-specific costimulation blockade with and without adhesion blockade with LFA3-Ig to determine what adjunctive role these agents could play in VCA transplantation when combined with more conventional agents. Compared to tacrolimus, the addition of belatacept improved rejection free allograft survival. The combination with LFA3-Ig reduced CD2hi memory T cells, however did not provide additional protection against allograft rejection and hindered protective immunity. Histology paralleled clinical histopathology and Banff grading. These data provide the basis for the study of costimulation blockade in VCA in a relevant preclinical model. PMID:26139552

  3. Assessment of allograft function using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Anupma; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Lal, Hira; Yadav, Abhishek; Bhadhuria, Dharmendra; Prasad, Narayan; Gupta, Amit

    2014-11-01

    Developing a non-invasive method such as diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) could be used as a feasible and reproducible modality in the differential diagnosis of allograft dysfunction. We assessed the functional status of the renal allograft by DWMRI and its applicability in assessment of graft dysfunction on all end-stage renal transplant patients who attained normal renal function on the 7th day post-transplantation. Follow-up imaging of the recipient allograft was performed at the end of 90 and 180 days and in case of graft dysfunction. Kidney biopsies were performed to correlate with the corresponding MRI. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps of the cortex and medulla were obtained by studying the DWMRI. The ADC values were significantly lower in the medulla compared with the cortex in normal donor kidneys and normally functioning transplanted kidneys, while they decreased significantly when rejection occurred. The reduction in ADC values occurred both in the cortex and in the medulla, and correlated with the degree of rejection on the kidney biopsies. The ADC values increased significantly during the recovery from rejection. We conclude that DWMRI can be beneficial in the diagnosis and follow-up of transplant patients during acute rejection.

  4. STAT4 gene polymorphism in patients after renal allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowska-Żamojcin, Ewa; Dziedziejko, Violetta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Domański, Leszek; Słuczanowska-Głabowska, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction STAT4 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 4) is involved in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Some studies have suggested that STAT4 may be involved in the immune response after graft transplantation. Several polymorphisms in the STAT4 gene have been identified. The most commonly studied polymorphism in the STAT4 gene is rs7574865. In our study, we examined whether this polymorphism is associated with the early and late functions of renal allografts. Material and methods A total of 270 recipients of first renal transplants were included in the study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the STAT4 gene were genotyped using TaqMan genotyping assays. Results There were no statistically significant associations between the STAT4 gene rs7574865 polymorphism and delayed graft function, acute rejection, chronic allograft dysfunction, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, or creatinine serum concentrations after transplantation. Conclusions Our results suggest a lack of association between the STAT4 rs7574865 SNP and kidney allograft function in the Polish population. PMID:27833442

  5. Zoledronic acid, an aminobisphosphonate, prolongs survival of skin allografts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Yuan; Yang, Po-Sheng; Cheng, Shih-Ping; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Lee, Jie-Jen; Ko, Chun-Chuan; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2012-08-04

    Zoledronic acid (ZOL), an effective nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate used to prevent excessive bone loss in clinical practice, has been shown to affect the development of dendritic cells by redirecting differentiation toward a state of atypical maturation. The study was aimed to examine whether ZOL can reduce acute rejection of skin allografts. A skin transplantation model using C57BL/6 to BALB/c mice was used. ZOL was injected intraperitoneally into transplant recipients post-surgically. Graft survival, body weight, leukocyte count, hepatic and renal functions were assessed. ZOL treatment significantly prolonged skin allograft survival in mice. In terms of toxicity, there were no significant differences in body weight, leukocyte count, plasma alanine aminotransferase or creatinine levels between the ZOL-treated and control groups. Histopathology showed that the loss of skin integrity seen in control group was prevented by ZOL treatment. In draining lymph nodes and spleen, the number and clustering extent of mononuclear cells were markedly declined by ZOL treatment. The plasma IL-6 levels were reduced by treatment of ZOL. ZOL can prolong skin allograft survival without major toxicity.

  6. [Oral mucosa analog allografts in non-consanguineous rats].

    PubMed

    González, Luis; Padrón, Karla; Salmen, Siham; Jerez, Elsy; Dávila, Lorena; Solórzano, Eduvigis

    2017-01-24

    Although there are therapeutic options for the treatment of oral mucosa defects, the need for functional, anatomical and aesthetically similar substitutes persists, as well as for solutions to reduce autologous grafts morbidity. To determine clinical and histological compatibility of equivalent oral mucosa allografts generated through tissue engineering in non-consanguineous rats. We used a sample of oral mucosa from Sprague Dawley rats to obtain a fibroblast culture and a keratinocytes and fibroblasts co-culture. In both cases, we used a commercial collagen membrane as "scaffold". After ten weeks of culture, we grafted the resulting membranes into four Wistar rats. The first phase of the study was the development of the oral mucosa equivalents generated by tissue engineering. Then, we implanted them in immunocompetent Wistar rats, and finallywe evaluated the clinical and histological features of the allografts. In vivo evaluation of mucosal substitutes showed a correct integration of artificial oral mucosa in immunocompetent hosts, with an increase in periodontal biotype and the creation of a zone with increased keratinization. Histologically, the tissue was similar to the control oral mucosa sample with no inflammatory reaction nor clinical or histological rejection signs. The equivalent oral mucosa allografts generated by tissue engineering showed clinical and histological compatibility.

  7. Noninvasive methods of rejection diagnosis after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kemkes, B M; Schütz, A; Engelhardt, M; Brandl, U; Breuer, M

    1992-01-01

    For clinical follow-up and prognosis in heart transplant patients, it is important to understand accurately the presence and extent of cardiac allograft rejection. Since the introduction of endomyocardial biopsy, almost 40 different noninvasive diagnostic procedures for the recognition of myocardial rejection have been proposed. However, endomyocardial biopsy is invasive and not suitable for frequent monitoring. If the pattern of rejection shows a focal distribution, false-negative results can be expected. Discrepancies between biopsy findings and allograft function are obviously possible. State-of-the-art information will be given on the most reliable noninvasive methods for rejection diagnosis, which can be differentiated from electrophysiology (fast-Fourier-transformed electrocardiography and intramyocardial electrocardiography), echocardiography, immunologic methods (cytoimmunologic monitoring, transferrin receptors, and interleukin-2 receptors), various biochemical markers (neopterines, prolactin, urinary polyamines, and beta 2-microglobulins), radioisotopic techniques (antimyosin-monoclonal antibodies, thallium, technetium, and gallium scintigraphy and indium-labeled cells), as well as magnetic resonance imaging. Thus modified and patient-adapted antirejection therapy can be provided if the decision for or against antirejection therapy is not based on biopsy findings alone but rather is confirmed along with histologic, electrophysiologic, biochemical, immunologic, and functional parameters.

  8. Organ transplant tissue rejection: detection and staging by fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Whitehead, Peter D.; McManus, Bruce; Zeng, Haishan; Wilson-McManus, Janet; MacKinnon, Nick; Morgan, David C.; Dong, Chunming; Gerla, Paul; Kenyon, Jennifer

    1998-07-01

    Patients receiving heart or other organ transplants usually require some level of anti-rejection drug therapy, most commonly cyclosporine. The rejection status of the organ must be monitored to determine the optimal anti-rejection drug therapy. The current method for monitoring post-transplant rejection status of heart transplant patients consists of taking biopsies from the right ventricle. In this work we have developed a system employing optical and signal-processing techniques that will allow a cardiologist to measure spectral changes associated with tissue rejection using an optical catheter probe. The system employs time gated illumination and detection systems to deal with the dynamic signal acquisition problems associated with in vivo measurements of a beating heart. Spectral data processing software evaluates and processes the data to produce a simple numerical score. Results of measurements made on 100 excised transplanted isograft and allograft rat hearts have demonstrated the ability of the system to detect the presence of rejection and to accurately correlate the spectroscopic results with the ISHLT (International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) stage of rejection determined by histopathology. In vivo measurements using a pig transplant model are now in process.

  9. The treatment of peripheral nerve injuries using irradiated allografts and temporary host immunosuppression (in a rat model)

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, K.J.; Trumble, T.E. )

    1990-10-01

    Irradiation of allografts prior to transplantation and host immunosuppression with cyclosporin-A were studied separately and in combination as means of lessening the rejection of transplanted peripheral nerve tissue. Lewis and Brown Norway rats were used in the animal model, as they differ at both major and minor histocompatibility loci. Sciatic nerve grafts (2.5 cm) were used and the animals were followed for 16 weeks after nerve grafting. The outcome was studied by functional measurements (sensory testing, gait analysis, joint flexion contracture, and muscle weight), as well as by measurements of biochemical and histologic parameters (hydroxyproline concentration and axon counts, respectively). Sensory testing was not reliable because of crossover innervation by the saphenous nerve. Evaluation by standard gait-testing techniques was found to be unsatisfactory. However, the allografted animals receiving cyclosporin-A had significantly smaller flexion contractures, compared to the allografted animals without immunosuppression (17 degrees +/- 12 degrees vs. 44 degrees +/- 13 degrees and 51 degrees +/- 13 degrees, p less than 0.005). Allografted animals receiving short-term cyclosporin-A had contractures that were not significantly different from those seen in isografted control animals (17 degrees +/- 12 degrees vs. 22 degrees +/- 15 degrees, NS). Muscle hydroxyproline concentration analysis revealed a lower hydroxyproline concentration among the allografted groups that received irradiated allografts, compared to groups receiving nonirradiated allogeneic grafts. The studies of muscle hydroxyproline concentration and muscle weight both showed substantial reinnervation, even in allografted animals without pretreatment of the grafts or immunosuppression of the recipient animal.

  10. Allograft tolerance induced by donor apoptotic lymphocytes requires phagocytosis in the recipient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, E.; Gao, Y.; Chen, J.; Roberts, A. I.; Wang, X.; Chen, Z.; Shi, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death through apoptosis plays a critical role in regulating cellular homeostasis. Whether the disposal of apoptotic cells through phagocytosis can actively induce immune tolerance in vivo, however, remains controversial. Here, we report in a rat model that without using immunosuppressants, transfusion of apoptotic splenocytes from the donor strain prior to transplant dramatically prolonged survival of heart allografts. Histological analysis verified that rejection signs were significantly ameliorated. Splenocytes from rats transfused with donor apoptotic cells showed a dramatically decreased response to donor lymphocyte stimulation. Most importantly, blockade of phagocytosis in vivo, either with gadolinium chloride to disrupt phagocyte function or with annexin V to block binding of exposed phosphotidylserine to its receptor on phagocytes, abolished the beneficial effect of transfused apoptotic cells on heart allograft survival. Our results demonstrate that donor apoptotic cells promote specific allograft acceptance and that phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in vivo plays a crucial role in maintaining immune tolerance.

  11. Allograft tolerance induced by donor apoptotic lymphocytes requires phagocytosis in the recipient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, E.; Gao, Y.; Chen, J.; Roberts, A. I.; Wang, X.; Chen, Z.; Shi, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death through apoptosis plays a critical role in regulating cellular homeostasis. Whether the disposal of apoptotic cells through phagocytosis can actively induce immune tolerance in vivo, however, remains controversial. Here, we report in a rat model that without using immunosuppressants, transfusion of apoptotic splenocytes from the donor strain prior to transplant dramatically prolonged survival of heart allografts. Histological analysis verified that rejection signs were significantly ameliorated. Splenocytes from rats transfused with donor apoptotic cells showed a dramatically decreased response to donor lymphocyte stimulation. Most importantly, blockade of phagocytosis in vivo, either with gadolinium chloride to disrupt phagocyte function or with annexin V to block binding of exposed phosphotidylserine to its receptor on phagocytes, abolished the beneficial effect of transfused apoptotic cells on heart allograft survival. Our results demonstrate that donor apoptotic cells promote specific allograft acceptance and that phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in vivo plays a crucial role in maintaining immune tolerance.

  12. Acute Page kidney following renal allograft biopsy: a complication requiring early recognition and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Caumartin, Y; Warren, J; Luke, P P W

    2008-06-01

    The acute Page kidney phenomenon occurs as a consequence of external compression of the renal parenchyma leading to renal ischemia and hypertension. Between January 2000 and September 2007, 550 kidney transplants and 518 ultrasound-guided kidney biopsies were performed. During that time, four recipients developed acute oligo-anuria following ultrasound-guided allograft biopsy. Emergent doppler-ultrasounds were performed demonstrating absence of diastolic flow as well as a sub-capsular hematoma of the kidney. Prompt surgical exploration with allograft capsulotomy was performed in all cases. Immediately after capsulotomy, intraoperative Doppler study demonstrated robust return of diastolic flow. Three patients maintained good graft function, and one kidney was lost due to acute antibody-mediated rejection. We conclude that postbiopsy anuria associated with a subcapsular hematoma and acute absence of diastolic flow on doppler ultrasound should be considered pathognomonic of APK. All renal transplant specialists should be able to recognize this complication, because immediate surgical decompression can salvage the allograft.

  13. Biomechanical properties of bone allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Markham, T.C.

    1983-04-01

    The biomechanical properties of allograft bone can be altered by the methods chosen for its preservation and storage. These effects are minimal with deep-freezing or low-level radiation. Freeze-drying, however, markedly diminishes the torsional and bending strength of bone allografts but does not deleteriously affect the compressive or tensile strength. Irradiation of bone with more than 3.0 megarad or irradiation combined with freeze-drying appears to cause a significant reduction in breaking strength. These factors should be considered when choosing freeze-dried or irradiated allogeneic bone that will be subjected to significant loads following implantation.

  14. Tolerance induction in composite facial allograft transplantation in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Demir, Yavuz; Ozmen, Selahattin; Klimczak, Aleksandra; Mukherjee, Abir Lal; Siemionow, Maria

    2004-12-01

    Clinical application of composite tissue allograft transplants opened discussion on the restoration of facial deformities by allotransplantation. The authors introduce a hemifacial allograft transplant model to investigate the rationale for the development of functional tolerance across the major histocompatibility complex barrier. Eighteen rats in three groups were studied. The composite hemifacial allotransplantations including the ear and scalp were performed between Lewis-Brown Norway (RT1l+n) and Lewis (RT1l) rats and isotransplantations were performed between Lewis rats. Isograft controls (n = 6) and allograft controls (n = 6) did not receive treatment. Allografts in treatment group (n = 6) were treated with cyclosporine A 16 mg/kg/day during the first week; this dose was tapered to 2 mg/kg/day over 4 weeks and maintained at this level thereafter. Functional tolerance to face allografts was evaluated clinically and histologically. Donor-specific chimerism was assessed at days 21 and 63 by flow cytometry. In vitro evaluation of donor-specific tolerance was performed by mixed lymphocyte reaction at day 160 after transplantation. Isograft controls survived indefinitely. All nontreated allografts were rejected within 5 to 7 days after transplantation, as confirmed by histopathologic analysis. Five of six face allografts under the cyclosporine A protocol showed no signs of rejection for up to 240 days and remained alive and under evaluation, whereas one animal showed signs of rejection at day 140. This was reversed by adjustment of the cyclosporine A dose. At day 21 after transplantation, flow cytometric analysis of the donor-specific chimerism showed 1.11 percent of double-positive CD4FITC/RT1Ac-Cy7 and 1.43 percent of double-positive CD8PE/RT1Ac-Cy7 T-cell populations in the peripheral blood of hemiface allotransplant recipients. The chimerism level of double-positive CD4FITC/RT1Ac-Cy7 T cells increased to 3.39 percent, whereas it remained stable for the double

  15. Prolonged cardiac allograft survival in presensitized rats after a high activity Yunnan-cobra venom factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Chen, G; Guo, H; Wang, D W; Xie, L; Wang, S S; Wang, W Y; Xiong, Y L; Chen, S

    2006-12-01

    Complement-dependent antibody-mediated acute humoral rejection is the major obstacle of clinical transplantation across ABO incompatibility and human leukocyte antigen presensitization. We previously demonstrated that Yunnan-cobra venom factor (Y-CVF) could almost completely abrogate complement activity and successfully prevent hyperacute rejection in some xenotransplant models without any obvious toxicity. In this study we investigated whether depletion of complement by Y-CVF prevented acute humoral allograft rejection in presensitized rats thereby prolonging graft survival. Presensitization was achieved in Lewis rats by sequential grafting of three full-thickness skin pieces from Brown Norway rats. Serum cytotoxic alloantibody titers were determined by a modified in vitro complement-dependent microcytotoxicity assay. After presensitization, each Lewis rat received a heterotopic Brown Norway cardiac allograft. Fifteen recipients were divided into two groups: (1) no treatment control (n = 7); (2) Y-CVF therapy group (86 u/kg, IV, day -1) (n = 8). After cessation of the heart beat, allograft rejection was confirmed by pathologic as well as IgG and C3 immunohistochemical examinations. The mean graft survival time was significantly prolonged to 99.50 +/- 38.72 hours among rats that received Y-CVF vs 12.71 +/- 13.94 hours in nontreated controls (P < .001). Upon pathological and immunohistochemical examination, acute humoral rejection was mainly exhibited in the control group, whereas acute cellular rejection was mainly displayed in the Y-CVF therapy group. Our study demonstrated that complement depletion by Y-CVF significantly inhibited acute humoral allograft rejection in presensitized rats. As a therapeutic immunointervention tool for complement, Y-CVF has shown potential efficacy across ABO incompatible and positive cross-match barriers.

  16. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine.

  17. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine. PMID:25903472

  18. Immunosuppression after renal allograft failure: a survey of US practices.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, George P; Gohh, Reginald Y; Morrissey, Paul E; Rodrigue, James R; Mandelbrot, Didier A

    2013-01-01

    Little data exist to guide the management of immunosuppression after renal graft failure. More aggressive tapering of immunosuppressive medications may reduce the risk of infection, but may increase the risk of rejection and sensitization. To document current practices in the US, we emailed a questionnaire to medical and surgical transplant directors as identified by the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). Emails were sent to 221 programs, of which 93 (42.1%) responded. About 24.7% of respondents reported adjusting immunosuppression according to a standard protocol; 75.3% said practices are physician dependent. The majority said that 80 or 100% of patients are off all immunosuppression one yr after returning to dialysis. The most important factors cited in deciding whether to stop immunosuppression were plans to retransplant (40.2%) and signs and symptoms of rejection (37.0%). When asked which immunosuppressive medications are continued indefinitely, 21.5% responded prednisone and 71.0% said none. Respondents most commonly said they performed graft nephrectomy only if there are signs and symptoms of rejection (47.3%) or if signs and symptoms of rejection fail to respond to steroids (34.4%). In the absence of good data to guide decisions on immunosuppression in patients with failed allografts, practices in the US vary greatly. More data are needed to determine which policies lead to the best outcomes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Gene expression profiling for monitoring graft rejection in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Leiro, M G; Paniagua-Martín, M J; Hermida-Prieto, M; Castro-Beiras, A

    2009-01-01

    Heart transplantation is a life-prolonging therapy for many patients with stage D heart failure and other forms of advanced heart disease. However, graft rejection and/or immunosuppression-related side effects are major causes of morbidity and death among heart transplant patients. Graft rejection monitoring remains a challenge. It would be desirable to be able to detect rejection early enough and specifically enough to prevent allograft dysfunction without unnecessary overimmunosuppression. Hitherto, the main technique employed in monitoring the rejection status of a transplanted heart has been endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), which allows rejection to be screened for and monitored on the basis of the extent and distribution of lymphocytic infiltrates and associated myocardial damage. However, EMB has significant limitations: it is invasive, its sensitivity is limited by sampling efficacy, and it suffers from considerable between-observer variability. Although many noninvasive techniques have been investigated, none so far has proved able to match the performance of EMB. Currently, a multiparametric approach is employed that comprises clinical examination for signs or symptoms of heart failure, EMBs, drug level monitoring, allograft function tests (mainly echocardiographic studies), and screening for allograft vasculopathy. Gene expression profiling may be a promising tool for this purpose.

  20. Predicting the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a lifesaving therapy for patients with end-stage cardiovascular disease. There has been remarkable progress in controlling acute rejection, and the early survival rate after the heart transplantation has significantly improved. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is one of the common causes of death and a major limiting factor for long-term graft survival years after heart transplantation. CAV is a progressive occlusion of arteries and veins of the transplanted heart. CAV is often clinically silent because of the denervation of the transplanted heart. CAV tends to be found at an advanced stage of disease, including myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and/or sudden cardiac death. Because of the serious sequelae of CAV, risk factors, prevention, and prediction of CAV have been investigated. Despite the effort by many researchers, the pathogenesis is not yet completely understood. There are a number of both immune and nonimmune factors in the donor and recipient that are related to the development of CAV. In addition, several biomarkers in blood and tissue are found to correlate with the presence of CAV, and that may be able to predict CAV. Here, we review the pathology, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and the potential for prediction of CAV.

  1. Emphysema in the renal allograft

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.L.; Sullivan, B.M.; Fluornoy, J.G.; Gerza, C.

    1985-04-01

    Two diabetic patients in whom emphysematous pyelonephritis developed after renal transplantation are described. Clinical recognition of this unusual and serious infection is masked by the effects of immunosuppression. Abdominal radiographic, ultrasound, and computed tomography findings are discussed. The clinical presentation includes urinary tract infection, sepsis, and acute tubular malfunction of the allograft in insulin-dependent diabetics.

  2. Evaluation of In-111 labeled lymphocytes in an acute rejection model

    SciTech Connect

    Schauwecker, D.S.; Leapman, S.B.; Siddiqui, A.R.; Filo, R.S.; Smith, P.G.; Forney, M.N.

    1983-01-01

    Four days after surgery, canine renal allografts were studied with 290-500 microCi of In-111/10(8) lymphocytes. All transplants were visualized, implying that it may not be necessary to harvest large numbers of lymphocytes from immunosuppressed patients. On the day of renal transplant, a second set of dogs were injected with 80-150 microCi of In-111/10(8) lymphocytes. No delayed visualization could be seen 2-4 days later when rejection commenced. Cellular damage, even at this lower level of labeling, may require injection of labeled lymphocytes after the onset of the rejection process in order to visualize the rejection organ.

  3. Immunosuppression in cardiac graft rejection: A human in vitro model to study the potential use of new immunomodulatory drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Crescioli, Clara Squecco, Roberta; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Sottili, Mariangela; Gelmini, Stefania; Borgogni, Elisa; Sarchielli, Erica; Scolletta, Sabino; Francini, Fabio; Annunziato, Francesco; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Serio, Mario

    2008-04-01

    CXCL10-CXCR3 axis plays a pivotal role in cardiac allograft rejection, so that targeting CXCL10 without inducing generalized immunosuppression may be of therapeutic significance in allotransplantation. Since the role of resident cells in cardiac rejection is still unclear, we aimed to establish reliable human cardiomyocyte cultures to investigate Th1 cytokine-mediated response in allograft rejection. We used human fetal cardiomyocytes (Hfcm) isolated from fetal hearts, obtained after legal abortions. Hfcm expressed specific cardiac lineage markers, specific cardiac structural proteins, typical cardiac currents and generated ventricular action potentials. Thus, Hfcm represent a reliable in vitro tool for allograft rejection research, since they resemble the features of mature cells. Hfcm secreted CXCL10 in response to IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha}{alpha}; this effect was magnified by cytokine combination. Cytokine synergy was associated to a significant TNF{alpha}-induced up-regulation of IFN{gamma}R. The response of Hfcm to some currently used immunosuppressive drugs compared to rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} agonist and Th1-mediated response inhibitor, was also evaluated. Only micophenolic acid and rosiglitazone halved CXCL10 secretion by Hfcm. Given the pivotal role of IFN{gamma}-induced chemokines in Th1-mediated allograft rejection, these preliminary results suggest that the combined effects of immunosuppressive agents and rosiglitazone could be potentially beneficial to patients receiving heart transplants.

  4. Peripheral nerve regeneration through allografts compared with autografts in FK506-treated monkeys.

    PubMed

    Aubá, Cristina; Hontanilla, Bernardo; Arcocha, Juan; Gorría, Oscar

    2006-10-01

    The clinical use of nerve allografts combined with immunosuppressant therapy has become a genuine possibility that could supersede the classic use of autografts. However, contradictory data have been reported on whether immunosuppressant therapy should be temporarily administered. The purpose of this study was to compare the nerve regeneration obtained using ulnar nerve allografts in nonhuman primates temporarily treated with FK506 (tacrolimus) with that obtained using nerve autografts. Four-centimeter nerve autografts or allografts were placed in the distal ulnar motor nerve of eight monkeys. The FK506 was temporarily administered to the animals of the allograft group for 2 months. At periods of 3, 5, and 8 months postsurgery, quantitative electrophysiological recordings were obtained to estimate muscle response. A quantitative analysis of ulnar motor neurons in the spinal cord was performed and axons were counted stereologically. No statistically significant differences were found in the neuronal and axonal counts between autograft and allograft groups at 8 months. The electrophysiological studies showed no differences relative to the amplitude, but the autograft group presented with a greater nerve conduction velocity (NCV). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the number of neurons and distal axonal counts in the two groups. Nerve regeneration through cold-preserved allografts in a primate model temporarily treated with FK506 was similar to that obtained using nerve autografts, in terms of neuronal and axonal counts. Nevertheless, temporary immunosuppression produced lower NCV when allografts were used, with less maturation of the myelinated fibers, which indicated that a partial rejection had taken place.

  5. Infrequency of cytomegalovirus genome in coronary arteriopathy of human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Kandolf, R.; Kendall, T. J.; Thieszen, S. L.; Wilson, J. E.; Radio, S. J.; Costanzo, M. R.; Winters, G. L.; Miller, L. L.; McManus, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    In heart transplantation, long-term engraftment success is severely limited by the rapid development of obliterative disease of the coronary arteries. Data from various groups have been suggestive of a pathogenetic role of herpesviruses, particularly human cytomegalovirus, in accelerated allograft coronary artery disease; however, results are not yet conclusive. This study examines the hypothesis that human cytomegalovirus infection of allograft tissues is related pathogenetically and directly to accelerated coronary artery disease. Using in situ DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction, we examined particular coronary artery segments from 41 human heart allografts (ranging from 4 days to greater than 4 years after transplantation; mean, 457 days) and 22 donor age- and gender-comparable, coronary site-matched trauma victims for presence of human cytomegalovirus DNA. Human cytomegalovirus genome was detected in 8 of 41 (19.5%) allografts and in 1 of 22 (4.5%) control hearts. This difference in positivity was not statistically significant (P = 0.10). In the human cytomegalovirus-positive hearts, viral genome was localized to perivascular myocardium or coronary artery media or adventitia. Human cytomegalovirus genome was not detected in arterial intima of any allograft or control heart, although human cytomegalovirus genome was readily identified within intima of small pulmonary arteries from lung tissue with human cytomegalovirus pneumonitis. By statistical analyses, the presence of human cytomegalovirus genome was not associated with the nature or digitized extent of transplant arteriopathy, evidence of rejection, allograft recipient or donor serological data suggestive of human cytomegalovirus infection, duration of allograft implantation, or causes of death or retransplantation. Thus, our data indicate a low frequency of detectable human cytomegalovirus genome in accelerated coronary artery disease and do not support a direct role for human cytomegalovirus

  6. Effects of donor age and cell senescence on kidney allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Melk, A; Schmidt, B M W; Braun, H; Vongwiwatana, A; Urmson, J; Zhu, L-F; Rayner, D; Halloran, P F

    2009-01-01

    The biological processes responsible for somatic cell senescence contribute to organ aging and progression of chronic diseases, and this may contribute to kidney transplant outcomes. We examined the effect of pre-existing donor aging on the performance of kidney transplants, comparing mouse kidney isografts and allografts from old versus young donors. Before transplantation, old kidneys were histologically normal, but displayed an increased expression of senescence marker p16(INK4a). Old allografts at day 7 showed a more rapid emergence of epithelial changes and a further increase in the expression of p16(INK4a). Similar but much milder changes occurred in old isografts. These changes were absent in young allografts at day 7, but emerged by day 21. The expression of p16(INK4a) remained low in young kidney allografts at day 7, but increased with severe rejection at day 21. Isografts from young donors showed no epithelial changes and no increase in p16(INK4a). The measurements of the alloimmune response-infiltrate, cytology, expression of perforin, granzyme B, IFN-gamma and MHC-were not increased in old allografts. Thus, old donor kidneys display abnormal parenchymal susceptibility to transplant stresses and enhanced induction of senescence marker p16(INK4a), but were not more immunogenic. These data are compatible with a key role of somatic cell senescence mechanisms in kidney transplant outcomes by contributing to donor aging, being accelerated by transplant stresses, and imposing limits on the capacity of the tissue to proliferate.

  7. Micro and Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems for Preventing Allotransplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James D.; Acharya, Abhinav P.; Little, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in transplant immunology, tissue damage caused by acute allograft rejection remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the transplant recipient. Moreover, the long-term sequelae of lifelong immunosuppression leaves patients at risk for developing a host of other deleterious conditions. Controlled drug delivery using micro- and nanoparticles (MNPs) is an effective way to deliver higher local doses of a given drug to specific tissues and cells while mitigating systemic effects. Herein, we review several descriptions of MNP immunotherapies aimed at prolonging allograft survival. We also discuss developments in the field of biomimetic drug delivery that use MNP constructs to induce and recruit our bodies' own suppressive immune cells. Finally, we comment on the regulatory pathway associated with these drug delivery systems. Collectively, it is our hope the studies described in this review will help to usher in a new era of immunotherapy in organ transplantation. PMID:25937032

  8. Xenon treatment attenuates early renal allograft injury associated with prolonged hypothermic storage in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailin; Yoshida, Akira; Xiao, Wei; Ologunde, Rele; O'Dea, Kieran P; Takata, Masao; Tralau-Stewart, Catherine; George, Andrew J T; Ma, Daqing

    2013-10-01

    Prolonged hypothermic storage elicits severe ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) to renal grafts, contributing to delayed graft function (DGF) and episodes of acute immune rejection and shortened graft survival. Organoprotective strategies are therefore needed for improving long-term transplant outcome. The aim of this study is to investigate the renoprotective effect of xenon on early allograft injury associated with prolonged hypothermic storage. Xenon exposure enhanced the expression of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP-70) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and promoted cell survival after hypothermia-hypoxia insult in human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells, which was abolished by HSP-70 or HO-1 siRNA. In the brown Norway to Lewis rat renal transplantation, xenon administered to donor or recipient decreased the renal tubular cell death, inflammation, and MHC II expression, while delayed graft function (DGF) was therefore reduced. Pathological changes associated with acute rejection, including T-cell, macrophage, and fibroblast infiltration, were also decreased with xenon treatment. Donors or recipients treated with xenon in combination with cyclosporin A had prolonged renal allograft survival. Xenon protects allografts against delayed graft function, attenuates acute immune rejection, and enhances graft survival after prolonged hypothermic storage. Furthermore, xenon works additively with cyclosporin A to preserve post-transplant renal function.

  9. CTLA4-Ig in combination with FTY720 promotes allograft survival in sensitized recipients

    PubMed Central

    Khiew, Stella H.; Yang, Jinghui; Young, James S.; Chen, Jianjun; Wang, Qiang; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Miller, Michelle L.; Sciammas, Roger; Chong, Anita S.

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent evidence of improved graft outcomes and safety, the high incidence of early acute cellular rejection with belatacept, a high-affinity CTLA4-Ig, has limited its use in clinical transplantation. Here we define how the incomplete control of endogenous donor-reactive memory T cells results in belatacept-resistant rejection in an experimental model of BALB/c.2W-OVA donor heart transplantation into C57BL/6 recipients presensitized to donor splenocytes. These sensitized mice harbored modestly elevated numbers of endogenous donor-specific memory T cells and alloantibodies compared with naive recipients. Continuous CTLA4-Ig treatment was unexpectedly efficacious at inhibiting endogenous graft-reactive T cell expansion but was unable to inhibit late CD4+ and CD8+ T cell infiltration into the allografts, and rejection was observed in 50% of recipients by day 35 after transplantation. When CTLA4-Ig was combined with the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1PR1) functional antagonist FTY720, alloantibody production was inhibited and donor-specific IFN-γ–producing T cells were reduced to levels approaching nonsensitized tolerant recipients. Late T cell recruitment into the graft was also restrained, and graft survival improved with this combination therapy. These observations suggest that a rational strategy consisting of inhibiting memory T cell expansion and trafficking into the allograft with CTLA4-Ig and FTY720 can promote allograft survival in allosensitized recipients. PMID:28469082

  10. Donor dendritic cell–derived exosomes promote allograft-targeting immune response

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Canales, Darling M.; Divito, Sherrie J.; Shufesky, William J.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Erdos, Geza; Sullivan, Mara L.G.; Gibson, Gregory A.; Larregina, Adriana T.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    The immune response against transplanted allografts is one of the most potent reactions mounted by the immune system. The acute rejection response has been attributed to donor dendritic cells (DCs), which migrate to recipient lymphoid tissues and directly activate alloreactive T cells against donor MHC molecules. Here, using a murine heart transplant model, we determined that only a small number of donor DCs reach lymphoid tissues and investigated how this limited population of donor DCs efficiently initiates the alloreactive T cell response that causes acute rejection. In our mouse model, efficient passage of donor MHC molecules to recipient conventional DCs (cDCs) was dependent on the transfer of extracellular vesicles (EVs) from donor DCs that migrated from the graft to lymphoid tissues. These EVs shared characteristics with exosomes and were internalized or remained attached to the recipient cDCs. Recipient cDCs that acquired exosomes became activated and triggered full activation of alloreactive T cells. Depletion of recipient cDCs after cardiac transplantation drastically decreased presentation of donor MHC molecules to directly alloreactive T cells and delayed graft rejection in mice. These findings support a key role for transfer of donor EVs in the generation of allograft-targeting immune responses and suggest that interrupting this process has potential to dampen the immune response to allografts. PMID:27348586

  11. Prolonging survival in vascularized bone allograft transplantation: developing specific immune unresponsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Paskert, J.P.; Yaremchuk, M.J.; Randolph, M.A.; Weiland, A.J.

    1987-04-01

    Vascularized bone allografts (VBAs) could be useful adjuncts to the clinical reconstructive surgeon's arsenal. These grafts are known experimentally to be subject to host rejection. One way to control the rejection problem would be to develop specific immune unresponsiveness via host conditioning. Using a proven reliable model in inbred rats for studying heterotopic VBA transplantation, recipient animals were conditioned preoperatively with third-party unrelated blood, donor-specific blood (DSB) alone and with cyclosporine, and ultraviolet irradiated donor-specific blood. The combination of DSB plus cyclosporine delayed rejection of grafts across a strong histocompatibility barrier for three to four weeks. However, rejection was delayed across a weak histocompatibility barrier for five to six weeks using this same host pretreatment. The implications are that specific immunosuppression, although possible, is difficult to achieve in VBA transplantation, and that such techniques will rely on tissue-matching to minimize the genetic disparity between graft and host.

  12. Antibody-mediated rejection across solid organ transplants: manifestations, mechanisms, and therapies.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Nicole M; Reed, Elaine F

    2017-06-30

    Solid organ transplantation is a curative therapy for hundreds of thousands of patients with end-stage organ failure. However, long-term outcomes have not improved, and nearly half of transplant recipients will lose their allografts by 10 years after transplant. One of the major challenges facing clinical transplantation is antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) caused by anti-donor HLA antibodies. AMR is highly associated with graft loss, but unfortunately there are few efficacious therapies to prevent and reverse AMR. This Review describes the clinical and histological manifestations of AMR, and discusses the immunopathological mechanisms contributing to antibody-mediated allograft injury as well as current and emerging therapies.

  13. CD8(+)IL-17(+) T Cells Mediate Neutrophilic Airway Obliteration in T-bet-Deficient Mouse Lung Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lendermon, Elizabeth A; Dodd-o, Jeffrey M; Coon, Tiffany A; Miller, Hannah L; Ganguly, Sudipto; Popescu, Iulia; O'Donnell, Christopher P; Cardenes, Nayra; Levine, Melanie; Rojas, Mauricio; Weathington, Nathaniel M; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; McDyer, John F

    2015-05-01

    Acute cellular rejection is a known risk factor for the development of obliterative bronchiolitis, which limits the long-term survival of lung transplant recipients. However, the T cell effector mechanisms in both of these processes remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse orthotopic lung transplant model, we investigated whether C57BL/6 T-bet(-/-) recipients of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched BALB/c lung grafts develop rejection pathology and allospecific cytokine responses that differ from wild-type mice. T-bet(-/-) recipients demonstrated vigorous allograft rejection at 10 days, characterized by neutrophilic inflammation and predominantly CD8(+) T cells producing allospecific IL-17 and/or IFN-γ, in contrast to IFN-γ-dominant responses in WT mice. CD4(+) T cells produced IL-17 but not IFN-γ responses in T-bet(-/-) recipients, in contrast to WT controls. Costimulation blockade using anti-CD154 Ab significantly reduced allospecific CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) responses in both T-bet(-/-) and WT mice but had no attenuating effect on lung rejection pathology in T-bet(-/-) recipients or on the development of obliterative airway inflammation that occurred only in T-bet(-/-) recipients. However, neutralization of IL-17A significantly attenuated costimulation blockade-resistant rejection pathology and airway inflammation in T-bet(-/-) recipients. In addition, CXCL1 (neutrophil chemokine) was increased in T-bet(-/-) allografts, and IL-17 induced CXCL1 from mouse lung epithelial cells in vitro. Taken together, our data show that T-bet-deficient recipients of complete MHC-mismatched lung allografts develop costimulation blockade-resistant rejection characterized by neutrophilia and obliterative airway inflammation that is predominantly mediated by CD8(+)IL-17(+) T cells. Our data support T-bet-deficient mouse recipients of lung allografts as a viable animal model to study the immunopathogenesis of small airway injury in lung transplantation.

  14. Critical role for CD8 T cells in allograft acceptance induced by DST and CD40/CD154 costimulatory blockade.

    PubMed

    Gao, Donghong; Lunsford, Keri E; Eiring, Anna M; Bumgardner, Ginny L

    2004-07-01

    Donor-specific transfusion (DST) and CD40/CD154 costimulation blockade is a powerful immunosuppressive strategy which prolongs survival of many allografts. The efficacy of DST and anti-CD154 mAb for prolongation of hepatocellular allograft survival was only realized in C57BL/6 mice that have both CD4- and CD8-dependent pathways available (median survival time, MST, 82 days). Hepatocyte rejection in CD8 KO mice which is CD4-dependent was not suppressed by DST and anti-CD154 mAb treatment (MST, 7 days); unexpectedly DST abrogated the beneficial effects of anti-CD154 mAb for suppression of hepatocyte rejection (MST, 42 days) and on donor-reactive alloantibody production. Hepatocyte rejection in CD4 KO mice which is CD8-dependent was suppressed by treatment with DST and anti-CD154 mAb therapy (MST, 35 days) but did not differ significantly from immunotherapy with anti-CD154 mAb alone (MST, 32 days). Induction of hepatocellular allograft acceptance by DST and anti-CD154 mAb immunotherapy was dependent on host CD8(+) T cells, as demonstrated by CD8 depletion studies in C57BL/6 mice (MST, 14 days) and CD8 reconstitution of CD8 KO mice (MST, 56 days). These studies demonstrate that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell subsets contribute to induction of hepatocellular allograft acceptance by this immunotherapeutic strategy.

  15. Fresh vein allograft survival in dogs after cyclosporine treatment.

    PubMed

    Mingoli, A; Edwards, J D; Feldhaus, R J; Hunter, W J; Naspetti, R; Cavallari, N; Sapienza, P; Kretchmar, D H; Cavallaro, A

    1996-04-01

    Synthetic grafts are widely used for peripheral arterial reconstructions when autologous veins are not available, but their results have not been satisfactory. Venous allograft may be used as an alternative to synthetic prostheses. The aim of the study was to explore the immunosuppressive efficacy of Cyclosporine A (CyA) as a means of preventing venous allograft failures and rejection. We utilized 56 mongrel dogs. Immunological incompatibility was checked with the skin graft method. Donor inferior vena cava was transplanted into the infrarenal abdominal aorta of recipient animals. One group (group 1, 10 dogs) served as a control and three groups received CyA treatment regimens. Group 2 (10 dogs) received postoperative oral CyA treatment for 30 days. Group 3 (12 dogs) received a vein graft pretreated with a CyA solution without postoperative immunosuppressive therapy. Group 4 (9 dogs) received a vein graft pretreated with a CyA solution and postoperative CyA treatment for 30 days. Allografts were examined at 30 days for patency, aneurysmal dilatation, gross structural changes, inflammatory response, and lymphocytic infiltration. Sex chromatine assessment determined the origin (donor or recipient) of the endothelial cells. The allografts from groups 1 and 3 showed significant aneurysmal dilatation and perivenous inflammation when compared to dogs treated with oral CyA therapy (P < 0.0002). Moreover allografts treated with CyA therapy had a better-developed venous neointima (P < 0.009) with less fibrin (P < 0.02) and thinner medial (P < 0.0009) with less fibrin (P < 0.02), and thinner medial (P < 0.0009) and adventitial layers (P < 0.02). No significant differences were observed in neointimal thickness among the four groups. Lymphocytic infiltration was greater in the group of animals who did not receive oral CyA therapy (P < 0.0004). Barr bodies status showed significant differences between oral CyA treated groups and nontreated groups (P < 0.0003). Oral CyA therapy

  16. Use of CTLA4Ig for Induction of Mixed Chimerism and Renal Allograft Tolerance in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yohei; Ochiai, Takanori; Boskovic, Svjetlan; Nadazdin, Ognjenka; Oura, Tetsu; Schoenfeld, David; Cappetta, Kate; Smith, Rex-Neal; Colvin, Robert B; Madsen, Joren C.; Sachs, David H.; Benichou, Gilles; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported successful induction of renal allograft tolerance via a mixed chimerism approach in nonhuman primates (NHP). In those studies, we found that costimulatory blockade with anti-CD154 mAb was an effective adjunctive therapy for induction of renal allograft tolerance. However, since anti-CD154 mAb is not clinically available, we have evaluated CTLA4Ig as an alternative agent for effecting costimulation blockade in this treatment protocol. Two CTLA4-Igs, Abatacept and Belatacept, were substituted for anti-CD154 mAb in the conditioning regimen (low dose total body irradiation, thymic irradiation, ATG and a one month post-transplant course of cyclosporine (CyA)). Three recipients treated with the Abatacept regimen failed to develop comparable lymphoid chimerism to that achieved with anti-CD154 mAb treatment and these recipients rejected their kidney allografts early. With the Belatacept regimen, four of five recipients developed chimerism and three of these achieved long-term renal allograft survival (>861, >796 and >378 days) without maintenance immunosuppression. Neither chimerism nor long-term allograft survival were achieved in two recipients treated with the Belatacept regimen but with a lower, subtherapeutic dose of CyA. This study indicates that CD28/B7 blockade with Belatacept can provide a clinically applicable alternative to anti-CD154 mAb for promoting chimerism and renal allograft tolerance. PMID:25394378

  17. Mechanisms of rejection: role of complement.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Sacks, Steven H

    2014-02-01

    To provide the reader with an up-to-date comprehensive review of recent findings that highlight advances describing how proteins of the complement cascades contribute to the pathogenesis of solid organ rejection. The review is focussed mainly on renal transplantation. Of note are recent advances in elucidating the interactions between anaphylatoxins and their receptors in organ transplantation; there is evidence of direct engagement of C5aR on donor tubules and in addition, mechanisms by which the allostimulatory capacity of dendritic cells is modulated by complement are more fully understood. Activation of the lectin pathway is increasingly implicated in allograft rejection and the role of complement in modulating regulatory T cells is being vigorously investigated. As an alternative to systemic complement inhibition, there is continued focus on the design of targeted anti-complement therapies, directed to the donor organ. Complement has evolved as the first line of defence against pathogens, employing well defined effector mechanisms to rapidly remove infectious material. However, complement effector mechanisms are also triggered during inflammation associated with solid organ transplantation. Hence, complement has a significant role in mediating donor organ injury during both the initial ischaemia/reperfusion phase and the subsequent adaptive immune responses. Research on mechanisms of complement-mediated injury in transplantation provide a basis for the development of therapies that are aimed at transiently blocking complement activation at the site of injury, whereas leaving systemic anti-bacterial complement effector mechanisms intact.

  18. Cellular rejection of the conduction system after orthotopic heart transplantation for congenital atrioventricular block.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jessica B; Levi, Daniel S; Lai, Chi K; Alejos, Juan C; Fishbein, Michael C

    2006-11-01

    We report a case of severe acute cellular rejection of the cardiac allograft conduction system in a 15-month-old girl who received orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) for congestive heart failure from a congenital heart block. Post-operatively, the patient was treated for clinical evidence of rejection, but did not have electrocardiographic findings of heart block. Six weeks after transplantation, the patient developed sudden-onset bradycardia and died. Autopsy showed severe acute cellular rejection involving primarily the conduction system. Cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is a potentially lethal complication of OHT. Although diagnostic modalities to predict or detect ongoing cellular rejection in the conduction system are limited, recognizing the early signs, such as post-operative heart block, may prevent devastating consequences.

  19. Isolated pancreas rejections do not have an adverse impact on kidney graft survival whereas kidney rejections are associated with adverse pancreas graft survival in simultaneous pancreas kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Yaqub, Muhammad Sohail; Taber, Tim; Powelson, John; Fridell, Jonathan; Sharfuddin, Asif

    2017-09-16

    Diabetic Kidney Disease is associated with excessive mortality and morbidity. Simultaneous pancreas kidney transplantation (SPK) significantly improves quality of life and increases life expectancy of uremic diabetic patients. It is not known whether pancreas and kidney rejections in these transplant patients is concordant or discordant. We analyzed clinical data on all SPK transplants performed between 2003 and 2014 at Indiana University to assess the impact of isolated or combined pancreas and kidney rejections on patient and allograft outcomes. The primary outcome of interest was kidney graft rejection within 1 year of pancreatic rejection and kidney survival in SPK patients with and without pancreatic rejection. Mean age of patients was 44 ± 9 years; 61.9% were males; 88% were Caucasians. A total of 23.8% of cases had rejection [8.7% pancreatic rejection alone (PA), 4.4% had concordant pancreas and kidney (PK) rejection, and 10.7% had kidney rejection alone(KA)]. PK had a worse effect on kidney graft survival than PA (p = 0.019). Neither pancreas rejection nor kidney rejection had an adverse effect on patient survival. However, both pancreas graft failure and kidney graft failure adversely affected patient survival. Tacrolimus levels were not significantly different in all groups over a 10 year period (p = 0.4584). Concordant pancreas kidney rejection is synergistically deleterious to kidney graft survival. Graft failure, not graft rejection, is adversely associated with patient survival.

  20. Sex-specific effects of carotenoid intake on the immunological response to allografts in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed Central

    Grether, Gregory F.; Kasahara, Shinji; Kolluru, Gita R.; Cooper, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    Rarely are the evolutionary origins of mate preferences known, but, recently, the preference of female guppies (Poecilia reticulata) for males with carotenoid-based sexual coloration has been linked to a sensory bias that may have originally evolved for detecting carotenoid-rich fruits. If carotenoids enhance the immune systems of these fishes, as has been suggested for other species, this could explain the origin of the attraction to orange fruits as well as the maintenance of the female preference for orange males. We used the classic immunological technique of tissue grafting to assay a component of the immune response of guppies raised on two different dietary levels of carotenoids. Individual scales were transplanted between pairs of unrelated fishes, creating reciprocal allografts. Transplanted scales were scored on a six-point rejection scale every day for 10 days. Five days later, the same pairs of fishes received a second set of allografts and were scored again. Compared with low-carotenoid-diet males, high-carotenoid-diet males mounted a significantly stronger rejection response to the second allograft but not to the first allograft. High-carotenoid-diet females, however, showed no improvement in graft rejection compared with low-carotenoid-diet females. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence for sex-specific effects of carotenoid consumption on the immune system of a species with carotenoid-based sexual coloration. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the mate preference for carotenoid coloration is maintained by the benefits to females of choosing healthy mates, but they cast doubt on the idea that the benefits of carotenoid consumption, per se, could account for the origin of the preference. The sex-specificity of carotenoid effects on allograft rejection in guppies provides indirect support for the general hypothesis that males pay an immunological cost for sexual ornamentation. PMID:15002770

  1. Sex-specific effects of carotenoid intake on the immunological response to allografts in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Grether, Gregory F; Kasahara, Shinji; Kolluru, Gita R; Cooper, Edwin L

    2004-01-07

    Rarely are the evolutionary origins of mate preferences known, but, recently, the preference of female guppies (Poecilia reticulata) for males with carotenoid-based sexual coloration has been linked to a sensory bias that may have originally evolved for detecting carotenoid-rich fruits. If carotenoids enhance the immune systems of these fishes, as has been suggested for other species, this could explain the origin of the attraction to orange fruits as well as the maintenance of the female preference for orange males. We used the classic immunological technique of tissue grafting to assay a component of the immune response of guppies raised on two different dietary levels of carotenoids. Individual scales were transplanted between pairs of unrelated fishes, creating reciprocal allografts. Transplanted scales were scored on a six-point rejection scale every day for 10 days. Five days later, the same pairs of fishes received a second set of allografts and were scored again. Compared with low-carotenoid-diet males, high-carotenoid-diet males mounted a significantly stronger rejection response to the second allograft but not to the first allograft. High-carotenoid-diet females, however, showed no improvement in graft rejection compared with low-carotenoid-diet females. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence for sex-specific effects of carotenoid consumption on the immune system of a species with carotenoid-based sexual coloration. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the mate preference for carotenoid coloration is maintained by the benefits to females of choosing healthy mates, but they cast doubt on the idea that the benefits of carotenoid consumption, per se, could account for the origin of the preference. The sex-specificity of carotenoid effects on allograft rejection in guppies provides indirect support for the general hypothesis that males pay an immunological cost for sexual ornamentation.

  2. Altered Exosomal RNA Profiles in Bronchoalveolar Lavage from Lung Transplants with Acute Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hoji, Aki; Injean, Patil; Poynter, Steven T.; Briones, Claudia; Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav; Sam Weigt, S.; Shino, Michael Y.; Derhovanessian, Ariss; Saggar, Rajan; Ross, David; Ardehali, Abbas; Lynch, Joseph P.; Belperio, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The mechanism by which acute allograft rejection leads to chronic rejection remains poorly understood despite its common occurrence. Exosomes, membrane vesicles released from cells within the lung allograft, contain a diverse array of biomolecules that closely reflect the biologic state of the cell and tissue from which they are released. Exosome transcriptomes may provide a better understanding of the rejection process. Furthermore, biomarkers originating from this transcriptome could provide timely and sensitive detection of acute cellular rejection (AR), reducing the incidence of severe AR and chronic lung allograft dysfunction and improving outcomes. Objectives: To provide an in-depth analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid exosomal shuttle RNA population after lung transplantation and evaluate for differential expression between acute AR and quiescence. Methods: Serial bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were ultracentrifuged to obtain the exosomal pellet for RNA extraction, on which RNA-Seq was performed. Measurements and Main Results: AR demonstrates an intense inflammatory environment, skewed toward both innate and adaptive immune responses. Novel, potential upstream regulators identified offer potential therapeutic targets. Conclusions: Our findings validate bronchoalveolar lavage fluid exosomal shuttle RNA as a source for understanding the pathophysiology of AR and for biomarker discovery in lung transplantation. PMID:26308930

  3. Activation of the transcription factor c-Jun in acute cellular and antibody-mediated rejection after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Takahashi, Takamune; Horita, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Izumi; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Teraoka, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kazunari; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    2010-12-01

    c-Jun is a transcription factor that belongs to the activator protein-1 family of proteins. In human kidney disease, c-Jun is activated in glomerular and tubular cells and plays a major role in renal pathophysiology. However, the contribution of this pathway to renal allograft rejection has not been determined. We investigated whether c-Jun is activated in acute allograft rejection. c-Jun activation was assessed with immunohistochemistry using phospho-specific c-Jun antibodies in control human renal tissue and renal tissue from patients with acute cellular rejection, acute antibody-mediated rejection, and no rejection in the month after transplantation. In patients with acute cellular rejection, c-Jun activation was observed primarily in infiltrated T cells associated with tubulitis, interstitial cell infiltration, and endarteritis. The number of infiltrated phosphorylated c-Jun-positive cells in the tubules and interstitium was correlated with the Banff classification "t" and "i" scores. In patients with acute antibody-mediated rejection, c-Jun activation was observed in injured endothelial cells as well as in infiltrated cells, including macrophages, in the glomerular and peritubular capillaries. Furthermore, the serum creatinine levels and changes in serum creatinine from the previous year were significantly correlated with the total tubulointerstitial phosphorylated c-Jun-positive score (representing the number of positive nuclei in the tubules, interstitium, and peritubular capillaries). In conclusion, c-Jun was activated in acute antibody-mediated rejection and acute cellular rejection and was associated with reduced graft function. These findings suggest that c-Jun plays a key role in pathological events and may represent a novel therapeutic target in acute renal allograft rejection.

  4. IL-17A and IL-2-expanded regulatory T cells cooperate to inhibit Th1-mediated rejection of MHC II disparate skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Vokaer, Benoît; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Lemaître, Philippe H; Spilleboudt, Chloé; Le Moine, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Several evidences suggest that regulatory T cells (Treg) promote Th17 differentiation. Based on this hypothesis, we tested the effect of IL-17A neutralization in a model of skin transplantation in which long-term graft survival depends on a strong in vivo Treg expansion induced by transient exogenous IL-2 administration. As expected, IL-2 supplementation prevented rejection of MHC class II disparate skin allografts but, surprisingly, not in IL-17A-deficient recipients. We attested that IL-17A was not required for IL-2-mediated Treg expansion, intragraft recruitment or suppressive capacities. Instead, IL-17A prevented allograft rejection by inhibiting Th1 alloreactivity independently of Tregs. Indeed, T-bet expression of naive alloreactive CD4+ T cells and the subsequent Th1 immune response was significantly enhanced in IL-17A deficient mice. Our results illustrate for the first time a protective role of IL-17A in CD4+-mediated allograft rejection process.

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: allograft versus autograft.

    PubMed

    Chang, Spencer K Y; Egami, Darren K; Shaieb, Mark D; Kan, Darryl M; Richardson, Allen B

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the minimal 2-year outcome of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allografts versus autografts, both augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis. Retrospective review. Forty-six of 52 BPTB ACL reconstructions using allografts and 33 of 37 BPTB ACL reconstructions using autografts were followed up at a mean of 2.75 and 3.36 years, respectively. All patients had an iliotibial band tenodesis. Evaluations included the Lysholm II scale, a questionnaire, physical examination findings, and KT-1000 arthrometry. No statistically significant differences were seen between groups in Lysholm II scores or in any subjective category. Most patients (91% allograft; 97% autograft) had good to excellent Lysholm II scores. Sixty-five percent of allograft patients and 73% of autograft patients returned to their preinjury activity level. More allograft patients complained of retropatellar pain (16% v 9% for autograft patients). Fifty-three percent of allograft patients versus 23% of autograft patients had a flexion deficit of 5 degrees or more when compared with the normal contralateral side. When comparing KT-1000 side-to-side differences, we found no significant differences between groups. Ninety-one percent of both groups had maximum side-to-side differences less than 5 mm. Three allograft patients (6.5%) had traumatic ruptures at 12, 19, and 43 months postoperatively versus none in the autograft group. All three allograft patients who sustained postoperative traumatic ruptures had received fresh frozen, nonirradiated allografts. Results of ACL reconstruction using allografts or autografts augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis were comparable. The BPTB autograft should remain the gold standard, although the BPTB allograft in ACL reconstruction is a reasonable alternative.

  6. Downregulation of T cell receptor expression by CD8(+) lymphocytes in kidney allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Mannon, R B; Kotzin, B L; Nataraj, C; Ferri, K; Roper, E; Kurlander, R J; Coffman, T M

    1998-01-01

    Allospecific CD8(+) T lymphocytes are an important component of the cellular response in allograft rejection. These cells recognize and engage MHC class I antigens, leading to allospecific cytolytic responses and graft rejection. In mouse kidney allografts that survive to 3 wk after transplantation, we noted that the majority of CD8(+) cells do not express surface alpha/beta T cell receptor alpha/beta(TCR), gamma/deltaTCR, or CD3. However, these CD8(+)TCR- cells did express surface markers characteristic of T cells, including Thy1.2, CD2, and CD5. In addition, the CD8(+)TCR- cells expressed mRNA for TCR Vbeta gene families, and nearly half stained positive for cytoplasmic Vbeta8 protein, suggesting that they are T cells that have downregulated alpha/betaTCR protein expression from their cell surfaces. When these surface TCR- cells were isolated from kidney allografts by flow cytometry and cultured in the presence of either allogeneic or syngeneic stimulators, nearly 100% of cells reacquired normal levels of alpha/betaTCR expression with disproportionate usage of Vbeta8 chains. After recovery of their surface TCR expression, the CD8(+)TCR- population demonstrated strong alloreactivity in culture. These results suggest that the substantial number of CD8(+)TCR- cells found in long-term surviving mouse kidney allografts are alpha/beta-T cells that have downregulated their cell surface expression of TCR. While in other systems this phenotype may identify cells that have engaged antigen, our results indicate that loss of TCR expression by CD8(+) kidney graft-infiltrating cells may not depend on antigen engagement and that elements in the microenvironment of the kidney graft play a key role in this process. Factors that modulate expression of TCR by graft-infiltrating lymphocytes may have an important role in regulating rejection responses. PMID:9616223

  7. Murine islet allograft tolerance upon blockade of the B-lymphocyte stimulator, BLyS/BAFF.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Ronald F; Yu, Ming; Vivek, Kumar; Zekavat, Ghazal; Rostami, Susan Y; Ziaie, Amin S; Luo, Yanping; Koeberlein, Brigitte; Redfield, Robert R; Ward, Christopher D; Migone, Thi-Sau; Cancro, Michael P; Naji, Ali; Noorchashm, Hooman

    2012-04-15

    Immunologic rejection is a major barrier to successful long-term outcomes in clinical transplantation. The importance of B lymphocytes-and their secretory products, alloantibodies-in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection is accepted. Furthermore, it is now clear that the dominant regulator of peripheral B-cell homeostasis and tolerance is the B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), also referred to as the B-cell activating factor (BAFF). Recently, a novel class of clinical immunotherapeutic agents specific for BLyS, and its family of cytokines, has emerged for the treatment of B-cell-mediated diseases. In this study, we demonstrate the potential utility of BLyS-directed immunotherapy in preventing allograft rejection using a murine islet transplantation model. A transient period of mature peripheral B-cell depletion was induced by means of in vivo BLyS neutralization using a murine analog of the monoclonal antibody, Benlysta. Subsequently, fully major histocompatibility complex-mismatched islets were transplanted into naïve diabetic mice followed by a short course of rapamycin. After BLyS neutralization, indefinite islet allograft survival was achieved. Induction therapy with rapamycin was necessary, but not sufficient, for the achievement of this long-term graft survival. The tolerant state was associated with (1) abrogation of the donor-specific antibody response, (2) transient preponderance of immature/transitional B cells in all lymphoid organs, (3) impaired CD4 T-cell activation during the period of B-cell depletion, and (4) presence of a "regulatory" cytokine milieu. In vivo BLyS neutralization effectively induces humoral tolerance and promotes long-term islet allograft survival in mice. Therefore, B-lymphocyte-directed immunotherapy targeting the homeostatic regulator, BLyS, may be effective in promoting transplantation tolerance.

  8. Increased T cell glucose uptake reflects acute rejection in lung grafts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Delphine L.; Wang, Xingan; Yamamoto, Sumiharu; Carpenter, Danielle; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Li, Wenjun; Lin, Xue; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Huang, Howard J.; Gelman, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Although T cells are required for acute lung rejection, other graft-infiltrating cells such as neutrophils accumulate in allografts and are also high glucose utilizers. Positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose probe [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) has been employed to image solid organ acute rejection, but the sources of glucose utilization remain undefined. Using a mouse model of orthotopic lung transplantation, we analyzed glucose probe uptake in the grafts of syngeneic and allogeneic recipients with or without immunosuppression treatment. Pulmonary microPET scans demonstrated significantly higher [18F]FDG uptake in rejecting allografts when compared to transplanted lungs of either immunosuppressed or syngeneic recipients. [18F]FDG uptake was also markedly attenuated following T cell depletion therapy in lung recipients with ongoing acute rejection. Flow-cytometric analysis using the fluorescent deoxyglucose analog 2-NBDG revealed that T cells, and in particular CD8+ T cells, were the largest glucose utilizers in acutely rejecting lung grafts followed by neutrophils and antigen presenting cells. These data indicate that imaging modalities tailored toward assessing T cell metabolism may be useful in identifying acute rejection in lung recipients PMID:23927673

  9. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1 is down-regulated in renal transplant recipients with rejection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsai-Hung; Lee, Hui-Ting; Lai, Chien-Chih; Yang, An-Hang; Loong, Che-Chuan; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Yu, Chia-Li; Tsai, Chang-Youh

    2016-09-01

    The role of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) in maintaining the immunotolerance of renal allograft is unknown. To clarify this, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from renal transplant patients with or without rejection were analyzed for the expression of SOCS family proteins by cell culture, immunoblot, flowcytometry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Patients with renal graft rejection expressed lower levels of SOCS1 while those without rejection showed a higher SOCS1 expression in the PBMC either on stimulation or not. In addition, SOCS1 was constitutively expressed in normal individuals as well as renal transplant patients with graft tolerance while patients with rejection exhibited down-regulation of the SOCS1 but not SOCS3. The qPCR tests and flowcytometric measurements have also showed that the reduction of SOCS1 expression in rejection could be quantitatively evaluated. These results have suggested that down-regulation of SOCS1 may be regarded as a biomarker for early detection of renal allograft rejection.

  10. Heart transplantation using allografts from older donors: Multicenter study results.

    PubMed

    Roig, Eulàlia; Almenar, Luís; Crespo-Leiro, Marisa; Segovia, Javier; Mirabet, Sònia; Delgado, Juan; Pérez-Villa, Felix; Luís Lambert, Jose; Teresa Blasco, M; Muñiz, Javier

    2015-06-01

    The lengthy waiting time for heart transplantation is associated with high mortality. To increase the number of donors, new strategies have emerged, including the use of hearts from donors ≥50 years old. However, this practice remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes of patients receiving heart transplants from older donors. We retrospectively analyzed 2,102 consecutive heart transplants in 8 Spanish hospitals from 1998 to 2010. Acute and overall mortality were compared in patients with grafts from donors ≥50 years old versus grafts from younger donors. There were 1,758 (84%) transplanted grafts from donors < 50 years old (Group I) and 344 (16%) from donors ≥50 years old (Group II). Group I had more male donors than Group II (71% vs. 57%, p = 0.0001). The incidence of cardiovascular risk factors was higher in older donors. There were no differences in acute mortality or acute rejection episodes between the 2 groups. Global mortality was higher in Group II (rate ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.67; p = 0.001) than in Group I. After adjusting for donor cause of death, donor smoking history, recipient age, induction therapy, and cyclosporine therapy, the differences lost significance. Group II had a higher incidence of coronary allograft vasculopathy at 5 years (rate ratio, 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-2.27; p = 0.001). There were no differences in acute and overall mortality after adjusting for confounding factors. However, there was a midterm increased risk of coronary allograft vasculopathy with the use of older donors. Careful selection of recipients and close monitoring of coronary allograft vasculopathy are warranted in these patients. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Maiko; Yamamoto, Izumi; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Sugano, Naoki; Tanno, Yudo; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    We report a case of plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. A 33-year-old man was admitted for an episode biopsy; he had a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 5.7 mg/dL 1 year following primary kidney transplantation. Histological features included two distinct entities: (1) a focal, aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell (predominantly plasma cells) infiltration with moderate tubulitis; and (2) inflammatory cell infiltration (including neutrophils) in peritubular capillaries. Substantial laboratory examination showed that the patient had donor-specific antibodies for DQ4 and DQ6. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, we diagnosed him with plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection. We started 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy three times every 2 weeks for the former and plasma exchange with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for the latter histological feature. One month after treatment, a second allograft biopsy showed excellent responses to treatment for plasma cell-rich rejection, but moderate, acute antibody-mediated rejection remained. Therefore, we added plasma exchange with IVIG again. After treatment, allograft function was stable, with an S-Cr level of 2.8 mg/dL. This case report demonstrates the difficulty of the diagnosis of, and treatment for, plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. We also include a review of the related literature.

  12. Bidirectional intragraft alloreactivity drives the repopulation of human intestinal allografts and correlates with clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Julien; Shonts, Brittany; Lau, Sai-Ping; Obradovic, Aleksandar; Fu, Jianing; Yang, Suxiao; Lambert, Marion; Coley, Shana; Weiner, Joshua; Thome, Joseph; DeWolf, Susan; Farber, Donna L; Shen, Yufeng; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie; Bhagat, Govind; Griesemer, Adam; Martinez, Mercedes; Kato, Tomoaki; Sykes, Megan

    2016-10-01

    A paradigm in transplantation states that graft-infiltrating T cells are largely non-alloreactive "bystander" cells. However, the origin and specificity of allograft T cells over time has not been investigated in detail in animals or humans. Here, we use polychromatic flow cytometry and high throughput TCR sequencing of serial biopsies to show that gut-resident T cell turnover kinetics in human intestinal allografts are correlated with the balance between intra-graft host-vs-graft (HvG) and graft-vs-host (GvH) reactivities and with clinical outcomes. In the absence of rejection, donor T cells were enriched for GvH-reactive clones that persisted long-term in the graft. Early expansion of GvH clones in the graft correlated with rapid replacement of donor APCs by the recipient. Rejection was associated with transient infiltration by blood-like recipient CD28+ NKG2D(Hi) CD8+ alpha beta T cells, marked predominance of HvG clones, and accelerated T cell turnover in the graft. Ultimately, these recipient T cells acquired a steady state tissue-resident phenotype, but regained CD28 expression during rejections. Increased ratios of GvH to HvG clones were seen in non-rejectors, potentially mitigating the constant threat of rejection posed by HvG clones persisting within the tissue-resident graft T cell population.

  13. Bidirectional intragraft alloreactivity drives the repopulation of human intestinal allografts and correlates with clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Julien; Obradovic, Aleksandar; Fu, Jianing; Yang, Suxiao; Lambert, Marion; Coley, Shana; Weiner, Joshua; Thome, Joseph; DeWolf, Susan; Farber, Donna L.; Shen, Yufeng; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie; Bhagat, Govind; Griesemer, Adam; Martinez, Mercedes; Kato, Tomoaki; Sykes, Megan

    2016-01-01

    A paradigm in transplantation states that graft-infiltrating T cells are largely non-alloreactive “bystander” cells. However, the origin and specificity of allograft T cells over time has not been investigated in detail in animals or humans. Here, we use polychromatic flow cytometry and high throughput TCR sequencing of serial biopsies to show that gut-resident T cell turnover kinetics in human intestinal allografts are correlated with the balance between intra-graft host-vs-graft (HvG) and graft-vs-host (GvH) reactivities and with clinical outcomes. In the absence of rejection, donor T cells were enriched for GvH-reactive clones that persisted long-term in the graft. Early expansion of GvH clones in the graft correlated with rapid replacement of donor APCs by the recipient. Rejection was associated with transient infiltration by blood-like recipient CD28+ NKG2DHi CD8+ alpha beta T cells, marked predominance of HvG clones, and accelerated T cell turnover in the graft. Ultimately, these recipient T cells acquired a steady state tissue-resident phenotype, but regained CD28 expression during rejections. Increased ratios of GvH to HvG clones were seen in non-rejectors, potentially mitigating the constant threat of rejection posed by HvG clones persisting within the tissue-resident graft T cell population. PMID:28239678

  14. The influence of organ donor factors on early allograft function.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Christoph; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2003-03-01

    Postischaemic acute renal allograft failure is among the main risk factors for reduced transplant survival. Although new immunosuppressive protocols have reduced the number of acute rejections, the incidence of acute renal failure remained unchanged. On the basis of histomorphology it is not possible to predict donor kidneys at risk of subsequent failure. Some factors are associated with failure, but even combinations of these risk factors can not precisely predict the development of acute renal failure. Studies have therefore evaluated the influence of demographic donor and recipient factors on acute renal failure. New biotechnology and data mining tools are currently being used to study and identify the molecular predictors of acute renal failure. Recent studies showed that donor factors contributed to approximately 40% of the variability in early allograft function. Deductive approaches identified some isolated molecular targets, such as adhesion molecules, as risk factors. Explorative analysis of the entire human genome, however, identified several predictive clusters of genes, which can be functionally grouped into categories such as cell death, stress response, cell adhesion, transcription factors, inflammatory response or cell cycle-related genes. Based on this information, preventative strategies using antisense oligonucleotides or antibodies were adopted. Clinical studies identified the use of catecholamines in the organ donor as beneficial. All these efforts aim to reduce renal tubular damage. A detailed analysis of the molecular events and pathways of renal gene expression in the donor and after reperfusion, together with sophisticated data analysis tools, will provide new insights into the pathophysiology of acute renal failure.

  15. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  16. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng; Cruz Jr, Ruy J; Cai, Jun-Chao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence, risk factors and clinical outcomes of acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) after intestinal transplantation (ITx). METHODS A retrospective single-center analysis was performed to identify cases of acute ABMR after ITx, based on the presence of donor-specific antibody (DSA), acute tissue damage, C4d deposition, and allograft dysfunction. RESULTS Acute ABMR was identified in 18 (10.3%) out of 175 intestinal allografts with an average occurrence of 10 d (range, 4-162) after ITx. All acute ABMR cases were presensitized to donor human leukocyte antigens class I and/or II antigens with a detectable DSA. A positive cross-match was seen in 14 (77.8%) cases and twelve of 18 patients (66.7%) produced newly-formed DSA following ITx. Histological characteristics of acute ABMR include endothelial C4d deposits, interstitial hemorrhage, and severe congestion with focal fibrin thrombin in the lamina propria capillaries. Multivariate analysis identified a liver-free graft and high level of panel reactive antibody as a significant independent risk factor. Despite initial improvement after therapy, eleven recipients (61.1%) lost transplant secondary to rejection. Of those, 9 (50%) underwent graft removal and 4 (22.2%) received second transplantation following acute ABMR. At an average follow-up of 32.3 mo (range, 13.3-76.4), 8 (44.4%) recipients died. CONCLUSION Our results indicate that acute ABMR is an important cause of intestine graft dysfunction, particularly in a liver-exclusive graft and survivors are at an increased risk of developing refractory acute rejection and chronic rejection. More effective strategies to prevent and manage acute ABMR are needed to improve outcomes. PMID:28058223

  17. Symptomatic Respiratory Virus Infection and Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Cynthia E.; Preiksaitis, Carl M.; Lease, Erika D.; Edelman, Jeffrey; Kirby, Katharine A.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Raghu, Ganesh; Boeckh, Michael; Limaye, Ajit P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is a major cause of allograft loss post-lung transplantation. Prior studies have examined the association between respiratory virus infection (RVI) and CLAD were limited by older diagnostic techniques, study design, and case numbers. We examined the association between symptomatic RVI and CLAD using modern diagnostic techniques in a large contemporary cohort of lung transplant recipients (LTRs). Methods. We retrospectively assessed clinical variables including acute rejection, cytomegalovirus pneumonia, upper and lower RVI, and the primary endpoint of CLAD (determined by 2 independent reviewers) in 250 LTRs in a single university transplantation program. Univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to analyze the relationship between RVI and CLAD in a time-dependent manner, incorporating different periods of risk following RVI diagnosis. Results. Fifty patients (20%) were diagnosed with CLAD at a median of 95 weeks post-transplantation, and 79 (32%) had 114 episodes of RVI. In multivariate analysis, rejection and RVI were independently associated with CLAD (adjusted hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]) 2.2 (1.2–3.9), P = .01 and 1.9 (1.1–3.5), P = .03, respectively. The association of RVI with CLAD was stronger the more proximate the RVI episode: 4.8 (1.9–11.6), P < .01; 3.4 (1.5–7.5), P < .01; and 2.4 (1.2–5.0), P = .02 in multivariate analysis for 3, 6, and 12 months following RVI, respectively. Conclusions. Symptomatic RVI is independently associated with development of CLAD, with increased risk at shorter time periods following RVI. Prospective studies to characterize the virologic determinants of CLAD and define the underlying mechanisms are warranted. PMID:26565010

  18. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  19. Induction of tolerance to cardiac allografts in lethally irradiated rats reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Generally, organ grafts from one individual animal to another are rejected in one-two weeks. However, if the recipients are given Total Body Irradiation (TBI) just prior to grafting, followed by reconstitution of hemopoietic function with syngeneic (recipient-type) bone marrow cells, then vascularized organ grafts are permanently accepted. Initially after irradiation, it is possible to induce tolerance to many strain combinations in rats. This thesis examines the system of TBI as applied to the induction of tolerance in LEW recipients of WF cardiac allografts. These two rat strains are mismatched across the entire major histocompatibility complex. When the LEW recipient are given 860 rads, a WF cardiac allograft and LEW bone marrow on the same day, 60% of the grafts are accepted. Methods employed to improve the rate of graft acceptance include: treating either donor or recipient with small amounts of methotrexate, or waiting until two days after irradiation to repopulate with bone marrow. It seems from these investigations of some of the early events in the induction of tolerance to allografts following TBI and syngeneic marrow reconstitution that an immature cell population in the bone marrow interacts with a radioresistant cell population in the spleen to produce tolerance to completely MHC-mismatched allografts.

  20. Suppression of Chronic Damage in Renal Allografts by Liver X Receptor (LXR) Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Eva; Popovic, Zoran; Bedke, Jens; Wang, Shijun; Bonrouhi, Mahnaz; Gretz, Norbert; Stettner, Paula; Teupser, Daniel; Thiery, Joachim; Porubsky, Stefan; Adams, Judith; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2011-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXR)-α,β regulate intracellular cholesterol homeostasis and inhibit inflammatory gene expression. We studied the effects of the LXRα,β-agonist GW3965 on acute and chronic organ damage in the F344-LEW rat kidney transplantation model. In addition, to gain LXR isoform and cell-specific insights BALB/c kidneys were transplanted into mice with macrophage overexpression of LXRα (mLXRα-tg) and evaluated 7 and 42 days after transplantation. After 56 days GW3965 improved significantly function and morphology of rat kidney allografts by substantial reduction of mononuclear cell infiltrate and fibrosis; in vitro GW3965 reduced inflammatory activity of bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMDMs) and alloreactivity of T cells. Kidneys transplanted into mLXRα-tg mice were also protected from development of chronic allograft dysfunction. Similarly to GW3965-activated BMDMs, mLXRα-tg macrophages secreted significantly less monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β. Interestingly, 7 days after transplantation, when the total number of intragraft macrophages did not differ, evidently more arginase 1– and mannose receptor C type 1–positive cells were found in LXR rat and mice kidney allografts; in vitro both LXR activation by GW3965 and mLXRα overexpression accentuated the induction of alternative activation of BMDMs by IL-4/IL-13, suggesting an additional mechanism by LXRs to prevent graft damage. The results highlight the relevance of macrophage LXRα in allograft rejection and prevention of fibrosis. PMID:21703396

  1. A new in vitro approach to determine acquired tolerance in long-term kidney allograft recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Reinsmoen, N.L.; Kaufman, D.; Matas, A.; Sutherland, D.E.; Najarian, J.S.; Bach, F.H. )

    1990-11-01

    Previous studies indicate some kidney allograft recipients treated with total lymphoid irradiation, cyclosporine, or conventional immunosuppressive therapy demonstrate specific proliferative unresponsiveness in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) to donor cells at various times posttransplant. To investigate possible donor-specific hyporeactivity, we have studied 3 patients treated with TLI whose grafts have survived longer than 10 years; 2 patients given the same immunosuppressive protocol but without TLI whose grafts have survived longer than 10 years; and 27 CsA-treated living-related donor and cadaver-allograft recipients 1 year posttransplant. We confirmed previous observations of hyporeactivity of some patients' cells to stimulation by donor cells. In addition, we identified hyporeactivity to stimulation by homozygous typing cells (HTCs) defining the HLA-Dw specificities of the donor cells for all 3 of the 3 TLI patients, 1 of the 2 non-TLI patients, and 9 of the 27 patients 1 year posttransplant. The LRD recipients with donor-specific hyporeactivity as defined by the HTC analysis demonstrated fewer rejection episodes (25% vs. 57%) and lower mean creatinine levels (1.18 vs 1.78 mg/dL) than patients without donor-specific hyporeactivity. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring the immune status of allograft recipients posttransplant by means of HTC analysis, eliminating the need for pretransplant specimens. This approach provides a possible means to assess which patients may have acquired donor-specific hyporeactivity to their kidney allograft and thus may require less immunosuppression.

  2. Progressive histological damage in renal allografts is associated with expression of innate and adaptive immunity genes

    PubMed Central

    Naesens, Maarten; Khatri, Purvesh; Li, Li; Sigdel, Tara K.; Vitalone, Matthew J.; Chen, Rong; Butte, Atul J.; Salvatierra, Oscar; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2015-01-01

    The degree of progressive chronic histological damage is associated with long-term renal allograft survival. In order to identify promising molecular targets for timely intervention, we examined renal allograft protocol and indication biopsies from 120 low-risk pediatric and adolescent recipients by whole-genome microarray expression profiling. In data-driven analysis, we found a highly regulated pattern of adaptive and innate immune gene expression that correlated with established or ongoing histological chronic injury, and also with development of future chronic histological damage, even in histologically pristine kidneys. Hence, histologically unrecognized immunological injury at a molecular level sets the stage for the development of chronic tissue injury, while the same molecular response is accentuated during established and worsening chronic allograft damage. Irrespective of the hypothesized immune or nonimmune trigger for chronic allograft injury, a highly orchestrated regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses was found in the graft at the molecular level. This occurred months before histologic lesions appear, and quantitatively below the diagnostic threshold of classic T-cell or antibody-mediated rejection. Thus, measurement of specific immune gene expression in protocol biopsies may be warranted to predict the development of subsequent chronic injury in histologically quiescent grafts and as a means to titrate immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:21881554

  3. Calcium oxalate deposition in renal allografts: morphologic spectrum and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Truong, Luan D; Yakupoglu, Ulkem; Feig, Daniel; Hicks, John; Cartwight, Joiner; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Suki, Wadi N

    2004-08-01

    Many aspects of calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposition in renal transplant biopsies are not known. Review of all renal transplant biopsies performed in a 7-year period showed that CaOx deposition could be classified into three groups. Group I: Seven biopsies within a month post-transplant displayed rare CaOx foci against a background of acute tubular necrosis or acute cell-mediated rejection. At follow-up, five grafts functioned well and two failed due to chronic allograft nephropathy. CaOx in this context was an incidental finding secondary to a sudden excretion of an end-stage renal disease-induced increased body burden of CaOx. Group II: Two biopsies performed 2 and 10 months post-transplant showed rare CaOx foci against a background of chronic allograft nephropathy, leading to graft loss. CaOx in this context reflected nonspecific parenchymal deposition due to chronic renal failure regardless of causes. Group III: One biopsy with recurrent PH1 characterized by marked CaOx deposition associated with severe tubulointerstitial injury and graft loss 6 months post-transplant. There were two previously reported cases in which CaOx deposition in the renal allografts was due the antihypertensive drug naftidrofuryl oxalate or increased intestinal absorption of CaOx. CaOx deposition in renal allografts can be classified in different categories with distinctive morphologic features and clinical implications.

  4. Cyclosporine-associated renal arteriopathy resulting in loss of allograft function

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, B.G.; Innes, J.T.; Whitehurst, R.M.; Sharma, H.M.; Ferguson, R.M.

    1985-06-01

    Cyclosporine-associated arteriopathy was the cause of graft loss in 40 percent of all allografts that failed in a series of 200 consecutive cadaveric renal transplants. Arteriopathy was diagnosed by biopsy and renal uptake of indium 111m labeled platelets in the face of acute renal deterioration. A moderate thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic picture of hemolytic uremia was also present on peripheral blood smear. Immunofluorescence and histologic characteristics of the allograft biopsy specimens failed to show evidence for acute rejection: immunoglobulin M, immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, C1q, C3, and C4 were not present, and there was no evidence of an interstitial or vascular mononuclear cellular infiltrate. Two clinical presentations have been described. In Group I (seven patients), anuria occurred rapidly within the first 2 weeks after transplantation. In Group II (nine patients) renal function gradually diminished 1 to 5 months after starting cyclosporine therapy. Fifteen of the 16 recipients had progressive and irreversible loss of renal function which was pathologically associated with fibrin deposition, intimal proliferation, and thrombotic occlusion of the cortical interlobular and arcuate arteries, with subsequent focal glomerular ischemia and cortical infarction. One recipient with rapid loss of renal function received an intraarterial allograft infusion of streptokinase and subsequent systemic heparinization, which resulted in return of normal allograft function. The syndrome of cyclosporine-associated arteriopathy has been linked to a lack of or reduced amounts of prostacyclin-stimulating factor or prostacyclin.

  5. Development and maintenance of donor-specific chimerism in semi-allogenic and fully major histocompatibility complex mismatched facial allograft transplants.

    PubMed

    Siemionow, Maria; Demir, Yavuz; Mukherjee, Abir; Klimczak, Aleksandra

    2005-03-15

    The clinical application of composite tissue allograft transplants opened the discussion on the restoration of facial deformities by allotransplantation. We introduce a hemifacial allograft transplant model to investigate the rationale for the development of operational tolerance across a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barrier. Thirty rats were studied in five groups of six animals each. The composite hemiface isograft transplantations were performed in group 1. Allograft rejection controls included semi-allogenic transplantations from LBN (RT1(1+n) donors (group 2) and fully allogenic transplantations from ACI (RT1a) donors (group 3) to LEW (RT1(1)) recipients. In the allograft treatment groups, recipients of LBN (group 4) and ACI donors (group 5) were treated with cyclosporine A monotherapy (16 mg/kg/day, tapered to 2 mg/kg/day). Face allografts were evaluated clinically and histologically. Donor-specific chimerism for MHC class I RT1n and RT1a antigens was assessed by flow cytometry. Mixed lymphocyte reaction for donor-specific tolerance in vitro was tested at day 160 posttransplant. Isograft controls survived indefinitely. All nontreated allografts rejected within 5 to 8 days posttransplant. Long-term survival was achieved in 100% of LBN (up to 400 days) and ACI (up to 330 days) recipients. At day 160, posttransplant donor-specific chimerism was present in recipients of LBN (10.14% CD4/RT1n, 6.38% CD8/RT1n, 10.02% CD45RA/RT1n) and ACI (17.54% CD4/RT1a, 9.28% CD8/RT1a) transplants, and mixed lymphocyte reaction confirmed tolerance in recipients of LBN transplants and moderate reactivity in recipients of ACI allografts. Operational tolerance was induced in hemiface allograft transplants across an MHC barrier under cyclosporine A monotherapy protocol. It was associated directly with the presence of multilineage donor-specific chimerism.

  6. [Lymphoid neogenesis and lymphangiogenesis: two newcomers in the pathophysiology of chronic rejection].

    PubMed

    Attuil-Audenis, Valérie; Duthey, Aurélie; Patey, Natacha; Gautreau, Chantal; McGregor, Brigitte; Morelon, Emmanuel; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Nicoletti, Antonino; Thaunat, Olivier

    2009-04-01

    Chronic rejection is one of the main causes of late allograft failure and no therapy is currently available to prevent efficiently its development. Improving the comprehension of the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of chronic rejection is a mandatory step to propose innovative therapies that would prolong grafts' survival. Using the rat aortic interposition model of chronic vascular rejection, we have demonstrated that the intragraft inflammatory infiltrate progressively organized itself into a functional ectopic lymphoid tissue (tertiary lymphoid organ) supporting the local synthesis of alloantibody. Thus, during chronic rejection the graft is at the same time the target and the site of elaboration of the humoral allo-immune response. This hypothesis has been confirmed in the clinical setting by the analysis of human grafts (kidneys, hearts and lungs) removed for terminal failure due to chronic rejection. This lymphoid neogenesis process, previously identified in other chronic inflammatory diseases, occurs with a strikingly high frequency in chronically rejected grafts, suggesting that an additional mechanism synergizes to initiate the development of tertiary lymphoid organs during chronic rejection. We propose that the defective lymphatic drainage of chronically rejected organs triggers lymphoid neogenesis and we discuss the complex crosstalk between lymphoid neogenesis and lymphangiogenesis that takes place during chronic rejection.

  7. Reliability of whole slide images as a diagnostic modality for renal allograft biopsies.

    PubMed

    Jen, Kuang-Yu; Olson, Jean L; Brodsky, Sergey; Zhou, Xin J; Nadasdy, Tibor; Laszik, Zoltan G

    2013-05-01

    The use of digital whole slide images (WSI) in the field of pathology has become feasible for routine diagnostic purposes and has become more prevalent in recent years. This type of technology offers many advantages but must show the same degree of diagnostic reliability as conventional glass slides. Several studies have examined this issue in various settings and indicate that WSI are a reliable method for diagnostic pathology. Since transplant pathology is a highly specialized field that requires not only accurate but rapid diagnostic evaluation of biopsy materials, this field may greatly benefit from the use of WSI. In this study, we assessed the reliability of using WSI compared to conventional glass slides in renal allograft biopsies. We examined morphologic features and diagnostic categories defined by the Banff 07 Classification of Renal Allograft Pathology as well as additional morphologic features not included in this classification scheme. We found that intraobserver scores, when comparing the use of glass slides versus WSI, showed substantial agreement for both morphologic features (κ = 0.68) and acute rejection diagnostic categories (κ = 0.74). Furthermore, interobserver reliability was comparable for morphologic features (κ = 0.44 [glass] vs 0.42 [WSI]) and acute rejection diagnostic categories (κ = 0.49 [glass] vs 0.51 [WSI]). These data indicate that WSI are as reliable as glass slides for the evaluation of renal allograft biopsies.

  8. Tubuloreticular Inclusions in Renal Allografts Associate with Viral Infections and Donor-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jill; Moran, Linda; Brookes, Paul; Santos-Nunez, Eva; McLean, Adam G.; Cairns, Thomas; Taube, David; Cook, Terence H.; Roufosse, Candice

    2016-01-01

    The presence of tubuloreticular inclusions (TRIs) in native glomerular endothelial cells associates with viral infections and lupus nephritis. However, the associations of TRIs in renal transplant biopsy specimens are not known. We analyzed data from 316 patients who had a transplant biopsy with electron microscopy examination; 41 of 316 (13.0%) patients had TRIs. Patients with TRIs had significantly lower allograft survival rates (50.9%) than patients without TRIs (74.3%; P=0.03). Transplant glomerulopathy–free survival was also inferior in the TRI-positive group (57.5%) compared with the TRI-negative group (87.3%; P=0.002). Serologically, hepatitis C associated with the presence of TRIs (P=0.04) along with donor-specific antibodies (P=0.01). Furthermore, patients who were TRI positive were more likely than patients who were TRI negative to have had a previous rejection episode (P=0.02). On multivariate analysis, TRIs associated with prior rejection, viral infections, and class 1 HLA donor–specific antibodies. These results show that the presence of TRIs in renal allograft biopsy specimens associates with poor allograft outcomes and serologic evidence of viral infections and alloimmunity. The association with alloimmunity is a novel finding that warrants additional investigation. PMID:26614383

  9. The recipient's heme oxygenase-1 promoter region polymorphism is associated with cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Freystaetter, Kathrin; Andreas, Martin; Bilban, Martin; Perkmann, Thomas; Kaider, Alexandra; Masetti, Marco; Kocher, Alfred; Wolzt, Michael; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2017-02-10

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyses the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. The promoter region contains a highly polymorphic (GT)n repeat, where shorter (GT)n repeat sequences are linked to higher transcriptional activity, which was shown to correlate with a cytoprotective effect. Higher HO-1 levels may protect from cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Cardiac allograft recipients transplanted between 1988 and 2012 were analyzed for the HO-1 (GT)n repeat polymorphism using PCR and DNA fragment analysis with capillary electrophoresis. A relation to cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) was analyzed using Cox regression including common risk factors for CAV and the occurrence of rejection episodes as explanatory variables. A total of 344 patients were analyzed, of which 127 patients were positive for CAV (36.9%). In our multivariable Cox regression analysis, the short homozygous HO-1 (GT)n genotype with <27 repeats (S/S) revealed a higher risk for CAV (P = 0.032). Donor age (P = 0.001) and donor weight (P = 0.005) were significant predictors for CAV. A potential risk for CAV was associated with rejection episodes (P = 0.058) and history of smoking (P = 0.06). The recipient HO-1 (GT)n genotype may contribute to CAV development. This finding has to be evaluated in larger series including studies targeting the underlying disease mechanism.

  10. "Science" Rejects Postmodernism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Pierre, Elizabeth Adams

    2002-01-01

    The National Research Council report, "Scientific Research in Education," claims to present an inclusive view of sciences in responding to federal attempts to legislate educational research. This article asserts that it narrowly defines science as positivism and methodology as quantitative, rejecting postmodernism and omitting other theories. Uses…

  11. Noninvasive detection of rejection of transplanted hearts with indium-111-labeled lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Eisen, H.J.; Eisenberg, S.B.; Saffitz, J.E.; Bolman, R.M. 3d.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R.

    1987-04-01

    To determine whether cardiac transplant rejection can be detected noninvasively with indium-111 (/sup 111/In)-labeled lymphocytes, we studied 11 dogs with thoracic heterotopic cardiac transplants without immunosuppression and five dogs with transplants treated with cyclosporine (10 mg/kg/day) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day). All were evaluated sequentially with gamma scintigraphy after administration of 150 to 350 muCi of autologous /sup 111/In-lymphocytes. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells (1 to 3 mCi) were used for correction of radioactivity in the blood pool attributable to circulating labeled lymphocytes. Lymphocyte infiltration was quantified as the ratio of indium in the myocardium of the transplant or native heart compared with that in blood (indium excess, IE). Results were correlated with mechanical and electrical activity of allografts and with histologic findings in sequential biopsy specimens. In untreated dogs (n = 11), IE was 15.5 +/- 7.0 (SD) in transplanted hearts undergoing rejection and 0.4 +/- 1.1 in native hearts on the day before animals were killed. In dogs treated with cyclosporine and prednisone (n = 5), IE was minimal in allografts during the course of immunosuppression (0.8 +/- 0.4) and increased to 22.9 +/- 11.1 after immunosuppression was stopped. Scintigraphic criteria of rejection (IE greater than 2 SD above that in native hearts) correlated with results of biopsies indicative of rejection and appeared before electrophysiologic or mechanical manifestations of dysfunction. Thus infiltration of labeled lymphocytes in allografts, indicative of rejection, is detectable noninvasively by gamma scintigraphy and provides a sensitive approach potentially applicable to clinical monitoring for early detection of rejection and guidance for titration of immunosuppressive measures.

  12. Preoperative preparation of high-risk, specifically hyperimmunized canine renal allograft recipients with total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, F.T.; Meek, A.G.; Arnold, A.N.; Miura, S.; Hayashi, R.; Strober, S.

    1987-08-01

    Hyperimmunized subjects are a particularly high-risk and rapidly growing group in the patient population awaiting renal transplantation. In a search for methods designed to ameliorate the prognosis in such cases, dogs of defined DLA genotype were sensitized with DLA incompatible skin allografts and injections of buffy coat. Each recipient was challenged with a renal allograft bearing the same DLA incompatibilities. Five dogs received kidney transplants, without any other treatment, and rejected their transplants at 2.5, 4, 5, 6, and 6.5 days, respectively. Another four dogs were given a 9-11-week course (1760 +/- 35 cGy) of total-lymphoid irradiation (TLI), followed by rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG); these animals rejected their renal allografts at 7, 8, 14, and 17 days, respectively. Five other dogs were treated with TLI and received cyclosporine (CsA) and methylprednisolone (MPd) daily until graft rejection. Their renal allografts survived for 7.5, 8.5, 20, 62, and 227 days, respectively. Renal allografts placed in normal recipients under the same conditions of donor-recipient DLA incompatibility had a mean survival time of 12.4 days (range: 10-18 days). At the time of transplantation, the specific anti-DLA antibody titers in the recipients were 81 to 243 in the untreated dogs; 27 to 81 in the TLI-ATG-treated group, and 3 to 243 in the TLI-CsA/MPd-treated group. The titers fell within 24-48 hr after renal transplantation, to 3 to 81 in the untreated sensitized dogs; they were 3 to 9 in the TLI-ATG-treated group, and were 9 to 243 in the TLI-CsA/MPd treated group. The cytotoxic antibody titers reached postoperative peaks of 6500 to 200,000 in the untreated dogs; 729 to 6500 in the TLI-ATG-treated dogs, and 243 to 6500 in the TLI-CsA/MPd-treated recipients.

  13. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption.

    PubMed

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Koefoed-Nielsen, Pernille; Bistrup, Claus

    2010-01-01

    ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody-mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation complicated by acute antibody-mediated rejection, caused by ABO antibodies, may successfully be treated with this regime.

  14. Vancomycin iontophoresis of allograft bone

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, M. C.; Day, R.; Wood, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The most concerning infection of allografts and operative procedures is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and no current iontophoresed antibiotics effectively combat this microbe. It was initially hypothesised that iontophoresis of vancomycin through bone would not be effective due to its large molecular size and lack of charge. The aim of this study was to determine whether this was a viable procedure and to find the optimum conditions for its use. Methods An iontophoresis cell was set up with varying concentrations of Vancomycin within the medulla of a section of sheep tibia, sealed from an external saline solution. The cell was run for varying times, Vancomycin concentrations and voltages, to gain information on optimisation of conditions for impregnating the graft. Each graft was then sectioned and dust ground from the exposed surface. The dust was serially washed to extract the Vancomycin and concentrations measured and plotted for all variables tested. Results Vancomycin was successfully delivered and impregnated to the graft using the iontophoresis technique. The first order fit to the whole data set gave a significant result (p = 0.0233), with a significant concentration (p = 0.02774) component. The time component was the next most significant (p = 0.0597), but did not exceed the 95% confidence level. Conclusions Iontophoresis is an effective method for delivering Vancomycin to allograft bone. The concentrations of the vancomycin solution affected the bone concentration, but results were highly variable. Further study should be done on the effectiveness of delivering different antibiotics using this method. PMID:24729101

  15. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  16. Recurrent Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis in Renal Allograft Recipients: Role of Human Leukocyte Antigen Mismatching and Other Clinical Variables

    PubMed Central

    Sharief, Shimi; Mahesh, Shefali; Del Rio, Marcela; Telis, Vivian; Woroniecki, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Recurrence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) after renal transplantation impacts long-term graft survival and limits access to transplantation. We hypothesized that HLA donor/recipient matching could be used as a surrogate marker of recurrence. In a retrospective study of 42 pediatric and 77 adult subjects with primary FSGS, transplanted from 1990 to 2007 at a single center, we analyzed the degree of donor/recipient HLA compatibility and other clinical variables associated with FSGS recurrence. There were total of 131 allografts for primary FSGS (11 subjects were transplanted twice, and 1 had a third allograft) with 20 cases of FSGS recurrence (17 children) in the primary allograft, and two children who had FSGS recurrence in the second allograft. Fifty-two subjects (40%) were African American, and 66 (50%) Caucasians. Recurrent FSGS and controls were not different for age at transplant, gender, donor source, acute/chronic rejection episodes, and HLA matches. Recurrent FSGS was not associated with HLA mismatches; power equals 83%. Immunosuppressive regimen had no effect on recurrence of FSGS, P = .75. Recurrent FSGS is not associated with HLA mismatching, acute cellular or vascular rejection, and occurs primarily in the pediatric population. PMID:21755058

  17. Complement-fixing donor-specific antibodies identified by a novel C1q assay are associated with allograft loss.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Scott M; Chen, Ge; Sequeira, Flavia A; Lou, Calvin D; Alexander, Steven R; Tyan, Dolly B

    2012-02-01

    Long-term outcomes following renal transplantation remain disappointing. Recently, interest has focused on the antibody-mediated component of allograft injury and the deleterious effects of DSA. We applied a novel C1q solid-phase assay in parallel with the standard IgG SAB assay to identify DSA with the potential to activate complement by binding C1q. Among 193 consecutive renal transplants at our center, 19.2% developed de novo DSA following transplantation. Of the patients with DSA, 43% had antibodies that bound C1q in vitro [C1q+ DSA]. Patients with C1q+ DSA were more likely to develop allograft loss than patients with DSA that did not bind C1q (46.7% vs. 15%; p = 0.04); patients with C1q+ DSA were nearly six times more likely to lose their transplant than those with C1q- DSA. Additionally, patients with C1q+ DSA who underwent allograft biopsy were more likely to demonstrate C4d deposition (50% vs. 8%; p = 0.03) and meet criteria for acute rejection (60% vs. 17%; p = 0.02) when compared with patients with DSA that did not bind C1q. These data suggest that DSA with the ability to activate complement, as determined by this novel C1q assay, are associated with greater risk of acute rejection and allograft loss.

  18. Antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation: a review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miae; Martin, Spencer T; Townsend, Keri R; Gabardi, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), also known as B-cell-mediated or humoral rejection, is a significant complication after kidney transplantation that carries a poor prognosis. Although fewer than 10% of kidney transplant patients experience AMR, as many as 30% of these patients experience graft loss as a consequence. Although AMR is mediated by antibodies against an allograft and results in histologic changes in allograft vasculature that differ from cellular rejection, it has not been recognized as a separate disease process until recently. With an improved understanding about the importance of the development of antibodies against allografts as well as complement activation, significant advances have occurred in the treatment of AMR. The standard of care for AMR includes plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin that remove and neutralize antibodies, respectively. Agents targeting B cells (rituximab and alemtuzumab), plasma cells (bortezomib), and the complement system (eculizumab) have also been used successfully to treat AMR in kidney transplant recipients. However, the high cost of these medications, their use for unlabeled indications, and a lack of prospective studies evaluating their efficacy and safety limit the routine use of these agents in the treatment of AMR in kidney transplant recipients.

  19. Challenges inherent to the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Nicholas; Westall, Glen; Paraskeva, Miranda; Ciciulla, John; Cantwell, Linda; Snell, Greg

    2015-01-01

    A bilateral sequential lung transplant was performed on a young female with cystic fibrosis-related bronchiectasis. She had negative prospective T- and B-cell crossmatch, and no known donor-specific antibodies. Post-transplantation, she developed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates of uncertain etiology, compounded by persistent tachycardia and questionable medication adherence. Despite aggressive intervention for suspected cellular rejection with high-dose intravenous corticosteroid, immunoglobulin, and anti-thymocyte globulin, her condition deteriorated to ultimately require ventilatory support. The eventual discovery of eplet donor-recipient mismatches on related DQB1 alleles raised the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection. Before plasmapheresis could be instituted, the patient rapidly succumbed to respiratory failure. Postmortem examination confirmed features of atypical allograft rejection, without evidence of classic acute cellular rejection. This is an unconventional case of antibody-mediated lung allograft rejection – an entity that is currently a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Prevention of donor-specific antibodies by correct donor-recipient matching, and optimizing adherence post-transplantation are most important. PMID:25802749

  20. CD28 Family and Chronic Rejection: “To Belatacept...and Beyond!”

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marcos V.; Machado, Juliana R.; Rocha, Laura P.; Castellano, Lúcio R.; Reis, Marlene A.; Corrêa, Rosana R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Kidneys are one of the most frequently transplanted human organs. Immunosuppressive agents may prevent or reverse most acute rejection episodes; however, the graft may still succumb to chronic rejection. The immunological response involved in the chronic rejection process depends on both innate and adaptive immune response. T lymphocytes have a pivotal role in chronic rejection in adaptive immune response. Meanwhile, we aim to present a general overview on the state-of-the-art knowledge of the strategies used for manipulating the lymphocyte activation mechanisms involved in allografts, with emphasis on T-lymphocyte costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules of the B7-CD28 superfamily. A deeper understanding of the structure and function of these molecules improves both the knowledge of the immune system itself and their potential action as rejection inducers or tolerance promoters. In this context, the central role played by CD28 family, especially the relationship between CD28 and CTLA-4, becomes an interesting target for the development of immune-based therapies aiming to increase the survival rate of allografts and to decrease autoimmune phenomena. Good results obtained by the recent development of abatacept and belatacept with potential clinical use aroused better expectations concerning the outcome of transplanted patients. PMID:22720132

  1. The effect of cyclosporine, total lymphoid irradiation, and cobra venom factor on hyperacute rejection.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, S J; Halperin, E C; Murphy, C E; Saad, T; Abernethy, K; Miller, D; Bollinger, R R

    1985-01-01

    Transplantation into sensitized recipients is contraindicated due to the potential for hyperacute rejection. In order to study the mechanism of hyperacute rejection and the role of immunosuppression in the face of presensitization, we evaluated the effect of total lymphoid irradiation, cyclosporine, and cobra venom factor, alone and in combination, on hyperacute rejection of heterotopic rat heart allografts. Lewis rats were sensitized to strongly RT-1-incompatible ACI rats by three successive skin grafts. Heart allografts were then performed, and survived for a mean period of 15.7 +/- 7.4 hours. Neither preoperative treatment of hypersensitized rats with total lymphoid irradiation alone nor with cyclosporine (5 mg/kg/day) resulted in a prolongation of survival (20.4 +/- 16.6 hours and 35.6 +/- 6.2 hours, respectively). However, complement depletion using cobra venom factor significantly prolonged mean graft survival time to 114.4 +/- 31.0 hours (p less than 0.05). Cyclosporine (10 mg/kg/day) also significantly prolonged survival to 149 +/- 29 hours (p less than 0.01), but did not lower the antibody or complement levels. The addition of total lymphoid irradiation or cyclosporine to treatment with cobra venom factor did not result in longer survival than cobra venom factor alone. In conclusion, cobra venom factor and cyclosporine delay but do not prevent hyperacute rejection, while total lymphoid irradiation has no observable effect on hyperacute rejection.

  2. Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection and Possible Anti-Proliferative Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of renal transplants is increasing with time, and renal transplantation is the only definite treatment for end-stage renal disease. We have limited the acute and late acute rejection of kidney allografts, but the long-term survival of renal tissues still remains a difficult and unanswered question as most of the renal transplants undergo failure within a decade of their transplantation. Among various histopathological changes that signify chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), tubular atrophy, fibrous thickening of the arteries, fibrosis of the kidney interstitium, and glomerulosclerosis are the most important. Moreover, these structural changes are followed by a decline in the kidney function as well. The underlying mechanism that triggers the long-term rejection of renal transplants involves both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. T cells, with their related cytokines, cause tissue damage. In addition, CD 20+ B cells and their antibodies play an important role in the long-term graft rejection. Other risk factors that predispose a recipient to long-term graft rejection include HLA-mismatching, acute episodes of graft rejection, mismatch in donor-recipient age, and smoking. The purpose of this review article is the analyze current literature and find different anti-proliferative agents that can suppress the immune system and can thus contribute to the long-term survival of renal transplants. The findings of this review paper can be helpful in understanding the long-term survival of renal transplants and various ways to improve it. PMID:26677426

  3. Effect of cyclosporine, total lymphoid irradiation, and cobra venom factor on hyperacute rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtle, S.J.; Halperin, E.C.; Murphy, C.E.; Saad, T.; Abernethy, K.; Miller, D.; Bollinger, R.R.

    1985-09-01

    Transplantation into sensitized recipients is contraindicated due to the potential for hyperacute rejection. In order to study the mechanism of hyperacute rejection and the role of immunosuppression in the face of presensitization, we evaluated the effect of total lymphoid irradiation, cyclosporine, and cobra venom factor, alone and in combination, on hyperacute rejection of heterotopic rat heart allografts. Lewis rats were sensitized to strongly RT-1-incompatible ACI rats by three successive skin grafts. Heart allografts were then performed, and survived for a mean period of 15.7 +/- 7.4 hours. Neither preoperative treatment of hypersensitized rats with total lymphoid irradiation alone nor with cyclosporine (5 mg/kg/day) resulted in a prolongation of survival (20.4 +/- 16.6 hours and 35.6 +/- 6.2 hours, respectively). However, complement depletion using cobra venom factor significantly prolonged mean graft survival time to 114.4 +/- 31.0 hours (p less than 0.05). Cyclosporine (10 mg/kg/day) also significantly prolonged survival to 149 +/- 29 hours (p less than 0.01), but did not lower the antibody or complement levels. The addition of total lymphoid irradiation or cyclosporine to treatment with cobra venom factor did not result in longer survival than cobra venom factor alone. In conclusion, cobra venom factor and cyclosporine delay but do not prevent hyperacute rejection, while total lymphoid irradiation has no observable effect on hyperacute rejection.

  4. Blocking MHC class II on human endothelium mitigates acute rejection

    PubMed Central

    Abrahimi, Parwiz; Qin, Lingfeng; Chang, William G.; Bothwell, Alfred L.M.; Tellides, George; Saltzman, W. Mark; Pober, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection is mediated by host CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) targeting graft class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. In experimental rodent models, rejection requires differentiation of naive CD8+ T cells into alloreactive CTL within secondary lymphoid organs, whereas in humans, CTL may alternatively develop within the graft from circulating CD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM) that recognize class I MHC molecules on graft endothelial cells (EC). This latter pathway is poorly understood. Here, we show that host CD4+ TEM, activated by EC class II MHC molecules, provide critical help for this process. First, blocking HLA-DR on EC lining human artery grafts in immunodeficient mice reduces CD8+ CTL development within and acute rejection of the artery by adoptively transferred allogeneic human lymphocytes. Second, siRNA knockdown or CRISPR/Cas9 ablation of class II MHC molecules on EC prevents CD4+ TEM from helping CD8+ TEM to develop into CTL in vitro. Finally, implanted synthetic microvessels, formed from CRISPR/Cas9-modified EC lacking class II MHC molecules, are significantly protected from CD8+ T cell–mediated destruction in vivo. We conclude that human CD8+ TEM–mediated rejection targeting graft EC class I MHC molecules requires help from CD4+ TEM cells activated by recognition of class II MHC molecules. PMID:26900601

  5. Reducing allograft contamination and disease transmission: intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Chay-You; Yew, Andy Khye-Soon; Tay, Darren Keng-Jin; Chia, Shi-Lu; Yeo, Seng-Jin; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Chin, Pak-Lin

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Singapore General Hospital Bone Bank, which exclusively stores femoral head allografts, relies on flash sterilisation to prevent allograft-related disease transmission and wound infection. However, intraosseous temperatures during autoclaving may be lower than required to eliminate human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis B and C viruses. The aim of this study is to determine the intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving and to assess the adequacy of autoclaving in preventing disease transmission. METHODS Six femoral heads were acquired from patients who underwent hip arthroplasty. The specimens were divided into two groups. The first group underwent flash sterilisation with a sterilisation time of 4 min, while a longer sterilisation time of 22 min was used for the second group. RESULTS The highest core temperature in the first group was 130°C, while the core temperatures in the second group plateaued at 133°C for all allografts. In the first group, only smaller allografts maintained temperatures sufficient for the inactivation of the clinically relevant viral pathogens. In contrast, all allografts in the second group were terminally sterilised. CONCLUSION There is an inverse correlation between the size of allografts and intraosseous temperatures achieved during autoclaving. Therefore, we recommend dividing large allografts into smaller pieces, in order to achieve intraosseous temperatures adequate for the elimination of transmissible pathogens during flash sterilisation. Allografts should not be terminally sterilised, as the resulting allografts will become unusable. Despite modern processing techniques, stringent donor selection remains vital in the effort to prevent allograft-related infections. Autoclaving is an economical and efficacious method of preventing allograft-related disease transmission. PMID:25631893

  6. Reducing allograft contamination and disease transmission: intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving.

    PubMed

    Ang, Chay-You; Yew, Andy Khye-Soon; Tay, Darren Keng-Jin; Chia, Shi-Lu; Yeo, Seng-Jin; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Chin, Pak-Lin

    2014-10-01

    The Singapore General Hospital Bone Bank, which exclusively stores femoral head allografts, relies on flash sterilisation to prevent allograft-related disease transmission and wound infection. However, intraosseous temperatures during autoclaving may be lower than required to eliminate human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis B and C viruses. The aim of this study is to determine the intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving and to assess the adequacy of autoclaving in preventing disease transmission. Six femoral heads were acquired from patients who underwent hip arthroplasty. The specimens were divided into two groups. The first group underwent flash sterilisation with a sterilisation time of 4 min, while a longer sterilisation time of 22 min was used for the second group. The highest core temperature in the first group was 130°C, while the core temperatures in the second group plateaued at 133°C for all allografts. In the first group, only smaller allografts maintained temperatures sufficient for the inactivation of the clinically relevant viral pathogens. In contrast, all allografts in the second group were terminally sterilised. There is an inverse correlation between the size of allografts and intraosseous temperatures achieved during autoclaving. Therefore, we recommend dividing large allografts into smaller pieces, in order to achieve intraosseous temperatures adequate for the elimination of transmissible pathogens during flash sterilisation. Allografts should not be terminally sterilised, as the resulting allografts will become unusable. Despite modern processing techniques, stringent donor selection remains vital in the effort to prevent allograft-related infections. Autoclaving is an economical and efficacious method of preventing allograft-related disease transmission.

  7. Spontaneous long-term acceptance of RT-1-incompatible liver allografts in inbred rats. Analysis of the immune status.

    PubMed

    Houssin, D; Charpentier, B; Gugenheim, J; Baudot, P; Tamisier, D; Lang, P; Gigou, M; Bismuth, H

    1983-12-01

    In several combinations of inbred rats, liver allografts are spontaneously tolerated, and after a few weeks liver tolerant rats are in a state of donor-specific transplantation tolerance. In vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted to analyze the immunological status of LEW or BN rats with spontaneously tolerated (LEW X BN) F1 liver allografts several months after transplantation. Acute rejection of secondary donor-specific heart allografts retransplanted from liver-tolerant rats to normal syngeneic hosts suggests that the state of tolerance in liver-tolerant rats is related to an active modification of the immune system of the rat and not to a reduced immunogenicity of the graft. No cytotoxic antibodies or cells were found in liver-tolerant rats. Reactivity in mixed lymphocyte culture was normal or slightly reduced. Arguments for the presence of splenic suppressor cells were found in LEW tolerant rats using a local graft-versus-host assay, but these could not be found in BN rats, or when attempting to transfer or to break the tolerance state. A nonspecific humoral blocking factor was found in vitro in liver-tolerant rats but transfer of serum from liver-tolerant rats to normal syngeneic hosts did not permit a significant prolongation of donor-specific heart allografts. These results suggest that more than one mechanism may be involved at the maintenance phase of liver allograft tolerance.

  8. Nitrogen-13-ammonia and PET to detect allograft coronary artery disease after heart transplantation: comparison with coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X M; Delbeke, D; Sandler, M P; Yeoh, T K; Votaw, J R; Frist, W H

    1995-06-01

    The diffuse nature of allograft coronary artery disease (CAD) suggests that global myocardial blood flow (MBF) may decrease with time after transplantation; therefore the diagnosis of this disease remains problematic. To investigate whether PET detects a fall in allograft MBF over time, PET scans (108) were obtained from 43 heart transplant recipients. Thirty-five patients underwent two serial PET scans 1 yr apart. MBF was measured by PET using 13N-ammonia as a tracer. Coronary angiography was performed parallel with PET imaging and compared with perfusion rates measured by PET scans. MBF measured by PET decreased sequentially with time. The mean MBF was 73 +/- 21, 56 +/- 13, 51 +/- 11 and 51 +/- 27 ml/min/100 g of tissue in patients surviving 3 mo, 1, 2 and 3 yr after transplantation, respectively. Significant MBF decrease occurred within 1 yr after transplantation. Sequential PET studies showed a decrease in MBF in 22 of 35 patients (63%). Mean MBF for the first and second scans was 65 +/- 18 and 54 +/- 16, respectively. MBF decrease was more profound in patients (n = 11) angiographic evidence of CAD. There was a trend towards increased rejection and CMV infection rates in patients with decreased MBF. With time, PET detects a decrease in MBF in cardiac allografts. The frequency of MBF decrease detected by PET is concordant with the true incidence of allograft CAD, suggesting that sequential PET is a more sensitive modality for monitoring allograft CAD than angiography.

  9. Effect of CTLA-4 gene polymorphisms on long-term kidney allograft function in Han Chinese recipients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 gene (CTLA-4) have been associated with graft rejection and long-term clinical outcome after organ transplantation. Our aim was to examine the association between CTLA-4 SNPs (rs733618, rs4553808, rs5742909, rs231775, rs3087243) and long-term allograft function in Chinese renal transplant recipients. Genotyping of CTLA-4 SNPs was performed in 292 renal transplantation recipients. To assess long-term allograft function, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was determined 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after renal transplantation. CTLA-4 rs733618 and rs3087243 alleles and genotypes as well as the rs5742909 and rs231775 genotypes were significantly associated with long-term allograft function after transplantation (P<0.05). Patients with favorable genotypes had higher allograft function during the 60 months after transplantation. The TACGG, CACAG and CGTAA haplotypes were also associated with long-term kidney function after renal transplantation (P<0.05 or P<0.01). In sum, the favorable CTLA-4 rs5742909TT genotype, CTLA-4 rs733618C and rs3087243A alleles, and CACAG and CGTAA haplotypes, as well as the unfavorable rs733618TT, rs3087243GG and rs231775GG genotypes and TACGG haplotype could potentially serve as effective indicators of long-term allograft function in Chinese renal transplantation recipients. PMID:27081086

  10. [Hand allograft transplantation: what are the implications?].

    PubMed

    Masquelet, Alain Charles

    2013-12-01

    The first hand allograft transplantation was performed in 1998 by a French surgeons team and has opened the era of functional allotransfers. In France, the authorized preliminary study included five patients who sustained traumatic amputation of both hands. All patients had bilateral hand allograft transplantation. Long-term results (follow-up ranging from 3 to 12 years) undoubtedly show a useful daily function, a good psychological acceptance and a physiological integration. Despite several obstacles as the need of immunosuppressive therapy for life, hand allograft transplantation is worthy of interest in some outstanding situations.

  11. The relation between apoptosis of acinar cells and nitric oxide during acute rejection of pancreas transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiaoguang, Ni; Zhong, Liu; Hailong, Chen; Ping, Zhao; Xiaofeng, Bai; Fenglin, Guan

    2003-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important mechanism of immune-mediated graft damage. Nitric oxide (NO) generated by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis. This study investigated whether apoptosis occurs during pancreas allograft rejection and examined the relationship of apoptosis of acinar cells and NO. The rats were divided into three groups: untreated isograft group, untreated allograft group and aminoguanidine (AG)-treated group. The pancreatic grafts were harvested on the post-transplantation day 3, 5 and 7 and were used to detect the histopathological rejection grade, the expression of iNOS and the apoptotic index (AI) of the graft. iNOS presented faint positive in the acinar cells of untreated isografts and did not change greatly after transplantation (P>0.05), the level of iNOS in the untreated allografts increased progressively (P<0.01) and at the same time point was significantly higher than that of untreated isograft group and AG-treated group (P<0.01). The transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling showed that the apoptotic cells were mainly acinar cells. A significant correlation between AI and iNOS was noted (P<0.01, r=0.611). Therefore, NO-mediated apoptosis of acinar cells plays an important role in acute rejection of pancreas transplantation, AG can mitigate the damage of pancreas allografts.

  12. Increased BK viremia and progression to BK-virus nephropathy following high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin for acute cellular rejection.

    PubMed

    Boonyapredee, Maytee; Knight, Kendral; Little, Dustin

    2014-06-01

    BK virus nephropathy and cellular rejection are common causes of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. The two can be difficult to distinguish on allograft biopsy and can be present simultaneously. Management of the patient with coexistent BK infection and rejection is complicated by the conflicting ideals of decreasing immunosuppression to treat the former and increasing immunosuppression to treat the latter. The authors present the case of a 57-year-old renal transplant recipient who underwent allograft biopsy 8 weeks post-transplant for evaluation of increased serum creatinine in the setting of BK viremia (BKV). Biopsy revealed Banff classification 1b acute cellular rejection, with insufficient evidence to diagnose BK virus-associated nephropathy. The patient was administered intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), with no other changes in immunosuppressive therapy. Plasma and urine BK increased exponentially following IVIG administration, and allograft function further deteriorated. Repeat biopsy showed overt BK viral nephropathy, and BKV and creatinine decreased only after reduction in immunosuppression and initiation of leflunomide. Although case series have suggested a potential role for IVIG in the setting of BK infection, further study is needed to define the safety and efficacy of this approach. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Testing the Efficacy of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Detecting Transplant Rejection Using a Murine Model of Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, K; Ohori, S; Meral, F C; Uehara, M; Giannini, S; Ichimura, T; Smith, R N; Jolesz, F A; Guleria, I; Zhang, Y; White, P J; McDannold, N J; Hoffmeister, K; Givertz, M M; Abdi, R

    2016-12-23

    One of the key unmet needs to improve long-term outcomes of heart transplantation is to develop accurate, noninvasive, and practical diagnostic tools to detect transplant rejection. Early intragraft inflammation and endothelial cell injuries occur prior to advanced transplant rejection. We developed a novel diagnostic imaging platform to detect early declines in microvascular perfusion (MP) of cardiac transplants using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). The efficacy of CEUS in detecting transplant rejection was tested in a murine model of heart transplants, a standard preclinical model of solid organ transplant. As compared to the syngeneic groups, a progressive decline in MP was demonstrated in the allografts undergoing acute transplant rejection (40%, 64%, and 92% on days 4, 6, and 8 posttransplantation, respectively) and chronic rejection (33%, 33%, and 92% on days 5, 14, and 30 posttransplantation, respectively). Our perfusion studies showed restoration of MP following antirejection therapy, highlighting its potential to help monitor efficacy of antirejection therapy. Our data suggest that early endothelial cell injury and platelet aggregation contributed to the early MP decline observed in the allografts. High-resolution MP mapping may allow for noninvasive detection of heart transplant rejection. The data presented have the potential to help in the development of next-generation imaging approaches to diagnose transplant rejection.

  14. Complement-binding anti-HLA antibodies and kidney-allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Vernerey, Dewi; Prugger, Christof; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Mooney, Nuala; Suberbielle, Caroline; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Méjean, Arnaud; Desgrandchamps, François; Anglicheau, Dany; Nochy, Dominique; Charron, Dominique; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Delahousse, Michel; Legendre, Christophe; Glotz, Denis; Hill, Gary S; Zeevi, Adriana; Jouven, Xavier

    2013-09-26

    Anti-HLA antibodies hamper successful transplantation, and activation of the complement cascade is involved in antibody-mediated rejection. We investigated whether the complement-binding capacity of anti-HLA antibodies plays a role in kidney-allograft failure. We enrolled patients who received kidney allografts at two transplantation centers in Paris between January 1, 2005, and January 1, 2011, in a population-based study. Patients were screened for the presence of circulating donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies and their complement-binding capacity. Graft injury phenotype and the time to kidney-allograft loss were assessed. The primary analysis included 1016 patients. Patients with complement-binding donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies after transplantation had the lowest 5-year rate of graft survival (54%), as compared with patients with non-complement-binding donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (93%) and patients without donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (94%) (P<0.001 for both comparisons). The presence of complement-binding donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies after transplantation was associated with a risk of graft loss that was more than quadrupled (hazard ratio, 4.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.69 to 8.49) when adjusted for clinical, functional, histologic, and immunologic factors. These antibodies were also associated with an increased rate of antibody-mediated rejection, a more severe graft injury phenotype with more extensive microvascular inflammation, and increased deposition of complement fraction C4d within graft capillaries. Adding complement-binding donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies to a traditional risk model improved the stratification of patients at risk for graft failure (continuous net reclassification improvement, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.97). Assessment of the complement-binding capacity of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies appears to be useful in identifying patients at high risk for kidney-allograft loss.

  15. The Prevalence of Immunologic Injury in Renal Allograft Recipients with De Novo Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiquan; Jiang, Song; Li, Xue; Huang, Xianghua; Xie, Kenan; Cheng, Dongrui; Chen, Jinsong; Ji, Shuming; Wen, Jiqiu; Zhang, Mingchao; Zeng, Caihong; Liu, Zhihong

    2012-01-01

    Post-transplant proteinuria is a common complication after renal transplantation; it is associated with reduced graft and recipient survival. However, the prevalence of histological causes has been reported with considerable variation. A clinico-pathological re-evaluation of post-transplant proteinuria is necessary, especially after dismissal of the term “chronic allograft nephropathy,” which had been considered to be an important cause of proteinuria. Moreover, urinary protein can promote interstitial inflammation in native kidney, whether this occurs in renal allograft remains unknown. Factors that affect the graft outcome in patients with proteinuria also remain unclear. Here we collected 98 cases of renal allograft recipients who developed proteinuria after transplant, histological features were characterized using Banff scoring system. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for graft survival predictors. We found that transplant glomerulopathy was the leading (40.8%) cause of post-transplant proteinuria. Immunological causes, including transplant glomerulopathy, acute rejection, and chronic rejection accounted for the majority of all pathological causes of proteinuria. Nevertheless, almost all patients that developed proteinuria had immunological lesions in the graft, especially for interstitial inflammation. Intraglomerular C3 deposition was unexpectedly correlated with the severity of proteinuria. Moreover, the severity of interstitial inflammation was an independent risk factor for graft loss, while high level of hemoglobin was a protective factor for graft survival. This study revealed a predominance of immunological parameters in renal allografts with post-transplant proteinuria. These parameters not only correlate with the severity of proteinuria, but also with the outcome of the graft. PMID:22586485

  16. HLA-DQ Mismatches and Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Jeremy R.; Coates, Patrick T.; Lewis, Joshua R.; Russ, Graeme R.; Watson, Narelle; Holdsworth, Rhonda; Wong, Germaine

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives The current allocation algorithm for deceased donor kidney transplantation takes into consideration HLA mismatches at the ABDR loci but not HLA mismatches at other loci, including HLA-DQ. However, the independent effects of incompatibilities for the closely linked HLA-DQ antigens in the context of HLA-DR antigen matched and mismatched allografts are uncertain. We aimed to determine the effect of HLA-DQ mismatches on renal allograft outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, we examined the association between HLA-DQ mismatches and acute rejections in primary live and deceased donor kidney transplant recipients between 2004 and 2012 using adjusted Cox regression models. Results Of the 788 recipients followed for a median of 2.8 years (resulting in 2891 person-years), 321 (40.7%) and 467 (59.3%) received zero and one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, respectively. Compared with recipients who have received zero HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, those who have received one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys experienced greater numbers of any rejection (50 of 321 versus 117 of 467; P<0.01), late rejections (occurring >6 months post-transplant; 8 of 321 versus 27 of 467; P=0.03), and antibody-mediated rejections (AMRs; 12 of 321 versus 38 of 467; P=0.01). Compared with recipients of zero HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, the adjusted hazard ratios for any and late rejections in recipients who had received one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys were 1.54 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.08 to 2.19) and 2.85 (95% CI, 1.05 to 7.75), respectively. HLA-DR was an effect modifier between HLA-DQ mismatches and AMR (P value for interaction =0.02), such that the association between HLA-DQ mismatches and AMR was statistically significant in those who have received one or two HLA-DR mismatched kidneys, with adjusted hazard ratio of 2.50 (95% CI, 1.05 to 5.94). Conclusions HLA

  17. Soothing the Sting of Rejection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Joan Daniels

    1990-01-01

    Preventing rejection of a student by his/her peers and helping the child to cope with such rejection are ever-present challenges for teachers. Suggestions are given by teachers who have successfully dealt with students who were rejected by classmates. (IAH)

  18. Soothing the Sting of Rejection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Joan Daniels

    1990-01-01

    Preventing rejection of a student by his/her peers and helping the child to cope with such rejection are ever-present challenges for teachers. Suggestions are given by teachers who have successfully dealt with students who were rejected by classmates. (IAH)

  19. Effect of 34 kinds of traditional Japanese herbal medicines on prolongation of cardiac allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Uchiyama, M; Zhang, Q; Harada, T; Otsuka, K; Shimokawa, T; Niimi, M

    2014-05-01

    Herbal medicines have been used for over 3,000 years in Asian as alternative therapy for their variety effects and have recently become popular in Europe and the United States. In the last 30 years, Japanese herbal medicines were widely used for treatment of diseases after been recognized officially by Japanese government. In this study, we investigated the effect of 34 kinds of traditional Japanese herbal medicines on alloimmune responses in a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. CBA mice (H2(k)) underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (H2(b)) heart and received oral administration of 2 g/kg/d of the 34 kinds of herbal medicines from the day of transplantation until 7 days afterward. Naïve CBA mice rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (median survival time [MST], 7 days). CBA transplant recipients given 2 g/kg/d of Sairei-to (TJ-114) and Tokishakuyaku-san (TJ-23) had prolonged C57BL/6 allograft survival indefinitely (both MSTs > 100 days). Moreov