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Sample records for allopurinol xanthine oxidase

  1. Xanthine toxicity to caterpillars synergized by allopurinol, a xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Slansky, F

    1993-11-01

    Xanthine (2,6-dioxypurine), which occurs in certain legumes and other plants, was fed in artificial diet to larvae of two noctuid moth species, a legume specialist,Anticarsia gemmatalis, and a generalist,Spodoptera frugiperda. In addition, diets either lacked or contained allopurinol (4-hydroxypyrazolo(3,4-d)-pyrimidine), an inhibitor of xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase, enzymes that convert xanthine to uric acid. Xanthine alone (up to 2% fresh mass, fm) had little deleterious effect on either species, whereas allopurinol alone (up to 1% fm) had moderate but significant effects, increasing mortality, slowing development, and reducing insect biomass. At 0.5% fm allopurinol, the decrease in biomass-relative growth rate (RGR) was associated with reductions in the efficiency of conversion to biomass of digested food (ECD; both species) and in the biomass-relative consumption rate (RCR;A. gemmatalis). In addition, pupae of each species from allopurinol-fed larvae had increased water retention (i.e., lower percentage dry mass) compared with insects consuming control diet. When fed diet containing both compounds (1% fm xanthin+0.5% fm allopurinol), noA. gemmatalis and only 40% ofS. frugiperda larvae reached the prepupal stage; additionally for the latter species, there was a substantial slowing of growth and reductions in final biomass, RGR, RCR, and ECD. These results indicate a synergistic interaction, in which the effects of xanthine and allopurinol combined in the diet were significantly greater than the additive effects of each compound tested separately. Presumably, the inhibition of xanthine dehydrogenase by allopurinol prevented the absorbed xanthine from being converted to uric acid and excreted. In addition, this study expands the phenomenon of phytochemical detoxification by insects to include xanthine dehydrogenase, an enzyme generally not considered within this context. PMID:24248717

  2. Anti-nociceptive properties of the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol in mice: role of A1 adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, AP; Böhmer, AE; Antunes, C; Schallenberger, C; Porciúncula, LO; Elisabetsky, E; Lara, DR; Souza, DO

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Allopurinol is a potent inhibitor of the enzyme xanthine oxidase, used primarily in the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. It is well known that purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. We hypothesized that the inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol, thereby reducing purine degradation, could be a valid strategy to enhance purinergic activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-nociceptive profile of allopurinol on chemical and thermal pain models in mice. Experimental approach Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of vehicle (Tween 10%) or allopurinol (10–400 mg kg−1). Anti-nociceptive effects were measured with intraplantar capsaicin, intraplantar glutamate, tail-flick or hot-plate tests. Key results Allopurinol presented dose-dependent anti-nociceptive effects in all models. The opioid antagonist naloxone did not affect these anti-nociceptive effects. The non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist caffeine and the selective A1 adenosine-receptor antagonist, DPCPX, but not the selective A2A adenosine-receptor antagonist, SCH58261, completely prevented allopurinol-induced anti-nociception. No obvious motor deficits were produced by allopurinol, at doses up to 200 mg kg−1. Allopurinol also caused an increase in cerebrospinal fluid levels of purines, including the nucleosides adenosine and guanosine, and decreased cerebrospinal fluid concentration of uric acid. Conclusions and implications Allopurinol-induced anti-nociception may be related to adenosine accumulation. Allopurinol is an old and extensively used compound and seems to be well tolerated with no obvious central nervous system toxic effects at high doses. This drug may be useful to treat pain syndromes in humans. PMID:19133997

  3. Antidepressant-like effects of the xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitor allopurinol in rats. A comparison with fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz Özgür, Börte; Aksu, Hatice; Birincioğlu, Mustafa; Dost, Turhan

    2015-11-01

    Allopurinol is a xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitor that is widely used for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. The activity of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, which metabolizes tryptophan (TRP), is decreased by xanthine oxidase inhibitors, causing TRP levels in the body to be increased. Increases in TRP levels in the brain might have antidepressant effects. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antidepressant effects of allopurinol compared to those of fluoxetine, which is a proven antidepressant. Thirty-two Wistar albino male rats were divided into four groups (control, 10mg/kg fluoxetine, 50mg/kg allopurinol, 50mg/kg allopurinol+10 mg/kg fluoxetine; n=8 per group), and forced swimming tests were performed before and after 14days of drug administration. Serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and uric acid levels were measured in blood samples after the final treatment. When allopurinol and fluoxetine were administered separately, a decrease in the duration of immobility and an increased duration of swimming were observed in the forced swimming test. The results showed similar antidepressant efficacies between allopurinol and fluoxetine. However, we found no statistically significant difference in the antidepressant effect of the combined therapy versus single drug therapy. PMID:26409178

  4. Allopurinol

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called xanthine oxidase inhibitors. It works by reducing the production of ... of alcoholic beverages while you are taking allopurinol. Alcohol may decrease the effectiveness of allopurinol.

  5. Use of a xanthine oxidase inhibitor in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Al-Shamma, Safa; Eross, Balint; Mclaughlin, Simon

    2013-03-01

    A 62-year-old woman with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) failed to sustain remission when steroids were withdrawn from a regimen of steroids and azathioprine (AZA). Thiopurine metabolites revealed elevated 6-MMP (6-methyl mercaptopurine) and low 6-TGN (6-thioguanine nucleotide) consistent with AZA-induced hepatotoxicity. Introducing the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol led to rapid normalization of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and discontinuation of steroids. PMID:23238820

  6. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Garcinia esculenta twigs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lun-Lun; Fu, Wen-Wei; Watanabe, Shimpei; Shao, Yi-Nuo; Tan, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Tan, Chang-Heng; Xiu, Yan-Feng; Norimoto, Hisayoshi; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2014-12-01

    The EtOAc-soluble portion of the 80 % (v/v) EtOH extract from the twigs of Garcinia esculenta exhibited strong xanthine oxidase inhibition in vitro. Bioassay-guided purification led to the isolation of 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone (3) and griffipavixanthone (8) as the main xanthine oxidase inhibitors, along with six additional compounds (1, 2, 4-7), including two new compounds (1 and 2). This enzyme inhibition was dose dependent with an IC50 value of approximately 1.2 µM for 3 and 6.3 µM for 8. The inhibitory activity of 3 was stronger than the control allopurinol (IC50 value: 5.3 µM). To our knowledge, compound 8 is the first bixanthone that demonstrated potent XO inhibitory activity in vitro. The structures of the new compounds were established by spectroscopic analysis, and the optical properties and absolute stereochemistry of racemic (±) esculentin A (2) were further determined by the calculation of the DP4 probability and analysis of its MTPA ester derivatives. PMID:25340468

  7. Virtual Screening Analysis and In-vitro Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity of Some Commercially Available Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, Muthuswamy; Madeswaran, Arumugam; Asokkumar, Kuppusamy

    2013-01-01

    Allopurinol, the xanthine oxidase inhibitor, is the only drug available for the treatment of gout. We examined the xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of some commercially available flavonoids such asepigallocatechin, acacatechin, myricetin, naringenin, daidzein and glycitein by virtual screening and in-vitro studies. The interacting residues within the complex model and their contact types were identified. The virtual screening analysis were carried out using AutoDock 4.2 and in-vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was carried out using xanthine as the substrate. In addition, enzyme kinetics was performed using LineweaverBurkplot analysis. Allopurinol, a known xanthine oxidase inhibitor was used as the standard. The docking energy ofglycitein was found to be -8.49 kcal/mol which was less than that of the standard (-4.47 kcal/ mol). All the selected flavonoids were found to exhibit lower binding energy (-8.08 to -6.03 kcal/ mol) than allopurinol. The docking results confirm that flavonoids showed greater inhibition of xanthine oxidase due to their active binding sites and lesser binding energies compared to allopurinol. This may be attributed to the presence of benzopyran ring in the flavonoids. In the xanthine oxidase assay, IC50 value of glycitein was found to be 12±0.86 μg/mL, whereas that of allopurinol was 24±0.28 μg/mL. All the remaining compounds exhibited IC50 values ranging between 22±0.64 to 62±1.18 μg/mL. In the enzyme kinetic studies, flavonoids showed competitive type of enzyme inhibition. It can be concluded that flavonoids could be a promising remedy for the treatment of gout and related inflammatory disorders. Further in-vivo studies are required to develop potential compounds with lesser side effects. PMID:24250638

  8. Virtual Screening Analysis and In-vitro Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity of Some Commercially Available Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Umamaheswari, Muthuswamy; Madeswaran, Arumugam; Asokkumar, Kuppusamy

    2013-01-01

    Allopurinol, the xanthine oxidase inhibitor, is the only drug available for the treatment of gout. We examined the xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of some commercially available flavonoids such asepigallocatechin, acacatechin, myricetin, naringenin, daidzein and glycitein by virtual screening and in-vitro studies. The interacting residues within the complex model and their contact types were identified. The virtual screening analysis were carried out using AutoDock 4.2 and in-vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was carried out using xanthine as the substrate. In addition, enzyme kinetics was performed using LineweaverBurkplot analysis. Allopurinol, a known xanthine oxidase inhibitor was used as the standard. The docking energy ofglycitein was found to be -8.49 kcal/mol which was less than that of the standard (-4.47 kcal/ mol). All the selected flavonoids were found to exhibit lower binding energy (-8.08 to -6.03 kcal/ mol) than allopurinol. The docking results confirm that flavonoids showed greater inhibition of xanthine oxidase due to their active binding sites and lesser binding energies compared to allopurinol. This may be attributed to the presence of benzopyran ring in the flavonoids. In the xanthine oxidase assay, IC50 value of glycitein was found to be 12±0.86 μg/mL, whereas that of allopurinol was 24±0.28 μg/mL. All the remaining compounds exhibited IC50 values ranging between 22±0.64 to 62±1.18 μg/mL. In the enzyme kinetic studies, flavonoids showed competitive type of enzyme inhibition. It can be concluded that flavonoids could be a promising remedy for the treatment of gout and related inflammatory disorders. Further in-vivo studies are required to develop potential compounds with lesser side effects. PMID:24250638

  9. Potential xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Neha; Saxena, Sanjai

    2014-07-01

    Xanthine oxidase is considered as a potential target for treatment of hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia is predisposing factor for gout, chronic heart failure, atherosclerosis, tissue injury, and ischemia. To date, only two inhibitors of xanthine oxidase viz. allopurinol and febuxostat have been clinically approved for used as drugs. In the process of searching for new xanthine oxidase inhibitors, we screened culture filtrates of 42 endophytic fungi using in vitro qualitative and quantitative XO inhibitory assays. The qualitative assay exhibited potential XO inhibition by culture filtrates of four isolates viz. #1048 AMSTITYEL, #2CCSTITD, #6AMLWLS, and #96 CMSTITNEY. The XO inhibitory activity was present only in the chloroform extract of the culture filtrates. Chloroform extract of culture filtrate #1048 AMSTITYEL exhibited the highest inhibition of XO with an IC50 value of 0.61 μg ml(-1) which was better than allopurinol exhibiting an IC50 of 0.937 μg ml(-1) while febuxostat exhibited a much lower IC50 of 0.076 μg ml(-1). Further, molecular phylogenetic tools and morphological studies were used to identify #1048 AMSTITYEL as Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae. This is the first report of an endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae from Aegle marmelos exhibiting potential XO Inhibitory activity. PMID:24801403

  10. Neolignans as xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Hyptis rhomboides.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Fa; Lee, Shoei-Sheng

    2014-05-01

    The active fraction from the EtOH extract of Hyptis rhomboides against xanthine oxidase was identified by use of an HPLC microfractionation-centrifugal vacuum evaporation-bioassay hyphenated technique. Scale-up separation of the active subfractions using semi-preparative RP-HPLC provided 13 phenylpropanoid compounds, including O-styrenylneolignans, hyprhombins A-C, epihyprhombin B, and hyprhombin B methyl ester, and O-caffeoylnorneolignans, hyprhombins D and E. All of these compounds shared a common 1,4-benzodioxane skeleton, as established by spectroscopic analyses. Hyprhombin C and epihyprhombin B exhibited better anti-xanthine oxidase activity than allopurinol, with IC50 values of 0.6 and 2.0 μM, respectively. PMID:24559911

  11. Simulation of the solid state and the first and second hydration shell of the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol: Structures obtained using DFT and MP2 methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Ros, M. C.; Alcolea Palafox, M.

    2016-05-01

    Allopurinol (AL) was investigated in the isolated state, solid state, and in the hydrated form through an exhaustive quantum-chemical analysis. Full geometry optimization and energy calculations of the 11 most stable tautomers in the isolated state were performed. The most stable one corresponds to AL-15 at all the levels of computation. Several weak bands of the experimental spectrum in Ar-matrix were tentatively assigned to tautomer AL-25. The crystal unit cell of the solid state was simulated by a heptamer form. Comparisons with the experimental values confirm that only tautomer AL-15 appears in the solid state. The hydration of the two most stable tautomers: AL-15 and AL-25 was carried out. Solvent effects were considered using the Tomasi's polarized continuum model (PCM) and by the explicit model (EM) including a variable number of water molecules surrounding the base to simulate the first and second hydration shells. In this second hydration shell the calculated difference in the free energy between both tautomers is so small, that both tautomers can coexist in bull water. Some of the most important conclusions on the effects of the hydration on the molecular structure were presented. The deformation and interaction energies were corrected for basis set superposition error (BSSE) using the counterpoise (CP) procedure.

  12. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Vietnamese Blumea balsamifera L.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mai Thanh Thi; Nguyen, Nhan Trung

    2012-08-01

    From the MeOH extract of the aerial part of Blumea balsamifera L., a new dihydroflavonol, (2R,3S)-(-)-4'-O-methyldihydroquercetin (1), together with seven known compounds has been isolated. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-4 and 6-8 displayed significant xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity in a concentration-dependent manner, and compounds 1, 6 and 8 showed more potent inhibitory activity, with IC₅₀ values ranging from 0.23 to 1.91 µM, than that of a positive control allopurinol (IC₅₀ 2.50 µM). PMID:22821854

  13. The composition of milk xanthine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Hart, L. I.; McGartoll, Mary A.; Chapman, Helen R.; Bray, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    The composition of milk xanthine oxidase has been reinvestigated. When the enzyme is prepared by methods that include a selective denaturation step in the presence of sodium salicylate the product is obtained very conveniently and in high yield, and is homogeneous in the ultracentrifuge and in recycling gel filtration. It has specific activity higher than previously reported preparations of the enzyme and its composition approximates closely to 2mol of FAD, 2g-atoms of Mo and 8g-atoms of Fe/mol of protein (molecular weight about 275000). In contrast, when purely conventional preparative methods are used the product is also homogeneous by the above criteria but has a lower specific activity and is generally comparable to the crystallized enzyme described previously. Such samples also contain 2mol of FAD/mol of protein but they have lower contents of Mo (e.g. 1.2g-atom/mol). Amino acid compositions for the two types of preparation are indistinguishable. These results confirm the previous conclusion that conventional methods give mixtures of xanthine oxidase with an inactive modification of the enzyme now termed `de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase', and show that salicylate can selectively denature the latter. The origin of de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase was investigated. FAD/Mo ratios show that it is present not only in enzyme purified by conventional methods but also in `milk microsomes' (Bailie & Morton, 1958) and in enzyme samples prepared without proteolytic digestion. We conclude that it is secreted by cows together with the active enzyme and we discuss its occurrence in the preparations of other workers. Studies on the milks of individual cows show that nutritional rather than genetic factors determine the relative amounts of xanthine oxidase and de-molybdo-xanthine oxidase. A second inactive modification of the enzyme, now termed `inactivated xanthine oxidase', causes variability in activity relative to E450 or to Mo content and formation of it decreases these ratios

  14. Cytotoxicity of, and DNA damage by, active oxygen species produced by xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Chiricolo, M; Tazzari, P L; Abbondanza, A; Dinota, A; Battelli, M G

    1991-10-21

    Toxicity to Raji cells of the xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine system is related to the formation of single-strand DNA breaks. DNA damage was proportional to the concentration of xanthine oxidase and to the time of exposure. It was prevented by the absence of hypoxanthine, or by the presence of allopurinol, or both superoxide dismutase and catalase. The release of 51Cr from damaged cells was detectable 12 h after the inhibition of cloning efficiency and the production of DNA breakage. These data suggest that DNA damage induced by the oxygen products precedes the severe lesion to the cellular membrane. PMID:1936259

  15. Allopurinol

    MedlinePlus

    ... xanthine oxidase inhibitors. It works by reducing the production of uric acid in the body. High levels ... your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your body's response ...

  16. INCREASED XANTHINE OXIDASE IN THE SKIN OF PREECLAMPTIC WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Bainbridge, Shannon A.; Deng, Jau-Shyong; Roberts, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Xanthine oxioreductase is the holoenzyme responsible for terminal purine catabolism. Under conditions of metabolic stress or heightened pro-inflammatory cytokine production this enzyme is preferentially in it’s oxidized form, xanthine oxidase, with catalytic action that generates uric acid and the free radical superoxide. As preeclampsia is characterized by heightened inflammation, oxidative stress and hyperuricemia it has been proposed that xanthine oxidase plays a pivotal role in this hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. We sought to determine whether xanthine oxidase protein content was higher in maternal tissue of preeclamptic mothers, compared to healthy pregnant controls, using immunohistochemical analysis of skin biopsies. We further compared xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity in skin biopsies from preeclamptic women and patients with several inflammatory conditions. In preeclamptic women, intense xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity was present within the epidermis. By contrast, only very faint xanthine oxidase staining was observed in skin biopsies from healthy pregnant controls. Further, a role for inflammation in the increase of xanthine oxidase was suggested by similar findings of heightened xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity in the skin biopsies from non-pregnant individuals diagnosed with conditions of systemic inflammation. The finding of increased xanthine oxidase in maternal tissue, most likely as the result of heightened maternal inflammation, suggest maternal xanthine oxidase as a source of free radical and uric acid generation in preeclampsia. PMID:19196876

  17. Fluorescence quenching study of quercetin interaction with bovine milk xanthine oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh; Jabary, Hamideh Nadjarpour; Naseri, Abdolhossein; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2009-02-01

    Quercetin is a natural flavonoid with many important therapeutic properties. The interaction of this polyphenolic compound bovine milk xanthine oxidase as one of its major target proteins was studied using fluorescence quenching method for the first time. It was found that the fluorescence quenching of xanthine oxidase occurs through a static mechanism. The results revealed the presence of a single binding site on xanthine oxidase with the binding constant value equals to 1.153 × 10 4 l mol -1 at 310 K and pH 7.4. The thermodynamic parameters were also calculated at different temperatures. The enthalpy and entropy changes were found as -10.661 kJ mol -1 and +43.321 J mol -1 K -1 indicating that both hydrogen binding and hydrophobic are involved in the interaction of this polyphenolic natural compound with xanthine oxidase. The results may provide a ground for further studies with different flavonoids to find a safe alternative for allopurinol, the only xanthine oxidase inhibitor with clinical application.

  18. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase-xanthine-iron mediated lipid peroxidation by eugenol in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Nagababu, E; Lakshmaiah, N

    1997-01-01

    The effect of eugenol on xanthine oxidase (XO) xanthine(X)-Fe+3-ADP mediated lipid peroxidation was studied in liver microsomal lipid liposomes. Eugenol inhibited the lipid peroxidation in a dose dependent manner as assessed by formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. When tested for its effect on XO activity per se, (by measuring uric acid formation) eugenol inhibited the enzyme to an extent of 85% at 10 microm concentration and hence formation of O2.- also. However, the concentration of eugenol required for XO inhibition was more in presence of metal chelators such as EDTA, EGTA and DETAPAC, but not in presence of deferoxamine, ADP and citrate. The antiperoxidative effect of eugenol was about 35 times more and inhibition of XO was about 5 times higher as compared to the effect of allopurinol. Eugenol did not scavenge O2.- generated by phenazine methosulfate and NAD but inhibited propagation of peroxidation catalyzed by Fe2+ EDTA and lipid hydroperoxide containing liposomes. Eugenol inhibits XO-X-Fe+3 ADP mediated peroxidation by inhibiting the XO activity per se in addition to quenching various radical species. PMID:9046022

  19. [Pyonephrosis due to xanthine stones in a bitch treated with allopurinol].

    PubMed

    Maier, R; Lutter, F X; Lohss-Baumgärtner, E

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old, neutered, crossbreed bitch was presented as an emergency with painful abdomen, fever and vomiting. The cause of the acute abdomen was a pyonephrosis of the left kidney, caused by four xanthine stones, which had blocked the ureter. After surgical removal of the heavily altered left kidney, the bitch recovered rapidly. Because of a leishmaniasis the bitch had been treated with allopurinol over an extended period, the xanthine stone formation is likely to have resulted from allopurinol usage. Because there were additionally small concrements in the right kidney, the medication was stopped. Subsequently, the dog has received a low purine diet, and the leishmaniasis titer and renal function have been monitored regularly. PMID:24518947

  20. IRON REGULATES XANTHINE OXIDASE ACTIVITY IN THE LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The iron chelator deferoxamine has been reported to inhibit both xanthine oxidase (XO) and xanthine dehydrogenase activity, but the relationship of this effect to the availability of iron in the cellular and tissue environment remains unexplored. XO and total xanthine oxidoreduct...

  1. Glutamate neurotoxicity in rat cerebellar granule cells: a major role for xanthine oxidase in oxygen radical formation.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Gagliardi, S; Minervini, G M; Ciotti, M T; Marra, E; Calissano, P

    1997-05-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism through which the neurotransmitter glutamate causally participates in several neurological diseases, in vitro cultured cerebellar granule cells were exposed to glutamate and oxygen radical production was investigated. To this aim, a novel procedure was developed to detect oxygen radicals; the fluorescent dye 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein was used to detect production of peroxides, and a specific search for the possible conversion of the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase into xanthine oxidase after the excitotoxic glutamate pulse was undertaken. A 100 microM glutamate pulse administered to 7-day-old cerebellar granule cells is accompanied by the onset of neuronal death, the appearance of xanthine oxidase, and production of oxygen radicals. Xanthine oxidase activation and superoxide (O2.-) production are completely inhibited by concomitant incubation of glutamate with MK-801, a specific NMDA receptor antagonist, or by chelation of external calcium with EGTA. Partial inhibition of both cell death and parallel production of reactive oxygen species is achieved with allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, leupeptin, a protease inhibitor, reducing agents such as glutathione or dithiothreitol, antioxidants such as vitamin E and vitamin C, and externally added superoxide dismutase. It is concluded that glutamate-triggered, NMDA-mediated, massive Ca2+ influx induces rapid conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase into xanthine oxidase with subsequent production of reactive oxygen species that most probably have a causal involvement in the initial steps of the series of intracellular events leading to neuronal degeneration and death. PMID:9109530

  2. Effects of Xanthine Oxidase Inhibition in Hyperuricemic Heart Failure Patients: The EXACT-HF Study

    PubMed Central

    Givertz, Michael M.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Deswal, Anita; Haddad, Haissam; Butler, Javed; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Dunlap, Mark E.; LeWinter, Martin M.; Mann, Douglas L.; Felker, G. Michael; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Goldsmith, Steven R.; Ofili, Elizabeth O.; Saltzberg, Mitchell T.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Konstam, Marvin A.; Semigran, Marc J.; McNulty, Steven E.; Lee, Kerry L.; Shah, Monica R.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress may contribute to heart failure (HF) progression. Inhibiting xanthine oxidase in hyperuricemic HF patients may improve outcomes. Methods and Results We randomized 253 patients with symptomatic HF, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤40%, and serum uric acid levels ≥9.5 mg/dL to receive allopurinol (target dose, 600 mg daily) or placebo in a double-blind, multicenter trial. The primary composite endpoint at 24 weeks was based on survival, worsening HF, and patient global assessment. Secondary endpoints included change in quality of life, submaximal exercise capacity, and LVEF. Uric acid levels were significantly reduced with allopurinol compared to placebo (treatment difference, −4.2 [−4.9, −3.5] mg/dL and −3.5 [−4.2, −2.7] mg/dL at 12 and 24 weeks, respectively, both P<0.0001). At 24 weeks, there was no significant difference in clinical status between the allopurinol- and placebo-treated patients (worsened 45% vs. 46%, unchanged 42% vs. 34%, improved 13% vs. 19%, respectively; P=0.68). At 12 and 24 weeks, there was no significant difference in change in Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire scores or 6-minute walk distances between the 2 groups. At 24 weeks, LVEF did not change in either group or between groups. Rash occurred more frequently with allopurinol (10% vs. 2%, P=0.01), but there was no difference in serious adverse event rates between the groups (20% vs. 15%, P=0.36). Conclusions In high-risk HF patients with reduced ejection fraction and elevated uric acid levels, xanthine oxidase inhibition with allopurinol failed to improve clinical status, exercise capacity, quality of life, or LVEF at 24 weeks. PMID:25986447

  3. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase to prevent statin-induced myalgia and rhabdomiolysis.

    PubMed

    Alis, Rafael; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Risso-Ballester, Jennifer; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Cortell-Ballester, Jose; Romagnoli, Marco; Blesa, Jose R; Emanuele, Enzo

    2015-03-01

    Although statins remain the cornerstone of lipid-lowering therapy for reducing the burden of atherosclerotic vascular disease, their administration has been associated with muscle-related adverse effects, including myalgia and rhabdomyolysis. Such adverse events are probably due to reduced antioxidant defenses associated with fewer intermediate metabolites in the cholesterol synthesis pathway. We hypothesize that the concomitant inhibition of xanthine oxidase via coadministration of allopurinol with statins could diminish reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related muscle damage, which would have in turn have positive effects on both the incidence of muscle-related adverse events and cardiovascular outcomes. Accordingly, inhibition of xanthine oxidase has been previously shown to be effective for reducing biomarkers of muscle damage following exercise in professional athletes. Because of the widespread statin utilization and increasing trends in their therapeutic use in atherosclerotic vascular diseases, the proposed strategy could have important clinical implications for reducing statin-induced myalgia and rhabdomyolysis. PMID:25568951

  4. Xanthine oxidase status in ethanol-intoxicated rat liver.

    PubMed

    Abbondanza, A; Battelli, M G; Soffritti, M; Cessi, C

    1989-12-01

    The status of xanthine oxidase in ethanol-induced liver injury has been investigated in the rat, by acute and chronic ethanol treatments. A 38% increase of the enzyme O-form was observed after repeated ethanol administration. Chronic intoxication caused a significant decrease of total xanthine oxidase activity after both prolonged ethanol feeding and life span ethanol ingestion. The intermediate D/O-form of xanthine oxidase (that can act either as an oxidase or as a dehydrogenase, being able to react with O2 as well as with NAD+ as electron acceptor) increased 5.5-fold after prolonged ethanol feeding. PMID:2690670

  5. Monochloramine produces reactive oxygen species in liver by converting xanthine dehydrogenase into xanthine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, Satoru Miyoshi, Emi; Sadatoku, Namiko; Fujita, Junko; Negoro, Miki; Arakawa, Yukio; Fujimoto, Yohko

    2009-09-15

    In the present study, we assessed the influence of monochloramine (NH{sub 2}Cl) on the conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) into xanthine oxidase (XO) in rat liver in vitro. When incubated with the partially purified cytosolic fraction from rat liver, NH{sub 2}Cl (2.5-20 {mu}M) dose-dependently enhanced XO activity concomitant with a decrease in XD activity, implying that NH{sub 2}Cl can convert XD into the reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing form XO. The NH{sub 2}Cl (5 {mu}M)-induced XD/XO interconversion in the rat liver cytosol was completely inhibited when added in combination with an inhibitor of NH{sub 2}Cl methionine (25 {mu}M). A sulfhydryl reducing agent, dithiothreitol at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 5 mM also dose-dependently reversed the NH{sub 2}Cl (5 {mu}M)-induced XD/XO interconversion. These imply that NH{sub 2}Cl itself acts on the XD/XO interconversion, and that this conversion occurs at the cysteine residues in XD. Furthermore, using the fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, it was found that NH{sub 2}Cl could increase ROS generation in the cytoplasm of rat primary hepatocyte cultures, and that this increase might be reversed by an XO inhibitor, allopurinol. These results suggest that NH{sub 2}Cl has the potential to convert XD into XO in the liver, which in turn may induce the ROS generation in this region.

  6. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of Vietnamese medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mai Thanh Thi; Awale, Suresh; Tezuka, Yasuhiro; Tran, Quan Le; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kadota, Shigetoshi

    2004-09-01

    Among 288 extracts, prepared from 96 medicinal plants used in Vietnamese traditional medicine to treat gout and related symptoms, 188 demonstrated xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity at 100 microg/ml, with 46 having greater than 50% inhibition. At 50 microg/ml, 168 of the extracts were active, with 21 possessing more than 50% inhibition. At 25 microg/ml, 146 extracts exhibited inhibitory activity, with 8 showing over 50% inhibition, while 126 extracts presented activity at 10 microg/ml, with 2 having greater than 50% inhibition. The MeOH extracts of Artemisia vulgaris, Caesalpinia sappan (collected at the Seven-Mountain area), Blumea balsamifera (collected in Lam Dong province), Chrysanthemum sinense and MeOH-H(2)O extract of Tetracera scandens (Khanh Hoa province) exhibited strong XO inhibitory activity with IC(50) values less than 20 microg/ml. The most active extract was the MeOH extract of the flower of C. sinense with an IC(50) value of 5.1 microg/ml. Activity-guided fractionation of the MeOH extract led to the isolation of caffeic acid (1), luteolin (2), eriodictyol (3), and 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4). All these compounds showed significant XO inhibitory activity in a concentration-dependent manner, and the activity of 2 was more potent (IC(50) 1.3 microM) than the clinically used drug, allopurinol (IC(50) 2.5 microM). PMID:15340229

  7. Differential in vitro inhibition studies of some cerium vanadate derivatives on xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mustafa Oğuzhan; Kaya, Yeşim; Çelik, Gülşah; Kurtuluş, Figen; Arslan, Oktay; Güler, Özen Özensoy

    2015-04-01

    In this preliminary study, a new series of some cerium vanadate derivatives have been investigated as new type of inhibitors of xanthine oxidase (XO; E.C 1.17.3.2). XO is a superoxide-producing enzyme found normally in serum and the lungs, and its activity is concerned with several important health problems such as gout, severe liver damage, vascular dysfunction and injury, oxidative eye injury and renal failure. In this study, we present a critical overview of the effects of these novel type agents on XO with comparing the efficacy and safety profiles of allopurinol, the efficient classical inhibitor of XO. PMID:24964345

  8. Excitotoxic increase of xanthine dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase in the rat olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Buonamici, L; Abbondanza, A; Virgili, M; Contestabile, A; Stirpe, F

    1995-05-26

    Excitotoxic lesions induced by systemic injection of kainic acid, resulted in 2-3-fold increase of xanthine dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase activities in the rat olfactory cortex 48-72 h after drug administration. A significant increase of the xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase ratio was also observed at 4 and 48 h post-injection. No similar changes were noticed in the hippocampus. The enhancement of enzyme activity seems to be primarily a consequence of the altered cell composition in damaged area. Free radicals produced by the increased oxygen-dependent form of the enzyme could in turn aggravate the excitotoxic brain injury. PMID:7656426

  9. Amperometric biosensor based on prussian blue and nafion modified screen-printed electrode for screening of potential xanthine oxidase inhibitors from medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    El Harrad, Loubna; Amine, Aziz

    2016-04-01

    A simple and sensitive amperometric biosensor was developed for the screening of potential xanthine oxidase inhibitors from medicinal plants. This biosensor was prepared by immobilization of xanthine oxidase on the surface of prussian blue modified screen-printed electrodes using nafion and glutaraldehyde. The developed biosensor showed a linear amperometric response at an applied potential of +0.05 V toward the detection of hypoxanthine from 5 μM to 45 μM with a detection limit of 0.4 μM (S/N=3) and its sensitivity was found to be 600 mA M(-1) cm(-2). In addition, the biosensor exhibited a good storage stability. The inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol was studied under the optimized conditions. The linear range of allopurinol concentration is obtained up to 2.5 μM with an estimated 50% of inhibitionI50=1.8 μM. The developed biosensor was successfully applied to the screening of xanthine oxidase inhibitors from 13 medicinal plants belonging to different families. Indeed, Moroccan people traditionally use these plants as infusion for the treatment of gout and its related symptoms. For this purpose, water extracts obtained from the infusion of these plants were used for the experiments. In this work, 13 extracts were assayed and several of them demonstrated xanthine oxidase inhibitory effect, with an inhibition greater than 50% compared to spectrophotometry measurements that only few extracts showed an inhibition greater than 50%. PMID:26920482

  10. Interaction of Platelet Activating Factor, Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Xanthine Oxidase, and Leukocytes in the Generation of Hepatic Injury After Shock/Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Yasuhiko; Takano, Manabu; Patel, Mayur; Tien, Nevin; Takada, Tadahiro; Bulkley, Gregory B.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the putative relation of platelet activating factor (PAF), xanthine oxidase, reactive oxidants, and leukocytes in the pathogenesis of hepatic injury after shock/resuscitation (S/R) in vivo. Background Reactive oxygen metabolites generated by xanthine oxidase at reperfusion have been found to trigger postischemic injury in many organs, including the liver. However, the precise linear sequence of the mechanism of consequent hepatic injury after S/R remains to be characterized. Methods Unheparinized male rats were bled to a mean blood pressure of 45 ± 3 mmHg. After 2 hours of shock, they were resuscitated by reinfusion of shed blood (anticoagulated with citrate-phosphate-dextrose) and crystalloid and observed for the next 6 or 24 hours. Results S/R caused the oxidation of hepatic glutathione and generated centrolobular leukocyte accumulation at 6 hours, followed by predominantly centrolobular hepatocellular injury at 24 hours. Each of these components was attenuated by PAF inhibition with WEB 2170, xanthine oxidase inhibition with allopurinol, antioxidant treatment with N-acetylcysteine, or severe leukopenia induced by vinblastine. In each case, the degree of leukocyte accumulation at 6 hours correlated with the hepatocellular injury seen at 24 hours. However, xanthine oxidase inhibition with allopurinol failed to attenuate further the small level of residual hepatocellular injury seen in leukopenic rats. Conclusion These findings suggest that reactive oxidants generated by xanthine oxidase at reperfusion, stimulated by PAF, mediate hepatocellular injury by triggering leukocyte accumulation, primarily within the centrolobular sinusoids. PMID:10714632

  11. Bone marrow purging by a xanthine oxidase-antibody conjugate.

    PubMed

    Dinota, A; Tazzari, P L; Abbondanza, A; Battelli, M G; Gobbi, M; Stirpe, F

    1990-07-01

    The selective cytotoxicity of the xanthine oxidase conjugated to an 8A monoclonal antibody recognizing a human plasma cell-associated antigen has been described. The selectivity and the toxicity of the hypoxanthine/conjugated xanthine oxidase system was increased by removing the excess of conjugate and by adding chelated iron. Under these experimental conditions the cytotoxicity of the conjugate exceeded that of free xanthine oxidase by one order of magnitude. The conjugate effectively purged bone marrow from infiltrating neoplastic plasma cells and added target Raji cells, provided blood was removed and bone marrow peroxidases were exhausted. In conditions of purging effectiveness the conjugate had no toxicity to CFU-GM. No toxicity to mice was observed after i.v. injection of xanthine oxidase-antibody conjugate up to 2.9 U/kg body weight. Thus the hypoxanthine/conjugated xanthine oxidase system could be an effective and nontoxic tool for the ex vivo bone marrow purging in multiple myeloma patients for autologous transplantation. PMID:2390631

  12. Studies on the Mechanism of Aldehyde Oxidase and Xanthine Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Joshua F.

    2009-01-01

    DFT calculations support a concerted mechanism for xanthine oxidase and aldehyde oxidase hydride displacement from the sp2 carbon of 6-substituted 4-quinazolinones. The variations in transition state structure show that C-O bond formation is nearly complete in the transition state and the transition state changes are anti-Hammond with the C-H and C-O bond lengths being more product-like for the faster reactions. The C-O bond length in the transition state is around 90% formed. However, the C-H bond is only about 80% broken. This leads to a very tetrahedral transition state with an O-C-N angle of 109 degrees. Thus, while the mechanism is concerted, the anti-bonding orbital of the C-H bond that is broken is not directly attacked by the nucleophile and instead hydride displacement occurs after almost complete tetrahedral transition state formation. In support of this the C=N bond is lengthened in the transition state indicating that attack on the electrophilic carbon occurs by addition to the C=N bond with negative charge increasing on the nitrogen. Differences in experimental reaction rates are accurately reproduced by these calculations, and tend to support this mechanism. PMID:18998731

  13. Studies on the mechanism of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Joshua F; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2008-12-01

    DFT calculations support a concerted mechanism for xanthine oxidase and aldehyde oxidase hydride displacement from the sp(2) carbon of 6-substituted 4-quinazolinones. The variations in transition state structure show that C-O bond formation is nearly complete in the transition state and the transition state changes are anti-Hammond with the C-H and C-O bond lengths being more product-like for the faster reactions. The C-O bond length in the transition state is around 90% formed. However, the C-H bond is only about 80% broken. This leads to a very tetrahedral transition state with an O-C-N angle of 109 degrees. Thus, while the mechanism is concerted, the antibonding orbital of the C-H bond that is broken is not directly attacked by the nucleophile and instead hydride displacement occurs after almost complete tetrahedral transition state formation. In support of this the C=N bond is lengthened in the transition state indicating that attack on the electrophilic carbon occurs by addition to the C=N bond with negative charge increasing on the nitrogen. Differences in experimental reaction rates are accurately reproduced by these calculations and tend to support this mechanism. PMID:18998731

  14. Antioxidant, α-glucosidase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of bioactive compounds from maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Nile, Shivraj H; Park, Se W

    2014-01-01

    Chemical investigations into maize (Zea mays L.) kernels yielded phenolic compounds, which were structurally established using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The isolated phenolic compounds from maize kernel were examined in vitro for their antioxidant abilities by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazine) radical, OH radical scavenging activity, and reducing ability, along with α-glucosidase and xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibition. The isolated maize phenolics revealed significant xanthine oxidase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity to that of allopurinol and acarbose in vitro and in vivo, respectively. The kinetics study with xanthine oxidase revealed competitive type of inhibition by isolated maize vanillic acid (M2), ferulic acid (M5), 3'-methoxyhirsutrin (M7), and peonidin-3-glucoside (M10) as compared to control allopurinol. Overall, with few exceptions, all the phenolic compounds from maize kernel revealed significant biological activities with all parameters examined. Also, the phenolic compounds from maize were found to be more reactive toward DPPH radical and had considerable reducing ability and OH radical scavenging activity. These findings suggest that maize kernel phenolic compounds can be considered as potential antioxidant, α-glucosidase, and XO inhibitory agents those might be further explored for the design of lead antioxidant, antidiabetic and antigout drug candidates using in vivo trials. PMID:23957301

  15. Synthesis, xanthine oxidase inhibition, and antioxidant screening of benzophenone tagged thiazolidinone analogs.

    PubMed

    Ranganatha, V Lakshmi; Begum, A Bushra; Naveen, P; Zameer, Farhan; Hegdekatte, Raghavendra; Khanum, Shaukath Ara

    2014-08-01

    A series of novel 2-(diaryl methanone)-N-(4-oxo-2-phenyl-thiazolidin-3-yl)-acetamides were synthesized by various Schiff bases of (4-benzoyl-phenoxy)-aceto hydrazide with thioglycolic acid. The structures of the newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by IR, (1) H NMR, mass spectra, and C, H, N analysis. Further, all the synthesized compounds 9a-n were evaluated for xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibition and antioxidant properties. Among all the tested compounds, 9f, 9m, and 9n demonstrated potent XO inhibition of 52, 76, and 26%, respectively, compared to the standard drug allopurinol, which is evident from in vitro and in silico analysis. On the other hand, compounds 9c, 9d, and 9k exhibit potent antioxidant properties. PMID:24853493

  16. Electronic Structure Contributions to Reactivity in Xanthine Oxidase Family Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Benjamin W.; Kirk, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    We review the xanthine oxidase (XO) family of pyranopterin molybdenum enzymes with a specific emphasis on electronic structure contributions to reactivity. In addition to xanthine and aldehyde oxidoreductases, which catalyze the 2-electron oxidation of aromatic heterocycles and aldehyde substrates, this mini-review highlights recent work on the closely related carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) that catalyzes the oxidation of CO using a unique Mo-Cu heterobimetallic active site. A primary focus of this mini-review relates to how spectroscopy and computational methods have been used to develop an understanding of critical relationships between geometric structure, electronic structure, and catalytic function. PMID:25425163

  17. Glycosides and xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Conyza bonariensis.

    PubMed

    Kong, L D; Abliz, Z; Zhou, C X; Li, L J; Cheng, C H; Tan, R X

    2001-10-01

    Fractionation of the xanthine oxidase inhibitory methanol extract of Conyza bonariensis afforded three glycosides, in addition to nine known compounds including amyrin, beta-sitostero1 daucosterol, syringic acid 3-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzoic acid, eugenol 4-O-glucopyranoside, and luteolin, apigenin and takakin 8-O-glucuronide. The structures of the glycosides were established by a combination of spectroscopic methods (IR, MS, 1H and 13C NMR, DEPT, COSY, HMQC and HMBC) as 4-hydroxypyridin-3-carboxylic acid 4-O-glucopyranoside, 8-hydroxy-6,7-dihydrolinalool 8-O-glucopyranoside and bonaroside [viz. 1,3,4,12-tetrahydroxy-2-(9-hexadecenoylamino)octadecane 1-O-glucopyranoside]. The in vitro enzyme assay showed that syringic acid and takakin 8-O-glucuronide displayed weak inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase with IC50 values of 500+/-41 microM and 170+/-12 microM, respectively. PMID:11576616

  18. T lymphocyte killing by a xanthine-oxidase-containing immunotoxin.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Tazzari, P L; Bolognesi, A; Lemoli, R M; Stirpe, F

    1992-01-01

    We report on the preparation of an immunotoxin consisting of xanthine oxidase, a free-radical-producing enzyme, covalently linked to an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. The immunotoxin retained both enzymic and immunological properties and its toxicity to target cells (a) was greater than that of the free enzyme, (b) was proportional to the enzyme concentration, and (c) was reduced either in the absence of hypoxanthine or by an excess of free anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. The cytotoxicity and selectivity of the hypoxanthine/conjugated xanthine oxidase system were potentiated by the addition of chelated iron and by washing away the unbound immunotoxin prior to the addition of substrate. The same system was not toxic to bone marrow progenitor cells. A possible use of this immunotoxin for the ex vivo purging of organs to be transplanted from T lymphocytes, to avoid the graft-versus-host reaction, is suggested. PMID:1394345

  19. Evaluation of Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Potential and In vivo Hypouricemic Activity of Dimocarpus longan Lour. Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Shi-Yuan; Fu, Yuan-Tsung; Huang, Wen-Dar; Chen, Yung-Ann; Lei, Yi-Chih; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Hsu, Feng-Lin; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Longan is a fruit tree known to contain many phenolic components, which are capable of protecting people from oxidative damage through an anti-inflammatory mechanism. It may be also worthwhile to study the effect on lowering uric acid activity. Materials and Methods: This study investigates the lowering of uric acid using longan extracts, including flowers, pericarps, seeds, leaves, and twigs, on potassium-oxonate-induced hyperuricemia mice and its inhibitory actions against xanthine oxidase (XO) activities. Results: The findings revealed that ethyl acetate fraction of longan extracts exhibited strong XO-inhibitory activity, and the flower extracts (IC50 = 115.8 μg/mL) revealed more potent XO-inhibitory activity to those of pericarps (118.9 μg/mL), twigs (125.3 μg/mL), seeds (262.5 μg/mL), and leaves (331.1 μg/mL) in vitro. In addition, different dosages of longan extract (50–100 mg/kg) were administered to hyperuricemic mice. The lowering effect of longan extracts on uric acid at 75 mg/kg markedly reduced plasma uric acid levels in decreasing order: Flowers (80%) > seeds (72%) > pericarps (64%) > twigs (59%) > leaves (41%), compared with allopurinol (89%). Finally, 10 isolated phytochemicals from longan flowers were then examined in vitro. The results indicated that proanthocyanidin A2 and acetonylgeraniin A significantly inhibited XO activity in vitro. This is the first report providing new insights into the urate-reducing effect of phenolic dimer and hydrolyzable tannin, which can be developed to potential hypouricemic agents. SUMMARY Longan flower extracts possess more potent XO-inhibitory activity than pericarps, twigs, seeds, and leaves in vitroThe lowering effect of longan flowers and seeds extracts markedly reduced plasma uric acid levels as compared to allopurinol in vivoThe extract proanthocyanidin A2 and acetonylgeraniin A were demonstrated potent XO inhibitory activity in vitro Abbreviations used: PO: Potassium-oxonate, XO: xanthine

  20. Oxidative stress produced by xanthine oxidase induces apoptosis in human extravillous trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Murata, Masaharu; Fukushima, Kotaro; Takao, Tomoka; Seki, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Satoru; Wake, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been recognized as an important factor in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. It has been reported that the expression of xanthine oxidase (XO) in the cytotrophoblast and plasma hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) level are significantly higher in preeclamptics than in control women. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological influence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by XO on extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells. TCL1 cells, a human immortalized EVT cell line, were incubated with xanthine and XO (X/XO). We then measured the cell number, urate level of the culture media and the apoptotic cell ratio. Similar experiments were performed with additional administration of allopurinol, catalase, L-NAME or D-NAME, and with administration of H(2)O(2) in substitution for X/XO. We assessed the effects of H(2)O(2) on invasion ability, tube-like formation and protein expression of HIF1A and ITGAV of TCL1. Finally, the apoptotic cell ratio using primary cultured trophoblasts was measured following exposure to H(2)O(2). X/XO decreased the relative cell number and increased the urate level and apoptotic cell ratio significantly. Elevation of the urate level and apoptotic cell ratio was attenuated by allopurinol and catalase, respectively. L-NAME and D-NAME had no influence on these effects. H(2)O(2) also decreased the relative cell number. Pretreatment with H(2)O(2) significantly inhibited the invasion ability, tube-like formation and HIF1A and ITGAV of TCL1. H(2)O(2) also induced apoptosis in primary cultured trophoblasts. In conclusion, ROS produced by XO induced apoptosis and affected EVT function including invasion and differentiation. PMID:22986926

  1. Effect of Acute Xanthine Oxidase Inhibition on Myocardial Energetics During Basal and Very High Cardiac Workstates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joseph; Hu, Qingsong; Mansoor, Abdul; Kamdar, Forum

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia is associated with reduced myocardial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and increased free adenosine diphosphate (ADP) similar to the normal heart at very high cardiac workstates (HCW). We examined whether acute xanthine oxidase inhibition (XOI) in vivo can decrease myocardial free ADP in normal hearts functioning at basal cardiac workstates (BCW) or very HCW (catecholamine-induced). Myocardial high-energy phosphate (31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy), blood flow (radioactive microspheres), and oxygen consumption (MVO2) were measured in an open-chest canine model before and after infusion of vehicle or an XO inhibitor (allopurinol or febuxostat; n= 10 in each group) during BCW and infusion of dobutamine + dopamine to induce a very HCW. During BCW, both allopurinol and febuxostat resulted in higher phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP, corresponding to lower ADP levels. During vehicle infusion, HCW caused a decrease of PCr/ATP and an increase in myocardial free ADP. Although XOI did not prevent an increase in free ADP during catecholamine infusion, the values in the allopurinol or febuxostat groups (0.141±0.012 and 0.136±0.011 μmol/g dry wt, respectively) remained significantly less than in the vehicle group (0.180±0.017; P<0.05). Thus, at a given rate of ATP synthesis, XOI decreased the free ADP level needed to drive ATP synthesis, suggesting a more energy-efficient status. As contractile dysfunction in ischemia is characterized by increase of myocardial free ADP and energy deficiency, the data suggest that XOI might be a potential therapy for improving energy efficiency during myocardial ischemia. PMID:21584861

  2. Crucial involvement of xanthine oxidase in the intracellular signalling networks associated with human myeloid cell function

    PubMed Central

    Abooali, Maryam; Lall, Gurprit S.; Coughlan, Karen; Lall, Harjinder S.; Gibbs, Bernhard F.; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2014-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD) is an enzyme which plays a central role in purine catabolism by converting hypoxanthine into xanthine and then further into uric acid. Here we report that XOD is activated in THP-1 human myeloid cells in response to pro-inflammatory and growth factor stimulation. This effect occurred following stimulation of THP-1 cells with ligands of plasma membrane associated TLRs 2 and 4, endosomal TLRs 7 and 8 as well as stem cell growth factor (SCF). Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription complexes were found to be responsible for XOD upregulation. Importantly, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a major myeloid cell translation regulator, was also found to be essential for XOD activation. Specific inhibition of XOD by allopurinol and sodium tungstate led to an increase in intracellular AMP levels triggering downregulation of mTOR activation by phosphorylation of its T2446 residue. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that XOD is not only activated by pro-inflammatory stimuli or SCF but also plays an important role in maintaining mTOR-dependent translational control during the biological responses of human myeloid cells. PMID:25200751

  3. Crucial involvement of xanthine oxidase in the intracellular signalling networks associated with human myeloid cell function.

    PubMed

    Abooali, Maryam; Lall, Gurprit S; Coughlan, Karen; Lall, Harjinder S; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2014-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD) is an enzyme which plays a central role in purine catabolism by converting hypoxanthine into xanthine and then further into uric acid. Here we report that XOD is activated in THP-1 human myeloid cells in response to pro-inflammatory and growth factor stimulation. This effect occurred following stimulation of THP-1 cells with ligands of plasma membrane associated TLRs 2 and 4, endosomal TLRs 7 and 8 as well as stem cell growth factor (SCF). Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription complexes were found to be responsible for XOD upregulation. Importantly, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a major myeloid cell translation regulator, was also found to be essential for XOD activation. Specific inhibition of XOD by allopurinol and sodium tungstate led to an increase in intracellular AMP levels triggering downregulation of mTOR activation by phosphorylation of its T2446 residue. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that XOD is not only activated by pro-inflammatory stimuli or SCF but also plays an important role in maintaining mTOR-dependent translational control during the biological responses of human myeloid cells. PMID:25200751

  4. Xanthine Oxidase Mediates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-2α Degradation by Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Nanduri, Jayasri; Vaddi, Damodara Reddy; Khan, Shakil A.; Wang, Ning; Makerenko, Vladislav; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing with recurrent apnea produces chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH). We previously reported that IH leads to down-regulation of HIF-2α protein via a calpain-dependent signaling pathway resulting in oxidative stress. In the present study, we delineated the signaling pathways associated with calpain-dependent HIF-2α degradation in cell cultures and rats subjected to chronic IH. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers prevented HIF-2α degradation by IH and ROS mimetic decreased HIF-2α protein levels in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell cultures, suggesting that ROS mediate IH-induced HIF-2α degradation. IH activated xanthine oxidase (XO) by increased proteolytic conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase to XO. ROS generated by XO activated calpains, which contributed to HIF-2α degradation by IH. Calpain-induced HIF-2α degradation involves C-terminus but not the N-terminus of the HIF-2α protein. Pharmacological blockade as well as genetic knock down of XO prevented IH induced calpain activation and HIF-2α degradation in PC12 cells. Systemic administration of allopurinol to rats prevented IH-induced hypertension, oxidative stress and XO activation in adrenal medulla. These results demonstrate that ROS generated by XO activation mediates IH-induced HIF-2α degradation via activation of calpains. PMID:24124516

  5. Quantitation of rat liver xanthine oxidase by radioimmunoassay. A mechanism for sex-specific differences

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, D.E.; Levinson, D.J.

    1982-03-01

    To further delineate the mechanism responsible for the differences in xanthine oxidase activity in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed for the measurement of hepatic xanthine oxidase. The RIA could detect as little as 5 mg of liver enzyme. Specificity of the RIA was confirmed by 1) Ouchterlony double immuno-diffusion in which a single precipitin band exhibited xanthine oxidase activity, when crude liver homogenate and an enzyme-specific stain were used; 2) parallelism between purified 125I-labeled xanthine oxidase and serial dilutions of crude liver homogenate; 3) a linear correlation between xanthine oxidase activity and the level of enzyme protein; and 4) a single protein band coincident with purified xanthine oxidase, when an immunoprecipitate prepared from antisera and crude liver homogenate was analyzed on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels. Whether xanthine oxidase activity was assayed in the absence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) (oxidase form) or in the presence of NAD+ (dehydrogenase), male values were consistently higher, and both forms of the enzyme correlated significantly with each other. When purified to homogeneity, neither form of the enzyme was appreciably affected by 17 beta-estradiol or testosterone propionate. When the RIA was employed, levels of hepatic xanthine oxidase were significantly greater in male than in female rats. We concluded from these data that increased xanthine oxidase activity in the male corresponds to a greater quantitative complement of xanthine oxidase protein. Furthermore, lower xanthine oxidase activity in the female cannot be explained by immunologically cross-reactive material without enzyme activity nor by a direct sex-steroid enzyme interaction.

  6. Crystal structures of mammalian xanthine oxidoreductase bound with various inhibitors: allopurinol, febuxostat, and FYX-051.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi

    2008-02-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the reaction of hypoxanthine to xanthine and of xanthine to uric acid. Inhibitors of XOR can thus decrease the concentration of uric acid in serum. Crystal structures of XOR bound with various inhibitors reveal that inhibitors can be categorized into three types, i.e. mechanism-based, structure-based, and hybrid types. PMID:18360072

  7. Sensitive electrochemical measurement of hydroxyl radical generation induced by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Hirosuke; Tsuchiya, Yui; Sakamoto, Koichi

    2014-12-15

    A sensitive electrochemical measurement system for hydroxyl radical (OH) was developed using enzyme-catalyzed signal amplification. In the presence of 2,6-xylenol as a trapping agent, glucose as a substrate, and pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-GDH) as a catalyst, the amperometric signal of the trapping adduct 2,6-dimethylhydroquinone (DMHQ) produced by the hydroxylation of 2,6-xylenol was able to be amplified and detected sensitively. The limit of detection (signal/noise [S/N]=3) for DMHQ was 1 nM. There was no significant interference from urate and other oxidizable compounds in the reaction mixture at the applied potential of 0V versus Ag/AgCl. This method was employed to observe the OH generation induced by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase (XO) system. The reaction rates of the DMHQ production induced from the xanthine-XO system in the presence and absence of various Fe(III) complexes and proteins were compared. Those with a free coordination site on the Fe atom effectively enhanced the OH generation. PMID:25180984

  8. Microwave assisted synthesis of naphthopyrans catalysed by silica supported fluoroboric acid as a new class of non purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sahil; Sharma, Kirti; Ojha, Ritu; Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Gagandip; Nepali, Kunal; Bedi, P M S

    2014-01-15

    A series of naphthopyrans was synthesized employing silica supported fluoroboric acid under solvent free conditions in a microwave reactor. The catalytic influence of HBF4-SiO2 was investigated in detail to optimize the reaction conditions. The synthesised compounds were evaluated for in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity for the first time. Structure-activity relationship analyses have also been presented. Among the synthesised compounds, NP-17, NP-19, NP-20, NP-23, NP-24, NP-25 and NP-26 were the active inhibitors with an IC50 ranging from 4 to 17 μM. Compound NP-19 with a thiophenyl ring at position 1 emerged as the most potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor (IC50=4 μM) in comparison to allopurinol (IC50=11.10 μM) and febuxostat (IC50=0.025 μM). The basis of significant inhibition of xanthine oxidase by NP-19 was rationalized by its molecular docking at MTE binding site of xanthine oxidase. PMID:24388807

  9. [Molecular docking analysis of xanthine oxidase inhibition by constituents of cichory].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-jie; Lin, Zhi-jian; Zhang, Bing; Zhu, Chun-sheng; Niu, Hong-juan; Zhou, Yue; Nie, An-zheng; Wang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Human xanthine oxidase is considered to be a target for therapy of hyperuricemia. Cichorium intybus is a Chinese plant medicine which widely used in Xinjiang against various diseases. In order to screen the inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from C. intybus and to explore main pharmacological actions of cichory a compound collection of C. intybus was built via consulting related references about chemical research on cichory. The three-dimensional crystal structure of xanthine oxidase (PDB code: 1N5X) from Protein Data Bank was downloaded.. Autodock 4.2 was employed to screen the inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from cichory 70 compounds were found to possess quite low binding free energy comparing with TEI (febuxostat). C. intybus contains constituents possessing potential inhibitive activity against xanthine oxidase. It can explain the main pharmacological actions of cichory which can significantly lower the level of serum uric acid. PMID:26975108

  10. High concentrations of antibodies to xanthine oxidase in human and animal sera. Molecular characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Bruder, G; Jarasch, E D; Heid, H W

    1984-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of antibodies (IgG) specific to xanthine oxidase in both normal (nonimmune) human and animal sera, and in antisera raised against a diversity of unrelated antigens is described. A study of sera from 81 humans revealed that xanthine oxidase-specific IgG represents a high proportion (1-8%) of total IgG. No obvious correlation to pathological events or symptoms of disease could be found. These xanthine oxidase-specific antibodies could be isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography on purified human or bovine xanthine oxidase and showed specific binding to the enzyme polypeptide of Mr 155,000 in immunoblotting experiments. By immunofluorescence microscopy they displayed the same cell type-specific reaction as experimentally induced antibodies, i.e., the staining of lactating mammary gland epithelium and capillary endothelium. The naturally occurring xanthine oxidase-specific antibodies consisted of polyclonal IgG of various subclasses. F(ab')2 preparations gave immune-reactions identical to those of IgG. The human xanthine oxidase-specific IgG cross-reacted with the bovine enzyme and both human and animal antibodies partially inhibited its activity. The xanthine oxidase activity of human milk lipid globules and supernatant fractions from various human tissues was extremely low when compared with that of the bovine antigen. The enzyme protein, however, was effectively precipitated from these sources by both the human and bovine antibodies. We suggest that the exceptionally high concentrations of antibodies against one protein, xanthine oxidase, are due to self-immunization to the xanthine oxidase antigen present in endothelial cells of capillaries. We do not exclude, however, nutritional contributions of bovine milk antigen to the appearance of xanthine oxidase antibodies in human sera. The possible biological functions of this immunological reaction are discussed. Images PMID:6381540

  11. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise: a role in inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Hellsten, Y; Frandsen, U; Orthenblad, N; Sjødin, B; Richter, E A

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised and the control leg, together with venous blood samples, were obtained prior to exercise and at 45 min, 24, 48 and 96 h after exercise. The time courses of xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity and indicators of muscle damage and inflammation were examined. 2. The number of xanthine oxidase structures observed by immunohistological methods in the exercised muscle was up to eightfold higher than control from day 1 to day 4 after exercise (P < 0.05). The increase was attributed to an enhanced expression of xanthine oxidase in microvascular endothelial cells and an invasion of leucocytes containing xanthine oxidase. 3. The concentration of plasma interleukin-6 was significantly higher 90 min after exercise than before exercise (P < 0.05) and remained higher than pre-exercise levels throughout the 4 days. On day 4 the plasma creatine kinase activity was approximately 150-fold higher (P < 0.05) than resting levels. 4. Despite the increase in xanthine oxidase in the muscle there were no detectable changes in the levels of muscle malondialdehyde or in plasma antioxidant capacity up to 4 days post-exercise. 5. It is concluded that eccentric exercise leads to an increased level of xanthine oxidase in human muscle and that the increase is associated with secondary inflammatory processes. The increase in xanthine oxidase in the muscle occurs mainly in microvascular endothelial cells, but occurs also via infiltrating leucocytes containing xanthine oxidase. A role for leucocytes in xanthine oxidase induction in endothelium is proposed. Images Figure 2 PMID:9023782

  12. Characterization of an Anti-gout Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitor from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Jang, In-Taek; Hyun, Se-Hee; Shin, Ja-Won; Lee, Yun-Hae; Ji, Jeong-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-09-01

    We selected Pleurotus ostreatus from among several edible mushrooms because it has high anti-gout xanthine oxidase (XOD) inhibitory activity. The maximal amount of XOD inhibitor was extracted when the Pleurotus ostreatus fruiting body was treated with distilled water at 40℃ for 48 hr. The XOD inhibitor thus obtained was purified by Sephadex G-50 gel permeation chromatography, ultrafiltration, C18 solid phase extraction chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with 3% of solid yield, and its XOD inhibitory activity was 0.9 mg/mL of IC50. The purified XOD inhibitor was a tripeptide with the amino acid sequence phenylalanine-cysteine-histidine and a molecular weight of 441.3 Da. The XOD inhibitor-containing ultrafiltrates from Pleurotus ostreatus demonstrated dose-dependent anti-gout effects in a Sprague-Dawley rat model of potassium oxonate-induced gout, as shown by decreased serum urated levels at doses of 500 and 1,000 mg/kg, although the effect was not as great as that achieved with the commercial anti-gout agent, allopurinol when administered at a dose of 50 mg/kg. PMID:25346610

  13. 2-Arylquinazolin-4(3H)-ones: Inhibitory Activities Against Xanthine Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Humaira; Saad, Syed M; Perveen, Shahnaz; Arshia; Malik, Rizwana; Khan, Ajmal; Khan, Khalid M; Choudhary, Muhammad I

    2016-01-01

    2-Arylquinazolin-4(3H)-ones (1-25) were synthesized, and evaluated for their xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity. Significant to moderate activities were exhibited by the compounds 1-3, 7, 9, 13-15, 19-21, and 23 with IC50 between 2.80 - 28.13 µM as compared to the standard allopurinol (IC50 (IC50 = 2.01 ± 0.01 µM). Compounds 4-6, 8, 11-12, 16-18, 22, and 24 demonstrated a weak activity with IC50 values 44.60 - 112.60 µM. Nonetheless, compounds 10 and 25 did not show any activity. Amongst all derivatives, compound 2, containing a C-4´ dimethylamino group, was the most potent inhibitor of the enzyme with an IC50 value comparable to the standard. Kinetics studies on the most active compounds (2, 7, 9, 14, 15, 19, and 20) were conducted in order to determine their modes of inhibition and dissociation constants Ki. Some of the compounds of 2-arylquinazolin-4(3H)-one series were thus identified as potential leads for further studies towards the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. PMID:26256588

  14. Characterization of an Anti-gout Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitor from Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Jang, In-Taek; Hyun, Se-Hee; Shin, Ja-Won; Lee, Yun-Hae; Ji, Jeong-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    We selected Pleurotus ostreatus from among several edible mushrooms because it has high anti-gout xanthine oxidase (XOD) inhibitory activity. The maximal amount of XOD inhibitor was extracted when the Pleurotus ostreatus fruiting body was treated with distilled water at 40℃ for 48 hr. The XOD inhibitor thus obtained was purified by Sephadex G-50 gel permeation chromatography, ultrafiltration, C18 solid phase extraction chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with 3% of solid yield, and its XOD inhibitory activity was 0.9 mg/mL of IC50. The purified XOD inhibitor was a tripeptide with the amino acid sequence phenylalanine-cysteine-histidine and a molecular weight of 441.3 Da. The XOD inhibitor-containing ultrafiltrates from Pleurotus ostreatus demonstrated dose-dependent anti-gout effects in a Sprague-Dawley rat model of potassium oxonate-induced gout, as shown by decreased serum urated levels at doses of 500 and 1,000 mg/kg, although the effect was not as great as that achieved with the commercial anti-gout agent, allopurinol when administered at a dose of 50 mg/kg. PMID:25346610

  15. Reexamining Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics for xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Bassingthwaighte, James B; Chinn, Tamara M

    2013-03-01

    Abbreviated expressions for enzyme kinetic expressions, such as the Michaelis-Menten (M-M) equations, are based on the premise that enzyme concentrations are low compared with those of the substrate and product. When one does progress experiments, where the solute is consumed during conversion to form a series of products, the idealized conditions are violated. Here, we analyzed data of xanthine oxidase in vitro from Escribano et al. (Biochem J 254: 829, 1988) on two conversions in series, hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid. Analyses were done using four models: standard irreversible M-M reactions (model 1), Escribano et al.'s M-M forward reaction expressions with product inhibition (model 2), fully reversible M-M equations (model 3), and standard differential equations allowing forward and backward reactions with mass balance accounting for binding (model 4). The results showed that the need for invoking product inhibition vanishes with more complete analyses. The reactions were not quite irreversible, so the backward reaction had a small effect. Even though the enzyme concentration was only 1-2% of the initial substrate concentrations, accounting for the fraction of solutes bound to the enzyme did influence the parameter estimates, but in this case, the M-M model overestimated Michaelis constant values by only about one-third. This article also presents the research and models in a reproducible and publicly available form. PMID:23471247

  16. Reexamining Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics for xanthine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Tamara M.

    2013-01-01

    Abbreviated expressions for enzyme kinetic expressions, such as the Michaelis-Menten (M-M) equations, are based on the premise that enzyme concentrations are low compared with those of the substrate and product. When one does progress experiments, where the solute is consumed during conversion to form a series of products, the idealized conditions are violated. Here, we analyzed data of xanthine oxidase in vitro from Escribano et al. (Biochem J 254: 829, 1988) on two conversions in series, hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid. Analyses were done using four models: standard irreversible M-M reactions (model 1), Escribano et al.'s M-M forward reaction expressions with product inhibition (model 2), fully reversible M-M equations (model 3), and standard differential equations allowing forward and backward reactions with mass balance accounting for binding (model 4). The results showed that the need for invoking product inhibition vanishes with more complete analyses. The reactions were not quite irreversible, so the backward reaction had a small effect. Even though the enzyme concentration was only 1–2% of the initial substrate concentrations, accounting for the fraction of solutes bound to the enzyme did influence the parameter estimates, but in this case, the M-M model overestimated Michaelis constant values by only about one-third. This article also presents the research and models in a reproducible and publicly available form. PMID:23471247

  17. Xanthine oxidase inhibition by febuxostat attenuates experimental atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Johji; Busso, Nathalie; Ives, Annette; Matsui, Chieko; Tsujimoto, Syunsuke; Shirakura, Takashi; Tamura, Mizuho; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi; So, Alexander; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease due to lipid deposition in the arterial wall. Multiple mechanisms participate in the inflammatory process, including oxidative stress. Xanthine oxidase (XO) is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show enhanced XO expression in macrophages in the atherosclerotic plaque and in aortic endothelial cells in ApoE(-/-) mice, and that febuxostat, a highly potent XO inhibitor, suppressed plaque formation, reduced arterial ROS levels and improved endothelial dysfunction in ApoE(-/-) mice without affecting plasma cholesterol levels. In vitro, febuxostat inhibited cholesterol crystal-induced ROS formation and inflammatory cytokine release in murine macrophages. These results demonstrate that in the atherosclerotic plaque, XO-mediated ROS formation is pro-inflammatory and XO-inhibition by febuxostat is a potential therapy for atherosclerosis. PMID:24686534

  18. Determination of human plasma xanthine oxidase activity by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Moriwaki, Y; Takahashi, S; Tsutsumi, Z; Yamakita, J; Nasako, Y; Hiroishi, K; Higashino, K

    1996-06-01

    An assay for human plasma xanthine oxidase activity was developed with pterin as the substrate and the separation of product (isoxanthopterin) by high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. The reaction mixture consists of 60 microliters of plasma and 240 microliters of 0.2 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.0) containing 113 microM pterin. With this assay, the activity of plasma xanthine oxidase could be easily determined despite its low activity. As a result, it could be demonstrated that the intravenous administration of heparin or the oral administration of ethanol did not increase plasma xanthine oxidase activity in normal subjects, and also that plasma xanthine oxidase activity was higher in patients with hepatitis C virus infection than in healthy subjects or patients with gout. In addition, a single patient with von Gierke's disease showed a marked increase in the plasma activity of this enzyme, relative to that apparent in normal subjects. PMID:8811453

  19. Determination of xanthine oxidase in human serum by a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Musiani, S; Buonamici, L; Strocchi, P; Tazzari, P L; Gramantieri, L; Stirpe, F

    1999-03-01

    Xanthine oxidase was purified from human milk and used to immunise rabbits. A competitive immunoenzymatic assay with purified enzyme and rabbit antiserum was optimised to measure xanthine oxidase in human serum, the lowest detectable amount being 0.03 pmol of enzymatic protein. Thus, the test (i) is sensitive enough to determine xanthine oxidase in human serum, being more sensitive than the spectrophotometric method, (ii) it is more convenient for clinical laboratories than other sensitive tests and (iii) it has the advantage over the enzyme activity-based assays of also detecting inactive enzyme molecules. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the serum xanthine oxidase level in healthy donors and in patients with liver diseases, and it was found that any concentration below 1 mg/L is in the normal range. PMID:10217635

  20. Herpecaudin from Herpetospermum caudigerum, a Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitor with a Novel Isoprenoid Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Jiang, He Zhong; Tan, Rui; Jiao, Rui Hua; Deng, Xin Zhao; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Herpecaudin (3), a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with an unprecedented scaffold, was discovered from Herpetospermum caudigerum seeds. The structure was determined by spectroscopic and X-ray single crystallographic methods. A possible biogenetic pathway leading to herpecaudin is proposed, starting from congeners 23,24-dihydrocucurbitacin E (1) and endecaphyllacin B (2), and involving retro-aldol cleavage as a key step. All three compounds proved to be active and represent new scaffolds of non-purine analogue xanthine oxidase inhibitors. PMID:27272398

  1. Production of the carbonate radical anion during xanthine oxidase turnover in the presence of bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Marcelo G; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Di Mascio, Paolo; Augusto, Ohara

    2004-12-10

    Xanthine oxidase is generally recognized as a key enzyme in purine catabolism, but its structural complexity, low substrate specificity, and specialized tissue distribution suggest other functions that remain to be fully identified. The potential of xanthine oxidase to generate superoxide radical anion, hydrogen peroxide, and peroxynitrite has been extensively explored in pathophysiological contexts. Here we demonstrate that xanthine oxidase turnover at physiological pH produces a strong one-electron oxidant, the carbonate radical anion. The radical was shown to be produced from acetaldehyde oxidation by xanthine oxidase in the presence of catalase and bicarbonate on the basis of several lines of evidence such as oxidation of both dihydrorhodamine 123 and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide and chemiluminescence and isotope labeling/mass spectrometry studies. In the case of xanthine oxidase acting upon xanthine and hypoxanthine as substrates, carbonate radical anion production was also evidenced by the oxidation of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide and of dihydrorhodamine 123 in the presence of uricase. The results indicated that Fenton chemistry occurring in the bulk solution is not necessary for carbonate radical anion production. Under the conditions employed, the radical was likely to be produced at the enzyme active site by reduction of a peroxymonocarbonate intermediate whose formation and reduction is facilitated by the many xanthine oxidase redox centers. In addition to indicating that the carbonate radical anion may be an important mediator of the pathophysiological effects of xanthine oxidase, the results emphasize the potential of the bicarbonate-carbon dioxide pair as a source of biological oxidants. PMID:15448145

  2. Protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by allopurinol is dependent on aldehyde oxidase-mediated liver preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe and occasionally fatal liver injury. Numerous drugs that attenuate APAP toxicity have been described. However these compounds frequently protect by cytochrome P450 inhibition, thereby preventing the initiating step of toxicity. We have previously shown that pretreatment with allopurinol can effectively protect against APAP toxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the current study, C3HeB/FeJ mice were administered allopurinol 18 h or 1 h prior to an APAP overdose. Administration of allopurinol 18 h prior to APAP overdose resulted in an 88% reduction in liver injury (serum ALT) 6 h after APAP; however, 1 h pretreatment offered no protection. APAP-cysteine adducts and glutathione depletion kinetics were similar with or without allopurinol pretreatment. The phosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of c-jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK) have been implicated in the progression of APAP toxicity. In our study we showed equivalent early JNK activation (2 h) however late JNK activation (6 h) was attenuated in allopurinol treated mice, which suggests that later JNK activation is more critical for the toxicity. Additional mice were administered oxypurinol (primary metabolite of allopurinol) 18 h or 1 h pre-APAP, but neither treatment protected. This finding implicated an aldehyde oxidase (AO)-mediated metabolism of allopurinol, so mice were treated with hydralazine to inhibit AO prior to allopurinol/APAP administration, which eliminated the protective effects of allopurinol. We evaluated potential targets of AO-mediated preconditioning and found increased hepatic metallothionein 18 h post-allopurinol. These data show metabolism of allopurinol occurring independent of P450 isoenzymes preconditions the liver and renders the animal less susceptible to an APAP overdose. - Highlights: • 18 h allopurinol pretreatment protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • 1 h allopurinol pretreatment does not protect from APAP

  3. Substrate Orientation and Catalysis at the Molybdenum Site in Xanthine Oxidase CRYSTAL STRUCTURES IN COMPLEX WITH XANTHINE AND LUMAZINE

    SciTech Connect

    Pauff, James M.; Cao, Hongnan; Hille, Russ

    2010-01-12

    Xanthine oxidoreductase is a ubiquitous cytoplasmic protein that catalyzes the final two steps in purine catabolism. We have previously investigated the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme by rapid reaction kinetics and x-ray crystallography using the poor substrate 2-hydroxy-6-methylpurine, focusing our attention on the orientation of substrate in the active site and the role of Arg-880 in catalysis. Here we report additional crystal structures of as-isolated, functional xanthine oxidase in the course of reaction with the pterin substrate lumazine at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution and of the nonfunctional desulfo form of the enzyme in complex with xanthine at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. In both cases the orientation of substrate is such that the pyrimidine subnucleus is oriented opposite to that seen with the slow substrate 2-hydroxy-6-methylpurine. The mechanistic implications as to how the ensemble of active site functional groups in the active site work to accelerate reaction rate are discussed.

  4. The role of xanthine oxidase in thiopurine metabolism: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dennis R; Derijks, Luc J J; den Dulk, Meyno O; Gemmeke, Edy H K M; Hooymans, Piet M

    2007-12-01

    Azathioprine (AZA) is widely used in the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases. AZA is normally rapidly and almost completely converted to 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) in the liver, which is further metabolized into a variety of pharmacologic active thiopurine metabolites. 6-MP is catabolized by xanthine oxidase (XO) to the inactive metabolite 6-thiouric acid. The authors report the case of a woman with chronic autoimmune pancreatitis unable to form active thiopurine metabolites. The 55-year-old woman presented with weight loss, progressive elevation of liver transaminases, and serum amylase. She was treated with prednisolone 30 mg/day (1 mg/kg) and AZA was increased to 75 mg/day (2.5 mg/kg); this was later increased to 150 mg/day (5 mg/kg). Despite good patient compliance, the active metabolites of AZA, 6-thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN), and 6-methylmercaptopurine ribonucleotides (6-MMPR) could not be detected in the erythrocytes (RBC). Subsequently, AZA was switched to high-dose 6-MP (2.5 mg/kg) and the XO inhibitor allopurinol was added. After 1 week, this combination led to a high 6-TGN level of 616 pmol/8 x 10(8) RBC and a 6-MMPR level of 1319 pmol/8 x 10(8) RBC. Three weeks after starting treatment, 6-TGN and 6-MMPR even reached toxic levels (1163 pmol/8 x 10(8) RBC and 10015 pmol/8 x 10(8) RBC, respectively) so that 6-MP treatment was discontinued. To elucidate this finding, 6-MP (1.7 mg/kg) was prescribed for 3 days without allopurinol. The woman was not able to form active thiopurine metabolites. According to the authors, this is the first report of a patient unable to form detectable active thiopurine metabolites on AZA and 6-MP therapy despite good patient compliance. High XO activity led to an inability to form detectable levels of active thiopurine metabolites 6-TGN and 6-MMPR. This finding emphasizes the important role of XO in the biotransformation of thiopurines. PMID:18043486

  5. The Role of Aldehyde Oxidase and Xanthine Oxidase in the Biotransformation of a Novel Negative Allosteric Modulator of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Ryan D.; Blobaum, Anna L.; Byers, Frank W.; Santomango, Tammy S.; Bridges, Thomas M.; Stec, Donald; Brewer, Katrina A.; Sanchez-Ponce, Raymundo; Corlew, Melany M.; Rush, Roger; Felts, Andrew S.; Manka, Jason; Bates, Brittney S.; Venable, Daryl F.; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Jones, Carrie K.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Emmitte, Kyle A.

    2012-01-01

    Negative allosteric modulation (NAM) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) represents a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of childhood developmental disorders, such as fragile X syndrome and autism. VU0409106 emerged as a lead compound within a biaryl ether series, displaying potent and selective inhibition of mGlu5. Despite its high clearance and short half-life, VU0409106 demonstrated efficacy in rodent models of anxiety after extravascular administration. However, lack of a consistent correlation in rat between in vitro hepatic clearance and in vivo plasma clearance for the biaryl ether series prompted an investigation into the biotransformation of VU0409106 using hepatic subcellular fractions. An in vitro appraisal in rat, monkey, and human liver S9 fractions indicated that the principal pathway was NADPH-independent oxidation to metabolite M1 (+16 Da). Both raloxifene (aldehyde oxidase inhibitor) and allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor) attenuated the formation of M1, thus implicating the contribution of both molybdenum hydroxylases in the biotransformation of VU0409106. The use of 18O-labeled water in the S9 experiments confirmed the hydroxylase mechanism proposed, because 18O was incorporated into M1 (+18 Da) as well as in a secondary metabolite (M2; +36 Da), the formation of which was exclusively xanthine oxidase-mediated. This unusual dual and sequential hydroxylase metabolism was confirmed in liver S9 and hepatocytes of multiple species and correlated with in vivo data because M1 and M2 were the principal metabolites detected in rats administered VU0409106. An in vitro-in vivo correlation of predicted hepatic and plasma clearance was subsequently established for VU0409106 in rats and nonhuman primates. PMID:22711749

  6. Effect of dietary protein and iron on the fractional turnover rate of rat liver xanthine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, D.M.; Amy, N.K.

    1987-12-01

    Rat liver xanthine oxidase activity is regulated in response to dietary protein and iron. To investigate whether the change in activity was mediated by a change in the rate of protein degradation, we measured the fractional turnover rate using the double-isotope technique with (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)leucine and calculated the apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase in rats fed diets containing either 20 or 5% casein with either 35 or 5 mg iron/kg diet. Under control conditions, xanthine oxidase had an apparent half-life of 4.8 d and approximately 65% of the enzyme subunits were active. Rats fed diets with low dietary protein had lower xanthine oxidase activity, but the enzyme had a slower fractional turnover rate, resulting in an apparent half-life of 6.4 d, and only 15-20% of the enzyme was active. The apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase increased to 7.5 d in rats fed diets with low dietary iron, but dietary iron did not affect the specific activity of the enzyme or the percentage of active subunits. These results suggest that the loss of enzyme activity is not due to loss of enzyme protein by increased degradation, but rather to inactivation of the enzyme.

  7. Xanthine Oxidase and Cardiovascular Risk in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Harrison K.; Kelly, Aaron S.; Metzig, Andrea M.; Steinberger, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pathological mechanisms of how childhood obesity leads to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are not fully characterized. Oxidative-stress–related enzymes, such as xanthine oxidase (XO), have been linked to obesity, endothelial dysfunction, and CVD in adults, but little is known about this pathway in children. The aim of this study was to determine whether differential XO activity is associated with endothelial dysfunction, CVD risk factors, or cytokine levels. Methods: Fasting plasma samples were obtained from obese (BMI ≥95th percentile; n=20) and age- and gender-matched healthy weight (BMI >5th and <85th percentile; n=22) children and adolescents (mean age, 12±3 years) to quantify XO activity. In addition, fasting cholesterol, insulin, glucose, blood pressure, endothelial function, and cytokine levels were assessed. Results: We observed a 3.8-fold increase in plasma XO activity in obese, compared to healthy weight, children (118±21 vs. 31±9 nU/mg of protein; p<0.001). Plasma XO activity was correlated with BMI z-score (r=0.41), waist circumference (r=0.41), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=−0.32), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (r=0.57), adiponectin (r=−0.53), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (r=−0.59). Conclusion: XO activity is highly elevated in obese children and correlates with CVD risk factors, suggesting that XO may play a role in increasing cardiovascular risk early in life in the context of obesity. PMID:24568669

  8. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Pilot, T.F.; Meany, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.

  9. Chemical Evidence for Potent Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity of Ethyl Acetate Extract of Citrus aurantium L. Dried Immature Fruits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Wei; Guo, Bing-Hua; Gao, Hua; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Yao, Hui-Li; Cheng, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase is a key enzyme which can catalyze hypoxanthine and xanthine to uric acid causing hyperuricemia in humans. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of 24 organic extracts of four species belonging to Citrus genus of the family Rutaceae were assayed in vitro. Since the ethyl acetate extract of C. aurantium dried immature fruits showed the highest xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity, chemical evidence for the potent inhibitory activity was clarified on the basis of structure identification of the active constituents. Five flavanones and two polymethoxyflavones were isolated and evaluated for inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase in vitro. Of the compounds, hesperetin showed more potent inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 16.48 μM. For the first time, this study provides a rational basis for the use of C. aurantium dried immature fruits against hyperuricemia. PMID:26950105

  10. 3,4-Dihydroxy-5-nitrobenzaldehyde (DHNB) is a Potent Inhibitor of Xanthine Oxidase: a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of hyperuricemia and gout

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jian-Ming; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2013-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, excess of uric acid in the blood, is a clinical problem that causes gout and is also considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) produces uric acid during the purine metabolism; therefore, discovering novel XO inhibitors is an important strategy to develop an effective therapy for hyperuricemia and gout. We found that 3,4-dihydroxy-5-nitrobenzaldehyde (DHNB), a derivative of the natural substance protocatechuic aldehyde, potently inhibited XO activity with an IC50 value of 3 μM. DHNB inhibited XO activity in a time-dependent manner, which was similar to that of allopurinol, a clinical XO inhibitory drug. DHNB displayed potent mixed-type inhibition of the activity of XO, and showed an additive effect with allopurinol at the low concentration. Structure-activity relationship studies of DHNB indicated that the aldehyde moiety, the catechol moiety, and nitration at C-5 were required for XO inhibition. DHNB interacted with the molybdenum center of XO and was slowly converted to its carboxylic acid at a rate of 10-10 mol/L/s. In addition, DHNB directly scavenged free radical DPPH and ROS, including ONOO− and HOCl. DHNB effectively reduced serum uric acid levels in allantoxanamide-induced hyperuricemic mice. Furthermore, mice given a large dose (500 mg/kg) of DHNB did not show any side effects, while 42% of allopurinol-treated mice died and their offspring lost their fur. Thus, DHNB could be an outstanding candidate for a novel XO inhibitory drug that has potent activity and low toxicity, as well as antioxidant activity and a distinct chemical structure from allopurinol. PMID:23994369

  11. Xanthine oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species mediate 4-oxo-2-nonenal-induced hepatocyte cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, Satoru Negoro, Miki; Kitamura, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Yohko

    2010-12-01

    Among the aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation, there have been several reports concerning the toxicity of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), whereas little information is available about 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE). In the present study, we examined the effects of 4-HNE and 4-ONE on the cell viability of primary rat hepatocyte cultures. At concentrations of 5, 10, and 20 {mu}M, 4-HNE had no significant effect on the cell viability of primary rat hepatocytes cultures, whereas 4-ONE potently decreased the cell viability in a dose-dependent manner (5-20 {mu}M, 23-69% inhibition). The TUNEL assay showed that 4-ONE causes apoptosis in the cells. 4-ONE also increased 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-fluorescence intensity from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein, an indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, diminished the 4-ONE-induced increase in the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-fluorescence intensity and the decrease in viability, indicating the role of XO in mediating 4-ONE-induced cell death. These observations suggest that 4-ONE has the potential to induce liver cell death via XO-derived ROS generation.

  12. The xanthine oxidase activity in different of secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styła, Katarzyna; Wojciech Szajdak, Lech

    2010-05-01

    The investigations were carried out on the transect of peatland 4.5 km long, located in the Agroecological Landscape Park host D. Chlapowski in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). The sites investigation were located along Wyskoć ditch. The following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbęchy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo in two layers: acrotelm (0-50 cm) and catotelm (50-100 cm). The object of this study was to characterize the biochemical properties by the determination of the xanthine oxidase activity in two layers (acrotelm and catotelm) of the four different peat-moorsh soils used as meadow. The xanthine oxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring uric acid formation at λmax=290 nm with xanthine as substrate. In peat-moorsh soil the highest activities of xanthine oxidasewas observed in the Shelterbelt and whereas the lowest - in Zbęchy, Bridge and Hirudo. Activities of this enzyme in peat-moorsh soil ranged from 5.96 to 19.51 μmol h-1g d.m soil. Increased activities of xanthine oxidase have been recorded on the depth 50-100 cm - catotelm (from 11.71 to 19.51 μmol h-1g d.m soil) in comparison with the depth 0-50 cm - acrotelm (from 5.96 to 14.64 μmol h-1g d.m soil). This work was supported by a grant No. N N305 3204 36 founded by Polish Ministry of Education.

  13. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by the aldehyde oxidase inhibitor raloxifene: implications for identifying molybdopterin nitrite reductases.

    PubMed

    Weidert, E R; Schoenborn, S O; Cantu-Medellin, N; Choughule, K V; Jones, J P; Kelley, E E

    2014-02-15

    Sources of nitric oxide alternative to nitric oxide synthases are gaining significant traction as crucial mediators of vessel function under hypoxic inflammatory conditions. For example, capacity to catalyze the one electron reduction of nitrite (NO2-) to ·NO has been reported for hemoglobin, myoglobin and molybdopterin-containing enzymes including xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) and aldehyde oxidase (AO). For XOR and AO, use of selective inhibition strategies is therefore crucial when attempting to assign relative contributions to nitrite-mediated ·NO formation in cells and tissue. To this end, XOR inhibition has been accomplished with application of classic pyrazolopyrimidine-based inhibitors allo/oxypurinol or the newly FDA-approved XOR-specific inhibitor, Uloric® (febuxostat). Likewise, raloxifene, an estrogen receptor antagonist, has been identified as a potent (Ki=1.0 nM) inhibitor of AO. Herein, we characterize the inhibition kinetics of raloxifene for XOR and describe the resultant effects on inhibiting XO-catalyzed ·NO formation. Exposure of purified XO to raloxifene (PBS, pH 7.4) resulted in a dose-dependent (12.5-100 μM) inhibition of xanthine oxidation to uric acid. Dixon plot analysis revealed a competitive inhibition process with a Ki=13 μM. This inhibitory process was more effective under acidic pH; similar to values encountered under hypoxic/inflammatory conditions. In addition, raloxifene also inhibited anoxic XO-catalyzed reduction of NO2- to NO (EC50=64 μM). In contrast to having no effect on XO-catalyzed uric acid production, the AO inhibitor menadione demonstrated potent inhibition of XO-catalyzed NO2- reduction (EC50=60 nM); somewhat similar to the XO-specific inhibitor, febuxostat (EC50=4 nM). Importantly, febuxostat was found to be a very poor inhibitor of human AO (EC50=613 μM) suggesting its usefulness for validating XO-dependent contributions to NO2- reduction in biological systems. Combined, these data indicate care should be taken

  14. Granulomatous reaction to red tattoo pigment treated with allopurinol.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Mariana Marteleto; Aguinaga, Felipe; Grynszpan, Rachel; Lima, Victor Maselli; Azulay, David Rubem; Cuzzi, Tullia; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia; Manela-Azulay, Mônica

    2015-09-01

    Granulomatous reactions to tattoo ink are most commonly associated with mercury sulfide, a component of red pigments. Treatment options show limited results. Allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, has been reported as a successful alternative treatment to granulomatous disorders, such as sarcoidosis and granulomatous reactions to fillers and tattoos. We report a case of granulomatous reaction to red tattoo pigment treated with allopurinol for 6 months. Good clinical improvement could be noticed during this time. Two months after we stopped the treatment, the lesion recurred. Allopurinol emerges as an important drug for the management of granulomatous reactions caused by tattoo pigments. Based on the significant clinical improvement noticed during its use, we recommend new studies to elucidate all the potential benefits of the use of allopurinol for the treatment of granulomatous reactions to tattoo ink. PMID:26211454

  15. Inhibitory effects of cardols and related compounds on superoxide anion generation by xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Maeta, Ayami; Yamagiwa, Yoshiro; Kubo, Isao

    2015-01-01

    5-Pentadecatrienylresorcinol, isolated from cashew nuts and commonly known as cardol (C₁₅:₃), prevented the generation of superoxide radicals catalysed by xanthine oxidase without the inhibition of uric acid formation. The inhibition kinetics did not follow the Michelis-Menten equation, but instead followed the Hill equation. Cardol (C₁₀:₀) also inhibited superoxide anion generation, but resorcinol and cardol (C₅:₀) did not inhibit superoxide anion generation. The related compounds 3,5-dihydroxyphenyl alkanoates and alkyl 2,4-dihydroxybenzoates, had more than a C9 chain, cooperatively inhibited but alkyl 3,5-dihydroxybenzoates, regardless of their alkyl chain length, did not inhibit the superoxide anion generation. These results suggested that specific inhibitors for superoxide anion generation catalysed by xanthine oxidase consisted of an electron-rich resorcinol group and an alkyl chain having longer than C9 chain. PMID:25053055

  16. Interaction of a green ester-bonded gemini surfactant with xanthine oxidase: Biophysical perspective.

    PubMed

    Akram, Mohd; Bhat, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Kabir-ud-Din

    2015-01-01

    A multi technique approach was utilized to explore the interaction between a novel green gemini surfactant, ethane-1,2-diyl bis(N,N-dimethyl-N-tetradecylammoniumacetoxy) dichloride (14-E2-14), with bovine milk xanthine oxidase (XO). Tensiometric, spectroscopic, microscopic and molecular modeling results demonstrate significant interaction and structural change of native xanthine oxidase upon 14-E2-14 combination. The results obtained in this study may be beneficial for scientists to calibrate conformation of the enzyme by novel biodegradable/green microstructures; consequently, it would likely add new impetus in understanding the treatment modes of various diseases like gout, hyperuricemia, liver and brain necrosis. Moreover, the 14-E2-14-XO interaction assists to unfurl new routes in the designing/selection of green-surfactant-protein mixtures widely used in food processing, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25849998

  17. In vitro oxidative metabolism of 6-mercaptopurine in human liver: insights into the role of the molybdoflavoenzymes aldehyde oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and xanthine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Choughule, Kanika V; Barnaba, Carlo; Joswig-Jones, Carolyn A; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2014-08-01

    Anticancer agent 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) has been in use since 1953 for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite being available for 60 years, several aspects of 6MP drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans are unknown. Molybdoflavoenzymes such as aldehyde oxidase (AO) and xanthine oxidase (XO) have previously been implicated in the metabolism of this drug. In this study, we investigated the in vitro metabolism of 6MP to 6-thiouric acid (6TUA) in pooled human liver cytosol. We discovered that 6MP is metabolized to 6TUA through sequential metabolism via the 6-thioxanthine (6TX) intermediate. The role of human AO and XO in the metabolism of 6MP was established using the specific inhibitors raloxifene and febuxostat. Both AO and XO were involved in the metabolism of the 6TX intermediate, whereas only XO was responsible for the conversion of 6TX to 6TUA. These findings were further confirmed using purified human AO and Escherichia coli lysate containing expressed recombinant human XO. Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH), which belongs to the family of xanthine oxidoreductases and preferentially reduces nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), was shown to contribute to the overall production of the 6TX intermediate as well as the final product 6TUA in the presence of NAD(+) in human liver cytosol. In conclusion, we present evidence that three enzymes, AO, XO, and XDH, contribute to the production of 6TX intermediate, whereas only XO and XDH are involved in the conversion of 6TX to 6TUA in pooled HLC. PMID:24824603

  18. Simulated ischaemia-reperfusion conditions increase xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities in rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Buonamici, L; Virgili, M; Abbondanza, A; Contestabile, A

    1998-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities increased by 87% in rat brain slices after 30 min in vitro ischaemia. A further 41% increase was induced by 30 min simulated reperfusion of ischaemic slices. No conversion from the dehydrogenase to the oxidase activity was observed. The increment of enzyme activity was not due to neosynthesis of the enzyme, since it was not affected by the addition of cycloheximide during the ischaemic incubation. The increased oxygen-dependent form of the enzyme could aggravate the ischaemic brain injury by free radicals production, in particular after reperfusion. PMID:9460697

  19. [Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken

    2008-04-01

    Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase decrease production of uric acid, thus they act as hypouricemic drugs. Allopurinol, a prototypical xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, has been widely prescribed for treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. However, severe side effects of allopurinol may occur in patients with renal insufficiency. Recently, novel nonpurine selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase have been developed as potential alternatives to allopurinol. They have different inhibition mechanisms, utilizing the enzyme structure and the reaction mechanism. Such variation of the inhibition mechanism affects/in vivo/hypouricemic effects of the inhibitors. PMID:18409526

  20. Preliminary pharmacological studies on Eugenia uniflora leaves: xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, G; Theoduloz, C; Franco, L; Ferro, E; de Arias, A R

    1987-11-01

    Eugenia uniflora is widely used in Paraguayan folk medicine. A hydroalcoholic extract of the leaves showed some central nervous system activity in hippocratic screening when given intraperitoneally, but little to no acute or subacute toxicity in doses up to 4200 mg/kg orally in BALB c mice. The LD50 of the extract was 220 mg/kg i.p. in mice. A decoction or infusion of the leaves is recommended for treating gout by native herbalists. The known flavonoids quercitrin, quercetin, myricitrin and myricetin were found to be responsible for the xanthine oxidase inhibitory action of the plant extract. PMID:3437769

  1. Allopurinol and oxypurinol promote osteoblast differentiation and increase bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Orriss, Isabel R.; Arnett, Timothy R.; George, Jacob; Witham, Miles D.

    2016-01-01

    Allopurinol and its active metabolite, oxypurinol are widely used in the treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. They inhibit xanthine oxidase (XO) an enzyme in the purine degradation pathway that converts xanthine to uric acid. This investigation examined the effect of allopurinol and oxypurinol on bone formation, cell number and viability, gene expression and enzyme activity in differentiating and mature, bone-forming osteoblasts. Although mRNA expression remained relatively constant, XO activity decreased over time with mature osteoblasts displaying reduced levels of uric acid (20% decrease). Treatment with allopurinol and oxypurinol (0.1–1 µM) reduced XO activity by up to 30%. At these concentrations, allopurinol and oxypurinol increased bone formation by osteoblasts ~4-fold and ~3-fold, respectively. Cell number and viability were unaffected. Both drugs increased tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity up to 65%. Osteocalcin and TNAP mRNA expression was increased, 5-fold and 2-fold, respectively. Expression of NPP1, the enzyme responsible for generating the mineralisation inhibitor, pyrophosphate, was decreased 5-fold. Col1α1 mRNA expression and soluble collagen levels were unchanged. Osteoclast formation and resorptive activity were not affected by treatment with allopurinol or oxypurinol. Our data suggest that inhibition of XO activity promotes osteoblast differentiation, leading to increased bone formation in vitro. PMID:26968635

  2. Posttranslational ruling of xanthine oxidase activity in bovine milk by its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Silanikove, Nissim Shapiro, Fira; Leitner, Gabriel

    2007-11-23

    The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that the substrates of xanthine oxidase (XO), xanthine and hypoxanthine, are consumed while the milk is stored in the gland between milkings, and to explore how XO activity responds to bacteria commonly associated with subclinical infections in the mammary gland. Freshly secreted milk was obtained following complete evacuation of the gland and induction of milk ejection with oxytocin. In bacteria-free fresh milk xanthine and hypoxanthine were converted to uric acid within 30 min (T{sub 1/2} {approx} 10 min), which in turn provides electrons for formation of hydrogen peroxide and endows the alveolar lumen with passive protection against invading bacteria. On the other hand, the longer residence time of milk in the cistern compartment was not associated with oxidative stress as a result of XO idleness caused by exhaustion of its physiological fuels. The specific response of XO to bacteria species and the resulting bacteria-dependent nitrosative stress further demonstrates that it is part of the gland immune system.

  3. Inhibition of chrysin on xanthine oxidase activity and its inhibition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Suyun; Zhang, Guowen; Liao, Yijing; Pan, Junhui

    2015-11-01

    Chrysin, a bioactive flavonoid, was investigated for its potential to inhibit the activity of xanthine oxidase (XO), a key enzyme catalyzing xanthine to uric acid and finally causing gout. The kinetic analysis showed that chrysin possessed a strong inhibition on XO ability in a reversible competitive manner with IC50 value of (1.26±0.04)×10(-6)molL(-1). The results of fluorescence titrations indicated that chrysin bound to XO with high affinity, and the interaction was predominately driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces. Analysis of circular dichroism demonstrated that chrysin induced the conformational change of XO with increases in α-helix and β-sheet and reductions in β-turn and random coil structures. Molecular simulation revealed that chrysin interacted with the amino acid residues Leu648, Phe649, Glu802, Leu873, Ser876, Glu879, Arg880, Phe1009, Thr1010, Val1011 and Phe1013 located within the active cavity of XO. The mechanism of chrysin on XO activity may be the insertion of chrysin into the active site occupying the catalytic center of XO to avoid the entrance of xanthine and causing conformational changes in XO. Furthermore, the interaction assays indicated that chrysin and its structural analog apigenin exhibited an additive effect on inhibition of XO. PMID:26275460

  4. A sensitive method to assay the xanthine oxidase activity in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Valenti, D; Gagliardi, S; Passarella, S

    2000-11-01

    Since xanthine oxidase (XO, Xanthine:oxidoreductase, E.C.1.2.3.22) is a key enzyme in reactive oxygen specie formation which plays a major role in cell oxidative stress, the availability of a sensitive and simple assay useful to detect its activity in monolayer cell cultures is worthwhile. In order to achieve this, we developed a method in which the conversion of pterine into isoxanthopterin is monitored fluorimetrically. Temperature assay was 50 degrees C. The activity of XO was detected in cerebellar granule cells exposed to glutamate. Since XO is formed from protease-dependent xanthine dehydrogenase processing, its activity appearance was found to be prevented by the protease inhibitor, leupeptin, as well as the glutamate NMDA-receptor inhibitor, MK-801, and the Ca(++) complexing agent, EGTA. The reported novel protocol, at variance with a conventional method, is shown to be a simple, fast, sensitive and relatively cheap method to assay XO activity. In addition, the reported assay can be applied to any cell type in culture. PMID:11086257

  5. In vitro and in vivo studies on adlay-derived seed extracts: phenolic profiles, antioxidant activities, serum uric acid suppression, and xanthine oxidase inhibitory effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mouming; Zhu, Dashuai; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Su, Guowan; Lin, Lianzhu; Wang, Xiao; Dong, Yi

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential of polished adlay, brown adlay, adlay bran, and adlay hull to prevent and treat hyperuricemia. Brown adlay extract effectively decreased the serum uric acid levels of oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rats. Free and bound phenolic extracts from these materials contained significant amounts of phenolics, with free phenolics dominated by chlorogenic acid and p-coumaric acid while bound phenolics dominated by p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Free and bound phenolics of adlay bran exhibited significant xanthine oxidase inhibition activities, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities, oxygen radical absorbance capacities, and superoxide radical scavenging activities. Adlay bran phenolics could be effective xanthine oxidase inhibitors and radical scavengers. p-Coumaric acid is a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with strong superoxide radical scavenging activity. However, ferulic acid is a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with weak superoxide radical scavenging activity. Chlorogenic acid is a superoxide radical scavenger with weak xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity. PMID:25029106

  6. A structure-based catalytic mechanism for the xanthine oxidase family of molybdenum enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, R; Hof, P; Duarte, R O; Moura, J J; Moura, I; Liu, M Y; LeGall, J; Hille, R; Archer, M; Romão, M J

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structure of the xanthine oxidase-related molybdenum-iron protein aldehyde oxido-reductase from the sulfate reducing anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Desulfovibrio gigas (Mop) was analyzed in its desulfo-, sulfo-, oxidized, reduced, and alcohol-bound forms at 1.8-A resolution. In the sulfo-form the molybdenum molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor has a dithiolene-bound fac-[Mo, = O, = S, ---(OH2)] substructure. Bound inhibitory isopropanol in the inner compartment of the substrate binding tunnel is a model for the Michaelis complex of the reaction with aldehydes (H-C = O,-R). The reaction is proposed to proceed by transfer of the molybdenum-bound water molecule as OH- after proton transfer to Glu-869 to the carbonyl carbon of the substrate in concert with hydride transfer to the sulfido group to generate [MoIV, = O, -SH, ---(O-C = O, -R)). Dissociation of the carboxylic acid product may be facilitated by transient binding of Glu-869 to the molybdenum. The metal-bound water is replenished from a chain of internal water molecules. A second alcohol binding site in the spacious outer compartment may cause the strong substrate inhibition observed. This compartment is the putative binding site of large inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8799115

  7. Absorption of enzymatically active sup 125 I-labeled bovine milk xanthine oxidase fed to rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Rzucidlo, S.J. ); Zikakis, J.P. )

    1990-05-01

    Rabbits fed a regular laboratory diet supplemented with a high-fat milk containing xanthine oxidase (XO) were studied to determine the presence of active XO in the blood. A pilot feeding study, where rabbits consumed a high-fat diet containing xanthine oxidase, showed a correlation between dairy food consumption and XO activity in the blood. Antibody to dietary XO was also found. In a second study, rabbits were fed ad libitum the high-fat milk and blood serum samples were tested weekly for XO activity. No elevation in serum XO activity was found. A third study showed that serum XO activity was increased when rabbits were force fed the high-fat milk. The final study consisted of force feeding {sup 125}I-labeled XO to one rabbit to ascertain whether the observed increase in serum XO was due to dietary or endogenous XO. Isoelectric focusing of sera collected from the test rabbit strongly suggested that at least a portion of the serum XO contained the radioactive label. This is the first direct evidence showing the uptake of dietary active XO from the gut.

  8. Superoxide dismutase attenuated post-ischaemic contractile dysfunction in a myocardial xanthine oxidase deficient species.

    PubMed

    Ooiwa, H; Miura, T; Iwamoto, T; Ogawa, T; Ishimoto, R; Adachi, T; Iimura, O

    1992-02-01

    1. We assessed the effect of polyethylene glycol conjugated superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD) on myocardial stunning in the rabbit heart in which xanthine oxidase level is extremely low. 2. In open-chest anaesthetized rabbits, the left marginal branch of the coronary artery was occluded for 10 min and then reperfused for 30 min. A group of rabbits (PEG-SOD group) received 1000 units/kg of PED-SOD and another group (control group) was given saline 15 min before the coronary occlusion. 3. Regional systolic thickening fraction (TF) was similarly reduced to approximately -25% of baseline value during ischaemia in both groups. However recovery of TF after reperfusion was significantly better in the PEG-SOD group (n = 9) and TF at 30 min after reperfusion was 70.1 +/- 3.9% of baseline value compared with 44.9 +/- 3.4% in the control group (n = 9; P less than 0.05). Rate-pressure products, left ventricular pressure, and LV dP/dt max were not significantly different between the PEG-SOD treated and untreated control rabbits at any time during the experiment. PEG-SOD did not modify the regional myocardial blood flow (coloured microsphere method) during ischaemia/reperfusion, which was assessed by using separate groups of rabbits. 4. These findings indicate that oxygen free radicals are important in the pathogenesis of myocardial stunning in xanthine oxidase deficient hearts. PMID:1555325

  9. Synthesis and bioevaluation of 2-phenyl-4-methyl-1,3-selenazole-5-carboxylic acids as potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qi; Cheng, Zengjin; Ma, Xiaoxue; Wang, Lijie; Feng, Dongjie; Cui, Yuanhang; Bao, Kai; Wu, Lan; Zhang, Weige

    2014-10-01

    A series of 2-phenyl-4-methyl-1,3-selenazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives (8a-f, 9a-m) were synthesized and evaluated for inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase in vitro. Structure-activity relationship analyses have also been presented. Most of the target compounds exhibited potency levels in the nanomolar range. Compound 9e emerged as the most potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor (IC50 = 5.5 nM) in comparison to febuxostat (IC50 = 18.6 nM). Steady-state kinetics measurements with the bovine milk enzyme indicated a mixed type inhibition with Ki and Ki' values of 0.9 and 2.3 nM, respectively. A molecular modeling study on compounds 9e was performed to gain an insight into its binding mode with xanthine oxidase, and to provide the basis for further structure-guided design of new non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors related with 2-phenyl-4-methyl-1,3-selenazole-5-carboxylic acid scaffold. PMID:25113879

  10. Thermal properties of milk fat, xanthine oxidase, caseins and whey proteins in pulsed electric field-treated bovine whole milk.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Oey, Indrawati; Everett, David W

    2016-09-15

    Thermodynamics of milk components (milk fat, xanthine oxidase, caseins and whey proteins) in pulsed electric field (PEF)-treated milk were compared with thermally treated milk (63 °C for 30 min and 73 °C for 15s). PEF treatments were applied at 20 or 26 kV cm(-1) for 34 μs with or without pre-heating of milk (55 °C for 24s), using bipolar square wave pulses in a continuous mode of operation. PEF treatments did not affect the final temperatures of fat melting (Tmelting) or xanthine oxidase denaturation (Tdenaturation), whereas thermal treatments increased both the Tmelting of milk fat and the Tdenaturation for xanthine oxidase by 2-3 °C. Xanthine oxidase denaturation was ∼13% less after PEF treatments compared with the thermal treatments. The enthalpy change (ΔH of denaturation) of whey proteins decreased in the treated-milk, and denaturation increased with the treatment intensity. New endothermic peaks in the calorimetric thermograms of treated milk revealed the formation of complexes due to interactions between MFGM (milk fat globule membrane) proteins and skim milk proteins. Evidence for the adsorption of complexes onto the MFGM surface was obtained from the increase in surface hydrophobicity of proteins, revealing the presence of unfolded hydrophobic regions. PMID:27080877

  11. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  12. The inhibitory kinetics and mechanism of dietary vitamins D3 and B2 on xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Suyun; Zhang, Guowen; Liao, Yijing; Gong, Deming

    2016-06-15

    Dietary guidelines to promote health are usually based on the patterns' prediction on disease risk of foods and nutrients. Overactivity of xanthine oxidase (XO) is the underlying cause of gout. Herein, the inhibitory kinetics and mechanism of dietary vitamins D3 and B2 on XO were investigated by multispectroscopic methods and a molecular modeling technique. The results showed that vitamin D3 competitively inhibited XO with an inhibition constant of 26.93 ± 0.42 μM by inserting into the active cavity of XO interacting with the surrounding amino acid residues through hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces. Vitamin D3 bound to XO thereby induced the structural compactness of XO which in turn hindered the binding of substrate xanthine to cause the inhibition on XO. Vitamin B2 exhibited a mixed-type inhibition by binding to the vicinity of the active cavity with an inhibition constant of 37.76 ± 0.87 μM through hydrophobic interactions and a feeble hydrogen bond, and it induced the unfolding of the XO structure and an increase of the flexible loops (β-turns and random coils) which might move to cover the active pocket and reduce the binding of the substrate xanthine, and then lead to a lower catalytic activity of the enzyme. In addition, vitamins D3 and B2 showed a synergistic effect on inhibiting the activity of XO in a certain range of concentration. These findings may provide new insights into the inhibitory mechanism of vitamins D3 and B2 on XO and functional research of the vitamins in the supplementary treatment of gout. PMID:27241164

  13. Effect of smoking on serum xanthine oxidase, malondialdehyde, ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol levels in healthy male subjects

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ali Akbar; Khand, Fatehuddin; Khand, Tayyab Uddin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of smoking on serum xanthine oxidase, malondialdehyde, α- tocopherol and ascorbic acid levels in healthy adult male subjects. Methods: This cross-sectional comparative study was carried out at Isra University Hyderabad from July 2012 to December 2012. One hundred and twenty apparently healthy adult male subjects (60 smokers and 60 non-smokers) included in present study, were recruited from Jaindal kot, a small village located midway between Hyderabad and Matiari. Serum samples from smokers and non-smokers were analyzed for xanthine oxidase and malondialdehyde levels by standard kit methods, while for ascorbic acid and alpha- tocopherol by spectrophotometric methods. Results: The mean xanthine oxidase and malondialdehyde levels measured in healthy smokers were 0.30±0.05 mg/dl and 37.50±4.05 µmoles/l respectively as against 0.25±0.04 mg/dl and 19.86±2.21µmoles/l in non-smokers. Both xanthine oxidase and malondialdehyde levels were significantly (p<0.001) raised in healthy smokers than in non-smokers. Likewise, mean vitamin E and vitamin C levels were respectively 0.69±0.37 mg/dl and 0.80±0.16 mg/dl in healthy smokers compared to 1.14±0.43 mg/dl and 1.22±0.29 mg/dl in non-smokers. The concentrations of both these vitamins were significantly (p<0.001) lower in smokers than in non-smokers. Conclusion: The results of present study demonstrate that smoking had significantly increased xanthine oxidase and malondialdehyde levels and decreased vitamins C and E (antioxidants) levels. These findings suggest that smokers have to take additional amounts of vitamins C and E in order to avoid deleterious effects of smoking on their health. PMID:25878632

  14. The effect of allopurinol administration on mitochondrial respiration and gene expression of xanthine oxidoreductase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and inflammatory cytokines in selected tissues of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Settle, T; Falkenstein, E; Klandorf, H

    2015-10-01

    Birds have a remarkable longevity for their body size despite an increased body temperature, higher metabolic rate, and increased blood glucose concentrations compared to most mammals. As the end-product of purine degradation, uric acid (UA) is generated in the xanthine/hypoxanthine reactions catalyzed by xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR). In the first study, Cobb × Cobb broilers (n = 12; 4 weeks old) were separated into 2 treatments (n = 6); control (CON) and allopurinol (AL) 35 mg/kg BW (ALLO). The purpose of this study was to assess mitochondrial function in broiler chickens in response to potential oxidative stress generated from the administration of AL for 1 wk. There was a significant reduction in state 3 respiration (P = 0.01) and state 4 respiration (P = 0.007) in AL-treated birds compared to the controls. The purpose of the second study was to assess the effect of AL on gene expression of inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ (IFN)-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p35, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and XOR in liver tissue. Cobb × Cobb broilers were separated into two groups at 4 wk age (n = 10); CON and ALLO. After 1 wk AL treatment, half of the birds in each group (CON 1 and ALLO 1) were euthanized while the remaining birds continued on AL treatment for an additional week (CON 2 and ALLO 2). A significant increase in gene expression of XOR, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-12p35 in ALLO 2 birds as compared to birds in CON 2 was detected. Liver UA content was significantly decreased in both ALLO 1(P = 0.003) and ALLO 2 (P = 0.012) birds when compared to CON 1 and CON 2, respectively. The AL reduced liver UA concentrations and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. Additional studies are needed to determine if AL causes a direct effect on mitochondria or if mitochondrial dysfunction observed in liver mitochondria was due indirectly through increased oxidative stress or increased inflammation. PMID:26316336

  15. Allopurinol induces innate immune responses through mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akira; Oda, Shingo; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, is a frequent cause of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) in humans, including drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Although SCARs have been suspected to be immune-mediated, the mechanisms of allopurinol-induced SCARs remain unclear. In this study, we examined whether allopurinol has the ability to induce innate immune responses in vitro using human dendritic cell (DC)-like cell lines, including HL-60, THP-1 and K562, and a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment of HL-60 cells with allopurinol significantly increased the mRNA expression levels of interleukin-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor α in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, allopurinol induced the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, which regulate cytokine production in DC. In addition, allopurinol-induced increases in cytokine expression were inhibited by co-treatment with the MAPK inhibitors. Collectively, these results suggest that allopurinol has the ability to induce innate immune responses in a DC-like cell line through activation of the MAPK signaling pathways. These results indicate that innate immune responses induced by allopurinol might be involved in the development of allopurinol-induced SCARs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26641773

  16. Honey as an apitherapic product: its inhibitory effect on urease and xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Huseyin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate new natural inhibitor sources for the enzymes urease and xanthine oxidase (XO). Chestnut, oak and polyfloral honey extracts were used to determine inhibition effects of both enzymes. In addition to investigate inhibition, the antioxidant capacities of these honeys were determined using total phenolic content (TPC), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and DPPH radical scavenging activity assays. Due to their high phenolic content, chestnut and oak honeys are found to be a powerful source for inhibition of both enzymes. Especially, oak honeys were efficient for urease inhibition with 0.012-0.021 g/mL IC50 values, and also chestnut honeys were powerful for XO inhibition with 0.028-0.039 g/mL IC50 values. Regular daily consumption of these honeys can prevent gastric ulcers deriving from Helicobacter pylori and pathological disorders mediated by reactive oxygen species. PMID:25942364

  17. New insights into xanthine oxidase behavior upon heating using spectroscopy and in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Dumitrașcu, Loredana; Stănciuc, Nicoleta; Aprodu, Iuliana

    2016-07-01

    Thermal dependent conformational changes of xanthine oxidase (XOD) were studied using sensitive and non-destructive methods like fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling in the temperature range of 25-85°C. Intrinsic fluorescence studies showed that the microenvironment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues becomes more exposed to solvent as the temperature increased up to 85°C, whereas in case of flavin cofactor is rather conserved. At higher temperatures, the flavin adenine dinucleotide is displaced from the core of the protein, but is not fully released as shown by the Stern Volmer quenching constant and accessible fraction of the cofactor. Anyway, no significant changes in the structure of XOD monomer were identified after running molecular dynamics simulations at temperatures 25°C, 65°C and 85°C. Therefore, we can conclude that the most important changes in the protein structure at thermal treatment mainly consist on molecular aggregation and dissociation events. PMID:27044347

  18. Studies on the mechanism of action of 6-mercaptopurine. Interaction with copper and xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Kela, U; Vijayvargiya, R

    1981-01-01

    Interaction between 6-mercaptopurine, Cu2+ and the enzyme xanthine oxidase (EC 1.2.3.2.) was examined. Whereas Cu2+ was found to inhibit the enzyme, 6-mercaptopurine could protect as well as reverse the enzyme inhibition produced by the metal ion. The formation of a complex between 6-mercaptopurine and Cu2+ seems to be responsible for the observed effect. Job's [(1928) Ann. Chem. 9, 113] method has shown the composition of the complex to be 1:1. The apparent stability constant (log K value), as determined by Subhrama Rao & Raghav Rao's [(1955) J. Sci. Chem. Ind. Res. 143, 278], method is found to be 6.74. It is suggested that the formation of a stable complex between 6-mercaptopurine molecules and Cu2+ may be an additional mechanism of action of 6-mercaptopurine, particularly with reference to its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:6895465

  19. Is Xanthine Oxidase, a Marker in Pre-eclampsia? A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bambrana, Vanishree; Kotur, Pushpa P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pre-eclampsia is an obstetrics problem that affects multiple systemic functions and leads to the increased maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The objective of the study was to evaluate the plasma levels of Xanthine oxidase (XO) activity, uric acid and Nitric oxide (NO) levels in women with pre-eclampsia and normal pregnancy during antenatal and postpartum period. Materials and Methods A case control study was conducted in women with normal pregnancy (n=50) and pre-eclampsia (n=50) before and after delivery. XO activity, uric acid and NO levels were determined from samples at 30-39 weeks of gestation. The current study was conducted in association with Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of R.L. Jalappa Hospital and Research Center. The blood samples were analysed for assay of XO, uric acid and NO. The results were analysed by using SPSS software version 2013. P-value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The plasma XO activity was elevated (p<0.001) in the pre-eclampsia compared to normotensive pregnant women before delivery and decreased after delivery (p<0.001) significantly. Uric acid level showed a significant increase in pre-eclampsia when compared to the control before delivery (p<0.001) however values were non-significant after delivery. Conclusion Placenta plays a key role in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia. Placenta removal leads to decrease trend of xanthine oxidase activity, uric acid and elevation of Nitric oxide as reversible changes in pre-eclampsia patients within 48 hours after delivery. PMID:26557508

  20. [Allopurinol and its role in the treatment of sarcopenia].

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Beatriz; Olaso-Gonzalez, Gloria; Sebastia, Vicente; Viosca, Enrique; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Viña, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and uric acid and plays an important role in purine catabolism. The purine analogue, allopurinol, is a well-known inhibitor of XO widely used in the clinical management of gout and conditions associated with hyperuricemia. More recent data indicate that allopurinol reduces oxidative stress and improves vascular function in several cardiometabolic diseases, prolongs exercise time in angina, and improves the efficiency of cardiac contractility in heart failure. XO also plays an important role in free radical generation during skeletal muscle contraction and thus, it has been related to the muscle damage associated to exhaustive exercise. Several research groups have shown the protective effect of allopurinol in the prevention of this type of damage. Based on this background, a critical overview is presented on the possible role of allopurinol in the treatment of sarcopenia, a geriatric syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength with a risk of adverse outcomes, such as physical disability, poor quality of life and death. PMID:25131431

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of 1-hydroxy/methoxy-4-methyl-2-phenyl-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives as non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaolei; Zhang, Tingjian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Fangyang; Niu, Handong; Wu, Chunfu; Wang, Shaojie

    2015-10-20

    Xanthine oxidase is a key enzyme that catalyses hypoxanthine and xanthine to uric acid, whose overproduction leads to the gout-causing hyperuricemia. In this study, a series of 1-hydroxy/methoxy-4-methyl-2-phenyl-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives (4a-4k and 6a-6k) was synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory potency against xanthine oxidase. The 1-hydroxyl substituted derivatives 4a-4k showed excellent inhibitory potency with IC50 values ranging from 0.003 μM to 1.2 μM, with compounds 4d (IC₅₀ = 0.003 μM), 4e (IC₅₀ = 0.003 μM), and 4f (IC₅₀ = 0.006 μM) manifesting the most potent xanthine oxidase inhibitory potency that were comparable with that of Febuxostat (IC₅₀ = 0.01 μM). Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis revealed that representative compound 4f acted as a mixed-type inhibitor for xanthine oxidase. The basis of significant inhibition of xanthine oxidase by 4f was rationalized by its molecular docking into the active site of xanthine dehydrogenase. PMID:26363870

  2. Cardiac contractility in Antarctic teleost is modulated by nitrite through xanthine oxidase and cytochrome p-450 nitrite reductase.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Filippo; Amelio, Daniela; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Pellegrino, Daniela

    2015-09-15

    In mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates, nitrite anion, the largest pool of intravascular and tissue nitric oxide storage, represents a key player of many biological processes, including cardiac modulation. As shown by our studies on Antarctic teleosts, nitrite-dependent cardiac regulation is of great relevance also in cold-blooded vertebrates. This study analysed the influence elicited by nitrite on the performance of the perfused beating heart of two Antarctic stenotherm teleosts, the haemoglobinless Chionodraco hamatus (icefish) and the red-blooded Trematomus bernacchii. Since haemoglobin is crucial in nitric oxide homeostasis, the icefish, a naturally occurring genetic knockout for this protein, provides exclusive opportunities to investigate nitric oxide/nitrite signaling. In vivo, nitrite conversion to nitric oxide requires the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450, thus the involvement of these enzymes was also evaluated. We showed that, in C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite influenced cardiac performance by inducing a concentration-dependent positive inotropic effect which was unaffected by nitric oxide scavenging by PTIO in C. hamatus, while it was abolished in T. bernacchii. Specific inhibition of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450 revealed, in the two teleosts, that the nitrite-dependent inotropism required the nitrite reductase activity of both enzymes. We also found that xanthine oxidase is more expressed in C. hamatus than in T. bernacchii, while the opposite was observed concerning cytochrome P-450. Results suggested that in the heart of C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite is an integral physiological source of nitric oxide with important signaling properties, which require the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450. PMID:26045289

  3. Targeting of a plasma cell line with a conjugate containing xanthine oxidase and the monoclonal antibody 62B1.

    PubMed

    Tazzari, P L; Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Dinota, A; Rizzi, S; Gobbi, M; Stirpe, F

    1989-07-01

    We report on the preparation of an antibody-conjugated enzyme consisting of xanthine oxidase, a free-radical-producing enzyme, linked to the 62B1 monoclonal antibody, which recognizes the last steps of differentiation of B cell lineage (plasma cell and hairy cells). The conjugate specifically kills target cells, retaining both enzymic and immunological properties, without any damage to normal myeloid clonogenic efficiency. The model is suitable for ex vivo bone marrow purging in multiple myeloma patients. PMID:2787552

  4. Effects of allopurinol on exercise-induced muscle damage: new therapeutic approaches?

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, F; Pareja-Galeano, H; Perez-Quilis, C; Santos-Lozano, A; Fiuza-Luces, C; Garatachea, N; Lippi, G; Lucia, A

    2015-01-01

    Intensive muscular activity can trigger oxidative stress, and free radicals may hence be generated by working skeletal muscle. The role of the enzyme xanthine oxidase as a generating source of free radicals is well documented and therefore is involved in the skeletal muscle damage as well as in the potential transient cardiovascular damage induced by high-intensity physical exercise. Allopurinol is a purine hypoxanthine-based structural analog and a well-known inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. The administration of the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol may hence be regarded as promising, safe, and an economic strategy to decrease transient skeletal muscle damage (as well as heart damage, when occurring) in top-level athletes when administered before a competition or a particularly high-intensity training session. Although continuous administration of allopurinol in high-level athletes is not recommended due to its possible role in hampering training-induced adaptations, the drug might be useful in non-athletes. Exertional rhabdomyolysis is the most common form of rhabdomyolysis and affects individuals participating in a type of intense exercise to which they are not accustomed. This condition can cause exercise-related myoglobinuria, thus increasing the risk of acute renal failure and is also associated with sickle cell trait. In this manuscript, we have reviewed the recent evidence about the effects of allopurinol on exercise-induced muscle damage. More research is needed to determine whether allopurinol may be useful for preventing not only exertional rhabdomyolysis and acute renal damage but also skeletal muscle wasting in critical illness as well as in immobilized, bedridden, sarcopenic or cachectic patients. PMID:25181966

  5. The xanthine oxidase inhibitor febuxostat suppresses development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Yusuke; Seno, Yasuyuki; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Katasako, Aya; Mori, Keiichi; Matsunaga, Yasuka; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Kanaoka, Ryuhei; Yamamotoya, Takeshi; Kamata, Hideaki; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2015-07-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is an enzyme involved in the production of uric acid (UA) from purine nucleotides. Numerous recent studies have revealed the likelihood of metabolic syndrome including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or steatohepatitis (NASH) to be related to hyperuricemia. However, it remains unclear whether elevated serum UA during the development of NAFLD or NASH is a cause or a consequence of these diseases. In this study, the XO inhibitor febuxostat was administered to two types of NASH model mice. Febuxostat exerted a strong protective effect against NASH development induced by a high-fat diet containing trans fatty acid (HFDT). In contrast, methionine choline-deficient-diet-induced NASH development not accompanied by hyperuricemia showed no UA normalization, suggesting that the ameliorating effect of febuxostat occurs via the normalization of hyperuricemia itself and/or accompanying molecular mechanism(s) such as oxidative stress. In the HFDT-fed mice, hyperuricemia, elevated alanine aminotransferase, and increased Tunnel-positive cells in the liver were normalized by febuxostat administration. In addition, upregulation of fatty acid oxidation-related genes, fibrotic change, and increases in collagen deposition, inflammatory cytokine expressions, and lipid peroxidation in the HFDT-fed mice were also normalized by febuxostat administration. Taken together, these observations indicate that administration of febuxostat has a protective effect against HFDT-induced NASH development, suggesting the importance of XO in its pathogenesis. Thus XO inhibitors are potentially potent therapies for patients with NASH, particularly that associated with hyperuricemia. PMID:25999428

  6. Prokaryotic expression of the chicken xanthine oxidase (XOD) subunit and its localization in liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huayuan; Chen, Yanjun; Huang, Qiqi; Guo, Xiaoquan; Liu, Ping; Liu, Weilian; Zhang, Caiying; Cao, Huabin; Hu, Guoliang

    2016-06-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD) is the members of the molybdenum hydroxylase flavoprotein family and it plays a vital role in the body's purine catabolism. In this study, we cloned the XOD 37kDa subunit protein by using RT-PCR and pMD-18-T clone vector based on the total RNA extracted from chicken liver. The cloning XOD subunit protein gene was ligated into the pET-32a to construct the recombinant plasmid pET-XOD. After the pET-XOD expression vector was transformed into host cells Rosetta (DE3), the recombinant XOD subunit proteins (54.8kDa) were successfully induced by isopropy1 β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG). Rabbit antiserums were produced by using the purification of the recombinant XOD subunit protein as antigen. The titer of the antiserum was more than 1:102,400 determined by using ELISA. The result of Western blot demonstrated that the antiserum could specifically recognize the chicken liver XOD. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence showed that the XOD mainly presented in the cytoplasm of chicken hepatocytes and proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results indicated that the XOD subunit protein polyclonal antibody prepared by this method could be used for the further researches of the biological function of the XOD in the chicken. PMID:26949113

  7. Xanthine Oxidase-Derived ROS Display a Biphasic Effect on Endothelial Cells Adhesion and FAK Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ben-Mahdi, Meriem H; Dang, Pham My-Chan; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; O'Dowd, Yvonne; El-Benna, Jamel; Pasquier, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In pathological situations such as ischemia-reperfusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by different systems which are involved in endothelial cells injury, ultimately leading to severe organ dysfunctions. The aim of this work was to study the effect of ROS produced by hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase (Hx-XO) on the adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and on the signaling pathways involved. Results show that Hx-XO-derived ROS induced an increase in HUVEC adhesion in the early stages of the process (less than 30 min), followed by a decrease in adhesion in the later stages of the process. Interestingly, Hx-XO-derived ROS induced the same biphasic effect on the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase critical for cell adhesion, but not on ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The biphasic effect was not seen with ERK1/2 where a decrease in phosphorylation only was observed. Wortmannin, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, inhibited ROS-induced cell adhesion and FAK phosphorylation. Orthovanadate, a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and Resveratrol (Resv), an antioxidant agent, protected FAK and ERK1/2 from dephosphorylation and HUVEC from ROS-induced loss of adhesion. This study shows that ROS could have both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on HUVEC adhesion and FAK phosphorylation and suggests that PI3-kinase and tyrosine phosphatase control these effects. PMID:27528888

  8. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities and crystal structures of methoxyflavones from Kaempferia parviflora rhizome.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Kikuyo; Murata, Kazuya; Deguchi, Takahiro; Itoh, Kimihisa; Fujita, Takanori; Higashino, Masayuki; Yoshioka, Yuri; Matsumura, Shin-Ichi; Tanaka, Rika; Shinada, Tetsuro; Ohfune, Yasufumi; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora (KP), a Zingiberaceae plant, is used as a folk medicine in Thailand for the treatment of various symptoms, including general pains, colic gastrointestinal disorders, and male impotence. In this study, the inhibitory activities of KP against xanthine oxidase (XOD) were investigated. The extract of KP rhizomes showed more potent inhibitory activity (38% at 500 µg/ml) than those of the other Zingiberaceae plants tested. Ten methoxyflavones were isolated from the KP extract as the major chemical components and their chemical structures were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. The structurally confirmed methoxyflavones were subjected to the XOD inhibitory test. Among them, 3,5,7,4',5'-pentamethoxyflavone and 3',4',5,7-tetramethoxyflavone showed inhibitory activities (IC(50) of 0.9 and >4 mM, respectively) and their modes of inhibition are clarified as competitive/non-competitive mixed type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to present the inhibitory activities of KP, 3,5,7,4',5'-pentamethoxyflavone and 3',4',5,7-tetramethoxyflavone against XOD. PMID:21720029

  9. Uric acid and xanthine oxidase in heart failure - Emerging data and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Doehner, Wolfram; Jankowska, Ewa A; Springer, Jochen; Lainscak, Mitja; Anker, Stefan D

    2016-06-15

    The role of hyperuricaemia as cardiovascular risk factor has exhaustingly been debated for decades. While the association of elevated uric acid (UA) levels with increased mortality risk as convincingly been shown, the question whether UA is independently predictive of just a related effect within a more complex risk factor profile (including metabolic, inflammatory and haemodynamic risk factors) is still a matter of dispute. In heart failure the independent prognostic and functional impact of elevated UA has not only been shown but also the pathophysiologic mechanism(s) and the potential of targeted therapeutic interventions have been investigated in some detail. The emerging picture suggests the increased activity of the enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) with corresponding increased production of free oxygen radical (ROS) as a main underlying principle with the resulting increase in UA levels being mostly a marker of this up-regulated pathway. While this concept will not diminish the value of UA as a prognostic marker, it provides the basis for a novel metabolic treatment option and the means to identify those patients most eligible for this tailored therapy. This review will summarize the recent evidence on XO as a novel and promising therapeutic target in heart failure. PMID:26318388

  10. Xanthine Oxidase-Derived ROS Display a Biphasic Effect on Endothelial Cells Adhesion and FAK Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Pham My-Chan; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Pasquier, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In pathological situations such as ischemia-reperfusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by different systems which are involved in endothelial cells injury, ultimately leading to severe organ dysfunctions. The aim of this work was to study the effect of ROS produced by hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase (Hx-XO) on the adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and on the signaling pathways involved. Results show that Hx-XO-derived ROS induced an increase in HUVEC adhesion in the early stages of the process (less than 30 min), followed by a decrease in adhesion in the later stages of the process. Interestingly, Hx-XO-derived ROS induced the same biphasic effect on the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase critical for cell adhesion, but not on ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The biphasic effect was not seen with ERK1/2 where a decrease in phosphorylation only was observed. Wortmannin, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, inhibited ROS-induced cell adhesion and FAK phosphorylation. Orthovanadate, a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and Resveratrol (Resv), an antioxidant agent, protected FAK and ERK1/2 from dephosphorylation and HUVEC from ROS-induced loss of adhesion. This study shows that ROS could have both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on HUVEC adhesion and FAK phosphorylation and suggests that PI3-kinase and tyrosine phosphatase control these effects. PMID:27528888

  11. Characterization and Thermodynamic Relationship of Three Polymorphs of a Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitor, Febuxostat.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jinish; Jagia, Moksh; Bansal, Arvind Kumar; Patel, Sarsvatkumar

    2015-11-01

    Febuxostat (FXT), a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, is an interesting and unique molecule, which exhibits extensive polymorphism, with over 15 polymorphic forms reported to date. The primary purpose of the study was to characterize the three polymorphic forms with respect to their thermodynamic quantities and establish thermodynamic relationship between them. The polymorphs were characterized by thermal and powder X-ray diffraction methods. Three different methods were used to calculate the transition temperatures (Ttr) and thereby their thermodynamic relationships. Although the first and second method used calorimetric data (melting point and heat of fusion), the third method employed the use of configurational free energy phase diagram. The onset melting points of three polymorphic forms were found to be 482.89 ± 0.37 K for form I, 476.30 ± 1.21 K for form II, and 474.19 ± 0.11 K for form III. Moreover, the powder X-ray diffraction patterns for each form were also unique. The polymorphic pair of form I and II and of form I and III was found to be enantiotropic, whereas pair of form II and III was monotropic. Besides the relative thermodynamic aspects (free energy differences, enthalpy, entropy contributions) using different methods, the pharmaceutical implications and phase transformation aspects have also been covered. PMID:26178598

  12. Use of newly available febuxostat in a case of chronic tophaceous gout contraindicated to allopurinol and probenecid.

    PubMed

    Hilmi, B A; Asmahan, M I; Rosman, A

    2012-02-01

    Urate lowering therapy in this country has mainly been achieved by the use of allopurinol and probenecid. A new xanthine oxidase inhibitor called febuxostat has been approved in 2009 for treatment of hyperuricaemia in gout. In this report, we describe the management of a patient with chronic tophaceous gout using febuxostat. The reduction in serum uric acid to target levels was rapid, and the tophi size had also reduced significantly while on therapy. There was no unwanted side effect observed during the therapy. Therefore, febuxostat would be a useful alternative drug in the treatment of hyperuricaemia in gout patients who have contraindications to allopurinol and probenecid. PMID:22582566

  13. Effects of hypoxia and ethanol on xanthine oxidase of isolated rat hepatocytes: conversion from D to O form and leakage from cells.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Stirpe, F

    1992-06-15

    The combined effects of ethanol and hypoxia on the conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase (D form) to xanthine oxidase (O form) and on the leakage of the enzyme from isolated rat hepatocytes was studied. Time-dependent death of cells occurred during incubation in hypoxic conditions. Ethanol (40 mM) had only a moderate effect on viability in aerobiosis, but accelerated the loss of hypoxic cells, which was 96% after 3 h of incubation. In hypoxic conditions, the xanthine oxidase was gradually converted from D into O form. The conversion was complete in 3 h, and was accelerated by 1 mM xanthine or by ethanol, in a concentration-related manner. Hypoxia brought about a progressive leakage of xanthine oxidase from hepatocytes, which was accelerated by ethanol in a concentration-dependent manner. The enzyme found outside hepatocytes was mostly in its O form. The xanthine oxidase of hepatocytes cytosol was converted from D into O form by human plasma or serum. In all cases the conversion could be completely reverted by treatment of the extract with dithiothreitol. PMID:1643670

  14. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase and NAD(P)H oxidase in endothelial superoxide production in response to oscillatory shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNally, J. Scott; Davis, Michael E.; Giddens, Don P.; Saha, Aniket; Hwang, Jinah; Dikalov, Sergey; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Oscillatory shear stress occurs at sites of the circulation that are vulnerable to atherosclerosis. Because oxidative stress contributes to atherosclerosis, we sought to determine whether oscillatory shear stress increases endothelial production of reactive oxygen species and to define the enzymes responsible for this phenomenon. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were exposed to static, laminar (15 dyn/cm2), and oscillatory shear stress (+/-15 dyn/cm2). Oscillatory shear increased superoxide (O2.-) production by more than threefold over static and laminar conditions as detected using electron spin resonance (ESR). This increase in O2*- was inhibited by oxypurinol and culture of endothelial cells with tungsten but not by inhibitors of other enzymatic sources. Oxypurinol also prevented H2O2 production in response to oscillatory shear stress as measured by dichlorofluorescin diacetate and Amplex Red fluorescence. Xanthine-dependent O2*- production was increased in homogenates of endothelial cells exposed to oscillatory shear stress. This was associated with decreased xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) protein levels and enzymatic activity resulting in an elevated ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) to XDH. We also studied endothelial cells lacking the p47phox subunit of the NAD(P)H oxidase. These cells exhibited dramatically depressed O2*- production and had minimal XO protein and activity. Transfection of these cells with p47phox restored XO protein levels. Finally, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, prolonged inhibition of the NAD(P)H oxidase with apocynin decreased XO protein levels and prevented endothelial cell stimulation of O2*- production in response to oscillatory shear stress. These data suggest that the NAD(P)H oxidase maintains endothelial cell XO levels and that XO is responsible for increased reactive oxygen species production in response to oscillatory shear stress.

  15. Synthesis, crystal structures, fluorescence and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of pyrazole-based 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, De-Qiang; Yu, Chuan-Ming; You, Jin-Zong; Yang, Guang-Hui; Wang, Xue-Jie; Zhang, Yi-Ping

    2015-11-01

    A series of pyrazole-based 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives were rationally designed and synthesized in good yields by following a convenient route. All the newly synthesized molecules were fully characterized by IR, 1H NMR and elemental analysis. Eight compounds were structurally determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The fluorescence properties of all the compounds were investigated in dimethyl sulfoxide media. In addition, these newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for in vitro inhibitory activity against commercial enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) by measuring the formation of uric acid from xanthine. Among the compounds synthesized and tested, 3d and 3e were found to be moderate inhibitory activity against commercial XO with IC50 = 72.4 μM and 75.6 μM. The studies gave a new insight in further optimization of pyrazole-based 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives with excellent fluorescence properties and XO inhibitory activity.

  16. Substrate Orientation and Catalytic Specificity in the Action of Xanthine Oxidase: The Sequential Hydroxylation of Hypoxanthine to Uric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Hongnan; Pauff, James M.; Hille, Russ

    2010-11-29

    Xanthine oxidase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of a sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon in a broad range of aromatic heterocycles and aldehydes. Crystal structures of the bovine enzyme in complex with the physiological substrate hypoxanthine at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution have been determined, showing in each case two alternate orientations of substrate in the two active sites of the crystallographic asymmetric unit. One orientation is such that it is expected to yield hydroxylation at C-2 of substrate, yielding xanthine. The other suggests hydroxylation at C-8 to give 6,8-dihydroxypurine, a putative product not previously thought to be generated by the enzyme. Kinetic experiments demonstrate that >98% of hypoxanthine is hydroxylated at C-2 rather than C-8, indicating that the second crystallographically observed orientation is significantly less catalytically effective than the former. Theoretical calculations suggest that enzyme selectivity for the C-2 over C-8 of hypoxanthine is largely due to differences in the intrinsic reactivity of the two sites. For the orientation of hypoxanthine with C-2 proximal to the molybdenum center, the disposition of substrate in the active site is such that Arg880 and Glu802, previous shown to be catalytically important for the conversion of xanthine to uric acid, play similar roles in hydroxylation at C-2 as at C-8. Contrary to the literature, we find that 6,8-dihydroxypurine is effectively converted to uric acid by xanthine oxidase.

  17. Development of 2-(Substituted Benzylamino)-4-Methyl-1, 3-Thiazole-5-Carboxylic Acid Derivatives as Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitors and Free Radical Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Rahmat; Kumar, Suresh; Afzal, Obaid; Shalmali, Nishtha; Sharma, Manju; Bawa, Sandhya

    2016-04-01

    A series of 2-(substituted benzylamino)-4-methylthiazole-5-carboxylic acid was designed and synthesized as structural analogue of febuxostat. A methylene amine spacer was incorporated between the phenyl ring and thiazole ring in contrast to febuxostat in which the phenyl ring was directly linked with the thiazole moiety. The purpose of incorporating methylene amine was to provide a heteroatom which is expected to favour hydrogen bonding within the active site residues of the enzyme xanthine oxidase. The structure of all the compounds was established by the combined use of FT-IR, NMR and MS spectral data. All the compounds were screened in vitro for their ability to inhibit the enzyme xanthine oxidase as per the reported procedure along with DPPH free radical scavenging assay. Compounds 5j, 5k and 5l demonstrated satisfactory potent xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities with IC50 values, 3.6, 8.1 and 9.9 μm, respectively, whereas compounds 5k, 5n and 5p demonstrated moderate antioxidant activities having IC50 15.3, 17.6 and 19.6 μm, respectively, along with xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity. Compound 5k showed moderate xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity as compared with febuxostat along with antioxidant activity. All the compounds were also studied for their binding affinity in active site of enzyme (PDB ID-1N5X). PMID:26575582

  18. Is Xanthine oxidase activity in polycystic ovary syndrome associated with inflammatory and cardiovascular risk factors?

    PubMed

    Isık, Hatice; Aynıoglu, Oner; Tımur, Hakan; Sahbaz, Ahmet; Harma, Muge; Can, Murat; Guven, Berrak; Alptekin, Husnu; Kokturk, Furuzan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to examine women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) to determine the relationship between xanthine oxidase (XO) and oxidative stress, inflammatory status, and various clinical and biochemical parameters. In this cross-sectional study a total of 83 women including 45 PCOS patients and 38 healthy women were enrolled. We collected blood samples for XO and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, hormone levels, cholesterol values, and inflammatory markers. Body mass index (BMI) , waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and blood pressure were assessed. Blood samples were taken for hormonal levels, cholesterol levels, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell and neutrophil counts, XO and SOD activities. The basal hormone levels, triglyceride (TG) levels, TG/HDL-C (high density lipoprotein-cholesterol) ratios FPG, FPI and HOMA-IR levels were higher in PCOS patients compared to controls (p<0.05). Platelet and plateletcrit (PCT) values, CRP, and XO activity were significantly increased, however SOD activity was decreased in PCOS patients (p<0.001). XO activity was positively correlated with LH/FSH and TG/HDL ratios, CRP, PCT, FPG, FPI, and HOMA-IR, and negatively correlated with QUICKI levels. In conclusion, XO is a useful marker to assess oxidative stress in PCOS patients. Positive correlations between XO and inflammatory markers and cardiovascular disease risk factors suggest that XO plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PCOS and its metabolic complications. PMID:27295433

  19. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of LC350189, a novel xanthine oxidase inhibitor, in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seonghae; Shin, Donghoon; Lee, Howard; Jang, In-Jin; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction LC350189 is a novel selective xanthine oxidase inhibitor under clinical development for the management of hyperuricemia in gout patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of the drug in healthy subjects. Methods A dose-block randomized, double-blind, active and placebo-controlled, single- and multiple-dosing study was conducted. A single ascending dose (SAD) study (10–600 mg) and a multiple ascending dose (MAD) study with once-daily doses (100–800 mg) for 7 days were conducted. Serial samples of blood and urine for pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics analysis were collected, and tolerability and adverse events were assessed throughout the study. Results Sixty-seven and 58 subjects were enrolled in the SAD and MAD studies, respectively. The mean Cmax and AUClast values increased with increasing doses, and exposure to LC350189 was dose proportional. The 24-hour mean serum uric acid (Cmean,24) decreased by 8.7%–31.7% (day 1) and 53.5%–91.2% (day 7) from baseline in the SAD and MAD studies, respectively, and the percentage decrease in Cmean,24 increased with higher doses. Conclusion LC350189 was well tolerated in the dose range of 10–800 mg. It lowered the serum and urine uric acid levels substantially in this dose range; the extent of the decrease in the serum uric acid level in the 200 mg dose group was similar or higher compared to that of febuxostat 80 mg group in the MAD study. It is expected that LC350189 could be safely administered once daily to patients with hyperuricemia or gout, leading to a sufficient decrease in uric acid levels. PMID:26357467

  20. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of the methanolic extracts of selected Jordanian medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Hudaib, Mohammad M.; Tawaha, Khaled A.; Mohammad, Mohammad K.; Assaf, Areej M.; Issa, Ala Y.; Alali, Feras Q.; Aburjai, Talal A.; Bustanji, Yasser K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The search for novel xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors with a higher therapeutic activity and fewer side effects are desired not only to treat gout but also to combat various other diseases associated with the XO activity. At present, the potential of developing successful natural products for the management of XO-related diseases is still largely unexplored. In the present study, we have screened the methanolic extracts of various Jordanian medicinal plants for their XO inhibitory activities using an optimized protocol. Materials and Methods: The methanolic extracts of 23 medicinal plants, belonging to 12 families, were tested in vitro, at 200 μg/ml concentrations, for their XO inhibitory potential. The dose-dependent inhibition profiles of the most active plants were further evaluated by estimating the IC50 values of their corresponding extracts. Results: Six plants were found most active (% inhibition more than 39%). These plants are Salvia spinosa L. (IC50 = 53.7 μg/ml), Anthemis palestina Boiss. (168.0 μg/ml), Chrysanthemum coronarium L. (199.5 μg/ml), Achillea biebersteinii Afansiev (360.0 μg/ml), Rosmarinus officinalis L. (650.0 μg/ml), and Ginkgo biloba L. (595.8 μg/ml). Moreover, four more plants, namely Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (28.7% inhibition), Helianthemum ledifolium (L.) Mill. (28.4%), Majorana syriaca (L.) Kostel. (25.1%), and Mentha spicata L. (22.5%) showed a XO inhibitory activity in the range of 22–30%. Conclusion: The study showed that many of the tested plant species are potential sources of natural XO inhibitors that can be developed, upon further investigation, into successful herbal drugs for treatment of gout and other XO-related disorders. PMID:22262935

  1. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activities of Amaranthus cruentus L. and Amaranthus hybridus L. Extracts.

    PubMed

    Nana, Fernand W; Hilou, Adama; Millogo, Jeanne F; Nacoulma, Odile G

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary assessment of the nutraceutical value of Amaranthus cruentus (A. cruentus) and Amaranthus hybridus (A. hybridus), two food plant species found in Burkina Faso. Hydroacetonic (HAE), methanolic (ME), and aqueous extracts (AE) from the aerial parts were screened for in vitro antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities. Phytochemical analyses revealed the presence of polyphenols, tannins, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, saponins and betalains. Hydroacetonic extracts have shown the most diversity for secondary metabolites. The TLC analyses of flavonoids from HAE extracts showed the presence of rutin and other unidentified compounds. The phenolic compound contents of the HAE, ME and AE extracts were determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu method and ranged from 7.55 to 10.18 mg Gallic acid equivalent GAE/100 mg. Tannins, flavonoids, and flavonols ranged from 2.83 to 10.17 mg tannic acid equivalent (TAE)/100 mg, 0.37 to 7.06 mg quercetin equivalent (QE) /100 mg, and 0.09 to 1.31 mg QE/100 mg, respectively. The betacyanin contents were 40.42 and 6.35 mg Amaranthin Equivalent/100 g aerial parts (dry weight) in A. cruentus and A. hybridus, respectively. Free-radical scavenging activity expressed as IC50 (DPPH method) and iron reducing power (FRAP method) ranged from 56 to 423 µg/mL and from 2.26 to 2.56 mmol AAE/g, respectively. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of extracts of A. cruentus and A. hybridus were 3.18% and 38.22%, respectively. The A. hybridus extract showed the best antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibition activities. The results indicated that the phytochemical contents of the two species justify their traditional uses as nutraceutical food plants. PMID:24281664

  2. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activities of Amaranthus cruentus L. and Amaranthus hybridus L. Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Nana, Fernand W.; Hilou, Adama; Millogo, Jeanne F.; Nacoulma, Odile G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary assessment of the nutraceutical value of Amaranthus cruentus (A. cruentus) and Amaranthus hybridus (A. hybridus), two food plant species found in Burkina Faso. Hydroacetonic (HAE), methanolic (ME), and aqueous extracts (AE) from the aerial parts were screened for in vitro antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities. Phytochemical analyses revealed the presence of polyphenols, tannins, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, saponins and betalains. Hydroacetonic extracts have shown the most diversity for secondary metabolites. The TLC analyses of flavonoids from HAE extracts showed the presence of rutin and other unidentified compounds. The phenolic compound contents of the HAE, ME and AE extracts were determined using the Folin–Ciocalteu method and ranged from 7.55 to 10.18 mg Gallic acid equivalent GAE/100 mg. Tannins, flavonoids, and flavonols ranged from 2.83 to 10.17 mg tannic acid equivalent (TAE)/100 mg, 0.37 to 7.06 mg quercetin equivalent (QE) /100 mg, and 0.09 to 1.31 mg QE/100 mg, respectively. The betacyanin contents were 40.42 and 6.35 mg Amaranthin Equivalent/100 g aerial parts (dry weight) in A. cruentus and A. hybridus, respectively. Free-radical scavenging activity expressed as IC50 (DPPH method) and iron reducing power (FRAP method) ranged from 56 to 423 µg/mL and from 2.26 to 2.56 mmol AAE/g, respectively. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of extracts of A. cruentus and A. hybridus were 3.18% and 38.22%, respectively. The A. hybridus extract showed the best antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibition activities. The results indicated that the phytochemical contents of the two species justify their traditional uses as nutraceutical food plants. PMID:24281664

  3. Xanthine oxidase, but not neutrophils, contributes to activation of cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischaemia in cats

    PubMed Central

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    2002-01-01

    Activation of cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischaemia causes angina and induces important cardiovascular reflex responses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important chemical stimuli of cardiac afferents during and after ischaemia. Iron-catalysed Fenton chemistry constitutes one mechanism of production of hydroxyl radicals. Another potential source of these species is xanthine oxidase-catalysed oxidation of purines. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) also contribute to the production of ROS in some conditions. The present study tested the hypothesis that both xanthine oxidase-catalysed oxidation of purines and neutrophils provide a source of ROS sufficient to activate cardiac afferents during ischaemia. We recorded single-unit activity of cardiac afferents innervating the ventricles recorded from the left thoracic sympathetic chain (T1-5) of anaesthetized cats to identify the afferents' responses to ischaemia. The role of xanthine oxidase in activation of these afferents was determined by infusion of oxypurinol (10 mg kg−1, i.v.), an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. The importance of neutrophils as a potential source of ROS in the activation of cardiac afferents during ischaemia was assessed by the infusion of a polyclonal antibody (3 mg ml−1 kg−1, i.v.) raised in rabbits immunized with cat PMNs. This antibody decreased the number of circulating PMNs and, to a smaller extent, platelets. Since previous data suggest that platelets release serotonin (5-HT), which activates cardiac afferents through a serotonin receptor (subtype 3,5-HT3 receptor) mechanism, before treatment with the antibody in another group, we blocked 5-HT3 receptors on sensory nerve endings with tropisetron (300 μg kg−1, i.v.). We observed that oxypurinol significantly decreased the activity of cardiac afferents during myocardial ischaemia from 1.5 ± 0.4 to 0.8 ± 0.4 impulses s−1. Similarly, the polyclonal antibody significantly reduced the discharge frequency of

  4. Quercetin and hydroxytyrosol attenuates xanthine/xanthine oxidase-induced toxicity in H9c2 cardiomyocytes by regulation of oxidative stress and stress-sensitive signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Namik; Bali, Elif B; Karasu, Cimen

    2015-10-01

    The increased activity of xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XO) has been suggested as a risk factor for heart disease and herbal polyphenols exhibits cardioprotection in vitro and in vivo. To understand the cardioprotective action mechanisms of polyphenol quercetin and hydroxytyrosol, the expression levels of stress-responsive proteins were studied in X/XO-induced toxicity model of H9c2 cardiomyocyocytes. Pretreatment with each polypenol (0.1-10 μg/ml; 24 h) enhanced viability (p < 0.01; MTT test) and inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (p < 0.001; H2DCFDA assay) against 12 h exposure to a free radical generating system, X (0.5 mM) and XO (5 mU/ml). Western blotting experiments showed that X/XO increases the phosphorylation of downstream substrate of p38, MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK-2), p44/42-MAPK (Erk1/2) and cleaved caspase-3 (p < 0.001, vs. Control), however inhibits the levels of phosphorylated c-Jun and Hsp27 (p < 0.01, vs. Control). Pretreatment with quercetin or hydroxytyrosol attenuated the phosphorylation of MAPKAPK-2 and cleaved caspase-3 in X/XO-exposed cells (p < 0.01, vs. X/XO). Hydroxytyrosol enhanced the reduction of phosphorylation of a transcriptional target c-Jun and led to overphosphorylation in protective proteins, p44/42-MAPK and Hsp27 in X/XO-exposed cells (p < 0.01, vs. X/XO). Our data suggest that quercetin and hydroxytyrosol protects cardiomyocytes against X/XO-induced oxidative toxicity by diminishing intracellular ROS and the regulation of stress-sensitive protein kinase cascades and transcription factors. PMID:26374991

  5. X-ray Crystal Structure of Arsenite-Inhibited Xanthine Oxidase:[mu]-Sulfido,[mu]-Oxo Double Bridge between Molybdenum and Arsenic in the Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Hongnan; Hall, James; Hille, Russ

    2012-10-23

    Xanthine oxidoreductase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation reaction of sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon centers of a variety of substrates, including purines, aldehydes, and other heterocyclic compounds. The complex of arsenite-inhibited xanthine oxidase has been characterized previously by UV-vis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and the catalytically essential sulfido ligand of the square-pyrimidal molybdenum center has been suggested to be involved in arsenite binding through either a {mu}-sulfido,{mu}-oxo double bridge or a single {mu}-sulfido bridge. However, this is contrary to the crystallographically observed single {mu}-oxo bridge between molybdenum and arsenic in the desulfo form of aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas (an enzyme closely related to xanthine oxidase), whose molybdenum center has an oxo ligand replacing the catalytically essential sulfur, as seen in the functional form of xanthine oxidase. Here we use X-ray crystallography to characterize the molybdenum center of arsenite-inhibited xanthine oxidase and solve the structures of the oxidized and reduced inhibition complexes at 1.82 and 2.11 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. We observe {mu}-sulfido,{mu}-oxo double bridges between molybdenum and arsenic in the active sites of both complexes. Arsenic is four-coordinate with a distorted trigonal-pyramidal geometry in the oxidized complex and three-coordinate with a distorted trigonal-planar geometry in the reduced complex. The doubly bridged binding mode is in agreement with previous XAS data indicating that the catalytically essential sulfur is also essential for the high affinity of reduced xanthine oxidoreductase for arsenite.

  6. Olea europaea leaf (Ph.Eur.) extract as well as several of its isolated phenolics inhibit the gout-related enzyme xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, J; Kuchta, K; Arnhold, J; Rauwald, H W

    2011-05-15

    In Mediterranean folk medicine Olea europaea L. leaf (Ph.Eur.) preparations are used as a common remedy for gout. In this in vitro study kinetic measurements were performed on both an 80% ethanolic (v/v) Olea europaea leaf dry extract (OLE) as well as on nine of its typical phenolic constituents in order to investigate its possible inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase (XO), an enzyme well known to contribute significantly to this pathological process. Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis were used to determine K(i) values and the inhibition mode for the isolated phenolics, which were analysed by RP-HPLC for standardisation of OLE. The standardised OLE as well as some of the tested phenolics significantly inhibited the activity of XO. Among these, the flavone aglycone apigenin exhibited by far the strongest effect on XO with a K(i) value of 0.52 μM. In comparison, the known synthetic XO inhibitor allopurinol, used as a reference standard, showed a K(i) of 7.3 μM. Although the phenolic secoiridoid oleuropein, the main ingredient of the extract (24.8%), had a considerable higher K(i) value of 53.0 μM, it still displayed a significant inhibition of XO. Furthermore, caffeic acid (K(i) of 11.5 μM; 1.89% of the extract), luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucoside (K(i) of 15.0 μM; 0.86%) and luteolin (K(i) of 2.9 μM; 0.086%) also contributed significantly to the XO inhibiting effect of OLE. For oleuropein, a competitive mode of inhibition was found, while all other active substances displayed a mixed mode of inhibition. Tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, verbascoside, and apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, which makes up for 0.3% of the extract, were inactive in all tested concentrations. Regarding the pharmacological in vitro effect of apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, it has to be considered that it is transformed into the active apigenin aglycone in the mammalian body, thus also contributing substantially to the anti-gout activity of olive leaves. For the first time, this study provides a

  7. Allopurinol Use during Pregnancy - Outcome of 31 Prospectively Ascertained Cases and a Phenotype Possibly Indicative for Teratogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Hoeltzenbein, Maria; Stieler, Katja; Panse, Mary; Wacker, Evelin; Schaefer, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Allopurinol is a purine analogue that inhibits xanthine oxidase. It is mainly used for the treatment of hyperuricemia in patients with gout or tumor lysis syndrome. Experience with allopurinol in pregnancy is scarce. In 2011, Kozenko et al. reported on a child with multiple malformations after maternal treatment with allopurinol throughout pregnancy. Possible teratogenicity of allopurinol was proposed due to the similarity of the pattern of malformations in children with mycophenolate embryopathy. A possible common mechanism of both drugs, i.e. disruption of purine synthesis, was discussed. We report on the outcome of 31 prospectively ascertained pregnancies with allopurinol exposure at least during first trimester. Pregnancy outcomes were 2 spontaneous abortions, 2 elective terminations of pregnancy and 27 live born children. The overall rate of major malformations (3.7%) and of spontaneous abortions (cumulative incidence 11%, 95%-CI 3–40) were both within the normal range. However, there was one child with severe malformations including microphthalmia, cleft lip and palate, renal hypoplasia, low-set ears, hearing deficit, bilateral cryptorchidism, and micropenis. The striking similarity of the anomalies in this child and the case described by Kozenko et al. might be considered as a signal for teratogenicity. Thus, we would recommend caution with allopurinol treatment in the first trimester, until further data are available. PMID:23840514

  8. Allopurinol Protects against Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Injury in Rat Urinary Bladders

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ju-Hyun; Chun, Kwang Sik; Na, Yong-Gil; Song, Ki-Hak; Kim, Seung Il; Lim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Gun-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Bladder ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and markedly elevates the risk of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Allopurinol is an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (XO) and thus can serve as an antioxidant that reduces oxidative stress. Here, a rat model was used to assess the ability of allopurinol treatment to ameliorate the deleterious effects of urinary bladder I/R injury. I/R injury reduced the in vitro contractile responses of longitudinal bladder strips, elevated XO activity in the plasma and bladder tissue, increased the bladder levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, reduced the bladder levels of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), and decreased and increased the bladder levels of Bcl-2 and Bax, respectively. I/R injury also elevated lipid peroxidation in the bladder. Allopurinol treatment in the I/R injury was generated significantly ameliorating all I/R-induced changes. Moreover, an in situ fluorohistological approach also showed that allopurinol reduces the generation of intracellular superoxides enlarged by I/R injury. Together, the beneficial effects of allopurinol reducing ROS production may be mediated by normalizing the activity of the ERK, JNK, and Bax/Bcl-2 pathways and by controlling TNF-α expression. PMID:26491537

  9. Pallidifloside D from Smilax riparia enhanced allopurinol effects in hyperuricemia mice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Pi-Yong; Mi, Chao; He, Yi; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Shu-Qing; Yu, Fei; Anderson, Samantha; Zhang, Yan-Wen; Wu, Xiao-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Pallidifloside D, a saponin glycoside constituent from the total saponins of Smilax riparia, had been proved to be effective in hyperuricemic control. Allopurinol is a commonly used medication to treat hyperuricemia and its complications. In this study, we evaluated whether Pallidifloside D could enhance allopurinol's effects by decreasing the serum uric acid level in a hyperuricemic mouse model induced by potassium oxonate. We found that, compared with allopurinol alone, the combination of allopurinol and Pallidifloside D significantly decreased the serum uric acid level and increased the urine uric acid level (both P<0.05), leading to the normalized serum and urine uric acid concentrations. Data on serum, urine creatinine and BUN supported these observations. Our results showed that the synergistic effects of allopurinol combined with Pallidifloside D were linked to the inhibition of both serum and hepatic xanthine oxidase (XOD), the down-regulation of renal mURAT1 and mGLUT9, and the up-regulation of mOAT1. Our data may have a potential value in clinical practice in the treatment of gout and other hyperuricemic conditions. PMID:26051087

  10. GC-MS analysis of blood for the metabonomic investigation of the effects of physical exercise and allopurinol administration on rats.

    PubMed

    Pechlivanis, Alexandros; Chatziioannou, Anastasia Chrysovalantou; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Kouretas, Dimitrios; Mougios, Vassilis; Theodoridis, Georgios A

    2014-09-01

    Exhaustive exercise is a generator of free radicals and reactive species in mammals. Allopurinol is a known inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, a source of free radicals during exercise. In this study, the influence of allopurinol on the metabolic profile of blood plasma of rats that had undergone exhaustive swimming was investigated by GC-MS. Rats were divided into four groups: (i) placebo administration, no exercise; (ii) placebo administration followed by exercise until exhaustion; (iii) allopurinol administration, no exercise; and (iv) allopurinol administration followed by exercise until exhaustion. Samples obtained following the aforementioned treatments were analyzed on GC-MS after two-step derivatization (methoxymation and silylation). GC-MS analysis in full scan acquisition achieved the quantitation of 86 metabolites in 45min. GC-MS data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistical analysis methods. Safe classification/prediction of the samples was accomplished according to exercise and allopurinol administration. Separation of the study groups according to exercise was mainly due to lactic acid, pyruvic acid, 2-hydroxybutyric acid, uracil, oxalic acid, pyroglutamic acid and stearic acid (p<0.05). Separation according to allopurinol administration was mainly due to compounds of the purine catabolic pathway and amino acids. Allopurinol administration was not found to modulate the metabolic responses to exercise. PMID:24618030

  11. [The Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity and Hypouricemic Effects of Crude Drugs Obtained from the Silkworm in Mice].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryuichirou; Miyata, Yuuma; Minakuchi, Naoki; Murakami, Ayako; Sakazaki, Fumitoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of crude drugs obtained from the silkworm in mice with oxonic acid-induced hyperuricemia using xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity and plasma uric acid levels. The plasma uric acid level was analyzed using an improved HPLC with UV detection (HPLC-UV) method, which enabled high-sensitivity analysis of a microliter of plasma. Using this method, we evaluated natural products administered orally to the hypouricemic mice. The plasma uric acid level of mice administered a water-soluble extract from silkworm larvae with botrytis (used in traditional Chinese medicine to reduce wind, lower blood pressure, and change platelet coagulation) was significantly lower than in the control group 1, 2, and 3 h after treatment. In addition, water soluble extracts from a fungus (NBRC 31161) metabolite and silkworm pupae and larvae reduced the plasma uric acid levels in mice compared with the control group. PMID:26423873

  12. Allopurinol protects against ischemic insults in a mouse model of cortical microinfarction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun; Lan, Yue; He, Xiao-Fei; Luo, Chuan-Ming; Wang, Qin-Mei; Liang, Feng-Yin; Xu, Guang-Qing; Pei, Zhong

    2015-10-01

    Microinfarcts are common in patients with cognitive decline and dementia. Allopurinol (ALLO), a xanthine oxidase (XO) enzyme inhibitor, has been found to reduce proinflammatory molecules and oxidative stress in the vasculature. We here examined the effect of pre-treatment with allopurinol on the cortical microinfarction. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to a permanent single penetrating arteriole occlusion induced by two-photon laser irradiation. Infarction volume, the activation of glial cells and nitrosative stress in the ischemic brain was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Pre-treatment with ALLO achieved 42% reduction of infarct volume and significantly reduced microglia infiltration, astrocyte proliferation and nitrosative stress in the ischemic brain. These data indicate that ALLO protects against microinfarcts possibly through inhibition of nitrosative stress and attenuation of microglia infiltration as well as astrocytes reactivation. PMID:26187758

  13. Bioactive Compounds, Antioxidant, Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory, Tyrosinase Inhibitory and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Selected Agro-Industrial By-products

    PubMed Central

    Oskoueian, Ehsan; Abdullah, Norhani; Hendra, Rudi; Karimi, Ehsan

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of abundantly available agro-industrial by-products for their bioactive compounds and biological activities is beneficial in particular for the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, rapeseed meal, cottonseed meal and soybean meal were investigated for the presence of bioactive compounds and antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, xanthine oxidase and tyrosinase inhibitory activities. Methanolic extracts of rapeseed meal showed significantly (P < 0.01) higher phenolics and flavonoids contents; and significantly (P < 0.01) higher DPPH and nitric oxide free radical scavenging activities when compared to that of cottonseed meal and soybean meal extracts. Ferric thiocyanate and thiobarbituric acid tests results showed rapeseed meal with the highest antioxidant activity (P < 0.01) followed by BHT, cotton seed meal and soybean meal. Rapeseed meal extract in xanthine oxidase and tyrosinase inhibitory assays showed the lowest IC50 values followed by cottonseed and soybean meals. Anti-inflammatory assay using IFN-γ/LPS stimulated RAW 264.7 cells indicated rapeseed meal is a potent source of anti-inflammatory agent. Correlation analysis showed that phenolics and flavonoids were highly correlated to both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Rapeseed meal was found to be promising as a natural source of bioactive compounds with high antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, xanthine oxidase and tyrosinase inhibitory activities in contrast to cotton and soybean meals. PMID:22272095

  14. Further studies on the use of allopurinol to reduce plasma uric acid concentrations in the Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) hyperuricaemic model.

    PubMed

    Poffers, J; Lumeij, J T; Timmermans-Sprang, E P M; Redig, P T

    2002-12-01

    The present paper reports the effects of allopurinol in a raptor hyperuricaemic model. The study was performed as a follow-up to previous experiments wherein allopurinol was used in doses of 100 and 50 mg/kg, and was proved to be toxic at these higher dose rates. To investigate whether 25 mg/kg (semel in die) s.i.d. allopurinol is a safe and effective dose in Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) to reduce plasma uric acid concentrations, experimental studies were performed using the physiologically occurring postprandial hyperuricaemia. Preprandial and postprandial plasma concentrations of xanthine, hypoxanthine, allopurinol, oxypurinol and uric acid were established by high-performance liquid chromatography at various time intervals after receiving allopurinol (25 mg/kg SID) or placebo. No significant differences were observed between the experimental and the control group. These results indicate that this dose is safe to administer; however, this dose failed to cause a significant effect on plasma uric acid concentrations. Because of the low therapeutic ratio of allopurinol in Red-tailed Hawks, follow-up studies have concentrated on an alternative for the treatment of hyperuricaemia, namely urate oxidase. PMID:12593739

  15. ALLOPURINOL DOES NOT DECREASE BLOOD PRESSURE OR PREVENT THE DEVELOPMENT OF HYPERTENSION IN THE DOCA-SALT RAT MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, Theodora; Linder, A. Elizabeth; Davis, Robert P.; Burnett, Robert; Fink, Gregory D.; Watts, Stephanie W.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, disease in which ROS levels and markers of oxidative stress are increased. Xanthine oxidase (XO) is a ROS-producing enzyme the activity of which may increase during hypertension. Studies on XO inhibition effects on BP have yielded controversial results. We hypothesized that XO inhibition would decrease BP or attenuate the development of DOCA-salt hypertension. We administered the XO inhibitor, allopurinol (50 mg/kg/day, orally) or its vehicle to rats during the established or development stages of DOCA-salt hypertension. We validated XO inhibition by HPLC measurements of XO metabolites in urine, serum and tissues demonstrating decrease in products, increase in substrates and detection of the active metabolite of allopurinol, oxypurinol. We monitored BP continuously via radiotelemetry and performed gross evaluations of target organs of hypertension. Allopurinol treatment did not impact the course of DOCA-salt hypertension, regardless of the timing of administration. Aside from a significant decrease in pulse pressure in allopurinol-treated rats, no positive differences were observed between the allopurinol and the vehicle-treated rats. We conclude that XO does not play an important role in the development or maintenance of hypertension in the rat DOCA-salt hypertension model. PMID:20881613

  16. Protocol of the Febuxostat versus Allopurinol Streamlined Trial (FAST): a large prospective, randomised, open, blinded endpoint study comparing the cardiovascular safety of allopurinol and febuxostat in the management of symptomatic hyperuricaemia

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Thomas M; Ford, Ian; Nuki, George; Mackenzie, Isla S; De Caterina, Raffaele; Findlay, Evelyn; Hallas, Jesper; Hawkey, Christopher J; Ralston, Stuart; Walters, Matthew; Webster, John; McMurray, John; Perez Ruiz, Fernando; Jennings, Claudine G

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gout affects 2.5% of the UK's adult population and is now the most common type of inflammatory arthritis. The long-term management of gout requires reduction of serum urate levels and this is most often achieved with use of xanthine oxidase inhibitors, such as allopurinol. Febuxostat is the first new xanthine oxidase inhibitor since allopurinol and was licensed for use in 2008. The European Medicines Agency requested a postlicensing cardiovascular safety study of febuxostat versus allopurinol, which has been named the Febuxostat versus Allopurinol Streamlined trial (FAST). Methods and analysis FAST is a cardiovascular safety study using the prospective, randomised, open, blinded endpoint design. FAST is recruiting in the UK and Denmark. Recruited patients are aged over 60 years, prescribed allopurinol for symptomatic hyperuricaemia and have at least one additional cardiovascular risk factor. After an allopurinol lead-in phase where the dose of allopurinol is optimised to achieve European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) urate targets (serum urate <357 µmol/L), patients are randomised to either continue optimal dose allopurinol or to use febuxostat. Patients are followed-up for an average of 3 years. The primary endpoint is first occurrence of the Anti-Platelet Trialists’ Collaboration (APTC) cardiovascular endpoint of non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke or cardiovascular death. Secondary endpoints are all cause mortality and hospitalisations for heart failure, unstable, new or worsening angina, coronary or cerebral revascularisation, transient ischaemic attack, non-fatal cardiac arrest, venous and peripheral arterial vascular thrombotic event and arrhythmia with no evidence of ischaemia. The primary analysis is a non-inferiority analysis with a non-inferiority upper limit for the HR for the primary outcome of 1.3. Ethics and dissemination FAST (ISRCTN72443728) has ethical approval in the UK and Denmark, and results will be

  17. Screening for selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from Flos Chrysanthemum using ultrafiltration LC-MS combined with enzyme channel blocking.

    PubMed

    Song, Hui-Peng; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Yu; Mo, Hua-yan; Zhang, Mu; Chen, Jun; Li, Ping

    2014-06-15

    In this study, a new method based on ultrafiltration liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UF-LC-MS) combined with enzyme channel blocking (ECB) was developed to discover bioactive components from herbal medicines. Xanthine oxidase (XOD), a critical enzyme for treating gout, was employed as the target protein for screening. By comparing chromatographic profiles of the compounds binding to XOD before and after the ECB experiment, the selective ligands could be distinguished from the non-selective binders. In this experiment, febuxostat bound to the channel entering into the active site of the enzyme and prevented potential ligands from binding. Finally, four compounds, namely, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, apigenin-7-O-glucoside, luteolin and apigenin were screened and identified as the candidate XOD inhibitors based on the ultrafiltration chromatogram of Flos Chrysanthemum, a famous traditional Chinese medicine used in many prescriptions for gout treatment. To verify the compounds screened further, a microplate method was applied to evaluate their enzyme inhibitory activities. The IC50 values of the above 4 compounds were 23.61, 38.80, 1.54 and 1.96μM, respectively. The structure-function relationship was also estimated according to the in vitro assay. The results were in favor of the hypothesis that the Flos Chrysanthemum extract might be used for gout treatment by inhibiting XOD. PMID:24861872

  18. Bioassay-Guided Isolation and Identification of Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Constituents from the Leaves of Perilla frutescens.

    PubMed

    Huo, Li-Na; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Chun-Yu; Shi, Hai-Bo; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Guo, Bing-Hua; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Gao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Activity-directed fractionation and purification processes were employed to identify xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory compounds from the leaves of Perilla frutescens. The total extract was evaluated in vitro on XO inhibitory activity and in vivo in an experimental model with potassium oxonate-induced hyperuricemia in mice which was used to evaluate anti-hyperuricemic activity. The crude extract showed expressive urate-lowering activity results. Solvent partitioning of the total extract followed by macroporous resin column chromatography of the n-butanol extract yielded four extracts and eluted parts. Among them, only the 70% ethanol eluted part of the n-butanol extract showed strong activity and therefore was subjected to separation and purification using various chromatographic techniques. Five compounds showing potent activity were identified by comparing their spectral data with literature values to be caffeic acid, vinyl caffeate, rosmarinic acid, methyl rosmarinate, and apigenin. These results indicate that pending further study, these compounds could be used as novel natural product agents for the treatment of hyperuricemia. PMID:26425999

  19. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and xanthine oxidase activities in erythrocytes and plasma from marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Pérez-Milicua, Myrna Barjau; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal-Vertiz, Jaime A; de la Rosa, Alejandro; Vázquez-Medina, José P; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are key enzymes involved in the purine salvage pathway. PNP metabolizes purine bases to synthetize purine nucleotides whereas XO catalyzes the oxidation of purines to uric acid. In humans, PNP activity is reported to be high in erythrocytes and XO activity to be low in plasma; however, XO activity increases after ischemic events. XO activity in plasma of northern elephant seals has been reported during prolonged fasting and rest and voluntary associated apneas. The objective of this study was to analyze circulating PNP and XO activities in marine mammals adapted to tolerate repeated cycles of ischemia/reperfusion associated with diving (bottlenose dolphin, northern elephant seal) in comparison with semiaquatic (river otter) and terrestrial mammals (human, pig). PNP activities in plasma and erythrocytes, as well as XO activity in plasma, from all species were quantified by spectrophotometry. No clear relationship in circulating PNP or XO activity could be established between marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals. Erythrocytes from bottlenose dolphins and humans are highly permeable to nucleosides and glucose, intraerythrocyte PNP activity may be related to a release of purine nucleotides from the liver. High-energy costs will probably mean a higher ATP degradation rate in river otters, as compared to northern elephant seals or dolphins. Lower erythrocyte PNP activity and elevated plasma XO activity in northern elephant seal could be associated with fasting and/or sleep- and dive-associated apneas. PMID:24530799

  20. Elevated level of renal xanthine oxidase mRNA transcription after nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis virus infection in growing layers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huayuan; Huang, Qiqi; Liu, Weilian; Zou, Yuelong; Zhu, Shuliang; Deng, Guangfu; Kuang, Jun; Zhang, Caiying; Cao, Huabin; Hu, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    To assess relationships between xanthine oxidase (XOD) and nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis virus (NIBV) infection, 240 growing layers (35 days old) were randomly divided into two groups (infected and control) of 120 chickens each. Each chicken in the control and infected group was intranasally inoculated with 0.2 mL sterile physiological saline and virus, respectively, after which serum antioxidant parameters and renal XOD mRNA expression in growing layers were evaluated at 8, 15 and 22 days post-inoculation (dpi). The results showed that serum glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in the infected group were significantly lower than in the control group at 8 and 15 dpi (p < 0.01), while serum malondialdehyde concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.01). The serum uric acid was significantly higher than that of the control group at 15 dpi (p < 0.01). In addition, the kidney mRNA transcript level and serum activity of XOD in the infected group was significantly higher than that of the control group at 8, 15 and 22 dpi (p < 0.05). The results indicated that NIBV infection could cause the increases of renal XOD gene transcription and serum XOD activity, leading to hyperuricemia and reduction of antioxidants in the body. PMID:26119168

  1. Autophagy induced by cathepsin S inhibition induces early ROS production, oxidative DNA damage, and cell death via xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Chang; Chen, Kuo-Li; Cheung, Chun Hei Antonio; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2013-12-01

    Cathepsin S plays multiple roles in MHC class II antigen presentation, extracellular matrix degradation, angiogenesis, and tumorogenesis. Our previous study revealed that targeting cathepsin S could induce cellular cytotoxicity and reduce cell viability. For the current study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for targeting cathepsin S-induced cell death and its association with autophagy. Distinct from regulation of the classic autophagy pathway by reactive oxygen species (ROS), we demonstrated that autophagy is the genuine regulator of early ROS production. The molecular silencing of autophagy-dependent ATG genes (ATG5, ATG7, and LC3) and the pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA and wortmannin reduced ROS production significantly. In addition, xanthine oxidase (XO), which is upregulated by autophagy, is required for early ROS production, oxidative DNA damage, and consequent cell death. Autophagy inhibition suppresses the upregulation of XO, which is induced by cathepsin S inhibition, resulting in reduced ROS generation, DNA damage, and cell death. Collectively, our study reveals a noncanonical molecular pathway in which, after the inhibition of cathepsin S, autophagy induces early ROS production for oxidative DNA damage and cell death through XO. PMID:23892358

  2. Phlomis mauritanica extracts reduce the xanthine oxidase activity, scavenge the superoxide anions, and inhibit the aflatoxin B1-, sodium azide-, and 4-nitrophenyldiamine-induced mutagenicity in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Limem, Ilef; Bouhlel, Ines; Bouchemi, Meriem; Kilani, Soumaya; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben-Sghaier, Mohamed; Skandrani, Ines; Behouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2010-06-01

    Four extracts were prepared from the leaves of Phlomis mauritanica: lyophilized infusion, total oligomer flavonoids, methanol, and ethyl acetate extracts. The antimutagenic properties of these extracts were investigated by assessing the inhibition of the mutagenic effects of direct-acting mutagens such as sodium azide and 4-nitrophenylenediamine and indirect-acting mutagens like aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) using the Ames assay. The four extracts prepared from P. mauritanica strongly inhibit the mutagenicity induced by AFB1 in both Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 and TA 98 assay systems. Lyophilized infusion and methanol extracts at the dose of 250 microg per plate reduced AFB1 mutagenicity by 93% and 91%, respectively, in S. typhymurium strain TA 100. We examined also the antioxidant effect of these extracts by the enzymatic xanthine/xanthine oxidase assay. Result indicated that total oligomer flavonoids and ethyl acetate and methanol extracts were potent inhibitors of xanthine oxidase activity. In contrast, lyophilized infusion, total oligomer flavonoids, and methanol extracts exhibited a high degree of superoxide anion scavenging. Our findings emphasize the potential of P. mauritanica extracts to prevent mutations and oxidant effects. Furthermore, the results presented here could be an additional argument to support the use of this species as a medicinal and dietary plant. PMID:20406134

  3. Nature of the oxomolybdenum-thiolate pi-bond: implications for Mo-S bonding in sulfite oxidase and xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Rebecca L; Helton, Matthew E; Cosper, Michele Mader; Enemark, John H; Kirk, Martin L

    2004-03-01

    these monooxomolybdenum thiolate complexes. Finally, the presence of a covalent Mo-S pi interaction oriented orthogonal to the MOO bond is discussed with respect to electron-transfer regeneration in sulfite oxidase and Mo=S(sulfido) bonding in xanthine oxidase. PMID:14989655

  4. Evaluation of antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of different solvent extracts of leaves of Citrullus colocynthis

    PubMed Central

    Nessa, Fazilatun; Khan, Saeed A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Citrullus colocynthis is a folk medicinal plan of United Arab Emirates. Several studies on this plant reported and focused on the biological and toxicological profile of fruits pulp. The present study focused on the antioxidant potency of leaf extract of this plant. Aim: To evaluate the antioxidant and xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activities of C. colocynthis by chemical method. Materials and Methods: Four different solvent extracts (methanol-CCM, methanol: water (1:1)-CCMW, chloroform-CCC and hexane-CCH) of leaves of C. colocynthis were investigated for their free radical scavenging activity using DPPH radical as a substrate, lipid peroxidation (LPO) inhibitory activity using a model system consisting of β-carotene-linoleic acid, superoxide radical scavenging activity (enzymatically/nonenzymatically) and XO inhibitory activity. A dose response curve was plotted for determining SC50 and IC50 values for expressing the results of free radical scavenging activity and XO inhibitory activities respectively. Results: The high polyphenolic content of CCM and CCMW extract showed highest antioxidant activity irrespective the method used for this investigation. The overall results decreased in the order of: CCM > CCMW > CCC > CCH. CCH extract was inactive towards chemically generated superoxide radical and poor DPPH radical scavengers. The results of LPO inhibitory activities of leaves extract (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL) also decreased in the order of: CCM > CCMW > CCC > CCH. Overall 1.0 mg/mL leaves extract showed highest antioxidant potency amongst the studied concentration. Conclusion: CCMW and CCM extract of C. colocynthis exhibited promising antioxidants and XO inhibitory activities. PMID:25002802

  5. HZE ⁵⁶Fe-ion irradiation induces endothelial dysfunction in rat aorta: role of xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Soucy, Kevin G; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Kim, Jae Hyung; Oh, Young; Attarzadeh, David O; Sevinc, Baris; Kuo, Maggie M; Shoukas, Artin A; Vazquez, Marcelo E; Berkowitz, Dan E

    2011-10-01

    Ionizing radiation has been implicated in the development of significant cardiovascular complications. Since radiation exposure is associated with space exploration, astronauts are potentially at increased risk of accelerated cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effect of high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) iron-ion radiation on vascular and endothelial function as a model of space radiation. Rats were exposed to a single whole-body dose of iron-ion radiation at doses of 0, 0.5 or 1 Gy. In vivo aortic stiffness and ex vivo aortic tension responses were measured 6 and 8 months after exposure as indicators of chronic vascular injury. Rats exposed to 1 Gy iron ions demonstrated significantly increased aortic stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity. Aortic rings from irradiated rats exhibited impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation consistent with endothelial dysfunction. Acute xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibition or reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging restored endothelial-dependent responses to normal. In addition, XO activity was significantly elevated in rat aorta 4 months after whole-body irradiation. Furthermore, XO inhibition, initiated immediately after radiation exposure and continued until euthanasia, completely inhibited radiation-dependent XO activation. ROS production was elevated after 1 Gy irradiation while production of nitric oxide (NO) was significantly impaired. XO inhibition restored NO and ROS production. Finally, dietary XO inhibition preserved normal endothelial function and vascular stiffness after radiation exposure. These results demonstrate that radiation induced XO-dependent ROS production and nitroso-redox imbalance, leading to chronic vascular dysfunction. As a result, XO is a potential target for radioprotection. Enhancing the understanding of vascular radiation injury could lead to the development of effective methods to ameliorate radiation-induced vascular damage. PMID:21787183

  6. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of xanthine oxidase. The molybdenum centres of the functional and the desulpho forms.

    PubMed Central

    Bordas, J; Bray, R C; Garner, C D; Gutteridge, S; Hasnain, S S

    1980-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectra have been recorded for the molybdenum K-edge region of xanthine oxidase. Both the absorption edge and the extended fine structure (e.x.a.f.s.) regions were investigated. Spectra were obtained for samples of the desulpho enzyme as well as for mixtures of this with the active enzyme. The spectrum of the pure active form was then obtained by difference. The desulpho enzyme shows a pronounced step in the absorption edge, of a type previously associated terminal oxygen ligands. In the active enzyme this step has decreased markedly. Satisfactory simulations of the e.x.a.f.s. spectrum of the desulpho enzyme could be obtained by assuming the molybdenum to be bonded to two terminal oxygen atoms (Mo = O about .175 nm), two sulphur atoms (presumably from cysteine residues, Mo-S about .0250 nm) and one sulphur atom (presumably from a methionine residue, Mo-S about 0.290 nm). E.x.a.f.s. of the active enzyme differed appreciably from this. In keeping with earlier proposals [Gutteridge, Tanner & Bray (1978) Biochem. J. 175, 887-897], the spectrum of the active enzyme could be simulated if a sulphur atom at about 0.225 nm (i.e. presumably a terminal sulphur atom) replaced one of the terminal oxygen atoms of the desulpho from, with small changes in the other bond distances. Validity of the interpretative procedures, which involved phase shift and amplitude calculations ab initio, was demonstrated by using low molecular weight compounds of known structure. PMID:6894537

  7. Conformational alterations induced by novel green 16-E2-16 gemini surfactant in xanthine oxidase: Biophysical insights from tensiometry, spectroscopy, microscopy and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Akram, Mohd; Bhat, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Bhat, Waseem Feeroze; Kabir-ud-Din

    2015-11-01

    Herein we report the interaction of a biodegradable gemini surfactant, ethane-1,2-diyl bis(N,N-dimethyl-N-hexadecylammoniumacetoxy) dichloride (16-E2-16) with bovine milk xanthine oxidase (XO), employing tensiometry, fluorescence spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and computational molecular modeling. Surface tension results depict substantial changes in the micellar as well as interfacial parameters (CMC, ΠCMC, γCMC, Γmax, Amin, ΔGmic° and ΔGads°) of 16-E2-16 gemini surfactant upon XO combination, deciphering the interaction of XO with the gemini surfactant. Fluorescence measurements reveal that 16-E2-16 gemini surfactant causes quenching in the xanthine oxidase (XO) fluorescence spectra via static procedure and the values of various evaluated binding parameters (KSV, Kb, kq, ΔGb° and n) describe that 16-E2-16 effectively binds to XO. Three dimensional fluorescence, 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) binding, F1F3 ratio, UV, CD, FTIR, SEM and TEM results delineate changes in the secondary structure of xanthine oxidase. Molecular docking results provide complement to the steady-state fluorescence findings and support the view that quenching occurs due to non-polar environment experienced by aromatic residues of the enzyme. The results of this study can help scientists to tune the conformation of an enzyme (XO) with biocompatible amphiphilic microstructures, which will help to unfold further understanding in the treatment modes of various diseases like gout, hyperuricemia, liver and brain necrosis. PMID:26057098

  8. Switching from allopurinol to febuxostat for the treatment of hyperuricemia and renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Yuki; Mochizuki, Toshio; Moriyama, Takahito; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Takei, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2014-11-01

    Hyperuricemia is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Febuxostat is a novel xanthine oxidase inhibitor that is metabolized by many metabolic pathways in the kidney and the liver. We performed a 1-year cohort study of 73 hyperuricemic patients who had an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) below 45 ml/min and were being treated with urate-lowering therapy. In 51 patients, treatment was changed from allopurinol to febuxostat, and the other 22 patients were continued on allopurinol. The serum levels of uric acid (UA) level, creatinine, and other biochemical parameters were measured at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of treatment. The serum UA levels significantly decreased from 6.1 ± 1.0 to 5.7 ± 1.2 mg/dl in the febuxostat group and significantly increased from 6.2 ± 1.1 to 6.6 ± 1.1 mg/dl in the allopurinol group. The eGFR decreased 27.3 to 25.7 ml/min in the febuxostat group and from 26.1 to 19.9 ml/min in the allopurinol group. The switch from allopurinol to febuxostat was significantly associated with the changes in eGFR according to a multiple regression analysis (β = -0.22145, P < 0.05). Febuxostat reduced the serum UA levels and slowed the progression of renal disease in our CKD cohort in comparison with allopurinol. PMID:25048744

  9. Effect of Soy Sauce on Serum Uric Acid Levels in Hyperuricemic Rats and Identification of Flazin as a Potent Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Huipin; Zhao, Mouming; Su, Guowan; Lin, Lianzhu; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-15

    This is the first report on the ability of soy sauce to effectively reduce the serum uric acid levels and xanthine oxidase (XOD) activities of hyperuricemic rats. Soy sauce was partitioned sequentially into ethyl acetate and water fractions. The ethyl acetate fraction with strong XOD inhibition effect was purified further. On the basis of xanthine oxidase inhibitory (XOI) activity-guided purification, nine compounds including 3,4-dihydroxy ethyl cinnamate, diisobutyl terephthalate, harman, daidzein, flazin, catechol, thymine, genistein, and uracil were obtained. It was the first time that 3,4-dihydroxy ethyl cinnamate and diisobutyl terephthalate had been identified from soy sauce. Flazin with hydroxymethyl furan ketone group at C-1 and carboxyl at C-3 exhibited the strongest XOI activity (IC50 = 0.51 ± 0.05 mM). According to fluorescence quenching and molecular docking experiments, flazin could enter into the catalytic center of XOD to interact with Lys1045, Gln1194, and Arg912 mainly by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds. Flazin, catechol, and genistein not only were potent XOD inhibitors but also held certain antioxidant activities. According to ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) simulation in silico, flazin had good oral bioavailability in vivo. PMID:27181598

  10. Assessment of Antioxidant and Phenolic Compound Concentrations as well as Xanthine Oxidase and Tyrosinase Inhibitory Properties of Different Extracts of Pleurotus citrinopileatus Fruiting Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nuhu; Yoon, Ki Nam; Lee, Kyung Rim; Kim, Hye Young; Shin, Pyung Gyun; Cheong, Jong Chun; Yoo, Young Bok; Shim, Mi Ja; Lee, Min Woong

    2011-01-01

    Cellular damage caused by reactive oxygen species has been implicated in several diseases, thus establishing a significant role for antioxidants in maintaining human health. Acetone, methanol, and hot water extracts of Pleurotus citrinopileatus were evaluated for their antioxidant activities against β-carotene-linoleic acid and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, reducing power, ferrous ion-chelating abilities, and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities. In addition, the tyrosinase inhibitory effects and phenolic compound contents of the extracts were also analyzed. Methanol and acetone extracts of P. citrinopileatus showed stronger inhibition of β-carotene-linoleic acid compared to the hot water extract. Methanol extract (8 mg/mL) showed a significantly high reducing power of 2.92 compared to the other extracts. The hot water extract was more effective than the acetone and methanole extracts for scavenging DPPH radicals. The strongest chelating effect (92.72%) was obtained with 1.0 mg/mL of acetone extract. High performance liquid chromatography analysis detected eight phenolic compounds, including gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid, naringenin, hesperetin, formononetin, and biochanin-A, in an acetonitrile and hydrochloric acid (5 : 1) solvent extract. Xanthine oxidase and tyrosinase inhibitory activities of the acetone, methanol, and hot water extracts increased with increasing concentration. This study suggests that fruiting bodies of P. citrinopileatus can potentially be used as a readily accessible source of natural antioxidants. PMID:22783067

  11. Molecular Docking Analysis of Selected Clinacanthus nutans Constituents as Xanthine Oxidase, Nitric Oxide Synthase, Human Neutrophil Elastase, Matrix Metalloproteinase 2, Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 and Squalene Synthase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Radhakrishnan; Isha, Azizul; Wai, Lam Kok; Ismail, Intan Safinar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinacanthus nutans (Burm. f.) Lindau has gained popularity among Malaysians as a traditional plant for anti-inflammatory activity. Objective: This prompted us to carry out the present study on a selected 11 constituents of C. nutans which are clinacoside A–C, cycloclinacoside A1, shaftoside, vitexin, orientin, isovitexin, isoorientin, lupeol and β-sitosterol. Materials and Methods: Selected 11 constituents of C. nutans were evaluated on the docking behavior of xanthine oxidase (XO), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), human neutrophil elastase (HNE), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP 2 and 9), and squalene synthase (SQS) using Discovery Studio Version 3.1. Also, molecular physicochemical, bioactivity, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET), and toxicity prediction by computer assisted technology analyzes were also carried out. Results: The molecular physicochemical analysis revealed that four ligands, namely clinacoside A–C and cycloclinacoside A1 showed nil violations and complied with Lipinski's rule of five. As for the analysis of bioactivity, all the 11 selected constituents of C. nutans exhibited active score (>0) toward enzyme inhibitors descriptor. ADMET analysis showed that the ligands except orientin and isoorientin were predicted to have Cytochrome P4502D6 inhibition effect. Docking studies and binding free energy calculations revealed that clinacoside B exhibited the least binding energy for the target enzymes except for XO and SQS. Isovitexin and isoorientin showed the potentials in the docking and binding with all of the six targeted enzymes, whereas vitexin and orientin docked and bound with only NOS and HNE. Conclusion: This present study has paved a new insight in understanding these 11 C. nutans ligands as potential inhibitors against XO, NOS, HNE, MMP 2, MMP 9, and SQS. SUMMARY Isovitexin and isoorientin (Clinacanthus nutans constituent) showed potentials in the docking and binding with all of the six targeted

  12. The xanthine oxidase inhibitor Febuxostat reduces tissue uric acid content and inhibits injury-induced inflammation in the liver and lung.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Yang, Ke; Rock, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    Necrotic cell death in vivo induces a robust neutrophilic inflammatory response and the resulting inflammation can cause further tissue damage and disease. Dying cells induce this inflammation by releasing pro-inflammatory intracellular components, one of which is uric acid. Cells contain high levels of intracellular uric acid, which is produced when purines are oxidized by the enzyme xanthine oxidase. Here we test whether a non-nucleoside xanthine oxidase inhibitor, Febuxostat (FBX), can reduce intracellular uric acid levels and inhibit cell death-induced inflammation in two different murine tissue injury models; acid-induced acute lung injury and acetaminophen liver injury. Infiltration of inflammatory cells induced by acid injection into lungs or peritoneal administration of acetaminophen was evaluated by quantification with flow cytometry and tissue myeloperoxidase activity in the presence or absence of FBX treatment. Uric acid levels in serum and tissue were measured before giving the stimuli and during inflammation. The impact of FBX treatment on the peritoneal inflammation caused by the microbial stimulus, zymosan, was also analyzed to see whether FBX had a broad anti-inflammatory effect. We found that FBX reduced uric acid levels in acid-injured lung tissue and inhibited acute pulmonary inflammation triggered by lung injury. Similarly, FBX reduced uric acid levels in the liver and inhibited inflammation in response to acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury. In contrast, FBX did not reduce inflammation to zymosan, and therefore is not acting as a general anti-inflammatory agent. These results point to the potential of using agents like FBX to treat cell death-induced inflammation. PMID:25449036

  13. Spin–spin interaction between molybdenum and one of the iron–sulphur systems of xanthine oxidase and its relevance to the enzymic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, David J.; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M.; Bray, Robert C.

    1972-01-01

    1. Electron-paramagnetic-resonance (e.p.r.) studies at 9 and 35GHz at helium temperatures have given new information relating to the structure and mechanism of action of xanthine oxidase. 2. As reported by others, the enzyme gives two types of e.p.r. signal attributed to iron–sulphur systems. The first has gav.=1.95. Parameters of the second are determined as g1 2.12, g2 2.007 and g3 1.91, with gav.=2.01. This species seems to have a slightly higher redox potential than the former one. 3. Temperature-dependent changes in the form of Mov e.p.r. signals from the enzyme, observed under certain conditions, are shown to be due to weak spin–spin interaction between Mov and gav.=1.95 Fe/S. The phenomenon has been studied most fully for the Slow Mov signal. Here, the spectral change takes the form of an additional approximately isotropic 11G splitting, detected below about 45°K only. Samples without Fe/S reduced showed no such changes of spectrum. 4. Similar spectral changes were observed in the Rapid Mov signals, obtained in rapid-freezing experiments, but only in samples corresponding to relatively long reaction times with the substrate. It is suggested therefore that the phenomenon may provide a means of distinguishing enzyme centres with Mo only reduced from those in which both Mo and Fe/S are reduced. 5. Additional rapid-freezing data tending to support a two- rather than a one-electron transfer of reducing equivalents from substrates to xanthine oxidase are reported. PMID:4347785

  14. Organic compounds present in airborne particles stimulate superoxide production and DNA fragmentation: role of NOX and xanthine oxidase in animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Busso, Iván Tavera; Silva, Guillermo Benjamín; Carreras, Hebe Alejandra

    2016-08-01

    Suspended particulate matter trigger the production of reactive oxygen species. However, most of the studies dealing with oxidative damage of airborne particles focus on the effects of individual compounds and not real mixtures. In order to study the enzymatic superoxide production resulting from the exposition to a complex mixture, we derived organic extracts from airborne particles collected daily in an urban area and exposed kidney, liver, and heart mammal tissues. After that, we measured DNA damage employing the comet assay. We observed that in every tissue, NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase were involved in O2 (-) production when they were exposed to the organic extracts, as the lucigenin's chemiluminescence decays when enzymes were inhibited. The same trend was observed with the percentage of cells with comets, since DNA damage was higher when they were exposed to same experimental conditions. Our data allow us to hypothesize that these enzymes play an important role in the oxidative stress produced by PAHs and that there is a mechanism involving them in the O2 (-)generation. PMID:27180836

  15. Use of allopurinol to optimize thiopurine immunomodulator efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Miles P

    2008-07-01

    The thiopurine immunomodulators azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine are integral to the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), particularly as corticosteroid-sparing and maintenance agents; however, up to 50% of patients do not adequately respond to these agents. Advances in pharmacogenomics and an increased understanding of thiopurine metabolism have led to the practice of measuring the thiopurine metabolites 6-thioguanine (6-TGN) and 6-methylmercaptopurine (6-MMP) to help achieve optimal immunomodulator dosages. Metabolite profiles are also useful for categorizing the reasons for thiopurine treatment failures. A desirable metabolite profile favors 6-TGN production over 6-MMP formation; however, a significant subgroup of IBD patients, perhaps 15%, preferentially metabolizes thiopurines toward the inefficacious and potentially hepatotoxic metabolite 6-MMP. The xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol has been shown recently to advantageously switch thiopurine metabolism toward 6-TGN production in this subgroup of patients, and small studies have shown this switch to be safe and clinically beneficial. This article reviews evidence describing the use of allopurinol to optimize immunomodulator metabolism, provides careful practice guidelines to clinicians considering this strategy, and briefly discusses the potential mechanisms by which this favorable interaction occurs. PMID:21960930

  16. Quantitative analysis of phenolic metabolites from different parts of Angelica keiskei by HPLC-ESI MS/MS and their xanthine oxidase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Wook; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Yuk, Heung Joo; Wang, Yan; Song, Yeong Hun; Jeong, Seong Hun; Park, Ki Hun

    2014-06-15

    Angelica keiskei is used as popular functional food stuff. However, quantitative analysis of this plant's metabolites has not yet been disclosed. The principal phenolic compounds (1-16) within A. keiskei were isolated, enabling us to quantify the metabolites within different parts of the plant. The specific quantification of metabolites (1-16) was accomplished by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using a quadruple tandem mass spectrometer. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were calculated as 0.4-44 μg/kg and 1.5-148 μg/kg, respectively. Abundance and composition of these metabolites varied significantly across different parts of plant. For example, the abundance of chalcones (12-16) decreased as follows: root bark (10.51 mg/g)>stems (8.52 mg/g)>leaves (2.63 mg/g)>root cores (1.44 mg/g). The chalcones were found to be responsible for the xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibition shown by this plant. The most potent inhibitor, xanthoangelol inhibited XO with an IC50 of 8.5 μM. Chalcones (12-16) exhibited mixed-type inhibition characteristics. PMID:24491695

  17. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Inhibits LPS-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation via Binding to Xanthine Oxidase in Mouse RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaolong; Guo, Yuhong; Zhao, Jingxia; Wang, Ning; Ding, Junying; Liu, Qingquan

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is an effective therapeutic agent for inflammatory diseases and autoimmune disorders; however, its regulatory effect on NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages has not been investigated. In this study, we predicted the potential interaction between HSYA and xanthine oxidase (XO) via PharmMapper inverse docking and confirmed the binding inhibition via inhibitory test (IC50 = 40.04 μM). Computation docking illustrated that, in this HSYA-XO complex, HSYA was surrounded by Leu 648, Leu 712, His 875, Leu 873, Ser 876, Glu 879, Phe 649, and Asn 650 with a binding energy of −5.77 kcal/M and formed hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl groups of HSYA at Glu 879, Asn 650, and His 875. We then found that HSYA significantly decreased the activity of XO in RAW264.7 macrophages and suppressed LPS-induced ROS generation. Moreover, we proved that HSYA markedly inhibited LPS-induced cleaved caspase-1 activation via suppressing the sensitization of NLRP3 inflammasome and prevented the mature IL-1β formation from pro-IL-1β form. These findings suggest that XO may be a potential target of HSYA via direct binding inhibition and the combination of HSYA-XO suppresses LPS-induced ROS generation, contributing to the depression of NLRP3 inflammasome and inhibition of IL-1β secretion in macrophages. PMID:27433030

  18. The relationship between hypertension and plasma allantoin, uric acid, xanthine oxidase activity and nitrite, and their predictive capacity in severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Oguz; Elmas, Onur; Aliciguzel, Yakup; Simsek, Tayyup

    2016-01-01

    It is controversial that uric acid (UA) levels are related to the severity of hypertension in preeclampsia (PE). Our aim in this study was to determine whether UA, xanthine oxidase activity (XOA), allantoin and nitrite levels are related to arterial blood pressure (BP) in PE. We formed a control group (n = 20) and a PE group (n = 20) for the study. Their BPs and plasma UA, XOA, allantoin and nitrite levels were measured. The values from the control and PE pregnant women were assessed via a Wilcoxon matched-pairs test. A Pearson correlation test was also performed. In addition, the diagnostic value of these tests was evaluated via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The BP, UA, XOA and allantoin levels in the PE patients were found to be higher when compared with those of the pregnant controls. The UA, XOA and allantoin levels showed high correlations with BP in cases of PE. However, there was no superiority among the correlations. No differences were observed between the groups in terms of nitrite levels and the relationship between nitrite and BP. UA, XOA and allantoin levels may be high due to placental cell death because of abnormal trophoblastic activity observed in PE. Moreover, the reactive oxygen products that are created during the genetic material degradation may explain how UA, XOA and allantoin levels are related to BP. According to ROC analysis, UA, XOA and allantoin assays are reliable predictors for the determination of PE. PMID:26366935

  19. Phloroglucinols inhibit chemical mediators and xanthine oxidase, and protect cisplatin-induced cell death by reducing reactive oxygen species in normal human urothelial and bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Wei; Huang, A-Mei; Tu, Huang-Yao; Weng, Jing-Ru; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Wei, Bai-Luh; Yang, Shyh-Chyun; Wang, Jih-Pyang; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Lin, Chun-Nan

    2009-10-14

    Phloroglucinols, garcinielliptones HA-HE (1-5), and C (6) were studied in vitro for their inhibitory effects on chemical mediators released from mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Compound 6 revealed significant inhibitory effect on release of lysozyme from rat neutrophils stimulated with formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP)/cytochalasin B (CB). Compounds 3, 4, and 6 showed significant inhibitory effects on superoxide anion generation in rat neutrophils stimulated with (fMLP)/(CB), while compounds 1 and 5 revealed inhibitory effects on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) formation in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Compounds 1 and 3-6 showed inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase (XO) and could inhibit the DNA breakage caused by O2(-*). Treatment of NTUB1 with 2 to 60 microM compound 3 and 5 microM cisplatin and SV-HUC1 with 9 to 60 microM 3 and 5 microM cisplatin, respectively, resulted in an increase of viability of cells. These results indicated that compounds 1 and 3-6 showed anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activities. Compound 3 mediates through the suppression of XO activity and reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and protection of subsequent cell death. PMID:19754119

  20. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory triterpenoid and phloroglucinol from guttiferaceous plants inhibit growth and induced apoptosis in human NTUB1 cells through a ROS-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Wei; Huang, A-Mei; Tu, Huang-Yao; Lee, Ling-Yi; Wu, Chien-Chang; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Yang, Shyh-Chyun; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Lin, Chun-Nan

    2011-01-12

    A known triterpenoid, β-amyrin (1), and a known and a new phloroglucinol, cohulupone (2) and garcinielliptone P (3), were isolated from the pericarp and heartwood and seed of Garcinia subelliptica, respectively. A new xanthonolignoid, hyperielliptone HF (4), was isolated from the heartwood of Hypericum geminiflorum. The new compounds were established by analysis of their spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-3 showed an inhibitory effect on xanthine oxidase (XO). Treatment of NTUB1, a human bladder cancer cell, with 1 or 1 cotreated with cisplatin for 24 h resulted in a decreased viability of cells. Exposure of NTUB1 to 1 or 1 cotreated with cisplatin for 24 h significantly increased the level of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flow cytometric analysis indicated that treatment of NTUB1 with 1 or 1 cotreated with cisplatin led to the cell cycle arrest, accompanied by an increase in the extent of apoptotic cell death in 1 or 1 combined with cisplatin-treated NTUB1 after 24 h. These data suggested that the presentation of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in 1 or 1 combined with cisplatin-treated NTUB1 for 24 h was mediated through an increased amount of ROS in cells exposed to 1 or 1 cotreated with cisplatin. PMID:21158429

  1. Xanthine Oxidase Activity Is Associated with Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Inflammatory and Oxidative Status Markers in Metabolic Syndrome: Effects of a Single Exercise Session

    PubMed Central

    Feoli, Ana Maria Pandolfo; Macagnan, Fabrício Edler; Piovesan, Carla Haas; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in metabolic syndrome in subjects submitted to a single exercise session. We also investigated parameters of oxidative and inflammatory status. Materials/Methods. A case-control study (9 healthy and 8 MS volunteers) was performed to measure XO, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase activities, lipid peroxidation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) content, glucose levels, and lipid profile. Body mass indices, abdominal circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and TG levels were also determined. The exercise session consisted of 3 minutes of stretching, 3 minutes of warm-up, 30 minutes at a constant dynamic workload at a moderate intensity, and 3 minutes at a low speed. The blood samples were collected before and 15 minutes after the exercise session. Results. Serum XO activity was higher in MS group compared to control group. SOD activity was lower in MS subjects. XO activity was correlated with SOD, abdominal circumference, body mass indices, and hsCRP. The single exercise session reduced the SOD activity in the control group. Conclusions. Our data support the association between oxidative stress and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and suggest XO is present in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24967004

  2. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M.; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A.; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells. PMID:26384306

  3. Acute kidney injury observed during phase 1 clinical trials of a novel xanthine oxidase/URAT1 dual inhibitor PF-06743649.

    PubMed

    Dua, Pinky; Gurrell, Rachel; Kirby, Simon; Sudworth, Maria; Loudon, Peter T

    2016-08-01

    The objective of these clinical studies was to assess the safety and urate lowering activity of a novel urate transporter 1 (URAT1)/ xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor PF-06743649 in healthy subjects and gout patients. Escalating doses of PF-06743649 or placebo were given to healthy young subjects, healthy elderly subjects and gout patients. Serum uric acid (sUA) and urinary pharmacodynamic markers were assayed, and safety was assessed by collection of adverse events and assessment of safety labs, ECGs and vital signs. Administration of PF-06743649 led to rapid decrease in sUA in all cohorts; in gout patients, a change from baseline of 69 % was observed for the 40 mg dose. Urinary and serum biomarkers were consistent with inhibition of both URAT1 and XO. Although dosing was otherwise well tolerated, two subjects experienced serious adverse events of acute kidney injury. Both subjects exhibited increased serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen in the first 3 days post first dose and were hospitalised. One subject exhibited oliguria for the first 24 h. Both subjects made a complete recovery with minimal intervention. PF-06743649 was effective at rapidly lowering sUA, but further development was terminated for an identified renal safety risk. PMID:27094945

  4. Isolation and characterization of the human aldehyde oxidase gene: conservation of intron/exon boundaries with the xanthine oxidoreductase gene indicates a common origin.

    PubMed Central

    Terao, M; Kurosaki, M; Demontis, S; Zanotta, S; Garattini, E

    1998-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a molybdo-flavo enzyme involved in the metabolism of various endogenous and exogenous N-heterocyclic compounds of pharmacological and toxicological importance. The enzyme is the product of a gene which is implicated in the aetio-pathogenesis of familial recessive amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here, we report the cloning and structural characterization of the human AO gene. AO is a single copy gene approximately 85 kb long with 35 transcribed exons. The transcription-initiation site and the sequence of the 5'-flanking region, containing several putative regulatory elements, were determined. The 5'-flanking region contains a functional promoter, as assessed by appropriate reporter constructs in transient transfection experiments. Comparison of the AO gene structure shows conservation of the position and type of exon/intron junctions relative to those observed in the gene coding for another molybdo-flavoprotein, i.e. xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR). As the two genes code for proteins with a high level of amino acid identity, our results strongly suggest that the AO and XOR genetic loci arose as the consequence of a duplication event. Southern blot analysis conducted on genomic DNA from various animal species with specific cDNA probes indicates that the AO gene is less conserved than the XOR gene during evolution. PMID:9601067

  5. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Bernhard F; Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Prokhorov, Alexandr; Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells. PMID:26384306

  6. Development of a selective and fast LC-MS/MS for determination of WSJ-537, an xanthine oxidase inhibitor, in rat plasma: Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianyang; Yang, Tian; Zhang, Donghu

    2016-08-15

    Gout is a common metabolic disorder caused by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals within joints. A new kind of xanthine oxidase inhibitor, WSJ-537, was developed as a potential drug. In order to investigate the pharmacokinetic behavior in vivo, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for determination the concentration of WSJ-537 in rat plasma was developed. After extraction by protein precipitation method with acetonitrile, the chromatographic separation was accomplished on a Venusil ASB C18 column(2.1mm×50mm, 3mm)at a flow rate of 0.3mLmin(-1) with the mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-ammonium acetate (33:67, v/v). An electrospray ionization (ESI) source was applied and operated in the positive ion mode. The plasma concentration was detected by multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode with the target fragment ions m/z 410.2→m/z 368.1 for WSJ-537 and m/z 244.1→m/z 185.0 for the IS. Good linearity was observed in the range of 20-800ngmL(-1) (r=0.9947). The recovery of WSJ-537 in rats plasma was more than 85%. This method was suitable for pharmacokinetic studies after oral administration of 10mg/kg WSJ-537 in rats. PMID:27322629

  7. Essential oil from leaves of Cinnamomum osmophloeum acts as a xanthine oxidase inhibitor and reduces the serum uric acid levels in oxonate-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, S Y; Yang, C W; Liao, J W; Zhen, W W; Chu, F H; Chang, S T

    2008-11-01

    The xanthine oxidase (XOD) inhibitory activity and anti-hyperuricemia effect in mice of Cinnamomum osmophloeum, which is an endemic tree in Taiwan, were evaluated in this study. The results demonstrated that the essential oil of C. osmophloeum leaves presented the strongest XOD inhibition activity (IC(50)=16.3 μg/ml); however, no significant XOD inhibition activities were found in ethanolic and hot water extracts. Furthermore, among the main compounds of essential oil, the cinnamaldehyde exhibited the potent XOD inhibition activity with an IC(50)=8.4 μg/ml. Besides, the reducing serum uric acid levels in oxonate-induced mice by cinnamaldehyde were further investigated. The hyperuricemic mice were oral administrated cinnamaldehyde at a dosage of 150 mg/kg, the uric acid value in serum was reduced from 5.25±0.63 to 2.10±0.04 mg/dl, the levels of serum uric acid in mice was lowered down by 84.48% as compared to the hyperuricemic control group. Based on the results obtained in this study, cinnamaldehyde may be a potential lead compound for developing the pharmaceutic for anti-hyperuricemia agent. PMID:18693097

  8. As compared to allopurinol, urate-lowering therapy with febuxostat has superior effects on oxidative stress and pulse wave velocity in patients with severe chronic tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Tausche, A-K; Christoph, M; Forkmann, M; Richter, U; Kopprasch, S; Bielitz, C; Aringer, M; Wunderlich, C

    2014-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated whether an effective 12-month uric acid-lowering therapy (ULT) with the available xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors allopurinol and febuxostat in patients with chronic tophaceous gout has an impact on oxidative stress and/or vascular function. Patients with chronic tophaceous gout who did not receive active ULT were included. After clinical evaluation, serum uric acid levels (SUA) and markers of oxidative stress were measured, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) was assessed. Patients were then treated with allopurinol (n = 9) or with febuxostat (n = 8) to target a SUA level ≤ 360 μmol/L. After 1 year treatment, the SUA levels, markers of oxidative stress and the cfPWV were measured again. Baseline characteristics of both groups showed no significant differences except a higher prevalence of moderate impairment of renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min) in the febuxostat group. Uric acid lowering with either inhibitors of XO resulted in almost equally effective reduction in SUA levels. The both treatment groups did not differ in their baseline cfPWV (allopurinol group: 14.1 ± 3.4 m/s, febuxostat group: 13.7 ± 2.7 m/s, p = 0.80). However, after 1 year of therapy, we observed a significant cfPWV increase in the allopurinol group (16.8 ± 4.3 m/s, p = 0.001 as compared to baseline), but not in the febuxostat patients (13.3 ± 2.3 m/s, p = 0.55). Both febuxostat and allopurinol effectively lower SUA levels in patients with severe gout. However, we observed that febuxostat also appeared to be beneficial in preventing further arterial stiffening. Since cardiovascular events are an important issue in treating patients with gout, this unexpected finding may have important implications and should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials. PMID:24026528

  9. Successful treatment of refractory gout using combined therapy consisting of febuxostat and allopurinol in a patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Michitaka; Tomida, Hidetaka; Aoki, Takafumi; Hishida, Manabu; Morinaga, Takatoshi; Tamai, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Gouty arthritis is a metabolic disorder associated with hyperuricemia. Despite the development of novel pharmacotherapies, some hyperuricemia patients are drug refractory and develop gout. A 74-year-old man with frequent gouty attacks and chronic renal failure presented with asymmetrical polyarthritis affecting multiple joints. The diagnosis of gout was confirmed based on the presence of monosodium urate crystals in the patient's right wrist. The administration of systemic corticosteroids relieved the joint inflammation and pain; however, the urate level increased to 28 mg/dL and the gout attacks recurred. Combined allopurinol, febuxostat, and benzbromarone therapy reduced the urate level to <6 mg/dL, and the attacks gradually declined. This is the first report of two xanthine oxidase inhibitors being used to treat refractory gout. PMID:24633032

  10. Development and validation of a stability-indicating RP-HPLC method for the determination of febuxostat (a xanthine oxidase inhibitor).

    PubMed

    Mukthinuthalapati, Mathrusri Annapurna; Bandaru, Sai Pavan Kumar; Bukkapatnam, Venkatesh; Mohapatro, Chitaranjan

    2013-01-01

    Febuxostat is a selective inhibitor of xanthine oxidase that is used for the treatment of hyperuricaemia in patients with gout. An isocratic liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of febuxostat. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a C18 column using sodium acetate buffer (pH 4.0)-acetonitrile (40:60, v/v), with a flow rate 1.2 mL/min (ultraviolet detection at 254 nm). Linearity was observed in the concentration range of 0.1-200 µg/mL (R(2) = 0.9999) with a linear regression equation of y = 21148x - 2025.1. The limit of quantification was found to be 0.0783 µg/mL and the limit of detection was found to be 0.0257 µg/mL. Febuxostat was subjected to stress conditions of degradation in aqueous solutions, including acidic, alkaline, oxidation, photolysis and thermal degradation. The forced degradation studies were performed by using sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide and thermal and ultraviolet radiation. Febuxostat is more sensitive toward acidic conditions than oxidation and very resistant toward alkaline, thermal and photolytic degradations. The method was validated as per the guidelines of the International Conference on Harmonization. The intra-day and inter-day precision (relative standard deviation) was found to be 0.29-0.41 and 0.63-0.76, respectively. The method is simple, specific, precise, robust and accurate for the determination of febuxostat in pharmaceutical dosage forms (tablets). PMID:23204011

  11. QT/QTc study conducted in Japanese adult healthy subjects: a novel xanthine oxidase inhibitor topiroxostat was not associated with QT prolongation.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Hiroya; Nakamura, Yuji; Fujita, Tomoe; Kumagai, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    A QT/QTc study was conducted in compliance with ICH E14 guideline to evaluate the effects of a new xanthine oxidase inhibitor topiroxostat in Japanese healthy subjects. Forty-eight Japanese healthy subjects (males 24; females 24) received a single oral dose of topiroxostat (60 or 180 mg), moxifloxacin (400 mg) or placebo in a single-center, double-blind, four-period crossover design. Fridericia's formula (QTcF = QT/RR(0.33) ) was used as a primary method for QT-interval correction. The mean QTcF was prolonged by moxifloxacin, of which largest time-matched difference from placebo administration was 13.6 milliseconds with 90% confidence interval (CI) of 11.2 and 15.9 milliseconds at 4 hours post-dose. The mean QTcF was hardly affected by either dose of topiroxostat, of which largest time-matched difference from placebo administration was 2.9 milliseconds with 90% CI of 0.6 and 5.3 milliseconds at 4 hours post-dose for 60 mg, and 2.3 milliseconds with 90% CI of 0 and 4.7 milliseconds at 1 hour post-dose for 180 mg. The results were essentially the same in the sex subgroup analysis. Moxifloxacin can be used as a positive control for QT/QTc studies in Japanese subjects; and topiroxostat may not cause QT-interval prolongation in males as well as females. PMID:24214189

  12. Active-site-directed reductive alkylation of xanthine oxidase by imidazo[4,5-g]quinazoline-4,9-diones functionalized with a leaving group.

    PubMed

    Lee, C H; Skibo, E B

    1987-11-17

    A new class of purine antimetabolites, directed toward xanthine oxidase, was designed by employing some of the features found in the bioreductive alkylator mitomycin C. The design involved functionalizing the purine-like imidazo[4,5-g]quinazoline ring system as a quinone (4,9-dione) bearing a 2 alpha leaving group. Due to the presence of the electron-deficient quinone ring, the leaving group cannot participate in alkylation reactions. Reduction to the hydroquinone (4,9-dihydroxy) derivative, however, permits elimination of the leaving group to afford an alkylating quinone methide. In spite of the electronic differences, both quinone and hydroquinone derivatives of the imidazo[4,5-g]quinazoline system are able to enter the purine-utilizing active site of the enzyme. Thus, the hypoxanthine-like quinone derivative [2-(bromomethyl)-3-methylimidazo[4,5-g]quinazoline-4,8, 9(3H, 7H)-trione] and its hydroquinone derivative can act as reducing substrates for the enzyme, resulting in conversion to the xanthane-like 6-oxo derivatives. Hydrolysis studies described herein indicate that the hypoxanthine-like hydroquinone derivative eliminates HBr to afford an extended quinone methide species. The observed alkylation of the enzyme by this derivative may thus pertain to quinone methide generation and nucleophile trapping during enzymatic oxidation at the 6-position. Enzymatic studies indicate that the hypoxanthine-like quinone is an oxidizing suicide substrate for the enzyme. Thus, the reduced enzyme transfers electrons to this quinone, and the resulting hydroquinone inactivates the enzyme. As with mitomycin C, reduction and quinone methide formation are necessary for alkylation by the title quinone. This system is therefore an example of a purine active-site-directed reductive alkylator.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3427077

  13. Age- and sex-related effects in German cockroaches fed an allopurinol diet (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Suiter, D R; Koehler, P G; Patterson, R S

    1993-09-01

    The effects of feeding several ages of adult and nymphal German cockroaches a laboratory rat chow diet containing 0.10% allopurinol were investigated. All cockroaches fed the allopurinol diet suffered increased mortality. The range of LT50 values (the time required to kill 50% of an experimental cohort) for four ages of nymphs (1-8, 16-23, 21-28, and 28-35 d old following hatch) continuously fed the allopurinol diet was 1.36 wk (4.72-6.08 wk). Regardless of sex, young adult (1-7 d old following eclosion) cockroaches fed the allopurinol diet died significantly sooner than older adults (28-35 d old following eclosion); males died significantly sooner than females. All females fed the allopurinol diet as nymphs aborted their oothecae. Although an initial ootheca were hatched from cockroaches fed the allopurinol diet as adults, all subsequent oothecae were aborted. Untreated females mated with allopurinol-fed males experienced successful reproduction, but allopurinol-fed females mated with either allopurinol- or control diet-fed males failed to reproduce. Evidence suggests that cockroaches suffer increased mortality and reproductive failure from increased levels of hypoxanthine and xanthine. PMID:8254639

  14. Bioactive compounds from Carissa opaca roots and xanthine oxidase and alpha-amylase inhibitory activities of their methanolic extract and its fractions in different solvents

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Ramsha; Ahmed, Dildar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carissa opaca is known for its many ethnomedicinal uses. There was a need to study its bioactivities and identify its phytochemicals. Objective: The objective was to isolate and identify phytochemicals from roots of C. opaca and to evaluate xanthine oxidase (XO) and alpha-amylase inhibitory activities of their methanolic extract and its fractions. Materials and Methods: Methanolic extract of finely divided powder of roots of C. opaca was obtained by cold maceration, followed by its fractionation to obtain hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanolic, and aqueous fractions. Phytochemicals screening was done by standard protocols. XO and alpha-amylase inhibitory activities of the methanolic extract and its fractions were studied. The most active ethyl acetate fraction was subjected to the column and thin layer chromatography to isolate its compounds, which were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography comparison. Results: Methanolic extract displayed significant activity against both the enzymes with IC50 of 156.0 mg/mL and 5.6 mg/mL for XO and alpha-amylase, respectively. Ethyl acetate fraction showed highest activity against both the enzymes with IC50 of 129 mg/mL and 4.9 mg/mL for XO and alpha-amylase, respectively. Chloroform fraction had IC50 of 154.2 mg/mL and 5.5 mg/mL for XO and alpha-amylase, respectively. Aqueous fraction exhibited significant efficacy against alpha-amylase (IC50 5.0 mg/mL). Hexane fraction showed good activity against alpha-amylase in a dose-dependent manner but exhibited opposite trend against XO. The compounds isolated from ethyl acetate fraction included limonene, vanillin, lupeol, rutin, quercetin, b-sitosterol, Vitamin E, 2-hydroxyacetophenone, naphthalenone, 2,3,3-trimethyl-2-(3-methylbuta-1,3-dienyl)-6-methylenecyclohexanone, and 2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, mono(2-ethylhexyl) ester. Conclusions: Moderately polar phytochemicals of C. opaca roots possess exploitable

  15. Anti-oxidant effects of the extracts from the leaves of Chromolaena odorata on human dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes against hydrogen peroxide and hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase induced damage.

    PubMed

    Thang, P T; Patrick, S; Teik, L S; Yung, C S

    2001-06-01

    In cutaneous tissue repair, oxidants and antioxidants play very important roles. In local acute and chronic wounds, oxidants are known to have the ability to cause as cell damage and may function as inhibitory factors to wound healing. The administration of anti-oxidants or free radical scavengers is reportedly helpful, notably in order to limit the delayed sequelae of thermal trauma and to enhance the healing process. Extracts from the leaves of Chromolaena odorata have been shown to be beneficial for treatment of wounds. Studies in vitro of these extracts demonstrated enhanced proliferation of fibroblasts, endothelial cells and keratinocytes, stimulation of keratinocyte migration in an in vitro wound assay, up-regulation of production by keratinocytes of extracellular matrix proteins and basement membrane components, and inhibition of collagen lattice contraction by fibroblasts. In this study, the anti-oxidant effects of both total ethanol and polyphenolic extracts from the plant leaves on hydrogen peroxide and hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase induced damage to human fibroblasts and keratinocytes were investigated. Cell viability was monitored by a colorimetric assay. The results showed that for fibroblasts, toxicity of hydrogen peroxide or hypoxanthine xanthine oxidase on cells was dose-dependent. Total ethanol extract (TEE) at 400 and 800 microg/ml showed maximum and consistent protective cellular effect on oxidant toxicity at low or high doses of oxidants. The 50 microg/ml concentration of TEE also had significant and slightly protective effects on fibroblasts against hydrogen peroxide and hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase induced damage, respectively. For keratinocytes, a dose-dependent relationship of oxidant toxicity was only seen with hydrogen peroxide but the protective action of the extract correlated with oxidant dosage. TEE at 400 and 800 microg/ml showed dose-dependent effects with both low and high concentration of oxidants. TEE at 50 microg/ml had no

  16. ASIC-like Currents in Freshly Isolated Cerebral Artery Smooth Muscle Cells are Inhibited by Endogenous Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wen-Shuo; Farley, Jerry M.; Drummond, Heather A.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to determine if VSMC ASIC-like currents are regulated by oxidative state. Methods: We used whole-cell patch clamp of isolated mouse cerebral VSMCs to determine if 1) reducing agents, such as DTT and GSH, and 2) inhibition of endogenous oxidase activity from NADPH and Xanthine oxidases potentiate active currents and activate electrically silent currents. Results: Pretreatment with 2 mM DTT or GSH, increased the mean peak amplitude of ASIC-like currents evoked by pH 6.0 from 0.4 ± 0.1 to 14.9 ± 3.6 pA/pF, and from 0.9 ± 0.3 to 11.3 ± 2.4 pA/pF, respectively. Pretreatment with apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, mimics the effect of the reducing agents, with the mean peak current amplitude increased from 0.9 ± 0.5 to 7.0 ± 2.6 pA/pF and from 0.5 ± 0.2 to 26.4 ± 6.8 pA/pF by 50 and 200 μM apocynin, respectively. Pretreatment with allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, also potentiates the VSMC ASIC-like activity. Conclusion: These findings suggest that VSMC ASIC-like channels are regulated by oxidative state and may be inhibited by basal endogenous oxidative sources such as NADPH and xanthine oxidase. PMID:21325830

  17. On the Permeation by Dioxygen of Urate Oxidase from Aspergillus flavus in Complex with Xanthine Anion: Dioxygen Pathways and a Portrait of the Enzyme Cavities from Molecular Dynamics Simulations in Water Solution.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    This work describes molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in aqueous media for the complex of the homotetrameric urate oxidase (UOX) from Aspergillus flavus with xanthine anion (5) in the presence of dioxygen (O2 ). After 196.6 ns of trajectory from unrestrained MD, a O2 molecule was observed leaving the bulk solvent to penetrate the enzyme between two subunits, A/C. From here, the same O2 molecule was observed migrating, across subunit C, to the hydrophobic cavity that shares residue V227 with the active site. The latter was finally attained, after 378.3 ns of trajectory, with O2 at a bonding distance from 5. The reverse same O2 pathway, from 5 to the bulk solvent, was observed as preferred pathway under random acceleration MD (RAMD), where an external, randomly oriented force was acting on O2 . Both MD and RAMD simulations revealed several cavities populated by O2 during its migration from the bulk solvent to the active site or backwards. Paying attention to the last hydrophobic cavity that apparently serves as O2 reservoir for the active site, it was noticed that its volume undergoes ample fluctuations during the MD simulation, as expected from the thermal motion of a flexible protein, independently from the particular subunit and no matter whether the cavity is filled or not by O2 . PMID:27151738

  18. Cisplatin-induced renal toxicity via tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, tumor suppressor P53, DNA damage, xanthine oxidase, histological changes, oxidative stress and nitric oxide in rats: protective effect of ginseng.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Mokhtar I; Hussien, Hend M

    2015-04-01

    Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent successfully used in the treatment of a wide range of solid tumors, while its usage is limited due to its nephrotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to examine the effectiveness of ginseng to ameliorate the renal nephrotoxicity, damage in kidney genomic DNA, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, tumor suppressor P53, histological changes and oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in rats. Cisplatin caused renal damage, including DNA fragmentation, upregulates gene expression of tumor suppressor protein p53 and tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6. Cisplatin increased the levels of kidney TBARS, xanthine oxidase, nitric oxide, serum urea and creatinine. Cisplatin decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (GST, GPX, CAT and SOD), ATPase and the levels of GSH. A microscopic examination showed that cisplatin caused kidney damage including vacuolization, severe necrosis and degenerative changes. Ginseng co-treatment with cisplatin reduced its renal damage, oxidative stress, DNA fragmentation and induced DNA repair processes. Also, ginseng diminished p53 activation and improved renal cell apoptosis and nephrotoxicity. It can be concluded that, the protective effects of ginseng against cisplatin induced-renal damage was associated with the attenuation of oxidative stress and the preservation of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25640527

  19. Further studies on allopurinol-induced hyperuricaemia and visceral gout in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Lumeij, J T; Sprang, E P; Redig, P T

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of allopurinol for the treatment of hyperuricemia in birds, experimental studies were performed using the physiologically occurring post-prandial hyperuricaemia in birds of prey as a model. Pre-and post-prandial plasma concentrations of allopurinol, oxypurinol, xanthine, hypoxan-thine and uric acid were established by high performance liquid chromatography in red-tailed hawks (RTH, Buteo jamaicensis) at various time intervals after receiving allopurinol (50 mg/kg SID) or placebo. The dosage used caused slight, but significantly elevated plasma uric acid concentrations compared to controls, as well as vomiting in the majority of treated birds. Markedly elevated plasma concentrations of oxypurinol, xanthine and hypoxanthine were seen in experimental birds. Toxic signs were attributed to oxypurinol, the active (and toxic) metabolite of allopurinol. Xanthinuria was considered to be the cause of the observed renal function disorder. Extrapolation of data from studies in humans and combining these with those of the present study suggest that the maximum dose of allopurinol that can be safely administered to RTH is about half the dose given in the present study, but this needs verification. PMID:18484017

  20. Allopurinol-mediated lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitor tolerance by Clostridium beijerinckii during acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ujor, Victor; Agu, Chidozie Victor; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2015-04-01

    In addition to glucans, xylans, and arabinans, lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates contain significant levels of nonsugar components that are toxic to the microbes that are typically used to convert biomass to biofuels and chemicals. To enhance the tolerance of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE)-generating Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to these lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitory compounds (LDMICs; e.g., furfural), we have been examining different metabolic perturbation strategies to increase the cellular reductant pools and thereby facilitate detoxification of LDMICs. As part of these efforts, we evaluated the effect of allopurinol, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H-generating xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH), on C. beijerinckii grown in furfural-supplemented medium and found that it unexpectedly increased the rate of detoxification of furfural by 1.4-fold and promoted growth, butanol, and ABE production by 1.2-, 2.5-, and 2-fold, respectively. Since NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) levels in C. beijerinckii were largely unchanged upon allopurinol treatment, we postulated and validated a possible basis in DNA repair to account for the solventogenic gains with allopurinol. Following the observation that supplementation of allopurinol in the C. beijerinckii growth media mitigates the toxic effects of nalidixic acid, a DNA-damaging antibiotic, we found that allopurinol elicited 2.4- and 6.7-fold increase in the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of xanthine and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases, key purine-salvage enzymes. Consistent with this finding, addition of inosine (a precursor of hypoxanthine) and xanthine led to 1.4- and 1.7-fold increase in butanol production in furfural-challenged cultures of C. beijerinckii. Taken together, our results provide a purine salvage-based rationale for the unanticipated effect of allopurinol in improving furfural tolerance of the ABE-fermenting C. beijerinckii. PMID:25690312

  1. Allopurinol therapy and cataractogenesis in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lerman, S.; Megaw, J.M.; Gardner, K.

    1982-08-01

    Long-term ingestion of allopurinol, an antihyperuricemic agent used to treat gout, may be related to the development of lens opacities in relatively young patients (second to fifth decades of life). Cataracts obtained from three patients taking allopurinol were subjected to high-resolution phosphorescence spectroscopy. The characteristic allopurinol triplet was demonstrated in all three cataracts. Identical spectra were obtained for normal human lenses incubated in media containing 10(-3)M allopurinol and exposed to 1.2 mW/cm2 ultraviolet radiation for 16 hours; control lenses (irradiated without allopurinol) showed no allopurinol triplets. Similar data were obtained for lenses from rats given one dose of allopurinol and exposed to ultraviolet radiation overnight. These data provide evidence that allopurinol can be photobound in rat and human lenses and suggest its cataractogenic potential.

  2. The structure of the inhibitory complex of alloxanthine (1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-4,6-diol) with the molybdenum centre of xanthine oxidase from electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, T R; George, G N; Bray, R C

    1984-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the inhibitory complex of alloxanthine (1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-4,5-diol) with xanthine oxidase, in extension of the work of Williams & Bray [Biochem. J. (1981) 195, 753-760]. By suitable regulation of the reaction conditions, up to 10% of the functional enzyme could be converted into the complex in the Mo(V) oxidation state. The e.p.r. spectrum of the complex was investigated in detail with the help of computer simulation and substitution with stable isotopes. Close structural analogy of the signal-giving species to that of the Very Rapid intermediate in enzyme turnover is shown by g-values (2.0279, 1.9593 and 1.9442) and by coupling to 33S in the cyanide-labile site of the enzyme [A(33S) 0.30, 3.10 and 0.70mT]. However, whereas in the Very Rapid signal there is strong coupling to 17O [Gutteridge & Bray, Biochem. J. (1980) 189, 615-623], instead, in the Alloxanthine signal there is strong coupling to a single nitrogen atom [A(14N) 0.35, 0.35, 0.32 mT]. This is presumed to originate from the 2-position of the heterocyclic ring system. From this work and from earlier kinetic studies it is concluded that alloxanthine, after being bound reversibly at the active centre, reacts slowly with it, in a specific manner, distinct from that in the normal catalytic reaction with substrates. This reaction involves elimination of an oxygen ligand of molybdenum and co-ordination, in this site, of alloxanthine via the N-2 nitrogen atom, to give a complex that is structurally but not chemically closely analogous to that of the Very Rapid species. PMID:6326752

  3. Transient hypofibrinogenemia due to allopurinol

    PubMed Central

    Yin, ZhiQiang; Xu, JiaLi; Li, YongQiang; Xia, JiPing; Luo, Dan

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a case of an 80-year-old male who suffered from drug eruption due to oral allopurinol for the treatment of gout. This patient complained of widespread erythema and maculopapule with itch, and small quantities of purplish-red rash with diffused distribution on four limbs were noted. After he was hospitalized, the area with purpuric rash increased in size, and hypofibrinogenemia was found. After treatment with intravenous infusion of fibrinogen and cryoprecipitate, and continued treatment with high-dose methylprednisolone, the skin rash gradually went away. This is the first report of purpura and hypofibrinogenemia induced by allopurinol and the pathophysiology underlying this reaction remained unknown. PMID:25214766

  4. Xanthine Oxidoreductase Function Contributes to Normal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Michael C; McEnaney, Ryan M; Shukla, Ankur J; Hong, Guiying; Kelley, Eric E; Tarpey, Margaret M; Gladwin, Mark; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Tzeng, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, nonhealing wounds result in patient morbidity and disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are both required for normal wound repair, and derangements of these result in impaired healing. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has the unique capacity to produce both ROS and NO. We hypothesize that XOR contributes to normal wound healing. Cutaneous wounds were created in C57Bl6 mice. XOR was inhibited with dietary tungsten or allopurinol. Topical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 0.15%) or allopurinol (30 μg) was applied to wounds every other day. Wounds were monitored until closure or collected at d 5 to assess XOR expression and activity, cell proliferation and histology. The effects of XOR, nitrite, H2O2 and allopurinol on keratinocyte cell (KC) and endothelial cell (EC) behavior were assessed. We identified XOR expression and activity in the skin and wound edges as well as granulation tissue. Cultured human KCs also expressed XOR. Tungsten significantly inhibited XOR activity and impaired healing with reduced ROS production with reduced angiogenesis and KC proliferation. The expression and activity of other tungsten-sensitive enzymes were minimal in the wound tissues. Oral allopurinol did not reduce XOR activity or alter wound healing but topical allopurinol significantly reduced XOR activity and delayed healing. Topical H2O2 restored wound healing in tungsten-fed mice. In vitro, nitrite and H2O2 both stimulated KC and EC proliferation and EC migration. These studies demonstrate for the first time that XOR is abundant in wounds and participates in normal wound healing through effects on ROS production. PMID:25879627

  5. Cataracts associated with allopurinol therapy.

    PubMed

    Fraunfelder, F T; Hanna, C; Dreis, M W; Cosgrove, K W

    1982-08-01

    The National Registry of Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects has accumulated 30 cases of suspected allopurinol-induced lens changes. The cataracts associated with this antihyperuricemic agent are initially anterior and posterior lens capsule changes with anterior subcapsular vacuoles. With time, wedge-shaped anterior and posterior cortical haze occurs, along with dense posterior subcapsular cataracts. Histologic studies of these cataracts showed no unique or identifying features. These cases do not prove a cause-and-effect relationship, but raise the suspicion that allopurinol may be cataractogenic in some patients. Additional case reports and lens material should be sent to the National Registry of Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects, Oregon Health Sciences University, 3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Rd., Portland, OR 97201. PMID:7114136

  6. Allopurinol-induced Sweet's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Polimeni, G; Cardillo, R; Garaffo, E; Giardina, C; Macrì, R; Sirna, V; Guarneri, C; Arcoraci, V

    2016-06-01

    Sweet's syndrome, or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is an uncommon severe cutaneous condition, not previously associated with allopurinol therapy. We describe the case of an 87-year-old woman with hyperuricemia who developed classic Sweet's syndrome manifestations 8 days after being treated with allopurinol. Patient's symptoms included fever, painful edema in the hands and lower limbs with non-pruritic erythematous plaques topped by pus-filled skin blisters, right eye conjunctivitis, splenomegaly and joint pain. At the emergency department, blood tests showed neutrophilic leukocytosis, inflammatory state and altered liver function. During hospitalization, she received unsuccessful treatments with two different antibiotics (namely ceftriaxone and levofloxacin), while treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone produced a rapid clinical remission of symptoms, cutaneous lesion pain improvement, normalization of her body temperature and her blood values returned to normal. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship between the patient's development of Sweet's syndrome and allopurinol therapy. Because the signs and symptoms of Sweet's syndrome resemble an infectious process, the correct diagnosis may be delayed and inappropriate treatment regimen with antibiotics may often precede glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:26684631

  7. Current management of gout in patients unresponsive or allergic to allopurinol.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    The manifestations of gout can be abolished permanently by lifelong urate-lowering therapy maintaining serum urate levels under 360 mmol/l, as this ensures dissolution of pathogenic crystals of monosodium urate monohydrate. Benzbromarone has been withdrawn from the market, leaving allopurinol as the only urate-lowering drug readily available in France. Allopurinol may induce unacceptable side effects, and in patients with dose-limiting renal failure it may not be sufficiently effective. Because allopurinol can induce serious side effects when given concomitantly with purine antimetabolites, it is contraindicated in organ transplant recipients. In patients who cannot tolerate allopurinol, dietary treatment, discontinuation of diuretic agents, and use of losartan or fenofibrate to treat concomitant hypertension or dyslipidemia, respectively, may ensure adequate control of serum urate levels. Desensitization to allopurinol can be attempted in patients with mild cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions but is difficult to perform and rarely used. Uricosuric agents may be helpful in patients with normal or diminished urate excretion. Probenecid is available in France from hospital pharmacies, and benzbromarone can be prescribed via a time-limited authorization procedure. Rasburicase, an Aspergillus urate oxidase produced by genetic engineering, is indicated to prevent acute hyperuricemia induced by chemotherapy for hematological malignancies. Factors that limit the use of rasburicase include the absence of a marketing authorization, the need for parenteral administration, and the absence of validated treatment schedules. Patients with renal failure precluding the use of effective allopurinol dosages are good candidates for benzbromarone therapy. Organ transplant recipients can be given benzbromarone, within the current restrictions to its use; alternatively, mycophenolate mofetil can be substituted for calcineurin inhibitors, which elevate serum urate levels, or for

  8. Role of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase in Interactions between 2′,3′-Dideoxyinosine and Allopurinol, Ganciclovir, or Tenofovir

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Adrian S.; Olson, Loren; Fridland, Arnold

    2004-01-01

    The level of systemic exposure to 2′,3′-dideoxyinosine (ddI) is increased 40 to 300% when it is coadministered with allopurinol (Allo), ganciclovir (GCV), or tenofovir. However, the mechanism for these drug interactions remains undefined. A metabolic route for ddI clearance is its breakdown by purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). Consistent with previous reports, enzymatic inhibition assays showed that acyclic nucleotide analogs can inhibit the phosphorolysis of inosine. It was further established that the mono- and diphosphate forms of tenofovir were inhibitors of PNP-dependent degradation of ddI (Kis, 38 nM and 1.3 μM, respectively). Allo and its metabolites were found to be relatively weak inhibitors of PNP (Kis, >100 μM). Coadministration of tenofovir, GCV, or Allo decreased the amounts of intracellular ddI breakdown products in CEM cells, while they increased the ddI concentrations (twofold increase with each drug at approximately 20 μM). While inhibition of the physiological function of PNP is unlikely due to the ubiquitous presence of high levels of enzymatic activity, phosphorylated metabolites of GCV and tenofovir may cause the increased level of exposure to ddI by direct inhibition of its phosphorolysis by PNP. The discrepancy between the cellular activity of Allo and the weak enzyme inhibition by Allo and its metabolites may be explained by an indirect mechanism of PNP inhibition. This mechanism may be facilitated by the unfavorable equilibrium of PNP and the buildup of one of its products (hypoxanthine) through the inhibition of xanthine oxidase by Allo. These findings support the inhibition of PNP-dependent ddI degradation as the molecular mechanism of these drug interactions. PMID:15047506

  9. Evaluation of neuronal protective effects of xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitors on severe whole-brain ischemia in mouse model and analysis of xanthine oxidoreductase activity in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Go; Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Matsuda, Yoko; Fuse, Akira; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) often result in high mortality. Free radicals play an important role in global cerebral I/R. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitors, such as allopurinol, have been reported to protect tissues from damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inhibiting its production through XOR inhibition. The recently introduced XOR inhibitor febuxostat, which is a more potent inhibitor than allopurinol, is expected to decrease free radical production more effectively. Here, we analyzed the effects of allopurinol and febuxostat in decreasing global severe cerebral I/R damage in mice. Mice were divided into three groups: a placebo group, an allopurinol group, and a febuxostat group. Pathological examinations, which were performed in each group in the CA1 and CA2 regions of the hippocampus 4 days after I/R surgery, revealed that there was a decrease in the number of neuronal cells in the 14-min occlusion model in both regions and that drugs that were administered to prevent this damage were not effective. The enzymatic activity was extremely low in the mouse brain, and XOR could not be detected in the nonischemic and ischemic mice brains with western blot analyses. Thus, one of the reasons for the decreased effectiveness of XOR inhibitors in controlling severe whole-brain ischemia in a mouse model was the low levels of expression of XOR in the mouse brain. PMID:25744353

  10. Pathways of nitrogen assimilation in cowpea nodules studied using /sup 15/N/sub 2/ and allopurinol. [Vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, C.A.; Storer, P.J.; Pate, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the presence of 0.5 millimolar allopurinol (4-hydroxypyrazolo (3,4-d)pyrimidine), an inhibitor of NAD:xanthine oxidoreductase (EC 1.2.3.2), intact attached nodules of cowpea (vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita 3) formed (/sup 15/N)xanthine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ at rates equivalent to those of ureide synthesis, confirming the direct assimilation of fixed nitrogen into purines. Xanthine accumulated in nodules and was exported in increasing amounts in xylem of allopurinol-treated plants. Other intermediates of purine oxidation, de novo purine synthesis, and ammonia assimilation did not increase and, over the time course of experiments (4 hours), allopurinol had no effect on nitrogenase (EC 1.87.99.2) activity. Negligible /sup 15/N -labeling of asparagine from /sup 15/N/sub 2/ was observed, suggesting that the significant pool (up to 14 micromoles per gram of nodule fresh weight) of this amide in cowpea nodules was not formed directly from fixation but may have accumulated as a consequence of phloem delivery.

  11. Chromate reduction by rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, R.B.; Cooke, R.T. Jr.

    1986-05-29

    Chromate was reduced during the oxidation of 1-methylnicotinamide chlorine by partially purified rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase. In addition to l-methylnicotinamide, several other electron donor substrates for aldehyde oxidase were able to support the enzymatic chromate reduction. The reduction required the presence of both enzyme and the electron donor substrate. The rate of the chromate reduction was retarded by inhibitors or aldehyde oxidase but was not affected by substrates or inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. These results are consistent with the involvement of aldehyde oxidase in the reduction of chromate by rabbit liver cytosolic enzyme preparations.

  12. Pulmonary vasodilator responses to sodium nitrite are mediated by an allopurinol-sensitive mechanism in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Casey, David B.; Badejo, Adeleke M.; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S.; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Hyman, Albert L.; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies show that pulmonary vasodilator responses to nitrite are enhanced by hypoxia. However, the mechanism by which nitrite is converted to vasoactive nitric oxide (NO) is uncertain. In the present study, intravenous injections of sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure were enhanced when tone in the pulmonary vascular bed was increased with U-46619. Under elevated tone conditions, decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in response to nitrite were attenuated by allopurinol in a dose that did not alter responses to the NO donors, sodium nitroprusside and diethylamine/NO, suggesting that xanthine oxidoreductase is the major enzyme-reducing nitrite to NO. Ventilation with a 10% O2 gas mixture increased pulmonary arterial pressure, and the response to hypoxia was enhanced by NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and not altered by allopurinol. This suggests that NO formed by the endothelium and not from the reduction of plasma nitrite modulates the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor response. Although intravenous injections of sodium nitrite reversed pulmonary hypertensive responses to U-46619, hypoxia, and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, the pulmonary vasodilator response to nitrite was not altered by ventilation with 10% O2 when baseline pulmonary arterial pressure was increased to similar values in animals breathing room air or the hypoxic gas. These data provide evidence that xanthine oxidoreductase is the major enzyme-reducing nitrite to vasoactive NO, and that this mechanism is not modified by hypoxia. PMID:19074675

  13. Hyperuricemia-Related Diseases and Xanthine Oxidoreductase (XOR) Inhibitors: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changyi; Lü, Jian-Ming; Yao, Qizhi

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid is the final oxidation product of purine metabolism in humans. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes oxidative hydroxylation of hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid, accompanying the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uric acid usually forms ions and salts known as urates and acid urates in serum. Clinically, overproduction or under-excretion of uric acid results in the elevated level of serum uric acid (SUA), termed hyperuricemia, which has long been established as the major etiologic factor in gout. Accordingly, urate-lowering drugs such as allopurinol, an XOR-inhibitor, are extensively used for the treatment of gout. In recent years, the prevalence of hyperuricemia has significantly increased and more clinical investigations have confirmed that hyperuricemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and many other diseases. Urate-lowering therapy may also play a critical role in the management of these diseases. However, current XOR-inhibitor drugs such as allopurinol and febuxostat may have significant adverse effects. Therefore, there has been great effort to develop new XOR-inhibitor drugs with less or no toxicity for the long-term treatment or prevention of these hyperuricemia-related diseases. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of uric acid homeostasis and alterations, updated prevalence, therapeutic outcomes, and molecular pathophysiology of hyperuricemia-related diseases. We also summarize current discoveries in the development of new XOR inhibitors. PMID:27423335

  14. Hyperuricemia-Related Diseases and Xanthine Oxidoreductase (XOR) Inhibitors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changyi; Lü, Jian-Ming; Yao, Qizhi

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid is the final oxidation product of purine metabolism in humans. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes oxidative hydroxylation of hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid, accompanying the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uric acid usually forms ions and salts known as urates and acid urates in serum. Clinically, overproduction or under-excretion of uric acid results in the elevated level of serum uric acid (SUA), termed hyperuricemia, which has long been established as the major etiologic factor in gout. Accordingly, urate-lowering drugs such as allopurinol, an XOR-inhibitor, are extensively used for the treatment of gout. In recent years, the prevalence of hyperuricemia has significantly increased and more clinical investigations have confirmed that hyperuricemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and many other diseases. Urate-lowering therapy may also play a critical role in the management of these diseases. However, current XOR-inhibitor drugs such as allopurinol and febuxostat may have significant adverse effects. Therefore, there has been great effort to develop new XOR-inhibitor drugs with less or no toxicity for the long-term treatment or prevention of these hyperuricemia-related diseases. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of uric acid homeostasis and alterations, updated prevalence, therapeutic outcomes, and molecular pathophysiology of hyperuricemia-related diseases. We also summarize current discoveries in the development of new XOR inhibitors. PMID:27423335

  15. A nanocomposite/crude extract enzyme-based xanthine biosensor.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Susan; Fooladi, Ebrahim; Malekaneh, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    A novel amperometric biosensor for xanthine was developed based on covalent immobilization of crude xanthine oxidase (XOD) extracted from bovine milk onto a hybrid nanocomposite film via glutaraldehyde. Toward the preparation of the film, a stable colloids solution of core-shell Fe3O4/polyaniline nanoparticles (PANI/Fe3O4 NPs) was dispersed in solution containing chitosan (CHT) and H2PtCl6 and electrodeposited over the surface of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) in one step. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometry, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used for characterization of the electrode surface. The developed biosensor (XOD/CHT/Pt NPs/PANI/Fe3O4/CPE) was employed for determination of xanthine based on amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reduction at -0.35V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The biosensor exhibited a fast response time to xanthine within 8s and a linear working concentration range from 0.2 to 36.0μM (R(2)=0.997) with a detection limit of 0.1μM (signal/noise [S/N]=3). The sensitivity of the biosensor was 13.58μAμM(-1)cm(-2). The apparent Michaelis-Menten (Km) value for xanthine was found to be 4.7μM. The fabricated biosensor was successfully applied for measurement of fish and chicken meat freshness, which was in agreement with the standard method at the 95% confidence level. PMID:25062853

  16. Pancytopenia due to the interaction of allopurinol with azathioprine or mercaptopurine.

    PubMed

    2000-04-01

    (1) Allopurinol increases the haematological toxicity of azathioprine and mercaptopurine, with a risk of pancytopenia. (2) Combination of allopurinol with azathioprine or mercaptopurine should be avoided. PMID:11503788

  17. Effects of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) and its Flavonol Constituents, Kaempferol and Quercetin, on Serum Uric Acid Levels, Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Liver Xanthine Oxidoreductase Aactivity inOxonate-Induced Hyperuricemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Haidari, Fatemeh; Keshavarz, Seid Ali; Mohammad Shahi, Majid; Mahboob, Soltan-Ali; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2011-01-01

    Increased serum uric acid is known to be a major risk related to the development of several oxidative stress diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of parsley, quercetin and kaempferol on serum uric acid levels, liver xanthine oxidoreductase activity and two non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress (total antioxidant capacity and malondialdehyde concentration) in normal and oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rats. A total of 60 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into ten equal groups; including 5 normal groups (vehicle, parsley, quercetin, kaempferol and allopurinol) and 5 hyperuricemic groups (vehicle, parsley, quercetin, kaempferol and allopurinol). Parsley (5 g/Kg), quercetin (5 mg/Kg), kaempferol (5 mg/Kg) and allopurinol (5 mg/Kg) were administrated to the corresponding groups by oral gavage once a day for 2 weeks. The results showed that parsley and its flavonol did not cause any significant reduction in the serum uric acid levels in normal rats, but significantly reduced the serum uric acid levels of hyperuricemic rats in a time-dependent manner. All treatments significantly inhibited liver xanthine oxidoreductase activity. Parsley, kaempferol and quercetin treatment led also to a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity and decrease in malondialdehyde concentration in hyperuricemic rats. Although the hypouricemic effect of allopurinol was much higher than that of parsley and its flavonol constituents, it could not significantly change oxidative stress biomarkers. These features of parsley and its flavonols make them as a possible alternative for allopurinol, or at least in combination therapy to minimize the side effects of allopurinol to treat hyperuricemia and oxidative stress diseases. PMID:24250417

  18. Mechanism of allopurinol induced TPMT inhibition.

    PubMed

    Blaker, P A; Arenas-Hernandez, M; Smith, M A; Shobowale-Bakre, E A; Fairbanks, L; Irving, P M; Sanderson, J D; Marinaki, A M

    2013-08-15

    Up to 1/5 of patients with wildtype thiopurine-S-methyltransferase (TPMT) activity prescribed azathioprine (AZA) or mercaptopurine (MP) demonstrate a skewed drug metabolism in which MP is preferentially methylated to yield methylmercaptopurine (MeMP). This is known as thiopurine hypermethylation and is associated with drug toxicity and treatment non-response. Co-prescription of allopurinol with low dose AZA/MP (25-33%) circumvents this phenotype and leads to a dramatic reduction in methylated metabolites; however, the biochemical mechanism remains unclear. Using intact and lysate red cell models we propose a novel pathway of allopurinol mediated TPMT inhibition, through the production of thioxanthine (TX, 2-hydroxymercaptopurine). In red blood cells pre-incubated with 250 μM MP for 2h prior to the addition of 250 μM TX or an equivalent volume of Earle's balanced salt solution, there was a significant reduction in the concentration of MeMP detected at 4h and 6h in cells exposed to TX (4 h, 1.68, p=0.0005, t-test). TX acts as a direct TPMT inhibitor with an apparent Ki of 0.329 mM. In addition we have confirmed that the mechanism is relevant to in vivo metabolism by demonstrating raised urinary TX levels in patients receiving combination therapy. We conclude that the formation of TX in patients receiving combination therapy with AZA/MP and allopurinol, likely explains the significant reduction of methylated metabolites due to direct TPMT inhibition. PMID:23770457

  19. Xanthine oxidoreductase activity assay in tissues using stable isotope-labeled substrate and liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Murase, Takayo; Nampei, Mai; Oka, Mitsuru; Ashizawa, Naoki; Matsumoto, Koji; Miyachi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Studies of pathological mechanisms and XOR inhibitor characterization, such as allopurinol, febuxostat, and topiroxostat, require accurate and sensitive measurements of XOR activity. However, the established assays have some disadvantages such as susceptibility to endogenous substances such as uric acid (UA), xanthine, or hypoxanthine. Here, we aimed to develop a novel XOR activity assay utilizing a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography (LC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) for tissues such as the liver, kidney, and plasma. Stable isotope-labeled [(15)N2]-xanthine was utilized as substrate and the production of [(15)N2]-uric acid was determined. [(15)N2]-UA production by XOR was dependent on the amounts of [(15)N2]-xanthine and enzyme and the time of reaction. Because high concentrations of endogenous xanthine and hypoxanthine affect XOR activities, we employed a multi-component analysis using LC/HRMS to improve the accuracy of XOR activity assay. Quantification of [(15)N2]-UA was validated and showed good linearity, accuracy, and precision. We measured the XOR activities of retired ICR mice using [(15)N2]-xanthine and LC/MS. The XOR activities in plasma, kidney, and liver samples were 38.1±0.7, 158±5, 928±25pmol/min/mg of protein, respectively (mean±SD, n=5). Furthermore, we measured the XOR activities in the same samples using the LC/ultraviolet and LC/fluorescence (FL) methods. The level of [(15)N2]-xanthine oxidation by XOR was equal to that of xanthine oxidation and approximately 7.9-8.9 times higher than that of pterin oxidation. We found a good correlation between XOR activities examined using LC/MS assay with [(15)N2]-xanthine and those examined using LC/FL assay with pterin. This result suggested that although both the LC/MS assay with [(15)N2]-xanthine and the LC/FL assay with pterin were useful, the former provided information regarding XOR activities that more directly reflected the physiological condition than the latter

  20. Mutations Associated with Functional Disorder of Xanthine Oxidoreductase and Hereditary Xanthinuria in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Amaya, Yoshihiro; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the conversion of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid with concomitant reduction of either NAD+ or O2. The enzyme is a target of drugs to treat hyperuricemia, gout and reactive oxygen-related diseases. Human diseases associated with genetically determined dysfunction of XOR are termed xanthinuria, because of the excretion of xanthine in urine. Xanthinuria is classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Type I xanthinuria involves XOR deficiency due to genetic defect of XOR, whereas type II xanthinuria involves dual deficiency of XOR and aldehyde oxidase (AO, a molybdoflavo enzyme similar to XOR) due to genetic defect in the molybdenum cofactor sulfurase. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency is associated with triple deficiency of XOR, AO and sulfite oxidase, due to defective synthesis of molybdopterin, which is a precursor of molybdenum cofactor for all three enzymes. The present review focuses on mutation or chemical modification studies of mammalian XOR, as well as on XOR mutations identified in humans, aimed at understanding the reaction mechanism of XOR and the relevance of mutated XORs as models to estimate the possible side effects of clinical application of XOR inhibitors. PMID:23203137

  1. Pulmonary vasodilator responses to sodium nitrite are mediated by an allopurinol-sensitive mechanism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Casey, David B; Badejo, Adeleke M; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Hyman, Albert L; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies show that pulmonary vasodilator responses to nitrite are enhanced by hypoxia. However, the mechanism by which nitrite is converted to vasoactive nitric oxide (NO) is uncertain. In the present study, intravenous injections of sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure were enhanced when tone in the pulmonary vascular bed was increased with U-46619. Under elevated tone conditions, decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in response to nitrite were attenuated by allopurinol in a dose that did not alter responses to the NO donors, sodium nitroprusside and diethylamine/NO, suggesting that xanthine oxidoreductase is the major enzyme-reducing nitrite to NO. Ventilation with a 10% O(2) gas mixture increased pulmonary arterial pressure, and the response to hypoxia was enhanced by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and not altered by allopurinol. This suggests that NO formed by the endothelium and not from the reduction of plasma nitrite modulates the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor response. Although intravenous injections of sodium nitrite reversed pulmonary hypertensive responses to U-46619, hypoxia, and N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, the pulmonary vasodilator response to nitrite was not altered by ventilation with 10% O(2) when baseline pulmonary arterial pressure was increased to similar values in animals breathing room air or the hypoxic gas. These data provide evidence that xanthine oxidoreductase is the major enzyme-reducing nitrite to vasoactive NO, and that this mechanism is not modified by hypoxia. PMID:19074675

  2. Mechanical stress activates xanthine oxidoreductase through MAP kinase-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E; Peng, Xinqi; Finigan, Jay H; Han, Eugenia J; Hasan, Emile J; Birukov, Konstantin G; Reddy, Sekhar P; Watkins, James E; Kayyali, Usamah S; Garcia, Joe G N; Tuder, Rubin M; Hassoun, Paul M

    2006-09-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) plays a prominent role in acute lung injury because of its ability to generate reactive oxygen species. We investigated the role of XOR in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Male C57BL/6J mice were assigned to spontaneous ventilation (sham) or mechanical ventilation (MV) with low (7 ml/kg) and high tidal volume (20 ml/kg) for 2 h after which lung XOR activity and expression were measured and the effect of the specific XOR inhibitor allopurinol on pulmonary vascular leakage was examined. In separate experiments, rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (RPMECs) were exposed to cyclic stretch (5% and 18% elongation, 20 cycles/min) for 2 h before intracellular XOR activity measurement. Lung XOR activity was significantly increased at 2 h of MV without changes in XOR expression. There was evidence of p38 MAP kinase, ERK1/2, and ERK5 phosphorylation, but no change in JNK phosphorylation. Evans blue dye extravasation and bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentration were significantly increased in response to MV, changes that were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with allopurinol. Cyclic stretch of RPMECs also caused MAP kinase phosphorylation and a 1.7-fold increase in XOR activity, which was completely abrogated by pretreatment of the cells with specific MAP kinase inhibitors. We conclude that XOR enzymatic activity is significantly increased by mechanical stress via activation of p38 MAP kinase and ERK and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema associated with VILI. PMID:16632522

  3. A high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and allantoin in serum.

    PubMed

    Kock, R; Delvoux, B; Greiling, H

    1993-05-01

    A method was developed for the simultaneous determination of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and allantoin based on isocratic reversed-phase chromatography. This HPLC-method additionally allows the direct determination with UV-detection of inosine-5'-phosphate, uridine, thymine, orotic acid, allopurinol and oxipurinol, besides hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid in the same chromatographic run. Allantoin elutes in this system near the void volume and a fraction is collected covering the retention time range for this substance. After hydrolysis allantoin is converted to glyoxylate-2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone, rechromatographed and detected at 360 nm. The coefficient of variation for this method does not exceed 5.0% for a serum concentration of 0.3 mumol/l hypoxanthine and is not greater than 5.3% for a xanthine concentration of 0.3 mumol/l serum. Recoveries were 90-110% for both hypoxanthine and xanthine. The determination of uric acid had an imprecision and inaccuracy not exceeding 1.45% in the concentration range of 103-568 mumol/l. Due to the more complex procedure required for the determination of allantoin, the coefficient of variation between days was 13.6% for a sample containing 0.8 mumol/l allantoin and the recoveries for this analyte were in the range of 86-93%. Reference ranges (mean +/- SD) determined on 171 serum samples from healthy adults were 12.7 +/- 6.6 mumol/l for hypoxanthine, 3.3 +/- 1.4 mumol/l for xanthine, and 15.7 +/- 7.9 mumol/l for allantoin. No significant age or sex dependence was observed. Uric acid concentrations were 320 +/- 55 mumol/l serum for men and 206 +/- 55 mumol/l for women. PMID:8357939

  4. Protein Conformational Gating of Enzymatic Activity in Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Eger, Bryan T.; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi; Pai, Emil F.

    2012-05-24

    In mammals, xanthine oxidoreductase can exist as xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO). The two enzymes possess common redox active cofactors, which form an electron transfer (ET) pathway terminated by a flavin cofactor. In spite of identical protein primary structures, the redox potential difference between XDH and XO for the flavin semiquinone/hydroquinone pair (E{sub sq/hq}) is {approx}170 mV, a striking difference. The former greatly prefers NAD{sup +} as ultimate substrate for ET from the iron-sulfur cluster FeS-II via flavin while the latter only accepts dioxygen. In XDH (without NAD{sup +}), however, the redox potential of the electron donor FeS-II is 180 mV higher than that for the acceptor flavin, yielding an energetically uphill ET. On the basis of new 1.65, 2.3, 1.9, and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures for XDH, XO, the NAD{sup +}- and NADH-complexed XDH, E{sub sq/hq} were calculated to better understand how the enzyme activates an ET from FeS-II to flavin. The majority of the E{sub sq/hq} difference between XDH and XO originates from a conformational change in the loop at positions 423-433 near the flavin binding site, causing the differences in stability of the semiquinone state. There was no large conformational change observed in response to NAD{sup +} binding at XDH. Instead, the positive charge of the NAD{sup +} ring, deprotonation of Asp429, and capping of the bulk surface of the flavin by the NAD{sup +} molecule all contribute to altering E{sub sq/hq} upon NAD{sup +} binding to XDH.

  5. Reexamining Michaelis-Menten Enzyme Kinetics for Xanthine Oxidase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassingthwaighte, James B.; Chinn, Tamara M.

    2013-01-01

    Abbreviated expressions for enzyme kinetic expressions, such as the Michaelis-Menten (M-M) equations, are based on the premise that enzyme concentrations are low compared with those of the substrate and product. When one does progress experiments, where the solute is consumed during conversion to form a series of products, the idealized conditions…

  6. Allopurinol Resistance in Leishmania infantum from Dogs with Disease Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Yasur-Landau, Daniel; Jaffe, Charles L.; David, Lior; Baneth, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis caused by the protozoan Leishmania infantum is a zoonotic, life threatening parasitic disease. Domestic dogs are the main peridomestic reservoir, and allopurinol is the most frequently used drug for the control of infection, alone or in combination with other drugs. Resistance of Leishmania strains from dogs to allopurinol has not been described before in clinical studies. Methodology/Principal Findings Following our observation of clinical disease relapse in dogs under allopurinol treatment, we tested susceptibility to allopurinol of L. infantum isolated from groups of dogs pre-treatment, treated in remission, and with disease relapse during treatment. Promastigote isolates obtained from four treated relapsed dogs (TR group) showed an average half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 996 μg/mL. A significantly lower IC50 (P = 0.01) was found for isolates from ten dogs before treatment (NT group, 200 μg/mL), as well as for five isolates obtained from treated dogs in remission (TA group, 268 μg/mL). Axenic amastigotes produced from isolates of the TR group also showed significantly higher (P = 0.002) IC50 compared to the NT group (1678 and 671 μg/mL, respectively). The lower sensitivity of intracellular amastigotes from the TR group relative to those from the NT group (P = 0.002) was confirmed using an infected macrophage model (6.3% and 20% growth inhibition, respectively at 300 μg/mL allopurinol). Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate allopurinol resistance in L. infantum and to associate it with disease relapse in the canine host. These findings are of concern as allopurinol is the main drug used for long term control of the disease in dogs, and resistant L. infantum strains may enhance uncontrolled transmission to humans and to other dogs. PMID:26735519

  7. Allopurinol use in a New Zealand population: prevalence and adherence.

    PubMed

    Horsburgh, Simon; Norris, Pauline; Becket, Gordon; Arroll, Bruce; Crampton, Peter; Cumming, Jacqueline; Keown, Shirley; Herbison, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Allopurinol is effective for the control of gout and its long-term complications when taken consistently. There is evidence that adherence to allopurinol therapy varies across population groups. This may exacerbate differences in the burden of gout on population groups and needs to be accurately assessed. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of allopurinol use in a region of New Zealand using community pharmacy dispensing data and to examine the levels of suboptimal adherence in various population groups. Data from all community pharmacy dispensing databases in a New Zealand region were collected for a year covering 2005/2006 giving a near complete picture of dispensings to area residents. Prevalence of allopurinol use in the region by age, sex, ethnicity and socioeconomic position was calculated. Adherence was assessed using the medication possession ratio (MPR), with a MPR of 0.80 indicative of suboptimal adherence. Multiple logistic regression was used to explore variations in suboptimal adherence across population groups. A total of 953 people received allopurinol in the study year (prevalence 3%). Prevalence was higher in males (6%) than in females (1%) and Māori (5%) than non-Māori (3%). The overall MPR during the study was 0.88, with 161 (22%) of patients using allopurinol having suboptimal adherence. Non-Māori were 54% less likely to have suboptimal allopurinol adherence compared to Māori (95% CI 0.30-0.72, p = 0.001). These findings are consistent with those from other studies nationally and internationally and point to the important role for health professionals in improving patient adherence to an effective gout treatment. PMID:24390636

  8. Allopurinol induced granuloma annulare in a patient of lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satyendra Kumar; Manchanda, Kajal; Bhayana, Aakash Amar; Verma, Anurag

    2013-01-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is a benign, inflammatory dermatosis involving dermis or subcutis with unknown etiology and poorly understood pathology. GA has characteristic histological features of necrobiosis, granuloma formation and abundant mucin deposition. Various predisposing factors, systemic diseases and drugs have been implicated in the etiology. We hereby describe a case of 70 year old male who was a known case of lepromatous leprosy, taking multidrug therapy for 6 months presented with multiple discrete, annular, firm, non tender, smooth surfaced skin colored papular lesions ranging in size from 0.5-1 cm over back for 1 month. There was past history of intake of allopurinol for hyperuricemia which was started 1 year back. There was history of similar lesions 6 months back which healed within 1 month of stopping allopurinol and he started taking the drug for the past 4 months on his own without any medical advice. Histopathological examination showed superficial and deep perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate with numerous histiocytes scattered in the intersititum of reticular dermis and abundant mucin in between the histiocytes. Allopurinol was implicated as an etiological agent and dramatic improvement was seen after stopping the drug for a period of 4 weeks. Naranjo's algorithm showed a probable association with a score of 6. Thus the final diagnosis of allopurinol induced generalised interstitial granuolma annulare was made. Patient was advised to continue antileprotic drugs, low purine diet and avoid allopurinol intake. PMID:23761716

  9. Allopurinol induced granuloma annulare in a patient of lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra Kumar; Manchanda, Kajal; Bhayana, Aakash Amar; Verma, Anurag

    2013-04-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is a benign, inflammatory dermatosis involving dermis or subcutis with unknown etiology and poorly understood pathology. GA has characteristic histological features of necrobiosis, granuloma formation and abundant mucin deposition. Various predisposing factors, systemic diseases and drugs have been implicated in the etiology. We hereby describe a case of 70 year old male who was a known case of lepromatous leprosy, taking multidrug therapy for 6 months presented with multiple discrete, annular, firm, non tender, smooth surfaced skin colored papular lesions ranging in size from 0.5-1 cm over back for 1 month. There was past history of intake of allopurinol for hyperuricemia which was started 1 year back. There was history of similar lesions 6 months back which healed within 1 month of stopping allopurinol and he started taking the drug for the past 4 months on his own without any medical advice. Histopathological examination showed superficial and deep perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate with numerous histiocytes scattered in the intersititum of reticular dermis and abundant mucin in between the histiocytes. Allopurinol was implicated as an etiological agent and dramatic improvement was seen after stopping the drug for a period of 4 weeks. Naranjo's algorithm showed a probable association with a score of 6. Thus the final diagnosis of allopurinol induced generalised interstitial granuolma annulare was made. Patient was advised to continue antileprotic drugs, low purine diet and avoid allopurinol intake. PMID:23761716

  10. Allopurinol hypersensitivity: investigating the cause and minimizing the risk.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Lisa K; Day, Richard O; Yun, James

    2016-04-01

    Allopurinol is the most commonly prescribed urate-lowering therapy for the management of gout. Serious adverse reactions associated with allopurinol, while rare, are feared owing to the high mortality. Such reactions can manifest as a rash combined with eosinophilia, leukocytosis, fever, hepatitis and progressive kidney failure. Risk factors for allopurinol-related severe adverse reactions include the recent introduction of allopurinol, the presence of the HLA-B(*)58:01 allele, and factors that influence the drug concentration. The interactions between allopurinol, its metabolite, oxypurinol, and T cells have been studied, and evidence exists that the presence of the HLA-B(*)58:01 allele and a high concentration of oxypurinol function synergistically to increase the number of potentially immunogenic-peptide-oxypurinol-HLA-B(*)58:01 complexes on the cell surface, thereby increasing the risk of T-cell sensitization and a subsequent adverse reaction. This Review will discuss the above issues and place this in the clinical context of reducing the risk of serious adverse reactions. PMID:26416594

  11. Infantile isolated sulphite oxidase deficiency: report of a case with negative sulphite test and normal sulphate excretion.

    PubMed

    van der Klei-van Moorsel, J M; Smit, L M; Brockstedt, M; Jakobs, C; Dorche, C; Duran, M

    1991-01-01

    We present the clinical and biochemical data of a patient with infantile isolated sulphite oxidase deficiency with late onset of symptoms. A comparison of the biochemical parameters is made with the neonatal type of this disease and with the data of described patients with the combined defect of sulphite oxidase and xanthine oxidase, due to molybdenum cofactor deficiency. False-negative sulphite dip stick test as a pitfall in the diagnosis of sulphite oxidase deficiency is discussed. PMID:2044591

  12. Construction of novel xanthine biosensor by using polymeric mediator/MWCNT nanocomposite layer for fish freshness detection.

    PubMed

    Dervisevic, Muamer; Custiuc, Esma; Çevik, Emre; Şenel, Mehmet

    2015-08-15

    A novel nanocomposite host matrix for enzyme immobilization of xanthine oxidase was developed by incorporating MWCNT in poly(GMA-co-VFc) copolymer film. In the food industry fish is a product with a very low commercial life, and a high variability as well elevated level of xanthine is an important biomarker as a sign of spoilage. The fabricated process was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the electrochemical behaviors of the biosensor were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The prepared enzyme electrodes exhibited maximum response at pH 7.0 and 45°C +0.35 V and reached 95% of steady-state current in about ∼ 4 s and its sensitivity was 16 mAM(-1). Linear ranges (2-28 μM, 28-46 and 46-86 μM), analytical performance and a low detection limit 0.12 μM obtained from the xanthine biosensor gives reliable results in measuring xanthine concentration in the fish meat. All the results indicating that the resulting biosensor exhibited a good response to xanthine that was related to the addition of MWCNT in the polymeric mediator film which played an important role in the biosensor performance. In addition, the biosensor exhibited high good storage stability and satisfactory anti-interference ability. PMID:25794751

  13. The Effects of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Inhibitors on Oxidative Stress Markers following Global Brain Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Matsuda, Yoko; Suzuki, Go; Fuse, Akira; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated that 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels in mouse brain were elevated from 1 h until 8 h after global brain ischemia for 14 min induced with the 3-vessel occlusion model; this result indicates that ischemia reperfusion injury generated oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species production was observed not only in the hippocampal region, but also in the cortical region. We further evaluated the neuroprotective effect of xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitors in the mouse 3-vessel occlusion model by analyzing changes in the expression of genes regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (including pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 and intercellular adhesion molecules-1). Administration of allopurinol resulted in a statistically significant decrease in IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA expression, whereas febuxostat had no significant effect on expression of these genes; nevertheless, both inhibitors effectively reduced serum uric acid concentration. It is suggested that the neuroprotective effect of allopurinol is derived not from inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by xanthine oxidoreductase, but rather from a direct free-radical-scavenging effect. PMID:26230326

  14. The Effects of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Inhibitors on Oxidative Stress Markers following Global Brain Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Matsuda, Yoko; Suzuki, Go; Fuse, Akira; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated that 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels in mouse brain were elevated from 1 h until 8 h after global brain ischemia for 14 min induced with the 3-vessel occlusion model; this result indicates that ischemia reperfusion injury generated oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species production was observed not only in the hippocampal region, but also in the cortical region. We further evaluated the neuroprotective effect of xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitors in the mouse 3-vessel occlusion model by analyzing changes in the expression of genes regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (including pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 and intercellular adhesion molecules-1). Administration of allopurinol resulted in a statistically significant decrease in IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA expression, whereas febuxostat had no significant effect on expression of these genes; nevertheless, both inhibitors effectively reduced serum uric acid concentration. It is suggested that the neuroprotective effect of allopurinol is derived not from inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by xanthine oxidoreductase, but rather from a direct free-radical-scavenging effect. PMID:26230326

  15. Expression of Drosophila melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase in Aspergillus nidulans and some properties of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Benjamin; Lowe, David J; Smith, Andrew T; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Demais, Stephane; Bray, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    Recent crystal structures of xanthine dehydrogenase, xanthine oxidase and related enzymes have paved the way for a detailed structural and functional analysis of these enzymes. One problem encountered when working with these proteins, especially with recombinant protein, is that the preparations tend to be heterogeneous, with only a fraction of the enzyme molecules being active. This is due to the incompleteness of post-translational modification, which for this protein is a complex, and incompletely understood, process involving incorporation of the Mo and Fe/S centres. The enzyme has been expressed previously in both Drosophila and insect cells using baculovirus. The insect cell system has been exploited by Iwasaki et al. [Iwasaki, Okamoto, Nishino, Mizushima and Hori (2000) J. Biochem (Tokyo) 127, 771-778], but, for the rat enzyme, yields a complex mixture of enzyme forms, containing around 10% of functional enzyme. The expression of Drosophila melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase in Aspergillus nidulans is described. The purified protein has been analysed both functionally and spectroscopically. Its specific activity is indistinguishable from that of the enzyme purified from fruit flies [Doyle, Burke, Chovnick, Dutton, Whittle and Bray (1996) Eur. J. Biochem. 239, 782-795], and it appears to be more active than recombinant xanthine dehydrogenase produced with the baculovirus system. EPR spectra of the recombinant Drosophila enzyme are reported, including parameters for the Fe/S centres. Only a very weak "Fe/SIII" signal (g(1,2,3), 2.057, 1.930, 1.858) was observed, in contrast to the strong analogous signal reported for the enzyme from baculovirus. Since this signal appears to be associated with incomplete post-translational modification, this is consistent with relatively more complete cofactor incorporation in the Aspergillus-produced enzyme. Thus we have developed a recombinant expression system for D. melanogaster xanthine dehydrogenase, which can be used

  16. Allopurinol in the treatment of acquired reactive perforating collagenosis*

    PubMed Central

    Tilz, Hemma; Becker, Jürgen Christian; Legat, Franz; Schettini, Antonio Pedro Mendes; Inzinger, Martin; Massone, Cesare

    2013-01-01

    Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis is a perforating dermatosis usually associated with different systemic diseases, mainly diabetes mellitus and/or chronic renal insufficiency. Different therapies have been tried but treatment is not standardized yet and remains a challenge. In the last few years, allopurinol has been reported as a good therapeutic option for acquired reactive perforating collagenosis. We describe the case of a 73-year-old man affected by acquired reactive perforating collagenosis associated with diabetes type 1 and chronic renal failure with secondary hyperparathyroidism. The patient was successfully treated with allopurinol 100mg once/day p.o.. PMID:23539010

  17. A comparative study of the concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and allantoin in the peripheral blood of normals and patients with acute myocardial infarction and other ischaemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kock, R; Delvoux, B; Sigmund, M; Greiling, H

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was the elucidation of the role of the xanthine oxidoreductase in the purine metabolism in ischaemic diseases of man. The serum concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and allantoin were determined in peripheral blood samples from patients with angina pectoris, cerebral insult and myocardial infarction with thrombolytic therapy and were compared with the concentrations obtained for healthy males and females. No significant differences were observed for the serum hypoxanthine concentrations, xanthine concentrations, the sum (hypoxanthine+xanthine) and the ratio (xanthine/hypoxanthine) between the healthy males, healthy females, the patients suffering from angina pectoris and the patients suffering from cerebral insult. An increase of the serum xanthine concentration in patients with myocardial infarction indicates a significant metabolic involvement of xanthine oxidoreductase in this disease and therefore a possible role in the development of tissue damage in the postischaemic phase due to oxygen radicals generated by the oxidase activity of this enzyme. The serum concentrations of uric acid and allantoin showed no differences between any of the studied groups. Study of the non-enzymatic oxidation of uric acid to allantoin by oxygen radicals, a relevant radical-scavenging mechanism in other diseases, provided no indication of an increased concentration of oxygen radicals due to the xanthine oxidoreductase reaction or other radical-producing mechanisms. PMID:7888480

  18. Xanthine oxidoreductase is present in human synovium.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, R E; Outhwaite, J M; Morris, C J; Blake, D R

    1987-01-01

    It is postulated that the mobile inflamed joint may be subject to cyclical ischaemic reperfusion injury. Xanthine oxidoreductase is an enzyme thought to contribute to oxidative reperfusion injury, and the detection of this activity in human synovium is described. Three normal and five rheumatoid tissues were assayed with a carbon-14 radioassay detecting the conversion of [14C]xanthine to [14C]uric acid. Rheumatoid synovia contained 0.67-305 microU/g tissue (n = 5), while normal synovia contained 1.2-5.0 microU/g tissue (n = 3). PMID:3426290

  19. [Panzytopenia from combination therapy with azathioprin and allopurinol].

    PubMed

    Seidel, W

    2004-10-01

    Azathioprine has been used in rheumatology for more than twenty years. Indications are collagen diseases with multiorgan involvement, where co-medications are frequently necessary. We describe a patient suffering from pancytopenia following a combination therapy of azathioprine and allopurinol because of lupus erythematodes and diabetic nephropathy with hyperuricemia. PMID:15517303

  20. The First Mammalian Aldehyde Oxidase Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Catarina; Mahro, Martin; Trincão, José; Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.; Ramos, Maria João; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Leimkühler, Silke; Romão, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidases (AOXs) are homodimeric proteins belonging to the xanthine oxidase family of molybdenum-containing enzymes. Each 150-kDa monomer contains a FAD redox cofactor, two spectroscopically distinct [2Fe-2S] clusters, and a molybdenum cofactor located within the protein active site. AOXs are characterized by broad range substrate specificity, oxidizing different aldehydes and aromatic N-heterocycles. Despite increasing recognition of its role in the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics, the physiological function of the protein is still largely unknown. We have crystallized and solved the crystal structure of mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 to 2.9 Å. This is the first mammalian AOX whose structure has been solved. The structure provides important insights into the protein active center and further evidence on the catalytic differences characterizing AOX and xanthine oxidoreductase. The mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 three-dimensional structure combined with kinetic, mutagenesis data, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics studies make a decisive contribution to understand the molecular basis of its rather broad substrate specificity. PMID:23019336

  1. Dual and Opposing Roles of Xanthine Dehydrogenase in Defense-Associated Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xianfeng; Wang, Wenming; Bittner, Florian; Schmidt, Nadine; Berkey, Robert; Zhang, Lingli; King, Harlan; Zhang, Yi; Feng, Jiayue; Wen, Yinqiang; Tan, Liqiang; Li, Yue; Zhang, Qiong; Deng, Ziniu; Xiong, Xingyao; Xiao, Shunyuan

    2016-05-01

    While plants produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) for stress signaling and pathogen defense, they need to remove excessive ROS induced during stress responses in order to minimize oxidative damage. How can plants fine-tune this balance and meet such conflicting needs? Here, we show that XANTHINE DEHYDROGENASE1 (XDH1) in Arabidopsis thaliana appears to play spatially opposite roles to serve this purpose. Through a large-scale genetic screen, we identified three missense mutations in XDH1 that impair XDH1's enzymatic functions and consequently affect the powdery mildew resistance mediated by RESISTANCE TO POWDERY MILDEW8 (RPW8) in epidermal cells and formation of xanthine-enriched autofluorescent objects in mesophyll cells. Further analyses revealed that in leaf epidermal cells, XDH1 likely functions as an oxidase, along with the NADPH oxidases RbohD and RbohF, to generate superoxide, which is dismutated into H2O2 The resulting enrichment of H2O2 in the fungal haustorial complex within infected epidermal cells helps to constrain the haustorium, thereby contributing to RPW8-dependent and RPW8-independent powdery mildew resistance. By contrast, in leaf mesophyll cells, XDH1 carries out xanthine dehydrogenase activity to produce uric acid in local and systemic tissues to scavenge H2O2 from stressed chloroplasts, thereby protecting plants from stress-induced oxidative damage. Thus, XDH1 plays spatially specified dual and opposing roles in modulation of ROS metabolism during defense responses in Arabidopsis. PMID:27152019

  2. Electronic spectra and structures of some biologically important xanthines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, M. K.; Mishra, P. C.

    1994-08-01

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of aqueous solutions of xanthine, caffeine, theophylline and theobromine have been studied at different pH. The observed spectra have been interpreted in terms of neutral and ionic forms of the molecules with the help of molecular orbital calculations. At neutral and acidic pH, the spectra can be assigned to the corresponding most stable neutral forms, with the exception that the fluorescence of xanthine at acidic pH appears to originate from the lowest singlet excited state of a cation of the molecule. At alkaline pH, xanthine and theophylline exist mainly as their monoanions. In xanthine and theophylline at alkaline pH, fluorescence originates from the lowest singlet excited state of the corresponding anion. However, in caffeine and theobromine, even at alkaline pH, fluorescence belongs to the neutral species. On the whole, the properties of xanthine are quite different from those of the methyl xanthines.

  3. Formation and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuciel, Radoslawa; Mazurkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    A model of reactive oxygen species metabolism is proposed as a laboratory exercise for students. The superoxide ion in this model is generated during the reaction of oxidation of xanthine, catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. The effect of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and allopurinol on superoxide ion generation and removal in this system is also…

  4. Measurement and Characterization of Superoxide Generation from Xanthine Dehydrogenase: A Redox-Regulated Pathway of Radical Generation in Ischemic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is an important source of oxygen free radicals and related postischemic injury. Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH), the major form of XOR in tissues, can be converted to xanthine oxidase (XO) by oxidation of sulfhydryl residues or by proteolysis. The conversion of XDH to XO has been assumed to be required for radical generation and tissue injury. It is also possible that XDH could generate significant quantities of superoxide, •O2–, for cellular signaling or injury; however, this possibility and its potential ramifications have not been previously considered. To unambiguously determine if XDH can be a significant source of •O2–, experiments were performed to measure and characterize •O2– generation using XDH from chicken liver that is locked in the dehydrogenase conformation. Electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping experiments with 5-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide demonstrated that XDH in the presence of xanthine produces significant amounts of •O2–. NAD+ and NADH inhibited the generation of •O2– from XDH in a dose-dependent manner, with NAD+ exhibiting stronger inhibition than NADH at low physiological concentrations. Decreased amounts of NAD+ and NADH, which occur during and following tissue ischemia, enhanced the generation of •O2– from XDH in the presence of xanthine. It was observed that XDH-mediated oxygen radical generation markedly depressed Ca2+-ATPase activity of isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles from cardiac muscle, and this was modulated by NAD+ and NADH. Thus, XDH can be an important redox-regulated source of •O2– generation in ischemic tissue, and conversion to XO is not required to activate radical formation and subsequent tissue injury. PMID:25243829

  5. Xanthine crystals induced by topiroxostat, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in rats, cause transitional cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Takeo; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Ashizawa, Naoki; Matsumoto, Koji; Iwanaga, Takashi; Saito, Kazuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the underlying mechanism of transitional cell tumors found in the carcinogenicity testing of topiroxostat, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in which topiroxostat was orally given to F344 rats at 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg for 2 years. In the urinary bladder, transitional cell papillomas and/or carcinomas were seen in males receiving 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg (1/49, 3/49, and 10/50, respectively). In the kidney, transitional cell papillomas and/or carcinomas in the pelvis were seen in 2/50 males and 1/50 females receiving 3 mg/kg. In the mechanistic study by 52-week oral treatment with topiroxostat at 3 mg/kg to F344 male rats, with and without citrate, simple and papillary transitional cell hyperplasias of the urinary bladder epithelium were observed in 5/17 in the topiroxostat-alone treatment group, along with xanthine-induced nephropathy, in contrast to neither xanthine crystals nor lesions in urinary organs by co-treatment group with citrate. As for sex differences of urinary bladder tumors, the BrdU labeling index for epithelial cells of the urinary bladder by 5-week oral treatment with topiroxostat at 10 mg/kg to F344 rats was increased in males only, showing consistency with histopathological findings. Therefore, the present study indicates that transitional cell tumors induced by topiroxostat in rats were due to physical stimulation to transitional cells of xanthine crystals/calculi and provides that other factors were not implicated in this tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the present study suggests that such tumors do not predict for humans since topiroxostat-induced xanthine deposition is a rodent-specific event. PMID:24448833

  6. Recombinant Rhodobacter capsulatus xanthine dehydrogenase, a useful model system for the characterization of protein variants leading to xanthinuria I in humans.

    PubMed

    Leimkuhler, Silke; Hodson, Rachael; George, Graham N; Rajagopalan, K V

    2003-06-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) forms an (alphabeta)2 heterotetramer and is highly homologous to homodimeric eukaryotic XDHs. The crystal structures of bovine XDH and R. capsulatus XDH showed that the two proteins have highly similar folds. We have developed an efficient system for the recombinant expression of R. capsulatus XDH in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein shows spectral features and a range of substrate specificities similar to bovine milk xanthine oxidase. However, R. capsulatus XDH is at least 5 times more active than bovine XDH and, unlike mammalian XDH, does not undergo the conversion to the oxidase form. EPR spectra were obtained for the FeS centers of the enzyme showing an axial signal for FeSI, which is different from that reported for xanthine oxidase. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the iron and molybdenum K-edge and the tungsten LIII-edge have been used to probe the different metal coordinations of variant forms of the enzyme. Based on a mutation identified in a patient suffering from xanthinuria I, the corresponding arginine 135 was substituted to a cysteine in R. capsulatus XDH, and the protein variant was purified and characterized. Two different forms of XDH-R135C were purified, an active (alphabeta)2 heterotetrameric form and an inactive (alphabeta) heterodimeric form. The active form contains a full complement of redox centers, whereas in the inactive form the FeSI center is likely to be missing. PMID:12670960

  7. Control of Plasma Uric Acid in Adults at Risk for Tumor Lysis Syndrome: Efficacy and Safety of Rasburicase Alone and Rasburicase Followed by Allopurinol Compared With Allopurinol Alone—Results of a Multicenter Phase III Study

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Jorge; Moore, Joseph O.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Wetzler, Meir; Craig, Michael; Matous, Jeffrey; Luger, Selina; Dey, Bimalangshu R.; Schiller, Gary J.; Pham, Dat; Abboud, Camille N.; Krishnamurthy, Muthuswamy; Brown, Archie; Laadem, Abderrahmane; Seiter, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Rasburicase is effective in controlling plasma uric acid in pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies. This study in adults evaluated safety of and compared efficacy of rasburicase alone with rasburicase followed by oral allopurinol and with allopurinol alone in controlling plasma uric acid. Patients and Methods Adults with hematologic malignancies at risk for hyperuricemia and tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) were randomly assigned to rasburicase (0.20 mg/kg/d intravenously days 1-5), rasburicase plus allopurinol (rasburicase 0.20 mg/kg/d days 1 to 3 followed by oral allopurinol 300 mg/d days 3 to 5), or allopurinol (300 mg/d orally days 1 to 5). Primary efficacy variable was plasma uric acid response rate defined as percentage of patients achieving or maintaining plasma uric acid ≤ 7.5 mg/dL during days 3 to 7. Results Ninety-two patients received rasburicase, 92 rasburicase plus allopurinol, and 91 allopurinol. Plasma uric acid response rate was 87% with rasburicase, 78% with rasburicase plus allopurinol, and 66% with allopurinol. It was significantly greater for rasburicase than for allopurinol (P = .001) in the overall study population, in patients at high risk for TLS (89% v 68%; P = .012), and in those with baseline hyperuricemia (90% v 53%; P = .015). Time to plasma uric acid control in hyperuricemic patients was 4 hours for rasburicase, 4 hours for rasburicase plus allopurinol, and 27 hours for allopurinol. Conclusion In adults with hyperuricemia or at high risk for TLS, rasburicase provided control of plasma uric acid more rapidly than allopurinol. Rasburicase was well tolerated as a single agent and in sequential combination with allopurinol. PMID:20713865

  8. Enhancement of the dissolution profile of allopurinol by a solid dispersion technique.

    PubMed

    Samy, A M; Marzouk, M A; Ammar, A A; Ahmed, M K

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve the solubility, and therefore the dissolution of poorly water-soluble allopurinol. Solid dispersions of allopurinol were prepared with different polymers or carriers such as polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP K30 and PVP K90), polyethylene glycol (PEG 4000 and PEG 6000), urea and mannitol at two drug : carrier ratios (1:1) and (1:2). Different methods such as melting and solvent evaporation methods were used to improve dissolution characteristics and solubility of allopurinol. The solid dispersions were characterized using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) while the interactions which took place were identified with fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Due to formation of hydrogen bonds between allopurinol and urea and mannitol, a transition of allopurinol from the crystalline to amorphous state was achieved. The DSC thermograms of the solid dispersions indicated the potential of heat induced interactions between allopurinol and the carriers used could influence dissolution rate of the drug. The dissolution amount (%) of pure allopurinol was 80% at 45 min. F5, F3, F6, F7, and F1 showed better dissolution percentages of 100, 93, 92.4, 90.6, and 89%, respectively, at 45 min. PMID:22491164

  9. Modifiable Factors Associated with Allopurinol Adherence and Outcomes Among Gout Patients in an Integrated Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Nazia; Coburn, Brian W.; Wu, Yi-Lin; Cheetham, T. Craig; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Saag, Kenneth G; Mikuls, Ted R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify modifiable patient and provider factors associated with allopurinol adherence and the achievement of a serum urate (sUA) goal in gout. Methods We identified a retrospective cohort of gout patients, newly initiated on allopurinol. All patient data came from administrative datasets at a large integrated health delivery system. Patients were > 18 years old at time of initial allopurinol dispensing, and had 12 months or more of membership and drug eligibility prior to the index date. Allopurinol adherence was defined as a proportion of days covered ≥ 0.80, evaluated during the first 12 months of observation after the initial dispensing. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with allopurinol nonadherence and attaining a sUA concentration < 6.0 mg/dl. Results We identified 13,341 gout patients with incident allopurinol use (mean age 60 years, 78% male). Of these, 9,581 patients (72%) had sUA measured both at baseline and during follow-up. Only 3,078 patients (32%) attained sUA target of < 6.0 mg/dl during follow-up. Potentially modifiable factors associated with treatment adherence and obtaining sUA goal in the multivariable analysis included concomitant diuretic use, prescriber specialty, and allopurinol dosing practices. Adherent patients were 2.5-fold more likely than nonadherent patients to achieve a sUA < 6.0 mg/dl during observation. Conclusion Among gout patients initiating allopurinol in this study, 68% did not reach sUA goal and 57% of patients were nonadherent. Modifiable factors, including allopurinol dose escalation, treatment adherence, rheumatology referral, and concomitant medication use could be important factors to consider in efforts aimed at optimizing gout treatment outcomes. PMID:25512479

  10. Xanthine oxidoreductase activation is implicated in the onset of metabolic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aibibula, Zulipiya; Ailixiding, Maierhaba; Iwata, Munetaka; Piao, Jinying; Hara, Yasushi; Okawa, Atsushi; Asou, Yoshinori

    2016-03-25

    A metabolic syndrome (MetS) is accompanied by hyperuricemia, during which xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the production of uric acid. In the cohort study, a correlation between uric acid concentration in the synovial fluid and osteoarthritis (OA) incidence is observed. The purpose of our study was to elucidate XOR function in terms of correlation between MetS and OA. Seven week-old male C57BL6J mice were fed normal diet (ND) or high fat diet (HFD) with or without febuxostat (FEB), a XOR inhibitor. HFD stimulated xanthine oxidase activity in the IPFP and the visceral fat. OA changes at the site of the knee joints had progressed due to HFD, but these changes were reduced upon FEB administration. IL-1β expression in the HFD group was increased in accordance with the enhancement of NLRP3 or iNOS expression in the IPFP, whereas it was inhibited by FEB administration. In the organ culture system, when the IPFP was stimulated with insulin, IL-1β expression was increased in accordance with the increase of NLRP3 expression; however, they were reduced by FEB administration. Based on the above results, we showed that inflammasome activation accompanied by an increase in XOR activity contributed to IPFP inflammation followed by OA progression. PMID:26903297

  11. Immunological comparison of sulfite oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, V.; Barber, M.J. )

    1991-03-11

    Polyclonal antibodies (rabbit), elicited against FPLC-purified chicken and rat liver sulfite oxidase (SO), have been examined for inhibition and binding to purified chicken (C), rat (R), bovine (B), alligator (A) and shark (S) liver enzymes. Anti-CSO IgG cross-reacted with all five enzymes, with varying affinities, in the order CSO=ASO{gt}RSO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-ROS IgG also cross-reacted with all five enzymes in the order RSO{gt}CSO=ASO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited sulfite:cyt. c reductase (S:CR), sulfite:ferricyanide reductase (S:FR) and sulfite:dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (S:DR) activities of CSO to different extents (S:CR{gt}S:FR=S:DR). Similar differential inhibition was found for anti-ROS IgG and RSO S:CR, S:FR and S:DR activities. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited S:CR activities in the order CSO=ASO{much gt}SSO{gt}BSO. RSO was uninhibited. For anti-RSO IgG the inhibition order was RSO{gt}SSO{gt}BSO{gt}ASO. CSO was uninhibited. Anti-CSO and RSO IgGs partially inhibited Chlorella nitrate reductase (NR). Minor cross-reactivity was found for xanthine oxidase. Common antigenic determinants for all five SO's and NR are indicated.

  12. Low-dose allopurinol plus azathioprine/cyclosporin/prednisolone, a novel immunosuppressive regimen.

    PubMed

    Chocair, P; Duley, J; Simmonds, H A; Cameron, J S; Ianhez, L; Arap, S; Sabbaga, E

    1993-07-10

    Early rejection can still complicate renal transplantation even with cyclosporin. We added low-dose allopurinol (25 mg on alternative days) to "triple" immunosuppression with cyclosporin, prednisolone, and azathioprine for twelve recipients of cadaver renal grafts. The controls were fifteen patients on triple therapy alone. Only one rejection episode occurred among the allopurinol-treated patients, whereas eleven controls had rejections (seven with more than one episode). Allopurinol may be toxic when combined with azathioprine, yet the bone marrow tolerated the new regimen well. As expected, reduction of the azathioprine dose was necessary in the treated group. PMID:8100914

  13. A Real-World Study of Switching From Allopurinol to Febuxostat in a Health Plan Database

    PubMed Central

    Altan, Aylin; Shiozawa, Aki; Bancroft, Tim; Singh, Jasvinder A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the real-world comparative effectiveness of continuing on allopurinol versus switching to febuxostat. Methods In a retrospective claims data study of enrollees in health plans affiliated with Optum, we evaluated patients from February 1, 2009, to May 31, 2012, with a gout diagnosis, a pharmacy claim for allopurinol or febuxostat, and at least 1 serum uric acid (SUA) result available during the follow-up period. Univariate and multivariable-adjusted analyses (controlling for patient demographics and clinical factors) assessed the likelihood of SUA lowering and achievement of target SUA of less than 6.0 mg/dL or less than 5.0 mg/dL in allopurinol continuers versus febuxostat switchers. Results The final study population included 748 subjects who switched to febuxostat from allopurinol and 4795 continuing users of allopurinol. The most common doses of allopurinol were 300 mg/d or less in 95% of allopurinol continuers and 93% of febuxostat switchers (prior to switching); the most common dose of febuxostat was 40 mg/d, in 77% of febuxostat switchers (after switching). Compared with allopurinol continuers, febuxostat switchers had greater (1) mean preindex SUA, 8.0 mg/dL versus 6.6 mg/dL (P < 0.001); (2) likelihood of postindex SUA of less than 6.0 mg/dL, 62.2% versus 58.7% (P = 0.072); (3) likelihood of postindex SUA of less than 5.0 mg/dL, 38.9% versus 29.6% (P < 0.001); and (4) decrease in SUA, 1.8 (SD, 2.2) mg/dL versus 0.4 (SD, 1.7) mg/dL (P < 0.001). In multivariable-adjusted analyses, compared with allopurinol continuers, febuxostat switchers had significantly higher likelihood of achieving SUA of less than 6.0 mg/dL (40% higher) and SUA of less than 5.0 mg/dL (83% higher). Conclusions In this “real-world” setting, many patients with gout not surprisingly were not treated with maximum permitted doses of allopurinol. Patients switched to febuxostat were more likely to achieve target SUA levels than those

  14. Effect of Allopurinol in Chronic Kidney Disease Progression and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    de Vinuesa, Soledad García; Verdalles, Ursula; Ruiz-Caro, Caridad; Ampuero, Jara; Rincón, Abraham; Arroyo, David; Luño, José

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hyperuricemia is associated with hypertension, inflammation, renal disease progression, and cardiovascular disease. However, no data are available regarding the effect of allopurinol in patients with chronic kidney disease. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We conducted a prospective, randomized trial of 113 patients with estimated GFR (eGFR) <60 ml/min. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with allopurinol 100 mg/d (n = 57) or to continue the usual therapy (n = 56). Clinical, biochemical, and inflammatory parameters were measured at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months of treatment. The objectives of study were: (1) renal disease progression; (2) cardiovascular events; and (3) hospitalizations of any causes. Results: Serum uric acid and C-reactive protein levels were significantly decreased in subjects treated with allopurinol. In the control group, eGFR decreased 3.3 ± 1.2 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and in the allopurinol group, eGFR increased 1.3 ± 1.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 after 24 months. Allopurinol treatment slowed down renal disease progression independently of age, gender, diabetes, C-reactive protein, albuminuria, and renin-angiotensin system blockers use. After a mean follow-up time of 23.4 ± 7.8 months, 22 patients suffered a cardiovascular event. Diabetes mellitus, previous coronary heart disease, and C-reactive protein levels increased cardiovascular risk. Allopurinol treatment reduces risk of cardiovascular events in 71% compared with standard therapy. Conclusions: Allopurinol decreases C-reactive protein and slows down the progression of renal disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. In addition, allopurinol reduces cardiovascular and hospitalization risk in these subjects. PMID:20538833

  15. Effects of Allopurinol on Arterial Stiffness: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gang; Qiu, Zhandong; Li, Dayong; Fang, Yu; Zhang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several studies have tested the effects of allopurinol on arterial stiffness, but the results have been inconclusive. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to investigate the impacts of allopurinol treatment on arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx). MATERIAL AND METHODS Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of allopurinol on arterial stiffness were identified through searching PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library for Central Register of Clinical Trials, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure up to December 2015. The primary endpoints were the change of PWV and AIx after allopurinol treatment. The weighted mean difference (WMD) or standardized mean difference (SMD) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of each study were pooled for meta-analysis. RESULTS A total of 11 RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in the final meta-analysis. Eight RCTs with 1,111 patients were pooled for PWV; eight RCTs with 397 patients were pooled for PWV. Allopurinol administration did not significantly change PWV (WMD=-0.19 m/s, 95% CI: -0.49 to 0.12, Z=1.21, p=0.23), but significantly reduced AIx (SMD=-0.34, 95% CI: -0.54 to -0.14, Z=3.35, p=0.0008). CONCLUSIONS Although our meta-analysis showed some favorable effects of allopurinol treatment on improving AIx, its impact on arterial stiffness must be tested in more large-scale RCTs. PMID:27110924

  16. Involvement of Xanthine Oxidoreductase-related Oxidative Stress in a Dermatophagoides farinae-induced Asthma Model of NC/Nga Mice.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Heri; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Kubo, Masayuki; Fujikura, Yoshihisa; Ogino, Keiki

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress is widely known to play a role in asthma. However, the contribution of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) as a source of the superoxide anion radical (O2-) in oxidative stress associated with asthma has not yet been examined in detail. Here we investigated pathophysiological changes in XOR in an experimental model of asthma induced by the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae (Df). In the lungs of Df-treated mice, the production of O2 - from XOR increased and the nitrite concentrations decreased, whereas the protein expression of XOR remained unchanged. Moreover, the protein expression levels of XOR and the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were higher in the Df-treated mice than in saline-treated mice. Immunohistochemically, although XOR was highly localized in the bronchial epithelial cells of the saline-treated mice, immunostaining for XOR was absent in the bronchial epithelium of Df-treated mice. These results suggest that oxidative stress is up-regulated by increases in the conversion of the dehydrogenase form (xanthine dehydrogenase; XDH) of XOR to the oxidase form (xanthine oxidase; XOD). PMID:27339206

  17. Hypouricemic effect of allopurinol are improved by Pallidifloside D based on the uric acid metabolism enzymes PRPS, HGPRT and PRPPAT.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Gang; Hou, Pi-Yong; Zhang, Xi; He, Yi; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Shu-Qing; Anderson, Samantha; Zhang, Yan-Wen; Wu, Xiao-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Allopurinol is a commonly used medication to treat hyperuricemia and its complications. Pallidifloside D, a saponin glycoside constituent from the total saponins of Smilax riparia, had been proved to enhanced hypouricemic effect of allopurinol based on uric acid metabolism enzyme XOD. In this study, we evaluated whether Pallidifloside D (5mg/kg) enhanced hypouricemic effect of allopurinol (5mg/kg) related to others uric acid metabolism enzymes such as PRPS, HGPRT and PRPPAT. We found that, compared with allopurinol alone, the combination of allopurinol and Pallidifloside D significantly up-regulated HGPRT mRNA expression and down-regulated the mRNA expression of PRPS and PRPPAT in PC12 cells (all P<0.01). These results strongly suggest that hypouricemic effect of allopurinol are improved by Pallidifloside D via numerous mechanisms and our data may have a potential value in clinical practice in the treatment of gout and other hyperuricemic conditions. PMID:27370097

  18. Urinary hypoxanthine and xanthine levels in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Turgan, N; Boydak, B; Habif, S; Gülter, C; Senol, B; Mutaf, I; Ozmen, D; Bayindir, O

    1999-01-01

    Ischemia leads to impaired ATP metabolism, with increased production of purine degradation products, such as hypoxanthine and xanthine, which are useful markers of tissue hypoxia. These extracellular markers of ischemia have been studied extensively in many clinical conditions of oxidative stress, including perinatal asphyxia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, cerebral ischemia, and preeclampsia. The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of urinary hypoxanthine and xanthine as ischemia markers in acute coronary syndromes. Urinary excretion of hypoxanthine and xanthine was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography in 30 patients with acute coronary syndromes and in 30 age- and sex-matched controls. Serum and urine uric acid, creatinine, and urea concentrations were also determined. Hypoxanthine excretion was significantly elevated in patients compared with healthy controls (84.37+/-8.63 and 42.70+/-3.97 nmol/mg creatinine, mean+/-SEM, P<0.0001). Urinary xanthine levels were also increased in patients with acute coronary syndromes (100.13+/-12.14 and 34.74+/-4.07 nmol/mg creatinine patients and controls, respectively; P<0.0001). Hypoxanthine and xanthine excretion showed a strong positive correlation in both groups. Significant negative correlations between urinary hypoxanthine and uric acid and xanthine and uric acid were observed in the patients, but not in controls. In conclusion, increased levels of ATP degradation products hypoxanthine and xanthine are observed in various hypoxic clinical conditions. This study suggests that these parameters may be useful markers of ischemia in patients with acute coronary syndromes. PMID:10784378

  19. Clinical and health care use characteristics of patients newly prescribed allopurinol, febuxostat and colchicine for gout

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seoyoung C.; Schmidt, Bernhard M.W.; Franklin, Jessica M.; Liu, Jun; Solomon, Daniel H.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Background Gout is a common inflammatory arthritis with the increasing prevalence in the developed countries. It is well-known that many patients with gout have significant comorbidities and high health care utilization. Methods Using US insurance claims data (2009–2011), a population-based cohort study was conducted to describe clinical characteristics and health care utilization patterns in patients with gout newly prescribed allopurinol, febuxostat or colchicine. Results There were 25,051 allopurinol, 4,288 febuxostat and 6,238 colchicine initiators. Mean age was 53 years and 83%–87% were male. More than half of patients had hypertension and hyperlipidemia, 20% had diabetes and 10% cardiovascular disease. The mean uric acid level (mg/dl) was similar at baseline ranging from 8.1 to 8.5 across the groups. Compared to allopurinol or colchicine initiators, febuxostat initiators had more comorbidities and greater health care uses including outpatient, inpatient or emergency room visits, both at baseline and during the follow-up. Use of gout related drugs, such as opioids, steroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, was most common in febuxostat and least common in colchicine initiators. The median daily dose at both start and end of treatment was 300mg for allopurinol, 40mg for febuxostat, and 1.2mg for colchicine. The dosage of allopurinol and febuxostat was rarely increased during the follow-up. Conclusion Patients who started allopurinol, febuxostat or colchicine for gout generally had hyperuricemia and multiple comorbidities. Febuxostat initiators had more comorbidities and greater use of health care resources and gout-related drugs than other groups. Overall, the dosages of allopurinol or febuxostat remained unchanged over time. PMID:23861232

  20. Impact of Urate Level on Cardiovascular Risk in Allopurinol Treated Patients. A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Søltoft Larsen, Kasper; Pottegård, Anton; Lindegaard, Hanne M.; Hallas, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Background Gout gives rise to increased risk of cardiovascular events. Gout attacks can be effectively prevented with urate lowering drugs, and allopurinol potentially reduces cardiovascular risk. What target level of urate is required to reduce cardiovascular risk is not known. Objectives To investigate the effect of achieving target plasma urate with allopurinol on cardiovascular outcomes in a case-control study nested within long-term users of allopurinol. Methods We identified long-term users of allopurinol in Funen County, Denmark. Among these, we identified all cases of cardiovascular events and sampled 4 controls to each case from the same population. The cases and controls were compared with respect to whether they reached a urate target below 0.36 mmol/l on allopurinol. The derived odds ratios were controlled for potential confounders available from data on prescriptions, laboratory values and in- and outpatient contacts. Results No association between treatment-to-target urate level and cardiovascular events were found (adjusted odds ratio of 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.79–1.28). No significant effect was seen in any subgroup defined by age, gender, renal function, allopurinol dose or the achieved urate level. Overall, the doses of allopurinol used in this study were low (mean ≈ 140 mg/day). Conclusion We were unable to demonstrate a link between achieved urate level in patients treated with allopurinol and risk of cardiovascular events. Possible explanations include that allopurinol doses higher than those used in this study are required to achieve cardiovascular risk reduction or that the cardiovascular effect of allopurinol is not mediated through low urate levels. It remains to be seen whether allopurinol has a dose-response relationship with cardiovascular events at higher doses. PMID:26751377

  1. Protective effects of fish oil, allopurinol, and verapamil on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Messiha, Basim Anwar Shehata; Abo-Youssef, Amira M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The major aim of this work was to study the protective effects of fish oil (FO), allopurinol, and verapamil on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced injury in experimental rats. Materials and Methods: Sixty male Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to six groups of 10 rats each. Group 1 served as a negative control. Group 2 served as hepatic IR control injury. Groups 3, 4, 5, and 6 received N-acetylcysteine (standard), FO, allopurinol, and verapamil, respectively, for 3 consecutive days prior to ischemia. All animals were fasted for 12 h, anesthetized and underwent midline laparotomy. The portal triads were clamped by mini-artery clamp for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 30 min. Blood samples were withdrawn for estimation of serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) activities as well as hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione, myeloperoxidase, and total nitrate/nitrite levels, in addition to histopathological examination. Results: Fish oil, allopurinol, and verapamil reduced hepatic IR injury as evidenced by significant reduction in serum ALT and AST enzyme activities. FO and verapamil markedly reduced oxidative stress as compared to control IR injury. Levels of inflammatory biomarkers in liver were also reduced after treatment with FO, allopurinol, or verapamil. In accordance, a marked improvement of histopathological findings was observed with all of the three treatments. Conclusion: The findings of this study prove the benefits of FO, allopurinol, and verapamil on hepatic IR-induced liver injury and are promising for further clinical trials. PMID:26283828

  2. The possible antianginal effect of allopurinol in vasopressin-induced ischemic model in rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Zahrani, Yahya A; Al-Harthi, Sameer E; Khan, Lateef M; El-Bassossy, Hani M; Edris, Sherif M; A Sattar, Mai A Alim

    2015-10-01

    The anti-anginal effects of allopurinol were assessed in experimental model rats of angina and their effects were evaluated with amlodipine. In the vasopressin-induced angina model, oral administration of allopurinol in dose of 10 mg/kg revealed remarkably analogous effects in comparison with amlodipine such as dose-dependent suppression of vasopressin-triggered time, duration and severity of ST depression. In addition, allopurinol produced dose dependent suppression of plasma Malondialdehyde (MDA) level, systolic blood pressure, cardiac contractility and cardiac oxygen consumption; while in contrast, amlodipine minimally suppressed the elevation of plasma MDA level. Endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) expression, serum nitrate were strikingly increased, however lipid profile was significantly reduced. Seemingly, allopurinol was found to be more potent than amlodipine - a calcium channel antagonist. To conclude, it was explicitly observed and verified that on the ischemic electrocardiography (ECG) changes in angina pectoris model in rats, allopurinol exerts a significant protective effects, reminiscent of enhancement of vascular oxidative stress, function of endothelial cells, improved coronary blood flow in addition to the potential enhancement in myocardial stress. Moreover, our findings were in conformity with several human studies. PMID:26594114

  3. The possible antianginal effect of allopurinol in vasopressin-induced ischemic model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zahrani, Yahya A.; Al-Harthi, Sameer E.; Khan, Lateef M.; El-Bassossy, Hani M.; Edris, Sherif M.; A. Sattar, Mai A. Alim

    2015-01-01

    The anti-anginal effects of allopurinol were assessed in experimental model rats of angina and their effects were evaluated with amlodipine. In the vasopressin-induced angina model, oral administration of allopurinol in dose of 10 mg/kg revealed remarkably analogous effects in comparison with amlodipine such as dose-dependent suppression of vasopressin-triggered time, duration and severity of ST depression. In addition, allopurinol produced dose dependent suppression of plasma Malondialdehyde (MDA) level, systolic blood pressure, cardiac contractility and cardiac oxygen consumption; while in contrast, amlodipine minimally suppressed the elevation of plasma MDA level. Endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) expression, serum nitrate were strikingly increased, however lipid profile was significantly reduced. Seemingly, allopurinol was found to be more potent than amlodipine – a calcium channel antagonist. To conclude, it was explicitly observed and verified that on the ischemic electrocardiography (ECG) changes in angina pectoris model in rats, allopurinol exerts a significant protective effects, reminiscent of enhancement of vascular oxidative stress, function of endothelial cells, improved coronary blood flow in addition to the potential enhancement in myocardial stress. Moreover, our findings were in conformity with several human studies. PMID:26594114

  4. [Allopurinol therapy in imported dogs with leishmaniasis treated outside the endemic area].

    PubMed

    Helm, M; Müller, W; Schaarschmidt, D; Grimm, F; Deplazes, P

    2013-10-01

    Canine leishmaniosis (CL) has become one of the most frequently diagnosed travel associated infection in dogs in Switzerland and Germany. The aim of the study was to define recommendations for treatment with allopurinol and follow-up examinations of dogs with CL in a non endemic area. 31 dogs infected with Leishmania were treated with allopurinol (10 - 15 mg/kg twice daily, per os) and the effectiveness was examined. The diagnosis had been confirmed by the detection of specific anti-Leishmania antibodies and/or Leihmania-DNA. 22 dogs had clinical signs (skin lesions, lameness or lack of fitness) and 9 dogs were asymptomatic but showed abnormal laboratory parameters. Under treatment with allopurinol the symptoms disappeared within 1 - 5 months in 20 dogs. PMID:24091231

  5. Effects of Allopurinol on Arterial Stiffness: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gang; Qiu, Zhandong; Li, Dayong; Fang, Yu; Zhang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    Background Several studies have tested the effects of allopurinol on arterial stiffness, but the results have been inconclusive. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to investigate the impacts of allopurinol treatment on arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx). Material/Methods Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of allopurinol on arterial stiffness were identified through searching PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library for Central Register of Clinical Trials, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure up to December 2015. The primary endpoints were the change of PWV and AIx after allopurinol treatment. The weighted mean difference (WMD) or standardized mean difference (SMD) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of each study were pooled for meta-analysis. Results A total of 11 RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in the final meta-analysis. Eight RCTs with 1,111 patients were pooled for PWV; eight RCTs with 397 patients were pooled for PWV. Allopurinol administration did not significantly change PWV (WMD=−0.19 m/s, 95% CI: −0.49 to 0.12, Z=1.21, p=0.23), but significantly reduced AIx (SMD=−0.34, 95% CI: −0.54 to −0.14, Z=3.35, p=0.0008). Conclusions Although our meta-analysis showed some favorable effects of allopurinol treatment on improving AIx, its impact on arterial stiffness must be tested in more large-scale RCTs. PMID:27110924

  6. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase in the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kramkowski, K; Leszczynska, A; Przyborowski, K; Kaminski, T; Rykaczewska, U; Sitek, B; Zakrzewska, A; Proniewski, B; Smolenski, R T; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W; Chlopicki, S

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying nitrite-induced effects on thrombosis and hemostasis in vivo are not clear. The goal of the work described here was to investigate the role of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) in the anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic activities of nitrite in rats in vivo. Arterial thrombosis was induced electrically in rats with renovascular hypertension by partial ligation of the left renal artery. Sodium nitrite (NaNO2, 0.17 mmol/kg twice daily for 3 days, p.o) was administered with or without one of the XOR-inhibitors: allopurinol (ALLO) and febuxostat (FEB) (100 and 5 mg/kg, p.o., for 3 days). Nitrite treatment (0.17 mmol/kg), which was associated with a significant increase in NOHb, nitrite/nitrate plasma concentration, resulted in a substantial decrease in thrombus weight (TW) (0.48 ± 0.03 mg vs. vehicle [VEH] 0.88 ± 0.08 mg, p < 0.001) without a significant hypotensive effect. The anti-thrombotic effect of nitrite was partially reversed by FEB (TW = 0.63 ± 0.06 mg, p < 0.05 vs. nitrites), but not by ALLO (TW = 0.43 ± 0.02 mg). In turn, profound anti-platelet effect of nitrite measured ex vivo using collagen-induced whole-blood platelet aggregation (70.5 ± 7.1% vs. VEH 100 ± 4.5%, p < 0.05) and dynamic thromboxaneB2 generation was fully reversed by both XOR-inhibitors. In addition, nitrite decreased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentration (0.47 ± 0.13 ng/ml vs. VEH 0.62 ± 0.04 ng/ml, p < 0.05) and FEB/ALLO reversed this effect. In vitro the anti-platelet effect of nitrite (1 mM) was reversed by FEB (0.1 mM) under hypoxia (0.5%O2) and normoxia (20%O2). Nitrite treatment had no effect on coagulation parameters. In conclusion, the nitrite-induced anti-platelet effect in rats in vivo is mediated by XOR, but XOR does not fully account for the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite. PMID:26374946

  7. Oxypurinol-Specific T Cells Possess Preferential TCR Clonotypes and Express Granulysin in Allopurinol-Induced Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Hung; Pan, Ren-You; Chu, Mu-Tzu; Chin, See-Wen; Huang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Wei-Chi; Chang, Jen-Yun; Hung, Shuen-Iu

    2015-09-01

    Allopurinol, a first-line drug for treating gout and hyperuricemia, is one of the leading causes of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). To investigate the molecular mechanism of allopurinol-induced SCAR, we enrolled 21 patients (13 Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and 8 drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS)), 11 tolerant controls, and 23 healthy donors. We performed in vitro T-cell activation assays by culturing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with allopurinol, oxypurinol, or febuxostat and measuring the expression of granulysin and IFN-γ in the supernatants of cultures. TCR repertoire was investigated by next-generation sequencing. Oxypurinol stimulation resulted in a significant increase in granulysin in the cultures of blood samples from SCAR patients (n=14) but not tolerant controls (n=11) or healthy donors (n=23). Oxypurinol induced T-cell response in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, whereas allopurinol or febuxostat did not. T cells from patients with allopurinol-SCAR showed no crossreactivity with febuxostat. Preferential TCR-V-β usage and clonal expansion of specific CDR3 (third complementarity-determining region) were found in the blister cells from skin lesions (n=8) and oxypurinol-activated T-cell cultures (n=4) from patients with allopurinol-SCAR. These data suggest that, in addition to HLA-B*58:01, clonotype-specific T cells expressing granulysin upon oxypurinol induction participate in the pathogenesis of allopurinol-induced SCAR. PMID:25946710

  8. Comparative effects of 4-aminopyrazolopyrimidine, its 2'-deoxyriboside derivative, and allopurinol on in vitro growth of American Leishmania species.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Casanova, M A

    1982-01-01

    When assayed on promastigotes of 10 American Leishmania isolates (including Leishmania brasiliensis and mexicana species), 4-aminopyrazolopyrimidine (AAP) was severalfold more active than allopurinol as a leishmanistatic drug. There were some intraspecific and interspecific differences among the isolates in their susceptibility to the inhibitory effects of APP and allopurinol. APP-2'-deoxyriboside did not affect the 10 isolates tested. This was surprising, because allopurinol riboside has previously been shown to be more active than allopurinol. In all of the American Leishmania isolates tested, the metabolism of [14C]6-APP resulted in a high level of HPP-ribose-5'-P and lower levels of APP-ribose-5'-P, APP-ribose-5'-PP, and APP-ribose-5'-PPP. MP, LR, LBY, and JAP isolates strongly converted APP into APP derivatives, thus perhaps explaining their greater susceptibility to the inhibitory effects of APP. With the 10 American Leishmania isolates tested, several purines reversed the inhibitory effects of allopurinol, but only adenine countered the inhibitory effects of APP. This suggests biochemical differences in the mechanisms of action of allopurinol and APP. Finally, and contrary to previous claims, the reversal by purines of the allopurinol-induced growth inhibition was not a Leishmania species-specific effect. PMID:6982678

  9. Urate-oxidase for the treatment of tophaceous gout in heart transplant recipients. A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, S; Roche, B; Dorent, R; Koeger, A C; Borget, C; Wrona, N; Bourgeois, P

    1995-05-01

    Gout in heart transplant recipients is common and poses a significant therapeutic challenge. Concomitant administration of azathioprine and allopurinol therapy carries a high risk of leukopenia. Uricosuric agents can cause renal lithiasis and/or acute renal failure in patients with renal failure and/or high urinary levels of uric acid. We report our experience with urate-oxidase in three heart transplant recipients with severe polyarticular and tophaceous gout, a history of leukopenia under allopurinol and unresponsiveness or contraindications to uricosuric agents. Urate-oxidase was given parenterally in a dosage of 1000 units per day, seven days a month. The injections were done intramuscularly in one patient and intravenously in the other two, who were under anticoagulant therapy. Patients 1 and 2 received 12 and 6 courses, respectively. The third patient had had four courses and was still under treatment at the time of this writing. Shrinking of the tophi and improved mobility of the fingers were seen in all three patients after the second course. No adverse effects were recorded. Our experience suggests that urate-oxidase therapy may decrease the urate burden in patients with severe tophaceous gout. Urate-oxidase therapy should be viewed as a phase in the treatment of gout, which must be followed by administration of another agent. PMID:7655872

  10. Myelosuppression associated with azathioprine-allopurinol interaction after heart and lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D; Sekar, M; Halil, O; Banner, N

    1996-06-15

    It is widely recommended that, during concurrent therapy with allopurinol, the azathioprine dosage should be decreased by at least two thirds. We retrospectively studied compliance with this guideline in 24 patients who had commenced allopurinol at a median of 33 months (range, 2-145 months) after heart and/or lung transplantation. The median reduction in azathioprine dose at initiation of allopurinol was 73.3% but ranged from 0% to 90% (>67% in 14 patients). Within 3 months, 11 (46%) of the patients became leukopenic (white blood cell count <4 x 10(9)/L), 7/23 (30%) became moderately anemic (hemoglobin <10 g/dl), and 5/23 (22%) became thrombocytopenic (platelets <150 X 10(9)/L). Decreasing the dose of azathioprine by two thirds or greater reduced but did not abolish the risk of myelotoxicity. These data highlight the need for close hematological monitoring of patients treated with this drug combination. Agents other than allopurinol should be considered for treating hyperuricemia after thoracic organ transplantation. PMID:8669118

  11. Structural and Functional Insights into the Catalytic Inactivity of the Major Fraction of Buffalo Milk Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Gadave, Kaustubh S.; Panda, Santanu; Singh, Surender; Kalra, Shalini; Malakar, Dhruba; Mohanty, Ashok K.; Kaushik, Jai K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) existing in two interconvertible forms, xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO), catabolises xanthine to uric acid that is further broken down to antioxidative agent allantoin. XOR also produces free radicals serving as second messenger and microbicidal agent. Large variation in the XO activity has been observed among various species. Both hypo and hyper activity of XOR leads to pathophysiological conditions. Given the important nutritional role of buffalo milk in human health especially in south Asia, it is crucial to understand the functional properties of buffalo XOR and the underlying structural basis of variations in comparison to other species. Methods and Findings Buffalo XO activity of 0.75 U/mg was almost half of cattle XO activity. Enzymatic efficiency (kcat/Km) of 0.11 sec−1 µM−1 of buffalo XO was 8–10 times smaller than that of cattle XO. Buffalo XOR also showed lower antibacterial activity than cattle XOR. A CD value (Δε430 nm) of 46,000 M−1 cm−1 suggested occupancy of 77.4% at Fe/S I centre. Buffalo XOR contained 0.31 molybdenum atom/subunit of which 48% existed in active sulfo form. The active form of XO in buffalo was only 16% in comparison to ∼30% in cattle. Sequencing revealed 97.4% similarity between buffalo and cattle XOR. FAD domain was least conserved, while metal binding domains (Fe/S and Molybdenum) were highly conserved. Homology modelling of buffalo XOR showed several variations occurring in clusters, especially close to FAD binding pocket which could affect NAD+ entry in the FAD centre. The difference in XO activity seems to be originating from cofactor deficiency, especially molybdenum. Conclusion A major fraction of buffalo milk XOR exists in a catalytically inactive form due to high content of demolybdo and desulfo forms. Lower Fe/S content and structural factors might be contributing to lower enzymatic efficiency of buffalo XOR in a minor way. PMID:24498153

  12. Allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome in patients with hematological malignancies: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hong Ki; Lee, Boin; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Ju, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Wan-Uk; Park, Young Min

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Allopurinol is a urate-lowering agent that is commonly used to prevent chemotherapy-related hyperuricemia. Allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is a disorder involving multiple organs, which may be accompanied by cutaneous adverse reactions. We identified the characteristics and clinical outcomes of chemotherapy-associated AHS in patients with hematological malignancies. Methods This retrospective single-center study included 26 AHS patients (11 with and 15 without hematological malignancies) admitted to Seoul St. Mary's Hospital. AHS was defined using the criteria of Singer and Wallace. Comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test as appropriate. Results In patients with a hematological malignancy and AHS, statistically significant differences were observed in terms of younger age at onset; shorter duration of exposure; higher starting and maintenance doses of allopurinol; lower incidence of eosinophilia, leukocytosis, and underlying renal insufficiency; and more frequent occurrence of fever compared to AHS patients without a hematological malignancy. Two AHS patients with a hematological malignancy were examined for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B typing, but neither patient harbored the HLA-B*5801 allele. All of the patients ceased allopurinol treatment, with most patients making a full recovery. Two patients in the study died; however, these deaths were unrelated to AHS. One patient developed serious sequelae of AHS that required hemodialysis. Conclusions Physicians who prescribe allopurinol for the prevention of chemotherapy-related hyperuricemia should be aware of the unique risk of AHS, even in patients with hematological malignancies who do not have known risk factors for AHS. Novel urate-lowering agents should be considered alternative treatments. PMID:26161019

  13. Allopurinol and the incidence of bladder cancer: a Taiwan national retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Jen; Hsieh, Ming-Chia; Liao, Wei-Ting; Chan, Ya-Ting; Chang, Shun-Jen

    2016-05-01

    Our aim is to investigate the risk association between allopurinol use and cancer incidence among gout patients using clinical evidence. Newly diagnosed male patients with gout, 20 years or older, were included after excluding those who had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, and were followed up for 12 years in a retrospective cohort study of one million outpatients of a national database. The gout patients were matched to male controls by age and first diagnosis date of gout disease. We then estimated the risk associations between incident cancers and duration of allopurinol use by Cox hazard regression, age-adjusted standardized incidence ratio, and incidence per 1000 person-years. A total of 24 050 gout patients and 76 129 controls were included. The incidence of all-cause cancers for gout patients and controls was 8.26 cases and 7.49 cases/1000 person-years, respectively; it was markedly increased in gout patients who used allopurinol for over 90 days. The hazard ratio of all-cause cancers was 1.21 (95% confidence interval=1.03-1.42, P=0.019) after adjustment for age and 2.26 for bladder cancer (95% confidence interval=1.32-3.87, P=0.003) on comparing those who used allopurinol for over 90 days with nonusers. Meanwhile, other cancers did not show the same significant result. We concluded that those who used allopurinol for a long duration had a higher occurrence of both bladder cancer and all-cause cancers in clinical evidence. PMID:25830898

  14. Xanthine Oxidoreductase-Derived Reactive Species: Physiological and Pathological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid and is widely distributed among species. In addition to this housekeeping function, mammalian XOR is a physiological source of superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, which can function as second messengers in the activation of various pathways. This review intends to address the physiological and pathological roles of XOR-derived oxidant molecules. The cytocidal action of XOR products has been claimed in relation to tissue damage, in particular damage induced by hypoxia and ischemia. Attempts to exploit this activity to eliminate unwanted cells via the construction of conjugates have also been reported. Moreover, different aspects of XOR activity related to phlogosis, endothelial activation, leukocyte activation, and vascular tone regulation, have been taken into consideration. Finally, the positive and negative outcomes concerning cancer pathology have been analyzed because XOR products may induce mutagenesis, cell proliferation, and tumor progression, but they are also associated with apoptosis and cell differentiation. In conclusion, XOR activity generates free radicals and other oxidant reactive species that may result in either harmful or beneficial outcomes. PMID:26823950

  15. Xanthine Oxidoreductase-Derived Reactive Species: Physiological and Pathological Effects.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid and is widely distributed among species. In addition to this housekeeping function, mammalian XOR is a physiological source of superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, which can function as second messengers in the activation of various pathways. This review intends to address the physiological and pathological roles of XOR-derived oxidant molecules. The cytocidal action of XOR products has been claimed in relation to tissue damage, in particular damage induced by hypoxia and ischemia. Attempts to exploit this activity to eliminate unwanted cells via the construction of conjugates have also been reported. Moreover, different aspects of XOR activity related to phlogosis, endothelial activation, leukocyte activation, and vascular tone regulation, have been taken into consideration. Finally, the positive and negative outcomes concerning cancer pathology have been analyzed because XOR products may induce mutagenesis, cell proliferation, and tumor progression, but they are also associated with apoptosis and cell differentiation. In conclusion, XOR activity generates free radicals and other oxidant reactive species that may result in either harmful or beneficial outcomes. PMID:26823950

  16. Genome-wide association study identifies ABCG2 (BCRP) as an allopurinol transporter and a determinant of drug response

    PubMed Central

    Wen, CC; Yee, SW; Liang, X; Hoffmann, TJ; Kvale, MN; Banda, Y; Jorgenson, E; Schaefer, C; Risch, N; Giacomini, KM

    2015-01-01

    The first-line treatment of hyperuricemia, which causes gout, is allopurinol. The allopurinol response is highly variable, with many users failing to achieve target serum uric acid (SUA) levels. No genome-wide association study (GWAS) has examined the genetic factors affecting allopurinol effectiveness. Using 2,027 subjects in Kaiser Permanente’s Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) Cohort, we conducted a GWAS of allopurinol-related SUA reduction, first in the largest ethnic group, non-Hispanic white (NHW) subjects, and then in a stratified transethnic meta-analysis. ABCG2, encoding the efflux pump BCRP, was associated with SUA reduction in NHW subjects (P = 2 × 10−8), and a missense allele (rs2231142) was associated with a reduced response (P = 3 × 10−7) in the meta-analysis. Isotopic uptake studies in cells demonstrated that BCRP transports allopurinol and genetic variants in ABCG2 affect this transport. Collectively, this first GWAS of allopurinol response demonstrates that ABCG2 is a key determinant of response to the drug. PMID:25676789

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Allopurinol in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Alan J.; Struthers, Allan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are limited by intermittent claudication in the distance they can walk. Allopurinol has been shown in coronary arterial disease to prolong exercise before angina occurs, likely by prevention of oxygen wastage in tissues and reduction of harmful oxidative stress. Methods In this study we evaluated whether allopurinol could prolong the time to development of leg pain in participants with PAD. In a double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial participants were randomized to receive either allopurinol 300 mg twice daily or placebo for 6 months. The primary outcome was change in exercise capacity on treadmill testing at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were 6-minute walking distance, Walking Impairment Questionnaire, SF-36 questionnaire, flow-mediated dilatation, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Outcome measures were repeated midstudy and at the end of study. The mean age of the 50 participants was 68.4 ± 1.2 years with 39 of 50 (78%) male. Results Five participants withdrew during the study (2 active, 3 placebo). There was a significant reduction in uric acid levels in those who received active treatment of 52.1% (P < 0.001), but no significant change in either the pain-free or the maximum walking distance. Other measures of exercise capacity, blood vessel function, and the participants' own assessment of their health and walking ability also did not change during the course of the study. Conclusions Although allopurinol has been shown to be of benefit in a number of other diseases, in this study there was no evidence of any improvement after treatment in patients with PAD. PMID:26277090

  18. In vitro effects of mycophenolic acid and allopurinol against Leishmania tropica in human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, J D; Webster, H K

    1982-01-01

    The possibility that purine inhibitors or analogs might be effective antileishmanial agents led to the determination of the antileishmanial activity of mycophenolic acid and allopurinol in vitro. The drugs were tested against Leishmania tropica amastigotes (mammalian forms) within human macrophages, a model in which achievable serum concentrations of antileishmanial agents currently in use eliminate approximately 90% of the parasites. Mycophenolic acid, an inhibitor of guanosine nucleotide synthesis from inosinic acid, was shown here to inhibit guanosine nucleotide synthesis in L. tropica promastigotes (insect forms). When tested against L. tropica amastigotes within macrophages, mycophenolic acid eliminated 50% of the parasites at achievable peak human serum levels (20 micrograms/ml) and 40% of the parasites at trough serum levels (1 to 10 micrograms/ml). This demonstrates that an inhibitor of guanosine nucleotide synthesis is partially effective against L. tropica in vitro. The purine analog allopurinol was also tested and was found to eliminate 50% of L. tropica amastigotes in this model. Because mycophenolic acid and allopurinol are partially, but not completely, effective antileishmanial agents in this in vitro model, their in vivo utility remains to be determined by clinical trials. PMID:7114837

  19. HLA-B*58:01 for Allopurinol-Induced Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions: Implication for Clinical Interpretation in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Jantararoungtong, Thawinee; Kuntawong, Parnrat; Puangpetch, Apichaya; Koomdee, Napatrupron; Satapornpong, Patompong; Supapsophon, Patcharin; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Rerkpattanapipat, Ticha

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the predisposition to different types of allopurinol-induced cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR), including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN; SJS-TEN, n = 13), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS, n = 10) and Maculopapular eruption (MPE; n = 7), conferred by HLA-B*58:01 in a Thai population. Methods: This case-control association study compares 30 patients with allopurinol-induced CADR, allopurinol-tolerant control patients (n = 100), and a Thai general population (n = 1095). Patients' human leukocyte antigen type B (HLA-B) alleles were genotyped by using a two-stage sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe system. Results: Of a total 30 patients with CADR due to allopurinol, 29 (96.7%) patients were found to be at least heterozygous for HLA-B*58:01, compared to only 4.0% in allopurinol-tolerant patients (p < 0.001). Odds ratio (OR) for the association of HLA-B*58:01 with allopurinol-induced CADR in this population was 696.0 (95% CI: 74.8–6475.0). The HLA-B*58:01 allele was present in all patients with allopurinol-induced SJS-TEN (OR = 579.0, 95%CI: 29.5–11362.7, p < 0.001) and DRESS (OR 430.3, 95%CI: 22.6–8958.9, p < 0.001). Additionally, OR of HLA-B*58:01 was highly significant in the allopurinol-induced MPE patients (OR 144.0, 95%CI: 13.9–1497.0, p < 0.001). Conclusion: In this study we confirmed the association between HLAB*58:01 and allopurinol-induced SJS-TEN in a Thai population. In addition, we identified an association between HLA-B*58:01 and allopurinol-induced DRESS and MPE in this population. Therefore, HLA-B*58:01 can be used as a pharmacogenetic marker for allopurinol-induced CADR including SJS-TEN, DRESS and MPE. These results suggest that screening for HLA-B*58:01 alleles in patients who will be treated with allopurinol would be clinically helpful in preventing the risk of developing CARD in a Thai patients. Summary Regardless of

  20. Febuxostat, a novel xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, improves hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Takashi; Nomura, Johji; Matsui, Chieko; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi; Tamura, Mizuho; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is an enzyme responsible for the production of uric acid. XO produces considerable amount of oxidative stress throughout the body. To date, however, its pathophysiologic role in hypertension and endothelial dysfunction still remains controversial. To explore the possible involvement of XO-derived oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of vascular dysfunction, by use of a selective XO inhibitor, febuxostat, we investigated the impact of pharmacological inhibition of XO on hypertension and vascular endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Sixteen-week-old SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with tap water (control) or water containing febuxostat (3 mg/kg/day) for 6 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) in febuxostat-treated SHR (220 ± 3 mmHg) was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased compared with the control SHR (236 ± 4 mmHg) while SBP in febuxostat-treated WKY was constant. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in aortas from febuxostat-treated SHR was significantly (P < 0.05) improved compared with the control SHR, whereas relaxation in response to sodium nitroprusside was not changed. Vascular XO activity and tissue nitrotyrosine level, a representative indicator of local oxidative stress, were considerably elevated in the control SHR compared with the control WKY, and this increment was abolished by febuxostat. Our results suggest that exaggerated XO activity and resultant increase in oxidative stress in this experimental model contribute to the hypertension and endothelial dysfunction, thereby supporting a notion that pharmacological inhibition of XO is valuable not only for hyperuricemia but also for treating hypertension and related endothelial dysfunction in human clinics. PMID:27198514

  1. Kinetic mechanism of Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Nagappa, Lakshmeesha K; Prahladarao, Vasudeva S; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2015-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (PfHGXPRT) exhibits a kinetic mechanism that differs from that of the human homolog. Human HGPRT follows a steady-state ordered mechanism, wherein PRPP binding precedes the binding of hypoxanthine/guanine and release of product IMP/GMP is the rate limiting step. In the current study, initial velocity kinetics with PfHGXPRT indicates a steady-state ordered mechanism, wherein xanthine binding is conditional to the binding of PRPP. The value of the rate constant for IMP dissociation is greater by 183-fold than the kcat for hypoxanthine phosphoribosylation and this results in the absence of burst in progress curves from pre-steady-state kinetics. Further, IMP binding is 1000 times faster (4s(-1) at 0.5μM IMP) when compared to the kcat (3.9±0.2×10(-3)s(-1)) for the reverse IMP pyrophosphorolysis reaction. These results lend support to the fact that in both forward and reverse reactions, the process of chemical conversion (formation of IMP/hypoxanthine) is slow and the events of ligand association and dissociation are faster. PMID:26902413

  2. The role of cellular oxidases and catalytic iron in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, S.; Jayatilleke, E. Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY )

    1992-01-01

    Free radical generation and catalytic iron have been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury but the source of free radicals is a subject of controversy. The mechanism of ethanol-induced liver injury was investigated in isolated hepatocytes from a rodent model of iron loading in which free radical generation was measured by the determination of alkane production. Iron loading increased hepatic non-heme iron 3-fold, increased the prooxidant activity of cytosolic ultrafiltrates 2-fold and doubled ethanol-induced alkane production. The role of cellular oxidases as a source of ethanol induced free radicals was studied through the use of selective inhibitors. In both the presence and absence of iron loading, selective inhibition of xanthine oxidase with oxipurinol diminished ethanol-induced alkane production 0-40%, inhibition of aldehyde oxidase with menadione diminished alkane production 36-75%, while the inhibition of aldehyde and xanthine oxidase by feeding tungstate virtually abolished alkane production. Addition of acetaldehyde to hepatocytes generated alkanes at rates comparable to those achieved with ethanol indicating the importance of acetaldehyde metabolism in free radical generation.

  3. FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, induces nephropathy in rats, but not in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Takeo; Ashizawa, Naoki; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Koji; Iwanaga, Takashi; Nagata, Osamu

    2009-06-01

    The present studies were performed to investigate the possible mechanism of marked species differences on nephropathy found in the long-term toxicity study of FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor. In the twenty-six-week dose toxicity study in the rat, in which FYX-051 was administered by oral gavage at 0.04, 0.2, and 1 mg/kg, xanthine-mediated nephropathy was seen only at 1 mg/kg, despite the presence of xanthine crystals in urine at 0.2 mg/kg and more; however, in the fifty-two-week dose toxicity study in the monkey, in which FYX-051 was administered by oral gavage at 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, no toxicities were seen, even at 300 mg/kg. These outcomes showed there would be 1500-fold or more differences in the mode of intrarenal xanthine deposition between rats and monkeys. Thus we performed the mechanistic study, and the following outcomes were obtained. First, the amount of urinary purine metabolites was thirty-fold higher in rats than in monkeys. Second, urinary xanthine solubility was sixfold higher in monkeys than in rats. Third, exposure levels of FYX-051 were five-fold higher in rats than in monkeys. Therefore, the present study indicated that the combined effects of purine metabolism, urinary xanthine solubility, and toxicokinetics would contribute to species differences in nephropathy, that is, absence of xanthine-mediated nephropathy in monkeys even at the highest dose of FYX-051. PMID:19336671

  4. Sequential combined treatment with allopurinol and benznidazole in the chronic phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Mazliah, D. E.; Alvarez, M. G.; Cooley, G.; Lococo, B. E.; Bertocchi, G.; Petti, M.; Albareda, M. C.; Armenti, A. H.; Tarleton, R. L.; Laucella, S. A.; Viotti, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Even though the use of combined drugs has been proved to be effective in other chronic infections, assessment of combined treatment of antiparasitic drugs in human Chagas' disease has not been performed. Herein, a pilot study was conducted to evaluate the tolerance and side effects of a sequential combined treatment of two antiparasitic drugs, allopurinol and benznidazole, in the chronic phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Patients and methods Changes in total and T. cruzi-specific T and B cells were monitored during a median follow-up of 36 months. Allopurinol was administered for 3 months (600 mg/day) followed by 30 days of benznidazole (5 mg/kg/day) in 11 T. cruzi-infected subjects. Results The combined sequential treatment of allopurinol and benznidazole was well tolerated. The levels of T. cruzi-specific antibodies significantly decreased after sequential combined treatment, as determined by conventional serology and by a multiplex assay using recombinant proteins. The frequency of T. cruzi-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells significantly increased after allopurinol treatment and decreased to background levels following benznidazole administration in a substantial proportion of subjects evaluated. The levels of total naive (CD45RA + CCR7 + CD62L+) CD4 + and CD8 + T cells were restored after allopurinol administration and maintained after completion of the combined drug protocol, along with a decrease in T cell activation in total peripheral CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. Conclusions This pilot study shows that the combination of allopurinol and benznidazole induces significant modifications in T and B cell responses indicative of a reduction in parasite burden, and sustains the feasibility of administration of two antiparasitic drugs in the chronic phase of Chagas' disease. PMID:23104493

  5. Life Threatening, Allopurinol-related Dress Syndrome as a Rare Cause of Fever of Unknown Origin.

    PubMed

    Civardi, Giuseppe; Zanlari, Luca; Bassi, Emanuele; Zangrandi, Adriano; Maria Cesinaro, Anna; Nosseir, Sofia; De Maria, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Drug reaction eosinophilia with systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a potentially life threatening condition secondary to the usage of a wide type of drugs. A 38-year-old woman under allopurinol therapy for hyperuricemia was admitted in our department with fever and a diffuse cutaneous erythematous eruption. A few days after admission she developed rapidly progressive signs of acute liver and kidney failure. Subsequently, her clinical conditions shortly improved. The histologic findings obtained from skin and liver biopsies were consistent with a toxic drug reaction. The patient completely recovered and has been healthy for five years. PMID:26278306

  6. Increase in thyroid stimulating hormone levels in patients with gout treated with inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Chinchilla, Sandra Pamela; Atxotegi, Joana; Urionagüena, Irati; Herrero-Beites, Ana Maria; Aniel-Quiroga, Maria Angeles

    2015-11-01

    Increase in thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels over the upper normal limit has been reported in a small percentage of patients treated with febuxostat in clinical trials, but a mechanistic explanation is not yet available. In an observational parallel longitudinal cohort study, we evaluated changes in TSH levels in patients with gout at baseline and during urate-lowering treatment with febuxostat. Patients to be started on allopurinol who had a measurement of TSH in the 6-month period prior to baseline evaluation were used for comparison. TSH levels and change in TSH levels at 12-month follow-up were compared between groups. Patients with abnormal TSH levels or previous thyroid disease or on amiodarone were not included for analysis. Eighty-eight patients treated with febuxostat and 87 with allopurinol were available for comparisons. Patients to be treated with febuxostat had higher urate levels and TSH levels, more severe gout, and poorer renal function, but were similar regarding other characteristics. A similar rise in TSH levels was observed in both groups (0.4 and 0.5 µUI/mL for febuxostat and allopurinol, respectively); at 12-mo, 7/88 (7.9 %) of patients on febuxostat and 4/87 (3.4 %) of patients on allopurinol showed TSH levels over 0.5 µUI/mL. Doses prescribed (corrected for estimated glomerular filtration rate in the case if patients on allopurinol) and baseline TSH levels were determinants of TSH levels at 12-month follow-up. No impact on free T4 (fT4) levels was observed. Febuxostat, but also allopurinol, increased TSH levels in a dose-dependent way, thus suggesting rather a class effect than a drug effect, but with no apparent impact on either clinical or fT4 levels. PMID:26342297

  7. Albumin microparticles as the carriers for allopurinol and applicable for the treatment of ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganyants, Hovsep Alexandr; Nikohosyan, Gayane; Danielyan, Kristine Edgar

    2016-11-01

    Albumin nanoparticles are already used for the treatment of the cancer. In our current work, it is presented the technique for the preparation of small-size 1- to 5-micron particles coated with the allopurinol. We propose that this combination of the compounds might be useful for the ischemic stroke treatment as the agent preventing formation of the brain edema, reactive oxygen species, and initiation of cells regeneration. Glutaraldehyde was used for the polymerization of albumin. Determination of the particle size was performed by the light as well as phase contrast microscopies and analyzed by Pixcavator 6.0 and Image Tool programs. Modification and establishment of iodine-based method served as the base for quantification of bound with the particles and free allopurinol. As a consequence of the experiments, the best formulation of glutaraldehyde ratio and albumin quantity as well as conditions for the formation of the smallest sized spheroid-shaped particles were found for the further in vivo application.

  8. Stability of acetazolamide, allopurinol, azathioprine, clonazepam, and flucytosine in extemporaneously compounded oral liquids.

    PubMed

    Allen, L V; Erickson, M A

    1996-08-15

    The stability of drugs commonly prescribed for use in oral liquid dosage forms but not commercially available as such was studied. Acetazolamide 25 mg/mL, allopurinol 20 mg/mL, azathioprine 50 mg/mL, clonazepam 0.1 mg/mL, and flucytosine 10 mg/mL were prepared in 1:1 mixture of Ora-Sweet and Ora-Plus (Paddock Laboratories), a 1:1 mixture of Ora-Sweet SF and Ora-Plus (Paddock Laboratories), and cherry syrup and placed in polyethylene terephthalate bottles. The sources of the drugs were capsules and tablets. Six bottles were prepared per liquid; three were stored at 5 degrees C and three at 25 degrees C, all in the dark. A sample was removed from each bottle initially and at intervals up to 60 days and analyzed for drug concentration by stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography. At least 94% of the initial drug concentration was retained in all the oral liquids for up to 60 days. There were no substantial changes in the appearance or odor of the liquids, or in the pH. Acetazolamide 25 mg/mL, allopurinol 20 mg/mL, azathioprine 50 mg/mL, clonazepam 0.1 mg/mL, and flucytosine 10 mg/mL were stable for up to 60 days at 5 and 25 degrees C in three extemporaneously compounded oral liquids. PMID:8862208

  9. Cannabinoids, loratadine and allopurinol as novel additions to the antipsoriatic ammunition.

    PubMed

    Namazi, M R

    2005-05-01

    As the current antipsoriatic medications are commonly associated with deleterious side-effects, a determined search for safer agents, which could be used alone or in combination with current antipsoriatic drugs, would be very imperative. Psoriasis is believed to be characterized by a type 1 cytokine pattern; interferon-gamma, interleukin (IL)-2 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha are predominantly expressed in this disorder. Nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, histamine, leukotriene B4, and decreased [corrected] keratinocyte cyclic adenosine monophosphate/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cAMP/cGMP) ratio are supposed to play roles in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Based on the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis, this paper introduces three novel, potential treatments for this clinical conundrum: (i) cannabinoids, which exert inhibitory effects on antigen processing and macrophage/T-cell interaction and also on the release of IL-2, TNF-alpha and nitric oxide from immune cells; (ii) loratadine, which is an antihistamine capable of increasing [corrected] the cAMP/cGMP ratio and the production of leukotriene B4; and (iii) allopurinol, which scavenges free radicals, inhibits the production of TNF-alpha, and downregulates the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and P2X7 receptors on monocytes/macrophages, which are involved in antigen presentation and production of the inflammatory response, respectively. Importantly, allopurinol, especially in combination with cyclosporin, has been shown to be effective against experimental autoimmune uveitis, which, like psoriasis, is a cell-mediated autoimmune disorder. PMID:15857457

  10. Synergistic action of tiazofurin with hypoxanthine and allopurinol in human neuroectodermal tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, T; Schuchter, K; Chiba, P; Ressmann, G; Lhotka, C; Gharehbaghi, K; Szalay, S M; Pillwein, K

    1993-12-01

    The activity of IMP dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.14), the key enzyme of de novo guanylate biosynthesis, was shown to be increased in tumor cells. Tiazofurin (TR), a potent and specific inhibitor of this enzyme, proved to be effective in the treatment of refractory granulocytic leukemia in blast crisis. We examined the effects of tiazofurin as a single agent and in combination with hypoxanthine and allopurinol in six different neuroectodermal tumor cell lines, the STA-BT-3 and 146-18 human glioblastoma cell lines, the SK-N-SH, LA-N-1 and LA-N-5 human neuroblastoma cell lines, and the STA-ET-1 Ewing tumor cell line. Tiazofurin inhibited tumor cell growth with IC50 values between 2.2 microM (LA-N-1 cell line) and 550 microM (LA-N-5 cells) and caused a significant decrease of intracellular GTP pools (GTP concentrations decreased to 39-79% of control). Incorporation of [8-14C]guanine into GTP pools was determined as a measure of guanylate salvage activity; incubation with 100 microM hypoxanthine caused a 62-96% inhibition of the salvage pathway. Incubation with tiazofurin (100 microM) and hypoxanthine (100 microM) synergistically inhibited tumor cell growth, and the addition of allopurinol (100 microM) strengthened these effects. Therefore, this drug combination, inhibiting guanylate de novo and salvage pathways, may prove useful in the treatment of human neuroectodermal tumors. PMID:7903533

  11. NADPH Oxidase Biology and the Regulation of Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Signaling and Cancer Drug Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Paletta-Silva, Rafael; Rocco-Machado, Nathália; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The outdated idea that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are only dangerous products of cellular metabolism, causing toxic and mutagenic effects on cellular components, is being replaced by the view that ROS have several important functions in cell signaling. In aerobic organisms, ROS can be generated from different sources, including the mitochondrial electron transport chain, xanthine oxidase, myeloperoxidase, and lipoxygenase, but the only enzyme family that produces ROS as its main product is the NADPH oxidase family (NOX enzymes). These transfer electrons from NADPH (converting it to NADP−) to oxygen to make O2•−. Due to their stability, the products of NADPH oxidase, hydrogen peroxide, and superoxide are considered the most favorable ROS to act as signaling molecules. Transcription factors that regulate gene expression involved in carcinogenesis are modulated by NADPH oxidase, and it has emerged as a promising target for cancer therapies. The present review discusses the mechanisms by which NADPH oxidase regulates signal transduction pathways in view of tyrosine kinase receptors, which are pivotal to regulating the hallmarks of cancer, and how ROS mediate the cytotoxicity of several cancer drugs employed in clinical practice. PMID:23434665

  12. Four-week effects of allopurinol and febuxostat treatments on blood pressure and serum creatinine level in gouty men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Seo, Young-Il; Song, Yeong W

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of uric acid lowering therapy (UALT), febuxostat and allopurinol, on blood pressure (BP) and serum creatinine level. Post-hoc data were derived from a phase-III, randomised, double-blind, 4-week trial of male gouty patients that compared the safety and efficacy of febuxostat and allopurinol in adults with gout. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of five groups, 35-37 in each group (febuxostat: 40, 80, 120 mg/d; allopurinol: 300 mg/d; control group: placebo). Blood pressure and serum creatinine level were measured at baseline and at weeks 2 and 4. Diastolic BP and creatinine level had decreased significantly in the UALT groups compared to the control group at week 4. Diastolic BP had decreased significantly in the allopurinol group and serum creatinine level had decreased significantly in the febuxostat groups at week 4. After adjusting for confounding variables, serum uric acid changes were found to be significantly correlated with changes in serum creatinine level but were not associated with changes in systolic or diastolic BP. UALT in gouty subjects significantly decreased diastolic BP and serum creatinine level. Changes in uric acid were significantly correlated with those in serum creatinine level, suggesting the feasibility of renal function improvement through UALT in gouty men. PMID:25120316

  13. Two brothers with skewed thiopurine metabolism in ulcerative colitis treated successfully with allopurinol and mercaptopurine dose reduction.

    PubMed

    Hoentjen, Frank; Hanauer, Stephen B; de Boer, Nanne K; Rubin, David T

    2012-01-01

    Thiopurine therapy effectively maintains remission in inflammatory bowel disease. However, many patients are unable to achieve optimum benefits from azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine because of undesirable metabolism related to high thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) activity characterized by hepatic transaminitis secondary to increased 6-methylmercaptopurine (6-MMP) production and reduced levels of therapeutic 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN). Allopurinol can optimize this skewed metabolism. We discuss two brothers who were both diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC). Their disease remained active despite oral and topical mesalamines. Steroids followed by 6-mercaptopurine (MP) were unsuccessfully introduced for both patients and both were found to have high 6-MMP and low 6-TGN levels, despite normal TMPT enzyme activity, accompanied by transaminitis. Allopurinol was introduced in combination with MP dose reduction. For both brothers addition of allopurinol was associated with successful remission and optimized MP metabolites. These siblings with active UC illustrate that skewed thiopurine metabolism may occur despite normal TPMT enzyme activity and can lead to adverse events in the absence of disease control. We confirm previous data showing that addition of allopurinol can reverse this skewed metabolism, and reduce both hepatotoxicity and disease activity, but we now also introduce the concept of a family history of preferential MP metabolism as a clue to effective management for other family members. PMID:22147254

  14. Xanthine derivatives without PDE effect stimulate voltage-activated chloride conductance of toad skin.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Wolfram; Katz, Uri

    2003-02-01

    The effect of xanthine derivatives on the voltage-activated Cl(-) conductance (G(Cl)) of amphibian skin was analyzed. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and the recently synthesized xanthine derivatives 3,7-dimethyl-1-propyl xanthine (X-32) and 3,7-dimethyl-1-isobutyl xanthine (X-33), which lack inhibitory effects on phosphodiesterases in CHO and Calu-3 cells, increased voltage-activated G(Cl) without effect on baseline conductance at inactivating voltage. Half-maximal stimulation of G(Cl) occurred at 108 +/- 9 microM for X-32 and X-33 after apical or basolateral application. The stimulation of G(Cl), which occurs only in the presence of Cl(-) in the mucosal solution, is caused by a shift of the voltage sensitivity to lower clamp potentials and an increase of the maximally activated level. Furosemide reversed both the shift of sensitivity and the increase in magnitude. These patterns are fundamentally different from those seen after application of membrane-permeant, nonmetabolized analogs of cAMP, and they indicate that the xanthines stimulate G(Cl) directly. This notion is strengthened by the lack of influence on intracellular cAMP content, which is consistent with the observations in CHO and Calu-3 cells. We propose that the xanthine derivatives increase the voltage sensitivity of a regulative component in the conductive Cl(-) pathway across amphibian skin. PMID:12397028

  15. Efficacy of allopurinol and benzbromarone for the control of hyperuricaemia. A pathogenic approach to the treatment of primary chronic gout

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Ruiz, F; Alonso-Ruiz, A; Calabozo, M; Herrero-Beites, A; Garcia-Erauskin, G; Ruiz-Lucea, E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To study the efficacy of allopurinol and benzbromarone to reduce serum urate concentrations in patients with primary chronic gout.
METHODS—Prospective, parallel, open study of 86 consecutive male patients with primary chronic gout. Forty nine patients (26 normal excretors and 23 under excretors) were given allopurinol 300 mg/day and 37 under excretors benzbromarone 100 mg/day. After achieving steady plasma urate concentrations with such doses, treatment was then adjusted to obtain optimal plasmatic urate concentrations (under 6 mg/dl).
RESULTS—Patients receiving allopurinol 300 mg/day showed a mean reduction of plasmatic urate of 2.75 mg/dl (from 8.60 to 5.85 mg/dl) and 3.34 mg/dl (from 9.10 to 5.76 mg/dl) in normal excretors and under excretors respectively. Patients receiving benzbromarone 100 mg/day achieved a reduction of plasmatic urate of 5.04 mg/dl (from 8.58 to 3.54 mg/dl). Fifty three per cent of patients receiving allopurinol and 100% receiving benzbromarone achieved optimal plasma urate concentrations at such doses. The patients with poor results with allopurinol 300 mg/day achieved a proper plasma urate concentration with allopurinol 450 to 600 mg/day, the mean final dose being 372 mg/day. Renal fuction improved and no case of renal lithiasis was observed among benzbromarone treated patients, whose mean final dose was 76 mg/day.
CONCLUSION—Benzbromarone is very effective to control plasma urate concentrations at doses ranging from 50 to 100 mg/day. Uricosuric treatment is a suitable approach to the treatment of patients with gout who show underexcretion of urate.

 Keywords: gout; gout suppressants; allopurinol; benzbromarone PMID:9849314

  16. Pre-Treatment with Allopurinol or Uricase Attenuates Barrier Dysfunction but Not Inflammation during Murine Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Maria T.; Aslami, Hamid; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Tuip-de Boer, Anita M.; Hegeman, Maria A.; Jongsma, Geartsje; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; van der Poll, Tom; Schultz, Marcus J.; Wieland, Catharina W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Uric acid released from injured tissue is considered a major endogenous danger signal and local instillation of uric acid crystals induces acute lung inflammation via activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is mediated by the NLRP3 inflammasome and increased uric acid levels in lung lavage fluid are reported. We studied levels in human lung injury and the contribution of uric acid in experimental VILI. Methods Uric acid levels in lung lavage fluid of patients with acute lung injury (ALI) were determined. In a different cohort of cardiac surgery patients, uric acid levels were correlated with pulmonary leakage index. In a mouse model of VILI the effect of allopurinol (inhibits uric acid synthesis) and uricase (degrades uric acid) pre-treatment on neutrophil influx, up-regulation of adhesion molecules, pulmonary and systemic cytokine levels, lung pathology, and regulation of receptors involved in the recognition of uric acid was studied. In addition, total protein and immunoglobulin M in lung lavage fluid and pulmonary wet/dry ratios were measured as markers of alveolar barrier dysfunction. Results Uric acid levels increased in ALI patients. In cardiac surgery patients, elevated levels correlated significantly with the pulmonary leakage index. Allopurinol or uricase treatment did not reduce ventilator-induced inflammation, IκB-α degradation, or up-regulation of NLRP3, Toll-like receptor 2, and Toll-like receptor 4 gene expression in mice. Alveolar barrier dysfunction was attenuated which was most pronounced in mice pre-treated with allopurinol: both treatment strategies reduced wet/dry ratio, allopurinol also lowered total protein and immunoglobulin M levels. Conclusions Local uric acid levels increase in patients with ALI. In mice, allopurinol and uricase attenuate ventilator-induced alveolar barrier dysfunction. PMID:23226314

  17. Sulfite Oxidase Catalyzes Single-Electron Transfer at Molybdenum Domain to Reduce Nitrite to Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Krizowski, Sabina; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin; Niks, Dimitri; Tejero, Jesús; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Wang, Ling; Ragireddy, Venkata; Frizzell, Sheila; Kelley, Eric E.; Zhang, Yingze; Basu, Partha; Hille, Russ

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Recent studies suggest that the molybdenum enzymes xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, and mARC exhibit nitrite reductase activity at low oxygen pressures. However, inhibition studies of xanthine oxidase in humans have failed to block nitrite-dependent changes in blood flow, leading to continued exploration for other candidate nitrite reductases. Another physiologically important molybdenum enzyme—sulfite oxidase (SO)—has not been extensively studied. Results: Using gas-phase nitric oxide (NO) detection and physiological concentrations of nitrite, SO functions as nitrite reductase in the presence of a one-electron donor, exhibiting redox coupling of substrate oxidation and nitrite reduction to form NO. With sulfite, the physiological substrate, SO only facilitates one turnover of nitrite reduction. Studies with recombinant heme and molybdenum domains of SO indicate that nitrite reduction occurs at the molybdenum center via coupled oxidation of Mo(IV) to Mo(V). Reaction rates of nitrite to NO decreased in the presence of a functional heme domain, mediated by steric and redox effects of this domain. Using knockdown of all molybdopterin enzymes and SO in fibroblasts isolated from patients with genetic deficiencies of molybdenum cofactor and SO, respectively, SO was found to significantly contribute to hypoxic nitrite signaling as demonstrated by activation of the canonical NO-sGC-cGMP pathway. Innovation: Nitrite binds to and is reduced at the molybdenum site of mammalian SO, which may be allosterically regulated by heme and molybdenum domain interactions, and contributes to the mammalian nitrate-nitrite-NO signaling pathway in human fibroblasts. Conclusion: SO is a putative mammalian nitrite reductase, catalyzing nitrite reduction at the Mo(IV) center. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 283–294. PMID:25314640

  18. Microbial and xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitory activity of some flavones.

    PubMed

    Khobragade, C N; Bodade, Ragini G; Shinde, M S; Jaju, Deepa R; Bhosle, R B; Dawane, B S

    2008-06-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is responsible for the pathological condition called Gout. In the present study different flavones synthesized from chalcone were evaluated in vitro for their inhibitory activity. Inhibitory activity of flavones on XDH was determined in terms of inhibition of uric acid synthesis from Xanthine. The enzymatic activity was found maximum at pH 7.5 and temperature 40 degrees C. The flavones 6-chloro-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(1)) and 6-chloro-7methyl-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one(F(2)),were noncompetitive and competitive inhibitor with Ki values 1.1 and 0.22 respectively. The flavones (F(1)), (F(2)), 6-chloro-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one(F(3)), 8-bromo-6-chloro-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(4)), 2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(5)) and 6-methyl-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(6)) were also screened for their antimicrobial activity, measured in terms of zone of inhibition. A broad spectrum antifungal activity was obtained against Trichoderma viridae, Candida albicans, Microsporum cannis, Penicillium chrysogenum and Fusarium moniliformae. In case of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavous only spore formation was affected, while antibacterial activity was observed against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Serratia marsecens only. The flavones were further analyzed for quantitative structural activity relationship study (QSAR) by using PASS, online software to determine their Pa value. Toxicity and drug relevant properties were revealed by PALLAS software in terms of their molecular weight. Log P values were also studied. The result showed both the F(1) and F(2) flavones as antigout and therefore supports the development of novel drugs for the treatment of gout. PMID:18569337

  19. DRESS syndrome potentially induced by allopurinol and triggered by influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Solak, Berna; Dikicier, Bahar Sevimli; Kara, Rabia Oztas; Erdem, Teoman

    2016-01-01

    Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, also known as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DHIS), is an acute, potentially life-threatening disease that includes skin rash, fever, haematological abnormalities and multiorgan involvement. Although its aetiopathogenesis is not exactly known, it is thought that inefficient drug detoxification leading to the accumulation of drug reactive metabolites causes autoimmune responses in skin and some internal organs, alters immune responses and induces reactivation of viral infections in people who have genetic predisposition. To the best of our knowledge, only one case of DRESS syndrome has been reported after delivery of the influenza vaccine, but the drug that induced the reaction in that case was sulfasalazine. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman, receiving allopurinol, who developed DRESS syndrome after taking the influenza vaccine. PMID:27030460

  20. Xanthine derivatives quantification in serum by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Peris-Vicente, Juan; Rambla-Alegre, Maria; Durgavanshi, Abhilasha; Bose, Devasish; Esteve-Romero, Josep; Marco-Peiró, Sergio

    2014-10-01

    A capillary electrophoresis method was developed to quantify caffeine and theophylline, xanthine derivatives with bronchodilator activity. Buffer concentration, pH and applied voltage were optimized using a central composite design-face centred. Separation conditions were: silica capillary tube, 75 μm (i.d.) and 61 cm (total length); absorbance detection, 280 nm; borate buffer, 20 mM, pH 9.0; applied voltage, 25 kV and 1 psi injection/8 s. Validation was performed in blank serum following the International Conference Harmonization guidelines: resolution (peaks without overlapping), linear range (0.125-50 µg/mL; r(2) > 0.9999), limits of detection and quantification (10; 20 and 33; 66 ppb for caffeine and theophylline, respectively), intra- and inter-day precision (Relative standard deviation lower than 1.9%) and accuracy (98-101%). Migration times were <8 min. This method is simple, specific and suitable and reaches high label claims (98.7-100.4%) in pharmaceutical formulations analysis. Moreover, the method was applied to the monitoring of the analytes in serum of patients. PMID:24220991

  1. Study on species differences in nephropathy induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Takeo; Ashizawa, Naoki; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Iwanaga, Takashi; Nagata, Osamu

    2011-05-01

    To clarify the toxicological aspects of FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, which is currently being developed as a therapeutic agent against gout and hyperuricemia, we performed the study focused on species differences in FYX-051-induced nephropathy. In the repeated toxicology testing by oral administration, nephropathy was seen at 1 mg/kg and more in rats and at 100 mg/kg in dogs, in contrast to no toxicity even at the practical maximum dose (300 mg/kg) in monkeys. The HPLC and LC-MS/MS analyses of intrarenal deposits in dogs have proven that the entity was xanthine. The study on dose dependency of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, urinary xanthine excretion, and kidney xanthine content by oral administration at 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg to rats revealed the involvement of xanthine in the occurrence of nephropathy, thus suggesting that plasma concentrations of FYX-051 can contribute to species differences. Regarding the possible factors of species differences, the daily urinary excretion of total purine metabolites was 30.5- and 6.3-fold greater in rats and dogs, respectively, than in monkeys. Urinary xanthine solubility was 2.3- and 6.3-fold higher in dogs and monkeys, respectively, than in rats. Plasma concentrations of FYX-051 were fivefold higher in rats than in dogs and monkeys, without differences between the latter two species. Therefore, the present study indicated that species differences in nephropathy were produced by the combined effects of purine metabolism, urinary xanthine solubility, and plasma concentrations of FYX-051. PMID:20936465

  2. Structure and function of mammalian aldehyde oxidases.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mineko; Romão, Maria João; Leimkühler, Silke; Bolis, Marco; Fratelli, Maddalena; Coelho, Catarina; Santos-Silva, Teresa; Garattini, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian aldehyde oxidases (AOXs; EC1.2.3.1) are a group of conserved proteins belonging to the family of molybdo-flavoenzymes along with the structurally related xanthine dehydrogenase enzyme. AOXs are characterized by broad substrate specificity, oxidizing not only aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes into the corresponding carboxylic acids, but also hydroxylating a series of heteroaromatic rings. The number of AOX isoenzymes expressed in different vertebrate species is variable. The two extremes are represented by humans, which express a single enzyme (AOX1) in many organs and mice or rats which are characterized by tissue-specific expression of four isoforms (AOX1, AOX2, AOX3, and AOX4). In vertebrates each AOX isoenzyme is the product of a distinct gene consisting of 35 highly conserved exons. The extant species-specific complement of AOX isoenzymes is the result of a complex evolutionary process consisting of a first phase characterized by a series of asynchronous gene duplications and a second phase where the pseudogenization and gene deletion events prevail. In the last few years remarkable advances in the elucidation of the structural characteristics and the catalytic mechanisms of mammalian AOXs have been made thanks to the successful crystallization of human AOX1 and mouse AOX3. Much less is known about the physiological function and physiological substrates of human AOX1 and other mammalian AOX isoenzymes, although the importance of these proteins in xenobiotic metabolism is fairly well established and their relevance in drug development is increasing. This review article provides an overview and a discussion of the current knowledge on mammalian AOX. PMID:26920149

  3. Use of HLA-B*58:01 genotyping to prevent allopurinol induced severe cutaneous adverse reactions in Taiwan: national prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Tai-Ming; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Chen, Shih-Yang; Chen, Kuo-Shu; Yu, Kuang-Hui; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Huang, Chung-Ming; Wang, Chrong-Reen; Weng, Chia-Tse; Yu, Chia-Li; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Lai, Wen-Ter; Tsai, Wen-Chan; Yin, Guang-Dar; Ou, Tsan-Teng; Cheng, Kai-Hung; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Liou, Teh-Ling; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Chen, Der-Yuan; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Weng, Meng-Yu; Chen, Yi-Ming; Chen, Chen-Hung; Liu, Ming-Fei; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Lee, Jia-Jung; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Wu, Chen-Ching; Hung, Shih-Yuan; Luo, Shue-Fen; Yang, Ya-Hui; Chuang, Hui-Ping; Chou, Yi-Chun; Liao, Hung-Ting; Wang, Chia-Wen; Huang, Chun-Lin; Chang, Chia-Shuo; Lee, Ming-Ta Michael; Chen, Pei; Wong, Chih-Shung; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of prospective screening for the HLA-B*58:01 allele to identify Taiwanese individuals at risk of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) induced by allopurinol treatment. Design National prospective cohort study. Setting 15 medical centres in different regions of Taiwan, from July 2009 to August 2014. Participants 2926 people who had an indication for allopurinol treatment but had not taken allopurinol previously. Participants were excluded if they had undergone a bone marrow transplant, were not of Han Chinese descent, and had a history of allopurinol induced hypersensitivity. DNA purified from 2910 participants’ peripheral blood was used to assess the presence of HLA-B*58:01. Main outcome measures Incidence of allopurinol induced SCARs with and without screening. Results Participants who tested positive for HLA-B*58:01 (19.6%, n=571) were advised to avoid allopurinol, and were referred to an alternate drug treatment or advised to continue with their prestudy treatment. Participants who tested negative (80.4%, n=2339) were given allopurinol. Participants were interviewed once a week for two months to monitor symptoms. The historical incidence of allopurinol induced SCARs, estimated by the National Health Insurance research database of Taiwan, was used for comparison. Mild, transient rash without blisters developed in 97 (3%) participants during follow-up. None of the participants was admitted to hospital owing to adverse drug reactions. SCARs did not develop in any of the participants receiving allopurinol who screened negative for HLA-B*58:01. By contrast, seven cases of SCARs were expected, based on the estimated historical incidence of allopurinol induced SCARs nationwide (0.30% per year, 95% confidence interval 0.28% to 0.31%; P=0.0026; two side one sample binomial test). Conclusions Prospective screening of the HLA-B*58:01 allele, coupled with an alternative drug treatment for carriers, significantly decreased the incidence

  4. CHARACTERISTICS OF POLYPHENOL OXIDASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.1) catalyzes the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones. Highly reactive o-quinones couple with phenolics and specific amino acids on proteins to form the characteristic browning products in many wounded fruits, vegetables, and leaf tissues of plant...

  5. [Life-threatening adverse effects of pharmacologic antihyperuricemic therapy].

    PubMed

    Russmann, St; Lauterburg, B

    2004-09-01

    Minor hypersensitivity reactions to allopurinol presenting as skin rash occur in approximately 2% of patients. A more severe, albeit rare, hypersensitivity reaction with fever, eosinophilia, dermatitis, renal failure, vasculitis and hepatic dysfunction carries a mortality of up to 20%. The incidence of this severe reaction can probably be reduced by adjusting the dose of allopurinol in patients with impaired renal function. Azathioprine and mercaptopurine are metabolised by xanthine oxidase, the enzyme that is inhibited by allopurinol. Concomitant administration can result in life-threatening neutropenia unless the dose of allopurinol is reduced by approximately 75%. The uricosuric agent benzbromarone has recently been withdrawn from the market because of several cases of fulminant hepatic failure with subsequent death of the patient or liver transplantation. PMID:15493119

  6. Xanthine urolithiasis causing bilateral ureteral obstruction in a 10-month-old cat.

    PubMed

    Mestrinho, Lisa A; Gonçalves, Tiago; Parreira, Pedro B; Niza, Maria M R E; Hamaide, Annick J

    2013-10-01

    Xanthine urolithiasis was diagnosed in a 10-month-old intact female domestic shorthair cat presented with acute renal failure due to bilateral ureteral obstruction. Ultrasonography revealed the presence of multiple uroliths in both kidneys and ureters that were not detectable on previous survey radiographs. Medical management failed and ureteral obstruction persisted with no evidence of stone migration into the bladder. Bilateral ureterotomy with urolith removal was performed in order to relieve the obstruction. The cat recovered from surgery, and blood urea nitrogen and creatinine values decreased within normal limits 6 days postoperatively. Urolith analysis by infrared spectrometry determined xanthine composition, and a higher blood and urine concentration of hypoxanthine and xanthine was also found. At 1-year follow-up, the cat was free of clinical signs. However, ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed small-size calculi in both kidneys, despite the low protein diet intake. The very young age of the animal suggests a possible congenital xanthinuria. PMID:23413269

  7. Vibrational spectral investigation on xanthine and its derivatives—theophylline, caffeine and theobromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekaran, S.; Sankari, G.; Ponnusamy, S.

    2005-01-01

    A normal coordinate analysis has been carried out on four compounds having a similar ring structure with different side chain substitutions, which are xanthine, caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine. Xanthine is chemically known as 2,6-dihydroxy purine. Caffeine, theophylline and theobromine are methylated xanthines. Considering the methyl groups as point mass, the number of normal modes of vibrations can be distributed as Γ vib=27 A'+12 A″ based on C s point group symmetry associated with the structures. In the present work 15 A' and 12 A″ normal modes are considered. A new set of orthonormal symmetry co-ordinates have been constructed. Wilson's F- G matrix method has been adopted for the normal coordinate analysis. A satisfactory vibrational band assignment has been made by employing the FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the compounds. The potential energy distribution is calculated with the arrived values of the force constants and hence the agreement of the frequency assignment has been checked.

  8. Efficacy of combined therapy with liposome-encapsulated meglumine antimoniate and allopurinol in treatment of canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Sydnei M; Amorim, Izabela F G; Ribeiro, Raul R; Azevedo, Erly G; Demicheli, Cynthia; Melo, Maria N; Tafuri, Wagner L; Gontijo, Nelder F; Michalick, Marilene S M; Frézard, Frédéric

    2012-06-01

    An innovative liposomal formulation of meglumine antimoniate (LMA) was recently reported to promote both long-term parasite suppression and reduction of infectivity to sand flies in dogs with visceral leishmaniasis. However, 5 months after treatment, parasites were still found in the bone marrow of all treated dogs. In order to improve treatment with LMA, the present study aimed to evaluate its efficacy in combination with allopurinol. Mongrel dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum were treated with six doses of LMA (6.5 mg Sb/kg of body weight/dose) given at 4-day intervals, plus allopurinol (20 mg/kg/24 h per os) for 140 days. Comparison was made with groups treated with LMA, allopurinol, empty liposomes plus allopurinol, empty liposomes, and saline. Dogs remained without treatment from day 140 to 200 after the start of treatment. The drug combination promoted both clinical improvement of dogs and significant reduction in the parasitic load in bone marrow and spleen on days 140 and 200 compared to these parameters in the pretreatment period. This is in contrast with the other protocols, which did not result in significant reduction of the bone marrow parasite load on day 200. Strikingly, the combined treatment, in contrast to the other regimens, induced negative quantitative PCR (qPCR) results in the liver of 100% of the dogs. Both xenodiagnosis and skin parasite determination by qPCR indicated that the drug combination was effective in blocking the transmission of skin parasites to sand flies. Based on all of the parasitological tests performed on day 200, 50% of the animals that received the combined treatment were considered cured. PMID:22411610

  9. Efficacy of Combined Therapy with Liposome-Encapsulated Meglumine Antimoniate and Allopurinol in Treatment of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Sydnei M.; Amorim, Izabela F. G.; Ribeiro, Raul R.; Azevedo, Erly G.; Demicheli, Cynthia; Melo, Maria N.; Tafuri, Wagner L.; Gontijo, Nelder F.; Michalick, Marilene S. M.

    2012-01-01

    An innovative liposomal formulation of meglumine antimoniate (LMA) was recently reported to promote both long-term parasite suppression and reduction of infectivity to sand flies in dogs with visceral leishmaniasis. However, 5 months after treatment, parasites were still found in the bone marrow of all treated dogs. In order to improve treatment with LMA, the present study aimed to evaluate its efficacy in combination with allopurinol. Mongrel dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum were treated with six doses of LMA (6.5 mg Sb/kg of body weight/dose) given at 4-day intervals, plus allopurinol (20 mg/kg/24 h per os) for 140 days. Comparison was made with groups treated with LMA, allopurinol, empty liposomes plus allopurinol, empty liposomes, and saline. Dogs remained without treatment from day 140 to 200 after the start of treatment. The drug combination promoted both clinical improvement of dogs and significant reduction in the parasitic load in bone marrow and spleen on days 140 and 200 compared to these parameters in the pretreatment period. This is in contrast with the other protocols, which did not result in significant reduction of the bone marrow parasite load on day 200. Strikingly, the combined treatment, in contrast to the other regimens, induced negative quantitative PCR (qPCR) results in the liver of 100% of the dogs. Both xenodiagnosis and skin parasite determination by qPCR indicated that the drug combination was effective in blocking the transmission of skin parasites to sand flies. Based on all of the parasitological tests performed on day 200, 50% of the animals that received the combined treatment were considered cured. PMID:22411610

  10. HPLC method development for the online-coupling of chromatographic Perilla frutescens extract separation with xanthine oxidase enzymatic assay.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Christine M; Grassmann, Johanna; Letzel, Thomas

    2016-05-30

    Enzyme-regulatory effects of compounds contained in complex mixtures can be unveiled by coupling a continuous-flow enzyme assay to a chromatographic separation. A temperature-elevated separation was developed and the performance was tested using Perilla frutescens plant extracts of various polarity (water, methanol, ethanol/water). Owning to the need of maintaining sufficient enzymatic activity, only low organic solvent concentrations can be added to the mobile phase. Hence, to broaden the spectrum of eluting compounds, two different organic solvents and various contents were tested. The chromatographic performance and elution was further improved by the application of a moderate temperature gradient to the column. By taking the effect of eluent composition as well as calculated logD values and molecular structure of known extract compounds into account, unknown features were tentatively assigned. The method used allowed the successful observation of an enzymatic inhibition caused by P. frutescens extract. PMID:26986639

  11. Antioxidant effect of naturally occurring xanthines on the oxidative damage of DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, A. J. S. C.; Telo, J. P.; Pereira, H. F.; Patrocínio, P. F.; Dias, R. M. B.

    1999-01-01

    The repair of the oxidised radicals of adenine and guanosine by several naturally occurring xanthines was studied. Each pair of DNA purine/xanthine was made to react with the sulphate radical and the decrease of the concentration of both compounds was measured by HPLC as a function of irradiation time. The results show that xanthine efficiently prevents the oxidation of the two DNA purines. Theophyline and paraxanthine repair the oxidised radical of adenine but not the one from guanosine. Theobromine and caffeine do not show any protecting effect. An order of the oxidation potentials of all the purines studied is proposed. La réparation des radicaux oxydés de l'adénine et de la guanosine par des xanthines naturelles a été étudiée en soumettant chaque paire base de l'ADN/xanthine à l'oxydation par le radical sulfate et en mesurant par HPLC la disparition des deux composés en fonction du temps d'irradiation. Les résultats montrent que la xanthine joue un rôle protecteur efficace contre l'oxydation des deux purines de l'ADN. La théophyline et la paraxanthine réparent le radical oxydé de l'adénine mais pas celui de la guanosine. La théobromine et la cafeíne n'ont pas d'effet protecteur. Un ordre de potentiels d'oxydation des purines étudiées est proposé.

  12. Effect of antiperoxidative drugs on gastric damage induced by ethanol in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mizui, T.; Sato, H.; Hirose, F.; Doteuchi, M.

    1987-08-10

    Lesion formation due to oral administration of absolute ethanol could be prevented by parenteral pretreatment with antiperoxidative drugs such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), quercetin and quinacrine. Also effective were allopurinol and oxypurinol, inhibitors of xanthine oxidase, but not superoxide dismutase (SOD) and hydroxyl radical scavengers, such as sodium benzoate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). BHT, quercetin, quinacrine and sulfhydryl compounds such as reduced glutathione and cysteamine which offer gastroprotection in vivo against ethanol inhibited lipid peroxidation induced in vitro by ferrous ion in porcine gastric mucosal homogenate, but SOD, sodium benzoate, DMSO, allopurinol and oxypurinol did not. These results suggest the possibility that an active species, probably derived from free iron mobilized by the xanthine oxidase system, other than oxygen radicals such as hydroxyl formation in the gastric mucosa after absolute ethanol administration. 38 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  13. A highly sensitive assay for xanthine oxidoreductase activity using a combination of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine and liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Murase, Takayo; Oka, Mitsuru; Nampei, Mai; Miyachi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we developed a highly sensitive assay for xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) activity utilizing a combination of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine and liquid chromatography (LC)/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (TQMS). In this assay, the amount of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]uric acid (UA) produced by XOR was determined by using LC/TQMS. For this assay, we synthesized [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine as a substrate, [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]UA as an analytical standard, and [(13) C3 ,(15) N3 ]UA as an internal standard. The [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]UA calibration curve obtained using LC/TQMS under the selected reaction monitoring mode was evaluated, and the results indicated good linearity (R(2)  = 0.998, weighting of 1/x(2) ) in the range of 20 to 4000 nM. As a model reaction of less active samples, the XOR activity of serial-diluted mouse plasma was measured. Thereby, the XOR activity of the 1024-fold-diluted mouse plasma was 4.49 ± 0.44 pmol/100 μL/h (mean ± standard deviation, n = 3). This value is comparable to the predicted XOR activity value of healthy human plasma. Hence, this combination method may be used to obtain high-sensitivity measurements required for XOR activity analysis on various organs or human plasma. PMID:27006202

  14. Ocular signs, diagnosis and long-term treatment with allopurinol in a cat with leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Richter; Schaarschmidt-Kiener; Krudewig

    2014-06-01

    A case of leishmaniasis with predominantly ocular signs in a cat living in Switzerland and it's treatment is reported. The cat was imported from Spain 4 years earlier and was initially presented with chronic uveitis. Laboratory test results were negative for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and Toxoplasma gondii, as well as for Bartonella haenselae and Leishmania spp. Twenty-one months later the cat was presented again because of development of keratitis and granulomatous blepharitis. Blood cell count revealed severe Pancytopenia; Cytology of fine needle aspirates of granulomatous lesions on both upper eyelids and of a corneal smear revealed intracytoplasmatic microorganisms. A preliminary diagnosis of leishmaniasis was supported by positive polymerase chain reaction from bone marrow and eyelid samples for Leishmania infantum DNA and by a high serum antibody titer for Leishmania spp. Treatment with Allopurinol (10 mg/kg, BID) orally led to rapid improvement of ocular signs, general condition and blood cell count with complete remission of lid and corneal lesions within 2 months of treatment. PMID:24867242

  15. Human herpes virus 6 encephalitis in allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Taro; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Tohyama, Mikiko; Koda, Yoshiyuki; Okuda, Shiho; Maeda, Nobuya; Kanda, Fumio; Yasukawa, Masaki; Hashimoto, Koji; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Ueda, Masato

    2003-01-01

    Hypersensitivity syndrome is one of the most severe forms of drug eruption, and is characterized by a severe, potentially lethal, multiorgan involvement. Recently, reactivation of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) has been suggested to be involved in this syndrome, although the exact role of HHV-6 remains elusive. In addition to exanthem subitum, neurological illnesses, such as infantile febrile illness without rash and encephalitis in immunocompromised patients have been attributed to HHV-6. A 51-year-old man developed a generalized erythematous eruption during treatment with allopurinol. Prednisolone improved his condition, but after the dose of prednisolone was reduced neurological abnormalities such as mental deterioration and positive meningeal signs developed. HHV-6 DNA in his blood by PCR analysis was positive. Furthermore, we detected HHV-6 DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. The titers of anti-HHV-6-IgG increased during the course. His neurological symptoms gradually improved and no neurological sequelae were noted. Neurological abnormalities associated with hypersensitivity syndrome are very rare. However, the detection of HHV-6 DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid strongly indicates an involvement of reactivated HHV-6 in encephalitis. PMID:12735642

  16. Simultaneous treatment with citrate prevents nephropathy induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Takeo; Ashizawa, Naoki; Matsumoto, Koji; Nakazawa, Takashi; Nagata, Osamu

    2005-09-01

    The possible mechanism of the underlying nephropathy found in the rat toxicity study of FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, was investigated. Rats received oral treatment of either 1 or 3 mg/kg of FYX-051, with and without citrate for four weeks to elucidate whether nephropathy could be caused by materials deposited in the kidney. Furthermore, analysis of the renal deposits in rats was also performed. Consequently, interstitial nephritis comprising interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration, dilatation, basophilia and epithelial necrosis of renal tubules and collecting ducts, deposits in renal tubules and collecting ducts, and so forth was seen in six of the eight rats and in all eight rats in the 1 and 3 mg/kg FYX-051 alone groups, respectively, with the intensity in the 3 mg/kg group being moderate to severe. In the simultaneous treatment with citrate group, however, no alterations were observed in the kidney, except for minimal interstitial nephritis in one instance in the 3 mg/kg FYX-051 + citrate group along with an increased urinary pH, leading to an increase in xanthine solubility. Analysis of intrarenal deposits showed that the entity would be composed of xanthine crystals. The present study, therefore, showed that nephropathy in rats occurring after the administration of FYX-051 was a secondary change caused by xanthine crystals being deposited in the kidney, and no other causes could be implicated in this kidney lesion. PMID:15933230

  17. Chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Nishino, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), a complex flavoprotein, catalyzes the metabolic reactions leading from hypoxanthine to xanthine and from xanthine to urate, and both reactions take place at the molybdenum cofactor. The enzyme is a target of drugs for therapy of gout or hyperuricemia. We review the chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of XOR, focusing on molybdenum-dependent reactions of actual or potential medical importance, including nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It is now generally accepted that XOR transfers the water-exchangeable -OH ligand of the molybdenum atom to the substrate. The hydroxyl group at OH-Mo(IV) can be replaced by urate, oxipurinol and FYX-051 derivatives and the structures of these complexes have been determined by xray crystallography under anaerobic conditions. Although formation of NO from nitrite or formation of xanthine from urate by XOR ischemically feasible, it is not yet clear whether these reactions have any physiological significance since the reactions are catalyzed at a slow rate even under anaerobic conditions. PMID:23116398

  18. Chemical Nature and Reaction Mechanisms of the Molybdenum Cofactor of Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Nishino, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), a complex flavoprotein, catalyzes the metabolic reactions leading from hypoxanthine to xanthine and from xanthine to urate, and both reactions take place at the molybdenum cofactor. The enzyme is a target of drugs for therapy of gout or hyperuricemia. We review the chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of XOR, focusing on molybdenum-dependent reactions of actual or potential medical importance, including nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It is now generally accepted that XOR transfers the water-exchangeable -OH ligand of the molybdenum atom to the substrate. The hydroxyl group at OH-Mo(IV) can be replaced by urate, oxipurinol and FYX-051 derivatives and the structures of these complexes have been determined by x-ray crystallography under anaerobic conditions. Although formation of NO from nitrite or formation of xanthine from urate by XOR is chemically feasible, it is not yet clear whether these reactions have any physiological significance since the reactions are catalyzed at a slow rate even under anaerobic conditions. PMID:23116398

  19. [A model-based meta-analysis to compare urate-lowering response rate of febuxostat and allopurinol in gout patient].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Li, Liang; Zhou, Tian-Yan; Lu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to compare the urate-lowering response rate of febuxostat and allopurinol in gout patient using a model-based meta-analysis. The literature search identified 22 clinical trials of gout with a total of 43 unique treatment arms that met our inclusion criteria, and a total of 6 365 gout patients were included in the study. The response rates of allopuriol and febuxostat were characterized by Tmax model and Emax model respectively, and the effect of baseline serum uric acid (sUA) and patient type on the drug effect was tested. The results showed that allopurinol can reach an average maximum response rate of 50.8% while febuxostat can reach a 100% response rate within a very short time, and the ED50 was 34.3 mg. Covariate analysis revealed that baseline sUA has a negative effect on response rate of allopurinol, and a positive effect on the predicted ED50 of febuxostat. For patients who had shown inadequate response to prior allopurinol treatment, the average response rate was about half that of the allopurinol responder patients. PMID:25920196

  20. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Masashi; Wakabayashi, Takashi

    1982-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (ferrocytochrome c:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.9.3.1) was purified from beef heart mitochondria. By washing the oxidase with detergent on a hydrophobic interaction column, phospholipids were depleted to the level of 1 mol of cardiolipin per mol of heme a. Hydrophobic impurities and partially denatured oxidase were separated from the intact oxidase on an affinity column with cytochrome c as the specific ligand. The final preparation of the oxidase contained seven distinct polypeptides. The molecular weight of the oxidase was estimated to be 130,000 from its specific heme a and copper content and from the subunit composition. Crystals of the oxidase were obtained by slow removal of the detergent from the buffer in which the oxidase was dissolved. The needle-shaped crystals were 100 μ m in average length and 5 μ m in width, and they strongly polarized visible light. Electron diffraction patterns were obtained with an unstained glutaraldehyde-fixed single crystal by electron microscopy using 1,000-kV electrons. From electron micrographs and the diffraction patterns of the crystal, it was concluded that the crystal is monoclinic in the space group P21, with unit cell dimensions a = 92 angstrom, b = 84 angstrom, and c = 103 angstrom, and α =β 90 degrees, γ = 126 degrees.

  1. Selective inhibition of NADPH oxidase reverses the over contraction of diabetic rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Atif Ur; Dugic, Elma; Benham, Chris; Lione, Lisa; Mackenzie, Louise S

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal vascular responsiveness in diabetes has been attributed to a number of changes in contractile pathways, affected in part by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been reported that NADPH oxidase (NOX) is increased in diabetic (streptozotocin treated; STZ) rat arteries; however the pharmacological agents used to inhibit NOX activity are known to be unsuitable for in vitro studies and have a high level of non-selectivity. Here we have used the highly selective NOX inhibitor VAS2870 in diabetic rat aorta and compared its effects with apocynin, SOD, and allopurinol on phenylephrine and U46619 induced contraction. Male Wistar rats were injected intraperitoneally with 65mg/kg STZ and development of diabetes was confirmed by testing blood glucose levels. Rats were killed by CO2 asphyxiation, and the thoracic aorta removed and mounted in an organ bath under a tension of 1g. Diabetic rat aortas exhibit a greatly increased response to phenylephrine, which was reduced to a level consistent with control rat aorta by 10(-5)M VAS2870 and 150U/ml SOD. Incubation with VAS2870 led to an increase in normal rat aorta contraction, but led to a significant reduction in phenylephrine and U46619 induced tone in diabetic rat aorta, which indicates that ROS in diabetic rats directly contributes to these contractile responses. Apocynin and allopurinol had no effect on contraction in diabetic or normal rat aorta. This data is the first to show that selective inhibition of NOX reduces diabetic arterial contraction in direct comparison with inhibition of other known contributors of ROS. PMID:25460721

  2. Safety and efficacy of oral febuxostat for treatment of HLA-B*5801-negative gout: a randomized, open-label, multicentre, allopurinol-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, K-H; Lai, J-H; Hsu, P-N; Chen, D-Y; Chen, C-J; Lin, H-Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This phase IIIB study compared the efficacy and safety of febuxostat and allopurinol in gout patients with or without tophi who were HLA-B*5801 negative. Method: Eligible patients were randomized to a febuxostat group (80 mg QD) or an allopurinol group (300 mg QD). Following an initial 2-week washout period, over the next 12 weeks we made five measurements of serum urate levels along with assessments of adverse events (AEs). Results: Forty-three out of 152 screened subjects (28.3%) were ineligible either because of the presence of the HLA-B*5801 allele or for various other reasons. The febuxostat group (n = 54) and the allopurinol group (n = 55) had no significant differences in demographic or baseline characteristics. From week 2 to week 12, the febuxostat group had a significantly lower serum urate level than the allopurinol group (p ≤ 0.001 for all comparisons) and significantly more patients with serum urate levels less than 6.0 mg/dL. The serum urate levels of the febuxostat group declined by more than 40% from week 2 to week 12 and this decrease was greater than that in the allopurinol group (~30%). The two groups were similar in terms of AEs. Conclusions: Febuxostat was more effective than allopurinol in reducing the serum urate levels of Han Chinese patients with gout or tophaceous gout who were HLA-B*5801 negative, without causing any serious skin reactions. Febuxostat should be considered for treatment of Han Chinese patients with gout who are HLA-B*5801 negative. PMID:26771445

  3. NADPH Oxidase and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hernandes, Marina S; Britto, Luiz R G

    2012-01-01

    NADPH oxidase (Nox) is a unique, multi-protein, electron transport system that produces large amounts of superoxide via the reduction of molecular oxygen. Nox-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be involved in a variety of physiological processes, including host defense and signal transduction. However, over the past decade, the involvement of (Nox)-dependent oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases has been increasingly recognized. ROS produced by Nox proteins contribute to neurodegenerative diseases through distinct mechanisms, such as oxidation of DNA, proteins, lipids, amino acids and metals, in addition to activation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on Nox involvement in neurodegeneration, focusing on Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. PMID:23730256

  4. Characterization of circulating lymphocyte subpopulations in canine leishmaniasis throughout treatment with antimonials and allopurinol.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Sonia; Martorell, Susanna; Costa, Manuela; Ferrer, Lluis; Ramis, Antonio

    2007-03-31

    Canine leishmaniasis (CL) is a systemic parasitic disease with a wide variability of response to specific therapy: the majority of patients apparently improve with treatment, some of them respond but later relapse, and few of them do not respond at all. It has been demonstrated that the immune response plays a key role in the development and outcome of Leishmania infection in the dog and in the response to the treatment, although this response is not well understood. Some authors have suggested that ill dogs show a reduction in the percentage of circulating CD4+ lymphocytes and in the CD4+/CD8+ ratio, both of which normalize after treatment and clinical recovery. The present paper discusses the variation of the different lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD21) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in 28 dogs diagnosed with CL and submitted to conventional treatment with meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) for 1 month and with allopurinol (Zyloric) for 1 year, in order to evaluate the usefulness of these parameters as indicators of the immunological condition of the ill animals and of the prognosis of their evolution during the treatment. It is concluded that circulating lymphocyte subpopulations are similar in dogs with leishmaniasis and in healthy dogs and that there is no correlation between the clinical status or response to therapy and the values of the counts of the different lymphocyte subpopulations. Therefore, the percentage of different lymphocyte subpopulations cannot be used as a parameter to predict the evolution of an individual patient in a clinical context. PMID:17110042

  5. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guidelines for human leukocyte antigen B (HLA-B) genotype and allopurinol dosing: 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Stamp, L K; Caudle, K E; Hershfield, M S; McDonagh, E M; Callaghan, J T; Tassaneeyakul, W; Mushiroda, T; Kamatani, N; Goldspiel, B R; Phillips, E J; Klein, T E; Lee, M T M

    2016-01-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guidelines for HLA-B*58:01 Genotype and Allopurinol Dosing was originally published in February 2013. We reviewed the recent literature and concluded that none of the evidence would change the therapeutic recommendations in the original guideline; therefore, the original publication remains clinically current. However, we have updated the Supplemental Material and included additional resources for applying CPIC guidelines into the electronic health record. Up-to-date information can be found at PharmGKB (http://www.pharmgkb.org). PMID:26094938

  6. The role of allopurinol in preventing oxygen free radical injury to skeletal muscle and endothelial cells after ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, R P; Battiston, B; Brunelli, G; Casella, A; Caimi, L

    1996-10-01

    One of the most important mechanisms in the production of ischemic damage after replantation surgery is the rise of oxygen free radicals during revascularization of ischemic tissues. Free radicals produce damage in the cell membranes (lipoperoxydation). This occurs not only in muscle tissue, but also in endothelial cells, with a consequent increase of local edema and the risk of compartment syndrome. This study attempted to interrupt the ischemic-reperfusion injury process in ischemic rat hindlimbs. Complete ischemia was induced for different numbers of hours (3, 6, 9, 12 hr) in four groups of rats (24 animals in each group). Allopurinol, an oxygen free radical scavenger, was tested in solution, 12.5 mg/kg b.w., in half the studied animals (n = 12). Collected data showed an increase (mean value: 0.60 nM/mg 3 hri 0.90 nM/mg at 6 hr; 0.80 nM/mg at 9 hr; 0.89 nM/mg at 12 hr; mean value in nonischemic muscle = 0.526 nM/mg) in lipoperoxides (NS between treated/untreated groups, p > 0.05) and high tissue pressure values in the posterior compartment of the ischemic rat hindlimbs. Allopurinol reduced the pressure values (p < 0.05 in Groups 1-3; p < 0.1 in Group 4), but was not effective in reducing lipoperoxides in skeletal muscle. PMID:8905544

  7. Methods for the synthesis of aza(deaza)xanthines as a basis of biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkov, D. A.; Geisman, A. N.; Khandazhinskaya, A. L.; Novikov, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    The review covers methods for the synthesis of aza(deaza)xanthines, i.e., fused pyrrolo-, pyrazolo- and triazolopyrimidine heterocyclic systems, which are common core structures of various biologically active compounds. The extensive range of modern synthetic approaches is organized according to target structures and starting building blocks. The presented material is intended to benefit broad audience of specialists in the fields of organic, medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry. The bibliography includes 195 references.

  8. Design and evaluation of xanthine based adenosine receptor antagonists: Potential hypoxia targeted immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Rhiannon; Lee, Joslynn; Chevalier, Vincent; Sadler, Sara; Selesniemi, Kaisa; Hatfield, Stephen; Sitkovsky, Michail; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Jones, Graham B.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques were applied to the design, synthesis and optimization of a new series of xanthine based adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. The optimized lead compound was converted to a PEG derivative and a functional in vitro bioassay used to confirm efficacy. Additionally, the PEGylated version showed enhanced aqueous solubility and was inert to photoisomerization, a known limitation of existing antagonists of this class. PMID:24126093

  9. Interactions of xanthines with activated carbon. I. Kinetics of the adsorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete Casas, R.; García Rodriguez, A.; Rey Bueno, F.; Espínola Lara, A.; Valenzuela Calahorro, C.; Navarrete Guijosa, A.

    2006-06-01

    Because of their pharmaceutical and industrial applications, we have studied the adsorption of xanthine derivates (caffeine and theophylline) by activated carbon. To this end, we examined kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic aspects of the process. This paper reports the kinetics results. The experimental results indicate that the process was first order in C and the overall process was assumed to involve a single, reversible adsorption-desorption process obeying a kinetic law postulated by us.

  10. Mechanism of Substrate and Inhibitor Binding of Rhodobacter Capsulatus Xanthine Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Dietzel, U.; Kuper, J; Doebbler, J; Schulte, A; Truglio, J; Leimkuhler, S; Kisker, C

    2009-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is an (ae)2 heterotetrameric cytoplasmic enzyme that resembles eukaryotic xanthine oxidoreductases in respect to both amino acid sequence and structural fold. To obtain a detailed understanding of the mechanism of substrate and inhibitor binding at the active site, we solved crystal structures of R. capsulatus XDH in the presence of its substrates hypoxanthine, xanthine, and the inhibitor pterin-6-aldehyde using either the inactive desulfo form of the enzyme or an active site mutant (EB232Q) to prevent substrate turnover. The hypoxanthine- and xanthine-bound structures reveal the orientation of both substrates at the active site and show the importance of residue GluB-232 for substrate positioning. The oxygen atom at the C-6 position of both substrates is oriented toward ArgB-310 in the active site. Thus the substrates bind in an orientation opposite to the one seen in the structure of the reduced enzyme with the inhibitor oxypurinol. The tightness of the substrates in the active site suggests that the intermediate products must exit the binding pocket to allow first the attack of the C-2, followed by oxidation of the C-8 atom to form the final product uric acid. Structural studies of pterin-6-aldehyde, a potent inhibitor of R. capsulatus XDH, contribute further to the understanding of the relative positioning of inhibitors and substrates in the binding pocket. Steady state kinetics reveal a competitive inhibition pattern with a Ki of 103.57 {+-} 18.96 nm for pterin-6-aldehyde.

  11. Xanthine oxidoreductase in cancer: more than a differentiation marker.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Human xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the last two steps of purine catabolism and is present in two interconvertible forms, which may utilize O2 or NAD(+) as electron acceptors. In addition to uric acid, XOR products may comprise reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that have many biologic effects, including inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and cytotoxicity, as well as mutagenesis and induction of proliferation. XOR is strictly modulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, and its expression and activity are highly variable in cancer. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) expression has been negatively associated with a high malignity grade and a worse prognosis in neoplasms of the breast, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and kidney, which normally express a high level of XOR protein. However, the level of XOR expression may be associated with a worse outcome in cancer of low XOR-expressing cells, in relation to the inflammatory response elicited through the tissue damage induced by tumor growth. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has been implicated in the process of oncogenesis either directly because it is able to catalyze the metabolic activation of carcinogenic substances or indirectly through the action of XOR-derived reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The role of uric acid is characterized by both oxidant and antioxidant action; thus, it is still debatable whether control of uricemia may be helpful to improve the outcomes of tumor illness. PMID:26687331

  12. Quercetin and Allopurinol Ameliorate Kidney Injury in STZ-Treated Rats with Regulation of Renal NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Wang, Fu-Meng; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, hyperlipidemia and inflammation are associated with diabetic nephropathy. The NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammation is recently recognized in the development of kidney injury. Urate and lipid are considered as danger signals in the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Although dietary flavonoid quercetin and allopurinol alleviate hyperuricemia, dyslipidmia and inflammation, their nephroprotective effects are currently unknown. In this study, we used streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nephropathy model with hyperuricemia and dyslipidemia in rats, and found over-expression of renal inflammasome components NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein and Caspase-1, resulting in elevation of IL-1β and IL-18, with subsequently deteriorated renal injury. These findings demonstrated the possible association between renal NLRP3 inflammasome activation and lipid accumulation to superimpose causes of nephrotoxicity in STZ-treated rats. The treatment of quercetin and allopurinol regulated renal urate transport-related proteins to reduce hyperuricemia, and lipid metabolism-related genes to alleviate kidney lipid accumulation in STZ-treated rats. Furthermore, quercetin and allopurinol were found to suppress renal NLRP3 inflammasome activation, at least partly, via their anti-hyperuricemic and anti-dyslipidemic effects, resulting in the amelioration of STZ-induced the superimposed nephrotoxicity in rats. These results may provide a basis for the prevention of diabetes-associated nephrotoxicity with urate-lowering agents such as quercetin and allopurinol. PMID:22701621

  13. Coupling in cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, R. J.; Blondin, G. A.; Zande, H. Vande; Haworth, R. A.; Green, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (ferrocytochrome c: oxygen oxidoreductase; EC 1.9.3.1) can be resolved into an electron transfer complex (ETC) and an ionophore transfer complex (ITC). Coupling requires an interaction between the moving electron in the ETC and a moving, positively charged ionophore-cation adduct in the ITC. The duplex character of cytochrome oxidase facilitates this interaction. The ITC mediates cyclical cation transport. It can be replaced as the coupling partner by the combination of valinomycin and nigericin in the presence of K+ when cytochrome oxidase is incorporated into liposomes containing acidic phospholipids or by the combination of lipid cytochrome c and bile acids in an ITC-resolved preparation of the ETC. Respiratory control can be induced by incorporating cytochrome oxidase into vesicles of unfractionated whole mitochondrial lipid. The activity of the ITC is suppressed by such incorporation and this suppression leads to the emergence of respiratory control. The ionophoroproteins of the ITC can be extracted into organic solvents; some 50% of the total protein of cytochrome oxidase is extractable. The release of free ionophore is achieved by tryptic digestion of the ionophoroprotein. Preliminary to this release the ionophoroprotein is degraded to an ionophoropeptide. Electrogenic ionophores, as well as uncoupler, are liberated by such proteolysis. The ITC contains a set of ionophoroproteins imbedded in a matrix of phospholipid. Images PMID:198794

  14. Expression of alternative oxidase in tomato

    SciTech Connect

    Kakefuda, M.; McIntosh, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is characterized by an increase in ethylene biosynthesis, a burst in respiration (i.e. the climacteric), fruit softening and pigmentation. As whole tomatoes ripened from mature green to red, there was an increase in the alternative oxidase capacity. Aging pink tomato slices for 24 and 48 hrs also showed an increase of alternative oxidase and cytochrome oxidase capacities. Monoclonal antibodies prepared to the Sauromatum guttatum alternative oxidase were used to follow the appearance of alternative oxidase in tomato fruits. There is a corresponding increase in a 36kDa protein with an increase in alternative oxidase capacity. Effects of ethylene and norbornadiene on alternative oxidase capacity were also studied. We are using an alternative oxidase cDNA clone from potato to study the expression of mRNA in ripening and wounded tomatoes to determine if the gene is transcriptionally regulated.

  15. Pterostilbene and allopurinol reduce fructose-induced podocyte oxidative stress and inflammation via microRNA-377.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Xiao-Qin; Gu, Ting-Ting; Song, Lin; Li, Jian-Mei; Xue, Qiao-Chu; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2015-06-01

    High dietary fructose is an important causative factor in the development of metabolic syndrome-associated glomerular podocyte oxidative stress and injury. Here, we identified microRNA-377 (miR-377) as a biomarker of oxidative stress in renal cortex of fructose-fed rats, which correlated with podocyte injury and albuminuria in metabolic syndrome. Fructose feeding increased miR-377 expression, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression and activity, and caused O2(-) and H2O2 overproduction in kidney cortex or glomeruli of rats. This reactive oxygen species induction increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) expression and activated the NOD-like receptor pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome to produce interleukin-1β in kidney glomeruli of fructose-fed rats. These pathological processes were further evaluated in cultured differentiated podocytes exposed to 5mM fructose, or transfected with miR-377 mimic/inhibitor and TXNIP siRNA, or co-incubated with p38 MAPK inhibitor, demonstrating that miR-377 overexpression activates the O2(-)/p38 MAPK/TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome pathway to promote oxidative stress and inflammation in fructose-induced podocyte injury. Antioxidants pterostilbene and allopurinol were found to ameliorate fructose-induced hyperuricemia, podocyte injury, and albuminuria in rats. More importantly, pterostilbene and allopurinol inhibited podocyte miR-377 overexpression to increase SOD1 and SOD2 levels and suppress the O2(-)/p38 MAPK/TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome pathway activation in vivo and in vitro, consistent with the reduction of oxidative stress and inflammation. These findings suggest that miR-377 plays an important role in glomerular podocyte oxidative stress, inflammation, and injury driven by high fructose. Inhibition of miR-377 by antioxidants may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention of metabolic syndrome-associated glomerular podocyte injury. PMID:25746774

  16. Xanthine metabolism in Bacillus subtilis: characterization of the xpt-pbuX operon and evidence for purine- and nitrogen-controlled expression of genes involved in xanthine salvage and catabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, L C; Schou, S; Nygaard, P; Saxild, H H

    1997-01-01

    The xpt and pbuX genes from Bacillus subtilis were cloned, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. The xpt gene encodes a specific xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, and the pbuX gene encodes a xanthine-specific purine permease. The genes have overlapping coding regions, and Northern (RNA) blot analysis indicated an operon organization. The translation of the second gene, pbuX, was strongly dependent on the translation of the first gene, xpt. Expression of the operon was repressed by purines, and the effector molecules appear to be hypoxanthine and guanine. When hypoxanthine and guanine were added together, a 160-fold repression was observed. The regulation of expression was at the level of transcription, and we propose that a transcription termination-antitermination control mechanism similar to the one suggested for the regulation of the purine biosynthesis operon exists. The expression of the xpt-pbuX operon was reduced when hypoxanthine served as the sole nitrogen source. Under these conditions, the level of the hypoxanthine- and xanthine-degrading enzyme, xanthine dehydrogenase, was induced more than 80-fold. The xanthine dehydrogenase level was completely derepressed in a glnA (glutamine synthetase) genetic background. Although the regulation of the expression of the xpt-pbuX operon was found to be affected by the nitrogen source, it was normal in a glnA mutant strain. This result suggests the existence of different signalling pathways for repression of the transcription of the xpt-pbuX operon and the induction of xanthine dehydrogenase. PMID:9098051

  17. Managing new-onset gout in pediatric renal transplant recipients: when, how, to what extent.

    PubMed

    Assadi, Farahnak

    2013-01-01

    Hyperuricemia and gout are common among adult renal transplant recipients, but it is rarely reported following pediatric renal transplantations. Treating gout in pediatric kidney transplant recipients presents clinical challenges to the management of both immunosuppressive regimen and hyperuricemia for their effects on serum uric acid levels, renal function and drug interactions. Most renal transplant recipients have a relative impairment of renal clearance of urate due to abnormalities in renal transport, explaining the association of hyperuricemia and decreased glomerular filtration rate. Risk factors for the development of gout include impaired renal function, hypertension, heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Calcineurin inhibitors, particularly cyclosporine, are the most important risk factor for gout in transplant recipients and should not be used in pediatric renal transplant recipients. Diuretic therapy increases the risk of gout by causing extracellular volume contraction with consequent enhancement of proximal tubular reabsorption. Corticosteroids are increasingly replacing nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and colchicine for the treatment of acute gout flares because they have little effect on kidney function. Proper management is aimed at lowering serum uric acid level below 6.0 mg/dL with xanthine oxidase inhibitors such as allopurinol or febuxostat. Allopurinol and mycophenolate mofetil are safer to use in combination than are allopurinol and azathioprine. Febuxostat is an alternative to allopurinol in patients with allopurinol intolerance or hypersensitivity. Pegloticase is indicated for patients with severe gout in whom allopurinol and febuxostat have not been effective or tolerated. PMID:22941874

  18. Spectroscopic evidence of xanthine compounds fluorescence quenching effect on water-soluble porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    The formation of π-stacked complexes between water-soluble porphyrins: 4,4‧,4″,4″‧-(21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)tetrakis-(benzoic acid) (H2TCPP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-21H,23H-porphine (H2TPPS4), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TMePyP), the Cu(II) complexes of H2TTMePP and H2TMePyP, as well as chlorophyll a with xanthine, theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) has been studied analysing their absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra in aqueous (or acetone in case of chlorophyll a) solution. During titration by the compounds from xanthine group the bathochromic effect in the porphyrin absorption spectra as well as the hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret maximum can be noticed. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions in the systems examined suggests the process of static quenching. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 103 - 102 mol-1. The results obtained show that xanthine and its derivatives can quench the fluorescence of the porphyrins according to the number of methyl groups in the molecule of quencher.

  19. A placebo-controlled study examining the effect of allopurinol on heart rate variability and dysrhythmia counts in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Shehab, Abdullah M A; Butler, Robert; MacFadyen, Robert J; Struthers, Allan D

    2001-01-01

    Aims Allopurinol improves endothelial function in chronic heart failure by reducing oxidative stress. We wished to explore if such an effect would attenuate autonomic dysfunction in CHF in line with many other effective therapies in CHF. Methods We performed a prospective, randomized, double-blind cross-over study in 16 patients with NYHA Class II-IV chronic heart failure (mean age 67 ± 10 years, 13 male, comparing allopurinol (2 months) at a daily dose of 300 mg (if creatinine < 150 µmol l−1) or 100 mg (if creatinine > 150 µmol l−1) with matched placebo. Mean heart rate and dysrhythmia counts were recorded from 24 h Holter tapes at monthly intervals for 6 months. We assessed autonomic function using standard time domain heart rate variability parameters (HRV): SDNN, SDANN, SDNN index, rMSSD and TI. Results Allopurinol had no significant effect on heart rate variability compared with placebo; the results are expressed as a difference in means ± s.d. with 95% confidence interval (CI) between allopurinol and placebo: SDNN mean=6.5 ± 4.8 ms, P = 0.18 and 95% CI (−3.7, 17); TI mean=−2.1 ± 1.4, P = 0.16 and 95% CI (−5.2, 0.8); SDANN mean=−2.8 ± 7 ms, P = 0.68 and 95% CI (−18, 12); SDNNi mean=2 ± 6.6, P = 0.7 and 95% CI (−12, 16); RMSSD mean=−0.9 ± 2, P = 0.68 and 95% CI (−5.6, 3.7). For mean heart rate the corresponding results were 0.9 ± 1.4, P = 0.5 and 95% CI (−2, 3.8). Log 24 h ventricular ectopic counts (VEC) were 0.032 ± 0.37, P = 0.7 and 95% CI (−0.1, 0.2). Patient compliance with study medication was good since allopurinol showed its expected effect of reducing plasma uric acid (P < 0.001). Conclusions Allopurinol at doses, which are known to reduce oxidative stress appear to have no significant effect on resting autonomic tone, as indicated by time domain heart rate variability or on dysrhythmia count in stable heart failure patients. PMID:11318768

  20. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of HLA-B*5801 Testing in Preventing Allopurinol-Induced SJS/TEN in Thai Population

    PubMed Central

    Saokaew, Surasak; Tassaneeyakul, Wichittra; Maenthaisong, Ratree; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2014-01-01

    Background Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN), caused by allopurinol therapy, are strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), HLA-B*5801. Identification of HLA-B*5801 genotype before prescribing allopurinol offers the possibility of avoiding allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN. As there is a paucity of evidence about economic value of such testing, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of HLA-B*5801 testing compared with usual care (no genetic testing) before allopurinol administration in Thailand. Methods and Finding A decision analytical and Markov model was used to estimate life time costs and outcomes represented as quality adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. The model was populated with relevant information of the association between gene and allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN, test characteristics, costs, and epidemiologic data for Thailand from a societal perspective. Input data were obtained from the literature and a retrospective database analysis. The results were expressed as incremental cost per QALY gained. A base-case analysis was performed for patients at age 30. A series of sensitivity analyses including scenario, one-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were constructed to explore the robustness of the findings. Based on a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 patients, the incremental total cost was 923,919 THB (USD 29,804) and incremental QALY was 5.89 with an ICER of 156,937.04 THB (USD 5,062) per QALY gained. The cost of gout management, incidence of SJS/TEN, case fatality rate of SJS/TEN, and cost of genetic testing are considered very influential parameters on the cost-effectiveness value of HLA-B*5801 testing. Conclusions The genetic testing for HLA-B*5801 before allopurinol administration is considered a highly potential cost-effective intervention in Thailand. The findings are sensitive to a number of factors. In addition to cost-effectiveness findings, consideration of other factors including

  1. Acyclic phosph(on)ate inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Evans, Gary B.; Hazleton, Keith Z.; Mason, Jennifer M.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenic protozoa responsible for malaria lack enzymes for the de novo synthesis of purines and rely on purine salvage from the host. In Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) converts hypoxanthine to inosine monophosphate and is essential for purine salvage making the enzyme an anti-malarial drug target. We have synthesized a number of simple acyclic aza-C- nucleosides and shown that some are potent inhibitors of Pf HGXPRT while showing excellent selectivity for the Pf versus the human enzyme. PMID:23810424

  2. Free radical pathways for the prebiotic formation of xanthine and isoguanine from formamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeilani, Yassin A.; Nguyen, Huyen Thi; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2014-04-01

    Free radical pathways for the synthesis of xanthine and isoguanine from formamide were studied using density functional theory (B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)). The proposed mechanisms are complex and appropriate for the non-aqueous scenario of prebiotic reactions. Formation of the carbonyl bond in the nucleobases proceeds through enol-keto tautomerization since the direct formation of the Cdbnd O bond is a highly endothermic step. The mechanisms show 2-amino-imidazole as a precursor for nucleobases and polyazaporphyrin. The proposed mechanisms contribute to a further understanding of the origin of biomolecules.

  3. Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase-inhibiting herbicides (also referred to as Protox- or PPO-inhibiting herbicides) were commercialized in the 1960s and their market share reached approximately 10% (total herbicide active ingredient output) in the late 1990’s. The wide-spread adoption of glyphosate-resista...

  4. Pharmacology of drugs for hyperuricemia. Mechanisms, kinetics and interactions.

    PubMed

    Pea, F

    2005-01-01

    The pharmacological profile of drugs for hyperuricemia is reviewed. These agents may reduce the amount of uric acid in blood by means of two different ways: (1) by reducing uric acid production through the inhibition of the enzyme xanthine oxidase (as allopurinol); (2) by increasing uric acid clearance through an inhibition of its renal tubular reabsorption (as probenecid), or through its metabolic conversion to a more soluble compound (as urate oxidase). Allopurinol is rapidly converted in the body to the active metabolite oxypurinol whose total body exposure may be 20-fold greater than that of the parent compound due to a much longer elimination half-life. Allopurinol undergoes several pharmacokinetic interactions with concomitant administered drugs, some of which may be potentially hazardous (especially with mercaptopurine and azathioprine). Probenecid is an uricosuric agent which undergoes extensive hepatic metabolism and whose elimination after high doses may become dose dependent. It may inhibit renal tubular secretion of several coadministered agents, including methotrexate and sulphonylureas. Rasburicase is a recombinant form of the enzyme urate oxidase which catalyzes the conversion of uric acid to the more soluble compound allantoin. Unlike allopurinol, it does not promote accumulation of hypoxanthine and xanthine in plasma, thus preventing the risk of xanthine nephropathy. Rasburicase showed no significant accumulation in children after administration of either 0.15 or 0.20 mg/kg/daily for 5 days. Rasburicase probably undergoes peptide hydrolysis and in in vitro studies was shown neither to inhibit or induce cytochrome P450 isoenzymes nor to interact with several drugs, so that no relevant interaction is expected during cotreatment in patients. PMID:15604604

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uridine and inosine: high concentrations of the ATP metabolite, hypoxanthine, after hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, R A; Lund, R J

    1983-01-01

    CSF obtained for clinical purposes from newborn, children and adults has been analysed by high pressure liquid chromatography for hypoxanthine, xanthine, inosine, uridine and urate. Large rises in hypoxanthine and to a lesser extent xanthine occur for about 24 h after hypoxia. High concentrations were associated with later evidence of brain damage or subsequent death. Changes in CSF could be independent of those in plasma. Small or negligible rises were associated with localised and generalised infections including bacterial meningitis, fits, or both. Marked and rapid rises were found after death. These estimations may "predict" the extent of brain damage or brain death. PMID:6681617

  6. Evaluation of anticancer effects and enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity of xanthine derivatives using canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Tomoki; Katayama, Masaaki; Uzuka, Yuji; Okamura, Yasuhiko

    2013-10-01

    Methylxanthine derivatives increase cAMP and are known to have diuretic, cardiac, and central nervous system stimulatory effects. Moreover, caffeine inhibits the development of tumors induced by various carcinogens. The aim of this work was to elucidate the anticancer effects on apoptosis of xanthine derivatives alone and with doxorubicin in canine hemangiosarcoma cells. Xanthine derivatives with or without doxorubicin were administered to cells, and the effects were investigated by measuring tumor cell proliferation, cell death (cytotoxicity) induction, and apoptosis by the expression of annexin V or caspase 3/7. Both caffeine and theophylline induced apoptosis, and the treated cells expressed annexin V and caspase 3/7. Both drugs enhanced doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity; however, hypoxanthine showed no effect. These results indicate that theophylline is similar to caffeine; both drugs may enhance doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting ATM/ATR kinases. Our data suggest that caffeine and theophylline have anticancer effects and can improve the treatment effect in canine hemangiosarcoma patients. PMID:23871419

  7. Both combined oral azithromycin plus allopurinol and intramuscular Glucantime yield low efficacy in the treatment of Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dastgheib, Ladan; Naseri, Mahsa; Mirashe, Zahra

    2012-12-01

    Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis (OWCL) is an endemic and major health problem in Iran. The optimal treatment of OWCL is unknown, and current treatments are not ideally effective and have many adverse effects. To compare the efficacy and tolerability of combined oral azithromycin and allopurinol with intramuscular Glucantime in the treatment of OWCL, we conducted a prospective randomized clinical trial. A total of 86 patients with OWCL were assigned and divided randomly into two groups; they received a combination of azithromycin capsule 10 mg/kg/d and allopurinol tablet 10 mg/kg/d for two months or IM injection of Glucantime 20 mg/kg of antimony daily for 20 days. All patients were followed for two months after termination of treatment. Although immediately at the end of the treatment period, complete response was seen in 27.8% of patients on combination therapy vs. 0% in the Glucantime group. The combination of azithromycin and allopurinol had a better outcome; two months after the end of the treatment period, complete, partial, and no responses were seen in 38.9%, 22.2%, and 38.9% in combination therapy and 40%, 31.4%, and 28.6% in the Glucantime group. There was no significant difference between the response rate in both groups after two months (P = 0.5). No severe adverse effect occurred. This study demonstrated that the efficacy of combined oral azithromycin and allopurinol at the above doses and duration was similar to that of IM Glucantime in the treatment of OWCL. PMID:23171020

  8. Development of the pteridine pathway in the zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, I; McDonald, T; Hesslinger, C; Pelletier, I; Boyle, P; McDonaldo, T

    2000-06-23

    In the zebrafish, the peripheral neurons and the pigment cells are derived from the neural crest and share the pteridine pathway, which leads either to the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin or to xanthophore pigments. The components of the pteridine pattern were identified as tetrahydrobiopterin, sepiapterin, 7-oxobiopterin, isoxanthopterin, and 2,4,7-trioxopteridine. The expression of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity during the first 24-h postfertilization, followed by 6-pyruvoyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin synthase and sepiapterin reductase, suggest an early supply of tetrahydrobiopterin for neurotransmitter synthesis in the neurons and for tyrosine supply in the melanophores. At 48-h postfertilization, sepiapterin formation branches off the de novo pathway of tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis. Sepiapterin, via 7,8-dihydrobiopterin and biopterin, serves as a precursor for the formation of 7-oxobiopterin, which may be further catabolized to isoxanthopterin and 2,4,7-trioxopteridine. Neither 7, 8-dihydrobiopterin nor biopterin is a substrate for xanthine oxidoreductase. In contrast, both of these compounds are oxidized at C-7 by a xanthine oxidase variant form, which is inactivated by KCN, but is insensitive to allopurinol. The oxidase and the dehydrogenase form of xanthine oxidoreductase as well as the xanthine oxidase variant have specific developmental patterns. It follows that GTP cyclohydrolase I, the formation of sepiapterin, and the xanthine oxidoreductase family control the pteridine pathway in the zebrafish. PMID:10770954

  9. ACROLEIN ACTIVATES MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES BY INCREASING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Timothy E.; Zheng, Yu-Ting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca2+]I with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca2+]I, leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure. PMID:19371603

  10. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Timothy E; Zheng, Yu-Ting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+](i)), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca2+](I) with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca2+](I), leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure. PMID:19371603

  11. Urate oxidase: primary structure and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X W; Lee, C C; Muzny, D M; Caskey, C T

    1989-01-01

    Urate oxidase, or uricase (EC 1.7.3.3), is a peroxisomal enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of uric acid to allantoin in most mammals. In humans and certain other primates, however, the enzyme has been lost by some unknown mechanism. To identify the molecular basis for this loss, urate oxidase cDNA clones were isolated from pig, mouse, and baboon, and their DNA sequences were determined. The mouse urate oxidase open reading frame encodes a 303-amino acid polypeptide, while the pig and baboon urate oxidase cDNAs encode a 304-amino acid polypeptide due to a single codon deletion/insertion event. The authenticity of this single additional codon was confirmed by sequencing the mouse and pig genomic copies of the gene. The urate oxidase sequence contains a domain similar to the type 2 copper binding motif found in other copper binding proteins, suggesting that the copper ion in urate oxidase is coordinated as a type 2 structure. Based upon a comparison of the NH2-terminal peptide and deduced sequences, we propose that the maturation of pig urate oxidase involves the posttranslational cleavage of a six-amino acid peptide. Two nonsense mutations were found in the human urate oxidase gene, which confirms, at the molecular level, that the urate oxidase gene in humans is nonfunctional. The sequence comparisons favor the hypothesis that the loss of urate oxidase in humans is due to a sudden mutational event rather than a progressive mutational process. Images PMID:2594778

  12. Solid-Phase Synthesis of 1,3,7,8-Tetrasubstituted Xanthine Derivatives on Traceless Solid Support.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doohyun; Lee, Seungyeon; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Bae, Jong-Sup; Baek, Dong Jae; Lee, Taeho

    2016-01-11

    Traceless solid-phase synthesis of 1,3,7,8-tetrasubstituted xanthine (1,3,7,8-tetrasubstituted 1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H)-dione) derivatives has been developed. The solid-phase synthetic route began on a solid supported N'-cyano-N-substituted carbamimidothioate, which was prepared from cyanamide, isothiocyanate, and Merrifield resin. After N-alkylation of carbamimidothioate resin with ethyl 2-bromoacetate, an imidazole ring is introduced by Thorpe-Ziegler-type cyclization. The resulting imidazole resin is converted to 1,3,7-trisubstituted xanthine resin using sequential reactions, such as Lewis acid-catalyzed urea formation, pyrimidine ring cyclization, and N-alkylation. After oxidation of sulfides to sulfones, traceless cleavage with amine or thiol nucleophiles afforded the desired 1,3,7,8-tetrasubstituted xanthines in good purities and overall yields (eight-steps; 36 examples). This efficient solid-phase synthesis enables the incorporation of four diversity points into the preparation of the 1,3,7,8-tetrasubstituted xanthines. PMID:26616892

  13. Incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kosonen, T; Uriu-Hare, J Y; Clegg, M S; Keen, C L; Rucker, R B

    1997-10-01

    Lysyl oxidase is a copper-dependent enzyme involved in extracellular processing of collagens and elastin. Although it is known that copper is essential for the functional activity of the enzyme, there is little information on the incorporation of copper. In the present study we examined the insertion of copper into lysyl oxidase using 67Cu in cell-free transcription/translation assays and in normal skin fibroblast culture systems. When a full-length lysyl oxidase cDNA was used as a template for transcription/translation reactions in vitro, unprocessed prolysyl oxidase appeared to bind copper. To examine further the post-translational incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase, confluent skin fibroblasts were incubated with inhibitors of protein synthesis (cycloheximide, 10 microg/ml), glycosylation (tunicamycin, 10 microg/ml), protein secretion (brefeldin A, 10 microg/ml) and prolysyl oxidase processing (procollagen C-peptidase inhibitor, 2.5 microg/ml) together with 300 microCi of carrier-free 67Cu. It was observed that protein synthesis was a prerequisite for copper incorporation, but inhibition of glycosylation by tunicamycin did not affect the secretion of 67Cu as lysyl oxidase. Brefeldin A inhibited the secretion of 67Ci-labelled lysyl oxidase by 46%, but the intracellular incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase was not affected. In addition, the inhibition of the extracellular proteolytic processing of prolysyl oxidase to lysyl oxidase had minimal effects on the secretion of protein-bound 67Cu. Our results indicate that, similar to caeruloplasmin processing [Sato and Gitlin (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 5128-5134], copper is inserted into prolysyl oxidase independently of glycosylation. PMID:9355764

  14. Arsenite Oxidase Also Functions as an Antimonite Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Warelow, Thomas P.; Kang, Yoon-Suk; Romano, Christine; Osborne, Thomas H.; Lehr, Corinne R.; Bothner, Brian; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic and antimony are toxic metalloids and are considered priority environmental pollutants by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Significant advances have been made in understanding microbe-arsenic interactions and how they influence arsenic redox speciation in the environment. However, even the most basic features of how and why a microorganism detects and reacts to antimony remain poorly understood. Previous work with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain 5A concluded that oxidation of antimonite [Sb(III)] and arsenite [As(III)] required different biochemical pathways. Here, we show with in vivo experiments that a mutation in aioA [encoding the large subunit of As(III) oxidase] reduces the ability to oxidize Sb(III) by approximately one-third relative to the ability of the wild type. Further, in vitro studies with the purified As(III) oxidase from Rhizobium sp. strain NT-26 (AioA shares 94% amino acid sequence identity with AioA of A. tumefaciens) provide direct evidence of Sb(III) oxidation but also show a significantly decreased Vmax compared to that of As(III) oxidation. The aioBA genes encoding As(III) oxidase are induced by As(III) but not by Sb(III), whereas arsR gene expression is induced by both As(III) and Sb(III), suggesting that detection and transcriptional responses for As(III) and Sb(III) differ. While Sb(III) and As(III) are similar with respect to cellular extrusion (ArsB or Acr3) and interaction with ArsR, they differ in the regulatory mechanisms that control the expression of genes encoding the different Ars or Aio activities. In summary, this study documents an enzymatic basis for microbial Sb(III) oxidation, although additional Sb(III) oxidation activity also is apparent in this bacterium. PMID:25576601

  15. Oxipurinol: alloxanthine, Oxyprim, oxypurinol.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Oxipurinol [alloxanthine, Oxyprim, oxypurinol] is the active metabolite of the only commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor, allopurinol. Oxipurinol is also a xanthine oxidase inhibitor. Oxipurinol is currently being developed by Cardiome Pharma. It is waiting for approval in the US for the treatment of allopurinol-intolerant hyperuricaemia (gout) and is in phase III trials for the treatment of congestive heart failure. Allopurinol is indicated for the treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Approximately 3-5% of patients receiving allopurinol develop intolerance to the drug. Oxipurinol was originally developed by Burroughs Wellcome (later GlaxoSmithKline), and has been available on a compassionate-use basis since 1967 for use in allopurinol-intolerant patients. The licensee company ILEX Oncology has stated that oxipurinol does not have patent protection. Oxipurinol's potential for treatment of congestive heart failure is based on the possibility that xanthine oxidase inhibitors may improve myocardial work efficiency by sensitising cardiac muscle cells to calcium ions, which are a key determinant of cardiac muscle function. This results in more efficient contraction of cardiac muscle cells, without the same increase in oxygen demand. At the second annual BioPartnering North America conference (BPN-2004) [February 2004, Vancouver, Canada], Cardiome Pharma stated that it was seeking a commercialisation partner to market and distribute oxipurinol in the US for the treatment of allopurinol-intolerant hyperuricaemia. In 1995, ILEX Oncology obtained an exclusive licence to oxipurinol from Burroughs Wellcome. Burroughs Wellcome later became part of Glaxo Wellcome, which merged with SmithKline Beecham in December 2000 to form GlaxoSmithKline. ILEX's licence agreement is now with GlaxoSmithKline and The Wellcome Foundation. In December 2001, ILEX granted Paralex, a privately held New York-based company, an exclusive sublicence to all of ILEX's rights to

  16. Effect of 4-hydroxypyrazolo (3,4-d) pyrimidine (allopurinol) on postirradiation cerebral blood flow: implications of free radical involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Arroyo, C.M.; Hampton, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    In an attempt to elucidate mechanisms underlying the irradiation-induced decrease in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in primates, hippocampal and hypothalamic blood flows of rhesus monkeys were measured by hydrogen clearance, before and after exposure to 100 Gy, whole body, gamma irradiation. Systemic blood pressures were monitored simultaneously. Compared to control animals, the irradiated monkeys exhibited an abrupt decline in systemic blood pressure to 35% of the preirradiation level within 10 min postirradiation, falling to 12% by 60 min. A decrease in hippocampal blood flow to 32% of the preirradiation level was noted at 10 min postirradiation, followed by a slight recovery to 43% at 30 min and a decline to 23% by 60 min. The hypothalamic blood flow of the same animals showed a steady decrease to 43% of the preirradiation levels by 60 min postirradiation. The postradiation systemic blood pressure of the allopurinol treated monkeys was not statistically different from the untreated, irradiated monkeys and was statistically different from the control monkeys. However, the treated, irradiated monkeys displayed rCBF values that were not significantly different from the nonirradiated controls. These findings suggest the involvement of free radicals in the postirradiation decrease in regional cerebral blood flow but not necessarily in the postirradiation hypotension seen in the primate.

  17. Synthesis, DNA binding and antiviral activity of new uracil, xanthine, and pteridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    El-Sabbagh, Osama I; El-Sadek, Mohamed E; El-Kalyoubi, Samar; Ismail, Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    Some new 6-amino-1,3-dimethyl-5-(substituted methylidene)aminouracils were synthesized. Most of them were cyclized with triethyl orthoformate as a one-carbon source to afford 1,3-dime-thyl-6-substituted pteridine derivatives. Certain uracils gave xanthine instead of the expected pteridine derivatives upon using another one-carbon source such as triethyl orthoacetate or triethyl orthobenzoate. The nucleic acid binding assay revealed that some new compounds showed high affinity, chelation, and fragmentation of nucleic acids whether DNA or RNA contrary to acyclovir that has affinity to DNA only. The antiviral activity of these novel compounds showed that compounds 2e and 2f reduced the cytopathogencity of Peste des petits ruminant virus (PPRV) on Vero cell culture by 60 and 50%, respectively. PMID:17206606

  18. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, Keith Z.; Ho, Meng-Chaio; Cassera, Maria B.; Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Rosario Jr., Irving; Merino, Emilio F.; Almo, Steve C.; Tyler, Peter C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  19. Xanthine effects on renal proximal tubular function and cyclic AMP metabolism.

    PubMed

    Coulson, R; Scheinman, S J

    1989-02-01

    We evaluated the renal effects of xanthines using two in vitro models: the isolated perfused rat kidney (IPRK) and cultured opossum kidney (OK) cells, a continuous cell line that resembles proximal tubule and responds to parathyroid hormone (PTH). 1,3-Diethyl-8-phenylxanthine (DPX) a potent adenosine receptor antagonist, increased urine volume, glomerular filtration rate, vascular resistance and the fractional excretions of Na, K, Ca and Pi in the IPRK. DPX lowered the Na-dependent uptake of Pi by OK cells. By comparison enprofylline, 3-propylxanthine (ENP), a weak adenosine receptor antagonist, produced a slight elevation in glomerular filtration rate but no changes in electrolyte excretion by IPRK or Pi uptake by OK cells. Both DPX and ENP produced negligible elevations in basal IPRK cAMP. A 1-nM bolus of PTH elevated urinary and perfusate cAMP 50- and 10-fold, respectively. PTH-elevated urinary and perfusate cAMP were augmented further 4- to 7-fold with DPX and 3- to 4-fold with ENP (All IPRK experiments used 50 microM xanthine). OK cells produced a 2-fold cAMP response to 10 nM PTH alone. OK cells treated with 50 microM DPX exhibited no increase in basal but a 13-fold increase in PTH-stimulated cell cAMP. The rank order of potency at 50 microM to augment OK cell cAMP with 10 nM PTH was DPX greater than 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPC) greater than 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine greater than theobromine greater than theophylline greater than caffeine greater than ENP = no effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2537403

  20. The Reductive Half-reaction of Xanthine Dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Hall, James; Reschke, Stefan; Cao, Hongnan; Leimkühler, Silke; Hille, Russ

    2014-01-01

    The kinetic properties of an E232Q variant of the xanthine dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus have been examined to ascertain whether Glu232 in wild-type enzyme is protonated or unprotonated in the course of catalysis at neutral pH. We find that kred, the limiting rate constant for reduction at high [xanthine], is significantly compromised in the variant, a result that is inconsistent with Glu232 being neutral in the active site of the wild-type enzyme. A comparison of the pH dependence of both kred and kred/Kd from reductive half-reaction experiments between wild-type and enzyme and the E232Q variant suggests that the ionized Glu232 of wild-type enzyme plays an important role in catalysis by discriminating against the monoanionic form of substrate, effectively increasing the pKa of substrate by two pH units and ensuring that at physiological pH the neutral form of substrate predominates in the Michaelis complex. A kinetic isotope study of the wild-type R. capsulatus enzyme indicates that, as previously determined for the bovine and chicken enzymes, product release is principally rate-limiting in catalysis. The disparity in rate constants for the chemical step of the reaction and product release, however, is not as great in the bacterial enzyme as compared with the vertebrate forms. The results indicate that the bacterial and bovine enzymes catalyze the chemical step of the reaction to the same degree and that the faster turnover observed with the bacterial enzyme is due to a faster rate constant for product release than is seen with the vertebrate enzyme. PMID:25258317

  1. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  2. Febuxostat: a review of its use in the treatment of hyperuricaemia in patients with gout.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2015-03-01

    Febuxostat (Adenuric(®), Uloric(®), Feburic(®)) is an orally-active, potent, non-purine, selective xanthine oxidase inhibitor. In the EU, it is indicated in adults for the treatment of chronic hyperuricaemia in conditions where urate deposition has already occurred. Unlike allopurinol, the prototypical xanthine oxidase inhibitor that is the cornerstone therapy for chronic gout, febuxostat does not require dosage adjustment in patients with mild or moderate renal impairment. In randomized, double-blind studies, 6-12 months' treatment with febuxostat at dosages approved for use in the EU (80 and 120 mg/day) was significantly more effective in lowering serum uric acid (sUA) levels in patients with hyperuricaemia and gout than allopurinol at dosages commonly prescribed in practice (100-300 mg/day); febuxostat demonstrated greater urate-lowering efficacy than allopurinol in patients with renal impairment. In open-label extension studies, 3-5 years' treatment with febuxostat maintained a target sUA level of <6.0 mg/dL in most patients; sustained reduction in sUA level was associated with near elimination of gout flares and improved tophus status. Febuxostat therapy was generally well tolerated during clinical development; frequently reported adverse events included liver function abnormalities, diarrhoea and rash. Cardiovascular (CV) events were the most common serious adverse events; the comparative safety of febuxostat and allopurinol is being examined further in large, ongoing trials in patients with gout who already have, or are at risk of developing, CV disease. In conclusion, febuxostat is a well established antihyperuricaemic agent that provides an effective alternative to allopurinol for the management of chronic gout. PMID:25724536

  3. [Bone marrow depression after azathioprine. New discoveries on an old drug].

    PubMed

    Löwhagen, G B; Lindstedt, G

    2000-02-01

    Azathioprine, a cytostatic and immunosuppressive drug in use for some 30 years, can give rise to life-threatening neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. This may be caused by unexpectedly high concentrations of cytotoxic metabolites due to abnormally slow inactivation of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) by thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) and/or xanthine oxidase. Low TPMT activity may be due to genetic polymorphism or interaction with drugs such as salicylic acid derivatives, while xanthine oxidase may be inhibited by allopurinol. High TPMT activity, on the other hand, may hamper cytostatic treatment. Safer and more effective treatment with azathioprine and its metabolite 6-MP becomes possible with new laboratory methods for pharmacotherapy monitoring. PMID:10707497

  4. Miracle Fruit (Synsepalum dulcificum) Exhibits as a Novel Anti-Hyperuricaemia Agent.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yeu-Ching; Lin, Kai-Sian; Jhai, Yi-Fen; Lee, Bao-Hong; Han, Yifan; Cui, Zhibin; Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Wu, She-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Miracle fruit (Synsepalum dulcificum) belongs to the Sapotaceae family. It can change flavors on taste buds, transforming acidic tastes to sweet. We evaluated various miracle fruit extracts, including water, butanol, ethyl acetate (EA), and hexane fractions, to determine its antioxidant effects. These extracts isolated from miracle fruit exerted potential for reduction of uric acid and inhibited xanthine oxidase activity in vitro and in monosodiumurate (MSU)-treated RAW264.7 macrophages. Moreover, we also found that the butanol extracts of miracle fruit attenuated oxonic acid potassium salt-induced hyperuricaemia in ICR mice by lowering serum uric acid levels and activating hepatic xanthine oxidase. These effects were equal to those of allopurinol, suggesting that the butanol extract of miracle fruit could be developed as a novel anti-hyperuricaemia agent or health food. PMID:26821007

  5. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance to study different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy. PMID:26846578

  6. Identification of Crucial Amino Acids in Mouse Aldehyde Oxidase 3 That Determine Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Mahro, Martin; Brás, Natércia F.; Cerqueira, Nuno M. F. S. A.; Teutloff, Christian; Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João; Leimkühler, Silke

    2013-01-01

    In order to elucidate factors that determine substrate specificity and activity of mammalian molybdo-flavoproteins we performed site directed mutagenesis of mouse aldehyde oxidase 3 (mAOX3). The sequence alignment of different aldehyde oxidase (AOX) isoforms identified variations in the active site of mAOX3 in comparison to other AOX proteins and xanthine oxidoreductases (XOR). Based on the structural alignment of mAOX3 and bovine XOR, differences in amino acid residues involved in substrate binding in XORs in comparison to AOXs were identified. We exchanged several residues in the active site to the ones found in other AOX homologues in mouse or to residues present in bovine XOR in order to examine their influence on substrate selectivity and catalytic activity. Additionally we analyzed the influence of the [2Fe-2S] domains of mAOX3 on its kinetic properties and cofactor saturation. We applied UV-VIS and EPR monitored redox-titrations to determine the redox potentials of wild type mAOX3 and mAOX3 variants containing the iron-sulfur centers of mAOX1. In addition, a combination of molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations (MD) was used to investigate factors that modulate the substrate specificity and activity of wild type and AOX variants. The successful conversion of an AOX enzyme to an XOR enzyme was achieved exchanging eight residues in the active site of mAOX3. It was observed that the absence of the K889H exchange substantially decreased the activity of the enzyme towards all substrates analyzed, revealing that this residue has an important role in catalysis. PMID:24358164

  7. Discovery of GSK2795039, a Novel Small Molecule NADPH Oxidase 2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Kazufumi; Chen, Woei Shin; Chueng, Adeline L.W.; Dunne, Angela A.; Seredenina, Tamara; Filippova, Aleksandra; Ramachandran, Sumitra; Bridges, Angela; Chaudry, Laiq; Pettman, Gary; Allan, Craig; Duncan, Sarah; Lee, Kiew Ching; Lim, Jean; Ma, May Thu; Ong, Agnes B.; Ye, Nicole Y.; Nasir, Shabina; Mulyanidewi, Sri; Aw, Chiu Cheong; Oon, Pamela P.; Liao, Shihua; Li, Dizheng; Johns, Douglas G.; Miller, Neil D.; Davies, Ceri H.; Browne, Edward R.; Matsuoka, Yasuji; Chen, Deborah W.; Jaquet, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The NADPH oxidase (NOX) family of enzymes catalyzes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). NOX enzymes not only have a key role in a variety of physiological processes but also contribute to oxidative stress in certain disease states. To date, while numerous small molecule inhibitors have been reported (in particular for NOX2), none have demonstrated inhibitory activity in vivo. As such, there is a need for the identification of improved NOX inhibitors to enable further evaluation of the biological functions of NOX enzymes in vivo as well as the therapeutic potential of NOX inhibition. In this study, both the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profiles of GSK2795039, a novel NOX2 inhibitor, were characterized in comparison with other published NOX inhibitors. Results: GSK2795039 inhibited both the formation of ROS and the utilization of the enzyme substrates, NADPH and oxygen, in a variety of semirecombinant cell-free and cell-based NOX2 assays. It inhibited NOX2 in an NADPH competitive manner and was selective over other NOX isoforms, xanthine oxidase, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzymes. Following systemic administration in mice, GSK2795039 abolished the production of ROS by activated NOX2 enzyme in a paw inflammation model. Furthermore, GSK2795039 showed activity in a murine model of acute pancreatitis, reducing the levels of serum amylase triggered by systemic injection of cerulein. Innovation and Conclusions: GSK2795039 is a novel NOX2 inhibitor that is the first small molecule to demonstrate inhibition of the NOX2 enzyme in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 358–374. PMID:26135714

  8. A novel reaction mediated by human aldehyde oxidase: amide hydrolysis of GDC-0834.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Jasleen K; Wong, Susan; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Liu, Lichuan; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Barr, John T; Jones, Jeffrey P; Halladay, Jason S

    2015-06-01

    GDC-0834, a Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor investigated as a potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, was previously reported to be extensively metabolized by amide hydrolysis such that no measurable levels of this compound were detected in human circulation after oral administration. In vitro studies in human liver cytosol determined that GDC-0834 (R)-N-(3-(6-(4-(1,4-dimethyl-3-oxopiperazin-2-yl)phenylamino)-4-methyl-5-oxo- 4,5-dihydropyrazin-2-yl)-2-methylphenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b] thiophene-2-carboxamide) was rapidly hydrolyzed with a CLint of 0.511 ml/min per milligram of protein. Aldehyde oxidase (AO) and carboxylesterase (CES) were putatively identified as the enzymes responsible after cytosolic fractionation and mass spectrometry-proteomics analysis of the enzymatically active fractions. Results were confirmed by a series of kinetic experiments with inhibitors of AO, CES, and xanthine oxidase (XO), which implicated AO and CES, but not XO, as mediating GDC-0834 amide hydrolysis. Further supporting the interaction between GDC-0834 and AO, GDC-0834 was shown to be a potent reversible inhibitor of six known AO substrates with IC50 values ranging from 0.86 to 1.87 μM. Additionally, in silico modeling studies suggest that GDC-0834 is capable of binding in the active site of AO with the amide bond of GDC-0834 near the molybdenum cofactor (MoCo), orientated in such a way to enable potential nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl of the amide bond by the hydroxyl of MoCo. Together, the in vitro and in silico results suggest the involvement of AO in the amide hydrolysis of GDC-0834. PMID:25845827

  9. Establishment of simultaneous treatment model with citrate for preventing nephropathy induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in rats.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, Naoki; Shimo, Takeo; Matsumoto, Koji; Taniguchi, Tetsuya; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Nagata, Osamu

    2011-04-01

    As a precedent study for elucidating the mechanism of possible urinary bladder carcinogenesis due to xanthine crystals induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, we have determined the experimental conditions suitable for the 52-week simultaneous treatment with citrate in F344 rats. Simultaneous treatment with citrate and FYX-051 produced both increased urinary citrate excretion and suppression of urinary xanthine deposition at around 4 hours after a single dosing, but these effects disappeared 2 hours later, indicating a lack of the durability of citrate effects. Next, we carried out a 7-day simultaneous treatment study by two daily treatments, that is, FYX-051 (6 mg/kg) and citrate (2,000 mg/kg), followed by citrate-alone treatment, under the conditions of selected dosing intervals, the second dose of citrate, and dosing volume. As a result, the dosing interval of citrate was found to be optimal at 4 hours, but not at 3 or 5 hours, because this treatment completely inhibited intrarenal xanthine deposition. The dose of citrate for the second treatment and the dosing volume were found to be sufficient at 1,500 mg/kg and 10 mL/kg, respectively. Subsequently, a 4-week study by simultaneous treatment at 3 mg/kg of FYX-051 and citrate (2,000 mg/kg) + citrate (1,500 mg/kg), under the improved conditions, revealed that renal lesions could be drastically inhibited. Thus, the present study demonstrated that the interval of two citrate treatments is pivotal and indicated that the improved model would be useful for the mechanistic study of FYX-051-induced urinary bladder carcinogenesis because of an easier treatment method than our previous model. PMID:21105859

  10. Variability in tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nitric oxide, and xanthine oxidase responses to endotoxin challenge in heifers: Effect of estrous cycle stage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The severity of host response to some disease agents differs between sexes and this dimorphism has been attributed to the immunomodulating effects of steroid hormones. Our objective was to determine in heifers whether the phase of estrous cycle affected immune response mediators after endotoxin cha...

  11. Effects of anthocyanins from purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. cultivar Eshu No. 8) on the serum uric acid level and xanthine oxidase activity in hyperuricemic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Cheng; Su, Guan-Hua; Luo, Chun-Li; Pang, Ya-Lu; Wang, Lin; Li, Xing; Wen, Jia-Hao; Zhang, Jiu-Liang

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the hypouricemic effect of the anthocyanin-rich purple sweet potato extract (APSPE). In vitro, APSPE has been proved to significantly inhibit XO activity in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, APSPE could not only inhibit the XO activity in mouse liver, but also reduce the serum uric acid level in hyperuricemic mice and affect the expression of mRNA levels of related renal transporters, such as mURAT1, mGLUT9, mOAT1 and mOCTN2. Moreover, APSPE could effectively regulate BUN and Cr levels to normal and decrease the inflammatory cellular influx in the tubule of the hyperuricemic mice. This study indicates the potential clinical utility of APSPE as a safe and effective anti-hyperuricemia bioactive agent or functional food. PMID:26201407

  12. Synthesis and pharmacological characterization of novel xanthine carboxylate amides as A2A adenosine receptor ligands exhibiting bronchospasmolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rakesh; Bansal, Ranju; Rohilla, Suman; Kachler, Sonja; Klotz, Karl-Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The carboxylate amides of 8-phenyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine described herein represent a new series of selective ligands of the adenosine A2A receptors exhibiting bronchospasmolytic activity. The effects of location of 8-phenyl substitutions on the adenosine receptor (AR) binding affinities of the newly synthesized xanthines have also been studied. The compounds displayed moderate to potent binding affinities toward various adenosine receptor subtypes when evaluated through radioligand binding studies. However, most of the compounds showed the maximum affinity for the A2A subtype, some with high selectivity versus all other subtypes. Xanthine carboxylate amide 13b with a diethylaminoethylamino moiety at the para-position of the 8-phenylxanthine scaffold was identified as the most potent A2A adenosine receptor ligand with Ki=0.06μM. Similarly potent and highly A2A-selective are the isovanillin derivatives 16a and 16d. In addition, the newly synthesized xanthine derivatives showed good in vivo bronchospasmolytic activity when tested in guinea pigs. PMID:26851736

  13. RRM analysis of protoporphyrinogen oxidase.

    PubMed

    Sauren, M; Pirogova, E; Cosic, I

    2004-12-01

    Enzymes are crucial in accelerating metabolic reactions in living organisms. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PpOI) is an enzyme that catalyses the production of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a protein used in a cancer treatment known as photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study, a structure-function analysis of PpOI was carried out using the Resonant Recognition Model (RRM), a physico-mathematical approach for analysis of proteins interactions. This method is based on the finding that the distribution of delocalised electron energies along the protein plays a crucial role in determining the protein's biological activity. Two digital signal processing (DSP) methods were used: Fourier Transform (FT) and Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT). Here we have determined the characteristic frequencies and the "hot spot" amino acids, and predicted the location of proteins' active site(s). Several proteins that potentially belong to the PpOI functional group were also analysed to distinguish their viability in this role. PMID:15712584

  14. Crosstalk between mitochondria and NADPH oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Dikalov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in physiological and pathological processes. In recent years, a feed-forward regulation of the ROS sources has been reported. The interaction between main cellular sources of ROS, such as mitochondria and NADPH oxidases, however, remain obscure. This work summarizes the latest findings on the role of crosstalk between mitochondria and NADPH oxidases in pathophysiological processes. Mitochondria have the highest levels of antioxidants in the cell and play an important role in the maintenance of cellular redox status, thereby acting as an ROS and redox sink and limiting NADPH oxidase activity. Mitochondria, however, are not only a target for ROS produced by NADPH oxidase but also a significant source of ROS, which under certain condition may stimulate NADPH oxidases. This crosstalk between mitochondria and NADPH oxidases, therefore, may represent a feed-forward vicious cycle of ROS production which can be pharmacologically targeted under conditions of oxidative stress. It has been demonstrated that mitochondria-targeted antioxidants break this vicious cycle, inhibiting ROS production by mitochondria and reducing NADPH oxidase activity. This may provide a novel strategy for treatment of many pathological conditions including aging, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypertension and degenerative neurological disorders in which mitochondrial oxidative stress seems to play a role. It is conceivable that the use of mitochondria-targeted treatments would be effective in these conditions. PMID:21777669

  15. Structural Insights into Sulfite Oxidase Deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Wilson, H.; Graf, T.; Xiang, S.; Jaramillo-Busquets, S.; Rajagopalan, K.; Kisker, C.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfite oxidase deficiency is a lethal genetic disease that results from defects either in the genes encoding proteins involved in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis or in the sulfite oxidase gene itself. Several point mutations in the sulfite oxidase gene have been identified from patients suffering from this disease worldwide. Although detailed biochemical analyses have been carried out on these mutations, no structural data could be obtained because of problems in crystallizing recombinant human and rat sulfite oxidases and the failure to clone the chicken sulfite oxidase gene. We synthesized the gene for chicken sulfite oxidase de novo, working backward from the amino acid sequence of the native chicken liver enzyme by PCR amplification of a series of 72 overlapping primers. The recombinant protein displayed the characteristic absorption spectrum of sulfite oxidase and exhibited steady state and rapid kinetic parameters comparable with those of the tissue-derived enzyme. We solved the crystal structures of the wild type and the sulfite oxidase deficiency-causing R138Q (R160Q in humans) variant of recombinant chicken sulfite oxidase in the resting and sulfate-bound forms. Significant alterations in the substrate-binding pocket were detected in the structure of the mutant, and a comparison between the wild type and mutant protein revealed that the active site residue Arg-450 adopts different conformations in the presence and absence of bound sulfate. The size of the binding pocket is thereby considerably reduced, and its position relative to the cofactor is shifted, causing an increase in the distance of the sulfur atom of the bound sulfate to the molybdenum.

  16. Human lysyl oxidase-like 2.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Finney, Joel; Ronnebaum, Trey; Mure, Minae

    2014-12-01

    Lysyl oxidase like-2 (LOXL2) belongs to the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family, which comprises Cu(2+)- and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ)-dependent amine oxidases. LOXL2 is proposed to function similarly to LOX in the extracellular matrix (ECM) by promoting crosslinking of collagen and elastin. LOXL2 has also been proposed to regulate extracellular and intracellular cell signaling pathways. Dysregulation of LOXL2 has been linked to many diseases, including cancer, pro-oncogenic angiogenesis, fibrosis and heart diseases. In this review, we will give an overview of the current understandings and hypotheses regarding the molecular functions of LOXL2. PMID:25146937

  17. NADPH Oxidases and Angiotensin II Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Abel Martin; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade many studies have demonstrated the importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by NADPH oxidases in angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling, as well as a role for ROS in the development of different diseases in which Ang II is a central component. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of activation of NADPH oxidases by Ang II and describe the molecular targets of ROS in Ang II signaling in the vasculature, kidney and brain. We also discuss the effects of genetic manipulation of NADPH oxidase function on the physiology and pathophysiology of the renin angiotensin system. PMID:19059306

  18. Effect of 4-hydroxypyrazolo (3,4-D) pyrimidine (allopurinol) on post-irradiation cerebral blood flow: implications of free-radical involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Arroyo, C.M.; Hampton, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Early transient incapacitation (ETI) is the complete cessation of motor performance, occurring transiently and within the first 30 min following exposure to supralethal doses of ionizing irradiation. Studies have reported severe decreases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in primates at the same postirradiation time after receiving supralethal doses of gamma irradiation. One study demonstrated a dramatic fall of total cerebral blood flow following a single, 25-Gy, Co exposure. Free radical interactions have been implicated in a large number of pathological conditions including irradiation injury, ischemia, microvascular injury, and cell membrane damage. The triphasic cerebral ischemic response seen after irradiation may be even more damaging than complete ischemia since reperfusion may lead to the formation of additional free radicals. A possible mode of pharmacologic intervention may be the introduction of superoxide dismutase or allopurinol since both were used to attenuate the biochemical and functional damage usually associated with free-radical production. This study was designed to determine whether the inhibition of free radical formation via the preirradiation administration of allopurinol would be successful in altering the postirradiation hypotension and reduced rCBF. The hippocampus and the hypothalamus, were selected for the determination of blood flow in this study since a dramatic, postirradiation decrease in blood flow has been reported in these areas.

  19. Genetic Heterogeneity within Electrophoretic "Alleles" of Xanthine Dehydrogenase in DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R. S.; Lewontin, R. C.; Felton, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental plan for an exhaustive determination of genic variation at structural gene loci is presented. In the initial steps of this program, 146 isochromosomal lines from 12 geographic populations of D. pseudoobscura were examined for allelic variation of xanthine dehydrogenase by the serial use of 4 different electrophoretic conditions and a heat stability test. The 5 criteria revealed a total of 37 allelic classes out of the 146 genomes examined where only 6 had been previously revealed by the usual method of gel electrophoresis. This immense increase in genic variation also showed previously unsuspected population differences between the main part of the species distribution and the isolated population of Bogotá, Colombia, in conformity with the known partial reproductive isolation of the Bogotá population. The average heterozygosity at the Xdh locus is at least 72% in natural populations. This result, together with the very large number of alleles segregating and the pattern of allelic frequencies, has implications for theories of genetic polymorphism which are discussed. PMID:1001881

  20. Determination of Flavonoids, Phenolic Acids, and Xanthines in Mate Tea (Ilex paraguariensis St.-Hil.)

    PubMed Central

    Bojić, Mirza; Simon Haas, Vicente; Maleš, Željan

    2013-01-01

    Raw material, different formulations of foods, and dietary supplements of mate demands control of the content of bioactive substances for which high performance thin layer chromatography (TLC), described here, presents simple and rapid approach for detections as well as quantification. Using TLC densitometry, the following bioactive compounds were identified and quantified: chlorogenic acid (2.1 mg/g), caffeic acid (1.5 mg/g), rutin (5.2 mg/g), quercetin (2.2 mg/g), and kaempferol (4.5 mg/g). The results obtained with TLC densitometry for caffeine (5.4 mg/g) and theobromine (2.7 mg/g) show no statistical difference to the content of total xanthines (7.6 mg/g) obtained by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Thus, TLC remains a technique of choice for simple and rapid analysis of great number of samples as well as a primary screening technique in plant analysis. PMID:23841023

  1. The crystal structure of xanthine oxidoreductase during catalysis: Implications for reaction mechanism and enzyme inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ken; Matsumoto, Koji; Hille, Russ; Eger, Bryan T.; Pai, Emil F.; Nishino, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    Molybdenum is widely distributed in biology and is usually found as a mononuclear metal center in the active sites of many enzymes catalyzing oxygen atom transfer. The molybdenum hydroxylases are distinct from other biological systems catalyzing hydroxylation reactions in that the oxygen atom incorporated into the product is derived from water rather than molecular oxygen. Here, we present the crystal structure of the key intermediate in the hydroxylation reaction of xanthine oxidoreductase with a slow substrate, in which the carbon–oxygen bond of the product is formed, yet the product remains complexed to the molybdenum. This intermediate displays a stable broad charge–transfer band at ≈640 nm. The crystal structure of the complex indicates that the catalytically labile Mo—OH oxygen has formed a bond with a carbon atom of the substrate. In addition, the Mo⋕S group of the oxidized enzyme has become protonated to afford Mo—SH on reduction of the molybdenum center. In contrast to previous assignments, we find this last ligand at an equatorial position in the square-pyramidal metal coordination sphere, not the apical position. A water molecule usually seen in the active site of the enzyme is absent in the present structure, which probably accounts for the stability of this intermediate toward ligand displacement by hydroxide. PMID:15148401

  2. Rapid and sensitive gas-chromatographic determination of caffeine in blood plasma, saliva, and xanthine beverages.

    PubMed

    Teeuwen, H W; Elbers, E L; van Rossum, J M

    1991-02-01

    A gas chromatographic procedure is reported for the determination of caffeine in plasma, saliva, and xanthine beverages. Using a 75 cm column packed with OV-17, nitrogen-sensitive detection, and 1 ml samples, a suitable limit of analysis (coefficient of variation (CV) = 10.2%) of 50 ng/ml was obtained in plasma. Within-day CVs at caffeine concentrations of 0.1-0.5-2.0-7.5-15.0 micrograms/ml in plasma were 7.7-5.6-4.8-3.8-3.4%, respectively. The limit of detection, defined as the injected quantity of caffeine giving rise to a signal to noise ratio of 2, is 40 pg, corresponding to a plasma concentration of 1 ng/ml. The procedure involves addition of the internal standard 7-pentyl theophylline and alkaline extraction of the sample with dichloromethane. The method described rivals any gaschromatographic assay published so far in rapidness and accuracy. Plasma and saliva caffeine concentrations were determined in a healthy male volunteer after swallowing 400 ml of coffee. The calculated pharmacokinetic parameters, assuming complete absorption of caffeine from the G.I. tract, agree well with previously published values. PMID:1875916

  3. Study on inclusion complex of cyclodextrin with methyl xanthine derivatives by fluorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yan-Li; Ding, Li-Hua; Dong, Chuan; Niu, Wei-Ping; Shuang, Shao-Min

    2003-10-01

    The inclusion complexes of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and HP-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) with caffeine, theophylline and theobromine were investigated by fluorimetry. Various factors affecting the formation of inclusion complexes were discussed in detail including forming time, pH effect and temperature. The results indicate that inclusion process was affected seriously by laying time and pH. The forming time of β-CD inclusion complexes is much longer than that of HP-β-CD. The optimum pH range is about 7-12 for caffeine, 8-10 for TP, 10.5-12 for TB. The intensities of their fluorescence increase with the decreasing of temperature. Their maximum excitation wavelengths are all in the range of 280-290 nm. The emission wavelength of caffeine and theophylline are both in the range of 340-360 nm, and that of theobromine is about 325 nm. The fluorescence signals are intensified with the increasing concentration of CD. The stoichiometry of the inclusion complexes of CD with these three methyl xanthine derivatives are all 1:1 and the formation constant are all calculated.

  4. Selective cytotoxicity of an oxygen-radical-generating enzyme conjugated to a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Tazzari, P L; Dinota, A; Rizzi, S; Grassi, G; Gobbi, M; Stirpe, F

    1988-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody 8A, which recognizes a human plasma cell-associated antigen, was covalently linked to xanthine oxidase in a conjugate maintaining both immunological and enzymatic properties. A significant degree of target cell lysis was obtained at an enzyme concentration that was ineffective on non-target cells and on myeloid staminal cells (CFU-GM). The cytotoxic activity was abolished by an excess of antibody, by allopurinol and by superoxide dismutase and catalase. A possible use of the conjugate for bone marrow purging in multiple myeloma patients is suggested. PMID:3262464

  5. Selective cytotoxicity of an oxygen-radical-generating enzyme conjugated to a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Tazzari, P L; Dinota, A; Rizzi, S; Grassi, G; Gobbi, M; Stirpe, F

    1988-07-01

    The monoclonal antibody 8A, which recognizes a human plasma cell-associated antigen, was covalently linked to xanthine oxidase in a conjugate maintaining both immunological and enzymatic properties. A significant degree of target cell lysis was obtained at an enzyme concentration that was ineffective on non-target cells and on myeloid staminal cells (CFU-GM). The cytotoxic activity was abolished by an excess of antibody, by allopurinol and by superoxide dismutase and catalase. A possible use of the conjugate for bone marrow purging in multiple myeloma patients is suggested. PMID:3262464

  6. Regulation of NADPH oxidases in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Leonardo F; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-09-01

    The only known function of NAD(P)H oxidases is to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Skeletal muscles express three isoforms of NAD(P)H oxidases (Nox1, Nox2, and Nox4) that have been identified as critical modulators of redox homeostasis. Nox2 acts as the main source of skeletal muscle ROS during contractions, participates in insulin signaling and glucose transport, and mediates the myocyte response to osmotic stress. Nox2 and Nox4 contribute to skeletal muscle abnormalities elicited by angiotensin II, muscular dystrophy, heart failure, and high fat diet. Our review addresses the expression and regulation of NAD(P)H oxidases with emphasis on aspects that are relevant to skeletal muscle. We also summarize: i) the most widely used NAD(P)H oxidases activity assays and inhibitors, and ii) studies that have defined Nox enzymes as protagonists of skeletal muscle redox homeostasis in a variety of health and disease conditions. PMID:27184955

  7. Activation of Polyphenol Oxidase of Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase of leaves is located mainly in chloroplasts isolated by differential or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. This activity is part of the lamellar structure that is not lost on repeated washing of the plastids. The oxidase activity was stable during prolonged storage of the particles at 4 C or —18 C. The Km (dihydroxyphenylalanine) for spinach leaf polyphenol oxidase was 7 mm by a spectrophotometric assay and 2 mm by the manometric assay. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the leaf peroxisomal fraction, after isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient, did not coincide with the peroxisomal enzymes but was attributed to proplastids at nearly the same specific density. Plants were grouped by the latency properties for polyphenol oxidase in their isolated chloroplasts. In a group including spinach, Swiss chard, and beet leaves the plastids immediately after preparation from fresh leaves required a small amount of light for maximal rates of oxidation of dihydroxyphenylalanine. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the dark or light increased many fold during aging of these chloroplasts for 1 to 5 days. Soluble polyphenol oxidase of the cytoplasm was not so stimulated. Chloroplasts prepared from stored leaves were also much more active than from fresh leaves. Maximum rates of dihydroxyphenylalanine oxidation were 2 to 6 mmoles × mg−1 chlorophyll × hr−1. Equal stimulation of latent polyphenol oxidase in fresh or aged chloroplasts in this group was obtained by either light, an aged trypsin digest, 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea, or antimycin A. A variety of other treatments did not activate or had little effect on the oxidase, including various peptides, salts, detergents, and other proteolytic enzymes. Activation of latent polyphenol oxidase in spinach chloroplasts by trypsin amounted to as much as 30-fold. The trypsin activation occurred even after the trypsin had been treated with 10% trichloroacetic acid, 1.0 n HCl or boiled for 30

  8. Heme/copper terminal oxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson-Miller, S.; Babcock, G.T.

    1996-11-01

    Spatially well-organized electron-transfer reactions in a series of membrane-bound redox proteins form the basis for energy conservation in both photosynthesis and respiration. The membrane-bound nature of the electron-transfer processes is critical, as the free energy made available in exergonic redox chemistry is used to generate transmembrane proton concentration and electrostatic potential gradients. These gradients are subsequently used to drive ATP formation, which provides the immediate energy source for constructive cellular processes. The terminal heme/copper oxidases in respiratory electron-transfer chains illustrate a number of the thermodynamic and structural principles that have driven the development of respiration. This class of enzyme reduces dioxygen to water, thus clearing the respiratory system of low-energy electrons so that sustained electron transfer and free-energy transduction can occur. By using dioxygen as the oxidizing substrate, free-energy production per electron through the chain is substantial, owing to the high reduction potential of O{sub 2} (0.815 V at pH 7). 122 refs.

  9. Direct Activation of β-Cell KATP Channels with a Novel Xanthine Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Raphemot, Rene; Swale, Daniel R.; Dadi, Prasanna K.; Jacobson, David A.; Cooper, Paige; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Banerjee, Sreedatta; Nichols, Colin G.

    2014-01-01

    ATP-regulated potassium (KATP) channel complexes of inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir) 6.2 and sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) 1 critically regulate pancreatic islet β-cell membrane potential, calcium influx, and insulin secretion, and consequently, represent important drug targets for metabolic disorders of glucose homeostasis. The KATP channel opener diazoxide is used clinically to treat intractable hypoglycemia caused by excessive insulin secretion, but its use is limited by off-target effects due to lack of potency and selectivity. Some progress has been made in developing improved Kir6.2/SUR1 agonists from existing chemical scaffolds and compound screening, but there are surprisingly few distinct chemotypes that are specific for SUR1-containing KATP channels. Here we report the serendipitous discovery in a high-throughput screen of a novel activator of Kir6.2/SUR1: VU0071063 [7-(4-(tert-butyl)benzyl)-1,3-dimethyl-1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H)-dione]. The xanthine derivative rapidly and dose-dependently activates Kir6.2/SUR1 with a half-effective concentration (EC50) of approximately 7 μM, is more efficacious than diazoxide at low micromolar concentrations, directly activates the channel in excised membrane patches, and is selective for SUR1- over SUR2A-containing Kir6.1 or Kir6.2 channels, as well as Kir2.1, Kir2.2, Kir2.3, Kir3.1/3.2, and voltage-gated potassium channel 2.1. Finally, we show that VU0071063 activates native Kir6.2/SUR1 channels, thereby inhibiting glucose-stimulated calcium entry in isolated mouse pancreatic β cells. VU0071063 represents a novel tool/compound for investigating β-cell physiology, KATP channel gating, and a new chemical scaffold for developing improved activators with medicinal chemistry. PMID:24646456

  10. Decreased xanthine oxidoreductase is a predictor of poor prognosis in early‐stage gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Linder, N; Haglund, C; Lundin, M; Nordling, S; Ristimäki, A; Kokkola, A; Mrena, J; Wiksten, J‐P; Lundin, J

    2006-01-01

    Background Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is a key enzyme in the degradation of DNA, RNA and high‐energy phosphates. About half of the patients with breast cancer have a decrease in XOR expression. Patients with breast cancer with unfavourable prognosis are independently identified by the loss of XOR. Aim To assess the clinical relevance of XOR expression in gastric cancer. Methods XOR levels were studied by immunohistochemistry in tissue microarray specimens of 337 patients with gastric cancer and the relation between XOR expression and a series of clinicopathological variables, as well as disease‐specific survival, was assessed. Results XOR was moderately decreased in 41% and was undetectable in another 14% of the tumours compared with the corresponding normal tissue. Decreased XOR was associated with advanced stage, deep tumour penetration, diffusely spread tumour location, positive lymph node status, large tumour size, non‐curative disease, cellular aneuploidy, high S‐phase fraction and high cyclooxygenase‐2 expression, but not with p53 expression or Borrmann classification. Down regulation of XOR was associated with unfavourable outcome, and the cumulative 5‐year gastric cancer‐specific survival in patients with strong XOR expression was 47%, compared with 22% in those with moderate to negative expression (p<0.001). This was also true in patients with stage I–II (p = 0.01) and lymph node‐negative (p = 0.02) disease, as well as in patients with smaller (⩽5 cm) tumours (p = 0.02). Conclusion XOR expression in gastric cancer may be a new marker for a more aggressive gastric cancer biology, similar to that previously reported for breast cancer. PMID:16935971

  11. FYX-051: a novel and potent hybrid-type inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Koji; Okamoto, Ken; Ashizawa, Naoki; Nishino, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    4-[5-(Pyridin-4-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]pyridine-2-carbonitrile (FYX-051) is a potent inhibitor of bovine milk xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR). Steady-state kinetics study showed that it initially behaved as a competitive-type inhibitor with a K(i) value of 5.7 × 10(-9) M, then after a few minutes it formed a tight complex with XOR via a Mo-oxygen-carbon atom covalent linkage, as reported previously (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:7931-7936, 2004). Thus, FYX-051 is a hybrid-type inhibitor exhibiting both structure- and mechanism-based inhibition. The FYX-051-XOR complex decomposed with a half-life of 20.4 h, but the enzyme activity did not fully recover. This was found to be caused by XOR-mediated conversion of FYX-051 to 4-[5-(2-hydroxypyridin-4-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]pyridine-2-carbonitrile (2-hydroxy-FYX-051), as well as formation of 6-hydroxy-4-[5-(2-hydroxypyridin-4-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]pyridine-2-carbonitrile (dihydroxy-FYX-051) and 4-[5-(2,6-dihydroxypyridin-4-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]-6-hydroxypyridine-2-carbonitrile (trihydroxy-FYX-051) during prolonged incubation for up to 72 h. A distinct charge-transfer band was observed concomitantly with the formation of the trihydroxy-FYX-051-XOR complex. Crystallographic analysis of the charge-transfer complex indicated that a Mo-nitrogen-carbon bond was formed between molybdenum of XOR and the nitrile group of trihydroxy-FYX-051. FYX-051 showed a potent and long-lasting hypouricemic effect in a rat model of potassium oxonate-induced hyperuricemia, and it seems to be a promising candidate for the clinical treatment of hyperuricemia. PMID:20952484

  12. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model. PMID:27029427

  13. Down-regulation of hepatic urea synthesis by oxypurines: xanthine and uric acid inhibit N-acetylglutamate synthase.

    PubMed

    Nissim, Itzhak; Horyn, Oksana; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Caldovic, Ljubica; Barcelona, Belen; Cervera, Javier; Tuchman, Mendel; Yudkoff, Marc

    2011-06-24

    We previously reported that isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), a derivative of oxypurine, inhibits citrulline synthesis by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that IBMX and other oxypurines containing a 2,6-dione group interfere with the binding of glutamate to the active site of N-acetylglutamate synthetase (NAGS), thereby decreasing synthesis of N-acetylglutamate, the obligatory activator of carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS1). The result is reduction of citrulline and urea synthesis. Experiments were performed with (15)N-labeled substrates, purified hepatic CPS1, and recombinant mouse NAGS as well as isolated mitochondria. We also used isolated hepatocytes to examine the action of various oxypurines on ureagenesis and to assess the ameliorating affect of N-carbamylglutamate and/or l-arginine on NAGS inhibition. Among various oxypurines tested, only IBMX, xanthine, or uric acid significantly increased the apparent K(m) for glutamate and decreased velocity of NAGS, with little effect on CPS1. The inhibition of NAGS is time- and dose-dependent and leads to decreased formation of the CPS1-N-acetylglutamate complex and consequent inhibition of citrulline and urea synthesis. However, such inhibition was reversed by supplementation with N-carbamylglutamate. The data demonstrate that xanthine and uric acid, both physiologically occurring oxypurines, inhibit the hepatic synthesis of N-acetylglutamate. An important and novel concept emerging from this study is that xanthine and/or uric acid may have a role in the regulation of ureagenesis and, thus, nitrogen homeostasis in normal and disease states. PMID:21540182

  14. Mechanism of Porcine Liver Xanthine Oxidoreductase Mediated N-Oxide Reduction of Cyadox as Revealed by Docking and Mutagenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Xu; Huang, Lingli; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is a cytoplasmic molybdenum-containing oxidoreductase, catalyzing both endogenous purines and exogenous compounds. It is suggested that XOR in porcine hepatocytes catalyzes the N-oxide reduction of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides (QdNOs). To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this metabolism, the cDNA of porcine XOR was cloned and heterologously expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. The bovine XOR, showing sequence identity of 91% to porcine XOR, was employed as template for homology modeling. By docking cyadox, a representative compound of QdNOs, into porcine XOR model, eight amino acid residues, Gly47, Asn352, Ser360, Arg427, Asp430, Asp431, Ser1227 and Lys1230, were located at distances of less than 4Å to cyadox. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze their catalytic functions. Compared with wild type porcine XOR, G47A, S360P, D431A, S1227A, and K1230A displayed altered kinetic parameters in cyadox reduction, similarly to that in xanthine oxidation, indicating these mutations influenced electron-donating process of xanthine before subsequent electron transfer to cyadox to fulfill the N-oxide reduction. Differently, R427E and D430H, both located in the 424–434 loop, exhibited a much lower Km and a decreased Vmax respectively in cyadox reduction. Arg427 may be related to the substrate binding of porcine XOR to cyadox, and Asp430 is suggested to be involved in the transfer of electron to cyadox. This study initially reveals the possible catalytic mechanism of porcine XOR in cyadox metabolism, providing with novel insights into the structure-function relationship of XOR in the reduction of exogenous di-N-oxides. PMID:24040113

  15. GPCR Ligand Dendrimer (GLiDe) Conjugates: Adenosine Receptor Interactions of a Series of Multivalent Xanthine Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Kecskés, Angela; Tosh, Dilip K.; Wei, Qiang; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists were tethered from polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers to provide high receptor affinity and selectivity. Here we prepared GPCR Ligand Dendrimer (GLiDe) conjugates from a potent adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist; such agents are of interest for treating Parkinson’s disease, asthma, and other conditions. Xanthine amine congener (XAC) was appended with an alkyne group on an extended C8 substituent for coupling by Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry to azide-derivatized G4 (fourth-generation) PAMAM dendrimers to form triazoles. These conjugates also contained triazole-linked PEG groups (8 or 22 moieties per 64 terminal positions) for increasing water-solubility and optionally prosthetic groups for spectroscopic characterization and affinity labeling. Human AR binding affinity increased progressively with the degree of xanthine substitution to reach Ki values in the nM range. The order of affinity of each conjugate was hA2AAR > hA3AR > hA1AR, while the corresponding monomer was ranked hA2AAR > hA1AR ≥ hA3AR. The antagonist activity of the most potent conjugate 14 (34 xanthines per dendrimer) was examined at the Gi-coupled A1AR. Conjugate 14 at 100 nM right-shifted the AR agonist concentration-response curve in a cyclic AMP functional assay in a parallel manner, but at 10 nM (lower than its Ki value) it significantly suppressed the maximal agonist effect in calcium mobilization. This is the first systematic probing of a potent AR antagonist tethered on a dendrimer and its activity as a function of variable loading. PMID:21539392

  16. Proline dehydrogenase (oxidase) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Phang, James M

    2012-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (oxidase, PRODH/POX), the first enzyme in the proline degradative pathway, plays a special role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Proline metabolism catalyzed by PRODH/POX is closely linked with the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and urea cycle. The proline cycle formed by the interconversion of proline and Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) between mitochondria and cytosol interlocks with pentose phosphate pathway. Importantly, by catalyzing proline to P5C, PRODH/POX donates electrons into the electron transport chain to generate ROS or ATP. In earlier studies, we found that PRODH/POX functions as a tumor suppressor to initiate apoptosis, inhibit tumor growth, and block the cell cycle, all by ROS signaling. It also suppresses hypoxia inducible factor signaling by increasing α-ketoglutarate. During tumor progression, PRODH/POX is under the control of various tumor-associated factors, such as tumor suppressor p53, inflammatory factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), onco-miRNA miR-23b*, and oncogenic transcription factor c-MYC. Recent studies revealed the two-sided features of PRODH/POX-mediated regulation. Under metabolic stress such as oxygen and glucose deprivation, PRODH/POX can be induced to serve as a tumor survival factor through ATP production or ROS-induced autophagy. The paradoxical roles of PRODH/POX can be understood considering the temporal and spatial context of the tumor. Further studies will provide additional insights into this protein and on its metabolic effects in tumors, which may lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:22886911

  17. Treatment of calcium nephrolithiasis in the patient with hyperuricosuria.

    PubMed

    Arowojolu, Omotayo; Goldfarb, David S

    2014-12-01

    Nearly one-third of patients with calcium stones have hyperuricosuria. In vitro studies and clinical trials have investigated the relationship between uric acid and calcium stones, but the association between hyperuricosuria and calcium stone formation in patients is still being debated. Uric acid appears to cause salting out of calcium oxalate in human urine. However, the importance of this in vitro phenomenon to the proposed association is not supported in cross-sectional observational studies. A small placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial showed that allopurinol decreased the rate of recurrent calcium oxalate calculi in patients with hyperuricosuria and normocalciuria. An assessment of the effect of combination therapy of allopurinol with indapamide showed no additive effect. Allopurinol may have antioxidant effects that are responsible for its reducing calcium stone formation, which are independent of xanthine oxidase inhibition. In addition, a newer xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, febuxostat, may also be effective in the prevention of calcium stones, as it reduces urinary uric acid excretion. PMID:24687403

  18. NADPH oxidases: new actors in thyroid cancer?

    PubMed

    Ameziane-El-Hassani, Rabii; Schlumberger, Martin; Dupuy, Corinne

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a crucial substrate for thyroid peroxidase, a key enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis. However, as a potent oxidant, H2O2 might also be responsible for the high level of oxidative DNA damage observed in thyroid tissues, such as DNA base lesions and strand breakages, which promote chromosomal instability and contribute to the development of tumours. Although the role of H2O2 in thyroid hormone synthesis is well established, its precise mechanisms of action in pathological processes are still under investigation. The NADPH oxidase/dual oxidase family are the only oxidoreductases whose primary function is to produce reactive oxygen species. As such, the function and expression of these enzymes are tightly regulated. Thyrocytes express dual oxidase 2, which produces most of the H2O2 for thyroid hormone synthesis. Thyrocytes also express dual oxidase 1 and NADPH oxidase 4, but the roles of these enzymes are still unknown. Here, we review the structure, expression, localization and function of these enzymes. We focus on their potential role in thyroid cancer, which is characterized by increased expression of these enzymes. PMID:27174022

  19. Allopurinol enhances the activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in inflammatory bowel disease patients during low-dose thiopurine therapy: preliminary data of an ongoing series.

    PubMed

    Seinen, Margien L; de Boer, Nanne K H; Smid, Kees; van Asseldonk, Dirk P; Bouma, Gerd; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A; Peters, Godefridus J

    2011-12-01

    Thiopurines are crucial in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The phenotype of pivotal metabolic enzymes determines whether thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) are generated in clinically sufficiently high levels. The first step in activation of thiopurine prodrugs to 6-TGN is catalysis by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Often, patients exhibit a clinically unfavorable metabolism, leading to discontinuation of conventional thiopurine therapy. The combination of allopurinol and low-dose thiopurine therapy may optimize this variant metabolism, presumably by affecting enzyme activities. We performed a prospective pharmacodynamic study to determine the effect of combination therapy on the activity of HGPRT. The activity of HGPRT and 6-TGN concentrations was measured in red blood cells during thiopurine monotherapy and after 4 weeks of combination therapy. The activity of HGPRT was also measured after 12 weeks of combination therapy. From the results, we conclude that combination therapy increases the activity of HGPRT and subsequently 6-TGN concentrations. PMID:22132961

  20. CYTOCHROME OXIDASE IN NORMAL AND REGENERATING NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Howard A.; Mellors, Robert C.

    1945-01-01

    Manometric determinations of cytochrome oxidase activity were carried out on grey matter from the thalamus and anterior horn of cats and monkeys under various experimental conditions. The thalamus of the cat was studied following the degeneration of virtually all the thalamic neurons secondary to decortication. In comparing the deneuronated thalamus with the normal one, it was found that approximately 34 per cent of the cytochrome oxidase activity was contributed by the neurons and the balance by neuroglia and mesodermal tissues which on the operated side remained comparable to that of the normal side. Total activity of the normal thalamus averaged 5.52 units per mg. of dry weight where I unit is defined as the amount of cytochrome oxidase required to produce a net oxygen consumption of 10 c.mm. per hour under the specified conditions of the experiment. The grey matter of the anterior horns of the spinal cord was isolated by a special technique and its cytochrome oxidase activity was compared with anterior horns in which motoneurons had been stimulated to regenerative activity by section of peripheral nerves. Each animal was studied in relation to an anterior horn which was normal and one in which only the functional state of the motoneurons had been changed. Average normal levels of 2.23 units were found for cat anterior horn and 0.69 units for the monkey. Reductions of cytochrome oxidase activity in the range of 22 to 23 per cent were observed for both cat and monkey following nerve section. In the latter the time sequence was carefully studied in relation to the cytological cycle known as chromatolysis and a virus refractory state previously described by us. It was found that maximal reduction of cytochrome oxidase activity coincided with maximal refractoriness of the cells to poliomyelitis virus (30 to 70 days following nerve section). Neither of these states could be correlated in time with maximal chromatolysis (10 to 15 days). PMID:19871471

  1. Potential Pharmacologic Treatments for Cystinuria and for Calcium Stones Associated with Hyperuricosuria

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, David S.

    2012-03-14

    Two new potential pharmacologic therapies for recurrent stone disease are described. The role of hyperuricosuria in promoting calcium stones is controversial with only some but not all epidemiologic studies demonstrating associations between increasing urinary uric acid excretion and calcium stone disease. The relationship is supported by the ability of uric acid to 'salt out' (or reduce the solubility of) calcium oxalate in vitro. A randomized, controlled trial of allopurinol in patients with hyperuricosuria and normocalciuria was also effective in preventing recurrent stones. Febuxostat, a nonpurine inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (also known as xanthine dehydrogenase or xanthine oxidoreductase) may have advantages over allopurinol and is being tested in a similar protocol, with the eventual goal of determining whether urate-lowering therapy prevents recurrent calcium stones. Treatments for cystinuria have advanced little in the past 30 years. Atomic force microscopy has been used recently to demonstrate that effective inhibition of cystine crystal growth is accomplished at low concentrations of L-cystine methyl ester and L-cystine dimethyl ester, structural analogs of cystine that provide steric inhibition of crystal growth. In vitro, L-cystine dimethyl ester had a significant inhibitory effect on crystal growth. The drug's safety and effectiveness will be tested in an Slc3a1 knockout mouse that serves as an animal model of cystinuria.

  2. Tempol improves xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated vascular responses to nitrite in experimental renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Guimaraes, Danielle A; Tella, Sandra O Conde; Blanco, Ana L Furlan; Angelis, Celio D; Schechter, Alan N; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-08-01

    Upregulation of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) increases vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and contributes to nitroso-redox imbalance. However, XOR can generate nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite, and increased superoxide could inactivate NO formed from nitrite. This study tested the hypothesis that XOR contributes to the cardiovascular effects of nitrite in renovascular hypertension, and that treatment with the antioxidant tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) improves XOR-mediated effects of nitrite. Blood pressure was assessed weekly in two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) and control rats. After six weeks of hypertension, the relaxing responses to nitrite were assessed in aortic rings in the presence of the XOR inhibitor oxypurinol (or vehicle), either in the absence or in the presence of tempol. Moreover, in vivo hypotensive responses to nitrite were also examined in the presence of oxypurinol (or vehicle) and tempol (or vehicle). Aortic XOR activity and expression were evaluated by fluorescence and Western blot, respectively. Vascular ROS production was assessed by the dihydroethidium assay. 2K1C hypertensive rats showed increased aortic XOR activity and vascular ROS production compared with control rats. Oxypurinol shifted the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right in aortic rings from 2K1C rats (but not in controls). Oxypurinol also attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite in 2K1C rats (but not in controls). These functional findings agree with increased aortic and plasma XOR activity found in 2K1C rats. Tempol treatment enhanced oxypurinol-induced shift of the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right. However, antioxidant treatment did not affect XOR-mediated hypotensive effects of nitrite. Our results show that XOR is important to the cardiovascular responses to nitrite in 2K1C hypertension, and XOR inhibitors commonly used by patients may cancel this effect. This finding suggests that nitrite treatment may not be

  3. Inorganic nitrite attenuates NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide generation in activated macrophages via a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Peleli, Maria; Zollbrecht, Christa; Giulietti, Alessia; Terrando, Niccolo; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Carlström, Mattias

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of many disorders, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Immune cells are major sources of superoxide (O2(∙-)) as part of the innate host defense system, but exaggerated and sustained O2(∙-) generation may lead to progressive inflammation and organ injuries. Previous studies have proven organ-protective effects of inorganic nitrite, a precursor of nitric oxide (NO), in conditions manifested by oxidative stress and inflammation. However, the mechanisms are still not clear. This study aimed at investigating the potential role of nitrite in modulating NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity in immune cells. Mice peritoneal macrophages or human monocytes were activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with or without coincubation with nitrite. O2(∙-) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formation were detected by lucigenin-based chemiluminescence and fluorescence techniques, respectively. The intracellular NO production was measured by DAF-FM DA fluorescence. NOX isoforms and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression were detected by qPCR. LPS increased both O2(∙-) and ONOO(-) production in macrophages, which was significantly reduced by nitrite (10µmol/L). Mechanistically, the effects of nitrite are (1) linked to increased NO generation, (2) similar to that observed with the NO donor DETA-NONOate, and (3) can be abolished by the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO or by the xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor febuxostat. Nox2 expression was increased in activated macrophages, but was not influenced by nitrite. However, nitrite attenuated LPS-induced upregulation of iNOS expression. Similar to that observed in mice macrophages, nitrite also reduced O2(∙-) generation in LPS-activated human monocytes. In conclusion, XO-mediated reduction of nitrite attenuates NOX activity in activated macrophages, which may modulate the inflammatory response. PMID:25724690

  4. Oxidative stress, NADPH oxidases, and arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Runge, Marschall S; Madamanchi, Nageswara R

    2016-05-10

    Atherosclerosis and its major complications - myocardial infarction and stroke - remain major causes of death and disability in the United States and world-wide. Indeed, with dramatic increases in obesity and diabetes mellitus, the prevalence and public health impact of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) will likely remain high. Major advances have been made in development of new therapies to reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis and CVD, in particular for treatment of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Oxidative stress is the common mechanistic link for many CVD risk factors. However, only recently have the tools existed to study the interface between oxidative stress and CVD in animal models. The most important source of reactive oxygen species (and hence oxidative stress) in vascular cells are the multiple forms of enzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase). Recently published and emerging studies now clearly establish that: 1) NADPH oxidases are of critical importance in atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal models; 2) given the tissue-specific expression of key components of NADPH oxidase, it may be possible to target vascular oxidative stress for prevention of CVD. PMID:25649240

  5. The substrate tolerance of alcohol oxidases.

    PubMed

    Pickl, Mathias; Fuchs, Michael; Glueck, Silvia M; Faber, Kurt

    2015-08-01

    Alcohols are a rich source of compounds from renewable sources, but they have to be activated in order to allow the modification of their carbon backbone. The latter can be achieved via oxidation to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. As an alternative to (thermodynamically disfavoured) nicotinamide-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases, alcohol oxidases make use of molecular oxygen but their application is under-represented in synthetic biotransformations. In this review, the mechanism of copper-containing and flavoprotein alcohol oxidases is discussed in view of their ability to accept electronically activated or non-activated alcohols and their propensity towards over-oxidation of aldehydes yielding carboxylic acids. In order to facilitate the selection of the optimal enzyme for a given biocatalytic application, the substrate tolerance of alcohol oxidases is compiled and discussed: Substrates are classified into groups (non-activated prim- and sec-alcohols; activated allylic, cinnamic and benzylic alcohols; hydroxy acids; sugar alcohols; nucleotide alcohols; sterols) together with suitable alcohol oxidases, their microbial source, relative activities and (stereo)selectivities. PMID:26153139

  6. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some methylated xanthines and the laser desorption of caffeine and theophylline from thin layer chromatography plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption/laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and xanthine are reported. These mass spectra are compared with published spectra obtained using electron impact ionization. Mass spectra of caffeine and theophylline obtained by IR laser desorption from thin layer chromatography plates are also described. The laser desorption of materials from thin layer chromatography plates is discussed.

  7. Structure-function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H; Davies, Gideon J; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure-function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  8. Structure–function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family

    PubMed Central

    Yin, DeLu (Tyler); Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M.; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure–function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  9. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol reduce fructose-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis by attenuating CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Ma, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Jia, Ke-Ke; Liu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Rong; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Fructose consumption induces metabolic syndrome to increase cardiovascular disease risk. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol possess anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activity to relieve heart injury in metabolic syndrome. But the mechanisms of fructose-induced cardiac injury, and cardioprotective effects of cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol are not completely understood. In this study, fructose-fed rats displayed metabolic syndrome with elevated serum ox-LDL, cardiac oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Scavenger receptor CD36, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR6, IL-1R-associated kinase 4/1 (IRAK4/1), nucleotide-binding domain (NOD)-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), drosophila mothers against DPP homolog (Smad) 2/3 phosphorylation and Smad4 were increased in animal and H9c2 cell models. These pathological processes were further evaluated in ox-LDL or fructose-exposed H9c2 cells pretreated with ROS scavenger and CD36 specific inhibitor, or IRAK1/4 inhibitor, and transfected with CD36, NLRP3, or IRAK4/1 siRNA, demonstrating that NLPR3 inflammasome activation through CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling may promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol reduced cardiac oxidative stress to suppress NLPR3 inflammasome activation and TGF-β/Smads signaling by inhibiting CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling under fructose induction. These results suggest that the blockage of CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation by cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol may protect against fructose-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:27270216

  10. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol reduce fructose-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis by attenuating CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Ma, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Jia, Ke-Ke; Liu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Rong; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Fructose consumption induces metabolic syndrome to increase cardiovascular disease risk. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol possess anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activity to relieve heart injury in metabolic syndrome. But the mechanisms of fructose-induced cardiac injury, and cardioprotective effects of cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol are not completely understood. In this study, fructose-fed rats displayed metabolic syndrome with elevated serum ox-LDL, cardiac oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Scavenger receptor CD36, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR6, IL-1R-associated kinase 4/1 (IRAK4/1), nucleotide-binding domain (NOD)-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), drosophila mothers against DPP homolog (Smad) 2/3 phosphorylation and Smad4 were increased in animal and H9c2 cell models. These pathological processes were further evaluated in ox-LDL or fructose-exposed H9c2 cells pretreated with ROS scavenger and CD36 specific inhibitor, or IRAK1/4 inhibitor, and transfected with CD36, NLRP3, or IRAK4/1 siRNA, demonstrating that NLPR3 inflammasome activation through CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling may promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. Cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol reduced cardiac oxidative stress to suppress NLPR3 inflammasome activation and TGF-β/Smads signaling by inhibiting CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling under fructose induction. These results suggest that the blockage of CD36-mediated TLR4/6-IRAK4/1 signaling to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation by cinnamaldehyde and allopurinol may protect against fructose-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:27270216

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to the alternative oxidase of higher plant mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Elthon, T.E.; Nickels, R.L.; McIntosh, L. )

    1989-04-01

    The higher plant mitochondrial electron transport chain contains, in addition to the cytochrome chain which terminates with cytochrome oxidase, an alternative pathway that terminates with an alternative oxidase. The alternative oxidase of Sauromatum guttatum Schott has recently been identified as a cluster of proteins with apparent M{sub r} of 37, 36, and 35 kilodaltons (kD). Monoclonal antibodies have now been prepared to these proteins and designated as AOA (binding all three proteins of the alternative oxidase cluster), AOU (binding the upper or 37 kD protein), and AOL (binding the lower or 36 and 35 kD proteins). All three antibodies bind to their respective alternative oxidase proteins whether the proteins are in their native or denatured states. AOA and AOU inhibit alternative oxidase activity around 49%, whereas AOL inhibits activity only 14%. When coupled individually to Sepharose 4B, all three monoclonal resins were capable of retaining the entire cluster of alternative oxidase proteins, suggesting that these proteins are physically associated in some manner. The monoclonals were capable of binding similar mitochondrial proteins in a number of thermogenic and nonthermogenic species, indicating that they will be useful in characterizing and purifying the alternative oxidase of different systems. The ability of the monoclonal-Sepharose 4B resins to retain the cluster of previously identified alternative oxidase proteins, along with the inhibition of alternative oxidase activity by these monoclonals, supports the role of these proteins in constituting the alternative oxidase.

  12. Maternal fructose drives placental uric acid production leading to adverse fetal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Zeenat A; Thompson, Alysha; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Al-Hammadi, Noor; Saben, Jessica L; Moley, Kelle H

    2016-01-01

    Maternal metabolic diseases increase offspring risk for low birth weight and cardiometabolic diseases in adulthood. Excess fructose consumption may confer metabolic risks for both women and their offspring. However, the direct consequences of fructose intake per se are unknown. We assessed the impact of a maternal high-fructose diet on the fetal-placental unit in mice in the absence of metabolic syndrome and determined the association between maternal serum fructose and placental uric acid levels in humans. In mice, maternal fructose consumption led to placental inefficiency, fetal growth restriction, elevated fetal serum glucose and triglyceride levels. In the placenta, fructose induced de novo uric acid synthesis by activating the activities of the enzymes AMP deaminase and xanthine oxidase. Moreover, the placentas had increased lipids and altered expression of genes that control oxidative stress. Treatment of mothers with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol reduced placental uric acid levels, prevented placental inefficiency, and improved fetal weights and serum triglycerides. Finally, in 18 women delivering at term, maternal serum fructose levels significantly correlated with placental uric acid levels. These findings suggest that in mice, excess maternal fructose consumption impairs placental function via a xanthine oxidase/uric acid-dependent mechanism, and similar effects may occur in humans. PMID:27125896

  13. Maternal fructose drives placental uric acid production leading to adverse fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Zeenat A.; Thompson, Alysha; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Al-Hammadi, Noor; Saben, Jessica L.; Moley, Kelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal metabolic diseases increase offspring risk for low birth weight and cardiometabolic diseases in adulthood. Excess fructose consumption may confer metabolic risks for both women and their offspring. However, the direct consequences of fructose intake per se are unknown. We assessed the impact of a maternal high-fructose diet on the fetal-placental unit in mice in the absence of metabolic syndrome and determined the association between maternal serum fructose and placental uric acid levels in humans. In mice, maternal fructose consumption led to placental inefficiency, fetal growth restriction, elevated fetal serum glucose and triglyceride levels. In the placenta, fructose induced de novo uric acid synthesis by activating the activities of the enzymes AMP deaminase and xanthine oxidase. Moreover, the placentas had increased lipids and altered expression of genes that control oxidative stress. Treatment of mothers with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol reduced placental uric acid levels, prevented placental inefficiency, and improved fetal weights and serum triglycerides. Finally, in 18 women delivering at term, maternal serum fructose levels significantly correlated with placental uric acid levels. These findings suggest that in mice, excess maternal fructose consumption impairs placental function via a xanthine oxidase/uric acid-dependent mechanism, and similar effects may occur in humans. PMID:27125896

  14. HPTLC Analysis, Antioxidant and Antigout Activity of Indian Plants.

    PubMed

    Nile, Shivraj Hariram; Park, Se Won

    2014-01-01

    The HPTLC analysis, antioxidant, and antigout activity of Asparagus racemosus, Withania somnifera, Vitex negundo, Plumbago zeylanica, Butea monosperma and Tephrosia purpurea extracts were investigated. The chemical fingerprinting were carried out by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), antioxidant activity by ABTS, DPPH, FRAP radical scavenging assays, and antiogout activity by cow milk xanthine oxidase. The HPTLC fingerprint qualitatively revealed predominant amount of flavonoids. The TEAC values ranged from 45.80 to 140 µM trolox/100 g dry weight for ABTS, from 85 to 430 µM trolox/ 100 g dw DPPH, and 185 to 560 µM trolox/100 g dw for FRAP respectively. Plants used in this study was found to inhibit the toxicity, as seen from the decreased LPO and increased GSH, SOD and CAT levels. The total phenolic and flavonoid content ranged from 10.21 to 28.17 and 5.80 to 10.1 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100 gdw respectively. The plant extracts demonstrated significant xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity at 100 g/mL and revealed an inhibition greater than 50 % and IC50 values below the standard. This effect was almost similar to the activity of allopurinol (Standard drug) against xanthine oxidase (90.2 ± 0.4 %). These plant root extract will be subjected for further extensive studies to isolate and identify their active constituents which are useful for against inflammation and gout. PMID:25237348

  15. Electronic structure of some adenosine receptor antagonists. III. Quantitative investigation of the electronic absorption spectra of alkyl xanthines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, H.; Shalaby, Samia H.; El-sawy, K. M.; Hilal, Rifaat

    2002-07-01

    Quantitative and comparative investigation of the electronic absorption spectra of theophylline, caffeine and their derivatives is reported. The spectra of theophylline, caffeine and theobromine were compared to establish the predominant tautomeric species in solution. This comparison, analysis of solvent effects and assignments of the observed transitions via MO computations indicate the exits of only one tautomeric species in solution that is the N7 form. A low-lying triplet state was identified which corresponds to a HOMO-LUMO transition. This relatively long-lived T 1 state is always less polar than the ground state and may very well underlie the photochemical reactivity of alkyl xanthines. Substituents of different electron donating or withdrawing strengths and solvent effects are investigated and analyzed. The present analysis is facilitated via computer deconvolution of the observed spectra and MO computation.

  16. NADPH oxidases in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Belmondo, Simone; Calcagno, Cristina; Genre, Andrea; Puppo, Alain; Pauly, Nicolas; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases are the major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that plays key roles as both signal and stressor in several plant processes, including defense responses against pathogens. ROS accumulation in root cells during arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) development has raised the interest in understanding how ROS-mediated defense programs are modulated during the establishment of this mutualistic interaction. We have recently analyzed the expression pattern of 5 NADPH oxidase (also called RBOH) encoding genes in Medicago truncatula, showing that only one of them (MtRbohE) is specifically upregulated in arbuscule-containing cells. In line with this result, RNAi silencing of MtRbohE generated a strong alteration in root colonization, with a significant reduction in the number of arbusculated cells. On this basis, we propose that MtRBOHE-mediated ROS production plays a crucial role in the intracellular accommodation of arbuscules. PMID:27018627

  17. Human copper-dependent amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Finney, Joel; Moon, Hee-Jung; Ronnebaum, Trey; Lantz, Mason; Mure, Minae

    2014-03-15

    Copper amine oxidases (CAOs) are a class of enzymes that contain Cu(2+) and a tyrosine-derived quinone cofactor, catalyze the conversion of a primary amine functional group to an aldehyde, and generate hydrogen peroxide and ammonia as byproducts. These enzymes can be classified into two non-homologous families: 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone (TPQ)-dependent CAOs and the lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ)-dependent lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of proteins. In this review, we will focus on recent developments in the field of research concerning human CAOs and the LOX family of proteins. The aberrant expression of these enzymes is linked to inflammation, fibrosis, tumor metastasis/invasion and other diseases. Consequently, there is a critical need to understand the functions of these proteins at the molecular level, so that strategies targeting these enzymes can be developed to combat human diseases. PMID:24407025

  18. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  19. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Timothy E. Zheng Yuting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I} with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I}, leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  20. Strain differences in the responsiveness between Sprague-Dawley and Fischer rats to nephropathy induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, Naoki; Shimo, Takeo; Matsumoto, Koji; Oba, Kazuhiko; Nakazawa, Takashi; Nagata, Osamu

    2006-12-15

    To determine a rat strain appropriate for carcinogenicity testing of FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, we performed a 4-week oral toxicity study by administering 0.3, 1 and 3 mg/kg, and 1, 3 and 10 mg/kg of FYX-051 to male Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Fischer (F344) rats, respectively. Histopathology revealed that the degree of FYX-051-induced nephropathy was 3-fold stronger in SD rats than in F344 rats. Our previous study demonstrated that the key factor of species differences in FYX-051-induced nephropathy is purine metabolism. This observation led us to examine the involvement of purine metabolism in differences among two strains of rats. However, purine metabolism was proven not to be implicated as an important factor. Subsequently, other factors responsible for the strain differences were examined. FYX-051-induced increases in plasma xanthine concentrations were higher in SD rats than in F344 rats, suggesting more remarkable effects on pharmacodynamics in the former than the latter. Urinary volume was greater in F344 rats administered 10 mg/kg of FYX-051 (6.8 ml/h/kg) than in SD rats administered 3 mg/kg of FYX-051 (5.0 ml/h/kg), implying easier xanthine excretion in the former. Urinary xanthine solubility was 55 mg/dl in F344 rats aged 6 weeks, in contrast to 38 mg/dl in SD rats of the same age. Also, there were no significant differences in exposure levels at the same dose between SD and F344 rats. The outcomes of exposure levels and renal histopathology in both rats suggest the possibility that F344 rats could be exposed to a 3-fold higher amount of drug than SD rats in a carcinogenicity bioassay. The present study, therefore, suggested that strain differences of nephrotoxicity were caused by the combined effects of pharmacodynamics, xanthine excretion capacity, and urinary xanthine solubility. Furthermore, these results indicate that F344 rats would be a suitable strain for the carcinogenicity study of FYX-051. PMID:17084874

  1. Comparison of kinetic properties of amine oxidases from sainfoin and lentil and immunochemical characterization of copper/quinoprotein amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Zajoncová, L; Frébort, I; Luhová, L; Sebela, M; Galuszka, P; Pec, P

    1999-01-01

    Kinetic properties of novel amine oxidase isolated from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) were compared to those of typical plant amine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6) from lentil (Lens culinaris). The amine oxidase from sainfoin was active toward substrates, such as 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) with K(m) of 0.09 mM and 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine) with K(m) of 0.24 mM. The maximum rate of oxidation for cadaverine at saturating concentration was 2.7 fold higher than that of putrescine. The amine oxidase from lentil had the maximum rate for putrescine comparable to the rate of sainfoin amine oxidase with the same substrate. Both amine oxidases, like other plant Cu-amine oxidases, were inhibited by substrate analogs (1,5-diamino-3-pentanone, 1,4-diamino-2-butanone and aminoguanidine), Cu2+ chelating agents (diethyltriamine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2,2'-bipyridyl, imidazole, sodium cyanide and sodium azide), some alkaloids (L-lobeline and cinchonine), some lathyrogens (beta-aminopropionitrile and aminoacetonitrile) and other inhibitors (benzamide oxime, acetone oxime, hydroxylamine and pargyline). Tested by Ouchterlony's double diffusion in agarose gel, polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from sainfoin, pea and grass pea cross-reacted with amine oxidases from several other Fabaceae and from barley (Hordeum vulgare) of Poaceae, while amine oxidase from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger did not cross-react at all. However, using Western blotting after SDS-PAGE with rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from Aspergillus niger, some degree of similarity of plant amine oxidases from sainfoin, pea, field pea, grass pea, fenugreek, common melilot, white sweetclover and Vicia panonica with the A. niger amine oxidase was confirmed. PMID:10092944

  2. Thyroid function in 36 dogs with leishmaniosis due to Leishmania infantum before and during treatment with allopurinol with or without meglumine antimonate.

    PubMed

    Saridomichelakis, Manolis N; Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Chatzis, Manolis K; Kasabalis, Dimitris; Steiner, Jörg M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Petanides, Theodoros

    2013-10-18

    Hypothyroidism may predispose to the development of canine leishmaniosis or it may appear during the course of the latter due to infiltration and destruction of the thyroid gland by infected macrophages. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate thyroid function through measurement of serum total thyroxin (tT₄), free thyroxin (fT₄), and canine thyroid stimulating hormone (cTSH) concentrations in 36 dogs with leishmaniosis, before and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment with allopurinol with or without meglumine antimonate. Before treatment 27/36 (75%) dogs had serum tT₄ concentrations below the lower limit of the reference interval but only 2 of them had concurrently serum fT₄ concentrations below the lower limit of the reference interval and none had increased serum cTSH concentrations. During treatment there were no significant changes in serum tT₄ or fT₄ concentrations, whereas a significant increase in serum cTSH was observed. Two dogs had decreased serum tT₄ and fT₄ but normal cTSH concentrations before treatment and two other dogs had decreased serum tT₄ and increased cTSH, but normal fT₄ concentrations during the treatment period. Although hypothyroidism could not be definitively excluded in these dogs it is considered unlikely based on their overall hormonal profile, clinical presentation, and response to treatment. Therefore, hypothyroidism does not appear to be an important predisposing disease or a frequent complication of canine leishmaniosis. PMID:23685064

  3. Pathological changes in platelet histamine oxidases in atopic eczema

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Gruia

    1993-01-01

    Increased plasma histamine levels were associated with significantly lowered diamine and type B monoamine oxidase activities in platelet-rich plasma of atopic eczema (AE) patients. The diamine oxidase has almost normal cofactor levels (pyridoxal phosphate and Cu2+) but the cofactor levels for type B monoamine oxidase (flavin adenine dinucleotide and Fe2+) are lowered. The biogenic amines putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and serotonin in the sera, as well as dopamine and epinephrine in EDTA-plasma were found to be normal. It is unlikely, therefore, that these amines are responsible for the decreased activities of monoamine and diamine oxidase in these patients. The most likely causative factors for the inhibition of the diamine oxidase are nicotine, alcohol, food additives and other environmental chemicals, or perhaps a genetic defect of the diamine oxidase. PMID:18475554

  4. Gravity Responsive NADH Oxidase of the Plasma Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing gravity using an NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane which has been found to respond to unit gravity and low centrifugal g forces. The oxidation rate of NADH supplied to the NADH oxidase is measured and translated to represent the relative gravitational force exerted on the protein. The NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane may be obtained from plant or animal sources or may be produced recombinantly.

  5. An overview on alcohol oxidases and their potential applications.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Pranab; Chinnadayyala, Soma Sekhar R; Chakraborty, Mitun; Kumar, Adepu Kiran; Kakoti, Ankana

    2013-05-01

    Alcohol oxidases (Alcohol: O₂ Oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.3.x) are flavoenzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alcohols to the corresponding carbonyl compounds with a concomitant release of hydrogen peroxide. Based on substrate specificity, alcohol oxidases may be categorized broadly into four different groups namely, (a) short chain alcohol oxidase (SCAO), (b) long chain alcohol oxidase (LCAO), (c) aromatic alcohol oxidase (AAO), and (d) secondary alcohol oxidase (SAO). The sources reported for these enzymes are mostly limited to bacteria, yeast, fungi, plant, insect, and mollusks. However, the quantum of reports for each category of enzymes considerably varies across these sources. The enzymes belonging to SCAO and LCAO are intracellular in nature, whereas AAO and SAO are mostly secreted to the medium. SCAO and LCAO are invariably reported as multimeric proteins with very high holoenzyme molecular masses, but the molecular characteristics of these enzymes are yet to be clearly elucidated. One of the striking features of the alcohol oxidases that make them distinct from the widely known alcohol dehydrogenase is the avidly bound cofactor to the redox center of these enzymes that obviate the need to supplement cofactor during the catalytic reaction. These flavin-based redox enzymes have gained enormous importance in the development of various industrial processes and products primarily for developing biosensors and production of various industrially useful carbonyl compounds. The present review provides an overview on alcohol oxidases from different categories focusing research on these oxidases during the last decade along with their potential industrial applications. PMID:23525937

  6. Myocardial ischemia and reperfusion: the role of oxygen radicals in tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Werns, S W; Lucchesi, B R

    1989-01-01

    Thrombolytic therapy has gained widespread acceptance as a means of treating coronary artery thrombosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Although experimental data have demonstrated that timely reperfusion limits the extent of infarction caused by regional ischemia, there is growing evidence that reperfusion is associated with an inflammatory response to ischemia that exacerbates the tissue injury. Ischemic myocardium releases archidonate and complement-derived chemotactic factors, e.g., leukotriene B4 and C5a, which attract and activate neutrophils. Reperfusion of ischemic myocardium accelerates the influx of neutrophils, which release reactive oxygen products, such as superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, resulting in the formation of a hydroxyl radical and hypochlorous acid. The latter two species may damage viable endothelial cells and myocytes via the peroxidation of lipids and oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups, leading to perturbations of membrane permeability and enzyme function. Neutrophil depletion by antiserum and inhibition of neutrophil function by drugs, e.g., ibuprofen, prostaglandins (prostacyclin and PGE1), or a monoclonal antibody, to the adherence-promoting glycoprotein Mo-1 receptor, have been shown to limit the extent of canine myocardial injury due to coronary artery occlusion/reperfusion. Recent studies have challenged the hypothesis that xanthine-oxidase-derived oxygen radicals are a cause of reperfusion injury. Treatment with allopurinol or oxypurinol may exert beneficial effects on ischemic myocardium that are unrelated to the inhibition of xanthine oxidase. Furthermore, the human heart may lack xanthine oxidase activity. Further basic research is needed, therefore, to clarify the importance of xanthine oxidase in the pathophysiology of reperfusion injury.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2488090

  7. Nox NADPH Oxidases and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Thaís L.S.; Abrahão, Thalita B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Understanding isoform- and context-specific subcellular Nox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase compartmentalization allows relevant functional inferences. This review addresses the interplay between Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an increasingly evident player in redox pathophysiology given its role in redox protein folding and stress responses. Recent Advances: Catalytic/regulatory transmembrane subunits are synthesized in the ER and their processing includes folding, N-glycosylation, heme insertion, p22phox heterodimerization, as shown for phagocyte Nox2. Dual oxidase (Duox) maturation also involves the regulation by ER-resident Duoxa2. The ER is the activation site for some isoforms, typically Nox4, but potentially other isoforms. Such location influences redox/Nox-mediated calcium signaling regulation via ER targets, such as sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Growing evidence suggests that Noxes are integral signaling elements of the unfolded protein response during ER stress, with Nox4 playing a dual prosurvival/proapoptotic role in this setting, whereas Nox2 enhances proapoptotic signaling. ER chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) closely interact with Noxes. PDI supports growth factor-dependent Nox1 activation and mRNA expression, as well as migration in smooth muscle cells, and PDI overexpression induces acute spontaneous Nox activation. Critical Issues: Mechanisms of PDI effects include possible support of complex formation and RhoGTPase activation. In phagocytes, PDI supports phagocytosis, Nox activation, and redox-dependent interactions with p47phox. Together, the results implicate PDI as possible Nox organizer. Future Directions: We propose that convergence between Noxes and ER may have evolutive roots given ER-related functional contexts, which paved Nox evolution, namely calcium signaling and pathogen killing. Overall, the interplay between

  8. NADPH oxidase promotes neutrophil extracellular trap formation in pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Röhm, Marc; Grimm, Melissa J; D'Auria, Anthony C; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G; Segal, Brahm H; Urban, Constantin F

    2014-05-01

    NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in antimicrobial host defense and in regulating inflammation. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in generation of reactive oxidant intermediates. Aspergillus species are ubiquitous, filamentous fungi, which can cause invasive aspergillosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CGD, reflecting the critical role for NADPH oxidase in antifungal host defense. Activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils can be coupled to the release of proteins and chromatin that comingle in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which can augment extracellular antimicrobial host defense. NETosis can be driven by NADPH oxidase-dependent and -independent pathways. We therefore undertook an analysis of whether NADPH oxidase was required for NETosis in Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Oropharyngeal instillation of live Aspergillus hyphae induced neutrophilic pneumonitis in both wild-type and NADPH oxidase-deficient (p47(phox-/-)) mice which had resolved in wild-type mice by day 5 but progressed in p47(phox-/-) mice. NETs, identified by immunostaining, were observed in lungs of wild-type mice but were absent in p47(phox-/-) mice. Using bona fide NETs and nuclear chromatin decondensation as an early NETosis marker, we found that NETosis required a functional NADPH oxidase in vivo and ex vivo. In addition, NADPH oxidase increased the proportion of apoptotic neutrophils. Together, our results show that NADPH oxidase is required for pulmonary clearance of Aspergillus hyphae and generation of NETs in vivo. We speculate that dual modulation of NETosis and apoptosis by NADPH oxidase enhances antifungal host defense and promotes resolution of inflammation upon infection clearance. PMID:24549323

  9. Multicopper oxidase-1 orthologs from diverse insect species have ascorbate oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zeyu; Dittmer, Neal T.; Lang, Minglin; Brummett, Lisa M.; Braun, Caroline L.; Davis, Lawrence C.; Kanost, Michael R.; Gorman, Maureen J.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family of enzymes can be classified by their substrate specificity; for example, ferroxidases oxidize ferrous iron, ascorbate oxidases oxidize ascorbate, and laccases oxidize aromatic substrates such as diphenols. Our previous work on an insect multicopper oxidase, MCO1, suggested that it may function as a ferroxidase. This hypothesis was based on three lines of evidence: RNAi-mediated knock down of Drosophila melanogaster MCO1 (DmMCO1) affects iron homeostasis, DmMCO1 has ferroxidase activity, and DmMCO1 has predicted iron binding residues. In our current study, we expanded our focus to include MCO1 from Anopheles gambiae, Tribolium castaneum, and Manduca sexta. We verified that MCO1 orthologs have similar expression profiles, and that the MCO1 protein is located on the basal surface of cells where it is positioned to oxidize substrates in the hemolymph. In addition, we determined that RNAi-mediated knock down of MCO1 in A. gambiae affects iron homeostasis. To further characterize the enzymatic activity of MCO1 orthologs, we purified recombinant MCO1 from all four insect species and performed kinetic analyses using ferrous iron, ascorbate and two diphenols as substrates. We found that all of the MCO1 orthologs are much better at oxidizing ascorbate than they are at oxidizing ferrous iron or diphenols. This result is surpring because ascorbate oxidases are thought to be specific to plants and fungi. An analysis of three predicted iron binding residues in DmMCO1 revealed that they are not required for ferroxidase or laccase activity, but two of the residues (His374 and Asp380) influence oxidation of ascorbate. These two residues are conserved in MCO1 orthologs from insects and crustaceans; therefore, they are likely to be important for MCO1 function. The results of this study suggest that MCO1 orthologs function as ascorbate oxidases and influence iron homeostasis through an unknown mechanism. PMID:25701385

  10. In vivo evidence of free radical generation in the mouse lung after exposure to Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterium: an ESR spin-trapping investigation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keizo; Corbett, Jean; Mason, Ronald P; Kadiiska, Maria B

    2012-05-01

    In the Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced rodent pneumonia model, it is thought that free radicals are significantly associated with the disease pathogenesis. However, until now there has been no direct evidence of free radical generation in vivo. Here we used electron spin resonance (ESR) and in vivo spin trapping with α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone to investigate free radical production in a murine model. We detected and identified generation of lipid-derived free radicals in vivo (a(N) =14.86 ± 0.03 G and a(H)(β) =2.48 ± 0.09 G). To further investigate the mechanism of lipid radical production, we used modulating agents and knockout mice. We found that with GdCl(3) (phagocytic toxicant), NADPH-oxidase knockout mice (Nox2(-)/(-)), allopurinol (xanthine-oxidase inhibitor) and Desferal (metal chelator), generation of lipid radicals was decreased; histopathological and biological markers of acute lung injury were noticeably improved. Our study demonstrates that lipid-derived free radical formation is mediated by NADPH-oxidase and xanthine-oxidase activation and that metal-catalysed hydroxyl radical-like species play important roles in lung injury caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:22339444

  11. Effect of contraceptive steroids on monoamine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, Jennifer; Collins, G. G. S.; Pryse-Davies, J.; Sandler, M.

    1969-01-01

    Cyclical variations in monoamine oxidase activity during the human menstrual cycle, specific to the endometrium and modified in women undergoing contraceptive steroid treatment, may reflect changes in hormonal environment. Treatment of rats with individual constituents of the contraceptive pill causes analogous changes: oestrogens inhibit and progestogens potentiate uterine monoamine oxidase activity. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3

  12. Activation of antibacterial autophagy by NADPH oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ju; Canadien, Veronica; Lam, Grace Y.; Steinberg, Benjamin E.; Dinauer, Mary C.; Magalhaes, Marco A. O.; Glogauer, Michael; Grinstein, Sergio; Brumell, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in immunity to microbial pathogens. The autophagy system can target bacteria in phagosomes, promoting phagosome maturation and preventing pathogen escape into the cytosol. Recently, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling from phagosomes was found to initiate their targeting by the autophagy system, but the mechanism by which TLR signaling activates autophagy is unclear. Here we show that autophagy targeting of phagosomes is not exclusive to those containing TLR ligands. Engagement of either TLRs or the Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) during phagocytosis induced recruitment of the autophagy protein LC3 to phagosomes with similar kinetics. Both receptors are known to activate the NOX2 NADPH oxidase, which plays a central role in microbial killing by phagocytes through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that NOX2-generated ROS are necessary for LC3 recruitment to phagosomes. Antibacterial autophagy in human epithelial cells, which do not express NOX2, was also dependent on ROS generation. These data reveal a coupling of oxidative and nonoxidative killing activities of the NOX2 NADPH oxidase in phagocytes through autophagy. Furthermore, our results suggest a general role for members of the NOX family in regulating autophagy. PMID:19339495

  13. Chronic hyperuricemia, uric acid deposit and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Ferri, Livia; Desideri, Giovambattista; Di Giosia, Paolo; Cheli, Paola; Del Pinto, Rita; Properzi, Giuliana; Ferri, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is commonly associated with traditional risk factors such as dysglicemia, dyslipidemia, central obesity and abnormal blood pressure, i.e. the metabolic syndrome. Concordantly, recent studies have revived the controversy over the role of circulating uric acid, hyperuricemia, and gout as an independent prognostic factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this regard, different studies also evaluated the possible role of xanthine inhibitors in inducing blood pressure reduction, increment in flow-mediated dilation, and improved cardiovascular prognosis in various patient settings. The vast majority of these studies have been conducted with either allopurinol or its active metabolite oxypurinol, i.e. two purine-like non-selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. More recently, the role of uric acid as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the possible protective role exerted by reduction of hyperuricemia to normal level have been evaluated by the use of febuxostat, a selective, non purine-like xanthine oxidase inhibitor. In this review, we will report current evidence on hyperuricemia in cardiovascular disease. The value of uric acid as a biomarker and as a potential therapeutic target for tailored old and novel "cardiometabolic" treatments will be also discussed. PMID:23173592

  14. Chronic Hyperuricemia, Uric Acid Deposit and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Davide; Ferri, Livia; Desideri, Giovambattista; Giosia, Paolo Di; Cheli, Paola; Pinto, Rita Del; Properzi, Giuliana; Ferri, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is commonly associated with traditional risk factors such as dysglicemia, dyslipidemia, central obesity and abnormal blood pressure, i.e. the metabolic syndrome. Concordantly, recent studies have revived the controversy over the role of circulating uric acid, hyperuricemia, and gout as an independent prognostic factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this regard, different studies also evaluated the possible role of xanthine inhibitors in inducing blood pressure reduction, increment in flow-mediated dilation, and improved cardiovascular prognosis in various patient settings. The vast majority of these studies have been conducted with either allopurinol or its active metabolite oxypurinol, i.e. two purine-like non-selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. More recently, the role of uric acid as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the possible protective role exerted by reduction of hyperuricemia to normal level have been evaluated by the use of febuxostat, a selective, non purine-like xanthine oxidase inhibitor. In this review, we will report current evidence on hyperuricemia in cardiovascular disease. The value of uric acid as a biomarker and as a potential therapeutic target for tailored old and novel “cardiometabolic” treatments will be also discussed. PMID:23173592

  15. Canakinumab reduces the risk of acute gouty arthritis flares during initiation of allopurinol treatment: results of a double-blind, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Naomi; Mysler, Eduardo; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; De Meulemeester, Marc; Rovensky, Jozef; Arulmani, Udayasankar; Balfour, Alison; Krammer, Gerhard; Sallstig, Peter; So, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the efficacy and safety of canakinumab, a fully human anti-interleukin 1β monoclonal antibody, for prophylaxis against acute gouty arthritis flares in patients initiating urate-lowering treatment. Methods In this double-blind, double-dummy, dose-ranging study, 432 patients with gouty arthritis initiating allopurinol treatment were randomised 1:1:1:1:1:1:2 to receive: a single dose of canakinumab, 25, 50, 100, 200, or 300 mg subcutaneously; 4×4-weekly doses of canakinumab (50+50+25+25 mg subcutaneously); or daily colchicine 0.5 mg orally for 16 weeks. Patients recorded details of flares in diaries. The study aimed to determine the canakinumab dose having equivalent efficacy to colchicine 0.5 mg at 16 weeks. Results A dose-response for canakinumab was not apparent with any of the four predefined dose-response models. The estimated canakinumab dose with equivalent efficacy to colchicine was below the range of doses tested. At 16 weeks, there was a 62% to 72% reduction in the mean number of flares per patient for canakinumab doses ≥50 mg versus colchicine based on a negative binomial model (rate ratio: 0.28–0.38, p≤0.0083), and the percentage of patients experiencing ≥1 flare was significantly lower for all canakinumab doses (15% to 27%) versus colchicine (44%, p<0.05). There was a 64% to 72% reduction in the risk of experiencing ≥1 flare for canakinumab doses ≥50 mg versus colchicine at 16 weeks (hazard ratio (HR): 0.28–0.36, p≤0.05). The incidence of adverse events was similar across treatment groups. Conclusions Single canakinumab doses ≥50 mg or four 4-weekly doses provided superior prophylaxis against flares compared with daily colchicine 0.5 mg. PMID:21540198

  16. Febuxostat Inhibition of Endothelial-Bound XO: Implications for Targeting Vascular ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Umair Z.; Hundley, Nicholas J.; Romero, Guillermo; Radi, Rafael; Freeman, Bruce A.; Tarpey, Margaret M.; Kelley, Eric E.

    2011-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is a critical source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to vascular inflammation. Binding of XO to vascular endothelial cell glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) results in significant resistance to inhibition by traditional pyrazolopyrimidine-based inhibitors such as allopurinol. Therefore, we compared the extent of XO inhibition (free and GAG-bound) by allopurinol to febuxostat, a newly approved nonpurine XO-specific inhibitor. In solution, febuxostat was 1000 fold more potent than allopurinol inhibition of XO-dependent uric acid formation (IC50 = 1.8 nM vs. 2.9 μM). Association of XO with heparin-Sepharose 6B (HS6B-XO) had minimal effect on inhibition of uric acid formation by febuxostat (IC50 = 4.4 nM) while further limiting the effect of allopurinol (IC50 = 64 μM). Kinetic analysis of febuxostat inhibition revealed Ki values of 0.96 nM (free) and 0.92 nM (HS6B-XO), confirming equivalent inhibition for both free and GAG-immobilized enzyme. When XO was bound to endothelial cell GAGs, complete enzyme inhibition was observed with 25 nM febuxostat, while no more than 80% inhibition was seen with either allopurinol or oxypurinol, even at concentrations above those tolerated clinically. The superior potency for inhibition of endothelium-associated XO is predictive of a significant role for febuxostat in investigating pathological states where XO-derived ROS are contributive and traditional XO inhibitors are only slightly effective. PMID:21554948

  17. Analysis of xanthine dehydrogenase mRNA levels in mutants affecting the expression of the rosy locus.

    PubMed Central

    Covington, M; Fleenor, D; Devlin, R B

    1984-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) mRNA levels were measured in a number of mutants and natural variants affecting XDH gene expression. Two variants, ry+4 and ry+10, contain cis-acting elements which map to a region flanking the 5' end of the XDH gene. Ry+4, which has 2-3 times more XDH protein than a wild type strain, has 3.2 times more XDH mRNA. Ry+10 has 50% of the wild type XDH level and 54% of the wild type XDH mRNA level. Three rosy mutants which map within the structural gene were also examined. Two of these had little if any XDH mRNA, but the third mutant had 1.3 times more XDH mRNA than wild type flies. Another mutant, ry2 , which contains no XDH protein and has a 9KB transposable element inserted into the XDH gene, has normal levels of XDH mRNA transcripts which are also the same size as those found in the wild type strain. Changes in XDH mRNA levels were measured during Drosophila development and found to parallel changes in the amount of XDH protein. In addition, there were no large changes in the size of XDH mRNA during development. Images PMID:6588363

  18. Trials of the bronchodilator activity of the xanthine analogue SDZ MKS 492 in healthy volunteers during a methacholine challenge test.

    PubMed

    Foster, R W; Jubber, A S; Hassan, N A; Franke, B; Vernillet, L; Denouel, J; Carpenter, J R; Small, R C

    1993-01-01

    An approximately steady-state reduction of specific airway conductance was induced in healthy human subjects by means of an individualized inhaled methacholine loading dose followed by a maintenance dose regime. Tested against this background bronchoconstriction, the xanthine analogue SDZ MKS 492, when administered as a single oral dose of 40 mg, showed a significant bronchodilator action, which lasted for up to 5.5 h. Bronchodilatation was not seen after administration of 10 or 20 mg doses. SDZ MKS 492 inhaled as a dry powder had a bronchodilator action that was small, most evident with the 12 mg dose and transient. The peak relief of imposed bronchoconstriction was 29% and the apparent half-time of removal of SDZ MKS 492 from its site of action was 5-6 min. Inhaled SDZ 492 had a bitter taste that was not masked by inclusion of menthol and aspartame in the formulation. The bronchodilatation seen in laboratory animals can also be produced by SDZ MKS 492 in man when administered orally or by inhalation. Its magnitude correlates better with the plasma concentration of parent drug than with that of either of the identified metabolites. Dispositional processes in the lung abbreviate its action after administration by inhalation. PMID:8276046

  19. Effects of xanthine derivatives in a light/dark test in mice and the contribution of adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, M; Miyazaki, S; Onodera, K

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the effects of adenosine receptor antagonists, caffeine, theophylline, 8-phenyltheophylline, and 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), in a light/dark test in mice. All antagonists decreased the time spent in the light zone in this test, which suggested that these compounds have anxiogenic effects. The anxiogenic effects of theophylline were reduced by pretreatment with CGS 21680, an A2-selective agonist, but not by N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), an A1-selective agonist. However, the antagonism of the theophylline-induced anxiogenic effects by CGS21680 was only observed in the time spent in the light zone, and DPCPX-induced anxiogenic effects were neither reversed by CGS 21680 nor by CPA. Finally, it is notable that xanthine-derived adenosine antagonists tested here commonly showed anxiogenic effects in the light/dark test in mice. It is suggested that there is a minor contribution of adenosine receptors to these effects, although theophylline-induced anxiogenic effects were antagonized by an A2 receptor agonist. PMID:7746025

  20. Xanthine and 8-oxoguanine in G-quadruplexes: formation of a G·G·X·O tetrad

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Vee Vee; Heddi, Brahim; Lech, Christopher Jacques; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are four-stranded structures built from stacked G-tetrads (G·G·G·G), which are planar cyclical assemblies of four guanine bases interacting through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonds. A G-quadruplex containing a single guanine analog substitution, such as 8-oxoguanine (O) or xanthine (X), would suffer from a loss of a Hoogsteen hydrogen bond within a G-tetrad and/or potential steric hindrance. We show that a proper arrangement of O and X bases can reestablish the hydrogen-bond pattern within a G·G·X·O tetrad. Rational incorporation of G·G·X·O tetrads in a (3+1) G-quadruplex demonstrated a similar folding topology and thermal stability to that of the unmodified G-quadruplex. pH titration conducted on X·O-modified G-quadruplexes indicated a protonation-deprotonation equilibrium of X with a pKa ∼6.7. The solution structure of a G-quadruplex containing a G·G·X·O tetrad was determined, displaying the same folding topology in both the protonated and deprotonated states. A G-quadruplex containing a deprotonated X·O pair was shown to exhibit a more electronegative groove compared to that of the unmodified one. These differences are likely to manifest in the electronic properties of G-quadruplexes and may have important implications for drug targeting and DNA-protein interactions. PMID:26400177

  1. The complex roles of NADPH oxidases in fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Deborah; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary NADPH oxidases play key roles in immunity and inflammation that go beyond the production of microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS). The past decade has brought a new appreciation for the diversity of roles played by ROS in signaling associated with inflammation and immunity. NADPH oxidase activity affects disease outcome during infections by human pathogenic fungi, an important group of emerging and opportunistic pathogens that includes Candida, Aspergillus and Cryptococcus species. Here we review how alternative roles of NADPH oxidase activity impact fungal infection and how ROS signaling affects fungal physiology. Particular attention is paid to roles for NADPH oxidase in immune migration, immunoregulation in pulmonary infection, neutrophil extracellular trap formation, autophagy and inflammasome activity. These recent advances highlight the power and versatility of spatiotemporally controlled redox regulation in the context of infection, and point to a need to understand the molecular consequences of NADPH oxidase activity in the cell. PMID:24905433

  2. Ascorbic acid and L-gulonolactone oxidase in lagomorphs.

    PubMed

    Jenness, R; Birney, E C; Ayaz, K L

    1978-01-01

    1. The activity of L-gulonolactone oxidase (EC 1.1.3.8) in the liver of eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) is about 10-fold greater in winter than in summer. 2. L-gulonolactone oxidase activity is low and tissue ascorbate high during all seasons in snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus). 3. Liver contents of ascorbate fall to low levels in L. americanus fed on rabbit chow in the laboratory. 4. The activity of L-gulonolactone oxidase in liver of Sylvilagus and Oryctolagus is depressed by feeding high levels of L-ascorbic acid. 5. The New Zealand White breed of domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) has considerably higher levels of L-gulonolactone oxidase and liver ascorbate than does the Dutch breed. 6. In a wild population of Oryctolagus sampled in Australia L-gulonolactone oxidase levels were intermediate between those of the two domestic breeds and more variable than either. PMID:318384

  3. Differential involvement of various sources of reactive oxygen species in thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes and contractile dysfunction of the heart and diaphragm muscles.

    PubMed

    Elnakish, Mohammad T; Schultz, Eric J; Gearinger, Rachel L; Saad, Nancy S; Rastogi, Neha; Ahmed, Amany A E; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul M L

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid hormones are key regulators of basal metabolic state and oxidative metabolism. Hyperthyroidism has been reported to cause significant alterations in hemodynamics, and in cardiac and diaphragm muscle functions, all of which have been linked to increased oxidative stress. However, the definite source of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in each of these phenotypes is still unknown. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that thyroxin (T4) may produce distinct hemodynamic, cardiac, and diaphragm muscle abnormalities by differentially affecting various sources of ROS. Wild-type and T4 mice with and without 2-week treatments with allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor), apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor), L-NIO (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), or MitoTEMPO (mitochondria-targeted antioxidant) were studied. Blood pressure and echocardiography were noninvasively evaluated, followed by ex vivo assessments of isolated heart and diaphragm muscle functions. Treatment with L-NIO attenuated the T4-induced hypertension in mice. However, apocynin improved the left-ventricular (LV) dysfunction without preventing the cardiac hypertrophy in these mice. Both allopurinol and MitoTEMPO reduced the T4-induced fatigability of the diaphragm muscles. In conclusion, we show here for the first time that T4 exerts differential effects on various sources of ROS to induce distinct cardiovascular and skeletal muscle phenotypes. Additionally, we find that T4-induced LV dysfunction is independent of cardiac hypertrophy and NADPH oxidase is a key player in this process. Furthermore, we prove the significance of both xanthine oxidase and mitochondrial ROS pathways in T4-induced fatigability of diaphragm muscles. Finally, we confirm the importance of the nitric oxide pathway in T4-induced hypertension. PMID:25795514

  4. Differential involvement of various sources of reactive oxygen species in thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes and contractile dysfunction of the heart and diaphragm muscles

    PubMed Central

    Elnakish, Mohammad T.; Schultz, Eric J.; Gearinger, Rachel L.; Saad, Nancy S.; Rastogi, Neha; Ahmed, Amany A.E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are key regulators of basal metabolic state and oxidative metabolism. Hyperthyroidism has been reported to cause significant alterations in hemodynamics, and in cardiac and diaphragm muscle function, all of which have been linked to increased oxidative stress. However, the definite source of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in each of these phenotypes is still unknown. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that thyroxin (T4) may produce distinct hemodynamic, cardiac, and diaphragm muscle abnormalities by differentially affecting various sources of ROS. Wild-type and T4 mice with and without 2-week treatments with allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor), apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor), L-NIO (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), or MitoTEMPO (mitochondria-targeted antioxidant) were studied. Blood pressure and echocardiography were noninvasively evaluated, followed by ex vivo assessments of isolated heart and diaphragm muscle functions. Treatment with L-NIO attenuated the T4-induced hypertension in mice. However, apocynin improved the left-ventricular (LV) dysfunction without preventing the cardiac hypertrophy in these mice. Both allopurinol and MitoTEMPO reduced the T4-induced fatigability of the diaphragm muscles. In conclusion, we show here for the first time that T4 exerts differential effects on various sources of ROS to induce distinct cardiovascular and skeletal muscle phenotypes. Additionally, we find that T4-induced LV dysfunction is independent of cardiac hypertrophy and NADPH oxidase is a key player in this process. Furthermore, we prove the significance of both xanthine oxidase and mitochondrial ROS pathways in T4-induced fatigability of diaphragm muscles. Finally, we confirm the importance of the nitric oxide pathway in T4-induced hypertension. PMID:25795514

  5. Gene structure and quinol oxidase activity of a cytochrome bd-type oxidase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, J; Koga, E; Mizuta, T; Sato, C; Noguchi, S; Sone, N

    1999-04-21

    Gram-positive thermophilic Bacillus species contain cytochrome caa3-type cytochrome c oxidase as their main terminal oxidase in the respiratory chain. We previously identified and purified an alternative oxidase, cytochrome bd-type quinol oxidase, from a mutant of Bacillus stearothermophilus defective in the caa3-type oxidase activity (J. Sakamoto et al., FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 143 (1996) 151-158). Compared with proteobacterial counterparts, B. stearothermophilus cytochrome bd showed lower molecular weights of the two subunits, shorter wavelength of alpha-band absorption maximum due to heme D, and lower quinol oxidase activity. Preincubation with menaquinone-2 enhanced the enzyme activity up to 40 times, suggesting that, besides the catalytic site, there is another quinone-binding site which largely affects the enzyme activity. In order to clarify the molecular basis of the differences of cytochromes bd between B. stearothermophilus and proteobacteria, the genes encoding for the B. stearothermophilus bd was cloned based on its partial peptide sequences. The gene for subunit I (cbdA) encodes 448 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 50195 Da, which is 14 and 17% shorter than those of Escherichia coli and Azotobacter vinelandii, respectively, and CbdA lacks the C-terminal half of the long hydrophilic loop between the putative transmembrane segments V and VI (Q loop), which has been suggested to include the substrate quinone-binding site for the E. coli enzyme. The gene for subunit II (cbdB) encodes 342 residues with a molecular weight of 38992 Da. Homology search indicated that the B. stearothermophilus cbdAB has the highest sequence similarity to ythAB in B. subtilis genome rather than to cydAB, the first set of cytochrome bd genes identified in the genome. Sequence comparison of cytochromes bd and their homologs from various organisms demonstrates that the proteins can be classified into two subfamilies, a proteobacterial type including E. coli bd and a

  6. Expression of the alternative oxidase complements cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Dassa, Emmanuel P; Dufour, Eric; Gonçalves, Sérgio; Paupe, Vincent; Hakkaart, Gertjan A J; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from early onset devastating encephalomyopathy and cardiomyopathy, to neurological diseases in adulthood and in the elderly. No method of compensating successfully for COX deficiency has been reported so far. In vitro, COX-deficient human cells require additional glucose, pyruvate and uridine for normal growth and are specifically sensitive to oxidative stress. Here, we have tested whether the expression of a mitochondrially targeted, cyanide-resistant, alternative oxidase (AOX) from Ciona intestinalis could alleviate the metabolic abnormalities of COX-deficient human cells either from a patient harbouring a COX15 pathological mutation or rendered deficient by silencing the COX10 gene using shRNA. We demonstrate that the expression of the AOX, well-tolerated by the cells, compensates for both the growth defect and the pronounced oxidant-sensitivity of COX-deficient human cells. PMID:20049701

  7. In Situ Enzymatically Generated Photoswitchable Oxidase Mimetics and Their Application for Colorimetric Detection of Glucose Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gen-Xia; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Dong, Yu-Ming; Li, Zai-Jun; Wang, Guang-Li

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a simple and amplified colorimetric assay is developed for the detection of the enzymatic activity of glucose oxidase (GOx) based on in situ formation of a photoswitchable oxidase mimetic of PO₄(3-)-capped CdS quantum dots (QDs). GOx catalyzes the oxidation of 1-thio-β-d-glucose to give 1-thio-β-d-gluconic acid which spontaneously hydrolyzes to β-d-gluconic acid and H₂S; the generated H₂S instantly reacts with Cd(2+) in the presence of Na₃PO₄ to give PO₄(3-)-stabilized CdS QDs in situ. Under visible-light (λ ≥ 400 nm) stimulation, the PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs are a new style of oxidase mimic derived by producing some active species, such as h⁺, (•)OH, O₂(•-) and a little H₂O₂, which can oxidize the typical substrate (3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzydine (TMB)) with a color change. Based on the GOx-triggered growth of the oxidase mimetics of PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs in situ, we developed a simple and amplified colorimetric assay to probe the enzymatic activity of GOx. The proposed method allowed the detection of the enzymatic activity of GOx over the range from 25 μg/L to 50 mg/L with a low detection limit of 6.6 μg/L. We believe the PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs generated in situ with photo-stimulated enzyme-mimicking activity may find wide potential applications in biosensors. PMID:27409598

  8. NADPH Oxidases in Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Joy X.; Török, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common feature observed in a wide spectrum of chronic liver diseases including viral hepatitis, alcoholic, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) are emerging as major sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several major isoforms are expressed in the liver, including NOX1, NOX2, and NOX4. While the phagocytic NOX2 has been known to play an important role in Kupffer cell and neutrophil phagocytic activity and inflammation, the nonphagocytic NOX homologues are increasingly recognized as key enzymes in oxidative injury and wound healing. In this review, we will summarize the current advances in knowledge on the regulatory pathways of NOX activation, their cellular distribution, and their role in the modulation of redox signaling in liver diseases. PMID:26436133

  9. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hou, Mei-Fang; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Wei-De; Liao, Lin; Wan, Hong-Fu

    2011-11-01

    In this study, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was extracted from commercial potatoes. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO was investigated. The experimental results show that potato PPO is more active in weak acid than in basic condition and that the optimum pH for the reaction is 5.0. The degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO reaches a maximum at 298 K. After reaction for 1 h, the removal of both pentachlorophenol and total organic carbon is >70% with 6.0 units/mL potato PPO at pH 5.0 and 298 K. Pentachlorophenol can be degraded through dechlorination and ring-opening by potato PPO. The work demonstrates that pentachlorophenol can be effectively eliminated by crude potato PPO. PMID:21967325

  10. Visualization of monoamine oxidase in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Pappas, N.; Shea, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Logan, J.

    1996-12-31

    Monoamine oxidase is a flavin enzyme which exists in two subtypes, MAO A and MAO B. In human brain MAO B predominates and is largely compartmentalized in cell bodies of serotonergic neurons and glia. Regional distribution of MAO B was determined by positron computed tomography with volunteers after the administration of deuterium substituted [11C]L-deprenyl. The basal ganglia and thalamus exhibited the greatest concentrations of MAO B with intermediate levels in the frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus while lowest levels were observed in the parietal and temporal cortices and cerebellum. We observed that brain MAO B increases with are in health normal subjects, however the increases were generally smaller than those revealed with post-mortem studies.

  11. Drugs related to monoamine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Zdeněk

    2016-08-01

    Progress in understanding the role of monoamine neurotransmission in pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders was made after the discovery of the mechanisms of action of psychoactive drugs, including monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. The increase in monoamine neurotransmitter availability, decrease in hydrogen peroxide production, and neuroprotective effects evoked by MAO inhibitors represent an important approach in the development of new drugs for the treatment of mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. New drugs are synthesized by acting as multitarget-directed ligands, with MAO, acetylcholinesterase, and iron chelation as targets. Basic information is summarized in this paper about the drug-induced regulation of monoaminergic systems in the brain, with a focus on MAO inhibition. Desirable effects of MAO inhibition include increased availability of monoamine neurotransmitters, decreased oxidative stress, decreased formation of neurotoxins, induction of pro-survival genes and antiapoptotic factors, and improved mitochondrial functions. PMID:26944656

  12. NADPH Oxidases in Lung Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Karen; Hecker, Louise; Luckhardt, Tracy R.; Cheng, Guangjie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The evolution of the lungs and circulatory systems in vertebrates ensured the availability of molecular oxygen (O2; dioxygen) for aerobic cellular metabolism of internal organs in large animals. O2 serves as the physiologic terminal acceptor of mitochondrial electron transfer and of the NADPH oxidase (Nox) family of oxidoreductases to generate primarily water and reactive oxygen species (ROS), respectively. Recent advances: The purposeful generation of ROS by Nox family enzymes suggests important roles in normal physiology and adaptation, most notably in host defense against invading pathogens and in cellular signaling. Critical issues: However, there is emerging evidence that, in the context of chronic stress and/or aging, Nox enzymes contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of lung diseases. Future Directions: Here, we review evolving functions of Nox enzymes in normal lung physiology and emerging pathophysiologic roles in lung disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2838–2853. PMID:24093231

  13. Modeling dioxygen reduction at multicopper oxidase cathodes.

    PubMed

    Agbo, Peter; Heath, James R; Gray, Harry B

    2014-10-01

    We report a general kinetics model for catalytic dioxygen reduction on multicopper oxidase (MCO) cathodes. Our rate equation combines Butler-Volmer (BV) electrode kinetics and the Michaelis-Menten (MM) formalism for enzymatic catalysis, with the BV model accounting for interfacial electron transfer (ET) between the electrode surface and the MCO type 1 copper site. Extending the principles of MM kinetics to this system produced an analytical expression incorporating the effects of subsequent intramolecular ET and dioxygen binding to the trinuclear copper cluster into the cumulative model. We employed experimental electrochemical data on Thermus thermophilus laccase as benchmarks to validate our model, which we suggest will aid in the design of more efficient MCO cathodes. In addition, we demonstrate the model's utility in determining estimates for both the electronic coupling and average distance between the laccase type-1 active site and the cathode substrate. PMID:25188422

  14. POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 from rice (Oryza sativa) is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taibo; Wook Kim, Dong; Niitsu, Masaru; Berberich, Thomas; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2014-01-01

    POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 (OsPAO1), from rice (Oryza sativa), and POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5 (AtPAO5), from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are enzymes sharing high identity at the amino acid level and with similar characteristics, such as polyamine specificity and pH preference; furthermore, both proteins localize to the cytosol. A loss-of-function Arabidopsis mutant, Atpao5–2, was hypersensitive to low doses of exogenous thermospermine but this phenotype could be rescued by introduction of the wild-type AtPAO5 gene. Introduction of OsPAO1, under the control of a constitutive promoter, into Atpao5–2 mutants also restored normal thermospermine sensitivity, allowing growth in the presence of low levels of thermospermine, along with a concomitant decrease in thermospermine content in plants. By contrast, introduction of OsPAO3, which encodes a peroxisome-localized polyamine oxidase, into Atpao5–2 plants could not rescue any of the mutant phenotypes in the presence of thermospermine. These results suggest that OsPAO1 is the functional ortholog of AtPAO5. PMID:25763711

  15. POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 from rice (Oryza sativa) is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taibo; Wook Kim, Dong; Niitsu, Masaru; Berberich, Thomas; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2014-07-25

    POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 (OsPAO1), from rice (Oryza sativa), and POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5 (AtPAO5), from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are enzymes sharing high identity at the amino acid level and with similar characteristics, such as polyamine specificity and pH preference; furthermore, both proteins localize to the cytosol. A loss-of-function Arabidopsis mutant, Atpao5-2, was hypersensitive to low doses of exogenous thermospermine but this phenotype could be rescued by introduction of the wild-type AtPAO5 gene. Introduction of OsPAO1, under the control of a constitutive promoter, into Atpao5-2 mutants also restored normal thermospermine sensitivity, allowing growth in the presence of low levels of thermospermine, along with a concomitant decrease in thermospermine content in plants. By contrast, introduction of OsPAO3, which encodes a peroxisome-localized polyamine oxidase, into Atpao5-2 plants could not rescue any of the mutant phenotypes in the presence of thermospermine. These results suggest that OsPAO1 is the functional ortholog of AtPAO5. PMID:25061821

  16. Lysyl oxidase binds transforming growth factor-beta and regulates its signaling via amine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Atsawasuwan, Phimon; Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Kaku, Masaru; Fong, Keith S K; Csiszar, Katalin; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2008-12-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX), an amine oxidase critical for the initiation of collagen and elastin cross-linking, has recently been shown to regulate cellular activities possibly by modulating the functions of growth factors. In this study, we investigated the interaction between LOX and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), a potent growth factor abundant in bone, the effect of LOX on TGF-beta1 signaling, and its potential mechanism. The specific binding between mature LOX and mature TGF-beta1 was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase pulldown assay in vitro. Both proteins were colocalized in the extracellular matrix in an osteoblastic cell culture system, and the binding complex was identified in the mineral-associated fraction of bone matrix. Furthermore, LOX suppressed TGF-beta1-induced Smad3 phosphorylation likely through its amine oxidase activity. The data indicate that LOX binds to mature TGF-beta1 and enzymatically regulates its signaling in bone and thus may play an important role in bone maintenance and remodeling. PMID:18835815

  17. Phagocyte NADPH oxidase and specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Cachat, Julien; Deffert, Christine; Hugues, Stephanie; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2 produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is a well-known player in host defence. However, there is also increasing evidence for a regulatory role of NOX2 in adaptive immunity. Deficiency in phagocyte NADPH oxidase causes chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) in humans, a condition that can also be studied in CGD mice. Clinical observations in CGD patients suggest a higher susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, in particular lupus, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and rheumatoid arthritis. In mice, a strong correlation exists between a polymorphism in a NOX2 subunit and the development of autoimmune arthritis. NOX2 deficiency in mice also favours lupus development. Both CGD patients and CGD mice exhibit increased levels of immunoglobulins, including autoantibodies. Despite these phenotypes suggesting a role for NOX2 in specific immunity, mechanistic explanations for the typical increase of CGD in autoimmune disease and antibody levels are still preliminary. NOX2-dependent ROS generation is well documented for dendritic cells and B-lymphocytes. It is unclear whether T-lymphocytes produce ROS themselves or whether they are exposed to ROS derived from dendritic cells during the process of antigen presentation. ROS are signalling molecules in virtually any cell type, including T- and B-lymphocytes. However, knowledge about the impact of ROS-dependent signalling on T- and B-lymphocyte phenotype and response is still limited. ROS might contribute to Th1/Th2/Th17 cell fate decisions during T-lymphocyte activation and might enhance immunoglobulin production by B-lymphocytes. In dendritic cells, NOX2-derived ROS might be important for antigen processing and cell activation. PMID:25760962

  18. Polyphenol Oxidase Activity Expression in Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Romero, Diana; Solano, Francisco; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing of the genome of Ralstonia solanacearum revealed several genes that putatively code for polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). To study the actual expression of these genes, we looked for and detected all kinds of PPO activities, including laccase, cresolase, and catechol oxidase activities, in cellular extracts of this microorganism. The conditions for the PPO assays were optimized for the phenolic substrate, pH, and sodium dodecyl sulfate concentration used. It was demonstrated that three different PPOs are expressed. The genes coding for the enzymes were unambiguously correlated with the enzymatic activities detected by generation of null mutations in the genes by using insertional mutagenesis with a suicide plasmid and estimating the changes in the levels of enzymatic activities compared to the levels in the wild-type strain. The protein encoded by the RSp1530 locus is a multicopper protein with laccase activity. Two other genes, RSc0337 and RSc1501, code for nonblue copper proteins exhibiting homology to tyrosinases. The product of RSc0337 has strong tyrosine hydroxylase activity, and it has been shown that this enzyme is involved in melanin synthesis by R. solanacearum. The product of the RSc1501 gene is an enzyme that shows a clear preference for oxidation of o-diphenols. Preliminary characterization of the mutants obtained indicated that PPOs expressed by R. solanacearum may participate in resistance to phenolic compounds since the mutants exhibited higher sensitivity to l-tyrosine than the wild-type strain. These results suggest a possible role in the pathogenic process to avoid plant resistance mechanisms involving the participation of phenolic compounds. PMID:16269713

  19. Evaluation of oxalate decarboxylase and oxalate oxidase for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Cassland, Pierre; Sjöde, Anders; Winestrand, Sandra; Jönsson, Leif J; Nilvebrant, Nils-Olof

    2010-05-01

    Increased recirculation of process water has given rise to problems with formation of calcium oxalate incrusts (scaling) in the pulp and paper industry and in forest biorefineries. The potential in using oxalate decarboxylase from Aspergillus niger for oxalic acid removal in industrial bleaching plant filtrates containing oxalic acid was examined and compared with barley oxalate oxidase. Ten different filtrates from chemical pulping were selected for the evaluation. Oxalate decarboxylase degraded oxalic acid faster than oxalate oxidase in eight of the filtrates, while oxalate oxidase performed better in one filtrate. One of the filtrates inhibited both enzymes. The potential inhibitory effect of selected compounds on the enzymatic activity was tested. Oxalate decarboxylase was more sensitive than oxalate oxidase to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate decarboxylase was not as sensitive to chlorate and chlorite as oxalate oxidase. Up to 4 mM chlorate ions, the highest concentration tested, had no inhibitory effect on oxalate decarboxylase. Analysis of the filtrates suggests that high concentrations of chlorate present in some of the filtrates were responsible for the higher sensitivity of oxalate oxidase in these filtrates. Oxalate decarboxylase was thus a better choice than oxalate oxidase for treatment of filtrates from chlorine dioxide bleaching. PMID:19763895

  20. Dephenolization of industrial wastewaters catalyzed by polyphenol oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Atlow, S.C.; Bonadonna-Aparo, L.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    A new enzymatic method for the removal of phenols from industrial aqueous effluents has been developed. The method uses the enzyme polyphenol oxidase which oxidizes phenols to the corresponding o-quinones; the latter then undergo a nonenzymatic polymerization to form water-insoluble aggregates. Therefore, the enzyme in effect precipitates phenols from water. Polyphenol oxidase has been found to nearly completely dephenolize solutions of phenol in the concentration range from 0.01 to 1.0 g/L. The enzymatic treatment is effective over a wide range of pH and temperature; a crude preparation of polyphenol oxidase (mushroom extract) is as effective as a purified, commercially obtained version. In addition to phenol itself, polyphenol oxidase is capable of precipitating from water a number of substituted phenols (cresols, chlorophenols, naphthol, etc.). Also, even pollutants which are unreactive towards polyphenol oxidase can be enzymatically coprecipitated with phenol. The polyphenol oxidase treatment has been successfully used to dephenolize two different real industrial wastewater samples, from a plant producing triarylphosphates and from a coke plant. The advantage of the polyphenol oxidase dephenolization over the peroxidase-catalyzed one previously elaborated by the authors is that the former enzyme uses molecular oxygen instead of costly hydrogen peroxide (used by peroxidase) as an oxidant.

  1. Immobilization of Pichia pastoris cells containing alcohol oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleknia, S; Ahmadi, H; Norouzian, D

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The attempts were made to describe the development of a whole cell immobilization of P. pastoris by entrapping the cells in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell Pichia pastoris was evaluated in comparison with yeast biomass production. Materials and Methods Methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris was obtained from Collection of Standard Microorganisms, Department of Bacterial Vaccines, Pasteur Institute of Iran (CSMPI). Stock culture was maintained on YPD agar plates. Alcohol oxidase was strongly induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were harvested by centrifugation then permeabilized. Finally the cells were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel beads. The activity of alcohol oxidase was determined by method of Tane et al. Results At the end of the logarithmic phase of cell culture, the alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell P. Pastoris reached the highest level. In comparison, the alcohol oxidase activity was measured in an immobilized P. pastoris when entrapped in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of cells was induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were permeabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and immobilized. CTAB was also found to increase the gel permeability. Alcohol oxidase activity of immobilized cells was then quantitated by ABTS/POD spectrophotometric method at OD 420. There was a 14% increase in alcohol oxidase activity in immobilized cells as compared with free cells. By addition of 2-butanol as a substrate, the relative activity of alcohol oxidase was significantly higher as compared with other substrates added to the reaction media. Conclusion Immobilization of cells could eliminate lengthy and expensive procedures of enzyme separation and purification, protect and stabilize enzyme activity, and perform easy separation of the enzyme from the reaction media. PMID:22530090

  2. Febuxostat in the management of hyperuricemia and chronic gout: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Miao; Tomlinson, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Febuxostat is a novel, potent, non-purine selective xanthine oxidase inhibitor, which in clinical trials demonstrated superior ability to lower and maintain serum urate levels below 6 mg/dL compared with conventionally used doses of allopurinol. Febuxostat was well tolerated in long term treatment in patients with hyperuricemia including those experiencing hypersensitity/intolerance to allopurinol. Dose adjustment appears unnecessary in patients with mild to moderate renal or liver insufficiency or advanced age. The most common adverse reactions reported were abnormal liver function tests, headache, and gastrointestinal symptoms, which were usually mild and transient. However, whether hepatotoxicity becomes a limitation in the use of febuxostat needs to be determined in further studies. An increased frequency of gout flares occurs for a prolonged period after treatment initiation, as with any aggressive lowering of serum urate, and prolonged prophylaxis with colchicine or NSAIDs is usually required. Febuxostat has been granted marketing authorization by the European Commission in early 2008 for the treatment of chronic hyperuricemia and gout. Febuxostat is the first major treatment alternative for gout in more than 40 years and is a promising alternative to allopurinol, although continued long-term surveillance on safety and efficacy is required. PMID:19337428

  3. CotA, a Multicopper Oxidase from Bacillus pumilus WH4, Exhibits Manganese-Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianmei; Bao, Peng; Bai, Tenglong; Deng, Lin; Wu, Hui; Liu, Fan; He, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) are a family of enzymes that use copper ions as cofactors to oxidize various substrates. Previous research has demonstrated that several MCOs such as MnxG, MofA and MoxA can act as putative Mn(II) oxidases. Meanwhile, the endospore coat protein CotA from Bacillus species has been confirmed as a typical MCO. To study the relationship between CotA and the Mn(II) oxidation, the cotA gene from a highly active Mn(II)-oxidizing strain Bacillus pumilus WH4 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain M15. The purified CotA contained approximately four copper atoms per molecule and showed spectroscopic properties typical of blue copper oxidases. Importantly, apart from the laccase activities, the CotA also displayed substantial Mn(II)-oxidase activities both in liquid culture system and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum Mn(II) oxidase activity was obtained at 53°C in HEPES buffer (pH 8.0) supplemented with 0.8 mM CuCl2. Besides, the addition of o-phenanthroline and EDTA both led to a complete suppression of Mn(II)-oxidizing activity. The specific activity of purified CotA towards Mn(II) was 0.27 U/mg. The Km, Vmax and kcat values towards Mn(II) were 14.85±1.17 mM, 3.01×10−6±0.21 M·min−1 and 0.32±0.02 s−1, respectively. Moreover, the Mn(II)-oxidizing activity of the recombinant E. coli strain M15-pQE-cotA was significantly increased when cultured both in Mn-containing K liquid medium and on agar plates. After 7-day liquid cultivation, M15-pQE-cotA resulted in 18.2% removal of Mn(II) from the medium. Furthermore, the biogenic Mn oxides were clearly observed on the cell surfaces of M15-pQE-cotA by scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report that provides the direct observation of Mn(II) oxidation with the heterologously expressed protein CotA, Therefore, this novel finding not only establishes the foundation for in-depth study of Mn(II) oxidation mechanisms, but also offers a

  4. The terminal oxidase in the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H; Denis, M; Malatesta, F

    1997-06-01

    The molecular properties of a novel membrane quinol oxidase from the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica 617 are presented. The protein contains 2b hemes/mole which may be distinguished by EPR spectroscopy but not by optical spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Respiration, though being cyanide insensitive, is not inhibited by carbon monoxide and oxygen reduction is carried out only half-way with production of hydrogen peroxide. The terminal oxidase represents, therefore, a unique example in the large family of terminal oxidases known up to date. PMID:9337488

  5. Identification of yeasts from clinical specimens by oxidase test.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Arora, B S; Mathur, M D

    2000-10-01

    A total of 100 yeasts and yeast like fungi isolates from clinical specimens were negative for oxidase production on Sabouraud dextrose agar. When grown on Columbia agar, chocolate agar, tryptose agar, Mueller-Hinton agar, brain heart infusion and a medium resembling Sabouraud's dextrose agar but with starch instead of dextrose, all the isolate of Candida albicans (55), C. guilliermondii (6), C. parapsilosis (14), C. tropicalis (6), C. pseudotropicalis (6) and Crytococcus neoformans (2) were positive for oxidase producation. Torulopsis glabrata (2), Saccharomyces cervisiae (2) and two out of seven isolates of C. krusei were negative for oxidase test. PMID:11344606

  6. Aiding and abetting roles of NOX oxidases in cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Block, Karen; Gorin, Yves

    2013-01-01

    NADPH oxidases of the NADPH oxidase (NOX) family are dedicated reactive oxygen species-generating enzymes that broadly and specifically regulate redox-sensitive signalling pathways that are involved in cancer development and progression. They act at specific cellular membranes and microdomains through the activation of oncogenes and the inactivation of tumour suppressor proteins. In this Review, we discuss primary targets and redox-linked signalling systems that are influenced by NOX-derived ROS, and the biological role of NOX oxidases in the aetiology of cancer. PMID:22918415

  7. Multilayered Polyelectrolyte Microcapsules: Interaction with the Enzyme Cytochrome C Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Laura; Dellacasa, Elena; Noor, Mohamed R.; Soulimane, Tewfik; Bianchini, Paolo; D'Autilia, Francesca; Antipov, Alexei; Diaspro, Alberto; Tofail, Syed A. M.; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2014-01-01

    Cell-sized polyelectrolyte capsules functionalized with a redox-driven proton pump protein were assembled for the first time. The interaction of polyelectrolyte microcapsules, fabricated by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly, with cytochrome c oxidase molecules was investigated. We found that the cytochrome c oxidase retained its functionality, that the functionalized microcapsules interacting with cytochrome c oxidase were permeable and that the permeability characteristics of the microcapsule shell depend on the shell components. This work provides a significant input towards the fabrication of an integrated device made of biological components and based on specific biomolecular functions and properties. PMID:25372607

  8. Effects of topiroxostat and febuxostat on urinary albumin excretion and plasma xanthine oxidoreductase activity in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Nampei, Mai; Morimoto, Nobutaka; Ashizawa, Naoki; Iwanaga, Takashi; Sakamoto, Ryusuke

    2016-06-01

    Topiroxostat, a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, has been shown to decrease the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio compared with placebo in hyperuricemic patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Thus, we aimed to ascertain the albuminuria-lowering effect of topiroxostat in diabetic mouse. Db/db mice were fed standard diets with or without topiroxostat (0.1, 0.3, 1, and 3mg/kg/day) and febuxostat (0.1, 0.3, and 1mg/kg/day) for four weeks. Urinary albumin and purine bodies levels, XOR activities, and drug concentrations in the liver, kidney, and plasma were measured. Moreover, the XOR inhibitory activity of each XOR inhibitor was evaluated with or without an exogenous protein in vitro. Topiroxostat decreased dose-dependently the urinary albumin excretion, but febuxostat did not show such a tendency. Treatment with topiroxostat inhibited plasma XOR activity with dose-dependent increase in plasma purine levels, which was not observed by febuxostat. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis revealed that topiroxostat and febuxostat concentration in each tissue showed a good correlation with both the hypouricemic effect and plasma drug concentration, whereas the change in albuminuria correlated neither with the change in uric acid nor with drug concentration in plasma. However, the change in urinary albumin and plasma XOR activity showed good correlation in topiroxostat group. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 value) of febuxostat against plasma XOR in vitro was 12-fold higher than that of topiroxostat, and increased by approximately 13-fold by interfering with an exogenous protein. Topiroxostat caused reduced urinary albumin excretion, in which potent inhibition of the plasma XOR activity might be involved. PMID:27038523

  9. Study on toxicological aspects of crystal-mediated nephrotoxicity induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Takeo; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Ashizawa, Naoki; Oba, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Osamu

    2011-04-01

    To clarify the toxicological aspects of crystal-mediated nephrotoxicity, we performed analysis concerning the correlation between representative kidney-related parameters and renal histopathology, using the individual data obtained from the 4-week toxicity studies of FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, by oral administration at 1 and 3 mg/kg to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and at 3 and 10 mg/kg to F344 rats. In SD rats, the correlation coefficient on histopathology between the right and left kidneys was 0.7826 and remained within a lower range of strong correlation (range: ±0.7 ∼ ±0.9). The correlation coefficient between body-weight gains, urinary volume, osmolarity, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and relative kidney weights and renal histopathology was -0.6648, 0.7896, -0.7751, 0.8195, 0.8479, and 0.8969, respectively, showing a strong correlation, except a moderate correlation in body-weight gains (range: ±0.4 ∼ ±0.7). In F344 rats, the correlation coefficient on histopathology between the right and left kidneys was 0.8637, remaining within an upper range of strong correlation. The correlation coefficient between the above parameters and renal histopathology was -0.8175, 0.8616, -0.9045, 0.9010, 0.8991, and 0.9524, respectively, showing an extremely strong correlation in urinary osmolarity, serum BUN, and relative kidney weights (range: ±0.9 ∼ ±1.0). Therefore, the present study suggests that FYX-051-induced nephrotoxicity may occur with more inconsistency in the degree of nephropathy between the right and left kidneys in SD rats than in F344 rats, which would explain the above outcomes. PMID:21314469

  10. Beyond brown: polyphenol oxidases as enzymes of plant specialized metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Most cloned and/or characterized plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) have catechol oxidase activity (i.e., they oxidize o-diphenols to o-quinones) and are localized or predicted to be localized to plastids. As a class, they have broad substrate specificity and are associated with browning of produce and other plant materials. Because PPOs are often induced by wounding or pathogen attack, they are most generally believed to play important roles in plant defense responses. However, a few well-characterized PPOs appear to have very specific roles in the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites via both tyrosinase (monophenol oxidase) and catechol oxidase activities. Here we detail a few examples of these and explore the possibility that there may be many more “biosynthetic” PPOs. PMID:25642234

  11. Inhibition of plant and mammalian diamine oxidase by substrate analogues.

    PubMed

    Biegański, T; Osińska, Z; Masliński, C

    1982-04-01

    Imidazoles, aliphatic substrate analogues and the natural dipeptides, carnosine and anserine, were investigated as inhibitors of diamine oxidase from the pig kidney, human pregnancy plasma and pea seedlings. Imidazole, methylimidazoles, N-acetylimidazole, histamine and N tau-methylhistamine are relatively potent inhibitors of mammalian diamine oxidase showing no influence on plant enzymes. Anserine and carnosine are inhibitors of pig kidney and pea seedling enzymes. Ki values are 2 microM and 10 microM respectively. Investigated natural derivatives of putrescine and cadaverine have no influence on diamine oxidase of different origin. In conclusion, we present some evidence to suggest that mammalian diamine oxidase, despite a high reaction rate with putrescine, is better adapted to histamine oxidation, whereas for plant enzymes the diamines are preferred substrates. PMID:6805264

  12. [Heterogeneity of molecular forms of phenol oxidase from grape leaves].

    PubMed

    Pruidze, G N; Zaprometov, M N; Durmishidze, S V; Kintsurashvili, D F

    1983-07-01

    The substrate specificity and some kinetic properties of the monomeric (Mr = 26 000--35 000) and dimeric (Mr = 55 000--70 000) forms of phenol oxidase from vine leaves were studied. These forms possess different hydroxylating and o-diphenol oxidase activities. A kinetic analysis demonstrated that the monomeric form of the enzyme possesses a higher affinity for monophenols and can more effectively accomplish the hydroxylation reaction as compared to the dimeric one. During vine vegetation the ratio of molecular forms of phenol oxidase is altered manifesting itself in quantitative and qualitative changes of enzymatic activity. During plant maturation the dimeric fraction is predominant. The maturation process is associated with a sharp rise of the o-phenol oxidase activity, a disappearance of the hydroxylating activity and a substantial deceleration of phenol compounds production. PMID:6412775

  13. Confirmation of a blocked amino terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Janolino, V.G.; Morrison-Rowe, S.J.; Swaisgood, H.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The isolation of sulfhydryl oxidase from bovine milk in a suitably pure form for sequencing was carried out by transient covalent affinity chromatography of diafiltered whey using cysteinylsuccinamidopropyl-glass as matrix. The glutathione-eluted proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. By radiolabeling the affinity chromatography-purified enzyme with ({sup 14}C)iodoacetate before subjecting to SDS-PAGE, the sulfhydryl oxidase band was identified, because sulfhydryl oxidase is known to be inactivated by alkylation of one sulfhydryl group per mole. The results confirmed that sulfhydryl oxidase corresponds to the 85 ({plus minus} 5)-kDa band observed on SDS-PAGE. The protein band corresponding to radiolabeled sulfhydryl oxidase was recovered from SDS-PAGE gels by electrophoretic elution and by electroblotting on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane and subjected to gas phase sequencing. Precautions were taken during electrophoretic elution to prevent reactions that result in N-terminal blocking. Both methods of protein recovery yielded negative results when subjected to sequence analysis indicating that the N-terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase is blocked.

  14. Lysyl oxidase activity regulates oncogenic stress response and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Wiel, C; Augert, A; Vincent, D F; Gitenay, D; Vindrieux, D; Le Calvé, B; Arfi, V; Lallet-Daher, H; Reynaud, C; Treilleux, I; Bartholin, L; Lelievre, E; Bernard, D

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a stable proliferation arrest, is induced in response to various stresses. Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) results in blocked proliferation and constitutes a fail-safe program counteracting tumorigenesis. The events that enable a tumor in a benign senescent state to escape from OIS and become malignant are largely unknown. We show that lysyl oxidase activity contributes to the decision to maintain senescence. Indeed, in human epithelial cell the constitutive expression of the LOX or LOXL2 protein favored OIS escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize OIS. The relevance of these in vitro observations is supported by in vivo findings: in a transgenic mouse model of aggressive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing lysyl oxidase activity accelerates senescence escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize senescence, delay tumorigenesis, and increase survival. Mechanistically, we show that lysyl oxidase activity favors the escape of senescence by regulating the focal-adhesion kinase. Altogether, our results demonstrate that lysyl oxidase activity participates in primary tumor growth by directly impacting the senescence stability. PMID:24113189

  15. Molecular aspects of monoamine oxidase B.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Rona R

    2016-08-01

    Monoamine oxidases (MAO) influence the monoamine levels in brain by virtue of their role in neurotransmitter breakdown. MAO B is the predominant form in glial cells and in platelets. MAO B structure, function and kinetics are described as a background for the effect of alterations in its activity on behavior. The need to inhibit MAO B to combat decreased brain amines continues to drive the search for new drugs. Reversible and irreversible inhibitors are now designed using data-mining, computational screening, docking and molecular dynamics. Multi-target ligands designed to combat the elevated activity of MAO B in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases incorporate MAO inhibition (usually irreversible) as well as iron chelation, antioxidant or neuroprotective properties. The main focus of drug design is the catalytic activity of MAO, but the imidazoline I2 site in the entrance cavity of MAO B is also a pharmacological target. Endogenous regulation of MAO B expression is discussed briefly in light of new studies measuring mRNA, protein, or activity in healthy and degenerative samples, including the effect of DNA methylation on the expression. Overall, this review focuses on examples of recent research on the molecular aspects of the expression, activity, and inhibition of MAO B. PMID:26891670

  16. Polyphenol oxidase from yacon roots (Smallanthus sonchifolius).

    PubMed

    Neves, Valdir Augusto; da Silva, Maraiza Aparecida

    2007-03-21

    Polyphenol oxidase (E.C. 1.14.18.1) (PPO) extracted from yacon roots (Smallanthus sonchifolius) was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and separation on Sephadex G-100. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 45 490+/-3500 Da and Km values of 0.23, 1.14, 1.34, and 5.0 mM for the substrates caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, 4-methylcatechol, and catechol, respectively. When assayed with resorcinol, DL-DOPA, pyrogallol, protocatechuic, p-coumaric, ferulic, and cinnamic acids, catechin, and quercetin, the PPO showed no activity. The optimum pH varied from 5.0 to 6.6, depending on substrate. PPO activity was inhibited by various phenolic and nonphenolic compounds. p-Coumaric and cinnamic acids showed competitive inhibition, with Ki values of 0.017 and 0.011 mM, respectively, using chlorogenic acid as substrate. Heat inactivation from 60 to 90 degrees C showed the enzyme to be relatively stable at 60-70 degrees C, with progressive inactivation when incubated at 80 and 90 degrees C. The Ea (apparent activation energy) for inactivation was 93.69 kJ mol-1. Sucrose, maltose, glucose, fructose, and trehalose at high concentrations appeared to protect yacon PPO against thermal inactivation at 75 and 80 degrees C. PMID:17316020

  17. Origin and evolution of lysyl oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOX) are copper-dependent enzymes that oxidize primary amine substrates to reactive aldehydes. The best-studied role of LOX enzymes is the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in animals by cross-linking collagens and elastin, although intracellular functions have been reported as well. Five different LOX enzymes have been identified in mammals, LOX and LOX-like (LOXL) 1 to 4, showing a highly conserved catalytic carboxy terminal domain and more divergence in the rest of the sequence. Here we have surveyed a wide selection of genomes in order to infer the evolutionary history of LOX. We identified LOX proteins not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, as well as in bacteria and archaea – which reveals a pre-metazoan origin for this gene family. LOX genes expanded during metazoan evolution resulting in two superfamilies, LOXL2/L3/L4 and LOX/L1/L5. Considering the current knowledge on the function of mammalian LOX isoforms in ECM remodeling, we propose that LOXL2/L3/L4 members might have preferentially been involved in making cross-linked collagen IV-based basement membrane, whereas the diversification of LOX/L1/L5 forms contributed to chordate/vertebrate-specific ECM innovations, such as elastin and fibronectin. Our work provides a novel view on the evolution of this family of enzymes. PMID:26024311

  18. Origin and evolution of lysyl oxidases.

    PubMed

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOX) are copper-dependent enzymes that oxidize primary amine substrates to reactive aldehydes. The best-studied role of LOX enzymes is the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in animals by cross-linking collagens and elastin, although intracellular functions have been reported as well. Five different LOX enzymes have been identified in mammals, LOX and LOX-like (LOXL) 1 to 4, showing a highly conserved catalytic carboxy terminal domain and more divergence in the rest of the sequence. Here we have surveyed a wide selection of genomes in order to infer the evolutionary history of LOX. We identified LOX proteins not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, as well as in bacteria and archaea - which reveals a pre-metazoan origin for this gene family. LOX genes expanded during metazoan evolution resulting in two superfamilies, LOXL2/L3/L4 and LOX/L1/L5. Considering the current knowledge on the function of mammalian LOX isoforms in ECM remodeling, we propose that LOXL2/L3/L4 members might have preferentially been involved in making cross-linked collagen IV-based basement membrane, whereas the diversification of LOX/L1/L5 forms contributed to chordate/vertebrate-specific ECM innovations, such as elastin and fibronectin. Our work provides a novel view on the evolution of this family of enzymes. PMID:26024311

  19. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  20. Photodynamic therapy using a protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fingar, V H; Wieman, T J; McMahon, K S; Haydon, P S; Halling, B P; Yuhas, D A; Winkelman, J W

    1997-10-15

    The use of endogenously created porphyrins as an alternative to photosensitizer injection for photodynamic therapy is a rapidly evolving area of study. One common method to induce porphyrin synthesis and accumulation in cells is the topical, oral, or parenteral administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid, a precursor for heme biosynthesis. Porphyrin accumulation may also be elicited by the use of enzyme inhibitors of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Groups of DBA/2 mice bearing SMT-F mammary tumors were placed on a diet containing 0-4000 ppm of a protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor, FP-846. This agent blocks a critical step in porphyrin metabolism and results in elevated intracellular levels of protoporphyrin IX. Light treatment of tumors produced both initial and long-term regression that was dependent on the amount of inhibitor, the duration of inhibitor exposure to animals, and the amount of light used in PDT. Tumor regression occurred without significant destruction of normal tissues in the treatment field and without initial vascular constriction or blood flow stasis. Tumor cure in animals given 4000 ppm FP-846 in feed for 3 days and 300 J/cm2 602-670 nm light (23% cure) was similar to the response in animals given 10 mg/kg Photofrin and the same light dose (20%). PMID:9377568

  1. Analyzing the electrogenicity of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ilsoo; Warshel, Arieh

    2016-07-12

    Measurements of voltage changes in response to charge separation within membrane proteins can offer fundamental information on spectroscopically "invisible" steps. For example, results from studies of voltage changes associated with electron and proton transfer in cytochrome c oxidase could, in principle, be used to discriminate between different theoretical models describing the molecular mechanism of proton pumping. Earlier analyses of data from these measurements have been based on macroscopic considerations that may not allow for exploring the actual molecular mechanisms. Here, we have used a coarse-grained model describing the relation between observed voltage changes and specific charge-transfer reactions, which includes an explicit description of the membrane, the electrolytes, and the electrodes. The results from these calculations offer mechanistic insights at the molecular level. Our main conclusion is that previously assumed mechanistic evidence that was based on electrogenic measurements is not unique. However, the ability of our calculations to obtain reliable voltage changes means that we have a tool that can be used to describe a wide range of electrogenic charge transfers in channels and transporters, by combining voltage measurements with other experiments and simulations to analyze new mechanistic proposals. PMID:27357681

  2. Molecularly "wired" cholesterol oxidase for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Leonida, Mihaela D; Aurian-Blajeni, Benedict

    2015-02-01

    The influence of several factors on the activity of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) transiently exposed to a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was studied. Presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, prosthetic group of ChOx) during exposure to RTIL makes the procedure enzyme-friendly, while the use of RTIL (green reagent) makes it environmentally-friendly. Following exposure to RTIL and its subsequent removal, FAD becomes part of the molecular structure of the refolded protein (a molecular "wire"). This makes the procedure used here a molecular one. The factors studied were: FAD presence in RTIL during modification, water presence during exposure to RTIL, and ratio FAD:RTIL during "wiring". Performance parameters monitored were: enzyme activity before and after "wiring" (expressed as (dA/dt)/mg enzyme, and measured spectrophotometrically), peak current in an amperometric biosensor for cholesterol detection, and linearity of the biosensor response depending on cholesterol concentration. After RTIL removal, the modified enzyme (ME) retained a high percentage of the added FAD, which supplemented that of the native enzyme (functioning as a "wire" and enhancing electron transfer kinetics), and a fraction of the initial activity. Used in an amperometric biosensor, ME showed catalytic activity, linear behavior as a function of cholesterol concentration, and stability. PMID:25579496

  3. Crystallization of carbohydrate oxidase from Microdochium nivale.

    PubMed

    Dusková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Østergaard, Lars Henrik; Fuglsang, Claus Crone; Kolenko, Petr; Stepánková, Andrea; Hasek, Jindrich

    2009-06-01

    Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase was produced by heterologous recombinant expression in Aspergillus oryzae, purified and crystallized. The enzyme crystallizes with varying crystal morphologies depending on the crystallization conditions. Several different crystal forms were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, two of which were used for diffraction measurements. Hexagon-shaped crystals (form I) diffracted to 2.66 A resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.7, c = 610.4 A and apparent space group P6(2)22. Analysis of the data quality showed almost perfect twinning of the crystals. Attempts to solve the structure by molecular replacement did not give satisfactory results. Recently, clusters of rod-shaped crystals (form II) were grown in a solution containing PEG MME 550. These crystals belonged to the monoclinic system C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 132.9, b = 56.6, c = 86.5 A, beta = 95.7 degrees . Data sets were collected to a resolution of 2.4 A. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method. Model refinement is currently in progress. PMID:19478452

  4. Crystallization of carbohydrate oxidase from Microdochium nivale

    PubMed Central

    Dušková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Østergaard, Lars Henrik; Fuglsang, Claus Crone; Kolenko, Petr; Štěpánková, Andrea; Hašek, Jindřich

    2009-01-01

    Microdochium nivale carbohydrate oxidase was produced by heterologous recombinant expression in Aspergillus oryzae, purified and crystallized. The enzyme crystallizes with varying crystal morphologies depending on the crystallization conditions. Several different crystal forms were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, two of which were used for diffraction measurements. Hexagon-shaped crystals (form I) diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.7, c = 610.4 Å and apparent space group P6222. Analysis of the data quality showed almost perfect twinning of the crystals. Attempts to solve the structure by molecular replacement did not give satisfactory results. Recently, clusters of rod-shaped crystals (form II) were grown in a solution containing PEG MME 550. These crystals belonged to the monoclinic system C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 132.9, b = 56.6, c = 86.5 Å, β = 95.7°. Data sets were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å. The structure was solved by the molecular-replacement method. Model refinement is currently in progress. PMID:19478452

  5. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variablesmore » which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.« less

  6. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

  7. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Shackleton, D R; Hulmes, D J

    1990-03-01

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a [4,5-3H]-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware. PMID:1971160

  8. Position-Specific Isotope Analysis of Xanthines: A (13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Method to Determine the (13)C Intramolecular Composition at Natural Abundance.

    PubMed

    Diomande, Didier G; Martineau, Estelle; Gilbert, Alexis; Nun, Pierrick; Murata, Ariaki; Yamada, Keita; Watanabe, Naoharu; Tea, Illa; Robins, Richard J; Yoshida, Naohiro; Remaud, Gérald S

    2015-07-01

    The natural xanthines caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline are of major commercial importance as flavor constituents in coffee, cocoa, tea, and a number of other beverages. However, their exploitation for authenticity, a requirement in these commodities that have a large origin-based price-range, by the standard method of isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS) is limited. We have now developed a methodology that overcomes this deficit that exploits the power of isotopic quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry combined with chemical modification of the xanthines to enable the determination of positional intramolecular (13)C/(12)C ratios (δ(13)Ci) with high precision. However, only caffeine is amenable to analysis: theobromine and theophylline present substantial difficulties due to their poor solubility. However, their N-methylation to caffeine makes spectral acquisition feasible. The method is confirmed as robust, with good repeatability of the δ(13)Ci values in caffeine appropriate for isotope fractionation measurements at natural abundance. It is shown that there is negligible isotope fractionation during the chemical N-methylation procedure. Thus, the method preserves the original positional δ(13)Ci values. The method has been applied to measure the position-specific variation of the (13)C/(12)C distribution in caffeine. Not only is a clear difference between caffeine isolated from different sources observed, but theobromine from cocoa is found to show a (13)C pattern distinct from that of caffeine. PMID:26067163

  9. An alcohol oxidase of Phanerochaete chrysosporium with a distinct glycerol oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Linke, Diana; Lehnert, Nicole; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf G

    2014-01-01

    An intracellular alcohol oxidase (AOX) was isolated from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Pch), grown on l-lactate induction medium, and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. The dimeric protein consisted of two identical 75kDa subunits. The open reading frame of 1,956bp resulted in a monomer consisting of 651 amino acids. The enzyme showed a pI at 5.4, a pH optimum of 9, a temperature optimum at 50°C, possessed putative conserved domains of the GMC superfamily, a FAD binding domain, and showed up to 86% homology to alcohol oxidase sequences of Gloeophyllum trabeum and Coprinopsis cinerea. As was shown for the first time for an AOX from a basidiomycete, not only methanol, but also lower primary alcohols and glycerol were accepted as substrates. An assay based on aldehyde dehydrogenase confirmed d-glyceraldehyde as the product of the reaction. A bioprocess based on this enzyme could alleviate the problems associated with the huge side-stream of glycerol occurring during the manufacture of biodiesel, yielding the green oxidant hydrogen peroxide. PMID:24910330

  10. Monoamine oxidase and agitation in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Uzun, Suzana; Podobnik, Josip; Kozumplik, Oliver; Vlatkovic, Suzana; Pivac, Nela

    2016-08-01

    Subjects with schizophrenia or conduct disorder display a lifelong pattern of antisocial, aggressive and violent behavior and agitation. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme involved in the degradation of various monoamine neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and therefore has a role in various psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and pathological behaviors. Platelet MAO-B activity has been associated with psychopathy- and aggression-related personality traits, while variants of the MAOA and MAOB genes have been associated with diverse clinical phenotypes, including aggressiveness, antisocial problems and violent delinquency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of platelet MAO-B activity, MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism and MAOA uVNTR polymorphism with severe agitation in 363 subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. The results demonstrated significant association of severe agitation and smoking, but not diagnosis or age, with platelet MAO-B activity. Higher platelet MAO-B activity was found in subjects with severe agitation compared to non-agitated subjects. Platelet MAO-B activity was not associated with MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism. These results suggested the association between increased platelet MAO-B activity and severe agitation. No significant association was found between severe agitation and MAOA uVNTR or MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism, revealing that these individual polymorphisms in MAO genes are not related to severe agitation in subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. As our study included 363 homogenous Caucasian male subjects, our data showing this negative genetic association will be a useful addition to future meta-analyses. PMID:26851573

  11. Monoamine oxidase inhibitory activities of heterocyclic chalcones.

    PubMed

    Minders, Corné; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Lourens, Anna C U

    2015-11-15

    Studies have shown that natural and synthetic chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones) possess monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition activities. Of particular importance to the present study is a report that a series of furanochalcones acts as MAO-B selective inhibitors. Since the effect of heterocyclic substitution, other than furan (and more recently thiophene, piperidine and quinoline) on the MAO inhibitory properties of the chalcone scaffold remains unexplored, the aim of this study was to synthesise and evaluate further heterocyclic chalcone analogues as inhibitors of the human MAOs. For this purpose, heterocyclic chalcone analogues that incorporate pyrrole, 5-methylthiophene, 5-chlorothiophene and 6-methoxypyridine substitution were examined. Seven of the nine synthesised compounds exhibited IC50 values <1 μM for the inhibition of MAO-B, with all compounds exhibiting higher affinities for MAO-B compared to the MAO-A isoform. The most potent MAO-B inhibitor (4h) displays an IC50 value of 0.067 μM while the most potent MAO-A inhibitor (4e) exhibits an IC50 value of 3.81 μM. It was further established that selected heterocyclic chalcones are reversible and competitive MAO inhibitors. 4h, however, may exhibit tight-binding to MAO-B, a property linked to its thiophene moiety. We conclude that high potency chalcones such as 4h represent suitable leads for the development of MAO-B inhibitors for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26432037

  12. Role of NADPH Oxidases in Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Yong-Han; Kim, Jonghwa; Aoyama, Tomonori; De Minicis, Samuele; Bataller, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Hepatic fibrosis is the common pathophysiologic process resulting from chronic liver injury, characterized by the accumulation of an excessive extracellular matrix. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) is a multicomponent enzyme complex that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to a wide range of stimuli. In addition to phagocytic NOX2, there are six nonphagocytic NOX proteins. Recent Advances: In the liver, NOX is functionally expressed both in the phagocytic form and in the nonphagocytic form. NOX-derived ROS contributes to various kinds of liver disease caused by alcohol, hepatitis C virus, and toxic bile acids. Recent evidence indicates that both phagocytic NOX2 and nonphagocytic NOX isoforms, including NOX1 and NOX4, mediate distinct profibrogenic actions in hepatic stellate cells, the main fibrogenic cell type in the liver. The critical role of NOX in hepatic fibrogenesis provides a rationale to assess pharmacological NOX inhibitors that treat hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. Critical Issues: Although there is compelling evidence indicating a crucial role for NOX-mediated ROS generation in hepatic fibrogenesis, little is known about the expression, subcellular localization, regulation, and redox signaling of NOX isoforms in specific cell types in the liver. Moreover, the exact mechanism of NOX-mediated fibrogenic signaling is still largely unknown. Future Directions: A better understanding through further research about NOX-mediated fibrogenic signaling may enable the development of novel anti-fibrotic therapy using NOX inhibition strategy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2854–2872. PMID:24040957

  13. Effects of feeding endophyte-infected fescue seed to Holstein cows during the dry period on plasma nitric oxide (NO), xanthine oxidase (XO) and haptoglobin (Hp) status in newborn calves.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fescue toxicosis in cattle, caused by ingestion of endophyte-infected fescue (EIF), is associated with decreased feed intake, growth, milk production and reproductive efficiency as well as decreased resistance to heat, transportation and immune stress. Increased inflammatory response to immune chal...

  14. Cross-clamping of the thoracic aorta. Influence of aortic shunts, laminectomy, papaverine, calcium channel blocker, allopurinol, and superoxide dismutase on spinal cord blood flow and paraplegia in baboons.

    PubMed

    Svensson, L G; Von Ritter, C M; Groeneveld, H T; Rickards, E S; Hunter, S J; Robinson, M F; Hinder, R A

    1986-07-01

    There is a high incidence of paraplegia associated with thoracic aortic cross-clamping, even when cardiopulmonary bypass or shunts are used. In 56 adult baboons, spinal cord blood flow (SCBF), vascular anatomy, and paraplegia rates were evaluated. Tissue blood flow was measured by radioactive microspheres. Various procedures were used to increase SCBF and to prevent ischemia-reperfusion injury. It was found that the rate of paraplegia was inversely correlated with neural tissue ischemia (SCBF) and directly correlated with reperfusion hyperemia. Two methods completely prevented paraplegia. These two methods were a thoracic shunt with occlusion of the infrarenal aorta or cerebrospinal fluid drainage plus intrathecal papaverine injection, both of which were associated with an increased SCBF. Furthermore, papaverine dilated the anterior spinal artery (ASA) (p = 0.007) and increased the blood flow through the lower ASA. Whereas procedures utilizing a calcium channel blocker (flunarizine), allopurinol, superoxide dismutase (SOD), laminectomy alone, and a thoracoabdominal shunt not perfusing the arteria radicularis magna (ARM) all failed to prevent paraplegia, allopurinol (p = 0.026) and SOD (p = 0.004) did prevent gastric stress lesions, indicating that their failure to prevent paraplegia was not due to a lack of activity. Of great clinical interest is that, if a shunt is used and the ARM is perfused, infrarenal aortic cross-clamping increases SCBF, thus preventing paraplegia. Intrathecal application of papaverine proved to be even more effective in increasing SCBF and also completely prevented paraplegia. As this is a safer procedure than the insertion of shunts, this is the method of choice for the prevention of paraplegia associated with thoracic aortic cross-clamping. The preliminary trial using intrathecal papaverine in human beings has thus far shown no adverse side effects from the drug, and no paraplegia has occurred. PMID:3729582

  15. Cross-clamping of the thoracic aorta. Influence of aortic shunts, laminectomy, papaverine, calcium channel blocker, allopurinol, and superoxide dismutase on spinal cord blood flow and paraplegia in baboons.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, L G; Von Ritter, C M; Groeneveld, H T; Rickards, E S; Hunter, S J; Robinson, M F; Hinder, R A

    1986-01-01

    There is a high incidence of paraplegia associated with thoracic aortic cross-clamping, even when cardiopulmonary bypass or shunts are used. In 56 adult baboons, spinal cord blood flow (SCBF), vascular anatomy, and paraplegia rates were evaluated. Tissue blood flow was measured by radioactive microspheres. Various procedures were used to increase SCBF and to prevent ischemia-reperfusion injury. It was found that the rate of paraplegia was inversely correlated with neural tissue ischemia (SCBF) and directly correlated with reperfusion hyperemia. Two methods completely prevented paraplegia. These two methods were a thoracic shunt with occlusion of the infrarenal aorta or cerebrospinal fluid drainage plus intrathecal papaverine injection, both of which were associated with an increased SCBF. Furthermore, papaverine dilated the anterior spinal artery (ASA) (p = 0.007) and increased the blood flow through the lower ASA. Whereas procedures utilizing a calcium channel blocker (flunarizine), allopurinol, superoxide dismutase (SOD), laminectomy alone, and a thoracoabdominal shunt not perfusing the arteria radicularis magna (ARM) all failed to prevent paraplegia, allopurinol (p = 0.026) and SOD (p = 0.004) did prevent gastric stress lesions, indicating that their failure to prevent paraplegia was not due to a lack of activity. Of great clinical interest is that, if a shunt is used and the ARM is perfused, infrarenal aortic cross-clamping increases SCBF, thus preventing paraplegia. Intrathecal application of papaverine proved to be even more effective in increasing SCBF and also completely prevented paraplegia. As this is a safer procedure than the insertion of shunts, this is the method of choice for the prevention of paraplegia associated with thoracic aortic cross-clamping. The preliminary trial using intrathecal papaverine in human beings has thus far shown no adverse side effects from the drug, and no paraplegia has occurred. PMID:3729582

  16. Terminal Oxidases of Bacillus subtilis Strain 168: One Quinol Oxidase, Cytochrome aa3 or Cytochrome bd, Is Required for Aerobic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Winstedt, Lena; von Wachenfeldt, Claes

    2000-01-01

    The gram-positive endospore-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis has, under aerobic conditions, a branched respiratory system comprising one quinol oxidase branch and one cytochrome oxidase branch. The system terminates in one of four alternative terminal oxidases. Cytochrome caa3 is a cytochrome c oxidase, whereas cytochrome bd and cytochrome aa3 are quinol oxidases. A fourth terminal oxidase, YthAB, is a putative quinol oxidase predicted from DNA sequence analysis. None of the terminal oxidases are, by themselves, essential for growth. However, one quinol oxidase (cytochrome aa3 or cytochrome bd) is required for aerobic growth of B. subtilis strain 168. Data indicating that cytochrome aa3 is the major oxidase used by exponentially growing cells in minimal and rich medium are presented. We show that one of the two heme-copper oxidases, cytochrome caa3 or cytochrome aa3, is required for efficient sporulation of B. subtilis strain 168 and that deletion of YthAB in a strain lacking cytochrome aa3 makes the strain sporulation deficient. PMID:11073895

  17. Crystal Structure of Alcohol Oxidase from Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Valerius, Oliver; Feussner, Ivo; Ficner, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    FAD-dependent alcohol oxidases (AOX) are key enzymes of methylotrophic organisms that can utilize lower primary alcohols as sole source of carbon and energy. Here we report the crystal structure analysis of the methanol oxidase AOX1 from Pichia pastoris. The crystallographic phase problem was solved by means of Molecular Replacement in combination with initial structure rebuilding using Rosetta model completion and relaxation against an averaged electron density map. The subunit arrangement of the homo-octameric AOX1 differs from that of octameric vanillyl alcohol oxidase and other dimeric or tetrameric alcohol oxidases, due to the insertion of two large protruding loop regions and an additional C-terminal extension in AOX1. In comparison to other alcohol oxidases, the active site cavity of AOX1 is significantly reduced in size, which could explain the observed preference for methanol as substrate. All AOX1 subunits of the structure reported here harbor a modified flavin adenine dinucleotide, which contains an arabityl chain instead of a ribityl chain attached to the isoalloxazine ring. PMID:26905908

  18. NADPH OXIDASE: STRUCTURE AND ACTIVATION MECHANISMS (REVIEW). NOTE I.

    PubMed

    Filip-Ciubotaru, Florina; Manciuc, Carmen; Stoleriu, Gabriela; Foia, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), with its generically termed NOX isoforms, is the major source of ROS (reactive oxigen species) in biological systems. ROS are small oxygen-derived molecules with an important role in various biological processes (physiological or pathological). If under physiological conditions some processes are beneficial and necessary for life, under pathophysiological conditions they are noxious, harmful. NADPH oxidases are present in phagocytes and in a wide variety of nonphagocytic cells. The enzyme generates superoxide by transferring electrons from NADPH inside the cell across the membrane and coupling them to molecular oxygen to produce superoxide anion, a reactive free-radical. Structurally, NADPH oxidase is a multicomponent enzyme which includes two integral membrane proteins, glycoprotein gp9 1 Phox and adaptor protein p22(phox), which together form the heterodimeric flavocytochrome b558 that constitutes the core of the enzyme. During the resting state, the multidomain regulatory subunits p40P(phox), p47(phox), p67(Phox) are located in the cytosol organized as a complex. The activation of phagocytic NADPH oxidase occurs through a complex series of protein interactions. PMID:27125069

  19. Sulfide inhibition of and metabolism by cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Peter; Marshall, Doug C; Cooper, Chris E; Wilson, Mike T

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a classic cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor, is also an in vitro oxidase substrate and an in vivo candidate hormonal ('gasotransmitter') species affecting sleep and hibernation. H2S, nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) share some common features. All are low-molecular-mass physiological effectors and also oxidase inhibitors, capable of binding more than one enzyme site, and each is an oxidizable 'substrate'. The oxidase oxidizes CO to CO2, NO to nitrite and sulfide to probable persulfide species. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase in an aerobic steady state with ascorbate and cytochrome c is rapidly inhibited by sulfide in a biphasic manner. At least two successive inhibited species are involved, probably partially reduced. The oxidized enzyme, in the absence of turnover, occurs in at least two forms: the 'pulsed' and 'resting' states. The pulsed form reacts aerobically with sulfide to form two intermediates, 'P' and 'F', otherwise involved in the reaction of oxygen with reduced enzyme. Sulfide can directly reduce the oxygen-reactive a3CuB binuclear centre in the pulsed state. The resting enzyme does not undergo such a step, but only a very slow one-electron reduction of the electron-transferring haem a. In final reactivation phases, both the steady-state inhibition of catalysis and the accumulation of P and F states are reversed by slow sulfide oxidation. A model for this complex reaction pattern is presented. PMID:24059525

  20. Crystal Structure of Alcohol Oxidase from