Science.gov

Sample records for allograft vasculopathy cav

  1. Predicting the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a lifesaving therapy for patients with end-stage cardiovascular disease. There has been remarkable progress in controlling acute rejection, and the early survival rate after the heart transplantation has significantly improved. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is one of the common causes of death and a major limiting factor for long-term graft survival years after heart transplantation. CAV is a progressive occlusion of arteries and veins of the transplanted heart. CAV is often clinically silent because of the denervation of the transplanted heart. CAV tends to be found at an advanced stage of disease, including myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and/or sudden cardiac death. Because of the serious sequelae of CAV, risk factors, prevention, and prediction of CAV have been investigated. Despite the effort by many researchers, the pathogenesis is not yet completely understood. There are a number of both immune and nonimmune factors in the donor and recipient that are related to the development of CAV. In addition, several biomarkers in blood and tissue are found to correlate with the presence of CAV, and that may be able to predict CAV. Here, we review the pathology, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and the potential for prediction of CAV. PMID:24972526

  2. Coronary Collaterals Predict Improved Survival and Allograft Function in Patients with Coronary Allograft Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lavine, Kory J.; Sintek, Marc; Novak, Eric; Ewald, Gregory; Geltman, Edward; Joseph, Susan; Pfeifer, John; Mann, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite improvements in the care of patients who have received cardiac transplants, coronary allograft vasculopathy (CAV) remains the most prevalent cause of late allograft failure and cardiac mortality. Few proven therapies are available for this important disease. The presence of coronary collaterals imparts a favorable prognosis in patients with native ischemic heart disease; however, the impact of collaterals in CAV is unknown. Methods and results To determine whether the development of coronary collaterals is associated with improved outcomes in patients with CAV, we performed a retrospective analysis of patients followed in the heart transplant program at Barnes Jewish Hospital from 1994–2008. The primary endpoints included all cause mortality and the composite of all cause mortality, retransplantation, and inotrope dependence. We screened 493 patients and identified 59 (12%) subjects with moderate to severe CAV. Angiographically visible coronary collaterals were present in 34 (57%) subjects. Kaplan-Meier and Cox multivariable analyses revealed that patients with collaterals had reduced incidence of all cause mortality HR 0.20, p<0.001 and the composite endpoint HR 0.17, p<0.001. In addition, patients with collaterals had less severe heart failure symptoms as measured by NYHA class. Immunostaining of biopsy specimens revealed that among patients with CAV, the presence of coronary collaterals correlated with increased microvascular density, reduced fibrosis and lower LVEDP. Conclusions Together, these data demonstrate that the presence of coronary collaterals predicts a favorable prognosis in patients with CAV and suggests that interventions aimed at promoting collateral and microvascular growth may serve as effective therapies for this disease. PMID:23709657

  3. Characteristics of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy Induced by Immunomodulation in the Miniature Swine

    PubMed Central

    Akashima, Tomohiro; Terasaki, Takamitsu; Wada, Yuko; Ito-Amano, Midori; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to develop swine cardiac transplantation model for study of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and to characterize the mechanisms of its formation. Methods: Heterotropic cardiac transplantation was performed in swine leukocyte antigen mismatched miniature swine, and CAV was induced by immunomodulation by cyclosporine A (CyA). Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed to identify cellular components of CAV. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was developed for detection of 1 and Y-chromosome for identification of cell origin in the female donor to the male recipient heart transplantation model. Results: CAV was successfully developed by immunomodulation of CyA. Severity of CAV revealed more prominent in the distal epicardial coronary arteries than proximal coronary arteries. Phenotype of the SMCs proliferated in the intimal thickening of CAV were mostly embryonal/secretory type. Our new chromosome specific probes for FISH method were useful for discrimination of sex of each cell, and proliferated SMCs were revealed to be mainly donor origin. Conclusion: CAV mimicking human heart transplantation can be developed by appropriate immunomodulation in the swine. In swine CAV, proliferated SMCs seen in the intimal thickening were demonstrated to be from the donor origin. PMID:24747545

  4. Statin therapy in cardiac allograft vasculopathy progression in heart transplant patients: Does potency matter?

    PubMed

    Sieg, Adam; Weeks, Phillip; Krustchinsky, Lori; Rajapreyar, Indranee

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a unique multi-factorial pathologic process encountered following heart transplantation. Several risk factors have been identified including a combination of immunologic and non-immunologic processes. Significant research has been conducted to elucidate the driving forces of CAV as well as improved identification, prevention and treatment strategies. Statin therapy following transplant remains the standard of care to help prevent the progression of CAV. The benefits of statin therapy following transplantation correspond to cholesterol control, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mechanisms as well as potentially unknown mechanisms. Despite known drug interactions with calcineurin inhibitors, the use of statins is highly recommended in the current International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines. Limited research has been conducted on the impact of higher intensity statin therapy following heart transplant and the relative risks and benefits are unknown. This review focuses on risk factors and pathophysiology of CAV, the role of statin therapy in heart transplantation, and the potential added benefit of more intense statin therapy to limit the progression of this graft-limiting complication. PMID:27079752

  5. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting for a left main lesion due to cardiac allograft vasculopathy in Japan: first report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Hata, Hiroki; Murata, Yoshihiro; Seguchi, Osamu; Yanase, Masanobu; Shimahara, Yusuke; Sato, Shunsuke; Nakatani, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major cause of mortality after transplantation. We treated a 44-year-old female with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) 4 years after heart transplantation. Annual examinations, including coronary angiography and intravenous ultrasound (IVUS), revealed a severe lesion in the left main trunk. The left internal mammary artery was successfully anastomosed to the left anterior descending artery in an off-pump manner. To ensure that patients have a good long-term outcome after heart transplantation, routine examinations, including IVUS, are crucial, because of the nature of CAV. OPCAB is a good option for a left main trunk lesion due to CAV.

  6. Reduced Progression of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy with Routine Use of Induction Therapy with Basiliximab

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ricardo; Moura, Lidia Ana Zytynski; Lopes, Sergio Veiga; da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Souza Filho, Newton Fernando Stadler; Fernandes, Tiago Luiz; Salvatti, Natália Boing; Faria Neto, José Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major limitation for long-term survival of patients undergoing heart transplantation (HT). Some immunosuppressants can reduce the risk of CAV. Objectives The primary objective was to evaluate the variation in the volumetric growth of the intimal layer measured by intracoronary ultrasound (IVUS) after 1 year in patients who received basiliximab compared with that in a control group. Methods Thirteen patients treated at a single center between 2007 and 2009 were analyzed retrospectively. Evaluations were performed with IVUS, measuring the volume of a coronary segment within the first 30 days and 1 year after HT. Vasculopathy was characterized by the volume of the intima of the vessel. Results Thirteen patients included (7 in the basiliximab group and 6 in the control group). On IVUS assessment, the control group was found to have greater vessel volume (120–185.43 mm3 vs. 127.77–131.32 mm3; p = 0.051). Intimal layer growth (i.e., CAV) was also higher in the control group (27.30–49.15 mm3 [∆80%] vs. 20.23–26.69 mm3 [∆33%]; p = 0.015). Univariate regression analysis revealed that plaque volume and prior atherosclerosis of the donor were not related to intima growth (r = 0.15, p = 0.96), whereas positive remodeling was directly proportional to the volumetric growth of the intima (r = 0.85, p < 0.001). Conclusion Routine induction therapy with basiliximab was associated with reduced growth of the intima of the vessel during the first year after HT. PMID:26107815

  7. The use of proliferation signal inhibitors in the prevention and treatment of allograft vasculopathy in heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Juan F; Manito, Nicolás; Segovia, Javier; Almenar, Luis; Arizón, José M; Campreciós, Marta; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Díaz, Beatriz; González-Vílchez, Francisco; Mirabet, Sònia; Palomo, Jesús; Roig, Eulàlia; de la Torre, José M

    2009-04-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) currently represents one of the most important causes of long-term morbidity and mortality in the heart transplant population. In well-designed studies with de novo patients, the use of proliferation signal inhibitors (PSIs; everolimus and sirolimus) has been shown to significantly prevent the intimal growth of graft coronary arteries in comparison to other immunosuppressive regimens, reducing the incidence of vasculopathy at 12 and 24 months. In addition, conversion to PSIs in maintenance patients with established CAV has also shown promising results in the reduction of the progression of the disease and its clinical consequences. For these reasons the interest shown by various transplantation units in the potential role of PSIs in this field is growing. The aim of the present article is to review the information obtained to date on the use of PSIs in heart transplant recipients, both in the prevention and the treatment of CAV. The principal published recommendations on the introduction and appropriate management of these drugs in clinical practice are also collected, as well as certain recommendations given by the authors based on their experience.

  8. In Situ-Targeting of Dendritic Cells with Donor-Derived Apoptotic Cells Restrains Indirect Allorecognition and Ameliorates Allograft Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiliang; Shufesky, William J.; Montecalvo, Angela; Divito, Sherrie J.; Larregina, Adriana T.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is an atheromatous-like lesion that affects vessels of transplanted organs. It is a component of chronic rejection that conventional immuno-suppression fails to prevent, and is a major cause of graft loss. Indirect allo-recognition through T cells and allo-Abs are critical during CAV pathogenesis. We tested whether the indirect allo-response and its impact on CAV is down-regulated by in situ-delivery of donor Ags to recipient's dendritic cells (DCs) in lymphoid organs in a pro-tolerogenic fashion, through administration of donor splenocytes undergoing early apoptosis. Following systemic injection, donor apoptotic cells were internalized by splenic CD11chi CD8α+ and CD8− DCs, but not by CD11cint plasmacytoid DCs. Those DCs that phagocytosed apoptotic cells in vivo remained quiescent, resisted ex vivo-maturation, and presented allo-Ag for up to 3 days. Administration of donor apoptotic splenocytes, unlike cells alive, (i) promoted deletion, FoxP3 expression and IL-10 secretion, and decreased IFN-γ-release in indirect pathway CD4 T cells; and (ii) reduced cross-priming of anti-donor CD8 T cells in vivo. Targeting recipient's DCs with donor apoptotic cells reduced significantly CAV in a fully-mismatched aortic allograft model. The effect was donor specific, dependent on the physical characteristics of the apoptotic cells, and was associated to down-regulation of the indirect type-1 T cell allo-response and secretion of allo-Abs, when compared to recipients treated with donor cells alive or necrotic. Down-regulation of indirect allo-recognition through in situ-delivery of donor-Ag to recipient's quiescent DCs constitutes a promising strategy to prevent/ameliorate indirect allorecognition and CAV. PMID:19333400

  9. Transplant graft vasculopathy: an emerging target for prevention and treatment of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Duk-Hee; Kang, Shin-Wook; Jeong, Hyeon Joo; Kim, Yu Seun; Yang, Chul Woo; Johnson, Richard J

    2004-12-31

    Maintenance of healthy endothelium is essential to vascular homeostasis, and preservation of endothelial cell function is critical for transplant allograft function. Damage of microvascular endothelial cells is now regarded as a characteristic feature of acute vascular rejection and chronic allograft nephropathy, which is an important predictor of graft loss and is often associated with transplant vasculopathy. In this review, we will discuss the role of microvascular endothelium, in renal allograft dysfunction, particularly as it relates to markers of endothelial dysfunction and endothelial repair mechanisms. We also discuss the potential for therapies targeting endothelial dysfunction and transplant graft vasculopathy.

  10. Brief Review: Interacting Mechanisms in the Pathogenesis of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pober, Jordan S.; Jane-wit, Dan; Qin, Lingfeng; Tellides, George

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy is the major cause of late graft loss in heart transplant recipients. Histological studies of characteristic end stage lesions reveal arterial changes consisting of a diffuse, confluent and concentric intimal expansion containing graft-derived cells expressing smooth muscle markers, extracellular matrix, penetrating microvessels and a host mononuclear cell infiltrate concentrated subjacent to an intact graft-derived luminal endothelial cell lining with little evidence of acute injury. This intimal expansion combined with inadequate compensatory outward remodeling produces severe generalized stenosis extending throughout the epicardial and intramyocardial arterial tree that causes ischemic graft failure. CAV lesions affect at least 50% of transplant recipients and are both progressive and refractory to treatment, resulting in about 5% graft loss per year through the first ten years post-transplant. Lesions typically stop at the suture line, implicating alloimmunity as the primary driver, but pathogenesis may be multifactorial. Here we will discuss six potential contributors to lesion formation: (1) conventional risk factors for atherosclerosis; (2) pre- or peri-transplant injuries; (3) infection; (4) innate immunity; (5) T cell-mediated immunity; and (6) B cell-mediated immunity through production of donor-specific antibody. Finally, we will consider how these various mechanisms may interact with each other. PMID:24903097

  11. Cardiogenic shock and coronary endothelial dysfunction predict cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Fernandez, Silvia; Manito-Lorite, Nicolas; Gómez-Hospital, Joan Antoni; Roca, Josep; Fontanillas, Carles; Melgares-Moreno, Rafael; Azpitarte-Almagro, José; Cequier-Fillat, Angel

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains one of the major causes of death post-heart transplantation. Its etiology is multifactorial and prevention is challenging. The aim of this study was to prospectively determine factors related to cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation. This research was planned on 179 patients submitted to heart transplant. Performance of an early coronary angiography with endothelial function evaluation was scheduled at three-month post-transplant. Patients underwent a second coronary angiography after five-yr follow-up. At the 5- ± 2-yr follow-up, 43% of the patients had developed cardiac allograft vasculopathy (severe in 26% of them). Three independent predictors of cardiac allograft vasculopathy were identified: cardiogenic shock at the time of the transplant operation (OR: 6.49; 95% CI: 1.86-22.7, p = 0.003); early coronary endothelial dysfunction (OR: 3.9; 95% CI: 1.49-10.2, p = 0.006), and older donor age (OR: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.00-1.10, p = 0.044). Besides early endothelial coronary dysfunction and older donor age, a new predictor for development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy was identified: cardiogenic shock at the time of transplantation. In these high-risk patient subgroups, preventive measures (treatment of cardiovascular risk factors, use of novel immunosuppressive agents such as mTOR inhibitors) should be earlier and much more aggressive.

  12. International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working formulation of a standardized nomenclature for cardiac allograft vasculopathy-2010.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Dipchand, Anne; Ensminger, Stephan M; Hiemann, Nicola E; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Madsen, Joren; Parameshwar, Jayan; Starling, Randall C; Uber, Patricia A

    2010-07-01

    The development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains the Achilles heel of cardiac transplantation. Unfortunately, the definitions of cardiac allograft vasculopathy are diverse, and there are no uniform international standards for the nomenclature of this entity. This consensus document, commissioned by the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Board, is based on best evidence and clinical consensus derived from critical analysis of available information pertaining to angiography, intravascular ultrasound imaging, microvascular function, cardiac allograft histology, circulating immune markers, non-invasive imaging tests, and gene-based and protein-based biomarkers. This document represents a working formulation for an international nomenclature of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, similar to the development of the system for adjudication of cardiac allograft rejection by histology.

  13. International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working formulation of a standardized nomenclature for cardiac allograft vasculopathy-2010.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Dipchand, Anne; Ensminger, Stephan M; Hiemann, Nicola E; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Madsen, Joren; Parameshwar, Jayan; Starling, Randall C; Uber, Patricia A

    2010-07-01

    The development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains the Achilles heel of cardiac transplantation. Unfortunately, the definitions of cardiac allograft vasculopathy are diverse, and there are no uniform international standards for the nomenclature of this entity. This consensus document, commissioned by the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Board, is based on best evidence and clinical consensus derived from critical analysis of available information pertaining to angiography, intravascular ultrasound imaging, microvascular function, cardiac allograft histology, circulating immune markers, non-invasive imaging tests, and gene-based and protein-based biomarkers. This document represents a working formulation for an international nomenclature of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, similar to the development of the system for adjudication of cardiac allograft rejection by histology. PMID:20620917

  14. Sex Related Differences in the Risk of Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Subsequent Allograft Vasculopathy Post-Heart Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grupper, Avishay; Nestorovic, Emilija M.; Daly, Richard C.; Milic, Natasa M.; Joyce, Lyle D.; Stulak, John M.; Joyce, David L.; Edwards, Brooks S.; Pereira, Naveen L.; Kushwaha, Sudhir S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregnancies may result in antibodies against HLA, a risk factor for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and subsequent cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) after heart transplantation (HTx). The aim of this study was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of AMR events and subsequent risk of CAV among HTx recipients. Methods The study comprised 160 patients (51 [32%] women) who underwent HTx in 2008 to 2014. The cumulative effect of AMR events was calculated by AMR score (sum of myocardial biopsy grading divided by number of biopsies taken during 3 years post-HTx). Results Females had higher levels of anti-HLA I antibodies pre-HTx compared to males which was associated with a history of pregnancies, total number of children and with a higher AMR score at 6 months post-HTx (P < 0.05). Women demonstrated a significant increase in the total incidence of AMR events (27 vs. 7%, P = 0.001) and in AMR scores at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months post-HTx compared to men (P < 0.05). There were no differences in cellular rejection between the groups. A history of AMR events was associated with a significantly increased risk of severe CAV onset (hazard ratio, 7.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-31.5; P = 0.012). Conclusions Women are at higher risk for AMR post-HTx which subsequently increases their risk for CAV. Females recipients may benefit from closer surveillance to identify AMR at an earlier stage post-HTx, and targeted immunosuppressive therapy to attenuate the development of CAV.

  15. Diagnosis and management of coronary allograft vasculopathy in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Dedieu, Nathalie; Greil, Gerald; Wong, James; Fenton, Matthew; Burch, Michael; Hussain, Tarique

    2014-01-01

    Coronary allograft vasculopathy remains one of the leading causes of death beyond the first year post transplant. As a result of denervation following transplantation, patients lack ischaemic symptoms and presentation is often late when the graft is already compromised. Current diagnostic tools are rather invasive, or in case of angiography, significantly lack sensitivity. Therefore a non-invasive tool that could allow early diagnosis would be invaluable.This paper review the disease form its different diagnosis techniques,including new and less invasive diagnostic tools to its pharmacological management and possible treatments. PMID:25540736

  16. Quiescent interplay between inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha: influence on transplant graft vasculopathy in renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Matata, Bashir M; Hakim, Nadey S

    2006-06-01

    A healthy endothelium is essential for vascular homeostasis, and preservation of endothelial cell function is critical for maintaining transplant allograft function. Damage to the microvascular endothelial cells is now regarded as a characteristic feature of acute vascular rejection, an important predictor of graft loss. It is also linked with transplant vasculopathy, often associated with chronic allograft nephropathy. Large bursts of nitric oxide in infiltrating monocytes/macrophages modulated by inducible nitric oxide synthase are considered pivotal in driving this mechanism. Indeed, it has been shown recently that increased circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the rejecting kidneys are largely responsible for triggering inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. This in turn suggests that several structural and functional features of graft rejection could be mediated by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Despite the large body of evidence that supports immunologic involvement, knowledge concerning the cellular and biochemical mechanisms for nephritic cell dysfunction and death is incomplete. The role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mediating pathophysiological activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase during transplant vasculopathy remains contentious. Here, we discuss the effect of inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha interaction on progressive damage to glomerular and vascular structures during renal allograft rejection. Selective inhibition of inducible nitrous oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha as a potential therapy for ameliorating endothelial dysfunction and transplant graft vasculopathy is also discussed.

  17. Attenuation of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy by Sirolimus: Relationship to Time Interval Following Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yoshiki; Cassar, Andrew; Yoshino, Satoshi; Flammer, Andreas J.; Li, Jing; Gulati, Rajiv; Topilsky, Yan; Raichlin, Eugenia; Lennon, Ryan J.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Kushwaha, Sudhir S.; Lerman, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to assess temporal changes in plaque size and components following heart transplantation (HTx), and to evaluate the differences in treatment effects on plaque progression between sirolimus and calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). Methods The study comprised 146 HTx recipients who were converted from CNIs to sirolimus as primary immunosuppressant (sirolimus group, n=61), and those who were maintained on CNIs (CNI group, n=85). A retrospective compositional analysis of serial virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound was performed. Results During a median follow-up of 2.8 years, there was a significant difference in plaque volume in favor of sirolimus between groups (P=0.004). When subjects were subclassified according to the time interval between HTx and study inclusion, those in the early group (≤2 years after HTx) had a greater increase in plaque volume (P=0.006) characterized by a higher progression rate of fibrous plaque volume (P=0.01). The treatment difference between groups in plaque volume was identified in the early group in favor of sirolimus with attenuating effects on the progression of fibrous plaque component (both P=0.03 for interaction). By contrast, there were significant differences of necrotic core and dense calcium volume (both P<0.05 for interaction) in favor of CNIs in the late group (≥6 years after HTx). Conclusions Compared with a continued CNI therapy, sirolimus attenuated plaque progression in recipients with early conversion, but contributed to increases in necrotic core and dense calcium volume in those with late conversion. The current study supports the early initiation of sirolimus offers greater benefits on the development of CAV. PMID:23856215

  18. Livedoid vasculopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sample search on this topic. Selected Full-Text Journal Articles Kerk N, Goerge T. Livedoid vasculopathy: ... Share this content: Share this content: × Copy Link text Link copied to your clipboard. Close Copy Link ...

  19. B cells mediate chronic allograft rejection independently of antibody production.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Ng, Yue-Harn; Singh, Tripti; Jiang, Ke; Sheriff, Khaleefathullah A; Ippolito, Renee; Zahalka, Salwa; Li, Qi; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Ramaswami, Balathiripurasundari; Lund, Frances E; Chalasani, Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Chronic rejection is the primary cause of long-term failure of transplanted organs and is often viewed as an antibody-dependent process. Chronic rejection, however, is also observed in mice and humans with no detectable circulating alloantibodies, suggesting that antibody-independent pathways may also contribute to pathogenesis of transplant rejection. Here, we have provided direct evidence that chronic rejection of vascularized heart allografts occurs in the complete absence of antibodies, but requires the presence of B cells. Mice that were deficient for antibodies but not B cells experienced the same chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which is a pathognomonic feature of chronic rejection, as WT mice; however, mice that were deficient for both B cells and antibodies were protected from CAV. B cells contributed to CAV by supporting splenic lymphoid architecture, T cell cytokine production, and infiltration of T cells into graft vessels. In chimeric mice, in which B cells were present but could not present antigen, both T cell responses and CAV were markedly reduced. These findings establish that chronic rejection can occur in the complete absence of antibodies and that B cells contribute to this process by supporting T cell responses through antigen presentation and maintenance of lymphoid architecture.

  20. Mitochondrial vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications. PMID:27231520

  1. Hypertensive Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Bae

    2014-01-01

    An exclusive interview by Prof. Jeong Bae Park conducted with Dr. Rhian M. Touyz in Seoul while she was visiting for the Korean Society of Hypertension, May 10, 2014. In this interview, Dr. Touyz explains and describes hypertensive vasculopathy. PMID:26587442

  2. The challenge to detect heart transplant rejection and transplant vasculopathy non-invasively - a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Engin; Burgstahler, Christof; Aebert, Hermann; Schroeder, Stephen; Helber, Uwe; Kopp, Andreas F; Ziemer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft rejection and vasculopathy are the main factors limiting long-term survival after heart transplantation. In this pilot study we investigated whether non-invasive methods are beneficial to detect cardiac allograft rejection (Grade 0-3 R) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Thus we compared multi-slice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging with invasive methods like coronary angiography and left endomyocardial biopsy. Methods 10 asymptomatic long-term survivors after heart transplantation (8 male, 2 female, mean age 52.1 ± 12 years, 73 ± 11 months after transplantation) were included. In a blinded fashion, coronary angiography and multi-slice computed tomography and ventricular endomyocardial biopsy and magnetic resonance imaging were compared against each other. Results Cardiac allograft vasculopathy and atherosclerosis were correctly detected by multi-slice computed tomography and coronary angiography with positive correlation (r = 1). Late contrast enchancement found by magnetic resonance imaging correlated positively (r = 0.92, r2 = 0.85, p < 0.05) with the histological diagnosis of transplant rejection revealed by myocardial biopsy. None of the examined endomyocardial specimen revealed cardiac allograft rejection greater than Grade 1 R. Conclusion A combined non-invasive approach using multi-slice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may help to assess cardiac allograft vasculopathy and cardiac allograft rejection after heart transplantation before applying more invasive methods. PMID:19682394

  3. Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Ciardella, Antonio P; Donsoff, Irene M; Huang, Sheau J; Costa, Danielle L; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A

    2004-01-01

    Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy was first described as a peculiar hemorrhagic disorder of the macula, characterized by recurrent sub-retinal and sub-retinal pigment epithelium bleeding in middle aged black women. The use of indocyanine green angiography and subsequently of optical coherent tomography has widened our ability to study and understand the pathophysiology of this disorder. The primary abnormality involves the choroidal circulation, and the characteristic lesion is an inner choroidal vascular network of vessels ending in an aneurysmal bulge or outward projection, visible clinically as a reddish orange, spheroid, polyp-like structure. We have also recognized that individuals of African-American and Asian descents are more at risk for developing polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy as the disorder seems to preferentially affect pigmented individuals. However, it has been shown that while that still holds true, patients of other racial backgrounds may be afflicted. Particularly, polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy has been found to be present in about 8-13% of white patients with clinical appearance of exudative age-related macular degeneration. Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy has also been reported in Irish, French, German, and Italian patients. The natural course of the disease often follows a remitting-relapsing course, and clinically, it is associated with chronic, multiple, recurrent serosanguineous detachments of the retinal pigment epithelium and neurosensory retina with long-term preservation of good vision. Photodynamic treatment appears to be a promising alternative to conventional laser therapy, for the treatment of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. In conclusion, polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy seems to be a distinct clinical entity that should be differentiated from other types of choroidal neovascularization associated with age-related macular degeneration and other known choroidal degenerative, inflammatory, and ischemic disorders. PMID

  4. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2015-06-24

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit.

  5. Livedoid vasculopathy - a thrombotic disease.

    PubMed

    Kerk, Nina; Goerge, Tobias

    2013-09-01

    Livedoid vasculopathy is a rare, chronic occlusive disease of vessels supporting the upper layers of the skin. It is characterized by purpuric maculae and recurrent painful ulcerations mostly affecting the lower leg. These ulcerations occur episodically especially in summer time and heal slowly, leaving characteristic porcelain-white scars called ’atrophie blanche’.This review is focused on the current knowledge on livedoid vasculopathy and modern therapy strategies resulting from its etiopathogenetic associations with prothrombotic states. Livedoid vasculopathy and its pathophysiology are clearly distinguished from inflammatory vasculitis and thus require a different therapeutic approach. The prevention of irreversible residual scarring and improving the quality of life of patients in this often misdiagnosed disease is one of the main treatment goals.

  6. Deceased donor multidrug resistance protein 1 and caveolin 1 gene variants may influence allograft survival in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Divers, Jasmin; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Julian, Bruce A.; Israni, Ajay K.; Schladt, David; Pastan, Stephen O.; Chattrabhuti, Kryt; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Kirk, Allan D.; Brown, W. Mark; Gaston, Robert S.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Farney, Alan C.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Stratta, Robert J.; Guan, Meijian; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Bowden, Donald W.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Ma, Lijun; Freedman, Barry I.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in donor multidrug resistance protein 1 (ABCB1) and caveolin 1 (CAV1) genes are associated with renal allograft failure after transplantation in Europeans. Here we assessed transplantation outcomes of kidneys from 368 African American (AA) and 314 European American (EA) deceased donors based on 38 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning ABCB1 and 16 SNPs spanning CAV1, including previously associated index and haplotype-tagging SNPs. Tests for association with time to allograft failure were performed for the 1,233 resultant kidney transplantations, adjusting for recipient age, sex, ethnicity, cold ischemia time, PRA, HLA match, expanded-criteria donation, and APOL1- nephropathy variants in AA donors. Interaction analyses between APOL1 with ABCB1 and CAV1 were performed. In a meta-analysis of all transplantations, ABCB1 index SNP rs1045642 was associated with time to allograft failure and other ABCB1 SNPs were nominally associated, but not CAV1 SNPs. ABCB1 SNP rs1045642 showed consistent effects with the 558 transplantations from EA donors, but not with the 675 transplantations from AA donors. ABCB1 SNP rs956825 and CAV1 SNP rs6466583 interacted with APOL1 in transplants from AA donors. Thus, the T allele at ABCB1 rs1045642 is associated with shorter renal allograft survival for kidneys from American donors. Interactions between ABCB1 and CAV1 with APOL1 may influence allograft failure for transplanted kidneys from AA donors. PMID:25853335

  7. Renal infarction due to lupus vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Varalaxmi, B; Sandeep, P; Sridhar, A V S S N; Raveendra, P; Kishore, C Krishna; Ram, R; Kumar, V Siva

    2015-08-01

    In the ISN/RPS 2003 classification of lupus nephritis (LN) renal vascular lesions are not mentioned. We present a patient with postpartum lupus vasculopathy. The renal biopsy in our patient showed concentric intimal thickening with narrowed lumen. No inflammatory changes were found. It also revealed immunoglobulin and complement deposition on the wall of the arteriole. These changes indicate lupus vasculopathy. The glomeruli revealed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis, with wire loops and cellular crescent in one glomerulus. The patient showed improvement with immunosuppression.

  8. Extensive extracranial and intracranial Varicella zoster vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Lalla, Rakesh; Patil, Tushar B

    2012-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV)-induced vasculopathy is an uncommon cause of stroke in a young immunocompetent host. Owing to scarcity of data of VZV-induced vasculopathy and lack of awareness about this condition and its diagnostic test, these cases may be easily missed. In this case, we report an immunocompetent host presenting right-side hemiplegia with motor aphasia and complete loss of vision in the left eye due to complete occlusion of the left common carotid artery without any history of skin rash preceding stroke. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis for varicella antibody revealed very high titres and CT aortogram demonstrated aortoarteritis with occlusion of left common carotid artery. To our knowledge, varicella zoster vasculopathy-associated aortoarteritis has not been described in the literature. PMID:23010463

  9. Livedoid Thrombotic Vasculopathy Responding to Doxycycline Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Matthew S.; Lee, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Livedoid vasculopathy is a disease of the lower extremities that occurs predominantly in women. It begins as purpura and eventually ulcerates. Multiple causes have been posited, but many cases are found to be idiopathic. Many treatment modalities have been attempted to control the disease process, but many cases remain difficult to treat, and, at times, the treatments have side effects that limit treatment. This is a case report in a small number of patients tested in unblinded fashion. We report the effective use of doxycycline in the treatment of long-standing livedoid vasculopathy in two patients. PMID:21212844

  10. Developments in Varicella Zoster Virus Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Gilden, Don

    2016-02-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a highly neurotropic human herpesvirus. Primary infection usually causes varicella (chicken pox), after which virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. VZV reactivation results in zoster (shingles) which is frequently complicated by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia). VZV reactivation also causes meningoencephalitis, myelitis, ocular disorders, and vasculopathy, all of which can occur in the absence of rash. This review focuses on the association of VZV and stroke, and on the widening spectrum of disorders produced by VZV vasculopathy in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, including recipients of varicella vaccine. Aside from ischemic stroke, VZV infection of cerebral arteries may lead to development of intracerebral aneurysms, with or without hemorrhage. Moreover, recent clinical-virological case reports and retrospective pathological-virological analyses of temporal arteries positive or negative for giant cell arteritis (GCA) indicate that extracranial VZV vasculopathy triggers the immunopathology of GCA. While many patients with GCA improve after corticosteroid treatment, prolonged corticosteroid use may potentiate VZV infection, leading to fatal vasculopathy in the brain and other organs.

  11. Developments in Varicella Zoster Virus Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Gilden, Don

    2016-02-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a highly neurotropic human herpesvirus. Primary infection usually causes varicella (chicken pox), after which virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. VZV reactivation results in zoster (shingles) which is frequently complicated by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia). VZV reactivation also causes meningoencephalitis, myelitis, ocular disorders, and vasculopathy, all of which can occur in the absence of rash. This review focuses on the association of VZV and stroke, and on the widening spectrum of disorders produced by VZV vasculopathy in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals, including recipients of varicella vaccine. Aside from ischemic stroke, VZV infection of cerebral arteries may lead to development of intracerebral aneurysms, with or without hemorrhage. Moreover, recent clinical-virological case reports and retrospective pathological-virological analyses of temporal arteries positive or negative for giant cell arteritis (GCA) indicate that extracranial VZV vasculopathy triggers the immunopathology of GCA. While many patients with GCA improve after corticosteroid treatment, prolonged corticosteroid use may potentiate VZV infection, leading to fatal vasculopathy in the brain and other organs. PMID:26750127

  12. De novo expression of fetal ED-A(+) fibronectin and B (+) tenascin-C splicing variants in human cardiac allografts: potential impact for targeted therapy of rejection.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Matusiak-Brückner, Monika; Richter, Petra; Grün, Katja; Ziffels, Barbara; Neri, Dario; Maschek, Hansjörg; Schulz, Uwe; Pfeil, Alexander; Jung, Christian; Figulla, Hans R; Gummert, Jan; Berndt, Alexander; Renner, André

    2014-10-01

    Management of acute and especially chronic rejection after human cardiac transplantation is still challenging. Chronic rejection, represented by allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and cardiac interstitial fibrosis (CIF) is known to cause severe long-term complications. Rejection associated tissue-remodelling entails the reoccurrence of fetal variants of Fibronectin (Fn) and Tenascin-C (Tn-C), which are virtually absent in adult human organs. In a rat model, an extensive re-expression could be demonstrated for ED-A(+) Fn with spatial association to CAV and CIF. Thus, it is of great interest to investigate the cardiac tissue expression and distribution in human samples. From 48 heart transplanted patients, 64 tissue specimens derived from right ventricular biopsies were available. Histopathological analysis was performed according to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) guidelines for the detection of acute rejection. By immunohistochemistry, protein expression of ED-A(+) Fn, B(+) Tn-C, alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD31 and CD45 was assessed and analysed semiquantitatively. Co-localisation studies were performed by means of immunofluorescence double labelling. Histopathological analysis of the 64 samples revealed different ISHLT grades (0R in 36 cases, 1R in 20 cases and 2R in 8 cases). There was a distinct and quantitatively relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C in most samples. Semi-quantitative evaluation did not show any correlation to the acute rejection grade for all markers. Interestingly, significant correlations to the extent of inflammation could be shown for ED-A(+) Fn (r = 0.442, p = 0.000) and B(+) Tn-C (r = 0.408, p = 0.001) as well as between both proteins (r = 0.663, p = 0.000). A spatial association of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C to CAV and CIF could be demonstrated. A relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C following human heart transplantation could be demonstrated with spatial association to

  13. Role of anti-vimentin antibodies in allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Rose, Marlene L

    2013-11-01

    Production of anti-vimentin antibodies (AVA) after solid organ transplantation are common. Although classically thought to be expressed mainly within the cytosol, recent evidence demonstrates that extracellular or cell surface expression of vimentin is not unusual. This review examines the evidence to assess whether AVA contribute to allograft pathology. Clinical studies suggest that AVA are associated with cardiac allograft vasculopathy in heart transplant recipients. Studies in non-human primates confirm that production of AVA after renal and heart transplantation are not inhibited by Cyclosporine. Experimental studies have demonstrated that mice pre-immunised with vimentin undergo accelerated acute rejection and vascular intimal occlusion of cardiac allografts. Adoptive transfer of hyperimmune sera containing AVA into B-cell-knock-out mice caused accelerated rejection of allografted hearts, this is clear evidence that antibodies to vimentin accelerate rejection. AVA act in concert with the alloimmune response and AVA do not damage syngeneic or native heart allografts. Confocal microscopy of allografted organs in vimentin immunised mice shows extensive expression of vimentin on endothelial cells, apoptotic leukocytes and platelet/leukocyte conjugates, co-localising with C4d. One explanation for the ability of AVA to accelerate rejection would be fixation of complement within the graft and subsequent pro-inflammatory effects; there may also be interactions with platelets within the vasculature.

  14. Natural Killer Cell Reduction and Uteroplacental Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Golic, Michaela; Haase, Nadine; Herse, Florian; Wehner, Anika; Vercruysse, Lisbeth; Pijnenborg, Robert; Balogh, Andras; Saether, Per Christian; Dissen, Erik; Luft, Friedrich C; Przybyl, Lukasz; Park, Joon-Keun; Alnaes-Katjavivi, Patji; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Verlohren, Stefan; Henrich, Wolfgang; Muller, Dominik N; Dechend, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    Uterine natural killer cells are important for uteroplacental development and pregnancy maintenance. Their role in pregnancy disorders, such as preeclampsia, is unknown. We reduced the number of natural killer cells by administering rabbit anti-asialo GM1 antiserum in an established rat preeclamptic model (female human angiotensinogen×male human renin) and evaluated the effects at the end of pregnancy (day 21), compared with preeclamptic control rats receiving normal rabbit serum. In 100% of the antiserum-treated, preeclamptic rats (7/7), we observed highly degenerated vessel cross sections in the mesometrial triangle at the end of pregnancy. This maternal uterine vasculopathy was characterized by a total absence of nucleated/living cells in the vessel wall and perivascularly and prominent presence of fibrosis. Furthermore, there were no endovascular trophoblast cells within the vessel lumen. In the control, normal rabbit serum-treated, preeclamptic rats, only 20% (1/5) of the animals displayed such vasculopathy. We confirmed the results in healthy pregnant wild-type rats: after anti-asialo GM1 treatment, 67% of maternal rats displayed vasculopathy at the end of pregnancy compared with 0% in rabbit serum-treated control rats. This vasculopathy was associated with a significantly lower fetal weight in wild-type rats and deterioration of fetal brain/liver weight ratio in preeclamptic rats. Anti-asialo GM1 application had no influence on maternal hypertension and albuminuria during pregnancy. Our results show a new role of natural killer cells during hypertensive pregnancy in maintaining vascular integrity. In normotensive pregnancy, this integrity seems important for fetal growth.

  15. Natural Killer Cell Reduction and Uteroplacental Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Golic, Michaela; Haase, Nadine; Herse, Florian; Wehner, Anika; Vercruysse, Lisbeth; Pijnenborg, Robert; Balogh, Andras; Saether, Per Christian; Dissen, Erik; Luft, Friedrich C; Przybyl, Lukasz; Park, Joon-Keun; Alnaes-Katjavivi, Patji; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Verlohren, Stefan; Henrich, Wolfgang; Muller, Dominik N; Dechend, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    Uterine natural killer cells are important for uteroplacental development and pregnancy maintenance. Their role in pregnancy disorders, such as preeclampsia, is unknown. We reduced the number of natural killer cells by administering rabbit anti-asialo GM1 antiserum in an established rat preeclamptic model (female human angiotensinogen×male human renin) and evaluated the effects at the end of pregnancy (day 21), compared with preeclamptic control rats receiving normal rabbit serum. In 100% of the antiserum-treated, preeclamptic rats (7/7), we observed highly degenerated vessel cross sections in the mesometrial triangle at the end of pregnancy. This maternal uterine vasculopathy was characterized by a total absence of nucleated/living cells in the vessel wall and perivascularly and prominent presence of fibrosis. Furthermore, there were no endovascular trophoblast cells within the vessel lumen. In the control, normal rabbit serum-treated, preeclamptic rats, only 20% (1/5) of the animals displayed such vasculopathy. We confirmed the results in healthy pregnant wild-type rats: after anti-asialo GM1 treatment, 67% of maternal rats displayed vasculopathy at the end of pregnancy compared with 0% in rabbit serum-treated control rats. This vasculopathy was associated with a significantly lower fetal weight in wild-type rats and deterioration of fetal brain/liver weight ratio in preeclamptic rats. Anti-asialo GM1 application had no influence on maternal hypertension and albuminuria during pregnancy. Our results show a new role of natural killer cells during hypertensive pregnancy in maintaining vascular integrity. In normotensive pregnancy, this integrity seems important for fetal growth. PMID:27550919

  16. Spectrum and prevalence of vasculopathy in pediatric neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Bonnie; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Tekes, Aylin; Bergner, Amanda; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Jordan, Lori C

    2013-05-01

    To describe the spectrum and associated clinical features of peripheral and cerebral vasculopathy in pediatric patients with neurofibromatosis type 1, children seen at a single center from 2000 to 2010 with appropriate imaging studies were identified. Scans were assessed for vascular disease by 2 pediatric neuroradiologists. Of 181 children, 80 had pertinent imaging studies: 77 had brain imaging, 6 had peripheral imaging, and 3 had both. Vasculopathy was identified in 14/80 children (18%, minimum prevalence of 14/181; 8%). Of those with vascular abnormalities, 2/14 had peripheral vasculopathy (1% minimum prevalence) and 12/14 had cerebrovascular abnormalities (7% minimum prevalence). No associations were found between vasculopathy and common clinical features of neurofibromatosis type 1, including optic pathway glioma, plexiform neurofibroma, skeletal abnormalities, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or suspected learning disability. Both peripheral and cerebral vasculopathy are important complications of pediatric neurofibromatosis type 1 and should be considered in the management of this complex disease.

  17. [Large vessels vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván

    2015-12-01

    Vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis is a severe, in many cases irreversible, manifestation that can lead to amputation. While the classical clinical manifestations of the disease have to do with the involvement of microcirculation, proximal vessels of upper and lower limbs can also be affected. This involvement of large vessels may be related to systemic sclerosis, vasculitis or atherosclerotic, and the differential diagnosis is not easy. To conduct a proper and early diagnosis, it is essential to start prompt appropriate treatment. In this review, we examine the involvement of large vessels in scleroderma, an understudied manifestation with important prognostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:25726305

  18. Eplerenone in the Treatment of Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Kapil G; Wagner, Alan L

    2015-01-01

    Overactivation of mineralocorticoid receptor pathways has been implicated in the pathophysiology of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Recently, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists such as eplerenone have demonstrated success in treating subretinal fluid in CSCR. This case demonstrates a patient who was initially presumed to have subretinal fluid secondary to CSCR and was started on a trial of oral eplerenone. It quickly became evident that her subretinal fluid was secondary to a peripapillary polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy network, but she demonstrated a significant improvement with oral eplerenone. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of eplerenone use to treat polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy.

  19. Silent polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy in a patient with angioid streaks.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, Zafer; Bayraktar, Serife; Oray, Merih; Kir, Nur

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of silent polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) in a patient with angioid streaks. PCV was detected during a routine ophthalmic examination and confirmed by fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and optical coherence tomography. After 2 years of follow-up, the PCV remained silent without any complications. We report this rare coexistence and review literature on this topic. PMID:27463636

  20. Intellectual Ability and Executive Function in Pediatric Moyamoya Vasculopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tricia S.; Westmacott, Robyn; Dlamini, Nomazulu; Granite, Leeor; Dirks, Peter; Askalan, Rand; MacGregor, Daune; Moharir, Mahendranath; Deveber, Gabrielle

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Moyamoya vasculopathy is characterized by progressive stenosis of the major arteries of the Circle of Willis, resulting in compromised cerebral blood flow and increased risk of stroke. The objectives of the current study were to examine intellectual and executive functioning of children with moyamoya and to evaluate the impact of moyamoya…

  1. Livedoid vasculopathy: A review of pathogenesis and principles of management.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Biju; Neema, Shekhar; Verma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Livedoid vasculopathy is a rare cutaneous disease manifesting as recurrent ulcers on the lower extremities. The ulceration results in atrophic, porcelain white scars termed as atrophie blanche. The pathogenesis is yet to be understood with the main mechanism being hypercoagulability and inflammation playing a secondary role. The important procoagulant factors include protein C and S deficiency, factor V Leiden mutation, antithrombin III deficiency, prothrombin gene mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. Histopathology of livedoid vasculopathy is characterized by intraluminal thrombosis, proliferation of the endothelium and segmental hyalinization of dermal vessels. The treatment is multipronged with anti-thrombotic measures such as anti-platelet drugs, systemic anticoagulants and fibrinolytic therapy taking precedence over anti-inflammatory agents. Colchicine, hydroxychloroquine, vasodilators, intravenous immunoglobulin, folic acid, immunosuppressive therapy and supportive measures are also of some benefit. A multidisciplinary approach would go a long way in the management of these patients resulting in relief from pain and physical as well as psychological scarring.

  2. Livedoid vasculopathy: A review of pathogenesis and principles of management.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Biju; Neema, Shekhar; Verma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Livedoid vasculopathy is a rare cutaneous disease manifesting as recurrent ulcers on the lower extremities. The ulceration results in atrophic, porcelain white scars termed as atrophie blanche. The pathogenesis is yet to be understood with the main mechanism being hypercoagulability and inflammation playing a secondary role. The important procoagulant factors include protein C and S deficiency, factor V Leiden mutation, antithrombin III deficiency, prothrombin gene mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. Histopathology of livedoid vasculopathy is characterized by intraluminal thrombosis, proliferation of the endothelium and segmental hyalinization of dermal vessels. The treatment is multipronged with anti-thrombotic measures such as anti-platelet drugs, systemic anticoagulants and fibrinolytic therapy taking precedence over anti-inflammatory agents. Colchicine, hydroxychloroquine, vasodilators, intravenous immunoglobulin, folic acid, immunosuppressive therapy and supportive measures are also of some benefit. A multidisciplinary approach would go a long way in the management of these patients resulting in relief from pain and physical as well as psychological scarring. PMID:27297279

  3. Mesenteric Arteriovenous Dysplasia/Vasculopathy Is Distinct From Fibromuscular Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Patil, Deepa T; Kissiedu, Juliana; Rodriguez, E Rene; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Liu, Xiuli; Rybicki, Lisa A; Tan, Carmela D

    2016-10-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a noninflammatory, nonatherosclerotic vasculopathy that usually affects the carotid and renal arteries. We have observed FMD-like vascular changes in specimens resected for ischemia or Crohn's disease (CD). On the basis of a systematic clinicopathologic review of these 11 cases identified between 1982 and 2014, we describe a distinct mesenteric vasculopathy that involves both arteries and veins [mesenteric arteriovenous dysplasia/vasculopathy (MAVD/V)] and is characterized by (1) concentric/eccentric smooth muscle collarette around the tunica media of both the artery and the vein in ≥2 foci, (2) varying degrees of intimal and medial hyperplasia and adventitial fibrosis, and (3) lack of inflammation or thrombi. MAVD/V cases were clinically diagnosed as CD (45%), mass/lesion (27%), ischemia (9%), obstruction (9%), or rectal prolapse (9%). Abdominal pain for >1 year was the most common symptom. Most patients were women (M:F=1:2.7; mean age, 63 y). Mucosal changes mimicking CD, such as architectural distortion (55%), multifocal ulcers (73%), and pyloric gland metaplasia (64%), were common; however, no granulomas or transmural lymphoid aggregates were identified. Ischemic pattern of injury was seen in 4 cases. Upon follow-up (mean, 31.2 mo), 8 patients were found to be asymptomatic, 2 had died of unrelated causes, and 1 was lost to follow-up. We propose the name MAVD/V for a distinct noninflammatory, nonatherosclerotic, localized form of mesenteric vasculopathy that involves both arteries and veins, distinct from FMD. Unlike FMD, surgical resection appears to be curative, with a favorable clinical outcome. Awareness of this vascular entity is important as patients may be potentially misdiagnosed as having CD and ischemic bowel disease. PMID:27487739

  4. Regulation of aldosterone secretion by Cav1.3.

    PubMed

    Xie, Catherine B; Shaikh, Lalarukh Haris; Garg, Sumedha; Tanriver, Gizem; Teo, Ada E D; Zhou, Junhua; Maniero, Carmela; Zhao, Wanfeng; Kang, Soosung; Silverman, Richard B; Azizan, Elena A B; Brown, Morris J

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) vary in phenotype and genotype. Zona glomerulosa (ZG)-like APAs frequently have mutations of an L-type calcium channel (LTCC) CaV1.3. Using a novel antagonist of CaV1.3, compound 8, we investigated the role of CaV1.3 on steroidogenesis in the human adrenocortical cell line, H295R, and in primary human adrenal cells. This investigational drug was compared with the common antihypertensive drug nifedipine, which has 4.5-fold selectivity for the vascular LTCC, CaV1.2, over CaV1.3. In H295R cells transfected with wild-type or mutant CaV1.3 channels, the latter produced more aldosterone than wild-type, which was ameliorated by 100 μM of compound 8. In primary adrenal and non-transfected H295R cells, compound 8 decreased aldosterone production similar to high concentration of nifedipine (100 μM). Selective CaV1.3 blockade may offer a novel way of treating primary hyperaldosteronism, which avoids the vascular side effects of CaV1.2-blockade, and provides targeted treatment for ZG-like APAs with mutations of CaV1.3. PMID:27098837

  5. Regulation of aldosterone secretion by Cav1.3

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Catherine B.; Haris Shaikh, Lalarukh; Garg, Sumedha; Tanriver, Gizem; Teo, Ada E. D.; Zhou, Junhua; Maniero, Carmela; Zhao, Wanfeng; Kang, Soosung; Silverman, Richard B.; Azizan, Elena A. B.; Brown, Morris J.

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) vary in phenotype and genotype. Zona glomerulosa (ZG)-like APAs frequently have mutations of an L-type calcium channel (LTCC) CaV1.3. Using a novel antagonist of CaV1.3, compound 8, we investigated the role of CaV1.3 on steroidogenesis in the human adrenocortical cell line, H295R, and in primary human adrenal cells. This investigational drug was compared with the common antihypertensive drug nifedipine, which has 4.5-fold selectivity for the vascular LTCC, CaV1.2, over CaV1.3. In H295R cells transfected with wild-type or mutant CaV1.3 channels, the latter produced more aldosterone than wild-type, which was ameliorated by 100 μM of compound 8. In primary adrenal and non-transfected H295R cells, compound 8 decreased aldosterone production similar to high concentration of nifedipine (100 μM). Selective CaV1.3 blockade may offer a novel way of treating primary hyperaldosteronism, which avoids the vascular side effects of CaV1.2-blockade, and provides targeted treatment for ZG-like APAs with mutations of CaV1.3. PMID:27098837

  6. Differential zinc permeation and blockade of L-type Ca2+ channel isoforms Cav1.2 and Cav1.3.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Jung; Min, Se-Hong; Kang, Ho-Won; Lee, Jung-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Certain voltage-activated Ca2+ channels have been reported to act as potential zinc entry routes. However, it remains to be determined whether zinc can permeate individual Ca2+ channel isoforms. We expressed recombinant Ca2+ channel isoforms in Xenopus oocytes and attempted to record zinc currents from them using a two-electrode voltage clamp method. We found that, in an extracellular zinc solution, inward currents arising from zinc permeation could be recorded from Xenopus oocytes expressing L-type Cav1.2 or Cav1.3 isoforms, but not from oocytes expressing Cav2.2, Cav2.3, Cav3.1, or Cav3.2. Zinc currents through Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 were blocked by nimodipine, but enhanced by (±)Bay K8644, supporting the finding that zinc can permeate both L-type Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 channel isoforms. We also examined the blocking effects of low concentrations of zinc on Ca2+ currents through the L-type channel isoforms. Low micro-molar zinc potently blocked Ca2+ currents through Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 with different sensitivities (IC50 for Cav1.2 and Cav1.3=18.4 and 34.1 μM) and de-accelerated the activation and inactivation kinetics in a concentration-dependent manner. Notably, mild acidifications of the external zinc solution increased zinc currents through Cav1.2 and Cav1.3, with the increment level for Cav1.3 being greater than that for Cav1.2. In overall, we provide evidence that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 isoforms are capable of potentially functioning as zinc permeation routes, through which zinc entry can be differentially augmented by mild acidifications.

  7. Proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases in CSF of patients with VZV vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dallas; Alvarez, Enrique; Selva, Sean; Gilden, Don

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the CSF of patients with virologically verified varicella zoster virus (VZV) vasculopathy. Methods: CSF from 30 patients with virologically verified VZV vasculopathy was analyzed for levels of proinflammatory cytokines and MMPs using the Meso Scale Discovery multiplex ELISA platform. Positive CNS inflammatory disease controls were provided by CSF from 30 patients with multiple sclerosis. Negative controls were provided by CSF from 20 healthy controls. Results: Compared to multiple sclerosis CSF and CSF from healthy controls, levels of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, and MMP-2 were significantly elevated in VZV vasculopathy CSF. Conclusions: CSF of patients with VZV vasculopathy revealed a unique profile of elevated proinflammatory cytokines, IL-8 and IL-6, along with elevated MMP-2. The relevance of these cytokines to the pathogenesis of VZV vasculopathy requires further study. PMID:27340684

  8. Mechanisms of vasculopathy in sickle cell disease and thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Morris, Claudia R

    2008-01-01

    Many mechanisms contribute to the complex pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD), with dysfunction of the vascular endothelium as a unifying theme. Specifically, hemolysis-associated low arginine and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, amplified by NO synthase uncoupling, elevated arginase activity, superoxide production, oxidative stress, accumulation of arginine analogs such as asymmetric dimethylarginine, ischemia-reperfusion injury, inflammation, apolipoprotein A-1 depletion, and a hypercoagulable state are significant mechanisms contributing to endothelial dysfunction. Genetic polymorphisms also influence disease severity. Clearly the variable spectrum of disease is the consequence of multiple events and genetic susceptibility that go beyond the occurrence of a single amino acid substitution in the beta globin chain of hemoglobin. Recent studies begin to demonstrate overlap among these seemingly unrelated processes. Impaired NO bioavailability represents the central feature of endothelial dysfunction, and is a common denominator in the pathogenesis of vasculopathy in SCD. The consequences of decreased NO bioavailability include endothelial cell activation, upregulation of the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1, vasoconstriction, platelet activation, increased tissue factor, and activation of coagulation, all of which ultimately translate into the clinical manifestations of SCD. Evidence supporting vasculopathy subphenotypes in SCD, including pulmonary hypertension, priapism, cutaneous leg ulceration, and stroke, will be reviewed and relevance to other hemolytic disorders including the thalassemia syndromes will be considered. PMID:19074078

  9. Livedoid vasculopathy in a patient with lupus anticoagulant and MTHFR mutation: treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin.

    PubMed

    Abou Rahal, Jihane; Ishak, Rim S; Otrock, Zaher K; Kibbi, Abdul-Ghani; Taher, Ali T

    2012-11-01

    Livedoid vasculopathy is characterized by painful purpuric lesions on the extremities which frequently ulcerate and heal with atrophic scarring. For many years, livedoid vasculopathy has been considered to be a primary vasculitic process. However, there has been evidence considering livedoid vasculopathy as an occlusive vasculopathy due to a hypercoagulable state. We present the case of livedoid vasculopathy in a 21-year-old female who had been suffering of painful lower extremity lesions of 3 years duration. The patient was found to be lupus anticoagulant positive and homozygous for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation. The patient was successfully treated with low-molecular-weight heparin. PMID:22592843

  10. Exome Array Analysis Identifies CAV1/CAV2 as a Susceptibility Locus for Intraocular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Lee, Kristine E.; Truitt, Barbara; Klein, Ronald; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Duggal, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Intraocular pressure (IOP) is an important clinical parameter in the evaluation of ocular health. Elevated IOP is a major risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The goal of this study was to identify rare and less common variants that influence IOP. Methods. We performed an exome array analysis in a subset of 1660 individuals from a population-based cohort, the Beaver Dam Eye Study. Associations with IOP were tested on 45,849 single nucleotide variants and 12,390 autosomal genes across the genome. Results. Intraocular pressure was suggestively associated with novel variants located in FAR2 at 12p11.22 (rs4931170, P = 1.2 × 10−5), in GGA3 at 17q25.1 (rs52809447, P = 6.7 × 10−5), and in PKDREJ at 22q13.31 (rs7291444, P = 7.4 × 10−5). Gene-based analysis found suggestive associations between IOP and the genes HAP1, MTBP, FREM3, and PHF12. We successfully replicated the associations with GAS7 (P = 7.4 × 10−3) for IOP, and also identified a previously reported POAG locus in the CAV1/CAV2 region to be associated with IOP (P = 3.3 × 10−3). This association was confirmed in a meta-analysis with three published genome-wide association studies (Pcombined = 4.0 × 10−11). Conclusions. Our results suggest that novel genetic variants and genes with multiple, less common variants may play a role in the control of IOP. The implication of the caveolin genes, CAV1/CAV2, as a common genetic factor influencing both IOP variations and POAG may provide new insights of the underlying mechanism leading to glaucoma and glaucomatous visual field loss. PMID:25525164

  11. Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculopathy: A Case Report Demonstrating Vasculitis using Black-Blood MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jay; Poonawala, Husain; Keay, Susan K; Serulle, Yafell; Steven, Andrew; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Cole, John W

    2016-01-01

    Infections are rare but important causes of stroke. Among these, varicella zoster virus has been known to cause ischemic stroke. During an attack of herpes zoster ophthalmicus, it has been hypothesized that the virus replicates in the trigeminal ganglion and travels via the trigeminal nerve centrally to cause cerebral vasculopathy. Here we present a case of a 69 year-old Caucasian immunocompromised woman who suffered recurrent ischemic infarcts within the same vascular distribution following an episode of zoster ophthalmicus three months prior. An imaging technique termed black-blood magnetic resonance imaging was utilized to aid in the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis. The case is used to provide a literature review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of cerebral varicella zoster vasculopathy. In situations where an isolated unilateral cerebral vasculopathy is identified, neurologists are urged to consider varicella zoster as a treatable etiologic agent, as untreated vasculopathy can lead to further strokes. PMID:27065314

  12. PV-1 IS NEGATIVELY REGULATED BY VEGF IN THE LUNG OF CAV-1, BUT NOT CAV-2, NULL MICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An N-glycosylated 60-kDa PV-1 protein that binds heparin was detected in mouse lung from a single mRNA transcript. In the absence of disulfide bond reduction PV-1 is detected as a dimer or large molecular weight oligomer. In the lung of Cav-1, but not Cav-2, null mice the amount of PV-1 protein is d...

  13. Ontogenic Changes and Differential Localization of T-type Ca2+ Channel Subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Carolina; García-Madrona, Sebastián; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    T-type calcium (Ca2+) channels play a central role in regulating membrane excitability in the brain. Although the contributions of T-type current to neuron output is often proposed to reflect a differential distribution of T-type channel subtypes to somato-dendritic compartments, their precise subcellular distributions in central neurons are not fully determined. Using histoblot and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic techniques, we have investigated the expression, regional distribution and subcellular localization of T-type Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channel subunits in the adult brain, as well as the ontogeny of expression during postnatal development. Histoblot analysis showed that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly non-overlapping patterns. Cav3.1 showed the highest expression level in the molecular layer (ml) of the cerebellum (Cb), and Cav3.2 in the hippocampus (Hp) and the ml of Cb. During development, levels of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 increased with age, although there were marked region- and developmental stage-specific differences in their expression. At the cellular and subcellular level, immunoelectron microscopy showed that labeling for Cav3.1 was present in somato-dendritic domains of hippocampal interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs), while Cav3.2 was present in somato-dendritic domains of CA1 pyramidal cells, hippocampal interneurons and PCs. Most of the immunoparticles for Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were either associated with the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes, with notable differences depending on the compartment. Thus, Cav3.1 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of interneurons, whereas Cav3.2 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of dendritic spines and had a major intracellular distribution in dendritic shafts. In PCs, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 showed similar distribution patterns. In addition to its main postsynaptic distribution, Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1 was also detected in axon terminals establishing

  14. Ontogenic Changes and Differential Localization of T-type Ca(2+) Channel Subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Carolina; García-Madrona, Sebastián; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    T-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channels play a central role in regulating membrane excitability in the brain. Although the contributions of T-type current to neuron output is often proposed to reflect a differential distribution of T-type channel subtypes to somato-dendritic compartments, their precise subcellular distributions in central neurons are not fully determined. Using histoblot and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic techniques, we have investigated the expression, regional distribution and subcellular localization of T-type Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channel subunits in the adult brain, as well as the ontogeny of expression during postnatal development. Histoblot analysis showed that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly non-overlapping patterns. Cav3.1 showed the highest expression level in the molecular layer (ml) of the cerebellum (Cb), and Cav3.2 in the hippocampus (Hp) and the ml of Cb. During development, levels of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 increased with age, although there were marked region- and developmental stage-specific differences in their expression. At the cellular and subcellular level, immunoelectron microscopy showed that labeling for Cav3.1 was present in somato-dendritic domains of hippocampal interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs), while Cav3.2 was present in somato-dendritic domains of CA1 pyramidal cells, hippocampal interneurons and PCs. Most of the immunoparticles for Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were either associated with the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes, with notable differences depending on the compartment. Thus, Cav3.1 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of interneurons, whereas Cav3.2 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of dendritic spines and had a major intracellular distribution in dendritic shafts. In PCs, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 showed similar distribution patterns. In addition to its main postsynaptic distribution, Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1 was also detected in axon terminals establishing

  15. Ontogenic Changes and Differential Localization of T-type Ca2+ Channel Subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Carolina; García-Madrona, Sebastián; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    T-type calcium (Ca2+) channels play a central role in regulating membrane excitability in the brain. Although the contributions of T-type current to neuron output is often proposed to reflect a differential distribution of T-type channel subtypes to somato-dendritic compartments, their precise subcellular distributions in central neurons are not fully determined. Using histoblot and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic techniques, we have investigated the expression, regional distribution and subcellular localization of T-type Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channel subunits in the adult brain, as well as the ontogeny of expression during postnatal development. Histoblot analysis showed that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly non-overlapping patterns. Cav3.1 showed the highest expression level in the molecular layer (ml) of the cerebellum (Cb), and Cav3.2 in the hippocampus (Hp) and the ml of Cb. During development, levels of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 increased with age, although there were marked region- and developmental stage-specific differences in their expression. At the cellular and subcellular level, immunoelectron microscopy showed that labeling for Cav3.1 was present in somato-dendritic domains of hippocampal interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs), while Cav3.2 was present in somato-dendritic domains of CA1 pyramidal cells, hippocampal interneurons and PCs. Most of the immunoparticles for Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were either associated with the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes, with notable differences depending on the compartment. Thus, Cav3.1 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of interneurons, whereas Cav3.2 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of dendritic spines and had a major intracellular distribution in dendritic shafts. In PCs, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 showed similar distribution patterns. In addition to its main postsynaptic distribution, Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1 was also detected in axon terminals establishing

  16. Diagnosis and Vasculopathy in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterized by pulmonary hypertension caused by nonresolving thromboemboli of the pulmonary artery. However, up to 40% of CTEPH patients have had no clinically apparent acute pulmonary embolic episodes. In addition, both a female predominance and an association of HLA with CTEPH unrelated to deep vein thrombosis are observed in Japan, thus suggesting this condition to be a type of pulmonary vasculopathy. The key for making an accurate diagnosis is to consider CTEPH in any patients with dyspnea on exertion. Perfusion scans provide an excellent noninvasive tool for distinguishing between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and CTEPH, while CT angiography is useful for differentiating arteritis, tumor, and a congenital anomaly of the pulmonary artery from CTEPH. Pulmonary angiography (PAG) is still considered the gold standard for evaluating CTEPH. No subpleural perfusion in any segments by PAG with high pulmonary vascular resistance is might be related to small vessel disease, thus resulting in a poor outcome after surgery. Recent data suggest a potential therapeutic benefit of antiproliferative therapy for cells isolated from endarterectomized tissue. PMID:23555373

  17. Livedoid vasculopathy: clinical features and treatment in 24 Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Suiying; Su, Wei; Jin, Peiying; Shao, Changgeng

    2014-09-01

    Livedo vasculopathy (LV) is a chronic cutaneous disorder characterised by recurrent, painful ulceration ending in stellate scars. We have conducted a retrospective study of clinical features and treatment response of LV in 24 Chinese patients. LV occurred more frequently in women (male:female ratio  1:3). The peak age at onset of disease ranged from 14 to 20 years, younger than previously published data. 87.5% of the patients (21/24) showed significant summer exacerbation with ulcer formation. Out of 24 patients tested, 14 (58.3%) had positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Ten out of 14 patients (71.4%) were tested to be hypersensitive to multivalent insect antigens. Combinative anti-inflammatory therapy with steroids, tetracycline and Tripterygium glycosides plus antiplatelet/profibrinolytic drugs promoted quick healing of ulcer and reduce recurrence. The younger age of disease presentation and significant summer exacerbation are 2 novel clinical features observed in this study. These findings suggest that apart from procoagulation other risk factors may contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of LV. Although antiplatelet/profibrinolytic drugs are deemed as a first line therapy for LV, anti-inflammatory medications such as steroids, tetracycline and Tripterygium glycosides, from our experiences, are indispensable, especially for acute, ulcerative stage of disease.

  18. Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sayman Muslubaş, Işıl; Hocaoğlu, Mümin; Arf, Serra; Özdemir, Hakan; Karaçorlu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report outcomes of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and combined therapy with PDT and intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) in patients with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV). Materials and Methods: Thirty-four eyes of 31 patients with subfoveal PCV were evaluated. Nine eyes were treated with PDT and 25 eyes treated with combined therapy of PDT and IVB. All eyes had a follow-up period of at least 12 months. In this retrospective study the demographic features, best corrected visual acuity, fundus color photography, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography of the 34 eyes were evaluated. Results: Visual acuity improved but did not change significantly in the patients treated with PDT and combined PDT+IVB therapy (p=0.149; p=0.087). Although the mean central foveal thickness decreased in both groups, there was no statistically significant difference between groups (p=0.98). The polypoidal lesions regressed in 6 (66.7%) of 9 eyes in the PDT monotherapy group and 16 (64%) of 25 eyes in the PDT+IVB combined therapy group. Conclusion: Both PDT and a combined therapy of PDT and IVB yielded successful outcomes in patients with PCV. PMID:27800252

  19. NFBD1/MDC1 regulates Cav1 and Cav2 independently of DNA damage and p53.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kathleen A; Colavito, Sierra A; Schulz, Vincent; Wakefield, Patricia Heffernan; Sessa, William; Tuck, David; Stern, David F

    2011-06-01

    NFBD1/MDC1 is involved in DNA damage checkpoint signaling and DNA repair. NFBD1 binds to the chromatin component γH2AX at sites of DNA damage, causing amplification of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated gene (ATM) pathway signaling and recruitment of DNA repair factors. Residues 508-995 of NFBD1 possess transactivation activity, suggesting a possible role of NFBD1 in transcription. Furthermore, NFBD1 influences p53-mediated transcription in response to adriamycin. We sought to determine the role of NFBD1 in ionizing radiation (IR)-responsive transcription and if NFBD1 influences transcription independently of p53. Using microarray analysis, we identified genes altered upon NFBD1 knockdown. Surprisingly, most NFBD1 regulated genes are regulated in both the absence and presence of IR, thus pointing toward a novel function for NFBD1 outside of the DNA damage response. Furthermore, NFBD1 knockdown regulated genes mostly independent of p53 knockdown. These genes are involved in pathways including focal adhesion signaling, carbohydrate metabolism, and insulin signaling. We found that CAV1 and CAV2 mRNA and protein levels are reduced by both NFBD1 knockdown and knockout independently of IR and p53. NFBD1-depleted cells exhibit some similar phenotypes to Cav1-depleted cells. Furthermore, like Cav1-depletion, NFBD1 shRNA increases Erk phosphorylation. Thus, Cav1 could act as a mediator of the DNA-damage independent effects of NFBD1 in mitogenic signaling.

  20. NFBD1/MDC1 Regulates Cav1 and Cav2 Independently of DNA Damage and p53

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kathleen A.; Colavito, Sierra A.; Schulz, Vincent; Wakefield, Patricia Heffernan; Sessa, William; Tuck, David; Stern, David F.

    2014-01-01

    NFBD1/MDC1 is involved in DNA damage checkpoint signaling and DNA repair. NFBD1 binds to the chromatin component γH2AX at sites of DNA damage, causing amplification of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated gene (ATM) pathway signaling and recruitment of DNA repair factors. Residues 508–995 of NFBD1 possess transactivation activity, suggesting a possible role of NFBD1 in transcription. Furthermore, NFBD1 influences p53-mediated transcription in response to adriamycin. We sought to determine the role of NFBD1 in ionizing radiation (IR)–responsive transcription and if NFBD1 influences transcription independently of p53. Using microarray analysis, we identified genes altered upon NFBD1 knockdown. Surprisingly, most NFBD1 regulated genes are regulated in both the absence and presence of IR, thus pointing toward a novel function for NFBD1 outside of the DNA damage response. Furthermore, NFBD1 knockdown regulated genes mostly independent of p53 knockdown. These genes are involved in pathways including focal adhesion signaling, carbohydrate metabolism, and insulin signaling. We found that CAV1 and CAV2 mRNA and protein levels are reduced by both NFBD1 knockdown and knockout independently of IR and p53. NFBD1-depleted cells exhibit some similar phenotypes to Cav1-depleted cells. Furthermore, like Cav1-depletion, NFBD1 shRNA increases Erk phosphorylation. Thus, Cav1 could act as a mediator of the DNA-damage independent effects of NFBD1 in mitogenic signaling. PMID:21551225

  1. Freeze-dried microarterial allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, J.; Hargrave, J.C.

    1990-02-01

    Rehydrated freeze-dried microarterial allografts were implanted to bridge arterial defects using New Zealand White rabbits as the experimental model. Segments of artery from the rabbit ear and thigh were harvested and preserved for a minimum of 2 weeks after freeze-drying. These allografts, approximately 1 mm in diameter and ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 cm in length, were rehydrated and then implanted in low-pressure and high-pressure arterial systems. Poor patency was noted in low-pressure systems in both allografts and autografts, tested in 12 rabbits. In the high-pressure arterial systems, allografts that were freeze-dried and reconstituted failed in a group of 10 rabbits with an 8-week patency rate of 30 percent. Gamma irradiation in an effort to reduce infection and antigenicity of grafts after freeze-drying was associated with a patency rate of 10 percent at 8 weeks in this system in another group of 10 rabbits. Postoperative cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a patency rate of 22.2 percent in the high-pressure arterial system in a 9-rabbit group. Control autografts in this system in a group of 10 rabbits showed a 100 percent patency at 8 weeks. Microarterial grafts depend on perfusion pressure of the vascular bed for long-term patency. Rehydrated freeze-dried microarterial allografts do not seem to function well in lengths of 1 to 2.5 cm when implanted in a high-pressure arterial system. Freeze-dried arterial allografts are probably not antigenic.

  2. Use of [18F]FDG PET to Monitor The Development of Cardiac Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kevin P.; Dearling, Jason L. J.; Seto, Tatsuichiro; Dunning, Patricia; Fahey, Frederic; Packard, Alan B.; Briscoe, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has the potential to be a specific, sensitive and quantitative diagnostic test for transplant rejection. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and 13N-labeled ammonia ([13N]NH3) small animal PET imaging in a well-established murine cardiac rejection model. Methods Heterotopic transplants were performed using minor MHC mismatched B6.C-H2bm12 donor hearts in C57BL/6(H-2b) recipients. C57BL/6 donor hearts into C57BL/6 recipients served as isograft controls. [18F]FDG PET imaging was performed weekly between post-transplant days 7 and 42 and the percent injected dose was computed for each graft. [13N]NH3 imaging was performed to evaluate myocardial perfusion. Results There was a significant increase in [18F]FDG uptake in allografts from day 14 to day 21 (1.6% to 5.2%; P<0.001) and uptake in allografts was significantly increased on post-transplant days 21 (5.2% vs. 0.9%; P=0.005) and 28 (4.8% vs. 0.9%; P=0.006) compared to isograft controls. Furthermore, [18F]FDG uptake correlated with an increase in rejection within allografts between days 14 and 28 post-transplant. Finally, the uptake of [13N]NH3 was significantly lower relative to the native heart in allografts with chronic vasculopathy compared to isograft controls on day 28 (P=0.01). Conclusions PET imaging with [18F]FDG can be used following transplantation to monitor the evolution of rejection. In addition, decreased uptake of [13N]NH3 in rejecting allografts may be reflective of decreased myocardial blood flow. These data suggest that combined [18F]FDG and [13N]NH3 PET imaging could be used as a non-invasive, quantitative technique for serial monitoring of allograft rejection and has potential application in human transplant recipients. PMID:25675207

  3. Determinants in CaV1 Channels That Regulate the Ca2+ Sensitivity of Bound Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Halling, D. Brent; Georgiou, Dimitra K.; Black, D. J.; Yang, Guojun; Fallon, Jennifer L.; Quiocho, Florante A.; Pedersen, Steen E.; Hamilton, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    Calmodulin binds to IQ motifs in the α1 subunit of CaV1.1 and CaV1.2, but the affinities of calmodulin for the motif and for Ca2+ are higher when bound to CaV1.2 IQ. The CaV1.1 IQ and CaV1.2 IQ sequences differ by four amino acids. We determined the structure of calmodulin bound to CaV1.1 IQ and compared it with that of calmodulin bound to CaV1.2 IQ. Four methionines in Ca2+-calmodulin form a hydrophobic binding pocket for the peptide, but only one of the four nonconserved amino acids (His-1532 of CaV1.1 and Tyr-1675 of CaV1.2) contacts this calmodulin pocket. However, Tyr-1675 in CaV1.2 contributes only modestly to the higher affinity of this peptide for calmodulin; the other three amino acids in CaV1.2 contribute significantly to the difference in the Ca2+ affinity of the bound calmodulin despite having no direct contact with calmodulin. Those residues appear to allow an interaction with calmodulin with one lobe Ca2+-bound and one lobe Ca2+-free. Our data also provide evidence for lobe-lobe interactions in calmodulin bound to CaV1.2. PMID:19473981

  4. Donor Heart Treatment With COMP-Ang1 Limits Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Rejection of Cardiac Allografts.

    PubMed

    Syrjälä, S O; Nykänen, A I; Tuuminen, R; Raissadati, A; Keränen, M A I; Arnaudova, R; Krebs, R; Koh, G Y; Alitalo, K; Lemström, K B

    2015-08-01

    The major cause of death during the first year after heart transplantation is primary graft dysfunction due to preservation and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Angiopoietin-1 is a Tie2 receptor-binding paracrine growth factor with anti-inflammatory properties and indispensable roles in vascular development and stability. We used a stable variant of angiopoietin-1 (COMP-Ang1) to test whether ex vivo intracoronary treatment with a single dose of COMP-Ang1 in donor Dark Agouti rat heart subjected to 4-h cold ischemia would prevent microvascular dysfunction and inflammatory responses in the fully allogeneic recipient Wistar Furth rat. COMP-Ang1 reduced endothelial cell-cell junction disruption of the donor heart in transmission electron microscopy during 4-h cold ischemia, improved myocardial reflow, and reduced microvascular leakage and cardiomyocyte injury of transplanted allografts during IRI. Concurrently, the treatment reduced expression of danger signals, dendritic cell maturation markers, endothelial cell adhesion molecule VCAM-1 and RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase activation and the influx of macrophages and neutrophils. Furthermore, COMP-Ang1 treatment provided sustained anti-inflammatory effects during acute rejection and prevented the development of cardiac fibrosis and allograft vasculopathy. These results suggest donor heart treatment with COMP-Ang1 having important clinical implications in the prevention of primary and subsequent long-term injury and dysfunction in cardiac allografts. PMID:25932532

  5. Emphysema in the renal allograft

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.L.; Sullivan, B.M.; Fluornoy, J.G.; Gerza, C.

    1985-04-01

    Two diabetic patients in whom emphysematous pyelonephritis developed after renal transplantation are described. Clinical recognition of this unusual and serious infection is masked by the effects of immunosuppression. Abdominal radiographic, ultrasound, and computed tomography findings are discussed. The clinical presentation includes urinary tract infection, sepsis, and acute tubular malfunction of the allograft in insulin-dependent diabetics.

  6. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications. PMID:27519944

  7. PREFACE: 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, M.; Müller, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is our pleasure and privilege to welcome all the participants of the 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015) to Lausanne. Since its initiation in 1986 in Sendai, Japan, the CAV symposium has grown to become the world's foremost event dedicated to cavitation. Hosted by EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) and staged at the SwissTech Convention Center, CAV2015 is a unique opportunity to exchange with leading scientists and industry experts about the latest advances in theoretical modelling, numerical simulation and experimentation related to cavitation phenomena with a special emphasis on practical applications. The topics covered by CAV2015 include cavitation in ¬fluid machinery and fuel systems, bubble dynamics, cavitation erosion, advanced numerical simulation, sonochemistery, biomedicine and experimental techniques. CAV2015 will also host an exhibition of leading providers of state of the art measurement equipment, including high-speed imaging systems, non-intrusive velocimetry, pressure sensors, as well as numerical solvers. We have accepted over 190 papers, which will be presented in four parallel sessions. The proceedings will appear in the open access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of the IOP Conference Series. All published papers are fully citable and upon publication will be free to download in perpetuity. We would like to thank all the reviewers for their great help during the selection process. We will also propose six plenary speakers to highlight cavitation issues in different fields. Finally, we would like to warmly thank our sponsors for their valuable support and the local Organizing Committee for the efforts in setting up this important event. We look forward to seeing you in Lausanne!

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft tendons.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sabrina M; MacGillivray, John D; Warren, Russell F

    2003-01-01

    Allograft tissue allows reconstruction of the ACL without the donor site morbidity that can be caused by autograft harvesting. Patients who must kneel as a part of their occupation or chosen sport are particularly good candidates for allograft reconstruction. Patients over 45 years of age and those requiring revision ACL surgery can also benefit from the use and availability of allograft tendons. In some cases, patients or surgeons may opt for allograft tendons to maximize the result or morbidity ratio. Despite advances in cadaver screening and graft preparation, there remain risks of disease transmission and joint infection after allograft implantation. Detailed explanation and informed consent is vitally important in cases in which allograft tissue is used.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft tendons.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sabrina M; MacGillivray, John D; Warren, Russell F

    2003-01-01

    Allograft tissue allows reconstruction of the ACL without the donor site morbidity that can be caused by autograft harvesting. Patients who must kneel as a part of their occupation or chosen sport are particularly good candidates for allograft reconstruction. Patients over 45 years of age and those requiring revision ACL surgery can also benefit from the use and availability of allograft tendons. In some cases, patients or surgeons may opt for allograft tendons to maximize the result or morbidity ratio. Despite advances in cadaver screening and graft preparation, there remain risks of disease transmission and joint infection after allograft implantation. Detailed explanation and informed consent is vitally important in cases in which allograft tissue is used. PMID:12735200

  10. Microwave sterilization of femoral head allograft.

    PubMed

    Dunsmuir, Robert A; Gallacher, Grace

    2003-10-01

    The potential shortage of allograft bone has led to the need to investigate other sources of bone for allografts. Some allograft bone donated from primary total hip arthroplasty recipients must be discarded or treated to become usable as a result of bacterial contamination. Femoral head allografts were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. A domestic microwave oven was used. The contaminated bone was exposed to microwave irradiation for different time periods. The samples were then cultured to attempt to grow the two bacterial species. The contaminated bone samples failed to grow any organisms after 2 min of exposure to microwave irradiation. This study shows that sterilization of femoral head allografts contaminated with S. aureus and B. subtilis can be achieved with microwave irradiation in a domestic microwave oven. This method of sterilization of bone allografts is cheap, easily used, and an effective way to process contaminated bone. PMID:14532216

  11. Alternative Splicing Generates a Novel Truncated Cav1.2 Channel in Neonatal Rat Heart*

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ping; Yu, Dejie; Hu, Zhenyu; Liang, Mui Cheng; Wang, Jue Jin; Yu, Chye Yun; Ng, Gandi; Yong, Tan Fong; Soon, Jia Lin; Chua, Yeow Leng; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2015-01-01

    L-type Cav1.2 Ca2+ channel undergoes extensive alternative splicing, generating functionally different channels. Alternatively spliced Cav1.2 Ca2+ channels have been found to be expressed in a tissue-specific manner or under pathological conditions. To provide a more comprehensive understanding of alternative splicing in Cav1.2 channel, we systematically investigated the splicing patterns in the neonatal and adult rat hearts. The neonatal heart expresses a novel 104-bp exon 33L at the IVS3-4 linker that is generated by the use of an alternative acceptor site. Inclusion of exon 33L causes frameshift and C-terminal truncation. Whole-cell electrophysiological recordings of Cav1.233L channels expressed in HEK 293 cells did not detect any current. However, when co-expressed with wild type Cav1.2 channels, Cav1.233L channels reduced the current density and altered the electrophysiological properties of the wild type Cav1.2 channels. Interestingly, the truncated 3.5-domain Cav1.233L channels also yielded a dominant negative effect on Cav1.3 channels, but not on Cav3.2 channels, suggesting that Cavβ subunits is required for Cav1.233L regulation. A biochemical study provided evidence that Cav1.233L channels enhanced protein degradation of wild type channels via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Although the physiological significance of the Cav1.233L channels in neonatal heart is still unknown, our report demonstrates the ability of this novel truncated channel to modulate the activity of the functional Cav1.2 channels. Moreover, the human Cav1.2 channel also contains exon 33L that is developmentally regulated in heart. Unexpectedly, human exon 33L has a one-nucleotide insertion that allowed in-frame translation of a full Cav1.2 channel. An electrophysiological study showed that human Cav1.233L channel is a functional channel but conducts Ca2+ ions at a much lower level. PMID:25694430

  12. Mucormycosis (zygomycosis) of renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Krishan L; Joshi, Kusum; Kohli, Harbir S; Jha, Vivekanand; Sakhuja, Vinay

    2012-12-01

    Fungal infection is relatively common among renal transplant recipients from developing countries. Mucormycosis, also known as zygomycosis, is one of the most serious fungal infections in these patients. The most common of presentation is rhino-cerebral. Isolated involvement of a renal allograft is very rare. A thorough search of literature and our medical records yielded a total of 24 cases with mucormycosis of the transplanted kidney. There was an association with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and anti-rejection treatment in these patients and most of these transplants were performed in the developing countries from unrelated donors. The outcome was very poor with an early mortality in 13 (54.5%) patients. Renal allograft mucormycosis is a relatively rare and potentially fatal complication following renal transplantation. Early diagnosis, graft nephrectomy and appropriate antifungal therapy may result in an improved prognosis for these patients.

  13. ENDOTHELIAL CELLS IN ALLOGRAFT REJECTION

    PubMed Central

    Al-Lamki, Rafia S.; Bradley, John R.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2008-01-01

    In organ transplantation, blood borne cells and macromolecules (e.g. antibodies) of the host immune system are brought into direct contact with the endothelial cell (EC) lining of graft vessels. In this location, graft ECs play several roles in allograft rejection, including the initiation of rejection responses by presentation of alloantigen to circulating T cells; the development of inflammation and thrombosis; and as targets of injury and agents of repair. PMID:19034000

  14. Expression and Pharmacology of Endogenous Cav Channels in SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Silmara R.; Vetter, Irina; Ragnarsson, Lotten; Lewis, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells provide a useful in vitro model to study the mechanisms underlying neurotransmission and nociception. These cells are derived from human sympathetic neuronal tissue and thus, express a number of the Cav channel subtypes essential for regulation of important physiological functions, such as heart contraction and nociception, including the clinically validated pain target Cav2.2. We have detected mRNA transcripts for a range of endogenous expressed subtypes Cav1.3, Cav2.2 (including two Cav1.3, and three Cav2.2 splice variant isoforms) and Cav3.1 in SH-SY5Y cells; as well as Cav auxiliary subunits α2δ1–3, β1, β3, β4, γ1, γ4–5, and γ7. Both high- and low-voltage activated Cav channels generated calcium signals in SH-SY5Y cells. Pharmacological characterisation using ω-conotoxins CVID and MVIIA revealed significantly (∼ 10-fold) higher affinity at human versus rat Cav2.2, while GVIA, which interacts with Cav2.2 through a distinct pharmacophore had similar affinity for both species. CVID, GVIA and MVIIA affinity was higher for SH-SY5Y membranes vs whole cells in the binding assays and functional assays, suggesting auxiliary subunits expressed endogenously in native systems can strongly influence Cav2.2 channels pharmacology. These results may have implications for strategies used to identify therapeutic leads at Cav2.2 channels. PMID:23536870

  15. Emerging concepts in dengue pathogenesis: interplay between plasmablasts, platelets, and complement in triggering vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Eduardo J M; Hottz, Eugenio D; Garcia-Bates, Tatiana M; Bozza, Fernando; Marques, Ernesto T A; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV) that represents a serious and expanding global health threat. Most DENV infections are inapparent or produce mild and self-limiting illness; however a significant proportion results in severe disease characterized by vasculopathy and plasma leakage that may culminate in shock and death. The cause of dengue-associated vasculopathy is likely to be multifactorial but remains essentially unknown. Severe disease is manifest during a critical phase from 4 to 7 days after onset of symptoms, once the virus has disappeared from the circulation but before the peak of T-cell activation, suggesting that other factors mediate vasculopathy. Here, we present evidence for a combined role of plasmablasts, complement, and platelets in driving severe disease in DENV infection. Massive expansion of virus-specific plasmablasts peaks during the critical phase of infection, coincident with activation of complement and activation and depletion of platelets. We propose a step-wise model in which virus-specific antibodies produced by plasmablasts form immune complexes, leading to activation of complement and release of vasoactive anaphylatoxins. Platelets become activated through binding of complement- and antibody-coated virus, as well as direct binding of virus to DC-SIGN, leading to the release of inflammatory microparticles and cytokines and sequestration of platelets in the microvasculature. We suggest that the combined effects of anaphylatoxins, inflammatory microparticles, and platelet sequestration serve as triggers of vasculopathy in severe dengue.

  16. Varicella zoster virus vasculopathies: diverse clinical manifestations, laboratory features, pathogenesis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, Don; Cohrs, Randall J; Mahalingam, Ravi; Nagel, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    Vasculopathies caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV) are indicative of a productive virus infection in cerebral arteries after either reactivation of VZV (shingles) or primary infection (chickenpox). VZV vasculopathy can cause ischaemic infarction of the brain and spinal cord, as well as aneurysm, subarachnoid and cerebral haemorrhage, carotid dissection, and, rarely, peripheral arterial disease. VZV vasculopathy in immunocompetent or immunocompromised individuals can be unifocal or multifocal with deep-seated and superficial infarctions. Lesions at the grey–white matter junction on brain imaging are a clue to diagnosis. Involvement of both large and small arteries is more common than that of either alone. Most patients have a mononuclear cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, often with red blood cells. Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and rash are absent in about a third of cases. Anti-VZV IgG antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid is found more frequently than VZV DNA. In recent years, the number of recognised VZV vasculopathies has grown, and accurate diagnosis is important for the effective treatment of these disorders. PMID:19608099

  17. Role of Transcranial Doppler in the Evaluation of Vasculopathy in Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Mei-Ling Sharon; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular complications are important causes of cerebral infarction in tuberculous meningitis (TBM).Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) is a non-invasive tool that can provide real-time information about cerebral hemodynamics. However, the literature on the role of TCD in the diagnosis or monitoring of vasculopathy associated with TBM is scarce. We explored the role of TCD in the diagnosis and monitoring of TBM-related vasculopathy of the major intracranial arteries. Methods Consecutive patients with TBM admitted to our tertiary center between 2011 and 2015 were included. All patients underwent TCD evaluation within 2 weeks of hospitalisation and it was repeated 2 weeks later. Mean flow velocity (Vmean) and pulsatility index (PI) were recorded. Flow velocities obtained from the submandibular internal carotid artery were also measured to calculate the Lindegaard ratio. A correlation was made between the patients who demonstrated vasculopathy on TCD, and patients with confirmed focal narrowing on computed tomography angiography (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). The modified Rankin scale (mRS) was used to assess the clinical outcome at three and six months. Results A total of 36 patients were recruited. Focally elevated flow velocities in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) were observed in 11 (30.6%) patients, bilaterally in 6 of them. The Lindegaard ratio was elevated (>3) in 10 (90.9%) of them, which occurred as early as the fourth day of hospitalization and persisted as long as four months. Eighty percent of patients with TBM vasculopathy by TCD criteria, also had narrowing on CTA or MRA. Ten patients (27.8%) achieved good outcome (mRS 0–2) at 3 months, which increased to 13 (36.1%) at 6 months. Conclusion A considerable proportion of patients with TBM develops intracranial vasculopathy, which can be reliably diagnosed and monitored using TCD. PMID:27723828

  18. High prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus (CAV) type 2 in domestic dog populations in South Africa precludes the use of CAV-based recombinant rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wright, N; Jackson, F R; Niezgoda, M; Ellison, J A; Rupprecht, C E; Nel, L H

    2013-08-28

    Rabies in dogs can be controlled through mass vaccination. Oral vaccination of domestic dogs would be useful in the developing world, where greater vaccination coverage is needed especially in inaccessible areas or places with large numbers of free-roaming dogs. From this perspective, recent research has focused on development of new recombinant vaccines that can be administered orally in a bait to be used as adjunct for parenteral vaccination. One such candidate, a recombinant canine adenovirus type 2 vaccine expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (CAV2-RG), is considered a promising option for dogs, given host specificity and safety. To assess the potential use of this vaccine in domestic dog populations, we investigated the prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus type 2 in South African dogs. Blood was collected from 241 dogs from the Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces. Sampled dogs had not previously been vaccinated against canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV1) or canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2). Animals from both provinces had a high percentage of seropositivity (45% and 62%), suggesting that CAV2 circulates extensively among domestic dog populations in South Africa. Given this finding, we evaluated the effect of pre-existing CAV-specific antibodies on the efficacy of the CAV2-RG vaccine delivered via the oral route in dogs. Purpose-bred Beagle dogs, which received prior vaccination against canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus and CAV, were immunized by oral administration of CAV2-RG. After rabies virus (RABV) infection all animals, except one vaccinated dog, developed rabies. This study demonstrated that pre-existing antibodies against CAV, such as naturally occurs in South African dogs, inhibits the development of neutralizing antibodies against RABV when immunized with a CAV-based rabies recombinant vaccine. PMID:23867013

  19. High prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus (CAV) type 2 in domestic dog populations in South Africa precludes the use of CAV-based recombinant rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wright, N; Jackson, F R; Niezgoda, M; Ellison, J A; Rupprecht, C E; Nel, L H

    2013-08-28

    Rabies in dogs can be controlled through mass vaccination. Oral vaccination of domestic dogs would be useful in the developing world, where greater vaccination coverage is needed especially in inaccessible areas or places with large numbers of free-roaming dogs. From this perspective, recent research has focused on development of new recombinant vaccines that can be administered orally in a bait to be used as adjunct for parenteral vaccination. One such candidate, a recombinant canine adenovirus type 2 vaccine expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (CAV2-RG), is considered a promising option for dogs, given host specificity and safety. To assess the potential use of this vaccine in domestic dog populations, we investigated the prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus type 2 in South African dogs. Blood was collected from 241 dogs from the Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces. Sampled dogs had not previously been vaccinated against canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV1) or canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2). Animals from both provinces had a high percentage of seropositivity (45% and 62%), suggesting that CAV2 circulates extensively among domestic dog populations in South Africa. Given this finding, we evaluated the effect of pre-existing CAV-specific antibodies on the efficacy of the CAV2-RG vaccine delivered via the oral route in dogs. Purpose-bred Beagle dogs, which received prior vaccination against canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus and CAV, were immunized by oral administration of CAV2-RG. After rabies virus (RABV) infection all animals, except one vaccinated dog, developed rabies. This study demonstrated that pre-existing antibodies against CAV, such as naturally occurs in South African dogs, inhibits the development of neutralizing antibodies against RABV when immunized with a CAV-based rabies recombinant vaccine.

  20. Allografts in Soft Tissue Reconstructive Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Giedraitis, Andrius; Arnoczky, Steven P.; Bedi, Asheesh

    2014-01-01

    Context Allografts offer several important advantages over autografts in musculoskeletal reconstructive procedures, such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Despite growing widespread use of allograft tissue, serious concerns regarding safety and functionality remain. We discuss the latest knowledge of the potential benefits and risks of allograft use and offer a critical review of allograft tissue regulation, management, and sterilization to enable the surgeon to better inform athletes considering reconstructive surgery options. Evidence Acquisition A review of sources published in the past 10 years is the primary basis of this research. Study Design: Observational analysis (cohort study). Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results Comparable outcome data for autografts and allografts do not support universal standards for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and physician recommendation and bias appear to significantly influence patient preference and satisfaction. Sterilization by gamma and electron-beam irradiation diminishes the biomechanical integrity of allograft tissue, but radioprotective agents such as collagen cross-linking and free radical scavengers appear to have potential in mitigating the deleterious effects of irradiation and preserving tissue strength and stability. Conclusion Allografts offer greater graft availability and reduced morbidity in orthopaedic reconstructive procedures, but greater expansion of their use by surgeons is challenged by the need to maintain tissue sterility and biomechanical functionality. Advances in the radioprotection of irradiated tissue may lessen concerns regarding allograft safety and structural stability. PMID:24790696

  1. Demand for human allograft tissue in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lakey, Jonathan R T; Mirbolooki, Mohammadreza; Rogers, Christina; Mohr, Jim

    2007-01-01

    There is relatively little known about the demand for allograft tissues in Canada. The Canadian Council for Donation and Transplantation (CCDT) is a national advisory body that undertook a comprehensive "market survey" to estimate surgical demand for human allograft tissues in Canada. The report "Demand for Human Allograft Tissue in Canada" reflects survey results sent to 5 prominent User Groups. User Groups were identified as orthopaedic surgeons; neurosurgeons; corneal transplant surgeons; plastic surgeons, specifically those at Canadian Burn Units; and cardiac surgeons (adult and paediatric surgery). The demand for allograft grafts was determined and then extrapolated across the total User Group and then increases in allograft tissue use over the next 1-2 years across User Groups were predicted. The overall response rate for the survey was 21.4%. It varied from a low of 19.6% for the orthopaedic survey to a high of 40.5% for the corneal survey. The estimated current demand for allograft tissue in Canada ranges from a low of 34,442 grafts per year to a high of 62,098 grafts per year. The predicted increase in use of allograft tissue over the next 1-2 year period would suggest that annual demand could rise to somewhere in the range of 42,589-72,210 grafts. The highest rated preferences (98% and 94%) were for accredited and Canadian tissue banks, respectively. This study represents a key step in addressing the paucity of information concerning the demand for allograft tissue in Canada.

  2. Allograft Replacement for Absent Native Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Salma; Wanivenhaus, Florian; Fox, Alice J.; Warren, Russell F.; Doyle, Maureen; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Structural instability due to poor soft tissue quality often requires augmentation. Allografts are important biological substitutes that are used for the symptomatic patient in the reconstruction of deficient ligaments, tendons, menisci, and osteochondral defects. Interest in the clinical application of allografts has arisen from the demand to obtain stable anatomy with restoration of function and protection against additional injury, particularly for high-demand patients who participate in sports. Traditionally, allografts were employed to reinforce weakened tissue. However, they can also be employed to substitute deficient or functionally absent tissue, particularly in the sports medicine setting. Objective: This article presents a series of 6 cases that utilized allografts to restore functionally deficient anatomic architecture, rather than just simply augmenting the degenerated or damaged native tissue. Detailed discussions are presented of the use of allografts as a successful treatment strategy to replace functionally weakened tissue, often after failed primary repairs. PMID:24427387

  3. Zebrafish CaV2.1 Calcium Channels Are Tailored for Fast Synchronous Neuromuscular Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, David; Wen, Hua; Brehm, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The CaV2.2 (N-type) and CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-dependent calcium channels are prevalent throughout the nervous system where they mediate synaptic transmission, but the basis for the selective presence at individual synapses still remains an open question. The CaV2.1 channels have been proposed to respond more effectively to brief action potentials (APs), an idea supported by computational modeling. However, the side-by-side comparison of CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 kinetics in intact neurons failed to reveal differences. As an alternative means for direct functional comparison we expressed zebrafish CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 α-subunits, along with their accessory subunits, in HEK293 cells. HEK cells lack calcium currents, thereby circumventing the need for pharmacological inhibition of mixed calcium channel isoforms present in neurons. HEK cells also have a simplified morphology compared to neurons, which improves voltage control. Our measurements revealed faster kinetics and shallower voltage-dependence of activation and deactivation for CaV2.1. Additionally, recordings of calcium current in response to a command waveform based on the motorneuron AP show, directly, more effective activation of CaV2.1. Analysis of calcium currents associated with the AP waveform indicate an approximately fourfold greater open probability (PO) for CaV2.1. The efficient activation of CaV2.1 channels during APs may contribute to the highly reliable transmission at zebrafish neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25650925

  4. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  5. Hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke secondary to herpes simplex virus type 2 meningitis and vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Snider, Samuel B; Jacobs, Claire S; Scripko, Patricia S; Klein, Joshua P; Lyons, Jennifer L

    2014-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) meningitis dogmatically is benign and self-limited in the immune competent patient. However, we describe how left untreated HSV-2 meningitis can be complicated by vasculitis and both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. We report a 57-year-old woman with lymphocytic meningitis complicated by ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage in the setting of vasculopathy and HSV-2 DNA detected in CSF successfully treated with acyclovir and corticosteroids. Subsequent angiographic magnetic resonance imaging revealed improvement in the vasculopathy after treatment. This case demonstrates that HSV-2 meningitis may take a less benign course and further provides the first evidence of angiographic improvement in addition to clinical improvement after definitive treatment.

  6. Future of allografts in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Harner, Christopher D; Lo, Marvin Y

    2009-04-01

    Allografts play a prominent role in sports medicine, and their usage has increased dramatically over the past few decades, but the role of allograft in the future of sports medicine largely depends on several factors: (1) the ability of the tissue banking industry to convince both surgeons and the general population that tissue procurement is safe and nearly disease-free, (2) the ability to sterilize tissue with minimal compromise to tissue integrity, (3) successful clinical outcomes with allograft, and (4) the advent of artificial scaffolds and ligaments that function as well. PMID:19306738

  7. Allograft safety in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven B; Sekiya, Jon K

    2007-10-01

    Allograft tissue seems to provide an excellent option for reconstruction of the ACL in the primary and revision setting. Although in general the risks of using allograft tissue in ACL reconstruction are low, the consequences of complications associated with disease or infection transmission or of recurrent instability secondary to graft failure are large. Surgeons should provide patients with the information available regarding allograft risks and should have thorough knowledge of the source and preparation of the grafts by their tissue bank before implantation for ACL reconstruction.

  8. Allograft safety in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven B; Sekiya, Jon K

    2007-10-01

    Allograft tissue seems to provide an excellent option for reconstruction of the ACL in the primary and revision setting. Although in general the risks of using allograft tissue in ACL reconstruction are low, the consequences of complications associated with disease or infection transmission or of recurrent instability secondary to graft failure are large. Surgeons should provide patients with the information available regarding allograft risks and should have thorough knowledge of the source and preparation of the grafts by their tissue bank before implantation for ACL reconstruction. PMID:17920955

  9. Venom peptides as a rich source of cav2.2 channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Silmara R; Vetter, Irina; Lewis, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    Ca(v)2.2 is a calcium channel subtype localized at nerve terminals, including nociceptive fibers, where it initiates neurotransmitter release. Ca(v)2.2 is an important contributor to synaptic transmission in ascending pain pathways, and is up-regulated in the spinal cord in chronic pain states along with the auxiliary α2δ1 subunit. It is therefore not surprising that toxins that inhibit Ca(v)2.2 are analgesic. Venomous animals, such as cone snails, spiders, snakes, assassin bugs, centipedes and scorpions are rich sources of remarkably potent and selective Ca(v)2.2 inhibitors. However, side effects in humans currently limit their clinical use. Here we review Ca(v)2.2 inhibitors from venoms and their potential as drug leads. PMID:23381143

  10. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-01-01

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts. PMID:27158422

  11. Computational Biology: Modeling Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    PubMed

    Stegall, Mark D; Borrows, Richard

    2015-01-01

    New approaches are needed to develop more effective interventions to prevent long-term rejection of organ allografts. Computational biology provides a powerful tool to assess the large amount of complex data that is generated in longitudinal studies in this area. This manuscript outlines how our two groups are using mathematical modeling to analyze predictors of graft loss using both clinical and experimental data and how we plan to expand this approach to investigate specific mechanisms of chronic renal allograft injury.

  12. Treatment of lymphocele in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, B M; Perloff, L J; Grossman, R A; Naji, A; Barker, C F

    1985-04-01

    Retroperitoneal lymphoceles developed in 12 renal allograft recipients during the last nine years. The interval between transplantation and the development of symptoms averaged seven months. The specific syndrome suggesting the presence of a lymphocele included lower abdominal swelling, weight gain, and, occasionally, fever without an obvious source of infection. Although these symptoms mimicked allograft rejection, diagnosis was easily made by ultrasound and intravenous pyelogram. Surgical marsupialization of the lymphocele with drainage into the peritoneal cavity proved to be an effective treatment.

  13. Transplantation of cryopreserved canine venous allografts.

    PubMed

    Bank, H L; Schmehl, M K; Warner, R; Pratt, M F; Albernaz, M S; Metcalf, J S; Darcy, M

    1991-01-01

    Local vascular reconstructions frequently require the use of vein grafts to bridge arterial or venous defects. Most previous studies on the use of cryopreserved veins have used relatively large caliber vessels. There have been few studies on the effectiveness of cryopreserved micro- or small-venous allografts. Here, we tested two types of cryopreserved venous allografts: (1) 1.5- to 1.9-mm diameter microvenous grafts (MVG); and (2) 4- to 5-mm diameter small venous grafts (SVG). Cryopreserved MVG allografts were placed into saphenous arteries of six experimental dogs and SVG cryopreserved allografts were placed into femoral arteries of six experimental dogs for 3 to 6 weeks. Two fresh MVG autografts were also transplanted into experimental dogs as controls and autografts were transferred to the contralateral side in SVG dogs as controls. None of the six cryopreserved MVG grafts retained patency but three/six cryopreserved SVG allografts were patent at harvest. Histological examination of grfts revealed control autografts were undergoing arterialization with an intact intima. Experimental cryopreserved allografts showed extensive medial fibrosis, significant lymphocytic infiltrates, and sporadic areas of intact intima for both patent and nonpatent grafts.

  14. Invasive Streptococcus pyogenes after allograft implantation--Colorado, 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-12-01

    Allograft tissues are used for various orthopedic procedures (e.g., ligament reconstruction, meniscal transplantation, and spinal surgery). In 2002, approximately one million allografts were distributed for transplantation (American Association of Tissue Banks [AATB], unpublished data, 2002). Recent reports of allograft-associated infections have prompted evaluation of the processing and quality-control methods employed by tissue processors. This report describes a case of invasive disease with Streptococcus pyogenes (i.e., group A streptococcus [GAS]), after reconstructive knee surgery using contaminated allograft tissue and provides recommendations to reduce the risk for allograft-associated infections. Although allograft infections are rare, they highlight the need for improved tissue evaluation and processing standards.

  15. Functional regulatory T cells produced by inhibiting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 3 prevent allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Gang; Nadig, Satish N.; Bäckdahl, Liselotte; Beck, Stephan; Francis, Ross S.; Schiopu, Alexandru; Whatcott, Andrew; Wood, Kathryn J.; Bushell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) manipulated ex vivo have potential as cellular therapeutics in autoimmunity and transplantation. Although it is possible to expand naturally occurring Tregs, an attractive alternative possibility, particularly suited to solid organ and bone marrow transplantation, is the stimulation of total T cell populations with defined allogeneic antigen presenting cells under conditions that lead to the generation or expansion of donor-reactive, adaptive Tregs. Here we demonstrate that stimulation of mouse CD4+ T cells by immature allogeneic dendritic cells (DCs) combined with pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase 3 (PDEi) results in a functional enrichment of Foxp3+ T cells. Without further manipulation or selection, the resultant population delayed skin allograft rejection mediated by polyclonal CD4+ effectors or donor-reactive CD8+ TCR transgenic T cells and inhibited both effector cell proliferation and T cell priming for IFN-γ production. Notably, PDE inhibition also enhanced the enrichment of human Foxp3+ CD4+ T cells driven by allogeneic APC. These cells inhibited T cell proliferation in a standard in vitro mixed lymphocyte assay and importantly, attenuated the development of vasculopathy mediated by autologous PBMC in a functionally relevant humanized mouse transplant model. These data establish a method for the ex vivo generation of graft-reactive, functional mouse and human Tregs that uses a clinically approved agent, making pharmacological PDE inhibition a potential strategy for Treg-based therapies PMID:21593400

  16. The Cavβ1a subunit regulates gene expression and suppresses myogenin in muscle progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jackson; Pereyra, Andrea; Zhang, Tan; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-06-23

    Voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β subunits are auxiliary subunits to Cavs. Recent reports show Cavβ subunits may enter the nucleus and suggest a role in transcriptional regulation, but the physiological relevance of this localization remains unclear. We sought to define the nuclear function of Cavβ in muscle progenitor cells (MPCs). We found that Cavβ1a is expressed in proliferating MPCs, before expression of the calcium conducting subunit Cav1.1, and enters the nucleus. Loss of Cavβ1a expression impaired MPC expansion in vitro and in vivo and caused widespread changes in global gene expression, including up-regulation of myogenin. Additionally, we found that Cavβ1a localizes to the promoter region of a number of genes, preferentially at noncanonical (NC) E-box sites. Cavβ1a binds to a region of the Myog promoter containing an NC E-box, suggesting a mechanism for inhibition of myogenin gene expression. This work indicates that Cavβ1a acts as a Cav-independent regulator of gene expression in MPCs, and is required for their normal expansion during myogenic development. PMID:24934157

  17. The Cavβ1a subunit regulates gene expression and suppresses myogenin in muscle progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jackson; Pereyra, Andrea; Zhang, Tan; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Kuan, Pei-Fen

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β subunits are auxiliary subunits to Cavs. Recent reports show Cavβ subunits may enter the nucleus and suggest a role in transcriptional regulation, but the physiological relevance of this localization remains unclear. We sought to define the nuclear function of Cavβ in muscle progenitor cells (MPCs). We found that Cavβ1a is expressed in proliferating MPCs, before expression of the calcium conducting subunit Cav1.1, and enters the nucleus. Loss of Cavβ1a expression impaired MPC expansion in vitro and in vivo and caused widespread changes in global gene expression, including up-regulation of myogenin. Additionally, we found that Cavβ1a localizes to the promoter region of a number of genes, preferentially at noncanonical (NC) E-box sites. Cavβ1a binds to a region of the Myog promoter containing an NC E-box, suggesting a mechanism for inhibition of myogenin gene expression. This work indicates that Cavβ1a acts as a Cav-independent regulator of gene expression in MPCs, and is required for their normal expansion during myogenic development. PMID:24934157

  18. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Matza, Didi; Badou, Abdallah; Klemic, Kathryn G; Stein, Judith; Govindarajulu, Usha; Nadler, Monica J; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Flavell, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1) α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR) suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling. PMID:26815481

  19. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Matza, Didi; Badou, Abdallah; Klemic, Kathryn G.; Stein, Judith; Govindarajulu, Usha; Nadler, Monica J.; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M.; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1) α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR) suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling. PMID:26815481

  20. Pericytes Derived from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Protect against Retinal Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Thomas A.; Clabough, Erin B. D.; Kao, David S.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Durham, Jennifer T.; Zotter, Brendan C.; Seaman, Scott A.; Cronk, Stephen M.; Rakoczy, Elizabeth P.; Katz, Adam J.; Herman, Ira M.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Yates, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Retinal vasculopathies, including diabetic retinopathy (DR), threaten the vision of over 100 million people. Retinal pericytes are critical for microvascular control, supporting retinal endothelial cells via direct contact and paracrine mechanisms. With pericyte death or loss, endothelial dysfunction ensues, resulting in hypoxic insult, pathologic angiogenesis, and ultimately blindness. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) differentiate into pericytes, suggesting they may be useful as a protective and regenerative cellular therapy for retinal vascular disease. In this study, we examine the ability of ASCs to differentiate into pericytes that can stabilize retinal vessels in multiple pre-clinical models of retinal vasculopathy. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that ASCs express pericyte-specific markers in vitro. When injected intravitreally into the murine eye subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), ASCs were capable of migrating to and integrating with the retinal vasculature. Integrated ASCs maintained marker expression and pericyte-like morphology in vivo for at least 2 months. ASCs injected after OIR vessel destabilization and ablation enhanced vessel regrowth (16% reduction in avascular area). ASCs injected intravitreally before OIR vessel destabilization prevented retinal capillary dropout (53% reduction). Treatment of ASCs with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) enhanced hASC pericyte function, in a manner similar to native retinal pericytes, with increased marker expression of smooth muscle actin, cellular contractility, endothelial stabilization, and microvascular protection in OIR. Finally, injected ASCs prevented capillary loss in the diabetic retinopathic Akimba mouse (79% reduction 2 months after injection). Conclusions/Significance ASC-derived pericytes can integrate with retinal vasculature, adopting both pericyte morphology and marker expression, and provide functional vascular protection in multiple murine models of

  1. Environmental perspectives of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex. Steudel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Jatin; Kalra, Swinder J. S.; Naraian, Ram

    2014-09-01

    Extensive research is being conducted worldwide to find alternative and efficient systems to lessen the impacts of climate change and reduce environmental pollution. The genus Phragmites has proven ability to mitigate the environmental pollution of its surroundings. Common reed ( Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex. Steudel), a graminaceous plant of cosmopolitan nature, has been extensively studied especially for the mitigation of environmental contamination. The capability of common reed to grow well at extreme environmental conditions such as elevated CO2 and high temperature is conferred by several factors such as change of carbon trapping mechanism (from C3 to C4 and vice versa), microbial association and biochemical adaptations. P. australis has been a most preferred unique plant system, especially in ecological engineering for improving the quality of wastewater. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the suitability of Phragmites australis for environmental remediation and summarizes recent advancements in our understanding of this grass.

  2. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography of Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy Associated With Benign Choroidal Nevus.

    PubMed

    De Salvo, Gabriella; Vaz-Pereira, Sara; Sehmi, Kulwant S; Andrews, Richard M; Sagoo, Mandeep S

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) complicating benign choroidal nevus and their tomographic features at spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) are reported. Two eyes with choroidal nevus and associated subretinal fluid underwent complete ophthalmological examination, SD-OCT, fundus fluorescein angiography, and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). SD-OCT and ICGA confirmed the diagnosis of PCV in both cases. Ophthalmologists should be aware of this rare combination between choroidal nevus and PCV. If a choroidal nevus presents with subretinal fluid, this does not always herald malignant transformation, and PCV should be ruled out so that the correct treatment can be planned.

  3. H2S- and NO-Signaling Pathways in Alzheimer's Amyloid Vasculopathy: Synergism or Antagonism?

    PubMed Central

    Salmina, Alla B.; Komleva, Yulia K.; Szijártó, István A.; Gorina, Yana V.; Lopatina, Olga L.; Gertsog, Galina E.; Filipovic, Milos R.; Gollasch, Maik

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's type of neurodegeneration dramatically affects H2S and NO synthesis and interactions in the brain, which results in dysregulated vasomotor function, brain tissue hypoperfusion and hypoxia, development of perivascular inflammation, promotion of Aβ deposition, and impairment of neurogenesis/angiogenesis. H2S- and NO-signaling pathways have been described to offer protection against Alzheimer's amyloid vasculopathy and neurodegeneration. This review describes recent developments of the increasing relevance of H2S and NO in Alzheimer's disease (AD). More studies are however needed to fully determine their potential use as therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's and other forms of vascular dementia. PMID:26696896

  4. The endothelial biology of sickle cell disease: inflammation and a chronic vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Hebbel, Robert P; Osarogiagbon, Raymond; Kaul, Dhananjay

    2004-03-01

    A single amino acid substitution in hemoglobin comprises the molecular basis for sickle cell anemia, but evolution of the corresponding clinical disease is extraordinarily complicated and likely involves multiple pathogenic factors. Sickle disease is fundamentally an inflammatory state, with activation of the endothelium, probably through proximate effects of reperfusion injury physiology and chronic molestation by adherent red cells and white cells. The disease also involves enhanced angiogenic propensity, activation of coagulation, disordered vasoregulation, and a component of chronic vasculopathy. Sickle cell anemia is truly an endothelial disease, and it is likely that genetic differences in endothelial function help govern its astonishing phenotypic diversity. PMID:15280088

  5. [Thrombotic vasculopathy probably associated with cocaine contaminated with levamisole: report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Velasco, María Abril; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia; Rodríguez-Carreón, Angélica; Díaz-Lozano, Marisol; Sánchez-Armendáriz, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The vasculities are complex diseases. Their cutaneous manifestations are very important and often mirror several pathologies. Cocaine use has been related to both, vasculitis and thrombotic vasculopathy and pseudovasculitis. A new syndrome has been described in association with its adulteration with levamisole. It can be very serious, leading patients to death. This is relevant as levamisole-adultered cocaine seems to be increasingly offered to consumers. Our goal is to report the first two cases in Mexico, which faces an important raise in cocaine use, emphasizing that a high suspicion based on certain characteristics allows for early recognition and adequate treatment.

  6. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  7. Transient mixed chimerism for allograft tolerance.

    PubMed

    Oura, Tetsu; Hotta, Kiyohiko; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2015-04-01

    Mixed chimerism discovered in Freemartin cattle by Ray Owen 70 years ago paved the way for research on immune tolerance. Since his discovery, significant progress has been made in the effort to induce allograft tolerance via mixed chimerism in various murine models. However, induction of persistent mixed chimerism has proved to be extremely difficult in major histocompatibility complex mismatched humans. Chimerism induced in humans tends to either disappear or convert to full donor chimerism, depending on the intensity of the conditioning regimen. Nevertheless, our studies in both NHPs and humans have clearly demonstrated that renal allograft tolerance can be induced by transient mixed chimerism. Our studies have shown that solid organ allograft tolerance via transient mixed chimerism 1) requires induction of multilineage hematologic chimerism, 2) depends on peripheral regulatory mechanisms, rather than thymic deletion, for long-term maintenance, 3) is organ specific (kidney and lung but not heart allograft tolerance are feasible). A major advantage of tolerance induction via transient mixed chimerism is exclusion of the risk of graft-versus-host disease. Our ongoing studies are directed toward improving the consistency of tolerance induction, reducing the morbidity of the conditioning regimen, substituting clinically available agents, such as Belatacept for the now unavailable anti-CD2 monoclonal antibody, and extending the protocol to recipients of deceased donor allografts.

  8. Thrombotic microangiopathy in renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Radha, S.; Tameem, Afroz; Sridhar, G.; Aiyangar, A.; Rajaram, K. G.; Prasad, R.; Kiran, K.

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a serious complication of renal transplantation. It is a morphological expression of various etiological factors. In a renal allograft, TMA can occur de novo or be a recurrent disease. The aim of this study was to analyze the etiological factors and observe the changing trends of TMA with respect to emerging new etiological factors. We evaluated 131 graft biopsies over a period of 2½ years (2010-2012). All the renal biopsies were formalin fixed, paraffin embedded. Twenty serial sections were studied. Stains routinely used were Hematoxylin and Eosin, Periodic Acid Schiff, Massons Trichrome and Silver Methenamine stains. C4d by immunohistochemical method was done on all graft biopsies. Incidence of TMA in our series was 9.1%. Out of the 12 cases, five were associated with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity, three were diagnosed as acute antibody-mediated rejection, and two were recurrent haemolytic uremic syndrome. One patient developed haemolytic uremic syndrome on treatment with sirolimus and one patient was cytomegalovirus positive on treatment with ganciclovir, developed haemolytic uremic syndrome during treatment course. This study describes a spectrum of etiological factors for thrombotic mciroangiopathy ranging from common cause like calcineurin inhibitor toxicity to rare cause like ganciclovir induced TMA. PMID:24574627

  9. Thrombotic microangiopathy in renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Radha, S; Tameem, Afroz; Sridhar, G; Aiyangar, A; Rajaram, K G; Prasad, R; Kiran, K

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a serious complication of renal transplantation. It is a morphological expression of various etiological factors. In a renal allograft, TMA can occur de novo or be a recurrent disease. The aim of this study was to analyze the etiological factors and observe the changing trends of TMA with respect to emerging new etiological factors. We evaluated 131 graft biopsies over a period of 2½ years (2010-2012). All the renal biopsies were formalin fixed, paraffin embedded. Twenty serial sections were studied. Stains routinely used were Hematoxylin and Eosin, Periodic Acid Schiff, Massons Trichrome and Silver Methenamine stains. C4d by immunohistochemical method was done on all graft biopsies. Incidence of TMA in our series was 9.1%. Out of the 12 cases, five were associated with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity, three were diagnosed as acute antibody-mediated rejection, and two were recurrent haemolytic uremic syndrome. One patient developed haemolytic uremic syndrome on treatment with sirolimus and one patient was cytomegalovirus positive on treatment with ganciclovir, developed haemolytic uremic syndrome during treatment course. This study describes a spectrum of etiological factors for thrombotic mciroangiopathy ranging from common cause like calcineurin inhibitor toxicity to rare cause like ganciclovir induced TMA.

  10. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: CAV-OX ULTRAVIOLET OXIDATION PROCESS MAGNUM WATER TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CAV-OX® technology (see Fig- ure 1) destroys organic contaminants, including chlorinated hy- drocarbons, in water. The process uses hydrogen peroxide, hy- drodynamic cavitation, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation to photolyze and oxidize organic compounds present in water at ...

  11. The Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel regulates temporal coding in mouse mechanoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Lewin, Gary R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In mammals there are three types of low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium channels, Cav3.1, Cav3.2 and Cav3.3, which all give rise to T-type Ca2+currents. T-type Ca2+currents have long been known to be highly enriched in a sub-population of medium-sized sensory neurones in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, the identity of the T-type-rich sensory neurones has remained controversial and the precise physiological role of the Cav3.2 calcium channel in these sensory neurones has not been directly addressed. Here we show, using Cav3.2−/− mutant mice, that these channels are essential for the normal temporal coding of moving stimuli by specialized skin mechanoreceptors called D-hair receptors. We show that D-hair receptors from Cav3.2−/− fire approximately 50% fewer spikes in response to ramp-and-hold displacement stimuli compared to wild type receptors. The reduced sensitivity of D-hair receptors in Cav3.2−/− mice is chiefly due to an increase in the mechanical threshold and a substantial temporal delay in the onset of high-frequency firing to moving stimuli. We examined the receptive properties of other cutaneous mechanoreceptors and Aδ- and C-fibre nociceptors in Cav3.2−/− mice, but found no alteration in their mechanosensitivity compared to Cav3.2+/+ mice. However, C-fibre nociceptors recorded in Cav3.2−/− mutant mice displayed a small but statistically significant reduction in their spiking rate during noxious heat ramps when compared to C-fibres in control mice. The T-type calcium channel Cav3.2 is thus not only a highly specific marker of D-hair receptors but is also required to maintain their high sensitivity and above all to ensure ultra rapid temporal detection of skin movement. PMID:21486775

  12. Analysis of Cav1.2 and Ryanodine Receptor Clusters in Rat Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Scriven, David R.L.; Asghari, Parisa; Schulson, Meredith N.; Moore, Edwin D.W.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the distribution of ryanodine receptor (RyR) and Cav1.2 clusters in adult rat ventricular myocytes using three-dimensional object-based colocalization metrics. We found that ∼75% of the Cav1.2 clusters and 65% of the RyR clusters were within couplons, and both were roughly two and a half times larger than their extradyadic counterparts. Within a couplon, Cav1.2 was concentrated near the center of the underlying RyR cluster and accounted for ∼67% of its size. These data, together with previous findings from binding studies, enable us to estimate that a couplon contains 74 RyR tetramers and 10 copies of the α-subunit of Cav1.2. Extradyadic clusters of RyR contained ∼30 tetramers, whereas the extradyadic Cav1.2 clusters contained, on average, only four channels. Between 80% and 85% of both RyR and Cav1.2 molecules are within couplons. RyR clusters were in the closest proximity, with a median nearest-neighbor distance of 552 nm; comparable values for Cav1.2 clusters and couplons were 619 nm and 735 nm, respectively. Extradyadic RyR clusters were significantly closer together (624 nm) and closer to the couplons (674 nm) than the couplons were to each other. In contrast, the extradyadic clusters of Cav1.2 showed no preferential localization and were broadly distributed. These results provide a wealth of morphometric data that are essential for understanding intracellular Ca2+ regulation and modeling Ca2+ dynamics. PMID:21156134

  13. Bone graft substitute: allograft and xenograft.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Rapid bone graft incorporation for structural rigidity is essential. Early range of motion, exercise, and weight-bearing are keys to rehabilitation. Structural and nonstructural bone grafts add length, height, and volume to alter alignment, function, and appearance. Bone graft types include: corticocancellous autograft, allograft, xenograft, and synthetic graft. Autogenic grafts are harvested from the patient, less likely to be rejected, and more likely to be incorporated; however, harvesting adds a procedure and donor site complication is common. Allografts, xenografts, and synthetic grafts eliminate secondary procedures and donor site complications; however, rejection and slower incorporation can occur.

  14. Postmortem diagnosis of Fabry disease with acromegaly and a unique vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masaki; Mori, Taisuke; Orikasa, Hideki; Oh, Haengphil; Suzuki, Kinuko; Koto, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Kazuto

    2007-09-01

    A 44-year-old Japanese man with elevated growth hormone levels and gradual deterioration of mental and renal function was admitted to the hospital. With his deteriorated general condition and renal failure, the patient developed pulmonary thromboembolism and died of respiratory failure. Autopsy examination was conducted, which revealed abnormal accumulation or intracytoplasmic storage of lipid-rich material in the small blood vessels, kidney, heart, and nervous system. After postmortem pathologic studies, including light-microscopic histochemistry, electron microscopy, and biochemical analysis of the stored lipid contents, a final diagnosis of Fabry disease was made. Histopathologic examination revealed a unique vasculopathy characterized by the presence of abnormal intracytoplasmic lipid inclusions and vascular remodeling. With regard to the clinical presentation of acromegaly, hyperplasia but not adenomatous transformation of the acidophils of the anterior pituitary gland with immunohistochemical detection of growth hormone within the cells was noted. In this case, the complication of acromegaly with hyperplasia of the acidophilic cells of the anterior pituitary gland and the unique vasculopathy causing significant organ failure, mainly of the kidney, heart, and central nervous systems, possibly as a result of microcirculatory failure, are considered to be not incidental findings but to be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of Farby disease.

  15. Aβ immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease: effects on apoE and cerebral vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Boche, Delphine; Carare, Roxana; Johnston, David; Holmes, Clive; Love, Seth; Nicoll, James A R

    2014-12-01

    Aβ immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) results in the removal of Aβ plaques and increased cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). In current clinical trials, amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIAs), putatively due to exacerbation of CAA, are concerning side effects. We aimed to assess the role of the Aβ transporter apolipoprotein E (apoE) in the exacerbation of CAA and development of CAA-associated vasculopathy after Aβ immunotherapy. 12 Aβ42-immunized AD (iAD; AN1792, Elan Pharmaceuticals) cases were compared with 28 unimmunized AD (cAD) cases. Immunohistochemistry was quantified for Aβ42, apoE, apoE E4 and smooth muscle actin, and CAA-associated vasculopathy was analyzed. Aβ immunotherapy was associated with redistribution of apoE from cortical plaques to cerebral vessel walls, mirroring the altered distribution of Aβ42. Concentric vessel wall splitting was increased threefold in leptomeningeal vessels after immunotherapy (cAD 6.3 vs iAD 20.6 %, P < 0.001), but smooth muscle cell abnormalities did not differ. The findings suggest that apoE is involved in the removal of plaques and transport of Aβ to the cerebral vasculature induced by Aβ immunotherapy. Immunotherapy was not associated with CAA-related vascular smooth muscle damage, but was accompanied by increased splitting of the vessel wall, perhaps reflecting enhanced deposition and subsequent removal of Aβ. ARIA occurring in some current trials of Aβ immunotherapy may reflect an extreme form of these vascular changes.

  16. Protein kinase A modulation of CaV1.4 calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E.; Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels by protein kinase A (PKA) represents a crucial element within cardiac, skeletal muscle and neurological systems. Although much work has been done to understand this regulation in cardiac CaV1.2 Ca2+ channels, relatively little is known about the closely related CaV1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels, which feature prominently in the visual system. Here we find that CaV1.4 channels are indeed modulated by PKA phosphorylation within the inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent inactivation (ICDI) motif. Phosphorylation of this region promotes the occupancy of calmodulin on the channel, thus increasing channel open probability (PO) and Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Although this interaction seems specific to CaV1.4 channels, introduction of ICDI1.4 to CaV1.3 or CaV1.2 channels endows these channels with a form of PKA modulation, previously unobserved in heterologous systems. Thus, this mechanism may not only play an important role in the visual system but may be generalizable across the L-type channel family. PMID:27456671

  17. Protein kinase A modulation of CaV1.4 calcium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E.; Yue, David T.

    2016-07-01

    The regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels by protein kinase A (PKA) represents a crucial element within cardiac, skeletal muscle and neurological systems. Although much work has been done to understand this regulation in cardiac CaV1.2 Ca2+ channels, relatively little is known about the closely related CaV1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels, which feature prominently in the visual system. Here we find that CaV1.4 channels are indeed modulated by PKA phosphorylation within the inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent inactivation (ICDI) motif. Phosphorylation of this region promotes the occupancy of calmodulin on the channel, thus increasing channel open probability (PO) and Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Although this interaction seems specific to CaV1.4 channels, introduction of ICDI1.4 to CaV1.3 or CaV1.2 channels endows these channels with a form of PKA modulation, previously unobserved in heterologous systems. Thus, this mechanism may not only play an important role in the visual system but may be generalizable across the L-type channel family.

  18. Allograft rejection in cattle with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Müller, K E; Rutten, V P; Becker, C K; Hoek, A; Bernadina, W E; Wentink, G H; Figdor, C G

    1995-09-01

    In the present investigation cell-mediated immunity in animals with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was studied by means of skin transplantation experiments. Autograft and allograft behaviour in animals with BLAD was compared with the behaviour of simultaneously transplanted autografts and allografts in healthy controls. Allograft survival time was prolonged in three BLAD cattle (28, 30, and 72 days) compared to six healthy controls (12-14 days). When transplantations were repeated on one animal with BLAD using skin grafts from the same donor, accelerated rejection was observed (allograft survival time decreased from 72 days at primary to 35 days at secondary and to 21 days at tertiary transplantation), suggesting the development of immunological memory. Graft-infiltrating lymphocytes that were obtained from allograft biopsies during the period of rejection, were shown to be from recipient origin (beta 2-integrin negative). Our findings demonstrate that, although prolonged allograft survival is observed in cattle with BLAD, skin allografts are ultimately rejected. PMID:8533316

  19. Renal allograft fibrosis: biology and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Boor, P; Floege, J

    2015-04-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the final common pathway of progressive renal diseases. In allografts, it is assessed with tubular atrophy as interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IF/TA). IF/TA occurs in about 40% of kidney allografts at 3-6 months after transplantation, increasing to 65% at 2 years. The origin of renal fibrosis in the allograft is complex and includes donor-related factors, in particular in case of expanded criteria donors, ischemia-reperfusion injury, immune-mediated damage, recurrence of underlying diseases, hypertensive damage, nephrotoxicity of immunosuppressants, recurrent graft infections, postrenal obstruction, etc. Based largely on studies in the non-transplant setting, there is a large body of literature on the role of different cell types, be it intrinsic to the kidney or bone marrow derived, in mediating renal fibrosis, and the number of mediator systems contributing to fibrotic changes is growing steadily. Here we review the most important cellular processes and mediators involved in the progress of renal fibrosis, with a focus on the allograft situation, and discuss some of the challenges in translating experimental insights into clinical trials, in particular fibrosis biomarkers or imaging modalities.

  20. Effects of complement activation on allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Joong Hyuk; Heeger, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize the current knowledge regarding mechanisms linking the complement system to transplant injury, highlighting findings reported since 2013. Recent findings Building upon the documentation that complement activation is a pathogenic mediator of post-transplant ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, emerging evidence indicates blocking either the classical or lectin pathways attenuates IR injury in animal models. Immune cell-derived and locally activated complement, including intracellular C3 positively modulates allo-reactive T cell activation and expansion, while simultaneously inhibiting regulatory T cell induction and function, together promoting transplant rejection. While alloantibody-initiated complement activation directly injures target cells, complement-dependent signals activate endothelial cells to facilitate T cell dependent inflammation. Complement activation within allografts contributes to progressive chronic injury and fibrosis. Summary The complement cascade, traditionally considered relevant to transplantation only as an effector mechanism of antibody-initiated allograft injury, is now understood to damage the allograft through multiple mechanisms. Complement activation promotes post-transplant IR injury, formation and function of allo-antibody, differentiation and function of alloreactive T cells, and contributes to chronic progressive allograft failure. The recognition that complement impacts transplant injury at many levels provides a foundation for targeting complement as a therapy to prolong transplant survival and improve patient health. PMID:26132735

  1. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Trentacosta, Natasha; Graham, William C; Gersoff, Wayne K

    2016-06-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation has evolved over the years to provide a state-of-the-art technique for the sports medicine surgeon to utilize in preserving contact mechanics and function of the knee in irreparable meniscal pathology. However, this procedure continues to spark considerable debate on proper tissue processing techniques, acceptable indications, methods of implantation, and potential long-term outcomes. PMID:27135295

  2. Acute colitis in the renal allograft recipient.

    PubMed Central

    Perloff, L J; Chon, H; Petrella, E J; Grossman, R A; Barker, C F

    1976-01-01

    Four renal allograft recipients with evidence of ischemic damage to the colon are presented and compared with 11 cases from 5 major series. Similarities in the patients included: deterioration of renal function, multiple immunosuppressive and antibiotic regimens, the use of cadaver renal allografts, and diagnostic and therapeutic measures requiring frequent enemas with barium and ion-exchange resins. Two of our patients underwent surgery for the removal of segments of necrotic colon after several weeks of fever and abdominal pain initially attributed to either acute rejection, viral infection, or pancreatitis. One patient had three days of melena and responded to non-operative therapy. The fourth patient developed ischemic colonic changes 10 weeks after allograft nephrectomy and was receiving no immunosuppression at the time. Broad spectrum antibiotics were used at various times in all patients. Early aggressive evaluation of gastrointestinal complaints--including barium enema, upper gastrointestinal series with small bowel follow-through, proctosigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, and arteriography--is indicated, in view of the lethality of the complication of colonic ulceration. The clinical pictures presented emphasize the fact that recipients of renal allografts are commonly heir to many complications which may be considered rare in the normal population. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4a. Fig. 4b. PMID:1108814

  3. The L-type calcium channel Cav1.3 is required for proper hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Marschallinger, Julia; Sah, Anupam; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Unger, Michael; Rotheneichner, Peter; Kharitonova, Maria; Waclawiczek, Alexander; Gerner, Philipp; Jaksch-Bogensperger, Heidi; Berger, Stefan; Striessnig, Jörg; Singewald, Nicolas; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Aigner, Ludwig

    2015-12-01

    L-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) are widely expressed within different brain regions including the hippocampus. The isoforms Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 have been shown to be involved in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, cognitive functions that require proper hippocampal neurogenesis. In vitro, functional LTCCs are expressed on neuronal progenitor cells, where they promote neuronal differentiation. Expression of LTCCs on neural stem and progenitor cells within the neurogenic regions in the adult brain in vivo has not been examined so far, and a contribution of the individual isoforms Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 to adult neurogenesis remained to be clarified. To reveal the role of these channels we first evaluated the expression patterns of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) in adult (2- and 3-month old) and middle-aged (15-month old) mice on mRNA and protein levels. We performed immunohistological analysis of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult and middle-aged Cav1.3(-/-) mice and finally addressed the importance of Cav1.3 for hippocampal function by evaluating spatial memory and depression-like behavior in adult Cav1.3(-/-) mice. Our results showed Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 expression at different stages of neuronal differentiation. While Cav1.2 was primarily restricted to mature NeuN(+) granular neurons, Cav1.3 was expressed in Nestin(+) neural stem cells and in mature NeuN(+) granular neurons. Adult and middle-aged Cav1.3(-/-) mice showed severe impairments in dentate gyrus neurogenesis, with significantly smaller dentate gyrus volume, reduced survival of newly generated cells, and reduced neuronal differentiation. Further, Cav1.3(-/-) mice showed impairment in the hippocampus dependent object location memory test, implicating Cav1.3 as an essential element for hippocampus-associated cognitive functions. Thus, modulation of LTCC activities may have a crucial impact on neurogenic responses and cognition, which should be

  4. Arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Seijas Vázquez, Roberto; García Balletbó, Montserrat; Álvarez Díaz, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Cuscó Segarra, Xavier; Rius Vilarrubia, Marta; Cugat Bertomeu, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    Partial or total meniscectomy are common procedures performed at Orthopedic Surgery departments. Despite providing a great relief of pain, it has been related to early onset knee osteoarthritis. Meniscal allograft transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to meniscectomy. The purposes of this study were to describe an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs technique and to report the preliminary results. All meniscal allograft transplantations performed between 2001 and 2006 were approached for eligibility, and a total of 35 patients (involving 37 menisci) were finally engaged in the study. Patients were excluded if they had ipsilateral knee ligament reconstruction or cartilage repair surgery before meniscal transplantation or other knee surgeries after the meniscal transplantation. Scores on Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale for pain were obtained at a mean follow-up of 38.6 months and compared to pre-operative data. Data on chondral lesions were obtained during the arthroscopic procedure and through imaging (radiographs and MRI) studies pre-operatively. Two graft failures out of 59 transplants (3.4%) were found. Daily life accidents were responsible for all graft failures. Significant improvements for Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and VAS for pain scores following the meniscal allograft transplantation were found (P < 0.0001). Controlling for chondral lesion, there was no significant interactions for Lysholm (n.s.), Subjective IKDC Form (n.s.), and VAS for pain scores (n.s.). This study demonstrated that an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs improved knee function and symptoms after a total meniscectomy. Improvements were observed independently of the degree of chondral lesion.

  5. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype.

  6. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype. PMID:23321639

  7. Composition and Antidiarrheal Activity of Bidens odorata Cav.

    PubMed Central

    Zavala-Mendoza, Daniel; Alarcon-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Pérez-Gutierrez, Salud; Escobar-Villanueva, M. Carmen; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The antidiarrheal effects of chloroform, methanol, and aqueous extracts of Bidens odorata Cav. were investigated at doses of 200 mg/kg on castor-oil-induced diarrhea. The chloroform extract of B. odorata (CBO) reduced diarrhea by 72.72%. The effect of CBO was evaluated on mice with diarrhea induced by castor oil, MgSO4, arachidonic acid, or prostaglandin E2. CBO inhibited the contraction induced by carbachol chloride on ileum (100 µg/mL) and intestinal transit (200 mg/kg) in Wistar rats. The active fraction of CBO (F4) at doses of 100 mg/kg inhibited the diarrhea induced by castor oil (90.1%) or arachidonic acid (72.9%) but did not inhibit the diarrhea induced by PGE2. The active fraction of F4 (FR5) only was tested on diarrhea induced with castor oil and inhibited this diarrhea by 92.1%. The compositions of F4 and FR5 were determined by GC-MS, and oleic, palmitic, linoleic, and stearic acids were found. F4 and a mixture of the four fatty acids inhibited diarrhea at doses of 100 mg/kg (90.1% and 70.6%, resp.). The results of this study show that B. odorata has antidiarrheal effects, as is claimed by folk medicine, and could possibly be used for the production of a phytomedicine. PMID:24282432

  8. Physicochemical properties of tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) hydrocolloid fractions.

    PubMed

    Gannasin, Sri Puvanesvari; Adzahan, Noranizan Mohd; Hamzah, Mohd Yusof; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Muhammad, Kharidah

    2015-09-01

    Tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) is an underutilised fruit in Malaysia. The fruit, however, contains good proportions of soluble fibre, protein, starch, anthocyanins and carotenoids. Amongst the fruits, only tamarillo mesocarp contains both polar (anthocyanins) and non-polar (carotenoids) pigments. The ability to retain both polar and non-polar pigments in the mesocarp could be related to the unique properties of its hydrocolloids. To understand the pigment-hydrocolloid interaction in the fruit, information on the physicochemical characteristics of the hydrocolloids is required. Therefore, hydrocolloids from the anthocyanin-rich seed mucilage fraction of the tamarillo and its carotenoid-rich pulp fraction were extracted and characterised. Water and 1% citric acid were used to extract the seed mucilage hydrocolloid while 72% ethanol and 20mM HEPES buffer were used for pulp hydrocolloid extraction. Seed mucilage hydrocolloid was primarily composed of arabinogalactan protein-associated pectin whereas pulp hydrocolloid was composed of hemicellulosic polysaccharides with some naturally interacting proteins and neutral polysaccharides. PMID:25842340

  9. Subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral vasculopathy in a child with sickle cell anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inusa, Baba; Casale, Maddalena; Booth, Caroline; Lucas, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Stroke in sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is either infarctive or haemorrhagic in nature. In childhood, over 75% of strokes in SCA are infarctive. We present an adolescent with SCA who developed hypertension at the age of 13, and was treated with lisinopril. Sixteen months later she was found in cardiorespiratory arrest and died on arrival in hospital. The last transcranial Doppler scan performed 6 months before her death and a brain MRI were reported normal. The autopsy discovered massive subarachnoid haemorrhage in association with vascular damage in the circle of Willis arteries. The case highlights a cause of haemorrhagic stroke, the first reported association between hypertension, SCA and a histopathologically proven cerebral vasculopathy. The difficulties in the management of haemorrhagic stroke and the poor outcome in SCA are discussed. PMID:25336550

  10. Early-Onset Stroke and Vasculopathy Associated with Mutations in ADA2

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Q.; Yang, D.; Ombrello, A.K.; Zavialov, Andrey V.; Toro, C.; Zavialov, Anton V.; Stone, D.L.; Chae, J.J.; Rosenzweig, S.D.; Bishop, K.; Barron, K.S.; Kuehn, H.S.; Hoffmann, P.; Negro, A.; Tsai, W.L.; Cowen, E.W.; Pei, W.; Milner, J.D.; Silvin, C.; Heller, T.; Chin, D.T.; Patronas, N.J.; Barber, J.S.; Lee, C.-C.R.; Wood, G.M.; Ling, A.; Kelly, S.J.; Kleiner, D.E.; Mullikin, J.C.; Ganson, N.J.; Kong, H.H.; Hambleton, S.; Candotti, F.; Quezado, M.M.; Calvo, K.R.; Alao, H.; Barham, B.K.; Jones, A.; Meschia, J.F.; Worrall, B.B.; Kasner, S.E.; Rich, S.S.; Goldbach-Mansky, R.; Abinun, M.; Chalom, E.; Gotte, A.C.; Punaro, M.; Pascual, V.; Verbsky, J.W.; Torgerson, T.R.; Singer, N.G.; Gershon, T.R.; Ozen, S.; Karadag, O.; Fleisher, T.A.; Remmers, E.F.; Burgess, S.M.; Moir, S.L.; Gadina, M.; Sood, R.; Hershfield, M.S.; Boehm, M.; Kastner, D.L.; Aksentijevich, I.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND We observed a syndrome of intermittent fevers, early-onset lacunar strokes and other neurovascular manifestations, livedoid rash, hepatosplenomegaly, and systemic vasculopathy in three unrelated patients. We suspected a genetic cause because the disorder presented in early childhood. METHODS We performed whole-exome sequencing in the initial three patients and their unaffected parents and candidate-gene sequencing in three patients with a similar phenotype, as well as two young siblings with polyarteritis nodosa and one patient with small-vessel vasculitis. Enzyme assays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemical testing, flow cytometry, and cytokine profiling were performed on samples from the patients. To study protein function, we used morpholino-mediated knockdowns in zebrafish and short hairpin RNA knockdowns in U937 cells cultured with human dermal endothelial cells. RESULTS All nine patients carried recessively inherited mutations in CECR1 (cat eye syndrome chromosome region, candidate 1), encoding adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2), that were predicted to be deleterious; these mutations were rare or absent in healthy controls. Six patients were compound heterozygous for eight CECR1 mutations, whereas the three patients with polyarteritis nodosa or small-vessel vasculitis were homozygous for the p.Gly47Arg mutation. Patients had a marked reduction in the levels of ADA2 and ADA2-specific enzyme activity in the blood. Skin, liver, and brain biopsies revealed vasculopathic changes characterized by compromised endothelial integrity, endothelial cellular activation, and inflammation. Knockdown of a zebrafish ADA2 homologue caused intracranial hemorrhages and neutropenia — phenotypes that were prevented by coinjection with nonmutated (but not with mutated) human CECR1. Monocytes from patients induced damage in cocultured endothelial-cell layers. CONCLUSIONS Loss-of-function mutations in CECR1 were associated with a spectrum of vascular and inflammatory phenotypes

  11. Factors Predicting Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Failure

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nicholas; Asplin, Laura; Thompson, Peter; Spalding, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) is performed to improve symptoms and function in patients with a meniscal-deficient compartment of the knee. Numerous studies have shown a consistent improvement in patient-reported outcomes, but high failure rates have been reported by some studies. The typical patients undergoing MAT often have multiple other pathologies that require treatment at the time of surgery. The factors that predict failure of a meniscal allograft within this complex patient group are not clearly defined. Purpose: To determine predictors of MAT failure in a large series to refine the indications for surgery and better inform future patients. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All patients undergoing MAT at a single institution between May 2005 and May 2014 with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were prospectively evaluated and included in this study. Failure was defined as removal of the allograft, revision transplantation, or conversion to a joint replacement. Patients were grouped according to the articular cartilage status at the time of the index surgery: group 1, intact or partial-thickness chondral loss; group 2, full-thickness chondral loss 1 condyle; and group 3, full-thickness chondral loss both condyles. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine significant predictors of failure, independently of other factors. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were produced for overall survival and significant predictors of failure in the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: There were 125 consecutive MATs performed, with 1 patient lost to follow-up. The median follow-up was 3 years (range, 1-10 years). The 5-year graft survival for the entire cohort was 82% (group 1, 97%; group 2, 82%; group 3, 62%). The probability of failure in group 1 was 85% lower (95% CI, 13%-97%) than in group 3 at any time. The probability of failure with lateral allografts was 76% lower (95% CI, 16%-89%) than medial allografts at

  12. Invasive Streptococcus pyogenes after allograft implantation--Colorado, 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-12-01

    Allograft tissues are used for various orthopedic procedures (e.g., ligament reconstruction, meniscal transplantation, and spinal surgery). In 2002, approximately one million allografts were distributed for transplantation (American Association of Tissue Banks [AATB], unpublished data, 2002). Recent reports of allograft-associated infections have prompted evaluation of the processing and quality-control methods employed by tissue processors. This report describes a case of invasive disease with Streptococcus pyogenes (i.e., group A streptococcus [GAS]), after reconstructive knee surgery using contaminated allograft tissue and provides recommendations to reduce the risk for allograft-associated infections. Although allograft infections are rare, they highlight the need for improved tissue evaluation and processing standards. PMID:14654764

  13. Diethyldithiocarbamate-mediated zinc ion chelation reveals role of Cav2.3 channels in glucagon secretion.

    PubMed

    Drobinskaya, Irina; Neumaier, Felix; Pereverzev, Alexey; Hescheler, Jürgen; Schneider, Toni

    2015-05-01

    Peptide-hormone secretion is partially triggered by Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) and gene inactivation of Zn2+-sensitive Cav2.3-type VGCCs is associated with disturbed glucose homeostasis in mice. Zn2+ has been implicated in pancreatic islet cell crosstalk and recent findings indicate that sudden cessation of Zn2+ supply during hypoglycemia triggers glucagon secretion in rodents. Here we show that diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), a chelating agent for Zn2+ and other group IIB metal ions, differentially affects blood glucose and serum peptide hormone level in wild-type mice and mice lacking the Cav2.3-subunit. Fasting glucose and glucagon level were significantly higher in Cav2.3-deficient compared to wild-type mice, while DEDTC Zn2+-chelation produced a significant and correlated increase of blood glucose and serum glucagon concentration in wild-type but not Cav2.3-deficient mice. Glucose tolerance tests revealed severe glucose intolerance in Zn2+-depleted Cav2.3-deficient but not vehicle-treated Cav2.3-deficient or Zn2+-depleted wildtype mice. Collectively, these findings indicate that Cav2.3 channels are critically involved in the Zn2+-mediated suppression of glucagon secretion during hyperglycemia. Especially under conditions of Zn2+ deficiency, ablation or dysfunction of Cav2.3 channels may lead to severe disturbances in glucose homeostasis. PMID:25603538

  14. Procurement of hand and arm allografts.

    PubMed

    Cetrulo, Curtis L; Kovach, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Upper extremity transplantation has been at the forefront of vascularized composite allotransplantation. There have been more hand and upper extremity transplants than any other kinds of vascularized composite allotransplantation. However, it is a new and evolving field. Reconstructive surgeons are relative newcomers to the field of transplantation, and the procurement of upper extremity allografts has many subtleties that will differ depending on the intended recipient. However, there are certain principles that can be adhered to that this review serves to elucidate. PMID:24310234

  15. Procurement of hand and arm allografts.

    PubMed

    Cetrulo, Curtis L; Kovach, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Upper extremity transplantation has been at the forefront of vascularized composite allotransplantation. There have been more hand and upper extremity transplants than any other kinds of vascularized composite allotransplantation. However, it is a new and evolving field. Reconstructive surgeons are relative newcomers to the field of transplantation, and the procurement of upper extremity allografts has many subtleties that will differ depending on the intended recipient. However, there are certain principles that can be adhered to that this review serves to elucidate.

  16. Mouse kidney transplantation: models of allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Tse, George H; Hesketh, Emily E; Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique.

  17. Mouse Kidney Transplantation: Models of Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P.

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique. PMID:25350513

  18. Cacna1c (Cav1.2) Modulates Electroencephalographic Rhythm and Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deependra; Dedic, Nina; Flachskamm, Cornelia; Voulé, Stephanie; Deussing, Jan M.; Kimura, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The CACNA1C gene encodes the alpha 1C (α1C) subunit of the Cav1.2 voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel (LTCC). Some of the other voltage-dependent calcium channels, e.g., P-/Q-type, Cav2.1; N-type, Cav2.2; E-/R-type, Cav2.3; and T-type, Cav3.3 have been implicated in sleep modulation. However, the contribution of LTCCs to sleep remains largely unknown. Based on recent genome-wide association studies, CACNA1C emerged as one of potential candidate genes associated with both sleep and psychiatric disorders. Indeed, most patients with mental illnesses have sleep problems and vice versa. Design: To investigate an impact of Cav1.2 on sleep-wake behavior and electroencephalogram (EEG) activity, polysomnography was performed in heterozygous Cacna1c (HET) knockout mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates under baseline and challenging conditions (acute sleep deprivation and restraint stress). Measurements and Results: HET mice displayed significantly lower EEG spectral power than WT mice across high frequency ranges (beta to gamma) during wake and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Although HET mice spent slightly more time asleep in the dark period, daily amounts of sleep did not differ between the two genotypes. However, recovery sleep after exposure to both types of challenging stress conditions differed markedly; HET mice exhibited reduced REM sleep recovery responses compared to WT mice. Conclusions: These results suggest the involvement of Cacna1c (Cav1.2) in fast electroencephalogram oscillations and REM sleep regulatory processes. Lower spectral gamma activity, slightly increased sleep demands, and altered REM sleep responses found in heterozygous Cacna1c knockout mice may rather resemble a sleep phenotype observed in schizophrenia patients. Citation: Kumar D, Dedic N, FLachskamm C, Voulé S, Deussing JM, Kimura M. Cacna1c (Cav1.2) modulates electroencephalographic rhythm and rapid eye movement sleep recovery. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1371–1380. PMID

  19. Purkinje cell-specific ablation of Cav2.1 channels is sufficient to cause cerebellar ataxia in mice.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Boyan; Kros, Lieke; Shyti, Reinald; Plak, Petra; Haasdijk, Elize D; Raike, Robert S; Frants, Rune R; Hess, Ellen J; Hoebeek, Freek E; De Zeeuw, Chris I; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2012-03-01

    The Cacna1a gene encodes the α(1A) subunit of voltage-gated Ca(V)2.1 Ca(2+) channels that are involved in neurotransmission at central synapses. Ca(V)2.1-α(1)-knockout (α1KO) mice, which lack Ca(V)2.1 channels in all neurons, have a very severe phenotype of cerebellar ataxia and dystonia, and usually die around postnatal day 20. This early lethality, combined with the wide expression of Ca(V)2.1 channels throughout the cerebellar cortex and nuclei, prohibited determination of the contribution of particular cerebellar cell types to the development of the severe neurobiological phenotype in Cacna1a mutant mice. Here, we crossed conditional Cacna1a mice with transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase, driven by the Purkinje cell-specific Pcp2 promoter, to specifically ablate the Ca(V)2.1-α(1A) subunit and thereby Ca(V)2.1 channels in Purkinje cells. Purkinje cell Ca(V)2.1-α(1A)-knockout (PCα1KO) mice aged without difficulties, rescuing the lethal phenotype seen in α1KO mice. PCα1KO mice exhibited cerebellar ataxia starting around P12, much earlier than the first signs of progressive Purkinje cell loss, which appears in these mice between P30 and P45. Secondary cell loss was observed in the granular and molecular layers of the cerebellum and the volume of all individual cerebellar nuclei was reduced. In this mouse model with a cell type-specific ablation of Ca(V)2.1 channels, we show that ablation of Ca(V)2.1 channels restricted to Purkinje cells is sufficient to cause cerebellar ataxia. We demonstrate that spatial ablation of Ca(V)2.1 channels may help in unraveling mechanisms of human disease.

  20. Splice variants of the CaV1.3 L-type calcium channel regulate dendritic spine morphology

    PubMed Central

    Stanika, Ruslan; Campiglio, Marta; Pinggera, Alexandra; Lee, Amy; Striessnig, Jörg; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic compartments of glutamatergic synapses in the brain. Their number and shape are subject to change in synaptic plasticity and neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson’s disease. The L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 constitutes an important calcium entry pathway implicated in the regulation of spine morphology. Here we investigated the importance of full-length CaV1.3L and two C-terminally truncated splice variants (CaV1.342A and CaV1.343S) and their modulation by densin-180 and shank1b for the morphology of dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons. Live-cell immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy of epitope-tagged CaV1.3L revealed its localization at the base-, neck-, and head-region of dendritic spines. Expression of the short splice variants or deletion of the C-terminal PDZ-binding motif in CaV1.3L induced aberrant dendritic spine elongation. Similar morphological alterations were induced by co-expression of densin-180 or shank1b with CaV1.3L and correlated with increased CaV1.3 currents and dendritic calcium signals in transfected neurons. Together, our findings suggest a key role of CaV1.3 in regulating dendritic spine structure. Under physiological conditions it may contribute to the structural plasticity of glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, altered regulation of CaV1.3 channels may provide an important mechanism in the development of postsynaptic aberrations associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27708393

  1. Divergent control of Cav-1 expression in non-cancerous Li-Fraumeni syndrome and human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Zaki A.; Sultan, Ahmed S.

    2013-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is primarily characterized by development of tumors exhibiting germ-line mutations in the p53 gene. Cell lines developed from patients of a LFS family have decreased p53 activity as evidenced by the absence of apoptosis upon etoposide treatment. To test our hypothesis that changes in gene expression beyond p53 per se are contributing to the development of tumors, we compared gene expression in non-cancerous skin fibroblasts of LFS-affected (p53 heterozygous) vs. non-affected (p53 wild-type homozygous) family members. Expression analysis showed that several genes were differentially regulated in the p53 homozygous and heterozygous cell lines. We were particularly intrigued by the decreased expression (~88%) of a putative tumor-suppressor protein, caveolin-1 (Cav-1), in the p53-mutant cells. Decreased expression of Cav-1 was also seen in both p53-knockout and p21-knockout HTC116 cells suggesting that p53 controls Cav-1 expression through p21 and leading to the speculation that p53, Cav-1 and p21 may be part of a positive auto-regulatory feedback loop. The direct relationship between p53 and Cav-1 was also tested with HeLa cells (containing inactive p53), which expressed a significantly lower Cav-1 protein. A panel of nonfunctional and p53-deficient colon and epithelial breast cancer cell lines showed undetectable expression of Cav-1 supporting the role of p53 in the control of Cav-1. However, in two aggressively metastasizing breast cancer cell lines, Cav-1 was strongly expressed suggesting a possible role in tumor metastasis. Thus, there is a divergent control of Cav-1 expression as evidenced in non-cancerous Li-Fraumeni syndrome and some aggressive human cancer cell lines. PMID:23114650

  2. PTH promotes allograft integration in a calvarial bone defect

    PubMed Central

    Sheyn, Dmitriy; Yakubovich, Doron Cohn; Kallai, Ilan; Su, Susan; Da, Xiaoyu; Pelled, Gadi; Tawackoli, Wafa; Cook-Weins, Galen; Schwarz, Edward M.; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma

    2013-01-01

    Allografts may be useful in craniofacial bone repair, although they often fail to integrate with the host bone. We hypothesized that intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) would enhance mesenchymal stem cell recruitment and differentiation, resulting in allograft osseointegration in cranial membranous bones. Calvarial bone defects were created in transgenic mice, in which luciferase is expressed under the control of the osteocalcin promoter. The mice were given implants of allografts with or without daily PTH treatment. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was performed to monitor host osteprogenitor differentiation at the implantation site. Bone formation was evaluated with the aid of fluorescence imaging (FLI) and micro–computed tomography (μCT) as well as histological analyses. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to evaluate the expression of key osteogenic and angiogenic genes. Osteoprogenitor differentiation, as detected by BLI, in mice treated with an allograft implant and PTH was over 2-fold higher than those in mice treated with an allograft implant without PTH. FLI also demonstrated that the bone mineralization process in PTH-treated allografts was significantly higher than that in untreated allografts. The μCT scans revealed a significant increase in bone formation in Allograft + PTH–treated mice comparing to Allograft + PBS treated mice. The osteogenic genes osteocalcin (Oc/Bglap) and integrin binding sialoprotein (Ibsp) were upregulated in the Allograft + PTH–treated animals. In summary, PTH treatment enhances osteoprogenitor differentiation and augments bone formation around structural allografts. The precise mechanism is not clear, but we show that infiltration pattern of mast cells, associated with the formation of fibrotic tissue, in the defect site is significantly affected by the PTH treatment. PMID:24131143

  3. Alternative Splicing in CaV2.2 Regulates Neuronal Trafficking via Adaptor Protein Complex-1 Adaptor Protein Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Macabuag, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    N-type voltage-gated calcium (CaV2.2) channels are expressed in neurons and targeted to the plasma membrane of presynaptic terminals, facilitating neurotransmitter release. Here, we find that the adaptor protein complex-1 (AP-1) mediates trafficking of CaV2.2 from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface. Examination of splice variants of CaV2.2, containing either exon 37a (selectively expressed in nociceptors) or 37b in the proximal C terminus, reveal that canonical AP-1 binding motifs, YxxΦ and [DE]xxxL[LI], present only in exon 37a, enhance intracellular trafficking of exon 37a-containing CaV2.2 to the axons and plasma membrane of rat DRG neurons. Finally, we identify differential effects of dopamine-2 receptor (D2R) and its agonist-induced activation on trafficking of CaV2.2 isoforms. D2R slowed the endocytosis of CaV2.2 containing exon 37b, but not exon 37a, and activation by the agonist quinpirole reversed the effect of the D2R. Our work thus reveals key mechanisms involved in the trafficking of N-type calcium channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT CaV2.2 channels are important for neurotransmitter release, but how they are trafficked is still poorly understood. Here, we describe a novel mechanism for trafficking of CaV2.2 from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface which is mediated by the adaptor protein AP-1. Alternative splicing of exon 37 produces CaV2.2-exon 37a, selectively expressed in nociceptors, or CaV2.2-exon 37b, which is the major splice isoform. Our study reveals that canonical AP-1 binding motifs (YxxΦ and [DE]xxxL[LI]), present in exon 37a, but not 37b, enhance intracellular trafficking of exon 37a-containing CaV2.2 to axons and plasma membrane of DRG neurons. Interaction of APs with CaV2.2 channels may also be key underlying mechanisms for differential effects of the dopamine D2 receptor on trafficking of CaV2.2 splice variants. PMID:26511252

  4. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  5. A Phase II Multicenter Trial With Rivaroxaban in the Treatment of Livedoid Vasculopathy Assessing Pain on a Visual Analog Scale

    PubMed Central

    Drabik, Attyla; Hillgruber, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Background Livedoid vasculopathy is an orphan skin disease characterized by recurrent thrombosis of the cutaneous microcirculation. It manifests itself almost exclusively in the ankles, the back of the feet, and the distal part of the lower legs. Because of the vascular occlusion, patients suffer from intense local ischemic pain. Incidence of livedoid vasculopathy is estimated to be around 1:100,000. There are currently no approved treatments for livedoid vasculopathy, making off-label therapy the only option. In Europe, thromboprophylactic treatment with low-molecular-weight heparins has become widely accepted. Objective The aim of this trial is the statistical verification of the therapeutic effects of the anticoagulant rivaroxaban in patients suffering from livedoid vasculopathy. Methods We performed a therapeutic phase IIa trial designed as a prospective, one-armed, multicenter, interventional series of cases with a calculated sample size of 20 patients. The primary outcome is the assessment of local pain on the visual analog scale (VAS) as an intraindividual difference of 2 values between baseline and 12 weeks. Results Enrollment started in December 2012 and was still open at the date of submission. The study is expected to finish in November 2014. Conclusions Livedoid vasculopathy is associated with increased thrombophilia in the cutaneous microcirculation and the continuous use of anticoagulants helps improve the symptoms. The causes of cutaneous infarctions are heterogenous, but ultimately follow the known mechanisms of the coagulation cascade. Rivaroxaban affects the coagulation cascade and inhibits the factor Xa–dependent conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, thereby considerably reducing the risk of thrombosis. Trial Registration Trial Registration EudraCT Number: 2012-000108-13-DE; https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search?query=eudract_number:2012-000108-13 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6UCktWVCA); German Clinical

  6. Proximal humeral osteoarticular allografts: technique, pearls and pitfalls, outcomes.

    PubMed

    Farfalli, German L; Ayerza, Miguel A; Muscolo, D Luis; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A

    2015-12-01

    Allograft transplantation is a biologic reconstruction option for massive bone defects after resection of bone sarcomas. This type of reconstruction not only restores bone stock but it also allows us to reconstruct the joint anatomically. These factors are a major concern, especially in a young and active population.We are describing indications, surgical techniques, pearls and pitfalls, and outcomes of proximal humeral osteoarticular allografts, done at present time in our institution.We found that allograft fractures and articular complications, as epiphyseal resorption and subchondral fracture, are the main complications observed in proximal humerus osteoarticular allograft reconstructions. Nevertheless, only fractures need a reconstruction revision. Joint complications may adversely affect the limb function, but for this reason, an allograft revision is rarely performed.

  7. Surgical techniques and radiological findings of meniscus allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang Yub; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, So Mi

    2016-08-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation has been performed over the past 25 years to relieve knee pain and improve knee function in patients with an irreparable meniscus injury. The efficacy and safety of meniscus allograft transplantation have been established in numerous experimental and clinical researches. However, there is a lack of reviews to aid radiologists who are routinely interpreting images and evaluating the outcome of the procedures, and also meniscus allograft transplantation is not widely performed in most hospitals. This review focuses on the indications of the procedure, the different surgical techniques used for meniscus allograft transplantation according to the involvement of the lateral and medial meniscus, and the associated procedures. The postoperative radiological findings and surgical complications of the meniscus allograft transplantation are also described in detail.

  8. Variation in seed traits and germination potential of Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav. Following its invasion in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav. (Silverleaf nightshade) is presently considered to be one of the worst agricultural weeds around the world including the Mediterranean basin. Plant’s native range is considered to be an area expanding from Southern US to Northern Mexico. Introduced unintentionally from so...

  9. CAV-OX CAVITATION OXIDIATION PROCESS - MAGNUM WATER TECHNOLOGY, INC. - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report evaluates the ability of the CAV-OX cavitation oxidation process to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC) present in aqueous wastes. This report also presents economic data based on the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program demonstration and nine...

  10. CACNA1C (Cav1.2) in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Shambhu; Dao, David T.; Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Arad, Michal; Smith, Robert J.; Soldatov, Nikolai M.; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most consistent genetic findings to have emerged from bipolar disorder genome wide association studies (GWAS) is with CACNA1C, a gene that codes for the α1C subunit of the Cav1.2 voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel (LTCC). Genetic variation in CACNA1C have also been associated with depression, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, as well as changes in brain function and structure in control subjects who have no diagnosable psychiatric illness. These data are consistent with a continuum of shared neurobiological vulnerability between diverse—Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) defined—neuropsychiatric diseases. While involved in numerous cellular functions, Cav1.2 is most frequently implicated in coupling of cell membrane depolarization to transient increase of the membrane permeability for calcium, leading to activation and, potentially, changes in intracellular signaling pathway activity, gene transcription, and synaptic plasticity. Cav1.2 is involved in the proper function of numerous neurological circuits including those involving the hippocampus, amygdala, and mesolimbic reward system, which are strongly implicated in psychiatric disease pathophysiology. A number of behavioral effects of LTCC inhibitors have been described including antidepressant-like behavioral actions in rodent models. Clinical studies suggest possible treatment effects in a subset of patients with mood disorders. We review the genetic structure and variation of CACNA1C, discussing relevant human genetic and clinical findings, as well as the biological actions of Cav1.2 that are most relevant to psychiatric illness. PMID:22705413

  11. Roscovitine inhibits CaV3.1 (T-type) channels by preferentially affecting closed-state inactivation.

    PubMed

    Yarotskyy, Viktor; Elmslie, Keith S

    2012-02-01

    T-type calcium channels (Ca(V)3) play an important role in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancerogenesis. Ca(V)3 channel blockers have been proposed as potential cancer treatments. Roscovitine, a trisubstituted purine, is a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that is currently undergoing phase II clinical trials as an anticancer drug and has been shown to affect calcium and potassium channel activity. Here, we investigate the effect of roscovitine on Ca(V)3.1 channels. Ca(V)3.1 channels were transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, and currents were recorded by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Roscovitine blocks Ca(V)3.1 channels with higher affinity for depolarized cells (EC₅₀ of 10 μM), which is associated with a negative shift in the voltage dependence of closed-state inactivation. Enhanced inactivation is mediated by roscovitine-induced acceleration of closed-state inactivation and slowed recovery from inactivation. Small effects of roscovitine were also observed on T-channel deactivation and open-state inactivation, but neither could explain the inhibitory effect. Roscovitine inhibits Ca(V)3.1 channels within the therapeutic range (10-50 μM) in part by stabilizing the closed-inactivated state. The ability of roscovitine to block multiple mediators of proliferation, including CDKs and Ca(V)3.1 channels, may facilitate its anticancer properties. PMID:22088954

  12. Developing Pulmonary Vasculopathy in Systemic Sclerosis, Detected with Non-Invasive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Daniel; Oudiz, Ronald J.; Karpouzas, George; Hovanesyan, Arsen; Jayasinghe, Amali; Hansen, James E.; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Wasserman, Karlman

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) may develop exercise intolerance due to musculoskeletal involvement, restrictive lung disease, left ventricular dysfunction, or pulmonary vasculopathy (PV). The latter is particularly important since it may lead to lethal pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hypothesized that abnormalities during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in patients with SSc can identify PV leading to overt PAH. Methods Thirty SSc patients from the Harbor-UCLA Rheumatology clinic, not clinically suspected of having significant pulmonary vascular disease, were referred for this prospective study. Resting pulmonary function and exercise gas exchange were assessed, including peakVO2, anaerobic threshold (AT), heart rate- VO2 relationship (O2-pulse), exercise breathing reserve and parameters of ventilation-perfusion mismatching, as evidenced by elevated ventilatory equivalent for CO2 (VE/VCO2) and reduced end-tidal pCO2 (PETCO2) at the AT. Results Gas exchange patterns were abnormal in 16 pts with specific cardiopulmonary disease physiology: Eleven patients had findings consistent with PV, while five had findings consistent with left-ventricular dysfunction (LVD). Although both groups had low peak VO2 and AT, a higher VE/VCO2 at AT and decreasing PETCO2 during early exercise distinguished PV from LVD. Conclusions Previously undiagnosed exercise impairments due to LVD or PV were common in our SSc patients. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing may help to differentiate and detect these disorders early in patients with SSc. PMID:21179195

  13. Ca(V)1.3-driven SK channel activation regulates pacemaking and spike frequency adaptation in mouse chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Vandael, David H F; Zuccotti, Annalisa; Striessnig, Joerg; Carbone, Emilio

    2012-11-14

    Mouse chromaffin cells (MCCs) fire spontaneous action potentials (APs) at rest. Ca(v)1.3 L-type calcium channels sustain the pacemaker current, and their loss results in depolarized resting potentials (V(rest)), spike broadening, and remarkable switches into depolarization block after BayK 8644 application. A functional coupling between Ca(v)1.3 and BK channels has been reported but cannot fully account for the aforementioned observations. Here, using Ca(v)1.3(-/-) mice, we investigated the role of Ca(v)1.3 on SK channel activation and how this functional coupling affects the firing patterns induced by sustained current injections. MCCs express SK1-3 channels whose tonic currents are responsible for the slow irregular firing observed at rest. Percentage of frequency increase induced by apamin was found inversely correlated to basal firing frequency. Upon stimulation, MCCs build-up Ca(v)1.3-dependent SK currents during the interspike intervals that lead to a notable degree of spike frequency adaptation (SFA). The major contribution of Ca(v)1.3 to the subthreshold Ca(2+) charge during an AP-train rather than a specific molecular coupling to SK channels accounts for the reduced SFA of Ca(v)1.3(-/-) MCCs. Low adaptation ratios due to reduced SK activation associated with Ca(v)1.3 deficiency prevent the efficient recovery of Na(V) channels from inactivation. This promotes a rapid decline of AP amplitudes and facilitates early onset of depolarization block following prolonged stimulation. Thus, besides serving as pacemaker, Ca(v)1.3 slows down MCC firing by activating SK channels that maintain Na(V) channel availability high enough to preserve stable AP waveforms, even upon high-frequency stimulation of chromaffin cells during stress responses. PMID:23152617

  14. Similar molecular determinants on Rem mediate two distinct modes of inhibition of CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Puckerin, Akil A.; Chang, Donald D.; Subramanyam, Prakash; Colecraft, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rad/Rem/Rem2/Gem (RGK) proteins are Ras-like GTPases that potently inhibit all high-voltage-gated calcium (CaV1/CaV2) channels and are, thus, well-positioned to tune diverse physiological processes. Understanding how RGK proteins inhibit CaV channels is important for perspectives on their (patho)physiological roles and could advance their development and use as genetically-encoded CaV channel blockers. We previously reported that Rem can block surface CaV1.2 channels in 2 independent ways that engage distinct components of the channel complex: (1) by binding auxiliary β subunits (β-binding-dependent inhibition, or BBD); and (2) by binding the pore-forming α1C subunit N-terminus (α1C-binding-dependent inhibition, or ABD). By contrast, Gem uses only the BBD mechanism to block CaV1.2. Rem molecular determinants required for BBD CaV1.2 inhibition are the distal C-terminus and the guanine nucleotide binding G-domain which interact with the plasma membrane and CaVβ, respectively. However, Rem determinants for ABD CaV1.2 inhibition are unknown. Here, combining fluorescence resonance energy transfer, electrophysiology, systematic truncations, and Rem/Gem chimeras we found that the same Rem distal C-terminus and G-domain also mediate ABD CaV1.2 inhibition, but with different interaction partners. Rem distal C-terminus interacts with α1C N-terminus to anchor the G-domain which likely interacts with an as-yet-unidentified site. In contrast to some previous studies, neither the C-terminus of Rem nor Gem was sufficient to inhibit CaV1/CaV2 channels. The results reveal that similar molecular determinants on Rem are repurposed to initiate 2 independent mechanisms of CaV1.2 inhibition. PMID:27115600

  15. Autograft Versus Nonirradiated Allograft Tissue for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mariscalco, Michael W.; Magnussen, Robert A.; Mehta, Divyesh; Hewett, Timothy E.; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Background An autograft has traditionally been the gold standard for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), but the use of allograft tissue has increased in recent years. While numerous studies have demonstrated that irradiated allografts are associated with increased failure rates, some report excellent results after ACLR with nonirradiated allografts. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine whether the use of nonirradiated allograft tissue is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with autografts. Hypothesis Patients undergoing ACLR with autografts versus nonirradiated allografts will demonstrate no significant differences in graft failure risk, laxity on postoperative physical examination, or differences in patient-oriented outcome scores. Study Design Systematic review. Methods A systematic review was performed to identify prospective or retrospective comparative studies (evidence level 1, 2, or 3) of autografts versus nonirradiated allografts for ACLR. Outcome data included graft failure based on clinical findings and instrumented laxity, postoperative laxity on physical examination, and patient-reported outcome scores. Studies were excluded if they did not specify whether the allograft had been irradiated. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed by 2 examiners. Results Nine studies comparing autografts and nonirradiated allografts were included. Six of the 9 studies compared bone– patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autografts with BPTB allografts. Two studies compared hamstring tendon autografts to hamstring tendon allografts, and 1 study compared hamstring tendon autografts to tibialis anterior allografts. The mean patient age in 7 of 9 studies ranged from 24.5 to 32 years, with 1 study including only patients older than 40 years and another not reporting patient age. The mean follow-up duration was 24 to 94 months. Six of 9 studies reported clinical graft failure rates, 8 of 9 reported postoperative instrumented

  16. Sterilization of skin allografts by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Bourroul, Selma Cecília; Herson, Marisa Roma; Pino, Eddy; Matho, Monica Beatriz

    2002-11-01

    The skin has a fundamental role in the viability of human body. In the case of extensive wounds, skin allografts provide an alternative to cover temporarily the damaged areas. After donor screening and preservation in glycerol 85%, the skin can be stored in a Skin Bank. Glycerol at this concentration has a bacteriostatic effect after certain time of preservation. On the other hand, skin sterilization by ionizing radiation may reduce the quarentine period for transplantation in patients. The objective of this work was to evaluate allograft sterilization using two sources of ionizing radiation. Through the analysis of stress-strain, it was intended to verify possible effects of the radiation on the structure of preserved grafts. Three groups of skin samples were selected. The first group was maintained in the initial conditions, not irradiated. The second was exposed to cobalt-60, while the third one was irradiated using an Dynamitron Accelerator JOB188 electron beam. The irradiation dose was 25 kGy for both tests. Both irradiation sources, and the Instron Universal Machine used for biomechanical experiments, are installed at the Centro de Tecnologia das Radiações/Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (São Paulo, Brazil). According to the preliminary results, biomechanical characteristics of the samples irradiated seem to be maintained with regard to the non irradiated group.

  17. Erythroblast transformation-specific 2 correlates with vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rat heterotopic heart transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Yan, Daliang; Li, Yangcheng; Sha, Xilin; Wu, Kunpeng; Zhao, Jianhua; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) decreases the long-term survival of heart transplantation recipients. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis is an important pathological feature of CAV. Erythroblast transformation-specific 2 (Ets-2), as a transcription factor, participates in cell apoptosis and plays an important role in organ transplantation. Methods Hearts from Wistar-Furth (WF:RT1u) rats were heterotopically transplanted into Lewis (Lew:RT1l) rats without immunosuppression. Additional syngeneic heterotopic cardiac transplantations were performed in Lewis rats. HE staining was used to identify CAV. Ets-2 expression was examined by western blot. Ets-2 tissue location was examined by immunohistochemical assay and double immunostaining. Cleaved caspase 3 expression was detected by western blot. Co-localization of Ets-2 and cleaved caspase 3 was detected by double immunostaining. Ets-2, p53, cleaved caspase 3 and Bcl-xl expression in rat VSMC line A7R5 was examined after Ets-2 siRNA transfection. TUNEL assay was applied to detect A7R5 apoptosis with or without ETS-2 siRNA transfection. Immunoprecipitation was performed to explore the interaction between Ets-2 and p53. Results Ets-2 expression decreased in the allograft group but had no obvious change in the isograft group. Meanwhile, the phenomenon of CAV was observed in the allograft group and there is neointima formation in the isograft group which is not obvious compared with allograft group. Additionally, Ets-2 expression was opposite to VSMC apoptosis in the allograft group. In vitro, Ets-2 siRNA transfection in A7R5cells resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis. Finally, Ets-2 interacted with p53. Conclusions Ets-2 might inhibit VSMC apoptosis via p53 pathway. The results further elucidate the molecular mechanism of VSMC apoptosis after heart transplantation during CAV and provide theoretical basis for seeking new specific drug targets for CAV prevention and treatment.

  18. Erythroblast transformation-specific 2 correlates with vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rat heterotopic heart transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Yan, Daliang; Li, Yangcheng; Sha, Xilin; Wu, Kunpeng; Zhao, Jianhua; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) decreases the long-term survival of heart transplantation recipients. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis is an important pathological feature of CAV. Erythroblast transformation-specific 2 (Ets-2), as a transcription factor, participates in cell apoptosis and plays an important role in organ transplantation. Methods Hearts from Wistar-Furth (WF:RT1u) rats were heterotopically transplanted into Lewis (Lew:RT1l) rats without immunosuppression. Additional syngeneic heterotopic cardiac transplantations were performed in Lewis rats. HE staining was used to identify CAV. Ets-2 expression was examined by western blot. Ets-2 tissue location was examined by immunohistochemical assay and double immunostaining. Cleaved caspase 3 expression was detected by western blot. Co-localization of Ets-2 and cleaved caspase 3 was detected by double immunostaining. Ets-2, p53, cleaved caspase 3 and Bcl-xl expression in rat VSMC line A7R5 was examined after Ets-2 siRNA transfection. TUNEL assay was applied to detect A7R5 apoptosis with or without ETS-2 siRNA transfection. Immunoprecipitation was performed to explore the interaction between Ets-2 and p53. Results Ets-2 expression decreased in the allograft group but had no obvious change in the isograft group. Meanwhile, the phenomenon of CAV was observed in the allograft group and there is neointima formation in the isograft group which is not obvious compared with allograft group. Additionally, Ets-2 expression was opposite to VSMC apoptosis in the allograft group. In vitro, Ets-2 siRNA transfection in A7R5cells resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis. Finally, Ets-2 interacted with p53. Conclusions Ets-2 might inhibit VSMC apoptosis via p53 pathway. The results further elucidate the molecular mechanism of VSMC apoptosis after heart transplantation during CAV and provide theoretical basis for seeking new specific drug targets for CAV prevention and treatment. PMID:27621856

  19. Autograft versus allograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Shun-Li; Yuan, Zhi-Fang; Ning, Guang-Zhi; Yang, Bo; Li, Hai-Liang; Sun, Jing-Cheng; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is considered as the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of ACL tear. However, there is a crucial controversy in terms of whether to use autograft or allograft in ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare autograft with allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials that compared autograft with allograft in ACL reconstruction up to January 31, 2016. The relative risk or mean difference with 95% confidence interval was calculated using either a fixed- or random-effects model. The risk of bias for individual studies according to the Cochrane Handbook. The trial sequential analysis was used to test the robustness of our findings and get more conservative estimates. Results: Thirteen trials were included, involving 1636 participants. The results of this meta-analysis indicated that autograft brought about lower clinical failure, better overall International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) level, better pivot-shift test, better Lachman test, greater Tegner score, and better instrumented laxity test (P < 0.05) than allograft. Autograft was not statistically different from allograft in Lysholm score, subjective IKDC score, and Daniel 1-leg hop test (P > 0.05). Subgroup analyses demonstrated that autograft was superior to irradiated allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction in clinical failure, Lysholm score, pivot-shift test, Lachman test, Tegner score, instrumented laxity test, and subjective IKDC score (P < 0.05). Moreover, there were no significant differences between autograft and nonirradiated allograft. Conclusions: Autograft is superior to irradiated allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction concerning knee function and laxity, but there are no significant differences between autograft and nonirradiated allograft. However

  20. Autograft, allograft and bone substitutes in reconstructive orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiarello, Eugenio; Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Capra, Paola; Calamelli, Carlotta; Shehu, Alba; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-10-01

    Reconstruction of bone defects is a challenge for all orthopedic surgeons worldwide; to overcome this problem there are different options: the use of autografts, allografts and bone substitutes (BSs) to enhance and accelerate bone repair. Autografts have excellent biological properties but are associated with morbidity of the donor site and are restricted in volume. Allografts are available in adequate quantity but concerns still remain about the risk of infections, moreover they do not have osteogenetic properties. Bone substitutes have different indications and are very attractive for orthopedic surgeons. The present paper briefly reviews the advantages and disadvantages of autografts, allografts and BSs for bone reconstruction.

  1. Acute and Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ryan J; Weng, Francis L; Kandula, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Allograft dysfunction after a kidney transplant is often clinically asymptomatic and is usually detected as an increase in serum creatinine level with corresponding decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The diagnostic evaluation may include blood tests, urinalysis, transplant ultrasonography, radionuclide imaging, and allograft biopsy. Whether it occurs early or later after transplant, allograft dysfunction requires prompt evaluation to determine its cause and subsequent management. Acute rejection, medication toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors, and BK virus nephropathy can occur early or later. Other later causes include transplant glomerulopathy, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and renal artery stenosis.

  2. Phosphorylation of Cav1.2 on S1928 uncouples the L-type Ca2+ channel from the β2 adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Patriarchi, Tommaso; Qian, Hai; Di Biase, Valentina; Malik, Zulfiquar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Price, Jennifer L; Hammes, Erik A; Buonarati, Olivia R; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Catterall, William A; Hofmann, Franz; Xiang, Yang K; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Chen, Chao-Ye; Navedo, Manuel F; Hell, Johannes W

    2016-06-15

    Agonist-triggered downregulation of β-adrenergic receptors (ARs) constitutes vital negative feedback to prevent cellular overexcitation. Here, we report a novel downregulation of β2AR signaling highly specific for Cav1.2. We find that β2-AR binding to Cav1.2 residues 1923-1942 is required for β-adrenergic regulation of Cav1.2. Despite the prominence of PKA-mediated phosphorylation of Cav1.2 S1928 within the newly identified β2AR binding site, its physiological function has so far escaped identification. We show that phosphorylation of S1928 displaces the β2AR from Cav1.2 upon β-adrenergic stimulation rendering Cav1.2 refractory for several minutes from further β-adrenergic stimulation. This effect is lost in S1928A knock-in mice. Although AMPARs are clustered at postsynaptic sites like Cav1.2, β2AR association with and regulation of AMPARs do not show such dissociation. Accordingly, displacement of the β2AR from Cav1.2 is a uniquely specific desensitization mechanism of Cav1.2 regulation by highly localized β2AR/cAMP/PKA/S1928 signaling. The physiological implications of this mechanism are underscored by our finding that LTP induced by prolonged theta tetanus (PTT-LTP) depends on Cav1.2 and its regulation by channel-associated β2AR. PMID:27103070

  3. Phosphorylation of Cav1.2 on S1928 uncouples the L-type Ca2+ channel from the β2 adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Patriarchi, Tommaso; Qian, Hai; Di Biase, Valentina; Malik, Zulfiquar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Price, Jennifer L; Hammes, Erik A; Buonarati, Olivia R; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Catterall, William A; Hofmann, Franz; Xiang, Yang K; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Chen, Chao-Ye; Navedo, Manuel F; Hell, Johannes W

    2016-06-15

    Agonist-triggered downregulation of β-adrenergic receptors (ARs) constitutes vital negative feedback to prevent cellular overexcitation. Here, we report a novel downregulation of β2AR signaling highly specific for Cav1.2. We find that β2-AR binding to Cav1.2 residues 1923-1942 is required for β-adrenergic regulation of Cav1.2. Despite the prominence of PKA-mediated phosphorylation of Cav1.2 S1928 within the newly identified β2AR binding site, its physiological function has so far escaped identification. We show that phosphorylation of S1928 displaces the β2AR from Cav1.2 upon β-adrenergic stimulation rendering Cav1.2 refractory for several minutes from further β-adrenergic stimulation. This effect is lost in S1928A knock-in mice. Although AMPARs are clustered at postsynaptic sites like Cav1.2, β2AR association with and regulation of AMPARs do not show such dissociation. Accordingly, displacement of the β2AR from Cav1.2 is a uniquely specific desensitization mechanism of Cav1.2 regulation by highly localized β2AR/cAMP/PKA/S1928 signaling. The physiological implications of this mechanism are underscored by our finding that LTP induced by prolonged theta tetanus (PTT-LTP) depends on Cav1.2 and its regulation by channel-associated β2AR.

  4. Evidence of a novel gene HERPUD1 in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Enzhong; Bai, Yujing; Huang, Lvzhen; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Chunfang; Zhao, Mingwei; Li, Xiaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) is an exudative maculopathy, with clinical features distinct from neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) which is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. Our studies focused on the genetic background and function of a novel gene HERPUD1 in PCV. HERPUD1 has been reported to increase the level of amyloid β (Aβ), which is a component of drusen deposits underlying the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer. To verify the genetic functional associations of HERPUD1 with PCV, exome sequencing of HERPUD1 was performed in unrelated Chinese individuals, including nAMD patients, PCV patients and control subjects. Immunohistochemistry assays for HERPUD1 were performed in the subretinal membranes of PCV patients. The relationship between HERPUD1 and amyloid beta precursor was determined using real-time PCR in HERPUD1-overexpressing RPE cells. The gene expression patterns of angiogenesis cytokines and chemokines in both Aβ-treated RPE cells and in Brown Norway rats that received Aβ subretinal injections were determined. We showed that HERPUD1 rs2217332 is significant associated with Chinese PCV, and HERPUD1 was expressed in PCV subretinal membranes. Besides, Plasma Aβ42 protein was significantly higher in PCV patients compared to nAMD and control subjects. Aβ could upregulate angiogenic factors, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases both in RPE cells and in a rat model of subretinal Aβ injection. The imbalance of the cytokines may be one of the mechanisms for the formation and development of PCV. Our results strongly suggest that HERPUD1 is highly associated with PCV patients. PMID:26823705

  5. HTRA1 promoter variant differentiates polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy from exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tsz Kin; Liang, Xiao Ying; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ma, Li; Tam, Pancy O S; Wang, Jian Xiong; Chen, Li Jia; Chen, Haoyu; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) share similar abnormal choroidal vasculature, but responses to treatments are different. In this study, we sequenced the whole HTRA1 gene and its promoter by direct sequencing in a Hong Kong Chinese PCV cohort. We identified rs11200638, c.34delCinsTCCT, c.59C>T, rs1049331 and rs2293870 significantly associated with PCV. Notably, rs2672598 was significantly associated with exudative AMD (p = 1.31 × 10(-4)) than PCV (p = 0.11). Logistic regression indicated that rs2672598 (p = 2.27 × 10(-3)) remained significant after adjusting for rs11200638 in exudative AMD. Moreover, the rs11200638-rs2672598 joint genotype AA-CC conferred higher risk to exudative AMD (43.11 folds) than PCV (3.68 folds). Promoter analysis showed that rs2672598 C-allele showed higher luciferase expression than wildtype T-allele (p = 0.026), independent of rs11200638 genotype (p = 0.621). Coherently, vitreous humor HTRA1 expression with rs2672598 CC genotype was significantly higher than that with TT genotype by 2.56 folds (p = 0.02). Furthermore, rs2672598 C-allele was predicted to alter the transcription factor binding sites, but not rs11200638 A-allele. Our results revealed that HTRA1 rs2672598 is more significantly associated with exudative AMD than PCV in ARMS2/HTRA1 region, and it is responsible for elevated HTRA1 transcriptional activity and HTRA1 protein expression. PMID:27338780

  6. HTRA1 promoter variant differentiates polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy from exudative age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Tsz Kin; Liang, Xiao Ying; Lai, Timothy Y. Y.; Ma, Li; Tam, Pancy O. S.; Wang, Jian Xiong; Chen, Li Jia; Chen, Haoyu; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) share similar abnormal choroidal vasculature, but responses to treatments are different. In this study, we sequenced the whole HTRA1 gene and its promoter by direct sequencing in a Hong Kong Chinese PCV cohort. We identified rs11200638, c.34delCinsTCCT, c.59C>T, rs1049331 and rs2293870 significantly associated with PCV. Notably, rs2672598 was significantly associated with exudative AMD (p = 1.31 × 10−4) than PCV (p = 0.11). Logistic regression indicated that rs2672598 (p = 2.27 × 10−3) remained significant after adjusting for rs11200638 in exudative AMD. Moreover, the rs11200638-rs2672598 joint genotype AA-CC conferred higher risk to exudative AMD (43.11 folds) than PCV (3.68 folds). Promoter analysis showed that rs2672598 C-allele showed higher luciferase expression than wildtype T-allele (p = 0.026), independent of rs11200638 genotype (p = 0.621). Coherently, vitreous humor HTRA1 expression with rs2672598 CC genotype was significantly higher than that with TT genotype by 2.56 folds (p = 0.02). Furthermore, rs2672598 C-allele was predicted to alter the transcription factor binding sites, but not rs11200638 A-allele. Our results revealed that HTRA1 rs2672598 is more significantly associated with exudative AMD than PCV in ARMS2/HTRA1 region, and it is responsible for elevated HTRA1 transcriptional activity and HTRA1 protein expression. PMID:27338780

  7. Dual-Axis Rotational Coronary Angiography: A New Technique for Detecting Graft Coronary Vasculopathy in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gudausky, Todd M.; Pelech, Andrew N.; Stendahl, Gail; Tillman, Kathryn; Mattice, Judy; Berger, Stuart; Zangwill, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Annual surveillance coronary angiograpyhy to screen for graft coronary vasculopathy is routine practice after orthotopic heart transplantation. Traditionally, this is performed with direct coronary angiography using static single-plane or biplane angiography. Recently, technological advances have made it possible to perform dual-axis rotational coronary angiography (RA). This technique differs from standard static single-plane or biplane angiography in that a single detector is preprogrammed to swing through a complex 80° arc during a single injection. It has the advantage of providing a perspective of the vessels from a full arc of images rather than from one or two static images per contrast injection. The current study evaluated two coronary angiography techniques used consecutively at a single center to evaluate pediatric heart transplant recipients for graft coronary vasculopathy. A total of 23 patients underwent routine coronary angiography using both biplane static coronary angiography (BiP) and RA techniques at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin from February 2009 to September 2010. Demographic and procedure data were collected from each procedure and analyzed for significance utilizing a Wilcoxon rank sum test. No significant demographic or procedural differences between the BiP and the RA procedures were noted. Specific measures of radiation dose including fluoroscopy time and dose area product were similar among the imaging techniques. The findings show that RA can be performed safely and reproducibly in pediatric heart transplant recipients. Compared with standard BiP, RA does not increase radiation exposure or contrast use and in our experience has provided superior angiographic imaging for the evaluation of graft coronary vasculopathy. PMID:22956061

  8. Semaphorin 3A induces CaV2.3 channel-dependent conversion of axons to dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Makoto; Togashi, Kazunobu; von Schimmelmann, Melanie J.; Lim, Chae-Seok; Maeda, Shin-ichi; Yamashita, Naoya; Goshima, Yoshio; Ishii, Shin; Hong, Kyonsoo

    2012-01-01

    Polarized neurites, axons and dendrites, form the functional circuitry of the nervous system. Secreted guidance cues often convert the polarity of neuron migration and neurite outgrowth by regulating ion channels. Here, we show that secreted semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) converts the neurite identity of Xenopus spinal commissural interneurons (xSCINs) by activating CaV2.3 channels (CaV2.3). Sema3A treatment converted the identity of axons of cultured xSCINs to that of dendrites by recruiting functional CaV2.3. Inhibition of Sema3A signalling prevented both the expression of CaV2.3 and acquisition of the dendrite identity, and inhibition of CaV2.3 function resulted in multiple axon-like neurites of xSCINs in the spinal cord. Furthermore, Sema3A-triggered cGMP production and PKG activity induced, respectively, the expression of functional CaV2.3 and the dendrite identity. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which a guidance cue controls the identity of neurites during nervous system development. PMID:21602796

  9. Thermomechanical repository and shaft response analyses using the CAVS (Cracking And Void Strain) jointed rock model: Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dial, B.W.; Maxwell, D.E.

    1986-12-01

    Numerical studies of the far-field repository and near-field shaft response for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt have been performed with the STEALTH computer code using the CAVS model for jointed rock. CAVS is a constitutive model that can simulate the slip and dilatancy of fracture planes in a jointed rock mass. The initiation and/or propagation of fractures can also be modeled when stress intensity criteria are met. The CAVS models are based on the joint models proposed with appropriate modifications for numerical simulations. The STEALTH/CAVS model has been previously used to model (1) explosive fracturing of a wellbore, (2) earthquake effects on tunnels in a generic nuclear waste repository, (3) horizontal emplacement for a nuclear waste repository in jointed granite, and (4) tunnel response in jointed rock. The use of CAVS to model far-field repository and near-field shaft response was different from previous approaches because it represented a spatially oriented approach to rock response and failure, rather than the traditional stress invariant formulation for yielding. In addition, CAVS tracked the response of the joint apertures to the time-dependent stress changes in the far-field repository and near-field shaft regions. 28 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Ca2+ entry into neurons is facilitated by cooperative gating of clustered CaV1.3 channels

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Claudia M; Dixon, Rose E; Tajada, Sendoa; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Santana, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    CaV1.3 channels regulate excitability in many neurons. As is the case for all voltage-gated channels, it is widely assumed that individual CaV1.3 channels behave independently with respect to voltage-activation, open probability, and facilitation. Here, we report the results of super-resolution imaging, optogenetic, and electrophysiological measurements that refute this long-held view. We found that the short channel isoform (CaV1.3S), but not the long (CaV1.3L), associates in functional clusters of two or more channels that open cooperatively, facilitating Ca2+ influx. CaV1.3S channels are coupled via a C-terminus-to-C-terminus interaction that requires binding of the incoming Ca2+ to calmodulin (CaM) and subsequent binding of CaM to the pre-IQ domain of the channels. Physically-coupled channels facilitate Ca2+ currents as a consequence of their higher open probabilities, leading to increased firing rates in rat hippocampal neurons. We propose that cooperative gating of CaV1.3S channels represents a mechanism for the regulation of Ca2+ signaling and electrical activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15744.001 PMID:27187148

  11. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S.; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. PMID:25981458

  12. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. PMID:25981458

  13. Dysplasia Epiphysealis Hemimelica Treated with Osteochondral Allograft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Chris A.; Wolf, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), or Trevor's disease, is a developmental disorder of the pediatric skeleton characterized by asymmetric osteochondral overgrowth. Methods We present the case of a five year old boy with a two year history of right knee pain and evidence of DEH on imaging who underwent initial arthroscopic resection of his lesion with subsequent recurrence. The patient then underwent osteochondral allograft revision surgery and was asymptomatic at two year follow-up with a congruent joint surface. Results To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a DEH lesion treated with osteochondral allograft and also the youngest reported case of osteochondral allograft placement in the literature. Conclusions Osteochondral allograft may be a viable option in DEH and other deformities of the pediatric knee. Level of Evidence Level V PMID:26361443

  14. Deletion of the L-type Calcium Channel CaV1.3 but not CaV1.2 Results in a Diminished sAHP in Mouse CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamelli, Amy E.; McKinney, Brandon C.; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2009-01-01

    Trains of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons are followed by a prolonged calcium-dependent post-burst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) that serves to limit further firing to a sustained depolarizing input. A reduction in the AHP accompanies acquisition of several types of learning and increases in the AHP are correlated with age-related cognitive impairment. The AHP develops primarily as the result of activation of outward calcium-activated potassium currents; however the precise source of calcium for activation of the AHP remains unclear. There is substantial experimental evidence suggesting that calcium influx via voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (L-VGCCs) contributes to the generation of the AHP. Two L-VGCC subtypes are predominately expressed in the hippocampus, CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, however it is not known which L-VGCC subtype is involved in generation of the AHP. This ambiguity is due in large part to the fact that at present there are no subunit-specific agonists or antagonists. Therefore, using mice in which the gene encoding CaV1.2 or CaV1.3 was deleted, we sought to determine the impact of alterations in levels of these two L-VCGG subtypes on neuronal excitability. No differences in any AHP measure were seen between neurons from CaV1.2 knockout mice and controls. However, the total area of the AHP was significantly smaller in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to neurons from wildtype controls. A significant reduction in the amplitude of the AHP was also seen at the 1 sec time point in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to those from controls. Reductions in both the area and 1 sec amplitude suggest the involvement of calcium influx via CaV1.3 in the slow AHP (sAHP). Thus, the results of our study demonstrate that deletion of CaV1.3, but not CaV1.2, significantly impacts the generation of the sAHP. PMID:20014384

  15. CAV3 mutations causing exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis: Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies.

    PubMed

    Scalco, Renata Siciliani; Gardiner, Alice R; Pitceathly, Robert D S; Hilton-Jones, David; Schapira, Anthony H; Turner, Chris; Parton, Matt; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Barresi, Rita; Marsh, Julie; Manzur, Adnan Y; Childs, Anne-Marie; Feng, Lucy; Murphy, Elaine; Lamont, Phillipa J; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Wallefeld, William; Davis, Mark R; Laing, Nigel G; Holton, Janice L; Fialho, Doreen; Bushby, Kate; Hanna, Michael G; Phadke, Rahul; Jungbluth, Heinz; Houlden, Henry; Quinlivan, Ros

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is often due to a combination of environmental trigger(s) and genetic predisposition; however, the underlying genetic cause remains elusive in many cases. Mutations in CAV3 lead to various neuromuscular phenotypes with partial overlap, including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD1C), rippling muscle disease, distal myopathy and isolated hyperCKemia. Here we present a series of eight patients from seven families presenting with exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis caused by mutations in CAV3 diagnosed by next generation sequencing (NGS) (n = 6). Symptoms included myalgia (n = 7), exercise intolerance (n = 7) and episodes of rhabdomyolysis (n = 2). Percussion-induced rapid muscle contractions (PIRCs) were seen in five out of six patients examined. A previously reported heterozygous mutation in CAV3 (p.T78M) and three novel variants (p.V14I, p.F41S, p.F54V) were identified. Caveolin-3 immunolabeling in muscle was normal in 3/4 patients; however, immunoblotting showed more than 50% reduction of caveolin-3 in five patients compared with controls. This case series demonstrates that exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis may be caused by CAV3 mutations and broadens the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies. In our series, immunoblotting was a more sensitive method to detect reduced caveolin-3 levels than immunohistochemistry in skeletal muscle. Patients presenting with muscle pain, exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis should be routinely tested for PIRCs as this may be an important clinical clue for caveolinopathies, even in the absence of other "typical" features. The use of NGS may expand current knowledge concerning inherited diseases, and unexpected/atypical phenotypes may be attributed to well-known human disease genes. PMID:27312022

  16. Deceased donor skin allograft banking: Response and utilization

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Madhuri A.; De, Anuradha S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In the absence of xenograft and biosynthetic skin substitutes, deceased donor skin allografts is a feasible option for saving life of patient with extensive burn injury in our country. Aims: The first deceased donor skin allograft bank in India became functional at Lokmanya Tilak Municipal (LTM) medical college and hospital on 24th April 2000. The response of Indian society to this new concept of skin donation after death and the pattern of utilization of banked allografts from 2000 to 2010 has been presented in this study. Settings and Design: This allograft skin bank was established by the department of surgery. The departments of surgery and microbiology share the responsibility of smooth functioning of the bank. Materials and Methods: The response in terms of number of donations and the profile of donors was analyzed from records. Pattern and outcome of allograft utilization was studied from specially designed forms. Results: During these ten years, 262 deceased donor skin allograft donations were received. The response showed significant improvement after counselling was extended to the community. Majority of the donors were above 70 years of age and procurement was done at home for most. Skin allografts from 249 donors were used for 165 patients in ten years. The outcome was encouraging with seven deaths in 151 recipients with burn injuries. Conclusions: Our experience shows that the Indian society is ready to accept the concept of skin donation after death. Use of skin allografts is life saving for large burns. We need to prepare guidelines for the establishment of more skin banks in the country. PMID:21321645

  17. A Case of Intraparenchymal Pseudoaneurysms in Kidney Allograft.

    PubMed

    Lorentz, Liam Antony; Hlabangana, Linda Tebogo; Davies, Malcom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Percutaneous needle biopsy is routinely performed for renal allograft management. Vascular complications of the procedure include pseudoaneurysm and arterio-venous fistulae formation. Delayed diagnosis of these complications is due to their mostly asymptomatic and indolent nature. CASE REPORT We present a case of extensive intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysm formation within the inferior pole of the allograft, diagnosed two years following the most recent biopsy procedure. CONCLUSIONS Renal pseudoaneurysms may only be diagnosed years after their formation as they are typically asymptomatic. PMID:27510594

  18. The Spectrum of Renal Allograft Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Sourabh; Atkinson, David; Collins, Clare; Briggs, David; Ball, Simon; Sharif, Adnan; Skordilis, Kassiani; Vydianath, Bindu; Neil, Desley; Borrows, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Causes of “true” late kidney allograft failure remain unclear as study selection bias and limited follow-up risk incomplete representation of the spectrum. Methods We evaluated all unselected graft failures from 2008–2014 (n = 171; 0–36 years post-transplantation) by contemporary classification of indication biopsies “proximate” to failure, DSA assessment, clinical and biochemical data. Results The spectrum of graft failure changed markedly depending on the timing of allograft failure. Failures within the first year were most commonly attributed to technical failure, acute rejection (with T-cell mediated rejection [TCMR] dominating antibody-mediated rejection [ABMR]). Failures beyond a year were increasingly dominated by ABMR and ‘interstitial fibrosis with tubular atrophy’ without rejection, infection or recurrent disease (“IFTA”). Cases of IFTA associated with inflammation in non-scarred areas (compared with no inflammation or inflammation solely within scarred regions) were more commonly associated with episodes of prior rejection, late rejection and nonadherence, pointing to an alloimmune aetiology. Nonadherence and late rejection were common in ABMR and TCMR, particularly Acute Active ABMR. Acute Active ABMR and nonadherence were associated with younger age, faster functional decline, and less hyalinosis on biopsy. Chronic and Chronic Active ABMR were more commonly associated with Class II DSA. C1q-binding DSA, detected in 33% of ABMR episodes, were associated with shorter time to graft failure. Most non-biopsied patients were DSA-negative (16/21; 76.1%). Finally, twelve losses to recurrent disease were seen (16%). Conclusion This data from an unselected population identifies IFTA alongside ABMR as a very important cause of true late graft failure, with nonadherence-associated TCMR as a phenomenon in some patients. It highlights clinical and immunological characteristics of ABMR subgroups, and should inform clinical practice and

  19. Biodegradable foam coating of cortical allografts.

    PubMed

    Bondre, S; Lewandrowski, K U; Hasirci, V; Cattaneo, M V; Gresser, J D; Wise, D L; Tomford, W W; Trantolo, D J

    2000-06-01

    Clinical outcomes of bone allograft procedures may be improved by modifying the surface of the graft with an osteoconductive biopolymeric coating. In this comparative in vitro study, we evaluated the dimensional stability, mechanical strength, hydrophilicity, and water uptake of biodegradable foams of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) and poly(d,l-lactic-co glycolic acid) (PLGA) when applied as surface coatings to cortical bone. Cortical bone samples were divided into four groups: Type I, untreated bone; Type II, laser-perforated bone; Type III, partially demineralized bone; and Type IV, laser-perforated and partially demineralized bone. Results show that PPF wets easily, achieving 12.5% wt/wt in 30 min. Compressive tests on the PPF foam material showed that the compressive strength was 6.8 MPa prior to in vitro incubation but then gradually reduced to 1.9 MPa at 8 weeks. Push-out and pulloff strength tests showed that initially both PPF and PLGA foam coatings had comparable adherence strengths to the cortical bone samples (100-150 N). When additional geometrical surface alteration by perforation and demineralization of the bony substrate was employed, in vitro adherence of the PPF foam coating was further increased to 120 N, demonstrating a statistically significant improvement of push-out strength throughout the entire 8-week observation period (p<0.0002 for all four data points). The pore geometry of PPF-foam coatings changed little over the 2-month evaluation period. In comparison, PLGA foam coating around the cortical bone samples rapidly lost structure with a decrease of 67% in strength seen after 1-week in vitro incubation. These new types of bone allografts may be particularly useful where the use of other replacement materials is not feasible or practical.

  20. Musculoskeletal allograft risks and recalls in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Thomas E; Joyce, Michael J; Steinmetz, Michael P; Lieberman, Isador H; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2008-10-01

    There have been several improvements to the US tissue banking industry over the past decade. Tissue banks had limited active government regulation until 1993, at which time the US Food and Drug Administration began regulatory oversight because of reports of disease transmission from allograft tissues. Reports in recent years of disease transmission associated with the use of allografts have further raised concerns about the safety of such implants. A retrospective review of allograft recall data was performed to analyze allograft recall by tissue type, reason, and year during the period from January 1994 to June 30, 2007. During the study period, more than 96.5% of all allograft tissues recalled were musculoskeletal. The reasons underlying recent musculoskeletal tissue recalls include insufficient or improper donor evaluation, contamination, recipient infection, and positive serologic tests. Infectious disease transmission following allograft implantation may occur if potential donors are not adequately evaluated or screened serologically during the prerecovery phase and if the implant is not sterilized before implantation. PMID:18832599

  1. Functional Properties of a Newly Identified C-terminal Splice Variant of Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Gabriella; Gebhart, Mathias; Scharinger, Anja; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Busquet, Perrine; Poggiani, Chiara; Sartori, Simone; Mangoni, Matteo E.; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Herzig, Stefan; Striessnig, Jörg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    An intramolecular interaction between a distal (DCRD) and a proximal regulatory domain (PCRD) within the C terminus of long Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels (Cav1.3L) is a major determinant of their voltage- and Ca2+-dependent gating kinetics. Removal of these regulatory domains by alternative splicing generates Cav1.342A channels that activate at a more negative voltage range and exhibit more pronounced Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Here we describe the discovery of a novel short splice variant (Cav1.343S) that is expressed at high levels in the brain but not in the heart. It lacks the DCRD but, in contrast to Cav1.342A, still contains PCRD. When expressed together with α2δ1 and β3 subunits in tsA-201 cells, Cav1.343S also activated at more negative voltages like Cav1.342A but Ca2+-dependent inactivation was less pronounced. Single channel recordings revealed much higher channel open probabilities for both short splice variants as compared with Cav1.3L. The presence of the proximal C terminus in Cav1.343S channels preserved their modulation by distal C terminus-containing Cav1.3- and Cav1.2-derived C-terminal peptides. Removal of the C-terminal modulation by alternative splicing also induced a faster decay of Ca2+ influx during electrical activities mimicking trains of neuronal action potentials. Our findings extend the spectrum of functionally diverse Cav1.3 L-type channels produced by tissue-specific alternative splicing. This diversity may help to fine tune Ca2+ channel signaling and, in the case of short variants lacking a functional C-terminal modulation, prevent excessive Ca2+ accumulation during burst firing in neurons. This may be especially important in neurons that are affected by Ca2+-induced neurodegenerative processes. PMID:21998310

  2. Down-regulation of CaV1.2 channels during hypertension: how fewer CaV1.2 channels allow more Ca2+ into hypertensive arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tajada, Sendoa; Cidad, Pilar; Colinas, Olaia; Santana, L Fernando; López-López, José R; Pérez-García, M Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a clinical syndrome characterized by increased arterial tone. Although the mechanisms are varied, the generally accepted view is that increased CaV1.2 channel function is a common feature of this pathological condition. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying vascular dysfunction in a mouse model of genetic hypertension. Contrary to expectation, we found that whole-cell CaV1.2 currents (ICa) were lower in hypertensive (BPH line) than normotensive (BPN line) myocytes. However, local CaV1.2 sparklet activity was higher in BPH cells, suggesting that the relatively low ICa in these cells was produced by a few hyperactive CaV1.2 channels. Furthermore, our data suggest that while the lower expression of the pore-forming α1c subunit of CaV1.2 currents underlies the lower ICa in BPH myocytes, the increased sparklet activity was due to a different composition in the auxiliary subunits of the CaV1.2 complexes. ICa currents in BPN cells were produced by channels composed of α1c/α2δ/β3 subunits, while in BPH myocytes currents were probably generated by the opening of channels formed by α1c/α2δ/β2 subunits. In addition, Ca2+ sparks evoked large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) currents of lower magnitude in BPH than in BPN myocytes, because BK channels were less sensitive to Ca2+. Our data are consistent with a model in which a decrease in the global number of CaV1.2 currents coexist with the existence of a subpopulation of highly active channels that dominate the resting Ca2+ influx. The decrease in BK channel activity makes the hyperpolarizing brake ineffective and leads BPH myocytes to a more contracted resting state. PMID:24167226

  3. A Frame-Shift Mutation in CAV1 Is Associated with a Severe Neonatal Progeroid and Lipodystrophy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Siniard, Ashley L; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Corneveaux, Jason J; Malenica, Ivana; Richholt, Ryan; Van Camp, Guy; De Both, Matt; Swaminathan, Shanker; Turk, Mari; Ramsey, Keri; Craig, David W; Narayanan, Vinodh; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old female patient presenting with an unknown syndrome of a neonatal progeroid appearance, lipodystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, cutis marmorata, feeding disorder and failure to thrive was investigated by whole-genome sequencing. This revealed a de novo, heterozygous, frame-shift mutation in the Caveolin1 gene (CAV1) (p.Phe160X). Mutations in CAV1, encoding the main component of the caveolae in plasma membranes, cause Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 3 (BSCL). Although BSCL is recessive, heterozygous carriers either show a reduced phenotype of partial lipodystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, or no phenotype. To investigate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this syndrome in more depth, we performed next generation RNA sequencing of peripheral blood, which showed several dysregulated pathways in the patient that might be related to the phenotypic progeroid features (apoptosis, DNA repair/replication, mitochondrial). Secondly, we found a significant down-regulation of known Cav1 interaction partners, verifying the dysfunction of CAV1. Other known progeroid genes and lipodystrophy genes were also dysregulated. Next, western blotting of lysates of cultured fibroblasts showed that the patient shows a significantly decreased expression of wild-type CAV1 protein, demonstrating a loss-of-function mutation, though her phenotype is more severe that other heterozygotes with similar mutations. This phenotypic variety could be explained by differences in genetic background. Indications for this are supported by additional rare variants we found in AGPAT2 and LPIN1 lipodystrophy genes. CAV1, AGPAT2 and LPIN1 all play an important role in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in adipose tissue, and the defective function in different parts of this pathway, though not all to the same extend, could contribute to a more severe lipoatrophic phenotype in this patient. In conclusion, we report, for the first time, an association of CAV1 dysfunction with a syndrome

  4. Redundancy of Cav2.1 channel accessory subunits in transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Kaja, Simon; Todorov, Boyan; van de Ven, Rob C G; Ferrari, Michel D; Frants, Rune R; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Plomp, Jaap J

    2007-04-27

    Ca(v)2.1 (P/Q-type) channels possess a voltage-sensitive pore-forming alpha(1) subunit that can associate with the accessory subunits alpha(2)delta, beta and gamma. The primary role of Ca(v)2.1 channels is to mediate transmitter release from nerve terminals both in the central and peripheral nervous system. Whole-cell voltage-clamp studies in in vitro expression systems have indicated that accessory channel subunits can have diverse modulatory effects on membrane expression and biophysical properties of Ca(v)2.1 channels. However, there is only limited knowledge on whether similar modulation also occurs in the specific presynaptic environment in vivo and, hence, whether accessory subunits influence neurotransmitter release. Ducky, lethargic and stargazer are mutant mice that lack functional alpha(2)delta-2, beta(4) and gamma(2) accessory Ca(v) channel subunits, respectively. The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a peripheral synapse, where transmitter release is governed exclusively by Ca(v)2.1 channels, and which can be characterized electrophysiologically with relative experimental ease. In order to investigate a possible synaptic influence of accessory subunits in detail, we electrophysiologically measured acetylcholine (ACh) release at NMJs of these three mutants. Surprisingly, we did not find any changes compared to wild-type littermates, other than a small reduction (25%) of evoked ACh release at ducky NMJs. This effect is most likely due to the approximately 40% reduced synapse size, associated with the reduced size of ducky mice, rather than resulting directly from reduced Ca(v)2.1 channel function due to alpha(2)delta-2 absence. We conclude that alpha(2)delta-2, beta(4), and gamma(2) accessory subunits are redundant for the transmitter release-mediating function of presynaptic Ca(v)2.1 channels at the mouse NMJ.

  5. Apoptotic tubular cell death during acute renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Wever, P C; Aten, J; Rentenaar, R J; Hack, C E; Koopman, G; Weening, J J; ten Berge, I J

    1998-01-01

    Tubular cells are important targets during acute renal allograft rejection and induction of apoptosis might be a mechanism of tubular cell destruction. Susceptibility to induction of apoptosis is regulated by the homologous Bcl-2 and Bax proteins. Expression of Bcl-2 and Bax is regulated by p53, which down-regulates expression of Bcl-2, while simultaneously up-regulating expression of Bax. We studied apoptotic tubular cell death in 10 renal allograft biopsies from transplant recipients with acute rejection by in situ end-labelling and the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide. Tubular expression of p53, Bcl-2 and Bax was studies by immunohistochemistry. Five renal allograft biopsies from transplant recipients with uncomplicated clinical course and histologically normal renal tissue present in nephrectomy specimens from 4 patients with renal adenocarcinoma served as control specimens. Apoptotic cells and apoptotic bodies were detected in tubular epithelia and tubular lumina in 9 out of 10 acute rejection biopsies. In control renal tissue, apoptotic cells were detected in 1 biopsy only. Compared to control renal tissue, acute renal allograft rejection was, furthermore, associated with a shift in the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax in favour of Bax in tubular epithelia and increased expression of p53 in tubular nuclei. These observations demonstrate that apoptosis contributes in part to tubular cell destruction during acute renal allograft rejection. In accordance, the shift in the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax in favour of Bax indicates increased susceptibility of tubular epithelia to induction of apoptosis. The expression of p53 in tubular nuclei during acute renal allograft rejection indicates the presence of damaged DNA, which can be important in initiation of part of the observed apoptosis. These findings elucidate part of the mechanisms controlling apoptotic tubular cell death during acute renal allograft rejection.

  6. Phoneutria nigriventer omega-phonetoxin IIA blocks the Cav2 family of calcium channels and interacts with omega-conotoxin-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Raquel Gouvea; Van Renterghem, Catherine; Martin-Moutot, Nicole; Mansuelle, Pascal; Cordeiro, Marta N; Diniz, Carlos Ribeiro; Mori, Yasuo; De Lima, Maria Elena; Seagar, Michael

    2002-04-19

    omega-Phonetoxin IIA (omegaPtxIIA), a peptide from spider venom (Phoneutria nigriventer), inhibits high threshold voltage-dependent calcium currents in neurons. To define its pharmacological specificity, we have used patch-clamp methods in cell lines expressing recombinant Ca(v)2.1, Ca(v)2.2, and Ca(v)2.3 channels (P/Q-, N-, and R-type currents, respectively). Calcium currents generated by Ca(v)2.1 and Ca(v)2.2 were blocked almost irreversibly by 3 nm omegaPtxIIA, whereas Ca(v)2.3 showed partial and readily reversible inhibition. Binding assays with mono[(125)I]iodo-omegaPtxIIA indicated that membranes expressing recombinant Ca(v)2.1 or Ca(v)2.2 channels showed a single class of sites with similar affinity (K(D) approximately 50 pm), whereas low affinity interactions were detectable with Ca(v)2.3. Kinetic, saturation, and displacement assays demonstrated that rat brain synaptosomes displayed multiple classes of binding sites for (125)I-omegaPtxIIA. High affinity binding of (125)I-omegaPtxIIA was totally displaced by omegaPtxIIA (K(i) = 100 pm), but only partially by omega-conotoxin GVIA (25% inhibition) and omega-conotoxin MVIIC (50% inhibition at 0.3 microm). (125)I-omegaPtxIIA thus defines a unique high affinity binding site that is predominantly associated with Ca(v)2.1 or Ca(v)2.2 channels.

  7. Banking of massive osteoarticular and intercalary bone allografts--12 years' experience.

    PubMed

    Malinin, T I; Martinez, O V; Brown, M D

    1985-01-01

    Preparation and banking of massive osteoarticular allografts and intercalary bone allografts have been performed for the past 12 years. Careful selection of donors as well as extensive laboratory studies of the donor and the allograft have virtually eliminated the danger of transmitting disease from the donor to the recipient. The availability of a variety of allografts in the Tissue Bank allows for the selection, on an anatomic basis, of an allograft best suited for a particular recipient. The authors have supplied several hundred allografts to recipients in many institutions on the premise that excision, preparation, banking, and implantation of bone allografts constitute a clinical service. Thus, the surgeon who excises and prepares the allograft assumes a joint responsibility for the care of the recipient with the surgeon who implants the allograft. This establishes a close working relationship, which encourages frequent consultation between the parties concerned. This relationship is of particular importance in the initial evaluation of the patient and in determining which particular allograft will best serve a given patient. The experience at the authors' institution provides a model for a multiinstitutional facility that may serve as a base for discussion of the methodology involved in the excision, preparation, and storage of bone allografts. The costs associated with the operation of such a facility are not inconsiderable, but the cost of individual osteoarticular and intercalary allografts can be brought down by an increase in the efficiency of operation inherent in the processing of allografts from over 100 donors per year. During the past several years, the cost of excising and preparing intercalary allografts has been $600 per implant, while the cost for osteochondral allografts varied between $900 and $1,200. Such a large multiinstitutional facility offers the advantages of readily available allografts and quality control. However, because of the

  8. Resistance to pathologic cardiac hypertrophy and reduced expression of CaV1.2 in Trpc3-depleted mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Jung Woo; Lee, Young Ho; Yoen, Su-In; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Joo Young

    2016-10-01

    Sustained elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) reprograms cardiovascular cell fate, leading to cellular hypertrophy via Ca(2+)-calmodulin/calcineurin (Cn)/NFAT activation. Accumulating evidence suggests that transient receptor potential canonical (Trpc) channels play important roles in the development of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we demonstrated that Trpc3 mediates pathologic cardiac hypertrophy in neurohumoral elevation via direct regulation of CaV1.2 expressions. Elevated PE (phenylephrine) was maintained in mice by continuous infusion using an osmotic pump. Wild-type (WT) mice, but not Trpc3 (-/-) showed a sudden decrease in blood pressure (BP) or death following elevation of BP under conditions of elevated PE. Trpc3 (-/-) mesenteric artery showed decreased PE-stimulated vasoconstriction. Analysis of morphology, function, and pathologic marker expression revealed that PE elevation caused pathologic cardiac hypertrophy in WT mice, which was prevented by deletion of Trpc3. Interestingly, protection by Trpc3 deletion seemed to be a result of reduced cardiac CaV1.2 expressions. Basal and PE induced increased expression of protein and mRNA of CaV1.2 was decreased in Trpc3 (-/-) heart. Accordingly, altered expression of CaV1.2 was observed by knockdown or stimulation of Trpc3 in cardiomyocytes. These findings suggest that Trpc3 is a mediator of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy not only through mediating part of the Ca(2+) influx, but also through control of CaV1.2 expressions.

  9. Molecular and biophysical basis of glutamate and trace metal modulation of voltage-gated Cav2.3 calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Vitko, Iuliia; Lazarenko, Roman M.; Orestes, Peihan; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe a new mechanism by which glutamate (Glu) and trace metals reciprocally modulate activity of the Cav2.3 channel by profoundly shifting its voltage-dependent gating. We show that zinc and copper, at physiologically relevant concentrations, occupy an extracellular binding site on the surface of Cav2.3 and hold the threshold for activation of these channels in a depolarized voltage range. Abolishing this binding by chelation or the substitution of key amino acid residues in IS1–IS2 (H111) and IS2–IS3 (H179 and H183) loops potentiates Cav2.3 by shifting the voltage dependence of activation toward more negative membrane potentials. We demonstrate that copper regulates the voltage dependence of Cav2.3 by affecting gating charge movements. Thus, in the presence of copper, gating charges transition into the “ON” position slower, delaying activation and reducing the voltage sensitivity of the channel. Overall, our results suggest a new mechanism by which Glu and trace metals transiently modulate voltage-dependent gating of Cav2.3, potentially affecting synaptic transmission and plasticity in the brain. PMID:22371363

  10. Lipid Modulation of Calcium Flux through CaV2.3 Regulates Acrosome Exocytosis and Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Roy; Buttke, Danielle E.; Asano, Atsushi; Mukai, Chinatsu; Nelson, Jacquelyn L.; Ren, Dongjun; Miller, Richard; Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Atlas, Daphne; Travis, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Membrane lipid regulation of cell function is poorly understood. In early development, sterol efflux and the ganglioside GM1 regulate sperm acrosome exocytosis (AE) and fertilization competence through unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that sterol efflux and focal enrichment of GM1 trigger Ca2+ influx necessary for AE through CaV2.3, whose activity has been highly controversial in sperm. Sperm lacking CaV2.3’s pore-forming α1E subunit showed altered Ca2+ responses, reduced AE, and a strong sub-fertility phenotype. Surprisingly, AE depended on spatio-temporal information encoded by flux through CaV2.3—not merely the presence/ amplitude of Ca2+ waves. Using both studies in sperm and voltage clamp of Xenopus oocytes, we define a molecular mechanism for GM1/CaV2.3 regulatory interaction, requiring GM1’s lipid and sugar components and CaV2.3’s α1E and α2δ subunits. Our results provide mechanistic understanding of membrane lipid regulation of Ca2+ flux and therefore Ca2+-dependent cellular and developmental processes such as exocytosis and fertilization. PMID:24525187

  11. Cav1.3 (CACNA1D) L‐type Ca2+ channel dysfunction in CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Striessnig, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cav1.3 belongs to the family of voltage‐gated L‐type Ca2+ channels and is encoded by the CACNA1D gene. Cav1.3 channels are not only essential for cardiac pacemaking, hearing and hormone secretion but are also expressed postsynaptically in neurons, where they shape neuronal firing and plasticity. Recent findings provide evidence that human mutations in the CACNA1D gene can confer risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disease and perhaps also epilepsy. Loss of Cav1.3 function, as shown in knock‐out mouse models and by human mutations, does not result in neuropsychiatric or neurological disease symptoms, whereas their acute selective pharmacological activation results in a depressive‐like behaviour in mice. Therefore it is likely that CACNA1D mutations enhancing activity may be disease relevant also in humans. Indeed, whole exome sequencing studies, originally prompted to identify mutations in primary aldosteronism, revealed de novo CACNA1D missense mutations permitting enhanced Ca2+ signalling through Cav1.3. Remarkably, apart from primary aldosteronism, heterozygous carriers of these mutations also showed seizures and neurological abnormalities. Different missense mutations with very similar gain‐of‐function properties were recently reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). These data strongly suggest that CACNA1D mutations enhancing Cav1.3 activity confer a strong risk for – or even cause – CNS disorders, such as ASD. PMID:26842699

  12. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  13. Positive culture in allograft ACL-reconstruction: what to do?

    PubMed

    Díaz-de-Rada, P; Barriga, A; Barroso, J L; García-Barrecheguren, E; Alfonso, M; Valentí, J R

    2003-07-01

    The transmission of disease or infection from the donor to the recipient is always a risk with the use of allografts. We carried out a research study on the behavioural pattern of implanted allografts, which were initially stored in perfect conditions (all cultures being negative) but later presented positive cultures at the implantation stage. Because there is no information available on how to deal with this type of situation, our aim was to set guidelines on the course of action which would be required in such a case. We conducted a retrospective study of 181 patients who underwent an ACL reconstruction using BPTB allografts. All previous bone and blood cultures and tests for hepatitis B and C, syphilis and HIV were negative. An allograft sample was taken for culture in the operating theatre just before its implantation. The results of the cultures were obtained 3-5 days after the operation. We had 24 allografts with positive culture (13.25%) after the implantation with no clinical infection in any of these patients. Positive cultures could be caused by undetected contamination while harvesting, storing or during manipulation before implantation. The lack of clinical signs of infection during the follow-up of our patients may indicate that no specific treatment-other than an antibiotic protocol-would be required when facing a case of positive culture of a graft piece after its implantation.

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament allograft transplantation for intraarticular ligamentous reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M; Dellmann, A; Gruber, J; Clahsen, H; Bürrig, K F

    1992-01-01

    A multiplicity of surgical operations have been developed in an attempt to achieve satisfactory function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair. None of these procedures have been able to reproduce the fiber organization anatomy of attachment site, vascularity, or function of the ACL. Twenty-nine foxhounds received a deep-frozen bone-ACL-bone allograft and a ligament augmentation device (LAD). Biomechanical, microvascular, and histological changes were evaluated 3, 6, and 12 months following implantation. The maximum loads of the allograft/LADs were 34.3% (387.2 N) after 3 months, 49.3% (556.6 N) after 6 months, and 61.1% (698.8 N) after a year. The maximum load was 69.1% (780 N). In general, after 6 months the allografts showed normal collagen orientation. The allografts demonstrated no evidence of infection or immune reaction. No bone ingrowth into the LAD was observed. Polarized light microscopy and periodic acid-schiff staining showed that the new bone-ligament substance interface had intact fiber orientation at the area of the ligament insertion. Microvascular examination using the Spalteholtz technique revealed revascularization and the importance of an infrapatellar fat pad for the nourishment of ACL allografts.

  15. Severe adult burn survivors. What information about skin allografts?

    PubMed Central

    Gaucher, Sonia; Duchange, Nathalie; Jarraya, Mohamed; Magne, Jocelyne; Rochet, Jean-Michel; Stéphanazzi, Jean; Hervé, Christian; Moutel, Grégoire

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective During the acute phase of a severe burn, surgery is an emergency. In this situation, human skin allografts constitute an effective temporary skin substitute. However, information about the use of human tissue can not be given to the patients because most of the allografted patients are unconscious due to their injury. Objective This study explored the restitution of information on skin donation to patients who have been skin allografted and who have survived their injury. Method A qualitative study was conducted due to the limited number of patients in ability to be interviewed according to our medical and psychological criteria. Results and discussion Twelve patients who had been treated between 2002 and 2008 were interviewed. Our results show that 10 of them ignored that they had received skin allografts. One of the two patients who knew that they had received allografts knew that skin had been harvested from deceased donor. All patients expressed that there is no information that should not be delivered. They also expressed their relief to have had the opportunity to discuss their case and at being informed during their interview. Their own experience impacted their view in favor of organ and tissue donation. PMID:23229877

  16. Significant prolongation of segmental pancreatic allograft survival in two species

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    A study was conducted to assess the suppression of segmental pancreatic allograft rejection by cyclosporine (CSA) alone in baboons and dogs, and subtotal marrow irradiation (TL1) alone and TL 1 in combination with CSA in baboons. Total pancreatectomy in the dog and primate provided a reliable diabetic model, induced an absolute deficiency of insulin and was uniformly lethal if not treated. Continuous administration of CSA in baboons resulted in modest allograft survival. As in baboons, dogs receiving CSA 25 mg/kg/d rendered moderate graft prolongation but a dose of 40 mg/kg/d resulted in significant graft survival (greater than 100 days) in 5 of 8 allograft recipients. Irradiation alone resulted in minimal baboon pancreatic allograft survival of 20 baboons receiving TL1 1,000 rad and CSA, 3 had graft survival greater than of 100 days. Of 15 baboons receiving TL1 800 rad and CSA, 6 had graft survival of greater than 100 days. In conclusion, CSA administration in dogs and TL1 in combination with CSA in baboons resulted in highly significant segmental pancreatic allograft survival.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament allograft transplantation for intraarticular ligamentous reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M; Dellmann, A; Gruber, J; Clahsen, H; Bürrig, K F

    1992-01-01

    A multiplicity of surgical operations have been developed in an attempt to achieve satisfactory function after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair. None of these procedures have been able to reproduce the fiber organization anatomy of attachment site, vascularity, or function of the ACL. Twenty-nine foxhounds received a deep-frozen bone-ACL-bone allograft and a ligament augmentation device (LAD). Biomechanical, microvascular, and histological changes were evaluated 3, 6, and 12 months following implantation. The maximum loads of the allograft/LADs were 34.3% (387.2 N) after 3 months, 49.3% (556.6 N) after 6 months, and 61.1% (698.8 N) after a year. The maximum load was 69.1% (780 N). In general, after 6 months the allografts showed normal collagen orientation. The allografts demonstrated no evidence of infection or immune reaction. No bone ingrowth into the LAD was observed. Polarized light microscopy and periodic acid-schiff staining showed that the new bone-ligament substance interface had intact fiber orientation at the area of the ligament insertion. Microvascular examination using the Spalteholtz technique revealed revascularization and the importance of an infrapatellar fat pad for the nourishment of ACL allografts. PMID:1389780

  18. Positive culture in allograft ACL-reconstruction: what to do?

    PubMed

    Díaz-de-Rada, P; Barriga, A; Barroso, J L; García-Barrecheguren, E; Alfonso, M; Valentí, J R

    2003-07-01

    The transmission of disease or infection from the donor to the recipient is always a risk with the use of allografts. We carried out a research study on the behavioural pattern of implanted allografts, which were initially stored in perfect conditions (all cultures being negative) but later presented positive cultures at the implantation stage. Because there is no information available on how to deal with this type of situation, our aim was to set guidelines on the course of action which would be required in such a case. We conducted a retrospective study of 181 patients who underwent an ACL reconstruction using BPTB allografts. All previous bone and blood cultures and tests for hepatitis B and C, syphilis and HIV were negative. An allograft sample was taken for culture in the operating theatre just before its implantation. The results of the cultures were obtained 3-5 days after the operation. We had 24 allografts with positive culture (13.25%) after the implantation with no clinical infection in any of these patients. Positive cultures could be caused by undetected contamination while harvesting, storing or during manipulation before implantation. The lack of clinical signs of infection during the follow-up of our patients may indicate that no specific treatment-other than an antibiotic protocol-would be required when facing a case of positive culture of a graft piece after its implantation. PMID:12827226

  19. Oral hydrogen water prevents chronic allograft nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Jon S; Zhan, Jianghua; Wang, Yinna; Sugimoto, Ryujiro; Tsung, Allan; McCurry, Kenneth R; Billiar, Timothy R; Nakao, Atsunori

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the development of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy seen in chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). As molecular hydrogen gas can act as a scavenger of ROS, we tested the effect of treatment with hydrogen water (HW) in a model of kidney transplantation, in which allografts from Lewis rats were orthotopically transplanted into Brown Norway recipients that had undergone bilateral nephrectomy. Molecular hydrogen was dissolved in water and recipients were given HW from day 0 until day 150. Rats that were treated with regular water (RW) gradually developed proteinuria and their creatinine clearance declined, ultimately leading to graft failure secondary to CAN. In contrast, treatment with HW improved allograft function, slowed the progression of CAN, reduced oxidant injury and inflammatory mediator production, and improved overall survival. Inflammatory signaling pathways, such as mitogen-activated protein kinases, were less activated in renal allografts from HW-treated rats as compared with RW-treated rats. Hence, oral HW is an effective antioxidant and antiinflammatory agent that prevented CAN, improved survival of rat renal allografts, and may be of therapeutic value in the setting of transplantation. PMID:19907413

  20. Autophagy in allografts rejection: A new direction?

    PubMed

    Sun, Hukui; Cheng, Dayan; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huaiquan; Liang, Ting; Hou, Guihua

    2016-03-18

    Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection is still a major risk for graft survival. Modulating the dosage of immunosuppressive drugs is not a good choice for all patients, new rejection mechanisms discovery are crucial to limit the inflammatory process and preserve the function of the transplant. Autophagy, a fundamental cellular process, can be detected in all subsets of lymphocytes and freshly isolated naive T lymphocytes. It is required for the homeostasis and function of T lymphocytes, which lead to cell survival or cell death depending on the context. T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and costimulator signals induce strong autophagy, and autophagy deficient T cells leads to rampant apoptosis upon TCR stimulation. Autophagy has been proved to be activated during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and associated with grafts dysfunction. Furthermore, Autophagy has also emerged as a key mechanism in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune response to self-antigens, which relates with negative selection and Foxp3(+) Treg induction. Although, the role of autophagy in allograft rejection is unknown, current data suggest that autophagy indeed sweeps across both in the graft organs and recipients lymphocytes after transplantation. This review presents the rationale for the hypothesis that targeting the autophagy pathway could be beneficial in promoting graft survival after transplantation. PMID:26876576

  1. Autophagy in allografts rejection: A new direction?

    PubMed

    Sun, Hukui; Cheng, Dayan; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huaiquan; Liang, Ting; Hou, Guihua

    2016-03-18

    Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection is still a major risk for graft survival. Modulating the dosage of immunosuppressive drugs is not a good choice for all patients, new rejection mechanisms discovery are crucial to limit the inflammatory process and preserve the function of the transplant. Autophagy, a fundamental cellular process, can be detected in all subsets of lymphocytes and freshly isolated naive T lymphocytes. It is required for the homeostasis and function of T lymphocytes, which lead to cell survival or cell death depending on the context. T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and costimulator signals induce strong autophagy, and autophagy deficient T cells leads to rampant apoptosis upon TCR stimulation. Autophagy has been proved to be activated during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and associated with grafts dysfunction. Furthermore, Autophagy has also emerged as a key mechanism in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune response to self-antigens, which relates with negative selection and Foxp3(+) Treg induction. Although, the role of autophagy in allograft rejection is unknown, current data suggest that autophagy indeed sweeps across both in the graft organs and recipients lymphocytes after transplantation. This review presents the rationale for the hypothesis that targeting the autophagy pathway could be beneficial in promoting graft survival after transplantation.

  2. Differential gene expression pattern in biopsies with renal allograft pyelonephritis and allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Oghumu, Steve; Nori, Uday; Bracewell, Anna; Zhang, Jianying; Bott, Cherri; Nadasdy, Gyongyi M; Brodsky, Sergey V; Pelletier, Ronald; Satoskar, Abhay R; Nadasdy, Tibor; Satoskar, Anjali A

    2016-09-01

    Differentiating acute pyelonephritis (APN) from acute rejection (AR) in renal allograft biopsies can sometimes be difficult because of overlapping clinical and histologic features, lack of positive urine cultures,and variable response to antibiotics. We wanted to study differential gene expression between AR and APN using biopsy tissue. Thirty-three biopsies were analyzed using NanoString multiplex platform and PCR (6 transplant baseline biopsies, 8 AR, 15 APN [8 culture positive, 7 culture negative], and 4 native pyelonephritis [NP]). Additional 22 biopsies were tested by PCR to validate the results. CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and IDO1 were the top differentially expressed genes, upregulated in AR. Lactoferrin (LTF) and CXCL1 were higher in APN and NP. No statistically significant difference in transcript levels was seen between culture-positive and culture-negative APN biopsies. Comparing the overall mRNA signature using Ingenuity pathway analysis, interferon-gamma emerged as the dominant upstream regulator in AR and allograft APN, but not in NP (which clustered separately). Our study suggests that chemokine pathways in graft APN may differ from NP and in fact resemble AR, due to a component of alloreactivity, resulting in variable response to antibiotic treatment. Therefore, cautious addition of steroids might help in resistant cases of graft APN.

  3. The L-Type voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1.3 mediates consolidation, but not extinction, of contextually conditioned fear in mice.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Brandon C; Murphy, Geoffrey G

    2006-01-01

    Using pharmacological techniques, it has been demonstrated that both consolidation and extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning are dependent to some extent upon L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs). Although these studies have successfully implicated LVGCCs in Pavlovian fear conditioning, they do not provide information about the specific LVGCC isoform involved. Both of the major LVGCC subtypes found in the brain (Cav1.2 and Cav1.3) are targets of the pharmacological manipulations used in earlier work. In this study, we used mice in which the gene for the pore-forming subunit (alpha1D) Cav1.3 was deleted (Cav1.3 knockout mice) to elucidate its contribution to consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. We find that Cav1.3 knockout mice exhibit significant impairments in consolidation of contextual fear conditioning. However, once sufficiently overtrained, the Cav1.3 knockout mice exhibit rates of extinction that are identical to that observed in wild-type mice. We also find that Cav1.3 knockout mice perform as well as wild-type mice on the hidden platform version of the Morris water maze, suggesting that the consolidation deficit in conditioned fear observed in the Cav1.3 knockout mice is not likely the result of an inability to encode the context, but may reflect an inability to make the association between the context and the unconditioned stimulus.

  4. Ca2+-dependent facilitation of Cav1.3 Ca2+ channels by densin and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Meagan A.; Christel, Carl J.; Jiao, Yuxia; Abiria, Sunday; Kim, Kristin Y.; Usachev, Yuriy M.; Obermair, Gerald J.; Colbran, Roger J.; Lee, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Cav1 (L-type) channels and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) are key regulators of Ca2+ signaling in neurons. CaMKII directly potentiates the activity of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 channels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we report that the CaMKII-associated protein, densin, is required for Ca2+-dependent facilitation of Cav1.3 channels. While neither CaMKII nor densin independently affect Cav1.3 properties in transfected HEK293T cells, the two together augment Cav1.3 Ca2+ currents during repetitive, but not sustained, depolarizing stimuli. Facilitation requires Ca2+, CaMKII activation and its association with densin, as well as densin binding to the Cav1.3 α1 subunit C-terminal domain. Cav1.3 channels and densin are targeted to dendritic spines in neurons and form a complex with CaMKII in the brain. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism for Ca2+-dependent facilitation that may intensify postsynaptic Ca2+ signals during high-frequency stimulation. PMID:20392935

  5. Critical role of CAV1/caveolin-1 in cell stress responses in human breast cancer cells via modulation of lysosomal function and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yin; Tan, Shi-Hao; Ng, Shukie; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Na-Di; Koo, Gi-Bang; McMahon, Kerrie-Ann; Parton, Robert G; Hill, Michelle M; Del Pozo, Miguel A; Kim, You-Sun; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-01-01

    CAV1 (caveolin 1, caveolae protein, 22kDa) is well known as a principal scaffolding protein of caveolae, a specialized plasma membrane structure. Relatively, the caveolae-independent function of CAV1 is less studied. Autophagy is a process known to involve various membrane structures, including autophagosomes, lysosomes, and autolysosomes for degradation of intracellular proteins and organelles. Currently, the function of CAV1 in autophagy remains largely elusive. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that CAV1 deficiency promotes both basal and inducible autophagy. Interestingly, the promoting effect was found mainly in the late stage of autophagy via enhancing lysosomal function and autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Notably, the regulatory function of CAV1 in lysosome and autophagy was found to be caveolae-independent, and acts through lipid rafts. Furthermore, the elevated autophagy level induced by CAV1 deficiency serves as a cell survival mechanism under starvation. Importantly, downregulation of CAV1 and enhanced autophagy level were observed in human breast cancer cells and tissues. Taken together, our data reveal a novel function of CAV1 and lipid rafts in breast cancer development via modulation of lysosomal function and autophagy.

  6. Critical role of CAV1/caveolin-1 in cell stress responses in human breast cancer cells via modulation of lysosomal function and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yin; Tan, Shi-Hao; Ng, Shukie; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Na-Di; Koo, Gi-Bang; McMahon, Kerrie-Ann; Parton, Robert G; Hill, Michelle M; del Pozo, Miguel A; Kim, You-Sun; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-01-01

    CAV1 (caveolin 1, caveolae protein, 22kDa) is well known as a principal scaffolding protein of caveolae, a specialized plasma membrane structure. Relatively, the caveolae-independent function of CAV1 is less studied. Autophagy is a process known to involve various membrane structures, including autophagosomes, lysosomes, and autolysosomes for degradation of intracellular proteins and organelles. Currently, the function of CAV1 in autophagy remains largely elusive. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that CAV1 deficiency promotes both basal and inducible autophagy. Interestingly, the promoting effect was found mainly in the late stage of autophagy via enhancing lysosomal function and autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Notably, the regulatory function of CAV1 in lysosome and autophagy was found to be caveolae-independent, and acts through lipid rafts. Furthermore, the elevated autophagy level induced by CAV1 deficiency serves as a cell survival mechanism under starvation. Importantly, downregulation of CAV1 and enhanced autophagy level were observed in human breast cancer cells and tissues. Taken together, our data reveal a novel function of CAV1 and lipid rafts in breast cancer development via modulation of lysosomal function and autophagy. PMID:25945613

  7. Livedoid vasculopathy associated with combined prothrombin G20210A and factor V (Leiden) heterozygosity and MTHFR C677T homozygosity.

    PubMed

    Irani-Hakime, Noha A; Stephan, Farid; Kreidy, Raghid; Jureidini, Isabelle; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2008-08-01

    Livedoid vasculopathy (LV) is an occlusive thrombotic disease of lower extremities. A 34-year-old woman presented with 4-year history of recurrent necrotic and painful lesions with violaceous and purpuric border on both legs. Initial treatment with hydroxychloroquine, dapsone and prednisone were unsuccessful. Skin biopsy showed inflammatory infiltrate with epidermal necrosis. Prothrombin G20210A and factor V-Leiden heterozygosity, and MTHFR C677T homozygosity with hyperhomocysteinemia were confirmed. LV diagnosis was made; acetylsalicylic acid, folic acid, vitamin B12, and prednisone treatement resulted in complete healing. This is the first report on coexistence of prothrombin G20210A, factor V-Leiden, and homozygous MTHFR C677T with hyperhomocysteinemia in LV. PMID:18360788

  8. Combining bisphosphonates with allograft bone for implant fixation.

    PubMed

    Mathijssen, N M C; Buma, P; Hannink, G

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this review was to discuss the current state of research of combining bisphosphonates with allograft bone for implant fixation. The allograft bone can only be reached by the bisphosphonate once it has been revascularized. However, this can be circumvented by local administration of bisphosphonates. Several animal studies showed that local application of bisphosphonates might protect the graft from resorption. There seems to be an optimum concentration for local application, however, this optimum varies for all different bisphosphonates. It can be concluded that local administration of bisphosphonates might play an important role in improving stability after surgery in which a prosthesis is combined with allograft bone to restore bony defects, however caution should be taken when extrapolating results of animal research to the human clinical situation. More research is needed to study the effect of local bisphophonate use in humans and to study possible side effects.

  9. Alternative splicing in the C-terminus of CaV2.2 controls expression and gating of N-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Castiglioni, Andrew J; Raingo, Jesica; Lipscombe, Diane

    2006-01-01

    N-type CaV2.2 calcium channels localize to presynaptic nerve terminals of nociceptors where they control neurotransmitter release. Nociceptive neurons express a unique set of ion channels and receptors important for optimizing their role in transmission of noxious stimuli. Included among these is a structurally and functionally distinct N-type calcium channel splice isoform, CaV2.2e[37a], expressed in a subset of nociceptors and with limited expression in other parts of the nervous system. CaV2.2[e37a] arises from the mutually exclusive replacement of e37a for e37b in the C-terminus of CaV2.2 mRNA. N-type current densities in nociceptors that express a combination of CaV2.2e[37a] and CaV2.2e[37b] mRNAs are significantly larger compared to cells that express only CaV2.2e[37b]. Here we show that e37a supports increased expression of functional N-type channels and an increase in channel open time as compared to CaV2.2 channels that contain e37b. To understand how e37a affects N-type currents we compared macroscopic and single-channel ionic currents as well as gating currents in tsA201 cells expressing CaV2.2e[37a] and CaV2.2e[37b]. When activated, CaV2.2e[37a] channels remain open for longer and are expressed at higher density than CaV2.2e[37b] channels. These unique features of the CaV2.2e[37a] isoform combine to augment substantially the amount of calcium that enters cells in response to action potentials. Our studies of the e37a/e37b splice site reveal a multifunctional domain in the C-terminus of CaV2.2 that regulates the overall activity of N-type calcium channels in nociceptors. PMID:16857708

  10. BATF inhibition prevent acute allograft rejection after cardiac transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; He, Fan; Dai, Chen; Tan, Rumeng; Ma, Dongxia; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Bo; Feng, Jincheng; Wei, Lai; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Zhishui

    2016-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection is a serious and life-threatening complication of organ transplantation. Th17 cells induced inflammation has been described to play an important role in allograft rejection. Since there is a plenty of evidence indicating that transcriptional factor BATF regulates the differentiation of Th17 and follicular T helper cells both in vitro and in vivo, we investigated whether is BATF involved in acute rejection and allograft survival by injecting lentivirus containing BATF shRNA through tail vein before the cardiac transplantation operation. We found that the allograft survival time of the mice treated with BATF shRNA was significantly prolonged compared with that of negative shRNA treated group and the control group. Further pathological analysis revealed that the BATF shRNA treatment group had significantly lower rejection degree than the negative shRNA group, while there was no significant difference between the negative shRNA group and the control group. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay were used to determine the proportion of T helper cells, the expression of specific transcription factor and the inflammatory cytokines respectively. Data showed that BATF regulated Th17 and Treg responses during allograft rejection. And BATF inhibition led to reduction of the expression level of Rorγ-t and enhancement of the Foxp-3. In addition, cytokines IL-17A and IL-4 were found decreased. This may indicate BATF as a novel therapy target for treatment of acute allograft rejection. PMID:27648151

  11. BATF inhibition prevent acute allograft rejection after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; He, Fan; Dai, Chen; Tan, Rumeng; Ma, Dongxia; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Bo; Feng, Jincheng; Wei, Lai; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Zhishui

    2016-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection is a serious and life-threatening complication of organ transplantation. Th17 cells induced inflammation has been described to play an important role in allograft rejection. Since there is a plenty of evidence indicating that transcriptional factor BATF regulates the differentiation of Th17 and follicular T helper cells both in vitro and in vivo, we investigated whether is BATF involved in acute rejection and allograft survival by injecting lentivirus containing BATF shRNA through tail vein before the cardiac transplantation operation. We found that the allograft survival time of the mice treated with BATF shRNA was significantly prolonged compared with that of negative shRNA treated group and the control group. Further pathological analysis revealed that the BATF shRNA treatment group had significantly lower rejection degree than the negative shRNA group, while there was no significant difference between the negative shRNA group and the control group. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay were used to determine the proportion of T helper cells, the expression of specific transcription factor and the inflammatory cytokines respectively. Data showed that BATF regulated Th17 and Treg responses during allograft rejection. And BATF inhibition led to reduction of the expression level of Rorγ-t and enhancement of the Foxp-3. In addition, cytokines IL-17A and IL-4 were found decreased. This may indicate BATF as a novel therapy target for treatment of acute allograft rejection. PMID:27648151

  12. BATF inhibition prevent acute allograft rejection after cardiac transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; He, Fan; Dai, Chen; Tan, Rumeng; Ma, Dongxia; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Bo; Feng, Jincheng; Wei, Lai; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Zhishui

    2016-01-01

    Acute allograft rejection is a serious and life-threatening complication of organ transplantation. Th17 cells induced inflammation has been described to play an important role in allograft rejection. Since there is a plenty of evidence indicating that transcriptional factor BATF regulates the differentiation of Th17 and follicular T helper cells both in vitro and in vivo, we investigated whether is BATF involved in acute rejection and allograft survival by injecting lentivirus containing BATF shRNA through tail vein before the cardiac transplantation operation. We found that the allograft survival time of the mice treated with BATF shRNA was significantly prolonged compared with that of negative shRNA treated group and the control group. Further pathological analysis revealed that the BATF shRNA treatment group had significantly lower rejection degree than the negative shRNA group, while there was no significant difference between the negative shRNA group and the control group. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay were used to determine the proportion of T helper cells, the expression of specific transcription factor and the inflammatory cytokines respectively. Data showed that BATF regulated Th17 and Treg responses during allograft rejection. And BATF inhibition led to reduction of the expression level of Rorγ-t and enhancement of the Foxp-3. In addition, cytokines IL-17A and IL-4 were found decreased. This may indicate BATF as a novel therapy target for treatment of acute allograft rejection.

  13. A Case of Intraparenchymal Pseudoaneurysms in Kidney Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Lorentz, Liam Antony; Hlabangana, Linda Tebogo; Davies, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: Intraparenchymal pseudo-aneurysms in kidney transplant Symptoms: Asymptomatic Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Percutaneous renal biopsy Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Percutaneous needle biopsy is routinely performed for renal allograft management. Vascular complications of the procedure include pseudoaneurysm and arterio-venous fistulae formation. Delayed diagnosis of these complications is due to their mostly asymptomatic and indolent nature. Case Report: We present a case of extensive intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysm formation within the inferior pole of the allograft, diagnosed two years following the most recent biopsy procedure. Conclusions: Renal pseudoaneurysms may only be diagnosed years after their formation as they are typically asymptomatic. PMID:27510594

  14. Rare presentations of cytomegalovirus infection in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Ardalan, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common viral infection after kidney transplantation. Clinical presentations of cytomegalovirus infection range from asymptomatic infection to organ-specific involvement. Most symptomatic infections manifest as fever and cytopenia. The gastrointestinal tract is the most common site of tissue-invasive infection, often presenting as diarrhea or gastrointestinal bleeding. Gastrointestinal obstruction, perforation, thrombosis of large gastrointestinal veins, splenic artery thrombosis, and pancreatitis are rare gastrointestinal presentations of cytomegalovirus infection. Renal-allograft ureteral stricture and skin involvement are other rare presentations of cytomegalovirus infection. hemophagocytic syndrome, thrombotic microangiopathy, adrenal insufficiency, and renal allograft artery stenosis are other rare symptoms of cytomegalovirus infection.

  15. Aberrant Splicing Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of L-type CaV1.2 Calcium Channels by Competitive Binding for CaVβ Subunits in Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenyu; Wang, Jiong-Wei; Yu, Dejie; Soon, Jia Lin; de Kleijn, Dominique P. V.; Foo, Roger; Liao, Ping; Colecraft, Henry M.; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2016-01-01

    Decreased expression and activity of CaV1.2 calcium channels has been reported in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we identified in rodents a splice variant of CaV1.2 channel, named CaV1.2e21+22, that contained the pair of mutually exclusive exons 21 and 22. This variant was highly expressed in neonatal hearts. The abundance of this variant was gradually increased by 12.5-folds within 14 days of transverse aortic banding that induced cardiac hypertrophy in adult mouse hearts and was also elevated in left ventricles from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Although this variant did not conduct Ca2+ ions, it reduced the cell-surface expression of wild-type CaV1.2 channels and consequently decreased the whole-cell Ca2+ influx via the CaV1.2 channels. In addition, the CaV1.2e21+22 variant interacted with CaVβ subunits significantly more than wild-type CaV1.2 channels, and competition of CaVβ subunits by CaV1.2e21+22 consequently enhanced ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation of the wild-type CaV1.2 channels. Our findings show that the resurgence of a specific neonatal splice variant of CaV1.2 channels in adult heart under stress may contribute to heart failure. PMID:27731386

  16. Contrasting anesthetic sensitivities of T-type Ca2+ channels of reticular thalamic neurons and recombinant Ca(v)3.3 channels.

    PubMed

    Joksovic, Pavle M; Brimelow, Barbara C; Murbartián, Janet; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2005-01-01

    Reticular thalamocortical neurons express a slowly inactivating T-type Ca(2+) current that is quite similar to that recorded from recombinant Ca(v)3.3b (alpha1Ib) channels. These neurons also express abundant Ca(v)3.3 mRNA, suggesting that it underlies the native current. Here, we test this hypothesis by comparing the anesthetic sensitivities of recombinant Ca(v)3.3b channels stably expressed in HEK 293 cells to native T channels in reticular thalamic neurons (nRT) from brain slices of young rats. Barbiturates completely blocked both Ca(v)3.3 and nRT currents, with pentobarbital being about twice more potent in blocking Ca(v)3.3 currents. Isoflurane had about the same potency in blocking Ca(v)3.3 and nRT currents, but enflurane, etomidate, propofol, and ethanol exhibited 2-4 fold higher potency in blocking nRT vs Ca(v)3.3 currents. Nitrous oxide (N(2)O; laughing gas) blocked completely nRT currents with IC(50) of 20%, but did not significantly affect Ca(v)3.3 currents at four-fold higher concentrations. In addition, we observed that in lower concentration, N(2)O reversibly increased nRT but not Ca(v)3.3 currents. In conclusion, contrasting anesthetic sensitivities of Ca(v)3.3 and nRT T-type Ca(2+) channels strongly suggest that different molecular structures of Ca(2+) channels give rise to slowly inactivating T-type Ca(2+) currents. Furthermore, effects of volatile anesthetics and ethanol on slowly inactivating T-type Ca(2+) channel variants may contribute to the clinical effects of these agents. PMID:15644869

  17. Altered thalamocortical rhythmicity and connectivity in mice lacking CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channels in unconsciousness.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Lee, Seongwon; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-06-23

    In unconscious status (e.g., deep sleep and anesthetic unconsciousness) where cognitive functions are not generated there is still a significant level of brain activity present. Indeed, the electrophysiology of the unconscious brain is characterized by well-defined thalamocortical rhythmicity. Here we address the ionic basis for such thalamocortical rhythms during unconsciousness. In particular, we address the role of CaV3.1 T-type Ca(2+) channels, which are richly expressed in thalamic neurons. Toward this aim, we examined the electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes of mice lacking CaV3.1 channels (CaV3.1 knockout) during unconsciousness induced by ketamine or ethanol administration. Our findings indicate that CaV3.1 KO mice displayed attenuated low-frequency oscillations in thalamocortical loops, especially in the 1- to 4-Hz delta band, compared with control mice (CaV3.1 WT). Intriguingly, we also found that CaV3.1 KO mice exhibited augmented high-frequency oscillations during unconsciousness. In a behavioral measure of unconsciousness dynamics, CaV3.1 KO mice took longer to fall into the unconscious state than controls. In addition, such unconscious events had a shorter duration than those of control mice. The thalamocortical interaction level between mediodorsal thalamus and frontal cortex in CaV3.1 KO mice was significantly lower, especially for delta band oscillations, compared with that of CaV3.1 WT mice, during unconsciousness. These results suggest that the CaV3.1 channel is required for the generation of a given set of thalamocortical rhythms during unconsciousness. Further, that thalamocortical resonant neuronal activity supported by this channel is important for the control of vigilance states.

  18. CaV1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels modulate depression-like behaviour in mice independent of deaf phenotype.

    PubMed

    Busquet, Perrine; Nguyen, Ngoc Khoi; Schmid, Eduard; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Seeliger, Mathias W; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Mizuno, Fengxia; Akopian, Abram; Striessnig, Jörg; Singewald, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channels can modulate affective behaviour. We therefore explored the role of CaV1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels in depression- and anxiety-like behaviours using CaV1.3-deficient mice (CaV1.3-/-). We showed that CaV1.3-/- mice displayed less immobility in the forced swim test as well as in the tail suspension test, indicating an antidepressant-like phenotype. Locomotor activity in the home cage or a novel open-field test was not influenced. In the elevated plus maze (EPM), CaV1.3-/- mice entered the open arms more frequently and spent more time there indicating an anxiolytic-like phenotype which was, however, not supported in the stress-induced hyperthermia test. By performing parallel experiments in Claudin 14 knockout mice (Cldn14-/-), which like CaV1.3-/- mice are congenitally deaf, an influence of deafness on the antidepressant-like phenotype could be ruled out. On the other hand, a similar EPM behaviour indicative of an anxiolytic phenotype was also found in the Cldn14-/- animals. Using electroretinography and visual behavioural tasks we demonstrated that at least in mice, CaV1.3 channels do not significantly contribute to visual function. However, marked morphological changes were revealed in synaptic ribbons in the outer plexiform layer of CaV1.3-/- retinas by immunohistochemistry suggesting a possible role of this channel type in structural plasticity at the ribbon synapse. Taken together, our findings indicate that CaV1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels modulate depression-like behaviour but are not essential for visual function. The findings raise the possibility that selective modulation of CaV1.3 channels could be a promising new therapeutic concept for the treatment of mood disorders.

  19. Porous Allograft Bone Scaffolds: Doping with Strontium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28±0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60±0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes. PMID:23922703

  20. Porous allograft bone scaffolds: doping with strontium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28 ± 0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60 ± 0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes. PMID:23922703

  1. The use of C(av) rather than AUC in safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Smith, D A; Morgan, P; Vogel, W M; Walker, D K

    2010-06-01

    Toxicokinetic data have traditionally been presented as maximum observed plasma concentrations (C(max)) and area under the concentration time curve (AUC) values. These values have been used to compare exposures across studies and species to provide valuable interpretation of drug safety data. Increasingly, questions are asked of toxicology studies to more accurately describe the concentration effect relationships in terms of compound affinity for target and off-target receptors. C(max) values can immediately be referenced to known pharmacological activities, particularly when the extent of plasma protein binding is taken into account. This provides a measure of the more pharmacologically relevant free drug exposure. AUC values on the other hand contain the component of time, which means that direct comparison to pharmacological activity values are not immediately possible. Conversion of AUC to average plasma concentration (C(av)) provides a simple and convenient means to allow such a comparison without losing any information imparted by AUC values. In this paper, the benefit and advantage of applying C(av) values is illustrated using examples taken from the literature.

  2. The use of C(av) rather than AUC in safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Smith, D A; Morgan, P; Vogel, W M; Walker, D K

    2010-06-01

    Toxicokinetic data have traditionally been presented as maximum observed plasma concentrations (C(max)) and area under the concentration time curve (AUC) values. These values have been used to compare exposures across studies and species to provide valuable interpretation of drug safety data. Increasingly, questions are asked of toxicology studies to more accurately describe the concentration effect relationships in terms of compound affinity for target and off-target receptors. C(max) values can immediately be referenced to known pharmacological activities, particularly when the extent of plasma protein binding is taken into account. This provides a measure of the more pharmacologically relevant free drug exposure. AUC values on the other hand contain the component of time, which means that direct comparison to pharmacological activity values are not immediately possible. Conversion of AUC to average plasma concentration (C(av)) provides a simple and convenient means to allow such a comparison without losing any information imparted by AUC values. In this paper, the benefit and advantage of applying C(av) values is illustrated using examples taken from the literature. PMID:20074607

  3. [Gene cloning and sequencing of chicken anemia virus(CAV) isolated from Harbin].

    PubMed

    He, Chengqing; Ding, Naizheng; Li, Jingpeng; Li, Yunlong

    2002-08-01

    A Chicken anemia virus has been isolated from a chicken flock in Harbin of China. The genome of the ivrus was cloned through polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and sequence of the genome was analyzed. The cycle genome is made of 2298 base pairs including three overlapping open reading frames(vp1, vp2, vp3) and a regulative region. Comparing sequence of the genome through BLAST in GenBank, this sequence exhibits 96.9% identity with other genome of CA Vs and least. Multiple alignment of this genome of this virus, 26p4, strain isolated in Germany, strain isolated in Malaysia and Cux-1 found that this sequence exhibits 98.2% (42/2298), 98.2% (42/2298), 96.9% (72/2298) and 97.5% (60/2319) identify with them, respectively. A new CAV strain was isolated and it has better identify with CAV isolated in Europe countries than is Asia country Malaysia. Multiple alignment of VP1, VP2, VP3 of 26p4, strain isolated in Germany, strain isolated in Malaysia, Cux-1 and strain isolated in Harbin of China found the VP2 the most conservative.

  4. Inhibition of the immune response to experimental fresh osteoarticular allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigo, J.J.; Schnaser, A.M.; Reynolds, H.M. Jr.; Biggart, J.M. 3d.; Leathers, M.W.; Chism, S.E.; Thorson, E.; Grotz, T.; Yang, Q.M. )

    1989-06-01

    The immune response to osteoarticular allografts is capable of destroying the cartilage--a tissue that has antigens on its cells identical to those on the bone and marrow cells. Osteoarticular allografts of the distal femur were performed in rats using various methods to attempt to temporarily inhibit the antibody response. The temporary systemic immunosuppressant regimens investigated were cyclophosphamide, azathioprine and prednisolone, cyclosporine A, and total lymphoid irradiation. The most successful appeared to be cyclosporine A, but significant side effects were observed. To specifically inhibit the immune response in the allograft antigens without systemically inhibiting the entire immune system, passive enhancement and preadministration of donor blood were tried. Neither was as effective as coating the donor bone with biodegradable cements, a method previously found to be successful. Cyclosporine A was investigated in dogs in a preliminary study of medial compartmental knee allografts and was found to be successful in inhibiting the antibody response and in producing a more successful graft; however, some significant side effects were similarly observed.

  5. Functional Immune Anatomy of the Liver-As an Allograft.

    PubMed

    Demetris, A J; Bellamy, C O C; Gandhi, C R; Prost, S; Nakanuma, Y; Stolz, D B

    2016-06-01

    The liver is an immunoregulatory organ in which a tolerogenic microenvironment mitigates the relative "strength" of local immune responses. Paradoxically, necro-inflammatory diseases create the need for most liver transplants. Treatment of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and acute T cell-mediated rejection have redirected focus on long-term allograft structural integrity. Understanding of insults should enable decades of morbidity-free survival after liver replacement because of these tolerogenic properties. Studies of long-term survivors show low-grade chronic inflammatory, fibrotic, and microvascular lesions, likely related to some combination of environment insults (i.e. abnormal physiology), donor-specific antibodies, and T cell-mediated immunity. The resultant conundrum is familiar in transplantation: adequate immunosuppression produces chronic toxicities, while lightened immunosuppression leads to sensitization, immunological injury, and structural deterioration. The "balance" is more favorable for liver than other solid organ allografts. This occurs because of unique hepatic immune physiology and provides unintended benefits for allografts by modulating various afferent and efferent limbs of allogenic immune responses. This review is intended to provide a better understanding of liver immune microanatomy and physiology and thereby (a) the potential structural consequences of low-level, including allo-antibody-mediated injury; and (b) how liver allografts modulate immune reactions. Special attention is given to the microvasculature and hepatic mononuclear phagocytic system.

  6. Urine Proteomics to Detect Biomarkers for Chronic Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Luís F.; Solé-Gonzalez, Amanda; Kalko, Susana G.; Bañon-Maneus, Elisenda; Solé, Manel; Diekmann, Fritz; Gutierrez-Dalmau, Alex; Abian, Joaquin; Campistol, Josep M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite optimal immunosuppressive therapy, more than 50% of kidney transplants fail because of chronic allograft dysfunction. A noninvasive means to diagnose chronic allograft dysfunction may allow earlier interventions that could improve graft half-life. In this proof-of-concept study, we used mass spectrometry to analyze differences in the urinary polypeptide patterns of 32 patients with chronic allograft dysfunction (14 with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 18 with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection) and 18 control subjects (eight stable recipients and 10 healthy control subjects). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed good segregation of samples in groups corresponding mainly to the four biomedical conditions. Moreover, the composition of the proteome of the pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy group differed from that of the chronic active antibody-mediated rejection group, and an independent validation set confirmed these results. The 14 protein ions that best discriminated between these two groups correctly identified 100% of the patients with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 100% of the patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection. In summary, this study establishes a pattern for two histologic lesions associated with distinct graft outcomes and constitutes a first step to designing a specific, noninvasive diagnostic tool for chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:19056874

  7. Tuberculosis in a renal allograft recipient presenting with intussusception.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, A; Basu, G; Sen, I; Asirvatham, R; Michael, J S; Pulimood, A B; John, G T

    2012-01-01

    Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is more common in renal allograft recipients and may present with dissemination or an atypical features. We report a renal allograft recipient with intestinal TB presenting 3 years after transplantation with persistent fever, weight loss, diarrhea, abdominal pain and mass in the abdomen with intestinal obstruction. He was diagnosed to be having an ileocolic intussusception which on resection showed a granulomatous inflammation with presence of acid-fast bacilli (AFB) typical of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, AFB was detected in the tracheal aspirate, indicating dissemination. He received anti-TB therapy (ATT) from the fourth postoperative day. However, he developed a probable immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) with multiorgan failure and died on 11(th) postoperative day. This is the first report of intestinal TB presenting as intussusception in a renal allograft recipient. The development of IRIS after starting ATT is rare in renal allograft recipients. This report highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for diagnosing TB early among renal transplant recipients and the therapeutic dilemma with overwhelming infection and development of IRIS upon reduction of immunosuppression and starting ATT.

  8. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft. PMID:27725836

  9. Kidney allograft survival in dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Lum, C.T.; Lewis, W.I.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is immunosuppressive and, in rodents, can induce a state where transplantation of allogenic bone marrow results in chimerism and permanent acceptance of organ allografts from the donor strain. Twelve splenectomized dogs were treated with TLI (150 rads per fraction, total dose 1950 to 3000 rads) before bilateral nephrectomy and renal allotransplantation. Eight dogs received bone marrow from the kidney donor. In 13 untreated control dogs renal allografts functioned for a mean +- (SE) of 4.7 +- 0.3 days. In the four TLI treated dogs who did not receive bone marrow the renal allografts functioned for 15 to 76 days (two dogs died with functioning grafts). In the eight TLI treated dogs who received donor bone marrow, two died immediately after transplantation, two rejected at 3 and 13 days, one died at 13 days with a functioning graft, and two have had the grafts function for longer than 500 days. Chimerism was not detected in the one dog tested. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to stimulation with phytohemaglutinin and in mixed lymphocyte culture was suppressed for at least one month after TLI. The results confirm the immunosuppressive effect of TLI. The absence of kidney rejection in two recipients of donor bone marrow show the potential of this approach to induce long-term immunologic unresponsiveness as to an organ allograft, but the outcome is unpredictable and further experiments are needed to define the optimal conditions for administration of TLI and bone marrow to the recipients.

  10. Identification and treatment of cyclosporine-associated allograft thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schlanger, R.E.; Henry, M.L.; Sommer, B.G.; Ferguson, R.M.

    1986-08-01

    Endothelial injury associated with cyclosporine (CSA) therapy in the absence of rejection has resulted in irreversible intrarenal allograft thrombosis and transplant loss. Indium 111 (/sup 111/In)-labeled platelet scanning is an effective way to identify those transplants that are at risk for acute loss. Two hundred prospective /sup 111/In scans were obtained (100 on allografts with normal function and 100 with transplant dysfunction of all causes). /sup 111/In scans in patients with dose-dependent CSA nephrotoxicity (N = 58) and biopsy proved acute rejection (N = 22) were negative. Grossly abnormal scans (three to eight times greater than hepatic uptake) were noted in nine recipients identified as having a hemolytic uremic-like syndrome associated with CSA use. Accelerated allograft functional loss was irreversible in six patients despite stopping CSA, systemic anticoagulation, increased steroids and antilymphocyte globulin, and infusion of fresh-frozen plasma. Three patients with grossly positive /sup 111/In scans and clinical and laboratory parameters consistent with this syndrome were treated with cessation of CSA and intra-arterial infusion of streptokinase into the renal allograft followed by systemic heparinization. Normal transplant function was regained and continues at 1, 7, and 8 months after transplant. /sup 111/In-labeled platelet scanning can noninvasively identify this syndrome of CSA-associated arteriopathy and allow for early therapy to reverse it. Intrarenal arterial streptokinase therapy is a successful way to treat acute CSA-associated arteriopathy.

  11. Whole exome sequencing identifies de novo heterozygous CAV1 mutations associated with a novel neonatal onset lipodystrophy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garg, Abhimanyu; Kircher, Martin; Del Campo, Miguel; Amato, R Stephen; Agarwal, Anil K

    2015-08-01

    Despite remarkable progress in identifying causal genes for many types of genetic lipodystrophies in the last decade, the molecular basis of many extremely rare lipodystrophy patients with distinctive phenotypes remains unclear. We conducted whole exome sequencing of the parents and probands from six pedigrees with neonatal onset of generalized loss of subcutaneous fat with additional distinctive phenotypic features and report de novo heterozygous null mutations, c.424C>T (p.Q142*) and c.479_480delTT (p.F160*), in CAV1 in a 7-year-old male and a 3-year-old female of European origin, respectively. Both the patients had generalized fat loss, thin mottled skin and progeroid features at birth. The male patient had cataracts requiring extraction at age 30 months and the female patient had pulmonary arterial hypertension. Dermal fibroblasts of the female patient revealed negligible CAV1 immunofluorescence staining compared to control but there were no differences in the number and morphology of caveolae upon electron microscopy examination. Based upon the similarities in the clinical features of these two patients, previous reports of CAV1 mutations in patients with lipodystrophies and pulmonary hypertension, and similar features seen in CAV1 null mice, we conclude that these variants are the most likely cause of one subtype of neonatal onset generalized lipodystrophy syndrome.

  12. Pathophysiological implication of CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channels in trigeminal neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Hwang, Eunjin; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial pathophysiological issue concerning central neuropathic pain is the modification of sensory processing by abnormally increased low-frequency brain rhythms. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for such abnormal rhythmicity and its relation to neuropathic pain syndrome. Toward this aim, we investigated the behavioral and electrophysiological consequences of trigeminal neuropathic pain following infraorbital nerve ligations in CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channel knockout and wild-type mice. CaV3.1 knockout mice had decreased mechanical hypersensitivity and reduced low-frequency rhythms in the primary somatosensory cortex and related thalamic nuclei than wild-type mice. Lateral inhibition of gamma rhythm in primary somatosensory cortex layer 4, reflecting intact sensory contrast, was present in knockout mice but severely impaired in wild-type mice. Moreover, cross-frequency coupling between low-frequency and gamma rhythms, which may serve in sensory processing, was pronounced in wild-type mice but not in CaV3.1 knockout mice. Our results suggest that the presence of CaV3.1 channels is a key element in the pathophysiology of trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:26858455

  13. Graded Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent coupling of voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Rose E; Moreno, Claudia M; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Navedo, Manuel F; Santana, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    In the heart, reliable activation of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the plateau of the ventricular action potential requires synchronous opening of multiple CaV1.2 channels. Yet the mechanisms that coordinate this simultaneous opening during every heartbeat are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CaV1.2 channels form clusters that undergo dynamic, reciprocal, allosteric interactions. This ‘functional coupling’ facilitates Ca2+ influx by increasing activation of adjoined channels and occurs through C-terminal-to-C-terminal interactions. These interactions are initiated by binding of incoming Ca2+ to calmodulin (CaM) and proceed through Ca2+/CaM binding to the CaV1.2 pre-IQ domain. Coupling fades as [Ca2+]i decreases, but persists longer than the current that evoked it, providing evidence for ‘molecular memory’. Our findings suggest a model for CaV1.2 channel gating and Ca2+-influx amplification that unifies diverse observations about Ca2+ signaling in the heart, and challenges the long-held view that voltage-gated channels open and close independently. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05608.001 PMID:25714924

  14. Usefulness of Diastolic Strain Measurements in Predicting Elevated Left Ventricular Filling Pressure and Risk of Rejection or Coronary Artery Vasculopathy in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jimmy C; Magdo, H Sonali; Yu, Sunkyung; Lowery, Ray; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Zamberlan, Mary; Gajarski, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    In pediatric heart transplant recipients, elevated pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is associated with rejection and coronary artery vasculopathy. This study aimed to evaluate which echocardiographic parameters track changes in PCWP and predict adverse outcomes (rejection or coronary artery vasculopathy). This prospective single-center study enrolled 49 patients (median 11.4 years old, interquartile range 7.4 to 16.5) at time of cardiac catheterization and echocardiography. Median follow-up was 2.4 years (range 1.2 to 3.1 years), with serial testing per clinical protocol. Ratio of early mitral inflow to annular velocity (E/E'), left atrial (LA) distensibility, peak LA systolic strain, E/left ventricular (LV) diastolic strain, and E/LV diastolic strain rate were measured from echocardiograms. Increase in PCWP ≥3 mm Hg was associated with changes in LA distensibility, E/E', and E/LV diastolic strain, with highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for E/LV diastolic strain (0.76). In 9 patients who subsequently developed rejection or coronary artery vasculopathy, E/LV diastolic strain rate at baseline differed from patients without events (median 57.0 vs 43.6, p = 0.02). On serial studies, only change in LV ejection fraction differed in patients with events (median -10% vs -1%, p = 0.01); decrease in LV ejection fraction of -19% had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 44%. In conclusion, LV diastolic strain and strain rate measurements can track changes in PCWP and identify patients at risk for subsequent rejection or coronary artery vasculopathy. Further studies are necessary to confirm these data in a larger cohort.

  15. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups

    PubMed Central

    Licursi, Valerio; Brito, Catarina; La Torre, Mattia; Alves, Paula M.; Simao, Daniel; Mottini, Carla; Salinas, Sara; Negri, Rodolfo; Tagliafico, Enrico; Kremer, Eric J.; Saggio, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD) canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2) are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR. PMID:26207738

  16. Large Ca2+-dependent facilitation of CaV2.1 channels revealed by Ca2+ photo-uncaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shin-Rong; Adams, Paul J; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Key points CaV2.1 channels constitute a dominant Ca2+ entry pathway into brain neurons, triggering downstream Ca2+-dependent processes such as neurotransmitter release. CaV2.1 is itself modulated by Ca2+, resulting in activity-dependent enhancement of channel opening termed Ca2+-dependent facilitation (CDF). Real-time Ca2+ imaging and Ca2+ uncaging here reveal that CDF turns out to be strikingly faster, more Ca2+ sensitive, and larger than anticipated on previous grounds. Robust resolution of the quantitative profile of CDF enables deduction of a realistic biophysical model for this process. These results suggest that CaV2.1 CDF would figure most prominently in short-term synaptic plasticity and cerebellar Purkinje cell rhythmicity. Abstract CaV2.1 (P-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels constitute a major source of neuronal Ca2+ current, strongly influencing rhythmicity and triggering neurotransmitter release throughout the central nervous system. Fitting with such stature among Ca2+ entry pathways, CaV2.1 is itself feedback regulated by intracellular Ca2+, acting through calmodulin to facilitate channel opening. The precise neurophysiological role of this calcium-dependent facilitation (CDF) remains uncertain, however, in large measure because the very magnitude, Ca2+ dependence and kinetics of CDF have resisted quantification by conventional means. Here, we utilize the photo-uncaging of Ca2+ with CaV2.1 channels fluxing Li+ currents, so that voltage-dependent activation of channel gating is no longer conflated with Ca2+ entry, and CDF is then driven solely by light-induced increases in Ca2+. By using this strategy, we now find that CDF can be unexpectedly large, enhancing currents by as much as twofold at physiological voltages. CDF is steeply Ca2+ dependent, with a Hill coefficient of approximately two, a half-maximal effect reached by nearly 500 nm Ca2+, and Ca2+ on/off kinetics in the order of milliseconds to tens of milliseconds. These properties were

  17. Ablation of Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated Ca²⁺ channels in mouse forebrain generates multiple cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, Robert Theodor; Elgueta, Claudio; Sleman, Faten; Castonguay, Jan; Wilmes, Thomas; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Klugbauer, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca²⁺ channels located at the presynaptic membrane are known to control a multitude of Ca²⁺-dependent cellular processes such as neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity. Our knowledge about their contributions to complex cognitive functions, however, is restricted by the limited adequacy of existing transgenic Ca(V)2.1 mouse models. Global Ca(V)2.1 knock-out mice lacking the α1 subunit Cacna1a gene product exhibit early postnatal lethality which makes them unsuitable to analyse the relevance of Ca(V)2.1 Ca²⁺ channels for complex behaviour in adult mice. Consequently we established a forebrain specific Ca(V)2.1 knock-out model by crossing mice with a floxed Cacna1a gene with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the control of the NEX promoter. This novel mouse model enabled us to investigate the contribution of Ca(V)2.1 to complex cognitive functions, particularly learning and memory. Electrophysiological analysis allowed us to test the specificity of our conditional knock-out model and revealed an impaired synaptic transmission at hippocampal glutamatergic synapses. At the behavioural level, the forebrain-specific Ca(V)2.1 knock-out resulted in deficits in spatial learning and reference memory, reduced recognition memory, increased exploratory behaviour and a strong attenuation of circadian rhythmicity. In summary, we present a novel conditional Ca(V)2.1 knock-out model that is most suitable for analysing the in vivo functions of Ca(V)2.1 in the adult murine forebrain.

  18. MiR-103 inhibits osteoblast proliferation mainly through suppressing Cav1.2 expression in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongyang; Cao, Xinsheng; Hu, Zebing; Zhang, Lianchang; Wang, Han; Zhou, Hua; Li, Dongtao; Zhang, Shu; Xie, Manjiang

    2015-07-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in modulating osteoblast function and bone formation. However, the influence of miRNA on osteoblast proliferation and the possible mechanisms underlying remain to be defined. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether miR-103 regulates osteoblast proliferation under simulated microgravity condition through regulating Cav1.2, the primary subunit of L-type voltage sensitive calcium channels (LTCCs). We first investigated the effect of simulated microgravity on osteoblast proliferation and the outcomes clearly demonstrated that the mechanical unloading inhibits MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell proliferation. Using quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR), we provided data showing that miR-103 was up-regulated in response to simulated microgravity. In addition, we observed that up-regulation of miR-103 inhibited and down-regulation of miR-103 promoted osteoblast proliferation under simulated microgravity condition. Furthermore, knocking-down or over-expressing miR-103, respectively, up- or down-regulated the level of Cav1.2 expression and LTCC currents, suggesting that miR-103 acts as an endogenous attenuator of Cav1.2 in osteoblasts under simulated microgravity condition. More importantly, we showed that the effect of miR-103 on osteoblast proliferation was diminished in simulated microgravity, when co-transfecting miR-103 mimic or inhibitor with Cav1.2 siRNA. Taken together, our data suggest that miR-103 inhibits osteoblast proliferation mainly through suppression of Cav1.2 expression under simulated microgravity condition. This work may provide a novel mechanism of microgravity-induced detrimental effects on osteoblast proliferation, identifying miR-103 as a novel possible therapeutic target in bone remodeling disorders in this mechanical unloading.

  19. Functional properties of a newly identified C-terminal splice variant of Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Bock, Gabriella; Gebhart, Mathias; Scharinger, Anja; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Busquet, Perrine; Poggiani, Chiara; Sartori, Simone; Mangoni, Matteo E; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J; Herzig, Stefan; Striessnig, Jörg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2011-12-01

    An intramolecular interaction between a distal (DCRD) and a proximal regulatory domain (PCRD) within the C terminus of long Ca(v)1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels (Ca(v)1.3(L)) is a major determinant of their voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent gating kinetics. Removal of these regulatory domains by alternative splicing generates Ca(v)1.3(42A) channels that activate at a more negative voltage range and exhibit more pronounced Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. Here we describe the discovery of a novel short splice variant (Ca(v)1.3(43S)) that is expressed at high levels in the brain but not in the heart. It lacks the DCRD but, in contrast to Ca(v)1.3(42A), still contains PCRD. When expressed together with α2δ1 and β3 subunits in tsA-201 cells, Ca(v)1.3(43S) also activated at more negative voltages like Ca(v)1.3(42A) but Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation was less pronounced. Single channel recordings revealed much higher channel open probabilities for both short splice variants as compared with Ca(v)1.3(L). The presence of the proximal C terminus in Ca(v)1.3(43S) channels preserved their modulation by distal C terminus-containing Ca(v)1.3- and Ca(v)1.2-derived C-terminal peptides. Removal of the C-terminal modulation by alternative splicing also induced a faster decay of Ca(2+) influx during electrical activities mimicking trains of neuronal action potentials. Our findings extend the spectrum of functionally diverse Ca(v)1.3 L-type channels produced by tissue-specific alternative splicing. This diversity may help to fine tune Ca(2+) channel signaling and, in the case of short variants lacking a functional C-terminal modulation, prevent excessive Ca(2+) accumulation during burst firing in neurons. This may be especially important in neurons that are affected by Ca(2+)-induced neurodegenerative processes.

  20. Alcohol Withdrawal-Induced Seizure Susceptibility is Associated with an Upregulation of CaV1.3 Channels in the Rat Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Akinfiresoye, Luli R.; Allard, Joanne S.; Lovinger, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We previously reported increased current density through L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV1) channels in inferior colliculus (IC) neurons during alcohol withdrawal. However, the molecular correlate of this increased CaV1 current is currently unknown. Methods: Rats received three daily doses of ethanol every 8 hours for 4 consecutive days; control rats received vehicle. The IC was dissected at various time intervals following alcohol withdrawal, and the mRNA and protein levels of the CaV1.3 and CaV1.2 α1 subunits were measured. In separate experiments, rats were tested for their susceptibility to alcohol withdrawal–induced seizures (AWS) 3, 24, and 48 hours after alcohol withdrawal. Results: In the alcohol-treated group, AWS were observed 24 hours after withdrawal; no seizures were observed at 3 or 48 hours. No seizures were observed at any time in the control-treated rats. Compared to control-treated rats, the mRNA level of the CaV1.3 α1 subunit was increased 1.4-fold, 1.9-fold, and 1.3-fold at 3, 24, and 48 hours, respectively. In contrast, the mRNA level of the CaV1.2 α1 subunit increased 1.5-fold and 1.4-fold at 24 and 48 hours, respectively. At 24 hours, Western blot analyses revealed that the levels of the CaV1.3 and CaV1.2 α1 subunits increased by 52% and 32%, respectively, 24 hours after alcohol withdrawal. In contrast, the CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 α1 subunits were not altered at either 3 or 48 hours during alcohol withdrawal. Conclusions: Expression of the CaV1.3 α1 subunit increased in parallel with AWS development, suggesting that altered L-type CaV1.3 channel expression is an important feature of AWS pathogenesis. PMID:25556199

  1. Spectrum of Cav1.4 dysfunction in congenital stationary night blindness type 2☆

    PubMed Central

    Burtscher, Verena; Schicker, Klaus; Novikova, Elena; Pöhn, Birgit; Stockner, Thomas; Kugler, Christof; Singh, Anamika; Zeitz, Christina; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Audo, Isabelle; Leroy, Bart Peter; Freissmuth, Michael; Herzig, Stefan; Matthes, Jan; Koschak, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Defective retinal synaptic transmission in patients affected with congenital stationary night blindness type 2 (CSNB2) can result from different dysfunction phenotypes in Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels. Here we investigated two prototypical Cav1.4 variants from either end of the functional spectrum. Using whole-cell and single-channel patch-clamp techniques, we provide analysis of the biophysical characteristics of the point mutation L860P and the C-terminal truncating mutation R1827X. L860P showed a typical loss-of-function phenotype attributed to a reduced number of functional channels expressed at the plasma membrane as implied by gating current and non-stationary noise analyses. This phenotype can be rationalized, because the inserted proline is predicted to break an amphipatic helix close to the transmembrane segment IIIS1 and thus to reduce channel stability and promote misfolding. In fact, L860P was subject to an increased turnover. In contrast, R1827X displayed an apparent gain-of-function phenotype, i.e., due to a hyperpolarizing shift of the IV-curve and increased single-channel activity. However, truncation also resulted in the loss of functional C-terminal modulation and thus unmasked calcium-dependent inactivation. Thus R1827X failed to support continuous calcium influx. Current inactivation curtails the dynamic range of photoreceptors (e.g., when adapting to variation in illumination). Taken together, the analysis of two representative mutations that occur in CSNB2 patients revealed fundamental differences in the underlying defect. These may explain subtle variations in the clinical manifestation and must be taken into account, if channel function is to be restored by pharmacochaperones or related approaches. PMID:24796500

  2. Kidney retransplantation for BK virus nephropathy with active viremia without allograft nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingbo; Danovitch, Gabriel; Pham, Phuong-Thu; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Huang, Edmund

    2015-12-01

    BK virus nephropathy is an important cause of kidney allograft failure. Retransplantation has been successfully performed for patients with previous allograft loss due to BK virus nephropathy; however, whether allograft nephrectomy and viral clearance are required prior to retransplantation is controversial. Some recent studies have suggested that retransplantion can be successfully achieved without allograft nephrectomy if viremia is cleared prior to retransplant. The only published experience of successful retransplantation in the presence of active viremia occurred in the presence of concomitant allograft nephrectomy of the failing kidney. In this report, we describe a case of successful repeat kidney transplant in a patient with high-grade BK viremia and fulminant hepatic failure without concomitant allograft nephrectomy performed under the setting of a simultaneous liver-kidney transplant.

  3. Micro-organisms isolated from cadaveric samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    Allograft musculoskeletal tissue is commonly used in orthopaedic surgical procedures. Cadaveric donors of musculoskeletal tissue supply multiple allografts such as tendons, ligaments and bone. The microbiology laboratory of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (SEALS, Australia) has cultured cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples for bacterial and fungal isolates since 2006. This study will retrospectively review the micro-organisms isolated over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swab and tissue samples were received for bioburden testing and were inoculated onto agar and/or broth culture media. Growth was obtained from 25.1 % of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples received. The predominant organisms isolated were coagulase-negative staphylococci and coliforms, with the heaviest bioburden recovered from the hemipelvis. The rate of bacterial and fungal isolates from cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples is higher than that from living donors. The type of organism isolated may influence the suitability of the allograft for transplant.

  4. Macitentan reverses early obstructive pulmonary vasculopathy in rats: early intervention in overcoming the survivin-mediated resistance to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Tsutomu; Sawada, Hirofumi; Otsuki, Shoichiro; Yodoya, Noriko; Kato, Taichi; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Erquan; Saitoh, Shinji; Shimpo, Hideto; Maruyama, Kazuo; Komada, Yoshihiro; Mitani, Yoshihide

    2015-03-15

    It remains unknown whether current disease-targeting therapy can histologically reverse obstructive pulmonary vasculopathy and how the timing of the therapy influences the antiremodeling effects of the compound. We test the hypothesis that a novel endothelin receptor antagonist macitentan reverses the early and/or late stages of occlusive pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) in rats. Rats with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which were produced by combined exposure to a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor Sugen 5416 and hypobaric hypoxia for 3 wk, were assigned to receive macitentan or vehicle during 3-5 wk (early study) or during 5-8 wk (late study) after Sugen injection. Compared with vehicle-treated PAH rats and PAH rats evaluated before treatment initiation, the macitentan-treated rats showed decreases in the proportion of occlusive lesions in the early study, a finding consistent with the reversal of right ventricular systolic pressure and indexes of right ventricular hypertrophy and medial wall thickness. Macitentan ameliorated but did not reverse the proportion of occlusive lesions in the late study. Although macitentan decreased the proportion of Ki67+ lesions in both studies, macitentan increased the proportion of cleaved caspase 3+ lesions and suppressed an antiapoptotic molecule survivin expression in the early study but not in the late study. In conclusion, macitentan reversed early but not late obstructive PVD in rats. This reversal was associated with the suppression of survivin-related resistance to apoptosis and proliferation of cells in PVD.

  5. Cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy as a cause of acute kidney injury in dogs in the UK.

    PubMed

    Holm, L P; Hawkins, I; Robin, C; Newton, R J; Jepson, R; Stanzani, G; McMahon, L A; Pesavento, P; Carr, T; Cogan, T; Couto, C G; Cianciolo, R; Walker, D J

    2015-04-11

    To describe the signalment, clinicopathological findings and outcome in dogs presenting with acute kidney injury (AKI) and skin lesions between November 2012 and March 2014, in whom cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy (CRGV) was suspected and renal thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) was histopathologically confirmed. The medical records of dogs with skin lesions and AKI, with histopathologically confirmed renal TMA, were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty dogs from across the UK were identified with clinicopathological findings compatible with CRGV. These findings included the following: skin lesions, predominantly affecting the distal extremities; AKI; and variably, anaemia, thrombocytopaenia and hyperbilirubinaemia. Known causes of AKI were excluded. The major renal histopathological finding was TMA. All thirty dogs died or were euthanised. Shiga toxin was not identified in the kidneys of affected dogs. Escherichia coli genes encoding shiga toxin were not identified in faeces from affected dogs. CRGV has previously been reported in greyhounds in the USA, a greyhound in the UK, without renal involvement, and a Great Dane in Germany. This is the first report of a series of non-greyhound dogs with CRGV and AKI in the UK. CRGV is a disease of unknown aetiology carrying a poor prognosis when azotaemia develops.

  6. Cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy as a cause of acute kidney injury in dogs in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, I.; Robin, C.; Newton, R. J.; Jepson, R.; Stanzani, G.; McMahon, L. A.; Pesavento, P.; Carr, T.; Cogan, T.; Couto, C. G.; Cianciolo, R.; Walker, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the signalment, clinicopathological findings and outcome in dogs presenting with acute kidney injury (AKI) and skin lesions between November 2012 and March 2014, in whom cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy (CRGV) was suspected and renal thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) was histopathologically confirmed. The medical records of dogs with skin lesions and AKI, with histopathologically confirmed renal TMA, were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty dogs from across the UK were identified with clinicopathological findings compatible with CRGV. These findings included the following: skin lesions, predominantly affecting the distal extremities; AKI; and variably, anaemia, thrombocytopaenia and hyperbilirubinaemia. Known causes of AKI were excluded. The major renal histopathogical finding was TMA. All thirty dogs died or were euthanised. Shiga toxin was not identified in the kidneys of affected dogs. Escherichia coli genes encoding shiga toxin were not identified in faeces from affected dogs. CRGV has previously been reported in greyhounds in the USA, a greyhound in the UK, without renal involvement, and a Great Dane in Germany. This is the first report of a series of non-greyhound dogs with CRGV and AKI in the UK. CRGV is a disease of unknown aetiology carrying a poor prognosis when azotaemia develops. PMID:25802439

  7. Longitudinal Strain and Strain Rate Abnormalities Precede Invasive Diagnosis of Transplant Coronary Artery Vasculopathy in Pediatric Cardiac Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Zoeller, Bridget B; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Younoszai, Adel K; Landeck, Bruce F

    2016-04-01

    Transplant coronary artery vasculopathy (TCAV) is the primary cause of late graft loss in pediatric heart transplant recipients. TCAV is diagnosed using angiography or intravascular ultrasound; however, noninvasive methods remain elusive. We sought to define patterns of myocardial mechanics in patients with TCAV and to determine whether this can detect TCAV before invasive methods. In this retrospective study, we queried our heart transplant database to identify all recipients with TCAV since 2006 (n = 41). Echoes were reviewed from the last normal catheterization and at TCAV diagnosis, and from time-matched transplant controls (n = 33) without TCAV. Peak global circumferential and longitudinal strain and systolic and diastolic strain rate (SSR and DSR) of the left ventricle were derived using velocity vector imaging. T tests were used to compare both groups longitudinally and between groups at both time points. Longitudinal strain, SSR, and DSR were diminished in the TCAV group compared to the transplant control group at both time points. No differences were found across time points in either group. Retrospective modeling using a longitudinal strain cutoff of 15 % on echoes 2 years prior to TCAV diagnosis predicted development or exclusion of TCAV with sensitivity of 53 %, specificity of 89 % with an area under the curve of 0.8. Decreases in longitudinal strain measurements demonstrate that alterations in myocardial mechanics occur in patients with TCAV at least 2 years prior to invasive diagnosis. These early changes may be due to microvascular disease. This modality could aid in earlier treatment and intervention for this challenging problem .

  8. Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using tendon allografts--Florida and Louisiana, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-12-01

    In the United States, approximately 50,000 knee surgeries are performed each year for repairing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Tissue allografts frequently are used for ACL reconstruction, and septic arthritis is a rare complication of such procedures. This report describes four patients who acquired postsurgical septic arthritis probably associated with contaminated bone-tendon-bone allografts used for ACL reconstruction. Effective sterilization methods that do not functionally alter musculoskeletal tissue are needed to prevent allograft-related infections.

  9. Septic arthritis following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using tendon allografts--Florida and Louisiana, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-12-01

    In the United States, approximately 50,000 knee surgeries are performed each year for repairing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Tissue allografts frequently are used for ACL reconstruction, and septic arthritis is a rare complication of such procedures. This report describes four patients who acquired postsurgical septic arthritis probably associated with contaminated bone-tendon-bone allografts used for ACL reconstruction. Effective sterilization methods that do not functionally alter musculoskeletal tissue are needed to prevent allograft-related infections. PMID:11770503

  10. Optimization of the genomic DNA extraction method of silverleaf nightshade/ (Solanum elaeagnifolium /Cav.), an invasive plant in the cultivated areas within the Mediterranean region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The geographical origin of an invasive in the cultivated area within the Mediterranean region, silverleaf nightshade, Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav, (Solanaceae) should be identified through the analysis of genetic similarities between native and introduced populations using microsatellite markers. Bef...

  11. Characterization of a Synaptic Vesicle Binding Motif on the Distal CaV2.2 Channel C-terminal.

    PubMed

    Gardezi, Sabiha R; Nath, Arup R; Li, Qi; Stanley, Elise F

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles (SVs) that are gated to fuse with the presynaptic membrane by calcium ions that enter through voltage-gated calcium channels (CaVs). There is compelling evidence that SVs associate closely with the CaVs but the molecular linking mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using a cell-free, synaptic vesicle-pull-down assay method (SV-PD) we have recently demonstrated that SVs can bind both to the intact CaV2.2 channel and also to a fusion protein comprising the distal third, C3 segment, of its long C-terminal. This site was localized to a 49 amino acid region just proximal to the C-terminal tip. To further restrict the SV binding site we generated five, 10 amino acid mimetic blocking peptides spanning this region. Of these, HQARRVPNGY effectively inhibited SV-PD and also inhibited SV recycling when cryoloaded into chick brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Further, SV-PD was markedly reduced using a C3 fusion protein that lacked the HQARRVPNGY sequence, C3HQless. We zeroed in on the SV binding motif within HQARRVPNGY by means of a palette of mutant blocking peptides. To our surprise, peptides that lacked the highly conserved VPNGY sequence still blocked SV-PD. However, substitution of the HQ and RR amino acids markedly reduced block. Of these, the RR pair was essential but not sufficient as the full block was not observed without H suggesting a CaV2.2 SV binding motif of HxxRR. Interestingly, CaV2.1, the other primary presynaptic calcium channel, exhibits a similar motif, RHxRR, that likely serves the same function. Bioinformatic analysis showed that variations of this binding motif, +(+) xRR (where + is a positively charged aa H or R), are conserved from lung-fish to man. Further studies will be necessary to identify the C terminal motif binding partner on the SV itself and to determine the role of this molecular interaction in synaptic transmission. We hypothesize that the distal C-terminal participates in the capture

  12. Characterization of a Synaptic Vesicle Binding Motif on the Distal CaV2.2 Channel C-terminal

    PubMed Central

    Gardezi, Sabiha R.; Nath, Arup R.; Li, Qi; Stanley, Elise F.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles (SVs) that are gated to fuse with the presynaptic membrane by calcium ions that enter through voltage-gated calcium channels (CaVs). There is compelling evidence that SVs associate closely with the CaVs but the molecular linking mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using a cell-free, synaptic vesicle-pull-down assay method (SV-PD) we have recently demonstrated that SVs can bind both to the intact CaV2.2 channel and also to a fusion protein comprising the distal third, C3 segment, of its long C-terminal. This site was localized to a 49 amino acid region just proximal to the C-terminal tip. To further restrict the SV binding site we generated five, 10 amino acid mimetic blocking peptides spanning this region. Of these, HQARRVPNGY effectively inhibited SV-PD and also inhibited SV recycling when cryoloaded into chick brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Further, SV-PD was markedly reduced using a C3 fusion protein that lacked the HQARRVPNGY sequence, C3HQless. We zeroed in on the SV binding motif within HQARRVPNGY by means of a palette of mutant blocking peptides. To our surprise, peptides that lacked the highly conserved VPNGY sequence still blocked SV-PD. However, substitution of the HQ and RR amino acids markedly reduced block. Of these, the RR pair was essential but not sufficient as the full block was not observed without H suggesting a CaV2.2 SV binding motif of HxxRR. Interestingly, CaV2.1, the other primary presynaptic calcium channel, exhibits a similar motif, RHxRR, that likely serves the same function. Bioinformatic analysis showed that variations of this binding motif, +(+) xRR (where + is a positively charged aa H or R), are conserved from lung-fish to man. Further studies will be necessary to identify the C terminal motif binding partner on the SV itself and to determine the role of this molecular interaction in synaptic transmission. We hypothesize that the distal C-terminal participates in the capture

  13. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  14. Total lymphoid irradiation for treatment of intractable cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, S.A.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Stinson, E.B. )

    1991-03-01

    The ability of postoperative total lymphoid irradiation to reverse otherwise intractable cardiac allograft rejection was examined in a group of 10 patients in whom conventional rejection therapy (including pulsed steroids and monoclonal or polyclonal anti-T-cell antibody therapy) had failed to provide sustained freedom from rejection. Follow-up periods range from 73 to 1119 days since the start of total lymphoid irradiation. No patient died or sustained serious morbidity because of the irradiation. Three patients have had no further rejection (follow-up periods, 105 to 365 days). Two patients died--one in cardiogenic shock during the course of total lymphoid irradiation, the other with recurrent rejection caused by noncompliance with his medical regimen. Total lymphoid irradiation appears to be a safe and a moderately effective immunosuppressive modality for 'salvage' therapy of cardiac allograft rejection unresponsive to conventional therapy.

  15. Experimental rat models of chronic allograft nephropathy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Badri; Haylor, John

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is the leading cause of late allograft loss after renal transplantation (RT), which continues to remain an unresolved problem. A rat model of CAN was first described in 1969 by White et al. Although the rat model of RT can be technically challenging, it is attractive because the pathogenesis of CAN is similar to that following human RT and the pathological features of CAN develop within months as compared with years in human RT. The rat model of RT is considered as a useful investigational tool in the field of experimental transplantation research. We have reviewed the literature on studies of rat RT reporting the donor and recipient strain combinations that have investigated resultant survival and histological outcomes. Several different combinations of inbred and outbred rat combinations have been reported to investigate the multiple aspects of transplantation, including acute rejection, cellular and humoral rejection mechanisms and their treatments, CAN, and potential targets for its prevention. PMID:25092995

  16. Healing properties of allograft from alendronate-treated animal in lumbar spine interbody cage fusion.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingyun; Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Bünger, Mathias; Egund, Niels; Lind, Martin; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Bünger, Cody

    2005-04-01

    This study investigated the healing potential of allograft from bisphosphonate-treated animals in anterior lumbar spine interbody fusion. Three levels of anterior lumbar interbody fusion with Brantigan cages were performed in two groups of five landrace pigs. Empty Brantigan cages or cages filled with either autograft or allograft were located randomly at different levels. The allograft materials for the treatment group were taken from the pigs that had been fed with alendronate, 10 mg daily for 3 months. The histological fusion rate was 2/5 in alendronate-treated allograft and 3/5 in non-treated allograft. The mean bone volume was 39% and 37.2% in alendronate-treated or non-treated allograft (NS), respectively. No statistical difference was found between the same grafted cage comparing two groups. The histological fusion rate was 7/10 in all autograft cage levels and 5/10 in combined allograft cage levels. No fusion was found at all in empty cage levels. With the numbers available, no statistically significant difference was found in histological fusion between autograft and allograft applications. There was a significant difference of mean bone volume between autograft (49.2%) and empty cage (27.5%) (P<0.01). In conclusion, this study did not demonstrate different healing properties of alendronate-treated and non-treated allograft for anterior lumbar interbody fusion in pigs. PMID:15248057

  17. The safe and effective use of allograft tissue--an update.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Scott A; King, Warren

    2003-01-01

    The use of allograft tissue in orthopaedic surgery has increased tremendously over the last several years. Tissue availability, reduced surgical times, and lack of donor site morbidity are attractive characteristics to surgeons and patients alike. Although complications, such as disease transmission, are relatively uncommon when using allograft tissue, they do occur. This article will review the literature concerning the safe and effective use of allograft tissue, as well as present four case reports of Clostridium septicum infection caused by implantation of contaminated allograft tissue.

  18. Fresh-frozen Complete Extensor Mechanism Allograft versus Autograft Reconstruction in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanyin; Zhang, Hongtao; Ma, Qiong; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Yinglong; Fan, Qingyu; Ma, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Different clinical results have been reported in the repair of extensor mechanism disruption using fresh-frozen complete extensor mechanism (CEM) allograft, creating a need for a better understanding of fresh-frozen CME allograft reconstruction. Here, we perform histological and biomechanical analyses of fresh-frozen CEM allograft or autograft reconstruction in an in vivo rabbit model. Our histological results show complete incorporation of the quadriceps tendon into the host tissues, patellar survival and total integration of the allograft tibia, with relatively fewer osteocytes, into the host tibia. Vascularity and cellularity are reduced and delayed in the allograft but exhibit similar distributions to those in the autograft. The infrapatellar fat pad provides the main blood supply, and the lowest cellularity is observed in the patellar tendon close to the tibia in both the allograft and autograft. The biomechanical properties of the junction of quadriceps tendon and host tissues and those of the allograft patellar tendon are completely and considerably restored, respectively. Therefore, fresh-frozen CEM allograft reconstruction is viable, but the distal patellar tendon and the tibial block may be the weak links of the reconstruction. These findings provide new insight into the use of allograft in repairing disruption of the extensor mechanism. PMID:26911538

  19. Prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts in the primate with total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Els, D.; Du Toit, L.B.; Weideman, A.; Davids, H.; van der Merwe, E.

    1987-09-01

    The prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts (PDA) by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and in combination with cyclosporine (CsA) was assessed in a well established total pancreatectomy, diabetic, primate transplantation model. Pancreatic transplantation was performed in 119 pancreatectomized baboons (Papio ursinus). Of a total of 109 allografts performed, 71 were segmental allografts (open duct drainage) and 38 PDA. Of 119 graft recipients, 10 received segmental pancreatic autografts. TLI and CsA administered separately to segmental allograft recipients resulted in modest allograft survival and indefinite graft survival was not observed. 8 of 17 (47%) segmental allograft recipients that received TLI and CsA had graft survival beyond 100 days, indicating highly significant pancreatic allograft survival. All long-term segmental allograft recipients were rendered normoglycemic (plasma glucose less than 8 mmol/L) by this immunosuppressive regimen. In contrast, poor results were observed in PDA recipients treated with TLI and CsA. Mean survival in 18 treated PDA recipients was 23.8 days, 8 survived longer than 20 days (44.4%), and 1 greater than 100 days (5.5%). Despite treatment, early rejection of the duodenum in PDA recipients frequently resulted in necrosis and perforation and contributed to a high morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that, in contrast to the significant prolongation of segmental allografts by TLI and CsA, poor immunosuppression was achieved by this regimen in PDA recipients and was associated with a high morbidity and mortality caused by early rejection of the duodenum.

  20. Immunomodulation of vascular endothelium: Effects of ultraviolet B irradiation on vein allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, M.L.; Hardy, M.A.; Gordon, R.E.; Reemtsma, K.; Benvenisty, A.I. )

    1990-01-01

    Prosthetic grafts of vein allografts are inadequate as small-diameter vessel substitutes. We have applied ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation to modulate the immunogenicity of vein allografts to avoid immunologic injury. The veins of male ACI rats were irradiated with UVB (60 mJ/cm2) in situ and transplanted to male ACI rats (autografts) and female Lewis rats (allografts). Nonirradiated veins served as controls. At 4, 7, 14, and 28 days, all grafts were patent and were studied for morphologic changes by scanning electron microscopy and for immunogold labeling of major histocompatibility complex class II antigen expression. In autografts, scanning electron microscopy demonstrated minimal endothelial loss after grafting, regardless of UVB irradiation. Untreated allografts showed severe endothelial injury 4, 7, and 14 days after transplantation. UVB irradiation of veins protected allografts from injury to the endothelium and basement membrane. Major histocompatibility complex class II-positive endothelial cells were not seen in autografts but were seen in 40% of cells 4 days after transplantation in untreated allografts. UVB-treated allografts showed MHC class II antigen expression labeling of 20% of the endothelial cells. Barr body analysis demonstrated the donor origin of these endothelial cells. UVB irradiation of rat vein allografts prolongs endothelial survival while decreasing endothelial surface expression of class II antigens. These data suggest that modification of vein immunogenicity with UVB irradiation may permit functional survival of small-vessel allografts without chronic immunosuppression.

  1. The safe and effective use of allograft tissue--an update.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Scott A; King, Warren

    2003-01-01

    The use of allograft tissue in orthopaedic surgery has increased tremendously over the last several years. Tissue availability, reduced surgical times, and lack of donor site morbidity are attractive characteristics to surgeons and patients alike. Although complications, such as disease transmission, are relatively uncommon when using allograft tissue, they do occur. This article will review the literature concerning the safe and effective use of allograft tissue, as well as present four case reports of Clostridium septicum infection caused by implantation of contaminated allograft tissue. PMID:12975205

  2. Quantitative podocyte parameters predict human native kidney and allograft half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Abhijit S.; Afshinnia, Farsad; Cibrik, Diane; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Zhang, Min; Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Samaniego, Milagros; Bitzer, Markus; Wiggins, Jocelyn E.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Li, Yi; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Kidney function decreases with age. A potential mechanistic explanation for kidney and allograft half-life has evolved through the realization that linear reduction in glomerular podocyte density could drive progressive glomerulosclerosis to impact both native kidney and allograft half-lives. METHODS. Predictions from podometrics (quantitation of podocyte parameters) were tested using independent pathologic, functional, and outcome data for native kidneys and allografts derived from published reports and large registries. RESULTS. With age, native kidneys exponentially develop glomerulosclerosis, reduced renal function, and end-stage kidney disease, projecting a finite average kidney life span. The slope of allograft failure rate versus age parallels that of reduction in podocyte density versus age. Quantitative modeling projects allograft half-life at any donor age, and rate of podocyte detachment parallels the observed allograft loss rate. CONCLUSION. Native kidneys are designed to have a limited average life span of about 100–140 years. Allografts undergo an accelerated aging-like process that accounts for their unexpectedly short half-life (about 15 years), the observation that older donor age is associated with shorter allograft half-life, and the fact that long-term allograft survival has not substantially improved. Podometrics provides potential readouts for these processes, thereby offering new approaches for monitoring and intervention. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health. PMID:27280173

  3. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  4. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  5. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  6. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  7. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  8. The effects of immunosuppression and anticoagulation on fibrin deposition and swelling in rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Jasani, M K; Jayson, M I

    1987-01-01

    Rat cardiac allograft recipients were injected with radiolabeled human fibrinogen at intervals after transplantation. There was a progressive increase in tracer accumulation within graft ventricles, peaking at the time of rejection at about 30-fold that within syngeneic grafts. Protein extraction experiments indicated that ca. 90% of tracer was present as cross-linked fibrin at the time of rejection. Exudation within rejecting allografts was nearly threefold that in syngeneic grafts. The weight of allografts at different times after transplantation increased in close concordance with fibrin deposition. Pharmacologically immunosuppressed recipients showed negligible fibrin deposition and swelling whereas "B" rats and thoracic-duct-lymph-drained recipients showed moderate allograft swelling in the absence of significant fibrin deposition or rejection. The decreased fibrin deposition was not a result of depressed plasma clotting factor levels. B rats reconstituted with thoracic duct lymphocytes still had reduced allograft fibrin deposition in the presence of normal amounts of swelling and exudation. The anticoagulants warfarin and heparin greatly decreased allograft fibrin but were almost without effect on allograft swelling, exudation, and rejection. The possible participation of infiltrating macrophages in allograft fibrin deposition is discussed. Unlike cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity reactions, normal amounts of fibrin deposition appear not to be essential for full cardiac allograft rejection.

  9. The Best Disease-Linked Cl Channel hBest1 Regulates Cav1 (L-type) Ca2+ Channels Via SH3-binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kuai; Xiao, Qinghuan; Cui, Guiying; Lee, Amy; Hartzell, H. Criss

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the bestrophin-1 (Best1) gene are linked to several kinds of macular degeneration in both humans and dogs. Although bestrophins have been shown clearly to be Cl− ion channels, it is controversial whether Cl− channel dysfunction can explain the diseases. It has been suggested that bestrophins are multi-functional proteins: they may regulate voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in addition to functioning as Cl− channels. Here we show that hBest1 differentially modulates Cav1.3 (L-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels through association with the Cavβ subunit. In transfected HEK-293 cells, hBest1 inhibited Cav1.3. Inhibition of Cav1.3 was not observed in the absence of the β subunit. Also, the hBest1 C-terminus binds to Cavβ subunits, suggesting that the effect of hBest1 was mediated by the Cavβ subunit. The region of hBest1 responsible for the effect was localized to a region (amino acids 330 − 370) in the cytoplasmic C-terminus that contains a predicted SH3-binding domain that is not present in other bestrophin subtypes. Mutation of Pro330 and Pro334 abolished the effects of hBest1 on Cav1.3. The effect was specific to hBest1: it was not observed with mBest1, -2, or -3. Wild type hBest1 and the disease-causing mutants R92S, G299R, and D312N inhibited Cav currents the same amount, whereas the A146K and G222E mutants were less effective. We propose that hBest1 regulates Cav channels by interacting with the Cavβ subunit and altering channel availability. Our findings reveal a novel function of bestrophin in regulation of Cav channels and suggest a possible mechanism for the role of hBest1 in macular degeneration. PMID:18509027

  10. Endogenous and exogenous hydrogen sulfide facilitates T-type calcium channel currents in Cav3.2-expressing HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Miyamoto, Yosuke; Kanaoka, Daiki; Ide, Hiroki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Ohkubo, Tsuyako; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2014-02-28

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter, is formed from l-cysteine by multiple enzymes including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). We have shown that an H2S donor, NaHS, causes hyperalgesia in rodents, an effect inhibited by knockdown of Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels (T-channels), and that NaHS facilitates T-channel-dependent currents (T-currents) in NG108-15 cells that naturally express Cav3.2. In the present study, we asked if endogenous and exogenous H2S participates in regulation of the channel functions in Cav3.2-transfected HEK293 (Cav3.2-HEK293) cells. dl-Propargylglycine (PPG), a CSE inhibitor, significantly decreased T-currents in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells, but not in NG108-15 cells. NaHS at 1.5mM did not affect T-currents in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells, but enhanced T-currents in NG108-15 cells. In the presence of PPG, NaHS at 1.5mM, but not 0.1-0.3mM, increased T-currents in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells. Similarly, Na2S, another H2S donor, at 0.1-0.3mM significantly increased T-currents in the presence, but not absence, of PPG in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells. Expression of CSE was detected at protein and mRNA levels in HEK293 cells. Intraplantar administration of Na2S, like NaHS, caused mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect blocked by NNC 55-0396, a T-channel inhibitor. The in vivo potency of Na2S was higher than NaHS. These results suggest that the function of Cav3.2 T-channels is tonically enhanced by endogenous H2S synthesized by CSE in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells, and that exogenous H2S is capable of enhancing Cav3.2 function when endogenous H2S production by CSE is inhibited. In addition, Na2S is considered a more potent H2S donor than NaHS in vitro as well as in vivo.

  11. Regulatory oversight in the United States of vascularized composite allografts.

    PubMed

    Glazier, Alexandra K

    2016-06-01

    Vascularized composite allograft (VCA) transplantation is a medically acceptable treatment for the reconstruction of major tissue loss. The advent of VCA transplantation has spurred regulatory and policy development in the United States to address the multiple clinical, ethical and legal issues that must be considered for the practice of VCA donation and transplantation to develop within the existing framework of public trust and transparency vital to the success of donation and transplantation. PMID:26284312

  12. Isolation, synthesis and characterization of ω-TRTX-Cc1a, a novel tarantula venom peptide that selectively targets L-type Cav channels.

    PubMed

    Klint, Julie K; Berecki, Géza; Durek, Thomas; Mobli, Mehdi; Knapp, Oliver; King, Glenn F; Adams, David J; Alewood, Paul F; Rash, Lachlan D

    2014-05-15

    Spider venoms are replete with peptidic ion channel modulators, often with novel subtype selectivity, making them a rich source of pharmacological tools and drug leads. In a search for subtype-selective blockers of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels, we isolated and characterized a novel 39-residue peptide, ω-TRTX-Cc1a (Cc1a), from the venom of the tarantula Citharischius crawshayi (now Pelinobius muticus). Cc1a is 67% identical to the spider toxin ω-TRTX-Hg1a, an inhibitor of CaV2.3 channels. We assembled Cc1a using a combination of Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. Oxidative folding yielded two stable, slowly interconverting isomers. Cc1a preferentially inhibited Ba(2+) currents (IBa) mediated by L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3) CaV channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 825nM and 2.24μM, respectively. In rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, Cc1a inhibited IBa mediated by high voltage-activated CaV channels but did not affect low voltage-activated T-type CaV channels. Cc1a exhibited weak activity at NaV1.5 and NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels stably expressed in mammalian HEK or CHO cells, respectively. Experiments with modified Cc1a peptides, truncated at the N-terminus (ΔG1-E5) or C-terminus (ΔW35-V39), demonstrated that the N- and C-termini are important for voltage-gated ion channel modulation. We conclude that Cc1a represents a novel pharmacological tool for probing the structure and function of L-type CaV channels.

  13. Gain-of-function nature of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels alters firing properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Knoflach, Dagmar; Schicker, Klaus; Glösmann, Martin; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proper function of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels is crucial for neurotransmitter release in the retina. Our understanding about how different levels of Cav1.4 channel activity affect retinal function is still limited. In the gain-of-function mouse model Cav1.4-IT we expected a reduction in the photoreceptor dynamic range but still transmission toward retinal ganglion cells. A fraction of Cav1.4-IT ganglion cells responded to light stimulation in multielectrode array recordings from whole-mounted retinas, but showed a significantly delayed response onset. Another significant number of cells showed higher activity in darkness. In addition to structural remodeling observed at the first retinal synapse of Cav1.4-IT mice the functional data suggested a loss of contrast enhancement, a fundamental feature of our visual system. In fact, Cav1.4-IT mouse retinas showed a decline in spatial response and changes in their contrast sensitivity profile. Photoreceptor degeneration was obvious from the nodular structure of cone axons and enlarged pedicles which partly moved toward the outer nuclear layer. Loss of photoreceptors was also expressed as reduced expression of proteins involved in chemical and electrical transmission, as such metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR6 and the gap junction protein Connexin 36. Such gross changes in retinal structure and function could also explain the diminished visual performance of CSNB2 patients. The expression pattern of the plasma-membrane calcium ATPase 1 which participates in the maintenance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in photoreceptors was changed in Cav1.4-IT mice. This might be part of a protection mechanism against increased calcium influx, as this is suggested for Cav1.4-IT channels. PMID:26274509

  14. Isolation, synthesis and characterization of ω-TRTX-Cc1a, a novel tarantula venom peptide that selectively targets L-type Cav channels.

    PubMed

    Klint, Julie K; Berecki, Géza; Durek, Thomas; Mobli, Mehdi; Knapp, Oliver; King, Glenn F; Adams, David J; Alewood, Paul F; Rash, Lachlan D

    2014-05-15

    Spider venoms are replete with peptidic ion channel modulators, often with novel subtype selectivity, making them a rich source of pharmacological tools and drug leads. In a search for subtype-selective blockers of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels, we isolated and characterized a novel 39-residue peptide, ω-TRTX-Cc1a (Cc1a), from the venom of the tarantula Citharischius crawshayi (now Pelinobius muticus). Cc1a is 67% identical to the spider toxin ω-TRTX-Hg1a, an inhibitor of CaV2.3 channels. We assembled Cc1a using a combination of Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. Oxidative folding yielded two stable, slowly interconverting isomers. Cc1a preferentially inhibited Ba(2+) currents (IBa) mediated by L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3) CaV channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 825nM and 2.24μM, respectively. In rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, Cc1a inhibited IBa mediated by high voltage-activated CaV channels but did not affect low voltage-activated T-type CaV channels. Cc1a exhibited weak activity at NaV1.5 and NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels stably expressed in mammalian HEK or CHO cells, respectively. Experiments with modified Cc1a peptides, truncated at the N-terminus (ΔG1-E5) or C-terminus (ΔW35-V39), demonstrated that the N- and C-termini are important for voltage-gated ion channel modulation. We conclude that Cc1a represents a novel pharmacological tool for probing the structure and function of L-type CaV channels. PMID:24561180

  15. Significance of urinary proteome pattern in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Suhail, Sufi M

    2014-01-01

    Urinary proteomics is developing as a platform of urinary biomarkers of immense potential in recent years. The definition of urinary proteome in the context of renal allograft and characterization of different proteome patterns in various graft dysfunctions have led to the development of a distinct science of this noninvasive tool. Substantial numbers of studies have shown that different renal allograft disease states, both acute and chronic, could portray unique urinary proteome pattern enabling early diagnosis of graft dysfunction and proper manipulation of immunosuppressive strategy that could impact graft prognosis. The methodology of the urinary proteome is nonetheless not more complex than that of other sophisticated assays of conventional urinary protein analysis. Moreover, the need for a centralized database is also felt by the researchers as more and more studies have been presenting their results from different corners and as systems of organizing these newly emerging data being developed at international and national levels. In this context concept of urinary proteomics in renal allograft recipients would be of significant importance in clinical transplantation.

  16. Renal allograft tuberculosis with infected lymphocele transmitted from the donor.

    PubMed

    Al-Nesf, Maryam Ali; Al-Ani, Omar Isam; Al-Ani, Ahmed Abdul-Rahman; Rashed, Awad Hamed

    2014-03-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis (TB) from a donor through renal transplantation is a rare incident. We are reporting a 53-year-old Qatari woman diagnosed with renal allograft TB infection. The disease was confirmed by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fluid from the lymphocele and demonstration of caseating granuloma in graft biopsy with acid-fast bacilli seen on Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The diagnosis was made quite early post-transplantation. The presence of the granuloma, which is unusual with patients on intensive immunosuppressant medications, suggests that transmission of the infection occurred from the donor rather than from the activation of latent infection. In reviewing the literature, we found ten case reports of TB in transplanted kidney with transmission of TB infection from the donor. The presence of TB in lymphocele in association with the infected transplant by TB, to the best of our knowledge, was reported only once in the literature. Our case had unfavorable outcome and ended by renal allograft nephrectomy and hemodialysis. We are presenting this case of TB infection of renal allograft and lymphocele diagnosed early post-transplantation transmitted from the donor and pertinent review from the literature.

  17. Significance of urinary proteome pattern in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Suhail, Sufi M

    2014-01-01

    Urinary proteomics is developing as a platform of urinary biomarkers of immense potential in recent years. The definition of urinary proteome in the context of renal allograft and characterization of different proteome patterns in various graft dysfunctions have led to the development of a distinct science of this noninvasive tool. Substantial numbers of studies have shown that different renal allograft disease states, both acute and chronic, could portray unique urinary proteome pattern enabling early diagnosis of graft dysfunction and proper manipulation of immunosuppressive strategy that could impact graft prognosis. The methodology of the urinary proteome is nonetheless not more complex than that of other sophisticated assays of conventional urinary protein analysis. Moreover, the need for a centralized database is also felt by the researchers as more and more studies have been presenting their results from different corners and as systems of organizing these newly emerging data being developed at international and national levels. In this context concept of urinary proteomics in renal allograft recipients would be of significant importance in clinical transplantation. PMID:24757556

  18. Biomechanical Strength of Large Diaphyseal Deep-frozen Allografts.

    PubMed

    Nather, A; Goh, J C

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the biomechanical strength of deep-frozen allografts as they heal. Twenty-eight adult cats were used with the tibia as the experimental model site. Deep-frozen allografts stored at -80 degrees C were used to reconstruct a large tibial defect (at least two-thirds of the diaphysis). An intra-medullary rod was used for fixation. The healing was studied by X-ray at observation periods of 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24 and 36 weeks. Post-transplantation biomechanical testing was performed using the Shimadzu Universal Testing Machine DCS series with a torsion test device of 50 kg force metre. Parameters studied included maximum torque, torsional stiffness and energy of absorption. The transplanted grafts were compared to the mechanical properties of the internal controls of the normal opposite tibia of each cat. The results of the mechanical tests demonstrated that deep-frozen allografts did not regain normal strength. At nine months, only about 60% of normal torque strength and about 80% of normal torsional stiffness was achieved. Clinically, it is important to employ strong and rigid internal fixation using intra-medullary nailing rather than plating to allow for immediate mobilisation and reduce the rate of graft fracture.

  19. Divergent biophysical properties, gating mechanisms, and possible functions of the two skeletal muscle CaV1.1 calcium channel splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Tuluc, Petronel; Flucher, Bernhard E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes that specifically allow calcium ions to enter the cell in response to membrane depolarization. But, for many years it seemed that the skeletal muscle calcium channel CaV1.1 is the exception. The classical splice variant CaV1.1a activates slowly, has a very small current amplitude and poor voltage sensitivity. In fact adult muscle fibers work perfectly well even in the absence of calcium influx. Recently a new splice variant of the skeletal muscle calcium channel CaV1.1e has been characterized. The lack of the 19 amino acid exon 29 in this splice variant results in a rapidly activating calcium channel with high current amplitude and good voltage sensitivity. CaV1.1e is the dominant channel in embryonic muscle, where the expression of this high calcium-conducting CaV1.1 isoform readily explains developmental processes depending on L-type calcium currents. Moreover, the availability of these two structurally similar but functionally distinct channel variants facilitates the analysis of the molecular mechanisms underlying the unique current properties of the classical CaV1.1a channel. PMID:22057633

  20. T-type calcium channel Cav3.2 deficient mice show elevated anxiety, impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Laffray, Sophie; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The fine-tuning of neuronal excitability relies on a tight control of Ca2+ homeostasis. The low voltage-activated (LVA) T-type calcium channels (Cav3.1, Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 isoforms) play a critical role in regulating these processes. Despite their wide expression throughout the central nervous system, the implication of T-type Cav3.2 isoform in brain functions is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigate the effect of genetic ablation of this isoform in affective disorders, including anxiety, cognitive functions as well as sensitivity to drugs of abuse. Using a wide range of behavioral assays we show that genetic ablation of the cacna1h gene results in an anxiety-like phenotype, whereas novelty-induced locomotor activity is unaffected. Deletion of the T-type channel Cav3.2 also triggers impairment of hippocampus-dependent recognition memories. Acute and sensitized hyperlocomotion induced by d-amphetamine and cocaine are dramatically reduced in T-type Cav3.2 deficient mice. In addition, the administration of the T-type blocker TTA-A2 prevented the expression of locomotor sensitization observed in wildtype mice. In conclusion, our data reveal that physiological activity of this specific Ca2+ channel is required for affective and cognitive behaviors. Moreover, our work highlights the interest of T-type channel blockers as therapeutic strategies to reverse drug-associated alterations. PMID:24672455

  1. A CaV2.1 N-terminal fragment relieves the dominant-negative inhibition by an Episodic ataxia 2 mutant.

    PubMed

    Dahimene, Shehrazade; Page, Karen M; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Pratt, Wendy S; D'Arco, Marianna; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-09-01

    Episodic ataxia 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the gene CACNA1A that encodes the pore-forming CaV2.1 calcium channel subunit. The majority of EA2 mutations reported so far are nonsense or deletion/insertion mutations predicted to form truncated proteins. Heterologous expression of wild-type CaV2.1, together with truncated constructs that mimic EA2 mutants, significantly suppressed wild-type calcium channel function, indicating that the truncated protein produces a dominant-negative effect (Jouvenceau et al., 2001; Page et al., 2004). A similar finding has been shown for CaV2.2 (Raghib et al., 2001). We show here that a highly conserved sequence in the cytoplasmic N-terminus is involved in this process, for both CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 channels. Additionally, we were able to interfere with the suppressive effect of an EA2 construct by mutating key N-terminal residues within it. We postulate that the N-terminus of the truncated channel plays an essential part in its interaction with the full-length CaV2.1, which prevents the correct folding of the wild-type channel. In agreement with this, we were able to disrupt the interaction between EA2 and the full length channel by co-expressing a free N-terminal peptide. PMID:27260834

  2. A CaV2.1 N-terminal fragment relieves the dominant-negative inhibition by an Episodic ataxia 2 mutant.

    PubMed

    Dahimene, Shehrazade; Page, Karen M; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Pratt, Wendy S; D'Arco, Marianna; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-09-01

    Episodic ataxia 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the gene CACNA1A that encodes the pore-forming CaV2.1 calcium channel subunit. The majority of EA2 mutations reported so far are nonsense or deletion/insertion mutations predicted to form truncated proteins. Heterologous expression of wild-type CaV2.1, together with truncated constructs that mimic EA2 mutants, significantly suppressed wild-type calcium channel function, indicating that the truncated protein produces a dominant-negative effect (Jouvenceau et al., 2001; Page et al., 2004). A similar finding has been shown for CaV2.2 (Raghib et al., 2001). We show here that a highly conserved sequence in the cytoplasmic N-terminus is involved in this process, for both CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 channels. Additionally, we were able to interfere with the suppressive effect of an EA2 construct by mutating key N-terminal residues within it. We postulate that the N-terminus of the truncated channel plays an essential part in its interaction with the full-length CaV2.1, which prevents the correct folding of the wild-type channel. In agreement with this, we were able to disrupt the interaction between EA2 and the full length channel by co-expressing a free N-terminal peptide.

  3. Curcumin inhibits ACTH- and angiotensin II-stimulated cortisol secretion and Ca(v)3.2 current.

    PubMed

    Enyeart, Judith A; Liu, Haiyan; Enyeart, John J

    2009-08-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone and angiotensin II stimulate cortisol secretion from bovine adrenal zona fasciculata cells by the activation of adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C-coupled receptors. Curcumin (1- 20 muM), a compound found in the spice turmeric, inhibited cortisol secretion stimulated by ACTH, AngII, and 8CPT-cAMP. Curcumin also suppressed ACTH-stimulated increases in mRNAs coding for steroid acute regulatory protein and CYP11a1 steroid hydroxylase. In whole cell patch clamp recordings from AZF cells, curcumin at slightly higher concentrations also inhibited Ca(v)3.2 current. These results identify curcumin as an effective inhibitor of ACTH- and AngII-stimulated cortisol secretion. The inhibition of Ca(v)3.2 current by curcumin may contribute to its suppression of secretion.

  4. Observational fear learning involves affective pain system and Cav1.2 Ca2+ channels in ACC

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Daejong; Kim, Sangwoo; Chetana, Mattu; Jo, Daewoong; Ruley, H Earl; Lin, Shih-Yao; Rabah, Dania; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2010-01-01

    Fear can be acquired vicariously through social observation of others suffering from aversive stimuli. We found that mice (observers) developed freezing behavior by observing other mice (demonstrators) receive repetitive foot shocks. Observers had higher fear responses when demonstrators were socially related to themselves, such as siblings or mating partners. Inactivation of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and parafascicular or mediodorsal thalamic nuclei, which comprise the medial pain system representing pain affection, substantially impaired this observational fear learning, whereas inactivation of sensory thalamic nuclei had no effect. The ACC neuronal activities were increased and synchronized with those of the lateral amygdala at theta rhythm frequency during this learning. Furthermore, an ACC-limited deletion of Cav1.2 Ca2+ channels in mice impaired observational fear learning and reduced behavioral pain responses. These results demonstrate the functional involvement of the affective pain system and Cav1.2 channels of the ACC in observational social fear. PMID:20190743

  5. Observational fear learning involves affective pain system and Cav1.2 Ca2+ channels in ACC.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Daejong; Kim, Sangwoo; Chetana, Mattu; Jo, Daewoong; Ruley, H Earl; Lin, Shih-Yao; Rabah, Dania; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2010-04-01

    Fear can be acquired vicariously through social observation of others suffering from aversive stimuli. We found that mice (observers) developed freezing behavior by observing other mice (demonstrators) receive repetitive foot shocks. Observers had higher fear responses when demonstrators were socially related to themselves, such as siblings or mating partners. Inactivation of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and parafascicular or mediodorsal thalamic nuclei, which comprise the medial pain system representing pain affection, substantially impaired this observational fear learning, whereas inactivation of sensory thalamic nuclei had no effect. The ACC neuronal activities were increased and synchronized with those of the lateral amygdala at theta rhythm frequency during this learning. Furthermore, an ACC-limited deletion of Ca(v)1.2 Ca(2+) channels in mice impaired observational fear learning and reduced behavioral pain responses. These results demonstrate the functional involvement of the affective pain system and Ca(v)1.2 channels of the ACC in observational social fear.

  6. RGS12 interacts with the SNARE-binding region of the Cav2.2 calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Richman, Ryan W; Strock, Jesse; Hains, Melinda D; Cabanilla, Nory Jun; Lau, King-Kei; Siderovski, David P; Diversé-Pierluissi, María

    2005-01-14

    Activation of GABAB receptors in chick dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons inhibits the Cav2.2 calcium channel in both a voltage-dependent and voltage-independent manner. The voltage-independent inhibition requires activation of a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates the alpha1 subunit of the channel and thereby recruits RGS12, a member of the "regulator of G protein signaling" (RGS) proteins. Here we report that RGS12 binds to the SNARE-binding or "synprint" region (amino acids 726-985) in loop II-III of the calcium channel alpha1 subunit. A recombinant protein encompassing the N-terminal PTB domain of RGS12 binds to the synprint region in protein overlay and surface plasmon resonance binding assays; this interaction is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation and yet is within a sequence that differs from the canonical NPXY motif targeted by other PTB domains. In electrophysiological experiments, microinjection of DRG neurons with synprint-derived peptides containing the tyrosine residue Tyr-804 altered the rate of desensitization of neurotransmitter-mediated inhibition of the Cav2.2 calcium channel, whereas peptides centered about a second tyrosine residue, Tyr-815, were without effect. RGS12 from a DRG neuron lysate was precipitated using synprint peptides containing phosphorylated Tyr-804. The high degree of conservation of Tyr-804 in the SNARE-binding region of Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 calcium channels suggests that this region, in addition to the binding of SNARE proteins, is also important for determining the time course of the modulation of calcium current via tyrosine phosphorylation.

  7. Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy: a new case series with clinicopathologic and ultrastructural correlation, literature review, and insight into the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Salama, Samih S

    2015-05-01

    Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy (CCV) is a rare distinct idiopathic microangiopathy of the superficial cutaneous vasculature. Seven new cases are reported (6 females and 1 male) ranging in age from 42 to 85 years, with some showing unusual clinical and histopathological findings. All presented with macular telangiectases starting on the lower extremities and spreading progressively in 5 cases and were suspected to have generalized essential telangiectasia. Two cases had a history of over 20 years. One case had lesions in the abdominal striae, and 1 was markedly ecchymotic. All skin biopsies showed the characteristic features of CCV with dilatation and marked thickening of the walls of superficial dermal blood vessels displaying reduplication of the basement membrane on periodic acid-Schiff-diastase stain and deposition of hyaline collagenous material immunostaining as collagen type IV, and showing decreased or absent actin staining. However, the changes were subtle and only seen focally in some biopsies. Few lymphoid cells were present around occasional vessels. Electron microscopy showed increased basement membrane lamellae with marked deposition of normal and some abnormal collagen (Luse-like bodies) and focal endothelial damage, suggesting reparative perivascular fibrosis resulting from repeated endothelial injury. These cases (and all 18 previously reported ones) are of a wide age range and no gender predilection. This disorder is underdiagnosed, and it is likely that some cases clinically suspected to be generalized essential telangiectasia may actually represent CCV. Better recognition by dermatologists may lead to more biopsies from patients with generalized telangiectasia and a further understanding of the pathogenesis of CCV and its relationship to other cutaneous vascular disorders.

  8. [The age-related macular degeneration as a vascular disease/part of systemic vasculopathy: contributions to its pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-03-01

    The wall of blood vessels including those in choroids may be harmed by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic, and genetic impacts (risk factors), which may trigger a protracted response, the so-called host defense response. As a consequence, pathological changes resulting in vascular injury (e. g. atherosclerosis, age-related macular degeneration) may be evolved. Risk factors can also act directly on the endothelium through an increased production of reactive oxygen species promoting an endothelial activation, which leads to endothelial dysfunction, the onset of vascular disease. Thus, endothelial dysfunction is a link between the harmful stimulus and vascular injury; any kind of harmful stimuli may trigger the defensive chain that results in inflammation that may lead to vascular injury. It has been shown that even early age-related macular degeneration is associated with the presence of diffuse arterial disease and patients with early age-related macular degeneration demonstrate signs of systemic and retinal vascular alterations. Chronic inflammation, a feature of AMD, is tightly linked to diseases associated with ED: AMD is accompanied by a general inflammatory response, in the form of complement system activation, similar to that observed in degenerative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. All these facts indicate that age-related macular degeneration may be a vascular disease (or part of a systemic vasculopathy). This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction may prevent the development or improve vascular disease resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration as well.

  9. Intravitreal Anti-vascular Endothelial Growth Factor for Treating Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy with Grape-like Polyp Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Young Suk; Kim, Jong Woo; Lee, Tae Gon; Kim, Chul Gu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate 12-month outcomes of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy for polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) with grape-like polyp clusters. Methods This retrospective observational study included 23 eyes of 23 patients who were newly diagnosed with PCV with grape-like polyp clusters, and who were subsequently treated with anti-VEGF monotherapy. The study compares the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of the patients at diagnosis, at 3 months, and at 12 months after diagnosis. In addition, 12-month changes in BCVA values were compared between cases with subfoveal or juxtafoveal polyps and cases with extrafoveal polyps. Results The baseline, 3-month, and 12-month logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution BCVA was 0.62 ± 0.35, 0.50 ± 0.43, and 0.58 ± 0.48, respectively. Compared to the baseline, patient BCVA was not significantly different at 12 months after diagnosis (p = 0.764). Six eyes (26.1%) gained ≥0.2 logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution BCVA. In cases with subfoveal or juxtafoveal polyps, BCVA values at baseline and at 12 months after diagnosis were 0.66 ± 0.37 and 0.69 ± 0.53, respectively. In cases with extrafoveal polyps, the values were 0.54 ± 0.33 and 0.37 ± 0.31, respectively. Changes in BCVA values were significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.023). Conclusions Although anti-VEGF therapy has favorable short-term efficacy for treating PCV with grape-like polyp clusters, long-term visual improvements are generally limited in the majority of afflicted eyes. The presence of subfoveal or juxtafoveal polyps may suggest unfavorable treatment outcomes. PMID:27478354

  10. Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss and Mild Vasculopathy in Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase (Mthfr)-Deficient Mice: A Model of Mild Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Markand, Shanu; Saul, Alan; Roon, Penny; Prasad, Puttur; Martin, Pamela; Rozen, Rima; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (Mthfr) is a key enzyme in homocysteine-methionine metabolism. We investigated Mthfr expression in retina and asked whether mild hyperhomocysteinemia, due to Mthfr deficiency, alters retinal neurovascular structure and function. Methods. Expression of Mthfr was investigated at the gene and protein level using quantitative (q) RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The Mthfr+/+ and Mthfr+/− mice were subjected to comprehensive evaluation using ERG, funduscopy, fluorescein angiography (FA), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), HPLC, and morphometric and IHC analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) at 8 to 24 weeks. Results. Gene and protein analyses disclosed widespread retinal expression of Mthfr. Electroretinography (ERG) revealed a significant decrease in positive scotopic threshold response in retinas of Mthfr+/− mice at 24 weeks. Fundus examination in mice from both groups was normal; FA revealed areas of focal vascular leakage in 20% of Mthfr+/− mice at 12 to 16 weeks and 60% by 24 weeks. The SD-OCT revealed a significant decrease in nerve fiber layer (NFL) thickness at 24 weeks in Mthfr+/− compared to Mthfr+/+ mice. There was a 2-fold elevation in retinal hcy at 24 weeks in Mthfr+/− mice by HPLC and IHC. Morphometric analysis revealed an approximately 20% reduction in cells in the ganglion cell layer of Mthfr+/− mice at 24 weeks. The IHC indicated significantly increased GFAP labeling suggestive of Müller cell activation. Conclusions. Mildly hyperhomocysteinemic Mthfr+/− mice demonstrate reduced ganglion cell function, thinner NFL, and mild vasculopathy by 24 weeks. The retinal phenotype is similar to that of hyperhomocysteinemic mice with deficiency of cystathionine-β-synthase (Cbs) reported earlier. The data support the hypothesis that hyperhomocysteinemia may be causative in certain retinal neurovasculopathies. PMID:25766590

  11. Complex regulation of voltage-dependent activation and inactivation properties of retinal voltage-gated Cav1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels by Ca2+-binding protein 4 (CaBP4).

    PubMed

    Shaltiel, Lior; Paparizos, Christos; Fenske, Stefanie; Hassan, Sami; Gruner, Christian; Rötzer, Katrin; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A

    2012-10-19

    Cav1.4 L-type Ca(2+) channels are crucial for synaptic transmission in retinal photoreceptors and bipolar neurons. Recent studies suggest that the activity of this channel is regulated by the Ca(2+)-binding protein 4 (CaBP4). In the present study, we explored this issue by examining functional effects of CaBP4 on heterologously expressed Cav1.4. We show that CaBP4 dramatically increases Cav1.4 channel availability. This effect crucially depends on the presence of the C-terminal ICDI (inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation) domain of Cav1.4 and is absent in a Cav1.4 mutant lacking the ICDI. Using FRET experiments, we demonstrate that CaBP4 interacts with the IQ motif of Cav1.4 and that it interferes with the binding of the ICDI domain. Based on these findings, we suggest that CaBP4 increases Cav1.4 channel availability by relieving the inhibitory effects of the ICDI domain on voltage-dependent Cav1.4 channel gating. We also functionally characterized two CaBP4 mutants that are associated with a congenital variant of human night blindness and other closely related nonstationary retinal diseases. Although both mutants interact with Cav1.4 channels, the functional effects of CaBP4 mutants are only partially preserved, leading to a reduction of Cav1.4 channel availability and loss of function. In conclusion, our study sheds new light on the functional interaction between CaBP4 and Cav1.4. Moreover, it provides insights into the mechanism by which CaBP4 mutants lead to loss of Cav1.4 function and to retinal disease. PMID:22936811

  12. β-Adrenergic–regulated phosphorylation of the skeletal muscle CaV1.1 channel in the fight-or-flight response

    PubMed Central

    Emrick, Michelle A.; Sadilek, Martin; Konoki, Keiichi; Catterall, William A.

    2010-01-01

    CaV1 channels initiate excitation–contraction coupling in skeletal and cardiac muscle. During the fight-or-flight response, epinephrine released by the adrenal medulla and norepinephrine released from sympathetic nerves increase muscle contractility by activation of the β-adrenergic receptor/cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway and up-regulation of CaV1 channels in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Although the physiological mechanism of this pathway is well defined, the molecular mechanism and the sites of protein phosphorylation required for CaV1 channel regulation are unknown. To identify the regulatory sites of phosphorylation under physiologically relevant conditions, CaV1.1 channels were purified from skeletal muscle and sites of phosphorylation on the α1 subunit were identified by mass spectrometry. Two phosphorylation sites were identified in the proximal C-terminal domain, serine 1575 (S1575) and threonine 1579 (T1579), which are conserved in cardiac CaV1.2 channels (S1700 and T1704, respectively). In vitro phosphorylation revealed that CaV1.1-S1575 is a substrate for both cAMP-dependent protein kinase and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, whereas CaV1.1-T1579 is a substrate for casein kinase 2. Treatment of rabbits with isoproterenol to activate β-adrenergic receptors increased phosphorylation of S1575 in skeletal muscle CaV1.1 channels in vivo, and treatment with propranolol to inhibit β-adrenergic receptors reduced phosphorylation. As S1575 and T1579 in CaV1.1 channels and their homologs in CaV1.2 channels are located at a key regulatory interface between the distal and proximal C-terminal domains, it is likely that phosphorylation of these sites in skeletal and cardiac muscle is directly involved in calcium channel regulation in response to the sympathetic nervous system in the fight-or-flight response. PMID:20937870

  13. Beta-adrenergic-regulated phosphorylation of the skeletal muscle Ca(V)1.1 channel in the fight-or-flight response.

    PubMed

    Emrick, Michelle A; Sadilek, Martin; Konoki, Keiichi; Catterall, William A

    2010-10-26

    Ca(V)1 channels initiate excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal and cardiac muscle. During the fight-or-flight response, epinephrine released by the adrenal medulla and norepinephrine released from sympathetic nerves increase muscle contractility by activation of the β-adrenergic receptor/cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway and up-regulation of Ca(V)1 channels in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Although the physiological mechanism of this pathway is well defined, the molecular mechanism and the sites of protein phosphorylation required for Ca(V)1 channel regulation are unknown. To identify the regulatory sites of phosphorylation under physiologically relevant conditions, Ca(V)1.1 channels were purified from skeletal muscle and sites of phosphorylation on the α1 subunit were identified by mass spectrometry. Two phosphorylation sites were identified in the proximal C-terminal domain, serine 1575 (S1575) and threonine 1579 (T1579), which are conserved in cardiac Ca(V)1.2 channels (S1700 and T1704, respectively). In vitro phosphorylation revealed that Ca(V)1.1-S1575 is a substrate for both cAMP-dependent protein kinase and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, whereas Ca(V)1.1-T1579 is a substrate for casein kinase 2. Treatment of rabbits with isoproterenol to activate β-adrenergic receptors increased phosphorylation of S1575 in skeletal muscle Ca(V)1.1 channels in vivo, and treatment with propranolol to inhibit β-adrenergic receptors reduced phosphorylation. As S1575 and T1579 in Ca(V)1.1 channels and their homologs in Ca(V)1.2 channels are located at a key regulatory interface between the distal and proximal C-terminal domains, it is likely that phosphorylation of these sites in skeletal and cardiac muscle is directly involved in calcium channel regulation in response to the sympathetic nervous system in the fight-or-flight response.

  14. Expression and Regulation of Cav3.2 T-Type Calcium Channels during Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yasuhiro; Kumamoto, Natsuko; Shimada, Shoichi; Ugawa, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The Cav3.2 isoform of the T-type calcium channel is expressed in primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and these channels contribute to nociceptive and neuropathic pain in rats. However, there are conflicting reports on the roles of these channels in pain processing in rats and mice. In addition, the function of T-type channels in persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia is poorly understood. We performed behavioral and comprehensive histochemical analyses to characterize Cav3.2-expressing DRG neurons and examined the regulation of T-type channels in DRGs from C57BL/6 mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. We show that approximately 20% of mouse DRG neurons express Cav3.2 mRNA and protein. The size of the majority of Cav3.2-positive DRG neurons (69 ± 8%) ranged from 300 to 700 μm2 in cross-sectional area and 20 to 30 μm in estimated diameter. These channels co-localized with either neurofilament-H (NF-H) or peripherin. The peripherin-positive cells also overlapped with neurons that were positive for isolectin B4 (IB4) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) but were distinct from transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-positive neurons during normal mouse states. In mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia, Cav3.2 channels, but not Cav3.1 or Cav3.3 channels, were upregulated in ipsilateral DRG neurons during the sub-acute phase. The increased Cav3.2 expression partially resulted from an increased number of Cav3.2-immunoreactive neurons; this increase in number was particularly significant for TRPV1-positive neurons. Finally, preceding and periodic intraplantar treatment with the T-type calcium channel blockers mibefradil and NNC 55-0396 markedly reduced and reversed mechanical hyperalgesia during the acute and sub-acute phases, respectively, in mice. These data suggest that Cav3.2 T-type channels participate in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia, and this channel might play an even greater

  15. Anaplastic Ependymoma in a Child With Sickle Cell Anemia: A Case Report Highlighting Treatment Challenges for Young Children With Central Nervous System Tumors and Underlying Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Erin E; Meier, Emily R; Wells, Elizabeth M; Hwang, Eugene I; Packer, Roger J

    2016-03-01

    A 3-year-old boy with sickle cell anemia (SCA) presented with progressive daily emesis and was found to have an anaplastic ependymoma. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are usually employed after subtotal resections of anaplastic ependymomas, although the benefits from chemotherapy are unclear. To mitigate the risks of adjuvant treatment in this patient at risk for SCA-associated vasculopathy, renal impairment, and other end-organ damage, proton beam irradiation without chemotherapy was chosen. Scheduled packed red blood cell transfusions were instituted to maintain sickle hemoglobin levels less than 30%. This case highlights treatment complexities for malignant brain tumors in patients predisposed to treatment-related adverse effects.

  16. Anaplastic Ependymoma in a Child With Sickle Cell Anemia: A Case Report Highlighting Treatment Challenges for Young Children With Central Nervous System Tumors and Underlying Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Erin E; Meier, Emily R; Wells, Elizabeth M; Hwang, Eugene I; Packer, Roger J

    2016-03-01

    A 3-year-old boy with sickle cell anemia (SCA) presented with progressive daily emesis and was found to have an anaplastic ependymoma. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are usually employed after subtotal resections of anaplastic ependymomas, although the benefits from chemotherapy are unclear. To mitigate the risks of adjuvant treatment in this patient at risk for SCA-associated vasculopathy, renal impairment, and other end-organ damage, proton beam irradiation without chemotherapy was chosen. Scheduled packed red blood cell transfusions were instituted to maintain sickle hemoglobin levels less than 30%. This case highlights treatment complexities for malignant brain tumors in patients predisposed to treatment-related adverse effects. PMID:26488903

  17. Recurrent 2,8-dihydroxyadenine nephropathy: a rare but preventable cause of renal allograft failure

    PubMed Central

    Zaidan, Mohamad; Palsson, Runolfur; Gall, Emilie Cornec-Le; Garstka, Antoine; Maggiore, Umberto; Deteix, Patrice; Battista, Michele; Gagné, Eve-Reine; Ceballos-Picot, Irène; Van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; Legendre, Christophe; Daudon, Michel; Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive enzyme defect of purine metabolism that usually manifests as 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (2,8-DHA) nephrolithiasis and more rarely chronic kidney disease. The disease is most often misdiagnosed and can recur in the renal allograft. We analyzed 9 patients with recurrent 2,8-DHA crystalline nephropathy, in all of whom the diagnosis had been missed prior to renal transplantation. The diagnosis was established for a median of 5 (range, 1.5–312) weeks following the transplant procedure. Patients had delayed graft function (n=2), acute-on-chronic (n=5) or acute (n=1) allograft dysfunction, whereas one patient had normal graft function at the time of diagnosis. Analysis of allograft biopsies showed birefringent 2,8-DHA crystals in renal tubular lumens, within tubular epithelial cells and interstitium. Fourier transformed infrared microscopy confirmed the diagnosis in all cases, which was further supported by 2,8-DHA crystalluria, undetectable erythrocyte APRT enzyme activity, and genetic testing. With allopurinol therapy, the allograft function improved (n=7), remained stable (n=1), or worsened (n=1). At last follow-up, 2 patients had experienced allograft loss and 5 had persistent chronic allograft dysfunction. 2,8-DHA nephropathy is a rare but underdiagnosed and preventable disorder that can recur in the renal allograft and may lead to allograft loss. PMID:25307253

  18. CT Lesion Model-Based Structural Allografts: Custom Fabrication and Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Jan Claas; Hesselbarth, Uwe; Seifert, Philipp; Nowack, Dimitri; von Versen, Rüdiger; Smith, Mark David; Seifert, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Patients requiring knee and hip revision arthroplasty often present with difficult anatomical situations that limit options for surgery. Customised mega-implants may be one of few remaining treatment options. However, extensive damage to residual bone stock may also be present, and in such cases even customised prosthetics may be difficult to implant. Small quantities of lost bone can be replaced with standard allografts or autologous bone. Larger defects may require structural macro-allografts, sometimes in combination with implants (allograft-prosthesis composites). Methods Herein, we describe a process for manufacturing lesion-specific large structural allografts according to a 3D, full-scale, lithographically generated defect model. These macro-allografts deliver the volume and the mechanical stability necessary for certain complex revisions. They are patient-and implant-matched, negate some requirements for additional implants and biomaterials and save time in the operating theatre by eliminating the requirement for intra-operative sizing and shaping of standard allografts. Conclusion While a robust data set from long-term follow-up of patients receiving customised macro-allografts is not yet available, initial clinical experience and results suggest that lesion-matched macro-allografts can be an important component of revision joint surgery. PMID:23800856

  19. Spleen tyrosine kinase contributes to acute renal allograft rejection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ramessur Chandran, Sharmila; Tesch, Greg H; Han, Yingjie; Woodman, Naomi; Mulley, William R; Kanellis, John; Blease, Kate; Ma, Frank Y; Nikolic-Paterson, David J

    2015-02-01

    Kidney allografts induce strong T-cell and antibody responses which mediate acute rejection. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is expressed by most leucocytes, except mature T cells, and is involved in intracellular signalling following activation of the Fcγ-receptor, B-cell receptor and some integrins. A role for Syk signalling has been established in antibody-dependent native kidney disease, but little is known of Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral nephrectomy and received an orthotopic Wistar renal allograft. Recipient rats were treated with a Syk inhibitor (CC0482417, 30 mg/kg/bid), or vehicle, from 1 h before surgery until being killed 5 days later. Vehicle-treated recipients developed severe allograft failure with marked histologic damage in association with dense leucocyte infiltration (T cells, macrophages, neutrophils and NK cells) and deposition of IgM, IgG and C3. Immunostaining identified Syk expression by many infiltrating leucocytes. CC0482417 treatment significantly improved allograft function and reduced histologic damage, although allograft injury was still clearly evident. CC0482417 failed to prevent T-cell infiltration and activation within the allograft. However, CC0482417 significantly attenuated acute tubular necrosis, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and thrombosis of peritubular capillaries. In conclusion, this study identifies a role for Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Syk inhibition may be a useful addition to T-cell-based immunotherapy in renal transplantation.

  20. B cells assist allograft rejection in the deficiency of protein kinase c-theta.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenwei; Xu, Rui; Ma, Lian Li; Han, Wei; Geevarghese, Sunil K; Williams, Phillip E; Sciammas, Roger; Chong, Anita S; Yin, Deng Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have previously shown that mice deficient in protein kinase C theta (PKCθ) have the ability to reject cardiac allografts, but are susceptible to tolerance induction. Here we tested role of B cells in assisting alloimmune responses in the absence of PKCθ. Mouse cardiac allograft transplantations were performed from Balb/c (H-2d) to PKCθ knockout (PKCθ(-/-)), PKCθ and B cell double-knockout (PBDK, H-2b) mice and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. PBDK mice spontaneously accepted the allografts with the inhibition of NF-κB activation in the donor cardiac allograft. Anti-B cell antibody (rituximab) significantly delayed allograft rejection in PKCθ(-/-), but not in WT mice. Co-transfer of PKCθ(-/-) T plus PKCθ(-/-) B cells or primed sera triggered allograft rejection in Rag1(-/-) mice, and only major histocompatibility complex class II-enriched B cells, but not class I-enriched B cells, were able to promote rejection. This, together with the inability of PKCθ(-/-) and CD28(-/-) double-deficient (PCDK) mice to acutely reject allografts, suggested that an effective cognate interaction between PKCθ(-/-) T and B cells for acute rejection is CD28 molecule dependent. We conclude that T-B cell interactions synergize with PKCθ(-/-) T cells to mediate acute allograft rejection.

  1. Monitoring of human liver and kidney allograft tolerance: a tissue/histopathology perspective.

    PubMed

    Demetris, Anthony J; Lunz, John G; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Wu, Tong; Nalesnik, Michael; Thomson, Angus W

    2009-01-01

    Several factors acting together have recently enabled clinicians to seriously consider whether chronic immunosuppression is needed in all solid organ allograft recipients. This has prompted a dozen or so centers throughout the world to prospectively wean immunosuppression from conventionally treated liver allograft recipients. The goal is to lessen the impact of chronic immunosuppression and empirically identify occasional recipients who show operational tolerance, defined as gross phenotype of tolerance in the presence of an immune response and/or immune deficit that has little or no significant clinical impact. Rare operationally tolerant kidney allograft recipients have also been identified, usually by single case reports, but only a couple of prospective weaning trials in conventionally treated kidney allograft recipients have been attempted and reported. Pre- and postweaning allograft biopsy monitoring of recipients adds a critical dimension to these trials, not only for patient safety but also for determining whether events in the allografts can contribute to a mechanistic understanding of allograft acceptance. The following is based on a literature review and personal experience regarding the practical and scientific aspects of biopsy monitoring of potential or actual operationally tolerant human liver and kidney allograft recipients where the goal, intended or attained, was complete withdrawal of immunosuppression.

  2. Expression patterns of T-type Cav3.2 channel and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor in dorsal root ganglion neurons of mice after sciatic nerve axotomy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Si-Fang; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Xiao-Ya; Wang, Bing; Li, Cheng-Hui; Sun, Yan-Gang; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2016-10-19

    Substantial evidence indicates that T-type Cav3.2 channel and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) contribute to pain hypersensitivity within primary sensory nerves. A recent study suggested that activation of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) could increase Cav3.2 channel currents and further contribute to inflammatory pain sensitivity. However, the expression patterns of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R and their colocalization in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in chronic neuropathic pain condition remain unknown. In this study, we explored expression patterns of Cav3.2, IGF-1R and their colocalization, and whether phenotypic switch occurs in a subpopulation of Cav3.2 or IGF-1R neurons in mouse DRGs after sciatic nerve axotomy with immunofluorescence, real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and western blot assays. We found that expressions of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R, and their colocalization were not increased in DRGs of mice following axotomy. In addition, Cav3.2 or IGF-1R subpopulation neurons did not acquire significant switch in expression phenotype after sciatic nerve axotomy. Our findings argue for an upregulation of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R expression in lumbar DRGs post-sciatic nerve axotomy and provided an insight for understanding the functions of peripheral afferent Cav3.2 channel and IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:27571431

  3. Meniscal allograft transplantation--part I: background, results, graft selection and preservation, and surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Rijk, Paul C

    2004-09-01

    Removal of the meniscus leads to progressive degenerative arthritis of the knee on a long-term basis. Therefore, meniscal allograft transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to meniscectomy. Although several experimental and clinical studies have documented that meniscal allografts show capsular ingrowth in meniscectomized knees, it remains to be established whether meniscal allograft transplantation can prevent degenerative changes after meniscectomy. Part 1 of this Current Concepts review will discuss the function, anatomy, and composition of the meniscus, followed by the history of surgery of meniscal tears and the healing of meniscal allografts in experimental and clinical studies. In addition, issues concerning preservation techniques, immunological reactions, sizing, disease transmission, indications, surgical technique, graft fixation, rehabilitation, and complications, will be taken into consideration. It can be concluded that the use of meniscal allografts in clinical practice has progressed to a point where relief of pain may be expected for the short-term.

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patient with a renal allograft: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Ryuk, Jong-Pil; Choi, Hyang Hee; Kwon, Sang-Hwy; Huh, Seung

    2009-02-01

    Renal transplant recipients requiring aortic reconstruction due to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pose a unique clinical problem. The concern during surgery is causing ischemic injury to the renal allograft. A variety of strategies for protection of the renal allograft during AAA intervention have been described including a temporary shunt, cold renal perfusion, extracorporeal bypass, general hypothermia, and endovascular stent-grafting. In addition, some investigators have reported no remarkable complications of the renal allograft without any specific measures. We treated a case of AAA in a patient with a renal allograft using a temporary aortofemoral shunt with good result. Since this technique is safe and effective, it should be considered in similar patients with AAA and previously placed renal allografts.

  5. Meniscal allograft transplantation--part I: background, results, graft selection and preservation, and surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Rijk, Paul C

    2004-09-01

    Removal of the meniscus leads to progressive degenerative arthritis of the knee on a long-term basis. Therefore, meniscal allograft transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to meniscectomy. Although several experimental and clinical studies have documented that meniscal allografts show capsular ingrowth in meniscectomized knees, it remains to be established whether meniscal allograft transplantation can prevent degenerative changes after meniscectomy. Part 1 of this Current Concepts review will discuss the function, anatomy, and composition of the meniscus, followed by the history of surgery of meniscal tears and the healing of meniscal allografts in experimental and clinical studies. In addition, issues concerning preservation techniques, immunological reactions, sizing, disease transmission, indications, surgical technique, graft fixation, rehabilitation, and complications, will be taken into consideration. It can be concluded that the use of meniscal allografts in clinical practice has progressed to a point where relief of pain may be expected for the short-term. PMID:15346115

  6. Three-dimensional virtual bone bank system workflow for structural bone allograft selection: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Lucas Eduardo; Farfalli, German Luis; Milano, Federico Edgardo; Ayerza, Miguel Angel; Muscolo, Domingo Luis; Aponte-Tinao, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Structural bone allograft has been used in bone defect reconstruction during the last fifty years with acceptable results. However, allograft selection methods were based on 2-dimensional templates using X-rays. Thanks to preoperative planning platforms, three-dimensional (3D) CT-derived bone models were used to define size and shape comparison between host and donor. The purpose of this study was to describe the workflow of this virtual technique in order to explain how to choose the best allograft using a virtual bone bank system. We measured all bones in a 3D virtual environment determining the best match. The use of a virtual bone bank system has allowed optimizing the allograft selection in a bone bank, providing more information to the surgeons before surgery. In conclusion, 3D preoperative planning in a virtual environment for allograft selection is an important and helpful tool in order to achieve a good match between host and donor.

  7. Altered short-term synaptic plasticity and reduced muscle strength in mice with impaired regulation of presynaptic CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Nanou, Evanthia; Yan, Jin; Whitehead, Nicholas P; Kim, Min Jeong; Froehner, Stanley C; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2016-01-26

    Facilitation and inactivation of P/Q-type calcium (Ca(2+)) currents through the regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) 2.1 channels by Ca(2+) sensor (CaS) proteins contributes to the facilitation and rapid depression of synaptic transmission in cultured neurons that transiently express CaV2.1 channels. To examine the modulation of endogenous CaV2.1 channels by CaS proteins in native synapses, we introduced a mutation (IM-AA) into the CaS protein-binding site in the C-terminal domain of CaV2.1 channels in mice, and tested synaptic facilitation and depression in neuromuscular junction synapses that use exclusively CaV2.1 channels for Ca(2+) entry that triggers synaptic transmission. Even though basal synaptic transmission was unaltered in the neuromuscular synapses in IM-AA mice, we found reduced short-term facilitation in response to paired stimuli at short interstimulus intervals in IM-AA synapses. In response to trains of action potentials, we found increased facilitation at lower frequencies (10-30 Hz) in IM-AA synapses accompanied by slowed synaptic depression, whereas synaptic facilitation was reduced at high stimulus frequencies (50-100 Hz) that would induce strong muscle contraction. As a consequence of altered regulation of CaV2.1 channels, the hindlimb tibialis anterior muscle in IM-AA mice exhibited reduced peak force in response to 50 Hz stimulation and increased muscle fatigue. The IM-AA mice also had impaired motor control, exercise capacity, and grip strength. Taken together, our results indicate that regulation of CaV2.1 channels by CaS proteins is essential for normal synaptic plasticity at the neuromuscular junction and for muscle strength, endurance, and motor coordination in mice in vivo.

  8. Agronomical and chemical characterisation of Thymbra capitata (L.) Cav. biotypes from Sicily, Italy.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Teresa; Dugo, Giacomo; Leto, Claudio; Cicero, Nicola; Tropea, Alessia; Virga, Giuseppe; Leone, Raffaele; Licata, Mario; La Bella, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the agronomical and chemical characterisation of 13 Sicilian biotypes of Thymbra capitata (L.) Cav., grown under the same agricultural and environmental condition, are reported. The main morpho-productive parameters and quali-quantitative profile of essential oils (EOs) were determined. The EOs were analysed by gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis statistical methods were used to group biotypes according to the EOs chemical composition. The EO yield ranged between 4.6 and 8.1 (v/w). A total of 38 EO compounds have been identified. The compounds mostly represented were α-pinene, myrcene, α-terpinene, p-cymene, γ-terpinene, borneol, carvacrol and β-caryophyllene. In all biotypes, the carvacrol (67.4-79.5%) was the main compound, confirming that T. capitata is a carvacrol chemotype. The results showed that all Sicilian Thymbra biotypes have a good adaptation to the climatic conditions of the test environment.

  9. A comparative study of mucilage and pulp polysaccharides from tamarillo fruit (Solanum betaceum Cav.).

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Georgia Erdmann; Iacomini, Marcello; Cordeiro, Lucimara M C

    2016-07-01

    A comparative study of mucilage (locular tissue) and pulp polysaccharides from ripe tamarillo fruits (Solanum betaceum Cav.) was carried out. After aqueous and alkaline extractions and various purification steps (freeze-thaw and α-amylase - EC 3.2.1.1 treatments, Fehling precipitation and ultrafiltration through 50 kDa cut-off membrane), the obtained fractions from mucilage were analyzed by sugar composition, HPSEC, and NMR spectroscopy analyses. The results showed that the mucilage of tamarillo contains a highly methoxylated homogalacturonans mixed with type I arabinogalactans, a linear (1 → 5)-linked α-L-arabinan, and a linear (1 → 4)-β-D-xylan. A comparison with polysaccharides extracted from the pulp revealed that differences were observed in the yield and in the ratio of extracted polysaccharides. Moreover, structural differences between pulp and mucilage polysaccharides were also observed, such as in the length of side chains of the pectins, and in the degree of branching of the xylans. PMID:27163609

  10. Chemical constituents and biological activities of Galinsoga parviflora cav. (Asteraceae) from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Islam; Abd El-Aziz, Ehsan; Hafez, Samia; El-Shazly, Assem

    2013-01-01

    The phytochemical investigation of an aqueous ethanolic extract of Galinsoga parviflora Cav. (Asteraceae) resulted in the isolation and identification of eleven compounds namely: triacontanol, phytol, beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, 7-hydroxy-beta-sitosterol, 7-hydroxystigmasterol, beta-sitosterol-3-O-beta-D-glucoside, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid, protocatechuic acid, fumaric acid, and uracil. Furthermore, 48 volatile constituents were identified in the hydrodistilled oil of the aerial parts. The ethanolic extract at a content of 400 mg/kg body weight (BW) exerted 87% reduction in the alanine aminotransferase enzyme level in cirrhotic rats compared with the standard silymarin (150 mg/kg BW) and also exerted a reduction in the blood glucose level equivalent to that of glibenclamide (5 mg/kg BW) in diabetic rats. The ethanolic extract, light petroleum and ethyl acetate fractions exhibited substantial antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Aspergillus niger, and Candida albicans. The ethyl acetate fraction showed strong antioxidant activity at a concentration of 150 mg/mL as compared with 0.1 M ascorbic acid. The cytotoxic effect against the MCF-7 cell line was found to be weak. PMID:24066513

  11. Agronomical and chemical characterisation of Thymbra capitata (L.) Cav. biotypes from Sicily, Italy.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Teresa; Dugo, Giacomo; Leto, Claudio; Cicero, Nicola; Tropea, Alessia; Virga, Giuseppe; Leone, Raffaele; Licata, Mario; La Bella, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the agronomical and chemical characterisation of 13 Sicilian biotypes of Thymbra capitata (L.) Cav., grown under the same agricultural and environmental condition, are reported. The main morpho-productive parameters and quali-quantitative profile of essential oils (EOs) were determined. The EOs were analysed by gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis statistical methods were used to group biotypes according to the EOs chemical composition. The EO yield ranged between 4.6 and 8.1 (v/w). A total of 38 EO compounds have been identified. The compounds mostly represented were α-pinene, myrcene, α-terpinene, p-cymene, γ-terpinene, borneol, carvacrol and β-caryophyllene. In all biotypes, the carvacrol (67.4-79.5%) was the main compound, confirming that T. capitata is a carvacrol chemotype. The results showed that all Sicilian Thymbra biotypes have a good adaptation to the climatic conditions of the test environment. PMID:25600887

  12. Results of 32 Allograft-prosthesis Composite Reconstructions of the Proximal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Larousserie, Frédérique; Thévenin, Fabrice; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Anract, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The use of allograft-prosthesis composites for reconstruction after bone tumor resection at the proximal femur has generated considerable interest since the mid1980s on the basis that their use would improve function and survival, and restore bone stock. Although functional improvement has been documented, it is unknown whether these composites survive long periods and whether they restore bone stock. We therefore determined long-term allograft-prosthesis composite survival, identified major complications that led to revision, and determined whether allograft bone stock could be spared at the time of revision. We also compared the radiographic appearance of allografts sterilized by gamma radiation and fresh-frozen allografts. We retrospectively reviewed 32 patients with bone malignancy in the proximal femur who underwent reconstruction with a cemented allograft-prosthesis composite. The allograft-prosthesis composite was a primary reconstruction for 23 patients and a revision procedure for nine. The minimum followup was 2 months (median, 68 months; range, 2–232 months). The cumulative incidence of revision for any reason was 14% at 5 years (95% confidence interval, 1%–28%) and 19% at 10 years (95% confidence interval, 3%–34%). Nine patients (28%) had revision of the reconstruction during followup; four of these patients had revision surgery for infection. Allografts sterilized by gamma radiation showed worse resorption than fresh-frozen allografts. Based on reported results, allograft-composite prostheses do not appear to improve survival compared with megaprostheses. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19851817

  13. Generation of suppressive blood cells for control of allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Christian; Sandra-Petrescu, Flavius; Jiga, Lucian; Dittmar, Laura; Mohr, Elisabeth; Greil, Johann; Mier, Walter; Becker, Luis E; Lang, Peter; Opelz, Gerhard; Terness, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Our previous studies in rats showed that incubation of monocytic dendritic cells (DCs) with the chemotherapeutic drug mitomycin C (MMC) renders the cells immunosuppressive. Donor-derived MMC-DCs injected into the recipient prior to transplantation prolonged heart allograft survival. Although the generation of DCs is labour-intensive and time-consuming, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) can be easily harvested. In the present study, we analyse under which conditions DCs can be replaced by PBMCs and examine their mode of action. When injected into rats, MMC-incubated donor PBMCs (MICs) strongly prolonged heart allograft survival. Removal of monocytes from PBMCs completely abrogated their suppressive effect, indicating that monocytes are the active cell population. Suppression of rejection was donor-specific. The injected MICs migrated into peripheral lymphoid organs and led to an increased number of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) expressing cluster of differentiation (CD) markers CD4 and CD25 and forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3). Tolerance could be transferred to syngeneic recipients with blood or spleen cells. Depletion of Tregs from tolerogenic cells abrogated their suppressive effect, arguing for mediation of immunosuppression by CD4⁺CD25⁺FoxP3⁺ Tregs. Donor-derived MICs also prolonged kidney allograft survival in pigs. MICs generated from donor monocytes were applied for the first time in humans in a patient suffering from therapy-resistant rejection of a haploidentical stem cell transplant. We describe, in the present paper, a simple method for in vitro generation of suppressor blood cells for potential use in clinical organ transplantation. Although the case report does not allow us to draw any conclusion about their therapeutic effectiveness, it shows that MICs can be easily generated and applied in humans.

  14. Urine Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Human Kidney Allograft Status.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Schwartz, Joseph E; Sharma, Vijay K; Chen, Qiuying; Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana M; Ding, Ruchuang; Ikle, David N; Bridges, Nancy D; Williams, Nikki M; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Karoly, Edward D; Mohney, Robert P; Abecassis, Michael; Friedewald, John; Knechtle, Stuart J; Becker, Yolanda T; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham; Gross, Steven S; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis and prognostication of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft may help realize the full benefits of kidney transplantation. To investigate whether urine metabolites predict kidney allograft status, we determined levels of 749 metabolites in 1516 urine samples from 241 kidney graft recipients enrolled in the prospective multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-04 study. A metabolite signature of the ratio of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine in biopsy specimen-matched urine supernatants best discriminated acute cellular rejection biopsy specimens from specimens without rejection. For clinical application, we developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based assay that enabled absolute and rapid quantification of the 3-sialyllactose-to-xanthosine ratio in urine samples. A composite signature of ratios of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine and quinolinate to X-16397 and our previously reported urinary cell mRNA signature of 18S ribosomal RNA, CD3ε mRNA, and interferon-inducible protein-10 mRNA outperformed the metabolite signatures and the mRNA signature. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the composite metabolite-mRNA signature was 0.93, and the signature was diagnostic of acute cellular rejection with a specificity of 84% and a sensitivity of 90%. The composite signature, developed using solely biopsy specimen-matched urine samples, predicted future acute cellular rejection when applied to pristine samples taken days to weeks before biopsy. We conclude that metabolite profiling of urine offers a noninvasive means of diagnosing and prognosticating acute cellular rejection in the human kidney allograft, and that the combined metabolite and mRNA signature is diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection with very high accuracy.

  15. Rinsing of allograft bone does not improve implant fixation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Impacted morselized allograft bone is a well-established method for reconstructing bone defects at revision surgery. However, the incorporation of bone graft is not always complete, and a substantial volume of fibrous tissue has been found around grafted implants. We hypothesized that rinsing the bone graft may improve graft incorporation by removing the majority of immunogenic factors present in blood, marrow, and fat. Methods We implanted a cylindrical (10- × 6-mm) porous-coated Ti implant into each proximal tibia of 12 dogs. The implants were surrounded by a 2.5-mm gap into which morselized fresh frozen allograft bone was impacted. The bone graft was either (1) untreated or (2) rinsed in 37°C saline for 3 × 1 min. After 4 weeks, the animals were killed and implant fixation was evaluated by mechanical push-out and histomorphometry. Results The groups (rinsed vs. control) were similar regarding mechanical implant fixation (mean (SD)): shear strength (MPa) 2.7 (1.0) vs. 2.9 (1.2), stiffness (MPa/mm) 15 (6.7) vs. 15 (5.6), and energy absorption (kJ/m2) 0.5 (0.2) vs. 0.6 (0.4), The same was evident for the new bone formation on the implant surface and around the implant: ongrowth (%) 6 vs. 7 and ingrowth (%) 9 vs. 9. Although not statistically significant, a 61% reduction in fibrous tissue ongrowth and 50% reduction in ingrowth were found in the rinsed group. Interpretation Within the limits of this experimental model, we did not detect any benefits of rinsing morselized allograft bone prior to impaction grafting. PMID:23621809

  16. Human flexor tendon tissue engineering: revitalization of biostatic allograft scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Woon, Colin Y L; Farnebo, Simon; Schmitt, Taliah; Kraus, Armin; Megerle, Kai; Pham, Hung; Yan, Xinrui; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Chang, James

    2012-12-01

    Cadaveric tendon allografts form a readily available and underutilized source of graft material. Because of their material properties, allografts are biomechanically and biologically superior to synthetic scaffolds. However, before clinical use, allografts must undergo decellularization to reduce immunogenicity and oxidation to increase porosity, leaving a nonvital biostatic scaffold. Ex vivo seeding, or revitalization, is thought to hasten graft incorporation and stimulate intrinsic tendon healing, permitting early mobilization and return to function. In this study, we examined physical and biochemical augmentation methods, including scaffold surface scoring (physical) and rehydration of lyophilized scaffolds in serum (biochemical). Scaffolds were divided into four groups: (1) scored scaffolds, (2) lyophilized scaffolds rehydrated in fetal calf serum (FCS), (3) scaffolds both scored and rehydrated in FCS, and (4) control scaffolds. Scaffolds were reseeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Reseeding efficacy was quantified by a live cell and total cell assays and qualified histologically with hematoxylin and eosin, live/dead and SYTO green nucleic acid stains, TUNEL apoptosis stains, procollagen stains, and transmission electron microscopy. Scaffold-seeded cell viability at up to 2 weeks in vitro and up to 4 weeks in vivo was demonstrated with bioluminescent imaging of scaffolds seeded with luciferase-positive ADSCs. The effect of seeding on scaffold biomechanical properties was demonstrated with evaluation of ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and an elastic modulus (EM). We found that scaffold surface scoring led to an increase in live and total cell attachment and penetration (MTS assay, p<0.001 and DNA assay, p=0.003, respectively). Histology confirmed greater total cell number in both construct core and surface in scored compared with unscored constructs. Cells reseeded on scored constructs displayed reduced apoptosis, persistent procollagen production, and

  17. Hyperglycemia-Induced Vasculopathy in the Murine Conceptus Is Mediated via Reductions of VEGF-A Expression and VEGF Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, Emese; Haigh, Jody; Nagy, Andras; Madri, Joseph A.

    2001-01-01

    Major congenital malformations, including those affecting the cardiovascular system, remain the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in infants of diabetic mothers. Interestingly, targeted mutations of several genes (including VEGF and VEGF receptors) and many teratogenic agents (including excess D-glucose) that give rise to embryonic lethal phenotypes during organogenesis are associated with a failure in the formation and/or maintenance of a functional vitelline circulation. Given the similarities in the pathology of the abnormal vitelline circulation in many of these conditions, we hypothesized that the hyperglycemic insult present in diabetes could cause the resultant abnormalities in the vitelline circulation by affecting VEGF/VEGF receptor signaling pathway(s). In this study we report that hyperglycemic insult results in reduced levels of VEGF-A in the conceptus, which in turn, leads to abnormal VEGF receptor signaling, ultimately resulting in embryonic (vitelline) vasculopathy. These findings and our observation that addition of exogenous rVEGF-A165 within a defined concentration range blunts the hyperglycemia-induced vasculopathy in the conceptus support the concept that VEGF levels can be modulated by glucose levels. In addition, these findings may ultimately lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of selected congenital cardiovascular abnormalities associated with diabetes. PMID:11290536

  18. Integrins alpha4 and alpha M, collagen1A1, and matrix metalloproteinase 7 are upregulated in acute Kawasaki disease vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reindel, Rebecca; Baker, Susan C.; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Rowley, Carol A.; Shulman, Stanford T.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Lingen, Mark W.; Rowley, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Kawasaki Disease (KD) can result in fatal coronary artery aneurysms especially in untreated patients. Our recent studies of KD vascular pathology revealed subacute/chronic vasculitis that began early in the illness with proliferation of smooth muscle cell derived-myofibroblasts in a complex extracellular matrix (ECM). We hypothesized that there is dysregulation of specific ECM and adhesion molecules in KD coronary arteries. Methods Gene expression profiling for ECM and adhesion molecules was performed on 6 acute KD and 8 control coronary arteries using a targeted real-time PCR array approach. Results Integrins alpha4 and alphaM (ITGA4, ITGAM), collagen 1A1 (COL1A1), and matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) were significantly upregulated in KD coronary arteries compared with controls. Immunohistochemistry with anti- ITGAM antibodies revealed expression on inflammatory cells within the coronary artery wall in KD patients but not controls. Conclusion Integrins ITGA4 and ITGAM are upregulated in KD vasculopathy, likely promoting inflammatory recruitment that stimulates smooth muscle cell transition to myofibroblasts and their proliferation. MMP-7 likely enhances myofibroblast proliferation and luminal lesion expansion, and overexpression of COL1A1 may lead to coronary artery stenosis. Identification of the molecular pathogenesis of KD vasculopathy may lead to the development of circulating biomarkers and to directed therapeutic interventions. PMID:23344661

  19. Calmodulin kinase II is involved in voltage-dependent facilitation of the L-type Cav1.2 calcium channel: Identification of the phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Seong; Karl, Rosi; Moosmang, Sven; Lenhardt, Peter; Klugbauer, Norbert; Hofmann, Franz; Kleppisch, Thomas; Welling, Andrea

    2006-09-01

    Calcium-dependent facilitation of L-type calcium channels has been reported to depend on the function of calmodulin kinase II. In contrast, the mechanism for voltage-dependent facilitation is not clear. In HEK 293 cells expressing Ca(v)1.2, Ca(v)beta2a, and calmodulin kinase II, the calcium current measured at +30 mV was facilitated up to 1.5-fold by a 200-ms-long prepulse to +160 mV. This voltage-dependent facilitation was prevented by the calmodulin kinase II inhibitors KN93 and the autocamtide-2-related peptide. In cells expressing the Ca(v)1.2 mutation I1649E, a residue critical for the binding of Ca2+-bound calmodulin, facilitation was also abolished. Calmodulin kinase II was coimmunoprecipitated with the Ca(v)1.2 channel from murine heart and HEK 293 cells expressing Ca(v)1.2 and calmodulinkinase II. The precipitated Ca(v)1.2 channel was phosphorylated in the presence of calmodulin and Ca2+. Fifteen putative calmodulin kinase II phosphorylation sites were identified mostly in the carboxyl-terminal tail of Ca(v)1.2. Neither truncation at amino acid 1728 nor changing the II-III loop serines 808 and 888 to alanines affected facilitation of the calcium current. In contrast, facilitation was decreased by the single mutations S1512A and S1570A and abolished by the double mutation S1512A/S1570A. These serines flank the carboxyl-terminal EF-hand motif. Immunoprecipitation of calmodulin kinase II with the Ca(v)1.2 channel was not affected by the mutation S1512A/S1570A. The phosphorylation of the Ca(v)1.2 protein was strongly decreased in the S1512A/S1570A double mutant. These results suggest that voltage-dependent facilitation of the Ca(v)1.2 channel depends on the phosphorylation of Ser1512/Ser1570 by calmodulin kinase II. PMID:16820363

  20. Modulation of Voltage- and Ca2+-dependent Gating of CaV1.3 L-type Calcium Channels by Alternative Splicing of a C-terminal Regulatory Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anamika; Gebhart, Mathias; Fritsch, Reinhard; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Poggiani, Chiara; Hoda, Jean-Charles; Engel, Jutta; Romanin, Christoph; Striessnig, Jörg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Low voltage activation of CaV1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels controls excitability in sensory cells and central neurons as well as sinoatrial node pacemaking. CaV1.3-mediated pacemaking determines neuronal vulnerability of dopaminergic striatal neurons affected in Parkinson disease. We have previously found that in CaV1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels, activation, voltage, and calcium-dependent inactivation are controlled by an intrinsic distal C-terminal modulator. Because alternative splicing in the CaV1.3 α1 subunit C terminus gives rise to a long (CaV1.342) and a short form (CaV1.342A), we investigated if a C-terminal modulatory mechanism also controls CaV1.3 gating. The biophysical properties of both splice variants were compared after heterologous expression together with β3 and α2δ1 subunits in HEK-293 cells. Activation of calcium current through CaV1.342A channels was more pronounced at negative voltages, and inactivation was faster because of enhanced calcium-dependent inactivation. By investigating several CaV1.3 channel truncations, we restricted the modulator activity to the last 116 amino acids of the C terminus. The resulting CaV1.3ΔC116 channels showed gating properties similar to CaV1.342A that were reverted by co-expression of the corresponding C-terminal peptide C116. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments confirmed an intramolecular protein interaction in the C terminus of CaV1.3 channels that also modulates calmodulin binding. These experiments revealed a novel mechanism of channel modulation enabling cells to tightly control CaV1.3 channel activity by alternative splicing. The absence of the C-terminal modulator in short splice forms facilitates CaV1.3 channel activation at lower voltages expected to favor CaV1.3 activity at threshold voltages as required for modulation of neuronal firing behavior and sinoatrial node pacemaking. PMID:18482979

  1. Pharmacological modulation of the AKT/microRNA-199a-5p/CAV1 pathway ameliorates cystic fibrosis lung hyper-inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping-xia; Cheng, Jijun; Zou, Siying; D’Souza, Anthony D.; Koff, Jonathan L.; Lu, Jun; Lee, Patty J.; Krause, Diane S.; Egan, Marie E.; Bruscia, Emanuela M.

    2015-01-01

    In Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients, hyper-inflammation is a key factor in lung destruction and disease morbidity. We have previously demonstrated that macrophages drive the lung hyper-inflammatory response to LPS in CF mice, due to reduced levels of the scaffold protein CAV1 with subsequent uncontrolled TLR4 signaling. Here we show that reduced CAV1 and, consequently, increased TLR4 signaling, in human and murine CF macrophages and murine CF lungs, is caused by high microRNA-199a-5p levels, which are PI3K/AKT-dependent. Down-regulation of microRNA-199a-5p or increased AKT signaling restores CAV1 expression and reduces hyper-inflammation in CF macrophages. Importantly, the FDA approved drug celecoxib reestablishes the AKT/miR-199a-5p/CAV1 axis in CF macrophages, and ameliorates lung hyper-inflammation in Cftr-deficient mice. Thus, we identify the AKT/miR-199a-5p/CAV1 pathway as a regulator of innate immunity, which is dysfunctional in CF macrophages contributing to lung hyper-inflammation. Importantly, this pathway is targeted by celecoxib. PMID:25665524

  2. The composition of the microbiota modulates allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuk Man; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Stefka, Andrew T; Molinero, Luciana L; Theriault, Betty; Aquino-Michaels, Keston; Sivan, Ayelet S; Nagler, Cathryn R; Gajewski, Thomas F; Chong, Anita S; Bartman, Caroline; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Transplantation is the only cure for end-stage organ failure, but without immunosuppression, T cells rapidly reject allografts. While genetic disparities between donor and recipient are major determinants of the kinetics of transplant rejection, little is known about the contribution of environmental factors. Because colonized organs have worse transplant outcome than sterile organs, we tested the influence of host and donor microbiota on skin transplant rejection. Compared with untreated conventional mice, pretreatment of donors and recipients with broad-spectrum antibiotics (Abx) or use of germ-free (GF) donors and recipients resulted in prolonged survival of minor antigen-mismatched skin grafts. Increased graft survival correlated with reduced type I IFN signaling in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and decreased priming of alloreactive T cells. Colonization of GF mice with fecal material from untreated conventional mice, but not from Abx-pretreated mice, enhanced the ability of APCs to prime alloreactive T cells and accelerated graft rejection, suggesting that alloimmunity is modulated by the composition of microbiota rather than the quantity of bacteria. Abx pretreatment of conventional mice also delayed rejection of major antigen-mismatched skin and MHC class II-mismatched cardiac allografts. This study demonstrates that Abx pretreatment prolongs graft survival, suggesting that targeting microbial constituents is a potential therapeutic strategy for enhancing graft acceptance.

  3. Selective lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporin A in rat heart allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuromoto, N.; Hardy, M.A.; Fawwaz, R.; Reemtsma, K.; Nowygrod, R.

    1984-05-01

    Short-term peritransplant treatment utilizing 2-dose ALG and 1-dose Palladium-109-hematoporphyrin (PD-H) for selective lymphoid irradiation (SLI) leads to donor-specific permanent acceptance of heart allografts in the Fisher to Lewis rat model. The same treatment significantly prolongs survival of hearts transplanted to strongly histoincompatable , presensitized, and xenogeneic recipients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate synergistic effects of short-term, low-dose cyclosporin treatment and SLI in an attempt to develop a nontoxic protocol utilizing peritransplant treatment for immune preconditioning with minimal subsequent immunosuppression. Single-agent treatment alone with cyclosporin, ALG, or Pd-H resulted in a maximal mean graft survival time (MST) of 33 days. Immunosuppression with 1-dose Pd-H, 2-dose ALG, and low-dose cyclosporin (5 mg/kg) for 14 days doubled the MST to 78 days. Use of therapeutic-dose cyclosporin (20 mg/kg), given for just 3 days, was also quite effective, MST of 57 days with SLI and 43 days with ALG, but toxic; 3 of 12 recipients died of infection with functioning grafts. These results demonstrate that the use of low-dose cyclosporin over a short interval, when combined with peritransplant SLI, is a highly effective and safe method for prolonging heart allograft survival.

  4. De novo C3 glomerulonephritis in a renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Ji Hae; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Yu Seun; Cheong, Hae-Il; Lim, Beom Jin; Kim, Beom Seok; Jeong, Hyeon Joo

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) is a recently described, rare glomerular disease characterized by predominant or sole glomerular C3 deposits. Morphologic features of C3GN are similar to those of dense deposit disease (DDD); however, ribbon-like intramembranous electron-dense deposits are absent in the former. We report a case of de novo C3GN in a renal allograft with morphologic transformation to DDD. A 6-year-old boy presented with congenital left renal agenesis and right ureteropelvic junction obstruction. The patient underwent pyeloplasty but experienced recurrent urinary tract infections. At the age of 22 years, he received a renal allograft from a living related donor. C3GN was diagnosed after 1 year of transplantation; initial histology showed minimal mesangiopathy and this progressed to mesangial proliferation and membranoproliferative features over the next 7 years. Serum creatinine levels were stabilized with anti-rejection treatments for combating repeated episodes of acute rejection; however, glomerular and tubular band-like electron-dense deposits became evident.

  5. The composition of the microbiota modulates allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yuk Man; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Stefka, Andrew T.; Molinero, Luciana L.; Theriault, Betty; Aquino-Michaels, Keston; Sivan, Ayelet S.; Nagler, Cathryn R.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Chong, Anita S.; Bartman, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation is the only cure for end-stage organ failure, but without immunosuppression, T cells rapidly reject allografts. While genetic disparities between donor and recipient are major determinants of the kinetics of transplant rejection, little is known about the contribution of environmental factors. Because colonized organs have worse transplant outcome than sterile organs, we tested the influence of host and donor microbiota on skin transplant rejection. Compared with untreated conventional mice, pretreatment of donors and recipients with broad-spectrum antibiotics (Abx) or use of germ-free (GF) donors and recipients resulted in prolonged survival of minor antigen–mismatched skin grafts. Increased graft survival correlated with reduced type I IFN signaling in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and decreased priming of alloreactive T cells. Colonization of GF mice with fecal material from untreated conventional mice, but not from Abx-pretreated mice, enhanced the ability of APCs to prime alloreactive T cells and accelerated graft rejection, suggesting that alloimmunity is modulated by the composition of microbiota rather than the quantity of bacteria. Abx pretreatment of conventional mice also delayed rejection of major antigen–mismatched skin and MHC class II–mismatched cardiac allografts. This study demonstrates that Abx pretreatment prolongs graft survival, suggesting that targeting microbial constituents is a potential therapeutic strategy for enhancing graft acceptance. PMID:27322054

  6. A prospective study on knee proprioception after meniscal allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thijs, Y; Witvrouw, E; Evens, B; Coorevits, P; Almqvist, F; Verdonk, R

    2007-06-01

    The meniscus plays an important role in the proprioceptive ability of the knee joint. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the short-term influence of a meniscus replacement on the proprioception of the knee. Fourteen patients who had undergone a fresh meniscal allograft transplantation between May 2001 and June 2003 were tested pre-operatively and 6 months post-operatively. Disability regarding pain, stiffness and functionality of the affected knee during daily activities was measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC) scale. The knee joint position sense was assessed using the Biodex System 3 isokinetic dynamometer. The results of the WOMAC scale showed no significant differences concerning pain, stiffness or knee function between the pre- and post-operative condition of the knee. Assessment of the knee joint position sense at a reference point of 70 degrees of knee flexion revealed a significant improvement of the proprioception of the operated knee at 6 months after surgery compared with the pre-operative condition. The results of this study suggest that although no significant improvement of pain and functionality of the operated knee occurred at this short-term follow-up period, a meniscal allograft transplantation seems to have a significant positive effect on the joint position sense of the previously meniscectomised knee.

  7. Osteochondral allograft transplantation for treatment of glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Chapovsky, Felix; Kelly, John D

    2005-08-01

    The intimate contact between articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid labrum contribute to glenohumeral stability. When the articular surface area of these 2 surfaces is decreased, as with the presence of a bony Bankart lesion or an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, the shoulder is more prone to dislocation. Although osteochondral allograft transplantation has become widely popular for the treatment of osteochondral defects of the knee, it is less used for treating bony defects of the humeral head. We present a case in which a 16-year-old male athlete with multiple anterior shoulder dislocations underwent arthroscopic repair of a Bankart lesion. His arthroscopic repair ultimately failed and on subsequent magnetic resonance imaging he was found to have a large, engaging Hill-Sachs defect. He underwent arthroscopic osteochondral allograft transplantation to correct the humeral head bony deformity. As of the 1-year follow-up, the patient has had no recurrences and had returned to his normal level of activity.

  8. De novo C3 glomerulonephritis in a renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Ji Hae; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Yu Seun; Cheong, Hae-Il; Lim, Beom Jin; Kim, Beom Seok; Jeong, Hyeon Joo

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) is a recently described, rare glomerular disease characterized by predominant or sole glomerular C3 deposits. Morphologic features of C3GN are similar to those of dense deposit disease (DDD); however, ribbon-like intramembranous electron-dense deposits are absent in the former. We report a case of de novo C3GN in a renal allograft with morphologic transformation to DDD. A 6-year-old boy presented with congenital left renal agenesis and right ureteropelvic junction obstruction. The patient underwent pyeloplasty but experienced recurrent urinary tract infections. At the age of 22 years, he received a renal allograft from a living related donor. C3GN was diagnosed after 1 year of transplantation; initial histology showed minimal mesangiopathy and this progressed to mesangial proliferation and membranoproliferative features over the next 7 years. Serum creatinine levels were stabilized with anti-rejection treatments for combating repeated episodes of acute rejection; however, glomerular and tubular band-like electron-dense deposits became evident. PMID:26986539

  9. Requirement of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR3 for Acute Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Wayne W.; Lu, Bao; Gao, Wei; Csizmadia, Vilmos; Faia, Kerrie; King, Jennifer A.; Smiley, Stephen T.; Ling, Mai; Gerard, Norma P.; Gerard, Craig

    2000-01-01

    Chemokines provide signals for activation and recruitment of effector cells into sites of inflammation, acting via specific G protein–coupled receptors. However, in vitro data demonstrating the presence of multiple ligands for a given chemokine receptor, and often multiple receptors for a given chemokine, have led to concerns of biologic redundancy. Here we show that acute cardiac allograft rejection is accompanied by progressive intragraft production of the chemokines interferon (IFN)-γ–inducible protein of 10 kD (IP-10), monokine induced by IFN-γ (Mig), and IFN-inducible T cell α chemoattractant (I-TAC), and by infiltration of activated T cells bearing the corresponding chemokine receptor, CXCR3. We used three in vivo models to demonstrate a role for CXCR3 in the development of transplant rejection. First, CXCR3-deficient (CXCR3−/−) mice showed profound resistance to development of acute allograft rejection. Second, CXCR3−/− allograft recipients treated with a brief, subtherapeutic course of cyclosporin A maintained their allografts permanently and without evidence of chronic rejection. Third, CXCR+/+ mice treated with an anti-CXCR3 monoclonal antibody showed prolongation of allograft survival, even if begun after the onset of rejection. Taken in conjunction with our findings of CXCR3 expression in rejecting human cardiac allografts, we conclude that CXCR3 plays a key role in T cell activation, recruitment, and allograft destruction. PMID:11085753

  10. Renal Allograft Torsion: US and CT Imaging Findings of a Rare Posttransplant Complication.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Rohit; Dasyam, Anil K; Tan, Henke; Furlan, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Vascular torsion is a rare renal transplant complication which requires prompt diagnosis and surgery to salvage allograft function. We report here a case of renal allograft torsion with interesting imaging findings on unenhanced CT and color Doppler ultrasound. A 60-year-old woman with a history of pancreas and kidney transplant presented to the emergency room with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and minimal urine output. Unenhanced CT of the abdomen demonstrated an enlarged and malrotated renal allograft with moderate hydronephrosis. Color Doppler ultrasound demonstrated lack of vascularity within the allograft. The patient was taken urgently to the operating room where the renal allograft was found twisted 360 degrees around the vascular pedicle. After the allograft was detorsed, the color of the kidney returned and the Doppler signals for arterial flow improved. Intraoperative biopsy showed no evidence of infarct or acute cellular rejection. The detorsed kidney was surgically fixed in position in its upper and lower poles. Follow-up ultrasound 1 day later demonstrated normal blood flow to the renal allograft and the serum level of creatinine returned to normal.

  11. Long-term outcomes of allograft reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Lenehan, Eric A; Payne, W Barrett; Askam, Brad M; Grana, William A; Farrow, Lutul D

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have found higher rates of failed reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with use of allograft when compared with autograft reconstruction. To evaluate the long-term outcomes of allograft ACL reconstruction, we retrospectively reviewed the cases of all patients who underwent allograft (n=99) or autograft (n=24) ACL reconstruction by 2 senior surgeons at a single institution over an 8-year period. Seventeen (17%) of the 99 allograft reconstructions required additional surgery. Reoperation and revision ACL reconstruction rates (30.8% and 20.5%, respectively) were much higher for patients 25 years of age or younger than for patients older than 25 years. In our cohort of NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I athletes, the revision ACL reconstruction rate was 62% for allograft ACL reconstruction and 0% for autograft reconstruction. Our study found that reoperation and revision rates for irradiated soft-tissue allograft ACL reconstruction were higher than generally quoted for autograft reconstruction. Given the extremely high graft failure rates in patients younger than 25 years, we recommend against routine use of irradiated soft-tissue allograft for ACL reconstruction in younger patients. PMID:25950536

  12. Long-term outcomes of allograft reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Lenehan, Eric A; Payne, W Barrett; Askam, Brad M; Grana, William A; Farrow, Lutul D

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have found higher rates of failed reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with use of allograft when compared with autograft reconstruction. To evaluate the long-term outcomes of allograft ACL reconstruction, we retrospectively reviewed the cases of all patients who underwent allograft (n=99) or autograft (n=24) ACL reconstruction by 2 senior surgeons at a single institution over an 8-year period. Seventeen (17%) of the 99 allograft reconstructions required additional surgery. Reoperation and revision ACL reconstruction rates (30.8% and 20.5%, respectively) were much higher for patients 25 years of age or younger than for patients older than 25 years. In our cohort of NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I athletes, the revision ACL reconstruction rate was 62% for allograft ACL reconstruction and 0% for autograft reconstruction. Our study found that reoperation and revision rates for irradiated soft-tissue allograft ACL reconstruction were higher than generally quoted for autograft reconstruction. Given the extremely high graft failure rates in patients younger than 25 years, we recommend against routine use of irradiated soft-tissue allograft for ACL reconstruction in younger patients.

  13. Allograft update: the current status of tissue regulation, procurement, processing, and sterilization.

    PubMed

    McAllister, David R; Joyce, Michael J; Mann, Barton J; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2007-12-01

    Allografts are commonly used during sports medicine surgical procedures in the United States, and their frequency of use is increasing. Based on surgeon reports, it is estimated that more than 60 000 allografts were used in knee surgeries by members of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine in 2005. In the United States, there are governmental agencies and other regulatory bodies involved in the oversight of tissue banks. In 2005, the Food and Drug Administration finalized its requirements for current good tissue practice and has mandated new rules regarding the "manufacture" of allogenic tissue. In response to well-publicized infections associated with the implantation of allograft tissue, some tissue banks have developed methods to sterilize allograft tissue. Although many surgeons have significant concerns about the safety of allografts, the majority believe that sterilized allografts are safe but that the sterilization process negatively affects tissue biology and biomechanics. However, most know very little about the principles of sterilization and the proprietary processes currently used in tissue banking. This article will review the current status of allograft tissue regulation, procurement, processing, and sterilization in the United States.

  14. Investigation of biological activity of polar extracts isolated from Phlomis crinita Cav ssp. mauritanica Munby.

    PubMed

    Limem-Ben Amor, Ilef; Skandrani, Ines; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben Sghaïer, Mohamed; Neffati, Aicha; Bhouri, Wissem; Bouhlel, Ines; Chouchane, Nabil; Kilani, Soumaya; Guedon, Emmanuel; Ghoul, Mohamed; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-01-01

    The lyophilized infusion, the methanol, the ethyl acetate, and the total oligomer flavonoid (TOF)-enriched extracts prepared from the dried leaves of Phlomis crinita Cav. ssp. mauritanica Munby were investigated for the contents of flavonoids, tannins, coumarines and steroids. Antibacterial activity was investigated toward five bacterial strains. An inhibitory effect was observed against Staphyllococcus aureus and Enterococcus feacalis, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations ranged from 2.5 to 5 mg/mL of extract. The tested extracts exhibit an important free radical scavenging activity toward the 1,1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical; with IC(50) values of 30.5, 6, 32, and 31.5 microg/mL, respectively, in the presence of lyophilized infusion, the TOF, the methanol, and the ethyl acetate extracts. Genotoxic and antigenotoxic properties of the different extracts were studied by using the SOS chromotest with Escherichia coli PQ37. The lyophilized infusion and TOF extracts obtained from P. crinita ssp. mauritanica showed no genotoxicity, whereas methanol and ethyl acetate extracts are considered as marginally genotoxic. On the other hand, we showed that each extract inhibited the mutagenicity induced by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) (10 microg/assay) and nifuroxazide (NF) (10 microg/assay). The ethyl acetate extract showed the strongest level of protection toward the genotoxicity induced by both directly and indirectly genotoxic NF and AFB1. These tests proved that the lyophilized infusion possesses an antiradical activity likewise, it showed no genotoxic effect; that is why we choose this extract to assess its antiulcerogenic activity by using an ethanol-induced ulcerogenesis model in the rat. This test demonstrates that 300 mg/kg of a P. crinita ssp. mauritanica lyophilized infusion was more effective than the reference compound, cimetidine. PMID:19514937

  15. Patient Survival in Renal Allograft Failure: A Time-dependent Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Moghaddameh; Azmandian, Jalal; Zeraati, Hojjat; Mahmoodi, Mahmood; Mohammad, Kazem; Fazeli, Faramarz; Ebadzadeh, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: To improve patient survival after a renal transplant, it is important to detect which variables affect it. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of renal allograft failure on patient survival. Patients and Methods: This retrospective cohort study included 405 renal transplant patients from Kerman University of Medical Sciences hospital, Kerman, Iran from 2004 to 2010. Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival rates of patients, and time-dependent Cox regression was used to examine the effect of allograft failure on patient survival. Results: During 4.06 years (median) of follow-up 28 (6.9%) patients died and 20 (71.4%) of dead patients had allograft failure. Survival rate of patients with allograft failure at 1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-year were 0.98, 0.8, 0.53, and 0.53, respectively; in patients with allograft function these values were 0.99, 0.98, 0.97, and 0.96, respectively. The unadjusted death rate was 0.5 per 100 patient years for the maintained allograft function, which increased to 9 per 100 patient years for patients following allograft failure. In fully adjusted model the risk of death increased in patients with allograft failure (HR = 2.09; 95% CI: 1.56-2.81), pretransplant diabetes (HR = 2.81; 95% CI: 1.2-6.7), patients with BMI ≥ 25 (vs. 18.5 ≤ BMI < 25) (HR = 3.56; 95% CI: 1.09-11.6). With an increase in recipient age this risk increased (HR = 1.04 per year increase; 95% CI: 1.01-6.7). Receiving a living kidney transplant decreased this risk (HR = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.39-0.69). Conclusions: An increase in recipient age and BMI, affliction with diabetes, allograft failure, and receiving deceased kidney transplant increased the risk of death. PMID:24719808

  16. Allograft pretreatment for the repair of sciatic nerve defects: green tea polyphenols versus radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng-hu; Zhen, Ping; Li, Shen-song; Liang, Xiao-yan; Gao, Ming-xuan; Tian, Qi; Li, Xu-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment of nerve allografts by exposure to irradiation or green tea polyphenols can eliminate neuroimmunogenicity, inhibit early immunological rejection, encourage nerve regeneration and functional recovery, improve tissue preservation, and minimize postoperative infection. In the present study, we investigate which intervention achieves better results. We produced a 1.0 cm sciatic nerve defect in rats, and divided the rats into four treatment groups: autograft, fresh nerve allograft, green tea polyphenol-pretreated (1 mg/mL, 4°C) nerve allograft, and irradiation-pretreated nerve allograft (26.39 Gy/min for 12 hours; total 19 kGy). The animals were observed, and sciatic nerve electrophysiology, histology, and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at 6 and 12 weeks after grafting. The circumference and structure of the transplanted nerve in rats that received autografts or green tea polyphenol-pretreated nerve allografts were similar to those of the host sciatic nerve. Compared with the groups that received fresh or irradiation-pretreated nerve allografts, motor nerve conduction velocity in the autograft and fresh nerve allograft groups was greater, more neurites grew into the allografts, Schwann cell proliferation was evident, and a large number of new blood vessels was observed; in addition, massive myelinated nerve fibers formed, and abundant microfilaments and microtubules were present in the axoplasm. Our findings indicate that nerve allografts pretreated by green tea polyphenols are equivalent to transplanting autologous nerves in the repair of sciatic nerve defects, and promote nerve regeneration. Pretreatment using green tea polyphenols is better than pretreatment with irradiation. PMID:25788934

  17. Electrophysiological characterization of activation state-dependent Ca(v)2 channel antagonist TROX-1 in spinal nerve injured rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, R; Rutten, K; Valdor, M; Schiene, K; Wigge, S; Schunk, S; Damann, N; Christoph, T; Dickenson, A H

    2015-06-25

    Prialt, a synthetic version of Ca(v)2.2 antagonist ω-conotoxin MVIIA derived from Conus magus, is the first clinically approved voltage-gated calcium channel blocker for refractory chronic pain. However, due to the narrow therapeutic window and considerable side effects associated with systemic dosing, Prialt is only administered intrathecally. N-triazole oxindole (TROX-1) is a novel use-dependent and activation state-selective small-molecule inhibitor of Ca(v)2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 calcium channels designed to overcome the limitations of Prialt. We have examined the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of blocking calcium channels with TROX-1. In vitro, TROX-1, in contrast to state-independent antagonist Prialt, preferentially inhibits Ca(v)2.2 currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons under depolarized conditions. In vivo electrophysiology was performed to record from deep dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurons in non-sentient spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) and sham-operated rats. In SNL rats, spinal neurons exhibited reduced responses to innocuous and noxious punctate mechanical stimulation of the receptive field following subcutaneous administration of TROX-1, an effect that was absent in sham-operated animals. No effect was observed on neuronal responses evoked by dynamic brushing, heat or cold stimulation in SNL or sham rats. The wind-up response of spinal neurons following repeated electrical stimulation of the receptive field was also unaffected. Spinally applied TROX-1 dose dependently inhibited mechanically evoked neuronal responses in SNL but not sham-operated rats, consistent with behavioral observations. This study confirms the pathological state-dependent actions of TROX-1 through a likely spinal mechanism and reveals a modality selective change in calcium channel function following nerve injury. PMID:25839150

  18. Hydrogen sulfide-induced itch requires activation of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Long; Tian, Bin; Huang, Ya; Peng, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    The contributions of gasotransmitters to itch sensation are largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a ubiquitous gasotransmitter, in itch signaling. We found that intradermal injection of H2S donors NaHS or Na2S, but not GYY4137 (a slow-releasing H2S donor), dose-dependently induced scratching behavior in a μ-opioid receptor-dependent and histamine-independent manner in mice. Interestingly, NaHS induced itch via unique mechanisms that involved capsaicin-insensitive A-fibers, but not TRPV1-expressing C-fibers that are traditionally considered for mediating itch, revealed by depletion of TRPV1-expressing C-fibers by systemic resiniferatoxin treatment. Moreover, local application of capsaizapine (TRPV1 blocker) or HC-030031 (TRPA1 blocker) had no effects on NaHS-evoked scratching. Strikingly, pharmacological blockade and silencing of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel by mibefradil, ascorbic acid, zinc chloride or Cav3.2 siRNA dramatically decreased NaHS-evoked scratching. NaHS induced robust alloknesis (touch-evoked itch), which was inhibited by T-type calcium channels blocker mibefradil. Compound 48/80-induced itch was enhanced by an endogenous precursor of H2S (L-cysteine) but attenuated by inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine γ-lyase and cystathionine β-synthase. These results indicated that H2S, as a novel nonhistaminergic itch mediator, may activates Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel, probably located at A-fibers, to induce scratching and alloknesis in mice. PMID:26602811

  19. Hydrogen sulfide-induced itch requires activation of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Long; Tian, Bin; Huang, Ya; Peng, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    The contributions of gasotransmitters to itch sensation are largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a ubiquitous gasotransmitter, in itch signaling. We found that intradermal injection of H2S donors NaHS or Na2S, but not GYY4137 (a slow-releasing H2S donor), dose-dependently induced scratching behavior in a μ-opioid receptor-dependent and histamine-independent manner in mice. Interestingly, NaHS induced itch via unique mechanisms that involved capsaicin-insensitive A-fibers, but not TRPV1-expressing C-fibers that are traditionally considered for mediating itch, revealed by depletion of TRPV1-expressing C-fibers by systemic resiniferatoxin treatment. Moreover, local application of capsaizapine (TRPV1 blocker) or HC-030031 (TRPA1 blocker) had no effects on NaHS-evoked scratching. Strikingly, pharmacological blockade and silencing of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel by mibefradil, ascorbic acid, zinc chloride or Cav3.2 siRNA dramatically decreased NaHS-evoked scratching. NaHS induced robust alloknesis (touch-evoked itch), which was inhibited by T-type calcium channels blocker mibefradil. Compound 48/80-induced itch was enhanced by an endogenous precursor of H2S (L-cysteine) but attenuated by inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine γ-lyase and cystathionine β-synthase. These results indicated that H2S, as a novel nonhistaminergic itch mediator, may activates Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel, probably located at A-fibers, to induce scratching and alloknesis in mice. PMID:26602811

  20. Chondroblastoma of the Knee Treated with Resection and Osteochondral Allograft Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur. PMID:25548701

  1. Chondroblastoma of the knee treated with resection and osteochondral allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Chafey, David; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur.

  2. Quality control in tissue banking--ensuring the safety of allograft tissues.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Linda K; Mansavage, Vicki L

    2006-09-01

    DESPITE FEDERAL REGULATIONS for tissue-banking practices, inadequate quality control led to the largest allograft tissue recall in history in October 2005. THE RECALL INCLUDED all allograft tissues obtained from 761 donors and distributed by five tissue banks. Many of these tissues already had been implanted and were unrecoverable. THIS ARTICLE DESCRIBES the many tissue-banking industry variables, including donor selection and testing and tissue recovery, processing, and preservation. QUESTIONS THAT HEALTH CARE providers can ask to determine which tissue banks' quality control measures best ensure the safety of the allografts they provide also are included. PMID:17004664

  3. Chondroblastoma of the knee treated with resection and osteochondral allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Chafey, David; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur. PMID:25548701

  4. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  5. Myoglobinuria masquerading as acute rejection in a renal allograft recipient with recurrent post transplant diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pallav; Sharma, Amit; Khullar, Dinesh

    2014-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis contributes to 7-10% of total AKI cases. Myoglobinuria as a cause of acute renal allograft dysfunction is extremely uncommon. Renal allograft recipient on cyclosporine or tacrolimus can develop myoglobinuria in presence of other precipitating factors. Present case describes an interesting report of myoglobinuria in a patient with post transplant diabetic nephropathy mimicking acute graft rejection. Clinically myoglobinuria presenting as renal allograft dysfunction is diagnosis of exclusion and renal biopsy is extremely important in making a correct diagnosis and planning optimal management in such cases.

  6. Orthopedic applications of acellular human dermal allograft for shoulder and elbow surgery.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Daniel C; Shore, Brett; Mirzayan, Raffy

    2015-07-01

    Shoulder and elbow tendon injuries are some of the most challenging problems to treat surgically. Tendon repairs in the upper extremity can be complicated by poor tendon quality and, often times, poor healing. Extracellular matrices, such as human dermal allografts, have been used to augment tendon repairs in shoulder and elbow surgery. The indications and surgical techniques regarding the use of human dermal allograft continue to evolve. This article reviews the basic science, rationale for use, and surgical applications of human dermal allograft in shoulder and elbow tendon injuries.

  7. Cav1.2 splice variant with exon 9* is critical for regulation of cerebral artery diameter

    PubMed Central

    Nystoriak, Matthew A.; Murakami, Kentaro; Penar, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) are essential for numerous processes in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Alternative splicing modulates proteomic composition of Cav1.2 to generate functional variation between channel isoforms. Here, we describe expression and function of Cav1.2 channels containing alternatively spliced exon 9* in cerebral artery myocytes. RT-PCR showed expression of Cav1.2 splice variants both containing (α1C9/9*/10) and lacking (α1C9/10) exon 9* in intact rabbit and human cerebral arteries. With the use of laser capture microdissection and RT-PCR, expression of mRNA for both α1C9/9*/10 and α1C9/10 was demonstrated in isolated cerebral artery myocytes. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed significantly greater α1C9/9*/10 expression relative to α1C9/10 in intact rabbit cerebral arteries compared with cardiac tissue and cerebral cortex. To demonstrate a functional role for α1C9/9*/10, smooth muscle of intact cerebral arteries was treated with antisense oligonucleotides targeting α1C9/9*/10 (α1C9/9*/10-AS) or exon 9 (α1C-AS), expressed in all Cav1.2 splice variants, by reversible permeabilization and organ cultured for 1–4 days. Treatment with α1C9/9*/10-AS reduced maximal constriction induced by elevated extracellular K+ ([K+]o) by ∼75% compared with α1C9/9*/10-sense-treated arteries. Maximal constriction in response to the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin and [K+]o EC50 values were not altered by antisense treatment. Decreases in maximal [K+]o-induced constriction were similar between α1C9/9*/10-AS and α1C-AS groups (22.7 ± 9% and 25.6 ± 4% constriction, respectively). We conclude that although cerebral artery myocytes express both α1C9/9*/10 and α1C9/10 VDCC splice variants, α1C9/9*/10 is functionally dominant in the control of cerebral artery diameter. PMID:19717733

  8. Inhibitory and excitatory axon terminals share a common nano-architecture of their Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Althof, Daniel; Baehrens, David; Watanabe, Masahiko; Suzuki, Noboru; Fakler, Bernd; Kulik, Ákos

    2015-01-01

    Tuning of the time course and strength of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter release is fundamental for the precise operation of cortical network activity and is controlled by Ca(2+) influx into presynaptic terminals through the high voltage-activated P/Q-type Ca(2+) (Cav2.1) channels. Proper channel-mediated Ca(2+)-signaling critically depends on the topographical arrangement of the channels in the presynaptic membrane. Here, we used high-resolution SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica immunoelectron microscopy together with automatized computational analysis of Cav2.1 immunogold labeling to determine the precise subcellular organization of Cav2.1 channels in both inhibitory and excitatory terminals. Immunoparticles labeling the pore-forming α1 subunit of Cav2.1 channels were enriched over the active zone of the boutons with the number of channels (3-62) correlated with the area of the synaptic membrane. Detailed analysis showed that Cav2.1 channels are non-uniformly distributed over the presynaptic membrane specialization where they are arranged in clusters of an average five channels per cluster covering a mean area with a diameter of about 70 nm. Importantly, clustered arrangement and cluster properties did not show any significant difference between GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals. Our data demonstrate a common nano-architecture of Cav2.1 channels in inhibitory and excitatory boutons in stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 area suggesting that the cluster arrangement is crucial for the precise release of transmitters from the axonal boutons. PMID:26321916

  9. Alternative splicing generates a smaller assortment of CaV2.1 transcripts in cerebellar Purkinje cells than in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Kanumilli, Srinivasan; Tringham, Elizabeth W; Payne, C Elizabeth; Dupere, Jonathan R B; Venkateswarlu, Kanamarlapudi; Usowicz, Maria M

    2006-01-12

    P/Q-type calcium channels control many calcium-driven functions in the brain. The CACNA1A gene encoding the pore-forming CaV2.1 (alpha1A) subunit of P/Q-type channels undergoes alternative splicing at multiple loci. This results in channel variants with different phenotypes. However, the combinatorial patterns of alternative splice events at two or more loci, and hence the diversity of CaV2.1 transcripts, are incompletely defined for specific brain regions and types of brain neurons. Using RT-PCR and splice variant-specific primers, we have identified multiple CaV2.1 transcript variants defined by different pairs of splice events in the cerebellum of adult rat. We have uncovered new splice variations between exons 28 and 34 (some of which predict a premature stop codon) and a new variation in exon 47 (which predicts a novel extended COOH-terminus). Single cell RT-PCR reveals that each individual cerebellar Purkinje neuron also expresses multiple alternative CaV2.1 transcripts, but the assortment is smaller than in the cerebellum. Two of these variants encode different extended COOH-termini which are not the same as those previously reported in Purkinje cells of the mouse. Our patch-clamp recordings show that calcium channel currents in the soma and dendrites of Purkinje cells are largely inhibited by a concentration of omega-agatoxin IVA selective for P-type over Q-type channels, suggesting that the different transcripts may form phenotypic variants of P-type calcium channels in Purkinje cells. These results expand the known diversity of CaV2.1 transcripts in cerebellar Purkinje cells, and propose the selective expression of distinct assortments of CaV2.1 transcripts in different brain neurons and species.

  10. Acute effects of pregabalin on the function and cellular distribution of Ca(V)2.1 in HEK293t cells.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Carina; Di Guilmi, Mariano N; Urbano, Francisco J; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2013-01-01

    We established a cell model to study the acute effects of pregabalin (PGB), a drug widely used in epilepsy and neuropathic pain, on voltage gated Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels function and distribution at the membrane level. HEK293t cells were transfected with plasmids coding for all subunits of the Ca(V)2.1 channel. We used a α1 fused to an eGFP tag to follow its distribution in time and at different experimental conditions. The expressed channel was functional as shown by the presence of barium-mediated, calcium currents of transfected cells measured by 'whole-cell voltage-clamp' recordings, showing a maximum current peak in the I-V curve at +20 mV. The GFP fluorescent signal was confined to the periphery of the cells. Incubation with 500 μM PGB, that binds α2δ subunits, for 30 min induced changes in localization of the fluorescent subunits as measured by fluorescent time lapse microscopy. These changes correlated with a reversible reduction of barium currents through Ca(V)2.1 calcium channels under the same conditions. However, no changes in the cellular distribution of the subunits were visualized for cells either expressing another membrane associated protein or after exposure of the Ca(V)2.1 channels to isoleucine, another α2δ ligand. Together these results show strong evidence for an acute effect of PGB on Ca(V)2.1 calcium channels' currents and distribution and suggest that internalization of Ca(V)2.1 channels might be a mechanism of PGB action. PMID:23063705

  11. Heparin/heparan sulfates bind to and modulate neuronal L-type (Cav1.2) voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Garau, Gianpiero; Magotti, Paola; Heine, Martin; Korotchenko, Svetlana; Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Berezin, Vladimir; Dityatev, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies revealed that L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (Cav1.2 L-VDCCs) are modulated by the neural extracellular matrix backbone, polyanionic glycan hyaluronic acid. Here we used isothermal titration calorimetry and screened a set of peptides derived from the extracellular domains of Cav1.2α1 to identify putative binding sites between the channel and hyaluronic acid or another class of polyanionic glycans, such as heparin/heparan sulfates. None of the tested peptides showed detectable interaction with hyaluronic acid, but two peptides derived from the first pore-forming domain of Cav1.2α1 subunit bound to heparin. At 25 °C the binding of the peptide P7 (MGKMHKTCYN) was at ~50 μM, and that of the peptide P8 (GHGRQCQNGTVCKPGWDGPKHG) was at ~21 μM. The Cav1.2α1 first pore forming segment that contained both peptides maintained a high affinity for heparin (~23 μM), integrating their enthalpic and entropic binding contributions. Interaction between heparin and recombinant as well as native full-length neuronal Cav1.2α1 channels was confirmed using the heparin-agarose pull down assay. Whole cell patch clamp recordings in HEK293 cells transfected with neuronal Cav1.2 channels revealed that enzymatic digestion of highly sulfated heparan sulfates with heparinase 1 affects neither voltage-dependence of channel activation nor the level of steady state inactivation, but did speed up channel inactivation. Treatment of hippocampal cultures with heparinase 1 reduced the firing rate and led to appearance of long-lasting bursts in the same manner as treatment with the inhibitor of L-VDCC diltiazem. Thus, heparan sulfate proteoglycans may bind to and regulate L-VDCC inactivation and network activity.

  12. ATP hydrolysis is critically required for function of CaV1.3 channels in cochlear inner hair cells via fueling Ca2+ clearance.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Simon; Krinner, Stefanie; Wong, Aaron B; Moser, Tobias; Pangršič, Tina

    2014-05-14

    Sound encoding is mediated by Ca(2+) influx-evoked release of glutamate at the ribbon synapse of inner hair cells. Here we studied the role of ATP in this process focusing on Ca(2+) current through CaV1.3 channels and Ca(2+) homeostasis in mouse inner hair cells. Patch-clamp recordings and Ca(2+) imaging demonstrate that hydrolyzable ATP is essential to maintain synaptic Ca(2+) influx in inner hair cells via fueling Ca(2+)-ATPases to avoid an increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and subsequent Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent inactivation of CaV1.3 channels.

  13. In situ expression of cytokines in human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoffen, E.; Van Wichen, D.; Stuij, I.; De Jonge, N.; Klöpping, C.; Lahpor, J.; Van Den Tweel, J.; Gmelig-Meyling, F.; De Weger, R.

    1996-01-01

    Although allograft rejection, the major complication of human organ transplantation, has been extensively studied, little is known about the exact cellular localization of the cytokine expression inside the graft during rejection. Therefore, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to study local cytokine mRNA and protein expression in human heart allografts, in relation to the phenotypical characteristics of the cellular infiltrate. Clear expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-9, and IL-10 and weak expression for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was detected in biopsies exhibiting high rejection grades (grade 3A/B). Also at lower grades of rejection, mRNA for IL-6 and IL-9 was present. Some mRNA for IL-1 beta, TNF-beta, and interferon (IFN)-gamma was detected in only a few biopsies. Using immunohistochemistry, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-10 protein was detected in biopsies with high rejection grades, whereas few cells expressed IL-6, IL-8, and IFN-gamma. In biopsies with lower grades of rejection, a weaker expression of these cytokines was observed. IL-4 was hardly detected in any of the biopsies. The level of IL-12 expression was equal in all biopsies. Although mRNA expression of several cytokines was expressed at a low level compared with the protein level of those cytokines, there was a good correlation between localization of cytokine mRNA and protein. Expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma was mainly detected in lymphocytes. IL-3, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 were not detected or not only detected in lymphocytes but also in other stromal elements (eg, macrophages). Macrophage production of IL-3 and IL-12 was confirmed by immunofluorescent double labeling with CD68. We conclude that cardiac allograft rejection is not simply regulated by T helper cell cytokine production, but other intragraft elements contribute considerably to this process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8952534

  14. Kidney-induced cardiac allograft tolerance in miniature swine is dependent on MHC-matching of donor cardiac and renal parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Madariaga, M L; Michel, S G; La Muraglia, G M; Sekijima, M; Villani, V; Leonard, D A; Powell, H J; Kurtz, J M; Farkash, E A; Colvin, R B; Allan, J S; Cetrulo, C L; Huang, C A; Sachs, D H; Yamada, K; Madsen, J C

    2015-06-01

    Kidney allografts possess the ability to enable a short course of immunosuppression to induce tolerance of themselves and of cardiac allografts across a full-MHC barrier in miniature swine. However, the renal element(s) responsible for kidney-induced cardiac allograft tolerance (KICAT) are unknown. Here we investigated whether MHC disparities between parenchyma versus hematopoietic-derived "passenger" cells of the heart and kidney allografts affected KICAT. Heart and kidney allografts were co-transplanted into MHC-mismatched recipients treated with high-dose tacrolimus for 12 days. Group 1 animals (n = 3) received kidney and heart allografts fully MHC-mismatched to each other and to the recipient. Group 2 animals (n = 3) received kidney and heart allografts MHC-matched to each other but MHC-mismatched to the recipient. Group 3 animals (n = 3) received chimeric kidney allografts whose parenchyma was MHC-mismatched to the donor heart. Group 4 animals (n = 3) received chimeric kidney allografts whose passenger leukocytes were MHC-mismatched to the donor heart. Five of six heart allografts in Groups 1 and 3 rejected <40 days. In contrast, heart allografts in Groups 2 and 4 survived >150 days without rejection (p < 0.05). These data demonstrate that KICAT requires MHC-matching between kidney allograft parenchyma and heart allografts, suggesting that cells intrinsic to the kidney enable cardiac allograft tolerance.

  15. Immune response to nonspecific and altered tissue antigens in soft tissue allografts.

    PubMed

    Pinkowski, J L; Rodrigo, J J; Sharkey, N A; Vasseur, P B

    1996-05-01

    Soft tissue allografts have many uses in orthopaedic surgery, including knee ligament reconstruction, hand tendon surgery, shoulder instability, and rotator cuff reconstruction. The predictable biologic incorporation of soft tissue allografts without rejection or fear of disease transmission continues to be a goal of basic science researchers. A review of the current knowledge if the immune system response to donor specific, nonspecific, and altered tissue antigens in soft tissue or tendon allografts is presented. An in vitro study was done in an attempt to decrease immunogenicity of a frozen bone-ligament graft by adding irrigation with Betadine scrub solution and hydrogen peroxide to the conventional storage process of freezing. Although the irrigation with cytotoxic agents would undoubtedly further decrease immunogenicity, it also decreased stiffness and maximum load by 15%. Whether this decreased strength and stiffness would compromise the incorporation and long term success of soft tissue allografts would need to be studied by in vitro experiments.

  16. Cadmium tolerance and accumulation of Althaea rosea Cav. and its potential as a hyperaccumulator under chemical enhancement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia Nv; Zhou, Qi Xing; Wang, Song; Sun, Ting

    2009-02-01

    The role of ornamental plants has drawn much attention as the urban pollution levels exacerbate. Althaea rosea Cav. had showed its strong tolerance and accumulation ability of Cd in our previous work, thus, the effects of ethylenediamine triacetic acid (EDTA), ethylenegluatarotriacetic acid (EGTA) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on its Cd phytoremediation capacity were further investigated in this work. It reconfirmed that the species had strong tolerance and accumulation ability of Cd. Particularly, the species can be regarded as a potential Cd-hyperaccumulator through applying chemical agents. However, different chelators and surfactants had great differences in affecting hyperaccumulating characteristics of the species. EGTA and SDS could not only increase the dry biomass of the plants, but also promote Cd accumulation in shoots and roots. On the contrary, EDTA was toxic to the species by restraining the growth of plants, although it could promote Cd accumulation in shoots and roots of the plants to a certain extent. Thus, EGTA and SDS were effective in enhancing phytoremediation with Althaea rosea Cav. for Cd contaminated soils, while EDTA is ineffective in this regard. PMID:18259884

  17. A rare schizophrenia risk variant of CACNA1I disrupts CaV3.3 channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, A.; Hope, J.; Allen, A.; Yorgan, V.; Lipscombe, D.; Pan, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    CACNA1I is a candidate schizophrenia risk gene. It encodes the pore-forming human CaV3.3 α1 subunit, a subtype of voltage-gated calcium channel that contributes to T-type currents. Recently, two de novo missense variations, T797M and R1346H, of hCaV3.3 were identified in individuals with schizophrenia. Here we show that R1346H, but not T797M, is associated with lower hCaV3.3 protein levels, reduced glycosylation, and lower membrane surface levels of hCaV3.3 when expressed in human cell lines compared to wild-type. Consistent with our biochemical analyses, whole-cell hCaV3.3 currents in cells expressing the R1346H variant were ~50% of those in cells expressing WT hCaV3.3, and neither R1346H nor T797M altered channel biophysical properties. Employing the NEURON simulation environment, we found that reducing hCaV3.3 current densities by 22% or more eliminates rebound bursting in model thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) neurons. Our analyses suggest that a single copy of Chr22: 39665939G > A CACNA1I has the capacity to disrupt CaV3.3 channel-dependent functions, including rebound bursting in TRN neurons, with potential implications for schizophrenia pathophysiology. PMID:27756899

  18. Cadmium tolerance and accumulation of Althaea rosea Cav. and its potential as a hyperaccumulator under chemical enhancement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia Nv; Zhou, Qi Xing; Wang, Song; Sun, Ting

    2009-02-01

    The role of ornamental plants has drawn much attention as the urban pollution levels exacerbate. Althaea rosea Cav. had showed its strong tolerance and accumulation ability of Cd in our previous work, thus, the effects of ethylenediamine triacetic acid (EDTA), ethylenegluatarotriacetic acid (EGTA) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on its Cd phytoremediation capacity were further investigated in this work. It reconfirmed that the species had strong tolerance and accumulation ability of Cd. Particularly, the species can be regarded as a potential Cd-hyperaccumulator through applying chemical agents. However, different chelators and surfactants had great differences in affecting hyperaccumulating characteristics of the species. EGTA and SDS could not only increase the dry biomass of the plants, but also promote Cd accumulation in shoots and roots. On the contrary, EDTA was toxic to the species by restraining the growth of plants, although it could promote Cd accumulation in shoots and roots of the plants to a certain extent. Thus, EGTA and SDS were effective in enhancing phytoremediation with Althaea rosea Cav. for Cd contaminated soils, while EDTA is ineffective in this regard.

  19. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  20. Arthroscopic capsule reconstruction in the hip using iliotibial band allograft.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Christiano A C; Sawyer, Gregory A; Fukui, Kiyokazu; Briggs, Karen K; Philippon, Marc J

    2015-02-01

    The hip capsule has been identified as an important static stabilizer of the hip joint. Despite the intrinsic bony stability of the hip socket, the capsule plays a key role in hip stability, particularly at the extremes of motion, and the iliofemoral ligament is the most important stabilizer in extension and external rotation. Patients who do not undergo capsular closure or plication may continue to complain of hip pain and dysfunction postoperatively, likely because of microinstability or muscle invagination into the capsular defect, and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging or magnetic resonance arthrography will identify the capsular defect. Seen primarily in the revision setting, capsular defects can cause recurrent stress at the chondrolabral junction. An attempt at secondary closure can be challenging because of capsular limb adherence to the surrounding soft tissues. Therefore reconstruction may be the only possible surgical solution for this problem. We describe our new surgical technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using iliotibial band allograft.

  1. Arthroscopic capsule reconstruction in the hip using iliotibial band allograft.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Christiano A C; Sawyer, Gregory A; Fukui, Kiyokazu; Briggs, Karen K; Philippon, Marc J

    2015-02-01

    The hip capsule has been identified as an important static stabilizer of the hip joint. Despite the intrinsic bony stability of the hip socket, the capsule plays a key role in hip stability, particularly at the extremes of motion, and the iliofemoral ligament is the most important stabilizer in extension and external rotation. Patients who do not undergo capsular closure or plication may continue to complain of hip pain and dysfunction postoperatively, likely because of microinstability or muscle invagination into the capsular defect, and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging or magnetic resonance arthrography will identify the capsular defect. Seen primarily in the revision setting, capsular defects can cause recurrent stress at the chondrolabral junction. An attempt at secondary closure can be challenging because of capsular limb adherence to the surrounding soft tissues. Therefore reconstruction may be the only possible surgical solution for this problem. We describe our new surgical technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using iliotibial band allograft. PMID:25973378

  2. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis recurrence in the renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Leca, Nicolae

    2014-09-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) represents a common histologic pattern of glomerular injury associated with a multitude of disease mechanisms. The etiology of FSGS is often classified into primary (idiopathic) and secondary forms in response to genetic abnormalities, infections, toxins, and systemic disorders that lead to adaptive changes, glomerular hyperfiltration, and proteinuria. Our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for FSGS was substantially enhanced in recent years because of major advances in the cell biology of the podocyte and parietal epithelial cell. Recurrence of FSGS occurs mainly in its primary form and is only rarely described in secondary forms. The re-enactment of pathologic mechanisms of FSGS as recurrent disease after kidney transplantation represents a biologic experiment that can provide unique insight. Nonetheless, recurrent FSGS remains a notable clinical problem that correlates with poorer renal allograft outcomes. This is the focus of this particular review, concentrating on the most recent developments.

  3. Glomerular thrombi in renal allografts associated with cyclosporin treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Neild, G H; Reuben, R; Hartley, R B; Cameron, J S

    1985-01-01

    We have found glomerular capillary thrombi or afferent arteriolar thrombosis in eight renal biopsy specimens from seven renal allograft recipients. All patients were receiving cyclosporin and prednisolone. Biopsies were performed either routinely one and four weeks after transplantation or during periods of renal dysfunction. None of the patients whose biopsy material contained glomerular thrombi was considered, in retrospect, to have been undergoing rejection at the time of biopsy. Thrombi consisted of finely granular material partially obstructing glomerular capillaries. By light microscopy the staining characteristics of the thrombi were compatible with platelet-fibrin aggregates, and this was confirmed by immunoperoxidase examination. Such thrombi have not previously been seen in biopsy material from patients treated with prednisolone and azathioprine, except rarely associated with acute vascular injection. In none of these patients was there haematological evidence of the haemolytic uraemic syndrome as has been reported in bone marrow recipients treated with cyclosporin. Images PMID:3882763

  4. Osteoarticular Allograft Reconstruction for an Angiosarcoma of the Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Galanopoulos, John; Vottis, Christos; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Palmerini, Emanuela; Kokkalis, Zinon T

    2016-01-01

    Angiosarcoma of bone is a rare high-grade malignant vascular tumor accounting for <1% of malignant bone tumors. Tumor location in the distal radius is very rare. Complete surgical resection with limb salvage surgery or amputation is essential for the outcome of the patient. However, the literature is vague regarding the best surgical approach for resection of the distal radius and the optimal reconstruction option after a bone tumor resection. Several reconstruction techniques have been described, varying from arthrodesis to arthroplasties. In this article, we present a report of a patient with angiosarcoma of the distal radius treated with complete resection and reconstruction with a distal radius osteoarticular allograft. We discuss the advantages and the limitations of this surgical technique for the distal radius. PMID:27649764

  5. Recurrent Plasmacytomas after Allografting in a Patient with Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Stawis, Allen N.; Maennle, Diane; Festuccia, Moreno; Uddin, Zia; Bruno, Benedetto

    2012-01-01

    Extramedullary recurrence in multiple myeloma patients has been reported after both autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and, more recently, after treatment with so-called new drugs with potent antimyeloma activity. Only a very few sizable reports focused on its clinical presentation and its incidence, which may be highly underestimated, and most observations are based on single patients reported from several institutions. Given the unusual sites of recurrence, diagnosis may be rather difficult and delayed treatment may play a relevant role in prognosis. Here we report a case of a myeloma patient, initially treated with an allograft, who enjoyed an eleven-year disease-free remission with very good quality of life. She eventually relapsed first with an extramedullary plasmacytoma in the breast and, two years later, with a right atrial cardiac mass. PMID:23326271

  6. Nerve Allografts Supplemented with Schwann Cells Overexpressing GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Santosa, Katherine B.; Jesuraj, Nithya J.; Viader, Andreu; MacEwan, Matthew; Newton, Piyaraj; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We sought to determine if supplementation of acellular nerve allografts (ANAs) with Schwann Cells overexpressing GDNF (G-SCs) would enhance functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury. Methods SCs expanded in vitro were infected with a lentiviral vector to induce GDNF overexpression. Wild type-SCs (WT-SCs) and G-SCs were seeded into ANAs used to repair a 14mm nerve gap defect. Animals were harvested after 6 and 12 weeks for histomorphometric and muscle force analysis. Results At 6 weeks, histomorphometry revealed that ANAs supplemented with G-SCs promoted similar regeneration compared to the isograft at midgraft. However, G-SCs failed to promote regeneration into the distal stump. At 12 weeks, ANAs with G-SCs had lower maximum and specific force production compared to controls. Discussion The combined results suggest that consistent overexpression of GDNF by G-SCs trapped axons in the graft and prevented functional regeneration. PMID:23169341

  7. Long-term Resolution of Blinding Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy with Recurrent Bilateral Central Involvement by Low-dose Oral Eplerenone Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bialasiewicz, Alexander Arthur; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud; Shenoy, Radha; Barman, Manish

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old male presented with serous retinal detachment over 3 months in his right eye. His left eye was blind due to retinal pigment epithelium detachment since 1997 with atrophy of the neurosensory retina. Fluorescein angiography had previously shown bilateral polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) confirmed PCV with central involvement. The patient underwent intravitreal injections of 6x Lucentis, 4x Avastin and one injection of aflibercept. PCV recurred from 1 to 4 months after each treatment. The patient had history of stroke, hypertension, and atrial fibrillation and was started on oral eplerenone 25 mg/day in October 2014, which resulted in a long-term ongoing complete retinal reattachment. OCT ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers showed full recovery of the fovea in the right eye and irreversible in the left eye. Low-dose eplerenone may resolve recalcitrant PCV with central involvement. The duration of treatment remains uncertain.

  8. Long-term Resolution of Blinding Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy with Recurrent Bilateral Central Involvement by Low-dose Oral Eplerenone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bialasiewicz, Alexander Arthur; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud; Shenoy, Radha; Barman, Manish

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old male presented with serous retinal detachment over 3 months in his right eye. His left eye was blind due to retinal pigment epithelium detachment since 1997 with atrophy of the neurosensory retina. Fluorescein angiography had previously shown bilateral polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) confirmed PCV with central involvement. The patient underwent intravitreal injections of 6x Lucentis, 4x Avastin and one injection of aflibercept. PCV recurred from 1 to 4 months after each treatment. The patient had history of stroke, hypertension, and atrial fibrillation and was started on oral eplerenone 25 mg/day in October 2014, which resulted in a long-term ongoing complete retinal reattachment. OCT ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers showed full recovery of the fovea in the right eye and irreversible in the left eye. Low-dose eplerenone may resolve recalcitrant PCV with central involvement. The duration of treatment remains uncertain. PMID:27162459

  9. Cavβ2 transcription start site variants modulate calcium handling in newborn rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Cristian; Hermosilla, Tamara; Morales, Danna; Encina, Matías; Torres-Díaz, Leandro; Díaz, Pablo; Sarmiento, Daniela; Simon, Felipe; Varela, Diego

    2015-12-01

    In the heart, the main pathway for calcium influx is mediated by L-type calcium channels, a multi-subunit complex composed of the pore-forming subunit CaV1.2 and the auxiliary subunits CaVα2δ1 and CaVβ2. To date, five distinct CaVβ2 transcriptional start site (TSS) variants (CaVβ2a-e) varying only in the composition and length of the N-terminal domain have been described, each of them granting distinct biophysical properties to the L-type current. However, the physiological role of these variants in Ca(2+) handling in the native tissue has not been explored. Our results show that four of these variants are present in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. The contribution of those CaVβ2 TSS variants on endogenous L-type current and Ca(2+) handling was explored by adenoviral-mediated overexpression of each CaVβ2 variant in cultured newborn rat cardiomyocytes. As expected, all CaVβ2 TSS variants increased L-type current density and produced distinctive changes on L-type calcium channel (LTCC) current activation and inactivation kinetics. The characteristics of the induced calcium transients were dependent on the TSS variant overexpressed. Moreover, the amplitude of the calcium transients varied depending on the subunit involved, being higher in cardiomyocytes transduced with CaVβ2a and smaller in CaVβ2d. Interestingly, the contribution of Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+) release on total calcium transients, as well as the sarcoplasmic calcium content, was found to be TSS-variant-dependent. Remarkably, determination of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance and cell size change indicates that CaVβ2 TSS variants modulate the cardiomyocyte hypertrophic state. In summary, we demonstrate that expression of individual CaVβ2 TSS variants regulates calcium handling in cardiomyocytes and, consequently, has significant repercussion in the development of hypertrophy.

  10. Cavβ2 transcription start site variants modulate calcium handling in newborn rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Cristian; Hermosilla, Tamara; Morales, Danna; Encina, Matías; Torres-Díaz, Leandro; Díaz, Pablo; Sarmiento, Daniela; Simon, Felipe; Varela, Diego

    2015-12-01

    In the heart, the main pathway for calcium influx is mediated by L-type calcium channels, a multi-subunit complex composed of the pore-forming subunit CaV1.2 and the auxiliary subunits CaVα2δ1 and CaVβ2. To date, five distinct CaVβ2 transcriptional start site (TSS) variants (CaVβ2a-e) varying only in the composition and length of the N-terminal domain have been described, each of them granting distinct biophysical properties to the L-type current. However, the physiological role of these variants in Ca(2+) handling in the native tissue has not been explored. Our results show that four of these variants are present in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. The contribution of those CaVβ2 TSS variants on endogenous L-type current and Ca(2+) handling was explored by adenoviral-mediated overexpression of each CaVβ2 variant in cultured newborn rat cardiomyocytes. As expected, all CaVβ2 TSS variants increased L-type current density and produced distinctive changes on L-type calcium channel (LTCC) current activation and inactivation kinetics. The characteristics of the induced calcium transients were dependent on the TSS variant overexpressed. Moreover, the amplitude of the calcium transients varied depending on the subunit involved, being higher in cardiomyocytes transduced with CaVβ2a and smaller in CaVβ2d. Interestingly, the contribution of Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+) release on total calcium transients, as well as the sarcoplasmic calcium content, was found to be TSS-variant-dependent. Remarkably, determination of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance and cell size change indicates that CaVβ2 TSS variants modulate the cardiomyocyte hypertrophic state. In summary, we demonstrate that expression of individual CaVβ2 TSS variants regulates calcium handling in cardiomyocytes and, consequently, has significant repercussion in the development of hypertrophy. PMID:26265381

  11. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Single Class I MHC-Disparate Cardiac Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Yusuke; Bucy, R. Pat; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Baldwin, William M.; Fairchild, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Murine CCR5−/− recipients produce high titers of antibody to complete MHC-mismatched heart and renal allografts. To study mechanisms of class I MHC antibody-mediated allograft injury, we tested the rejection of heart allografts transgenically expressing a single class I MHC disparity in wild-type C57BL/6 (H-2b) and B6.CCR5−/− recipients. Donor-specific antibody titers in CCR5−/− recipients were 30-fold higher than in wild-type recipients. B6.Kd allografts survived longer than 60 days in wild-type recipients whereas CCR5−/− recipients rejected all allografts within 14 days. Rejection was accompanied by infiltration of CD8 T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages and C4d deposition in the graft capillaries. B6.Kd allografts were rejected by CD8−/−/CCR5−/−, but not μMT−/−/CCR5−/−, recipients indicating the need for antibody but not CD8 T cells. Grafts retrieved at day 10 from CCR5−/− and CD8−/−/CCR5−/− recipients and from RAG-1−/− allograft recipients injected with anti-Kd antibodies expressed high levels of perforin, myeloperoxidase and CCL5 mRNA. These studies indicate that the continual production of anti-donor class I MHC antibody can mediate allograft rejection, that donor-reactive CD8 T cells synergize with the antibody to contribute to rejection, and that expression of three biomarkers during rejection can occur in the absence of this CD8 T cell activity. PMID:22578247

  12. Is Duplex-Ultrasound a useful tool in defining rejection episodes in composite tissue allograft transplants?

    PubMed

    Loizides, Alexander; Kronberger, Irmgard-Elisabeth; Plaikner, Michaela; Gruber, Hannes

    2015-12-01

    Immunologic reactions in transplanted organs are in more or less all allograft patients detectable: clear parameters exist as e.g. in renal transplants where the clearance power reduces by rejection. On the contrary, in composite tissue allografts clear and objective indicators stating a rejection episode lack. We present the case of a hand-transplanted subject with signs of acute transplant rejection diagnosed by means of Duplex Ultrasound and confirmed by biopsy.

  13. Editorial Commentary: Iliotibial Band Allograft Shows Promise for Arthroscopic Hip Labral Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic hip labral reconstruction using iliotibial band allograft in a modified front-to-back technique results in improved outcomes after 2-year follow-up. The authors' reasoning for reconstruction are reminiscent of similar arguments for restoring hoop stresses in knee meniscal surgery. Results are comparable to reported outcomes of labral repair, and allograft is particularly indicated for severe labral damage when repair is not possible. Don't miss the related technical note with video in Arthroscopy Techniques.

  14. Iliac Crest Bone Graft versus Local Autograft or Allograft for Lumbar Spinal Fusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, Alexander; Brodke, Darrel S.; Youssef, Jim A.; Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Dettori, Joseph R.; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S. Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To compare the effectiveness and safety between iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) and local autologous bone and allograft in the lumbar spine. Methods  A systematic search of multiple major medical reference databases identified studies evaluating spinal fusion in patients with degenerative joint disease using ICBG, local autograft, or allograft in the thoracolumbar spine. Results  Six comparative studies met our inclusion criteria. A “low” strength of the overall body of evidence suggested no difference in fusion percentages in the lumbar spine between local autograft and ICBG. We found no difference in fusion percentages based on low evidence comparing allograft with ICBG autograft. There were no differences in pain or functional results comparing local autograft or allograft with ICBG autograft. Donor site pain and hematoma/seroma occurred more frequently in ICBG autograft group for lumbar fusion procedures. There was low evidence around the estimate of patients with donor site pain following ICBG harvesting, ranging from 16.7 to 20%. With respect to revision, low evidence demonstrated no difference between allograft and ICBG autograft. There was no evidence comparing patients receiving allograft with local autograft for fusion, pain, functional, and safety outcomes. Conclusion  In the lumbar spine, ICBG, local autograft, and allograft have similar effectiveness in terms of fusion rates, pain scores, and functional outcomes. However, ICBG is associated with an increased risk for donor site-related complications. Significant limitations exist in the available literature when comparing ICBG, local autograft, and allograft for lumbar fusion, and thus ICBG versus other fusion methods necessitates further investigation. PMID:27556001

  15. Editorial Commentary: Iliotibial Band Allograft Shows Promise for Arthroscopic Hip Labral Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic hip labral reconstruction using iliotibial band allograft in a modified front-to-back technique results in improved outcomes after 2-year follow-up. The authors' reasoning for reconstruction are reminiscent of similar arguments for restoring hoop stresses in knee meniscal surgery. Results are comparable to reported outcomes of labral repair, and allograft is particularly indicated for severe labral damage when repair is not possible. Don't miss the related technical note with video in Arthroscopy Techniques. PMID:26743407

  16. Guided bone regeneration using an allograft material: review and case presentations.

    PubMed

    Bhola, Monish; Kinaia, Bassam M; Chahine, Katy

    2008-10-01

    Post extraction sites may have residual ridge deformities with insufficient bone present for future implant placement. This presents a challenge to the clinician attempting to obtain optimum results. To predictably augment these areas and obtain aesthetically pleasing results, bone grafting may be required. Guided bone regeneration with an allograft material is a predictable means by which to solve this challenge. This article describes three case presentations utilizing on allograft material for bone regeneration prior to implant placement.

  17. Cyclosporine-induced renal dysfunction in human renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Kiberd, B A

    1989-12-01

    Cyclosporine-treated renal allograft recipients frequently suffer CsA-related nephrotoxicity and hypertension. This study demonstrates that glomerular filtration rate is reduced acutely by 13% (P less than 0.02) and renal vascular resistance increased by 30% (P less than 0.05), immediately after patients take their CsA dose. The reduction in GFR is directly related to their trough CsA level (r = 0.82; P less than 0.01). The lower the trough CsA level the greater the fall in GFR after the CsA dose. Plasma renin activity does not increase after the CsA dose (pre-CsA 0.6 +/- 0.2 ng/L/sec vs. post-CsA 0.4 +/- 0.1 ng/L/sec; P = NS), and therefore cannot be responsible for the reduction in renal function. Short-term nifedipine treatment is effective in preventing the acute reduction in GFR (P less than 0.05). This occurred despite no apparent effect of nifedipine in altering trough or post-dose CsA levels. Furthermore nifedipine was effective in lowering both the mean arterial blood pressure (109 mmHg to 94 mmHg; P less than 0.01) and the elevated renal vascular resistance (25% reduction; P less than 0.02) observed in these patients. These results suggest that nifedipine may be a suitable agent for limiting acute CsA nephrotoxicity and for treating CsA-associated hypertension in renal allograft recipients.

  18. Molecular profile of osteoprogenitor cells seeded on allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kierann E; Huang, Zhinong; Ma, Ting; Irani, Afraaz; Lane Smith, R; Goodman, Stuart B

    2011-10-01

    In order to optimize and modulate bone formation it is essential to understand the expression patterns of key bone-specific growth factors, as osteoprogenitor cells undergo the processes of proliferation, differentiation and maturation. This study reports the sequential expression of bone-related growth and transcription factors when bone marrow-derived osteoprogenitor cells from C57BL mice were cultured on allograft bone discs. Mineralization and osteocalcin protein levels were used to track osteogenic differentiation and maturation. Bone-related growth factors, such as Bmp-2, Bmp-7, Ctnnb-1, Fgf-2, Igf-1, Vegf-a and Tgf-β1, and transcription factors, such as Runx-2 and osteocalcin, were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Total density of mineralized bone was significantly increased 7.6 ± 0.7% in allografts cultured with cells, compared with a 0.5 ± 2.0% increase in the controls without cells (p < 0.01). Osteocalcin protein levels peaked at day 4. Protein expression showed peaks of BMP-2 and TGF-β1 on day 2, with VEGF peaking on day 8, and IGF-1 decreasing on day 2. mRNA for Pdgf-a peaked on day 2; Bmp-2 on days 4 and 16; Ctnnb-1 on days 8 and 20; Vegf-a, Fgf-2, Runx-2 and Igf-1 on day 12; Tgf-β1 on day 16; and Pdgf-b on day 20. Osteogenic growth factors correlated with Runx-2 and Ctnnb-1, whereas a predominant vascular growth factor, Vegf-a, did not follow this pattern. Specific bone-related genes and proteins were expressed in a time-dependent manner when osteoprogenitor cells were cultured on cortico-cancellous bone discs in vitro. PMID:21953868

  19. Impaction grafting with morsellised allograft and tricalcium phosphate-hydroxyapatite: incorporation within ovine metaphyseal bone defects.

    PubMed

    Pratt, J N J; Griffon, D J; Dunlop, D G; Smith, N; Howie, C R

    2002-08-01

    An ovine model was used to investigate the in vivo properties of impacted tricalcium phosphate-hydroxyapatite (TCP-HA) aggregates, varying in chemical composition (ratio of TCP to HA) and particle size distribution (8 versus 3 particle size ranges). All pellets were impacted to a standard compactive effort. Eight sheep underwent implantation of pellets in 4 metaphyseal defects in both rear limbs. Treatment groups consisted of: (1) allograft (clinical control). (2) 50/50 allograft/80% HA/20% TCP in 8 particle size ranges, (3) 50/50 allograft/80% TCP/20% HA in 8 sizes and (4) 50/50 allograft/80% HA/20% TCP in only 3 sizes of particles. Healing of defects was evaluated at 14 weeks with computed tomography, histology and histomorphometry. The computer tomography (CT) density measured in all defects containing synthetic agents was higher than in defects filled with allograft alone (p<0.01). Defects containing 8 sizes of 80% HA/ 20% TCP granules (group 2) achieved lower histological scores and contained less bone than the clinical control (p<0.05), whereas groups 3 and 4 did not differ from the control. Although all synthetic agents were osteoconductive, our results suggest that increasing the ratio of TCP over HA and limiting the number of particle size ranges to 3 instead of 8 improve the performance of impacted aggregates as graft expanders. Evaluation under loading conditions of morsellised allograft expanded with 80% TCP/20% HA (BoneSave) in 3 particle size ranges is warranted.

  20. The impact of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies on late kidney allograft failure.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Hill, Gary S; Jordan, Stanley C

    2012-06-01

    Despite improvements in outcomes of renal transplantation, kidney allograft loss remains substantial, and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and costs. Identifying the pathologic pathways responsible for allograft loss, and the attendant development of therapeutic interventions, will be one of the guiding future objectives of transplant medicine. One of the most important advances of the past decade has been the demonstration of the destructive power of anti-HLA alloantibodies and their association with antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Compelling evidence exists to show that donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) are largely responsible for the chronic deterioration of allografts, a condition previously attributed to calcineurin inhibitor toxicity and chronic allograft nephropathy. The emergence of sensitive techniques to detect DSAs, together with advances in the assessment of graft pathology, have expanded the spectrum of what constitutes ABMR. Today, subtler forms of rejection--such as indolent ABMR, C4d-negative ABMR, and transplant arteriopathy--are seen in which DSAs exert a marked pathological effect. In addition, arteriosclerosis, previously thought to be a bystander lesion related to the vicissitudes of aging, is accelerated in ABMR. Advances in our understanding of the pathological significance of DSAs and ABMR show their primacy in the mediation of chronic allograft destruction. Therapies aimed at B cells, plasma cells and antibodies will be important therapeutic options to improve the length and quality of kidney allograft survival.

  1. Ablation of irreversibly rejected renal allograft by embolization with absolute ethanol: a new clinical application.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, V; Díaz, F; Perez, L; Domínguez, M L; Machado, M; Rodríguez, A; González-Posada, J; Hernández, D; de Bonis, E; Torres, A

    1993-10-01

    Surgical allograft nephrectomy has been the conventional therapy for removing failed kidney allografts when clinical manifestations of graft intolerance appear. However, removal of a transplanted kidney is an extensive surgical procedure. On the other hand, transcatheter vascular embolization (TVE) has proven useful in ablating organs and could be applied to renal transplant ablation. The aim of this study was to present the results of TVE for the treatment of graft intolerance syndrome (GIS) in failed allograft kidneys. Transcatheter vascular embolization was performed in 14 allograft recipients (33 +/- 13 years of age; 10 men and four women) affected by GIS after irreversible kidney allograft failure. Graft intolerance syndrome was diagnosed by fever (93%), hematuria (50%), graft pain (36%), flu-like symptoms (29%), and increased graft size (29%). Absolute ethanol (0.1 mL/kg body weight) was injected in the allograft artery, and in seven patients a stainless steel coil was left in the renal artery following ethanol injection. All patients showed clinical disappearance of the GIS. No major complication occurred, although a postembolization syndrome of pain, fever, hematuria, numbness, and paresthesia of the affected area appeared in 11 of the 14 patients. After 2 to 56 months of follow-up no late complications occurred, with the exception of a graft abscess formation in one patient after 6 months of embolization. Subsequent transplantectomy was uneventful. In conclusion, TVE is a safe and effective method for kidney graft ablation, and it may become an alternative treatment for GIS following irreversible rejection.

  2. Interplay between immune responses to HLA and non-HLA self-antigens in allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Angaswamy, Nataraju; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Sarma, Nayan J; Subramanian, Vijay; Klein, Christina; Wellen, Jason; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C; Mohanakumar, T

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies strongly suggest an increasing role for immune responses against self-antigens (Ags) which are not encoded by the major histocompatibility complex in the immunopathogenesis of allograft rejection. Although, improved surgical techniques coupled with improved methods to detect and avoid sensitization against donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) have improved the immediate and short term function of transplanted organs. However, acute and chronic rejection still remains a vexing problem for the long term function of the transplanted organ. Immediately following organ transplantation, several factors both immune and non immune mechanisms lead to the development of local inflammatory milieu which sets the stage for allograft rejection. Traditionally, development of antibodies (Abs) against mismatched donor HLA have been implicated in the development of Ab mediated rejection. However, recent studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that development of humoral and cellular immune responses against non-HLA self-Ags may contribute in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection. There are reports demonstrating that immune responses to self-Ags especially Abs to the self-Ags as well as cellular immune responses especially through IL17 has significant pro-fibrotic properties leading to chronic allograft failure. This review summarizes recent studies demonstrating the role for immune responses to self-Ags in allograft immunity leading to rejection as well as present recent evidence suggesting there is interplay between allo- and autoimmunity leading to allograft dysfunction.

  3. The appropriateness of swab cultures for the release of human allograft tissue.

    PubMed

    Ronholdt, Chad J; Bogdansky, Simon

    2005-08-01

    Surgeries utilizing human allograft tissues have increased dramatically in recent years. With this increase has come a greater reliance on the use of swab culturing to assess allograft tissues for microbial contamination prior to distribution. In contrast to the typical industrial microbiological uses for swabs, the tissue banking industry has relied on swab cultures as a sterility release method for allograft tissues. It has been reported in the literature that swabs have limitations, both in sensitivity and reproducibility, so their suitability as a final sterility release method was evaluated in this study. Two different swab-culturing systems were evaluated (COPAN, EZ Culturette) using human allograft tissues spiked with low levels of multiple bacterial and fungal microorganisms. The average microbial recoveries for all challenge microorganisms for each tissue type and each swab system were calculated. Percent recoveries for each challenge microorganism were also calculated and reported. The results indicated that both swab systems exhibited low and highly variable recoveries from the seeded allograft tissues. Further analysis indicated there was no statistical difference ( proportional, variant=0.05) between the two swab systems. It is the recommendation of the authors that swab culturing not be used to assess relatively low levels of microbial contamination on allografts. Instead, alternative validated microbial detection methods with improved sensitivity and reproducibility should be employed and validated for this critical task. PMID:15973533

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P < 0.001). In the allograft group, use of vascular access started within 7 days in 16 patients (80%), as soon as from the day of surgery in 10 patients. Primary (unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft. PMID:27478338

  5. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Cho, Yong-Pil; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P < 0.001). In the allograft group, use of vascular access started within 7 days in 16 patients (80%), as soon as from the day of surgery in 10 patients. Primary (unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft. PMID:27478338

  6. AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft: a report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rebecca; Josephson, Michelle A; Chang, Anthony; Meehan, Shane M

    2012-04-01

    AA amyloidosis is a disorder characterized by the abnormal formation, accumulation and systemic deposition of fibrillary material that frequently involves the kidney. Recurrent AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft has been documented in patients with tuberculosis, familial Mediterranean fever, ankylosing spondylitis, chronic pyelonephritis and rheumatoid arthritis. De novo AA amyloidosis is rarely described. We report two cases of AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft. Our first case is a 47-year-old male with a history of ankylosing spondylitis who developed end-stage renal disease reportedly from tubulointerstitial nephritis from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent use. A biopsy was never performed. One year after transplantation, AA amyloidosis was identified in the femoral head and 8 years post-transplantation, AA amyloidosis was identified in the renal allograft. He was treated with colchicine and adalimumab and has stable renal function at 1 year-follow-up. Our second case is a 57-year-old male with a long history of intravenous drug use and hepatitis C infection who developed end-stage kidney disease due to AA amyloidosis. Our second patient's course was complicated by renal adenovirus, pulmonary aspergillosis and hepatitis C with AA amyloidosis subsequently being identified in the allograft 2.5 years post-transplantation. Renal allograft function remains stable 4-years post-transplantation. These reports describe clinical and pathologic features of two cases of AA amyloidosis presenting with proteinuria and focal involvement of the renal allograft.

  7. Imaging of cardiac allograft rejection in dogs using indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Addonizio, L.J.; Michler, R.E.; Marboe, C.; Esser, P.E.; Johnson, L.L.; Seldin, D.W.; Gersony, W.M.; Alderson, P.O.; Rose, E.A.; Cannon, P.J.

    1987-03-01

    The acute rejection of cardiac allografts is currently diagnosed by the presence of myocyte necrosis on endomyocardial biopsy. We evaluated the efficacy of noninvasive scintigraphic imaging with indium-111-labeled anticardiac myosin Fab fragments (indium-111 antimyosin) to detect and quantify cardiac allograft rejection. Six dogs that had intrathoracic heterotopic cardiac allograft transplantation were injected with indium-111 antimyosin and planar and single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images were obtained in various stages of acute and subacute rejection. Four dogs had an allograft older than 8 months and had been on long-term immunosuppressive therapy; two dogs had an allograft less than 2 weeks old and were not on immunosuppressive therapy. Count ratios comparing heterotopic with native hearts were calculated from both SPECT images and in vitro scans of excised and sectioned hearts and were compared with the degree of rejection scored by an independent histopathologic review. Indium-111 antimyosin uptake was not visible in planar or SPECT images of native hearts. Faint diffuse uptake was apparent in cardiac allografts during long-term immunosuppression and intense radioactivity was present in hearts with electrocardiographic evidence of rejection. The heterotopic to native heart count ratios in SPECT images correlated significantly with the count ratios in the excised hearts (r = 0.93) and with the histopathologic rejection score (r = 0.97). The distribution of indium-111 antimyosin activity in right and left ventricles corresponded to areas of histopathologic abnormalities.

  8. Comparison of immune response to nerve allograft segments in fetal and adult rabbits: a histological study.

    PubMed

    Ağaoğlu, G; Kayikçioğlu, A; Sargon, M; Erk, Y; Mavili, E

    2000-04-01

    Fetuses, as opposed to adults, are immature immunologically and it has been proved that they can tolerate allograft materials much better than adults. In this study the rejection phenomenon of nerve allografts was compared histologically in fetuses and adults. The study was performed in 60 New Zealand rabbits (30 pregnant and 30 nonpregnant), and allograft nerve segments were obtained from Chinchilla rabbits. The animals were divided into fetal and adult groups. Each group was studied at various time periods. Nerve allografts were placed under the panniculus carnosus in the interscapular region of the fetuses and adults. In both fetal and adult groups, the nerve allograft segments were assessed histologically after 1, 7, and 30 days. The criteria used during the evaluation were the degenerative findings in the myelinated axons (large, medium, and small axons), changes in Schwann's cells, and the quantity of infiltrating cells. The changes were graded microscopically from 0 (no change) to 3 (severe destruction and cellular infiltration). Cellular infiltration was more extensive in the adult groups than in the fetal groups. Earlier fetal groups showed minimal infiltration, but the response became more extensive in the later fetal groups. This is probably related to the removal of the fetuses from their intrauterine environment. When comparing fetal and adult groups, the results were significant (p < 0.05). The fetuses tolerated the nerve allograft segments better than the adults. This may be related to the immature immune system of the fetuses.

  9. Systemic overexpression of matricellular protein CCN1 exacerbates obliterative bronchiolitis in mouse tracheal allografts.

    PubMed

    Raissadati, Alireza; Nykänen, Antti I; Tuuminen, Raimo; Syrjälä, Simo O; Krebs, Rainer; Arnaudova, Ralica; Rouvinen, Eeva; Wang, Xiaomin; Poller, Wolfgang; Lemström, Karl B

    2015-12-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) involves airway epithelial detachment, fibroproliferation, and inflammation, resulting in chronic rejection and transplant failure. Cysteine-rich 61 (CCN1) is an integrin receptor antagonist with a context-dependent role in inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes. We used a mouse tracheal OB model to investigate the role of CCN1 in the development of lung allograft OB. C57Bl/6 mice received a systemic injection of CCN1-expressing adenoviral vectors 2 days prior to subcutaneous implantation of tracheal allografts from major MHC-mismatched BALB/c mice. We treated another group of tracheal allograft recipients with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide to dissect the role of αvβ3-integrin signaling in mediating CCN1 effects in tracheal allografts. Allografts were removed 4 weeks after transplantation and analyzed for luminal occlusion, inflammation, and vasculogenesis. CCN1 overexpression induced luminal occlusion (P < 0.05), fibroproliferation, and smooth muscle cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Selective activation of αvβ3-integrin receptor failed to mimic the actions of CCN1, and blocking failed to inhibit the effects of CCN1 in tracheal allografts. In conclusion, CCN1 exacerbates tracheal OB by enhancing fibroproliferation via an αvβ3-integrin-independent pathway. Further experiments are required to uncover its potentially harmful role in the development of OB after lung transplantation.

  10. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Cho, Yong-Pil; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P < 0.001). In the allograft group, use of vascular access started within 7 days in 16 patients (80%), as soon as from the day of surgery in 10 patients. Primary (unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft.

  11. Increased Risk of Revision after ACL Reconstruction with Soft Tissue Allograft Compared to Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Maletis, Gregory; Chen, Jason; Inacio, Maria Carolina Secorun; Love, Rebecca; Funahashi, Tadashi Ted

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The use of allograft tissue for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) remains controversial. Numerous meta-analysis and systematic reviews of small clinical studies have not found differences between autograft and allograft outcomes but large registry studies have shown an increased risk of revision with allografts. The purpose of this study was to compare the risk of aseptic revision between bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autografts, hamstring tendon autografts and soft tissue allografts. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data was conducted using an US ACLR Registry. A cohort of primary unilateral ACLR cases reconstructed with BPTB autografts, hamstring autografts and soft tissue allografts (from any site) was identified. Aseptic revision was the end point of the study. Type of graft and allograft processing methods (non-processed, <1.8Mrads with and without chemical processing (Allowash or AlloTrue methods), >1.8 Mrads irradiation with and without chemical processing, and chemical processing alone (BioCleanse)) were the exposures of interest evaluated. Time from surgery was evaluated as an effect modifier. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, and race. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard models were employed. Hazard ratios (HR), 95% confidence intervals (CI) are provided. Results: The cohort had 14015 cases, 8924 (63.7%) were male, 6397 (45.6%) were White, 4557 (32.5%) cases used BPTB autograft, 3751 (26.8%) cases used soft tissue allograft and 5707 (40.7%) cases used hamstring autograft. The median age was 34.6 years-old (IQR 24.1-43.2) for allograft cases and 24.3 years-old (IQR 17.7-33.8) for hamstring autograft cases, and 22.0 years-old (IQR 17.6-30.0) for BPTB autograft cases. Compared to hamstring tendon autografts, an increased risk of revision was found in allografts processed with >1.8Mrads without chemical processing after 2.5 years (HR: 3.88 95%CI 1.48-10.12), and >1.8Mrads with

  12. Late aspergilloma of a renal allograft without need for operative management: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shannon, E M; Reid, M J A; Chin-Hong, P

    2016-04-01

    Aspergillus infection localized to the renal allograft is a rare and potentially life-threatening infection and typically requires a combination of operative and medical management. We report the case of a renal allograft aspergilloma in a renal transplant patient presenting 2 years post transplant, successfully managed non-surgically. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient presenting with an allograft aspergilloma so long after transplantation and being successfully managed with antifungal therapy alone.

  13. Lyophilized allografts without pre-treatment with glutaraldehyde are more suitable than cryopreserved allografts for pulmonary artery reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Olmos-Zúãiga, J.R.; Jasso-Victoria, R.; Díaz-Martínez, N.E.; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, M.O.; Sotres-Vega, A.; Heras-Romero, Y.; Baltazares-Lipp, M.; Baltazares-Lipp, M.E.; Santillán-Doherty, P.; Hernández-Jiménez, C.

    2015-01-01

    Various methods are available for preservation of vascular grafts for pulmonary artery (PA) replacement. Lyophilization and cryopreservation reduce antigenicity and prevent thrombosis and calcification in vascular grafts, so both methods can be used to obtain vascular bioprostheses. We evaluated the hemodynamic, gasometric, imaging, and macroscopic and microscopic findings produced by PA reconstruction with lyophilized (LyoPA) grafts and cryopreserved (CryoPA) grafts in dogs. Eighteen healthy crossbred adult dogs of both sexes weighing between 18 and 20 kg were used and divided into three groups of six: group I, PA section and reanastomosis; group II, PA resection and reconstruction with LyoPA allograft; group III, PA resection and reconstruction with CryoPA allograft. Dogs were evaluated 4 weeks after surgery, and the status of the graft and vascular anastomosis were examined macroscopically and microscopically. No clinical, radiologic, or blood-gas abnormalities were observed during the study. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) in group III increased significantly at the end of the study compared with baseline (P=0.02) and final [P=0.007, two-way repeat-measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA)] values. Pulmonary vascular resistance of groups II and III increased immediately after reperfusion and also at the end of the study compared to baseline. The increase shown by group III vs group I was significant only if compared with after surgery and study end (P=0.016 and P=0.005, respectively, two-way RM ANOVA). Microscopically, permeability was reduced by ≤75% in group III. In conclusion, substitution of PAs with LyoPA grafts is technically feasible and clinically promising. PMID:26648092

  14. Resveratrol Ameliorates High Glucose and High-Fat/Sucrose Diet-Induced Vascular Hyperpermeability Involving Cav-1/eNOS Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiao lin; Qu, Wei; Wang, Lin zhi; Huang, Bin qing; Ying, Chen jiang; Sun, Xiu fa; Hao, Li ping

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial hyperpermeability is one of the manifestations of endothelial dysfunction. Resveratrol (Res) is considered to be beneficial in protecting endothelial function. However, currently, the exact protective effect and involved mechanisms of Res on endothelial dysfunction-hyperpermeability have not been completely clarified. The aim of present study is to investigate the effects of Res on amelioration of endothelial hyperpermeability and the role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with a normal or high-fat/sucrose diet (HFS) with or without Res for 13 weeks. HFS and in vitro treatment with high glucose increased hyperpermeability in rat aorta, heart, liver and kidney and cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), respectively, which was attenuated by Res treatment. Application of Res reversed the changes in eNOS and Cav-1 expressions in aorta and heart of rats fed HFS and in BAECs incubated with high glucose. Res stimulated the formation of NO inhibited by high glucose in BAECs. Beta-Cyclodextrin (β-CD), caveolae inhibitor, showed the better beneficial effect than Res alone to up-regulate eNOS phosphorylative levels, while NG-Nitro-77 L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), eNOS inhibitor, had no effect on Cav-1 expression. Our studies suggested that HFS and in vitro treatment with high glucose caused endothelial hyperpermeability, which were ameliorated by Res at least involving Cav-1/eNOS regulation. PMID:25419974

  15. Stantonia pallida (Ashmead)(Hymenoptera: Braconidae) reared from Neomusotima conspurcatalis Warren (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), a classical biological control agent of Lygodium microphyllum (Cav.)R.Br.(Polypodiales: Lygodiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stantonia pallida (Ashmead) sensu Braet and Quicke (2004) and an undetermined species of Cotesia are reported from Neomusotima conspurcatalis Warren, a classical biological control agent of Lygodium microphyllum (Cav.) R. Br. in Florida. They are the first reported parasitoids of N. conspurcatalis. ...

  16. Cav3-type α1T calcium channels mediate transient calcium currents that regulate repetitive firing in Drosophila antennal lobe PNs

    PubMed Central

    Iniguez, Jorge; Schutte, Soleil S.

    2013-01-01

    Projection neurons (PNs), located in the antennal lobe region of the insect brain, play a key role in processing olfactory information. To explore how activity is regulated at the level of single PNs within this central circuit we have recorded from these neurons in adult Drosophila melanogaster brains. Our previous study demonstrated that PNs express voltage-gated calcium currents with a transient and sustained component. We found that the sustained component is mediated by cac gene-encoded Cav2-type channels involved in regulating action potential-independent release of neurotransmitter at excitatory cholinergic synapses. The function of the transient calcium current and the gene encoding the underlying channels, however, were unknown. Here we report that the transient current blocked by prepulse inactivation is sensitive to amiloride, a vertebrate Cav3-type channel blocker. In addition PN-specific RNAi knockdown of α1T, the Drosophila Cav3-type gene, caused a dramatic reduction in the transient current without altering the sustained component. These data demonstrate that the α1T gene encodes voltage-gated calcium channels underlying the amiloride-sensitive transient current. Alterations in evoked firing and spontaneous burst firing in the α1T knockdowns demonstrate that the Cav3-type calcium channels are important in regulating excitability in adult PNs. PMID:23864373

  17. ZC88, a novel N-type calcium channel blocker from 4-amino-piperidine derivatives state-dependent inhibits Cav2.2 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuzhuo; Yang, Lujia; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Dai, Weiwei; Zhang, Cheng; Yong, Zheng; Li, Jin; Zheng, Jianquan

    2015-04-24

    Small molecular inhibitors of Cav2.2 have been reported for the treatment of neuropathic pain; however, low selectivity and side effects limit their further development. In our study, a series of new compounds were designed and synthesized by optimizing the 4-amino-piperidine template. The results show that ZC88 inhibits transiently expressed Cav2.2 in state-dependent manner in oocytes with an IC50 of 0.45 ± 0.09 μM. The steady-state inactivation relationship curve is shifted to more negative potentials for the calcium channels, suggesting that ZC88 blocks inactivated state of the channel. ZC88 does not present any remarkable effects on voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel currents, l-type calcium channel currents, potassium channel and sodium channel currents. Taken together, these in vitro data suggest that ZC88 is a voltage-dependent, subtype-selective Cav2.2 channel inhibitor and can achieve an improved therapeutic window over the relatively state-independent Cav2.2-selective inhibitor, which may have potential to be developed into a novel analgesic agent. PMID:25681549

  18. Combined anti-ages and antioxidant activities of different solvent extracts of Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav (Solanacea) fruits during ripening and related to their phytochemical compositions

    PubMed Central

    Houda, Mejri; Derbré, Séverine; Jedy, Ahmed; Tlili, Nizar; Legault, Jean; Richomme, Pascal; Limam, Ferid; Saidani-Tounsi, Moufida

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are known as key factors for the development of diabetic complications such as retinopathy, cataract as well as atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s diseases. In this context, natural products have been previously identified as promising sources for antioxidant and anti-glycation compounds. The current study focuses on the evaluation of antioxidant and glycation inhibitory activities of different solvent extracts of Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav (Solanaceae) fruits at different ripening stages. The results showed that antioxidant and anti-AGEs activities were significantly influenced by solvents polarities and ripening stages of S. elaeagnifolium Cav. With one exception, methanolic extract of overripe S. elaeagnifolium Cav fruit showed important protective effects against cellular oxidative stress. The aqueous extract showed the highest ABTS+ scavenging ability. Principal component analysis showed that total phenolic and flavonoid contents correlated well with observed antioxidants and anti-glycation activities. These results bring attention to the possible use of S. elaeagnifolium Cav as a valuable source of bioactive compounds exhibiting antioxidant effects and potentially alleviating diabetic complications. PMID:26417319

  19. ZC88, a novel N-type calcium channel blocker from 4-amino-piperidine derivatives state-dependent inhibits Cav2.2 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuzhuo; Yang, Lujia; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Dai, Weiwei; Zhang, Cheng; Yong, Zheng; Li, Jin; Zheng, Jianquan

    2015-04-24

    Small molecular inhibitors of Cav2.2 have been reported for the treatment of neuropathic pain; however, low selectivity and side effects limit their further development. In our study, a series of new compounds were designed and synthesized by optimizing the 4-amino-piperidine template. The results show that ZC88 inhibits transiently expressed Cav2.2 in state-dependent manner in oocytes with an IC50 of 0.45 ± 0.09 μM. The steady-state inactivation relationship curve is shifted to more negative potentials for the calcium channels, suggesting that ZC88 blocks inactivated state of the channel. ZC88 does not present any remarkable effects on voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel currents, l-type calcium channel currents, potassium channel and sodium channel currents. Taken together, these in vitro data suggest that ZC88 is a voltage-dependent, subtype-selective Cav2.2 channel inhibitor and can achieve an improved therapeutic window over the relatively state-independent Cav2.2-selective inhibitor, which may have potential to be developed into a novel analgesic agent.

  20. An autism-associated mutation in CaV1.3 channels has opposing effects on voltage- and Ca2+-dependent regulation

    PubMed Central

    Limpitikul, Worawan B.; Dick, Ivy E.; Ben-Johny, Manu; Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    CaV1.3 channels are a major class of L-type Ca2+ channels which contribute to the rhythmicity of the heart and brain. In the brain, these channels are vital for excitation-transcription coupling, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal firing. Moreover, disruption of CaV1.3 function has been associated with several neurological disorders. Here, we focus on the de novo missense mutation A760G which has been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To explore the role of this mutation in ASD pathogenesis, we examined the effects of A760G on CaV1.3 channel gating and regulation. Introduction of the mutation severely diminished the Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) of CaV1.3 channels, an important feedback system required for Ca2+ homeostasis. This reduction in CDI was observed in two major channel splice variants, though to different extents. Using an allosteric model of channel gating, we found that the underlying mechanism of CDI reduction is likely due to enhanced channel opening within the Ca2+-inactivated mode. Remarkably, the A760G mutation also caused an opposite increase in voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI), resulting in a multifaceted mechanism underlying ASD. When combined, these regulatory deficits appear to increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, thus potentially disrupting neuronal development and synapse formation, ultimately leading to ASD. PMID:27255217

  1. Revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft and extra-articular iliotibial band tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; McConkey, Mark O; Forsythe, Brian; Harner, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a technically demanding procedure with outcomes that generally fail to reach those seen with primary ACL reconstruction. With most index procedures using autograft tissue, it is not uncommon for allograft tissue to be required for revision ACL reconstruction. Compared with autografts, allografts take longer to incorporate and lead to more episodes of instability. In this article, we describe ipsilateral iliotibial band tenodesis performed to augment use of bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft in revision ACL reconstruction. This technique adds rotational stability to protect the allograft tissue while it incorporates. PMID:25844596

  2. Revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft and extra-articular iliotibial band tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Randy; McConkey, Mark O; Forsythe, Brian; Harner, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a technically demanding procedure with outcomes that generally fail to reach those seen with primary ACL reconstruction. With most index procedures using autograft tissue, it is not uncommon for allograft tissue to be required for revision ACL reconstruction. Compared with autografts, allografts take longer to incorporate and lead to more episodes of instability. In this article, we describe ipsilateral iliotibial band tenodesis performed to augment use of bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft in revision ACL reconstruction. This technique adds rotational stability to protect the allograft tissue while it incorporates.

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with BPTB autograft, irradiated versus non-irradiated allograft: a prospective randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shaoqi; Zhang, Jihua; Xia, Changsuo; Zhang, Cailong; Yu, Tengbo

    2009-05-01

    The effect of using gamma irradiation to sterilize bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft on the clinical outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with irradiated allograft remains controversial. Our study was aimed to analyze the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with irradiated BPTB allograft compared with non-irradiated allograft and autograft. All BPTB allografts were obtained from a single tissue bank and the irradiated allografts were sterilized with 2.5 Mrad of irradiation prior to distribution. A total of 102 patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were prospectively randomized consecutively into three groups. The same surgical technique was used in all operations done by the same senior surgeon. Before surgery and at the average of 31 months follow-up (range 24-47 months) patients were evaluated by the same observer according to objective and subjective clinical evaluations. Of these patients, 99 (autograft 33, non-irradiated allograft 34, irradiated allograft 32) were available for full evaluation. When compared the irradiated allograft group to non-irradiated allograft group or autograft group at 31 months follow-up by the Lachman test, ADT, pivot shift test and KT-2000 arthrometer testing, statistically significant differences were found. Most importantly, 87.8% of patients in the Auto group, 85.3% in the Non-Ir-Auto group and just only 31.3% in the Ir-Allo group had a side-to-side difference of less than 3 mm according to KT-2000. The failure rate of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated allograft (34.4%) was higher than that with autograft (6.1%) and non-irradiated allograft (8.8%). The anterior and rotational stability decreased significantly in the irradiated allograft group. According to the overall IKDC, functional, subjective evaluations and activity level testing, no statistically significant differences were found between the three groups. However, there was a trend that the functional and

  4. Roles of Cav3.2 and TRPA1 channels targeted by hydrogen sulfide in pancreatic nociceptive processing in mice with or without acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuka; Fujimura, Mayuko; Nishimura, Sachiyo; Tsubota, Maho; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), formed by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), targets Ca(v)3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels (T channels) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), facilitating somatic pain. Pancreatitis-related pain also appears to involve activation of T channels by H(2)S formed by the upregulated CSE. Therefore, this study investigates the roles of the Ca(v)3.2 isoform and/or TRPA1 in pancreatic nociception in the absence and presence of pancreatitis. In anesthetized mice, AP18, a TRPA1 inhibitor, abolished the Fos expression in the spinal dorsal horn caused by injection of a TRPA1 agonist into the pancreatic duct. As did mibefradil, a T-channel inhibitor, in our previous report, AP18 prevented the Fos expression following ductal NaHS, an H(2)S donor. In the mice with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, the referred hyperalgesia was suppressed by NNC 55-0396 (NNC), a selective T-channel inhibitor; zinc chloride; or ascorbic acid, known to inhibit Ca(v)3.2 selectively among three T-channel isoforms; and knockdown of Ca(v)3.2. In contrast, AP18 and knockdown of TRPA1 had no significant effect on the cerulein-induced referred hyperalgesia, although they significantly potentiated the antihyperalgesic effect of NNC at a subeffective dose. TRPA1 but not Ca(v)3.2 in the dorsal root ganglia was downregulated at a protein level in mice with cerulein-induced pancreatitis. The data indicate that TRPA1 and Ca(v)3.2 mediate the exogenous H(2)S-induced pancreatic nociception in naïve mice and suggest that, in the mice with pancreatitis, Ca(v)3.2 targeted by H(2)S primarily participates in the pancreatic pain, whereas TRPA1 is downregulated and plays a secondary role in pancreatic nociceptive signaling.

  5. Roles of Cav3.2 and TRPA1 channels targeted by hydrogen sulfide in pancreatic nociceptive processing in mice with or without acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuka; Fujimura, Mayuko; Nishimura, Sachiyo; Tsubota, Maho; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), formed by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), targets Ca(v)3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels (T channels) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), facilitating somatic pain. Pancreatitis-related pain also appears to involve activation of T channels by H(2)S formed by the upregulated CSE. Therefore, this study investigates the roles of the Ca(v)3.2 isoform and/or TRPA1 in pancreatic nociception in the absence and presence of pancreatitis. In anesthetized mice, AP18, a TRPA1 inhibitor, abolished the Fos expression in the spinal dorsal horn caused by injection of a TRPA1 agonist into the pancreatic duct. As did mibefradil, a T-channel inhibitor, in our previous report, AP18 prevented the Fos expression following ductal NaHS, an H(2)S donor. In the mice with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, the referred hyperalgesia was suppressed by NNC 55-0396 (NNC), a selective T-channel inhibitor; zinc chloride; or ascorbic acid, known to inhibit Ca(v)3.2 selectively among three T-channel isoforms; and knockdown of Ca(v)3.2. In contrast, AP18 and knockdown of TRPA1 had no significant effect on the cerulein-induced referred hyperalgesia, although they significantly potentiated the antihyperalgesic effect of NNC at a subeffective dose. TRPA1 but not Ca(v)3.2 in the dorsal root ganglia was downregulated at a protein level in mice with cerulein-induced pancreatitis. The data indicate that TRPA1 and Ca(v)3.2 mediate the exogenous H(2)S-induced pancreatic nociception in naïve mice and suggest that, in the mice with pancreatitis, Ca(v)3.2 targeted by H(2)S primarily participates in the pancreatic pain, whereas TRPA1 is downregulated and plays a secondary role in pancreatic nociceptive signaling. PMID:25267397

  6. New bone formation by murine osteoprogenitor cells cultured on corticocancellous allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ehren R; Huang, Zhinong; Ma, Ting; Lindsey, Derek; Jacobs, Christopher; Smith, Robert L; Goodman, Stuart B

    2008-12-01

    The gold standard for bone grafting in orthopedics is autograft, however autograft has a limited supply and is associated with significant morbidity at the harvest site. One alternative, allograft bone, provides an osteoconductive scaffold, is in less limited supply, and it does not require a harvest from the patient. However, allograft lacks both osteogenic cells and osteoinductive proteins that make autograft bone so advantageous. This study provides a model to investigate strategies for augmentation of corticocancellous allograft bone discs with bone marrow-derived osteoprogenitor cells (OPCs) plus exogenous growth factors in vitro. In this model, allograft bone discs were created by cutting 1-mm thick slices from the distal femur and proximal tibia of euthanized mice. The allografts were sterilized and scanned by micro-computed tomography (microCT) to provide the pre-culture graft volume and trabecular characteristics. The discs were then seeded with OPCs harvested from murine bone marrow. The seeded grafts were placed in organ culture until harvest, after which they were re-scanned by microCT and the data compared to the corresponding pre-culture data. In addition, bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7, also know as osteogenic protein-1 or OP-1), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and OP-1 combined with bFGF were added on a daily basis to the cultures. After final microCT scanning, all grafts were sectioned and evaluated histologically after hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. microCT scans of cultured allografts with cells at 3, 5, and 9 weeks showed a time-dependent, statistically significant increase in bone volume. The trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.) of grafts, from both groups that were augmented with OP-1, showed a statistically significant increase in trabecular thickness of allografts with OPCs. These data suggest that bone marrow-derived OPCs adhere to, and produce, new bone on corticocancellous allograft in vitro. When exogenous OP-1 is added to

  7. Mechanism underlying unaltered cortical inhibitory synaptic transmission in contrast with enhanced excitatory transmission in CaV2.1 knockin migraine mice.

    PubMed

    Vecchia, Dania; Tottene, Angelita; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Pietrobon, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), a monogenic subtype of migraine with aura, is caused by gain-of-function mutations in CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels. In FHM1 knockin mice, excitatory neurotransmission at cortical pyramidal cell synapses is enhanced, but inhibitory neurotransmission at connected pairs of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons and pyramidal cells is unaltered, despite being initiated by CaV2.1 channels. The mechanism underlying the unaltered GABA release at cortical FS interneuron synapses remains unknown. Here, we show that the FHM1 R192Q mutation does not affect inhibitory transmission at autapses of cortical FS and other types of multipolar interneurons in microculture from R192Q knockin mice, and investigate the underlying mechanism. Lowering the extracellular [Ca(2+)] did not reveal gain-of-function of evoked transmission neither in control nor after prolongation of the action potential (AP) with tetraethylammonium, indicating unaltered AP-evoked presynaptic calcium influx at inhibitory autapses in FHM1 KI mice. Neither saturation of the presynaptic calcium sensor nor short duration of the AP can explain the unaltered inhibitory transmission in the mutant mice. Recordings of the P/Q-type calcium current in multipolar interneurons in microculture revealed that the current density and the gating properties of the CaV2.1 channels expressed in these interneurons are barely affected by the FHM1 mutation, in contrast with the enhanced current density and left-shifted activation gating of mutant CaV2.1 channels in cortical pyramidal cells. Our findings suggest that expression of specific CaV2.1 channels differentially sensitive to modulation by FHM1 mutations in inhibitory and excitatory cortical neurons underlies the gain-of-function of excitatory but unaltered inhibitory synaptic transmission and the likely consequent dysregulation of the cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance in FHM1. PMID:24907493

  8. Calcium sensor regulation of the CaV2.1 Ca2+ channel contributes to short-term synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Nanou, Evanthia; Sullivan, Jane M; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2016-01-26

    Short-term synaptic plasticity is induced by calcium (Ca(2+)) accumulating in presynaptic nerve terminals during repetitive action potentials. Regulation of voltage-gated CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels by Ca(2+) sensor proteins induces facilitation of Ca(2+) currents and synaptic facilitation in cultured neurons expressing exogenous CaV2.1 channels. However, it is unknown whether this mechanism contributes to facilitation in native synapses. We introduced the IM-AA mutation into the IQ-like motif (IM) of the Ca(2+) sensor binding site. This mutation does not alter voltage dependence or kinetics of CaV2.1 currents, or frequency or amplitude of spontaneous miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs); however, synaptic facilitation is completely blocked in excitatory glutamatergic synapses in hippocampal autaptic cultures. In acutely prepared hippocampal slices, frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs and amplitudes of evoked EPSCs are unaltered. In contrast, short-term synaptic facilitation in response to paired stimuli is reduced by ∼ 50%. In the presence of EGTA-AM to prevent global increases in free Ca(2+), the IM-AA mutation completely blocks short-term synaptic facilitation, indicating that synaptic facilitation by brief, local increases in Ca(2+) is dependent upon regulation of CaV2.1 channels by Ca(2+) sensor proteins. In response to trains of action potentials, synaptic facilitation is reduced in IM-AA synapses in initial stimuli, consistent with results of paired-pulse experiments; however, synaptic depression is also delayed, resulting in sustained increases in amplitudes of later EPSCs during trains of 10 stimuli at 10-20 Hz. Evidently, regulation of CaV2.1 channels by CaS proteins is required for normal short-term plasticity and normal encoding of information in native hippocampal synapses.

  9. Free radical signalling underlies inhibition of CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels by nitrous oxide in the pain pathway.

    PubMed

    Orestes, Peihan; Bojadzic, Damir; Lee, Jeonghan; Leach, Emily; Salajegheh, Reza; Digruccio, Michael R; Nelson, Michael T; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O, laughing gas) has been used as an anaesthetic and analgesic for almost two centuries, but its cellular targets remain unclear. Here, we present a molecular mechanism of nitrous oxide's selective inhibition of CaV3.2 low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium channels in pain pathways. Using site-directed mutagenesis and metal chelators such as diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid and deferoxamine, we reveal that a unique histidine at position 191 of CaV3.2 participates in a critical metal binding site, which may in turn interact with N2O to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). These free radicals are then likely to oxidize H191 of CaV3.2 in a localized metal-catalysed oxidation reaction. Evidence of hydrogen peroxide and free radical intermediates is given in that N2O inhibition of CaV3.2 channels is attenuated when H2O2 is neutralized by catalase. We also use the adrenochrome test as an indicator of ROS in vitro in the presence of N2O and iron. Ensuing in vivo studies indicate that mice lacking CaV3.2 channels display decreased analgesia to N2O in response to formalin-induced inflammatory pain. Furthermore, a superoxide dismutase and catalase mimetic, EUK-134, diminished pain responses to formalin in wild-type mice, but EUK-134 and N2O analgesia were not additive. This suggests that reduced ROS levels led to decreased inflammation, but without the presence of ROS, N2O was not able to provide additional analgesia. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of interaction between N2O and ion channels, furthering our understanding of this widely used analgesic in pain processing. PMID:21059758

  10. Free radical signalling underlies inhibition of CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels by nitrous oxide in the pain pathway

    PubMed Central

    Orestes, Peihan; Bojadzic, Damir; Lee, JeongHan; Leach, Emily; Salajegheh, Reza; DiGruccio, Michael R; Nelson, Michael T; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O, laughing gas) has been used as an anaesthetic and analgesic for almost two centuries, but its cellular targets remain unclear. Here, we present a molecular mechanism of nitrous oxide's selective inhibition of CaV3.2 low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium channels in pain pathways. Using site-directed mutagenesis and metal chelators such as diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid and deferoxamine, we reveal that a unique histidine at position 191 of CaV3.2 participates in a critical metal binding site, which may in turn interact with N2O to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). These free radicals are then likely to oxidize H191 of CaV3.2 in a localized metal-catalysed oxidation reaction. Evidence of hydrogen peroxide and free radical intermediates is given in that N2O inhibition of CaV3.2 channels is attenuated when H2O2 is neutralized by catalase. We also use the adrenochrome test as an indicator of ROS in vitro in the presence of N2O and iron. Ensuing in vivo studies indicate that mice lacking CaV3.2 channels display decreased analgesia to N2O in response to formalin-induced inflammatory pain. Furthermore, a superoxide dismutase and catalase mimetic, EUK-134, diminished pain responses to formalin in wild-type mice, but EUK-134 and N2O analgesia were not additive. This suggests that reduced ROS levels led to decreased inflammation, but without the presence of ROS, N2O was not able to provide additional analgesia. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of interaction between N2O and ion channels, furthering our understanding of this widely used analgesic in pain processing. PMID:21059758

  11. Significant Association Between CAV1 Variant rs3807989 on 7p31 and Atrial Fibrillation in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Chuchu; Wang, Xiaojing; Xu, Chengqi; Wu, Manman; Wang, Pengxia; Tu, Xin; Wang, Qing K

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in European ancestry populations revealed several genomic loci for atrial fibrillation (AF). We previously replicated the 4q25 locus (PITX2) and 16q22 locus (ZFHX3) in the Chinese population, but not the KCNN3 locus on 1q21. With single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3807989 in CAV1 encoding caveolin-1, however, controversial results were reported in 2 Chinese replication studies. Methods and Results Six remaining AF genetic loci from GWAS, including rs3807989/CAV1, rs593479/PRRX1, rs6479562/C9orf3, rs10824026/SYNPO2L, rs1152591/SYNE2, and rs7164883/HCN4, were analyzed in a Chinese Han population with 941 cases and 562 controls. Only rs3807989 showed significant association with AF (Padj=4.77×10−5), and the finding was replicated in 2 other independent populations with 709 cases and 2175 controls, 463 cases and 644 controls, and the combined population with a total of 2113 cases and 3381 controls (Padj=2.20×10−9; odds ratio [OR]=1.34 for major allele G). Meta-analysis, together with data from previous reports in Chinese and Japanese populations, also showed a significant association between rs3807989 and AF (P=3.40×10−4; OR=1.24 for allele G). We also found that rs3807989 showed a significant association with lone AF in 3 independent populations and in the combined population (Padj=3.85×10−8; OR=1.43 for major allele G). Conclusions The data in this study revealed a significant association between rs3807989 and AF in the Chinese Han population. Together with the findings that caveolin-1 interacts with potassium channels Kir2.1, KCNH2, and HCN4 and sodium channels Nav1.5 and Nav1.8, CAV1 becomes a strong candidate susceptibility gene for AF across different ethnic populations. This study is the first to show a significant association between rs3807989 and lone AF. PMID:25953654

  12. Processed allografts and type I collagen conduits for repair of peripheral nerve gaps.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Elizabeth L; Tuffaha, Sami H; Luciano, Janina P; Yan, Ying; Hunter, Daniel A; Magill, Christina K; Moore, Amy M; Tong, Alice Y; Mackinnon, Susan E; Borschel, Gregory H

    2009-06-01

    Autografting is the gold standard in the repair of peripheral nerve injuries that are not amenable to end-to-end coaptation. However, because autografts result in donor-site defects and are a limited resource, an effective substitute would be valuable. In a rat model, we compared isografts with Integra NeuraGen (NG) nerve guides, which are a commercially available type I collagen conduit, with processed rat allografts comparable to AxoGen's Avance human decellularized allograft product. In a 14-mm sciatic nerve gap model, isograft was superior to processed allograft, which was in turn superior to NG conduit at 6 weeks postoperatively (P < 0.05 for number of myelinated fibers both at midgraft and distal to the graft). At 12 weeks, these differences were no longer apparent. In a 28-mm graft model, isografts again performed better than processed allografts at both 6 and 22 weeks; regeneration through the NG conduit was often insufficient for analysis in this long graft model. Functional tests confirmed the superiority of isografts, although processed allografts permitted successful reinnervation of distal targets not seen in the NG conduit groups. Processed allografts were inherently non-immunogenic and maintained some internal laminin structure. We conclude that, particularly in a long gap model, nerve graft alternatives fail to confer the regenerative advantages of an isograft. However, AxoGen processed allografts are superior to a currently available conduit-style nerve guide, the Integra NeuraGen. They provide an alternative for reconstruction of short nerve gaps where a conduit might otherwise be used.

  13. Mechanoreceptor Reinnervation of Autografts Versus Allografts After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W.; Valladares, Roberto D.; Loi, Florence; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Loss of proprioceptive function occurs after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Clinical, motor, and proprioceptive function is known to improve after ACL reconstruction but does not return to normal. While histological studies of human ACL allografts have been unable to demonstrate mechanoreceptor reinnervation, animal data suggest that reinnervation may occur when an autograft is used. Purpose: To compare the presence or absence of mechanoreceptors between allograft versus autograft after ACL reconstruction in humans. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Ten patients with previous ACL reconstruction presenting for either revision ACL surgery or knee arthroscopy for other reasons were enrolled in a prospective, comparative study. Five patients had a previous autograft ACL and 5 patients had an allograft. Biopsies, either from intact or ruptured grafts, were taken from identical locations as close to the femoral and tibial insertions as possible. Specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) and monoclonal antibodies against neurofilament protein (NFP), known to be present in mechanoreceptor tissue. Immunohistochemical examination was carried out, and the number of NFP+ neural tissue analogs was counted and compared with that of native ACL tissue. Results: The mean time between original graft and biopsy was 6.9 years (range, 0.5-15 years). Histological examination showed significantly less NFP+ neural analogs in allograft and autograft patients than control tissue (mean number of NFP+ analogs per high-power field, 0.7 ± 0.9 [allograft] and 0.5 ± 0.8 [autograft] vs 4.7 ± 0.9 [controls]; P < .0001). There was no significant difference in NFP analogs between autograft and allograft tissue. Conclusion: We found a reduced concentration of NFP+ neural analogs in ACL grafts compared with native ACL tissue. This deficit exists irrespective of whether allograft or autograft is used. These findings may explain the continued

  14. An audit of consent for allograft use in elective orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mullan, C J; Pagoti, R; Davison, H; McAlinden, M G

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Patients receiving musculoskeletal allografts may be at risk of postoperative infection. The General Medical Council guidelines on consent highlight the importance of providing patients with the information they want or need on any proposed investigation or treatment, including any potential adverse outcomes. With the increased cost of defending medicolegal claims, it is paramount that adequate, clear informed patient consent be documented. Methods We retrospectively examined the patterns of informed consent for allograft bone use during elective orthopaedic procedures in a large unit with an onsite bone bank. The initial audit included patients operated over the course of 1 year. Following a feedback session, a re-audit was performed to identify improvements in practice. Results The case mix of both studies was very similar. Revision hip arthroplasty surgery constituted the major subgroup requiring allograft (48%), followed by foot and ankle surgery (16.3%) and revision knee arthroplasty surgery (11.4%) .On the initial audit, 17/45 cases (38%) had either adequate preoperative documentation of the outpatient discussion or an appropriately completed consent form on the planned use of allograft. On the re-audit, 44/78 cases (56%) had adequate pre-operative documentation. There was little correlation between how frequently a surgeon used allograft and the adequacy of consent (Correlation coefficient -0.12). Conclusions Although the risk of disease transmission with allograft may be variable, informed consent for allograft should be a routine part of preoperative discussions in elective orthopaedic surgery. Regular audit and feedback sessions may further improve consent documentation, alongside the targeting of high volume/low compliance surgeons.

  15. Rhizosphere effect and salinity competing to shape microbial communities in Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex-Steud.

    PubMed

    Borruso, Luigimaria; Bacci, Giovanni; Mengoni, Alessio; De Philippis, Roberto; Brusetti, Lorenzo

    2014-10-01

    Rhizobacterial communities associated with Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. in a hypersaline pond close to Wuliangsuhai Lake (Inner Mongolia - China) were investigated and compared with the microbial communities in bulk sediments of the same pond. Microbiological analyses have been done by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and partial 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing. Although community richness was higher in the rhizosphere samples than in bulk sediments, the salinity seemed to be the major factor shaping the structure of the microbial communities. Halanaerobiales was the most abundant taxon found in all the different samples and Desulfosalsimonas was observed to be present more in the rhizosphere rather than in bulk sediment.

  16. Spatial variability of methane emissions in a Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steud. dominated restored coastal brackish fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Stefan; Jurasinski, Gerald; Glatzel, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    Methane is a major greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to global warming with a global warming potential 25 times higher than carbon dioxide over a 100 year time horizon. Recently, closed chamber measurements of methane are replaced by ecosystem based Eddy Covariance measurements where possible. However estimates of emission factors for single vegetation units still need chamber based measurements. The resulting emission factors may be influenced by the arrangement of measurement spots in the ecosystem. Here, we analyze the spatial variability of annual emissions estimates based on dynamic closed chamber measurements in pure and mixed stands of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. in a restored coastal brackish fen. Annual methane emissions per measurement location vary largely between 76.54 and 1332 kg ha-1 a-1 CH4 but they do not differ significantly between pure and mixed stands of Phragmites australis. Mantel tests show no correlation of distances between spots and the variation in methane emissions (p

  17. GDF-15 enhances intracellular Ca2+ by increasing Cav1.3 expression in rat cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun-Mei; Wang, Chang-Ying; Hu, Changlong; Fang, Yan-Jia; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2016-01-01

    GDF-15 (growth/differentiation factor 15) is a novel member of the TGF (transforming growth factor)-β superfamily that has critical roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems. We reported previously that GDF-15 increased delayed rectifier outward K+ currents and Kv2.1 α subunit expression through TβRII (TGF-β receptor II) to activate Src kinase and Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling in rat CGNs (cerebellar granule neurons). In the present study, we found that treatment of CGNs with GDF-15 for 24 h increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in response to membrane depolarization, as determined by Ca2+ imaging. Whole-cell current recordings indicated that GDF-15 increased the inward Ca2+ current (ICa) without altering steady-state activation of Ca2+ channels. Treatment with nifedipine, an inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channels, abrogated GDF-15-induced increases in [Ca2+]i and ICa. The GDF-15-induced increase in ICa was mediated via up-regulation of the Cav1.3 α subunit, which was attenuated by inhibiting Akt/mTOR and ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) pathways and by pharmacological inhibition of Src-mediated TβRII phosphorylation. Given that Cav1.3 is not only a channel for Ca2+ influx, but also a transcriptional regulator, our data confirm that GDF-15 induces protein expression via TβRII and activation of a non-Smad pathway, and provide novel insight into the mechanism of GDF-15 function in neurons. PMID:27114559

  18. Contribution of Ion Channels in Calcium Signaling Regulating Phagocytosis: MaxiK, Cav1.3 and Bestrophin-1.

    PubMed

    Strauß, Olaf; Reichhart, Nadine; Gomez, Nestor Mas; Müller, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the BEST1 gene lead to a variety of retinal degenerations including Best's vitelliforme macular degeneration. The BEST1 gene product, bestrophin-1, is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). It is likely that mutant bestrophin-1 impairs functions of the RPE which support photoreceptor function and will thus lead to retinal degeneration. However, the RPE function which is influenced by bestrophin-1 is so far not identified. Previously we showed that bestrophin-1 interacts with L-type Ca²⁺ channels of the CaV1.3 subtype and that the endogenously expressed bestrophin-1 is required for intracellular Ca²⁺ regulation. A hallmark of Best's disease is the fast lipofuscin accumulation occurring already at young ages. Therefore, we addressed the hypothesis that bestrophin-1 might influence phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by the RPE. Here, siRNA knock-down of bestrophin-1 expression as well as inhibition of L-type Ca²⁺ channel activity modulated the POS phagocytosis in vitro. In vivo CaV1.3 expression appeared to be diurnal regulated with a higher expression rate in the afternoon. Compared to wild-type littermates, Ca V 1.3 (-/-) mice showed a shift in the circadian POS phagocytosis with an increased activity in the afternoon. Thus we suggest that mutant bestrophin-1 leads to an impaired regulation of the POS phagocytosis by the RPE which would explain the fast lipofuscin accumulation in Best patients.

  19. Kidney Versus Islet Allograft Survival After Induction of Mixed Chimerism With Combined Donor Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oura, Tetsu; Ko, Dicken S C; Boskovic, Svjetlan; O'Neil, John J; Chipashvili, Vaja; Koulmanda, Maria; Hotta, Kiyohiko; Kawai, Kento; Nadazdin, Ognjenka; Smith, R Neal; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported successful induction of transient mixed chimerism and long-term acceptance of renal allografts in MHC mismatched nonhuman primates. In this study, we attempted to extend this tolerance induction approach to islet allografts. A total of eight recipients underwent MHC mismatched combined islet and bone marrow (BM) transplantation after induction of diabetes by streptozotocin. Three recipients were treated after a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen that included low-dose total body and thymic irradiation, horse Atgam (ATG), six doses of anti-CD154 monoclonal antibody (mAb), and a 1-month course of cyclosporine (CyA) (Islet A). In Islet B, anti-CD8 mAb was administered in place of CyA. In Islet C, two recipients were treated with Islet B, but without ATG. The results were compared with previously reported results of eight cynomolgus monkeys that received combined kidney and BM transplantation (Kidney A) following the same conditioning regimen used in Islet A. The majority of kidney/BM recipients achieved long-term renal allograft survival after induction of transient chimerism. However, prolonged islet survival was not achieved in similarly conditioned islet/BM recipients (Islet A), despite induction of comparable levels of chimerism. In order to rule out islet allograft loss due to CyA toxicity, three recipients were treated with anti-CD8 mAb in place of CyA. Although these recipients developed significantly superior mixed chimerism and more prolonged islet allograft survival (61, 103, and 113 days), islet function was lost soon after the disappearance of chimerism. In Islet C recipients, neither prolonged chimerism nor islet survival was observed (30 and 40 days). Significant improvement of mixed chimerism induction and islet allograft survival were achieved with a CyA-free regimen that included anti-CD8 mAb. However, unlike the kidney allograft, islet allograft tolerance was not induced with transient chimerism. Induction of more

  20. Effect of tissue culture storage on the in vivo survival of canine osteochondral allografts.

    PubMed

    Oates, K M; Chen, A C; Young, E P; Kwan, M K; Amiel, D; Convery, F R

    1995-07-01

    In vitro studies in our laboratory have shown that the biomechanical and biochemical characteristics of osteochondral grafts can be preserved for as long as 28 days under tissue culture conditions. This study represents an attempt to extend these results to an in vivo model. In adult mongrel dogs, either an autograft, a fresh allograft, or a stored allograft was placed in a standardized defect on the weight-bearing surface of the medial femoral condyle. The stored grafts were kept at 4 degrees C in tissue culture medium for 14 days prior to implantation. The animals were killed at 12 weeks. Cartilage from the contralateral knee served as a control. The modulus and permeability of the cartilage were assessed with confined compression creep tests. The collagen and glycosaminoglycan contents were measured, and the cartilage was analyzed histologically with hematoxylin and eosin and safranin O stains. Grossly, the cartilage appeared viable at harvest. The histologic results were similar in the treatment groups, with the same spectrum of mild degenerative changes being noted in each group. The glycosaminoglycan content was significantly less in the autograft group than in its control group and than in the fresh allograft group. The glycosaminoglycan content did not differ significantly between fresh and stored allografts. The collagen content, modulus, and permeability did not differ either between experimental and control groups or between graft types. Our results support the conclusion that osteochondral allografts can be stored for as many as 14 days without significantly affecting the results of the procedure.

  1. Hair Follicle Dermal Sheath Derived Cells Improve Islet Allograft Survival without Systemic Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojie; Hao, Jianqiang; Leung, Gigi; Breitkopf, Trisia; Wang, Eddy; Kwong, Nicole; Akhoundsadegh, Noushin; Warnock, Garth L.; Shapiro, Jerry; McElwee, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs successfully prevent rejection of islet allografts in the treatment of type I diabetes. However, the drugs also suppress systemic immunity increasing the risk of opportunistic infection and cancer development in allograft recipients. In this study, we investigated a new treatment for autoimmune diabetes using naturally immune privileged, hair follicle derived, autologous cells to provide localized immune protection of islet allotransplants. Islets from Balb/c mouse donors were cotransplanted with syngeneic hair follicle dermal sheath cup cells (DSCC, group 1) or fibroblasts (FB, group 2) under the kidney capsule of immune-competent, streptozotocin induced, diabetic C57BL/6 recipients. Group 1 allografts survived significantly longer than group 2 (32.2 ± 12.2 versus 14.1 ± 3.3 days, P < 0.001) without administration of any systemic immunosuppressive agents. DSCC reduced T cell activation in the renal lymph node, prevented graft infiltrates, modulated inflammatory chemokine and cytokine profiles, and preserved better beta cell function in the islet allografts, but no systemic immunosuppression was observed. In summary, DSCC prolong islet allograft survival without systemic immunosuppression by local modulation of alloimmune responses, enhancing of beta cell survival, and promoting of graft revascularization. This novel finding demonstrates the capacity of easily accessible hair follicle cells to be used as local immunosuppression agents in islet transplantation. PMID:26000314

  2. Recipient treatment to overcome the allograft reaction, with special reference to nature's own solution.

    PubMed

    Billingham, R E; Head, J R

    1986-01-01

    The 6th decade of this century was particularly important for transplantation immunology. The universality of allograft rejection by normal hosts had won general acceptance and, experimentally, several means of abrogating host reactivity to allografts were discovered. These included sub-lethal whole body irradiation, administration of certain corticosteroid hormones and inoculation of very young animals with living cellular inocula from the future graft donor--i.e., classic, neonatal tolerance. The latter was particularly important since it indicated the feasibility of a specific, permanent solution to the clinical allograft problem. Radiation and drug-induced tolerance in adult subjects came along and chemical immunosuppressants, which led to successful clinical use of azathioprine. The important rediscovery of ALS pointed towards the development and clinical application of monoclonal antibodies many years later. With the development of immunogenetics and transplantation biology came recognition that the conceptus is a highly successful allograft, raising the question of how it is able to withstand rejection by its immunocompetent mother for the duration of pregnancy. Hopefully, knowledge of the principle(s) involved when they are finally elucidated will be applicable to clinical allograft recipients. Although functional hypoantigenicity of the syncytial trophoblast probably plays a major role in protecting the allogeneic conceptus, a strong case now exists that local, cell-based, immunosuppressive and immunoprotective activity within the placenta and decidua, mediated by suppressor and other cells, is important.

  3. Hair follicle dermal sheath derived cells improve islet allograft survival without systemic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojie; Hao, Jianqiang; Leung, Gigi; Breitkopf, Trisia; Wang, Eddy; Kwong, Nicole; Akhoundsadegh, Noushin; Warnock, Garth L; Shapiro, Jerry; McElwee, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs successfully prevent rejection of islet allografts in the treatment of type I diabetes. However, the drugs also suppress systemic immunity increasing the risk of opportunistic infection and cancer development in allograft recipients. In this study, we investigated a new treatment for autoimmune diabetes using naturally immune privileged, hair follicle derived, autologous cells to provide localized immune protection of islet allotransplants. Islets from Balb/c mouse donors were cotransplanted with syngeneic hair follicle dermal sheath cup cells (DSCC, group 1) or fibroblasts (FB, group 2) under the kidney capsule of immune-competent, streptozotocin induced, diabetic C57BL/6 recipients. Group 1 allografts survived significantly longer than group 2 (32.2 ± 12.2 versus 14.1 ± 3.3 days, P < 0.001) without administration of any systemic immunosuppressive agents. DSCC reduced T cell activation in the renal lymph node, prevented graft infiltrates, modulated inflammatory chemokine and cytokine profiles, and preserved better beta cell function in the islet allografts, but no systemic immunosuppression was observed. In summary, DSCC prolong islet allograft survival without systemic immunosuppression by local modulation of alloimmune responses, enhancing of beta cell survival, and promoting of graft revascularization. This novel finding demonstrates the capacity of easily accessible hair follicle cells to be used as local immunosuppression agents in islet transplantation.

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament allograft transplantation. Long-term function, histology, revascularization, and operative technique.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, P K; Seaber, A V; Glisson, R R; Ribbeck, B M; Bassett, F H

    1986-01-01

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to finding a satisfactory replacement for the injured ACL. None of the reconstruction techniques used in the past can be considered ideal because of their inability to duplicate the complex geometry, structure, and function of the ligament. Current advances in allograft transplantation and cryopreservation have led us to design and implement an experimental model for testing the feasibility of cryopreserved ACL allotransplantation. Groups of dogs were used to evaluate the effect of cryopreservation on ligament strength and to compare the relative performance of both autograft and allograft ACL transplants up to 18 months after implantation. The ligaments were examined mechanically, histologically, and microangiographically. The cryopreservation process and duration of storage had no effect on the biomechanical or structural properties of the ligament. The mechanical integrity of the allografts was similar to that of the autografts, with both achieving nearly 90% of control ligament strength by 36 weeks. Revascularization approached normal by 24 weeks in both autograft and allograft. No evidence of structural degradation or immunological reaction was seen. Based on these results, we believe that a cryopreserved ACL allograft can provide the ideal material for ACL reconstruction. We have outlined a surgical technique for harvesting and implanting this graft clinically.

  5. Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Barry I.; Julian, Bruce A.; Pastan, Stephen O.; Israni, Ajay K.; Schladt, David; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Gebel, Howard M.; Kirk, Allan D.; Gaston, Robert S.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Farney, Alan C.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Stratta, Robert J.; Mohan, Sumit; Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Adams, Patricia L.; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) nephropathy variants in African American deceased kidney donors were associated with shorter renal allograft survival in a prior single-center report. APOL1 G1 and G2 variants were genotyped in newly accrued DNA samples from African American deceased donors of kidneys recovered and/or transplanted in Alabama and North Carolina. APOL1 genotypes and allograft outcomes in subsequent transplants from 55 U.S. centers were linked, adjusting for age, sex and race/ethnicity of recipients, HLA match, cold ischemia time, panel reactive antibody levels, and donor type. For 221 transplantations from kidneys recovered in Alabama, there was a statistical trend toward shorter allograft survival in recipients of two-APOL1-nephropathy-variant kidneys (hazard ratio [HR] 2.71; p=0.06). For all 675 kidneys transplanted from donors at both centers, APOL1 genotype (HR 2.26; p=0.001) and African American recipient race/ethnicity (HR 1.60; p=0.03) were associated with allograft failure. Kidneys from African American deceased donors with two APOL1 nephropathy variants reproducibly associate with higher risk for allograft failure after transplantation. These findings warrant consideration of rapidly genotyping deceased African American kidney donors for APOL1 risk variants at organ recovery and incorporation of results into allocation and informed-consent processes. PMID:25809272

  6. Successful treatment of renal allograft and bladder malakoplakia with minimization of immunosuppression and prolonged antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Graves, Angela L; Texler, Michael; Manning, Laurens; Kulkarni, Hemant

    2014-04-01

    Malakoplakia is an unusual granulomatous inflammatory disorder associated with diminished bactericidal action of leucocytes that occurs in immunosuppressed hosts. Cases of renal allograft malakoplakia are generally associated with a poor graft and patient survival. We present the case of a 56-year-old female with allograft and bladder malakoplakia occurring two years after renal transplantation complicated by an early antibody mediated rejection. Following a number of symptomatic urinary tract infections caused by resistant Gram-negative bacilli, a diagnosis of malakoplakia was made by biopsy of a new mass lesion of the renal allograft. Cystoscopy also revealed malakoplakia of the bladder wall. Immunosuppressant regimen was modified. Mycophenolate mofetil was ceased, prednisolone reduced to 5 mg/day and tacrolimus concentrations were carefully monitored to maintain trough serum concentrations of 2-4 μg/L. Concurrently, she received a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics followed by 13 months of dual oral antibiotic therapy with fosfomycin and faropenem. This joint approach resulted in almost complete resolution of allograft malakoplakia lesions and sustained regression of bladder lesions on cystoscopy with histological resolution in bladder lesions. Her renal function has remained stable throughout the illness. If treated with sustained antimicrobial therapy and reduction of immunosuppression, cases of allograft malakoplakia may not necessarily be associated with poor graft survival. PMID:24460630

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress is a Mediator of Post-Transplant Injury in Severely Steatotic Liver Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher D.; Upadhya, Gundumi; Conzen, Kendra D.; Jia, Jianlou; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Xie, Yan; Ramachandran, Sabarinathan; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Davidson, Nicholas O.; Chapman, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis continues to present a major challenge in liver transplantation. These organs have been shown to have an increased susceptibility to cold ischemia and reperfusion (CIR) injury compared to otherwise comparable lean livers; the mechanisms governing this increased susceptibility to CIR injury are not fully understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is an important link between hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. In this study, we investigated ER stress signaling and blockade in the mediation of CIR injury in severely steatotic rodent allografts. Steatotic allografts from genetically leptin-resistant rodents had increased ER stress responses and increased markers of hepatocellular injury following liver transplantation into strain-matched lean recipients. ER stress response components were decreased by the chemical chaperone, TUDCA, resulting in improvement of the allograft injury. TUDCA treatment decreased NF-κB activation, and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β. However, the predominant response was decreased expression of the ER stress cell death mediator, CHOP. Further, activation of the inflammation-associated caspase 11 was decreased linking ER Stress/CHOP to pro-inflammatory cytokine production following steatotic liver transplantation. These data confirm ER stress in steatotic allografts, and implicate this as a mediating mechanism of inflammation and hepatocyte death in the steatotic liver allograft. PMID:21280192

  8. Currently available useful immunohistochemical markers of renal pathology for the diagnosis of renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Go; Shimizu, Akira

    2015-07-01

    Renal allograft dysfunction may be induced by various causes, including alloimmune rejection, viral infection, urinary tract obstruction, calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity and/or recurrent renal disease. In order to determine the underlying cause, a renal biopsy is performed and the renal transplant pathology is diagnosed using the internationally consensus Banff classification. Although a progressive understanding of allograft rejection has provided numerous immunohistochemical markers, only the C4d is regarded to be a sufficiently useful marker for antibody-mediated allograft rejection according to the Banff classification. This review summarizes currently available useful immunohistochemical markers of renal transplant pathology, including C4d, with diagnostic implications for human renal allograft rejection. In particular, we discuss immunohistochemical markers in the following three categories: immunohistochemical markers of renal pathology used to (i) analyze the mechanisms of alloimmune rejection, (ii) monitor cell injury and/or inflammation associated with rejection and (iii) identify renal components in order to improve the diagnosis of rejection. In addition, recent progress in the field of renal transplant pathology includes the development of a new method for assessing molecular pathology using OMICS analyses. As the recent findings of various studies in patients undergoing renal transplantation are very encouraging, novel immunohistochemical markers must be also developed and combined with new technologies for the diagnosis of human renal allograft rejection.

  9. Intragraft vascular occlusive sickle crisis with early renal allograft loss in occult sickle cell trait.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lisa; Garfinkel, Marc R; Chang, Anthony; Kadambi, Pradeep V; Meehan, Shane M

    2011-07-01

    Early renal allograft failure due to sickle cell trait is rare. We present clinical and pathologic findings in 2 cases of early renal allograft failure associated with renal vein thrombosis and extensive erythrocyte sickling. Hemoglobin AS was identified in retrospect. In case 1, a 41-year-old female recipient of a deceased donor renal transplant developed abdominal pain and acute allograft failure on day 16, necessitating immediate nephrectomy. In case 2, the transplanted kidney in a 58-year-old female recipient was noted to be mottled blue within minutes of reperfusion. At 24 hours, the patient was oliguric; and the graft was removed. Transplant nephrectomies had diffuse enlargement with diffuse, nonhemorrhagic, cortical, and medullary necrosis. Extensive sickle vascular occlusion was evident in renal vein branches; interlobar, interlobular, and arcuate veins; vasa recta; and peritubular capillaries. The renal arteries had sickle vascular occlusion in case 1. Glomeruli had only focal sickle vascular occlusion. The erythrocytes in sickle vascular occlusion had abundant cytoplasmic filaments by electron microscopy. Acute rejection was not identified in either case. Protein C and S levels, factor V Leiden, and lupus anticoagulant assays were within normal limits. Hemoglobin analysis revealed hemoglobin S of 21.8% and 25.6%, respectively. Renal allograft necrosis with intragraft sickle crisis, characterized by extensive vascular occlusive erythrocyte sickling and prominent renal vein thrombosis, was observed in 2 patients with sickle cell trait. Occult sickle cell trait may be a risk factor for early renal allograft loss.

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament allograft transplantation. Long-term function, histology, revascularization, and operative technique.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, P K; Seaber, A V; Glisson, R R; Ribbeck, B M; Bassett, F H

    1986-01-01

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to finding a satisfactory replacement for the injured ACL. None of the reconstruction techniques used in the past can be considered ideal because of their inability to duplicate the complex geometry, structure, and function of the ligament. Current advances in allograft transplantation and cryopreservation have led us to design and implement an experimental model for testing the feasibility of cryopreserved ACL allotransplantation. Groups of dogs were used to evaluate the effect of cryopreservation on ligament strength and to compare the relative performance of both autograft and allograft ACL transplants up to 18 months after implantation. The ligaments were examined mechanically, histologically, and microangiographically. The cryopreservation process and duration of storage had no effect on the biomechanical or structural properties of the ligament. The mechanical integrity of the allografts was similar to that of the autografts, with both achieving nearly 90% of control ligament strength by 36 weeks. Revascularization approached normal by 24 weeks in both autograft and allograft. No evidence of structural degradation or immunological reaction was seen. Based on these results, we believe that a cryopreserved ACL allograft can provide the ideal material for ACL reconstruction. We have outlined a surgical technique for harvesting and implanting this graft clinically. PMID:3777311

  11. Regenerative Effects of Three Types of Allografts on Rabbit Calvarium: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Rokn, Amir Reza; Shakeri, Abbas Seyed; Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Manasheof, Rebecca; Barikani, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to histologically compare the regenerative properties of two allografts manufactured by two Iranian companies. Materials and Methods: In this study, four 8-mm defects were produced in the calvaria of 12 rabbits. In three defects, three types of allografts namely ITB, CenoBone and Grafton were placed and one defect served as control. Samples were prepared and histomorphometric evaluations were carried out after healing periods of four weeks (interval 1) and eight weeks (interval 2). Qualitative and quantities variables were compared and analyzed with SPSS software. Results: Mild inflammation was observed in 45% and 12.5% of the samples in the first and second intervals, respectively. Foreign body reaction was observed in only 5% of the samples. The quality of regenerated bone was immature, mixed and lamellar in 54.5%, 15.9% and 4.5% of the samples, respectively. The rate of allograft resorption was the highest and lowest in the CenoBone and Grafton samples, respectively. The mean amount of regenerated bone was higher in areas containing Grafton; however, the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Despite the differences in the numerical values of bone regeneration, there were no statistically significant differences in bone generation among the material groups, and allografts manufactured in Iran can be suitable alternatives to Grafton with the same good properties. Further studies are necessary to clarify the efficacy of these allografts. PMID:27507993

  12. Functional MRI detects perfusion impairment in renal allografts with delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Hueper, Katja; Gueler, Faikah; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Gutberlet, Marcel; Jang, Mi-Sun; Lehner, Frank; Richter, Nicolas; Hanke, Nils; Peperhove, Matti; Martirosian, Petros; Tewes, Susanne; Vo Chieu, Van Dai; Großhennig, Anika; Haller, Hermann; Wacker, Frank; Gwinner, Wilfried; Hartung, Dagmar

    2015-06-15

    Delayed graft function (DGF) after kidney transplantation is not uncommon, and it is associated with long-term allograft impairment. Our aim was to compare renal perfusion changes measured with noninvasive functional MRI in patients early after kidney transplantation to renal function and allograft histology in biopsy samples. Forty-six patients underwent MRI 4-11 days after transplantation. Contrast-free MRI renal perfusion images were acquired using an arterial spin labeling technique. Renal function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and renal biopsies were performed when indicated within 5 days of MRI. Twenty-six of 46 patients had DGF. Of these, nine patients had acute rejection (including borderline), and eight had other changes (e.g., tubular injury or glomerulosclerosis). Renal perfusion was significantly lower in the DGF group compared with the group with good allograft function (231 ± 15 vs. 331 ± 15 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1), P < 0.001). Living donor allografts exhibited significantly higher perfusion values compared with deceased donor allografts (P < 0.001). Renal perfusion significantly correlated with eGFR (r = 0.64, P < 0.001), resistance index (r = -0.57, P < 0.001), and cold ischemia time (r = -0.48, P < 0.01). Furthermore, renal perfusion impairment early after transplantation predicted inferior renal outcome and graft loss. In conclusion, noninvasive functional MRI detects renal perfusion impairment early after kidney transplantation in patients with DGF.

  13. Broth versus solid agar culture of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    As part of the donor assessment protocol, bioburden assessment must be performed on allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples collected at the time of tissue retrieval. Swab samples of musculoskeletal tissue allografts from cadaveric donors are received at the microbiology department of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (Australia) to determine the presence of bacteria and fungi. This study will review the isolation rate of organisms from solid agar and broth culture of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swabs were inoculated onto horse blood agar (anaerobic, 35 °C) and chocolate agar (CO2, 35 °C) and then placed into a cooked meat broth (aerobic, 35 °C). A total of 1,912 swabs from 389 donors were received during the study period. 557 (29.1 %) swabs were culture positive with the isolation of 713 organisms, 249 (34.9 %) from solid agar culture and an additional 464 (65.1 %) from broth culture only. This study has shown that the broth culture of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal swab samples recovered a greater amount of organisms than solid agar culture. Isolates such as Clostridium species and Staphylococcus aureus would not have been isolated from solid agar culture alone. Broth culture is an essential part of the bioburden assessment protocol of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue in this laboratory.

  14. Bone marrow-derived T lymphocytes responsible for allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Senjanovic, M.; Marusic, M.

    1984-08-01

    Lethally irradiated mice reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow cells were grafted with allogeneic skin grafts 6-7 weeks after irradiation and reconstitution. Mice with intact thymuses rejected the grafts whereas the mice thymectomized before irradiation and reconstitution did not. Thymectomized irradiated mice (TIR mice) reconstituted with bone marrow cells from donors immune to the allografts rejected the grafts. Bone marrow cells from immunized donors, pretreated with Thy 1.2 antibody and C', did not confer immunity to TIR recipients. To determine the number of T lymphocytes necessary for the transfer of immunity by bone marrow cells from immunized donors, thymectomized irradiated mice were reconstituted with nonimmune bone marrow cells treated with Thy 1.2 antibody and C' and with various numbers of splenic T lymphocytes from nonimmune and immune donors. Allogeneic skin graft rejection was obtained with 10(6) nonimmune or 10(4) immune T cells. The effect of immune T cells was specific: i.e., immune T cells accelerated only rejection of the relevant skin grafts whereas against a third-party skin grafts acted as normal T lymphocytes.

  15. Long-term histopathology of allografts in sensitized kidney recipients.

    PubMed

    Miura, Masayoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Fukasawa, Yuichiro; Hotta, Kiyohiko; Itoh, Yosuke; Tamaki, Tohru

    2012-07-01

    Successful desensitization therapy has brought satisfying short-term outcomes in the recipients with anti-donor antibody. We analyzed the long-term pathology of the allografts in the sensitized kidney recipients. Eleven stable recipients after desensitization against positive flow cytometry T-cell crossmatch (FTXM) were included. They were divided into two groups, based on the protocol biopsies findings at three to eight yr (group 1: subclinical glomerulitis and/or peritubular capillaritis, n = 5 and group 2: no rejection, n = 6). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), presence of donor-specific antibody (DSA), mean channel shift (MCS) of FTXM, urine protein levels, acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR) episodes, and protocol biopsy findings were compared. Chronic transplant glomerulopathy was found in final biopsy of all group 1 cases. DSA was positive in 60% but C4d was positive in 20% case of the group 1. The history of AAMR was only found in the group 1. There was no difference in eGFR decline or proteinuria. The MCS of FTXM was higher in the group 1. The recipients with AAMR history, high MCS in FTXM, and subclinical microvascular inflammation in the early protocol biopsies have risk for developing chronic rejection in long term.

  16. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  17. Nature of hyperacute (accelerated second set) rejection in dog renal allografts and effects of heparin on rejection process.

    PubMed

    Amery, A H; Pegrum, G D; Risdon, R A; Williams, G

    1973-02-24

    Renal allografts were exchanged between unrelated mongrel dogs after previous sensitization with skin and kidney grafts from the same donors. Rapid rejection of the renal allografts was associated with the accumulation of platelets and leucocytes in the peritubular and glomerular capillaries but fibrin deposition was not demonstrated.Heparin infusion delayed but did not prevent the rejection process.

  18. CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels mediate the augmented calcium influx in carotid body glomus cells by chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Makarenko, Vladislav V; Ahmmed, Gias U; Peng, Ying-Jie; Khan, Shakil A; Nanduri, Jayasri; Kumar, Ganesh K; Fox, Aaron P; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a hallmark manifestation of sleep apnea. A heightened carotid body activity and the resulting chemosensory reflex mediate increased sympathetic nerve activity by CIH. However, the mechanisms underlying heightened carotid body activity by CIH are not known. An elevation of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in glomus cells, the primary oxygen-sensing cells, is an essential step for carotid body activation by hypoxia. In the present study, we examined the effects of CIH on the glomus cell [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia and assessed the underlying mechanisms. Glomus cells were harvested from adult rats or wild-type mice treated with 10 days of either room air (control) or CIH (alternating cycles of 15 s of hypoxia and 5 min of room air; 9 episodes/h; 8 h/day). CIH-treated glomus cells exhibited an enhanced [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia, and this effect was absent in the presence of 2-(4-cyclopropylphenyl)-N-((1R)-1-[5-[(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)oxo]-pyridin-2-yl]ethyl)acetamide (TTA-A2), a specific inhibitor of T-type Ca(2+) channels, and in voltage-gated calcium channel, type 3.2 (CaV3.2), null glomus cells. CaV3.2 knockout mice exhibited an absence of CIH-induced hypersensitivity of the carotid body. CIH increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in glomus cells. A ROS scavenger prevented the exaggerated TTA-A2-sensitive [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia. CIH had no effect on CaV3.2 mRNA levels. CIH augmented Ca(2+) currents and increased CaV3.2 protein in plasma membrane fractions of human embryonic kidney-293 cells stably expressing CaV3.2, and either a ROS scavenger or brefeldin-A, an inhibitor of protein trafficking, prevented these effects. These findings suggest that CIH leads to an augmented Ca(2+) influx via ROS-dependent facilitation of CaV3.2 protein trafficking to the plasma membrane.

  19. Splice-variant changes of the CaV3.2 T-type calcium channel mediate voltage-dependent facilitation and associate with cardiac hypertrophy and development

    PubMed Central

    David, Laurence S; Garcia, Esperanza; Cain, Stuart M; Thau, Elana M; Tyson, John R

    2010-01-01

    Low voltage-activated T-type calcium (Ca) channels contribute to the normal development of the heart and are also implicated in pathophysiological states such as cardiac hypertrophy. Functionally distinct T-type Ca channel isoforms can be generated by alternative splicing from each of three different T-type genes (CaV3.1, CaV3.2, CaV3.3), although it remains to be described whether specific splice variants are associated with developmental states and pathological conditions. We aimed to identify and functionally characterize CaV3.2 T-type Ca channel alternatively spliced variants from newborn animals and to compare with adult normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). DNA sequence analysis of full-length CaV3.2 cDNA generated from newborn heart tissue identified ten major regions of alternative splicing, the more common variants of which were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and also subject to functional examination by whole-cell patch clamp. The main findings are that: (1) cardiac CaV3.2 T-type Ca channels are subject to considerable alternative splicing, (2) there is preferential expression of CaV3.2(−25) splice variant channels in newborn rat heart with a developmental shift in adult heart that results in approximately equal levels of expression of both (+25) and (−25) exon variants, (3) in the adult stage of hypertensive rats there is both an increase in overall CaV3.2 expression and a shift towards expression of CaV3.2(+25) containing channels as the predominant form and (4) alternative splicing confers a variant-specific voltage-dependent facilitation of CaV3.2 channels. We conclude that CaV3.2 alternative splicing generates significant T-type Ca channel structural and functional diversity with potential implications relevant to cardiac developmental and pathophysiological states. PMID:20699644

  20. Compensatory T-type Ca2+ channel activity alters D2-autoreceptor responses of Substantia nigra dopamine neurons from Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channel KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Poetschke, Christina; Dragicevic, Elena; Duda, Johanna; Benkert, Julia; Dougalis, Antonios; DeZio, Roberta; Snutch, Terrance P.; Striessnig, Joerg; Liss, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The preferential degeneration of Substantia nigra dopamine midbrain neurons (SN DA) causes the motor-symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), especially the Cav1.3-subtype, generate an activity-related oscillatory Ca2+ burden in SN DA neurons, contributing to their degeneration and PD. While LTCC-blockers are already in clinical trials as PD-therapy, age-dependent functional roles of Cav1.3 LTCCs in SN DA neurons remain unclear. Thus, we analysed juvenile and adult Cav1.3-deficient mice with electrophysiological and molecular techniques. To unmask compensatory effects, we compared Cav1.3 KO mice with pharmacological LTCC-inhibition. LTCC-function was not necessary for SN DA pacemaker-activity at either age, but rather contributed to their pacemaker-precision. Moreover, juvenile Cav1.3 KO but not WT mice displayed adult wildtype-like, sensitised inhibitory dopamine-D2-autoreceptor (D2-AR) responses that depended upon both, interaction of the neuronal calcium sensor NCS-1 with D2-ARs, and on voltage-gated T-type calcium channel (TTCC) activity. This functional KO-phenotype was accompanied by cell-specific up-regulation of NCS-1 and Cav3.1-TTCC mRNA. Furthermore, in wildtype we identified an age-dependent switch of TTCC-function from contributing to SN DA pacemaker-precision in juveniles to pacemaker-frequency in adults. This novel interplay of Cav1.3 L-type and Cav3.1 T-type channels, and their modulation of SN DA activity-pattern and D2-AR-sensitisation, provide new insights into flexible age- and calcium-dependent activity-control of SN DA neurons and its pharmacological modulation. PMID:26381090

  1. Chronic fluoxetine administration increases expression of the L-channel gene Cav1.2 in astrocytes from the brain of treated mice and in culture and augments K(+)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i.

    PubMed

    Du, Ting; Liang, Chunguang; Li, Baoman; Hertz, Leif; Peng, Liang

    2014-03-01

    We have recently shown that freshly isolated astrocytes from the mouse brain express mRNA for the L-channel gene Cav1.3 to at least the same degree (per mg mRNA) as corresponding neurons. The amount of extracellular Ca(2+) actually entering cultured astrocytes by its opening is modest, but due to secondary Ca(2+)-mediated stimulation of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) the increase in free cytosolic Ca(2+) [Ca(2+)]i is substantial. The other Cav1 subtype expressed in brain is Cav1.2, which is even expressed in higher density. Although the different primers used for the two genes preclude exact quantitative comparison, the present study suggests that this is also the case in the freshly isolated astrocytes and neurons, which express equal Cav1.2 densities. Again, most of the increase in [Ca(2+)]i occurred by RyR activity. In contrast to Cav1.3 the expression of Cav1.2 was greatly increased (doubled) after two weeks of treatment with fluoxetine hydrochloride (10mg/kg). Accordingly [Ca(2+)]i in cultured astrocytes exposed to the addition of 10-60mM KCl increased substantially in cultured astrocytes treated chronically with fluoxetine with the lag time until the effect was observed depending upon the fluoxetine concentration. This effect was inhibited by nifedipine or siRNA against Cav1.2. The increase in K(+)-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i after fluoxetine treatment is directly opposite to a decrease in [Ca(2+)]i after treatment with any of the anti-bipolar drugs lithium, carbamazepine or valproic acid, due to reduced capacitative Ca(2+) influx. We have previously shown a similar effect after fluoxetine treatment, but it becomes overridden by the Cav1.2 up-regulation. PMID:24513410

  2. Arsenic trioxide inhibits accelerated allograft rejection mediated by alloreactive CD8(+) memory T cells and prolongs allograft survival time.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Guan, Tianjun; Gao, Chang; Lin, Yingying; Yan, Guoliang; Zhu, Maoshu; Lv, Chongshan; Xia, Junjie; Qi, Zhongquan

    2015-09-01

    CD8(+) memory T (Tm) cells are a significant barrier to transplant tolerance induction in alloantigen-primed recipients, and are insensitive to existing clinical immunosuppressants. Here, we studied the inhibition of CD8(+) Tm cells by arsenic trioxide (As2O3) for the first time. Alloantigen-primed CD8(+) Tm cells were transferred to T cell immunodeficient nude mice. The mice were subjected to heart allotransplantation, and treated with As2O3. The transplant survival time was determined, and the inhibitory effects of As2O3 on CD8(+) Tm cell-mediated immune rejection were assessed through serological studies and inspection of the transplanted heart and lymphoid organs. We found that As2O3 treatment prolonged the mean survival time of the graft and reduced the number of CD8(+) Tm cells in the spleen and lymph nodes. The expression of the genes encoding interleukin (IL)-2, and IFN-γ was reduced, while expression of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β was increased in the transplant. Our findings show that As2O3 treatment inhibits allograft rejection mediated by alloreactive CD8(+) Tm cells in the mouse heart transplantation model.

  3. Donor-gifted allograft lithiasis: extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy with over table module using the Lithostar Plus.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, R P; Ahlawat, R; Kumar, R V; Srinadh, E S; Banerjee, G K; Bhandari, M

    1995-01-01

    Allograft lithiasis is usually secondary. Donor-graft lithiasis is a rare cause and only 5 cases have been reported. We report 2 such cases which are the first in the live-related transplantation programme. The pressing need to increase the donor pool in developing countries, safety of therapy in graft lithiasis coupled with minimal estimated risk of lithiasis recurrence in the donor are the main justifications for accepting calculi bearing kidney for transplantation. The 2 cases underwent extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy using the overhead table module of the Lithostar Plus. The technical ease of lithotripsy using an on-line ultrasound module in these 'ectopically' placed kidneys is discussed. The effect of shockwaves on allograft function was studied by a pre- and post-renal scan (99Tc-DTPA) and serum creatinine. No adverse effect of shockwave on allograft function was noted both on short- and long-term follow-up.

  4. Sensory recovery following decellularized nerve allograft transplantation for digital nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yang; Chen, Gary; Tian, Guanglei; Tapia, Carla

    2013-12-01

    This study reported preliminary clinical experience of using decelluarised nerve allograft material for repair of digital nerve defect in five hand injury patients. From October 2009 to July 2010, five patients with traumatic nerve defect were treated with nerve repair using AxoGen® nerve allograft (AxoGen Inc, Alachua, FL) in California Hospital Medical Center. All patients were followed at least for 12 months, and sensory recovery and signs of infection or rejection were documented by a hand therapist. Average two-point discrimination was 6 mm, and average Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments test was 4.31. No wound infections or signs of rejections were observed at wound site. All patients reported sensory improvement during the follow-up period after operation. It is believed that decellularised nerve allografts may provide a readily available option for repair of segmental nerve defect.

  5. Determination of mechanical properties of impacted human morsellized cancellous allografts for revision joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Y; Wakui, T; Kobayashi, A; Ohashi, H; Kadoya, Y; Yamano, Y

    1999-12-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of mechanical properties of impacted morsellized cancellous allograft (IMCA) produced by dynamic compaction of allograft femoral heads ground by commercially available bone mills, i.e. rotating rasp and reciprocating type bone mills. Various ranges and profiles of particle size in the graft aggregates were obtained using these bone mills, and the effect of number of compaction as well as the distribution of particle sizes on the mechanical properties of IMCA under quasistatic compression and shear loading conditions was discussed. The morsellized cancellous allograft prepared by the reciprocating type bone mill showed a broad distribution of particle sizes, and gave IMCA superior mechanical properties to the graft with a more uniform size distribution, or prepared by the rotating rasp type bone mills. The increase of number of compaction also improved the mechanical properties of IMCA in compression.

  6. Emphysematous pyelonephritis in failed renal allograft: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Rahul Kumar; Lambe, Shahid; Kapoor, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) in renal allograft is rare but potentially lethal complication and requires aggressive medical and/or surgical therapy to achieve cure. We report a case of 60-year-old diabetic male with poor cardiac function on maintenance hemodialysis, who underwent delayed allograft nephrectomy for EPN in failed renal allograft. Blood culture grew Bacteroides. He was stable in the postoperative period but passed away on day 4 due to myocardial infarction likely secondary to poor baseline cardiac function. Delay in diagnosis and treatment could have contributed to this unfavorable outcome. There is a paucity of published literature regarding EPN in the transplant population, such that management decisions (percutaneous conservative versus urgent surgical) are challenging. Further studies are required to establish treatment guidelines.

  7. Postrenal transplant urinary leakage caused by segmental infarction of a renal allograft treated by partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Salehipour, Mehdi; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Eshraghian, Ahad; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Salahi, Heshmatollah; Bahador, Ali; Malek-hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2011-04-01

    Kidney transplant is the final treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease. Urinary leakage is the most-common surgical complication early after transplant. Another complication in the early posttransplant period is segmental allograft infarction. We report a kidney recipient who developed urinary leakage secondary to a segmental infarction of the upper pole of the transplanted kidney 2 months after transplant. The patient was treated successfully by a partial nephrectomy of the infracted upper lobe of the kidney. Three months after the partial nephrectomy of the allograft, serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine were normal, and the patient was able to partake in her daily activities. Partial nephrectomy in the context of infarction of a kidney allograft is safe and can be used in similar cases.

  8. Arthroscopic Anatomic Humeral Head Reconstruction With Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation for Large Hill-Sachs Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Snir, Nimrod; Wolfson, Theodore S.; Hamula, Mathew J.; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Meislin, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Anatomic reconstruction of the humeral head with osteochondral allograft has been reported as a solution for large Hill-Sachs lesions with or without glenoid bone loss. However, to date, varying techniques have been used. This technical note describes an arthroscopic reconstruction technique using fresh-frozen, side- and size-matched osteochondral humeral head allograft. Allograft plugs are press fit into the defect without internal fixation and seated flush with the surrounding articular surface. This technique restores the native articular contour of the humeral head without compromising shoulder range of motion. Potential benefits of this all-arthroscopic approach include minimal trauma to the soft tissue and articular surface without the need for hardware or staged reoperation. PMID:24266001

  9. Allograft tolerance induced by donor apoptotic lymphocytes requires phagocytosis in the recipient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, E.; Gao, Y.; Chen, J.; Roberts, A. I.; Wang, X.; Chen, Z.; Shi, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death through apoptosis plays a critical role in regulating cellular homeostasis. Whether the disposal of apoptotic cells through phagocytosis can actively induce immune tolerance in vivo, however, remains controversial. Here, we report in a rat model that without using immunosuppressants, transfusion of apoptotic splenocytes from the donor strain prior to transplant dramatically prolonged survival of heart allografts. Histological analysis verified that rejection signs were significantly ameliorated. Splenocytes from rats transfused with donor apoptotic cells showed a dramatically decreased response to donor lymphocyte stimulation. Most importantly, blockade of phagocytosis in vivo, either with gadolinium chloride to disrupt phagocyte function or with annexin V to block binding of exposed phosphotidylserine to its receptor on phagocytes, abolished the beneficial effect of transfused apoptotic cells on heart allograft survival. Our results demonstrate that donor apoptotic cells promote specific allograft acceptance and that phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in vivo plays a crucial role in maintaining immune tolerance.

  10. Comparison of Clinical Outcome of Autograft and Allograft Reconstruction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yu-Hua; Sun, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamstring (HS) autograft and bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft are the most common choice for reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). There was a little report about the clinical outcome and difference of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using allograft and autograft. This study aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autograft and allograft reconstruction for ACL tears. Methods: A total of 106 patients who underwent surgery because of ACL tear were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups, including 53 patients in each group. The patients in group I underwent standard ACL reconstruction with HS tendon autografts, while others in group II underwent reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. All the patients were followed up and analyzed; the mean follow-up was 81 months (range: 28–86 months). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, and patient satisfaction questionnaires. The complication rates of both groups were compared. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening were assessed using lateral and anteroposterior radiographs. Results: At the end of follow-up, no significant differences were found between the groups in terms of IKDC, Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and incidences of arthrofibrosis. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening was less in the HS tendon autografts. This difference was more significant on the tibial side. Conclusions: In the repair of ACL tears, allograft reconstruction is as effective as the autograft reconstruction, but the allograft can lead to more tunnel widening evidently in the tibial tunnel, particularly. PMID:26612290

  11. Anti‑migratory effect of rapamycin impairs allograft imaging by 18F‑fluorodeoxyglucose‑labeled splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hukui; Cheng, Dayan; Ma, Yuanyuan; Liu, Hong; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Kai; Hou, Guihua; Wang, Huaiquan

    2016-09-01

    Tracking lymphocyte migration is an emerging strategy for non‑invasive nuclear imaging of allografts; however, its clinical application remains to be fully demonstrated. In the present study, the feasibility of using rapamycin‑treated 18F‑fluorodeoxyglucose (18F‑FDG)‑labeled splenocytes for the in vivo imaging of allografts was evaluated. C57BL/6 skin was heterotopically transplanted onto non‑obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient recipient mice. BALB/c 18F‑FDG‑labeled splenocytes with or without rapamycin pretreatment (designated as FR and FC cells, respectively) were transferred into recipient mice 30 days later. Imaging of radiolabeled cells in the skin grafts was conducted through in vivo dynamic whole‑body phosphor‑autoradiography and histological analysis. Notably, rapamycin impaired the migration of 18F‑FDG‑labeled splenocytes to the graft. At all time points, the radioactivity of allografts (digital light units/mm2) was significantly lower in the group that received FR cells, compared with the group that received FC cells (P<0.01). Furthermore, the peak allograft to native skin ratio was 1.29±0.02 at 60 min for the FR group and 3.29±0.17 at 30 min for the FC group (P<0.001). In addition, the in vivo radioactivity of the allografts was observed to be correlated with the transferred cells, which were observed histologically (r2=0.887; P<0.0001). Although 18F‑FDG‑labeled splenocytes migrated to the allograft, imaging of these cells may not be possible in the presence of rapamycin. PMID:27432554

  12. Current Safety of Renal Allograft Biopsy With Indication in Adult Recipients: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Feng; Chen, Cheng-Hsu; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Cheng, Chi-Hung; Yu, Tung-Min; Chuang, Ya-Wen; Huang, Shih-Ting; Tsai, Jun-Li; Wu, Ming-Ju

    2016-02-01

    Renal biopsy remains the golden standard diagnosis of renal function deterioration. The safety in native kidney biopsy is well defined. However, it is a different story in allograft kidney biopsy. We conduct this retrospective study to clarify the safety of allograft kidney biopsy with indication.All variables were grouped by the year of biopsy and they were compared by Mann-Whitney U test (for continuous variables) or Chi-square test (for categorical variables). We collected possible factors associated with complications, including age, gender, body weight, renal function, cause of uremia, status of coagulation, hepatitis, size of needle, and immunosuppressants.We recruited all renal transplant recipients undergoing allograft biopsy between January of 2009 and December of 2014. This is the largest database for allograft kidney biopsy with indication. Of all the 269 biopsies, there was no difference in occurrence among the total 14 complications (5.2%) over these 6 years. There were only 3 cases of hematomas (1.11%), 6 gross hematuria (2.23%), 1 hydronephrosis (0.37%), and 2 hemoglobin decline (0.74%). The outcome of this cohort is the best compared to all other studies, and it is even better than the allograft protocol kidney biopsy. Among all possible factors, patients with pathological report containing "medullary tissue only" were susceptible to complications (P < 0.001, 1.8 of relative risk).In modern era, this study demonstrates the safety of allograft kidney biopsy with indication. Identifying the renal capsule before biopsy to avoid puncture into medulla is the most important element to prevent complications. PMID:26871853

  13. Ankle arthrodesis fusion rates for mesenchymal stem cell bone allograft versus proximal tibia autograft.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John J; Boone, Joshua J; Hansen, Myron; Brady, Chad; Gough, Adam; Swayzee, Zflan

    2014-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is commonly used in the treatment of ankle arthritis. The present study compared mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) bone allografts and proximal tibia autografts as adjuncts in performing ankle arthrodesis. A total of 109 consecutive ankle fusions performed from 2002 to 2008 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 109 fusions, 24 were excluded from the present study, leaving 85 patients who had undergone ankle arthrodesis. Of the 85 patients, 41 had received a proximal tibia autograft and 44, an MSC bone allograft. These 2 groups were reviewed and compared retrospectively at least 2 years postoperatively for the overall fusion rate, interval to radiographic fusion, and interval to clinical fusion. A modified and adjusted American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons ankle scale was used to measure patient satisfaction. The overall fusion rate was 84.1% in the MSC bone allograft group and 95.1% in the proximal tibia autograft group (p = .158). The corresponding mean intervals to radiographic fusion were 13.0 ± 2.5 weeks and 11.3 ± 2.8 weeks (p ≤ .001). The interval to clinical fusion was 13.1 ± 2.1 weeks and 11.0 ± 1.5 weeks (p ≤ .001) in the MSC bone allograft and proximal tibia autograft group, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the fusion rates between the MSC bone allograft and proximal tibia autograft groups. Also, no statistically significant difference was found between the preoperative and postoperative scores using a modified and adjusted American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons ankle scale between the 2 groups (p = .41 and p = .44, respectively). A statistically significant delay to radiographic and clinical fusion was present in the MSC bone allograft group compared with the proximal tibia autograft group; however, no difference was found in patient satisfaction. PMID:25158608

  14. Inhibition of Pim2-prolonged skin allograft survival through the apoptosis regulation pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongtao; Zhang, Chao; Liang, Ting; Song, Jing; Hao, Jing; Hou, Guihua

    2012-11-01

    Recently, apoptosis has been considered to be an important regulator for allograft survival. The serine/threonine kinase Pim2 has been implicated in many apoptotic pathways. In a previous study, we found that pim2 was highly expressed in CD4(+) T cells in an allograft model. Here, we further investigated the effects of Pim2 on allograft survival and the underlying mechanisms associated with apoptosis. The results showed that pim2 was overexpressed in grafts and spleens, particularly in spleen CD4(+) T cells when acute allorejection occurred, and correlated positively with the extent of rejection. In T cells from the spleens of naive BALB/c mice treated with 5 µM 4a (a specific inhibitor of Pim2) for 24 h, the apoptosis rate increased and the phosphorylation of BAD was decreased. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T cells treated with 4a in vitro to allografted severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice effectively prolonged allograft survival from 19.5±1.7 days to 31±2.3 days. Moreover, the results demonstrated that the CD4(+)CD25(-) effector T-cell subset was the predominate expresser of the pim2 gene as compared with the CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell subset. Alloantigen-induced CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells displayed less Foxp3 expression and a low suppression of apoptosis compared with effector CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells treated with 4a. Collectively, these data revealed that Pim2 facilitated allograft rejection primarily by modulating the apoptosis of effector T cells and the function of Treg cells. These data suggested that Pim2 may be an important target for in vivo anti-rejection therapies and for the ex vivo expansion of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells. PMID:23085945

  15. Early allograft dysfunction in liver transplantation with donation after cardiac death donors results in inferior survival.

    PubMed

    Lee, David D; Singh, Amandeep; Burns, Justin M; Perry, Dana K; Nguyen, Justin H; Taner, C Burcin

    2014-12-01

    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver allografts have been associated with increased morbidity from primary nonfunction, biliary complications, early allograft failure, cost, and mortality. Early allograft dysfunction (EAD) after liver transplantation has been found to be associated with inferior patient and graft survival. In a cohort of 205 consecutive liver-only transplant patients with allografts from DCD donors at a single center, the incidence of EAD was found to be 39.5%. The patient survival rates for those with no EAD and those with EAD at 1, 3, and 5 years were 97% and 89%, 79% and 79%, and 61% and 54%, respectively (P = 0.009). Allograft survival rates for recipients with no EAD and those with EAD at 1, 3, and 5 years were 90% and 75%, 72% and 64%, and 53% and 43%, respectively (P = 0.003). A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant association between the development of EAD and the cold ischemia time [odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-1.56, P = 0.037] and hepatocellular cancer as a secondary diagnosis in recipients (OR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.11-4.58, P = 0.025). There was no correlation between EAD and the development of ischemic cholangiopathy. In conclusion, EAD results in inferior patient and graft survival in recipients of DCD liver allografts. Understanding the events that cause EAD and developing preventive or early therapeutic approaches should be the focus of future investigations. PMID:25179581

  16. Ca2+ Binding/Permeation via Calcium Channel, CaV1.1, Regulates the Intracellular Distribution of the Fatty Acid Transport Protein, CD36, and Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Dimitra K; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Lee, Chang Seok; Griffin, Deric M; Wang, Hui; Lagor, William R; Pautler, Robia G; Dirksen, Robert T; Hamilton, Susan L

    2015-09-25

    Ca(2+) permeation and/or binding to the skeletal muscle L-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV1.1) facilitates activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase type II (CaMKII) and Ca(2+) store refilling to reduce muscle fatigue and atrophy (Lee, C. S., Dagnino-Acosta, A., Yarotskyy, V., Hanna, A., Lyfenko, A., Knoblauch, M., Georgiou, D. K., Poché, R. A., Swank, M. W., Long, C., Ismailov, I. I., Lanner, J., Tran, T., Dong, K., Rodney, G. G., Dickinson, M. E., Beeton, C., Zhang, P., Dirksen, R. T., and Hamilton, S. L. (2015) Skelet. Muscle 5, 4). Mice with a mutation (E1014K) in the Cacna1s (α1 subunit of CaV1.1) gene that abolishes Ca(2+) binding within the CaV1.1 pore gain more body weight and fat on a chow diet than control mice, without changes in food intake or activity, suggesting that CaV1.1-mediated CaMKII activation impacts muscle energy expenditure. We delineate a pathway (Cav1.1→ CaMKII→ NOS) in normal skeletal muscle that regulates the intracellular distribution of the fatty acid transport protein, CD36, altering fatty acid metabolism. The consequences of blocking this pathway are decreased mitochondrial β-oxidation and decreased energy expenditure. This study delineates a previously uncharacterized CaV1.1-mediated pathway that regulates energy utilization in skeletal muscle.

  17. Ca2+ Binding/Permeation via Calcium Channel, CaV1.1, Regulates the Intracellular Distribution of the Fatty Acid Transport Protein, CD36, and Fatty Acid Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Dimitra K.; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Lee, Chang Seok; Griffin, Deric M.; Wang, Hui; Lagor, William R.; Pautler, Robia G.; Dirksen, Robert T.; Hamilton, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ permeation and/or binding to the skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel (CaV1.1) facilitates activation of Ca2+/calmodulin kinase type II (CaMKII) and Ca2+ store refilling to reduce muscle fatigue and atrophy (Lee, C. S., Dagnino-Acosta, A., Yarotskyy, V., Hanna, A., Lyfenko, A., Knoblauch, M., Georgiou, D. K., Poché, R. A., Swank, M. W., Long, C., Ismailov, I. I., Lanner, J., Tran, T., Dong, K., Rodney, G. G., Dickinson, M. E., Beeton, C., Zhang, P., Dirksen, R. T., and Hamilton, S. L. (2015) Skelet. Muscle 5, 4). Mice with a mutation (E1014K) in the Cacna1s (α1 subunit of CaV1.1) gene that abolishes Ca2+ binding within the CaV1.1 pore gain more body weight and fat on a chow diet than control mice, without changes in food intake or activity, suggesting that CaV1.1-mediated CaMKII activation impacts muscle energy expenditure. We delineate a pathway (Cav1.1→ CaMKII→ NOS) in normal skeletal muscle that regulates the intracellular distribution of the fatty acid transport protein, CD36, altering fatty acid metabolism. The consequences of blocking this pathway are decreased mitochondrial β-oxidation and decreased energy expenditure. This study delineates a previously uncharacterized CaV1.1-mediated pathway that regulates energy utilization in skeletal muscle. PMID:26245899

  18. Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft-Tissue Fixation Through Bone Tunnels

    PubMed Central

    Spalding, Tim; Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nick A.; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation improves clinical outcomes for patients with symptomatic meniscus-deficient knees. We describe an established arthroscopic technique for meniscal allograft transplantation without the need for bone fixation of the meniscal horns. After preparation of the meniscal bed, the meniscus is parachuted into the knee through a silicone cannula and the meniscal horns are fixed with sutures through bone tunnels. The body of the meniscus is then fixed with a combination of all-inside and inside-out sutures. This technique is reliable and reproducible and has clinical outcomes comparable with those of bone plug fixation techniques. PMID:26900554

  19. Clinical allograft of a calcaneal tendon in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Lemoy, Marie-Josee; Summers, Laura; Colagross-Schouten, Angela

    2014-09-01

    A 5.5-y-old male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) housed in an outdoor field cage presented for severe trauma involving the left calcaneal tendon. Part of the management of this wound included an allograft of the calcaneal tendon from an animal that was euthanized for medical reasons. This case report describes the successful medical and surgical management of a macaque with a significant void of the calcaneal tendon. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a successful tendon allograft in a rhesus macaque for clinical purposes.

  20. The efficacy of mineralized allograft cortical and cancellous chips in maxillary sinus augmentations.

    PubMed

    Nevins, Myron; Parma-Benfenati, Stefano; Janke, Ulrich W; Kleyer, Aimé; Rasperini, Giulio; Tinti, Carlo; Schupbach, Peter; Kim, David M

    2014-01-01

    A mixture of mineralized allograft cortical and cancellous chips was used to augment the maxillary sinuses of 10 patients. Eleven sinus augmentation procedures were performed, and 19 bone cores were obtained at reentry after 6 to 7 months. Computed tomography at 6 months postaugmentation demonstrated bone formation in all sites. Light microscopic and histomorphometric evaluation confirmed bone formation at the treatment site that would receive osseointegrated implants to replace the missing maxillary posterior teeth. These encouraging results support the use of a mixture of mineralized allograft cortical and cancellous chips for sinus augmentation.

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Valenti, J R; Sala, D; Schweitzer, D

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on 30 patients who underwent an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allograft. An arthroscopic technique alone was used in 10 patients, and in the other 20 patients this was combined with a miniarthrotomy. After a mean follow up of 35 months, the overall functional results were satisfactory in 85%. There were no cases of infection, disease transmission or tissue rejection. Fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts are a good method of anterior cruciate reconstruction.

  2. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Valenti, J R; Sala, D; Schweitzer, D

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was performed on 30 patients who underwent an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with fresh-frozen patellar tendon allograft. An arthroscopic technique alone was used in 10 patients, and in the other 20 patients this was combined with a miniarthrotomy. After a mean follow up of 35 months, the overall functional results were satisfactory in 85%. There were no cases of infection, disease transmission or tissue rejection. Fresh-frozen patellar tendon allografts are a good method of anterior cruciate reconstruction. PMID:8002109

  3. Complicated chronic pancreatitis causing mycotic aortic aneurysm: in situ replacement with a cryopreserved aortic allograft.

    PubMed

    Knosalla, C; Bauer, M; Weng, Y g; Weidemann, H; Hetzer, R

    2000-11-01

    Mycotic aortic aneurysm, which resulted from infected pancreatic pseudocysts with retroperitoneal abscess, developed in a patient with chronic pancreatitis. The aorta was approached through median laparotomy. Necrotic material was debrided from the pancreatic pseudocysts, and the mycotic aneurysm was resected. The aorta was replaced in situ with a cryopreserved aortic allograft. This report discusses the rare complication of pancreatic pseudocysts, which affect the infrarenal abdominal aorta and cause a large mycotic aneurysm. This case suggests that the use of cryopreserved allografts is promising for in situ reconstruction, even in a grossly infected field.

  4. CACNA1H missense mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alter Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel activity and reticular thalamic neuron firing.

    PubMed

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Blesneac, Iulia; Pamphlett, Roger; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. In a recent study by Steinberg and colleagues, 2 recessive missense mutations were identified in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene (CACNA1H), in a family with an affected proband (early onset, long duration ALS) and 2 unaffected parents. We have introduced and functionally characterized these mutations using transiently expressed human Cav3.2 channels in tsA-201 cells. Both of these mutations produced mild but significant changes on T-type channel activity that are consistent with a loss of channel function. Computer modeling in thalamic reticular neurons suggested that these mutations result in decreased neuronal excitability of thalamic structures. Taken together, these findings implicate CACNA1H as a susceptibility gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  5. Optimizing rejection readouts in a corneal allograft transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Antonia; Böhringer, Daniel; Betancor, Paola Kammrath; Schlunck, Günther; Reinhard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of anterior segment spectral domain optic coherence tomography (ASOCT) as rejection readout in a keratoplasty mouse model and to compare ASOCT against the current standard (i.e., a clinical score system). Furthermore, to compare both approaches with respect to intra- and inter-individual observer variability and to calculate a critical point that distinguishes between rejection and non-rejection in ASOCT analysis. Methods Allogeneic penetrating keratoplasties (PKs) were performed using C3H/He donor mice and BALB/c recipient mice; syngeneic transplantations served as controls using BALB/c donors and recipients. Corneal graft rejection was determined with a clinical score. ASOCT was used to determine the central thickness of the corneal grafts in the same animals. The rejection status was corroborated with histopathological examination. Results The median survival time (MST) of the corneal allografts in the wild-type BALB/c mice was 12 days. Allogeneic transplantation led to a 100% rejection rate, whereas signs of rejection after syngeneic transplantation appeared in up to 20% of the mice. Central corneal thickness (CCT) determination via customized software revealed a direct correlation with the clinical score. Receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis confirmed CCT as a valid surrogate for rejection. Calculation of the area under the curve (AUC) revealed a value of 0.88 with an optimal cut-off at 267 pixels. Conclusions An increase in the CCT during acute allogeneic corneal graft rejection significantly correlated with the clinical surrogate parameter “corneal opacity.” ASOCT not only generates source data, but also analysis of the ASOCT data shows lower readout variability and fewer interpreter variations than the clinical score commonly used to define the time point of graft rejection in mice. PMID:27777504

  6. Comparison of medial versus lateral meniscus allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo; Liang, Jie; Ru, Neng; Li, Yu-Peng; Shang, Zheng-Hui; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a literature review and meta-analysis evaluating the effectiveness of medial and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT). Methods: The literature review and meta-analysis were conducted between August and October 2015 in the People’s Hospital of China Three Gorges University, Yi Chang, China. A systematic search was performed in the Medline and EMBASE databases, and the Cochrane Library for relevant literature published through October 2015. The outcomes of the included studies were analyzed in terms of the Lysholm Score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score, Knee Injury And Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Tegner Activity Score, MRI results, and failure rates. An adapted version of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used for the methodological quality assessment in the meta-analyses. Results: The literature review identified 12 observational studies, including 7 retrospective studies, 4 prospective studies, and the nature of one study was not reported. Significant differences in the outcomes of the lateral MAT group and the medial MAT group were observed in the IKDC scores, KOOS pain values, KOOS activities of daily living (ADL) values, and the absolute and relative extrusions observed on MRI, which suggested that the lateral MAT patients experienced superior clinical benefits compared with the medial MAT patients. However, significant differences between the lateral MAT group and the medial MAT group were not observed with regards to the Lysholm Scores, KOOS symptom values, KOOS sports and recreations values, KOOS quality of life (QOL) values, Tegner Activity Scores, VAS for pain values, and failure rates. Conclusion: The analysis results indicated that lateral MAT provides superior clinical outcomes compared with medial MAT according to the KOOS and IKDC scores. In addition, greater graft extrusion was observed in the medial group on MRI. Although significant differences were not

  7. Primary Cardiac Allograft Dysfunction—Validation of a Clinical Definition

    PubMed Central

    Dronavalli, Vamsidhar B.; Rogers, Chris A.; Banner, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart transplantation is an established treatment for advanced heart failure. Primary allograft dysfunction (PGD) is reported in up to 40% of transplants and is associated with a poor outcome. Methods As part of Heart Evaluation and Retrieval for Transplantation study, an investigation of the assessment of donor hearts for transplantation, we proposed a clinical definition for cardiac PGD comprising severely impaired systolic function affecting one or both ventricles accompanied by hypotension, low cardiac output, and high filling pressures occurring in the first 72 hours (in the absence of hyper acute rejection and technical surgical factors, such as cardiac tamponade). Here, we examine the prospective application of this definition to 290 heart transplants. We compared the clinical outcome of PGD and non-PGD cases. Results Ninety-four of 290 transplants developed PGD (32.4%). Inotrope use (score) was higher in the PGD group at 24, 48, and 72 hours after transplantation (P < 0.01). In the PGD group, there was a greater requirement for, intra-aortic balloon pump (50% vs 15%, P < 0.01), mechanical support (27% vs 0%, P < 0.01), and renal replacement therapy (61% vs 26%, P < 0.01). Intensive care stay was longer for recipients with PGD (median 14 vs 5 days, P < 0.01) and early mortality was higher (37% vs 4% at 30 days, 42% vs 8% at 1 year, P < 0.01). Conclusions In conclusion, our definition of PGD could be applied in a national multicenter study, and the cases it defined had more frequent complications and higher mortality. PMID:25742423

  8. High-risk corneal allografts: A therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Rajendran, Vijayalakshmi; Griffith, May; Forrester, John V; Kuffová, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most common surgical procedure amongst solid organ transplants with a high survival rate of 86% at 1-year post-grafting. This high success rate has been attributed to the immune privilege of the eye. However, mechanisms originally thought to promote immune privilege, such as the lack of antigen presenting cells and vessels in the cornea, are challenged by recent studies. Nevertheless, the immunological and physiological features of the cornea promoting a relatively weak alloimmune response is likely responsible for the high survival rate in “low-risk” settings. Furthermore, although corneal graft survival in “low-risk” recipients is favourable, the prognosis in “high-risk” recipients for corneal graft is poor. In “high-risk” grafts, the process of indirect allorecognition is accelerated by the enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses due to pre-existing inflammation and neovascularization of the host bed. This leads to the irreversible rejection of the allograft and ultimately graft failure. Many therapeutic measures are being tested in pre-clinical and clinical studies to counter the immunological challenge of “high-risk” recipients. Despite the prevailing dogma, recent data suggest that tissue matching together with use of systemic immunosuppression may increase the likelihood of graft acceptance in “high-risk” recipients. However, immunosuppressive drugs are accompanied with intolerance/side effects and toxicity, and therefore, novel cell-based therapies are in development which target host immune cells and restore immune homeostasis without significant side effect of treatment. In addition, developments in regenerative medicine may be able to solve both important short comings of allotransplantation: (1) graft rejection and ultimate graft failure; and (2) the lack of suitable donor corneas. The advances in technology and research indicate that wider therapeutic choices for patients may be available to

  9. “Slow” Voltage-Dependent Inactivation of CaV2.2 Calcium Channels Is Modulated by the PKC Activator Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate (PMA)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; McDavid, Sarah; Currie, Kevin P. M.

    2015-01-01

    CaV2.2 (N-type) voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca2+ channels) play key roles in neurons and neuroendocrine cells including the control of cellular excitability, neurotransmitter / hormone secretion, and gene expression. Calcium entry is precisely controlled by channel gating properties including multiple forms of inactivation. “Fast” voltage-dependent inactivation is relatively well-characterized and occurs over the tens-to- hundreds of milliseconds timeframe. Superimposed on this is the molecularly distinct, but poorly understood process of “slow” voltage-dependent inactivation, which develops / recovers over seconds-to-minutes. Protein kinases can modulate “slow” inactivation of sodium channels, but little is known about if/how second messengers control “slow” inactivation of Ca2+ channels. We investigated this using recombinant CaV2.2 channels expressed in HEK293 cells and native CaV2 channels endogenously expressed in adrenal chromaffin cells. The PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) dramatically prolonged recovery from “slow” inactivation, but an inactive control (4α-PMA) had no effect. This effect of PMA was prevented by calphostin C, which targets the C1-domain on PKC, but only partially reduced by inhibitors that target the catalytic domain of PKC. The subtype of the channel β-subunit altered the kinetics of inactivation but not the magnitude of slowing produced by PMA. Intracellular GDP-β-S reduced the effect of PMA suggesting a role for G proteins in modulating “slow” inactivation. We postulate that the kinetics of recovery from “slow” inactivation could provide a molecular memory of recent cellular activity and help control CaV2 channel availability, electrical excitability, and neurotransmission in the seconds-to-minutes timeframe. PMID:26222492

  10. Calpain inhibition rescues troponin T3 fragmentation, increases Cav1.1, and enhances skeletal muscle force in aging sedentary mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Pereyra, Andrea S; Wang, Zhong-Min; Birbrair, Alexander; Reisz, Julie A; Files, Daniel Clark; Purcell, Lina; Feng, Xin; Messi, Maria L; Feng, Hanzhong; Chalovich, Joseph; Jin, Jian-Ping; Furdui, Cristina; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-06-01

    Loss of strength in human and animal models of aging can be partially attributed to a well-recognized decrease in muscle mass; however, starting at middle-age, the normalized force (force/muscle cross-sectional area) in the knee extensors and single muscle fibers declines in a curvilinear manner. Strength is lost faster than muscle mass and is a more consistent risk factor for disability and death. Reduced expression of the voltage sensor Ca(2+) channel α1 subunit (Cav1.1) with aging leads to excitation-contraction uncoupling, which accounts for a significant fraction of the decrease in skeletal muscle function. We recently reported that in addition to its classical cytoplasmic location, fast skeletal muscle troponin T3 (TnT3) is fragmented in aging mice, and both full-length TnT3 (FL-TnT3) and its carboxyl-terminal (CT-TnT3) fragment shuttle to the nucleus. Here, we demonstrate that it regulates transcription of Cacna1s, the gene encoding Cav1.1. Knocking down TnT3 in vivo downregulated Cav1.1. TnT3 downregulation or overexpression decreased or increased, respectively, Cacna1s promoter activity, and the effect was ablated by truncating the TnT3 nuclear localization sequence. Further, we mapped the Cacna1s promoter region and established the consensus sequence for TnT3 binding to Cacna1s promoter. Systemic administration of BDA-410, a specific calpain inhibitor, prevented TnT3 fragmentation, and Cacna1s and Cav1.1 downregulation and improved muscle force generation in sedentary old mice.

  11. Ca(v)3.2 channel is a molecular substrate for inhibition of T-type calcium currents in rat sensory neurons by nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Todorovic, S M; Jevtovic-Todorovic, V; Mennerick, S; Perez-Reyes, E; Zorumski, C F

    2001-09-01

    Although nitrous oxide (N(2)O; laughing gas) remains widely used as an anesthetic and analgesic in clinical practice, its cellular mechanisms of action remain inadequately understood. In this report, we examined the effects of N(2)O on voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in acutely dissociated small sensory neurons of adult rat. At subanesthetic concentrations, N(2)O blocks low-voltage-activated, T-type Ca(2+) currents (T currents), but not high-voltage-activated (HVA) currents. This blockade of T currents was concentration dependent, with an IC(50) value of 45 +/- 13%, maximal block of 38 +/- 12%, and Hill coefficient of 2.6 +/- 1.0. No desensitization of the response or change in current kinetics was observed during N(2)O application. The magnitude of T current blockade by N(2)O does not seem to reflect any use- or voltage-dependent properties. In addition, T current blockade was not altered when intracellular GTP was replaced with guanosine 5'-(gamma-thio)triphosphate or guanosine 5'-0-(2-thiodiphosphate) suggesting a lack of involvement of G-proteins in the inhibition. N(2)O selectively blocked currents arising from the Ca(v)3.2 but not Ca(v)3.1 recombinant channels stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells in a concentration-dependent manner with an apparent affinity and potency similar to native dorsal root ganglion currents. Analogously, the block of Ca(v)3.2 T currents exhibited little voltage- or use-dependence. These data indicate that N(2)O selectively blocks T-type but not HVA Ca(2+) currents in small sensory neurons and Ca(v)3.2 currents in HEK cells at subanesthetic concentrations. Blockade of T currents may contribute to the anesthetic and/or analgesic effects of N(2)O. PMID:11502893

  12. Persistent increases in Ca(2+) influx through Cav1.2 shortens action potential and causes Ca(2+) overload-induced afterdepolarizations and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Ai, Xiaojie; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Chen, Biyi; Harris, David M; Tang, Mingxin; Xie, Yuping; Szeto, Christopher; Li, Yingxin; Li, Ying; Zhang, Hongyu; Eckhart, Andrea D; Koch, Walter J; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Chen, Xiongwen

    2016-01-01

    Persistent elevation of Ca(2+) influx due to prolongation of the action potential (AP), chronic activation of the β-adrenergic system and molecular remodeling occurs in stressed and diseased hearts. Increases in Ca(2+) influx are usually linked to prolonged myocyte action potentials and arrhythmias. However, the contribution of chronic enhancement of Cav1.2 activity on cardiac electrical remodeling and arrhythmogenicity has not been completely defined and is the subject of this study. Chronically increased Cav1.2 activity was produced with a cardiac specific, inducible double transgenic (DTG) mouse system overexpressing the β2a subunit of Cav (Cavβ2a). DTG myocytes had increased L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa-L), myocyte shortening, and Ca(2+) transients. DTG mice had enhanced cardiac performance, but died suddenly and prematurely. Telemetric electrocardiograms revealed shortened QT intervals in DTG mice. The action potential duration (APD) was shortened in DTG myocytes due to significant increases of potassium currents and channel abundance. However, shortened AP in DTG myocytes did not fully limit excess Ca(2+) influx and increased the peak and tail ICa-L. Enhanced ICa promoted sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) overload, diastolic Ca(2+) sparks and waves, and increased NCX activity, causing increased occurrence of early and delayed afterdepolarizations (EADs and DADs) that may contribute to premature ventricular beats and ventricular tachycardia. AV blocks that could be related to fibrosis of the AV node were also observed. Our study suggests that increasing ICa-L does not necessarily result in AP prolongation but causes SR Ca(2+) overload and fibrosis of AV node and myocardium to induce cellular arrhythmogenicity, arrhythmias, and conduction abnormalities.

  13. Regulation of the Cav1.2 cardiac channel by redox via modulation of CaM interaction with the channel.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Xu, Jianjun; Minobe, Etsuko; Shimoara, Shoken; Hao, Liying; Kameyama, Masaki

    2015-07-01

    Although it has been well documented that redox can modulate Cav1.2 channel activity, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In our study, we examined the effects of redox on Cav1.2 channel activity and on CaM interaction with the Cav1.2 α1 subunit. Dithiothreitol (DTT, 1 mM) in the cell-attached mode decreased, while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mM) increased channel activity to 72 and 303%, respectively. The effects of redox were maintained in the inside-out mode where channel activity was induced by CaM + ATP: DTT (1 mM) decreased, while H2O2 (1 mM) increased the channel activity. These results were mimicked by the thioredoxin and oxidized glutathione system. To test whether the redox state might determine channel activity by affecting the CaM interaction with the channel, we examined the effects of DTT and H2O2 on CaM binding to the N- and C-terminal fragments of the channel. We found that DTT concentration-dependently inhibited CaM binding to the C-terminus (IC50 37 μM), but H2O2 had no effect. Neither DTT nor H2O2 had an effect on CaM interaction with the N-terminus. These results suggest that redox-mediated regulation of the Cav1.2 channel is governed, at least partially, by modulation of the CaM interaction with the channel.

  14. β-Carotene Induces Apoptosis in Human Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines via the Cav-1/AKT/NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangzhan; Zhang, Yanting; Li, Qinghua; Yang, Lu; Zhang, Nannan; Ma, Shanshan; Zhang, Kun; Song, Jishi; Guan, Fangxia

    2016-03-01

    β-carotene, a type of terpenoid, has many metabolic and physiological functions. In particular, β-carotene has an antitumor effect. However, the efficacy of β-carotene against esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains unclear. In our study, β-carotene inhibited the growth of ESCC cells and downregulated expression of the Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) protein. Cav-1 protein was expressed only in ESCC cells, not in Het-1A cells. Moreover, β-carotene triggered apoptosis, induced cell cycle G0⁄G1 phase arrest, and inhibited cell migration. To explore the mechanism involved in these processes, we further examined the effect of β-carotene on the Cav-1-mediated AKT/NF-κB pathway. The results showed that the level of AKT and NF-κB phosphorylation was dramatically inhibited, which led to an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Correspondingly, the activity of Caspase-3 was also enhanced. These data suggest that β-carotene has an antiproliferative role in ESCC cells and may be a promising chemotherapeutic agent for use against ESCC cells. PMID:26733226

  15. CaV3.2 T-type channels mediate Ca²⁺ entry during oocyte maturation and following fertilization.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Miranda L; Zhang, Yingpei; Erxleben, Christian F; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; McDonough, Caitlin E; Miao, Yi-Liang; Armstrong, David L; Williams, Carmen J

    2015-12-01

    Initiation of mouse embryonic development depends upon a series of fertilization-induced rises in intracellular Ca(2+). Complete egg activation requires influx of extracellular Ca(2+); however, the channels that mediate this influx remain unknown. Here, we tested whether the α1 subunit of the T-type channel CaV3.2, encoded by Cacna1h, mediates Ca(2+) entry into oocytes. We show that mouse eggs express a robust voltage-activated Ca(2+) current that is completely absent in Cacna1h(-/-) eggs. Cacna1h(-/-) females have reduced litter sizes, and careful analysis of Ca(2+) oscillation patterns in Cacna1h(-/-) eggs following in vitro fertilization (IVF) revealed reductions in first transient length and oscillation persistence. Total and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores were also reduced in Cacna1h(-/-) eggs. Pharmacological inhibition of CaV3.2 in wild-type CF-1 strain eggs using mibefradil or pimozide reduced Ca(2+) store accumulation during oocyte maturation and reduced Ca(2+) oscillation persistence, frequency and number following IVF. Overall, these data show that CaV3.2 T-type channels have prev8iously unrecognized roles in supporting the meiotic-maturation-associated increase in ER Ca(2+) stores and mediating Ca(2+) influx required for the activation of development.

  16. Transcriptional repression of Caveolin-1 (CAV1) gene expression by GATA-6 in bladder smooth muscle hypertrophy in mice and human beings.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Goldfarb, Robert; John, Mary; Srinivasan, Vittala Gopal; Alanzi, Jaber; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Kathuria, Hasmeena; Zderic, Stephen A; Wein, Alan J; Chacko, Samuel

    2011-05-01

    Hypertrophy occurs in urinary bladder wall smooth muscle (BSM) in men with partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in animal models of PBOO. Hypertrophied BSM from the rabbit model exhibits down-regulation of caveolin-1, a structural and functional protein of caveolae that function as signaling platforms to mediate interaction between receptor proteins and adaptor and effector molecules to regulate signal generation, amplification, and diversification. Caveolin-1 expression is diminished in PBOO-induced BSM hypertrophy in mice and in men with BPH. The proximal promoter of the human and mouse caveolin-1 (CAV1) gene was characterized, and it was observed that the transcription factor GATA-6 binds this promoter, causing reduced expression of caveolin-1. Furthermore, caveolin-1 expression levels inversely correlate with the abundance of GATA-6 in BSM hypertrophy in mice and human beings. Silencing of GATA6 gene expression up-regulates caveolin-1 expression, whereas overexpression of GATA-6 protein sustains the transcriptional repression of caveolin-1 in bladder smooth muscle cells. Together, these data suggest that GATA-6 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CAV1 gene expression in PBOO-induced BSM hypertrophy in men and mice. GATA-6-induced transcriptional repression represents a new regulatory mechanism of CAV1 gene expression in pathologic BSM, and may serve as a target for new therapy for BPH-induced bladder dysfunction in aging men.

  17. Experimental oral immunization of ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) with a recombinant canine adenovirus vaccine CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP and an attenuated rabies virus SRV9.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinghui; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Shoufeng; Fang, Lijun; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rongliang

    2014-04-01

    Ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) are a major reservoir of rabies virus in southeastern China. Oral immunization has been shown to be a practical method for wildlife rabies management in Europe and North America. Two groups of 20 ferret badgers were given a single oral dose of a recombinant canine adenovirus-rabies vaccine, CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP, or an experimental attenuated rabies virus vaccine, SRV9. At 21 days, all ferret badgers had seroconverted, with serum virus-neutralizing antibodies ranging from 0.1 to 4.5 IU/mL. Titers were >0.50 IU/mL (an acceptable level) in 17/20 and 16/20 animals receiving CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP or SRV9, respectively. The serologic results indicate that the recombinant CAV-2-E3Δ-RGP is at least as effective as the attenuated rabies virus vaccine. Both may be considered for additional research as oral rabies vaccine candidates for ferret badgers.