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Sample records for allometric growth coefficients

  1. Allometric growth in reef-building corals.

    PubMed

    Dornelas, Maria; Madin, Joshua S; Baird, Andrew H; Connolly, Sean R

    2017-03-29

    Predicting demographic rates is a critical part of forecasting the future of ecosystems under global change. Here, we test if growth rates can be predicted from morphological traits for a highly diverse group of colonial symbiotic organisms: scleractinian corals. We ask whether growth is isometric or allometric among corals, and whether most variation in coral growth rates occurs at the level of the species or morphological group. We estimate growth as change in planar area for 11 species, across five morphological groups and over 5 years. We show that coral growth rates are best predicted from colony size and morphology rather than species. Coral size follows a power scaling law with a constant exponent of 0.91. Despite being colonial organisms, corals have consistent allometric scaling in growth. This consistency simplifies the task of projecting community responses to disturbance and climate change.

  2. Growth of the eye lens: II. Allometric studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the ontogeny and phylogeny of lens growth in a variety of species using allometry. Methods Data on the accumulation of wet and/or dry lens weight as a function of bodyweight were obtained for 40 species and subjected to allometric analysis to examine ontogenic growth and compaction. Allometric analysis was also used to compare the maximum adult lens weights for 147 species with the maximum adult bodyweight and to compare lens volumes calculated from wet and dry weights with eye volumes calculated from axial length. Results Linear allometric relationships were obtained for the comparison of ontogenic lens and bodyweight accumulation. The body mass exponent (BME) decreased with increasing animal size from around 1.0 in small rodents to 0.4 in large ungulates for both wet and dry weights. Compaction constants for the ontogenic growth ranged from 1.00 in birds and reptiles up to 1.30 in mammals. Allometric comparison of maximum lens wet and dry weights with maximum bodyweights also yielded linear plots with a BME of 0.504 for all warm blooded species except primates which had a BME of 0.25. When lens volumes were compared with eye volumes, all species yielded a scaling constant of 0.75 but the proportionality constants for primates and birds were lower. Conclusions Ontogenic lens growth is fastest, relative to body growth, in small animals and slowest in large animals. Fiber cell compaction takes place throughout life in most species, but not in birds and reptiles. Maximum adult lens size scales with eye size with the same exponent in all species, but birds and primates have smaller lenses relative to eye size than other species. Optical properties of the lens are generated through the combination of variations in the rate of growth, rate of compaction, shape and size. PMID:24715759

  3. Allometric growth in the extant coelacanth lung during ontogenetic development

    PubMed Central

    Cupello, Camila; Brito, Paulo M.; Herbin, Marc; Meunier, François J; Janvier, Philippe; Dutel, Hugo; Clément, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Coelacanths are lobe-finned fishes known from the Devonian to Recent that were long considered extinct, until the discovery of two living species in deep marine waters of the Mozambique Channel and Sulawesi. Despite extensive studies, the pulmonary system of extant coelacanths has not been fully investigated. Here we confirm the presence of a lung and discuss its allometric growth in Latimeria chalumnae, based on a unique ontogenetic series. Our results demonstrate the presence of a potentially functional, well-developed lung in the earliest known coelacanth embryo, and its arrested growth at later ontogenetic stages, when the lung is clearly vestigial. The parallel development of a fatty organ for buoyancy control suggests a unique adaptation to deep-water environments. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for the presence of small, hard, flexible plates around the lung in L. chalumnae, and consider them homologous to the plates of the ‘calcified lung' of fossil coelacanths. PMID:26372119

  4. Allometric growth in the extant coelacanth lung during ontogenetic development.

    PubMed

    Cupello, Camila; Brito, Paulo M; Herbin, Marc; Meunier, François J; Janvier, Philippe; Dutel, Hugo; Clément, Gaël

    2015-09-15

    Coelacanths are lobe-finned fishes known from the Devonian to Recent that were long considered extinct, until the discovery of two living species in deep marine waters of the Mozambique Channel and Sulawesi. Despite extensive studies, the pulmonary system of extant coelacanths has not been fully investigated. Here we confirm the presence of a lung and discuss its allometric growth in Latimeria chalumnae, based on a unique ontogenetic series. Our results demonstrate the presence of a potentially functional, well-developed lung in the earliest known coelacanth embryo, and its arrested growth at later ontogenetic stages, when the lung is clearly vestigial. The parallel development of a fatty organ for buoyancy control suggests a unique adaptation to deep-water environments. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for the presence of small, hard, flexible plates around the lung in L. chalumnae, and consider them homologous to the plates of the 'calcified lung' of fossil coelacanths.

  5. Allometric disparity in rodent evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B

    2013-01-01

    In this study, allometric trajectories for 51 rodent species, comprising equal representatives from each of the major clades (Ctenohystrica, Muroidea, Sciuridae), are compared in a multivariate morphospace (=allometric space) to quantify magnitudes of disparity in cranial growth. Variability in allometric trajectory patterns was compared to measures of adult disparity in each clade, and dietary habit among the examined species, which together encapsulated an ecomorphological breadth. Results indicate that the evolution of allometric trajectories in rodents is characterized by different features in sciurids compared with muroids and Ctenohystrica. Sciuridae was found to have a reduced magnitude of inter-trajectory change and growth patterns with less variation in allometric coefficient values among members. In contrast, a greater magnitude of difference between trajectories and an increased variation in allometric coefficient values was evident for both Ctenohystrica and muroids. Ctenohystrica and muroids achieved considerably higher adult disparities than sciurids, suggesting that conservatism in allometric trajectory modification may constrain morphological diversity in rodents. The results provide support for a role of ecology (dietary habit) in the evolution of allometric trajectories in rodents. PMID:23610638

  6. The effect of quantitative feed restriction on allometric growth in broilers.

    PubMed

    van der Klein, S A S; Silva, F A; Kwakkel, R P; Zuidhof, M J

    2017-01-01

    Feed restriction in broilers is aimed at preventing metabolic disorders, increasing feed efficiency, or manipulating carcass conformation. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of modest graded levels feed restriction during the second and third wk of life. Mixed-sex chickens were raised in pens with 4 replications per treatment to 35 d of age. Chickens were fed ad libitum throughout the trial, or 90, 80, or 70% of expected ad libitum feed intake during the second wk of life, or 95, 90, 85, or 80% of expected ad libitum feed intake during the third wk of life. Feed intake, BW, ADG, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were measured and weekly dissections were conducted to characterize allometric growth of the breast muscle, legs, abdominal fat pad, liver, gastro-intestinal tract (GIT), and heart. Feeding 70% of ad libitum during wk 2 and 80% during wk 3 reduced ADG during the restriction period and reduced BW at the end of the restriction period, but chickens exhibited complete compensatory growth within one wk after the restriction period. No significant effects of restriction treatment were found on BW, FCR, fat pad, empty GIT, breast muscle, heart, legs, and liver weight at d 35, but allometric growth curve for breast muscle was lower in birds fed 80 and 85% of ad libitum during wk 3, and for birds fed 70% of ad libitum in wk 2. Allometric growth curves for all body parts were different between males and females, except for the liver. Females had higher relative fat pad, breast muscle, and liver weight and a lower GIT and heart and leg weight compared with males at d 35. Feed restriction could differentially affect males and females. This study showed that feeding 70% of ad libitum in wk 2 might be beneficial to reduce fat pad, but later feed restriction in wk 3 may reduce breast muscle weight at broiler processing age.

  7. Allometric growth in juvenile marine turtles: possible role as an antipredator adaptation.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Michael; Scholl, Joshua

    2014-04-01

    Female marine turtles produce hundreds of offspring during their lifetime but few survive because small turtles have limited defenses and are vulnerable to many predators. Little is known about how small turtles improve their survival probabilities with growth though it is assumed that they do. We reared green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and loggerheads (Caretta caretta) from hatchlings to 13 weeks of age and documented that they grew wider faster than they grew longer. This pattern of allometric growth might enable small turtles to more quickly achieve protection from gape-limited predators, such as the dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus). As a test of that hypothesis, we measured how dolphinfish gape increased with length, reviewed the literature to determine how dolphinfish populations were size/age structured in nearby waters, and then determined the probability that a small turtle would encounter a fish large enough to consume it if it grew by allometry vs. by isometry (in which case it retained its hatchling proportions). Allometric growth more quickly reduced the probability of a lethal encounter than did isometric growth. On that basis, we suggest that allometry during early ontogeny may have evolved because it provides a survival benefit for small turtles.

  8. Estimating geographic variation on allometric growth and body condition of Blue Suckers with quantile regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, B.S.; Terrell, J.W.; Neely, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing our understanding of how environmental factors affect fish body condition and improving its utility as a metric of aquatic system health require reliable estimates of spatial variation in condition (weight at length). We used three statistical approaches that varied in how they accounted for heterogeneity in allometric growth to estimate differences in body condition of blue suckers Cycleptus elongatus across 19 large-river locations in the central USA. Quantile regression of an expanded allometric growth model provided the most comprehensive estimates, including variation in exponents within and among locations (range = 2.88–4.24). Blue suckers from more-southerly locations had the largest exponents. Mixed-effects mean regression of a similar expanded allometric growth model allowed exponents to vary among locations (range = 3.03–3.60). Mean relative weights compared across selected intervals of total length (TL = 510–594 and 594–692 mm) in a multiplicative model involved the implicit assumption that allometric exponents within and among locations were similar to the exponent (3.46) for the standard weight equation. Proportionate differences in the quantiles of weight at length for adult blue suckers (TL = 510, 594, 644, and 692 mm) compared with their average across locations ranged from 1.08 to 1.30 for southern locations (Texas, Mississippi) and from 0.84 to 1.00 for northern locations (Montana, North Dakota); proportionate differences for mean weight ranged from 1.13 to 1.17 and from 0.87 to 0.95, respectively, and those for mean relative weight ranged from 1.10 to 1.18 and from 0.86 to 0.98, respectively. Weights for fish at longer lengths varied by 600–700 g within a location and by as much as 2,000 g among southern and northern locations. Estimates for the Wabash River, Indiana (0.96–1.07 times the average; greatest increases for lower weights at shorter TLs), and for the Missouri River from Blair, Nebraska, to Sioux City, Iowa (0.90

  9. Sexual size dimorphism and allometric growth of Morelet's crocodiles in captivity.

    PubMed

    Barrios-Quiroz, Gabriel; Casas-Andreu, Gustavo; Escobedo-Galván, Armando H

    2012-03-01

    Few studies have conducted morphological analyses of crocodilians, and little information exists on differences between size-classes and sexes in Neotropical crocodilians. In this study, we measured nine morphological traits in 121 captive Morelet's crocodiles Crocodylus moreletii (81 females and 40 males). Our results revealed that individuals < 2 m total length do not exhibit sexual dimorphism in morphometric characteristics. However, for crocodiles over 2 m in length, males were significantly larger than females in terms of dorsal-cranial length, cranial width, snout width and snout-ventral length. In general, morphological traits demonstrated a strongly significant relationship with total length at the smaller size class of 150-200 cm length. However, in the highest size class of 250-300 cm length (large adult males), morphological traits were no longer significantly related with total length. Male crocodiles demonstrated allometric growth of cranial morphology with significantly greater increase in cranial width, snout width, and mid-snout width relative to total length at higher size classes. Morphological dimorphism and allometric growth may be associated with adaptive strategies for reproductive success.

  10. A critical appraisal of allometric growth among alpine cirques based on multivariate statistics and spatial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, Magali; Gunnell, Yanni; Calvet, Marc

    2015-01-01

    When considering the morphometric attributes of a glacial cirque, imbalances between length, width, and amplitude have been deemed relevant tools for discriminating between two possible pathways of cirque growth: downwearing by glaciers or backwearing by freeze-thaw processes. Based on a sample of 1071 cirques in the French Pyrenees, we reframe the concern for climatic variables by also granting systematic consideration to cirque lithology. Insight into the factors that control cirque shape is gained from Principal Component Analysis, where maps of eigenvalues assigned to six classes of bedrock display spatial patterns of cirque form as a function of position along the regional climatic gradient. Among crystalline rocks (granite, gneiss, migmatite), cirque form is predominantly determined by climatic controls. This is highlighted in the contrast between the elevated core of the Pleistocene icefield, where cirque isometry prevails, and the more peripheral areas (external sierras of the Atlantic precipitation zone and high sierras of the drier Mediterranean zone) where the lighter imprint of glaciation on the landscape has failed to erase (through glacial deepening) the allometric signature of pre-Pleistocene topographic features such as shallow valley heads and etch-basins. As a result, wide and shallow cirques occur in these settings. Among schist outcrops, in contrast, cirque form appears randomly distributed, suggesting that bedrock characteristics (e.g., structure) rather than climate are the key controls on cirque growth patterns. Given the importance of geological structure and preglacial topographic inheritance, cirques are complex landforms for which assumptions of allometric growth may be spurious. It follows that form is not always a reliable guide to process.

  11. Comparative Allometric Growth of the Mimetic Ephippid Reef Fishes Chaetodipterus faber and Platax orbicularis

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Breno; Sakai, Yoichi; Pereira, Pedro H. C.; Gasset, Eric; Buchet, Vincent; Maamaatuaiahutapu, Moana; Ready, Jonathan S.; Oliveira, Yrlan; Giarrizzo, Tommaso; Vallinoto, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Mimesis is a relatively widespread phenomenon among reef fish, but the ontogenetic processes relevant for mimetic associations in fish are still poorly understood. In the present study, the allometric growth of two allopatric leaf-mimetic species of ephippid fishes, Chaetodipterus faber from the Atlantic and Platax orbicularis from the Indo-Pacific, was analyzed using ten morphological variables. The development of fins was considered owing to the importance of these structures for mimetic behaviors during early life stages. Despite the anatomical and behavioral similarities in both juvenile and adult stages, C. faber and P. orbicularis showed distinct patterns of growth. The overall shape of C. faber transforms from a rounded-shape in mimetic juveniles to a lengthened profile in adults, while in P. orbicularis, juveniles present an oblong profile including dorsal and anal fins, with relative fin size diminishing while the overall profile grows rounder in adults. Although the two species are closely-related, the present results suggest that growth patterns in C. faber and P. orbicularis are different, and are probably independent events in ephippids that have resulted from similar selective processes. PMID:26630347

  12. Proctophantastes nettastomatis (Digenea: Zoogonidae) from Vanuatu deep-sea fish: new morphological features, allometric growth, and phenotypic plasticity aspects.

    PubMed

    Mouahid, Gabriel; Faliex, Elisabeth; Allienne, Jean-François; Cribb, Thomas H; Bray, Rodney A

    2012-05-01

    The present paper deals with Proctophantastes nettastomatis (Digenea: Zoogonidae; Lepidophyllinae) found in the intestine of three species of deep-sea fish, Dicrolene longimana (Ophidiidae, Ophidiiformes), Bathyuroconger sp. (Congridae, Anguilliformes), and Venefica tentaculata (Nettastomatidae, Anguilliformes). The fish were collected near the islands of Espiritu Santo, Erromango, and Epi, respectively, in the archipelago of Vanuatu (Southern Pacific Ocean) at depths ranging from 561 to 990 m. Morphological and histological analyses showed that the Vanuatu specimens differ from Proctophantastes abyssorum, Proctophantastes gillissi, Proctophantastes glandulosum, Proctophantastes infundibulum, and Proctophantastes brayi but are close to P. nettastomatis discovered in Suruga Bay, Japan. P. nettastomatis is redescribed based both on the observations of our specimens and of the Japanese holotype and paratype. The morphological variability of the species is described. Morphometric data allowed the identification of positive allometric growth for the hindbody, negative allometric growth for the ventral sucker, and a growth phenotypic plasticity between Ophidiiformes and Anguilliformes definitive hosts.

  13. Allometric growth and development of organs in ballan wrasse (Labrus bergylta Ascanius, 1767) larvae in relation to different live prey diets and growth rates

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Per-Arvid; Bardal, Tora; Øie, Gunvor; Kjørsvik, Elin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small fish larvae grow allometrically, but little is known about how this growth pattern may be affected by different growth rates and early diet quality. The present study investigates how different growth rates, caused by start-feeding with copepods or rotifers the first 30 days post-hatch (dph), affect allometric growth and development of nine major organs in ballan wrasse (Labrus bergylta) larvae up to experimental end at 60 dph. Feeding with cultivated copepod nauplii led to both increased larval somatic growth and faster development and growth of organ systems than feeding with rotifers. Of the organs studied, the digestive and respiratory organs increased the most in size between 4 and 8 dph, having a daily specific growth rate (SGR) between 30 and 40% in larvae fed copepods compared with 20% or less for rotifer-fed larvae. Muscle growth was prioritised from flexion stage and onwards, with a daily SGR close to 30% between 21 and 33 dph regardless of treatment. All larvae demonstrated a positive linear correlation between larval standard length (SL) and increase in total tissue volume, and no difference in allometric growth pattern was found between the larval treatments. A change from positive allometric to isometric growth was observed at a SL close to 6.0 mm, a sign associated with the start of metamorphosis. This was also where the larvae reached postflexion stage, and was accompanied by a change in growth pattern for most of the major organ systems. The first sign of a developing hepatopancreas was, however, first observed in the largest larva (17.4 mm SL, 55 dph), indicating that the metamorphosis in ballan wrasse is a gradual process lasting from 6.0 to at least 15-17 mm SL. PMID:27422903

  14. Allometric growth and development of organs in ballan wrasse (Labrus bergylta Ascanius, 1767) larvae in relation to different live prey diets and growth rates.

    PubMed

    Gagnat, Maren Ranheim; Wold, Per-Arvid; Bardal, Tora; Øie, Gunvor; Kjørsvik, Elin

    2016-09-15

    Small fish larvae grow allometrically, but little is known about how this growth pattern may be affected by different growth rates and early diet quality. The present study investigates how different growth rates, caused by start-feeding with copepods or rotifers the first 30 days post-hatch (dph), affect allometric growth and development of nine major organs in ballan wrasse (Labrus bergylta) larvae up to experimental end at 60 dph. Feeding with cultivated copepod nauplii led to both increased larval somatic growth and faster development and growth of organ systems than feeding with rotifers. Of the organs studied, the digestive and respiratory organs increased the most in size between 4 and 8 dph, having a daily specific growth rate (SGR) between 30 and 40% in larvae fed copepods compared with 20% or less for rotifer-fed larvae. Muscle growth was prioritised from flexion stage and onwards, with a daily SGR close to 30% between 21 and 33 dph regardless of treatment. All larvae demonstrated a positive linear correlation between larval standard length (SL) and increase in total tissue volume, and no difference in allometric growth pattern was found between the larval treatments. A change from positive allometric to isometric growth was observed at a SL close to 6.0 mm, a sign associated with the start of metamorphosis. This was also where the larvae reached postflexion stage, and was accompanied by a change in growth pattern for most of the major organ systems. The first sign of a developing hepatopancreas was, however, first observed in the largest larva (17.4 mm SL, 55 dph), indicating that the metamorphosis in ballan wrasse is a gradual process lasting from 6.0 to at least 15-17 mm SL.

  15. Effective distribution coefficient in magnetic Czochralski growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurle, D. T. J.; Series, R. W.

    1985-10-01

    The analysis by Burton, Prim and Slichter (1953) of the dependence of the effective distribution coefficient (keff) on the growth and crystal rotation rates in Czochralski growth is extended to include the effect of an imposed steady axial magnetic field. The theory is based on the analysis of the hydromagnetic flow at a rotating disk due to Kakutani (1962). It is shown that keff approaches unity as the field increases. The likely effects of this on the growth of silicon and gallium arsenide are discussed.

  16. Allometric growth rate of the spinal cord in relation to the vertebral column during prenatal life in male and female goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Ghazi, S M; Ranjbar, R; Khaksary Mahabady, M

    2016-01-01

    Total and regional allometric growth rates and termination sites of the spinal cord related to the respective vertebra were studied in 36 goat fetuses, from the Ahvaz slaughterhouse. These specimens were assigned to 3 groups, group 1 (CRL 10-20 cm), group 2 (CRL 21-30 cm), and group 3 (CRL 31-40 cm), each consisting of 6 male and 6 female fetuses. Observations in all 3 groups revealed that although the growth of the vertebral column was greater than that of the spinal cord, the difference in growth was not constant throughout the spine. While in cervical and thoracic regions the growth rate of the spinal cord in relation to the vertebral column was almost isometric, in the caudal part of the spine there was marked decline in growth of the spinal cord compared to the respective regions of the vertebral column. Craniocaudally, the allometric growth rate became drastically negative. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) between males and females. Except in thoracic region, all other regions showed significant differences (P<0.01) between similar regions in all 3 groups. In the lumbar region of group 2 no significant difference was found (P>0.05). As a consequence of the negative allometric growth of the spinal cord in relation to the vertebral column in the caudal part of the spine, the conus medullaris was displaced from S4-S5 in group 1 to S2 in group 3. No significant difference (P>0.05) between male and female fetuses concerning the termination of the spinal cord was found.

  17. Allometric growth rate of the spinal cord in relation to the vertebral column during prenatal life in male and female goats (Capra hircus)

    PubMed Central

    Ghazi, S. M.; Ranjbar, R.; Khaksary Mahabady, M.

    2016-01-01

    Total and regional allometric growth rates and termination sites of the spinal cord related to the respective vertebra were studied in 36 goat fetuses, from the Ahvaz slaughterhouse. These specimens were assigned to 3 groups, group 1 (CRL 10-20 cm), group 2 (CRL 21-30 cm), and group 3 (CRL 31-40 cm), each consisting of 6 male and 6 female fetuses. Observations in all 3 groups revealed that although the growth of the vertebral column was greater than that of the spinal cord, the difference in growth was not constant throughout the spine. While in cervical and thoracic regions the growth rate of the spinal cord in relation to the vertebral column was almost isometric, in the caudal part of the spine there was marked decline in growth of the spinal cord compared to the respective regions of the vertebral column. Craniocaudally, the allometric growth rate became drastically negative. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) between males and females. Except in thoracic region, all other regions showed significant differences (P<0.01) between similar regions in all 3 groups. In the lumbar region of group 2 no significant difference was found (P>0.05). As a consequence of the negative allometric growth of the spinal cord in relation to the vertebral column in the caudal part of the spine, the conus medullaris was displaced from S4-S5 in group 1 to S2 in group 3. No significant difference (P>0.05) between male and female fetuses concerning the termination of the spinal cord was found. PMID:28224007

  18. The influence of rapid growth in broilers on florfenicol pharmacokinetics - allometric modelling of the pharmacokinetic and haemodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Poźniak, B; Pawłowski, P; Pasławska, U; Grabowski, T; Suszko, A; Lis, M; Świtała, M

    2017-04-01

    1. The aim of this study was to determine if the pharmacokinetics (PK) of florfenicol (FF) undergo age-dependent changes in broilers. Since drug elimination depends on cardiovascular functions, a haemodynamic study was performed in parallel. 2. Broilers of 0.68, 1.27, 2.45 and 5.13 kg were administered FF in a single intravenous dose of 30 mg/kg body weight. Plasma drug concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography and PK parameters were calculated using a non-compartmental model. Echocardiography was used to measure haemodynamic functions. 3. During growth, the area under the drug concentration-time curve (AUCinf) increased from 25.7 ± 2.9 to 39.0 ± 8.0 mg h/l. Total body clearance (ClB) gradually decreased from 1.19 ± 0.14 to 0.80 ± 0.15 l/h/kg. Elimination half-life increased from 0.73 ± 0.08 to 1.07 ± 0.07 h, whereas volume of distribution (Vss) remained unchanged. Haemodynamic measurements revealed an increase in cardiac output, from 495 ± 65 to 1303 ± 306 ml/min, in the respective body weight groups. 4. Allometric models for PK and haemodynamic parameters were developed and validated. All models proved to be statistically significant; however, only models for ClB and Vss met stringent validation criteria. Model for ClB was used to calculate an optimal dose for a given age group that provides uniform AUCinf. 5. Age-dependent change in FF kinetics may cause variability in therapeutic response under clinical conditions. A novel approach to the dosing protocol was proposed as a means of optimising therapeutic efficacy.

  19. Allometric space and allometric disparity: a developmental perspective in the macroevolutionary analysis of morphological disparity.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Sylvain; Eble, Gunther J; Neige, Pascal

    2008-06-01

    Here, we advance novel uses of allometric spaces--multidimensional spaces specifically defined by allometric coefficients--with the goal of investigating the focal role of development in shaping the evolution of morphological disparity. From their examination, operational measures of allometric disparity can be derived, complementing standard signals of morphological disparity through an intuitive and process-oriented refinement of established analytical protocols used in disparity studies. Allometric spaces thereby become a promising context to reveal different patterns of evolutionary developmental changes and to assess their relative prevalence and importance. Such spaces offer a novel domain of investigation of phenotypic variation and should help in detecting large-scale trends, thus placing various macroevolutionary phenomena in an explicitly developmental context. Ammonoidea (Cephalopoda) at the Lower-Middle Jurassic transition were chosen as a case study to illustrate this methodological approach. We constructed two phenotypic spaces: a static, adult one (adult morphospace) and a dynamic, developmental one (allometric space). Comparative disparity analyses show a strikingly stable occupation in both spaces, despite extensive change in taxonomic composition. In contrast, disparity analyses of subclades reveal clearly distinct morphological and allometric disparity dynamics. Allometric approaches allow developmental insights into morphological diversification otherwise intractable from the analysis of adult morphospace alone.

  20. Comparative biology of the crab Goniopsis cruentata: geographic variation of body size, sexual maturity, and allometric growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lira, José Jonathas Pereira Rodrigues; Calado, Tereza Cristina dos Santos; Rezende, Carla Ferreira; Silva, José Roberto Feitosa

    2015-12-01

    Geographic variation of phenotypic traits is common across species and is often associated with variation in environmental conditions. Here, we found larger bodies and larger size at maturity in a northward, lower latitude population of the crab Goniopsis cruentata, which inhabits a hotter, drier environment in comparison with a southward, higher latitude population. Furthermore, the juvenile male gonopods grow more relative to body size in the population characterized by maturation at a smaller size. In contrast, the female abdomen widens at a higher rate among the late maturing population. These results provide further evidence that local environmental conditions play a role in phenotypic variation between populations inhabiting different latitudes. Moreover, they also show that variation in size at maturity and body size can lead to divergent allometric patterns of sexual characteristics that can have a sex-specific response.

  1. A conserved function of the zinc finger transcription factor Sp8/9 in allometric appendage growth in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus.

    PubMed

    Schaeper, Nina D; Prpic, Nikola-Michael; Wimmer, Ernst A

    2009-08-01

    The genes encoding the closely related zinc finger transcription factors Buttonhead (Btd) and D-Sp1 are expressed in the developing limb primordia of Drosophila melanogaster and are required for normal growth of the legs. The D-Sp1 homolog of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, Sp8 (appropriately termed Sp8/9), is also required for the proper growth of the leg segments. Here we report on the isolation and functional study of the Sp8/9 gene from the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus. We show that Sp8/9 is expressed in the developing appendages throughout development and that the downregulation of Sp8/9 via RNAi leads to antennae, rostrum, and legs with shortened and fused segments. This supports a conserved role of Sp8/9 in allometric leg segment growth. However, all leg segments including the claws are present and the expression of the leg genes Distal-less, dachshund, and homothorax are proportionally normal, thus providing no evidence for a role of Sp8/9 in appendage specification.

  2. Allometric scaling of countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiang; Yu, Tongkui

    2010-11-01

    As huge complex systems consisting of geographic regions, natural resources, people and economic entities, countries follow the allometric scaling law which is ubiquitous in ecological, and urban systems. We systematically investigated the allometric scaling relationships between a large number of macroscopic properties and geographic (area), demographic (population) and economic (GDP, gross domestic production) sizes of countries respectively. We found that most of the economic, trade, energy consumption, communication related properties have significant super-linear (the exponent is larger than 1) or nearly linear allometric scaling relations with the GDP. Meanwhile, the geographic (arable area, natural resources, etc.), demographic (labor force, military age population, etc.) and transportation-related properties (road length, airports) have significant and sub-linear (the exponent is smaller than 1) allometric scaling relations with area. Several differences of power law relations with respect to the population between countries and cities were pointed out. First, population increases sub-linearly with area in countries. Second, the GDP increases linearly in countries but not super-linearly as in cities. Finally, electricity or oil consumption per capita increases with population faster than cities.

  3. Allometric scaling of pegylated liposomal anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Caron, Whitney P; Clewell, Harvey; Dedrick, Robert; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Davis, Whitney L; Yu, Ning; Tonda, Margaret; Schellens, Jan H; Beijnen, Jos H; Zamboni, William C

    2011-10-01

    Pegylated liposomal formulations contain lipid conjugated to polyethylene glycol. The disposition of encapsulated drug is dictated by the composition of the liposome, thus altering the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of the drug. Allometric scaling is based on a power-log relationship between body weight (W) and drug clearance (CL) among mammals and has been used to compare the disposition of nonliposomal drugs across species. The objectives of this study were to use allometric scaling to: (1) compare the disposition of pegylated liposomal drugs across speciesand determine the best scaling model and (2) predict PK parameters of pegylated liposomal drugs in humans. The PK of pegylated liposomal CKD-602 (S-CKD602), doxorubicin (Doxil®), and cisplatin (SPI-077) were compared. PK studies ofS-CKD602, Doxil®, and SPI-077 were performed at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in male and female mice, rats, dogs and patients with refractory solid tumors. The allometric equation used to evaluate the relationship between W and CL in each species was CL = a(W)(m) (a = empirical coefficient; m = allometric exponent). Substitution of physiological variables other than body weight, such as factors representative of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) were evaluated. Dedrick Plots and Maximum Life-Span Potential (MLP) were used to determine scaling feasibility. Standard allometry demonstrated a relationship between clearance of S-CKD602, Doxil®, and SPI-077 and body, spleen, liver, and kidney weights, total monocyte count, and spleen and liver blood flow. However, using scaling to predict CL of these agents in humans often resulted in differences >30%. Despite a strong correlation between body weight and MPS-associated variables with CL among preclinical species, the use of the equations did not predict CL. Thus, new methods of allometric scaling and measures of MPS function need to be developed.

  4. Multi-scaling allometric analysis for urban and regional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanguang

    2017-01-01

    The concept of allometric growth is based on scaling relations, and it has been applied to urban and regional analysis for a long time. However, most allometric analyses were devoted to the single proportional relation between two elements of a geographical system. Few researches focus on the allometric scaling of multielements. In this paper, a process of multiscaling allometric analysis is developed for the studies on spatio-temporal evolution of complex systems. By means of linear algebra, general system theory, and by analogy with the analytical hierarchy process, the concepts of allometric growth can be integrated with the ideas from fractal dimension. Thus a new methodology of geo-spatial analysis and the related theoretical models emerge. Based on the least squares regression and matrix operations, a simple algorithm is proposed to solve the multiscaling allometric equation. Applying the analytical method of multielement allometry to Chinese cities and regions yields satisfying results. A conclusion is reached that the multiscaling allometric analysis can be employed to make a comprehensive evaluation for the relative levels of urban and regional development, and explain spatial heterogeneity. The notion of multiscaling allometry may enrich the current theory and methodology of spatial analyses of urban and regional evolution.

  5. Allometric Growth of Testes in Relation to Age, Body Weight and Selected Blood Parameters in Male Japanese Quail (Coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Vatsalya, Vatsalya; Arora, Kashmiri L

    2012-01-01

    The Japanese quail is a very valuable animal model for research in a variety of biological disciplines. The purpose of this study was to characterize and interrelate age-dependent testicular parameters with various blood constituents: blood glucose, plasma proteins and packed cell volume that are developing concurrently in the growing bird. Another objective of the study was to identify selective physioanatomical markers for predicting the testicular growth and the onset of sexual maturity. Male Japanese quail hatchlings were raised in temperature controlled brooders for up to 3 weeks of age under a constant light and then shifted to hanging cages in an air conditioned room set at ~73° F under a 14L: 10D lighting system and ad libitum access to feed and water. Starting d8, a group of 8-10 birds of uniform size and weight were selected randomly at 4-day intervals up to d52 of age for the project. The birds were weighed and blood sampled using the brachial vein and Blood Glucose (BGL), Total Plasma Proteins (PP) and Packed Cell Volume (PCV) levels were measured prior to euthanization. The testes were removed and measured for weight, length, width and Volume (VOL). All the testicular measurements were then correlated with age and body weight. The left testes were larger than the right testes and their differences were evident at d36 of age. Testicular measurements also reflected two distinct growth surges at d28, d32 and d36 of age. Combined Testes Weight (CTW) and Combined Testes Volume (CTV) revealed a strong positive correlation with PCV and PP and a negative correlation with Blood Glucose Level (BGL). Accordingly, these measurements could serve as reliable markers of growth rate and sexual maturation in male Japanese quail.

  6. Effective distribution coefficient of silicon dopants during magnetic Czochralski growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Series, R. W.; Hurle, D. T. J.; Barraclough, K. G.

    1985-09-01

    Silicon crystals have been grown under axial magnetic fields of up to 0.2 T. At 0.05 T the field starts to interact with the melt and dopant incorporation becomes erratic. As the field is increased to 0.2 T the interaction becomes more controlled and it is seen that the effective distribution coefficient (keff) moves towards unity. A theory based on the analysis by Burton, Prim and Slichter of the dependence of the effective distribution coefficient (keff) on growth and crystal rotation rates in Czochralski growth is extended to include the effect of an imposed steady axial magnetic field. The flow fields incorporated into the theory are based on the analysis of the hydromagnetic flow at a rotating disc due to Kakutani (1962). It is shown that keff approaches unity as the field increases.

  7. Allometric exponents as a tool to study the influence of climate on the trade-off between primary and secondary growth in major north-eastern American tree species

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, T.; Martin-Ducup, O.; Schneider, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Trees invest in both primary (e.g. height) and secondary (e.g. diameter) growth. The trade-off between these investments varies between species and changes with the tree growing environment. To better establish this trade-off, readily available allometric exponents relating height to diameter at breast height (γh,dbh) and stem volume to diameter at breast height (αv,dbh) were simultaneously studied. Methods Allometric exponents αv,dbh and γh,dbh were obtained from 8893 individual tree stem analyses from two broadleaved species (Betula papyrifera, Populus tremuloides) and four conifers (Picea glauca, Picea mariana, Pinus banksiana, Abies balsamea) in the temperate and boreal forests of the province of Quebec, Canada. αv,dbh and γh,dbh were related to tree age, stand density index (SDI), and mean temperature (TGS) and total precipitation (PGS) of the growing season. Key Results αv,dbh and γh,dbh were found to be invariant with PGS and positively related to SDI and TGS for all species except Pinus banksiana . The parameter values associated with SDI and TGS were of higher value for conifers than for broadleaved species. Conclusions This suggests that conifers and broadleaved species have different growth patterns. This could be explained by their different mode of development, the conifer species having a stronger apical dominance than broadleaved species. Such results could be further considered in allocation studies to quantify future carbon stocks in managed forests. PMID:26975315

  8. Jellyfish Body Plans Provide Allometric Advantages beyond Low Carbon Content

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Kylie A.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Lucas, Cathy H.; Sutherland, Kelly R.; Condon, Robert H.; Mianzan, Hermes; Purcell, Jennifer E.; Robinson, Kelly L.; Uye, Shin-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Jellyfish form spectacular blooms throughout the world’s oceans. Jellyfish body plans are characterised by high water and low carbon contents which enables them to grow much larger than non-gelatinous animals of equivalent carbon content and to deviate from non-gelatinous pelagic animals when incorporated into allometric relationships. Jellyfish have, however, been argued to conform to allometric relationships when carbon content is used as the metric for comparison. Here we test the hypothesis that differences in allometric relationships for several key functional parameters remain for jellyfish even after their body sizes are scaled to their carbon content. Data on carbon and nitrogen contents, rates of respiration, excretion, growth, longevity and swimming velocity of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were assembled. Allometric relationships between each variable and the equivalent spherical diameters of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were compared before and after sizes of jellyfish were standardised for their carbon content. Before standardisation, the slopes of the allometric relationships for respiration, excretion and growth were the same for jellyfish and other pelagic taxa but the intercepts differed. After standardisation, slopes and intercepts for respiration were similar but excretion rates of jellyfish were 10× slower, and growth rates 2× faster than those of other pelagic animals. Longevity of jellyfish was independent of size. The slope of the allometric relationship of swimming velocity of jellyfish differed from that of other pelagic animals but because they are larger jellyfish operate at Reynolds numbers approximately 10× greater than those of other pelagic animals of comparable carbon content. We conclude that low carbon and high water contents alone do not explain the differences in the intercepts or slopes of the allometric relationships of jellyfish and other pelagic animals and that the evolutionary longevity of jellyfish and

  9. Jellyfish body plans provide allometric advantages beyond low carbon content.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Kylie A; Duarte, Carlos M; Lucas, Cathy H; Sutherland, Kelly R; Condon, Robert H; Mianzan, Hermes; Purcell, Jennifer E; Robinson, Kelly L; Uye, Shin-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Jellyfish form spectacular blooms throughout the world's oceans. Jellyfish body plans are characterised by high water and low carbon contents which enables them to grow much larger than non-gelatinous animals of equivalent carbon content and to deviate from non-gelatinous pelagic animals when incorporated into allometric relationships. Jellyfish have, however, been argued to conform to allometric relationships when carbon content is used as the metric for comparison. Here we test the hypothesis that differences in allometric relationships for several key functional parameters remain for jellyfish even after their body sizes are scaled to their carbon content. Data on carbon and nitrogen contents, rates of respiration, excretion, growth, longevity and swimming velocity of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were assembled. Allometric relationships between each variable and the equivalent spherical diameters of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were compared before and after sizes of jellyfish were standardised for their carbon content. Before standardisation, the slopes of the allometric relationships for respiration, excretion and growth were the same for jellyfish and other pelagic taxa but the intercepts differed. After standardisation, slopes and intercepts for respiration were similar but excretion rates of jellyfish were 10× slower, and growth rates 2× faster than those of other pelagic animals. Longevity of jellyfish was independent of size. The slope of the allometric relationship of swimming velocity of jellyfish differed from that of other pelagic animals but because they are larger jellyfish operate at Reynolds numbers approximately 10× greater than those of other pelagic animals of comparable carbon content. We conclude that low carbon and high water contents alone do not explain the differences in the intercepts or slopes of the allometric relationships of jellyfish and other pelagic animals and that the evolutionary longevity of jellyfish and

  10. Growth of heat trace coefficients for locally symmetric spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkey, P.; Miatello, R. J.

    2012-10-01

    We study the asymptotic behavior of the heat trace coefficients an as n → ∞ for the scalar Laplacian in the context of locally symmetric spaces. We show that if a locally symmetric space is modeled on a noncompact type symmetric space X = G/K such that G has one conjugacy class of Cartan subgroups then these coefficients are O(C^n/n!) for some C > 0. In contrast, we prove that for even dimensional locally rank 1-symmetric spaces, one has |an| ≈ C'n . n! for some C' > 0. We conjecture this is the growth for general noncompact type symmetric spaces unless all Cartan subgroups in G are conjugate. These spaces also have the distinguishing property that the Huygens principle for the shifted wave equation holds (n odd). These examples show that growth estimates conjectured by Berry and Howls ["High orders of the Weyl expansion for quantum billiards: Resurgence of periodic orbits and the Stokes phenomenon," Proc. R. Soc. London A 447, 527-555 (1994), 10.1098/rspa.1994.0154] are sharp. We also construct examples of locally symmetric spaces which are not irreducible, which are not flat, and so that only a finite number of the an is non-zero.

  11. Comparative analysis of animal growth: a primate continuum revealed by a new dimensionless growth rate coefficient.

    PubMed

    Vinicius, Lucio; Mumby, Hannah S

    2013-05-01

    The comparative analysis of animal growth still awaits full integration into life-history studies, partially due to the difficulty of defining a comparable measure of growth rate across species. Using growth data from 50 primate species, we introduce a modified "general growth model" and a dimensionless growth rate coefficient β that controls for size scaling and phylogenetic effects in the distribution of growth rates. Our results contradict the prevailing idea that slow growth characterizes primates as a group: the observed range of β values shows that not all primates grow slowly, with galago species exhibiting growth rates similar or above the mammalian average, while other strepsirrhines and most New World monkeys show limited reduction in growth rates. Low growth rate characterizes apes and some papionines. Phylogenetic regressions reveal associations between β and life-history variables, providing tests for theories of primate growth evolution. We also show that primate slow growth is an exclusively postnatal phenomenon. Our study exemplifies how the dimensionless approach promotes the integration of growth rate data into comparative life-history analysis, and demonstrates its potential applicability to other cases of adaptive diversification of animal growth patterns.

  12. Aerosol hygroscopic growth parameterization based on a solute specific coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Steil, B.; Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.; Lelieveld, J.

    2011-09-01

    Water is a main component of atmospheric aerosols and its amount depends on the particle chemical composition. We introduce a new parameterization for the aerosol hygroscopic growth factor (HGF), based on an empirical relation between water activity (aw) and solute molality (μs) through a single solute specific coefficient νi. Three main advantages are: (1) wide applicability, (2) simplicity and (3) analytical nature. (1) Our approach considers the Kelvin effect and covers ideal solutions at large relative humidity (RH), including CCN activation, as well as concentrated solutions with high ionic strength at low RH such as the relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD). (2) A single νi coefficient suffices to parameterize the HGF for a wide range of particle sizes, from nanometer nucleation mode to micrometer coarse mode particles. (3) In contrast to previous methods, our analytical aw parameterization depends not only on a linear correction factor for the solute molality, instead νi also appears in the exponent in form x · ax. According to our findings, νi can be assumed constant for the entire aw range (0-1). Thus, the νi based method is computationally efficient. In this work we focus on single solute solutions, where νi is pre-determined with the bisection method from our analytical equations using RHD measurements and the saturation molality μssat. The computed aerosol HGF and supersaturation (Köhler-theory) compare well with the results of the thermodynamic reference model E-AIM for the key compounds NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 relevant for CCN modeling and calibration studies. The equations introduced here provide the basis of our revised gas-liquid-solid partitioning model, i.e. version 4 of the EQuilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model (EQSAM4), described in a companion paper.

  13. Allometric Scaling in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavar, Jayanth

    2009-03-01

    The unity of life is expressed not only in the universal basis of inheritance and energetics at the molecular level, but also in the pervasive scaling of traits with body size at the whole-organism level. More than 75 years ago, Kleiber and Brody and Proctor independently showed that the metabolic rates, B, of mammals and birds scale as the three-quarter power of their mass, M. Subsequent studies showed that most biological rates and times scale as M-1/4 and M^1/4 respectively, and that these so called quarter-power scaling relations hold for a variety of organisms, from unicellular prokaryotes and eukaryotes to trees and mammals. The wide applicability of Kleiber's law, across the 22 orders of magnitude of body mass from minute bacteria to giant whales and sequoias, raises the hope that there is some simple general explanation that underlies the incredible diversity of form and function. We will present a general theoretical framework for understanding the relationship between metabolic rate, B, and body mass, M. We show how the pervasive quarter-power biological scaling relations arise naturally from optimal directed resource supply systems. This framework robustly predicts that: 1) whole organism power and resource supply rate, B, scale as M^3/4; 2) most other rates, such as heart rate and maximal population growth rate scale as M-1/4; 3) most biological times, such as blood circulation time and lifespan, scale as M^1/4; and 4) the average velocity of flow through the network, v, such as the speed of blood and oxygen delivery, scales as M^1/12. Our framework is valid even when there is no underlying network. Our theory is applicable to unicellular organisms as well as to large animals and plants. This work was carried out in collaboration with Amos Maritan along with Jim Brown, John Damuth, Melanie Moses, Andrea Rinaldo, and Geoff West.

  14. Allometric scaling in-vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Arti

    2017-01-01

    About two decades ago, West and coworkers established a model which predicts that metabolic rate follows a three quarter power relationship with the mass of an organism, based on the premise that tissues are supplied nutrients through a fractal distribution network. Quarter power scaling is widely considered a universal law of biology and it is generally accepted that were in-vitro cultures to obey allometric metabolic scaling, they would have more predictive potential and could, for instance, provide a viable substitute for animals in research. This paper outlines a theoretical and computational framework for establishing quarter power scaling in three-dimensional spherical constructs in-vitro, starting where fractal distribution ends. Allometric scaling in non-vascular spherical tissue constructs was assessed using models of Michaelis Menten oxygen consumption and diffusion. The models demonstrate that physiological scaling is maintained when about 5 to 60% of the construct is exposed to oxygen concentrations less than the Michaelis Menten constant, with a significant concentration gradient in the sphere. The results have important implications for the design of downscaled in-vitro systems with physiological relevance. PMID:28169362

  15. Allometric scaling in-vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Arti

    2017-02-01

    About two decades ago, West and coworkers established a model which predicts that metabolic rate follows a three quarter power relationship with the mass of an organism, based on the premise that tissues are supplied nutrients through a fractal distribution network. Quarter power scaling is widely considered a universal law of biology and it is generally accepted that were in-vitro cultures to obey allometric metabolic scaling, they would have more predictive potential and could, for instance, provide a viable substitute for animals in research. This paper outlines a theoretical and computational framework for establishing quarter power scaling in three-dimensional spherical constructs in-vitro, starting where fractal distribution ends. Allometric scaling in non-vascular spherical tissue constructs was assessed using models of Michaelis Menten oxygen consumption and diffusion. The models demonstrate that physiological scaling is maintained when about 5 to 60% of the construct is exposed to oxygen concentrations less than the Michaelis Menten constant, with a significant concentration gradient in the sphere. The results have important implications for the design of downscaled in-vitro systems with physiological relevance.

  16. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: An allometric comparative analysis of different ECG markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomini, M. P.; Ingallina, F.; Barone, V.; Valentinuzzi, M. E.; Arini, P. D.

    2011-12-01

    Allometry, in general biology, measures the relative growth of a part in relation to the whole living organism. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is the heart adaptation to excessive load (systolic or diastolic). The increase in left ventricular mass leads to an increase in the electrocardiographic voltages. Based on clinical data, we compared the allometric behavior of three different ECG markers of LVH. To do this, the allometric fit AECG = δ + β (VM) relating left ventricular mass (estimated from ecocardiographic data) and ECG amplitudes (expressed as the Cornell-Voltage, Sokolow and the ECG overall voltage indexes) were compared. Besides, sensitivity and specifity for each index were analyzed. The more sensitive the ECG criteria, the better the allometric fit. In conclusion: The allometric paradigm should be regarded as the way to design new and more sensitive ECG-based LVH markers.

  17. Probability of ventricular fibrillation: allometric model based on the ST deviation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Allometry, in general biology, measures the relative growth of a part in relation to the whole living organism. Using reported clinical data, we apply this concept for evaluating the probability of ventricular fibrillation based on the electrocardiographic ST-segment deviation values. Methods Data collected by previous reports were used to fit an allometric model in order to estimate ventricular fibrillation probability. Patients presenting either with death, myocardial infarction or unstable angina were included to calculate such probability as, VFp = δ + β (ST), for three different ST deviations. The coefficients δ and β were obtained as the best fit to the clinical data extended over observational periods of 1, 6, 12 and 48 months from occurrence of the first reported chest pain accompanied by ST deviation. Results By application of the above equation in log-log representation, the fitting procedure produced the following overall coefficients: Average β = 0.46, with a maximum = 0.62 and a minimum = 0.42; Average δ = 1.28, with a maximum = 1.79 and a minimum = 0.92. For a 2 mm ST-deviation, the full range of predicted ventricular fibrillation probability extended from about 13% at 1 month up to 86% at 4 years after the original cardiac event. Conclusions These results, at least preliminarily, appear acceptable and still call for full clinical test. The model seems promising, especially if other parameters were taken into account, such as blood cardiac enzyme concentrations, ischemic or infarcted epicardial areas or ejection fraction. It is concluded, considering these results and a few references found in the literature, that the allometric model shows good predictive practical value to aid medical decisions. PMID:21226961

  18. Calculated diffusion coefficients and the growth rate of olivine in a basalt magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    Concentration gradients in glass adjacent to skeletal olivines in a basalt have been examined by electron probe. The glass is depleted in Mg, Fe, and Cr and enriched in Si, Al, Na, and Ca relative to that far from olivine. Ionic diffusion coefficients for the glass compositions are calculated from temperature, ionic radius and melt viscosity, using the Stokes-Einstein relation. At 1170 C, the diffusion coefficient of Mg(2+) ions in the basalt is 4.5 billionths sq cm per sec. Comparison with measured diffusion coefficients in a mugearite suggests this value may be 16 times too small. The concentration gradient data and the diffusion coefficients are used to calculate instantaneous olivine growth rates. Growth necessarily preceded emplacement such that the composition of the crystals plus the enclosing glass need not be that of a melt. The computed olivine growth rates are compatible with the rate of crystallization deduced for the Skaegaard intrusion.

  19. Allometric and temporal scaling of movement characteristics in Galapagos tortoises

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bastille-Rousseau, Guillaume; Yackulic, Charles B.; Frair, Jacqueline L.; Cabrera, Freddy; Blake, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how individual movement scales with body size is of fundamental importance in predicting ecological relationships for diverse species. One-dimensional movement metrics scale consistently with body size yet vary over different temporal scales. Knowing how temporal scale influences the relationship between animal body size and movement would better inform hypotheses about the efficiency of foraging behaviour, the ontogeny of energy budgets, and numerous life-history trade-offs.We investigated how the temporal scaling of allometric patterns in movement varies over the course of a year, specifically during periods of motivated (directional and fast movement) and unmotivated (stationary and tortuous movement) behaviour. We focused on a recently diverged group of species that displays wide variation in movement behaviour – giant Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) – to test how movement metrics estimated on a monthly basis scaled with body size.We used state-space modelling to estimate seven different movement metrics of Galapagos tortoises. We used log-log regression of the power law to evaluate allometric scaling for these movement metrics and contrasted relationships by species and sex.Allometric scaling of movement was more apparent during motivated periods of movement. During this period, allometry was revealed at multiple temporal intervals (hourly, daily and monthly), with values observed at daily and monthly intervals corresponding most closely to the expected one-fourth scaling coefficient, albeit with wide credible intervals. We further detected differences in the magnitude of scaling among taxa uncoupled from observed differences in the temporal structuring of their movement rates.Our results indicate that the definition of temporal scales is fundamental to the detection of allometry of movement and should be given more attention in movement studies. Our approach not only provides new conceptual insights into temporal attributes in one

  20. Allometric and temporal scaling of movement characteristics in Galapagos tortoises.

    PubMed

    Bastille-Rousseau, Guillaume; Yackulic, Charles B; Frair, Jacqueline L; Cabrera, Freddy; Blake, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how individual movement scales with body size is of fundamental importance in predicting ecological relationships for diverse species. One-dimensional movement metrics scale consistently with body size yet vary over different temporal scales. Knowing how temporal scale influences the relationship between animal body size and movement would better inform hypotheses about the efficiency of foraging behaviour, the ontogeny of energy budgets, and numerous life-history trade-offs. We investigated how the temporal scaling of allometric patterns in movement varies over the course of a year, specifically during periods of motivated (directional and fast movement) and unmotivated (stationary and tortuous movement) behaviour. We focused on a recently diverged group of species that displays wide variation in movement behaviour - giant Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp.) - to test how movement metrics estimated on a monthly basis scaled with body size. We used state-space modelling to estimate seven different movement metrics of Galapagos tortoises. We used log-log regression of the power law to evaluate allometric scaling for these movement metrics and contrasted relationships by species and sex. Allometric scaling of movement was more apparent during motivated periods of movement. During this period, allometry was revealed at multiple temporal intervals (hourly, daily and monthly), with values observed at daily and monthly intervals corresponding most closely to the expected one-fourth scaling coefficient, albeit with wide credible intervals. We further detected differences in the magnitude of scaling among taxa uncoupled from observed differences in the temporal structuring of their movement rates. Our results indicate that the definition of temporal scales is fundamental to the detection of allometry of movement and should be given more attention in movement studies. Our approach not only provides new conceptual insights into temporal attributes in one

  1. Julian Huxley, Uca pugnax and the allometric method.

    PubMed

    Packard, Gary C

    2012-02-15

    The allometric method, which often is attributed to Julian Huxley, entails fitting a straight line to logarithmic transformations of the original bivariate data and then back-transforming the resulting equation to form a power function in the arithmetic scale. Development of the technique was strongly influenced by Huxley's own research on growth by the enlarged 'crusher' claw in male fiddler crabs (Uca pugnax). Huxley reported a discontinuity in the log-log plot of chela mass vs body mass, which he interpreted as an abrupt change in relative growth of the chela at about the time crabs attain sexual maturity. My analysis of Huxley's arithmetic data indicates, however, that the discontinuity was an artifact caused by logarithmic transformation and that dynamics of growth by the crusher claw do not change at any point during development. Arithmetic data are well described by a power function fitted by nonlinear regression but not by one estimated by back-transforming a line fitted to logarithms. This finding and others like it call into question the continued reliance on the allometric method in contemporary research.

  2. Determination of growth-stage specific crop coefficients (Kc) of cotton and wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of crop coefficient (Kc), the ratio of crop evapotranspiration (ETc) to reference evapotranspiration (ETo), can enhance ETc estimates in relation to specific crop phenological development. This research was conducted to determine growth-stage-specific Kc and crop water use for cotton (Go...

  3. Calculation of Mass Transfer Coefficients in a Crystal Growth Chamber through Heat Transfer Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J H; Hand, L A

    2005-04-21

    The growth rate of a crystal in a supersaturated solution is limited by both reaction kinetics and the local concentration of solute. If the local mass transfer coefficient is too low, concentration of solute at the crystal-solution interface will drop below saturation, leading to a defect in the growing crystal. Here, mass transfer coefficients are calculated for a rotating crystal growing in a supersaturated solution of potassium diphosphate (KDP) in water. Since mass transfer is difficult to measure directly, the heat transfer coefficient of a scale model crystal in water is measured using temperature-sensitive paint (TSP). To the authors' knowledge this is the first use of TSP to measure temperatures in water. The corresponding mass transfer coefficient is then calculated using the Chilton- Colburn analogy. Measurements were made for three crystal sizes at two running conditions each. Running conditions include periodic reversals of rotation direction. Heat transfer coefficients were found to vary significantly both across the crystal faces and over the course of a rotation cycle, but not from one face to another. Mean heat transfer coefficients increased with both crystal size and rotation rate. Computed mass transfer coefficients were broadly in line with expectations from the full-scale crystal growth experiments. Additional experiments show that continuous rotation of the crystal results in about a 30% lower heat transfer compared to rotation with periodic reversals. The continuous rotation case also shows a periodic variation in heat transfer coefficient of about 15%, with a period about 1/20th of the rotation rate.

  4. The allometric model in chronic myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An allometric relationship between different electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters and infarcted ventricular mass was assessed in a myocardial infarction (MI) model in New Zealand rabbits. Methods A total of fifteen animals were used, out of which ten underwent left anterior descending coronary artery ligation to induce infarction (7–35% area). Myocardial infarction (MI) evolved and stabilized during a three month-period, after which, rabbits were sacrificed and the injured area was histologically confirmed. Right before sacrifice, ECGs were obtained to correlate several of its parameters to the infarcted mass. The latter was normalized after combining data from planimetry measurements and heart weight. The following ECG parameters were studied: RR and PR intervals, P-wave duration (PD), QRS duration (QRSD) and amplitude (QRSA), Q-wave (QA), R-wave (RA) and S-wave (SA) amplitudes, T-wave peak amplitude (TA), the interval from the peak to the end of the T-wave (TPE), ST-segment deviation (STA), QT interval (QT), corrected QT and JT intervals. Corrected QT was analyzed with different correction formulae, i.e., Bazett (QTB), Framingham (QTFRA), Fridericia (QTFRI), Hodge (QTHO) and Matsunaga (QTMA) and compared thereafter. The former variables and infarcted ventricular mass were then fitted to the allometric equation in terms of deviation from normality, in turn derived after ECGs in 5 healthy rabbits. Results Six variables (JT, QTB, QA, SA, TA and STA) presented statistical differences among leads. QT showed the best allometric fit (r = 0.78), followed by TA (r = 0.77), STA (r = 0.75), QTFRA (r = 0.72), TPE (r = 0.69), QTFRI (r = 0.68) and QTMA (r = 0.68). Corrected QT’s (QTFRA, QTFRI and QTMA) performed worse than the uncorrected counterpart (QT), the former scaling allometrically with similar goodness of fits. Conclusions QT, TA, STA and TPE could possibly be used to assess infarction extent in an old MI event through the

  5. Allometric scaling of brain regions to intra-cranial volume: An epidemiological MRI study.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Laura W; Vidal, Jean-Sébastien; Forsberg, Lars E; Zijdenbos, Alex P; Haight, Thaddeus; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van Buchem, Mark A; Launer, Lenore J

    2017-01-01

    There is growing evidence that sub-structures of the brain scale allometrically to total brain size, that is, in a non-proportional and non-linear way. Here, scaling of different volumes of interest (VOI) to intra-cranial volume (ICV) was examined. It was assessed whether scaling was allometric or isometric and whether scaling coefficients significantly differed from each other. We also tested to what extent allometric scaling of VOI was introduced by the automated segmentation technique. Furthermore, reproducibility of allometric scaling was studied different age groups and study populations. Study samples included samples of cognitively healthy adults from the community-based Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (AGES-Reykjavik Study) (N = 3,883), the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA) (N =709), and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) (N = 180). Data encompassed participants with different age, ethnicity, risk factor profile, and ICV and VOI obtained with different automated MRI segmentation techniques. Our analysis showed that (1) allometric scaling is a trait of all parts of the brain, (2) scaling of neo-cortical white matter, neo-cortical gray matter, and deep gray matter structures including the cerebellum are significantly different from each other, and (3) allometric scaling of brain structures cannot solely be explained by age-associated atrophy, sex, ethnicity, or a systematic bias from study-specific segmentation algorithm, but appears to be a true feature of brain geometry. Hum Brain Mapp 38:151-164, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Size structuring and allometric scaling relationships in coral reef fishes.

    PubMed

    Dunic, Jillian C; Baum, Julia K

    2017-05-01

    Temperate marine fish communities are often size-structured, with predators consuming increasingly larger prey and feeding at higher trophic levels as they grow. Gape limitation and ontogenetic diet shifts are key mechanisms by which size structuring arises in these communities. Little is known, however, about size structuring in coral reef fishes. Here, we aimed to advance understanding of size structuring in coral reef food webs by examining the evidence for these mechanisms in two groups of reef predators. Given the diversity of feeding modes amongst coral reef fishes, we also compared gape size-body size allometric relationships across functional groups to determine whether they are reliable indicators of size structuring. We used gut content analysis and quantile regressions of predator size-prey size relationships to test for evidence of gape limitation and ontogenetic niche shifts in reef piscivores (n = 13 species) and benthic invertivores (n = 3 species). We then estimated gape size-body size allometric scaling coefficients for 21 different species from four functional groups, including herbivores/detritivores, which are not expected to be gape-limited. We found evidence of both mechanisms for size structuring in coral reef piscivores, with maximum prey size scaling positively with predator body size, and ontogenetic diet shifts including prey type and expansion of prey size. There was, however, little evidence of size structuring in benthic invertivores. Across species and functional groups, absolute and relative gape sizes were largest in piscivores as expected, but gape size-body size scaling relationships were not indicative of size structuring. Instead, relative gape sizes and mouth morphologies may be better indicators. Our results provide evidence that coral reef piscivores are size-structured and that gape limitation and ontogenetic niche shifts are the mechanisms from which this structure arises. Although gape allometry was not indicative of

  7. Dependence of morphometric allometries on the growth kinetics of body parts.

    PubMed

    Nijhout, H Frederik

    2011-11-07

    As overall size varies, the sizes of body parts of many animals often appear to be related to each other by a power law, commonly called the allometric equation. Orderly scaling relationships among body parts are widespread in the animal world, but there is no general agreement about how these relationships come about. Presumably they depend on the patterns of growth of body parts, and simple analyses have shown that exponential growth can lead to size relationships that are well-described by the allometric equation. Exponential growth kinetics also allow for a simple biological interpretation of the coefficients of the power relationship. Nevertheless, many tissues do not grow with exponential kinetics, nor do they grow for the same period of time, and the consequences of more realistic growth patterns on the resulting allometric relationships of body parts are not well understood. In this paper I derive a set of allometric equations that assume different kinetics of growth: linear, exponential and sigmoidal. In these derivations I also include differences in development times as a variable, in addition to differences in the growth rates and initial sizes of the two structures whose allometric relationship is compared. I show how these equations can be used to deduce the effect of different causes of variation in absolute size on the resulting allometry. Variation in size can be due to variation in the duration of development, variation in growth rate or variation in initial size. I show that the meaning of the coefficients of the allometric equation depends on exactly how size variation comes about. I show that if two structures are assumed to grow with sigmoidal kinetics (logistic and Gompertz) the resulting allometric equations do not have a simple and intuitive structure and produce graphs that, over a sufficiently large range of sizes, can vary from linear, to sigmoidal to hump-shaped. Over a smaller range of absolute sizes, these sigmoid growth kinetics can

  8. Can growth-days predict the crop coefficient of cotton under mulched drip irrigation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengju; Tian, Fuqiang; Hu, Hongchang; Zhang, Zhi; Dai, Chao

    2015-04-01

    Mulched drip irrigation (MDI) has now become popular in arid and semi-arid areas like Tarim River basin located in northwest of China. It has the advantages of saving water as well as increasing crop yield. As an important cash crop, cotton is widely planted in Tarim basin that usually adopts MDI. Irrigation management requires prediction of evapotranspiration (ET). It is usually calculated by FAO-56 method, in which the crop coefficient (Kc) is a necessary parameter needed to determined a prior. Theoretically the crop characteristics like LAI can serve as a direct indicator to determine Kc. Practically two other indicators of growing-degree-day (GDD) and growth-day (GD) are also used to determine Kc. In this study a 3-year experiment was conducted to quantify the weekly ETc and develop a crop coefficient (Kc) model for mulched drip-irrigated cotton based on eddy covariance observation. Two polynomial models were developed to predict the Kc as a function of growth days (r2=0.95) and growing degree-day (GDD) (r2=0.96) in the growth stage after seeding. A logarithmic function (r2=0.87) was used to describe the Kc variability with LAI increase. The results showed that both the three models fitted well with the Kc and the LAI values could fit the Kc well before the end growth stage. The LAI can better simulate Kc with daily step, but with weekly step the accuracy of LAI is lower than the other two variables. Our results showed that the growth-day is a reliable indicator to predict the cotton Kc under MDI, which provide a basis for transpiration modeling in cotton fields.

  9. Absolute and allometric relationships between internal morphology and body mass in the adult collared peccary, Tayassu tajacu (Tayassuidae).

    PubMed

    Lochmiller, R L; Hellgren, E C; Grant, W E

    1986-01-01

    Selected morphological features of 8 adult male and 8 adult female collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu) shot from southern Texas during March 1983 are described. A total of 16 adult peccaries with an average body mass of 18.68 +/- 0.61 (SE) Kg was examined. Significant differences between males and females were observed for absolute and relative mass of liver and lungs, and relative heart mass. These visceral organs were heavier among females than males. Significant sex effects were also found for absolute and relative mass of the dorsal scent gland. The dorsal scent gland contributed twice as much to total body mass in males as in females. No sexual dimorphisms of the gastrointestinal tract were noted. Females had a significantly greater portion of total visceral fat deposited around the kidneys than did males. Relative mass of the mandible was significantly greater in males than in females. Adult males had extremely large accessory sex glands. The bulbourethral and seminal vesicle glands comprised 0.27 per cent of the total body mass. Allometric growth coefficients (b) varied among the various organs and glands examined, ranging from below (eyes, b = 0.34) to well above (seminal vesicles, b = 1.87) unity. Growth coefficients of lungs, kidneys, pituitary gland, and thyroid gland during adulthood greatly exceeded respective values in developing nurslings.

  10. Resolved shear stress intensity coefficient and fatigue crack growth in large crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, QI; Liu, Hao-Wen

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth in large grain Al alloy was studied. Fatigue crack growth is caused primarily by shear decohesion due to dislocation motion in the crack tip region. The crack paths in the large crystals are very irregular and zigzag. The crack planes are often inclined to the loading axis both in the inplane direction and the thickness direction. The stress intensity factors of such inclined cracks are approximated from the two dimensional finite element calculations. The plastic deformation in a large crystal is highly anisotropic, and dislocation motion in such crystals are driven by the resolved shear stress. The resolved shear stress intensity coefficient in a crack solid, RSSIC, is defined, and the coefficients for the slip systems at a crack tip are evaluated from the calculated stress intensity factors. The orientations of the crack planes are closely related to the slip planes with the high RSSIC values. If a single slip system has a much higher RSSIC than all the others, the crack will follow the slip plane, and the slip plane becomes the crack plane. If two or more slip systems have a high RSSIC, the crack plane is the result of the decohesion processes on these active slip planes.

  11. Modelling the growth curve of Maine-Anjou beef cattle using heteroskedastic random coefficients models

    PubMed Central

    Robert-Granié, Christèle; Heude, Barbara; Foulley, Jean-Louis

    2002-01-01

    A heteroskedastic random coefficients model was described for analyzing weight performances between the 100th and the 650th days of age of Maine-Anjou beef cattle. This model contained both fixed effects, random linear regression and heterogeneous variance components. The objective of this study was to analyze the difference of growth curves between animals born as twin and single bull calves. The method was based on log-linear models for residual and individual variances expressed as functions of explanatory variables. An expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm was proposed for calculating restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimates of the residual and individual components of variances and covariances. Likelihood ratio tests were used to assess hypotheses about parameters of this model. Growth of Maine-Anjou cattle was described by a third order regression on age for a mean growth curve, two correlated random effects for the individual variability and independent errors. Three sources of heterogeneity of residual variances were detected. The difference of weight performance between bulls born as single and twin bull calves was estimated to be equal to about 15 kg for the growth period considered. PMID:12270103

  12. Allometric Scaling of Wingate Anaerobic Power Test Scores in Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzler, Ronald K.; Stickley, Christopher D.; Kimura, Iris F.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we developed allometric exponents for scaling Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) power data that are reflective in controlling for body mass (BM) and lean body mass (LBM) and established a normative WAnT data set for college-age women. One hundred women completed a standard WAnT. Allometric exponents and percentile ranks for peak (PP)…

  13. Allometric scaling of plant life history.

    PubMed

    Marbà, Núria; Duarte, Carlos M; Agustí, Susana

    2007-10-02

    Plant mortality and birth rates are critical components of plant life history affecting the stability of plant populations and the ecosystems they form. Although allometric theory predicts that both plant birth and mortality rates should be size-dependent, this prediction has not yet been tested across plants ranging the full size spectrum. Here we show that both population mortality and population birth rates scale as the -(1/4) power and plant lifespan as the (1/4) power of plant mass across plant species spanning from the tiniest phototrophs to the largest trees. Whereas the controls on plant lifespans are as yet poorly understood, our findings suggest that plant mortality rates have evolved to match population birth rates, thereby helping to maintain plant communities in equilibrium and optimizing plant life histories.

  14. Allometric scaling of Wingate anaerobic powertest scores in women.

    PubMed

    Hetzler, Ronald K; Stickley, Christopher D; Kimura, Iris E

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we developed allometric exponents for scaling Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) power data that are effective in controlling for body mass (BM) and lean body mass (LBM) and established a normative WAnT data set for college-age women. One hundred women completed a standard WAnT Allometric exponents and percentile ranks for peak (PP) and mean power (MP) were established. Allometric exponents were applied to WAnT scores for an independent sample (n=31) to assess external validity. PP and MP were 477.0 W (SD = 80.0) and 372.6 W (SD = 61.5), respectively. Allometrice exponents for PP and MP scaled for BM were b = 0.92 and b = 0.76, respectively, and for LBM they were b = 0.93 and b = 0.91, respectively. In the independent sample, these exponents produced correlations between allometrically scaled PP and MP and BM of r = -.02 and r = .02, respectively. Correlations between allometrically scaled PP and MP and LBM were r = .004 and r = -.02, respectively. The allometric exponents were effective in partialing out the effect of BM for PP and MP and demonstrated acceptable levels of external validity when applied to an independent sample. The allometric exponents and normative values provide a useful tool for comparing WAnT scores in college-age women without the confounding effects of BM or LBM.

  15. Expression of VO2peak in Children and Youth, with Special Reference to Allometric Scaling.

    PubMed

    Loftin, Mark; Sothern, Melinda; Abe, Takashi; Bonis, Marc

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this review was to highlight research that has focused on examining expressions of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in children and youth, with special reference to allometric scaling. VO2peak is considered the highest VO2 during an increasing workload treadmill or bicycle ergometer test until volitional termination. We have reviewed scholarly works identified from PubMed, One Search, EBSCOhost and Google Scholar that examined VO2peak in absolute units (L·min(-1)), relative units [body mass, fat-free mass (FFM)], and allometric expressions [mass, height, lean body mass (LBM) or LBM of the legs raised to a power function] through July 2015. Often, the objective of measuring VO2peak is to evaluate cardiorespiratory function and fitness level. Since body size (body mass and height) frequently vary greatly in children and youth, expressing VO2peak in dimensionless units is often inappropriate for comparative or explanatory purposes. Consequently, expressing VO2peak in allometric units has gained increased research attention over the past 2 decades. In our review, scaling mass was the most frequent variable employed, with coefficients ranging from approximately 0.30 to over 1.0. The wide variance is probably due to several factors, including mass, height, LBM, sex, age, physical training, and small sample size. In summary, we recommend that since skeletal muscle is paramount for human locomotion, an allometric expression of VO2peak relative to LBM is the best expression of VO2peak in children and youth.

  16. Negative second virial coefficients as predictors of protein crystal growth: evidence from sedimentation equilibrium studies that refutes the designation of those light scattering parameters as osmotic virial coefficients.

    PubMed

    Deszczynski, Marcin; Harding, Stephen E; Winzor, Donald J

    2006-03-20

    The effects of ammonium sulphate concentration on the osmotic second virial coefficient (BAA/MA) for equine serum albumin (pH 5.6, 20 degrees C) have been examined by sedimentation equilibrium. After an initial steep decrease with increasing ammonium sulphate concentration, BAA/MA assumes an essentially concentration-independent magnitude of 8-9 ml/g. Such behaviour conforms with the statistical-mechanical prediction that a sufficient increase in ionic strength should effectively eliminate the contributions of charge interactions to BAA/MA but have no effect on the covolume contribution (8.4 ml/g for serum albumin). A similar situation is shown to apply to published sedimentation equilibrium data for lysozyme (pH 4.5). Although termed osmotic second virial coefficients and designated as such (B22), the negative values obtained in published light scattering studies of both systems have been described incorrectly because of the concomitant inclusion of the protein-salt contribution to thermodynamic nonideality of the protein. Those negative values are still valid predictors of conditions conducive to crystal growth inasmuch as they do reflect situations in which there is net attraction between protein molecules. However, the source of attraction responsible for the negative virial coefficient stems from the protein-salt rather than the protein-protein contribution, which is necessarily positive.

  17. Allometric method to estimate leaf area index for row crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf area index (LAI) is critical for predicting plant metabolism, biomass production, evapotranspiration, and greenhouse gas sequestration, but direct LAI measurements are difficult and labor intensive. Several methods are available to measure LAI indirectly or calculate LAI using allometric method...

  18. Small Sample Sizes Yield Biased Allometric Equations in Temperate Forests

    PubMed Central

    Duncanson, L.; Rourke, O.; Dubayah, R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification of forest carbon stocks is required for constraining the global carbon cycle and its impacts on climate. The accuracies of forest biomass maps are inherently dependent on the accuracy of the field biomass estimates used to calibrate models, which are generated with allometric equations. Here, we provide a quantitative assessment of the sensitivity of allometric parameters to sample size in temperate forests, focusing on the allometric relationship between tree height and crown radius. We use LiDAR remote sensing to isolate between 10,000 to more than 1,000,000 tree height and crown radius measurements per site in six U.S. forests. We find that fitted allometric parameters are highly sensitive to sample size, producing systematic overestimates of height. We extend our analysis to biomass through the application of empirical relationships from the literature, and show that given the small sample sizes used in common allometric equations for biomass, the average site-level biomass bias is ~+70% with a standard deviation of 71%, ranging from −4% to +193%. These findings underscore the importance of increasing the sample sizes used for allometric equation generation. PMID:26598233

  19. Small Sample Sizes Yield Biased Allometric Equations in Temperate Forests.

    PubMed

    Duncanson, L; Rourke, O; Dubayah, R

    2015-11-24

    Accurate quantification of forest carbon stocks is required for constraining the global carbon cycle and its impacts on climate. The accuracies of forest biomass maps are inherently dependent on the accuracy of the field biomass estimates used to calibrate models, which are generated with allometric equations. Here, we provide a quantitative assessment of the sensitivity of allometric parameters to sample size in temperate forests, focusing on the allometric relationship between tree height and crown radius. We use LiDAR remote sensing to isolate between 10,000 to more than 1,000,000 tree height and crown radius measurements per site in six U.S. forests. We find that fitted allometric parameters are highly sensitive to sample size, producing systematic overestimates of height. We extend our analysis to biomass through the application of empirical relationships from the literature, and show that given the small sample sizes used in common allometric equations for biomass, the average site-level biomass bias is ~+70% with a standard deviation of 71%, ranging from -4% to +193%. These findings underscore the importance of increasing the sample sizes used for allometric equation generation.

  20. Quantum statistics and allometric scaling of organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetrius, Lloyd

    2003-05-01

    This article proposes a mechanism to explain allometric relations between basal metabolic rate and the body size of organisms. The model postulates that energy transduction in biological organisms is constrained by two classes of dynamical processes: The first process has its origin in quantum mechanics and the constraints which the coupling of electron transport and proton translocation impose on metabolic activity. The second derives from evolutionary dynamics and the constraints which ecological and demographic forces impose on metabolic rate. These two processes are invoked to show that the scaling exponent between basal metabolic rate and body size follows a {3}/{4} rule, in the case of organisms subject to ecological constraints defined by scarce but dependable resources, and a {2}/{3} rule when constraints are defined by ample but only temporarily available resources. Our conclusions are based on general arguments incorporating the molecular mechanisms that determine metabolic activity at all levels of biological organization. Hence the model applies to uni-cellular organisms, plants and animals.

  1. Chronic nitrogen deposition alters tree allometric relationships: implications for biomass production and carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Inés; Zak, Donald R; Burton, Andrew J; Pregitzer, Kurt S

    2016-04-01

    As increasing levels of nitrogen (N) deposition impact many terrestrial ecosystems, understanding the potential effects of higher N availability is critical for forecasting tree carbon allocation patterns and thus future forest productivity. Most regional estimates of forest biomass apply allometric equations, with parameters estimated from a limited number of studies, to forest inventory data (i.e., tree diameter). However most of these allometric equations cannot account for potential effects of increased N availability on biomass allocation patterns. Using 18 yr of tree diameter, height, and mortality data collected for a dominant tree species (Acer saccharum) in an atmospheric N deposition experiment, we evaluated how greater N availability affects allometric relationships in this species. After taking into account site and individual variability, our results reveal significant differences in allometric parameters between ambient and experimental N deposition treatments. Large trees under experimental N deposition reached greater heights at a given diameter; moreover, their estimated maximum height (mean ± standard deviation: 33.7 ± 0.38 m) was significantly higher than that estimated under the ambient condition (31.3 ± 0.31 m). Within small tree sizes (5-10 cm diameter) there was greater mortality under experimental N deposition, whereas the relative growth rates of small trees were greater under experimental N deposition. Calculations of stemwood biomass using our parameter estimates for the diameter-height relationship indicated the potential for significant biases in these estimates (~2.5%), with under predictions of stemwood biomass averaging 4 Mg/ha lower if ambient parameters were to be used to estimate stem biomass of trees in the experimental N deposition treatment. As atmospheric N deposition continues to increase into the future, ignoring changes in tree allometry will contribute to the uncertainty associated with aboveground carbon storage

  2. An allometric analysis of the giraffe cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G; Skinner, J D

    2009-12-01

    There has been co-evolution of a long neck and high blood pressure in giraffes. How the cardiovascular system (CVS) has adapted to produce a high blood pressure, and how it compares with other similar sized mammals largely is unknown. We have measured body mass and heart structure in 56 giraffes of both genders ranging in body mass from 18 kg to 1500 kg, and developed allometric equations that relate changes in heart dimensions to growth and to cardiovascular function. Predictions made from these equations match measurements made in giraffes. We have found that heart mass increases as body mass increases but it has a relative mass of 0.51+/-0.7% of body mass which is the same as that in other mammals. The left ventricular and interventricular walls are hypertrophied and their thicknesses are linearly related to neck length. Systemic blood pressure increases as body mass and neck length increase and is twice that of mammals of the same body mass. Cardiac output is the same as, but peripheral resistance double that predicted for similar sized mammals. We have concluded that increasing hydrostatic pressure of the column of blood during neck elongation results in cardiac hypertrophy and concurrent hypertrophy of arteriole walls raising peripheral resistance, with an increase in blood pressure following.

  3. Thermodynamics constrains allometric scaling of optimal development time in insects.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Michael E; Frazier, Melanie R

    2013-01-01

    Development time is a critical life-history trait that has profound effects on organism fitness and on population growth rates. For ectotherms, development time is strongly influenced by temperature and is predicted to scale with body mass to the quarter power based on 1) the ontogenetic growth model of the metabolic theory of ecology which describes a bioenergetic balance between tissue maintenance and growth given the scaling relationship between metabolism and body size, and 2) numerous studies, primarily of vertebrate endotherms, that largely support this prediction. However, few studies have investigated the allometry of development time among invertebrates, including insects. Abundant data on development of diverse insects provides an ideal opportunity to better understand the scaling of development time in this ecologically and economically important group. Insects develop more quickly at warmer temperatures until reaching a minimum development time at some optimal temperature, after which development slows. We evaluated the allometry of insect development time by compiling estimates of minimum development time and optimal developmental temperature for 361 insect species from 16 orders with body mass varying over nearly 6 orders of magnitude. Allometric scaling exponents varied with the statistical approach: standardized major axis regression supported the predicted quarter-power scaling relationship, but ordinary and phylogenetic generalized least squares did not. Regardless of the statistical approach, body size alone explained less than 28% of the variation in development time. Models that also included optimal temperature explained over 50% of the variation in development time. Warm-adapted insects developed more quickly, regardless of body size, supporting the "hotter is better" hypothesis that posits that ectotherms have a limited ability to evolutionarily compensate for the depressing effects of low temperatures on rates of biological processes. The

  4. Thermodynamics Constrains Allometric Scaling of Optimal Development Time in Insects

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Michael E.; Frazier, Melanie R.

    2013-01-01

    Development time is a critical life-history trait that has profound effects on organism fitness and on population growth rates. For ectotherms, development time is strongly influenced by temperature and is predicted to scale with body mass to the quarter power based on 1) the ontogenetic growth model of the metabolic theory of ecology which describes a bioenergetic balance between tissue maintenance and growth given the scaling relationship between metabolism and body size, and 2) numerous studies, primarily of vertebrate endotherms, that largely support this prediction. However, few studies have investigated the allometry of development time among invertebrates, including insects. Abundant data on development of diverse insects provides an ideal opportunity to better understand the scaling of development time in this ecologically and economically important group. Insects develop more quickly at warmer temperatures until reaching a minimum development time at some optimal temperature, after which development slows. We evaluated the allometry of insect development time by compiling estimates of minimum development time and optimal developmental temperature for 361 insect species from 16 orders with body mass varying over nearly 6 orders of magnitude. Allometric scaling exponents varied with the statistical approach: standardized major axis regression supported the predicted quarter-power scaling relationship, but ordinary and phylogenetic generalized least squares did not. Regardless of the statistical approach, body size alone explained less than 28% of the variation in development time. Models that also included optimal temperature explained over 50% of the variation in development time. Warm-adapted insects developed more quickly, regardless of body size, supporting the “hotter is better” hypothesis that posits that ectotherms have a limited ability to evolutionarily compensate for the depressing effects of low temperatures on rates of biological processes

  5. Allometric scaling of Wingate anaerobic power test scores in men.

    PubMed

    Stickley, Christopher D; Hetzler, Ronald K; Wages, Jennifer J; Freemyer, Bret G; Kimura, Iris F

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the appropriate magnitude of allometric scaling of the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) power data for body mass (BM) and established normative data for the WAnT for adult men. Eighty-three men completed a standard WAnT using 0.1 kg·kg(-1) BM resistance. Allometric exponents and percentile ranks for 1-second peak power (PP), 5-second PP, and mean power (MP) were established. The Predicted Residual Sum of Squares (PRESS) procedure was used to assess external validity while avoiding data splitting. The mean 1-second PP, 5-second PP, and MP were 1,049.1 ± 168.8 W, 1,013.4 ± 158.6 W, and 777.9 ± 105.0 W, respectively. Allometric exponents for 1-second PP, 5-second PP, and MP scaled for BM were b = 0.89, 0.88, and 0.86, respectively. Correlations between allometrically scaled 1-second PP, 5-second PP, and MP, and BM were r = -0.03, -0.03, and -0.02, respectively, suggesting that the allometric exponents derived were effective in partialling out the effect of BM on WAnT values. The PRESS procedure values resulted in small decreases in R² (0.03, 0.04, and 0.02 for 1-second PP, 5-second PP, and MP, respectively) suggesting acceptable levels of external validity when applied to independent samples. The allometric exponents and normative values provide a useful tool for comparing WAnT scores in college-aged females without the confounding effect of BM. It is suggested that exponents of b = 0.89 (1-second PP), b = 0.88 (5-second PP), and b = 0.86 (MP) be used for allometrically scaling WAnT power values in healthy adult men and that the confidence limits for these allometric exponents be considered as 0.66-1.0 for PP and 0.69-1.0 for MP. The use of these exponents in allometric scaling of male WAnT power values provide coaches and practitioners with valid means for comparing power production between individuals without the confounding influence of BM.

  6. Determination of growth-state specific crop coefficients (Kc) of maize and sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A ratio of crop evapotranspiration (ETC) to reference evapotranspiration (ETO) determines a crop coefficient (Kc) value, which is related to specific crop phenological development to improve transferability of the Kc values. Development of Kc can assist in predicting crop irrigation needs using mete...

  7. Heterogeneity of cells may explain allometric scaling of metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-04-01

    The origin of allometric scaling of metabolic rate is a long-standing question in biology. Several models have been proposed for explaining the origin; however, they have advantages and disadvantages. In particular, previous models only demonstrate either two important observations for the allometric scaling: the variability of scaling exponents and predominance of 3/4-power law. Thus, these models have a dispute over their validity. In this study, we propose a simple geometry model, and show that a hypothesis that total surface area of cells determines metabolic rate can reproduce these two observations by combining two concepts: the impact of cell sizes on metabolic rate and fractal-like (hierarchical) organization. The proposed model both theoretically and numerically demonstrates the approximately 3/4-power law although several different biological strategies are considered. The model validity is confirmed using empirical data. Furthermore, the model suggests the importance of heterogeneity of cell size for the emergence of the allometric scaling. The proposed model provides intuitive and unique insights into the origin of allometric scaling laws in biology, despite several limitations of the model.

  8. Allometric scaling for predicting human clearance of bisphenol A

    SciTech Connect

    Collet, Séverine H. Picard-Hagen, Nicole Lacroix, Marlène Z. Puel, Sylvie Viguié, Catherine Bousquet-Melou, Alain Toutain, Pierre-Louis Gayrard, Véronique

    2015-05-01

    The investigation of interspecies differences in bisphenol A (BPA) pharmacokinetics (PK) may be useful for translating findings from animal studies to humans, identifying major processes involved in BPA clearance mechanisms, and predicting BPA PK parameters in man. For the first time, a large range of species in terms of body weight, from 0.02 kg (mice) to 495 kg (horses) was used to predict BPA clearance in man by an allometric approach. BPA PK was evaluated after intravenous administration of BPA in horses, sheep, pigs, dogs, rats and mice. A non-compartmental analysis was used to estimate plasma clearance and steady state volume of distribution and predict BPA PK parameters in humans from allometric scaling. In all the species investigated, BPA plasma clearance was high and of the same order of magnitude as their respective hepatic blood flow. By an allometric scaling, the human clearance was estimated to be 1.79 L/min (equivalent to 25.6 mL/kg.min) with a 95% prediction interval of 0.36 to 8.83 L/min. Our results support the hypothesis that there are highly efficient and hepatic mechanisms of BPA clearance in man. - Highlights: • Allometric scaling was used to predict BPA pharmacokinetic parameters in humans. • In all species, BPA plasma clearance approached hepatic blood flow. • Human BPA clearance was estimated to be 1.79 L/min.

  9. Correlation Between Posttraumatic Growth and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Based on Pearson Correlation Coefficient: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, An-Nuo; Wang, Lu-Lu; Li, Hui-Ping; Gong, Juan; Liu, Xiao-Hong

    2016-11-22

    The literature on posttraumatic growth (PTG) is burgeoning, with the inconsistencies in the literature of the relationship between PTG and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms becoming a focal point of attention. Thus, this meta-analysis aims to explore the relationship between PTG and PTSD symptoms through the Pearson correlation coefficient. A systematic search of the literature from January 1996 to November 2015 was completed. We retrieved reports on 63 studies that involved 26,951 patients. The weighted correlation coefficient revealed an effect size of 0.22 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.18 to 0.25. Meta-analysis provides evidence that PTG may be positively correlated with PTSD symptoms and that this correlation may be modified by age, trauma type, and time since trauma. Accordingly, people with high levels of PTG should not be ignored, but rather, they should continue to receive help to alleviate their PTSD symptoms.

  10. Allometric variation among juvenile, adult male and female eastern bearded dragons Pogona barbata (Cuvier, 1829), with comments on the behavioural implications.

    PubMed

    Wotherspoon, Danny; Burgin, Shelley

    2011-02-01

    The functional significance of allometric change in reptiles has received limited attention and the reason for such changes has been regarded as 'obscure'. In this paper we report data on the Australian Pogona barbata, the eastern bearded dragon, from across their range and review changes in allometric growth among juveniles, and adult males and females and consider the functional relevance of these changes. There were significant differences in the population for mass, tail length, tail width, rear leg length and jaw length. These differences were consistent with differences required in locomotor performance and thus habitat use, together with access to different preferred dietary components.

  11. Effect of hygroscopic growth on the aerosol light-scattering coefficient: A review of measurements, techniques and error sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Cazorla, A.; Zieger, P.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of the scattering enhancement factor, f(RH), is important for an accurate description of direct aerosol radiative forcing. This factor is defined as the ratio between the scattering coefficient at enhanced relative humidity, RH, to a reference (dry) scattering coefficient. Here, we review the different experimental designs used to measure the scattering coefficient at dry and humidified conditions as well as the procedures followed to analyze the measurements. Several empirical parameterizations for the relationship between f(RH) and RH have been proposed in the literature. These parameterizations have been reviewed and tested using experimental data representative of different hygroscopic growth behavior and a new parameterization is presented. The potential sources of error in f(RH) are discussed. A Monte Carlo method is used to investigate the overall measurement uncertainty, which is found to be around 20-40% for moderately hygroscopic aerosols. The main factors contributing to this uncertainty are the uncertainty in RH measurement, the dry reference state and the nephelometer uncertainty. A literature survey of nephelometry-based f(RH) measurements is presented as a function of aerosol type. In general, the highest f(RH) values were measured in clean marine environments, with pollution having a major influence on f(RH). Dust aerosol tended to have the lowest reported hygroscopicity of any of the aerosol types studied. Major open questions and suggestions for future research priorities are outlined.

  12. Quantum metabolism explains the allometric scaling of metabolic rates

    PubMed Central

    Demetrius, Lloyd; Tuszynski, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    A general model explaining the origin of allometric laws of physiology is proposed based on coupled energy-transducing oscillator networks embedded in a physical d-dimensional space (d = 1, 2, 3). This approach integrates Mitchell's theory of chemi-osmosis with the Debye model of the thermal properties of solids. We derive a scaling rule that relates the energy generated by redox reactions in cells, the dimensionality of the physical space and the mean cycle time. Two major regimes are found corresponding to classical and quantum behaviour. The classical behaviour leads to allometric isometry while the quantum regime leads to scaling laws relating metabolic rate and body size that cover a broad range of exponents that depend on dimensionality and specific parameter values. The regimes are consistent with a range of behaviours encountered in micelles, plants and animals and provide a conceptual framework for a theory of the metabolic function of living systems. PMID:19734187

  13. Quantum metabolism explains the allometric scaling of metabolic rates.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, Lloyd; Tuszynski, J A

    2010-03-06

    A general model explaining the origin of allometric laws of physiology is proposed based on coupled energy-transducing oscillator networks embedded in a physical d-dimensional space (d = 1, 2, 3). This approach integrates Mitchell's theory of chemi-osmosis with the Debye model of the thermal properties of solids. We derive a scaling rule that relates the energy generated by redox reactions in cells, the dimensionality of the physical space and the mean cycle time. Two major regimes are found corresponding to classical and quantum behaviour. The classical behaviour leads to allometric isometry while the quantum regime leads to scaling laws relating metabolic rate and body size that cover a broad range of exponents that depend on dimensionality and specific parameter values. The regimes are consistent with a range of behaviours encountered in micelles, plants and animals and provide a conceptual framework for a theory of the metabolic function of living systems.

  14. Evolution of static allometries: adaptive change in allometric slopes of eye span in stalk-eyed flies.

    PubMed

    Voje, Kjetil L; Hansen, Thomas F

    2013-02-01

    Julian Huxley showed that within-species (static) allometric (power-law) relations can arise from proportional growth regulation with the exponent in the power law equaling the factor of proportionality. Allometric exponents may therefore be hard to change and act as constraints on the independent evolution of traits. In apparent contradiction to this, many empirical studies have concluded that static allometries are evolvable. Many of these studies have been based, however, on a broad definition of allometry that includes any monotonic shape change with size, and do not falsify the hypothesis of constrained narrow-sense allometry. Here, we present the first phylogenetic comparative study of narrow-sense allometric exponents based on a reanalysis of data on eye span and body size in stalk-eyed flies (Diopsidae). Consistent with a role in sexual selection, we found strong evidence that male slopes were tracking "optima" based on sexual dimorphism and relative male trait size. This tracking was slow, however, with estimated times of 2-3 million years for adaptation to exceed ancestral influence on the trait. Our results are therefore consistent with adaptive evolution on million-year time scales, but cannot rule out that static allometry may act as a constraint on eye-span adaptation at shorter time scales.

  15. Quantifying the rate of biofilm growth of S. meliloti strains in microfluidics via the diffusion coefficient of microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorian, Matthew; Seitaridou, Effrosyni

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the rate of biofilm growth is essential for studying genes and preventing unwanted biofilms. In this study, the diffusion coefficient (D) of polystyrene microspheres was used to quantify biofilm growth rates of Sinorhizobia meliloti, a nitrogen fixing bacteria that forms a symbiotic relationship with alfalfa plants. Five strains were studied, two wild types (8530 expR+ and 1021) and three mutants in the exopolysaccharide (EPS I, EPS II) synthesis (8530 exoY , 9034 expG , and 9030-2 expA 1); 1021 and 9030-2 expA 1 are known to be unable to form biofilms. Each strain was inserted into a microfluidic channel with the microspheres. As the cultures grew, the spheres' D values were obtained every 24 hours for 4 days using fluorescence microscopy. Although the D values for 9030-2 expA 1 were inconclusive, 8530 expR+ , 8530 exoY , and 9034 expG showed significant decreases in D between 3 days of growth (| z | > 2 . 25 , p < 0 . 025). The data also indicated that 8530 expR+ and 8530 exoY grew at similar rates. There was no significant change in D for 1021 (χ2(2) = 5 . 76 , p > 0 . 05), which shows the lack of a structured biofilm community. Thus, D can be used as an indicator of the presence of a biofilm and its development.

  16. Allometric Trajectories and "Stress": A Quantitative Approach.

    PubMed

    Anfodillo, Tommaso; Petit, Giai; Sterck, Frank; Lechthaler, Silvia; Olson, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    The term "stress" is an important but vague term in plant biology. We show situations in which thinking in terms of "stress" is profitably replaced by quantifying distance from functionally optimal scaling relationships between plant parts. These relationships include, for example, the often-cited one between leaf area and sapwood area, which presumably reflects mutual dependence between sources and sink tissues and which scales positively within individuals and across species. These relationships seem to be so basic to plant functioning that they are favored by selection across nearly all plant lineages. Within a species or population, individuals that are far from the common scaling patterns are thus expected to perform negatively. For instance, "too little" leaf area (e.g., due to herbivory or disease) per unit of active stem mass would be expected to incur to low carbon income per respiratory cost and thus lead to lower growth. We present a framework that allows quantitative study of phenomena traditionally assigned to "stress," without need for recourse to this term. Our approach contrasts with traditional approaches for studying "stress," e.g., revealing that small "stressed" plants likely are in fact well suited to local conditions. We thus offer a quantitative perspective to the study of phenomena often referred to under such terms as "stress," plasticity, adaptation, and acclimation.

  17. Coarser wool is not a necessary consequence of sheep aging: allometric relationship between fibre diameter and fleece-free liveweight of Saxon Merino sheep.

    PubMed

    McGregor, B A; Butler, K L

    2016-12-01

    , Segment and ADG. Thus, MFD was allometrically related to the cube root of FFLwt over seasons and years for sheep, but to the square root of FFLwt for sheep grazed with goats. The result for sheep grazed alone accords with a primary response being that the allocation of nutrients towards the cross-sectional growth of wool follicles is proportional to the changes in the skin surface area arising from changes in the size of the sheep. The proportionality constant varied systematically with ADG, and in sheep only grazing, was about 5 when sheep lost 100 g/day and about 6 when sheep gained 100 g/day. The proportionality constant did not systematically change with chronological age. The variation in the allometric coefficient between individual sheep indicates that some sheep were more sensitive to changes in FFLwt than other sheep. Key practical implications include the following: (a) the reporting of systematic increases in MFD with age is likely to be a consequence of allowing sheep to increase in size during shearing intervals as they age; (b) comparisons of MFD between sheep are more likely to have a biological basis when standardised to a common FFLwt and not just to a common age;

  18. Allometric scaling in the dentition of primates and prediction of body weight from tooth size in fossils.

    PubMed

    Gingerich, P D; Smith, B H; Rosenberg, K

    1982-05-01

    Tooth size varies exponentially with body weight in primates. Logarithmic transformation of tooth crown area and body weight yields a linear model of slope 0.67 as an isometric (geometric) baseline for study of dental allometry. This model is compared with that predicted by metabolic scaling (slope = 0.75). Tarsius and other insectivores have larger teeth for their body size than generalized primates do and they are not included in this analysis. Among generalized primates, tooth size is highly correlated with body size. Correlations of upper and lower cheek teeth with body size range from 0.90-0.97, depending on tooth position. Central cheek teeth (P44 and M11) have allometric coefficients ranging from 0.57-0.65, falling well below geometric scaling. Anterior and posterior cheek teeth scale at or above metabolic scaling. Considered individually or as a group, upper cheek teeth scale allometrically with lower coefficients than corresponding lower cheek teeth; the reverse is true for incisors. The sum of crown areas for all upper cheek teeth scales significantly below geometric scaling, while the sum of crown areas for all lower cheek teeth approximates geometric scaling. Tooth size can be used to predict the body weight of generalized fossil primates. This is illustrated for Aegyptopithecus and other Eocene, Oligocene, and miocene primates. Regressions based on tooth size in generalized primates yield reasonable estimates of body weight, but much remains to be learned about tooth size and body size scaling in more restricted systematic groups and dietary guilds.

  19. Problems of allometric scaling analysis: examples from mammalian reproductive biology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert D; Genoud, Michel; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K

    2005-05-01

    Biological scaling analyses employing the widely used bivariate allometric model are beset by at least four interacting problems: (1) choice of an appropriate best-fit line with due attention to the influence of outliers; (2) objective recognition of divergent subsets in the data (allometric grades); (3) potential restrictions on statistical independence resulting from phylogenetic inertia; and (4) the need for extreme caution in inferring causation from correlation. A new non-parametric line-fitting technique has been developed that eliminates requirements for normality of distribution, greatly reduces the influence of outliers and permits objective recognition of grade shifts in substantial datasets. This technique is applied in scaling analyses of mammalian gestation periods and of neonatal body mass in primates. These analyses feed into a re-examination, conducted with partial correlation analysis, of the maternal energy hypothesis relating to mammalian brain evolution, which suggests links between body size and brain size in neonates and adults, gestation period and basal metabolic rate. Much has been made of the potential problem of phylogenetic inertia as a confounding factor in scaling analyses. However, this problem may be less severe than suspected earlier because nested analyses of variance conducted on residual variation (rather than on raw values) reveals that there is considerable variance at low taxonomic levels. In fact, limited divergence in body size between closely related species is one of the prime examples of phylogenetic inertia. One common approach to eliminating perceived problems of phylogenetic inertia in allometric analyses has been calculation of 'independent contrast values'. It is demonstrated that the reasoning behind this approach is flawed in several ways. Calculation of contrast values for closely related species of similar body size is, in fact, highly questionable, particularly when there are major deviations from the best

  20. An allometric scaling relationship in the brain of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Rachel A; Smyser, Christopher D; Rogers, Cynthia E; English, Ian; Wallendorf, Michael; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Meyer, Erin J; Van Essen, David C; Neil, Jeffrey J; Inder, Terrie E

    2014-01-01

    Allometry has been used to demonstrate a power–law scaling relationship in the brain of premature born infants. Forty-nine preterm infants underwent neonatal MRI scans and neurodevelopmental testing at age 2. Measures of cortical surface area and total cerebral volume demonstrated a power–law scaling relationship (α = 1.27). No associations were identified between these measures and investigated clinical variables. Term equivalent cortical surface area and total cerebral volume measures and scaling exponents were not related to outcome. These findings confirm a previously reported allometric scaling relationship in the preterm brain, and suggest that scaling is not a sensitive indicator of aberrant cortical maturation. PMID:25540808

  1. An allometric approach to quantify the extinction vulnerability of birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Hilbers, J P; Schipper, A M; Hendriks, A J; Verones, F; Pereira, H M; Huijbregts, M A J

    2016-03-01

    Methods to quantify the vulnerability of species to extinction are typically limited by the availability of species-specific input data pertaining to life-history characteristics and population dynamics. This lack of data hampers global biodiversity assessments and conservation planning. Here, we developed a new framework that systematically quantifies extinction risk based on allometric relationships between various wildlife demographic parameters and body size. These allometric relationships have a solid theoretical and ecological foundation. Extinction risk indicators included are (1) the probability of extinction, (2) the mean time to extinction, and (3) the critical patch size. We applied our framework to assess the global extinction vulnerability of terrestrial carnivorous and non-carnivorous birds and mammals. Irrespective of the indicator used, large-bodied species were found to be more vulnerable to extinction than their smaller counterparts. The patterns with body size were confirmed for all species groups by a comparison with IUCN data on the proportion of extant threatened species: the models correctly predicted a multimodal distribution with body size for carnivorous birds and a monotonic distribution for mammals and non-carnivorous birds. Carnivorous mammals were found to have higher extinction risks than non-carnivores, while birds were more prone to extinction than mammals. These results are explained by the allometric relationships, predicting the vulnerable species groups to have lower intrinsic population growth rates, smaller population sizes, lower carrying capacities, or larger dispersal distances, which, in turn, increase the importance of losses due to environmental stochastic effects and dispersal activities. Our study is the first to integrate population viability analysis and allometry into a novel, process-based framework that is able to quantify extinction risk of a large number of species without requiring data-intensive, species

  2. Testing the cranial evolutionary allometric 'rule' in Galliformes.

    PubMed

    Linde-Medina, M

    2016-09-01

    Recent comparative studies have indicated the existence of a common cranial evolutionary allometric (CREA) pattern in mammals and birds, in which smaller species have relatively smaller faces and bigger braincases than larger species. In these studies, cranial allometry was tested using a multivariate regression between shape (described using landmarks coordinates) and size (i.e. centroid size), after accounting for phylogenetic relatedness. Alternatively, cranial allometry can be determined by comparing the sizes of two anatomical parts using a bivariate regression analysis. In this analysis, a slope higher or lower than one indicates the existence of positive or negative allometry, respectively. Thus, in those species that support the CREA 'rule', positive allometry is expected for the association between face size and braincase size, which would indicate that larger species have disproportionally larger faces. In this study, I applied these two approaches to explore cranial allometry in 83 Galliformes (Aves, Galloanserae), ranging in mean body weight from 30 g to 2.5 kg. The multivariate regression between shape and centroid size revealed the existence of a significant allometric pattern resembling CREA, whereas the second analysis revealed a negative allometry for beak size and braincase size (i.e. contrary to the CREA 'rule', larger galliform species have disproportionally shorter beaks than smaller galliform species). This study suggests that the presence of CREA may be overestimated when using cranium size as the standard measurement.

  3. Allometric scaling of mortality rates with body mass in abalones.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Marisa; De Leo, Giulio A; Bevacqua, Daniele; Micheli, Fiorenza

    2012-04-01

    The existence of an allometric relationship between mortality rates and body mass has been theorized and extensively documented across taxa. Within species, however, the allometry between mortality rates and body mass has received substantially less attention and the consistency of such scaling patterns at the intra-specific level is controversial. We reviewed 73 experimental studies to examine the relationship between mortality rates and body size among seven species of abalone (Haliotis spp.), a marine herbivorous mollusk. Both in the field and in the laboratory, log-transformed mortality rates were negatively correlated with log-transformed individual body mass for all species considered, with allometric exponents remarkably similar among species. This regular pattern confirms previous findings that juvenile abalones suffer higher mortality rates than adult individuals. Field mortality rates were higher overall than those measured in the laboratory, and the relationship between mortality and body mass tended to be steeper in field than in laboratory conditions for all species considered. These results suggest that in the natural environment, additional mortality factors, especially linked to predation, could significantly contribute to mortality, particularly at small body sizes. On the other hand, the consistent allometry of mortality rates versus body mass in laboratory conditions suggests that other sources of mortality, beside predation, are size-dependent in abalone.

  4. Are tree ontogenetic structure and allometric relationship independent of vegetation formation type? A case study with Cordia oncocalyx in the Brazilian caatinga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Andréa P.; Martins, Fernando R.; Araújo, Francisca S.

    2012-08-01

    In temperate and tropical rainforests, ontogenetic structure and allometry during tree ontogeny are often associated with light gradients. Light is not considered a limiting resource in deciduous thorny woodland (DTW), but establishment and growth occur during a short rainy period, when the canopy is fully leaved and light in the understory may be modified. Our aim was to investigate whether the light gradient in DTW and the biomechanical limitations of tree growth would be enough to produce an ontogenetic structure and allometric growth similar to rainforest canopy trees. We investigated the ontogenetic stages and diameter-height relationship of Cordia oncocalyx (Boraginaceae), a dominant canopy tree of the DTW of semiarid northeastern Brazil. We tagged, measured and classified the ontogenetic stages of 2.895 individuals in a 1 ha area (5°6'58.1″S and 40°52'19.4″W). In the rainy season only 4.7% of the light falling on the canopy reached the ground. Initial ontogenetic stages, mainly infant (50.9%) and seedling (42.1%), were predominant in the population, with the remaining 7% distributed among juvenile, immature, virginile and reproductive. The ontogenetic structure was similar to that of rainforest tree species, but the population formed both permanent seed and infant banks in response to long dry periods and erratic rainy spells. Like many other Boraginaceae tree species in tropical rainforests, C. oncocalyx has a Prévost architectural model, but allometric growth was quite different from rainforest trees. C. oncocalyx invested slightly more in diameter at first, then in height and finally invested greatly in diameter and attained an asymptotic height. The continued high investment in diameter growth at late stages and the asymptotic height point to low tree density and more frequent xylem embolism as the main drivers of tree allometric shape in DTW. This indicates that tree ontogenetic structure and allometric relationships depend on vegetation

  5. Allometric relations of total volumes of prolactin cells and corticotropic cells to body length in the annual cyprinodont Cynolebias whitei: effects of environmental salinity, stress and ageing.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, J M; Wendelaar Bonga, S E

    1987-09-01

    An analysis of the allometric relations of the total volumes occupied by prolactin (PRL) and corticotropic (ACTH) cells (PRL volume and ACTH volume, respectively) to body length and a study of the immunocytochemical staining intensity of PRL and ACTH cells were used to determine the differences in activity of PRL and ACTH cells in freshwater-reared and in saltwater-reared Cynolebias whitei during the entire lifespan of this annual cyprinodont fish. An inflection in the allometric relation of PRL volume to body length was observed in fish of one-week old. The relatively large PRL volume in younger fish may be related to PRL cell activity before hatching. No inflections were observed in the allometric relations of PRL volume and ACTH volume to body length at the onset of maturation and the onset of ageing, indicating that the increased pituitary growth in maturing and ageing C. whitei is not the result of changes in PRL or ACTH cells. The slope of the allometric relation of PRL volume to body length in freshwater-reared fish was significantly steeper than the slope in saltwater-reared fish. The PRL volume in adult freshwater-reared fish was eight times larger than that in saltwater-reared fish of the same length. The intensity of immunocytochemical staining of saltwater PRL cells was significantly reduced. These volumetric and staining differences correspond to the low functional demand put upon PRL cells in saltwater-adapted fish. In contrast, the slope of the allometric relation of ACTH volume to body length and the intensity of immunocytochemical staining of ACTH cells were similar in freshwater-reared and in saltwater-reared fish.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Musculoskeletal determinants of pelvic sucker function in Hawaiian stream gobiid fishes: interspecific comparisons and allometric scaling.

    PubMed

    Maie, Takashi; Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Blob, Richard W

    2013-07-01

    Gobiid fishes possess a distinctive ventral sucker, formed from fusion of the pelvic fins. This sucker is used to adhere to a wide range of substrates including, in some species, the vertical cliffs of waterfalls that are climbed during upstream migrations. Previous studies of waterfall-climbing goby species have found that pressure differentials and adhesive forces generated by the sucker increase with positive allometry as fish grow in size, despite isometry or negative allometry of sucker area. To produce such scaling patterns for pressure differential and adhesive force, waterfall-climbing gobies might exhibit allometry for other muscular or skeletal components of the pelvic sucker that contribute to its adhesive function. In this study, we used anatomical dissections and modeling to evaluate the potential for allometric growth in the cross-sectional area, effective mechanical advantage (EMA), and force generating capacity of major protractor and retractor muscles of the pelvic sucker (m. protractor ischii and m. retractor ischii) that help to expand the sealed volume of the sucker to produce pressure differentials and adhesive force. We compared patterns for three Hawaiian gobiid species: a nonclimber (Stenogobius hawaiiensis), an ontogenetically limited climber (Awaous guamensis), and a proficient climber (Sicyopterus stimpsoni). Scaling patterns were relatively similar for all three species, typically exhibiting isometric or negatively allometric scaling for the muscles and lever systems examined. Although these scaling patterns do not help to explain the positive allometry of pressure differentials and adhesive force as climbing gobies grow, the best climber among the species we compared, S. stimpsoni, does exhibit the highest calculated estimates of EMA, muscular input force, and output force for pelvic sucker retraction at any body size, potentially facilitating its adhesive ability.

  7. Mechanisms driving carbon allocation in tropical rainforests: allometric constraints and environmental responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofhansl, Florian; Schnecker, Jörg; Singer, Gabriel; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Tropical forest ecosystems play a major role in global water and carbon cycles. However, mechanisms of C allocation in tropical forests and their response to environmental variation are largely unresolved as, due to the scarcity of data, they are underrepresented in global syntheses of forest C allocation. Allocation of gross primary production to wood production exerts a key control on forest C residence time and biomass C turnover, and therefore is of special interest for terrestrial ecosystem research and earth system science. Here, we synthesize pantropical data from 105 old-growth rainforests to investigate relationships between climate (mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature, dry season length and cloud cover), soil nutrient relations (soil N:P) and the partitioning of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) to wood production (WPart) using structural equation modelling. Our results show a strong increase of WPart with ANPP, pointing towards allometric scaling controls on WPart, with increasing light competition in more productive forests triggering greater ANPP allocation to wood production. ANPP itself was positively affected by mean annual temperature and soil N:P. Beyond these allometric controls on WPart we found direct environmental controls. WPart increased with dry season length in tropical montane rainforests and with mean annual precipitation in lowland tropical rainforests. We discuss different trade-offs between plant traits, such as community-wide changes along the wood economics spectrum, the leaf economics spectrum and the plant resource economics spectrum, as underlying mechanisms for direct climatic controls on WPart. We thereby provide new insights into mechanisms driving carbon allocation to WPart in tropical rainforests and show that low and high productive tropical rainforests may respond differently to projected global changes.

  8. Electrical activity, mode of incorporation and distribution coefficient of group V elements in Hg1-xCdxTe grown from tellurium rich liquid phase epitxial growth solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vydyanath, H. R.; Ellsworth, J. A.; Devaney, C. M.

    1987-01-01

    Hg1-xCdxTe films were grown liquid phase epitaxially from tellurium rich solutions containing up to 10 at. % of the group V elements P, As, Sb, and Bi. Chemical analysis of the Te growth solutions and the films was carried out in conjunction with extensive Hall effect measurements on the films subsequent to various annealing treatments under Hg rich and Te rich conditions. Despite the presence of a large concentration of the group V elements in the Te source solution, the maximum concentration of these elements incorporated into the liquid phase epitaxially grown Hg1-xCdxTe appears to vary from <1015cm-3 for Bi up to 1017cm-3 for phosphorus and As implying a distribution coefficient varying from <10-5 for Bi up to 10-3 for P at growth temperature of ˜500° C. This low value of the distribution coefficient for group V elements for growths from Te rich solutions contrasts with the moderately high values reported in the literature to date for growth from Hg rich solutions as well as pseudobinary solutions (Bridgman growth). The widely differing distribution coefficients and hence the solubility of the group V elements for Hg rich and Te rich liquid phase epitaxial solutions is explained on the basis that the activity coefficient of the group V elements in Te rich solutions is probably orders of magnitude lower than it is in Hg rich solutions. Finally, the results of the anneals at 200° C under Hg saturated conditions with and without a 500° C Hg saturated preanneal have indicated n to p conversion in many of the films attesting to the amphoteric behavior of the group V elements in LPE grown Hg1-xCdxTe(s) similar to the previously reported behavior of P in bulk grown Hg0.8Cd0.2Te.

  9. A critical review and database of biomass and volume allometric equation for trees and shrubs of Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, H.; Siddique, M. R. H.; Akhter, M.

    2016-08-01

    Estimations of biomass, volume and carbon stock are important in the decision making process for the sustainable management of a forest. These estimations can be conducted by using available allometric equations of biomass and volume. Present study aims to: i. develop a compilation with verified allometric equations of biomass, volume, and carbon for trees and shrubs of Bangladesh, ii. find out the gaps and scope for further development of allometric equations for different trees and shrubs of Bangladesh. Key stakeholders (government departments, research organizations, academic institutions, and potential individual researchers) were identified considering their involvement in use and development of allometric equations. A list of documents containing allometric equations was prepared from secondary sources. The documents were collected, examined, and sorted to avoid repetition, yielding 50 documents. These equations were tested through a quality control scheme involving operational verification, conceptual verification, applicability, and statistical credibility. A total of 517 allometric equations for 80 species of trees, shrubs, palm, and bamboo were recorded. In addition, 222 allometric equations for 39 species were validated through the quality control scheme. Among the verified equations, 20%, 12% and 62% of equations were for green-biomass, oven-dried biomass, and volume respectively and 4 tree species contributed 37% of the total verified equations. Five gaps have been pinpointed for the existing allometric equations of Bangladesh: a. little work on allometric equation of common tree and shrub species, b. most of the works were concentrated on certain species, c. very little proportion of allometric equations for biomass estimation, d. no allometric equation for belowground biomass and carbon estimation, and d. lower proportion of valid allometric equations. It is recommended that site and species specific allometric equations should be developed and

  10. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  11. A new predictive dynamic model describing the effect of the ambient temperature and the convective heat transfer coefficient on bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Ben Yaghlene, H; Leguerinel, I; Hamdi, M; Mafart, P

    2009-07-31

    In this study, predictive microbiology and food engineering were combined in order to develop a new analytical model predicting the bacterial growth under dynamic temperature conditions. The proposed model associates a simplified primary bacterial growth model without lag, the secondary Ratkowsky "square root" model and a simplified two-parameter heat transfer model regarding an infinite slab. The model takes into consideration the product thickness, its thermal properties, the ambient air temperature, the convective heat transfer coefficient and the growth parameters of the micro organism of concern. For the validation of the overall model, five different combinations of ambient air temperature (ranging from 8 degrees C to 12 degrees C), product thickness (ranging from 1 cm to 6 cm) and convective heat transfer coefficient (ranging from 8 W/(m(2) K) to 60 W/(m(2) K)) were tested during a cooling procedure. Moreover, three different ambient air temperature scenarios assuming alternated cooling and heating stages, drawn from real refrigerated food processes, were tested. General agreement between predicted and observed bacterial growth was obtained and less than 5% of the experimental data fell outside the 95% confidence bands estimated by the bootstrap percentile method, at all the tested conditions. Accordingly, the overall model was successfully validated for isothermal and dynamic refrigeration cycles allowing for temperature dynamic changes at the centre and at the surface of the product. The major impact of the convective heat transfer coefficient and the product thickness on bacterial growth during the product cooling was demonstrated. For instance, the time needed for the same level of bacterial growth to be reached at the product's half thickness was estimated to be 5 and 16.5 h at low and high convection level, respectively. Moreover, simulation results demonstrated that the predicted bacterial growth at the air ambient temperature cannot be assumed to be

  12. Allometric scaling laws for water uptake by plant roots.

    PubMed

    Biondini, Mario

    2008-03-07

    This paper develops scaling laws for plant roots of any arbitrary volume and branching configuration that maximize water uptake. Water uptake can occur along any part of the root network, and thus there is no branch-to-branch fluid conservation. Maximizing water uptake, therefore, involves balancing two flows that are inversely related: axial and radial conductivity. The scaling laws are tested against the root data of 1759 plants from 77 herbaceous species, and compared with those from the WBE model. I further discuss whether the scaling laws are invariant to soil water distribution. A summary of some of the results follows. (1) The optimal radius for a single root (no branches) scales with volume as r approximately volume(2/(8+a))(0allometric scaling for root radius branches (r(i+1)=beta*r(i)) is of the form beta=f(N)((2*epsilon(N))/(8+a)), where f(N)=A(N)/(n(b)*(1+A(N))), n(b) is the number of branches, and A(N) and epsilon(N) are functions of the number of root diameter classes (not constants as in the WBE model). (3) For large N, beta converges to the beta from the WBE model. For small N, the beta's for the two models diverge, but are highly correlated. (4) The fractal assumption of volume filling of the WBE model are also met in the root model even though they are not explicitly incorporated into it. (5) The WBE model for rigid tubes is an asymptotic solution for large root systems (large N and biomass). (6) The optimal scaling solutions for the root network appears to be independent of soil water distribution or water demand. The data set used for testing is included in the electronic supplementary archive of the journal.

  13. [Biomass allometric equations of nine common tree species in an evergreen broadleaved forest of subtropical China].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shu-di; Ren, Yin; Weng, Xian; Ding, Hong-feng; Luo, Yun-jian

    2015-02-01

    Biomass allometric equation (BAE) considered as a simple and reliable method in the estimation of forest biomass and carbon was used widely. In China, numerous studies focused on the BAEs for coniferous forest and pure broadleaved forest, and generalized BAEs were frequently used to estimate the biomass and carbon of mixed broadleaved forest, although they could induce large uncertainty in the estimates. In this study, we developed the species-specific and generalized BAEs using biomass measurement for 9 common broadleaved trees (Castanopsis fargesii, C. lamontii, C. tibetana, Lithocarpus glaber, Sloanea sinensis, Daphniphyllum oldhami, Alniphyllum fortunei, Manglietia yuyuanensis, and Engelhardtia fenzlii) of subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest, and compared differences in species-specific and generalized BAEs. The results showed that D (diameter at breast height) was a better independent variable in estimating the biomass of branch, leaf, root, aboveground section and total tree than a combined variable (D2 H) of D and H (tree height) , but D2H was better than D in estimating stem biomass. R2 (coefficient of determination) values of BAEs for 6 species decreased when adding H as the second independent variable into D- only BAEs, where R2 value for S. sinensis decreased by 5.6%. Compared with generalized D- and D2H-based BAEs, standard errors of estimate (SEE) of BAEs for 8 tree species decreased, and similar decreasing trend was observed for different components, where SEEs of the branch decreased by 13.0% and 20.3%. Therefore, the biomass carbon storage and its dynamic estimates were influenced largely by tree species and model types. In order to improve the accuracy of the estimates of biomass and carbon, we should consider the differences in tree species and model types.

  14. Patterns of cranial ontogeny in lacertid lizards: morphological and allometric disparity.

    PubMed

    Urošević, A; Ljubisavljević, K; Ivanović, A

    2013-02-01

    We explored the ontogenetic dynamics of the morphological and allometric disparity in the cranium shapes of twelve lacertid lizard species. The analysed species (Darevskia praticola, Dinarolacerta mosorensis, Iberolacerta horvathi, Lacerta agilis, L. trilineata, L. viridis, Podarcis erhardii, P. melisellensis, P. muralis, P. sicula, P. taurica and Zootoca vivipara) can be classified into different ecomorphs: terrestrial lizards that inhabit vegetated habitats (habitats with lush or sparse vegetation), saxicolous and shrub-climbing lizards. We observed that there was an overall increase in the morphological disparity (MD) during the ontogeny of the lacertid lizards. The ventral cranium, which is involved in the mechanics of jaw movement and feeding, showed higher levels of MD, an ontogenetic shift in the morphospace planes and more variable allometric patterns than more conserved dorsal crania. With respect to ecology, the allometric trajectories of the shrub-climbing species tended to cluster together, whereas the allometric trajectories of the saxicolous species were highly dispersed. Our results indicate that the ontogenetic patterns of morphological and allometric disparity in the lacertid lizards are modified by ecology and functional constraints and that the identical mechanisms that lead to intraspecific morphological variation also produce morphological divergence at higher taxonomic levels.

  15. Intra- and Interspecific Interactions as Proximate Determinants of Sexual Dimorphism and Allometric Trajectories in the Bottlenose Dolphin Tursiops truncatus (Cetacea, Odontoceti, Delphinidae)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Feeding adaptation, social behaviour, and interspecific interactions related to sexual dimorphism and allometric growth are particularly challenging to be investigated in the high sexual monomorphic Delphinidae. We used geometric morphometrics to extensively explore sexual dimorphism and ontogenetic allometry of different projections of the skull and the mandible of the bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus. Two-dimensional landmarks were recorded on the dorsal, ventral, lateral, and occipital views of the skull, and on the lateral view of the left and the right mandible of 104 specimens from the Mediterranean and the North Seas, differing environmental condition and degree of interspecific associations. Landmark configurations were transformed, standardized and superimposed through a Generalized Procrustes Analysis. Size and shape differences between adult males and females were respectively evaluated through ANOVA on centroid size, Procrustes ANOVA on Procrustes distances, and MANOVA on Procrustes coordinates. Ontogenetic allometry was investigated by multivariate regression of shape coordinates on centroid size in the largest homogenous sample from the North Sea. Results evidenced sexual dimorphic asymmetric traits only detected in the adults of the North Sea bottlenose dolphins living in monospecific associations, with females bearing a marked incision of the cavity hosting the left tympanic bulla. These differences were related to a more refined echolocalization system that likely enhances the exploitation of local resources by philopatric females. Distinct shape in immature versus mature stages and asymmetric changes in postnatal allometry of dorsal and occipital traits, suggest that differences between males and females are established early during growth. Allometric growth trajectories differed between males and females for the ventral view of the skull. Allometric trajectories differed among projections of skull and mandible, and were related to dietary

  16. Intra- and Interspecific Interactions as Proximate Determinants of Sexual Dimorphism and Allometric Trajectories in the Bottlenose Dolphin Tursiops truncatus (Cetacea, Odontoceti, Delphinidae).

    PubMed

    de Francesco, Maria Carla; Loy, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Feeding adaptation, social behaviour, and interspecific interactions related to sexual dimorphism and allometric growth are particularly challenging to be investigated in the high sexual monomorphic Delphinidae. We used geometric morphometrics to extensively explore sexual dimorphism and ontogenetic allometry of different projections of the skull and the mandible of the bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus. Two-dimensional landmarks were recorded on the dorsal, ventral, lateral, and occipital views of the skull, and on the lateral view of the left and the right mandible of 104 specimens from the Mediterranean and the North Seas, differing environmental condition and degree of interspecific associations. Landmark configurations were transformed, standardized and superimposed through a Generalized Procrustes Analysis. Size and shape differences between adult males and females were respectively evaluated through ANOVA on centroid size, Procrustes ANOVA on Procrustes distances, and MANOVA on Procrustes coordinates. Ontogenetic allometry was investigated by multivariate regression of shape coordinates on centroid size in the largest homogenous sample from the North Sea. Results evidenced sexual dimorphic asymmetric traits only detected in the adults of the North Sea bottlenose dolphins living in monospecific associations, with females bearing a marked incision of the cavity hosting the left tympanic bulla. These differences were related to a more refined echolocalization system that likely enhances the exploitation of local resources by philopatric females. Distinct shape in immature versus mature stages and asymmetric changes in postnatal allometry of dorsal and occipital traits, suggest that differences between males and females are established early during growth. Allometric growth trajectories differed between males and females for the ventral view of the skull. Allometric trajectories differed among projections of skull and mandible, and were related to dietary

  17. Allometric scaling of chemical restraint associated with inhalant anesthesia in giant anteaters.

    PubMed

    Carregaro, Adriano Bonfim; Gerardi, Patrícia Molina; Honsho, Daniel Kan

    2009-04-01

    This study describes the use of allometric scaling in five giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) submitted for osteosynthesis, gastrostomy, or treatment of burns. Chemical restraint was performed by allometric scaling using the dog as a reference; acepromazine (0.06 mg/kg), diazepam (0.3 mg/kg), ketamine (8.8 mg/kg), and buprenorphine (5.9 microg/kg) were combined, and the animals were maintained under isoflurane anesthesia. Heart rate, respiratory rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, temperature, and anesthetic depth were measured. Postoperative treatment consisted of ketoprofen, buprenorphine, and ceftiofur. Anesthetic induction was obtained in 10-15 min, achieving muscle relaxation and absence of excitement. Physiologic parameters were stable during the procedures, and postoperative treatment was effective. Allometric scaling was effective for chemical restraint and postoperative treatment.

  18. Environmental Conditions Influence Allometric Patterns in the Blow Fly, Chrysomya albiceps

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, M Battán; Peretti, Av

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study variations in allometry of body characters in females and males of two populations of blow flies, Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), under different environmental conditions to establish patterns of morphological variation. Body size of both males and females in the experimental population was significantly higher than in the individuals of the natural population, indicating an important influence of food on body size. All genitalic and non-genitalic characters in males and females of the two populations showed a trend towards negative allometry rather than isometry. Allometric patterns were modified in both sexes and between populations. The data show generally larger allometric slopes in females than in males. We confirmed that the environmental conditions have an important effect on allometric patterns and body size. PMID:22224467

  19. Allometric scaling of strength scores in NCAA division I-A football athletes.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yukiya; Hetzler, Ronald K; Stickley, Christopher D; Tamura, Kaori; Kimura, Iris F; Heffernan, Thomas P

    2014-12-01

    This study examined population-specific allometric exponents to control for the effect of body mass (BM) on bench press, clean, and squat strength measures among Division I-A collegiate football athletes. One repetition maximum data were obtained from a university pre-season football strength assessment (bench press, n = 207; clean, n = 88; and squat n = 86) and categorized into 3 groups by positions (line, linebacker, and skill). Regression diagnostics and correlations of scaled strength data to BM were used to assess the efficacy of the allometric scaling model and contrasted with that of ratio scaling and theoretically based allometric exponents of 0.67 and 0.33. The log-linear regression models yielded the following exponents (b): b = 0.559, 0.287, and 0.496 for bench press, clean, and squat, respectively. Correlations between bench press, clean, and squat to BM were r = -0.024, -0.047, and -0.018, respectively, suggesting that the derived allometric exponents were effective in partialling out the effect of BM on these lifts and removing between-group differences. Conversely, unscaled, ratio-scaled, and allometrically scaled (b = 0.67 or 0.33) data resulted in significant differences between groups. It is suggested that the exponents derived in the present study be used for allometrically scaling strength measures in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A football athletes. Use of the normative percentile rank scores provide coaches and trainers with a valid means of judging the effectiveness of their training programs by allowing comparisons between individuals without the confounding influence of BM.

  20. The ratio and allometric scaling of speed, power, and strength in elite male rugby union players.

    PubMed

    Crewther, Blair T; McGuigan, Mike R; Gill, Nicholas D

    2011-07-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of ratio and allometric scaling for normalizing speed, power, and strength in elite male rugby union players. Thirty rugby players (body mass [BM] 107.1 ± 10.1 kg, body height [BH] 187.8 ± 7.1 cm) were assessed for sprinting speed, peak power during countermovement jumps and squat jumps, and horizontal jumping distance. One-repetition maximum strength was assessed during a bench press, chin-up, and back squat. Performance was normalized using ratio and allometric scaling (Y/X), where Y is the performance, X, the body size variable (i.e., BM or BH), and b is the power exponent. An exponent of 1.0 was used during ratio scaling. Allometric scaling was applied using proposed exponents and derived exponents for each data set. The BM and BH variables were significantly related, or close to, performance during the speed, power and/or strength tests (p < 0.001-0.066). Ratio scaling and allometric scaling using proposed exponents were effective in normalizing performance (i.e., no significant correlations) for some of these tests. Allometric scaling with derived exponents normalized performance across all the tests undertaken, thereby removing the confounding effects of BM and BH. In terms of practical applications, allometric scaling with derived exponents may be used to normalize performance between larger rugby forwards and smaller rugby backs, and could provide additional information on rugby players of similar body size. Ratio scaling may provide the best predictive measure of performance (i.e., strongest correlations).

  1. The impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on the single-scattering albedo and its application on the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2016-04-01

    Hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles can significantly affect their single-scattering albedo (ω), and consequently alters the aerosol effect on tropospheric photochemistry. In this study, the impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on ω and its application to the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient (JNO2) are investigated for a typical aerosol particle population in the North China Plain (NCP). The variations of aerosol optical properties with relative humidity (RH) are calculated using a Mie theory aerosol optical model, on the basis of field measurements of number-size distribution and hygroscopic growth factor (at RH values above 90 %) from the 2009 HaChi (Haze in China) project. Results demonstrate that ambient ω has pronouncedly different diurnal patterns from ω measured at dry state, and is highly sensitive to the ambient RHs. Ambient ω in the NCP can be described by a dry state ω value of 0.863, increasing with the RH following a characteristic RH dependence curve. A Monte Carlo simulation shows that the uncertainty ofω from the propagation of uncertainties in the input parameters decreases from 0.03 (at dry state) to 0.015 (RHs > 90 %). The impact of hygroscopic growth on ω is further applied in the calculation of the radiative transfer process. Hygroscopic growth of the studied aerosol particle population generally inhibits the photolysis of NO2 at the ground level, whereas accelerates it above the moist planetary boundary layer. Compared with dry state, the calculated JNO2 at RH of 98 % at the height of 1 km increases by 30.4 %, because of the enhancement of ultraviolet radiation by the humidified scattering-dominant aerosol particles. The increase of JNO2 due to the aerosol hygroscopic growth above the upper boundary layer may affect the tropospheric photochemical processes and this needs to be taken into account in the atmospheric chemical models.

  2. Applying Individual Tree Structure From Lidar to Address the Sensitivity of Allometric Equations to Small Sample Sizes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncanson, L.; Dubayah, R.

    2015-12-01

    Lidar remote sensing is widely applied for mapping forest carbon stocks, and technological advances have improved our ability to capture structural details from forests, even resolving individual trees. Despite these advancements, the accuracy of forest aboveground biomass models remains limited by the quality of field estimates of biomass. The accuracies of field estimates are inherently dependent on the accuracy of the allometric equations used to relate measurable attributes to biomass. These equations are calibrated with relatively small samples of often spatially clustered trees. This research focuses on one of many issues involving allometric equations - understanding how sensitive allometric parameters are to the sample sizes used to fit them. We capitalize on recent advances in lidar remote sensing to extract individual tree structural information from six high-resolution airborne lidar datasets in the United States. We remotely measure millions of tree heights and crown radii, and fit allometric equations to the relationship between tree height and radius at a 'population' level, in each site. We then extract samples from our tree database, and build allometries on these smaller samples of trees, with varying sample sizes. We show that for the allometric relationship between tree height and crown radius, small sample sizes produce biased allometric equations that overestimate height for a given crown radius. We extend this analysis using translations from the literature to address potential implications for biomass, showing that site-level biomass may be greatly overestimated when applying allometric equations developed with the typically small sample sizes used in popular allometric equations for biomass.

  3. Dietary marker effects on fecal microbial ecology, fecal VFA, nutrient digestibility coefficients, and growth performance in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Kerr, B J; Weber, T E; Ziemer, C J

    2015-05-01

    control diet. In Exp. 2, no effect of dietary marker on pig performance was noted. Overall, the data indicate that the inclusion of Cr2O3, Fe2O3, or TiO2 as digestibility markers have little to no impact on microbial ecology, fecal ammonia or VFA concentrations, nutrient digestibility, or pig growth performance indicating they are suitable for use in digestion studies.

  4. ALLOMETRIC LENGTH-WEIGHT RELATIONSHIPS FOR BENTHIC PREY OF AQUATIC WILDLIFE IN COASTAL MARINE HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed models to estimate the soft tissue content of benthic marine invertebrates that are prey for aquatic wildlife. Allometric regression models of tissue wet weight with shell length for 10 species of benthic invertebrates had r2 values ranging from 0.29 for hermit crabs...

  5. Allometric biomass partitioning under nitrogen enrichment: Evidence from manipulative experiments around the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yunfeng; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-06-01

    Allometric and optimal hypotheses have been widely used to explain biomass partitioning in response to resource changes for individual plants; however, little evidence has been reported from measurements at the community level across a broad geographic scale. This study assessed the nitrogen (N) effect on community-level root to shoot (R/S) ratios and biomass partitioning functions by synthesizing global manipulative experiments. Results showed that, in aggregate, N addition decreased the R/S ratios in various biomes. However, the scaling slopes of the allometric equations were not significantly altered by the N enrichment, possibly indicating that N-induced reduction of the R/S ratio is a consequence of allometric allocation as a function of increasing plant size rather than an optimal partitioning model. To further illustrate this point, we developed power function models to explore the relationships between aboveground and belowground biomass for various biomes; then, we generated the predicted root biomass from the observed shoot biomass and predicted R/S ratios. The comparison of predicted and observed N-induced changes of the R/S ratio revealed no significant differences between each other, supporting the allometric allocation hypothesis. These results suggest that allometry, rather than optimal allocation, explains the N-induced reduction in the R/S ratio across global biomes.

  6. Allometric biomass partitioning under nitrogen enrichment: Evidence from manipulative experiments around the world

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yunfeng; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-01-01

    Allometric and optimal hypotheses have been widely used to explain biomass partitioning in response to resource changes for individual plants; however, little evidence has been reported from measurements at the community level across a broad geographic scale. This study assessed the nitrogen (N) effect on community-level root to shoot (R/S) ratios and biomass partitioning functions by synthesizing global manipulative experiments. Results showed that, in aggregate, N addition decreased the R/S ratios in various biomes. However, the scaling slopes of the allometric equations were not significantly altered by the N enrichment, possibly indicating that N-induced reduction of the R/S ratio is a consequence of allometric allocation as a function of increasing plant size rather than an optimal partitioning model. To further illustrate this point, we developed power function models to explore the relationships between aboveground and belowground biomass for various biomes; then, we generated the predicted root biomass from the observed shoot biomass and predicted R/S ratios. The comparison of predicted and observed N-induced changes of the R/S ratio revealed no significant differences between each other, supporting the allometric allocation hypothesis. These results suggest that allometry, rather than optimal allocation, explains the N-induced reduction in the R/S ratio across global biomes. PMID:27349584

  7. Mechanical Work and Long-Distance Performance Prediction: the Influence of Allometric Scaling

    PubMed Central

    Tartaruga, Marcus Peikriszwili; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Mota, Carlos Bolli; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Gomeñuka, Natalia Andrea; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of allometric scaling on the relationship between mechanical work and long-distance running performance in recreational runners. Fourteen recreational long-distance runners (male, mean ± SD - age: 29 ± 7 years; body mass: 70.0 ± 10.2 kg; body height: 1.71 ± 0.07 m; maximal oxygen uptake: VO2max 52.0 ± 4.9 ml·kg−1·min−1) performed two tests: a continuous incremental test to volitional exhaustion in order to determine VO2max, and a 6-minute running submaximal test at 3.1 m·s−1, during which segments in the sagittal plane were recorded using a digital camera and the internal (Wint), external (Wext) and total (Wtot) mechanic work, in J·kg−1·m−1, was subsequently calculated. The results indicated a significant correlation between mechanical work and performance, however, the strongest correlations were observed when allometric exponents were used (respectively for Wint, Wext and Wtot; non allometric vs. allometric scaling defined by literature (0.75) or determined mathematically (0.49): r = 0.38 vs. r = 0.44 and r = 0.50; r = 0.80 vs. r = 0.83 and r = 0.82; r = 0.70 vs. r = 0.77 and r = 0.78). These results indicate that mechanical work could be used as a predictor of recreational long-distance performance and an allometric model may improve this prediction. PMID:24235986

  8. Allometric scaling for chemical restraint in greater Rheas (Rhea americana) with Tiletamine and Zolazepam

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chemical restraint is of great importance in the clinical practice of wildlife animals. In such, interspecific allometric scaling proposes pharmacological doses to a wide range of species, based on previously known doses for domestic animals and the target animal’s body mass. The objective was to compare chemical restraint responses in the greater rhea (Rhea americana) with conventional doses of tiletamine/zolazepam, found in the literature for the species, and with doses calculated through interspecific allometric scaling extrapolation. From the Federal University of Piauí, six adult greater rheas (Rhea americana), three males and three females, were randomly selected to be subjects in this research. All six animals were submitted to two chemical restraint protocols with tiletamine and zolazepam, per intramuscular injection in the hind limb. The first protocol was composed of doses found on the literature for the species, while the second protocol used doses calculated by interspecific allometric scaling, with the domestic dog as model animal. Heart and respiratory rates, body temperature, eyelid reflex, digital pinch and metatarsal reflex were registered along with latency and ambulation times. Results The use of interspecific allometric scaling for chemical restraint with the combination tiletamine and zolazepam showed satisfying results, with great similarity to results obtained with conventional doses in Greater rheas. Conclusions Literature on chemical restraint and use of tiletamine and zolazepam in rheas is scarce. Chemical restraint is of extreme importance on these animals, due to their aggressive nature and low level of domesticity. This research may further establish the interspecific allometric scaling method as a viable tool for the veterinary physician in formulating anesthetic and chemical restraint protocols for wildlife animals. PMID:24625103

  9. [The growth and energy metabolism of Lymnaea stagnalis (Lymnaeidae, Gastropoda): I. Early postlarval period].

    PubMed

    Zotin, A A

    2009-01-01

    The growth and the oxygen uptake rate of Lymnaea stagnalis were studied during the first ten days after hatching. It is shown that these processes are atypical during early ontogenesis in comparison with adult mollusks. The obtained data on linear (height of shell) and weight growth can be equally well approximated with the von Bertalanffy equation or exponential and polynomial equations. Both linear and weight growth are characterized by an approximately constant specific rate associated with synchronous oscillations of a two-week period. The oscillations were observed also for the oxygen uptake rate, but of another period (about 2.6 weeks). On average the metabolic rate after the initial triple increase during the first three days remains stable. The polynomial coefficient of the allometric dependence of the total weight on the shell height is less reliable than that of the adult.

  10. Growth of the digestive organs in ducks with considerations on their growth in birds in general.

    PubMed

    Gille, U; Salomon, F V; Rönnert, J

    1999-05-01

    1. Growth of the oesophagus, proventriculus, gizzard, intestine, liver and pancreas weight was investigated in Mallards, White Pekins, Muscovies and a Muscovy x White Pekin cross. The birds varied in age between hatching and 154 d. The data were analysed by fitting both the Janoschek growth curve and the allometric formula. 2. The growth rate of all organs, except the oesophagus, peaked earlier (30 d for Muscovies and 14 d for the other breeds) than body weight and they grew faster to any given percentage of their final weight. In contrast, oesophagus weight showed growth curve characteristics similar to body weight. 3. Oesophagus weight showed simple, slightly negative allometry. The remaining organs followed complex allometry that can approximately be described by 2 allometric stages. The 1st phase was isometric to positive allometric. The 2nd showed marked negative allometry. 4. These growth patterns are assumed to be generally present in birds.

  11. Evaluating general allometric models: interspecific and intraspecific data tell different stories due to interspecific variation in stem tissue density and leaf size.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingxin; Lechowicz, Martin J; Zhou, Daowei; Price, Charles A

    2016-03-01

    The ability of general scaling models to capture the central tendency or dispersion in biological data has been questioned. In fact, the appropriate domain of such models has never been clearly articulated and they have been supported and challenged using both interspecific and/or intraspecific data. Here, we evaluate several simplifying assumptions and predictions of two prominent scaling models: West, Brown and Enquist's fractal model (WBE) and a null model of geometric similarity (GEOM). Using data for 53 herbaceous angiosperm species from the Songnen Grasslands of Northern China, we compared both the interspecific and intraspecific scaling relationships for plant geometry and biomass partitioning. Specifically, we considered biomass investment in shoots and leaves as well as related several traits not commonly collected in plant allometric analyses: shoot volume, leaf number, and mean leaf mass. At the interspecific level, we find substantial variation in regression slopes, and the simplifying assumptions of WBE and predictions of both the WBE and GEOM models do not hold. In contrast, we find substantial support for the WBE model at the intraspecific level, and to a lesser extent for GEOM. The differences between our results at interspecific and intraspecific levels are due to the fact that leaf size and stem tissue density vary considerably across species in contrast to the simplifying assumptions of WBE. These results highlight the domain within which simplifying model assumptions might be most appropriate, and suggest allometric models may be useful points of departure within some species, growth forms or taxonomic groups.

  12. An alternative method estimating hygroscopic growth factor of aerosol light scattering coefficient: a case study in an urban area of Guangzhou, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. S.; Zhang, L.; Tao, J.; Zhang, R. J.; Cao, J. J.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    A method was developed to estimate hygroscopic growth factor (f(RH)) of aerosol light scattering coefficient (bsp), making use of the measured size- and chemically-resolved aerosol samples. Regarding this method, chemical composition of the measured aerosol samples were first reconstructed using the equilibrium model ISOPPORIA II. The model reconstructed chemical composition varies with a varying relative humidity (RH) input, which was then employed to calculate bsp and f(RH) of bsp using Mie Model. Further, the RH dependence of f(RH) of bsp (denoted as f(RH) derived from model calculation was empirically fitted with a two-parameter formula. One of the two parameters was set to be a constant for practical applications. For validation, the developed formula of fsp(RH) was applied to correct the long-term records of measured bsp from the values under comparative dry conditions to the ones under ambient RH conditions. Compared with the original bsp data, the f(RH)-corrected bsp had a higher linear correlation with and a smaller discrepancy from the bsp data derived directly from visibility and absorption measurements. The method described in this paper provides an alternative approach to estimate fsp(RH) and has many potential applications.

  13. Relations between allometric scalings and fluctuations in complex systems: The case of Japanese firms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hayafumi; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    2013-02-01

    To elucidate allometric scaling in complex systems, we investigated the underlying scaling relationships between typical three-scale indicators for approximately 500,000 Japanese firms; namely, annual sales, number of employees, and number of business partners. First, new scaling relations including the distributions of fluctuations were discovered by systematically analyzing conditional statistics. Second, we introduced simple probabilistic models that reproduce all these scaling relations, and we derived relations between scaling exponents and the magnitude of fluctuations.

  14. An Allometric Analysis of Sex and Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects on Subcortical Anatomy in Humans.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Paul Kirkpatrick; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay N; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Lerch, Jason P; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-02-24

    Structural neuroimaging of humans with typical and atypical sex-chromosome complements has established the marked influence of both Yand X-/Y-chromosome dosage on total brain volume (TBV) and identified potential cortical substrates for the psychiatric phenotypes associated with sex-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). Here, in a cohort of 354 humans with varying karyotypes (XX, XY, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY, XXXXY), we investigate sex and SCA effects on subcortical size and shape; focusing on the striatum, pallidum and thalamus. We find large effect-size differences in the volume and shape of all three structures as a function of sex and SCA. We correct for TBV effects with a novel allometric method harnessing normative scaling rules for subcortical size and shape in humans, which we derive here for the first time. We show that all three subcortical volumes scale sublinearly with TBV among healthy humans, mirroring known relationships between subcortical volume and TBV among species. Traditional TBV correction methods assume linear scaling and can therefore invert or exaggerate sex and SCA effects on subcortical anatomy. Allometric analysis restricts sex-differences to: (1) greater pallidal volume (PV) in males, and (2) relative caudate head expansion and ventral striatum contraction in females. Allometric analysis of SCA reveals that supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes both cause disproportionate reductions in PV, and coordinated deformations of striatopallidal shape. Our study provides a novel understanding of sex and sex-chromosome dosage effects on subcortical organization, using an allometric approach that can be generalized to other basic and clinical structural neuroimaging settings.

  15. Allometric equations for integrating remote sensing imagery into forest monitoring programmes.

    PubMed

    Jucker, Tommaso; Caspersen, John; Chave, Jérôme; Antin, Cécile; Barbier, Nicolas; Bongers, Frans; Dalponte, Michele; van Ewijk, Karin Y; Forrester, David I; Haeni, Matthias; Higgins, Steven I; Holdaway, Robert J; Iida, Yoshiko; Lorimer, Craig; Marshall, Peter L; Momo, Stéphane; Moncrieff, Glenn R; Ploton, Pierre; Poorter, Lourens; Rahman, Kassim Abd; Schlund, Michael; Sonké, Bonaventure; Sterck, Frank J; Trugman, Anna T; Usoltsev, Vladimir A; Vanderwel, Mark C; Waldner, Peter; Wedeux, Beatrice M M; Wirth, Christian; Wöll, Hannsjörg; Woods, Murray; Xiang, Wenhua; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Coomes, David A

    2017-01-01

    Remote sensing is revolutionizing the way we study forests, and recent technological advances mean we are now able - for the first time - to identify and measure the crown dimensions of individual trees from airborne imagery. Yet to make full use of these data for quantifying forest carbon stocks and dynamics, a new generation of allometric tools which have tree height and crown size at their centre are needed. Here, we compile a global database of 108753 trees for which stem diameter, height and crown diameter have all been measured, including 2395 trees harvested to measure aboveground biomass. Using this database, we develop general allometric models for estimating both the diameter and aboveground biomass of trees from attributes which can be remotely sensed - specifically height and crown diameter. We show that tree height and crown diameter jointly quantify the aboveground biomass of individual trees and find that a single equation predicts stem diameter from these two variables across the world's forests. These new allometric models provide an intuitive way of integrating remote sensing imagery into large-scale forest monitoring programmes and will be of key importance for parameterizing the next generation of dynamic vegetation models.

  16. Allometric Equations for Aboveground and Belowground Biomass Estimations in an Evergreen Forest in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Vu Thanh; van Kuijk, Marijke; Anten, Niels P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Allometric regression models are widely used to estimate tropical forest biomass, but balancing model accuracy with efficiency of implementation remains a major challenge. In addition, while numerous models exist for aboveground mass, very few exist for roots. We developed allometric equations for aboveground biomass (AGB) and root biomass (RB) based on 300 (of 45 species) and 40 (of 25 species) sample trees respectively, in an evergreen forest in Vietnam. The biomass estimations from these local models were compared to regional and pan-tropical models. For AGB we also compared local models that distinguish functional types to an aggregated model, to assess the degree of specificity needed in local models. Besides diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree height (H), wood density (WD) was found to be an important parameter in AGB models. Existing pan-tropical models resulted in up to 27% higher estimates of AGB, and overestimated RB by nearly 150%, indicating the greater accuracy of local models at the plot level. Our functional group aggregated local model which combined data for all species, was as accurate in estimating AGB as functional type specific models, indicating that a local aggregated model is the best choice for predicting plot level AGB in tropical forests. Finally our study presents the first allometric biomass models for aboveground and root biomass in forests in Vietnam. PMID:27309718

  17. A potential mechanism for allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals

    PubMed Central

    Christen, Patrik; Ito, Keita; van Rietbergen, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Trabecular bone microstructural parameters, including trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, have been reported to scale with animal size with negative allometry, whereas bone volume fraction is animal size-invariant in terrestrial mammals. As for the majority of scaling patterns described in animals, its underlying mechanism is unknown. However, it has also been found that osteocyte density is inversely related to animal size, possibly adapted to metabolic rate, which shows a negative relationship as well. In addition, the signalling reach of osteocytes is limited by the extent of the lacuno-canalicular network, depending on trabecular dimensions and thus also on animal size. Here we propose animal size-dependent variations in osteocyte density and their signalling influence distance as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. Using an established and tested computational model of bone modelling and remodelling, we run simulations with different osteocyte densities and influence distances mimicking six terrestrial mammals covering a large range of body masses. Simulated trabecular structures revealed negative allometric scaling for trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, constant bone volume fraction, and bone turnover rates inversely related to animal size. These results are in agreement with previous observations supporting our proposal of osteocyte density and influence distance variation as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. The inverse relationship between bone turnover rates and animal size further indicates that trabecular bone scaling may be linked to metabolic rather than mechanical adaptations. PMID:25655770

  18. Allometric scaling of electrical excitation and propagation in the mammalian heart.

    PubMed

    Bassil, Guillaume; Zarzoso, Manuel; Noujaim, Sami F

    2016-09-26

    Variations in body mass impose constraints on the structure and function of mammalian species, including those of the cardiovascular system. Numerous biological processes, including cardiovascular parameters, have been shown to scale with body mass (BM) according to the law of allometric scaling: Y=Y =a∙BM(b) (Y, biological process; a, normalization constant; b, scaling exponent, which in many instances is a multiple of ¼). These parameters include heart and breathing rates, intervals and subintervals of the electrocardiogram (ECG), action potential duration (APD), metabolic rate, and temporal properties of ventricular fibrillation. For instance, the hierarchical branching networks of the vascular system, and of the specialized conduction system in the heart have been proposed to be important determinants of allometric scaling. A global and unifying molecular mechanism of allometric scaling has not been put forth, but changes in gene expression have been proposed to play an important role. Even though it is accepted that differences in body size have cardiovascular effects, the use of scaling in the clinical setting is limited. An increase in the clinical utilization of scaling is thought to lead to improved cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management in patients.

  19. A potential mechanism for allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    Christen, Patrik; Ito, Keita; van Rietbergen, Bert

    2015-03-01

    Trabecular bone microstructural parameters, including trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, have been reported to scale with animal size with negative allometry, whereas bone volume fraction is animal size-invariant in terrestrial mammals. As for the majority of scaling patterns described in animals, its underlying mechanism is unknown. However, it has also been found that osteocyte density is inversely related to animal size, possibly adapted to metabolic rate, which shows a negative relationship as well. In addition, the signalling reach of osteocytes is limited by the extent of the lacuno-canalicular network, depending on trabecular dimensions and thus also on animal size. Here we propose animal size-dependent variations in osteocyte density and their signalling influence distance as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. Using an established and tested computational model of bone modelling and remodelling, we run simulations with different osteocyte densities and influence distances mimicking six terrestrial mammals covering a large range of body masses. Simulated trabecular structures revealed negative allometric scaling for trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, constant bone volume fraction, and bone turnover rates inversely related to animal size. These results are in agreement with previous observations supporting our proposal of osteocyte density and influence distance variation as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. The inverse relationship between bone turnover rates and animal size further indicates that trabecular bone scaling may be linked to metabolic rather than mechanical adaptations.

  20. Stand variation in Pinus radiata and its relationship with allometric scaling and critical buckling height

    PubMed Central

    Waghorn, Matthew J.; Watt, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Allometric relationships and the determination of critical buckling heights have been examined for Pinus radiata in the past. However, how they relate to more mature Pinus radiata exhibiting a wide range of stem diameters, slenderness and modulus of elasticity (E) at operationally used stand densities is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between Pinus radiata stand structure variables and allometric scaling and critical buckling height. Methods Utilizing a Pinus radiata Nelder trial with stand density and genetic breed as variables, critical buckling height was calculated whilst reduced major axis regression was used to determine scaling exponents between critical height (Hcrit), actual height (H), ground line diameter (D), slenderness (S), density-specific stiffness (E/ρ) and modulus of elasticity (E). Key Results Critical buckling height was highly responsive to decreasing diameter and increasing slenderness. Safety factors in this study were typically considerably lower than previously reported margins in other species. As density-specific stiffness scaled negatively with diameter, the exponent of 0·55 between critical height and diameter did not meet the assumed value of 0·67 under constant density-specific stiffness. E scaled positively with stem slenderness to the power of 0·78. Conclusions The findings suggest that within species density-specific stiffness variation may influence critical height and the scaling exponent between critical height and diameter, which is considered so important in assumptions regarding allometric relationships. PMID:23388878

  1. Allometric comparison of skulls from two closely related weasels, Mustela itatsi and M. sibirica.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Abe, Mikiko; Motokawa, Masaharu

    2011-09-01

    We conducted an interspecific comparison of skulls from two closely related but differently sized mustelid species, Mustela itatsi and M. sibirica (Mammalia, Carnivora, Mustelidae); a sexual comparison within the latter species showed remarkable size dimorphism. We clarified several differences in skull proportion related to size using allometric analyses and qualitative comparisons. Allometric analysis revealed that the skulls of male M. itatsi (the smaller species) have a relatively long palate; a slender viscerocranium and postorbital constriction; a broad, short, and low neurocranium; small carnassials; and a short mandible with a thin body and small ramus compared to the skulls of male M. sibirica (the larger species). Similar results were obtained when male M. itatsi were compared to female M. sibirica, although the male M. itatsi had a broader viscerocranium than female M. sibirica. A sexual comparison in M. sibirica revealed a larger skull size among the males with a relatively wide viscerocranium; wide postorbital constriction; a slender, long, and high neurocranium; short and wide auditory bullae; short carnassials; and a long and high mandible compared to females. Qualitative comparisons revealed changes in a few characters depending on skull size or with respect to some cranial components in each species. The interspecific differences observed were clearly larger than the intraspecific differences for three qualitative characters. The allometric and qualitative differences detected between these species suggest that each species is not simply the dwarf and/or giant morph of the other, and complicated differences were clarified.

  2. Allometric scaling and prediction of concentration-time profiles of coagulation factors in humans from animals.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Iftekhar

    2013-09-01

    Allometric scaling is a useful tool in early drug development and can be used for the prediction of human pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters from animal PK parameters. The main objective of this work was to predict concentration-time profiles of coagulation factors in humans in a multi-compartment system using animal PK parameters. The prediction of concentration-time profiles in humans in a multi-compartment system was based on the predicted values of clearance and volumes of distribution (V(c), V(ss) and V(β)) from animals. Five coagulation factors from the literature were chosen that were described by two-compartment model in both humans and animals. Clearance and volumes of distribution from animals were allometrically scaled to humans and then were used to predict concentration-time profiles in humans. The predicted concentration-time profile for a given coagulation factor was accurate for most of the time points. Percent prediction error range varied across coagulation factors. The prediction error >50% was observed either at 1 or a maximum of two time points for a given drug. The study indicated that the allometric scaling can be useful in the prediction of concentration-time profiles of coagulation factors in humans from animals and may be helpful in designing a first-in-human study.

  3. Modeling aboveground tree woody biomass using national-scale allometric methods and airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Estimating tree aboveground biomass (AGB) and carbon (C) stocks using remote sensing is a critical component for understanding the global C cycle and mitigating climate change. However, the importance of allometry for remote sensing of AGB has not been recognized until recently. The overarching goals of this study are to understand the differences and relationships among three national-scale allometric methods (CRM, Jenkins, and the regional models) of the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program in the U.S. and to examine the impacts of using alternative allometry on the fitting statistics of remote sensing-based woody AGB models. Airborne lidar data from three study sites in the Pacific Northwest, USA were used to predict woody AGB estimated from the different allometric methods. It was found that the CRM and Jenkins estimates of woody AGB are related via the CRM adjustment factor. In terms of lidar-biomass modeling, CRM had the smallest model errors, while the Jenkins method had the largest ones and the regional method was between. The best model fitting from CRM is attributed to its inclusion of tree height in calculating merchantable stem volume and the strong dependence of non-merchantable stem biomass on merchantable stem biomass. This study also argues that it is important to characterize the allometric model errors for gaining a complete understanding of the remotely-sensed AGB prediction errors.

  4. An Allometric Analysis of Sex and Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects on Subcortical Anatomy in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay N.; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Lerch, Jason P.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Structural neuroimaging of humans with typical and atypical sex-chromosome complements has established the marked influence of both Yand X-/Y-chromosome dosage on total brain volume (TBV) and identified potential cortical substrates for the psychiatric phenotypes associated with sex-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). Here, in a cohort of 354 humans with varying karyotypes (XX, XY, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY, XXXXY), we investigate sex and SCA effects on subcortical size and shape; focusing on the striatum, pallidum and thalamus. We find large effect-size differences in the volume and shape of all three structures as a function of sex and SCA. We correct for TBV effects with a novel allometric method harnessing normative scaling rules for subcortical size and shape in humans, which we derive here for the first time. We show that all three subcortical volumes scale sublinearly with TBV among healthy humans, mirroring known relationships between subcortical volume and TBV among species. Traditional TBV correction methods assume linear scaling and can therefore invert or exaggerate sex and SCA effects on subcortical anatomy. Allometric analysis restricts sex-differences to: (1) greater pallidal volume (PV) in males, and (2) relative caudate head expansion and ventral striatum contraction in females. Allometric analysis of SCA reveals that supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes both cause disproportionate reductions in PV, and coordinated deformations of striatopallidal shape. Our study provides a novel understanding of sex and sex-chromosome dosage effects on subcortical organization, using an allometric approach that can be generalized to other basic and clinical structural neuroimaging settings. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sex and sex-chromosome dosage (SCD) are known to modulate human brain size and cortical anatomy, but very little is known regarding their impact on subcortical structures that work with the cortex to subserve a range of behaviors in health and disease. Moreover

  5. Quantitative Trait Loci Affecting Phenotypic Plasticity and the Allometric Relationship of Ovariole Number and Thorax Length in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bergland, Alan O.; Genissel, Anne; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.; Tatar, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Environmental factors during juvenile growth such as temperature and nutrition have major effects on adult morphology and life-history traits. In Drosophila melanogaster, ovary size, measured as ovariole number, and body size, measured as thorax length, are developmentally plastic traits with respect to larval nutrition. Herein we investigated the genetic basis for plasticity of ovariole number and body size, as well the genetic basis for their allometric relationship using recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a natural population in Winters, California. We reared 196 RILs in four yeast concentrations and measured ovariole number and body size. The genetic correlation between ovariole number and thorax length was positive, but the strength of this correlation decreased with increasing yeast concentration. Genetic variation and genotype-by-environment (G × E) interactions were observed for both traits. We identified quantitative trait loci (QTL), epistatic, QTL-by-environment, and epistatic-by-environment interactions for both traits and their scaling relationships. The results are discussed in the context of multivariate trait evolution. PMID:18716336

  6. Allometric Trajectories and “Stress”: A Quantitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Anfodillo, Tommaso; Petit, Giai; Sterck, Frank; Lechthaler, Silvia; Olson, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    The term “stress” is an important but vague term in plant biology. We show situations in which thinking in terms of “stress” is profitably replaced by quantifying distance from functionally optimal scaling relationships between plant parts. These relationships include, for example, the often-cited one between leaf area and sapwood area, which presumably reflects mutual dependence between sources and sink tissues and which scales positively within individuals and across species. These relationships seem to be so basic to plant functioning that they are favored by selection across nearly all plant lineages. Within a species or population, individuals that are far from the common scaling patterns are thus expected to perform negatively. For instance, “too little” leaf area (e.g., due to herbivory or disease) per unit of active stem mass would be expected to incur to low carbon income per respiratory cost and thus lead to lower growth. We present a framework that allows quantitative study of phenomena traditionally assigned to “stress,” without need for recourse to this term. Our approach contrasts with traditional approaches for studying “stress,” e.g., revealing that small “stressed” plants likely are in fact well suited to local conditions. We thus offer a quantitative perspective to the study of phenomena often referred to under such terms as “stress,” plasticity, adaptation, and acclimation. PMID:27881990

  7. A comparison of ratio and allometric scaling methods for normalizing power and strength in elite rugby union players.

    PubMed

    Crewther, Blair T; Gill, Nicholas; Weatherby, Robert P; Lowe, Tim

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we compared the effectiveness of ratio and allometric scaling for normalizing power and strength in elite male rugby union players. Rugby union forwards (n = 18) and backs (n = 20) were assessed for squat jump and bench throw peak power, and box squat and bench press one-repetition maximum strength. The performance data for the forwards and backs were compared using ratio (P/BM) and allometric scaling (P/BM(b)), where P represents performance, BM is body mass in kilograms, and b is a power exponent. A proposed allometric exponent (0.67) and exponents (+/-95% confidence intervals) derived for the box squat (0.33 +/- 0.31), bench press (0.45 +/- 0.30), bench throw (0.46 +/- 0.36), and squat jump (0.64 +/- 0.31) exercises were used. In general, the absolute expression of power and strength was superior for the heavier forwards, but after ratio scaling these performance measures then favoured the lighter backs. There were no performance differences between the forwards and backs after allometric scaling using either the proposed or the derived exponents. Thus, allometric scaling may provide a more effective method for normalizing power and strength in elite athletes when body size is a confounding variable.

  8. Efficacy of generic allometric equations for estimating biomass: a test in Japanese natural forests.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Masae I; Utsugi, Hajime; Tanouchi, Hiroyuki; Aiba, Masahiro; Kurokawa, Hiroko; Onoda, Yusuke; Nagano, Masahiro; Umehara, Toru; Ando, Makoto; Miyata, Rie; Hiura, Tsutom

    2015-07-01

    Accurate estimation of tree and forest biomass is key to evaluating forest ecosystem functions and the global carbon cycle. Allometric equations that estimate tree biomass from a set of predictors, such as stem diameter and tree height, are commonly used. Most allometric equations are site specific, usually developed from a small number of trees harvested in a small area, and are either species specific or ignore interspecific differences in allometry. Due to lack of site-specific allometries, local equations are often applied to sites for which they were not originally developed (foreign sites), sometimes leading to large errors in biomass estimates. In this study, we developed generic allometric equations for aboveground biomass and component (stem, branch, leaf, and root) biomass using large, compiled data sets of 1203 harvested trees belonging to 102 species (60 deciduous angiosperm, 32 evergreen angiosperm, and 10 evergreen gymnosperm species) from 70 boreal, temperate, and subtropical natural forests in Japan. The best generic equations provided better biomass estimates than did local equations that were applied to foreign sites. The best generic equations included explanatory variables that represent interspecific differences in allometry in addition to stem diameter, reducing error by 4-12% compared to the generic equations that did not include the interspecific difference. Different explanatory variables were selected for different components. For aboveground and stem biomass, the best generic equations had species-specific wood specific gravity as an explanatory variable. For branch, leaf, and root biomass, the best equations had functional types (deciduous angiosperm, evergreen angiosperm, and evergreen gymnosperm) instead of functional traits (wood specific gravity or leaf mass per area), suggesting importance of other traits in addition to these traits, such as canopy and root architecture. Inclusion of tree height in addition to stem diameter improved

  9. Allometric analysis of a morphological anti-predator trait in geographic populations of Japanese crucian carp

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Sakie; Fujimori, Hiroka; Hakoyama, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Costly anti-predator traits tend to be expressed only in high-predation conditions. For the cyprinid fish genus Carassius, deeper body depth is more adaptive to avoid predation by gape-limited piscivorous fish, but it raises swimming costs. It is therefore predicted that the relative body depth will decrease when the prey fish has reached a size larger than the predator gape-size. This prediction was tested by allometric analysis of the relation between body depth and standard length of triploid asexual females of the Japanese crucian carp (Carassius auratus sspp.) sampled from 13 geographic populations. The overall allometric relation was not significantly different from isometry. The estimate of the common major-axis slope was close to 1 (near-isometry). The mean relative body depth differed significantly among populations. A significant positive correlation was found with the mean annual air temperature. The geographic variation suggests that local selection pressures vary. In conclusion, the hypothesis that larger fish will have lower body depth was not supported, perhaps indicating that deep body depth in large fish is adaptive for some reason other than defense against piscivorous fish. PMID:28150742

  10. Allometric scaling of echocardiographic measurements in healthy Spanish foals with different body weight.

    PubMed

    Rovira, S; Muñoz, A; Rodilla, V

    2009-04-01

    Scaling in biology is usually allometric, and therefore, the size of the heart may be expressed as a power function of body weight (BW). The present research analyses the echocardiographic measurements in 68 healthy Spanish foals weighed between 70 and 347kg in order to determine the correct scaling exponent for the allometric equation. The echocardiographic parameters measured were: left ventricular internal dimensions (LVID), free wall thickness (LVFWT), interventricular septum thickness (IVST) at systole (s) and diastole (d), EPSS (distance between the point E of the mitral valve and the interventricular septum), and aorta diameters at the level of the aortic valve (AOD), base of valve leaflets (ABS), sinus of Valsalva (ASV) and sino-tubular junction (AJT). Indices of left ventricular performance were calculated. It was found that LVIDd, IVSTs, AOD, and ASV have a relationship to BW raised to 0.300-0.368 power, whereas left ventricular end-diastolic volume and stroke volume scaled to BW raised to 0.731-0.712 power. With these data, appropriate values can be calculated for normal Spanish foals.

  11. Constraint around Quarter-Power Allometric Scaling in Wild Tomatoes (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon; Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Muir, Christopher D; Thomas-Huebner, Meret

    2015-09-01

    The West-Brown-Enquist (WBE) metabolic scaling theory posits that many organismal features scale predictably with body size because of selection to minimize transport costs in resource distribution networks. Many scaling exponents are quarter-powers, as predicted by WBE, but there are also biologically significant deviations that could reflect adaptation to different environments. A central but untested prediction of the WBE model is that wide deviation from optimal scaling is penalized, leading to a pattern of constraint on scaling exponents. Here, we demonstrate, using phylogenetic comparative methods, that variation in allometric scaling between mass and leaf area across 17 wild tomato taxa is constrained around a value indistinguishable from that predicted by WBE but significantly greater than 2/3 (geometric-similarity model). The allometric-scaling exponent was highly correlated with fecundity, water use, and drought response, suggesting that it is functionally significant and therefore could be under selective constraints. However, scaling was not strictly log-log linear but rather declined during ontogeny in all species, as has been observed in many plant species. We caution that although our results supported one prediction of the WBE model, it did not strongly test the model in other important respects. Nevertheless, phylogenetic comparative methods such as those used here are powerful but underutilized tools for metabolic ecology that complement existing methods to adjudicate between models.

  12. Interspecies allometric meta-analysis of the comparative pharmacokinetics of 85 drugs across veterinary and laboratory animal species.

    PubMed

    Huang, Q; Gehring, R; Tell, L A; Li, M; Riviere, J E

    2015-06-01

    Allometric scaling is widely used for the determination of first dosage regimen and the interpolation or extrapolation of pharmacokinetic parameters across many animal species during drug development. In this article, 85 drugs used in veterinary medicine obtained from the Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank database were selected for allometric scaling analysis. Outlier species were identified by statistical methods. The results showed that 77% and 88% of drugs displayed significant correlations between total systemic clearance (CL) and volume of distribution at steady status (Vss) vs. body weight (P < 0.05) on a log-log scale, respectively. The distribution of the allometric exponent b for CL and Vss displays approximate normal distribution, with means (0.87 and 0.99) and standard deviations (0.143 and 0.157) for CL and Vss, respectively. Twelve drugs were identified to have at least one outlier species for CL and ten drugs for Vss. The human CL and Vss were predicted for selected drugs by the obtained allometric equations. The predicted CL and Vss were within a threefold error compared to observed values, except the predicted CL values for antipyrine, warfarin and diazepam. The results can be used to estimate cross-species pharmacokinetic profiles for predicting drug dosages in veterinary species, and to identify those species for which interpolation or extrapolation of pharmacokinetics properties may be problematic.

  13. Fifth dimension of life and the 4/5 allometric scaling law for human brain.

    PubMed

    He, Ji-Huan; Zhang, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Brain cells are not spherical. The basal metabolic rate (B) of a spherical cell scales as B approximately r2, where r is the radius of the cell; that of a brain cell scales as B approximately r(d), where r is the characteristic radius of the cell and d is the fractal dimensionality of its contour. The fractal geometry of the cell leads to a 4/5 allometric scaling law for human brain, uniquely endowing humans with a 5th dimension and successfully explains why the scaling exponent varies during rest and exercise. A striking analogy between Kleiber's 3/4 law and Newton's second law is heuristically illustrated. A physical explanation is given for the 4th dimension of life for three-dimensional organisms and the 5th dimension for human brain.

  14. Allometric relationships between the length of pregnancy and body parameters in mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, A. T.; Todorova, M.; Valev, D. T.; Todorova, R.

    2014-10-01

    In this manuscript we investigated the presence of allometric relationships between the length of pregnancy and the body parameters in mammals. The relationships between the length of pregnancy T (d) and the square of body length H2 (m2), body surface S (m2), body mass to surface ratio M/S (kg/m2) and body-mass index (BMI) (M/H2) were investigated in mammals: Metatheria and Placentalia, including animals with body mass ranging from 8g in Common shrew to 15t in Killer whale. In result, the found power equations are: T = 114.3 (H2)0.352; T= 120.4 S0.38; T = 9.147 (M/S)0.757 and T = 17.6 BMI0.605. The study showed that the M/S ratio and BMI are nearly equivalent characteristics in relation to length of pregnancy.

  15. New allometric scaling relationships and applications for dose and toxicity extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qiming; Yu, Jimmy; Connell, Des

    2014-01-01

    Allometric scaling between metabolic rate, size, body temperature, and other biological traits has found broad applications in ecology, physiology, and particularly in toxicology and pharmacology. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) was observed to scale with body size and temperature. However, the mass scaling exponent was increasingly debated whether it should be 2/3, 3/4, or neither, and scaling with body temperature also attracted recent attention. Based on thermodynamic principles, this work reports 2 new scaling relationships between BMR, size, temperature, and biological time. Good correlations were found with the new scaling relationships, and no universal scaling exponent can be obtained. The new scaling relationships were successfully validated with external toxicological and pharmacological studies. Results also demonstrated that individual extrapolation models can be built to obtain scaling exponent specific to the interested group, which can be practically applied for dose and toxicity extrapolations.

  16. An empirical assessment of tree branching networks and implications for plant allometric scaling models.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Stegen, James C; Savage, Van M; Smith, Duncan D; von Allmen, Erica I; Sperry, John S; Reich, Peter B; Enquist, Brian J

    2013-08-01

    Several theories predict whole-tree function on the basis of allometric scaling relationships assumed to emerge from traits of branching networks. To test this key assumption, and more generally, to explore patterns of external architecture within and across trees, we measure branch traits (radii/lengths) and calculate scaling exponents from five functionally divergent species. Consistent with leading theories, including metabolic scaling theory, branching is area preserving and statistically self-similar within trees. However, differences among scaling exponents calculated at node- and whole-tree levels challenge the assumption of an optimised, symmetrically branching tree. Furthermore, scaling exponents estimated for branch length change across branching orders, and exponents for scaling metabolic rate with plant size (or number of terminal tips) significantly differ from theoretical predictions. These findings, along with variability in the scaling of branch radii being less than for branch lengths, suggest extending current scaling theories to include asymmetrical branching and differential selective pressures in plant architectures.

  17. Geometric morphometric analysis of allometric variation in the mandibular morphology of the hominids of Atapuerca, Sima de los Huesos site.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Antonio; Bastir, Markus

    2004-06-01

    Allometry is an important factor of morphological integration that contributes to the organization of the phenotype and its variation. Variation in the allometric shape of the mandible is particularly important in hominid evolution because the mandible carries important taxonomic traits. Some of these traits are known to covary with size, particularly the retromolar space, symphyseal curvature, and position of the mental foramen. The mandible is a well studied system in the context of the evolutionary development of complex morphological structures because it is composed of different developmental units that are integrated within a single bone. In the present study, we investigated the allometric variation of two important developmental units that are separated by the inferior nerve (a branch of CN V3). We tested the null hypothesis that there would be no difference in allometric variation between the two components. Procrustes-based geometric morphometrics of 20 two-dimensional (2D) landmarks were analyzed by multivariate regressions of shape on size in samples from 121 humans, 48 chimpanzees, and 50 gorillas (all recent specimens), eight fossil hominids from Atapuerca, Sima de los Huesos (AT-SH), and 17 Neandertals. The findings show that in all of the examined species, there was significantly greater allometric variation in the supra-nerve unit than in the infra-nerve unit. The formation of the retromolar space exhibited an allometric relationship with the supra-nerve unit in all of the species studied. The formation of the chin-like morphology is an "apodynamic" feature of the infra-nerve unit in the AT-SH hominids. The results of this study support the hypothesis that allometry contributes to the organization of variation in complex morphological structures.

  18. 10 km running performance predicted by a multiple linear regression model with allometrically adjusted variables

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Cesar C. C.; Barros, Ronaldo V.; Bertuzzi, Romulo; Gagliardi, João F. L.; Lima-Silva, Adriano E.; Lambert, Mike I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to verify the power of VO2max, peak treadmill running velocity (PTV), and running economy (RE), unadjusted or allometrically adjusted, in predicting 10 km running performance. Eighteen male endurance runners performed: 1) an incremental test to exhaustion to determine VO2max and PTV; 2) a constant submaximal run at 12 km·h−1 on an outdoor track for RE determination; and 3) a 10 km running race. Unadjusted (VO2max, PTV and RE) and adjusted variables (VO2max0.72, PTV0.72 and RE0.60) were investigated through independent multiple regression models to predict 10 km running race time. There were no significant correlations between 10 km running time and either the adjusted or unadjusted VO2max. Significant correlations (p < 0.01) were found between 10 km running time and adjusted and unadjusted RE and PTV, providing models with effect size > 0.84 and power > 0.88. The allometrically adjusted predictive model was composed of PTV0.72 and RE0.60 and explained 83% of the variance in 10 km running time with a standard error of the estimate (SEE) of 1.5 min. The unadjusted model composed of a single PVT accounted for 72% of the variance in 10 km running time (SEE of 1.9 min). Both regression models provided powerful estimates of 10 km running time; however, the unadjusted PTV may provide an uncomplicated estimation. PMID:28149382

  19. Proton leak in hepatocytes and liver mitochondria from archosaurs (crocodiles) and allometric relationships for ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, A J; Else, P L; Manolis, S C; Brand, M D

    2002-07-01

    It has previously been shown that mitochondrial proton conductance decreases with increasing body mass in mammals and is lower in a 250-g lizard than the laboratory rat. To examine whether mitochondrial proton conductance is extremely low in very large reptiles, hepatocytes and mitochondria were prepared from saltwater crocodiles ( Crocodylus porosus) and freshwater crocodiles ( Crocodylus johnstoni). Respiration rates of hepatocytes and liver mitochondria were measured at 37 degrees C and compared with values obtained for rat or previously measured for other species. Respiration rates of hepatocytes from either species of crocodile were similar to those reported for lizards and approximately one fifth of the rates measured using cells from mammals (rat and sheep). Ten-to-thirty percent of crocodile hepatocyte respiration was used to drive mitochondrial proton leak, similar to the proportion in other species. Respiration rates of crocodile liver mitochondria were similar to those of mammalian species. Proton leak rate in isolated liver mitochondria was measured as a function of membrane potential. Contrary to our prediction, the mitochondrial proton conductance of liver mitochondria from crocodiles was greater than that of liver mitochondria from lizards and was similar to that of rats. The acyl composition of liver mitochondrial phospholipids from the crocodiles was more similar to that in mitochondria from rats than in mitochondria from lizards. The relatively high mitochondrial proton conductance was associated with a relatively small liver, which seems to be characteristic of crocodilians. Comparison of data from a number of diverse ectothermic species suggested that hepatocyte respiration rate may decrease with body mass, with an allometric exponent of about -0.2, similar to the exponent in mammalian hepatocytes. However, unlike mammals, liver mitochondrial proton conductance in ectotherms showed no allometric relationship with body size.

  20. Improved allometric models to estimate the aboveground biomass of tropical trees.

    PubMed

    Chave, Jérôme; Réjou-Méchain, Maxime; Búrquez, Alberto; Chidumayo, Emmanuel; Colgan, Matthew S; Delitti, Welington B C; Duque, Alvaro; Eid, Tron; Fearnside, Philip M; Goodman, Rosa C; Henry, Matieu; Martínez-Yrízar, Angelina; Mugasha, Wilson A; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Nelson, Bruce W; Ngomanda, Alfred; Nogueira, Euler M; Ortiz-Malavassi, Edgar; Pélissier, Raphaël; Ploton, Pierre; Ryan, Casey M; Saldarriaga, Juan G; Vieilledent, Ghislain

    2014-10-01

    Terrestrial carbon stock mapping is important for the successful implementation of climate change mitigation policies. Its accuracy depends on the availability of reliable allometric models to infer oven-dry aboveground biomass of trees from census data. The degree of uncertainty associated with previously published pantropical aboveground biomass allometries is large. We analyzed a global database of directly harvested trees at 58 sites, spanning a wide range of climatic conditions and vegetation types (4004 trees ≥ 5 cm trunk diameter). When trunk diameter, total tree height, and wood specific gravity were included in the aboveground biomass model as covariates, a single model was found to hold across tropical vegetation types, with no detectable effect of region or environmental factors. The mean percent bias and variance of this model was only slightly higher than that of locally fitted models. Wood specific gravity was an important predictor of aboveground biomass, especially when including a much broader range of vegetation types than previous studies. The generic tree diameter-height relationship depended linearly on a bioclimatic stress variable E, which compounds indices of temperature variability, precipitation variability, and drought intensity. For cases in which total tree height is unavailable for aboveground biomass estimation, a pantropical model incorporating wood density, trunk diameter, and the variable E outperformed previously published models without height. However, to minimize bias, the development of locally derived diameter-height relationships is advised whenever possible. Both new allometric models should contribute to improve the accuracy of biomass assessment protocols in tropical vegetation types, and to advancing our understanding of architectural and evolutionary constraints on woody plant development.

  1. Burrowing energetics of the Giant Burrowing Cockroach Macropanesthia rhinoceros: an allometric study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liangwen; Snelling, Edward P; Seymour, Roger S

    2014-11-01

    Burrowing is an important life strategy for many insects, yet the energetic cost of constructing burrows has never been studied in insects of different sizes. Open flow respirometry was used to determine the allometric scaling of standard metabolic rate (MRS) and burrowing metabolic rate (MRB) in the heaviest extant cockroach species, the Giant Burrowing Cockroach Macropanesthia rhinoceros, at different stages of development. At 10 °C, MRS (mW) scales with body mass (M; g) according to the allometric power equation, MRS=0.158M(0.74), at 20 °C the equation is MRS=0.470M(0.53), and at 30 °C the equation is MRS=1.22M(0.49) (overall Q10=2.23). MRS is much lower in M. rhinoceros compared to other insect species, which is consistent with several aspects of their life history, including flightlessness, extreme longevity (>5 years), burrowing, parental behaviour, and an energy-poor diet (dry eucalypt leaf litter). Energy expenditure during burrowing at 25 °C scales according to MRB=16.9M(0.44), and is approximately 17 times higher than resting rates measured at the same temperature, although the metabolic cost over a lifetime is probably low, because the animal does not burrow to find food. The net cost of transport by burrowing (Jm(-1)) scales according to NCOT=120M(0.49), and reflects the energetically demanding task of burrowing compared to other forms of locomotion. The net cost of excavating the soil (J cm(-3)) is statistically independent of body size.

  2. Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Fara

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents heuristic explanations of factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Common misconceptions regarding these topics are clarified. In addition, (a) the regression (b) Bartlett, (c) Anderson-Rubin, and (d) Thompson methods for calculating factor scores are reviewed. Syntax necessary to execute all four…

  3. The allometric relationship between resting metabolic rate and body mass in wild waterfowl (Anatidae) and an application to estimation of winter habitat requirements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.R.; Eadie, J. McA

    2006-01-01

    We examined the allometric relationship between resting metabolic rate (RMR; kJ day-1) and body mass (kg) in wild waterfowl (Anatidae) by regressing RMR on body mass using species means from data obtained from published literature (18 sources, 54 measurements, 24 species; all data from captive birds). There was no significant difference among measurements from the rest (night; n = 37), active (day; n = 14), and unspecified (n = 3) phases of the daily cycle (P > 0.10), and we pooled these measurements for analysis. The resulting power function (aMassb) for all waterfowl (swans, geese, and ducks) had an exponent (b; slope of the regression) of 0.74, indistinguishable from that determined with commonly used general equations for nonpasserine birds (0.72-0.73). In contrast, the mass proportionality coefficient (b; y-intercept at mass = 1 kg) of 422 exceeded that obtained from the nonpasserine equations by 29%-37%. Analyses using independent contrasts correcting for phylogeny did not substantially alter the equation. Our results suggest the waterfowl equation provides a more appropriate estimate of RMR for bioenergetics analyses of waterfowl than do the general nonpasserine equations. When adjusted with a multiple to account for energy costs of free living, the waterfowl equation better estimates daily energy expenditure. Using this equation, we estimated that the extent of wetland habitat required to support wintering waterfowl populations could be 37%-50% higher than previously predicted using general nonpasserine equations. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

  4. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Exosomes Suppress Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth in a Rat Model: Apparent Diffusion Coefficient, Natural Killer T-Cell Responses, and Histopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sheung-Fat; Yip, Hon-Kan; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Lee, Chen-Chang; Lee, Chia-Chang; Huang, Chung-Cheng; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Jui-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the effects of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) exosomes on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), natural killer T-cell (NKT-cell) responses, and histopathological features. ADMSC-derived exosomes appeared as nanoparticles (30–90 nm) on electron microscopy and were positive for CD63, tumor susceptibility gene-101, and β-catenin on western blotting. The control (n = 8) and exosome-treated (n = 8) rats with N1S1-induced HCC underwent baseline and posttreatment day 10 and day 20 magnetic resonance imaging and measurement of ADC. Magnetic resonance imaging showed rapidly enlarged HCCs with low ADCs in the controls. The exosome-treated rats showed partial but nonsignificant tumor reduction, and significant ADC and ADC ratio increases on day 10. On day 20, the exosome-treated rats harbored significantly smaller tumors and volume ratios, higher ADC and ADC ratios, more circulating and intratumoral NKT-cells, and low-grade HCC (P < 0.05 for all comparisons) compared to the controls. The ADC and volume ratios exhibited significant inverse correlations (P < 0.001, R2 = 0.679). ADMSC-derived exosomes promoted NKT-cell antitumor responses in rats, thereby facilitating HCC suppression, early ADC increase, and low-grade tumor differentiation. ADC may be an early biomarker of treatment response. PMID:26345219

  5. Hyperglycemia accelerates apparent diffusion coefficient-defined lesion growth after focal cerebral ischemia in rats with and without features of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tarr, David; Graham, Delyth; Roy, Lisa A; Holmes, William M; McCabe, Christopher; Mhairi Macrae, I; Muir, Keith W; Dewar, Deborah

    2013-10-01

    Poststroke hyperglycemia is associated with a poor outcome yet clinical management is inadequately informed. We sought to determine whether clinically relevant levels of hyperglycemia exert detrimental effects on the early evolution of focal ischemic brain damage, as determined by magnetic resonance imaging, in normal rats and in those modeling the 'metabolic syndrome'. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) or fructose-fed spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (ffSHRSP) rats were randomly allocated to groups for glucose or vehicle administration before permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Diffusion-weighted imaging was carried out over the first 4 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion and lesion volume calculated from apparent diffusion coefficient maps. Infarct volume and immunostaining for markers of oxidative stress were measured in the fixed brain sections at 24 hours. Hyperglycemia rapidly exacerbated early ischemic damage in both WKY and ffSHRSP rats but increased infarct volume only in WKY rats. There was only limited evidence of oxidative stress in hyperglycemic animals. Acute hyperglycemia, at clinically relevant levels, exacerbates early ischemic damage in both normal and metabolic syndrome rats. Management of hyperglycemia may have greatest benefit when performed in the acute phase after stroke in the absence or presence of comorbidities.

  6. Consistent allometric scaling of stomatal sizes and densities across taxonomic ranks and geologic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, H. J.; Price, C. A.; Wagner-Cremer, F.; Dekker, S. C.; Veneklaas, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Stomatal pores on plants leaves are an important link in the chain of processes that determine biosphere fluxes of water and carbon. Stomatal density (i.e. the number of stomata per area) and the size of the stomatal pore at maximum aperture are particularly relevant traits in this context because they determine the theoretical maximum diffusive stomatal conductance (gsmax) and thereby set an upper limit for leaf gas exchange. Observations on (sub)fossil leaves revealed that changes in stomatal densities are anti-correlated with changes in stomatal sizes at developmental and evolutionary timescales. Moreover, this anti-correlation appears consistently within single species, across multiple species in the extant plant community and at evolutionary time scales. The consistency of the relation between stomatal densities and sizes suggests that common mechanisms constrain the adaptation of these traits across the plant community. In an attempt to identify such potential generic constraints, we investigated the allometry between stomatal densities and sizes in the extant plant community and across geological time. As the size of the stomatal pore at maximum aperture is typically derived from the length of the stomatal pore, we considered the allometric scaling of pore length (lp) with stomatal density (Ds) as the power law: lp = k . Dsa in which k is a normalization constant and the exponent a is the slope of the scaling relation. Our null-hypothesis predicts that stomatal density and pore length scale along a constant slope of -1/2 based on a scale-invariant relation between pore length and the distance between neighboring pores. Our alternative hypothesis predicts a constant slope of -1 based on the idea that stomatal density and pore length scale along an invariant gsmax. To explore these scaling hypotheses in the extant plant community we compiled a dataset of combined observations of stomatal density and pore length on 111 species from published literature and new

  7. Growth of Cobitis narentana Karaman, 1928 in the Neretva River, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Davor; Mrakovcić, Milorad; Schneider, Daniela; Mustafić, Perica; Caleta, Marko; Radić, Ivana

    2003-01-01

    Age and growth of Cobitis narentana were examined in the delta of Neretva River in Croatia. Maximum observed length was 100.4 mm for females and 63.5 for males. Five age classes were determined, from 0+ to 4+. For both females (61.0%) and males (53.8%), the greatest proportion of specimens were in the 1+ age category. Growth was faster in males in the first year of life, while females grew at a faster rate than males after the first year. The Fulton condition factor was determined (CF=0.588 for males and CF=0.618 for females). The length-weight relationship was determined for females (W=8xl0(-5)L2.9325) and males (W=2x l0(-5)L2.6431). The parameter b was calculated as less than b=3.0, thus establishing that growth in both males and females was allometric. Growth rate was determined using the von Bertalanffy growth rate curves for females (Lt=101.1[ 1-e(-0.5(t-0.94)]; r2=0.99) and for males (Lt=65.3[1-e(-0.54(t-2.27)]; r2=0.97). The resulting growth rate coefficient (K) was found to be slightly higher in males (0.54) than in females (0.5).

  8. Stochastic ontogenetic growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, B. J.; West, D.

    2012-02-01

    An ontogenetic growth model (OGM) for a thermodynamically closed system is generalized to satisfy both the first and second law of thermodynamics. The hypothesized stochastic ontogenetic growth model (SOGM) is shown to entail the interspecies allometry relation by explicitly averaging the basal metabolic rate and the total body mass over the steady-state probability density for the total body mass (TBM). This is the first derivation of the interspecies metabolic allometric relation from a dynamical model and the asymptotic steady-state distribution of the TBM is fit to data and shown to be inverse power law.

  9. Allometric scaling of discontinuous gas exchange patterns in the locust Locusta migratoria throughout ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Edward P; Matthews, Philip G D; Seymour, Roger S

    2012-10-01

    The discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) is a three-phase breathing pattern displayed by many insects at rest. The pattern consists of an extended breath-hold period (closed phase), followed by a sequence of rapid gas exchange pulses (flutter phase), and then a period in which respiratory gases move freely between insect and environment (open phase). This study measured CO(2) emission in resting locusts Locusta migratoria throughout ontogeny, in normoxia (21 kPa P(O2)), hypoxia (7 kPa P(O2)) and hyperoxia (40 kPa P(O2)), to determine whether body mass and ambient O(2) affect DGC phase duration. In normoxia, mean CO(2) production rate scales with body mass (M(b); g) according to the allometric power equation , closed phase duration (C; min) scales with body mass according to the equation C=8.0M(b)(0.38±0.29), closed+flutter period (C+F; min) scales with body mass according to the equation C+F=26.6M (0.20±0.25)(b) and open phase duration (O; min) scales with body mass according to the equation O=13.3M(b) (0.23±0.18). Hypoxia results in a shorter C phase and longer O phase across all life stages, whereas hyperoxia elicits shorter C, C+F and O phases across all life stages. The tendency for larger locusts to exhibit longer C and C+F phases might arise if the positive allometric scaling of locust tracheal volume prolongs the time taken to reach the minimum O(2) and maximum CO(2) set-points that determine the duration of these respective periods, whereas an increasingly protracted O phase could reflect the additional time required for larger locusts to expel CO(2) through a relatively longer tracheal pathway. Observed changes in phase duration under hypoxia possibly serve to maximise O(2) uptake from the environment, whereas the response of the DGC to hyperoxia is difficult to explain, but could be affected by elevated levels of reactive oxygen species.

  10. Gender-based differences in the shape of the human corpus callosum are associated with allometric variations.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Emiliano; de la Cuétara, José Manuel; Colom, Roberto; Martin-Loeches, Manuel

    2012-04-01

    The corpus callosum displays considerable morphological variability between individuals. Although some characteristics are thought to differ between male and female brains, there is no agreement regarding the source of this variation. Biomedical imaging and geometric morphometrics have provided tools to investigate shape and size variation in terms of integration and correlation. Here we analyze variations at the midsagittal outline of the corpus callosum in a sample of 102 young adults in order to describe and quantify the pattern of covariation associated with its morphology. Our results suggest that the shape of the corpus callosum is characterized by low levels of morphological integration, which explains the large variability. In larger brains, a minor allometric component involves a relative reduction of the splenium. Small differences between males and?females are associated with this allometric pattern, induced primarily by size variation rather than gender-specific characteristics.

  11. [Age structure and growth pattern of Polytrichum juniperum populations in a mire of Changbai Mountains].

    PubMed

    Bu, Zhaojun; Yan, Yunfei; Dai, Dan; Wang, Xianwei

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the age structure and growth pattern of two Polytrichum juniperum populations with and without sporophytes in Hani mire of Changbai Mountains were studied by 'innate annual marker' method. The ramets of both populations were composed of 6 age classes, and their quantity and biomass showed a declining age structure, which was more obvious in the sporophyte produced population. No significant difference of biomass was found (P > 0.05) between the two populations. The dry material accumulation of the ramets in both populations increased with aging, and showed similar patterns of linear function. The ramets mean height of sporophyte-produced population was 6.17% shorter (P < 0.05) than the another, because sporophyte production limited the height growth. The ramets mean height also increased with aging, and showed similar patterns of linear function. In non-sporophyte produced population, the variation coefficient of ramets height was only 2.44%, which indicated the significance of similar height for ramets survival. In sporophyte produced population, the variation coefficient of ramets height was 25.07%, while that of ramets biomass was 8.25%, suggesting the significance of similar biomass to the reproduction of population. The biomass of ramets had a significantly positive correlation with height in both populations (P < 0.001), and no allometric growth was showed.

  12. High mortality and poor growth of green mussels, Perna viridis, in high chlorophyll- a environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, Tan Kar; Denil, Delta Jenetty; Ransangan, Julian

    2016-03-01

    The current study was carried out from May 2014 to April 2015 to estimate the stock status of P. viridis in Marudu Bay. The gonad development was monitored by histological examination, while the population parameters including asymptotic length ( L ∞), growth coefficient ( K), mortality rate ( Z, F and M), exploitation level ( E) and recruitment of P. viridis were estimated using the lengthfrequency data. Results of the current study demonstrated that P. viridis in Marudu Bay spawned throughout the year with two major peaks, one in April to May and another one in October to December. The recruitment pattern was continuous with the peak in May to June 2014, which corresponded to the first spawning peak in April. However, no significant recruitment was observed from the second spawning peak due to the difference in spawning timing between male and female populations. The estimated asymptotic length ( L ∞), growth coefficient ( K), total mortality ( Z), natural mortality ( M), fishing mortality ( F) and growth performance ( φ) of P. viridis in Marudu Bay were estimate to be 117 mm, 0.97 yr-1, 4.39 yr-1, 1.23 yr-1, 3.16 yr-1 and 4.123, respectively. The exponent b of the lengthweight relationship was 2.4 and exploitation level ( E) was 0.72. The high mortality, low condition indices and negative allometric of P. viridis in Marudu Bay is caused by a lack of suitable food in the surrounding water.

  13. Body and limb size dissociation at the origin of birds: uncoupling allometric constraints across a macroevolutionary transition.

    PubMed

    Dececchi, T Alexander; Larsson, Hans C E

    2013-09-01

    The origin of birds and powered flight is a classic major evolutionary transition. Research on their origin often focuses on the evolution of the wing with trends of forelimb elongation traced back through many nonavian maniraptoran dinosaurs. We present evidence that the relative forelimb elongation within avian antecedents is primarily due to allometry and is instead driven by a reduction in body size. Once body size is factored out, there is no trend of increasing forelimb length until the origin of birds. We report that early birds and nonavian theropods have significantly different scaling relationships within the forelimb and hindlimb skeleton. Ancestral forelimb and hindlimb allometric scaling to body size is rapidly decoupled at the origin of birds, when wings significantly elongate, by evolving a positive allometric relationship with body size from an ancestrally negative allometric pattern and legs significantly shorten by keeping a similar, near isometric relationship but with a reduced intercept. These results have implications for the evolution of powered flight and early diversification of birds. They suggest that their limb lengths first had to be dissociated from general body size scaling before expanding to the wide range of fore and hindlimb shapes and sizes present in today's birds.

  14. Exaggerated allometric structures in relation to demographic and ecological parameters in Lucanus cervus (Coleoptera: Lucanidae).

    PubMed

    Romiti, Federico; Tini, Massimiliano; Redolfi De Zan, Lara; Chiari, Stefano; Zauli, Agnese; Carpaneto, Giuseppe M

    2015-10-01

    Enlarged weapons and ornamental traits under sexual selection often show a positive allometric relationship with the overall body size. The present study explores the allometry of mandibles and their supporting structure, the head, in males of the European stag beetle, Lucanus cervus. This species shows a remarkable dimorphism in mandible shape and size that are used by males in intraspecific combats. Stag beetles were captured, measured, weighed, and released in the framework of a capture-mark-recapture study. The relationship of mandible length (ML) and head width in respect to the overall body size was described by a segmented regression model. A linear relationship was detected between ML and head width. The scaling relationships for both ML and head width identified the same switchpoint, highlighting the advantages of using combined results of weapons and their supporting structures in such analysis. These results led to a more consistent distinction of males in two morphologies: minor and major. The survival probability of individuals was dependent on the morphological class and was higher for minor males than for major. Elytron length and body mass of the individuals did not show any significant variation during the season. Differences in predatory pressure were detected between morphs by the collection and analysis of body fragments due to the predatory activity of corvids. Morphological differences and shift in demographic and ecological parameters between the two classes suggested that selection continues to favor intrasexual dimorphism in this species throughout a trade-off mechanism between costs and benefits of carrying exaggerated traits.

  15. A general allometric and life-history model for cellular differentiation in the transition to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Kessler, John O; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-03-01

    The transition from unicellular, to colonial, to larger multicellular organisms has benefits, costs, and requirements. Here we present a model inspired by the volvocine green algae that explains the dynamics involved in the unicellular-multicellular transition using life-history theory and allometry. We model the two fitness components (fecundity and viability) and compare the fitness of hypothetical colonies of different sizes with varying degrees of cellular differentiation to understand the general principles that underlie the evolution of multicellularity. We argue that germ-soma separation may have evolved to counteract the increasing costs and requirements of larger multicellular colonies. The model shows that the cost of investing in soma decreases with size. For lineages such as the Volvocales, as reproduction costs increase with size for undifferentiated colonies, soma specialization benefits the colony indirectly by decreasing such costs and directly by helping reproductive cells acquire resources for their metabolic needs. Germ specialization is favored once soma evolves and takes care of vegetative functions. To illustrate the model, we use some allometric relationships measured in Volvocales. Our analysis shows that the cost of reproducing an increasingly larger group has likely played an important role in the transition to multicellularity and cellular differentiation.

  16. An allometric analysis of the number of muscle spindles in mammalian skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Banks, R W

    2006-06-01

    An allometric analysis of the number of muscle spindles in relation to muscle mass in mammalian (mouse, rat, guinea-pig, cat, human) skeletal muscles is presented. It is shown that the trend to increasing number as muscle mass increases follows an isometric (length) relationship between species, whereas within a species, at least for the only essentially complete sample (human), the number of spindles scales, on average, with the square root rather than the cube root of muscle mass. An attempt is made to reconcile these apparently discrepant relationships. Use of the widely accepted spindle density (number of spindles g(-1) of muscle) as a measure of relative abundance of spindles in different muscles is shown to be grossly misleading. It is replaced with the residuals of the linear regression of ln spindle number against ln muscle mass. Significant differences in relative spindle abundance as measured by residuals were found between regional groups of muscles: the greatest abundance is in axial muscles, including those concerned with head position, whereas the least is in muscles of the shoulder girdle. No differences were found between large and small muscles operating in parallel, or between antigravity and non-antigravity muscles. For proximal vs. distal muscles, spindles were significantly less abundant in the hand than the arm, but there was no difference between the foot and the leg.

  17. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9–15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9–156 ATA • min‑1). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb – Ptiss) • τ‑1 dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1‑e‑r, where r = ∫(PtissN2 ‑ Thr ‑ Pamb) • Pamb–1 dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude.

  18. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness

    PubMed Central

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9–15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9–156 ATA • min−1). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb – Ptiss) • τ−1 dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1−e−r, where r = ∫(PtissN2 − Thr − Pamb) • Pamb–1 dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:28150725

  19. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-02-02

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9-15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9-156 ATA • min(-1)). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb - Ptiss) • τ(-1) dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1-e(-r), where r = ∫(PtissN2 - Thr - Pamb) • Pamb(-1) dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude.

  20. Mapping Urban Forest Leaf Area Index Using Lidar: A Comparison of Gap Fraction Inversion and Allometric Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, M.; Bookhagen, B.; McFadden, J. P.; Sun, A.; Roberts, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    In urban areas leaf area index (LAI) is a key ecosystem structural attribute with implications for energy and water balance, gas exchange, and anthropogenic energy use. Typically, citywide LAI estimates are extrapolated from those made on forest inventory sample plots through intensive crown measurement and allometric scaling. This is a time- and labor-intensive process yielding coarse spatial resolution results. In this study we generate spatially explicit estimates of LAI using high-point density airborne lidar throughout our study area in downtown Santa Barbara, CA. We implement two theoretically distinct modeling approaches. First, based on hemispherical photography at our 71 field plots, we estimate effective LAI using scan-angle corrected lidar laser penetration metrics (LPM). For our second approach, we adapt existing allometric equations for use with a suite of crown structural metrics (e.g., tree height, crown base height) measured with lidar. This approach allows for estimates of LAI to be made at the individual tree crown scale (ITC). This is important for evaluating fine-scale interactions between canopy and urban surfaces. The LPM method resulted in good agreement with field estimates (r2 = 0.80) and a slope of near unity (β = 0.998) using a model that assumed a spherical leaf angle distribution. Within ITC segments that were automatically delineated using watershed segmentation, lidar estimates of crown structure closely paralleled field measurements (r2=0.87 for crown length). LAI estimates based on the lidar structural variables corresponded well with estimates from field measurements (r2 = 0.84). Agreement between the LPM and allometric lidar methods was also strong across the 71 validation plots (r2 = 0.88) and among 450 sample points (r2 = 0.72) randomly distributed throughout the citywide maps. This is notably higher than the agreement between the hemiphoto and allometric ground-based estimates (r2 = 0.56). The allometric approach generally

  1. Allometric scaling of UK urban emissions: interpretation and implications for air quality management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Rob; Barnes, Matt; Whyatt, Duncan; Hewitt, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Allometry uncovers structures and patterns by relating the characteristics of complex systems to a measure of scale. We present an allometric analysis of air quality for UK urban settlements, beginning with emissions and moving on to consider air concentrations. We consider both airshed-average 'urban background' concentrations (cf. those derived from satellites for NO2) and local pollution 'hotspots'. We show that there is a strong and robust scaling (with respect to population) of the non-point-source emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane, as well as the toxic pollutants nitrogen dioxide, PM2.5, and 1,3-butadiene. The scaling of traffic-related emissions is not simply a reflection of road length, but rather results from the socio-economic patterning of road-use. The recent controversy regarding diesel vehicle emissions is germane to our study but does not affect our overall conclusions. We next develop an hypothesis for the population-scaling of airshed-average air concentrations, with which we demonstrate that, although average air quality is expected to be worse in large urban centres compared to small urban centres, the overall effect is an economy of scale (i.e., large cities reduce the overall burden of emissions compared to the same population spread over many smaller urban settlements). Our hypothesis explains satellite-derived observations of airshed-average urban NO2 concentrations. The theory derived also explains which properties of nature-based solutions (urban greening) can make a significant contribution at city scale, and points to a hitherto unforeseen opportunity to make large cities cleaner than smaller cities in absolute terms with respect to their airshed-average pollutant concentration.

  2. Allometric scaling and predicting cycling performance in (well-) trained female cyclists.

    PubMed

    Lamberts, R P; Davidowitz, K J

    2014-03-01

    As female cycling attains greater professionalism, a larger emphasis is placed on the ability to predict and monitor changes in their cycling performance. The main aim of this study was to determine if peak power output (PPO) adjusted for body mass (W · kg-0.32) accurately predicts flat 40-km time trial performance (40 km TT) in female cyclists as found in men. 20 (well-) trained female cyclists completed a PPO test including maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) and a flat 40 km TT test. Relationships between cycling performance parameters were also compared to the cycling performance of 45 male cyclists. Allometrically scaled PPW (W · kg(-0.32)) most accurately predicted 40 km TT performance in the female cyclists (r = -0.87, p<0.0001) compared to any other method, however different slopes between the parameters were found in the female and male cyclists (p=0.000115). In addition gender differences were also found between the relationship between relative PPO (W · kg-1) and relative VO2max (ml · min-1 · kg(-1))(p<0.0001), while no gender differences were found between actual and predicted cycling performance based on the Lamberts and Lambert Submaximal Cycle Test (LSCT), which was used a standardized warm-up. In conclusion, relationships between relative cycling parameters seem to differ between genders, while relationships between absolute cycling parameters seem to be similar. Therefore gender specific regression equations should be used when predicting relative cycling performance parameters.

  3. Using Combined Morphological, Allometric and Molecular Approaches to Identify Species of the Genus Raillietiella (Pentastomida)

    PubMed Central

    Kelehear, Crystal; Spratt, David M.; Dubey, Sylvain; Brown, Gregory P.; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Taxonomic studies of parasites can be severely compromised if the host species affects parasite morphology; an uncritical analysis might recognize multiple taxa simply because of phenotypically plastic responses of parasite morphology to host physiology. Pentastomids of the genus Raillietiella are endoparasitic crustaceans primarily infecting the respiratory system of carnivorous reptiles, but also recorded from bufonid anurans. The delineation of pentastomids at the generic level is clear, but the taxonomic status of many species is not. We collected raillietiellids from lungs of the invasive cane toad (Rhinella marina), the invasive Asian house gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus), and a native tree frog (Litoria caerulea) in tropical Australia, and employed a combination of genetic analyses, and traditional and novel morphological methods to clarify their identity. Conventional analyses of parasite morphology (which focus on raw values of morphological traits) revealed two discrete clusters in terms of pentastome hook size, implying two different species of pentastomes: one from toads and a tree frog (Raillietiella indica) and another from lizards (Raillietiella frenatus). However, these clusters disappeared in allometric analyses that took pentastome body size into account, suggesting that only a single pentastome taxon may be involved. Our molecular data revealed no genetic differences between parasites in toads versus lizards, confirming that there was only one species: R. frenatus. This pentastome (previously known only from lizards) clearly is also capable of maturing in anurans. Our analyses show that the morphological features used in pentastomid taxonomy change as the parasite transitions through developmental stages in the definitive host. To facilitate valid descriptions of new species of pentastomes, future taxonomic work should include both morphological measurements (incorporating quantitative measures of body size and hook bluntness) and molecular data

  4. Appropriate interpretation of aerobic capacity: allometric scaling in adult and young soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Chamari, K; Moussa-Chamari, I; Boussaidi, L; Hachana, Y; Kaouech, F; Wisloff, U

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare aerobic capacity of young and adult elite soccer players using appropriate scaling procedures. Methods: Twenty four male adult (mean (SD) age 24 (2) years, weight 75.7 (7.2) kg, VO2MAX 66.6 (5.2) ml/lbm/min, where lbm is lean body mass in kg) and 21 youth (14 (0.4) years, 60.2 (7.3) kg, 66.5 (5.9) ml/lbm/min) elite soccer players took part in the study. Allometric equations were used to determine the relation between maximal and submaximal oxygen cost of running (running economy) and body mass. Results: Maximal and submaximal oxygen uptake increased in proportion to body mass raised to the power of 0.72 (0.04) and 0.60 (0.06) respectively. The VO2MAX of adult players was similar to that of the youth players when expressed in direct proportion to body mass—that is, ml/kg/min—but 5% higher (p<0.05) when expressed using appropriate procedures for scaling. Conversely, compared with seniors, youth players had 13% higher (p<0.001) energy cost of running—that is, poorer running economy—when expressed as ml/kg/min but not when expressed according to the scaling procedures. Conclusions: Compared with the youth soccer players, VO2MAX in the seniors was underestimated and running economy overestimated when expressed traditionally as ml/lbm/min. The study clearly shows the pitfalls in previous studies when aerobic capacity was evaluated in subjects with different body mass. It further shows that the use of scaling procedures can affect the evaluation of, and the resultant training programme to improve, aerobic capacity. PMID:15665205

  5. Washout allometric reference method (WARM) for parametric analysis of [(11)C]PIB in human brains.

    PubMed

    Rodell, Anders; Aanerud, Joel; Braendgaard, Hans; Gjedde, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Rapid clearance and disappearance of a tracer from the circulation challenges the determination of the tracer's binding potentials in brain (BP ND) by positron emission tomography (PET). This is the case for the analysis of the binding of radiolabeled [(11)C]Pittsburgh Compound B ([(11)C]PIB) to amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques in brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). To resolve the issue of rapid clearance from the circulation, we here introduce the flow-independent Washout Allometric Reference Method (WARM) for the analysis of washout and binding of [(11)C]PIB in two groups of human subjects, healthy aged control subjects (HC), and patients suffering from AD, and we compare the results to the outcome of two conventional analysis methods. We also use the rapid initial clearance to obtain a surrogate measure of the rate of cerebral blood flow (CBF), as well as a method of identifying a suitable reference region directly from the [(11)C]PIB signal. The difference of average absolute CBF values between the AD and HC groups was highly significant (P < 0.003). The CBF measures were not significantly different between the groups when normalized to cerebellar gray matter flow. Thus, when flow differences confound conventional measures of [(11)C]PIB binding, the separate estimates of CBF and BP ND provide additional information about possible AD. The results demonstrate the importance of data-driven estimation of CBF and BP ND, as well as reference region detection from the [(11)C]PIB signal. We conclude that the WARM method yields stable measures of BP ND with relative ease, using only integration for noise reduction and no model regression. The method accounts for relative flow differences in the brain tissue and yields a calibrated measure of absolute CBF directly from the [(11)C]PIB signal. Compared to conventional methods, WARM optimizes the Aβ plaque load discrimination between patients with AD and healthy controls (P = 0.009).

  6. Allometric scaling relationship between above- and below-ground biomass within and across five woody seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dongliang; Ma, Yuzhu; Zhong, Quanling; Xu, Weifeng

    2014-10-01

    Allometric biomass allocation theory predicts that leaf biomass (M L ) scaled isometrically with stem (M S ) and root (M R ) biomass, and thus above-ground biomass (leaf and stem) (M A ) and root (M R ) scaled nearly isometrically with below-ground biomass (root) for tree seedlings across a wide diversity of taxa. Furthermore, prior studies also imply that scaling constant should vary with species. However, litter is known about whether such invariant isometric scaling exponents hold for intraspecific biomass allocation, and how variation in scaling constants influences the interspecific scaling relationship between above- and below-ground biomass. Biomass data of seedlings from five evergreen species were examined to test scaling relationships among biomass components across and within species. Model Type II regression was used to compare the numerical values of scaling exponents and constants among leaf, stem, root, and above- to below-ground biomass. The results indicated that M L and M S scaled in an isometric or a nearly isometric manner with M R , as well as M A to M R for five woody species. Significant variation was observed in the Y-intercepts of the biomass scaling curves, resulting in the divergence for intraspecific scaling and interspecific scaling relationships for M L versus M S and M L versus M R , but not for M S versus M R and M A versus M R . We conclude, therefore, that a nearly isometric scaling relationship of M A versus M R holds true within each of the studied woody species and across them irrespective the negative scaling relationship between leaf and stem.

  7. Modified Biserial Correlation Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, Helena Chmura

    1981-01-01

    Asymptotic distribution theory of Brogden's form of biserial correlation coefficient is derived and large sample estimates of its standard error obtained. Its relative efficiency to the biserial correlation coefficient is examined. Recommendations for choice of estimator of biserial correlation are presented. (Author/JKS)

  8. Allometric scaling of indirect effects: body size ratios predict non-consumptive effects in multi-predator systems.

    PubMed

    Krenek, Lauren; Rudolf, Volker H W

    2014-11-01

    Non-consumptive effects (NCES) frequently lead to non-independent effects of multiple predators. While such emergent predator effects are ubiquitous in natural communities, the strength of these effects varies among studies and systems, making it difficult to predict a priory how changes in predator diversity influence prey suppression. Thus, identifying general scaling rules which can explain this variation of non-independent effects is vital for modelling natural communities and how they respond to biodiversity loss. Body size is a key trait determining the nature and strength of ecological interactions. While great progress has been made using allometric relationships to predict the interaction strength of predator-prey pairs, it is unknown whether similar relationships explain variation in the strength of NCEs, and how they are related to consumptive effects. Here, we experimentally manipulate the relative size difference of multiple predators to determine whether NCEs follow general allometric scaling relationships in an aquatic multi-predator system. Results demonstrate that the presence and strength of NCEs can vary dramatically across predator combinations. However, this variation scaled predictably with the size ratio of predators, increasing the size difference among predators increased NCEs. This pattern was driven by a size-mediated shift in 'food web motif' from competition to intraguild predation and a positive correlation of NCEs and intraguild predation rate. Results indicate that models which assume that consumers have independent effects are particularly likely to make erroneous predictions when predators differ substantially in size, but simple allometric relationships of NCEs could be used to correct this bias.

  9. High-Throughput Tissue Bioenergetics Analysis Reveals Identical Metabolic Allometric Scaling for Teleost Hearts and Whole Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Jayasundara, Nishad; Kozal, Jordan S.; Arnold, Mariah C.; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Di Giulio, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Organismal metabolic rate, a fundamental metric in biology, demonstrates an allometric scaling relationship with body size. Fractal-like vascular distribution networks of biological systems are proposed to underlie metabolic rate allometric scaling laws from individual organisms to cells, mitochondria, and enzymes. Tissue-specific metabolic scaling is notably absent from this paradigm. In the current study, metabolic scaling relationships of hearts and brains with body size were examined by improving on a high-throughput whole-organ oxygen consumption rate (OCR) analysis method in five biomedically and environmentally relevant teleost model species. Tissue-specific metabolic scaling was compared with organismal routine metabolism (RMO2), which was measured using whole organismal respirometry. Basal heart OCR and organismal RMO2 scaled identically with body mass in a species-specific fashion across all five species tested. However, organismal maximum metabolic rates (MMO2) and pharmacologically-induced maximum cardiac metabolic rates in zebrafish Danio rerio did not show a similar relationship with body mass. Brain metabolic rates did not scale with body size. The identical allometric scaling of heart and organismal metabolic rates with body size suggests that hearts, the power generator of an organism’s vascular distribution network, might be crucial in determining teleost metabolic rate scaling under routine conditions. Furthermore, these findings indicate the possibility of measuring heart OCR utilizing the high-throughput approach presented here as a proxy for organismal metabolic rate—a useful metric in characterizing organismal fitness. In addition to heart and brain OCR, the current approach was also used to measure whole liver OCR, partition cardiac mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters using pharmacological agents, and estimate heart and brain glycolytic rates. This high-throughput whole-organ bioenergetic analysis method has important applications in

  10. High-Throughput Tissue Bioenergetics Analysis Reveals Identical Metabolic Allometric Scaling for Teleost Hearts and Whole Organisms.

    PubMed

    Jayasundara, Nishad; Kozal, Jordan S; Arnold, Mariah C; Chan, Sherine S L; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    Organismal metabolic rate, a fundamental metric in biology, demonstrates an allometric scaling relationship with body size. Fractal-like vascular distribution networks of biological systems are proposed to underlie metabolic rate allometric scaling laws from individual organisms to cells, mitochondria, and enzymes. Tissue-specific metabolic scaling is notably absent from this paradigm. In the current study, metabolic scaling relationships of hearts and brains with body size were examined by improving on a high-throughput whole-organ oxygen consumption rate (OCR) analysis method in five biomedically and environmentally relevant teleost model species. Tissue-specific metabolic scaling was compared with organismal routine metabolism (RMO2), which was measured using whole organismal respirometry. Basal heart OCR and organismal RMO2 scaled identically with body mass in a species-specific fashion across all five species tested. However, organismal maximum metabolic rates (MMO2) and pharmacologically-induced maximum cardiac metabolic rates in zebrafish Danio rerio did not show a similar relationship with body mass. Brain metabolic rates did not scale with body size. The identical allometric scaling of heart and organismal metabolic rates with body size suggests that hearts, the power generator of an organism's vascular distribution network, might be crucial in determining teleost metabolic rate scaling under routine conditions. Furthermore, these findings indicate the possibility of measuring heart OCR utilizing the high-throughput approach presented here as a proxy for organismal metabolic rate-a useful metric in characterizing organismal fitness. In addition to heart and brain OCR, the current approach was also used to measure whole liver OCR, partition cardiac mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters using pharmacological agents, and estimate heart and brain glycolytic rates. This high-throughput whole-organ bioenergetic analysis method has important applications in

  11. Integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling and allometric scaling for optimizing the dosage regimen of the monoclonal ior EGF/r3 antibody.

    PubMed

    Duconge, Jorge; Castillo, Rubén; Crombet, Tania; Alvarez, Daniel; Matheu, Janet; Vecino, Gloria; Alonso, Katia; Beausoleil, Irene; Valenzuela, Carmen; Becquer, Maria A; Fernández-Sánchez, Eduardo

    2004-02-01

    The multiple-dose strategy with the monoclonal ior EGF/r3 antibody, in xenograft bearing nude mice, was supported upon the basis of its integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship, according to both the temporal (K(e0)=0.0015+/-0.000035h(-1)) and the time-independent sensitivity (C(50%)(ss), 9.23+/-0.17microg/ml; C(max,eff)(ss), 12.5microg/ml) components of its tumor growth delay action. This relationship was consistent with a sigmoidal E(max) pharmacodynamic model postulating a hypothetical effect compartment that permits us to estimate an effective steady-state concentration range (7.5-12microg/ml). Using this information we calculated both the cumulative and non-cumulative dosage regimens to compare their response patterns with respect to the control group. It follows that the differences in the estimated tumor growth inhibition ratio were statistically significant between the control group and either of the treated ones (P<0.05). The median survival time in treated mice under non-cumulative regimen (72+/-10 days), predicted an increase in this parameter as compared to the control one (55+/-6 days). Finally, using the allometric paradigm, the empiric power equation for dose scaling across mammalian species allowed the calculation of the dosage schedule for further clinical trial. The estimated maintenance dose in human (70kg) was 200mg/m(2) to be given weekly, and the corresponding loading dose was 600mg/m(2).

  12. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  13. Variation in the cranium shape of wall lizards (Podarcis spp.): effects of phylogenetic constraints, allometric constraints and ecology.

    PubMed

    Urošević, Aleksandar; Ljubisavljević, Katarina; Jelić, Dušan; Ivanović, Ana

    2012-08-01

    We used geometric morphometrics to explore the influence of phylogenetic and allometric constraints as well as ecology on variation in cranium shape in five species of monophyletic, morphologically similar Podarcis lizards (Podarcis erhardii, Podarcis melisellensis, Podarcis muralis, Podarcis sicula and Podarcis taurica). These species belong to different clades, they differ in their habitat preferences and can be classified into two distinct morphotypes: saxicolous and terrestrial. We found (i) no phylogenetic signal in cranium shape, (ii) diverging allometric slopes among species, and (iii) a significant effect of habitat on cranium shape. The saxicolous species (P. erhardii and P. muralis) had crania with elongated parietals, elongated cranium bases, shortened anterior parts of the dorsal cranium, reduced chambers of the jaw adductor muscles and larger subocular foramina. These cranial features are adaptations that compensate for a flattened cranium, dwelling on vertical surfaces and seeking refuge in crevices. The crania of the terrestrial species (P. melisellensis, P. sicula and P. taurica) tended to be more elongate and robust, with enlarged chambers of the jaw adductor muscle, reduced skull bases and shortened parietals. Terrestrial species exhibited more variation in cranium shape than saxicolous species. Our study suggests that shape variation in Podarcis sp. lizards is largely influenced by ecology, which likely affects species-specific patterns of static allometry.

  14. Allometric dependence of the life span of mammal erythrocytes on thermal stability and sphingomyelin content of plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivan Tanev

    2007-08-01

    Thermal stability of erythrocyte membrane is a measure for its ability to maintain permeability barrier at deleterious conditions. Hence, it could impact the resistance of erythrocytes against detrimental factors in circulation. In this study the thermostability of erythrocyte membranes was expressed by the temperature, T(go), at which the transmembrane gradient of ion concentration rapidly dissipated during transient heating. T(go) is the inducing temperature of the membrane transition that activated passive ion permeability at hyperthermia causing thermal hemolysis. A good allometric correlation of T(go) to the resistance against thermal hemolysis and the life span of erythrocytes were found for 13 mammals; sheep, cow, goat, dog, horse, man, rabbit, pig, cat, hamster, guinea pig, rat, and mouse. For the same group, the values of T(go) were strictly related to the sphingomyelin content of erythrocyte membranes. The residual ion permeability, P, was temperature activated from 38 to 57 degrees C with activation energy of 250+/-15 kJ/mol that strongly differed from that below 37 degrees C. The projected value of P at 37 degrees C was about half that of residual physiological permeability for Na+ and K+ that build ground for possible explanation of the life span vs membrane thermostability allometric correlation.

  15. [Growth and mortality parameters of Orthopristis ruber (Perciformes: Haemulidae) from Los Frailes Archipelaeo. Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Atenas, Guerrieri; Eslava, Nora; González, Leo Walter; Guevara, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Orthopristis ruber is a species in high demand in Eastern Venezuela, but production has been decreasing in recent years. For this reason, our objective was to estimate the growth and mortality parameters of this resource. Monthly samples were collected from June 2011 to May 2012, obtaining 2980 specimens in El Tirano and Puerto Abajo. Data on total length (cm), total weight (g), and sex were recorded for each specimen. No sexual dimorphism was shown with respect to length (t(S)=1.113, p>0.05), so one length-weight ratio was established for both sexes (Wt=0.0612*Lt(2.54)); and they both exhibited minor allometric growth. Growth was estimated by analysis of length frequency distributions using FiSAT software. The estimated growth parameters (L.=39.03cm, W.=679.60g, k=0.48/year and t(O) = -0.32 year) showed moderately rapid growth. Length frequency data were adjusted to the von Bertalaniffy model, and indicated an exponential tendency of accelerated growth during the first years of life, followed by slow growth until the fish reached its maximum length. The coefficient of variation of the growth index (theta) demonstrated no differences in growth pattern. The natural mortality rate (M=0.97/year), from fishing (F=1.57/year), and total mortality (Z=2.54/year), were high, as well as the exploitation rate (E=0.62/year). We concluded that O. ruber has been fully exploited by artisanal fishers, and suggest a continuous study on population dynamics, to recommend optimum management techniques for the fishery.

  16. [Specific growth rate and the rate of energy metabolism in the ontogenesis of axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum (Amphibia: Ambystomatidae)].

    PubMed

    Vladimirova, I G; Kleĭmenov, S Iu; Alekseeva, T A; Radzinskaia, L I

    2003-01-01

    Concordant changes in the rate of energy metabolism and specific growth rate of axolotls have been revealed. Several periods of ontogeny are distinguished, which differ in the ratio of energy metabolism to body weight and, therefore, are described by different allometric equations. It is suggested that the specific growth rate of an animal determines the type of dependence of energy metabolism on body weight.

  17. Measuring Seebeck Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus and method with various features to minimize typical sources of errors is described. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement errors which may impact accurate measurement are identified and reduced. Applying the identified principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus and method employing a uniaxial, four-point geometry is described to operate from room temperature up to 1300K. These techniques for non-destructive Seebeck coefficient measurements are simple to operate, and are suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  18. JKTLD: Limb darkening coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2015-11-01

    JKTLD outputs theoretically-calculated limb darkening (LD) strengths for equations (LD laws) which predict the amount of LD as a function of the part of the star being observed. The coefficients of these laws are obtained by bilinear interpolation (in effective temperature and surface gravity) in published tables of coefficients calculated from stellar model atmospheres by several researchers. Many observations of stars require the strength of limb darkening (LD) to be estimated, which can be done using theoretical models of stellar atmospheres; JKTLD can help in these circumstances.

  19. Allometric growth of the trunk leads to the rostral shift of the pelvic fin in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yumie; Tamura, Mika; Aita, Yusuke; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Yasunori; Okabe, Masataka; Okada, Norihiro; Tanaka, Mikiko

    2010-11-01

    The pelvic fin position among teleost fishes has shifted rostrally during evolution, resulting in diversification of both behavior and habitat. We explored the developmental basis for the rostral shift in pelvic fin position in teleost fishes using zebrafish (abdominal pelvic fins) and Nile tilapia (thoracic pelvic fins). Cell fate mapping experiments revealed that changes in the distribution of lateral plate mesodermal cells accompany the trunk-tail protrusion. Presumptive pelvic fin cells are originally located at the body wall adjacent to the anterior limit of hoxc10a expression in the spinal cord, and their position shifts rostrally as the trunk grows. We then showed that the differences in pelvic fin position between zebrafish and Nile tilapia were not due to changes in expression or function of gdf11. We also found that hox-independent motoneurons located above the pelvic fins innervate into the pelvic musculature. Our results suggest that there is a common mechanism among teleosts and tetrapods that controls paired appendage positioning via gdf11, but in teleost fishes the position of prospective pelvic fin cells on the yolk surface shifts as the trunk grows. In addition, teleost motoneurons, which lack lateral motor columns, innervate the pelvic fins in a manner independent of the rostral-caudal patterns of hox expression in the spinal cord.

  20. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  1. Aboveground allometric models for freeze-affected black mangroves (Avicennia germinans): equations for a climate sensitive mangrove-marsh ecotone.

    PubMed

    Osland, Michael J; Day, Richard H; Larriviere, Jack C; From, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, species distributions are changing in response to climate change and land use change. In parts of the southeastern United States, climate change is expected to result in the poleward range expansion of black mangroves (Avicennia germinans) at the expense of some salt marsh vegetation. The morphology of A. germinans at its northern range limit is more shrub-like than in tropical climes in part due to the aboveground structural damage and vigorous multi-stem regrowth triggered by extreme winter temperatures. In this study, we developed aboveground allometric equations for freeze-affected black mangroves which can be used to quantify: (1) total aboveground biomass; (2) leaf biomass; (3) stem plus branch biomass; and (4) leaf area. Plant volume (i.e., a combination of crown area and plant height) was selected as the optimal predictor of the four response variables. We expect that our simple measurements and equations can be adapted for use in other mangrove ecosystems located in abiotic settings that result in mangrove individuals with dwarf or shrub-like morphologies including oligotrophic and arid environments. Many important ecological functions and services are affected by changes in coastal wetland plant community structure and productivity including carbon storage, nutrient cycling, coastal protection, recreation, fish and avian habitat, and ecosystem response to sea level rise and extreme climatic events. Coastal scientists in the southeastern United States can use the identified allometric equations, in combination with easily obtained and non-destructive plant volume measurements, to better quantify and monitor ecological change within the dynamic, climate sensitive, and highly-productive mangrove-marsh ecotone.

  2. Aboveground allometric models for freeze-affected black mangroves (Avicennia germinans): equations for a climate sensitive mangrove-marsh ecotone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osland, Michael J.; Day, Richard H.; Larriviere, Jack C.; From, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, species distributions are changing in response to climate change and land use change. In parts of the southeastern United States, climate change is expected to result in the poleward range expansion of black mangroves (Avicennia germinans) at the expense of some salt marsh vegetation. The morphology of A. germinans at its northern range limit is more shrub-like than in tropical climes in part due to the aboveground structural damage and vigorous multi-stem regrowth triggered by extreme winter temperatures. In this study, we developed aboveground allometric equations for freeze-affected black mangroves which can be used to quantify: (1) total aboveground biomass; (2) leaf biomass; (3) stem plus branch biomass; and (4) leaf area. Plant volume (i.e., a combination of crown area and plant height) was selected as the optimal predictor of the four response variables. We expect that our simple measurements and equations can be adapted for use in other mangrove ecosystems located in abiotic settings that result in mangrove individuals with dwarf or shrub-like morphologies including oligotrophic and arid environments. Many important ecological functions and services are affected by changes in coastal wetland plant community structure and productivity including carbon storage, nutrient cycling, coastal protection, recreation, fish and avian habitat, and ecosystem response to sea level rise and extreme climatic events. Coastal scientists in the southeastern United States can use the identified allometric equations, in combination with easily obtained and non-destructive plant volume measurements, to better quantify and monitor ecological change within the dynamic, climate sensitive, and highly-productive mangrove-marsh ecotone.

  3. Modeling Allometric Relationships in Leaves of Young Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) Grown at Different Temperature Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Wu, Lingtong; Henke, Michael; Ali, Basharat; Zhou, Weijun; Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Functional–structural plant modeling (FSPM) is a fast and dynamic method to predict plant growth under varying environmental conditions. Temperature is a primary factor affecting the rate of plant development. In the present study, we used three different temperature treatments (10/14°C, 18/22°C, and 26/30°C) to test the effect of temperature on growth and development of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) seedlings. Plants were sampled at regular intervals (every 3 days) to obtain growth data during the length of the experiment (1 month in total). Total leaf dry mass, leaf area, leaf mass per area (LMA), width-length ratio, and the ratio of petiole length to leaf blade length (PBR), were determined and statistically analyzed, and contributed to a morphometric database. LMA under high temperature was significantly smaller than LMA under medium and low temperature, while leaves at high temperature were significantly broader. An FSPM of rapeseed seedlings featuring a growth function used for leaf extension and biomass accumulation was implemented by combining measurement with literature data. The model delivered new insights into growth and development dynamics of winter oilseed rape seedlings. The present version of the model mainly focuses on the growth of plant leaves. However, future extensions of the model could be used in practice to better predict plant growth in spring and potential cold damage of the crop. PMID:28377775

  4. Allometric scaling of production and life-history variation in vascular plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enquist, Brian J.; West, Geoffrey B.; Charnov, Eric L.; Brown, James H.

    1999-10-01

    A prominent feature of comparative life histories is the well documented negative correlation between growth rate and life span. Patterns of resource allocation during growth and reproduction reflect life-history differences between species. This is particularly striking in tropical forests, where tree species can differ greatly in their rates of growth and ages of maturity but still attain similar canopy sizes. Here we provide a theoretical framework for relating life-history variables to rates of production, dM/dt, where M is above-ground mass and t is time. As metabolic rate limits production as an individual grows, dM/dt ~ M3/4. Incorporating interspecific variation in resource allocation to wood density, we derive a universal growth law that quantitatively fits data for a large sample of tropical tree species with diverse life histories. Combined with evolutionary life-history theory, the growth law also predicts several qualitative features of tree demography and reproduction. This framework also provides a general quantitative answer to why relative growth rate (1/M)(dM/df) decreases with increasing plant size (~M-1/4) and how it varies with differing allocation strategies.

  5. Sex effects on net protein and energy requirements for growth of Saanen goats.

    PubMed

    Souza, A P; St-Pierre, N R; Fernandes, M H R M; Almeida, A K; Vargas, J A C; Resende, K T; Teixeira, I A M A

    2017-03-22

    Requirements for growth in the different sexes remain poorly quantified in goats. The objective of this study was to develop equations for estimating net protein (NPG) and net energy (NEG) for growth in Saanen goats of different sexes from 5 to 45 kg of body weight (BW). A data set from 7 comparative slaughter studies (238 individual records) of Saanen goats was used. Allometric equations were developed to determine body protein and energy contents in the empty BW (EBW) as dependent variables and EBW as the allometric predictor. Parameter estimates were obtained using a linearized (log-transformation) expression of the allometric equations using the MIXED procedure in SAS software (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). The model included the random effect of the study and the fixed effects of sex (intact male, castrated male, and female; n = 94, 73, and 71, respectively), EBW, and their interactions. Net requirements for growth were estimated as the first partial derivative of the allometric equations with respect to EBW. Additionally, net requirements for growth were evaluated based on the degree of maturity. Monte Carlo techniques were used to estimate the uncertainty of the calculated net requirement values. Sex affected allometric relationships for protein and energy in Saanen goats. The allometric equation for protein content in the EBW of intact and castrated males was log10 protein (g) = 2.221 (±0.0224) + 1.015 (±0.0165) × log10 EBW (kg). For females, the relationship was log10 protein (g) = 2.277 (±0.0288) + 0.958 (±0.0218) × log10 EBW (kg). Therefore, NPG for males was greater than for females. The allometric equation for the energy content in the EBW of intact males was log10 energy (kcal) = 2.988 (±0.0323) + 1.240 (±0.0238) × log10 EBW (kg); of castrated males, log10 energy (kcal) = 2.873 (±0.0377) + 1.359 (±0.0283) × log10 EBW (kg); and of females, log10 energy (kcal) = 2.820 (±0.0377) + 1.442 (±0.0281) × log10 EBW (kg). The NEG of castrated

  6. Distribution coefficients of rare earth ions in cubic zirconium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, H.; Luther, K.-D.; Assmus, W.

    1994-08-01

    Cubic zirconium dioxide crystals are grown with the skull melting technique. The effective distribution coefficients for Nd(exp 3+), Sm(exp 3+) and Er(sup 3+) as dopants are determined experimentally as a function of the crystal growth velocity. With the Burton-Prim-Slichter theory, the equilibrium distribution coefficients can be calculated. The distribution coefficients of all other trivalent rare earth ions can be estimated by applying the correlation towards the ionic radii.

  7. Tree survey and allometric models for tiger bush in northern Senegal and comparison with tree parameters derived from high resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Mads Olander; Göttsche, Frank-M.; Diop, Doudou; Mbow, Cheikh; Olesen, Folke-S.; Fensholt, Rasmus; Sandholt, Inge

    2011-08-01

    A tree survey and an analysis of high resolution satellite data were performed to characterise the woody vegetation within a 10 × 10 km 2 area around a site located close to the town of Dahra in the semi-arid northern part of Senegal. The surveyed parameters were tree species, height, tree crown radius, and diameter at breast height (DBH), for which allometric models were determined. An object-based classification method was used to determine tree crown cover (TCC) from Quickbird data. The average TCC from the tree survey and the respective TCC from remote sensing were both about 3.0%. For areas beyond the surveyed areas TCC varied between 3.0% and 4.5%. Furthermore, an empirical correction factor for tree clumping was obtained, which considerably improved the estimated number of trees and the estimated average tree crown area and radius. An allometric model linking TCC to tree stem crosssectional area (CSA) was developed, which allows to estimate tree biomass from remote sensing. The allometric models for the three main tree species found performed well and had r2-values of about 0.7-0.8.

  8. Sexual size and shape dimorphism and allometric scaling patterns in head traits in the New Zealand common gecko Woodworthia maculatus.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Clint D

    2015-08-01

    Sexual dimorphism in shape and size is widespread across animal taxa and arises when natural or sexual selection operates differently on the sexes. Male and female common geckos (Woodworthia maculatus; formerly Hoplodactylus maculatus) in New Zealand do not appear to experience different viability selection pressure, nor do males appear to be under intense pre-copulatory sexual selection. It was therefore predicted that this species would be sexually monomorphic with regard to body size and the size and shape of the head. In line with the prediction, there was no sexual difference in head width, depth, or length or in lateral head shape. However, contrary to prediction, males had a larger body and lateral head size than females. This study suggests that males, at least on Maud Island, NZ, might be under stronger pre-copulatory sexual selection than previously recognized and thus have evolved larger heads (i.e. lateral head size) for use in male combat for females. Allometric scaling patterns do not differ between the sexes and suggest that head width and depth are under directional selection whereas lateral head size is under stabilizing selection. Diet ecology - an agent of natural selection common to both sexes - is likely largely responsible for the observed patterns of head size and shape and the lack of sexual dimorphism in them.

  9. Evolution of human growth spurts.

    PubMed

    Leigh, S R

    1996-12-01

    This study investigates subadult growth spurts in a large sample of anthropoid primates, including humans. Analyses of body mass growth curves show that humans are not unique in the expression of female and male body mass growth spurts. Subadult growth spurts are observed in both New World and Old World anthropoid primates and are more common in males than in females. Allometric analyses of growth spurts indicate that many aspects of primate growth spurts are strongly correlated with species size. Small species tend not to exhibit growth spurts. Although male and female scaling patterns for velocity and size measures are comparable, scaling relations of variables that measure the timing of growth spurts differ by sex. These patterns can be related to sexual differences in life histories. Scaling analyses further show that humans do not depart substantially from patterns that describe other anthropoid primates. Thus, in relative terms, human growth spurts are not exceptional compared to this sample of primates. The long absolute delay in the initiation of the human growth spurt may be of substantial evolutionary importance and serves to distinguish humans from other primates. In essence, humans exhibit growth spurts that are comparable to other primates in many respects. However, human growth spurts are shifted to very late absolute ages.

  10. Soil acidity, ecological stoichiometry and allometric scaling in grassland food webs

    PubMed Central

    MULDER, CHRISTIAN; ELSER, JAMES J

    2009-01-01

    The factors regulating the structure of food webs are a central focus of community and ecosystem ecology, as trophic interactions among species have important impacts on nutrient storage and cycling in many ecosystems. For soil invertebrates in grassland ecosystems in the Netherlands, the site-specific slopes of the faunal biomass to organism body mass relationships reflected basic biochemical and biogeochemical processes associated with soil acidity and soil C : N : P stoichiometry. That is, the higher the phosphorus availability in the soil, the higher, on average, the slope of the faunal biomass size spectrum (i.e., the higher the biomass of large-bodied invertebrates relative to the biomass of small invertebrates). While other factors may also be involved, these results are consistent with the growth rate hypothesis from biological stoichiometry that relates phosphorus demands to ribosomal RNA and protein production. Thus our data represent the first time that ecosystem phosphorus availability has been associated with allometry in soil food webs (supporting information available online). Our results have broad implications, as soil invertebrates of different size have different effects on soil processes.

  11. Growth stanzas in an Epinephelidae-Lutjanidae complex: considerations to length-weight relationships.

    PubMed

    Renán, Ximena; Trejo-Martínez, Jorge; Caballero-Arango, Doralice; Brulé, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    Growth stanzas or abrupt changes in growth rates are present throughout the life span of fish. Identifying growth stanzas will help to adequately described growth taking into account that fishes are indeterminate growers. In this study, we used length-weight (L-W) relationships to analyze the growth stanzas in the Grouper-Snapper complex of Southern Gulf of Mexico. For this, the type of sexuality, sex and different sexual maturity phase were considered in the analyses of three species of gonochoric Snappers (Lutjanidae) and six species of protogynous hermaphrodite Groupers (Epinephelidae). Welch ANOVA tests were carried out to deter- mine the existence of differences in length and weight between juveniles and adults per sex. According to the observed differences, L-W relationship parameters (a and b), standard error (SE b) and coefficients of determination (R2) were calculated for all species separately by sex and sexual maturity phase. Snappers' juvenile-females b-value ranged from 2.44-2.77, juvenile-males from 2.16-2.94, adult-females from 2.63-2.80 and adult-males from 2.63-2.98. Groupers' b-value ranged for juvenile-females 2.66-3.20, adult-females from 2.73-3.31 and for adult-males 2.93-3.29. For each relationship b-value was 1-tested (-Student) to explore differences from the allometric coefficient (b=3), which indicated changes in body form. Hypothesis test, for regression slopes (b) between Snappers' juvenile-females vs. adult-females and juvenile-males vs. adult-males and Groupers' juvenile-females vs. adult-females and adult-females vs. adult-males, indicated different growth stanzas related to gonadal development for Snappers, and to gonadal development and sex change in Groupers. The identification of growth stanzas is crucial to avoid an overestimation or misleading growth rate which is used in fisheries management to establish some target reference points, such as maximum sustainable yield or yield-per-recruit.

  12. Differentiating causality and correlation in allometric scaling: ant colony size drives metabolic hypometry.

    PubMed

    Waters, James S; Ochs, Alison; Fewell, Jennifer H; Harrison, Jon F

    2017-02-22

    Metabolic rates of individual animals and social insect colonies generally scale hypometrically, with mass-specific metabolic rates decreasing with increasing size. Although this allometry has wide ranging effects on social behaviour, ecology and evolution, its causes remain controversial. Because it is difficult to experimentally manipulate body size of organisms, most studies of metabolic scaling depend on correlative data, limiting their ability to determine causation. To overcome this limitation, we experimentally reduced the size of harvester ant colonies (Pogonomyrmex californicus) and quantified the consequent increase in mass-specific metabolic rates. Our results clearly demonstrate a causal relationship between colony size and hypometric changes in metabolic rate that could not be explained by changes in physical density. These findings provide evidence against prominent models arguing that the hypometric scaling of metabolic rate is primarily driven by constraints on resource delivery or surface area/volume ratios, because colonies were provided with excess food and colony size does not affect individual oxygen or nutrient transport. We found that larger colonies had lower median walking speeds and relatively more stationary ants and including walking speed as a variable in the mass-scaling allometry greatly reduced the amount of residual variation in the model, reinforcing the role of behaviour in metabolic allometry. Following the experimental size reduction, however, the proportion of stationary ants increased, demonstrating that variation in locomotory activity cannot solely explain hypometric scaling of metabolic rates in these colonies. Based on prior studies of this species, the increase in metabolic rate in size-reduced colonies could be due to increased anabolic processes associated with brood care and colony growth.

  13. Species-specific allometric scaling under self-thinning: evidence from long-term plots in forest stands.

    PubMed

    Pretzsch, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Experimental plots covering a 120 years' observation period in unthinned, even-aged pure stands of common beech (Fagus sylvatica), Norway spruce (Picea abies), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), and common oak (Quercus Petraea) are used to scrutinize Reineke's (1933) empirically derived stand density rule [see text], N=tree number per unit area, [see text]=mean stem diameter), Yoda's (1963) self-thinning law based on Euclidian geometry ([see text] [see text]=mean biomass per tree), and basic assumptions of West, Brown and Enquist's (1997, 1999) fractal scaling rules ([see text] [see text] w=biomass per tree, d=stem diameter). RMA and OLS regression provides observed allometric exponents, which are tested against the exponents, expected by the considered rules. Hope for a consistent scaling law fades away, as observed exponents significantly correspond with the considered rules only in a minority of cases: (1) exponent r of [see text] varies around Reineke's constant -1.605, but is significantly different from r=-2, supposed by Euclidian or fractal scaling, (2) Exponent c of the self-thinning line [see text] roams roughly about the Euclidian scaling constant -3/2, (3) Exponent a of [see text] tends to follow fractal scaling 8/3. The unique dataset's evaluation displays that (4) scaling exponents and their oscillation are species-specific, (5) Euclidian scaling of one relation and fractal scaling of another are coupled, depending on species. Ecological implications of the results in respect to self-tolerance (common oak>Norway spruce>Scots pine>common beech) and efficiency of space occupation (common beech>Scots pine>Norway spruce>common oak) are stressed and severe consequences for assessing, regulating and scheduling stand density are discussed.

  14. Effect of biological maturation on maximal oxygen uptake and ventilatory thresholds in soccer players: an allometric approach.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Giovani; Lorenzi, Thiago; Sapata, Katiuce; Lopes, Andre Luiz; Gaya, Adroaldo Cezar; Oliveira, Álvaro

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of biological maturation on maximal oxygen uptake ([Vdot]O(2max)) and ventilatory thresholds (VT(1) and VT(2)) in 110 young soccer players separated into pubescent and post-pubescent groups.. Maximal oxygen uptake and [Vdot]O(2) corresponding to VT(1) and VT(2) were expressed as absolute values, ratio standards, theoretical exponents, and experimentally observed exponents. Absolute [Vdot]O(2) (ml · min(-1)) was different between groups for VT(1), VT(2), and [Vdot]O(2max). Ratio standards (ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) were not significantly different between groups for VT(1), VT(2), and [Vdot]O(2max). Theoretical exponents (ml · kg(-0.67) · min(-1) and ml · kg(-0.75) · min(-1)) were not properly adjusted for the body mass effects on VT(1), VT(2), and [Vdot]O(2max). When the data were correctly adjusted using experimentally observed exponents, VT(1) (ml · kg(-0.94) · min(-1)) and VT(2) (ml · kg(-0.95) · min(-1)) were not different between groups. The experimentally observed exponent for [Vdot]O(2max) (ml · kg(-0.90) · min(-1)) was different between groups (P = 0.048); however, this difference could not be attributed to biological maturation. In conclusion, biological maturation had no effect on VT(1), VT(2) or [Vdot]O(2max) when the effect of body mass was adjusted by experimentally observed exponents. Thus, when evaluating the physiological performance of young soccer players, allometric scaling needs to be taken into account instead of using theoretical approaches.

  15. Larval serum proteins of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar: Allometric changes during development suggest several functions for arylphorin and lipophorin

    SciTech Connect

    Karpells, S.T.

    1989-01-01

    Storage proteins are the major nutritive intermediates in insects and although the serum storage proteins are relatively well studied, definitive roles for many of them have yet to be established. To further characterize their roles in development and to establish quantitative baselines for future studies, two serum proteins, arylphorin (Ap) and lipophorin (Lp), of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, were studied. Ap and Lp, isolated from larval hemolymph, were partially characterized biochemically and immunologically. Hemolymph concentrations throughout larval development were determined using quantitative immunoelectrophoresis and absolute hemolymph amounts of protein were determined by measuring hemolymph volume. Cyclic fluctuations in hemolymph concentrations of Ap in particular correlated with each molting cycle and an increase in Lp levels just prior to pupation suggest a metamorphic change in the role or demand for the protein. Sexual dimorphism in protein concentrations are explained in part by the sexual dimorphism in the number of larval instars. In fact, an additional instar of Ap accumulation in the female gypsy moth is suggested to compensate for the lack of a female-specific storage protein in this species. The last two days of each instar were found to be the optimum time to sample protein concentration with minimum variance. Allometric relationships among Ap accumulation, Lp accumulation and weight gain were uncovered. Ap labelled with ({sup 14}C)-N-ethylmaleimide was shown to be incorporated into newly synthesized cuticle and setae during a larval-larval molt. The antiserum developed against L. dispar Ap was used to identify the Ap of Trichoplusia in and study Ap titers in parasitized T. in larvae. The antiserum was also used to determine the immunological relatedness of 5 species of Lepidoptera.

  16. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  17. Allometric Relationships in Soybean to Estimate the Effect of Vegetation on Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, A. J.; Hornbuckle, B. K.; Patton, J.

    2011-12-01

    Microwave remote sensing is capable of developing soil moisture maps through satellite data. The resulting maps are useful indicators of hydrologic conditions. Water concentrations are deterministic of flooding events and potential agricultural resources. The emitted microwave radiation of soil is influenced by its moisture content. Models have been developed to incorporate parameters besides soil moisture that affect the emitted microwave radiation. We are interested in one of these parameters known as the optical depth. Optical depth is the effect of the canopy on the observed emission of microwaves. The vegetation directly competes with soil moisture as a contributor to the emitted microwave radiation and the optical depth appears within every term in the present satellite retrieval algorithm. Optical depth has been shown to be directly proportional to the amount of water contained within vegetation tissue. Allometry is a way to effectively and efficiently measure vegetation water content through the way the parts of the organism change in proportion to each other in response to growth. Vegetation water content is difficult to measure without taking destructive measurements, in addition to involving too much time and manual labor. Therefore, another component of vegetation can be measured in relation to vegetation water content which can then be related to optical depth. In our study we worked in soybean, a major crop in many areas of the world. We compared soybean vegetation water content to an estimate of the volume of an individual plant expressed as the product of canopy height and stem diameter squared (Zc*Sd2), both of which can be measured easily and nondestructively. We also wished to determine whether vegetation water content remained constant as a percentage to total biomass over the length of the growing season. Agricultural yield is most likely a function of the total dry mass of vegetation. Establishing the relationship between vegetation water

  18. Regulation of oxidative phosphorylation complex activity: effects of tissue-specific metabolic stress within an allometric series and acute changes in workload.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Darci; Covian, Raul; Aponte, Angel M; Glancy, Brian; Taylor, Joni F; Chess, David; Balaban, Robert S

    2012-05-01

    The concentration of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes (MOPCs) is tuned to the maximum energy conversion requirements of a given tissue; however, whether the activity of MOPCs is altered in response to acute changes in energy conversion demand is unclear. We hypothesized that MOPCs activity is modulated by tissue metabolic stress to maintain the energy-metabolism homeostasis. Metabolic stress was defined as the observed energy conversion rate/maximum energy conversion rate. The maximum energy conversion rate was assumed to be proportional to the concentration of MOPCs, as determined with optical spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. The resting metabolic stress of the heart and liver across the range of resting metabolic rates within an allometric series (mouse, rabbit, and pig) was determined from MPOCs content and literature respiratory values. The metabolic stress of the liver was high and nearly constant across the allometric series due to the proportional increase in MOPCs content with resting metabolic rate. In contrast, the MOPCs content of the heart was essentially constant in the allometric series, resulting in an increasing metabolic stress with decreasing animal size. The MOPCs activity was determined in native gels, with an emphasis on Complex V. Extracted MOPCs enzyme activity was proportional to resting metabolic stress across tissues and species. Complex V activity was also shown to be acutely modulated by changes in metabolic stress in the heart, in vivo and in vitro. The modulation of extracted MOPCs activity suggests that persistent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) alter MOPCs activity both chronically and acutely, specifically in the heart. Protein phosphorylation of Complex V was correlated with activity inhibition under several conditions, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may contribute to activity modulation with energy metabolic stress. These data are consistent with the notion that metabolic

  19. Effect of different types of commercial feed meal on the growth forms of Barbonymus schwanenfeldii (Lampam) in Chini Lake, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Omran; Idris, Mushrifah; Das, Simon Kumar

    2016-11-01

    This study was carried out at Tasik Chini where the effects of different feeds on growth form of B. schwanenfeldii were calculated using length weight relationship analysis (W = aLb). The results denotes that feeding high protein diet (32% protein) fish represent positive allometric growth (b > 3) while feeding lower protein diet (23 and 28% protein) fish represent negative allometric (b < 3) growth. The calculated condition factor values also denotes similar trends, feeding high protein diet fish represent better condition (K=51) compared to fed on lower protein diet. The data obtained from this study suggests to culture B. schwanenfeldii with high protein diet (32%) which will facilitate better growth form and condition consequently optimize the production of this commercially important fish species.

  20. Dinosaur Metabolism and the Allometry of Maximum Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Myhrvold, Nathan P.

    2016-01-01

    The allometry of maximum somatic growth rate has been used in prior studies to classify the metabolic state of both extant vertebrates and dinosaurs. The most recent such studies are reviewed, and their data is reanalyzed. The results of allometric regressions on growth rate are shown to depend on the choice of independent variable; the typical choice used in prior studies introduces a geometric shear transformation that exaggerates the statistical power of the regressions. The maximum growth rates of extant groups are found to have a great deal of overlap, including between groups with endothermic and ectothermic metabolism. Dinosaur growth rates show similar overlap, matching the rates found for mammals, reptiles and fish. The allometric scaling of growth rate with mass is found to have curvature (on a log-log scale) for many groups, contradicting the prevailing view that growth rate allometry follows a simple power law. Reanalysis shows that no correlation between growth rate and basal metabolic rate (BMR) has been demonstrated. These findings drive a conclusion that growth rate allometry studies to date cannot be used to determine dinosaur metabolism as has been previously argued. PMID:27828977

  1. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  2. The role of elevated ozone on growth, yield and seed quality amongst six cultivars of mung bean.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Nivedita; Agrawal, S B

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) can be deleterious to plants by decreasing crop yield and quality. Present study was conducted on six cultivars of mung bean (HUM-1, HUM-2, HUM-6, HUM-23, HUM-24 and HUM-26) grown under ambient O3 (NFC) and elevated O3 levels (ambient+10 ppb; NFC+) in open top chambers (OTCs) for two consecutive years. Ozone monitoring data showed high mean ambient concentration of O3 at the experimental site, which was above the threshold value of 40 ppb. Ozone exposure induced symptoms of foliar injury and also depicted accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which led to increased membrane damage vis-a-vis solute leakage. Root/shoot allometric coefficient (k), yield and seed quality showed negative response to O3. Differential response of mung bean cultivars against elevated O3 was assessed by comparing the levels of antioxidants, metabolites, growth, total biomass and yield. Cultivar HUM-1 showed maximum sensitivity towards O3 as compared to other cultivars. Findings of present study emphasized the possibility of selection of suitable O3 resistant cultivars for the areas experiencing high concentrations of O3.

  3. Allometric Analysis Detects Brain Size-Independent Effects of Sex and Sex Chromosome Complement on Human Cerebellar Organization.

    PubMed

    Mankiw, Catherine; Park, Min Tae M; Reardon, P K; Fish, Ari M; Clasen, Liv S; Greenstein, Deanna; Giedd, Jay N; Blumenthal, Jonathan D; Lerch, Jason P; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2017-03-17

    The cerebellum is a large hindbrain structure that is increasingly recognized for its contribution to diverse domains of cognitive and affective processing in human health and disease. Although several of these domains are sex-biased, our fundamental understanding of cerebellar sex differences - including their spatial distribution, potential biological determinants, and independence from brain volume variation - lags far behind that for the cerebrum. Here, we harness automated neuroimaging methods for cerebellar morphometrics in 417 individuals to (i) localize normative male-female differences in raw cerebellar volume, (ii) compare these to sex chromosome effects estimated across five rare X-/Y-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA) syndromes, and (iii) clarify brain size-independent effects of sex and SCA on cerebellar anatomy using a generalizable allometric approach which considers scaling relationships between regional cerebellar volume and brain volume in health. Integration of these approaches shows that (i) sex and SCA effects on raw cerebellar volume are large and distributed, but regionally heterogeneous, (ii) human cerebellar volume scales with brain volume in a highly non-linear and regionally heterogeneous fashion that departs from documented patterns of cerebellar scaling in phylogeny, and (iii) cerebellar organization is modified in a brain size-independent manner by sex (relative expansion of total cerebellum, flocculus, and Crus II-lobule VIIIB volumes in males) and SCA (contraction of total cerebellar, lobule IV and Crus I volumes with additional X- or Y-chromosomes; X-specific contraction of Crus II-lobule VIIIB). Our methods and results clarify the shifts in human cerebellar organization that accompany interwoven variations in sex, sex chromosome complement, and brain size.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTCerebellar systems are implicated in diverse domains of sex-biased behavior and pathology, but we lack a basic understanding of how sex differences in the human

  4. Functional constraints on phenomenological coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klika, Václav; Pavelka, Michal; Benziger, Jay B.

    2017-02-01

    Thermodynamic fluxes (diffusion fluxes, heat flux, etc.) are often proportional to thermodynamic forces (gradients of chemical potentials, temperature, etc.) via the matrix of phenomenological coefficients. Onsager's relations imply that the matrix is symmetric, which reduces the number of unknown coefficients is reduced. In this article we demonstrate that for a class of nonequilibrium thermodynamic models in addition to Onsager's relations the phenomenological coefficients must share the same functional dependence on the local thermodynamic state variables. Thermodynamic models and experimental data should be validated through consistency with the functional constraint. We present examples of coupled heat and mass transport (thermodiffusion) and coupled charge and mass transport (electro-osmotic drag). Additionally, these newly identified constraints further reduce the number of experiments needed to describe the phenomenological coefficient.

  5. Physiologic changes during growth and development.

    PubMed Central

    O'Flaherty, E J

    1994-01-01

    To express growth-related changes in physiologic or other functions in forms usable for kinetic modeling, we are interested in identifying regular relationships that take the form of simple mathematical expressions. Many anatomic and physiologic functions scale within or across species in accordance with the allometric relationship, y = axb. These include many organ weights, the glomerular filtration rate, respiration rate, oxygen consumption, or basal metabolic rate. The allometric lines may display discontinuities in slope associated with critical growth periods such as transitions from one growth phase to another. On the other hand, many other kinetically important processes depend on the physiocochemical characteristics of the agent and of the sites in the body with which it interacts. Their rates of development are determined by the age-dependence of these physiocochemical characteristics and of their interactions. Examples of different types of age-dependence are given, and their combined impact on the age-dependence of lead-kinetic behavior is examined. PMID:7737033

  6. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  7. Interspecies allometric scaling.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Robert P

    2010-01-01

    Lack of approved pharmaceutical agents and very limited pharmacokinetic data in the scientific literature for exotic, wildlife, and zoo species are a major issue for veterinarians treating these species. There are fewer than 15 compounds approved in the United States for zoo and wildlife species compared to nearly 300 drugs licensed for cattle. Zoo veterinarians are therefore required to extrapolate the use of approved agents (veterinary or human) to nonapproved species, often with little or no scientific basis to support drug or dose schedule selection. In general, species differences in drug absorption, metabolism, distribution, and excretion have been well documented for domestic species. However, there has been limited research to provide similar data for nondomestic species. Consequently, with the possible exception of pet bird species, there is little published information on the pharmacokinetic parameters of drugs in nondomestic species. Additionally, because of the commercial value of many zoo species, the traditional method of "trial and error" for drug and dose selection and related compliance issues is often inappropriate. There is an understandable concern, whereby the zoo veterinarian does not wish to be the first to administer an agent or formulation in an untested species. "One medicine" is a central concept in treating zoo species, in that vertebrate species are generally more similar than dissimilar. However, drug absorption can vary within as well as between species. Considering the anatomical differences between true monogastrics (canine and feline species), hind-gut fermentors (rodents, rabbits, horses, and elephants), fore-gut fermentors (Colobus monkeys and kangaroos), and ruminants (cattle, goats, sheep, and antelope), the potential for differences in pharmacokinetic profiles are marked. Moreover, there are potential differences between organisms in a single class. An example is the ability of several snake species to up- and down-regulate their digestive systems. This renders the time course of oral drug absorption dependent on both body temperature and time after feeding. Plasma protein binding may vary considerably between species and may also be temperature dependent. This is very significant when treating poikilothermic (reptiles, amphibians, and fish) species and when conducting pharmacokinetic studies with highly protein-bound drugs. The large body sizes of some zoo species create additional considerations for treatment with drugs and can place significant limitations on delivery of an effective drug dose.

  8. Growth, mortality and reproduction of the blue tilapia Oreochromis aureus (Perciformes: Cichlidae) in the Aguamilpa Reservoir, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Peña Messina, Emilio; Tapia Varela, Raul; Velázquez Abunader, José Iván; Orbe Mendoza, Alma Araceli; Velazco Arce, Javier Marcial de Jesús Ruiz

    2010-12-01

    Tilapia production has increased in Aguamilpa Reservoir, in Nayarit, Mexico, in the last few years and represents a good economic activity for rural communities and the country. We determined growth parameters, mortality and reproductive aspects for 2413 specimens of blue tilapia Oreochromis aureus in this reservoir. Samples were taken monthly from July 2000 through June 2001, of which 1 371 were males and 1 042 were females. Standard length (SL) and total weight (TW) were measured in each organism. The SL/TW relationships through power models for sexes were determined. The growth parameters L infinity k, and t0 of the von Bertalanffy equation were estimated using frequency distribution of length through ELEFAN-I computer program. Finally the reproductive cycle and size of first maturity were established using morph chromatic maturity scale. The results suggested that the males and females had negative allometric growth (b < 3). Significant differences were found between SL/TW model for the sexes, suggesting separate models for males and females. Results indicate that there are no differences in growth rates between sexes; the proposed parameters were L infinity = 43.33 cm standard length, k = 0.36/year and t0 = -0.43 years. Natural and fishing mortality coefficients were 0.83/year and 1.10/year, respectively. The estimated exploitation rate (0.57/year) suggested that during the study period the fishery showed signs of overfishing. Blue tilapia reproduces year-round; the highest activity occurs from January through May and size of first maturity was 23 cm SL. We conclude that it is necessary to establish a minimum catch size in this reservoir based on the reproductive behavior of this species.

  9. [Characteristics and Parameterization for Atmospheric Extinction Coefficient in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-na; Zhao, Pu-sheng; He, Di; Dong, Fan; Zhao, Xiu-juan; Zhang, Xiao-ling

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the characteristics of atmospheric extinction coefficient in Beijing, systematic measurements had been carried out for atmospheric visibility, PM2.5 concentration, scattering coefficient, black carbon, reactive gases, and meteorological parameters from 2013 to 2014. Based on these data, we compared some published fitting schemes of aerosol light scattering enhancement factor [ f(RH)], and discussed the characteristics and the key influence factors for atmospheric extinction coefficient. Then a set of parameterization models of atmospheric extinction coefficient for different seasons and different polluted levels had been established. The results showed that aerosol scattering accounted for more than 94% of total light extinction. In the summer and autumn, the aerosol hygroscopic growth caused by high relative humidity had increased the aerosol scattering coefficient by 70 to 80 percent. The parameterization models could reflect the influencing mechanism of aerosol and relative humidity upon ambient light extinction, and describe the seasonal variations of aerosol light extinction ability.

  10. The estimation of decay coefficient in pulsed transient data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, T. W.; Andrepont, W.; Park, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of estimation and interpretation of a decay coefficient in a pulsed transient signal is considered. Two methods are proposed in estimating the decay coefficient of pulsed decay transient data. The methods are derived through a spectral analysis for a parametric model of impulse response function of signal frequency. The several pulsed response data from T burner tests as well as some synthesized data are analyzed and the performance of the estimation procedures are examined. Suggestions for further research in this area are offered. The estimation procedures presented can be extended to the case of multiple frequencies in pulse response function and time dependent decay or growth coefficients.

  11. Ionization coefficient approach to modeling breakdown in nonuniform geometries.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Nicolaysen, Scott D.

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the work on breakdown modeling in nonuniform geometries by the ionization coefficient approach. Included are: (1) fits to primary and secondary ionization coefficients used in the modeling; (2) analytical test cases for sphere-to-sphere, wire-to-wire, corner, coaxial, and rod-to-plane geometries; a compilation of experimental data with source references; comparisons between code results, test case results, and experimental data. A simple criterion is proposed to differentiate between corona and spark. The effect of a dielectric surface on avalanche growth is examined by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The presence of a clean dry surface does not appear to enhance growth.

  12. Orthogonality of spherical harmonic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    Orthogonality relations are obtained for the spherical harmonic coefficients of functions defined on the surface of a sphere. Following a brief discussion of the orthogonality of Fourier series coefficients, consideration is given to the values averaged over all orientations of the coordinate system of the spherical harmonic coefficients of a function defined on the surface of a sphere that can be expressed in terms of Legendre polynomials for the special case where the function is the sum of two delta functions located at two different points on the sphere, and for the case of an essentially arbitrary function. It is noted that the orthogonality relations derived have found applications in statistical studies of the geomagnetic field.

  13. Using a laboratory-based growth model to estimate mass- and temperature-dependent growth parameters across populations of juvenile Chinook Salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Russell W.; Plumb, John M.; Huntington, Charles

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the parameters that govern mass- and temperature-dependent growth, we conducted a meta-analysis of existing growth data from juvenile Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were fed an ad libitum ration of a pelleted diet. Although the growth of juvenile Chinook Salmon has been well studied, research has focused on a single population, a narrow range of fish sizes, or a narrow range of temperatures. Therefore, we incorporated the Ratkowsky model for temperature-dependent growth into an allometric growth model; this model was then fitted to growth data from 11 data sources representing nine populations of juvenile Chinook Salmon. The model fit the growth data well, explaining 98% of the variation in final mass. The estimated allometric mass exponent (b) was 0.338 (SE = 0.025), similar to estimates reported for other salmonids. This estimate of b will be particularly useful for estimating mass-standardized growth rates of juvenile Chinook Salmon. In addition, the lower thermal limit, optimal temperature, and upper thermal limit for growth were estimated to be 1.8°C (SE = 0.63°C), 19.0°C (SE = 0.27°C), and 24.9°C (SE = 0.02°C), respectively. By taking a meta-analytical approach, we were able to provide a growth model that is applicable across populations of juvenile Chinook Salmon receiving an ad libitum ration of a pelleted diet.

  14. Crop Coefficients of Some Selected Crops of Andhra Pradesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. Chandrasekhar; Arunajyothy, S.; Mallikarjuna, P.

    2015-06-01

    Precise information on crop coefficients for estimating crop evapotranspiration (ETc) for regional scale irrigation planning is a major impediment in many regions. Crop coefficients suggested based on lysimeter data by earlier investigators have to be locally calibrated to account for the differences in the crop canopy under given climatic conditions. In the present study crop coefficients were derived based on reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0) estimated from Penman-Monteith equation and lysimeter measured ETc for groundnut, paddy, tobacco, sugarcane and castor crops at Tirupati, Nellore, Rajahmundry, Anakapalli and Rajendranagar centers of Andhra Pradesh respectively. Crop coefficients derived were compared with those recommended by FAO-56. The mean crop coefficients at different stages of growth were significantly different from those of FAO-56 curve though a similar trend was observed. A third order polynomial crop coefficient model has therefore been developed as a function of time (days after sowing the crop) for deriving suitable crop coefficients. The crop coefficient models suggested may be adopted to estimate crop evapotranspiration in the study area with reasonable degree of accuracy.

  15. Transport coefficients of gluonic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e

    2011-06-01

    The shear ({eta}) and bulk ({zeta}) viscous coefficients have been evaluated for a gluonic fluid. The elastic, gg{yields}gg and the inelastic, number nonconserving, gg{yields}ggg processes have been considered as the dominant perturbative processes in evaluating the viscous coefficients to entropy density (s) ratios. Recently the processes: gg{yields}ggg has been revisited and a correction to the widely used Gunion-Bertsch (GB) formula has been obtained. The {eta} and {zeta} have been evaluated for gluonic fluid with the formula recently derived. At large {alpha}{sub s} the value of {eta}/s approaches its lower bound, {approx}1/4{pi}.

  16. Seebeck coefficient of one electron

    SciTech Connect

    Durrani, Zahid A. K.

    2014-03-07

    The Seebeck coefficient of one electron, driven thermally into a semiconductor single-electron box, is investigated theoretically. With a finite temperature difference ΔT between the source and charging island, a single electron can charge the island in equilibrium, directly generating a Seebeck effect. Seebeck coefficients for small and finite ΔT are calculated and a thermally driven Coulomb staircase is predicted. Single-electron Seebeck oscillations occur with increasing ΔT, as one electron at a time charges the box. A method is proposed for experimental verification of these effects.

  17. Tables of the coefficients A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical coefficients required to express the angular distribution for the rotationally elastic or inelastic scattering of electrons from a diatomic molecule were tabulated for the case of nitrogen and in the energy range from 0.20 eV to 10.0 eV. Five different rotational states are considered.

  18. Identities for generalized hypergeometric coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Louck, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Generalizations of hypergeometric functions to arbitrarily many symmetric variables are discussed, along with their associated hypergeometric coefficients, and the setting within which these generalizations arose. Identities generalizing the Euler identity for {sub 2}F{sub 1}, the Saalschuetz identity, and two generalizations of the {sub 4}F{sub 3} Bailey identity, among others, are given. 16 refs.

  19. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  20. Integer Solutions of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    A good formula is like a good story, rich in description, powerful in communication, and eye-opening to readers. The formula presented in this article for determining the coefficients of the binomial expansion of (x + y)n is one such "good read." The beauty of this formula is in its simplicity--both describing a quantitative situation…

  1. Allometric constraints on, and trade-offs in, belowground carbon allocation and their control of soil respiration across global forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangshui; Yang, Yusheng; Robinson, David

    2014-05-01

    To fully understand how soil respiration is partitioned among its component fluxes and responds to climate, it is essential to relate it to belowground carbon allocation, the ultimate carbon source for soil respiration. This remains one of the largest gaps in knowledge of terrestrial carbon cycling. Here, we synthesize data on gross and net primary production and their components, and soil respiration and its components, from a global forest database, to determine mechanisms governing belowground carbon allocation and their relationship with soil respiration partitioning and soil respiration responses to climatic factors across global forest ecosystems. Our results revealed that there are three independent mechanisms controlling belowground carbon allocation and which influence soil respiration and its partitioning: an allometric constraint; a fine-root production vs. root respiration trade-off; and an above- vs. belowground trade-off in plant carbon. Global patterns in soil respiration and its partitioning are constrained primarily by the allometric allocation, which explains some of the previously ambiguous results reported in the literature. Responses of soil respiration and its components to mean annual temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen deposition can be mediated by changes in belowground carbon allocation. Soil respiration responds to mean annual temperature overwhelmingly through an increasing belowground carbon input as a result of extending total day length of growing season, but not by temperature-driven acceleration of soil carbon decomposition, which argues against the possibility of a strong positive feedback between global warming and soil carbon loss. Different nitrogen loads can trigger distinct belowground carbon allocation mechanisms, which are responsible for different responses of soil respiration to nitrogen addition that have been observed. These results provide new insights into belowground carbon allocation, partitioning of soil

  2. Calculation of a First-In-Man Dose of 7-O-Succinyl Macrolactin A Based on Allometric Scaling of Data from Mice, Rats, and Dogs.

    PubMed

    Noh, Keumhan; Kang, Wonku

    2017-03-10

    7-O-succinyl macrolactin A (SMA) exerts several pharmacological effects including anti-bacterial, anti-inflammation, and anticancer activities. Recently, SMA has been extensively evaluated as an anti-cancer drug. Thus, the objectives of the present study were to characterise the pharmacokinetics of SMA via both non-compartmental and compartmental analysis in mice, rats, and dogs, and to derive an appropriate first-in-man dose based on allometric scaling of the animal data. The time courses of plasma SMA concentrations after intravenous administration to rats and dogs were analysed retrospectively, as were data collected after intraperitoneal SMA injection in mice. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated via both noncompartmental and compartmental analysis, and were correlated with body weight and/or the potential maximum life-span. The clearance and distribution volume of SMA in humans were predicted, and a first-in-man dose proposed. A two-compartment model best described the time courses of SMA plasma concentrations after a saturation elimination process was applied to fit the dataset obtained from rats. Incorporation of the maximum potential life-span during allometric scaling was required to improve the estimation of human clearance. The SMA clearance and the distribution volume in the steady state, in a 70-kg adult male, were estimated to be 30.6 L/h and 19.5 L, respectively. To meet the area under the curve (AUC) required for anti-tumour activity, a dose of 100 mg (~1.5 mg/kg) was finally proposed as the first dose for a 70-kg human. Although toxicological profiles derived from non-clinical studies must be considered before any final decision is made, our work will facilitate clinical studies on SMA.

  3. An Allometric Modelling Approach to Identify the Optimal Body Shape Associated with, and Differences between Brazilian and Peruvian Youth Motor Performance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Simonete; Bustamante, Alcibíades; Nevill, Alan; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Freitas, Duarte; Prista, António; Maia, José

    2016-01-01

    Children from developed and developing countries differ in their body size and shape due to marked differences across their life history caused by social, economic and cultural differences which are also linked to their motor performance (MP). We used allometric models to identify size/shape characteristics associated with MP tests between Brazilian and Peruvian schoolchildren. A total of 4,560 subjects, 2,385 girls and 2,175 boys aged 9-15 years were studied. Height and weight were measured; biological maturation was estimated with the maturity offset technique; MP measures included the 12 minute run (12MR), handgrip strength (HG), standing long jump (SLJ) and the shuttle run speed (SR) tests; physical activity (PA) was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. A multiplicative allometric model was adopted to adjust for body size differences across countries. Reciprocal ponderal index (RPI) was found to be the most suitable body shape indicator associated with the 12MR, SLJ, HG and SR performance. A positive maturation offset parameter was also associated with a better performance in SLJ, HG and SR tests. Sex differences were found in all motor tests. Brazilian youth showed better scores in MP than their Peruvian peers, even when controlling for their body size differences The current study identified the key body size associated with four body mass-dependent MP tests. Biological maturation and PA were associated with strength and motor performance. Sex differences were found in all motor tests, as well as across countries favoring Brazilian children even when accounting for their body size/shape differences.

  4. An Allometric Modelling Approach to Identify the Optimal Body Shape Associated with, and Differences between Brazilian and Peruvian Youth Motor Performance

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Simonete; Bustamante, Alcibíades; Nevill, Alan; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Freitas, Duarte; Prista, António; Maia, José

    2016-01-01

    Children from developed and developing countries differ in their body size and shape due to marked differences across their life history caused by social, economic and cultural differences which are also linked to their motor performance (MP). We used allometric models to identify size/shape characteristics associated with MP tests between Brazilian and Peruvian schoolchildren. A total of 4,560 subjects, 2,385 girls and 2,175 boys aged 9–15 years were studied. Height and weight were measured; biological maturation was estimated with the maturity offset technique; MP measures included the 12 minute run (12MR), handgrip strength (HG), standing long jump (SLJ) and the shuttle run speed (SR) tests; physical activity (PA) was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. A multiplicative allometric model was adopted to adjust for body size differences across countries. Reciprocal ponderal index (RPI) was found to be the most suitable body shape indicator associated with the 12MR, SLJ, HG and SR performance. A positive maturation offset parameter was also associated with a better performance in SLJ, HG and SR tests. Sex differences were found in all motor tests. Brazilian youth showed better scores in MP than their Peruvian peers, even when controlling for their body size differences The current study identified the key body size associated with four body mass-dependent MP tests. Biological maturation and PA were associated with strength and motor performance. Sex differences were found in all motor tests, as well as across countries favoring Brazilian children even when accounting for their body size/shape differences. PMID:26939118

  5. Determination on Monod kinetic coefficients for volatile hydrophobic organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.; Jaffe, P.R.

    1996-06-20

    A new procedure is presented to determine Monod kinetic coefficients and the microbial yield coefficient for volatile hydrophobic compounds such as phenanthrene. Batch experiments were conducted with a mixed culture capable of degrading phenanthrene. The phenanthrene disappearance and carbon dioxide production were monitored with time. A maximum likelihood estimator was formulated to fit the set of equations that describe the system to the measured data. The model takes into account a number of processes such as partition onto the apparatus, volatilization, and partition onto the biomass. The parameters required to describe these processes were obtained by independent experiments. The yield coefficient could be determined within a small range. However, the specific growth rate and the half-saturation constant were found to vary widely, with pairs of them describing the system adequately. It was shown that partition and volatilization processes can significantly affect the determination of the yield and Monod kinetic coefficients and need to be taken into account.

  6. Transport coefficients of quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bennaceur, D.; Khalfaoui, A.H. )

    1993-09-01

    Transport coefficients of fully ionized plasmas with a weakly coupled, completely degenerate electron gas and classical ions with a wide range of coupling strength are expressed within the Bloch transport equation. Using the Kohler variational principle the collision integral of the quantum Boltzmann equation is derived, which accounts for quantum effects through collective plasma oscillations. The physical implications of the results are investigated through comparisons with other theories. For practical applications, electrical and thermal conductivities are derived in simple analytical formulas. The relation between these two transport coefficients is expressed in an explicit form, giving a generalized Wiedemann-Franz law, where the Lorentz ratio is a dependent function of the coupling parameter and the degree of degeneracy of the plasma.

  7. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  8. Consistent transport coefficients in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Rovira, M.; Ferrofontan, C.

    1986-01-01

    A consistent theory for dealing with transport phenomena in stellar atmospheres starting with the kinetic equations and introducing three cases (LTE, partial LTE, and non-LTE) was developed. The consistent hydrodynamical equations were presented for partial-LTE, the transport coefficients defined, and a method shown to calculate them. The method is based on the numerical solution of kinetic equations considering Landau, Boltzmann, and Focker-Planck collision terms. Finally a set of results for the transport coefficients derived for a partially ionized hydrogen gas with radiation was shown, considering ionization and recombination as well as elastic collisions. The results obtained imply major changes is some types of theoretical model calculations and can resolve some important current problems concerning energy and mass balance in the solar atmosphere. It is shown that energy balance in the lower solar transition region can be fully explained by means of radiation losses and conductive flux.

  9. Study of Dispersion Coefficient Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, K. R.; Bressan, C. K.; Pires, M. S. G.; Canno, L. M.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of water pollution has worsened in recent times due to releases, intentional or not, of pollutants in natural water bodies. This causes several studies about the distribution of pollutants are carried out. The water quality models have been developed and widely used today as a preventative tool, ie to try to predict what will be the concentration distribution of constituent along a body of water in spatial and temporal scale. To understand and use such models, it is necessary to know some concepts of hydraulic high on their application, including the longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This study aims to conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the channel dispersion coefficient, yielding more information about their direct determination in the literature.

  10. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  11. Convection coefficients at building surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerud, R. C.; Altmayer, E.; Bauman, F. S.; Gadgil, A.; Bohn, M.

    1982-09-01

    Correlations relating the rate of heat transfer from the surfaces of rooms to the enclosed air are being developed, based on empirical and analytic examinations of convection in enclosures. The correlations express the heat transfer rate in terms of boundary conditions relating to room geometry and surface temperatures. Work to date indicates that simple convection coefficient calculation techniques can be developed, which significantly improve accuracy of heat transfer predictions in comparison with the standard calculations recommended by ASHRAE.

  12. Estimating biokinetic coefficients in the PACT™ system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhiyao; Arbuckle, Wm Brian

    2016-02-01

    When powdered activated carbon (PAC) is continuously added to the aeration tank of an activated sludge reactor, the modification is called a PACT™ process (for powdered activated carbon treatment). The PAC provides many benefits, but complicates the determination of biological phenomena. Determination of bio-oxidation kinetics in a PACT system is a key to fully understanding enhanced biological mechanisms resulting from PAC addition. A model is developed to account for the main mechanisms involved in the PACT system -- adsorption, air stripping and bio-oxidation. The model enables the investigation of biokinetic information, including possible synergistic effects. Six parallel reactors were used to treat a synthetic waste; three activated sludge and three PACT. The PACT reactors provided significantly reduced effluent TOC (total organic carbon). Biokinetic coefficients were obtained from steady-state data using averaged reactor data and by using all data (22 points for each reactor). As expected, the PACT reactors resulted in a substantial reduction in the effluent concentration of non-biodegradable total organic carbon. The Monod equation's half-saturation coefficient (Ks) was reduced significantly in the PACT reactors, resulting in higher growth rates at lower concentrations. The maximum specific substrate utilization (qm) rate was also reduced about 25% using the averaged data and remained unchanged using all the data. The substrate utilization values are affected by errors in biomass determination and more research is needed to accurately determine biomass.

  13. Growth and development of chicks of two species of partridge: the grey partridge (Perdix perdix) and the chukar (Alectoris chukar).

    PubMed

    Pis, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    1. In two partridge species, the grey partridge (Perdix perdix) and chukar (Alectoris chukar), from hatching up to 120 d, the growth rate and development of body mass, wing, tarsus, and bill length were measured and fitted by Gompertz equations. 2. As a typical precocial species, partridges hatched with relatively well developed legs and bills, and wing growth followed a gradual development of thermoregulation. 3. Gompertz growth constants for body mass growth were 0·039 and 0·038 for grey partridges and chukars, respectively. 4. The allometric relationship between tarsus length and body mass followed a geometric similarity (1/3 power) in both grey partridges and chukars.

  14. Growth of body components and carcass composition of Iberian pigs of 10 to 150 kg body weight as affected by the level of feeding and dietary protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Nieto, R; Lara, L; Barea, R; García-Valverde, R; Conde-Aguilera, J A; Aguilera, J F

    2013-09-01

    A total of 211 growing-finishing Iberian (IB) pigs from 4 separate and independent sets of trials were slaughtered at several stages of growth from 10 to 150 kg BW to determine growth and development of chemical and physical components of the cold eviscerated carcass (CC; without head, feet, and tail). Within each set of trials, a factorial arrangement of treatments, involving several concentrations of ideal protein in the diets as 1 factor and 2 or 3 levels of feed intake as the other, was used. The main objective of the present study was to provide information on the relative growth of physical and chemical components of the CC of IB pigs, which differed because of the dietary treatment imposed, involving a wide range of protein-to-energy ratios and feeding levels. Allometric relationships (P < 0.001) were established between the weight of a chemical component in the CC and empty BW or CC weight. Irrespective of the adequacy of the dietary protein-to-energy ratio, the growth coefficient for CC weight relative to empty BW was >1 (P < 0.001), whereas those for protein, water, and ash relative to empty BW or CC weight were <1 (P < 0.001). In contrast, relative growth coefficients >1 (P < 0.001) were obtained for fat mass and total energy, reflecting the increase in fat relative content that occurs with increasing weight. Multiple-regression equations (P < 0.001) were developed using a stepwise procedure, which estimates the chemical (g/kg) or energy (MJ/kg) composition of CC as a function of empty BW, dietary protein-to-energy ratio, and feeding level, expressed as a multiple of the ME required for maintenance. It is concluded that even if the pattern of developmental growth for the IB pig may show some similarities (increased fat content or decreased proportional weight of some primal cuts with BW or age) with that observed for pigs of different genetic background, relevant differences were detected. They are related to a much smaller relative size of the IB pig

  15. Infinite time interval backward stochastic differential equations with continuous coefficients.

    PubMed

    Zong, Zhaojun; Hu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the existence theorem for [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] solutions to a class of 1-dimensional infinite time interval backward stochastic differential equations (BSDEs) under the conditions that the coefficients are continuous and have linear growths. We also obtain the existence of a minimal solution. Furthermore, we study the existence and uniqueness theorem for [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] solutions of infinite time interval BSDEs with non-uniformly Lipschitz coefficients. It should be pointed out that the assumptions of this result is weaker than that of Theorem 3.1 in Zong (Turkish J Math 37:704-718, 2013).

  16. Large-scale changes in bloater growth and condition in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prichard, Carson G.; Roseman, Edward F.; Keeler, Kevin M.; O'Brien, Timothy P.; Riley, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Native Bloaters Coregonus hoyi have exhibited multiple strong year-classes since 2005 and now are the most abundant benthopelagic offshore prey fish in Lake Huron, following the crash of nonnative AlewivesAlosa pseudoharengus and substantial declines in nonnative Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax. Despite recent recoveries in Bloater abundance, marketable-size (>229 mm) Bloaters remain scarce. We used annual survey data to assess temporal and spatial dynamics of Bloater body condition and lengths at age in the main basin of Lake Huron from 1973 to 2014. Basinwide lengths at age were modeled by cohort for the 1973–2003 year-classes using a von Bertalanffy growth model with time-varying Brody growth coefficient (k) and asymptotic length () parameters. Median Bloater weights at selected lengths were estimated to assess changes in condition by modeling weight–length relations with an allometric growth model that allowed growth parameters to vary spatially and temporally. Estimated Bloater lengths at age declined 14–24% among ages 4–8 for all year-classes between 1973 and 2004. Estimates of  declined from a peak of 394 mm (1973 year-class) to a minimum of 238 mm (1998 year-class). Observed mean lengths at age in 2014 were at all-time lows, suggesting that year-classes comprising the current Bloater population would have to follow growth trajectories unlike those characterizing the 1973–2003 year-classes to attain marketable size. Furthermore, estimated weights of 250-mm Bloaters (i.e., a large, commercially valuable size-class) declined 17% among all regions from 1976 to 2007. Decreases in body condition of large Bloaters are associated with lower lipid content and may be linked to marked declines in abundance of the amphipodsDiporeia spp. in Lake Huron. We hypothesize that since at least 1976, large Bloaters have become more negatively buoyant and may have incurred an increasingly greater metabolic cost performing diel vertical migrations to prey upon the opossum

  17. Interspecific prediction of photosynthetic light response curves using specific leaf mass and leaf nitrogen content: effects of differences in soil fertility and growth irradiance

    PubMed Central

    Lachapelle, Pierre-Philippe; Shipley, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous work has shown that the entire photosynthetic light response curve, based on both Mitscherlich and Michaelis–Menten functions, could be predicted in an interspecific context through allometric relations linking the parameters of these functions to two static leaf traits: leaf nitrogen (N) content and leaf mass per area (LMA). This paper describes to what extent these allometric relations are robust to changes in soil fertility and the growth irradiance of the plants. Methods Plants of 25 herbaceous species were grown under controlled conditions in factorial combinations of low/high soil fertility and low/high growth irradiance. Net photosynthetic rates per unit dry mass were measured at light intensities ranging from 0 to 700 µmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Key Results The differing growth environments induced large changes in N, LMA and in each of the parameter estimates of the Mitscherlich and Michaelis–Menten functions. However, the differing growth environments induced only small (although significant) changes in the allometric relationships linking N and LMA to the parameters of the two functions. As a result, 88 % (Mitcherlich) and 89 % (Michaelis–Menten) of the observed net photosynthetic rates over the full range of light intensities (0–700 µmol m−2 s−1 PAR) and across all four growth environments could be predicted using only N and LMA using the same allometric relations. Conclusions These results suggest the possibility of predicting net photosynthetic rates in nature across species over the full range of light intensities using readily available data. PMID:22442344

  18. The emission coefficient of uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.; Mack, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The emission coefficient for uranium plasmas (Temperature: 8000 K) was measured for the wavelength range (200 A - 6000 A). The results are compared to theory and other measurements. The absorption coefficient for the same wavelength interval is also given.

  19. Nonlinear variations of the reflexion coefficient for lower-hybrid heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petržílka, V. A.; Klíma, R.; Pavlo, P.

    1983-10-01

    The effect of the ponderomotive depression of the plasma density on the power reflexion coefficient is calculated in the first space harmonic approximation. Numerical results demonstrate a considerable growth of the reflexion coefficient when increasing the RF power. Exceptionally, the reflexion coefficient can be almost invariable up to high RF power densities ( 10kW cm-2), if the unperturbed plasma density gradient is high ( 5 × 1012 cm-4). The relation of the present theory to experiments is discussed.

  20. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  1. A Note on the Dynamic Correlation Coefficient.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-04

    The use of the dynamic correlation coefficient as a test of spuriousness in longitudinal designs was examined. It was shown that given conditions of...spuriousness and perfect stationarity, the dynamic correlation coefficient was positively, rather than inversely, related to spuriousness. It was...recommended that the dynamic correlation coefficient not be used in the future as a test of spuriousness. (Author)

  2. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  3. M-Bonomial Coefficients and Their Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2010-01-01

    In this note, we introduce M-bonomial coefficients or (M-bonacci binomial coefficients). These are similar to the binomial and the Fibonomial (or Fibonacci-binomial) coefficients and can be displayed in a triangle similar to Pascal's triangle from which some identities become obvious.

  4. Second virial coefficients for chain molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bokis, C.P.; Donohue, M.D. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Hall, C.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    The importance of having accurate second virial coefficients in phase equilibrium calculations, especially for the calculation of dew points, is discussed. The square-well potentials results in a simple but inaccurate equation for the second virial coefficient for small, spherical molecules such as argon. Here, the authors present a new equation for the second virial coefficient of both spherical molecules and chain molecules which is written in a form similar to that for the square-well potential. This new equation is accurate in comparison to Monte Carlo simulation data on second virial coefficients for square-well chain molecules and with second virial coefficients obtained from experiments on n-alkanes.

  5. Improved estimation of intrinsic growth r(max) for long-lived species: integrating matrix models and allometry.

    PubMed

    Dillingham, Peter W; Moore, Jeffrey E; Fletcher, David; Cortes, Enric; Curtis, K Alexandra; James, Kelsey C; Lewison, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic population growth rate (r(max)) is an important parameter for many ecological applications, such as population risk assessment and harvest management. However, r(max) can be a difficult parameter to estimate, particularly for long-lived species, for which appropriate life table data or abundance time series are typically not obtainable. We describe a method for improving estimates of r(max) for long-lived species by integrating life-history theory (allometric models) and population-specific demographic data (life table models). Broad allometric relationships, such as those between life history traits and body size, have long been recognized by ecologists. These relationships are useful for deriving theoretical expectations for r(max), but r(max) for real populations may vary from simple allometric estimators for "archetypical" species of a given taxa or body mass. Meanwhile, life table approaches can provide population-specific estimates of r(max) from empirical data, but these may have poor precision from imprecise and missing vital rate parameter estimates. Our method borrows strength from both approaches to provide estimates that are consistent with both life-history theory and population-specific empirical data, and are likely to be more robust than estimates provided by either method alone. Our method uses an' allometric constant: the product of r(max) and the associated generation time for a stable-age population growing at this rate. We conducted a meta-analysis to estimate the mean and variance of this allometric constant across well-studied populations from three vertebrate taxa (birds, mammals, and elasmobranchs) and found that the mean was approximately 1.0 for each taxon. We used these as informative Bayesian priors that determine how much to "shrink" imprecise vital rate estimates for a data-limited population toward the allometric expectation. The approach ultimately provides estimates of r(max) (and other vital rates) that reflect a balance

  6. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Nimon, Kim F.; Zientek, Linda R.; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients. PMID:26217273

  7. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients.

    PubMed

    Nimon, Kim F; Zientek, Linda R; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients.

  8. Gas-film coefficients for streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for predicting the gas-film coefficient for the volatilization of organic solutes from streams are developed. The film coefficient is a function of windspeed and water temperature. The dependence of the coefficient on windspeed is determined from published information on the evaporation of water from a canal. The dependence of the coefficient on temperature is determined from laboratory studies on the evaporation of water. Procedures for adjusting the coefficients for different organic solutes are based on the molecular diffusion coefficient and the molecular weight. The molecular weight procedure is easiest to use because of the availability of molecular weights. However, the theoretical basis of the procedure is questionable. The diffusion coefficient procedure is supported by considerable data. Questions, however, remain regarding the exact dependence of the film coefficint on the diffusion coefficient. It is suggested that the diffusion coefficient procedure with a 0.68-power dependence be used when precise estimate of the gas-film coefficient are needed and that the molecular weight procedure be used when only approximate estimates are needed.

  9. Recursive prescription for logarithmic jet rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerwick, Erik

    2013-11-01

    We derive a recursion relation for the analytic leading logarithmic coefficients of a final state gluon cascade. We demonstrate the potential of our method by analytically computing the rate coefficients for the emission of up to 80 gluons in both the exclusive-kt (Durham) and generalized inclusive-kt class of jet algorithms. There is a particularly simple form for the ratios of resolved coefficients. We suggest potential applications for our method including the efficient generation of shower histories.

  10. 46 CFR 45.55 - Freeboard coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Freeboard coefficient. 45.55 Section 45.55 Shipping... § 45.55 Freeboard coefficient. (a) For ships less than 350 feet in length (L), the freeboard coefficient is P 1 in the formula: P 1=P+A[(L/D)-(L/D s)] where P is a factor, which is a function of...

  11. 46 CFR 45.55 - Freeboard coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Freeboard coefficient. 45.55 Section 45.55 Shipping... § 45.55 Freeboard coefficient. (a) For ships less than 350 feet in length (L), the freeboard coefficient is P 1 in the formula: P 1=P+A[(L/D)-(L/D s)] where P is a factor, which is a function of...

  12. 46 CFR 45.55 - Freeboard coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Freeboard coefficient. 45.55 Section 45.55 Shipping... § 45.55 Freeboard coefficient. (a) For ships less than 350 feet in length (L), the freeboard coefficient is P 1 in the formula: P 1=P+A[(L/D)-(L/D s)] where P is a factor, which is a function of...

  13. 46 CFR 45.55 - Freeboard coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Freeboard coefficient. 45.55 Section 45.55 Shipping... § 45.55 Freeboard coefficient. (a) For ships less than 350 feet in length (L), the freeboard coefficient is P 1 in the formula: P 1=P+A[(L/D)-(L/D s)] where P is a factor, which is a function of...

  14. 46 CFR 45.55 - Freeboard coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Freeboard coefficient. 45.55 Section 45.55 Shipping... § 45.55 Freeboard coefficient. (a) For ships less than 350 feet in length (L), the freeboard coefficient is P 1 in the formula: P 1=P+A[(L/D)-(L/D s)] where P is a factor, which is a function of...

  15. Application of distribution coefficients to radiological assessment models

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, W.R.; Sanchez, A.L.; Underhill, D.W.; Thomas, E.

    1985-01-01

    A field and laboratory investigation of the transport of fallout radionuclides in natural, organic rich ecosystems has been initiated. Mountain-top peat bogs in Pennsylvania, New York and Virginia were sampled by coring, dated by Pb-210 methods and measured for bomb-produced Sr-90, Pu-239, 240, and Cs-137; laboratory measurements of the distribution coefficients for Cs-137, Sr-85, Ru-106, Am-241, and Co-57 by the constant shaking method have been made. These natural terrestrial ecosystems are labeled with fallout radionuclides from nuclear weapons tests which are environmental tracers of element transport. To explain the differences between the input from fallout and the distribution of Cs-137 in peat cores, a simple ''theoretical plate'' transport model has been used. Each year of growth is assumed to be a ''theoretical plate'' and Cs-137 deposited is transferred between plates by advection and mixing processes. The annual deposition of Cs-137 occurs on the (then) uppermost layer and is proportional to the atmospheric input. The theoretical plate model finds values of the advection and mixing coefficients which give the best fit between Cs-137 profile in the bog and the atmospherically-derived Cs-137. For the three bogs tested so far, the advection coefficients indicate an upward movement of Cs-137 as well as downward transport. Values for the diffusion coefficient range from 10E/sup -7/ to 10E/sup -9/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ depending on organic content and porosity. The mass transport values from the model are compared to laboratory measurements of distribution coefficients in simulated acid rain conditions. Based on the diffusion coefficients calculated from the model, a thickness of 8 to 20 cm of peat surrounding a leaking cannister of Cs-137 would not allow the radionuclide to enter an aquifer for 300 years from a low level waste disposal site.

  16. Commentary on Coefficient Alpha: A Cautionary Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2009-01-01

    The general use of coefficient alpha to assess reliability should be discouraged on a number of grounds. The assumptions underlying coefficient alpha are unlikely to hold in practice, and violation of these assumptions can result in nontrivial negative or positive bias. Structural equation modeling was discussed as an informative process both to…

  17. Implications of NGA for NEHRP site coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Three proposals are provided to update tables 11.4-1 and 11.4-2 of Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (7-10), by the American Society of Civil Engineers (2010) (ASCE/SEI 7-10), with site coefficients implied directly by NGA (Next Generation Attenuation) ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). Proposals include a recommendation to use straight-line interpolation to infer site coefficients at intermediate values of ̅vs (average shear velocity). Site coefficients are recommended to ensure consistency with ASCE/SEI 7-10 MCER (Maximum Considered Earthquake) seismic-design maps and simplified site-specific design spectra procedures requiring site classes with associated tabulated site coefficients and a reference site class with unity site coefficients. Recommended site coefficients are confirmed by independent observations of average site amplification coefficients inferred with respect to an average ground condition consistent with that used for the MCER maps. The NGA coefficients recommended for consideration are implied directly by the NGA GMPEs and do not require introduction of additional models.

  18. Coefficient Alpha and Reliability of Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almehrizi, Rashid S.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of large-scale assessments develop various score scales that are either linear or nonlinear transformations of raw scores for better interpretations and uses of assessment results. The current formula for coefficient alpha (a; the commonly used reliability coefficient) only provides internal consistency reliability estimates of raw…

  19. Decay of (p,q)-Fourier coefficients.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, David E; Gurka, Petr; Lang, Jan

    2014-10-08

    We show that essentially the speed of decay of the Fourier sine coefficients of a function in a Lebesgue space is comparable to that of the corresponding coefficients with respect to the basis formed by the generalized sine functions sin p,q .

  20. A gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chris J.; van der Slot, Peter J. M.; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser. An electro-optic modulator is used to switch between high and low gain states by making use of the polarization dependent gain of Alexandrite. In gain-coefficient switched mode, the laser produces 85 ns pulses with a pulse energy of 240 mJ at a repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  1. Coefficient Alpha Bootstrap Confidence Interval under Nonnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin; Newton, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Three different bootstrap methods for estimating confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient alpha were investigated. In addition, the bootstrap methods were compared with the most promising coefficient alpha CI estimation methods reported in the literature. The CI methods were assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation utilizing conditions…

  2. Calculator program set up for film coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Gracey, J.O.; Teter, D.L.

    1982-11-15

    Describes a mechanized computation scheme for the film coefficients used in heat transfer calculations designed for the Texas Instruments TI-59 programmable calculator. Presents tables showing application conditions (small diagram included) and the corresponding heat transfer equations for 10 heat flow situations; symbols used; user instructions, a complete film coefficient program; and storage assignments. Example problem and corresponding printout are given.

  3. Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Michael C.; Maeda, Yukiko

    2006-01-01

    The meta-analysis of coefficient alpha across many studies is becoming more common in psychology by a methodology labeled reliability generalization. Existing reliability generalization studies have not used the sampling distribution of coefficient alpha for precision weighting and other common meta-analytic procedures. A framework is provided for…

  4. Sodium chloride precipitation reaction coefficient from crystallization experiment in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naillon, A.; Joseph, P.; Prat, M.

    2017-04-01

    The crystal growth of sodium chloride from an aqueous solution is studied from evaporation experiments in microfluidic channels in conjunction with analytical and numerical computations. The crystal growth kinetics is recorded using a high speed camera in order to determine the intrinsic precipitation reaction coefficient. The study reveals that the crystal growth rates determined in previous studies are all affected by the ions transport phenomena in the solution and thus not representative of the precipitation reaction. It is suggested that accurate estimate of sodium chloride precipitation reaction coefficient presented here offers new opportunities for a better understanding of important issues involved in the damages of porous materials induced by the salt crystallization.

  5. Estimation of the simple correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2010-11-01

    This article investigates some unfamiliar properties of the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient for the estimation of simple correlation coefficient. Although Pearson's r is biased, except for limited situations, and the minimum variance unbiased estimator has been proposed in the literature, researchers routinely employ the sample correlation coefficient in their practical applications, because of its simplicity and popularity. In order to support such practice, this study examines the mean squared errors of r and several prominent formulas. The results reveal specific situations in which the sample correlation coefficient performs better than the unbiased and nearly unbiased estimators, facilitating recommendation of r as an effect size index for the strength of linear association between two variables. In addition, related issues of estimating the squared simple correlation coefficient are also considered.

  6. An agreement coefficient for image comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, L.; Gallo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Combination of datasets acquired from different sensor systems is necessary to construct a long time-series dataset for remotely sensed land-surface variables. Assessment of the agreement of the data derived from various sources is an important issue in understanding the data continuity through the time-series. Some traditional measures, including correlation coefficient, coefficient of determination, mean absolute error, and root mean square error, are not always optimal for evaluating the data agreement. For this reason, we developed a new agreement coefficient for comparing two different images. The agreement coefficient has the following properties: non-dimensional, bounded, symmetric, and distinguishable between systematic and unsystematic differences. The paper provides examples of agreement analyses for hypothetical data and actual remotely sensed data. The results demonstrate that the agreement coefficient does include the above properties, and therefore is a useful tool for image comparison. ?? 2006 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  7. Theoretical calculation of Joule-Thomson coefficient by using third virial coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Bahtiyar Akber; Somuncu, Elif; Askerov, Iskender M.

    2017-02-01

    The Joule-Thomson coefficient has been theoretical investigated by using third virial coefficient. Established expressions enable us accurate and rapid calculations of Joule-Thomson coefficient. As seen from numerical results the analytical expressions for third virial coefficients are a very useful, giving a very fast method to calculate other thermodynamics properties of gasses. As an example, the calculation results have been successfully tested by using various literature data.

  8. Use of the SLW index to calculate growth function in the sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus

    PubMed Central

    Poot-Salazar, Alicia; Hernández-Flores, Álvaro; Ardisson, Pedro-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Age and growth analysis is essential to fisheries management. Indirect methods to calculate growth are widely used; however, length frequency data analysis in sea cucumbers is complicated by high data variability caused by body wall elasticity. Here we calculated Isostichopus badionotus parameters of the von Bertalanffy growth function. In order to address bias produced by body wall elasticity, we compared the performance of four measurements and one compound index that combines different biometric parameters: the square root of the length-width product (SLW). Results showed that variability in length data due to body wall elasticity was controlled by using body length (Le) from the SLW compound index. Growth in I. badionotus follows a negative allometric tendency. Slow or zero growth periods were observed during October and November, when weather conditions were adverse. PMID:24909262

  9. Use of the SLW index to calculate growth function in the sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.

    PubMed

    Poot-Salazar, Alicia; Hernández-Flores, Álvaro; Ardisson, Pedro-Luis

    2014-06-09

    Age and growth analysis is essential to fisheries management. Indirect methods to calculate growth are widely used; however, length frequency data analysis in sea cucumbers is complicated by high data variability caused by body wall elasticity. Here we calculated Isostichopus badionotus parameters of the von Bertalanffy growth function. In order to address bias produced by body wall elasticity, we compared the performance of four measurements and one compound index that combines different biometric parameters: the square root of the length-width product (SLW). Results showed that variability in length data due to body wall elasticity was controlled by using body length (Le) from the SLW compound index. Growth in I. badionotus follows a negative allometric tendency. Slow or zero growth periods were observed during October and November, when weather conditions were adverse.

  10. Path-counting formulas for generalized kinship coefficients and condensed identity coefficients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, En; Ozsoyoglu, Z Meral

    2014-01-01

    An important computation on pedigree data is the calculation of condensed identity coefficients, which provide a complete description of the degree of relatedness of two individuals. The applications of condensed identity coefficients range from genetic counseling to disease tracking. Condensed identity coefficients can be computed using linear combinations of generalized kinship coefficients for two, three, four individuals, and two pairs of individuals and there are recursive formulas for computing those generalized kinship coefficients (Karigl, 1981). Path-counting formulas have been proposed for the (generalized) kinship coefficients for two (three) individuals but there have been no path-counting formulas for the other generalized kinship coefficients. It has also been shown that the computation of the (generalized) kinship coefficients for two (three) individuals using path-counting formulas is efficient for large pedigrees, together with path encoding schemes tailored for pedigree graphs. In this paper, we propose a framework for deriving path-counting formulas for generalized kinship coefficients. Then, we present the path-counting formulas for all generalized kinship coefficients for which there are recursive formulas and which are sufficient for computing condensed identity coefficients. We also perform experiments to compare the efficiency of our method with the recursive method for computing condensed identity coefficients on large pedigrees.

  11. Evaluation of Dimensionality in the Assessment of Internal Consistency Reliability: Coefficient Alpha and Omega Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    In the lead article, Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love demonstrate the relationship among homogeneity, internal consistency, and coefficient alpha, and also distinguish among them. These distinctions are important because too often coefficient alpha--a reliability coefficient--is interpreted as an index of homogeneity or internal consistency.…

  12. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John Eric; Carré, Matt J.

    2010-07-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.

  13. Spatial correlation coefficient images for ultrasonic detection.

    PubMed

    Cepel, Raina; Ho, K C; Rinker, Brett A; Palmer, Donald D; Lerch, Terrence P; Neal, Steven P

    2007-09-01

    In ultrasonics, image formation and detection are generally based on signal amplitude. In this paper, we introduce correlation coefficient images as a signal-amplitude independent approach for image formation. The correlation coefficients are calculated between A-scans digitized at adjacent measurement positions. In these images, defects are revealed as regions of high or low correlation relative to the background correlations associated with noise. Correlation coefficient and C-scan images are shown to demonstrate flat-bottom-hole detection in a stainless steel annular ring and crack detection in an aluminum aircraft structure.

  14. On the emission coefficient of uranium plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.; Mack, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The emission coefficient for uranium plasmas (temperature: 8000 K) was measured for the wavelength range from 1200 to 6000 A. The results were compared to theoretical calculations and other measurements. Reasonable agreement between theoretical predictions and our measurements was found in the region from 1200 to 2000 A. Although it was difficult to make absolute comparisons among the different reported measurements, considerable disagreement was found for the higher wavelength region. A short discussion regarding the overall comparisons is given, and final suggestions are made as to the most appropriate emission coefficient values to be used in future design calculations. The absorption coefficient for the same wavelength interval is also reported.

  15. Diffusion coefficients in leaflets of bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Mogre, Saurabh; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    We study diffusion coefficients of liquid domains by explicitly taking into account the two-layered structure called leaflets of the bilayer membrane. In general, the velocity fields associated with each leaflet are different and the layers sliding past each other cause frictional coupling. We obtain analytical results of diffusion coefficients for a circular liquid domain in a leaflet, and quantitatively study their dependence on the interleaflet friction. We also show that the diffusion coefficients diverge in the absence of coupling between the bilayer and solvents, even when the interleaflet friction is taken into account. In order to corroborate our theory, the effect of the interleaflet friction on the correlated diffusion is examined.

  16. Spreading coefficients of aliphatic hydrocarbons on water

    SciTech Connect

    Takii, Taichi; Mori, Y.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the equilibrium spreading coefficients of some aliphatic hydrocarbons (C[sub 6]C[sub 10]) on water. The thickness of a discrete lens of each hydrocarbon sample floating on a stagnant water pool was measured interferometrically and used to calculate the spreading coefficient of the hydrocarbon with the aid of Langmuir's capillarity theory. The dependences of the spreading coefficient, thus observed, on temperature (0--50 C) and on the number of carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon molecule are in qualitative agreement with the predictions based on the Lifshitz theory of van der Waals forces.

  17. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  18. Universal relations of transport coefficients from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cherman, Aleksey; Nellore, Abhinav

    2009-09-15

    We show that there are universal high-temperature relations for transport coefficients of plasmas described by a wide class of field theories with gravity duals. These theories can be viewed as strongly coupled large-N{sub c} conformal field theories deformed by one or more relevant operators. The transport coefficients we study are the speed of sound and bulk viscosity, as well as the conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and charge susceptibility of probe U(1) charges. We show that the sound bound v{sub s}{sup 2}{<=}1/3 is satisfied at high temperatures in these theories and also discuss bounds on the diffusion coefficient, the conductivity, and the bulk viscosity.

  19. Second virial coefficient of one dimensional gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mijatovic, M.

    1982-08-01

    The second virial coefficient of a one dimensional gas is calculated using the expressions for the scattering amplitude. The scattering amplitude is chosen in the form of rational function of wave vector.

  20. Heat transfer coefficient of cryotop during freezing.

    PubMed

    Li, W J; Zhou, X L; Wang, H S; Liu, B L; Dai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Cryotop is an efficient vitrification method for cryopreservation of oocytes. It has been widely used owing to its simple operation and high freezing rate. Recently, the heat transfer performance of cryotop was studied by numerical simulation in several studies. However, the range of heat transfer coefficient in the simulation is uncertain. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient for cryotop during freezing process was analyzed. The cooling rates of 40 percent ethylene glycol (EG) droplet in cryotop during freezing were measured by ultra-fast measurement system and calculated by numerical simulation at different value of heat transfer coefficient. Compared with the results obtained by two methods, the range of the heat transfer coefficient necessary for the numerical simulation of cryotop was determined, which is between 9000 W/(m(2)·K) and 10000 W/(m (2)·K).

  1. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging.

    PubMed

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Silva, Cristiane A; Balestrin, Lia B S; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  2. Transonic Blunt Body Aerodynamic Coefficients Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Jorge; Vargas, M.; Gonzalez, Ezequiel; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    In the framework of EXPERT (European Experimental Re-entry Test-bed) accurate transonic aerodynamic coefficients are of paramount importance for the correct trajectory assessment and parachute deployment. A combined CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) modelling and experimental campaign strategy was selected to obtain accurate coefficients. A preliminary set of coefficients were obtained by CFD Euler inviscid computation. Then experimental campaign was performed at DNW facilities at NLR. A profound review of the CFD modelling was done lighten up by WTT results, aimed to obtain reliable values of the coefficients in the future (specially the pitching moment). Study includes different turbulence modelling and mesh sensitivity analysis. Comparison with the WTT results is explored, and lessons learnt are collected.

  3. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E; Poole, L; Cherdak, A; Houghton, W

    1980-05-15

    An instrument has been developed that directly measures the multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. The design incorporates methods for compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in background light level. When used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  4. Concordance correlation coefficient applied to discrete data.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Josep L; Jover, Lluis

    2005-12-30

    In any field in which decisions are subject to measurements, interchangeability between the methods used to obtain these measurements is essential. To consider methods as interchangeable, a certain degree of agreement is needed between the measurements they provide. The concordance correlation coefficient is an index that assesses the strength of agreement and it has been widely applied in situations in which measurements are made on a continuous scale. Recently the concordance correlation coefficient has been defined as a specific intraclass correlation coefficient estimated by the variance components of a Normal-Normal mixed linear model. Although this coefficient was defined for the continuous scale case, it may also be used with a discrete scale. In this case the data are often transformed and normalized, and the concordance correlation is applied. This study discusses the expression of the concordance correlation coefficient for discrete Poisson data by means of the Poisson-Normal generalized linear mixed model. The behaviour of the concordance correlation coefficient estimate is assessed by means of a simulation study, in which the estimates were compared using four models: three Normal-Normal mixed models with raw data, log-transformed data and square-root transformed data, and the Poisson-Normal generalized linear mixed model. An example is provided in which two different methods are used to measure CD34+ cells.

  5. Holistic morphometric analysis of growth of the sand dollar Echinarachnius parma (Echinodermata:Echinoidea:Clypeasteroida).

    PubMed

    Zachos, Louis G

    2015-12-02

    Holistic morphometrics is a term implying complete shape characterization of all of the structural parts of an organism. The skeleton of an echinoid is comprised of hundreds of individual plates arranged in a closed 3-dimensional mosaic forming the test. GIS software and techniques were used to generate topologically correct digital models of an ontogenetic series of specimens of the sand dollar echinoid Echinarachnius parma. Plate growth can be considered in proportion to overall skeleton growth, resulting in a linear model of relative growth. Alternatively, separate logistic equations can be fit to the ontogenetic series of homologous plate areas using nonlinear least squares regression to result in a model for instantaneous growth. The linear and logistic parameters of the models describe the allometric growth of plates from different viewpoints. Growth is shown to fall into characteristic patterns defining distinct plate growth domains associated with development of the imago (larval) skeleton just prior to metamorphosis, early growth associated with expansion of the corona and fold-over (forming the flattened body form), juvenile growth and formation of petals, and adult growth. Functions of growth, plate translocation, plate juxtaposition between aboral and oral surfaces, and relationships with internal buttressing are quantified. Results offer explanations for general skeletal symmetry, distinction between ambulacral and interambulacral growth, the relationship of growth to internal buttressing, existence of a distinct petalodium, and anterior-posterior asymmetry during development. The parametric values of growth functions derived from the results are a basis for computational modeling of growth and development in sand dollars.

  6. Measurement of the distribution coefficient of neodymium in cubic ZrO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, H.; Luther, K.-D.; Assmus, W.

    1993-05-01

    The incorporation of solute elements into single crystals has been examined for many years. In this paper we investigate the distribution coefficient of Nd 2O 3 in cubic stabilized zirconiumdioxide crystals. The distribution coefficient is measured as a function of the growth velocity. The validity of the Burton-Prim-Slichter theory [J.A. Burton, R.C. Prim and W.P. Slichter, J. Chem. Phys. 21 (1953) 1987] for the system zirconium dioxide/yttrium oxide is confirmed by the experimental results. The value for the equilibrium distribution coefficient is evaluated as k0 = 0.426.

  7. Applications of the second virial coefficient: protein crystallization and solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, William W.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    2014-04-30

    This article highlights some of the ground-based studies emanating from NASA’s Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) program, and includes a more detailed discussion of the history and the progress made in one of the NASA-funded PCG investigations involving the use of measured second virial coefficients (B values) as a diagnostic indicator of solution conditions conducive to protein crystallization. This article begins by highlighting some of the ground-based studies emanating from NASA’s Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) program. This is followed by a more detailed discussion of the history of and the progress made in one of the NASA-funded PCG investigations involving the use of measured second virial coefficients (B values) as a diagnostic indicator of solution conditions conducive to protein crystallization. A second application of measured B values involves the determination of solution conditions that improve or maximize the solubility of aqueous and membrane proteins. These two important applications have led to several technological improvements that simplify the experimental expertise required, enable the measurement of membrane proteins and improve the diagnostic capability and measurement throughput.

  8. Temporal correlation coefficient for directed networks.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Kathrin; Salau, Jennifer; Krieter, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies dealing with network theory focused mainly on the static aggregation of edges over specific time window lengths. Thus, most of the dynamic information gets lost. To assess the quality of such a static aggregation the temporal correlation coefficient can be calculated. It measures the overall possibility for an edge to persist between two consecutive snapshots. Up to now, this measure is only defined for undirected networks. Therefore, we introduce the adaption of the temporal correlation coefficient to directed networks. This new methodology enables the distinction between ingoing and outgoing edges. Besides a small example network presenting the single calculation steps, we also calculated the proposed measurements for a real pig trade network to emphasize the importance of considering the edge direction. The farm types at the beginning of the pork supply chain showed clearly higher values for the outgoing temporal correlation coefficient compared to the farm types at the end of the pork supply chain. These farm types showed higher values for the ingoing temporal correlation coefficient. The temporal correlation coefficient is a valuable tool to understand the structural dynamics of these systems, as it assesses the consistency of the edge configuration. The adaption of this measure for directed networks may help to preserve meaningful additional information about the investigated network that might get lost if the edge directions are ignored.

  9. Computing spatial information from Fourier coefficient distributions.

    PubMed

    Heinz, William F; Werbin, Jeffrey L; Lattman, Eaton; Hoh, Jan H

    2011-05-01

    The spatial relationships between molecules can be quantified in terms of information. In the case of membranes, the spatial organization of molecules in a bilayer is closely related to biophysically and biologically important properties. Here, we present an approach to computing spatial information based on Fourier coefficient distributions. The Fourier transform (FT) of an image contains a complete description of the image, and the values of the FT coefficients are uniquely associated with that image. For an image where the distribution of pixels is uncorrelated, the FT coefficients are normally distributed and uncorrelated. Further, the probability distribution for the FT coefficients of such an image can readily be obtained by Parseval's theorem. We take advantage of these properties to compute the spatial information in an image by determining the probability of each coefficient (both real and imaginary parts) in the FT, then using the Shannon formalism to calculate information. By using the probability distribution obtained from Parseval's theorem, an effective distance from the uncorrelated or most uncertain case is obtained. The resulting quantity is an information computed in k-space (kSI). This approach provides a robust, facile and highly flexible framework for quantifying spatial information in images and other types of data (of arbitrary dimensions). The kSI metric is tested on a 2D Ising model, frequently used as a model for lipid bilayer; and the temperature-dependent phase transition is accurately determined from the spatial information in configurations of the system.

  10. Growth, efficiency, and yield of commercial broilers from 1957, 1978, and 20051

    PubMed Central

    Zuidhof, M. J.; Schneider, B. L.; Carney, V. L.; Korver, D. R.; Robinson, F. E.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of commercial selection on the growth, efficiency, and yield of broilers was studied using 2 University of Alberta Meat Control strains unselected since 1957 and 1978, and a commercial Ross 308 strain (2005). Mixed-sex chicks (n = 180 per strain) were placed into 4 replicate pens per strain, and grown on a current nutritional program to 56 d of age. Weekly front and side profile photographs of 8 birds per strain were collected. Growth rate, feed intake, and measures of feed efficiency including feed conversion ratio, residual feed intake, and residual maintenance energy requirements were characterized. A nonlinear mixed Gompertz growth model was used to predict BW and BW variation, useful for subsequent stochastic growth simulation. Dissections were conducted on 8 birds per strain semiweekly from 21 to 56 d of age to characterize allometric growth of pectoralis muscles, leg meat, abdominal fat pad, liver, gut, and heart. A novel nonlinear analysis of covariance was used to test the hypothesis that allometric growth patterns have changed as a result of commercial selection pressure. From 1957 to 2005, broiler growth increased by over 400%, with a concurrent 50% reduction in feed conversion ratio, corresponding to a compound annual rate of increase in 42 d live BW of 3.30%. Forty-two-day FCR decreased by 2.55% each year over the same 48-yr period. Pectoralis major growth potential increased, whereas abdominal fat decreased due to genetic selection pressure over the same time period. From 1957 to 2005, pectoralis minor yield at 42 d of age was 30% higher in males and 37% higher in females; pectoralis major yield increased by 79% in males and 85% in females. Over almost 50 yr of commercial quantitative genetic selection pressure, intended beneficial changes have been achieved. Unintended changes such as enhanced sexual dimorphism are likely inconsequential, though musculoskeletal, immune function, and parent stock management challenges may require additional

  11. Parametric modeling of quantile regression coefficient functions.

    PubMed

    Frumento, Paolo; Bottai, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    Estimating the conditional quantiles of outcome variables of interest is frequent in many research areas, and quantile regression is foremost among the utilized methods. The coefficients of a quantile regression model depend on the order of the quantile being estimated. For example, the coefficients for the median are generally different from those of the 10th centile. In this article, we describe an approach to modeling the regression coefficients as parametric functions of the order of the quantile. This approach may have advantages in terms of parsimony, efficiency, and may expand the potential of statistical modeling. Goodness-of-fit measures and testing procedures are discussed, and the results of a simulation study are presented. We apply the method to analyze the data that motivated this work. The described method is implemented in the qrcm R package.

  12. Temperature coefficients of multijunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virshup, G. F.; Chung, B.-C.; Ladle Ristow, M.; Kuryla, M. S.; Brinker, D.

    1990-01-01

    Temperature coefficients measured in solar simulators with those measured under AM0 solar illumination are compared to illustrate the challenges in making these measurements. It is shown that simulator measurements of the short-circuit current (delta Jsc/delta T) are inaccurate due to the mismatch between the solar spectrum and the simulators at the bandgaps of the solar cells. Especially susceptible to error is the delta Jsc/delta T of cells which are components in monolithic multijunction solar cells, such as GaAs filtered by 1.93-eV AlGaAs, which has an AM0 coefficient of 6.82 micro-A/sq cm/deg C, compared to a Xenon simulator coefficient of 22.2 micro-A/sq cm/deg C.

  13. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    SciTech Connect

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-07-15

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Seebeck Coefficient Measured With Differential Heat Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoltan, L.; Wood, C.; Stapfer, G.

    1986-01-01

    Common experimental errors reduced because pulse technique suppresses drifts in thermoelectric measurements. Differential-heat-pulse apparatus measures Seebeck coefficient in semiconductors at temperatures up to 1,900 K. Sample heated to measuring temperature in furnace. Ends of sample then differentially heated a few degrees more by lamps. Differential temperature rise and consequent Seebeck voltage measured via thermocouple leads. Because pulse technique used, errors that often arise from long-term drifts in thermoelectric measurements suppressed. Apparatus works with temperature differences of only few degrees, further increasing accuracy of coefficients obtained.

  15. Second virial coefficients of dipolar hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Philipse, Albert P; Kuipers, Bonny W M

    2010-08-18

    An asymptotic formula is reported for the second virial coefficient B(2) of a dipolar hard-sphere (DHS) fluid, in zero external field, for strongly coupled dipolar interactions. This simple formula, together with the one for the weak-coupling B(2), provides an accurate prediction of the second virial coefficient for a wide range of dipole moments, including those that are experimentally accessible in magnetite ferrofluids. The weak-coupling B(2) also yields an estimate of the magnetic moment minimally needed for isotropic gas-liquid phase-separation, if any, in the DHS fluid.

  16. Asymptotics of loop quantum gravity fusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Bianchi, Eugenio; Magliaro, Elena; Perini, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The fusion coefficients from SO(3) to SO(4) play a key role in the definition of spin foam models for the dynamics in loop quantum gravity. In this paper we give a simple analytic formula of the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine fusion coefficients. We study the large spin asymptotics and show that they map SO(3) semiclassical intertwiners into SU(2)L × SU(2)R semiclassical intertwiners. This non-trivial property opens the possibility for an analysis of the semiclassical behavior of the model.

  17. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-05-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  18. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  19. Onsager coefficients of a Brownian Carnot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumida, Y.; Okuda, K.

    2010-10-01

    We study a Brownian Carnot cycle introduced by Schmiedl and Seifert [Europhys. Lett. 81, 20003 (2008)] from a viewpoint of the linear irreversible thermodynamics. By considering the entropy production rate of this cycle, we can determine thermodynamic forces and fluxes of the cycle and calculate the Onsager coefficients for general protocols, that is, arbitrary schedules to change the potential confining the Brownian particle. We show that these Onsager coefficients contain the information of the protocol shape and they satisfy the tight-coupling condition irrespective of whatever protocol shape we choose. These properties may give an explanation why the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency often appears in the finite-time heat engines.

  20. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, H. P. Thakor, P. B. Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  1. Growth hormone and growth?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve

    2013-09-01

    Pituitary GH is obligatory for normal growth in mammals, but the importance of pituitary GH in avian growth is less certain. In birds, pituitary GH is biologically active and has growth promoting actions in the tibia-test bioassay. Its importance in normal growth is indicated by the growth suppression following the surgical removal of the pituitary gland or after the immunoneutralization of endogenous pituitary GH. The partial restoration of growth in some studies with GH-treated hypophysectomized birds also suggests GH dependency in avian growth, as does the dwarfism that occurs in some strains with GHR dysfunctions. Circulating GH concentrations are also correlated with body weight gain, being high in young, rapidly growing birds and low in slower growing older birds. Nevertheless, despite these observations, there is an extensive literature that concludes pituitary GH is not important in avian growth. This is based on numerous studies with hypophysectomized and intact birds that show only slight, transitory or absent growth responses to exogenous GH-treatment. Moreover, while circulating GH levels correlate with weight gain in young birds, this may merely reflect changes in the control of pituitary GH secretion during aging, as numerous studies involving experimental alterations in growth rate fail to show positive correlations between plasma GH concentrations and the alterations in growth rate. Furthermore, growth is known to occur in the absence of pituitary GH, as most embryonic development occurs prior to the ontogenetic appearance of pituitary somatotrophs and the appearance of GH in embryonic circulation. Early embryonic growth is also independent of the endocrine actions of pituitary GH, since removal of the presumptive pituitary gland does not impair early growth. Embryonic growth does, however, occur in the presence of extrapituitary GH, which is produced by most tissues and has autocrine or paracrine roles that locally promote growth and development

  2. Substratum cavities affect growth-plasticity, allometry, movement and feeding rates in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Hernández, J C; Russell, M P

    2010-02-01

    We assessed the influence of rock cavities, or pits, on the growth dynamics and behavior of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. In a paired-designed, laboratory experiment, sea urchins were assigned to sandstone blocks that were either 'Flat' or had a 'Pit' drilled into the center. At the start, both groups were approximately the same shape and size. In just 2 months, the shapes of the tests were significantly different between the two treatments, with the Pit urchins having an increased height:diameter profile. This result demonstrates the plastic nature of the sea urchin test and that, despite its apparent rigidity, it is capable of deforming during growth. In addition, the presence of pits modified behavior and food consumption as well as allometric growth of the test and Aristotle's lantern. Sea urchins on Pit sandstone blocks tended to stay in the cavities and not move about the flat areas, whereas individuals on Flat blocks changed position. Sea urchins in the Pit treatment consumed less food and had relatively larger demipyramids (the 'jaw' ossicle in Aristotle's lantern). These morphological and allometric changes occurred over a short time-period (8-20 weeks). We conclude that microhabitat is an important factor in controlling the behavior and growth dynamics of the bioeroding sea urchin S. purpuratus.

  3. Zernike aberration coefficients transformed to and from Fourier series coefficients for wavefront representation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guang-Ming

    2006-02-15

    The set of Fourier series is discussed following some discussion of Zernike polynomials. Fourier transforms of Zernike polynomials are derived that allow for relating Fourier series expansion coefficients to Zernike polynomial expansion coefficients. With iterative Fourier reconstruction, Zernike representations of wavefront aberrations can easily be obtained from wavefront derivative measurements.

  4. Extending the Constant Coefficient Solution Technique to Variable Coefficient Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Ahmed; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a class of second-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with variable coefficients whose closed-form solutions can be obtained by the same method used to solve ODEs with constant coefficients. General solutions for the homogeneous case are discussed.

  5. Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients: It's All One General Linear Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, S. Neil

    This paper explains the meaning and use of three important factor analytic statistics: factor scores, factor structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. For the discussion, 301 observations of junior high school students 11 measured variables from a previous study are analyzed. While factors provide the researcher with general…

  6. Computer programs for the concordance correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sara B; Kosinski, Andrzej S; Lin, Hung-Mo; Williamson, John M; Barnhart, Huiman X

    2007-10-01

    The CCC macro is presented for computation of the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), a common measure of reproducibility. The macro has been produced in both SAS and R, and a detailed presentation of the macro input and output for the SAS program is included. The macro provides estimation of three versions of the CCC, as presented by Lin [L.I.-K. Lin, A concordance correlation coefficient to evaluate reproducibility, Biometrics 45 (1989) 255-268], Barnhart et al. [H.X. Barnhart, J.L. Haber, J.L. Song, Overall concordance correlation coefficient for evaluating agreement among multiple observers, Biometrics 58 (2002) 1020-1027], and Williamson et al. [J.M. Williamson, S.B. Crawford, H.M. Lin, Resampling dependent concordance correlation coefficients, J. Biopharm. Stat. 17 (2007) 685-696]. It also provides bootstrap confidence intervals for the CCC, as well as for the difference in CCCs for both independent and dependent samples. The macro is designed for balanced data only. Detailed explanation of the involved computations and macro variable definitions are provided in the text. Two biomedical examples are included to illustrate that the macro can be easily implemented.

  7. On Not Interpreting Coefficients: Comment on Holt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Thomas P.

    1979-01-01

    A recent recommendation by Holt (EJ 200 576) that coefficients resulting from estimating log-linear and similar models should not be interpreted is argued to be based on lack of clarity about the substantive and theoretical importance of the choice between dummy and effect coding for categorical variables. (Author/GDC)

  8. The Seebeck coefficient of superionic conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2015-01-28

    We present a theory of the anomalous Seebeck coefficient found in the superionic conductor Cu{sub 2}Se. It has a phase transition at T = 400 K where the cations disorder but the anions do not. This disorder gives a temperature-dependent width to the electronic states in the conduction band. This width provides the anomalous Seebeck contribution.

  9. Apparatus Measures Seebeck Coefficient And Resistivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoltan, Leslie D.; Wood, Charles; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Liu, Yixin

    1993-01-01

    Electrical measurements made by four point probes, two of which double as temperature probes. Laboratory apparatus measures both Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities of candidate thermoelectric materials at temperatures from ambient to 1,300 K. Apparatus makes possible to take both measurements alternately and in rapid succession during same heating cycle, thereby reducing distortion.

  10. A new method for calculating loss coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Yang, W.T.; Liu, C.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    A method is proposed which avoids many limitations associated with traditional B-coefficient loss coefficient calculation. The proposed method, unlike the traditional B-coefficient method, is very fast and can handle line outages. The method utilizes network sensitivity factors which are established from DC load flow solutions. Line outage distribution factors (ODF's) are formulated using changes in network power generations to simulate the outaged line from the network. The method avoids the use of complicated reference frame transformations based upon Kron's tensor analysis. The necessity of data normalization used in least squares and the evaluation of the slope of [theta][sub j] versus PG[sub n] is not necessary with the proposed method. Using IEEE standard 14-bus and 30-bus systems, the method's results are compared against results obtained from an AC load flow program (LFED). The method's solution speed is compared to that of the LFED method, the base case database method and the conventional B-coefficient method based on A[sub jn]-factor. The proposed method is easy to implement and, when compared to other methods, has exhibited good accuracy and rapid execution times. The method is well suited to on-line dispatch applications.

  11. Experimental Influence Coefficients and Vibration Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, Deene J.; Kordes, Eldon E.

    1959-01-01

    Test results are presented for both symmetrical and antisymmetrical static loading of a wing model mounted on a three-point support system. The first six free-free vibration modes were determined experimentally. A comparison is made of the symmetrical nodal patterns and frequencies with the symmetrical nodal patterns and frequencies calculated from the experimental influence coefficients.

  12. Static coefficient test method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haehner, C. L.; Tarpley, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The static coefficient of friction between contacting surfaces of a plurality of bodies is determined by applying a load to the bodies in a direction normal to the contacting surfaces. Opposite ends of a flexible filament are connected to a load cell and the first of the bodies. A motor continuously moves the second of the bodies away from the load cell at constant velocity at right angles to the force of the normal load so that the first body moves intermittently relative to the second body across a contact surface between them. The load on the surfaces, the nature of the surfaces, and the speed of the first body relative to the load cell are such that the filament is alternately and cyclically tensioned and relaxed as the movement occurs. The maximum tension occurs at the incipient stages of movement of the first body relative to the second body. The load cell derives a series of measurements which are coupled to an x-y recorder, from which the maximum forces of the filament are determined to enable the static coefficient of friction to be determined. From the maximum forces and the normal force, the coefficient is determined. For determining coefficients of friction where there are large compression loads, the normal load is applied with a calibrated compression spring that is deflected by a predetermined amount determined by a spring load vs. deflection calibration curve.

  13. Problems on Divisibility of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.; Smoak, James

    2004-01-01

    Twelve unusual problems involving divisibility of the binomial coefficients are represented in this article. The problems are listed in "The Problems" section. All twelve problems have short solutions which are listed in "The Solutions" section. These problems could be assigned to students in any course in which the binomial theorem and Pascal's…

  14. The Evolution of Pearson's Correlation Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kader, Gary D.; Franklin, Christine A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an activity for developing the notion of association between two quantitative variables. By exploring a collection of scatter plots, the authors propose a nonstandard "intuitive" measure of association; and by examining properties of this measure, they develop the more standard measure, Pearson's Correlation Coefficient. The…

  15. The Seebeck coefficient of superionic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    We present a theory of the anomalous Seebeck coefficient found in the superionic conductor Cu2Se. It has a phase transition at T = 400 K where the cations disorder but the anions do not. This disorder gives a temperature-dependent width to the electronic states in the conduction band. This width provides the anomalous Seebeck contribution.

  16. Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Coefficient Alpha

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannick, Michael T.; Zhang, Nanhua

    2013-01-01

    The current paper describes and illustrates a Bayesian approach to the meta-analysis of coefficient alpha. Alpha is the most commonly used estimate of the reliability or consistency (freedom from measurement error) for educational and psychological measures. The conventional approach to meta-analysis uses inverse variance weights to combine…

  17. Coefficient Omega Bootstrap Confidence Intervals: Nonnormal Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the normal theory bootstrap (NTB), the percentile bootstrap (PB), and the bias-corrected and accelerated (BCa) bootstrap confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient omega was assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation under conditions not previously investigated. Of particular interests were nonnormal Likert-type and binary items.…

  18. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  19. Layer coefficients for NHDOT pavement materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoo, Vincent C.

    1994-09-01

    In 1992, the New Hampshire Department of Transportation (NHDOT) experimented with the use of reclaimed asphalt concrete as a base course material, identified by NHDOT as reclaimed stabilized base (RSB). The RSB and a control test section were placed on Interstate 93 between exits 18 and 19. The RSB test section was designed to the same structural number (SN) as the control. To evaluate the structural capacity of these test sections, the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) conducted deflection tests using a Dynatest 8000 falling weight deflectometer (FWD). Preliminary analysis of the results by NHDOT personnel showed higher deflection in the reclaimed asphalt concrete test sections. The explanation was that the layer coefficient used for the RSB layer in the design was probably incorrect. A total of 10 test sections constituting the base course materials used by NHDOT were built near Bow, New Hampshire. CRREL evaluated and estimated the layer coefficients of the base course materials. The test program was developed to characterize the material in more than one way. Tests were conducted with the heavy weight deflectometer (HWD), dynamic cone penetrometer (DCP) and the Clegg hammer. In situ California bearing ratio (CBR) tests were also conducted. The deflection from the HWD were used with the WESDEF back calculation program to determine the layer moduli. The moduli were than used with the AASHTO Design Guide to calculate the layer coefficients. The layer coefficients were also determined with the method proposed by Rohde. The CBR values from the Clegg hammer, in situ CBR and DCP tests were also used in the relationships in the HDM model to determine the layer coefficients.

  20. Hall coefficient measurement for nondestructive materials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Although Hall detectors are widely used for magnetic flux density measurements in numerous electromagnetic NDE applications, measurement of the Hall coefficient of metals and their alloys for NDE purposes has not been successfully attempted before. While other intrinsic electric properties, such as electric conductivity and, to a lesser degree, thermoelectric power, are widely used for NDE, Hall coefficient measurements have never been really considered mainly because the measurements are rather difficult to carry out, especially in high-conductivity materials. In contrast to electric conductivity, the Hall coefficient is influenced mainly by the concentration density of the free charge carriers, i.e., electrons in metals, and not so much by their mobility, therefore it could be a valuable addition to our NDE arsenal. We modified the alternating current potential drop (ACPD) method with square-electrode configuration by adding an external bias magnetic field modulation to measure the Hall coefficient. The presence of such a bias field violates the Reciprocity Theorem unless the sign of the magnetic field is switched between the two measurements, which can be exploited to measure the Hall coefficient in the presence of other variations that would otherwise hide it. This new experimental method was tested on paramagnetic alloys and yielded a ±4% reproducibility that probably could be further improved by additional development efforts. As a first step towards illustrating some of the potential applications of this new technique, we have done reversible applied stress measurements in Al 1100 plates and found the sensitivity of the technique to elastic strain surprisingly high.

  1. Series extension: predicting approximate series coefficients from a finite number of exact coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Anthony J.

    2016-10-01

    Given the first 20-100 coefficients of a typical generating function of the type that arises in many problems of statistical mechanics or enumerative combinatorics, we show that the method of differential approximants performs surprisingly well in predicting (approximately) subsequent coefficients. These can then be used by the ratio method to obtain improved estimates of critical parameters. In favourable cases, given only the first 20 coefficients, the next 100 coefficients are predicted with useful accuracy. More surprisingly, this is also the case when the method of differential approximants does not do a useful job in estimating the critical parameters, such as those cases in which one has stretched exponential asymptotic behaviour. Nevertheless, the coefficients are predicted with surprising accuracy. As one consequence, significant computer time can be saved in enumeration problems where several runs would normally be made, modulo different primes, and the coefficients constructed from their values modulo different primes. Another is in the checking of newly calculated coefficients. We believe that this concept of approximate series extension opens up a whole new chapter in the method of series analysis.

  2. Determination of the Peltier Coefficient of Germanium in a Vertical Bridgeman-Stockbarger Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigel, Michaela E. K.; Matthiesen, David H.

    1997-01-01

    The Peltier effect is the fundamental mechanism that makes interface demarcation through current pulsing possible. If a method for calculating the necessary current density for effective demarcation is to be developed, it will be necessary to know the value of the Peltier coefficient. This study determined experimentally the value of the Peltier coefficient for gallium-doped germanium by comparing the change in average growth rates between current-on and current-off periods. Current-on and current-off layer thickness measurements were made using differential interference contrast microscopy and atomic force microscopy. It was found that the Joule and Thomson effects could not be neglected. Peltier coefficients calculated from the experimental data with an analysis that accounts for Joule, Thomson, and Peltier effects yielded an average value for the Peltier coefficient of 0.076 +/- 0.015 V.

  3. Measurement of the iodine partition coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Furrer, M.; Cripps, R.C.; Gubler, R.

    1985-08-01

    The hydrolysis of iodine is complicated because it involves a number of species that differ considerably in their individual volatilities. Large uncertainties exist in the thermodynamic data of some of the iodine species, especially at temperatures above 25C. Because of this, an experiment was undertaken to measure the partition coefficient under varying physical and chemical conditions. Measurements of P were made for a temperature range of 21 to 113C under well-defined conditions (liquid molar concentration, pH, and redox potential) for inorganic iodine. The experimental results are interpreted with the aid of an analytical model and published thermodynamic data. A good agreement between calculated and measured values was found. The experimental setup allows the determination of very high partition coefficients up to a value of 2.0 X 10W. This is demonstrated by adding cesium-iodide to the fuel pool water of a boiling water reactor.

  4. Activity coefficient of aqueous sodium bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Pitzer, Kenneth S.; Peiper, J. Christopher

    1980-09-01

    The determination of the activity coefficient and related properties of sodium bicarbonate presents special problems because of the appreciable vapor pressure of CO2 above such solutions. With the development of reliable equations for the thermodynamic properties of mixed electrolytes, it is possible to determine the parameters for NaHCO3 from cell measurements or NaCl-NaHCO3 mixtures. Literature data are analyzed to illustrate the method and provide interim values, hoever it is noted that further measurements over a wider range of concentrations would yield more definitive results. Lastly, an estimate is also given for the activity coefficient of KHCO3.

  5. Divergence in Patterns of Leaf Growth Polarity Is Associated with the Expression Divergence of miR396

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lateral appendages often show allometric growth with a specific growth polarity along the proximo-distal axis. Studies on leaf growth in model plants have identified a basipetal growth direction with the highest growth rate at the proximal end and progressively lower rates toward the distal end. Although the molecular mechanisms governing such a growth pattern have been studied recently, variation in leaf growth polarity and, therefore, its evolutionary origin remain unknown. By surveying 75 eudicot species, here we report that leaf growth polarity is divergent. Leaf growth in the proximo-distal axis is polar, with more growth arising from either the proximal or the distal end; dispersed with no apparent polarity; or bidirectional, with more growth contributed by the central region and less growth at either end. We further demonstrate that the expression gradient of the miR396-GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR module strongly correlates with the polarity of leaf growth. Altering the endogenous pattern of miR396 expression in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana leaves only partially modified the spatial pattern of cell expansion, suggesting that the diverse growth polarities might have evolved via concerted changes in multiple gene regulatory networks. PMID:26410303

  6. Numerical Integral of Resistance Coefficients in Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. S.

    2017-01-01

    The resistance coefficients in the screened Coulomb potential of stellar plasma are evaluated to high accuracy. I have analyzed the possible singularities in the integral of scattering angle. There are possible singularities in the case of an attractive potential. This may result in a problem for the numerical integral. In order to avoid the problem, I have used a proper scheme, e.g., splitting into many subintervals where the width of each subinterval is determined by the variation of the integrand, to calculate the scattering angle. The collision integrals are calculated by using Romberg’s method, therefore the accuracy is high (i.e., ∼10‑12). The results of collision integrals and their derivatives for ‑7 ≤ ψ ≤ 5 are listed. By using Hermite polynomial interpolation from those data, the collision integrals can be obtained with an accuracy of 10‑10. For very weakly coupled plasma (ψ ≥ 4.5), analytical fittings for collision integrals are available with an accuracy of 10‑11. I have compared the final results of resistance coefficients with other works and found that, for a repulsive potential, the results are basically the same as others’ for an attractive potential, the results in cases of intermediate and strong coupling show significant differences. The resulting resistance coefficients are tested in the solar model. Comparing with the widely used models of Cox et al. and Thoul et al., the resistance coefficients in the screened Coulomb potential lead to a slightly weaker effect in the solar model, which is contrary to the expectation of attempts to solve the solar abundance problem.

  7. Quenching of spontaneous emission coefficients in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.; Lemaire, P.; Suckewer, S.

    1987-09-01

    We have observed changing Einstein coefficients of spontaneous emission as a function of electron density in CO/sub 2/ laser-produced plasmas. These measurements are based on the intensity branching ratio of CIV lines 5801 to 5812 A and 312.41 to 312.46 A which share a common upper level. Similar observations for CIII lines are also discussed. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  9. Haldane exclusion statistics and second virial coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, M.V.N.; Shankar, R. )

    1994-06-06

    We show that Haldane's new definition of statistics, when generalized to infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces, is determined by the high temperature limit of the second virial coefficient. We thus show that this exclusion statistics parameter [ital g] of anyone is nontrivial and is completely determined by its exchange statistics parameter [alpha]. We also compute [ital g] for quasiparticles in the Luttinger model and show that it is equal to [alpha].

  10. Negative Temperature Coefficient in Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenson, I. A.; Sergeev, Gleb B.

    1984-05-01

    A systematic analysis of reactions whose rate decreases with increase of temperature is presented. The possibility of a negative temperature coefficient in the elementary reactions is examined from the standpoint of the transition state theory and of collision theory. The mechanisms of complex reactions in which the temperature dependence of the rate is anomalous are discussed, and possible reasons for the anomaly are examined. The bibliography contains 175 references.

  11. Absorption Coefficient of Alkaline Earth Halides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    levels . As a natural consequence, the magnitude of the absorption coefficient is the key parameter in selecting laser window materials. Over the past...of as can be achieved through improved crystal growing techniques and surface polishing. 2.5. Urbach’s Rule A central question for the development of...high absorption levels , inaccuracies progressively increasing with decreasing absorption level , a natural consequence of decreasing in instrumental

  12. Gasoline-Water Distribution Coefficients of Xylidines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-06-01

    sample calculated. The extinction (absorption) of light is related to the concentration of the absorbing group by the Beer - Lambert law. It was neceaaar...the use of a Beckman quartz spectrophotometer . Data obtained 1dth the spectzrograph were checzed with the spectrophotom- eter and were reproducible to...within 5 percent of the value of the distribution coefficient given, The use of the spectrophotometer greatly enhanced the speed with which the

  13. Differences in absolute and relative growth between two shell forms of Pinna nobilis (Mollusca: Bivalvia) along the Tunisian coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaoui, Lotfi; Tlig-Zouari, Sabiha; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Belgacem, Walid; Hassine, Oum Kalthoum Ben

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated the absolute and relative growth patterns of the fan mussel Pinna nobilis along the Tunisian coastline, taking into consideration both the variability among different areas and between the two shell forms "combed" and "straight and wide". Five subpopulations of the species were sampled, one from northern, two from eastern and two from southern Tunisia. Various assumptions on the growth patterns were tested based on an information theory approach and multi-model inference. For absolute growth, the assumption of different growth patterns between the two shell forms of P. nobilis and no difference among subpopulations was the most supported by the data. For the same age, "straight and wide" individuals gained on average greater lengths than the "combed" individuals. The absolute growth of the species was found to be asymptotic and the logistic model was the one most supported by the data. As for the relative growth, apart from the classical allometric model Y = aXb, more complicated models of the form ln Y = f(ln X) that either assumed non-linearities or breakpoints were tested in combination with assumptions for possible differences between the two forms and among subpopulations. Among the eight studied relationships between morphometric characters, the classical allometric model was supported in only two cases, while in all other cases more complicated models were supported. Moreover, the assumption of different growth patterns between the two forms was supported in three cases and the assumption of different growth patterns among subpopulations in four cases. Although precise relationships between the morphometric plasticity of the fan mussel and environmental factors have not been proven in this paper, local small scale constraints might be responsible of the different growth patterns observed in the same locality. A possible co-action of genetic factors should be evaluated in the future.

  14. Edge Diffraction Coefficients around Critical Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradkin, L.; Harmer, M.; Darmon, M.

    2014-04-01

    The classical GTD (Geometrical Theory of Diffraction) gives a recipe, based on high-frequency asymptotics, for calculating edge diffraction coefficients in the geometrical regions where only diffracted waves propagate. The Uniform GTD extends this recipe to transition zones between irradiated and silent regions, known as penumbra. For many industrial materials, e.g. steels, and frequencies utlized in industrial ultrasonic transducers, that is, around 5 MHz, asymptotics suggested for description of geometrical regions supporting the head waves or transition regions surrounding their boundaries, known as critical rays, prove unsatisfactory. We present a numerical extension of GTD, which is based on a regularized, variable step Simpson's method for evaluating the edge diffraction coefficients in the regions of interference between head waves, diffracted waves and/or reflected waves. In mathematical terms, these are the regions of coalescence of three critical points - a branch point, stationary point and/or pole, respectively. We show that away from the shadow boundaries, near the critical rays the GTD still produces correct values of the edge diffraction coefficients.

  15. Roughness coefficients for stream channels in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldridge, B.N.; Garrett, J.M.

    1973-01-01

           n in which V = mean cross-sectional velocity of flow, in feet per second; R = hydraulic radius at a cross section, which is the cross-sectional area divided by the wetter perimeter, in feet; Se = energy slope; and n = coefficient of roughness. Many research studies have been made to determine "n" values for open-channel flow (Carter and others, 1963). Guidelines for selecting coefficient of roughness for stream channels are given in most of the literature of stream-channel hydraulics, but few of the data relate directly to streams of Arizona, The U.S> Geological Survey, at the request of the Arizona Highway Department, assembled the color photographs and tables of the Manning "n" values in this report to aid highway engineers in the selection of roughness coefficients for Arizona streams. Most of the photographs show channel reaches for which values of "n" have been assigned by experienced Survey personnel; a few photographs are included for reaches where "n" values have been verified. Verified "n" values are computed from a known discharge and measured channel geometry. Selected photographs of stream channels for which "n" values have been verified are included in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1849 (Barnes, 1967); stereoscopic slides of Barnes' (1967) photographs and additional photographs can be inspected at U.S> Geological Survey offices in: 2555 E. First Street, Tucson; and 5017 Federal Building, 230 N. First Avenue, Phoenix.

  16. Determining the Temperature Coefficient of Reference Resistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojkovski, J.; Batagelj, V.; Žužek, V.

    2017-04-01

    The influence of temperature on electrical resistance of standard resistors is presented within this paper. Electrical resistance is like any other quantity temperature dependent. This dependence is specified with the temperature coefficient, which gives the relative change of resistance with temperature. The level of resistance change is not linear as it changes with temperature, and therefore the coefficient is temperature dependent as well. At a certain temperature, its value is equal to zero—the stationary point. Use of the standard resistor at this exact temperature or in a narrow interval around it greatly reduces the influence of temperature on electrical resistance, even if the thermal conditions are not optimal. Measurements of temperature coefficient were taken on a group of standard resistors of the same type in a wide temperature range, and the temperature of the stationary point was determined. Measurements were taken by placing the resistors in an oil bath and changing its set point temperature from 18°C to 38°C. Electrical resistance of each resistor was measured using a resistance bridge, which had its reference resistor placed in a separate thermal enclosure at a constant temperature.

  17. Drag coefficients for winter Antarctic pack ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wamser, Christian; Martinson, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    Air-ice and ice-water drag coefficients referenced to 10-m-height winds for winter Antarctic pack ice based on measurements made from R/V Polarstern during the Winter Weddell Sea Project, 1986 (WWSP-86), and from R/V Akademik Fedorov during the Winter Weddell Gyre Study, 1989 (WWGS-89), are presented. The optimal values of the air-ice drag coefficients, made from turbulent flux measurements, are (1.79 +/- 0.06) x 10 exp -3 for WWSP-86 and (1.45 +/- 0.09) x 10 exp -3 for WWGS-89. A single ice-water drag coefficient for both WWSP-86 and WWGS-89, estimated from periods of ice drift throught to represent free-drift conditions, is (1.13 +/- 0.26) x 10 exp -3, and the ice-water turning angle is 18 +/- 18 deg. It is suggested that for a typical Antarctic winter pack ice cover, the ice cover reduces the momentum flux from the atmosphere to the ocean by about 33 percent.

  18. Discharge Coefficients for Axisymmetric Supersonic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was used to compute effective nozzle discharge coefficients for subscale sharp-edged converging/diverging nozzles, with a variety of convergence half-angles, motor operating conditions, and two propellants with different ballistics. Convergence half-angles ranged from 0 to 80 deg. Analysis was conducted at total temperatures from 2946K (5303R) to 3346K (6023R) and over total pressures ranged from 2.72 MPa (395 psia) to 20.68 MPa (3000 psia). Area ratios (A(sub e)/A*) ranged from 7.43 to 9.39. Ratio of specific heats (gamma) ranged from 1.13 to 1.18. Throat and exit Reynolds numbers were calculated to be 8.26 x 10(exp 5) and 5.51 x 10(exp 5), respectively. Present results of nozzle discharge coefficients are reported and correlated as a function of nozzle convergence half-angle (theta(sub c)) and area ratios (A(sub e)/A*) for a constant divergence half-angle (theta(sub d)) of 15 deg. Computed discharge coefficients ranged from 0.88 to 0.97. They are compared with theory and experimental data available in literature. Available turbulence models with respect to grid refinements and heat transfer are discussed.

  19. Field verification of the wind tunnel coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W. K.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate information about wind action on antennas is required for reliable prediction of antenna pointing errors in windy weather and for the design of an antenna controller with wind disturbance rejection properties. The wind tunnel data obtained 3 years ago using a scaled antenna model serves as an antenna industry standard, frequently used for the first purpose. The accuracy of the wind tunnel data has often been challenged, since they have not yet been tested in a field environment (full-aized antenna, real wind, actual terrain, etc.). The purpose of this investigation was to obtain selected field measurements and compare them with the available wind tunnel data. For this purpose, wind steady-state torques of the DSS-13 antenna were measured, and dimensionless wind torque coefficients were obtained for a variety of yaw and elevation angles. The results showed that the differences between the wind tunnel torque coefficients and the field torque coefficients were less than 10 percent of their values. The wind-gusting action on the antenna was characterized by the power spectra of the antenna encoder and the antenna torques. The spectra showed that wind gusting primarily affects the antenna principal modes.

  20. Diffusion coefficients in gravel under unsaturated conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.L.; Wright, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Diffusion coefficients were experimentally determined in unsaturated gravel to evaluate the effectiveness of gravel as a diffusion barrier to ionic transport in the vadose zone. Water contents were fixed by use of an ultracentrifuge with an ultralow constant rate flow pump supplying solution to the sample via a rotating seal. Once the gravel was at hydraulic steady state, the electrical conductivity was measured, and the diffusion coefficient calculated using the Nernst-Einstein equation. Diffusion coefficient values for potassium ion (D{sub e}) in four types of angular gravel ranged from 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} m{sup 2}/s (1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}/s) for a 6.3-9.5 mm angular granitic gravel at a volumetric water content of 5.5% to 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} m{sup 2}/s (2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2}/s) in a 4.0-6.3 mm quartzite gravel at a volumetric water content of 0.47%. Variations in D{sub e} values resulted primarily from differences in water content which depends on gravel type and particle size.

  1. Applications of the second virial coefficient: protein crystallization and solubility.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William W; Delucas, Lawrence J

    2014-05-01

    This article begins by highlighting some of the ground-based studies emanating from NASA's Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) program. This is followed by a more detailed discussion of the history of and the progress made in one of the NASA-funded PCG investigations involving the use of measured second virial coefficients (B values) as a diagnostic indicator of solution conditions conducive to protein crystallization. A second application of measured B values involves the determination of solution conditions that improve or maximize the solubility of aqueous and membrane proteins. These two important applications have led to several technological improvements that simplify the experimental expertise required, enable the measurement of membrane proteins and improve the diagnostic capability and measurement throughput.

  2. A Method for Maximizing Split-Half Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callender, John C.; Osburn, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for maximizing split-half reliability coefficients is described. Coefficients derived by the algorithm were found to be generally larger than odd-even split-half coefficients or other internal consistency measures and nearly as large as the largest split half coefficients. MSPLIT, Odd-Even, and Kuder-Richardson-20…

  3. Transport coefficients of He(+) ions in helium.

    PubMed

    Viehland, Larry A; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R; Wright, Timothy G

    2016-02-21

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of (4)He(+) in (4)He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X(2)Σu (+) and A(2)Σg (+) states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of (4)He(+) in (4)He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects.

  4. Conditional Reliability Coefficients for Test Scores.

    PubMed

    Nicewander, W Alan

    2017-04-06

    The most widely used, general index of measurement precision for psychological and educational test scores is the reliability coefficient-a ratio of true variance for a test score to the true-plus-error variance of the score. In item response theory (IRT) models for test scores, the information function is the central, conditional index of measurement precision. In this inquiry, conditional reliability coefficients for a variety of score types are derived as simple transformations of information functions. It is shown, for example, that the conditional reliability coefficient for an ordinary, number-correct score, X, is equal to, ρ(X,X'|θ)=I(X,θ)/[I(X,θ)+1] Where: θ is a latent variable measured by an observed test score, X; p(X, X'|θ) is the conditional reliability of X at a fixed value of θ; and I(X, θ) is the score information function. This is a surprisingly simple relationship between the 2, basic indices of measurement precision from IRT and classical test theory (CTT). This relationship holds for item scores as well as test scores based on sums of item scores-and it holds for dichotomous as well as polytomous items, or a mix of both item types. Also, conditional reliabilities are derived for computerized adaptive test scores, and for θ-estimates used as alternatives to number correct scores. These conditional reliabilities are all related to information in a manner similar-or-identical to the 1 given above for the number-correct (NC) score. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. Morphometric growth relationships of the immature human mandible and tongue.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Erin F; Kieser, Jules A; Kramer, Beverley

    2014-06-01

    The masticatory apparatus is a highly adaptive musculoskeletal complex comprising several relatively independent structural components, which assist in functions including feeding and breathing. We hypothesized that the tongue is elemental in the maintenance of normal ontogeny of the mandible and in its post-natal growth and development, and tested this using a morphometric approach. We assessed tongue and mandibular measurements in 174 (97 male) human cadavers. Landmark lingual and mandibular data were gathered individuals aged between 20 gestational weeks and 3 yr postnatal. In this analysis, geometric morphometrics assisted in visualizing the morphometrical growth changes in the mandible and tongue. A linear correlation in conjunction with principal component analysis further visualized the growth relationship between these structures. We found that the growth of the tongue and mandible were intrinsically linked in size and shape between 20 gestational weeks and 24 months postnatal. However, the mandible continued to change in shape and size into the 3rd yr of life, whereas the tongue only increased in size over this same period of time. These findings provide valuable insights into the allometric growth relationship between these structures, potentially assisting the clinician in predicting the behaviour of these structures in the assessment of malocclusions.

  6. Elastic-Stiffness Coefficients of Titanium Diboride

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, Hassel; Tanaka, Takaho

    2009-01-01

    Using resonance ultrasound spectroscopy, we measured the monocrystal elastic-stiffness coefficients, the Voigt Cij, of TiB2. With hexagonal symmetry, TiB2 exhibits five independent Cij: C11, C33, C44, C12, C13. Using Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging, we converted these monocrystal values to quasiisotropic (polycrystal) elastic stiffnesses. Briefly, we comment on effects of voids. From the Cij, we calculated the Debye characteristic temperature, the Grüneisen parameter, and various sound velocities. Our study resolves the enormous differences between two previous reports of TiB2’s Cij. PMID:27504232

  7. Onsager coefficients for systems with periodic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, Alexandre; Van den Broeck, Christian; Lindenberg, Katja

    2016-11-01

    We carry out the thermodynamic analysis of a Markovian stochastic engine, driven by a spatially and temporally periodic modulation in a d -dimensional space. We derive the analytic expressions for the Onsager coefficients characterizing the linear response regime for the isothermal transfer of one type of work (a driver) to another (a load), mediated by a stochastic time-periodic machine. As an illustration, we obtain the explicit results for a Markovian kangaroo process coupling two orthogonal directions and find extremely good agreement with numerical simulations. In addition, we obtain and discuss expressions for the entropy production, power, and efficiency for the kangaroo process.

  8. Fresnel coefficients in materials with magnetic monopoles.

    PubMed

    Costa-Quintana, J; López-Aguilar, F

    2011-02-14

    Recent experiments have found entities in crystals whose behavior is equivalent to magnetic monopoles. In this paper, we explain some optical properties based on the reformulated "Maxwell" equations in material media in which there are equivalent magnetic charges. We calculate the coefficients of reflection and transmission of an electromagnetic wave in a plane interface between the vacuum and a medium with magnetic charges. These results can give a more extended vision of the properties of the materials with magnetic monopoles, since the phase and the amplitudes of the reflected and transmitted waves, differ with and without these magnetic entities.

  9. Surface area coefficients for airship envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W S

    1922-01-01

    In naval architecture, it is customary to determine the wetted surface of a ship by means of some formula which involves the principal dimensions of the design and suitable constants. These formulas of naval architecture may be extended and applied to the calculation of the surface area of airship envelopes by the use of new values of the constants determined for this purpose. Surface area coefficients were calculated from the actual dimensions, surfaces, and volumes of 52 streamline bodies, which form a series covering the entire range of shapes used in the present aeronautical practice.

  10. Random Matrices and Lyapunov Coefficients Regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    2017-02-01

    Analyticity and other properties of the largest or smallest Lyapunov exponent of a product of real matrices with a "cone property" are studied as functions of the matrices entries, as long as they vary without destroying the cone property. The result is applied to stability directions, Lyapunov coefficients and Lyapunov exponents of a class of products of random matrices and to dynamical systems. The results are not new and the method is the main point of this work: it is is based on the classical theory of the Mayer series in Statistical Mechanics of rarefied gases.

  11. Experimental rotordynamic coefficient results for honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.; Childs, Dara W.

    1988-01-01

    Test results (leakage and rotordynamic coefficients) are presented for seven honeycomb-stator smooth-rotor seals. Tests were carried out with air at rotor speeds up to 16,000 cpm and supply pressures up to 8.2 bars. Test results for the seven seals are compared, and the most stable configuration is identified based on the whirl frequency ratio. Results from tests of a smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seal, a teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal, and the most stable honeycomb seal are compared.

  12. Peltier coefficient measurement in a thermoelectric module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Javier; Casanovas, Alejandro; María Chimeno, José

    2013-09-01

    A new method for measuring the Peltier coefficient in a thermocouple X/Y based on the energy balance at the junction has been proposed recently. This technique needs only the hot and cold temperatures of a thermoelectric module when an electric current flows through it as the operational variables. The temperature evolutions of the two module sides provide an evident and accurate idea of the Peltier effect. From these temperatures, the heat transfer between the module and the ambient is also evaluated. The thermoelectric phenomena are described in the framework of an observable theory. Based on this procedure, an experiment is presented for a university teaching laboratory at the undergraduate level.

  13. Gauge Invariance of Thermal Transport Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercole, Loris; Marcolongo, Aris; Umari, Paolo; Baroni, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    Thermal transport coefficients are independent of the specific microscopic expression for the energy density and current from which they can be derived through the Green-Kubo formula. We discuss this independence in terms of a kind of gauge invariance resulting from energy conservation and extensivity, and demonstrate it numerically for a Lennard-Jones fluid, where different forms of the microscopic energy density lead to different time correlation functions for the heat flux, all of them, however, resulting in the same value for the thermal conductivity.

  14. Measurement and analysis of the dextran partition coefficient in sucrose crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promraksa, Arwut; Flood, Adrian E.; Schneider, Philip A.

    2009-07-01

    The effect of crystallization conditions on the dextran partition coefficient between impure syrup and sugar crystal has been investigated in a batch crystallizer. The crystallizer is operated isothermally at temperatures of 30, 40, and 50 °C, at constant relative supersaturations of 0.05, 0.07, and 0.09, and with mother liquor dextran concentrations of 1000 and 2000 ppm/Brix. The dextran content has been determined by the CSR method. A 1:1 mass ratio of high-fraction dextran (approximately 250,000 Da) and low-fraction dextran (60,000-90,000 Da) is used to represent a wide range of dextran contamination. It is seen that the dextran partition coefficient in sucrose crystallization increases with both increasing supersaturation and increasing crystallization temperature. However it appears that these are secondary effects, with the partition coefficient strongly correlating with crystal growth rate alone, despite the regressed data having large variations in temperature, mother liquor dextran content, and supersaturation. Dextran incorporation into the sugar crystal results from both dextran adsorption onto the crystal surface and mother liquor inclusions. The explanation for the variation in the dextran content in sugar crystal with respect to the growth rate is due to increased adsorption due to the higher surface roughness of crystals grown at high growth rates. Although the dextran concentration in the solution affects the dextran content in the crystal, it does not strongly affect the dextran partition coefficient.

  15. The convergence coefficient across political systems.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Maria; Schofield, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Formal work on the electoral model often suggests that parties or candidates should locate themselves at the electoral mean. Recent research has found no evidence of such convergence. In order to explain nonconvergence, the stochastic electoral model is extended by including estimates of electoral valence. We introduce the notion of a convergence coefficient, c. It has been shown that high values of c imply that there is a significant centrifugal tendency acting on parties. We used electoral surveys to construct a stochastic valence model of the the elections in various countries. We find that the convergence coefficient varies across elections in a country, across countries with similar regimes, and across political regimes. In some countries, the centripetal tendency leads parties to converge to the electoral mean. In others the centrifugal tendency dominates and some parties locate far from the electoral mean. In particular, for countries with proportional electoral systems, namely, Israel, Turkey, and Poland, the centrifugal tendency is very high. In the majoritarian polities of the United States and Great Britain, the centrifugal tendency is very low. In anocracies, the autocrat imposes limitations on how far from the origin the opposition parties can move.

  16. Hood entry coefficients of compound exhaust hoods.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Crescente E

    2011-12-01

    A traditional method for assessing the flow rate in ventilation systems is based on multiple readings of velocity or velocity pressure (VP) (usually 10 or 20 points) taken in ductwork sections located away from fittings (> seven × diameters of straight duct). This study seeks to eliminate the need for a multiple-point evaluation and replace it with a simplified method that requires only a single measurement of hood static pressure (SP(h)) taken at a more accessible location (< three × diameters of straight duct from the hood entry). The SP(h) method is widely used for the assessment of flow rate in simple hoods. However, industrial applications quite often use compound hoods that are regularly of the slot/plenum type. For these hoods, a "compound coefficient of entry" has not been published, which makes the use of the hood static pressure method unfeasible. This study proposes a model for the computation of a "compound coefficient of entry" and validates the use of this model to assess flow rate in two systems of well-defined geometry (multi-slotted/plenum and single-slotted/tapered or "fish-tail" types). When using a conservative value of the slot loss factor (1.78), the proposed model yielded an estimate of the volumetric flow rate within 10% of that provided by a more comprehensive method of assessment. The simplicity of the hood static pressure method makes it very desirable, even in the upper range of experimental error found in this study.

  17. On Learning Cluster Coefficient of Private Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Wu, Xintao; Zhu, Jun; Xiang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Enabling accurate analysis of social network data while preserving differential privacy has been challenging since graph features such as clustering coefficient or modularity often have high sensitivity, which is different from traditional aggregate functions (e.g., count and sum) on tabular data. In this paper, we treat a graph statistics as a function f and develop a divide and conquer approach to enforce differential privacy. The basic procedure of this approach is to first decompose the target computation f into several less complex unit computations f1, …, fm connected by basic mathematical operations (e.g., addition, subtraction, multiplication, division), then perturb the output of each fi with Laplace noise derived from its own sensitivity value and the distributed privacy threshold εi, and finally combine those perturbed fi as the perturbed output of computation f. We examine how various operations affect the accuracy of complex computations. When unit computations have large global sensitivity values, we enforce the differential privacy by calibrating noise based on the smooth sensitivity, rather than the global sensitivity. By doing this, we achieve the strict differential privacy guarantee with smaller magnitude noise. We illustrate our approach by using clustering coefficient, which is a popular statistics used in social network analysis. Empirical evaluations on five real social networks and various synthetic graphs generated from three random graph models show the developed divide and conquer approach outperforms the direct approach. PMID:24429843

  18. Coefficient adaptive triangulation for strongly anisotropic problems

    SciTech Connect

    D`Azevedo, E.F.; Romine, C.H.; Donato, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Second order elliptic partial differential equations arise in many important applications, including flow through porous media, heat conduction, the distribution of electrical or magnetic potential. The prototype is the Laplace problem, which in discrete form produces a coefficient matrix that is relatively easy to solve in a regular domain. However, the presence of anisotropy produces a matrix whose condition number is increased, making the resulting linear system more difficult to solve. In this work, we take the anisotropy into account in the discretization by mapping each anisotropic region into a ``stretched`` coordinate space in which the anisotropy is removed. The region is then uniformly triangulated, and the resulting triangulation mapped back to the original space. The effect is to generate long slender triangles that are oriented in the direction of ``preferred flow.`` Slender triangles are generally regarded as numerically undesirable since they tend to cause poor conditioning; however, our triangulation has the effect of producing effective isotropy, thus improving the condition number of the resulting coefficient matrix.

  19. Full wave-field reflection coefficient inversion.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    This paper develops a Bayesian inversion for recovering multilayer geoacoustic (velocity, density, attenuation) profiles from a full wave-field (spherical-wave) seabed reflection response. The reflection data originate from acoustic time series windowed for a single bottom interaction, which are processed to yield reflection coefficient data as a function of frequency and angle. Replica data for inversion are computed using a wave number-integration model to calculate the full complex acoustic pressure field, which is processed to produce a commensurate seabed response function. To address the high computational cost of calculating short range acoustic fields, the inversion algorithms are parallelized and frequency averaging is replaced by range averaging in the forward model. The posterior probability density is interpreted in terms of optimal parameter estimates, marginal distributions, and credibility intervals. Inversion results for the full wave-field seabed response are compared to those obtained using plane-wave reflection coefficients. A realistic synthetic study indicates that the plane-wave assumption can fail, producing erroneous results with misleading uncertainty bounds, whereas excellent results are obtained with the full-wave reflection inversion.

  20. The Convergence Coefficient across Political Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Formal work on the electoral model often suggests that parties or candidates should locate themselves at the electoral mean. Recent research has found no evidence of such convergence. In order to explain nonconvergence, the stochastic electoral model is extended by including estimates of electoral valence. We introduce the notion of a convergence coefficient, c. It has been shown that high values of c imply that there is a significant centrifugal tendency acting on parties. We used electoral surveys to construct a stochastic valence model of the the elections in various countries. We find that the convergence coefficient varies across elections in a country, across countries with similar regimes, and across political regimes. In some countries, the centripetal tendency leads parties to converge to the electoral mean. In others the centrifugal tendency dominates and some parties locate far from the electoral mean. In particular, for countries with proportional electoral systems, namely, Israel, Turkey, and Poland, the centrifugal tendency is very high. In the majoritarian polities of the United States and Great Britain, the centrifugal tendency is very low. In anocracies, the autocrat imposes limitations on how far from the origin the opposition parties can move. PMID:24385886

  1. On Varying-coefficient Independence Screening for High-dimensional Varying-coefficient Models.

    PubMed

    Song, Rui; Yi, Feng; Zou, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Varying coefficient models have been widely used in longitudinal data analysis, nonlinear time series, survival analysis, and so on. They are natural non-parametric extensions of the classical linear models in many contexts, keeping good interpretability and allowing us to explore the dynamic nature of the model. Recently, penalized estimators have been used for fitting varying-coefficient models for high-dimensional data. In this paper, we propose a new computationally attractive algorithm called IVIS for fitting varying-coefficient models in ultra-high dimensions. The algorithm first fits a gSCAD penalized varying-coefficient model using a subset of covariates selected by a new varying-coefficient independence screening (VIS) technique. The sure screening property is established for VIS. The proposed algorithm then iterates between a greedy conditional VIS step and a gSCAD penalized fitting step. Simulation and a real data analysis demonstrate that IVIS has very competitive performance for moderate sample size and high dimension.

  2. On Varying-coefficient Independence Screening for High-dimensional Varying-coefficient Models

    PubMed Central

    Song, Rui; Yi, Feng; Zou, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Varying coefficient models have been widely used in longitudinal data analysis, nonlinear time series, survival analysis, and so on. They are natural non-parametric extensions of the classical linear models in many contexts, keeping good interpretability and allowing us to explore the dynamic nature of the model. Recently, penalized estimators have been used for fitting varying-coefficient models for high-dimensional data. In this paper, we propose a new computationally attractive algorithm called IVIS for fitting varying-coefficient models in ultra-high dimensions. The algorithm first fits a gSCAD penalized varying-coefficient model using a subset of covariates selected by a new varying-coefficient independence screening (VIS) technique. The sure screening property is established for VIS. The proposed algorithm then iterates between a greedy conditional VIS step and a gSCAD penalized fitting step. Simulation and a real data analysis demonstrate that IVIS has very competitive performance for moderate sample size and high dimension. PMID:25484548

  3. Measurement of attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Jeong, Hyunjo; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation corrections in nonlinear acoustics play an important role in the study of nonlinear fluids, biomedical imaging, or solid material characterization. The measurement of attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear regime is not easy because they depend on the source pressure and requires accurate diffraction corrections. In this work, the attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves which come from the absorption of water are measured in nonlinear ultrasonic experiments. Based on the quasilinear theory of the KZK equation, the nonlinear sound field equations are derived and the diffraction correction terms are extracted. The measured sound pressure amplitudes are adjusted first for diffraction corrections in order to reduce the impact on the measurement of attenuation coefficients from diffractions. The attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonics are calculated precisely from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting process of the experiment data. The results show that attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear condition depend on both frequency and source pressure, which are much different from a linear regime. In a relatively lower drive pressure, the attenuation coefficients increase linearly with frequency. However, they present the characteristic of nonlinear growth in a high drive pressure. As the diffraction corrections are obtained based on the quasilinear theory, it is important to use an appropriate source pressure for accurate attenuation measurements.

  4. Condensation coefficient of methanol vapor near vapor-liquid equilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, S.; Yano, T.; Ichijo, M.; Iwanami, K.

    This paper is concerned with the nonequilibrium condensation from a vapor to a liquid phase on the plate endwall of a shock tube behind a reflected shock wave. The growth of a liquid film on the endwall is measured by an optical interferometer using a laser beam. The experiment is carefully conducted on the precisely designed apparatus, and thereby the condensation coefficient of methanol vapor is determined in a wide range of vapor-liquid conditions from near to far from equilibrium states. The result shows that the condensation coefficient increases with the increase of the ratio of number densities of vapor and saturated vapor at the interface.

  5. Growth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland problem or disease. The pituitary gland makes growth hormone, which stimulates the growth of bone and other ... of it may be very short. Treatment with growth hormone can stimulate growth. People can also have too ...

  6. A new coefficient of concordance with applications to biosignal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weichao; Chen, Zhaoguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose a novel concordance coefficients called Order Statistics Concordance Coefficients based on order statistics and Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficient. For comparison, we also construct other three similar index based on Average Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficient, Kendall's Concordance Coefficients, Average Kendall's tau. We propose Multivariate Normal Model to estimate the correlation coefficient, Linear Model and Nonlinear Model to model the linear and nonlinear association between multichannel signals, And we also apply the concordance coefficients to biosignal analysis developed a new organizational index for quantifying organization of AF. Statistical evidences suggest that (a) Order Statistics Concordance Coefficients have better robust than other three index; (b) capable of distinguishing fibrillatory rhythms from nonfibrillatory rhythms, such as Atiral flutter; (c) can reflect the effectiveness of adenosine, a drug commonly used during electrophysiological procedures; and (d) perform better than other three concordance coefficients.

  7. Apparent diffusion coefficient normalization of normal liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Gao, Jia-Yin; Li, Jin-Ning; Yang, Da-Wei; Chen, Min; Zhou, Cheng; Yang, Zheng-Han

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been reported to be a helpful biomarker for detection and characterization of lesion. In view of the importance of ADC measurement reproducibility, the aim of this study was to probe the variability of the healthy hepatic ADC values measured at 3 MR scanners from different vendors and with different field strengths, and to investigate the reproducibility of normalized ADC (nADC) value with the spleen as the reference organ. Thirty enrolled healthy volunteers received DWI with GE 1.5T, Siemens 1.5T, and Philips 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) systems on liver and spleen (session 1) and were imaged again after 10 to 14 days using only GE 1.5T MR and Philips 3.0T MR systems (session 2). Interscan agreement and reproducibility of ADC measurements of liver and the calculated nADC values (ADCliver/ADCspleen) were statistically evaluated between 2 sessions. In session 1, ADC and nADC values of liver were evaluated for the scanner-related variability by 2-way analysis of variance and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) of ADCs and nADCs of liver were calculated for both 1.5 and 3.0-T MR system. Interscan agreement and reproducibility of ADC measurements of liver and related nADCs between 2 sessions were found to be satisfactory with ICC values of 0.773 to 0.905. In session 1, the liver nADCs obtained from different scanners were consistent (P = 0.112) without any significant difference in multiple comparison (P = 0.117 to >0.99) by using 2-way analysis of variance with post-hoc analysis of Bonferroni method, although the liver ADCs varied significantly (P < 0.001). nADCs measured by 3 scanners were in good interscanner agreements with ICCs of 0.685 to 0.776. The mean CV of nADCs of both 1.5T MR scanners (9.6%) was similar to that of 3.0T MR scanner (8.9%). ADCs measured at 3 MR scanners with different field strengths and vendors

  8. Comparison of vertical aerosol extinction coefficients from in-situ and LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Herrmann, E.; Bucci, S.; Fierli, F.; Cairo, F.; Gysel, M.; Tillmann, R.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Di Liberto, L.; Di Donfrancesco, G.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weingartner, E.; Virtanen, A.; Mentel, T. F.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ~ 50-800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a LIDAR system provided aerosol extinction coefficients for a vertically resolved comparison between in-situ and remote sensing results. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20% was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 to 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ~ 10 local time) before the mixed layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ~ 12 local time) the ML was fully developed, resulting in constant extinction coefficients at all altitudes measured on the Zeppelin NT. LIDAR results captured these dynamic features well and good agreement was found for the extinction coefficients compared to the in-situ results, using fixed LIDAR ratios (LR) between 30 and 70 sr for the altitudes probed with the Zeppelin. These LR are

  9. Experimental investigation of the iodine partition coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.L.; Babad, C.J.; Mulder, R.U.

    1985-11-01

    Short-term values of the iodine partition coefficient (IPC) were evaluated experimentally by an air/water system over the following ranges of conditions: temperature = 25 to 70/sup 0/C, pH = 5 to 9, and iodine concentration = 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -2/ kg iodine/m/sup 3/ H/sub 2/O. The experimental IPC values are relatively independent of temperature over the indicated range, but show a significant dependence on pH and iodine concentration. In basic solutions the short-term values are several orders of magnitude less than the true equilibrium values; in acid solutions, the differences are much less. These results are useful for predicting the disposition of iodine shortly (i.e., 1 to 10 h) after iodine has been released into an air/water environment.

  10. Transport Coefficients in weakly compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1996-01-01

    A theory of transport coefficients in weakly compressible turbulence is derived by applying Yoshizawa's two-scale direct interaction approximation to the compressible equations of motion linearized about a state of incompressible turbulence. The result is a generalization of the eddy viscosity representation of incompressible turbulence. In addition to the usual incompressible eddy viscosity, the calculation generates eddy diffusivities for entropy and pressure, and an effective bulk viscosity acting on the mean flow. The compressible fluctuations also generate an effective turbulent mean pressure and corrections to the speed of sound. Finally, a prediction unique to Yoshizawa's two-scale approximation is that terms containing gradients of incompressible turbulence quantities also appear in the mean flow equations. The form these terms take is described.

  11. Coefficient of restitution for a superelastic collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2017-03-01

    A simple experiment is described where the tip of a metal ruler is used to strike a 50 g mass. Since the ruler is very flexible, the impact duration is much longer than usual, giving the impression that the ruler simply pushes the mass forward at low speed over a long distance. The tip of the ruler remains in contact with the mass throughout the impact. However, the impact is best described as a long duration collision with a coefficient of restitution (COR) greater than zero, despite the fact that the relative speed during and at the end of the collision is zero. If the mass rests on a table and if the ruler strikes the table before striking the mass, then the ruler bends and stores elastic energy. The result is a superelastic collision where the COR is greater than unity.

  12. Transport coefficients for dense metal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlbrodt, Sandra; Redmer, Ronald

    2000-11-01

    Thermoelectric transport coefficients of metal plasmas are calculated within the linear response theory applied previously to determine the electrical conductivity of Al and Cu plasmas [R. Redmer, Phys. Rev. E 59, 1073 (1999)]. We consider temperatures of 1-3 eV and densities of 0.001-1 g/cm3 as relevant in rapid wire evaporation experiments. The plasma composition is calculated considering higher ionization stages of atoms up to 5+, and solving the respective system of coupled mass action laws. Interactions between charged particles are treated on T matrix level. Results for the electrical conductivity of various metal plasmas are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. Thermal conductivity and thermopower are also given. In addition, we compare with experimental data for temperatures up to 25 eV and liquidlike densities.

  13. Clustering stocks using partial correlation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sean S.; Chang, Woojin

    2016-11-01

    A partial correlation analysis is performed on the Korean stock market (KOSPI). The difference between Pearson correlation and the partial correlation is analyzed and it is found that when conditioned on the market return, Pearson correlation coefficients are generally greater than those of the partial correlation, which implies that the market return tends to drive up the correlation between stock returns. A clustering analysis is then performed to study the market structure given by the partial correlation analysis and the members of the clusters are compared with the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS). The initial hypothesis is that the firms in the same GICS sector are clustered together since they are in a similar business and environment. However, the result is inconsistent with the hypothesis and most clusters are a mix of multiple sectors suggesting that the traditional approach of using sectors to determine the proximity between stocks may not be sufficient enough to diversify a portfolio.

  14. Coefficient alpha and interculture test selection.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Steven; Kishi, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The internal consistency reliability of a measure can be a focal point in an evaluation of the potential adequacy of an instrument for adaptation to another cultural setting. Cronbach's alpha (α) coefficient is often used as the statistical index for such a determination. However, alpha presumes a tau-equivalent test and may constitute an inaccurate population estimate for multidimensional tests. These notions are expanded and examined with a Japanese version of a questionnaire on nursing attitudes toward suicidal patients, originally constructed in Sweden using the English language. The English measure was reported to have acceptable internal consistency (α) albeit the dimensionality of the questionnaire was not addressed. The Japanese scale was found to lack tau-equivalence. An alternative to alpha, "composite reliability," was computed and found to be below acceptable standards in magnitude and precision. Implications for research application of the Japanese instrument are discussed.

  15. Effective Electrocardiogram Steganography Based on Coefficient Alignment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Yu; Wang, Wen-Fong

    2016-03-01

    This study presents two types of data hiding methods based on coefficient alignment for electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, namely, lossy and reversible ECG steganographys. The lossy method is divided into high-quality and high-capacity ECG steganography, both of which are capable of hiding confidential patient data in ECG signals. The reversible data hiding method can not only hide secret messages but also completely restore the original ECG signal after bit extraction. Simulations confirmed that the perceived quality generated by the lossy ECG steganography methods was good, while hiding capacity was acceptable. In addition, these methods have a certain degree of robustness, which is rare in conventional ECG stegangraphy schemes. Moreover, the proposed reversible ECG steganography method can not only successfully extract hidden messages but also completely recover the original ECG data.

  16. Manning's roughness coefficient for Illinois streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soong, David T.; Prater, Crystal D.; Halfar, Teresa M.; Wobig, Loren A.

    2012-01-01

    Manning's roughness coefficients for 43 natural and constructed streams in Illinois are reported and displayed on a U.S. Geological Survey Web site. At a majority of the sites, discharge and stage were measured, and corresponding Manning's coefficients—the n-values—were determined at more than one river discharge. The n-values discussed in this report are computed from data representing the stream reach studied and, therefore, are reachwise values. Presentation of the resulting n-values takes a visual-comparison approach similar to the previously published Barnes report (1967), in which photographs of channel conditions, description of the site, and the resulting n-values are organized for each site. The Web site where the data can be accessed and are displayed is at URL http://il.water.usgs.gov/proj/nvalues/.

  17. Optical absorption coefficients of pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng; Zhao, Xianzhen; Fry, Edward S.

    2002-10-01

    The integrating cavity absorption meter(ICAM), which is independent of scattering effect, is used to measure the absolute values of small optical absorption coefficients of liquid. A modified ICAM is being used to measure the absorption of water in the wavelength range 300 to 700 nm. The ultrapure water produced by a two-stages water purification system reaches Type I quality. This is equal to or better than ASTM,CAP and NCCLS water quality standards. To avoid the fact that dissolved oxygen absorbs ultraviolet light due to the photochemical effect, the water sample is delivered through a nitrogen sealed system which will prevent the sample from contacting with oxygen. A compassion of our absorption spectrum with other existing data is given.

  18. Ultraprecise measurement of thermal coefficients of expansion.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S F; Bradford, J N; Berthold Iii, J W

    1970-11-01

    A novel method for determining thermal expansion coefficients has been devised. It is based on the dependence of Fabry-Perot resonances on the mirror separation. The expansion sample is formed into an etalon spacer, with highly reflecting endplates optically contacted to each end. The Fabry-Perot resonances are probed by variable radiofrequency sidebands derived from a frequency stabilized 633-nm He-Ne laser. A change in sample temperature DeltaT causes a change in interferometer length DeltaL, which shifts the resonance frequencies by Deltanu. Then alpha = (1/DeltaT)(DeltaL/L) = (1/DeltaT)(Deltanu/nu). alpha can be measured with precision limited ultimately by the stability of the stabilized laser (1:10(9) with presently available commercial lasers). alpha vs temperature has been measured for samples of Owens-Illinois Cer-Vit, Corning ULE silica, and Schott low expansion glass-ceramic.

  19. Upper bounds for flexoelectric coefficients in ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, P. V.; Ahluwalia, R.; Tagantsev, A. K.

    2014-02-01

    Flexoelectric effect is the response of electric polarization to the mechanical strain gradient. At the nano-scale, where large strain gradients are expected, the flexoelectric effect becomes appreciable and may substitute piezoelectric effect in centrosymmetric materials. These features make flexoelectricity of growing interest during the last decade. At the same time, the available theoretical and experimental results are rather contradictory. In particular, experimentally measured flexoelectric coefficients in some ferroelectric materials largely exceed theoretically predicted values. Here, we determine the upper limits for the magnitude of the static bulk contribution to the flexoelectric effect in ferroelectrics, the contribution which was customarily considered as the dominating one. The magnitude of the upper bounds obtained suggests that the anomalously high flexoelectric coupling documented for perovskite ceramics can hardly be attributed to a manifestation of the static bulk effect.

  20. Transport coefficients in superfluid neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Tolos, Laura; Manuel, Cristina; Sarkar, Sreemoyee; Tarrus, Jaume

    2016-01-22

    We study the shear and bulk viscosity coefficients as well as the thermal conductivity as arising from the collisions among phonons in superfluid neutron stars. We use effective field theory techniques to extract the allowed phonon collisional processes, written as a function of the equation of state and the gap of the system. The shear viscosity due to phonon scattering is compared to calculations of that coming from electron collisions. We also comment on the possible consequences for r-mode damping in superfluid neutron stars. Moreover, we find that phonon collisions give the leading contribution to the bulk viscosities in the core of the neutron stars. We finally obtain a temperature-independent thermal conductivity from phonon collisions and compare it with the electron-muon thermal conductivity in superfluid neutron stars.

  1. Partitioning coefficients between olivine and silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédard, J. H.

    2005-08-01

    Variation of Nernst partition coefficients ( D) between olivine and silicate melts cannot be neglected when modeling partial melting and fractional crystallization. Published natural and experimental olivine/liquidD data were examined for covariation with pressure, temperature, olivine forsterite content, and melt SiO 2, H 2O, MgO and MgO/MgO + FeO total. Values of olivine/liquidD generally increase with decreasing temperature and melt MgO content, and with increasing melt SiO 2 content, but generally show poor correlations with other variables. Multi-element olivine/liquidD profiles calculated from regressions of D REE-Sc-Y vs. melt MgO content are compared to results of the Lattice Strain Model to link melt MgO and: D0 (the strain compensated partition coefficient), EM3+ (Young's Modulus), and r0 (the size of the M site). Ln D0 varies linearly with Ln MgO in the melt; EM3+ varies linearly with melt MgO, with a dog-leg at ca. 1.5% MgO; and r0 remains constant at 0.807 Å. These equations are then used to calculate olivine/liquidD for these elements using the Lattice Strain Model. These empirical parameterizations of olivine/liquidD variations yield results comparable to experimental or natural partitioning data, and can easily be integrated into existing trace element modeling algorithms. The olivine/liquidD data suggest that basaltic melts in equilibrium with pure olivine may acquire small negative Ta-Hf-Zr-Ti anomalies, but that negative Nb anomalies are unlikely to develop. Misfits between results of the Lattice Strain Model and most light rare earth and large ion lithophile partitioning data suggest that kinetic effects may limit the lower value of D for extremely incompatible elements in natural situations characterized by high cooling/crystallization rates.

  2. Partition coefficients of organic contaminants with carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hsu-Wen; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Chiou, Cary T

    2010-07-15

    In view of the current lack of reliable partition coefficients for organic compounds with carbohydrates (K(ch)), carefully measured values with cellulose and starch, the two major forms of carbohydrates, are provided for a wide range of compounds: short-chain chlorinated hydrocarbons, halogenated benzenes, alkyl benzenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides. To ensure the accuracy of the K(ch) data, solute concentrations in both water and carbohydrate phases are measured by direct solvent extraction of the samples. For a given compound, the observed partition coefficient with cellulose (K(cl)) is virtually the same as that with starch (K(st)). This finding expedites the evaluation of organic contamination with different forms of carbohydrates. The presently determined K(ch) values of 13 PAHs are substantially lower (by 3-66 times) than the literature data; the latter are suspect as they were obtained with (i) presumably impure carbohydrate samples or (ii) indirectly measured equilibrium solute concentrations in carbohydrate and water phases. Although the K(ch) values are generally considerably lower than the respective K(ow) (octanol-water) or K(lipid) (lipid-water), accurate K(ch) data are duly required to accurately estimate the contamination of carbohydrates by organic compounds because of the abundance of carbohydrates over lipids in crops and plants. To overcome the current lack of reliable K(ch) data for organic compounds, a close correlation of log K(ch) with log K(ow) has been established for predicting the unavailable K(ch) data for low-polarity compounds.

  3. Apparent diffusion coefficient of normal adrenal glands*

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias, Paula Condé Lamparelli; Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; de Oliveira, Tatiane Mendes Gonçalves; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Elias Junior, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility and reliability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements of normal adrenal glands. Materials and methods This was a retrospective study involving 32 healthy subjects, divided into two groups: prepubertal (PreP, n = 12), aged from 2 months to 12.5 years (4 males; 8 females); and postpubertal (PostP, n = 20), aged from 11.9 to 61 years (5 males; 15 females). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) sequences were acquired at a 1.5 T scanner using b values of 0, 20, 500, and 1000 s/mm2. Two radiologists evaluated the images. ADC values were measured pixel-by-pixel on DW-MRI scans, and automatic co-registration with the ADC map was obtained. Results Mean ADC values for the right adrenal glands were 1.44 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PreP group and 1.23 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PostP group, whereas they were 1.58 × 10-3 mm2/s and 1.32 × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively, for the left glands. ADC values were higher in the PreP group than in the PostP group (p < 0.05). Agreement between readers was almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.84-0.94; p < 0.05). Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of performing DW-MRI measurements of normal adrenal glands. They could also support the feasibility of ADC measurements of small structures. PMID:28057963

  4. Non-Trivial Feature Derivation for Intensifying Feature Detection Using LIDAR Datasets Through Allometric Aggregation Data Analysis Applying Diffused Hierarchical Clustering for Discriminating Agricultural Land Cover in Portions of Northern Mindanao, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villar, Ricardo G.; Pelayo, Jigg L.; Mozo, Ray Mari N.; Salig, James B., Jr.; Bantugan, Jojemar

    2016-06-01

    Leaning on the derived results conducted by Central Mindanao University Phil-LiDAR 2.B.11 Image Processing Component, the paper attempts to provides the application of the Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) derived products in arriving quality Landcover classification considering the theoretical approach of data analysis principles to minimize the common problems in image classification. These are misclassification of objects and the non-distinguishable interpretation of pixelated features that results to confusion of class objects due to their closely-related spectral resemblance, unbalance saturation of RGB information is a challenged at the same time. Only low density LiDAR point cloud data is exploited in the research denotes as 2 pts/m2 of accuracy which bring forth essential derived information such as textures and matrices (number of returns, intensity textures, nDSM, etc.) in the intention of pursuing the conditions for selection characteristic. A novel approach that takes gain of the idea of object-based image analysis and the principle of allometric relation of two or more observables which are aggregated for each acquisition of datasets for establishing a proportionality function for data-partioning. In separating two or more data sets in distinct regions in a feature space of distributions, non-trivial computations for fitting distribution were employed to formulate the ideal hyperplane. Achieving the distribution computations, allometric relations were evaluated and match with the necessary rotation, scaling and transformation techniques to find applicable border conditions. Thus, a customized hybrid feature was developed and embedded in every object class feature to be used as classifier with employed hierarchical clustering strategy for cross-examining and filtering features. This features are boost using machine learning algorithms as trainable sets of information for a more competent feature detection. The product classification in this

  5. Deploying Fourier Coefficients to Unravel Soybean Canopy Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Jubery, Talukder Z.; Shook, Johnathon; Parmley, Kyle; Zhang, Jiaoping; Naik, Hsiang S.; Higgins, Race; Sarkar, Soumik; Singh, Arti; Singh, Asheesh K.; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2017-01-01

    Soybean canopy outline is an important trait used to understand light interception ability, canopy closure rates, row spacing response, which in turn affects crop growth and yield, and directly impacts weed species germination and emergence. In this manuscript, we utilize a methodology that constructs geometric measures of the soybean canopy outline from digital images of canopies, allowing visualization of the genetic diversity as well as a rigorous quantification of shape parameters. Our choice of data analysis approach is partially dictated by the need to efficiently store and analyze large datasets, especially in the context of planned high-throughput phenotyping experiments to capture time evolution of canopy outline which will produce very large datasets. Using the Elliptical Fourier Transformation (EFT) and Fourier Descriptors (EFD), canopy outlines of 446 soybean plant introduction (PI) lines from 25 different countries exhibiting a wide variety of maturity, seed weight, and stem termination were investigated in a field experiment planted as a randomized complete block design with up to four replications. Canopy outlines were extracted from digital images, and subsequently chain coded, and expanded into a shape spectrum by obtaining the Fourier coefficients/descriptors. These coefficients successfully reconstruct the canopy outline, and were used to measure traditional morphometric traits. Highest phenotypic diversity was observed for roundness, while solidity showed the lowest diversity across all countries. Some PI lines had extraordinary shape diversity in solidity. For interpretation and visualization of the complexity in shape, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on the EFD. PI lines were grouped in terms of origins, maturity index, seed weight, and stem termination index. No significant pattern or similarity was observed among the groups; although interestingly when genetic marker data was used for the PCA, patterns similar to canopy

  6. Deploying Fourier Coefficients to Unravel Soybean Canopy Diversity.

    PubMed

    Jubery, Talukder Z; Shook, Johnathon; Parmley, Kyle; Zhang, Jiaoping; Naik, Hsiang S; Higgins, Race; Sarkar, Soumik; Singh, Arti; Singh, Asheesh K; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2016-01-01

    Soybean canopy outline is an important trait used to understand light interception ability, canopy closure rates, row spacing response, which in turn affects crop growth and yield, and directly impacts weed species germination and emergence. In this manuscript, we utilize a methodology that constructs geometric measures of the soybean canopy outline from digital images of canopies, allowing visualization of the genetic diversity as well as a rigorous quantification of shape parameters. Our choice of data analysis approach is partially dictated by the need to efficiently store and analyze large datasets, especially in the context of planned high-throughput phenotyping experiments to capture time evolution of canopy outline which will produce very large datasets. Using the Elliptical Fourier Transformation (EFT) and Fourier Descriptors (EFD), canopy outlines of 446 soybean plant introduction (PI) lines from 25 different countries exhibiting a wide variety of maturity, seed weight, and stem termination were investigated in a field experiment planted as a randomized complete block design with up to four replications. Canopy outlines were extracted from digital images, and subsequently chain coded, and expanded into a shape spectrum by obtaining the Fourier coefficients/descriptors. These coefficients successfully reconstruct the canopy outline, and were used to measure traditional morphometric traits. Highest phenotypic diversity was observed for roundness, while solidity showed the lowest diversity across all countries. Some PI lines had extraordinary shape diversity in solidity. For interpretation and visualization of the complexity in shape, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on the EFD. PI lines were grouped in terms of origins, maturity index, seed weight, and stem termination index. No significant pattern or similarity was observed among the groups; although interestingly when genetic marker data was used for the PCA, patterns similar to canopy

  7. Acetylated lysozyme as impurity in lysozyme crystals: constant distribution coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2001-11-01

    Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was acetylated to modify molecular charge keeping the molecular size and weight nearly constant. Two derivatives, A and B, more and less acetylated, respectively, were obtained, separated, purified and added to the solution from which crystals of tetragonal HEWL crystals were grown. Amounts of the A and B impurities added were 0.76, 0.38 and 0.1 mg/ml and 0.43, 0.22, 0.1 mg/ml, respectively. The HEWL concentration were 20, 30 and 40 mg/ml. The crystals grown in 18 experiments for each impurity concentration and supersaturation were dissolved and quantities of A or B additives in these crystals were analyzed by cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography. All the data for each set of 18 samples with the different impurity and regular HEWL concentrations is well described by one distribution coefficient K=2.15±0.13 for A and K=3.42±0.25 for B. According to definition of K by Eq. (1) in the text, the condition K=const is equivalent to a decrease of impurity amount in the crystal as the supersaturation increases. The observed independence of the distribution coefficient on both the impurity concentration and supersaturation is explained by the dilution model described in this paper. It shows that the impurity adsorption and incorporation rates are proportional to the impurity concentration and that the growth rate is proportional to the concentration of crystallizing protein in solution. The frequency at which an impurity molecules irreversibly join the crystal was estimated to be 3 s -1, much higher than such frequency for regular crystal molecules 5×10 -2 s -1 at 30 mg/ml lysozyme concentration. Reasons for this inequality are discussed.

  8. Sedimentation Coefficient, Frictional Coefficient, and Molecular Weight: A Preparative Ultracentrifuge Experiment for the Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsall, H. B.; Wermeling, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment using a high-speed preparative centrifuge and calculator to demonstrate effects of the frictional coefficient of a macromolecule on its rate of transport in a force field and to estimate molecular weight of the macromolecule using an empirical relationship. Background information, procedures, and discussion of results are…

  9. Quantifying colocalization by correlation: the Pearson correlation coefficient is superior to the Mander's overlap coefficient.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jeremy; Parmryd, Ingela

    2010-08-01

    The Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) and the Mander's overlap coefficient (MOC) are used to quantify the degree of colocalization between fluorophores. The MOC was introduced to overcome perceived problems with the PCC. The two coefficients are mathematically similar, differing in the use of either the absolute intensities (MOC) or of the deviation from the mean (PCC). A range of correlated datasets, which extend to the limits of the PCC, only evoked a limited response from the MOC. The PCC is unaffected by changes to the offset while the MOC increases when the offset is positive. Both coefficients are independent of gain. The MOC is a confusing hybrid measurement, that combines correlation with a heavily weighted form of co-occurrence, favors high intensity combinations, downplays combinations in which either or both intensities are low and ignores blank pixels. The PCC only measures correlation. A surprising finding was that the addition of a second uncorrelated population can substantially increase the measured correlation, demonstrating the importance of excluding background pixels. Overall, since the MOC is unresponsive to substantial changes in the data and is hard to interpret, it is neither an alternative to nor a useful substitute for the PCC. The MOC is not suitable for making measurements of colocalization either by correlation or co-occurrence.

  10. Minority carrier diffusion lengths and absorption coefficients in silicon sheet material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, K. A.; Swimm, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the methods which have been developed for the measurement of the minority carrier diffusion length of silicon wafers require that the material have either a Schottky or an ohmic contact. The surface photovoltage (SPV) technique is an exception. The SPV technique could, therefore, become a valuable diagnostic tool in connection with current efforts to develop low-cost processes for the production of solar cells. The technique depends on a knowledge of the optical absorption coefficient. The considered investigation is concerned with a reevaluation of the absorption coefficient as a function of silicon processing. A comparison of absorption coefficient values showed these values to be relatively consistent from sample to sample, and independent of the sample growth method.

  11. The pyroelectric coefficient of free standing GaN grown by HVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachalke, Sven; Hofmann, Patrick; Leibiger, Gunnar; Habel, Frank S.; Mehner, Erik; Leisegang, Tilmann; Meyer, Dirk C.; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The present study reports on the temperature dependent pyroelectric coefficient of free-standing and strain-free gallium nitride (GaN) grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The Sharp-Garn method is applied to extract the pyroelectric coefficient from the electrical current response of the crystals subjected to a sinusoidal temperature excitation in a range of 0 °C to 160 °C. To avoid compensation of the pyroelectric response by an internal conductivity, insulating GaN crystals were used by applying C, Mn, and Fe doping during HVPE growth. The different pyroelectric coefficients observed at room temperature due to the doping correlate well with the change of the lattice parameter c. The obtained data are compared to previously published theoretical and experimental values of thin film GaN and discussed in terms of a strained lattice.

  12. The relation between pituitary gland and thyroid growth during the lifespan of the annual fish Cynolebias whitei and Nothobranchius korthausae: gonadotropic and thyrotropic cells.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, J M; Peute, J; Levels, P J

    1987-06-01

    In the annual cyprinodont Cynolebias whitei the cell types responsible for the increase of pituitary growth at the onset of maturation and for pituitary hyperplasia in old specimens were identified as gonadotropic cells and thyrotropic cells, respectively. The gonadotropic cells showed a high affinity to anti-carp alpha beta-GTH serum, both at light- and electron-microscopical levels. The allometric relation of total gonadotropic cell volume to body length, determined for fish from six weeks up to six months of age, showed no inflections. Therefore pituitary growth in maturing fish may be partly a result of proliferation of gonadotropes, although gonadotropic cells do not contribute to pituitary hyperplasia in old fish. Thyrotropic cells showed a weak affinity to anti-carp alpha beta-GTH serum at light-microscopical level. Under the electron microscope thyrotropic cells displayed signs of activation in maturing fish and signs of proliferation in old fish. The allometric relation of thyroid gland volume to body length paralleled that of pituitary volume to body length. Histologically the thyroid gland showed signs of inactivity in adult fish and of hyperplasia in old fish. The possibility, that gonadal maturation, pituitary thyrotropic activity, and growth of the thyroid in maturing fish are related through the inhibitory action of gonadal steroids on thyroid hormone release, is discussed. Pituitary hyperplasia in old fish is the result of proliferation of thyrotropic cells. Similar hyperplasia of pituitary and thyroid glands was observed in old Nothobranchius korthausae.

  13. The Attenuation of Correlation Coefficients: A Statistical Literacy Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafimow, David

    2016-01-01

    Much of the science reported in the media depends on correlation coefficients. But the size of correlation coefficients depends, in part, on the reliability with which the correlated variables are measured. Understanding this is a statistical literacy issue.

  14. Research on bimodal particle extinction coefficient during Brownian coagulation and condensation for the entire particle size regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2011-12-01

    The extinction coefficient of atmospheric aerosol particles influences the earth's radiation balance directly or indirectly, and it can be determined by the scattering and absorption characteristics of aerosol particles. The problem of estimating the change of extinction coefficient due to time evolution of bimodal particle size distribution is studied, and two improved methods for calculating the Brownian coagulation coefficient and the condensation growth rate are proposed, respectively. Through the improved method based on Otto kernel, the Brownian coagulation coefficient can be expressed simply in powers of particle volume for the entire particle size regime based on the fitted polynomials of the mean enhancement function. Meanwhile, the improved method based on Fuchs-Sutugin kernel is developed to obtain the condensation growth rate for the entire particle size regime. And then, the change of the overall extinction coefficient of bimodal distributions undergoing Brownian coagulation and condensation can be estimated comprehensively for the entire particle size regime. Simulation experiments indicate that the extinction coefficients obtained with the improved methods coincide fairly well with the true values, which provide a simple, reliable, and general method to estimate the change of extinction coefficient for the entire particle size regime during the bimodal particle dynamic processes.

  15. Bayesian Statistical Inference for Coefficient Alpha. ACT Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jun Corser; Woodruff, David J.

    Coefficient alpha is a simple and very useful index of test reliability that is widely used in educational and psychological measurement. Classical statistical inference for coefficient alpha is well developed. This paper presents two methods for Bayesian statistical inference for a single sample alpha coefficient. An approximate analytic method…

  16. Review of analysis methods for rotating systems with periodic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugundji, J.; Wendell, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Two of the more common procedures for analyzing the stability and forced response of equations with periodic coefficients are reviewed: the use of Floquet methods, and the use of multiblade coordinate and harmonic balance methods. The analysis procedures of these periodic coefficient systems are compared with those of the more familiar constant coefficient systems.

  17. 46 CFR 42.20-25 - Correction for block coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Correction for block coefficient. 42.20-25 Section 42.20-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-25 Correction for block coefficient. If the block coefficient...

  18. 46 CFR 42.20-25 - Correction for block coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Correction for block coefficient. 42.20-25 Section 42.20-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-25 Correction for block coefficient. If the block coefficient...

  19. Detection Performance of the Circular Correlation Coefficient Receiver,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    of the squared modulus of the circular serial correlation coefficient is found when no signal is present, allowing computation of the detection...threshold. For small data records, as is typical in radar applications, the performance of the correlation coefficient detector is compared to a standard... Correlation Coefficient , Autoregressive, CFAR, Autocorrelation Estimation, Radar Receiver, and Digital Signal Processing.

  20. 46 CFR 42.20-25 - Correction for block coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Correction for block coefficient. 42.20-25 Section 42.20-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-25 Correction for block coefficient. If the block coefficient...

  1. 46 CFR 42.20-25 - Correction for block coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Correction for block coefficient. 42.20-25 Section 42.20-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-25 Correction for block coefficient. If the block coefficient...

  2. 46 CFR 42.20-25 - Correction for block coefficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Correction for block coefficient. 42.20-25 Section 42.20-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-25 Correction for block coefficient. If the block coefficient...

  3. On some properties of SU(3) fusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquereaux, Robert; Zuber, Jean-Bernard

    2016-11-01

    Three aspects of the SU(3) fusion coefficients are revisited: the generating polynomials of fusion coefficients are written explicitly; some curious identities generalizing the classical Freudenthal-de Vries formula are derived; and the properties of the fusion coefficients under conjugation of one of the factors, previously analyzed in the classical case, are extended to the affine algebra su ˆ (3) at finite level.

  4. On Estimation and Hypothesis Testing Problems for Correlation Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, Helena Chmura

    1975-01-01

    A selection of statistical problems commonly encountered in psychological or psychiatric research concerning correlation coefficients are re-evaluated in the light of recently developed simplifications in the forms of the distribution theory of the intraclass correlation coefficient, of the product-moment correlation coefficient, and the Spearman…

  5. An Investigation of the Sampling Distribution of the Congruence Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbooks, Wendy J.; Elmore, Patricia B.

    This study developed and investigated an empirical sampling distribution of the congruence coefficient. The effects of sample size, number of variables, and population value of the congruence coefficient on the sampling distribution of the congruence coefficient were examined. Sample data were generated on the basis of the common factor model and…

  6. Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect the allometric partition of host plant biomass to shoots and roots? A meta-analysis of studies from 1990 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Veresoglou, Stavros D; Menexes, George; Rillig, Matthias C

    2012-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) are ubiquitous root symbioses with often pervasive effects on the plant host, one of which may be above- and belowground biomass allocation. A meta-analysis was conducted on 516 trials that were described in 90 available articles to examine whether AM colonization could result in a modification of partitioning of plant biomass in shoots and roots. It was hypothesized that alleviating plant nutrient limitations could result in a decrease of root to shoot (R/S) ratio in AM plants or, alternatively, the direction of shifts in the R/S ratio would be determined by the changes in total dry biomass. In our analysis, we considered four types of stresses: drought stress, single heavy metal stress, multiple heavy metal stress, and other potential abiotic plant stress factors. When disregarding any factors that could regulate effects, including stress status and mode of propagation, the overall AM effect was a significant modification of biomass towards shoot growth. However, the responses of stressed and clonally propagated plants differed from those of seed-grown unstressed plants. Our meta-analysis detected a considerable decline in the R/S ratio when plants were grown from seeds in the absence of abiotic stresses. Moreover, we demonstrate that additional regulators of the AM-mediated impact on R/S ratio were presence of competition from other plants, plant growth outcome of the symbiosis, growth substrate volume, experimental duration, and the identities of both plant and AM fungus. Our results indicate that a prediction of AM effects on R/S allocation becomes more accurate when considering regulators, most notably propagation mode and stress. We discuss possible mechanisms through which stress and other regulators may operate.

  7. Near-Unity Mass Accommodation Coefficient of Organic Molecules of Varying Structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have a significant effect on global climate, air quality, and consequently human health. Condensation of organic vapors is a key process in the growth of nanometer-sized particles to climate relevant sizes. This growth is very sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient α, a quantity describing the vapor uptake ability of the particles, but knowledge on α of atmospheric organics is lacking. In this work, we have determined α for four organic molecules with diverse structural properties: adipic acid, succinic acid, naphthalene, and nonane. The coefficients are studied using molecular dynamics simulations, complemented with expansion chamber measurements. Our results are consistent with α = 1 (indicating nearly perfect accommodation), regardless of the molecular structural properties, the phase state of the bulk condensed phase, or surface curvature. The results highlight the need for experimental techniques capable of resolving the internal structure of nanoparticles to better constrain the accommodation of atmospheric organics. PMID:25260072

  8. Impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqi; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-02-21

    We present a study through extensive simulation that considers the impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data collected from media mimicking breast tissue. We found that while the impact of scattering heterogeneities/targets is modest on photoacoustic recovery of optical absorption coefficients, the impact of scattering contrast caused by adipose tissue, a layer of normal tissue along the boundary of the breast, is dramatic on reconstruction of optical absorption coefficients using photoacoustic data-up to 25.8% relative error in recovering the absorption coefficient is estimated in such cases. To overcome this problem, we propose a new method to enhance photoacoustic recovery of the optical absorption coefficient in heterogeneous media by considering inhomogeneous scattering coefficient distribution provided by diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Results from extensive simulations show that photoacoustic recovery of absorption coefficient maps can be improved considerably with a priori scattering information from DOT.

  9. Transport coefficients of He+ ions in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Rainer; Viehland, Larry; Gray, Benjamin; Wright, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    New experimental mobilities of 4He+ in 4He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, have been determined. Uncertainties in the mobilities were reduced to about 1% by using a shuttered drift tube. Comparison with previously measured values show that only one set of previous data is reliable. We demonstrate that the mobilities and diffusion coeffcients of 4He+ in 4He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N with high precision if accurate potential energy curves are available for the X2Σu+ and A2Σg+ states, and if one takes into account resonant charge transfer and corrects for quantum-mechanical effects. Potentials, obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X =6,7) basis sets using the CASSCF +MRCISD approach were found to be in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available (separately) and with experiment, and those were subsequently used in a new computer program to determine semi-classical phase shifts and transport cross sections, from which the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. A new set of data for the mobilities of alpha particles (He2+) ions was obtained as a byproduct of the experiment, but the transport theory has not yet been completed.

  10. Sedimentation coefficient distributions of large particles.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Peter

    2016-07-21

    The spatial and temporal evolution of concentration boundaries in sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation reports on the size distribution of particles with high hydrodynamic resolution. For large particles such as large protein complexes, fibrils, viral particles, or nanoparticles, sedimentation conditions usually allow migration from diffusion to be neglected relative to sedimentation. In this case, the shape of the sedimentation boundaries of polydisperse mixtures relates directly to the underlying size-distributions. Integral and derivative methods for calculating sedimentation coefficient distributions g*(s) of large particles from experimental boundary profiles have been developed previously, and are recapitulated here in a common theoretical framework. This leads to a previously unrecognized relationship between g*(s) and the time-derivative of concentration profiles. Of closed analytical form, it is analogous to the well-known Bridgman relationship for the radial derivative. It provides a quantitative description of the effect of substituting the time-derivative by scan differences with finite time intervals, which appears as a skewed box average of the true distribution. This helps to theoretically clarify the differences between results from time-derivative method and the approach of directly fitting the integral definition of g*(s) to the entirety of experimental boundary data.

  11. Second virial coefficients of asymmetric top molecules.

    PubMed

    Wormer, Paul E S

    2005-05-08

    A short self-contained derivation is given for the second virial coefficient B2(T) of a gas consisting of identical interacting asymmetric rigid rotors. The resulting expression is correct through variant Planck's over h2. First, the canonical partition function is derived by means of an variant Planck's over h expansion of exp[-H/(k(B)T)] due to Friedmann [Adv. Chem. Phys. 4, 225 (1962)]. The present work applies angular momentum operators and known facts from angular momentum theory. It is considerably more accessible than Friedmann's exposition, which is not based on angular momentum operators, but instead on explicit derivatives with respect to Euler angles. The partition function obtained from the variant Planck's over h expansion is applied to the derivation of an expression for B2(T) that is identical in appearance to the expression for symmetric rotors of T Pack [J. Chem. Phys. 78, 7217 (1983)]. The final equation in this work is valid for rigid rotors of any symmetry.

  12. Zernike coefficients: are they really enough?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Progler, Christopher J.; Wong, Alfred K. K.

    2000-07-01

    Zernike aberration coefficients are routinely used in simulation exercises for lithographic printing and the discovery of Zernike values is considered strategic for many lithographic process engineers. Thanks to progress in actinic interferometry and resist based evaluation techniques, reliable estimates of Zernike component magnitudes are possible in many cases. It is expected that wavelength reductions from 248 nm and 193 nm to 157 nm along with continued use of aspheric elements in high NA designs will lead to an increase in the component of wavefront aberration that is not adequately characterized by a 36 term Zernike polynomial. Wavefront errors not well characterized by a conventional Zernike fit are variously termed mid- spatial frequency errors, lack of fit, residuals, flare, scatter etc. This paper explores the importance, characterization and analysis of these residual errors and attempts to clarify the boundaries between the various classes of wavefront error. We find that an accurate assessment an model of lens performance requires the inclusion of both residual wavefront errors and flare effects in addition to the customary 36 term Zernike expansion.

  13. Transport coefficients of soft repulsive particle fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.; Brańka, A. C.

    2008-03-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulation has been used to compute the self-diffusion coefficient, D, and shear viscosity, ηs, of soft-sphere fluids, in which the particles interact through the soft-sphere pair potential, phi(r) = epsilon(σ/r)n, where n measures the steepness or stiffness of the potential, epsilon and σ are a characteristic energy and distance, respectively. The simulations were carried out on monodisperse systems for a range of n values from the hard-sphere (n\\to \\infty ) limit down to n = 4 over a range of densities. An ideal glass transition value was estimated from the limit where D and \\eta_{\\mathrm {s}}^{-1}\\to 0 for each value of n. Nucleation of the crystalline phase was found to intervene prior to the formation of the glass itself, as has been found previously for hard spheres (i.e. n\\to \\infty ). With increasing softness the glass transition moves further within the solid part of the phase diagram, as predicted by Cardenas and Tosi (2005 Phys. Lett. A 336 423), although the volume fractions at the glass transition estimated by the current procedure here are systematically lower than the predictions of that study.

  14. Distilling allometric and environmental information from time series of conduit size: the standardization issue and its relationship to tree hydraulic architecture.

    PubMed

    Carrer, Marco; von Arx, Georg; Castagneri, Daniele; Petit, Giai

    2015-01-01

    Trees are among the best natural archives of past environmental information. Xylem anatomy preserves information related to tree allometry and ecophysiological performance, which is not available from the more customary ring-width or wood-density proxy parameters. Recent technological advances make tree-ring anatomy very attractive because time frames of many centuries can now be covered. This calls for the proper treatment of time series of xylem anatomical attributes. In this article, we synthesize current knowledge on the biophysical and physiological mechanisms influencing the short- to long-term variation in the most widely used wood-anatomical feature, namely conduit size. We also clarify the strong mechanistic link between conduit-lumen size, tree hydraulic architecture and height growth. Among the key consequences of these biophysical constraints is the pervasive, increasing trend of conduit size during ontogeny. Such knowledge is required to process time series of anatomical parameters correctly in order to obtain the information of interest. An appropriate standardization procedure is fundamental when analysing long tree-ring-related chronologies. When dealing with wood-anatomical parameters, this is even more critical. Only an interdisciplinary approach involving ecophysiology, wood anatomy and dendrochronology will help to distill the valuable information about tree height growth and past environmental variability correctly.

  15. Nonequivalence of second virial coefficients from sedimentation equilibrium and static light scattering studies of protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J; Deszczynski, Marcin; Harding, Stephen E; Wills, Peter R

    2007-06-01

    Experimental data for ovalbumin and lysozyme are presented to highlight the nonequivalence of second virial coefficients obtained for proteins by sedimentation equilibrium and light scattering. Theoretical considerations confirm that the quantity deduced from sedimentation equilibrium distributions is B(22), the osmotic second virial coefficient describing thermodynamic nonideality arising solely from protein self-interaction. On the other hand, the virial coefficient determined by light scattering is shown to reflect the combined contributions of protein-protein and protein-buffer interactions to thermodynamic nonideality of the protein solution. Misidentification of the light scattering parameter as B(22) accounts for published reports of negative osmotic second virial coefficients as indicators of conditions conducive to protein crystal growth. Finally, textbook assertions about the equivalence of second virial coefficients obtained by sedimentation equilibrium and light scattering reflect the restriction of consideration to single-solute systems. Although sedimentation equilibrium distributions for buffered protein solutions are, indeed, amenable to interpretation in such terms, the same situation does not apply to light scattering measurements because buffer constituents cannot be regarded as part of the solvent: instead they must be treated as non-scattering cosolutes.

  16. On the use of beta coefficients in meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Robert A; Brown, Steven P

    2005-01-01

    This research reports an investigation of the use of standardized regression (beta) coefficients in meta-analyses that use correlation coefficients as the effect-size metric. The investigation consisted of analyzing more than 1,700 corresponding beta coefficients and correlation coefficients harvested from published studies. Results indicate that, under certain conditions, using knowledge of corresponding beta coefficients to input missing correlations (effect sizes) generally produces relatively accurate and precise population effect-size estimates. Potential benefits from applying this knowledge include smaller sampling errors because of increased numbers of effect sizes and smaller non-sampling errors because of the inclusion of a broader array of research designs.

  17. Growth Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... function and also play a role in growth. Hypothyroidism can cause slow growth because the thyroid gland ... to support normal growth. A major symptom of hypothyroidism is feeling tired or sluggish. A blood test ...

  18. Condensation of water vapor: Experimental determination of mass and thermal accommodation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. M.; Vrtala, A.; Rudolf, R.; Wagner, P. E.; Riipinen, I.; Vesala, T.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Viisanen, Y.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-10-01

    Experimental determinations of mass and thermal accommodation coefficients αm and αt for condensation of water vapor in air have been conducted covering a temperature range from about 250 to 290 K. For the first time, both coefficients have been determined directly and simultaneously. To this end, growth of water droplets in air has been observed at different total gas pressures ranging from about 1000 down to 100 hPa. Monodispersed seed particles have been used as condensation nuclei. After addition of water vapor with well-defined partial vapor pressure, supersaturation was achieved by adiabatic expansion in an expansion chamber. Most experiments reported in the present paper were performed at vapor saturation ratios ranging from 1.30 to 1.50. Monodispersed Ag particles with a diameter of 9 nm have been used as condensation nuclei, and for humidification a diffusion humidifier was applied. One experiment was performed at the saturation ratio of 1.02, which resembles conditions observed in the Earth's lower atmosphere. In this experiment, monodispersed DEHS particles with a diameter of 80 nm were used as condensation nuclei, and water vapor was generated by quantitative evaporation of a liquid jet. Droplet growth was monitored using the CAMS method. For determination of the accommodation coefficients, experimental droplet growth curves were compared to corresponding theoretical curves. Quantitative comparison was performed by varying the respective accommodation coefficient and the starting time of droplet growth in a two-parameter best fit procedure. Considering the uncertainty with respect to the starting time of droplet growth and the uncertainties of the experimental water vapor supersaturation, corresponding maximum errors have been determined. From the results obtained it can be stated that αt is larger than 0.85 over the whole considered temperature range. For 250-270 K, values of αm below 0.8 are excluded, and for higher temperatures up to 290 K we can

  19. Determinations of equilibrium segregation, effective segregation and diffusion coefficients for Nd+3 doped in molten YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadian, M.; Saeedi, H.; Yadegari, M.; Shojaee, M.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a new mathematical model has been presented to determine the equilibrium segregation (k0) and effective segregation (keff) coefficients for neodymium (Nd) in YAG crystal grown by Czochralski (CZ) method. Determination of diffusion coefficient (DL) of Nd impurity in molten YAG is also investigated. In this model, utilizing Lambert W-function is a new idea to solve the Scheil equation for calculation of effective segregation coefficient. The Nd concentration in the crystal has been measured by optical absorption method to calculate keff. The analyses show that the keff is related to the growth parameters such as crystal growth rate (ug) and crystal rotation rate (ω), ( ug/√{ω}) but it is independent of the Nd concentration in the initial melt (C0). Based on obtained keff and experimental growth data, k0 and DL of Nd in molten YAG have been calculated. For all experiments, the average value of k0=0.216 and DL=1.4×10-6 (cm2/s) are obtained. Our results are corroborated by the theoretical and experimental data from the literature.

  20. A generalized concordance correlation coefficient for continuous and categorical data.

    PubMed

    King, T S; Chinchilli, V M

    2001-07-30

    This paper discusses a generalized version of the concordance correlation coefficient for agreement data. The concordance correlation coefficient evaluates the accuracy and precision between two measures, and is based on the expected value of the squared function of distance. We have generalized this coefficient by applying alternative functions of distance to produce more robust versions of the concordance correlation coefficient. In this paper we extend the application of this class of estimators to categorical data as well, and demonstrate similarities to the kappa and weighted kappa statistics. We also introduce a stratified concordance correlation coefficient which adjusts for explanatory factors, and an extended concordance correlation coefficient which measures agreement among more than two responses. With these extensions, the generalized concordance correlation coefficient provides a unifying approach to assessing agreement among two or more measures that are either continuous or categorical in scale.

  1. Correlation-coefficient-based fast template matching through partial elimination.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Arif; Khan, Sohaib

    2012-04-01

    Partial computation elimination techniques are often used for fast template matching. At a particular search location, computations are prematurely terminated as soon as it is found that this location cannot compete with an already known best match location. Due to the nonmonotonic growth pattern of the correlation-based similarity measures, partial computation elimination techniques have been traditionally considered inapplicable to speed up these measures. In this paper, we show that partial elimination techniques may be applied to a correlation coefficient by using a monotonic formulation, and we propose basic-mode and extended-mode partial correlation elimination algorithms for fast template matching. The basic-mode algorithm is more efficient on small template sizes, whereas the extended mode is faster on medium and larger templates. We also propose a strategy to decide which algorithm to use for a given data set. To achieve a high speedup, elimination algorithms require an initial guess of the peak correlation value. We propose two initialization schemes including a coarse-to-fine scheme for larger templates and a two-stage technique for small- and medium-sized templates. Our proposed algorithms are exact, i.e., having exhaustive equivalent accuracy, and are compared with the existing fast techniques using real image data sets on a wide variety of template sizes. While the actual speedups are data dependent, in most cases, our proposed algorithms have been found to be significantly faster than the other algorithms.

  2. Convective heat transfer during dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Axial growth rate measurements were carried out at 17 levels of supercooling between 0.043 C and 2 C, a temperature range in which convection, instead of diffusion, becomes the controlling mechanism of heat transfer in the dentritic growth process. The growth velocity, normalized to that expected for pure diffusive heat transfer, displays a dependence on orientation. The ratio of the observed growth velocity to that for convection-free growth and the coefficients of supercooling are formulated. The dependence of normalized growth rate in supercooling is described for downward growing dendrites. These experimental correlations can be justified theoretically only to a limited extent.

  3. Distribution Coefficients of Impurities in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. V.

    2014-04-01

    Impurities dissolved in very pure metals at the level of parts per million often cause an elevation or depression of the freezing temperature of the order of millikelvins. This represents a significant contribution to the uncertainty of standard platinum resistance thermometer calibrations. An important parameter for characterizing the behavior of impurities is the distribution coefficient , which is the ratio of the solid solubility to liquid solubility. A knowledge of for a given binary system is essential for contemporary methods of evaluating or correcting for the effect of impurities, and it is therefore of universal interest to have the most complete set of values possible. A survey of equilibrium values of (in the low concentration limit) reported in the literature for the International Temperature Scale of 1990 fixed points of Hg, Ga, In, Sn, Zn, Al, Au, Ag, and Cu is presented. In addition, thermodynamic calculations of using MTDATA are presented for 170 binary systems. In total, the combined values of from all available sources for 430 binary systems are presented. In addition, by considering all available values of for impurities in 25 different metal solvents (1300 binary systems) enough data are available to characterize patterns in the value of for a given impurity as a function of its position in the periodic table. This enables prediction of for a significant number of binary systems for which data and calculations are unavailable. By combining data from many sources, values of for solutes (atomic number from 1 to 94) in ITS-90 fixed points from Hg to Cu are suggested, together with some tentative predicted values where literature data and calculations are unavailable.

  4. Evaluating the crop coefficient using spectral reflectance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilman, J. L.; Heilman, W. E.; Moore, Donald G.

    1982-01-01

    Significant linear relationships were found between PVI and percent cover (r2 = 0.911), and between Kc and percent cover (r2 = 0.815). In addition, the position of the PVl intersection on the soil background line changed as a result of soil moisture increases following irrigation, even at high percent cover. Thus, once experimental relationships between Kc and crop growth are established, a mean Kc can be determined from spectral estimates of stage of development and the soil background component of PVI can be used to adjust the mean K, for increased evaporation following irrigation because the ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration will approach 1 when the soil surface is wet.

  5. Hispanic Population Growth and Rural Income Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrado, Emilio A.; Kandel, William A.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between Hispanic population growth and changes in U.S. rural income inequality from 1990 through 2000. Applying comparative approaches used for urban areas we disentangle Hispanic population growth's contribution to inequality by comparing and statistically modeling changes in the family income Gini coefficient across…

  6. On the reproductive energetics of chorusing males: Energy depletion profiles, restoration and growth in two sympatric species of Ranidella (Anura).

    PubMed

    Mac Nally, Ralph C

    1981-01-01

    The reproductive activity of males of two species of Ranidella was recorded for four years. Linear densities and vocal activity were monitored, and correlated with rainfall. Energy and ash content of somatic tissue were examined during the course of breeding seasons. Depletions of energy reserves in somatic tissue, fat-bodies and livers were charted through each breeding season. Allometric equations linking these energetic quantities with snout-vent length were used to estimate the growth between breeding seasons of soma, fat-bodies and livers. Males invest heavily in current reproduction and relatively little in growth. Virtually all of a male's reproductive expenditure is directed to mechanisms of intrasexual competition for matings rather than investment in gonads, gametes or parental behavior.

  7. Histology and postural change during the growth of the ceratopsian dinosaur Psittacosaurus lujiatunensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Benton, Michael J; Sullivan, Corwin; Martin Sander, P; Xu, Xing

    2013-01-01

    A few dinosaurs are inferred to have undergone an ontogenetic shift from quadrupedal-to-bipedal posture, or vice versa, based on skeletal allometry. The basal ceratopsian Psittacosaurus lujiatunensis is considered to have been mainly bipedal as an adult. Here we infer a postural shift in this species based on a novel combination of limb measurements and histological data. The forelimb is strongly negatively allometric relative to the hindlimb, and patterns of vascular canal orientation provide evidence that growth of the hindlimb was particularly rapid during the middle part of ontogeny. Histology also makes it possible to determine the ontogenetic ages of individual specimens, showing that the forelimb-to-hindlimb ratio changed rapidly during the first or second year of life and thereafter decreased gradually. Occurrence of an ontogenetic shift from quadrupedality to bipedality was evidently widespread in dinosaurs, and may even represent the ancestral condition for the entire group.

  8. Allometry and growth of eight tree taxa in United Kingdom woodlands

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Matthew R; Moustakas, Aristides; Carey, Gregory; Malhi, Yadvinder; Butt, Nathalie; Benham, Sue; Pallett, Denise; Schäfer, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    As part of a project to develop predictive ecosystem models of United Kingdom woodlands we have collated data from two United Kingdom woodlands - Wytham Woods and Alice Holt. Here we present data from 582 individual trees of eight taxa in the form of summary variables relating to the allometric relationships between trunk diameter, height, crown height, crown radius and trunk radial growth rate to the tree’s light environment and diameter at breast height. In addition the raw data files containing the variables from which the summary data were obtained. Large sample sizes with longitudinal data spanning 22 years make these datasets useful for future studies concerned with the way trees change in size and shape over their life-span. PMID:25977813

  9. Calculation and application of combined diffusion coefficients in thermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Anthony B.

    2014-03-01

    The combined diffusion coefficient method is widely used to treat the mixing and demixing of different plasma gases and vapours in thermal plasmas, such as welding arcs and plasma jets. It greatly simplifies the treatment of diffusion for many gas mixtures without sacrificing accuracy. Here, three subjects that are important in the implementation of the combined diffusion coefficient method are considered. First, it is shown that different expressions for the combined diffusion coefficients, arising from different definitions for the stoichiometric coefficients that assign the electrons to the two gases, are equivalent. Second, an approach is presented for calculating certain partial differential terms in the combined temperature and pressure diffusion coefficients that can cause difficulties. Finally, a method for applying the combined diffusion coefficients in computational models, which typically require diffusion to be expressed in terms of mass fraction gradients, is given.

  10. Piezo-optic coefficients of CaWO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mytsyk, B. G.; Kost', Ya. P.; Demyanyshyn, N. M.; Andrushchak, A. S.; Solskii, I. M.

    2015-01-01

    All components of the piezo-optic coefficient matrix of calcium tungstate crystals, belonging to the 4/ m symmetry class, are determined. The reliability of the piezo-optic effect measurements in CaWO4 crystals is achieved by determining each piezo-optic coefficient from several experimental geometries and is also based on the correlation of the absolute piezo-electric coefficients and the path-difference coefficients. The rotation-shear diagonal coefficients π44 and π66 and three principal piezo-optic coefficients π11, π13, and π31 are refined by the polarization-optical method. It is confirmed that both the interferometric and polarization-optical methods should be used to study the piezo-optic effect with high accuracy. The results show that calcium tungstate is a promising material for acousto-optical and photoelastic modulation.

  11. Low-reflection-coefficient liquid interfaces for system characterization.

    PubMed

    Hall, T J; Madsen, E L; Dong, F; Medina, I R; Frank, G R

    2001-07-01

    The use of liquid brominated hydrocarbons to form a planar reflecting interface with water is described. Gravity-based planar reflecting surfaces with known reflection coefficients can be used in system characterization for quantitative ultrasonics, and a set of surfaces with a range of reflection coefficients allows calibration of the output power and receiver gain of ultrasonic imaging systems. The substances reported here are immiscible in water and form interfaces with water, resulting in a broad range of acoustic reflection coefficients. Reflection coefficients were measured at temperatures from 18-24 degrees C for "pure" substances and for mixtures of two brominated hydrocarbons. Results show that reflection coefficients are weakly dependent on temperature and that, at a specific temperature, a significant range of arbitrarily small reflection coefficients is available, in the case of the mixtures, by the appropriate choice of weight-percents of the two brominated hydrocarbons.

  12. Osmotic second virial cross coefficients for star and linear polystyrenes

    SciTech Connect

    Striolo, Alberto; Prausnitz, John M. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720

    2000-08-15

    Experimental osmotic second virial cross coefficients are reported for linear and 8-arm star polystyrenes in three solvents: toluene, cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane. The osmotic second virial cross coefficient for 8-arm star and linear polystyrene is always positive and within the osmotic second virial coefficients measured for the single polymers. The positive cross coefficient indicates net repulsion between the two different polymers in dilute solution. The extent of repulsion is greatest in toluene and least in cyclohexane. To relate the macroscopic second virial coefficient to microscopic interactions, the potential of mean force between linear and 6-arm star polymers was computed by molecular simulation. The interaction between nonbonded polymer segments is given by a square-well potential. Well width was set equal to one half of the segment diameter. Different solvent conditions were investigated by using different well depths. Potentials of mean force were then used to compute the osmotic second virial cross coefficients. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. ANALYTIC FORMS OF THE PERPENDICULAR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT IN NRMHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A.

    2015-02-01

    In the past different analytic limits for the perpendicular diffusion coefficient of energetic particles interacting with magnetic turbulence were discussed. These different limits or cases correspond to different transport modes describing how the particles are diffusing across the large-scale magnetic field. In the current paper we describe a new transport regime by considering the model of noisy reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We derive different analytic forms of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, and while we do this, we focus on the aforementioned new transport mode. We show that for this turbulence model a small perpendicular diffusion coefficient can be obtained so that the latter diffusion coefficient is more than hundred times smaller than the parallel diffusion coefficient. This result is relevant to explain observations in the solar system where such small perpendicular diffusion coefficients have been reported.

  14. Personal dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for 1252 radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Otto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides are useful for routine calculations in radiation protection in industry, medicine and research. They give a simple and often sufficient estimate of dose rates during production, handling and storage of radionuclide sources, based solely on the source's activity. The latest compilation of such conversion coefficients dates from 20 y ago, based on nuclear decay data published 30 y ago. The present publication provides radionuclide-specific conversion coefficients to personal dose based on the most recent evaluations of nuclear decay data for 1252 radionuclides and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic radiations. It contains previously unknown conversion coefficients for >400 nuclides and corrects those conversion coefficients that were based on erroneous decay schemes. For the first time, estimates for the protection quantity Hp(3) are included.

  15. PAC91 - PROPERTIES AND COEFFICIENTS 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    The two principal functions of PAC91 are to provide a means of generating theoretical thermodynamic functions from molecular constant data and to supply a means of fitting these functions to empirical equations by using a least-squares fit. The coefficients obtained from the fit may then be used to generate a library of thermodynamic data in a uniform and easy-to-use format for use in other computer codes. Several large compilations of selected or calculated thermodynamic data currently exist. Nevertheless, there is a continuing need for additional calculations due to the discovery of new species, the revision of existing molecular constant data and structural parameters, the need for data at temperatures other than those already published, the availability of new or revised heats of formation, dissociation or transition, and the revision of fundamental constants or atomic weights. Calculations may also be needed to compare the results of assuming various possible forms of the partition function. In addition, there is often a preference for thermodynamic data in functional rather than tabular form. In order to satisfy these needs, the PAC91 program can perform any combination of the following: (1) calculate thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy) for any set of 1 to 202 temperatures, (2) obtain a least-squares fit of the first three of these functions (either individually, two at a time, or all three simultaneously) for up to eight temperature intervals, and (3) calculate, as a function of temperature, heats of formation and equilibrium constants from assigned reference elements. The thermodynamic functions for ideal gases may be calculated from molecular constant data using one of several partition function variations provided by the program. For monatomic gases, one of three partition function cutoff techniques may be selected by the user, and unobserved but predicted electronic energy levels may be included by the program

  16. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression over the entire UV-visible spectral range. These results are compared to results obtained from the absorbance measurements obtained in the field. The differences in calculated Angstrom absorption exponents between the field and laboratory measurements are attributed partly to the differences in time resolution of the sample collection resulting in heavier particle pileup on the filter surface of the 12-hour samples. Some differences in calculated results can also be attributed to the presence of narrow band absorbers below 400 nm that do not fall in the wavelengths covered by the 7 wavelengths of the aethalometer. 1. Marley, N.A., J.S. Gaffney, J.C. Baird, C.A. Blazer, P.J. Drayton, and J.E. Frederick, "The determination of scattering and absorption coefficients of size-fractionated aerosols for radiative transfer calculations." Aerosol Sci. Technol., 34, 535-549, (2001). This work was conducted as part of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program as part of the Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City during MILAGRO. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329. We also wish to thank Mexican Scientists and students for their assistance from the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  17. Spatial Correlation Coefficient Images for Ultrasonic Detection (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    for image formation and detection based on the similarity of adjacent signals. Signal similarity is quantified in terms of the correlation coefficient calculated...between A-scans digitized at adjacent measurement positions. Correlation coefficient images are introduced for visualizing the similarity...beam field with the defect. Correlation coefficient and C-scan images are shown to demonstrate flat-bottom-hole detection in a stainless steel annular

  18. Lock Culvert Valve Loss Coefficients. Hydraulic Laboratory Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    expansion on valve loss coefficients.,_ DO FORM M4 EDITION OF INOV 6S IS OBSOLETE Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (tan Data Entered) Ot...v 1 /2g where K = valve loss coefficient v AE = energy loss of the valve, ft V = average velocity in the culvert upstream from the valve, fps g...22g , to the head loss the total energy loss at the valve section, AE , was determined. The valve loss coefficient was then computed using Equation I

  19. DCFPAK: Dose coefficient data file package for Sandia National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Leggett, R.W.

    1996-07-31

    The FORTRAN-based computer package DCFPAK (Dose Coefficient File Package) has been developed to provide electronic access to the dose coefficient data files summarized in Federal Guidance Reports 11 and 12. DCFPAK also provides access to standard information regarding decay chains and assembles dose coefficients for all dosimetrically significant radioactive progeny of a specified radionuclide. DCFPAK was designed for application on a PC but, with minor modifications, may be implemented on a UNIX workstation.

  20. Scanning measurement of Seebeck coefficient of a heated sample

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Iwanaga, Shiho

    2016-04-19

    A novel scanning Seebeck coefficient measurement technique is disclosed utilizing a cold scanning thermocouple probe tip on heated bulk and thin film samples. The system measures variations in the Seebeck coefficient within the samples. The apparatus may be used for two dimensional mapping of the Seebeck coefficient on the bulk and thin film samples. This technique can be utilized for detection of defective regions, as well as phase separations in the sub-mm range of various thermoelectric materials.

  1. Discharge coefficients of impingement and film cooling holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, T.; Brown, A.; Garret, S.

    1985-03-01

    In this article measurements of fluid flow through impingement and film cooling holes for typical turbine blade cooling systems are presented. The purpose of the measurements was to determine hole discharge coefficients over a range of Reynolds numbers from 5,000 to 30,000 and to observe in this range the dependence of discharge coefficient on Reynolds number. The effect of hole geometry, that is, sharp edged inlet or corner radius inlet, on discharge coefficients is also measured. Correlations relating discharge coefficients to Reynolds number, corner radius to hole diameter ratio, and blowing parameter are suggested.

  2. Coefficients of convergent multiple Walsh-Paley series

    SciTech Connect

    Plotnikov, Mikhail G

    2012-09-30

    The paper is concerned with the behaviour of the coefficients of multiple Walsh-Paley series that are cube convergent to a finite sum. It is shown that even an everywhere convergent series of this kind may contain coefficients with numbers from a sufficiently large set that grow faster than any preassigned sequence. By Cohen's theorem, this sort of thing cannot happen for multiple trigonometric series that are cube convergent on a set of full measure - their coefficients cannot grow even exponentially. Null subsequences of coefficients are determined for multiple Walsh-Paley series that are cube convergent on a set of definite measure. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  3. On the relationship between coefficient alpha and composite reliability.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Robert A; Kim, Yeolib

    2013-01-01

    Cronbach's coefficient alpha is the most widely used estimator of the reliability of tests and scales. However, it has been criticized as being a lower bound and hence underestimating true reliability. A popular alternative to coefficient alpha is composite reliability, which is usually calculated in conjunction with structural equation modeling. A quantitative analysis of 2,524 pairs of coefficient alpha and composite reliability values derived from empirical investigations revealed that although the average composite reliability value (.86) exceeded the average corresponding coefficient alpha value (.84), the difference was relatively inconsequential for practical applications such as meta-analysis.

  4. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U.

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

  5. Friction coefficient estimation using an unscented Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunshi; Liang, Bo; Iwnicki, Simon

    2014-05-01

    The friction coefficient between a railway wheel and rail surface is a crucial factor in maintaining high acceleration and braking performance of railway vehicles; therefore, monitoring this friction coefficient is important. Due to the difficulty in directly measuring the friction coefficient, the creep force or creepage, indirect methods using state observers are used more frequently. This paper presents an approach using an unscented kalman filter to estimate the creep force and creepage and the friction coefficient from traction motor behaviours. A scaled roller rig is designed and a series of experiments is carried out to evaluate the estimator performance.

  6. Estimating varying coefficients for partial differential equation models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Cao, Jiguo; Carroll, Raymond J

    2017-01-11

    Partial differential equations (PDEs) are used to model complex dynamical systems in multiple dimensions, and their parameters often have important scientific interpretations. In some applications, PDE parameters are not constant but can change depending on the values of covariates, a feature that we call varying coefficients. We propose a parameter cascading method to estimate varying coefficients in PDE models from noisy data. Our estimates of the varying coefficients are shown to be consistent and asymptotically normally distributed. The performance of our method is evaluated by a simulation study and by an empirical study estimating three varying coefficients in a PDE model arising from LIDAR data.

  7. Sedimentation of multicomponent viruses: evaluation of sedimentation coefficient ratios.

    PubMed

    Larcom, L L; Barnett, O W

    1978-01-01

    Ratios of the sedimentation coefficients for alfalfa mosaic virus components are shown to be independent of the virus concentration and the density of the solvent. Different numbers of components are observed in solvents of different density. This implies that in sedimentation velocity experiments an estimate of the number of components of a multicomponent virus should involve centrifugation in solvents of different density. For some viruses, estimates of the sedimentation coefficients of individual components can be obtained from the coefficient ratios observed in unfractionated solutions and the sedimentation coefficient of the most easily purified component.

  8. Kinetic theory of the interdiffusion coefficient in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.

    1986-08-01

    Naive applications of Spitzer's theory to very dense plasmas can lead to negative diffusion coefficients. The interdiffusion coefficients in Binary Ionic Mixtures (two species of point ions in a uniform neutralizing background) have been calculated recently using molecular dynamics techniques. These calculations can provide useful benchmarks for theoretical evaluations of the diffusion coefficient in dense plasma mixtures. This paper gives a brief description of a kinetic theoretic approximation to the diffusion coefficient which generalizes Spitzer to high density and is in excellent agreement with the computer simulations. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Effect of kinetic boundary condition on the thermal transpiration coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Amakawa, Kenjiro

    2014-12-01

    The effect of kinetic boundary condition on the free molecular thermal transpiration coefficient γ is analyzed numerically. The Maxwell model boundary condition is applied in its original form in the sense that its accommodation coefficient depends on the speed of incident molecules. The results show that the value of γ depends much on the velocity dependency of the accommodation coefficient. The experimental result, γ < 0.5, can be reproduced if the grazing molecules reflect diffusely. This makes a sharp contrast with the previous works that γ =0.5 for the velocity independent accommodation coefficient.

  10. Methods of Calculation of a Friction Coefficient: Application to Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servantie, J.; Gaspard, P.

    2003-10-01

    In this Letter we develop theoretical and numerical methods to calculate the dynamic friction coefficient. The theoretical method is based on an adiabatic approximation which allows us to express the dynamic friction coefficient in terms of the time integral of the autocorrelation function of the force between both sliding objects. The motion of the objects and the autocorrelation function can be numerically calculated by molecular-dynamics simulations. We have successfully applied these methods to the evaluation of the dynamic friction coefficient of the relative motion of two concentric carbon nanotubes. The dynamic friction coefficient is shown to increase with the temperature.

  11. C-Depth Method to Determine Diffusion Coefficient and Partition Coefficient of PCB in Building Materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Kolarik, Barbara; Gunnarsen, Lars; Zhang, Yinping

    2015-10-20

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found to be persistent in the environment and possibly harmful. Many buildings are characterized with high PCB concentrations. Knowledge about partitioning between primary sources and building materials is critical for exposure assessment and practical remediation of PCB contamination. This study develops a C-depth method to determine diffusion coefficient (D) and partition coefficient (K), two key parameters governing the partitioning process. For concrete, a primary material studied here, relative standard deviations of results among five data sets are 5%-22% for K and 42-66% for D. Compared with existing methods, C-depth method overcomes the inability to obtain unique estimation for nonlinear regression and does not require assumed correlations for D and K among congeners. Comparison with a more sophisticated two-term approach implies significant uncertainty for D, and smaller uncertainty for K. However, considering uncertainties associated with sampling and chemical analysis, and impact of environmental factors, the results are acceptable for engineering applications. This was supported by good agreement between model prediction and measurement. Sensitivity analysis indicated that effective diffusion distance, contacting time of materials with primary sources, and depth of measured concentrations are critical for determining D, and PCB concentration in primary sources is critical for K.

  12. Growth reduction after defoliation is independent of CO2 supply in deciduous and evergreen young oaks.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Sandra; Palacio, Sara; Hoch, Günter

    2017-02-27

    Reduced productivity of trees after defoliation might be caused by limited carbon (C) availability. We investigated the combined effect of different atmospheric CO2 concentrations (160, 280 and 560 ppm) and early season defoliation on the growth and C reserves (nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC)) of saplings of two oak species with different leaf habits (deciduous Quercus petraea and evergreen Quercus ilex). In both species, higher CO2 supply significantly enhanced growth. Defoliation had a strong negative impact on growth (stronger for Q. ilex), but the relative reduction of growth caused by defoliation within each CO2 treatment was very similar across all three CO2 concentrations. Low CO2 and defoliation led to decreased NSC tissue concentrations mainly in the middle of the growing season in Q. ilex, but not in Q. petraea. However, also in Q. ilex, NSC increased in woody tissues in defoliated and low-CO2 saplings towards the end of the growing season. Although the saplings were C limited under these specific experimental conditions, growth reduction after defoliation was not directly caused by C limitation. Rather, growth of trees followed a strong allometric relationship between total leaf area and conductive woody tissue, which did not change across species, CO2 concentrations and defoliation treatments.

  13. On a Variable-Coefficient Modified KP Equation and a Generalized Variable-Coefficient KP Equation with Computerized Symbolic Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi-Tian; Tian, Bo

    The variable-coefficient nonlinear evolution equations, although realistically modeling various mechanical and physical situations, often cause some well-known powerful methods not to work efficiently. In this paper, we extend the power of the generalized hyperbolic-function method, which is based on the computerized symbolic computation, to a variable-coefficient modified Kadomtsov-Petviashvili (KP) equation and a generalized variable-coefficient KP equation. New exact analytic solutions thus come out.

  14. Binary-YORP Coefficients for Known Asteroid Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jay W.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    The binary YORP (bYORP) effect has been hypothesized to be a significant factor in the evolution of near-Earth binary asteroid systems (Cuk and Burns, Icarus, v.176, pp.418-431, 2005; McMahon and Scheeres, CMDA, v.106, pp.261-300, 2010). However, understanding of the coefficient values for realistic asteroid shapes is lacking due to the small number of shape models available for the generally smaller secondary asteroids. Until now, we have only calculated the coefficients based on the shape of 1999 KW4 Beta, although various studies by other authors have computed coefficients for artificially generated asteroids based on Gaussian Spheres and some shape models without self-shadowing (Steinberg and Sari, The Astronomical Journal, v.141, pp.55-64, 2011). We also scaled the 1999 KW4 Beta coefficients to other binary systems with no knowledge of the other systems' secondary shapes in order to make evolutionary predictions (McMahon and Scheeres, Icarus Vol. 209, pp 494-509, 2010). In this study, we compute the bYORP coefficient for a range of asteroid shapes, using these as a stand-in for actual secondaries. This allows us to circumvent the lack of information on binary asteroid secondaries and to develop a richer database of realistic coefficients. While this approach may miss some key features of binary secondaries, at the least it provides some statistics on the expected variability of the bYORP coefficient. We analyze all available asteroid shape models on the PDS-SBN, including radar-based shape models and models estimated from past spacecraft missions. The coefficients are computed with an updated algorithm that includes the effects of self-shadowing. We also present the coefficients for perturbed versions of the available shape models, which give effective error bars to the computed coefficients due to inexact shape models. Finally, we discuss the dynamical implications of the derived bYORP coefficients on binary asteroid evolution.

  15. Effect of matrix on the dry friction coefficient of unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren, V. I.; Savitskii, A. V.; Lyashkov, A. I.; Mamalimov, R. I.

    2008-10-01

    The coefficients of dry rest (μ0) and sliding (μ s ) friction on a polished disk made of quenched steel have been measured for various polymer matrices and fibers and for a composite unidirectionally reinforced with poly(amidobenzimidazole) (PABI) fibers. It is established that μ0 > μ s for matrices and fibers with glass transition temperatures T g below room temperature T R , otherwise μ0 ≈ μ s . This effect is explained by a sharp growth in the plasticity of polymers at T g , which leads to an increase in the polymer-steel contact area. For a composite with T g > T R , the dry friction coefficients obey the relation μ0 ≈ μ s ≈ μ e / C, where μ e is the coefficients of sliding friction of PABI fibers and C is their concentration. For T g < T R (plastic matrix), the friction coefficients of the composite and matrix are close because the latter cannot hold the fiber ends during friction. As a result, they are bent and aligned along the matrix surface or embedded in the surface layer.

  16. Eyelid Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... a microscope). The growth is usually removed surgically. Did You Know... A growth on the eyelid that ... respond to initial treatments. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  17. Mouth Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... the area (for example, biting a cheek or scraping by a sharp tooth edge or dental restoration). ... growth has the appearance of thrush, doctors examine scrapings under a microscope. For other growths that have ...

  18. Coefficient of distribution of some organophosphorous pesticides in rat tissue.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Repetto, R; Martinez, D; Repetto, M

    1995-06-01

    Coefficient of distribution in tissue is proposed as an indicator of the affinity of xenobiotics for different tissues and their tendency to accumulate. The present study shows the distribution of some organophosphorous pesticides in rat tissues. Using the coefficient of distribution we established the preference of these insecticides for the various tissues. Each pesticide had a specific pattern of affinity for different tissues.

  19. Factor Scores, Structure and Communality Coefficients: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odum, Mary

    2011-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this paper is to present an easy-to-understand primer on three important concepts of factor analysis: Factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Given that statistical analyses are a part of a global general linear model (GLM), and utilize weights as an integral part of analyses (Thompson, 2006;…

  20. Micro- and macroscale coefficients of friction of cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lomboy, Gilson; Sundararajan, Sriram; Wang, Kejin

    2013-12-15

    Millions of metric tons of cementitious materials are produced, transported and used in construction each year. The ease or difficulty of handling cementitious materials is greatly influenced by the material friction properties. In the present study, the coefficients of friction of cementitious materials were measured at the microscale and macroscale. The materials tested were commercially-available Portland cement, Class C fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag. At the microscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from the interaction forces between cementitious particles using an Atomic Force Microscope. At the macroscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from stresses on bulk cementitious materials under direct shear. The study indicated that the microscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.020 to 0.059, and the macroscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.56 to 0.75. The fly ash studied had the highest microscale coefficient of friction and the lowest macroscale coefficient of friction. -- Highlights: •Microscale (interparticle) coefficient of friction (COF) was determined with AFM. •Macroscale (bulk) COF was measured under direct shear. •Fly ash had the highest microscale COF and the lowest macroscale COF. •Portland cement against GGBFS had the lowest microscale COF. •Portland cement against Portland cement had the highest macroscale COF.

  1. Testing the Difference of Correlated Agreement Coefficients for Statistical Significance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwet, Kilem L.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the problem of testing the difference between two correlated agreement coefficients for statistical significance. A number of authors have proposed methods for testing the difference between two correlated kappa coefficients, which require either the use of resampling methods or the use of advanced statistical modeling…

  2. Analysis of a heat transfer device for measuring film coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medrow, R. A.; Johnson, R. L.; Loomis, W. R.; Wedeven, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    A heat transfer device consisting of a heated rotating cylinder in a bath was analyzed for its effectiveness to determine heat transfer coefficient of fluids. A time dependent analysis shows that the performance is insensitive to the value of heat transfer coefficient with the given rig configuration.

  3. Visualising the Roots of Quadratic Equations with Complex Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a natural extension of the root visualisation techniques first presented by Bardell (2012) for quadratic equations with real coefficients. Consideration is now given to the familiar quadratic equation "y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c" in which the coefficients "a," "b," "c" are generally…

  4. Temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Dubtsov, S. N.; Baklanov, A. M.

    2008-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles in gases has been experimentally studied. It is established that this dependence significantly differs from that predicted by various correlations, in particular, by the Cunningham-Millikan-Davies correlation that is used as an instrumental basis for virtually all methods of measurement of the diffusion coefficient in aerosols.

  5. Biases and Standard Errors of Standardized Regression Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Chan, Wai

    2011-01-01

    The paper obtains consistent standard errors (SE) and biases of order O(1/n) for the sample standardized regression coefficients with both random and given predictors. Analytical results indicate that the formulas for SEs given in popular text books are consistent only when the population value of the regression coefficient is zero. The sample…

  6. Delimiting Coefficient a from Internal Consistency and Unidimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sijtsma, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    I discuss the contribution by Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love (2015) in which they relate reliability represented by coefficient a to formal definitions of internal consistency and unidimensionality, both proposed by Cronbach (1951). I argue that coefficient a is a lower bound to reliability and that concepts of internal consistency and…

  7. Graphical Solution of the Monic Quadratic Equation with Complex Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laine, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    There are many geometrical approaches to the solution of the quadratic equation with real coefficients. In this article it is shown that the monic quadratic equation with complex coefficients can also be solved graphically, by the intersection of two hyperbolas; one hyperbola being derived from the real part of the quadratic equation and one from…

  8. A program to compute aquifer-response coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maddock, Thomas

    1974-01-01

    An alternating direction technique is used to solve finite difference equations approximating the flow of water in an aquifer. The solutions produce response coefficients relating pumping from wells to drawdowns within those wells. The product of the response coefficient with the pumping values produces a linear algebraic technological function that can be used for integrating hydrologic phenomena into planning and management models.

  9. Thermosphere Density Variability, Drag Coefficients, and Precision Satellite Orbits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-29

    complex satellites. 1 Introduction Atmospheric density and drag coefficient modeling have long been among the greatest uncertainties in the...limitation of existing theories for satellite drag coefficients. In addition, the research will examine whether modern computational fluids...2005) gives an introduction to the neutral atmosphere and the time varying effects on the thermospheric and exospheric density. These time varying

  10. ESTIMATING DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR NONIONIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A literature search was performed for dissolved organic carbon/water partition coefficients for nonionic chemicals (Kdoc) and Kdoc data was taken from more than sixty references. The Kdoc data were evaluated as a function of the n-octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow). A pre...

  11. REE and Strontium Partition Coefficients for Nakhla Pyroxenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oe, K.; McKay, G.; Le, L.

    2001-01-01

    We present new partition coefficients for REE and Sr determined using a synthetic melt that crystallizes pyroxenes very similar in composition to Nakhla pyroxene cores. We believe these are the most appropriate partition coefficients to use in studying Nakhla Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract..

  12. Determination of storage coefficients during pumping and recovery.

    PubMed

    Ashjari, Javad

    2013-01-01

    An aquifer test is used mostly to determine the storage coefficient and transmissivity. Although residual drawdown data are widely used in estimating the transmissivity of aquifers, the estimation of storage coefficients with recovery data is controversial. Some researchers have proposed methods to estimate storage coefficients with recovery data by assuming equality of storage coefficients for the recovery and pumping periods (S = S'). The aim of this study is to determine storage coefficients without such an assumption, that is, S≠S'. The method is a modified version of Banton-Bangoy's method without considering drawdown data due to pumping. Drawdown is plotted vs. the logarithmic ratio (t'/t) or time since pumping stopped to the duration of pumping and the ratio of storage coefficient during recovery to the storage coefficient from the pumping period (S'/S). The method is verified with one case study and two synthetic examples. Thus, it is possible to determine storage coefficient of pumping period accurately without any data from pumping period by recovery data.

  13. The dyadic diffraction coefficient for a curved edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouyoumjian, R. G.; Pathak, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    A compact dyadic diffraction coefficient for electromagnetic waves obliquely incident on a curved edge formed by perfectly conducting curved or plane surfaces is obtained. This diffraction coefficent remains valid in the transition regions adjacent to shadow and reflection boundaries, where the diffraction coefficients of Keller's original theory fail. The method is on Keller's method of the canonical problem, which in this case is the perfectly conducting wedge illuminated by plane, cylindrical, conical, and spherical waves. When the proper ray fixed coordinate system is introduced, the dyadic diffraction coefficient for the wedge is found to be the sum of only two dyads, and it is shown that this is also true for the dyadic diffraction coefficients of higher order edges. One dyad contains the acoustic soft diffraction coefficient; the other dyad contains the acoustic hard diffraction coefficient. The expressions for the acoustic wedge diffraction coefficients contain Fresnel integrals, which ensure that the total field is continuous at shadow and reflection boundaries. The diffraction coefficients have the same form for the different types of edge illumination; only the arguments of the Fresnel integrals are different. Since diffraction is a local phenomenon, and locally the curved edge structure is wedge shaped, this result is readily extended to the curved edge.

  14. An Investigation of the Sampling Distributions of Equating Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Frank B.

    1996-01-01

    Using the characteristic curve method for dichotomously scored test items, the sampling distributions of equating coefficients were examined. Simulations indicate that for the equating conditions studied, the sampling distributions of the equating coefficients appear to have acceptable characteristics, suggesting confidence in the values obtained…

  15. Studying the vertical aerosol extinction coefficient by comparing in situ airborne data and elastic backscatter lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Herrmann, Erik; Bucci, Silvia; Fierli, Federico; Cairo, Francesco; Gysel, Martin; Tillmann, Ralf; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Di Liberto, Luca; Di Donfrancesco, Guido; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Weingartner, Ernest; Virtanen, Annele; Mentel, Thomas F.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol particle optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ˜ 50 and 800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol particle size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a single wavelength polarization diversity elastic lidar system provided estimates of aerosol extinction coefficients using the Klett method to accomplish the inversion of the signal, for a vertically resolved comparison between in situ and remote-sensing results. Note, however, that the comparison was for the most part done in the altitude range where the overlap function is incomplete and accordingly uncertainties are larger. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20 % was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 and 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ˜ 10:00 LT - local time) before the mixing layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ˜ 12:00 LT) the ML was fully developed, resulting in

  16. Zero Pearson coefficient for strongly correlated growing trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Ferreira, A. L.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2010-03-01

    We obtained Pearson’s coefficient of strongly correlated recursive networks growing by preferential attachment of every new vertex by m edges. We found that the Pearson coefficient is exactly zero in the infinite network limit for the recursive trees (m=1) . If the number of connections of new vertices exceeds one (m>1) , then the Pearson coefficient in the infinite networks equals zero only when the degree distribution exponent γ does not exceed 4. We calculated the Pearson coefficient for finite networks and observed a slow power-law-like approach to an infinite network limit. Our findings indicate that Pearson’s coefficient strongly depends on size and details of networks, which makes this characteristic virtually useless for quantitative comparison of different networks.

  17. Zero Pearson coefficient for strongly correlated growing trees.

    PubMed

    Dorogovtsev, S N; Ferreira, A L; Goltsev, A V; Mendes, J F F

    2010-03-01

    We obtained Pearson's coefficient of strongly correlated recursive networks growing by preferential attachment of every new vertex by m edges. We found that the Pearson coefficient is exactly zero in the infinite network limit for the recursive trees (m=1). If the number of connections of new vertices exceeds one (m>1), then the Pearson coefficient in the infinite networks equals zero only when the degree distribution exponent gamma does not exceed 4. We calculated the Pearson coefficient for finite networks and observed a slow power-law-like approach to an infinite network limit. Our findings indicate that Pearson's coefficient strongly depends on size and details of networks, which makes this characteristic virtually useless for quantitative comparison of different networks.

  18. Direct Extraction of One-loop Integral Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Forde, Darren

    2007-04-16

    We present a general procedure for obtaining the coefficients of the scalar bubble and triangle integral functions of one-loop amplitudes. Coefficients are extracted by considering two-particle and triple unitarity cuts of the corresponding bubble and triangle integral functions. After choosing a specific parameterization of the cut loop momentum we can uniquely identify the coefficients of the desired integral functions simply by examining the behavior of the cut integrand as the unconstrained parameters of the cut loop momentum approach infinity. In this way we can produce compact forms for scalar integral coefficients. Applications of this method are presented for both QCD and electroweak processes, including an alternative form for the recently computed three-mass triangle coefficient in the six-photon amplitude A{sub 6}(1{sup -}, 2{sup +}, 3{sup -}, 4{sup +}, 5{sup -}, 6{sup +}). The direct nature of this extraction procedure allows for a very straightforward automation of the procedure.

  19. Nonlinear Varying Coefficient Models with Applications to Studying Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kürüm, Esra; Li, Runze; Wang, Yang; ŞEntürk, Damla

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by a study on factors affecting the level of photosynthetic activity in a natural ecosystem, we propose nonlinear varying coefficient models, in which the relationship between the predictors and the response variable is allowed to be nonlinear. One-step local linear estimators are developed for the nonlinear varying coefficient models and their asymptotic normality is established leading to point-wise asymptotic confidence bands for the coefficient functions. Two-step local linear estimators are also proposed for cases where the varying coefficient functions admit different degrees of smoothness; bootstrap confidence intervals are utilized for inference based on the two-step estimators. We further propose a generalized F test to study whether the coefficient functions vary over a covariate. We illustrate the proposed methodology via an application to an ecology data set and study the finite sample performance by Monte Carlo simulation studies. PMID:24976756

  20. Nonlinear Varying Coefficient Models with Applications to Studying Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kürüm, Esra; Li, Runze; Wang, Yang; SEntürk, Damla

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by a study on factors affecting the level of photosynthetic activity in a natural ecosystem, we propose nonlinear varying coefficient models, in which the relationship between the predictors and the response variable is allowed to be nonlinear. One-step local linear estimators are developed for the nonlinear varying coefficient models and their asymptotic normality is established leading to point-wise asymptotic confidence bands for the coefficient functions. Two-step local linear estimators are also proposed for cases where the varying coefficient functions admit different degrees of smoothness; bootstrap confidence intervals are utilized for inference based on the two-step estimators. We further propose a generalized F test to study whether the coefficient functions vary over a covariate. We illustrate the proposed methodology via an application to an ecology data set and study the finite sample performance by Monte Carlo simulation studies.

  1. Feature Selection for Varying Coefficient Models With Ultrahigh Dimensional Covariates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyuan; Li, Runze; Wu, Rongling

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with feature screening and variable selection for varying coefficient models with ultrahigh dimensional covariates. We propose a new feature screening procedure for these models based on conditional correlation coefficient. We systematically study the theoretical properties of the proposed procedure, and establish their sure screening property and the ranking consistency. To enhance the finite sample performance of the proposed procedure, we further develop an iterative feature screening procedure. Monte Carlo simulation studies were conducted to examine the performance of the proposed procedures. In practice, we advocate a two-stage approach for varying coefficient models. The two stage approach consists of (a) reducing the ultrahigh dimensionality by using the proposed procedure and (b) applying regularization methods for dimension-reduced varying coefficient models to make statistical inferences on the coefficient functions. We illustrate the proposed two-stage approach by a real data example.

  2. Drag coefficient modeling for grace using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Piyush M.; McLaughlin, Craig A.; Sutton, Eric K.

    2013-12-01

    Drag coefficient is a major source of uncertainty in predicting the orbit of a satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). Computational methods like the Test Particle Monte Carlo (TPMC) and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) are important tools in accurately computing physical drag coefficients. However, the methods are computationally expensive and cannot be employed real time. Therefore, modeling of the physical drag coefficient is required. This work presents a technique of developing parameterized drag coefficients models using the DSMC method. The technique is validated by developing a model for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite. Results show that drag coefficients computed using the developed model for GRACE agree to within 1% with those computed using DSMC.

  3. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J.; Cox, D. M.; Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P. J.; Barton, C. J.; Jenkins, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of 154Sm, 152Sm and 166Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  4. In Situ Effective Diffusion Coefficient Profiles in Live Biofilms Using Pulsed-Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Majors, Paul D.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Ahmed, B.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2010-08-15

    Diffusive mass transfer in biofilms is characterized by the effective diffusion coefficient. It is well-documented that the effective diffusion coefficient can vary by location in a biofilm. The current literature is dominated by effective diffusion coefficient measurements for distinct cell clusters and stratified biofilms showing this spatial variation. Regardless of whether distinct cell clusters or surface-averaging methods are used, position-dependent measurements of the effective diffusion coefficient are currently: 1) invasive to the biofilm, 2) performed under unnatural conditions, 3) lethal to cells, and/or 4) spatially restricted to only certain regions of the biofilm. Invasive measurements can lead to inaccurate results and prohibit further (time dependent) measurements which are important for the mathematical modeling of biofilms. In this study our goals were to: 1) measure the effective diffusion coefficient for water in live biofilms, 2) monitor how the effective diffusion coefficient changes over time under growth conditions, and 3) correlate the effective diffusion coefficient with depth in the biofilm. We measured in situ two-dimensional effective diffusion coefficient maps within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1biofilms using pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance methods, and used them to calculate surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) profiles. We found that 1) Drs decreased from the top of the biofilm to the bottom, 2) Drs profiles differed for biofilms of different ages, 3) Drs profiles changed over time and generally decreased with time, 4) all the biofilms showed very similar Drs profiles near the top of the biofilm, and 5) the Drs profile near the bottom of the biofilm was different for each biofilm. Practically, our results demonstrate that advanced biofilm models should use a variable effective diffusivity which changes with time and location in the biofilm.

  5. Variable-Coefficient Forced Burgers System in Nonlinear Fluid Mechanics and its Possibly Observable Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi-Tian; Xu, Xiao-Ge; Tian, Bo

    The forced Burgers equation works as a testing ground for a real turbulence, and as the qualitative model for a wide variety of problems including charge density waves, vortex lines in superconductors, disordered solids and epitaxial growth, etc. Its variable-coefficient generalizations call for better modeling of the physical situations. In this paper, we investigate a variable-coefficient generalization of the forced Burgers equation, and obtain several sets of exact soliton-like and other exact analytic solutions, via the extension of a generalized hyperbolic-function method with computerized symbolic computation. We also discuss the Wu method. We find some possibly observable effects, which might be discovered with the relevant experiments.

  6. Determination of the Peltier coefficient for gallium arsenide in a vertical Bridgman furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegel, Michaela E. K.; Matthiesen, David H.

    2011-10-01

    The Peltier coefficient for gallium arsenide solid in contact with its melt was experimentally determined. Selenium doped gallium arsenide samples were hermetically sealed in a fused quartz ampoule and processed in a vertical Bridgman furnace. During the translation period seven sequences of current-on and current-off periods were processed into the solidifying crystal. An axial slice was mechanochemically polished and then etched. Photomicrographs of the slice were taken with differential interference contrast microscopy and were used to measure the thickness of the current-on and current-off layers. These results were used to calculate growth rates from which the Peltier coefficient was calculated. An average value of 0.107±0.015 V was determined. The values calculated from the different sequences were in excellent agreement with each other even though the sequences had different current densities, current-on durations, and current-on to current-off ratios.

  7. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  8. Effects of Applied Electric Current on the Tip Radius and the Universal Amplitude Coefficient of a Single Growing Dendrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasresfahani, Mohammad Reza; Niroumand, Behzad; Kermanpur, Ahmad; Raeissi, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Modification of solidification structures by applying electric current has been the subject of interest in recent years. However, the exact relationships between the dendrite growth parameters and the current density are not yet clear. The dendrite tip geometry is an important growth parameter which can be characterized using the dendrite tip radius and the universal amplitude coefficient. In this paper, the dendrite tip shape was investigated in the absence and presence of an electric field using a transparent model material, i.e. the succinonitrile-acetone alloy. The results showed that both dendrite tip radius and universal amplitude coefficient increased by increasing the applied current density. The increase in the tip radius was attributed to the Joule heat produced at the solid-liquid interface which reduced the interface undercooling. The increase in the universal amplitude coefficient was postulated to be due to the changes in the distribution coefficient of the alloy system which would result in higher solute concentration in front of the solid-liquid interface. Owing to the increased universal amplitude coefficient, more prominent dendritic fins were observed at dendrites tips under electric current.

  9. Factors influencing the stream-aquifer flow exchange coefficient.

    PubMed

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J; Mehl, Steffen; Morgado, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of river gain from or loss to a hydraulically connected water table aquifer is crucial in issues of water rights and also when attempting to optimize conjunctive use of surface and ground waters. Typically in groundwater models this exchange flow is related to a difference in head between the river and some point in the aquifer, through a "coefficient." This coefficient has been defined differently as well as the location for the head in the aquifer. This paper proposes a new coefficient, analytically derived, and a specific location for the point where the aquifer head is used in the difference. The dimensionless part of the coefficient is referred to as the SAFE (stream-aquifer flow exchange) dimensionless conductance. The paper investigates the factors that influence the value of this new conductance. Among these factors are (1) the wetted perimeter of the cross-section, (2) the degree of penetration of the cross-section, and (3) the shape of the cross-section. The study shows that these factors just listed are indeed ordered in their respective level of importance. In addition the study verifies that the analytical correct value of the coefficient is matched by finite difference simulation only if the grid system is sufficiently fine. Thus the use of the analytical value of the coefficient is an accurate and efficient alternative to ad hoc estimates for the coefficient typically used in finite difference and finite element methods.

  10. Fast and efficient: postnatal growth and energy expenditure in an Arctic-breeding waterbird, the Red-throated Loon (Gavia stellata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizzolo, Daniel; Schmutz, Joel A.; Speakman, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental conditions can exert a strong influence on the growth and energy demands of chicks. We hypothesized that postnatal growth in a cold, aquatic environment would require a high level of energy metabolism in semiprecocial Red-throated Loon (Gavia stellata) chicks. We measured body-mass growth and daily energy expenditure (DEE) of free-ranging chicks in the Arctic. We used daily gains in body mass and DEE to estimate daily metabolizable energy (DME, kJ day-1) and total metabolizable energy (TME, kJ chick-1). Chicks gained body mass quickly, with a logistic growth rate constant 57% greater than the allometric prediction, yet were at only 60% of adult body mass at fledging. Males grew at a rate similar to that of females but for a slightly longer duration and so reached an asymptotic body mass 23% greater, and tarsus length 8% longer, than that of females. Chick growth performance was similar between first- and second-hatched chicks within broods of 2, which suggests that food availability was not limited. DEE increased in proportion to body mass, and DME peaked at 1,214 kJ day-1 on day 25 posthatching. Over the average 49-day postnatal period, TME was 49.0 MJ, which is within the range of error of the allometric prediction. Parents provided 58.6 MJ as food to meet this energy requirement. Given this chick energy requirement and the range of energy content of prey observed in the chick diet, selecting prey with higher energy content would greatly reduce adult provisioning effort. Red-throated Loon chicks did not have a high postnatal energy requirement, but rather grew quickly and fledged at a small size-with the effect of reducing the length of the postnatal period and, consequently, parental energy investment in chicks.

  11. A metabolic derivation of tritium transfer coefficients in animal products.

    PubMed

    Galeriu, D; Crout, N M; Melintescu, A; Beresford, N A; Peterson, S R; Van Hees, M

    2001-12-01

    Tritium is a potentially important environmental contaminant originating from the nuclear industry, and its behaviour in the environment is controlled by that of hydrogen. Animal food products represent a potentially important source of tritium in the human diet and a number of transfer coefficient values for tritium transfer to a limited number of animal products are available. In this paper we present an approach for the derivation of tritium transfer coefficients which is based on the metabolism of hydrogen in animals. The derived transfer coefficients separately account for transfer to and from free (i.e. water) and organically bound tritium. A novel aspect of the approach is that tritium transfer can be predicted for any animal product for which the required metabolic input parameters are available. The predicted transfer coefficients are compared to available independent data. Agreement is good (R2=0.97) with the exception of the transfer coefficient for transfer from tritiated water to organically bound tritium in ruminants. This may be attributable to the particular characteristics of ruminant digestion. We show that tritium transfer coefficients will vary in response to the metabolic status of an animal (e.g. stage of lactation, diet digestibility etc.) and that the use of a single transfer coefficient from diet to animal product is inappropriate. It is possible to derive concentration ratio values from the estimated transfer coefficients which relate the concentration of tritiated water and organically bound tritium in an animal product to their respective concentrations in the animals diet. These concentration ratios are shown to be less subject to metabolic variation and may be more useful radioecological parameters than transfer coefficients. For tritiated water the concentration ratio shows little variation between animal products ranging from 0.59 to 0.82. In the case of organically bound tritium the concentration ratios vary between animal products

  12. Determination of aragonite trace element distribution coefficients from speleothem calcite-aragonite transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassenburg, J. A.; Scholz, D.; Jochum, K. P.; Cheng, H.; Oster, J.; Immenhauser, A.; Richter, D. K.; Häger, T.; Jamieson, R. A.; Baldini, J. U. L.; Hoffmann, D.; Breitenbach, S. F. M.

    2016-10-01

    The processes that govern the incorporation of (trace) elements into speleothems can often be linked to environmental changes. Although element incorporation into speleothem calcite is now reasonably well understood, current knowledge regarding trace element variability in speleothem aragonite is very limited. Of particular interest is whether trace element distribution coefficients are above or below one in order to assess the extent to which prior aragonite precipitation has affected speleothem aragonite trace element records. This study uses nine calcite-to-aragonite transitions in seven speleothems from diverse environmental settings to derive the first quantitative estimates of the distribution coefficients for several elements in speleothem aragonite: DMg(Ar) = 9.7E-5 ± 9.01E-5, DBa(Ar) = 0.91 ± 0.88, DSr(Ar) = 1.38 ± 0.53, and DU(Ar) = 6.26 ± 4.54 (1σ SD). For one speleothem from western Germany, the distribution coefficients are generally higher, which is potentially related to the very low growth rates (<11 μm/year) of this sample. In particular, DSr(Ar) appears to show a negative correlation with growth rate when growth rate is below 20 μm/year. In summary, our results demonstrate that speleothem aragonite DMg(Ar) is below one, DU(Ar) is considerably above one, and DSr(Ar) is above one or close to unity. For DBa(Ar), reaching a similar conclusion is difficult due to the relatively high uncertainty. Enhanced prior aragonite precipitation will thus result in lower U and higher Mg concentrations in speleothem aragonite, although in many cases Mg in speleothem aragonite is most likely dominated by other processes. This result suggests that U concentrations in aragonitic stalagmites could serve as a very effective proxy for palaeo-rainfall.

  13. Fractional crystallization of iron meteorites: Constant versus changing partition coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Analyses of magmatic iron meteorites, plotted on LogC(sub i) vs LogC(sub Ni) diagrams, often form linear arrays. Traditionally, this linearity has been ascribed to fractional crystallization under the assumption of constant partition coefficients (i.e., Rayleigh fractionation). Paradoxically, however, partition coefficients in the Fe-Ni-S-P system are decidedly not constant. This contribution provides a rationale for understanding how trends on LogC(sub i) vs LogC(sub Ni) diagrams can be linear, even when partition coefficients are changing rapidly.

  14. Orientation and velocity dependence of the nonequilibrium partition coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, K. M.; Jackson, K. A.

    1995-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations based on a Spin-1 Ising Model for binary alloys have been used to investigate the non-equilibrium partition coefficient (k(sub neq)) as a function of solid-liquid interface velocity and orientation. In simulations of Si with a second component k(sub neq) is greater in the [111] direction than the [100] direction in agreement with experimental results reported by Azlz et al. The simulated partition coefficient scales with the square of the step velocity divided by the diffusion coefficient of the secondary component in the liquid.

  15. The resistance coefficient of commercial round wire grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, B; Pfluger, F

    1942-01-01

    The resistance coefficients of commercial types of round wire grids were examined for the purpose of obtaining the necessary data on supercharger test stands for throttling the inducted air to a pressure corresponding to a desired air density. The measurements of the coefficients ranged up to Reynolds numbers of 1000. In the arrangement of two grids in tandem, which was necessary in order to obtain high resistance coefficients with the solidity, that is, mesh density of grid, was found to be accompanied by a further relationship with the mutual spacing of the individual grids.

  16. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients using Neural Networks for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip with vehicle lateral symmetry and compressibility effects. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. In this paper a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network. The training data for the neural network is derived from wind tunnel test and numerical simulations. The coefficients of lift, drag, pitching moment are expressed as a function of alpha (angle of attack) and Mach number. The results produced from preliminary neural network analysis are very good.

  17. Correlation of octanol/water solubility ratios and partition coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsuwan, S.; Li, A.; Yalkowsky, S.H.

    1995-05-01

    The partition coefficient between octanol and water in an important physicochemical parameter for characterizing the lipophilicity or hydrophobicity of a compound and it is used in many fields, especially in the environmental and pharmaceutical sciences. The octanol/water solubility ratio (S{sub o}/S{sub W}) was found to be highly correlated with the octanol/water partition coefficient (K{sub ow}) of 82 pharmaceutically and environmentally relevant compounds. The solubility ratio gives comparable estimates to that of the group contribution (log P(calcd)) method for estimating the partition coefficient of the compounds used in this study.

  18. On the Li Coefficients for the Hecke L-functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Sami; Ouni, Raouf; Mazhouda, Kamel

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we compute and verify the positivity of the Li coefficients for the Hecke L-functions using an arithmetic formula established in Omar and Mazhouda, J. Number Theory 125(1), 50-58 (2007) and J. Number Theory 130(4), 1098-1108 (2010) and the Serre trace formula. Additional results are presented, including new formulas for the Li coefficients and a formulation of a criterion for the partial Riemann hypothesis. Basing on the numerical computations made below, we conjecture that these coefficients are increasing in n.

  19. Maxwell boundary condition and velocity dependent accommodation coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Struchtrup, Henning

    2013-11-15

    A modification of Maxwell's boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation is developed that allows to incorporate velocity dependent accommodation coefficients into the microscopic description. As a first example, it is suggested to consider the wall-particle interaction as a thermally activated process with three parameters. A simplified averaging procedure leads to jump and slip boundary conditions for hydrodynamics. Coefficients for velocity slip, temperature jump, and thermal transpiration flow are identified and compared with those resulting from the original Maxwell model and the Cercignani-Lampis model. An extension of the model leads to temperature dependent slip and jump coefficients.

  20. Mismatch between shape changes and ecological shifts during the post-settlement growth of the surgeonfish, Acanthurus triostegus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many coral reef fishes undergo habitat and diet shifts during ontogeny. However, studies focusing on the physiological and morphological adaptations that may prepare them for these transitions are relatively scarce. Here, we explored the body shape variation related to ontogenetic shifts in the ecology of the surgeonfish Acanthurus triostegus (Acanthuridae) from new settler to adult stages at Moorea Island (French Polynesia). Specifically, we tested the relationship between diet and habitat shifts and changes in overall body shape during the ontogeny of A. triostegus using a combination of geometric morphometric methods, stomach contents and stable isotope analysis. Results After reef settlement, stable isotope composition of carbon and nitrogen revealed a change from a zooplanktivorous to a benthic algae diet. The large amount of algae (> 75% of stomach contents) found in the digestive tract of small juveniles (25–30 mm SL) suggested the diet shift is rapid. The post-settlement growth of A. triostegus is highly allometric. The allometric shape changes mainly concern cephalic and pectoral regions. The head becomes shorter and more ventrally oriented during growth. Morphological changes are directly related to the diet shift given that a small mouth ventrally oriented is particularly suited for grazing activities at the adult stage. The pectoral fin is more anteriorely and vertically positioned and its basis is larger in adults than in juveniles. This shape variation had implications for swimming performance, manoeuvrability, turning ability and is related to habitat shift. Acanthurus triostegus achieves its main transformation of body shape to an adult-like form at size of 35–40 mm SL. Conclusion Most of the shape changes occurred after the reef colonization but before the transition between juvenile habitat (fringing reef) and adult habitat (barrier reef). A large amount of allometric variation was observed after diet shift from zooplankton to