Science.gov

Sample records for allosteric communication occurs

  1. The allosteric communication pathways in KIX domain of CBP

    PubMed Central

    Palazzesi, Ferruccio; Barducci, Alessandro; Tollinger, Martin; Parrinello, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Allosteric regulation plays an important role in a myriad of biomacromolecular processes. Specifically, in a protein, the process of allostery refers to the transmission of a local perturbation, such as ligand binding, to a distant site. Decades after the discovery of this phenomenon, models built on static images of proteins are being reconsidered with the knowledge that protein dynamics plays an important role in its function. Molecular dynamics simulations are a valuable tool for studying complex biomolecular systems, providing an atomistic description of their structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, their predictive power has been limited by the complexity of the biomolecule free-energy surface and by the length of the allosteric timescale (in the order of milliseconds). In this work, we are able to probe the origins of the allosteric changes that transcription factor mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) causes to the interactions of KIX domain of CREB-binding protein (CBP) with phosphorylated kinase inducible domain (pKID), by combing all-atom molecular dynamics with enhanced sampling methods recently developed in our group. We discuss our results in relation to previous NMR studies. We also develop a general simulations protocol to study allosteric phenomena and many other biological processes that occur in the micro/milliseconds timescale. PMID:23940332

  2. The allosteric communication pathways in KIX domain of CBP.

    PubMed

    Palazzesi, Ferruccio; Barducci, Alessandro; Tollinger, Martin; Parrinello, Michele

    2013-08-27

    Allosteric regulation plays an important role in a myriad of biomacromolecular processes. Specifically, in a protein, the process of allostery refers to the transmission of a local perturbation, such as ligand binding, to a distant site. Decades after the discovery of this phenomenon, models built on static images of proteins are being reconsidered with the knowledge that protein dynamics plays an important role in its function. Molecular dynamics simulations are a valuable tool for studying complex biomolecular systems, providing an atomistic description of their structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, their predictive power has been limited by the complexity of the biomolecule free-energy surface and by the length of the allosteric timescale (in the order of milliseconds). In this work, we are able to probe the origins of the allosteric changes that transcription factor mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) causes to the interactions of KIX domain of CREB-binding protein (CBP) with phosphorylated kinase inducible domain (pKID), by combing all-atom molecular dynamics with enhanced sampling methods recently developed in our group. We discuss our results in relation to previous NMR studies. We also develop a general simulations protocol to study allosteric phenomena and many other biological processes that occur in the micro/milliseconds timescale.

  3. Quantifying Allosteric Communication via Both Concerted Structural Changes and Conformational Disorder with CARDS.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukrit; Bowman, Gregory R

    2017-04-11

    Allosteric (i.e., long-range) communication within proteins is crucial for many biological processes, such as the activation of signaling cascades in response to specific stimuli. However, the physical basis for this communication remains unclear. Existing computational methods for identifying allostery focus on the role of concerted structural changes, but recent experimental work demonstrates that disorder is also an important factor. Here, we introduce the Correlation of All Rotameric and Dynamical States (CARDS) framework for quantifying correlations between both the structure and disorder of different regions of a protein. To quantify disorder, we draw inspiration from methods for quantifying "dynamic heterogeneity" from chemical physics to classify segments of a dihedral's time evolution as being in either ordered or disordered regimes. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, we apply CARDS to the Catabolite Activator Protein (CAP), a transcriptional activator that is regulated by Cyclic Adenosine MonoPhosphate (cAMP) binding. We find that CARDS captures allosteric communication between the two cAMP-Binding Domains (CBDs). Importantly, CARDS reveals that this coupling is dominated by disorder-mediated correlations, consistent with NMR experiments that establish allosteric coupling between the CBDs occurs without a concerted structural change. CARDS also recapitulates an enhanced role for disorder in the communication between the DNA-Binding Domains (DBDs) and CBDs in the S62F variant of CAP. Finally, we demonstrate that using CARDS to find communication hotspots identifies regions of CAP that are in allosteric communication without foreknowledge of their identities. Therefore, we expect CARDS to be of great utility for both understanding and predicting allostery.

  4. Mass spectrometry locates local and allosteric conformational changes that occur on cofactor binding

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Migas, Lukasz G.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David; Barran, Perdita E.

    2016-01-01

    Fdc1 is a decarboxylase enzyme that requires the novel prenylated FMN cofactor for activity. Here, we use it as an exemplar system to show how native top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry can measure the structural effect of cofactor binding by a protein. For Fdc1Ubix, the cofactor confers structural stability to the enzyme. IM–MS shows the holo protein to exist in four closely related conformational families, the populations of which differ in the apo form; the two smaller families are more populated in the presence of the cofactor and depopulated in its absence. These findings, supported by MD simulations, indicate a more open structure for the apo form. HDX-MS reveals that while the dominant structural changes occur proximal to the cofactor-binding site, rearrangements on cofactor binding are evident throughout the protein, predominantly attributable to allosteric conformational tightening, consistent with IM–MS data. PMID:27418477

  5. Mass spectrometry locates local and allosteric conformational changes that occur on cofactor binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Migas, Lukasz G.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David; Barran, Perdita E.

    2016-07-01

    Fdc1 is a decarboxylase enzyme that requires the novel prenylated FMN cofactor for activity. Here, we use it as an exemplar system to show how native top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry can measure the structural effect of cofactor binding by a protein. For Fdc1Ubix, the cofactor confers structural stability to the enzyme. IM-MS shows the holo protein to exist in four closely related conformational families, the populations of which differ in the apo form; the two smaller families are more populated in the presence of the cofactor and depopulated in its absence. These findings, supported by MD simulations, indicate a more open structure for the apo form. HDX-MS reveals that while the dominant structural changes occur proximal to the cofactor-binding site, rearrangements on cofactor binding are evident throughout the protein, predominantly attributable to allosteric conformational tightening, consistent with IM-MS data.

  6. Differences in Allosteric Communication Pipelines in the Inactive and Active States of a GPCR

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2014-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane proteins that allosterically transduce the signal of ligand binding in the extracellular (EC) domain to couple to proteins in the intracellular (IC) domain. However, the complete pathway of allosteric communication from the EC to the IC domain, including the role of individual amino acids in the pathway is not known. Using the correlation in torsion angle movements calculated from microseconds-long molecular-dynamics simulations, we elucidated the allosteric pathways in three different conformational states of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR): 1), the inverse-agonist-bound inactive state; 2), the agonist-bound intermediate state; and (3), the agonist- and G-protein-bound fully active state. The inactive state is less dynamic compared with the intermediate and active states, showing dense clusters of allosteric pathways (allosteric pipelines) connecting the EC with the IC domain. The allosteric pipelines from the EC domain to the IC domain are weakened in the intermediate state, thus decoupling the EC domain from the IC domain and making the receptor more dynamic compared with the other states. Also, the orthosteric ligand-binding site becomes the initiator region for allosteric communication in the intermediate state. This finding agrees with the paradigm that the nature of the agonist governs the specific signaling state of the receptor. These results provide an understanding of the mechanism of allosteric communication in class A GPCRs. In addition, our analysis shows that mutations that affect the ligand efficacy, but not the binding affinity, are located in the allosteric pipelines. This clarifies the role of such mutations, which has hitherto been unexplained. PMID:25028884

  7. Structure-Based Statistical Mechanical Model Accounts for the Causality and Energetics of Allosteric Communication

    PubMed Central

    Guarnera, Enrico; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is one of the pervasive mechanisms through which proteins in living systems carry out enzymatic activity, cell signaling, and metabolism control. Effective modeling of the protein function regulation requires a synthesis of the thermodynamic and structural views of allostery. We present here a structure-based statistical mechanical model of allostery, allowing one to observe causality of communication between regulatory and functional sites, and to estimate per residue free energy changes. Based on the consideration of ligand free and ligand bound systems in the context of a harmonic model, corresponding sets of characteristic normal modes are obtained and used as inputs for an allosteric potential. This potential quantifies the mean work exerted on a residue due to the local motion of its neighbors. Subsequently, in a statistical mechanical framework the entropic contribution to allosteric free energy of a residue is directly calculated from the comparison of conformational ensembles in the ligand free and ligand bound systems. As a result, this method provides a systematic approach for analyzing the energetics of allosteric communication based on a single structure. The feasibility of the approach was tested on a variety of allosteric proteins, heterogeneous in terms of size, topology and degree of oligomerization. The allosteric free energy calculations show the diversity of ways and complexity of scenarios existing in the phenomenology of allosteric causality and communication. The presented model is a step forward in developing the computational techniques aimed at detecting allosteric sites and obtaining the discriminative power between agonistic and antagonistic effectors, which are among the major goals in allosteric drug design. PMID:26939022

  8. Causality, transfer entropy, and allosteric communication landscapes in proteins with harmonic interactions.

    PubMed

    Hacisuleyman, Aysima; Erman, Burak

    2017-06-01

    A fast and approximate method of generating allosteric communication landscapes in proteins is presented by using Schreiber's entropy transfer concept in combination with the Gaussian Network Model of proteins. Predictions of the model and the allosteric communication landscapes generated show that information transfer in proteins does not necessarily take place along a single path, but an ensemble of pathways is possible. The model emphasizes that knowledge of entropy only is not sufficient for determining allosteric communication and additional information based on time delayed correlations should be introduced, which leads to the presence of causality in proteins. The model provides a simple tool for mapping entropy sink-source relations into pairs of residues. By this approach, residues that should be manipulated to control protein activity may be determined. This should be of great importance for allosteric drug design and for understanding the effects of mutations on function. The model is applied to determine allosteric communication in three proteins, Ubiquitin, Pyruvate Kinase, and the PDZ domain. Predictions are in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations and experimental evidence. Proteins 2017; 85:1056-1064. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Entropy Transfer between Residue Pairs and Allostery in Proteins: Quantifying Allosteric Communication in Ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It has recently been proposed by Gunasakaran et al. that allostery may be an intrinsic property of all proteins. Here, we develop a computational method that can determine and quantify allosteric activity in any given protein. Based on Schreiber's transfer entropy formulation, our approach leads to an information transfer landscape for the protein that shows the presence of entropy sinks and sources and explains how pairs of residues communicate with each other using entropy transfer. The model can identify the residues that drive the fluctuations of others. We apply the model to Ubiquitin, whose allosteric activity has not been emphasized until recently, and show that there are indeed systematic pathways of entropy and information transfer between residues that correlate well with the activities of the protein. We use 600 nanosecond molecular dynamics trajectories for Ubiquitin and its complex with human polymerase iota and evaluate entropy transfer between all pairs of residues of Ubiquitin and quantify the binding susceptibility changes upon complex formation. We explain the complex formation propensities of Ubiquitin in terms of entropy transfer. Important residues taking part in allosteric communication in Ubiquitin predicted by our approach are in agreement with results of NMR relaxation dispersion experiments. Finally, we show that time delayed correlation of fluctuations of two interacting residues possesses an intrinsic causality that tells which residue controls the interaction and which one is controlled. Our work shows that time delayed correlations, entropy transfer and causality are the required new concepts for explaining allosteric communication in proteins. PMID:28095404

  10. Entropy Transfer between Residue Pairs and Allostery in Proteins: Quantifying Allosteric Communication in Ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Hacisuleyman, Aysima; Erman, Burak

    2017-01-01

    It has recently been proposed by Gunasakaran et al. that allostery may be an intrinsic property of all proteins. Here, we develop a computational method that can determine and quantify allosteric activity in any given protein. Based on Schreiber's transfer entropy formulation, our approach leads to an information transfer landscape for the protein that shows the presence of entropy sinks and sources and explains how pairs of residues communicate with each other using entropy transfer. The model can identify the residues that drive the fluctuations of others. We apply the model to Ubiquitin, whose allosteric activity has not been emphasized until recently, and show that there are indeed systematic pathways of entropy and information transfer between residues that correlate well with the activities of the protein. We use 600 nanosecond molecular dynamics trajectories for Ubiquitin and its complex with human polymerase iota and evaluate entropy transfer between all pairs of residues of Ubiquitin and quantify the binding susceptibility changes upon complex formation. We explain the complex formation propensities of Ubiquitin in terms of entropy transfer. Important residues taking part in allosteric communication in Ubiquitin predicted by our approach are in agreement with results of NMR relaxation dispersion experiments. Finally, we show that time delayed correlation of fluctuations of two interacting residues possesses an intrinsic causality that tells which residue controls the interaction and which one is controlled. Our work shows that time delayed correlations, entropy transfer and causality are the required new concepts for explaining allosteric communication in proteins.

  11. Computational Modeling of Allosteric Communication Reveals Organizing Principles of Mutation-Induced Signaling in ABL and EGFR Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Anshuman; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2011-01-01

    The emerging structural information about allosteric kinase complexes and the growing number of allosteric inhibitors call for a systematic strategy to delineate and classify mechanisms of allosteric regulation and long-range communication that control kinase activity. In this work, we have investigated mechanistic aspects of long-range communications in ABL and EGFR kinases based on the results of multiscale simulations of regulatory complexes and computational modeling of signal propagation in proteins. These approaches have been systematically employed to elucidate organizing molecular principles of allosteric signaling in the ABL and EGFR multi-domain regulatory complexes and analyze allosteric signatures of the gate-keeper cancer mutations. We have presented evidence that mechanisms of allosteric activation may have universally evolved in the ABL and EGFR regulatory complexes as a product of a functional cross-talk between the organizing αF-helix and conformationally adaptive αI-helix and αC-helix. These structural elements form a dynamic network of efficiently communicated clusters that may control the long-range interdomain coupling and allosteric activation. The results of this study have unveiled a unifying effect of the gate-keeper cancer mutations as catalysts of kinase activation, leading to the enhanced long-range communication among allosterically coupled segments and stabilization of the active kinase form. The results of this study can reconcile recent experimental studies of allosteric inhibition and long-range cooperativity between binding sites in protein kinases. The presented study offers a novel molecular insight into mechanistic aspects of allosteric kinase signaling and provides a quantitative picture of activation mechanisms in protein kinases at the atomic level. PMID:21998569

  12. Computational Modeling of Allosteric Regulation in the Hsp90 Chaperones: A Statistical Ensemble Analysis of Protein Structure Networks and Allosteric Communications

    PubMed Central

    Blacklock, Kristin; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental role of the Hsp90 chaperone in regulating functional activity of diverse protein clients is essential for the integrity of signaling networks. In this work we have combined biophysical simulations of the Hsp90 crystal structures with the protein structure network analysis to characterize the statistical ensemble of allosteric interaction networks and communication pathways in the Hsp90 chaperones. We have found that principal structurally stable communities could be preserved during dynamic changes in the conformational ensemble. The dominant contribution of the inter-domain rigidity to the interaction networks has emerged as a common factor responsible for the thermodynamic stability of the active chaperone form during the ATPase cycle. Structural stability analysis using force constant profiling of the inter-residue fluctuation distances has identified a network of conserved structurally rigid residues that could serve as global mediating sites of allosteric communication. Mapping of the conformational landscape with the network centrality parameters has demonstrated that stable communities and mediating residues may act concertedly with the shifts in the conformational equilibrium and could describe the majority of functionally significant chaperone residues. The network analysis has revealed a relationship between structural stability, global centrality and functional significance of hotspot residues involved in chaperone regulation. We have found that allosteric interactions in the Hsp90 chaperone may be mediated by modules of structurally stable residues that display high betweenness in the global interaction network. The results of this study have suggested that allosteric interactions in the Hsp90 chaperone may operate via a mechanism that combines rapid and efficient communication by a single optimal pathway of structurally rigid residues and more robust signal transmission using an ensemble of suboptimal multiple communication routes. This

  13. Allosteric communication in the KIX domain proceeds through dynamic repacking of the hydrophobic core.

    PubMed

    Brüschweiler, Sven; Konrat, Robert; Tollinger, Martin

    2013-07-19

    The KIX domain of the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP) co-operatively mediates interactions between transcription factors. Binding of the transcription factor mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) induces the formation of a low-populated conformer of KIX that resembles the conformation of the KIX domain in the presence of a second transcription factor molecule. NMR spin relaxation studies have previously shown that allosteric coupling proceeds through a network of hydrophobic core residues that bridge the two binding sites. Here we describe high-resolution NMR solution structures of the binary complex of KIX with MLL and the ternary complex of KIX formed with MLL and phosphorylated kinase inducible domain of CREB (pKID) as a second ligand. We show that binding of pKID to the binary complex of KIX with MLL is accompanied by a defined repacking of the allosteric network in the hydrophobic core of the protein. Rotamer populations derived from methyl group (13)C chemical shifts reveal a dynamic contribution to the repacking process that is not captured by the structural coordinates and exemplify the dynamic nature of allosteric communication in the KIX domain.

  14. Allosteric Communication in the KIX Domain Proceeds through Dynamic Repacking of the Hydrophobic Core

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The KIX domain of the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP) co-operatively mediates interactions between transcription factors. Binding of the transcription factor mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) induces the formation of a low-populated conformer of KIX that resembles the conformation of the KIX domain in the presence of a second transcription factor molecule. NMR spin relaxation studies have previously shown that allosteric coupling proceeds through a network of hydrophobic core residues that bridge the two binding sites. Here we describe high-resolution NMR solution structures of the binary complex of KIX with MLL and the ternary complex of KIX formed with MLL and phosphorylated kinase inducible domain of CREB (pKID) as a second ligand. We show that binding of pKID to the binary complex of KIX with MLL is accompanied by a defined repacking of the allosteric network in the hydrophobic core of the protein. Rotamer populations derived from methyl group 13C chemical shifts reveal a dynamic contribution to the repacking process that is not captured by the structural coordinates and exemplify the dynamic nature of allosteric communication in the KIX domain. PMID:23651431

  15. Modular architecture of protein structures and allosteric communications: potential implications for signaling proteins and regulatory linkages

    PubMed Central

    del Sol, Antonio; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Amoros, Dolors; Nussinov, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Background Allosteric communications are vital for cellular signaling. Here we explore a relationship between protein architectural organization and shortcuts in signaling pathways. Results We show that protein domains consist of modules interconnected by residues that mediate signaling through the shortest pathways. These mediating residues tend to be located at the inter-modular boundaries, which are more rigid and display a larger number of long-range interactions than intra-modular regions. The inter-modular boundaries contain most of the residues centrally conserved in the protein fold, which may be crucial for information transfer between amino acids. Our approach to modular decomposition relies on a representation of protein structures as residue-interacting networks, and removal of the most central residue contacts, which are assumed to be crucial for allosteric communications. The modular decomposition of 100 multi-domain protein structures indicates that modules constitute the building blocks of domains. The analysis of 13 allosteric proteins revealed that modules characterize experimentally identified functional regions. Based on the study of an additional functionally annotated dataset of 115 proteins, we propose that high-modularity modules include functional sites and are the basic functional units. We provide examples (the Gαs subunit and P450 cytochromes) to illustrate that the modular architecture of active sites is linked to their functional specialization. Conclusion Our method decomposes protein structures into modules, allowing the study of signal transmission between functional sites. A modular configuration might be advantageous: it allows signaling proteins to expand their regulatory linkages and may elicit a broader range of control mechanisms either via modular combinations or through modulation of inter-modular linkages. PMID:17531094

  16. Intramolecular allosteric communication in dopamine D2 receptor revealed by evolutionary amino acid covariation.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yun-Min; Wilkins, Angela D; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Wensel, Theodore G; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-03-29

    The structural basis of allosteric signaling in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is important in guiding design of therapeutics and understanding phenotypic consequences of genetic variation. The Evolutionary Trace (ET) algorithm previously proved effective in redesigning receptors to mimic the ligand specificities of functionally distinct homologs. We now expand ET to consider mutual information, with validation in GPCR structure and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) function. The new algorithm, called ET-MIp, identifies evolutionarily relevant patterns of amino acid covariations. The improved predictions of structural proximity and D2R mutagenesis demonstrate that ET-MIp predicts functional interactions between residue pairs, particularly potency and efficacy of activation by dopamine. Remarkably, although most of the residue pairs chosen for mutagenesis are neither in the binding pocket nor in contact with each other, many exhibited functional interactions, implying at-a-distance coupling. The functional interaction between the coupled pairs correlated best with the evolutionary coupling potential derived from dopamine receptor sequences rather than with broader sets of GPCR sequences. These data suggest that the allosteric communication responsible for dopamine responses is resolved by ET-MIp and best discerned within a short evolutionary distance. Most double mutants restored dopamine response to wild-type levels, also suggesting that tight regulation of the response to dopamine drove the coevolution and intramolecular communications between coupled residues. Our approach provides a general tool to identify evolutionary covariation patterns in small sets of close sequence homologs and to translate them into functional linkages between residues.

  17. Calcium-Mediated Control of S100 Proteins: Allosteric Communication via an Agitator/Signal Blocking Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Shaw, Gary S; Konermann, Lars

    2017-08-23

    Allosteric proteins possess dynamically coupled residues for the propagation of input signals to distant target binding sites. The input signals usually correspond to "effector is present" or "effector is not present". Many aspects of allosteric regulation remain incompletely understood. This work focused on S100A11, a dimeric EF-hand protein with two hydrophobic target binding sites. An annexin peptide (Ax) served as the target. Target binding is allosterically controlled by Ca(2+) over a distance of ∼26 Å. Ca(2+) promotes formation of a [Ca4 S100 Ax2] complex, where the Ax peptides are accommodated between helices III/IV and III'/IV'. Without Ca(2+) these binding sites are closed, precluding interactions with Ax. The allosteric mechanism was probed by microsecond MD simulations in explicit water, complemented by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HDX/MS). Consistent with experimental data, MD runs in the absence of Ca(2+) and Ax culminated in target binding site closure. In simulations on [Ca4 S100] the target binding sites remained open. These results capture the essence of allosteric control, revealing how Ca(2+) prevents binding site closure. Both HDX/MS and MD data showed that the metalation sites become more dynamic after Ca(2+) loss. However, these enhanced dynamics do not represent the primary trigger of the allosteric cascade. Instead, a labile salt bridge acts as an incessantly active "agitator" that destabilizes the packing of adjacent residues, causing a domino chain of events that culminates in target binding site closure. This agitator represents the starting point of the allosteric signal propagation pathway. Ca(2+) binding rigidifies elements along this pathway, thereby blocking signal transmission. This blocking mechanism does not conform to the commonly held view that allosteric communication pathways generally originate at the sites where effectors interact with the protein.

  18. HPC Analysis of Multiple Binding Sites Communication and Allosteric Modulations in Drug Design: The HSP Case Study.

    PubMed

    Chiappori, Federica; Milanesi, Luciano; Merelli, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is a long-range macromolecular mechanism of internal regulation, in which the binding of a ligand in an allosteric site induces distant conformational changes in a distant portion of the protein, modifying its activity. From the drug design point of view, this mechanism can be exploited to achieve important therapeutic effects, since ligands able to bind allosteric sites may be designed to regulate target proteins. Computational tools are a valid support in this sense, since they allow the characterization of allosteric communications within proteins, which are essential to design modulator ligands. While considering long-range interactions in macromolecules, the principal drug design tool available to researcher is molecular dynamics, and related applications, since it allows the evaluation of conformational changes of a protein bound to a ligand. In particular, all-atoms molecular dynamics is suitable to verify the internal mechanisms that orchestrate allosteric communications, in order to identify key residues and internal pathways that modify the protein behaviour. The problem is that these techniques are heavily time-consuming and computationally intensive, thus high performance computing systems, including parallel computing and GPU-accelerated computations, are necessary to achieve results in a reasonable time. In this review, we will discuss how it is possible to exploit in silico approaches to characterize allosteric modulations and long-range interactions within proteins, describing the case study of the Heat Shock Proteins, a class of chaperons regulated by stress conditions, which is particularly important since it is involved in many cancers and neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Identifying paths of allosteric communication in the protein BirA through simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Gregory; Beckett, Dorothy; Matysiak, Silvina

    Biotin ligase/repressor (BirA) is a bifunctional enzyme which adenylates biotin and transfers the product, biotinyl-5'-AMP (bio-5'-AMP) to biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP). In the absence of BCCP, bio-5'-AMP promotes the dimerization of BirA. In dimer form, the BirA.bio-5'-AMP complex is able to bind to the biotin operator and prevents further synthesis of biotin. The bio-5'-AMP binds away from the dimer interface, so it is acting as an allosteric activator. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with BirA to look at fluctuations within the protein at equilibrium. We simulate apoBirA, liganded BirA, as well as two mutants, M211A and V219A. In agreement with experimental observations, several loops of the protein become stabilized for the liganded BirA when compared to the apo protein. In addition, changes in the dimer interface are observed for the M211A and V219A mutations, which are located in the ligand binding region. Using inter-residue correlation coefficients and pair energies a communication network through the protein is constructed. With this network we have identified paths which have the potential to be important in allosteric activation of BirA. These paths and the methods we use to identify them will be presented.

  20. Intramolecular allosteric communication in dopamine D2 receptor revealed by evolutionary amino acid covariation

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yun-Min; Wilkins, Angela D.; Rodriguez, Gustavo J.; Wensel, Theodore G.; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The structural basis of allosteric signaling in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is important in guiding design of therapeutics and understanding phenotypic consequences of genetic variation. The Evolutionary Trace (ET) algorithm previously proved effective in redesigning receptors to mimic the ligand specificities of functionally distinct homologs. We now expand ET to consider mutual information, with validation in GPCR structure and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) function. The new algorithm, called ET-MIp, identifies evolutionarily relevant patterns of amino acid covariations. The improved predictions of structural proximity and D2R mutagenesis demonstrate that ET-MIp predicts functional interactions between residue pairs, particularly potency and efficacy of activation by dopamine. Remarkably, although most of the residue pairs chosen for mutagenesis are neither in the binding pocket nor in contact with each other, many exhibited functional interactions, implying at-a-distance coupling. The functional interaction between the coupled pairs correlated best with the evolutionary coupling potential derived from dopamine receptor sequences rather than with broader sets of GPCR sequences. These data suggest that the allosteric communication responsible for dopamine responses is resolved by ET-MIp and best discerned within a short evolutionary distance. Most double mutants restored dopamine response to wild-type levels, also suggesting that tight regulation of the response to dopamine drove the coevolution and intramolecular communications between coupled residues. Our approach provides a general tool to identify evolutionary covariation patterns in small sets of close sequence homologs and to translate them into functional linkages between residues. PMID:26979958

  1. The Tryptophan Synthase α2β2 Complex: A Model for Substrate Channeling, Allosteric Communication, and Pyridoxal Phosphate Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Edith Wilson

    2013-01-01

    I reflect on my research on pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) enzymes over fifty-five years and on how I combined research with marriage and family. My Ph.D. research with Esmond E. Snell established one aspect of PLP enzyme mechanism. My postdoctoral work first with Hans L. Kornberg and then with Alton Meister characterized the structure and function of another PLP enzyme, l-aspartate β-decarboxylase. My independent research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) since 1966 has focused on the bacterial tryptophan synthase α2β2 complex. The β subunit catalyzes a number of PLP-dependent reactions. We have characterized these reactions and the allosteric effects of the α subunit. We also used chemical modification to probe enzyme structure and function. Our crystallization of the tryptophan synthase α2β2 complex from Salmonella typhimurium led to the determination of the three-dimensional structure with Craig Hyde and David Davies at NIH in 1988. This landmark structure was the first structure of a multienzyme complex and the first structure revealing an intramolecular tunnel. The structure has provided a basis for exploring mechanisms of catalysis, channeling, and allosteric communication in the tryptophan synthase α2β2 complex. The structure serves as a model for many other multiprotein complexes that are important for biological processes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:23426371

  2. The tryptophan synthase α2β2 complex: a model for substrate channeling, allosteric communication, and pyridoxal phosphate catalysis.

    PubMed

    Miles, Edith Wilson

    2013-04-05

    I reflect on my research on pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) enzymes over fifty-five years and on how I combined research with marriage and family. My Ph.D. research with Esmond E. Snell established one aspect of PLP enzyme mechanism. My postdoctoral work first with Hans L. Kornberg and then with Alton Meister characterized the structure and function of another PLP enzyme, l-aspartate β-decarboxylase. My independent research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) since 1966 has focused on the bacterial tryptophan synthase α2β2 complex. The β subunit catalyzes a number of PLP-dependent reactions. We have characterized these reactions and the allosteric effects of the α subunit. We also used chemical modification to probe enzyme structure and function. Our crystallization of the tryptophan synthase α2β2 complex from Salmonella typhimurium led to the determination of the three-dimensional structure with Craig Hyde and David Davies at NIH in 1988. This landmark structure was the first structure of a multienzyme complex and the first structure revealing an intramolecular tunnel. The structure has provided a basis for exploring mechanisms of catalysis, channeling, and allosteric communication in the tryptophan synthase α2β2 complex. The structure serves as a model for many other multiprotein complexes that are important for biological processes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  3. Direct observation of the dynamic process underlying allosteric signal transmission.

    PubMed

    Brüschweiler, Sven; Schanda, Paul; Kloiber, Karin; Brutscher, Bernhard; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Tollinger, Martin

    2009-03-04

    Allosteric regulation is an effective mechanism of control in biological processes. In allosteric proteins a signal originating at one site in the molecule is communicated through the protein structure to trigger a specific response at a remote site. Using NMR relaxation dispersion techniques we directly observe the dynamic process through which the KIX domain of CREB binding protein communicates allosteric information between binding sites. KIX mediates cooperativity between pairs of transcription factors through binding to two distinct interaction surfaces in an allosteric manner. We show that binding the activation domain of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) transcription factor to KIX induces a redistribution of the relative populations of KIX conformations toward a high-energy state in which the allosterically activated second binding site is already preformed, consistent with the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (WMC) model of allostery. The structural rearrangement process that links the two conformers and by which allosteric information is communicated occurs with a time constant of 3 ms at 27 degrees C. Our dynamic NMR data reveal that an evolutionarily conserved network of hydrophobic amino acids constitutes the pathway through which information is transmitted.

  4. Computational Analysis of Residue Interaction Networks and Coevolutionary Relationships in the Hsp70 Chaperones: A Community-Hopping Model of Allosteric Regulation and Communication

    PubMed Central

    Stetz, Gabrielle; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2017-01-01

    introduced a community-hopping model of allosteric communication. Atomistic reconstruction of signaling pathways in the DnaK structures captured a direction-specific mechanism and molecular details of signal transmission that are fully consistent with the mutagenesis experiments. The results of our study reconciled structural and functional experiments from a network-centric perspective by showing that global properties of the residue interaction networks and coevolutionary signatures may be linked with specificity and diversity of allosteric regulation mechanisms. PMID:28095400

  5. Allosteric communication pathways routed by Ca2+/Mg2+ exchange in GCAP1 selectively switch target regulation modes

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Valerio; Dell’Orco, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    GCAP1 is a neuronal calcium sensor protein that regulates the phototransduction cascade in vertebrates by switching between activator and inhibitor of the target guanylate cyclase (GC) in a Ca2+-dependent manner. We carried out exhaustive molecular dynamics simulations of GCAP1 and determined the intramolecular communication pathways involved in the specific GC activator/inhibitor switch. The switch was found to depend on the Mg2+/Ca2+ loading states of the three EF hands and on the way the information is transferred from each EF hand to specific residues at the GCAP1/GC interface. Post-translational myristoylation is fundamental to mediate long range allosteric interactions including the EF2-EF4 coupling and the communication between EF4 and the GC binding interface. Some hubs in the identified protein network are the target of retinal dystrophy mutations, suggesting that the lack of complete inhibition of GC observed in many cases is likely due to the perturbation of intra/intermolecular communication routes. PMID:27739433

  6. Allosteric communication between the nucleotide binding domains of caseinolytic peptidase B.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Higuero, José Ángel; Acebrón, Sergio P; Taneva, Stefka G; Del Castillo, Urko; Moro, Fernando; Muga, Arturo

    2011-07-22

    ClpB is a hexameric chaperone that solubilizes and reactivates protein aggregates in cooperation with the Hsp70/DnaK chaperone system. Each of the identical protein monomers contains two nucleotide binding domains (NBD), whose ATPase activity must be coupled to exert on the substrate the mechanical work required for its reactivation. However, how communication between these sites occurs is at present poorly understood. We have studied herein the affinity of each of the NBDs for nucleotides in WT ClpB and protein variants in which one or both sites are mutated to selectively impair nucleotide binding or hydrolysis. Our data show that the affinity of NBD2 for nucleotides (K(d) = 3-7 μm) is significantly higher than that of NBD1. Interestingly, the affinity of NBD1 depends on nucleotide binding to NBD2. Binding of ATP, but not ADP, to NBD2 increases the affinity of NBD1 (the K(d) decreases from ≈160-300 to 50-60 μm) for the corresponding nucleotide. Moreover, filling of the NBD2 ring with ATP allows the cooperative binding of this nucleotide and substrates to the NBD1 ring. Data also suggest that a minimum of four subunits cooperate to bind and reactivate two different aggregated protein substrates.

  7. Allosteric communication between DNA-binding and light-responsive domains of diatom class I aureochromes

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ankan; Herman, Elena; Serif, Manuel; Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Hepp, Sebastian; Pokorny, Richard; Kroth, Peter G.; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    The modular architecture of aureochrome blue light receptors, found in several algal groups including diatoms, is unique by having the LOV-type photoreceptor domain fused to the C-terminus of its putative effector, an N-terminal DNA-binding bZIP module. The structural and functional understanding of aureochromes’ light-dependent signaling mechanism is limited, despite their promise as an optogenetic tool. We show that class I aureochromes 1a and 1c from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum are regulated in a light-independent circadian rhythm. These aureochromes are capable to form functional homo- and heterodimers, which recognize the ACGT core sequence within the canonical ‘aureo box’, TGACGT, in a light-independent manner. The bZIP domain holds a more folded and less flexible but extended conformation in the duplex DNA-bound state. FT-IR spectroscopy in the absence and the presence of DNA shows light-dependent helix unfolding in the LOV domain, which leads to conformational changes in the bZIP region. The solution structure of DNA bound to aureochrome points to a tilted orientation that was further validated by molecular dynamics simulations. We propose that aureochrome signaling relies on an allosteric pathway from LOV to bZIP that results in conformational changes near the bZIP-DNA interface without major effects on the binding affinity. PMID:27179025

  8. Variations in clique and community patterns in protein structures during allosteric communication: investigation of dynamically equilibrated structures of methionyl tRNA synthetase complexes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amit; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2008-11-04

    The allosteric concept has played a key role in understanding the biological functions of proteins. The rigidity or plasticity and the conformational population are the two important ideas invoked in explaining the allosteric effect. Although molecular insights have been gained from a large number of structures, a precise assessment of the ligand-induced conformational changes in proteins at different levels, ranging from gross topology to intricate details, remains a challenge. In this study, we have explored the conformational changes in the complexes of methionyl tRNA synthetase (MetRS) through novel network parameters such as cliques and communities, which identify the rigid regions in the protein structure networks (PSNs) constructed from the noncovalent interactions of amino acid side chains. MetRS belongs to the aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (aaRS) family that plays a crucial role in the translation of genetic code. These enzymes are modular with distinct domains from which extensive genetic, kinetic, and structural data are available, highlighting the role of interdomain communication. The network parameters evaluated here on the conformational ensembles of MetRS complexes, generated from molecular dynamics simulations, have enabled us to understand the interdomain communication in detail. Additionally, the characterization of conformational changes in terms of cliques and communities has also become possible, which had eluded conventional analyses. Furthermore, we find that most of the residues participating in cliques and communities are strikingly different from those that take part in long-range communication. The cliques and communities evaluated here for the first time on PSNs have beautifully captured the local geometries in detail within the framework of global topology. Here the allosteric effect is revealed at the residue level via identification of the important residues specific for structural rigidity and functional flexibility in MetRS. This ought

  9. Exploring Molecular Mechanisms of Paradoxical Activation in the BRAF Kinase Dimers: Atomistic Simulations of Conformational Dynamics and Modeling of Allosteric Communication Networks and Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2016-01-01

    The recent studies have revealed that most BRAF inhibitors can paradoxically induce kinase activation by promoting dimerization and enzyme transactivation. Despite rapidly growing number of structural and functional studies about the BRAF dimer complexes, the molecular basis of paradoxical activation phenomenon is poorly understood and remains largely hypothetical. In this work, we have explored the relationships between inhibitor binding, protein dynamics and allosteric signaling in the BRAF dimers using a network-centric approach. Using this theoretical framework, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations with coevolutionary analysis and modeling of the residue interaction networks to determine molecular determinants of paradoxical activation. We have investigated functional effects produced by paradox inducer inhibitors PLX4720, Dabrafenib, Vemurafenib and a paradox breaker inhibitor PLX7904. Functional dynamics and binding free energy analyses of the BRAF dimer complexes have suggested that negative cooperativity effect and dimer-promoting potential of the inhibitors could be important drivers of paradoxical activation. We have introduced a protein structure network model in which coevolutionary residue dependencies and dynamic maps of residue correlations are integrated in the construction and analysis of the residue interaction networks. The results have shown that coevolutionary residues in the BRAF structures could assemble into independent structural modules and form a global interaction network that may promote dimerization. We have also found that BRAF inhibitors could modulate centrality and communication propensities of global mediating centers in the residue interaction networks. By simulating allosteric communication pathways in the BRAF structures, we have determined that paradox inducer and breaker inhibitors may activate specific signaling routes that correlate with the extent of paradoxical activation. While paradox inducer inhibitors may

  10. Selective peptide inhibitors of bifunctional thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase from Toxoplasma gondii provide insights into domain-domain communication and allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Landau, Mark J; Sharma, Hitesh; Anderson, Karen S

    2013-09-01

    The bifunctional enzyme thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase (TS-DHFR) plays an essential role in DNA synthesis and is unique to several species of pathogenic protozoans, including the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Infection by T. gondii causes the prevalent disease toxoplasmosis, for which TS-DHFR is a major therapeutic target. Here, we design peptides that target the dimer interface between the TS domains of bifunctional T. gondii TS-DHFR by mimicking β-strands at the interface, revealing a previously unknown allosteric target. The current study shows that these β-strand mimetic peptides bind to the apo-enzyme in a species-selective manner to inhibit both the TS and distal DHFR. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to monitor conformational switching of the TS domain and demonstrate that these peptides induce a conformational change in the enzyme. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, nonconserved residues in the linker between TS and DHFR were identified that play a key role in domain-domain communication and in peptide inhibition of the DHFR domain. These studies validate allosteric inhibition of apo-TS, specifically at the TS-TS interface, as a potential target for novel, species-specific therapeutics for treating T. gondii parasitic infections and overcoming drug resistance. © 2013 The Protein Society.

  11. Using THz time-scale infrared spectroscopy to examine the role of collective, thermal fluctuations in the formation of myoglobin allosteric communication pathways and ligand specificity.

    PubMed

    Woods, K N

    2014-06-28

    In this investigation we use THz time-scale spectroscopy to conduct an initial set of studies on myoglobin with the aim of providing further insight into the global, collective thermal fluctuations in the protein that have been hypothesized to play a prominent role in the dynamic formation of transient ligand channels as well as in shaping the molecular level basis for ligand discrimination. Using the two ligands O2 and CO, we have determined that the perturbation from the heme-ligand complex has a strong influence on the characteristics of the myoglobin collective dynamics that are excited upon binding. Further, the differences detected in the collective protein motions in Mb-O2 compared with those in Mb-CO appear to be intimately tied with the pathways of long-range allosteric communication in the protein, which ultimately determine the trajectories selected by the respective ligands on the path to and from the heme-binding cavity.

  12. Using cholinergic M1 receptor positive allosteric modulators to improve memory via enhancement of brain cholinergic communication.

    PubMed

    Chambon, Caroline; Jatzke, Claudia; Wegener, Nico; Gravius, Andreas; Danysz, Wojciech

    2012-12-15

    Benzylquinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA) is a recently described cholinergic muscarinic M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator having potential as cognitive enhancer in dementia. The present study focused on the characterisation of BQCA's mode of action in relation to positive effects on memory and side-effects in an animal model. To get insight into this mode of action, in vitro receptor potency/left shift experiments in cells stably expressing the rat's M(1) receptor were performed. They revealed an inflection point value of BQCA corresponding to 306nM, and potentiation of the agonist response up to 47-fold in presence of 10μM of BQCA. In vivo, brain microdialysis showed a maximal brain level of 270nM, 40min after i.p. administration at 10mg/kg. Based on in vitro data obtained with this dose, it can be concluded that BQCA reaches brain levels which should potentiate the agonist response about 4-fold. Behavioural data confirmed that BQCA used at 10mg/kg attenuated scopolamine-induced memory deficit in a spontaneous alternation task. Moreover, BQCA showed no side effect at 10mg/kg and above in spontaneous locomotion and salivation tests. The profile of BQCA observed in the present study displays a clear advantage over the M(1)-M(3) agonist cevimeline. The present data show the therapeutic potential of the M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator BQCA for the treatment of memory deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Insights into protein -- DNA interactions, stability and allosteric communications: A computational study of MutS-DNA recognition complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negureanu, Lacramioara; Salsbury, Freddie

    2012-02-01

    DNA mismatch repair proteins (MMR) maintain genetic stability by recognizing and repairing mismatched bases and insertion/deletion loops mistakenly incorporated during DNA replication, and initiate cellular response to certain types of DNA damage. The most abundant MMR mismatch-binding factor in eukaryotes, MutS, recognizes and initiates the repair of base-base mismatches and small insertion/deletions. We performed molecular dynamics simulations on mismatched and damaged MutS-DNA complexes. A comprehensive DNA binding site analysis of relevant conformations shows that MutS proteins recognize the mismatched and platinum cross-linked DNA substrates in significantly different modes. Distinctive conformational changes associated with MutS binding to mismatched and damaged DNA have been identified and they provide insight into the involvement of MMR proteins in DNA-repair and DNA-damage pathways. Stability and allosteric interactions at the heterodimer interface associated with the mismatch and damage recognition step allow for prediction of key residues in MMR cancer-causing mutations. A rigorous hydrogen bonding analysis for ADP molecules at the ATPase binding sites is also presented. A large number of known MMR cancer causing mutations among the residues were found.

  14. Allosteric mechanisms of nuclear receptors: insights from computational simulations.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, Jonathan A G; Gallastegui, Nerea; Osguthorpe, David J; Hagler, Arnold T; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2014-08-05

    The traditional structural view of allostery defines this key regulatory mechanism as the ability of one conformational event (allosteric site) to initiate another in a separate location (active site). In recent years computational simulations conducted to understand how this phenomenon occurs in nuclear receptors (NRs) has gained significant traction. These results have yield insights into allosteric changes and communication mechanisms that underpin ligand binding, coactivator binding site formation, post-translational modifications, and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, substantial efforts have been made in understanding the dynamic processes involved in ligand binding and coregulator recruitment to different NR conformations in order to predict cell/tissue-selective pharmacological outcomes of drugs. They also have improved the accuracy of in silico screening protocols so that nowadays they are becoming part of optimisation protocols for novel therapeutics. Here we summarise the important contributions that computational simulations have made towards understanding the structure/function relationships of NRs and how these can be exploited for rational drug design.

  15. An information theoretic framework reveals a tunable allosteric network in group II chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Tom; Dalton, Kevin; Tomlinson, Anthony; Pande, Vijay; Frydman, Judith

    2017-09-01

    ATP-dependent allosteric regulation of the ring-shaped group II chaperonins remains ill defined, in part because their complex oligomeric topology has limited the success of structural techniques in suggesting allosteric determinants. Further, their high sequence conservation has hindered the prediction of allosteric networks using mathematical covariation approaches. Here, we develop an information theoretic strategy that is robust to residue conservation and apply it to group II chaperonins. We identify a contiguous network of covarying residues that connects all nucleotide-binding pockets within each chaperonin ring. An interfacial residue between the networks of neighboring subunits controls positive cooperativity by communicating nucleotide occupancy within each ring. Strikingly, chaperonin allostery is tunable through single mutations at this position. Naturally occurring variants at this position that double the extent of positive cooperativity are less prevalent in nature. We propose that being less cooperative than attainable allows chaperonins to support robust folding over a wider range of metabolic conditions.

  16. Links Between Co-occurring Social-Communication and Hyperactive-Inattentive Trait Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    St. Pourcain, Beate; Mandy, William P.; Heron, Jon; Golding, Jean; Davey Smith, George; Skuse, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective There is overlap between an autistic and hyperactive-inattentive symptomatology when studied cross-sectionally. This study is the first to examine the longitudinal pattern of association between social-communication deficits and hyperactive-inattentive symptoms in the general population, from childhood through adolescence. We explored the interrelationship between trajectories of co-occurring symptoms, and sought evidence for shared prenatal/perinatal risk factors. Method Study participants were 5,383 singletons of white ethnicity from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Multiple measurements of hyperactive-inattentive traits (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire) and autistic social-communication impairment (Social Communication Disorder Checklist) were obtained between 4 and 17 years. Both traits and their trajectories were modeled in parallel using latent class growth analysis (LCGA). Trajectory membership was subsequently investigated with respect to prenatal/perinatal risk factors. Results LCGA analysis revealed two distinct social-communication trajectories (persistently impaired versus low-risk) and four hyperactive-inattentive trait trajectories (persistently impaired, intermediate, childhood-limited and low-risk). Autistic symptoms were more stable than those of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) behaviors, which showed greater variability. Trajectories for both traits were strongly but not reciprocally interlinked, such that the majority of children with a persistent hyperactive-inattentive symptomatology also showed persistent social-communication deficits but not vice versa. Shared predictors, especially for trajectories of persistent impairment, were maternal smoking during the first trimester, which included familial effects, and a teenage pregnancy. Conclusions Our longitudinal study reveals that a complex relationship exists between social-communication and hyperactive-inattentive traits. Patterns

  17. Dancing through Life: Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Network-Centric Modeling of Allosteric Mechanisms in Hsp70 and Hsp110 Chaperone Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stetz, Gabrielle; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones play an important role in regulating cellular processes that involve protein folding and stabilization, which are essential for the integrity of signaling networks. Although many aspects of allosteric regulatory mechanisms in Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones have been extensively studied and significantly advanced in recent experimental studies, the atomistic picture of signal propagation and energetics of dynamics-based communication still remain unresolved. In this work, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations and protein stability analysis of the chaperone structures with the network modeling of residue interaction networks to characterize molecular determinants of allosteric mechanisms. We have shown that allosteric mechanisms of Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones may be primarily determined by nucleotide-induced redistribution of local conformational ensembles in the inter-domain regions and the substrate binding domain. Conformational dynamics and energetics of the peptide substrate binding with the Hsp70 structures has been analyzed using free energy calculations, revealing allosteric hotspots that control negative cooperativity between regulatory sites. The results have indicated that cooperative interactions may promote a population-shift mechanism in Hsp70, in which functional residues are organized in a broad and robust allosteric network that can link the nucleotide-binding site and the substrate-binding regions. A smaller allosteric network in Hsp110 structures may elicit an entropy-driven allostery that occurs in the absence of global structural changes. We have found that global mediating residues with high network centrality may be organized in stable local communities that are indispensable for structural stability and efficient allosteric communications. The network-centric analysis of allosteric interactions has also established that centrality of functional residues could correlate with their sensitivity to mutations

  18. Allosteric control of an asymmetric transduction in a G protein-coupled receptor heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junke; Zhang, Zongyong; Moreno-Delgado, David; Dalton, James Ar; Rovira, Xavier; Trapero, Ana; Goudet, Cyril; Llebaria, Amadeu; Giraldo, Jesús; Yuan, Qilin; Rondard, Philippe; Huang, Siluo; Liu, Jianfeng; Pin, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-10

    GPCRs play critical roles in cell communication. Although GPCRs can form heteromers, their role in signaling remains elusive. Here we used rat metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors as prototypical dimers to study the functional interaction between each subunit. mGluRs can form both constitutive homo- and heterodimers. Whereas both mGlu2 and mGlu4 couple to G proteins, G protein activation is mediated by mGlu4 heptahelical domain (HD) exclusively in mGlu2-4 heterodimers. Such asymmetric transduction results from the action of both the dimeric extracellular domain, and an allosteric activation by the partially-activated non-functional mGlu2 HD. G proteins activation by mGlu2 HD occurs if either the mGlu2 HD is occupied by a positive allosteric modulator or if mGlu4 HD is inhibited by a negative modulator. These data revealed an oriented asymmetry in mGlu heterodimers that can be controlled with allosteric modulators. They provide new insight on the allosteric interaction between subunits in a GPCR dimer.

  19. Allosteric switch regulates protein–protein binding through collective motion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Colin A.; Pratihar, Supriya; Giller, Karin; Paulat, Maria; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Lee, Donghan; de Groot, Bert L.

    2016-01-01

    Many biological processes depend on allosteric communication between different parts of a protein, but the role of internal protein motion in propagating signals through the structure remains largely unknown. Through an experimental and computational analysis of the ground state dynamics in ubiquitin, we identify a collective global motion that is specifically linked to a conformational switch distant from the binding interface. This allosteric coupling is also present in crystal structures and is found to facilitate multispecificity, particularly binding to the ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) family of deubiquitinases. The collective motion that enables this allosteric communication does not affect binding through localized changes but, instead, depends on expansion and contraction of the entire protein domain. The characterization of these collective motions represents a promising avenue for finding and manipulating allosteric networks. PMID:26961002

  20. Links between Co-Occurring Social-Communication and Hyperactive-Inattentive Trait Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Pourcain, Beate; Mandy, William P.; Heron, Jon; Golding, Jean; Smith, George Davey; Skuse, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is overlap between an autistic and hyperactive-inattentive symptomatology when studied cross-sectionally. This study is the first to examine the longitudinal pattern of association between social-communication deficits and hyperactive-inattentive symptoms in the general population, from childhood through adolescence. We explored…

  1. Links between Co-Occurring Social-Communication and Hyperactive-Inattentive Trait Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Pourcain, Beate; Mandy, William P.; Heron, Jon; Golding, Jean; Smith, George Davey; Skuse, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is overlap between an autistic and hyperactive-inattentive symptomatology when studied cross-sectionally. This study is the first to examine the longitudinal pattern of association between social-communication deficits and hyperactive-inattentive symptoms in the general population, from childhood through adolescence. We explored…

  2. The allosteric switching mechanism in bacteriophage MS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkett, Matthew R.; Mirijanian, Dina T.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    We use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopts different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We discuss changes in molecular interactions responsible for this shift. We then identify networks of amino acids with correlated motions to reveal the mechanism by which effects of TR binding span the protein. We find that TR binding strongly affects residues located at the 5-fold and quasi-sixfold interfaces in the assembled capsid, suggesting a mechanism by which the TR binding could direct formation of the native capsid geometry. The analysis predicts amino acids whose substitution by mutagenesis could alter populations of the conformational substates or their transition rates.

  3. Controlling allosteric networks in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokholyan, Nikolay

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel methodology based on graph theory and discrete molecular dynamics simulations for delineating allosteric pathways in proteins. We use this methodology to uncover the structural mechanisms responsible for coupling of distal sites on proteins and utilize it for allosteric modulation of proteins. We will present examples where inference of allosteric networks and its rewiring allows us to ``rescue'' cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a protein associated with fatal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. We also use our methodology to control protein function allosterically. We design a novel protein domain that can be inserted into identified allosteric site of target protein. Using a drug that binds to our domain, we alter the function of the target protein. We successfully tested this methodology in vitro, in living cells and in zebrafish. We further demonstrate transferability of our allosteric modulation methodology to other systems and extend it to become ligh-activatable.

  4. Modulation of global low-frequency motions underlies allosteric regulation: demonstration in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Thomas L; Townsend, Philip D; Burnell, David; Jones, Matthew L; Richards, Shane A; McLeish, Tom C B; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R; Cann, Martin J

    2013-09-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distinct site. There is growing evidence that allosteric cooperativity can be communicated by modulation of protein dynamics without conformational change. The mechanisms, however, for communicating dynamic fluctuations between sites are debated. We provide a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low-frequency dynamics without a change in structure. We have generated coarse-grained models that describe the protein backbone motions of the CRP/FNR family transcription factors, CAP of Escherichia coli and GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The latter we demonstrate as a new exemplar for allostery without conformation change. We observe that binding the first molecule of cAMP ligand is correlated with modulation of the global normal modes and negative cooperativity for binding the second cAMP ligand without a change in mean structure. The theory makes key experimental predictions that are tested through an analysis of variant proteins by structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. Quantifying allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein "design space" that identified the inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, through analyzing CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. This finding provides a link between the position of CRP/FNR transcription factors within the allosteric free energy landscapes and evolutionary selection pressures. Our study therefore reveals significant features of the mechanistic basis for allostery. Changes in low-frequency dynamics correlate with allosteric effects on ligand binding without the requirement for a defined spatial pathway. In addition to evolving suitable three-dimensional structures, CRP/FNR family transcription factors have been selected to

  5. Regulatory network of the allosteric ATP inhibition of E. coli phosphofructokinase-2 studied by hybrid dimers.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Pablo; Soto, Francisco; Baez, Mauricio; Babul, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed an allosteric ATP inhibition mechanism of Pfk-2 determining the structure of different forms of the enzyme together with a kinetic enzyme analysis. Here we complement the mechanism by using hybrid oligomers of the homodimeric enzyme to get insights about the allosteric communication pathways between the same sites or different ones located in different subunits. Kinetic analysis of the hybrid enzymes indicate that homotropic interactions between allosteric sites for ATP or between substrate sites for fructose-6-P have a minor effect on the enzymatic inhibition induced by ATP. In fact, the sigmoid response for fructose-6-P observed at elevated ATP concentrations can be eliminated even though the enzymatic inhibition is still operative. Nevertheless, leverage coupling analysis supports heterotropic interactions between the allosteric ATP and fructose-6-P binding occurring between and within each subunit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  6. Short communication: Change of naturally occurring benzoic acid during skim milk fermentation by commercial cheese starters.

    PubMed

    Han, Noori; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Sun-Young; Yoo, Mi-Young; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Lim, Sang-Dong

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to investigate the change of naturally occurring benzoic acid (BA) during skim milk fermentation by 4 kinds of commercial cheese starters used in domestic cheese. The culture was incubated at 3-h intervals for 24h at 30, 35, and 40°C. The BA content during fermentation by Streptococcus thermophilus STB-01 was detected after 12h at all temperatures, sharply increasing at 30°C. In Lactobacillus paracasei LC431, BA was detected after 9h at all temperatures, sharply increasing until 18h and decreasing after 18h at 30 and 35°C. In the case of R707 (consisting of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris), BA increased from 6h to 15h and decreased after 15h at 40°C. The BA during STB-01 and CHN-11 (1:1; mixture of S. thermophilus, Lc. lactis ssp. lactis, Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris, Lc. lactis ssp. diacetylactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. cremoris) fermentation was detected after 3h at 35 and 40°C, sharply increasing up to 12h and decreasing after 15h at 35°C, and after 6h, increasing up to 9h at 30°C. After 3h, it steadily decreased at 40°C. The highest amount of BA was found during the fermentation by R707 at 30°C; 15h with 12.46mg/kg. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Allosteric Motions in Structures of Yeast NAD+-Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor,A.; Hu, G.; Hart, P.; McAlister-Henn, L.

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) are key regulators of flux through biosynthetic and oxidative pathways in response to cellular energy levels. Here we present the first structures of a eukaryotic member of this enzyme family, the allosteric, hetero-octameric, NAD+-specific IDH from yeast in three forms: (1) without ligands, (2) with bound analog citrate, and (3) with bound citrate + AMP. The structures reveal the molecular basis for ligand binding to homologous but distinct regulatory and catalytic sites positioned at the interfaces between IDH1 and IDH2 subunits and define pathways of communication between heterodimers and heterotetramers in the hetero-octamer. Disulfide bonds observed at the heterotetrameric interfaces in the unliganded IDH hetero-octamer are reduced in the ligand-bound forms, suggesting a redox regulatory mechanism that may be analogous to the 'on-off' regulation of non-allosteric bacterial IDHs via phosphorylation. The results strongly suggest that eukaryotic IDH enzymes are exquisitely tuned to ensure that allosteric activation occurs only when concentrations of isocitrate are elevated.

  8. Supramolecular Allosteric Cofacial Porphyrin Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveri, Christopher G.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.; Nguyen, Son Binh T.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Pink, Maren

    2008-04-12

    Nature routinely uses cooperative interactions to regulate cellular activity. For years, chemists have designed synthetic systems that aim toward harnessing the reactivity common to natural biological systems. By learning how to control these interactions in situ, one begins to allow for the preparation of man-made biomimetic systems that can efficiently mimic the interactions found in Nature. To this end, we have designed a synthetic protocol for the preparation of flexible metal-directed supramolecular cofacial porphyrin complexes which are readily obtained in greater than 90% yield through the use of new hemilabile porphyrin ligands with bifunctional ether-phosphine or thioether-phosphine substituents at the 5 and 15 positions on the porphyrin ring. The resulting architectures contain two hemilabile ligand-metal domains (Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} sites) and two cofacially aligned porphyrins (Zn{sup II} sites), offering orthogonal functionalities and allowing these multimetallic complexes to exist in two states, 'condensed' or 'open'. Combining the ether-phosphine ligand with the appropriate Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} transition-metal precursors results in 'open' macrocyclic products. In contrast, reacting the thioether-phosphine ligand with RhI or CuI precursors yields condensed structures that can be converted into their 'open' macrocyclic forms via introduction of additional ancillary ligands. The change in cavity size that occurs allows these structures to function as allosteric catalysts for the acyl transfer reaction between X-pyridylcarbinol (where X = 2, 3, or 4) and 1-acetylimidazole. For 3- and 4-pyridylcarbinol, the 'open' macrocycle accelerates the acyl transfer reaction more than the condensed analogue and significantly more than the porphyrin monomer. In contrast, an allosteric effect was not observed for 2-pyridylcarbinol, which is expected to be a weaker binder and is unfavorably constrained inside the macrocyclic cavity.

  9. Supramolecular Allosteric Cofacial Porphyrin Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Oliveri, Christopher G.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Pink, Maren

    2008-01-01

    Nature routinely uses cooperative interactions to regulate cellular activity. For years, chemists have designed synthetic systems that aim toward harnessing the reactivity common to natural biological systems. By learning how to control these interactions in situ, one begins to allow for the preparation of man-made biomimetic systems that can efficiently mimic the interactions found in Nature. To this end, we have designed a synthetic protocol for the preparation of flexible metal-directed supramolecular cofacial porphyrin complexes which are readily obtained in greater than 90% yield through the use of new hemilabile porphyrin ligands with bifunctional ether–phosphine or thioether–phosphine substituents at the 5 and 15 positions on the porphyrin ring. The resulting architectures contain two hemilabile ligand–metal domains (RhI or CuI sites) and two cofacially aligned porphyrins (ZnII sites), offering orthogonal functionalities and allowing these multimetallic complexes to exist in two states, “condensed” or “open”. Combining the ether–phosphine ligand with the appropriate RhI or CuI transition-metal precursors results in “open” macrocyclic products. In contrast, reacting the thioether–phosphine ligand with RhI or CuI precursors yields condensed structures that can be converted into their “open” macrocyclic forms via introduction of additional ancillary ligands. The change in cavity size that occurs allows these structures to function as allosteric catalysts for the acyl transfer reaction between X-pyridylcarbinol (where X = 2, 3, or 4) and 1-acetylimidazole. For 3-and 4-pyridylcarbinol, the “open” macrocycle accelerates the acyl transfer reaction more than the condensed analogue and significantly more than the porphyrin monomer. In contrast, an allosteric effect was not observed for 2-pyridylcarbinol, which is expected to be a weaker binder and is unfavorably constrained inside the macrocyclic cavity. PMID:17165783

  10. Dissecting dynamic allosteric pathways using chemically related small molecule activators

    PubMed Central

    Lisi, George P.; Manley, Gregory A.; Hendrickson, Heidi; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Loria, J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    1. Summary The allosteric mechanism of the heterodimeric enzyme imidazole glycerol phosphate synthase was studied in detail with solution NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. We studied IGPS in complex with a series of allosteric activators corresponding to a large range of catalytic rate enhancements (26 – 4900 fold), in which ligand binding is entropically driven. Conformational flexibility on the millisecond timescale plays a crucial role in intersubunit communication. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiments probing Ile, Leu, and Val methyl groups reveal that the apo- and glutamine-mimicked complexes are static on the millisecond timescale. Domain-wide motions are stimulated in the presence of the allosteric activators. These studies, in conjunction with ligand titrations, demonstrate that the allosteric network is widely dispersed and varies with the identity of the effector. Further, we find that stronger allosteric ligands create more conformational flexibility on the millisecond timescale throughout HisF. This domain-wide loosening leads to maximum catalytic activity. PMID:27238967

  11. Allosteric control in a metalloprotein dramatically alters function

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Elizabeth Leigh; Zuris, John A.; Wang, Charles; Vo, Phu Luong T.; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Paddock, Mark L.; Nechushtai, Rachel; Onuchic, Jose N.; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Metalloproteins (MPs) comprise one-third of all known protein structures. This diverse set of proteins contain a plethora of unique inorganic moieties capable of performing chemistry that would otherwise be impossible using only the amino acids found in nature. Most of the well-studied MPs are generally viewed as being very rigid in structure, and it is widely thought that the properties of the metal centers are primarily determined by the small fraction of amino acids that make up the local environment. Here we examine both theoretically and experimentally whether distal regions can influence the metal center in the diabetes drug target mitoNEET. We demonstrate that a loop (L2) 20 Å away from the metal center exerts allosteric control over the cluster binding domain and regulates multiple properties of the metal center. Mutagenesis of L2 results in significant shifts in the redox potential of the [2Fe-2S] cluster and orders of magnitude effects on the rate of [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer to an apo-acceptor protein. These surprising effects occur in the absence of any structural changes. An examination of the native basin dynamics of the protein using all-atom simulations shows that twisting in L2 controls scissoring in the cluster binding domain and results in perturbations to one of the cluster-coordinating histidines. These allosteric effects are in agreement with previous folding simulations that predicted L2 could communicate with residues surrounding the metal center. Our findings suggest that long-range dynamical changes in the protein backbone can have a significant effect on the functional properties of MPs. PMID:23271805

  12. Dynamic coupling and allosteric behavior in a non-allosteric protein†

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Michael W.; Gilmore, Steven A.; Edgell, Marshall H.; Lee, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Long-range intraprotein interactions give rise to many important protein behaviors. Understanding how energy is transduced through protein structures to either transmit a signal or elicit conformational changes is therefore a current challenge in structural biology. In an effort to understand such linkages, multiple V→A mutations were made in the small globular protein eglin c. The physical responses, as mapped by NMR spin relaxation, residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), and scalar couplings, illustrate that the interior of this non-allosteric protein forms a dynamic network and that local perturbations are transmitted as dynamic and structural changes to distal sites as far as 16 Å away. Two basic types of propagation responses were observed: contiguous pathways of enhanced (attenuated) dynamics with no change in structure; and dispersed (non-contiguous) changes in methyl rotation rates that appear to result from subtle deformation of backbone structure. In addition, energy transmission is found to be unidirectional. In one mutant, an allosteric conformational change of a side chain is seen in the context of a pathway of propagated changes in ps-ns dynamics. The observation of so many long-range interactions in a small, rigid system lends experimental weight to the idea that all well-folded proteins inherently possess allosteric features [Gunasekaran et al. (2004) Proteins 57, 433−443], and that dynamics are a rich source of information for mapping and gaining mechanistic insight into communication pathways in individual proteins. PMID:16784220

  13. Productive induced metastability in allosteric modulation of kinase function.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, Joan; Rodriguez Fris, Ariel; Appignanesi, Gustavo; Fernández, Ariel

    2014-07-01

    Allosteric modulators of kinase function are of considerable pharmacological interest as blockers or agonists of key cell-signaling pathways. They are gaining attention due to their purported higher selectivity and efficacy relative to ATP-competitive ligands. Upon binding to the target protein, allosteric inhibitors promote a conformational change that purposely facilitates or hampers ATP binding. However, allosteric binding remains a matter of contention because the binding site does not fit with a natural ligand (i.e. ATP or phosphorylation substrate) of the protein. In this study, we show that allosteric binding occurs by means of a local structural motif that promotes association with the ligand. We specifically show that allosteric modulators promote a local metastable state that is stabilized upon association. The induced conformational change generates a local enrichment of the protein in the so-called dehydrons, which are solvent-exposed backbone hydrogen bonds. These structural deficiencies that are inherently sticky are not present in the apo form and constitute a local metastable state that promotes association with the ligand. This productive induced metastability (PIM) is likely to translate into a general molecular design concept. © 2014 FEBS.

  14. ASBench: benchmarking sets for allosteric discovery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenkang; Wang, Guanqiao; Shen, Qiancheng; Liu, Xinyi; Lu, Shaoyong; Geng, Lv; Huang, Zhimin; Zhang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Allostery allows for the fine-tuning of protein function. Targeting allosteric sites is gaining increasing recognition as a novel strategy in drug design. The key challenge in the discovery of allosteric sites has strongly motivated the development of computational methods and thus high-quality, publicly accessible standard data have become indispensable. Here, we report benchmarking data for experimentally determined allosteric sites through a complex process, including a 'Core set' with 235 unique allosteric sites and a 'Core-Diversity set' with 147 structurally diverse allosteric sites. These benchmarking sets can be exploited to develop efficient computational methods to predict unknown allosteric sites in proteins and reveal unique allosteric ligand-protein interactions to guide allosteric drug design. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Allosteric Modulation of Chemoattractant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Marcello; Cesta, Maria Candida; Locati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Chemoattractants control selective leukocyte homing via interactions with a dedicated family of related G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Emerging evidence indicates that the signaling activity of these receptors, as for other GPCR, is influenced by allosteric modulators, which interact with the receptor in a binding site distinct from the binding site of the agonist and modulate the receptor signaling activity in response to the orthosteric ligand. Allosteric modulators have a number of potential advantages over orthosteric agonists/antagonists as therapeutic agents and offer unprecedented opportunities to identify extremely selective drug leads. Here, we resume evidence of allosterism in the context of chemoattractant receptors, discussing in particular its functional impact on functional selectivity and probe/concentration dependence of orthosteric ligands activities. PMID:27199992

  16. Co-occurring development of early childhood communication and motor skills: results from a population-based longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Wang, M V; Lekhal, R; Aarø, L E; Schjølberg, S

    2014-01-01

    Communicative and motor development is frequently found to be associated. In the current study we investigate to what extent communication and motor skills at 1½ years predict skills in the same domains at 3 years of age. This study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Heath. Data stem from 62,944 children and their mothers. Mothers completed questionnaires on their child's communication and motor skills at ages 1½ and 3. Associations between communication and motor skills were estimated in a cross-lagged model with latent variables. Early communication skills were correlated with early motor skills (0.72). Stability was high (0.81) across time points for motor skills and somewhat lower (0.40) for communication skills. Early motor skills predicted later communication skills (0.38) whereas early communication skills negatively predicted later motor skills (-0.14). Our findings provide support for the hypothesis that these two difficulties are not symptoms of separate disorders, but might rather be different manifestations of a common underlying neurodevelopmental weakness. However, there also seem to be specific developmental pathways for each domain. Besides theoretical interest, more knowledge about the relationship between these early skills might shed light upon early intervention strategies and preventive efforts commonly used with children with problems in these areas. Our findings suggest that the relationship between language and motor skills is not likely to be simple and directional but rather to be complex and multifaceted. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Sexual health communication between cancer survivors and providers: how frequently does it occur and which providers are preferred?

    PubMed

    Sporn, Nora J; Smith, Kelly B; Pirl, William F; Lennes, Inga T; Hyland, Kelly A; Park, Elyse R

    2015-09-01

    Sexual health concerns in cancer survivors are often unaddressed by providers. Study objectives were to assess cancer survivors' reported rates of communication with oncology providers about sexual health, preference for such communication with their oncology or primary care providers (PCPs), and factors associated with these communication rates and preferences. Sixty-six patients attending a cancer survivorship clinic were asked how often their oncologist addressed and initiated discussion about sexual functioning and whether they wanted their oncologist or PCP to ask about their sexual health. We also assessed whether various sociodemographic characteristics and levels of depression, anxiety, and sexual satisfaction were associated with survivors' sexual health communication rates and preferences. 41% of patients wanted their oncologist to ask about sexual health and 58% of patients wanted their PCP to ask about sexual health. Over 90% of patients reported that their oncologist infrequently addressed sexual health concerns and that their oncologist was unlikely to initiate such discussions. Education level influenced whether patients wanted their oncologist to ask about sexual health. Age, education level, and insurance type influenced whether patients wanted their PCP to ask about sexual health. Levels of depression, anxiety, and sexual satisfaction were not associated with communication rates or preferences. Patients attending a survivorship clinic reported infrequent communication about sexual health with their oncology providers, despite wanting their providers to ask about sexual health concerns. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Allosteric Dynamic Control of Binding

    PubMed Central

    Sumbul, Fidan; Acuner-Ozbabacan, Saliha Ece; Haliloglu, Turkan

    2015-01-01

    Proteins have a highly dynamic nature and there is a complex interrelation between their structural dynamics and binding behavior. By assuming various conformational ensembles, they perform both local and global fluctuations to interact with other proteins in a dynamic infrastructure adapted to functional motion. Here, we show that there is a significant association between allosteric mutations, which lead to high-binding-affinity changes, and the hinge positions of global modes, as revealed by a large-scale statistical analysis of data in the Structural Kinetic and Energetic Database of Mutant Protein Interactions (SKEMPI). We further examined the mechanism of allosteric dynamics by conducting studies on human growth hormone (hGH) and pyrin domain (PYD), and the results show how mutations at the hinge regions could allosterically affect the binding-site dynamics or induce alternative binding modes by modifying the ensemble of accessible conformations. The long-range dissemination of perturbations in local chemistry or physical interactions through an impact on global dynamics can restore the allosteric dynamics. Our findings suggest a mechanism for the coupling of structural dynamics to the modulation of protein interactions, which remains a critical phenomenon in understanding the effect of mutations that lead to functional changes in proteins. PMID:26338442

  19. Allosteric regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2012-03-15

    The liver enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase is responsible for conversion of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine. Phenylalanine hydroxylase is activated by phenylalanine; this activation is inhibited by the physiological reducing substrate tetrahydrobiopterin. Phosphorylation of Ser16 lowers the concentration of phenylalanine for activation. This review discusses the present understanding of the molecular details of the allosteric regulation of the enzyme.

  20. Hotspots for allosteric regulation on protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kimberly A.; McLaughlin, Richard N.; Ranganathan, Rama

    2012-01-01

    Recent work indicates a general architecture for proteins in which sparse networks of physically contiguous and co-evolving amino acids underlie basic aspects of structure and function. These networks, termed sectors, are spatially organized such that active sites are linked to many surface sites distributed throughout the structure. Using the metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase as a model system, we show that (1) the sector is strongly correlated to a network of residues undergoing millisecond conformational fluctuations associated with enzyme catalysis and (2) sector-connected surface sites are statistically preferred locations for the emergence of allosteric control in vivo. Thus, sectors represent an evolutionarily conserved “wiring” mechanism that can enable perturbations at specific surface positions to rapidly initiate conformational control over protein function. These findings suggest that sectors enable the evolution of intermolecular communication and regulation. PMID:22196731

  1. Extracellular Loop 2 of the Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 Mediates Allosterism of a Phenylacetamide Ago-Allosteric ModulatorS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nicola J.; Ward, Richard J.; Stoddart, Leigh A.; Hudson, Brian D.; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond; Morris, Joanne C.; Tränkle, Christian; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Adams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Allosteric agonists are powerful tools for exploring the pharmacology of closely related G protein-coupled receptors that have nonselective endogenous ligands, such as the short chain fatty acids at free fatty acid receptors 2 and 3 (FFA2/GPR43 and FFA3/GPR41, respectively). We explored the molecular mechanisms mediating the activity of 4-chloro-α-(1-methylethyl)-N-2-thiazolylbenzeneacetamide (4-CMTB), a recently described phenylacetamide allosteric agonist and allosteric modulator of endogenous ligand function at human FFA2, by combining our previous knowledge of the orthosteric binding site with targeted examination of 4-CMTB structure-activity relationships and mutagenesis and chimeric receptor generation. Here we show that 4-CMTB is a selective agonist for FFA2 that binds to a site distinct from the orthosteric site of the receptor. Ligand structure-activity relationship studies indicated that the N-thiazolyl amide is likely to provide hydrogen bond donor/acceptor interactions with the receptor. Substitution at Leu173 or the exchange of the entire extracellular loop 2 of FFA2 with that of FFA3 was sufficient to reduce or ablate, respectively, allosteric communication between the endogenous and allosteric agonists. Thus, we conclude that extracellular loop 2 of human FFA2 is required for transduction of cooperative signaling between the orthosteric and an as-yet-undefined allosteric binding site of the FFA2 receptor that is occupied by 4-CMTB. PMID:21498659

  2. Strain analysis of protein structures and low dimensionality of mechanical allosteric couplings.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael R; Tlusty, Tsvi; Leibler, Stanislas

    2016-10-04

    In many proteins, especially allosteric proteins that communicate regulatory states from allosteric to active sites, structural deformations are functionally important. To understand these deformations, dynamical experiments are ideal but challenging. Using static structural information, although more limited than dynamical analysis, is much more accessible. Underused for protein analysis, strain is the natural quantity for studying local deformations. We calculate strain tensor fields for proteins deformed by ligands or thermal fluctuations using crystal and NMR structure ensembles. Strains-primarily shears-show deformations around binding sites. These deformations can be induced solely by ligand binding at distant allosteric sites. Shears reveal quasi-2D paths of mechanical coupling between allosteric and active sites that may constitute a widespread mechanism of allostery. We argue that strain-particularly shear-is the most appropriate quantity for analysis of local protein deformations. This analysis can reveal mechanical and biological properties of many proteins.

  3. An allosteric conduit facilitates dynamic multisite substrate recognition by the SCFCdc4 ubiquitin ligase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csizmok, Veronika; Orlicky, Stephen; Cheng, Jing; Song, Jianhui; Bah, Alaji; Delgoshaie, Neda; Lin, Hong; Mittag, Tanja; Sicheri, Frank; Chan, Hue Sun; Tyers, Mike; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase SCFCdc4 mediates phosphorylation-dependent elimination of numerous substrates by binding one or more Cdc4 phosphodegrons (CPDs). Methyl-based NMR analysis of the Cdc4 WD40 domain demonstrates that Cyclin E, Sic1 and Ash1 degrons have variable effects on the primary Cdc4WD40 binding pocket. Unexpectedly, a Sic1-derived multi-CPD substrate (pSic1) perturbs methyls around a previously documented allosteric binding site for the chemical inhibitor SCF-I2. NMR cross-saturation experiments confirm direct contact between pSic1 and the allosteric pocket. Phosphopeptide affinity measurements reveal negative allosteric communication between the primary CPD and allosteric pockets. Mathematical modelling indicates that the allosteric pocket may enhance ultrasensitivity by tethering pSic1 to Cdc4. These results suggest negative allosteric interaction between two distinct binding pockets on the Cdc4WD40 domain may facilitate dynamic exchange of multiple CPD sites to confer ultrasensitive dependence on substrate phosphorylation.

  4. An allosteric conduit facilitates dynamic multisite substrate recognition by the SCFCdc4 ubiquitin ligase

    PubMed Central

    Csizmok, Veronika; Orlicky, Stephen; Cheng, Jing; Song, Jianhui; Bah, Alaji; Delgoshaie, Neda; Lin, Hong; Mittag, Tanja; Sicheri, Frank; Chan, Hue Sun; Tyers, Mike; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase SCFCdc4 mediates phosphorylation-dependent elimination of numerous substrates by binding one or more Cdc4 phosphodegrons (CPDs). Methyl-based NMR analysis of the Cdc4 WD40 domain demonstrates that Cyclin E, Sic1 and Ash1 degrons have variable effects on the primary Cdc4WD40 binding pocket. Unexpectedly, a Sic1-derived multi-CPD substrate (pSic1) perturbs methyls around a previously documented allosteric binding site for the chemical inhibitor SCF-I2. NMR cross-saturation experiments confirm direct contact between pSic1 and the allosteric pocket. Phosphopeptide affinity measurements reveal negative allosteric communication between the primary CPD and allosteric pockets. Mathematical modelling indicates that the allosteric pocket may enhance ultrasensitivity by tethering pSic1 to Cdc4. These results suggest negative allosteric interaction between two distinct binding pockets on the Cdc4WD40 domain may facilitate dynamic exchange of multiple CPD sites to confer ultrasensitive dependence on substrate phosphorylation. PMID:28045046

  5. NMR Characterization of Information Flow and Allosteric Communities in the MAP Kinase p38γ

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Phillip C.; Martin, Bryan T.; Wright, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular network structure of a protein provides valuable insights into allosteric sites and communication pathways. However, a straightforward method to comprehensively map and characterize these pathways is not currently available. Here we present an approach to characterize intramolecular network structure using NMR chemical shift perturbations. We apply the method to the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38γ. p38γ contains allosteric sites that are conserved among eukaryotic kinases as well as unique to the MAPK family. How these regulatory sites communicate with catalytic residues is not well understood. Using our method, we observe and characterize for the first time information flux between regulatory sites through a conserved kinase infrastructure. This network is accessed, reinforced, and broken in various states of p38γ, reflecting the functional state of the protein. We demonstrate that the approach detects critical junctions in the network corresponding to biologically significant allosteric sites and pathways. PMID:27353957

  6. Allosteric inhibition of human porphobilinogen synthase.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Sarah H; Ramirez, Ursula D; Selwood, Trevor; Stith, Linda; Jaffe, Eileen K

    2009-12-18

    Porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS) catalyzes the first common step in tetrapyrrole (e.g. heme, chlorophyll) biosynthesis. Human PBGS exists as an equilibrium of high activity octamers, low activity hexamers, and alternate dimer configurations that dictate the stoichiometry and architecture of further assembly. It is posited that small molecules can be found that inhibit human PBGS activity by stabilizing the hexamer. Such molecules, if present in the environment, could potentiate disease states associated with reduced PBGS activity, such as lead poisoning and ALAD porphyria, the latter of which is associated with human PBGS variants whose quaternary structure equilibrium is shifted toward the hexamer (Jaffe, E. K., and Stith, L. (2007) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 80, 329-337). Hexamer-stabilizing inhibitors of human PBGS were identified using in silico prescreening (docking) of approximately 111,000 structures to a hexamer-specific surface cavity of a human PBGS crystal structure. Seventy-seven compounds were evaluated in vitro; three provided 90-100% conversion of octamer to hexamer in a native PAGE mobility shift assay. Based on chemical purity, two (ML-3A9 and ML-3H2) were subjected to further evaluation of their effect on the quaternary structure equilibrium and enzymatic activity. Naturally occurring ALAD porphyria-associated human PBGS variants are shown to have an increased susceptibility to inhibition by both ML-3A9 and ML-3H2. ML-3H2 is a structural analog of amebicidal drugs, which have porphyria-like side effects. Data support the hypothesis that human PBGS hexamer stabilization may explain these side effects. The current work identifies allosteric ligands of human PBGS and, thus, identifies human PBGS as a medically relevant allosteric enzyme.

  7. Allosteric Inhibition of Human Porphobilinogen Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Sarah H.; Ramirez, Ursula D.; Selwood, Trevor; Stith, Linda; Jaffe, Eileen K.

    2009-01-01

    Porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS) catalyzes the first common step in tetrapyrrole (e.g. heme, chlorophyll) biosynthesis. Human PBGS exists as an equilibrium of high activity octamers, low activity hexamers, and alternate dimer configurations that dictate the stoichiometry and architecture of further assembly. It is posited that small molecules can be found that inhibit human PBGS activity by stabilizing the hexamer. Such molecules, if present in the environment, could potentiate disease states associated with reduced PBGS activity, such as lead poisoning and ALAD porphyria, the latter of which is associated with human PBGS variants whose quaternary structure equilibrium is shifted toward the hexamer (Jaffe, E. K., and Stith, L. (2007) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 80, 329–337). Hexamer-stabilizing inhibitors of human PBGS were identified using in silico prescreening (docking) of ∼111,000 structures to a hexamer-specific surface cavity of a human PBGS crystal structure. Seventy-seven compounds were evaluated in vitro; three provided 90–100% conversion of octamer to hexamer in a native PAGE mobility shift assay. Based on chemical purity, two (ML-3A9 and ML-3H2) were subjected to further evaluation of their effect on the quaternary structure equilibrium and enzymatic activity. Naturally occurring ALAD porphyria-associated human PBGS variants are shown to have an increased susceptibility to inhibition by both ML-3A9 and ML-3H2. ML-3H2 is a structural analog of amebicidal drugs, which have porphyria-like side effects. Data support the hypothesis that human PBGS hexamer stabilization may explain these side effects. The current work identifies allosteric ligands of human PBGS and, thus, identifies human PBGS as a medically relevant allosteric enzyme. PMID:19812033

  8. Allosteric Modulation of Purine and Pyrimidine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Göblyös, Anikó; IJzerman, Adriaan P.

    2011-01-01

    Among the purine and pyrimidine receptors, the discovery of small molecular allosteric modulators has been most highly advanced for the A1 and A3 ARs. These AR modulators have allosteric effects that are structurally separated from the orthosteric effects in SAR studies. The benzoylthiophene derivatives tend to act as allosteric agonists, as well as selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the A1 AR. A 2-amino-3-aroylthiophene derivative T-62 has been under development as a PAM of the A1 AR for the treatment of chronic pain. Several structurally distinct classes of allosteric modulators of the human A3 AR have been reported: 3-(2-pyridinyl)isoquinolines, 2,4-disubstituted quinolines, 1H-imidazo-[4,5-c]quinolin-4-amines, endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol and the food dye Brilliant Black BN. Site-directed mutagenesis of A1 and A3 ARs has identified residues associated with the allosteric effect, distinct from those that affect orthosteric binding. A few small molecular allosteric modulators have been reported for several of the P2X ligand-gated ion channels and the G protein-coupled P2Y receptor nucleotides. Metal ion modulation of the P2X receptors has been extensively explored. The allosteric approach to modulation of purine and pyrimidine receptors looks promising for development of drugs that are event-specific and site-specific in action. PMID:21586360

  9. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the Aβ peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. Principal Findings The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme. PMID:21731629

  10. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    SciTech Connect

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.; Gerrard, Juliet Ann

    2011-06-24

    Background Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the Aβ peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. Principal Findings The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  11. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    SciTech Connect

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.

    2012-05-25

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the A{beta} peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  12. Communication between the nucleotide binding domains of P-glycoprotein occurs via conformational changes that involve residue 508.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Mark P; Storm, Janet; Rothnie, Alice; Taylor, Andrew M; Linton, Kenneth J; Kerr, Ian D; Callaghan, Richard

    2003-07-01

    Our aim is to provide molecular understanding of the mechanisms underlying the (i) interaction between the two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) and (ii) coupling between NBDs and transmembrane domains within P-glycoprotein (Pgp) during a transport cycle. To facilitate this, we have introduced a number of unique cysteine residues at surface exposed positions (E393C, S452C, I500C, N508C, and K578C) in the N-terminal NBD of Pgp, which had previously been engineered to remove endogenous cysteines. Positions of the mutations were designed using a model based on crystallographic features of prokaryotic NBDs. The single cysteine mutants were expressed in insect cells using recombinant baculovirus and the proteins purified by metal affinity chromatography by virtue of a polyhistidine tag. None of the introduced cysteine residues perturbed the function of Pgp as judged by the characteristics of drug stimulated ATP hydrolysis. The role of residues at each of the introduced sites in the catalytic cycle of Pgp was investigated by the effect of covalent conjugation with N-ethyl-maleimide (NEM). All but one mutation (K578C) was accessible to labeling with [(3)H]-NEM. However, perturbation of ATPase activity was only observed for the derivitized N508C isoform. The principle functional manifestation was a marked inhibition of the "basal" rate of ATP hydrolysis. Neither the extent nor potency to which a range of drugs could affect the ATPase activity were altered in the NEM conjugated N508C isoform. The results imply that the accessibility of residue 508, located in the alpha-helical subdomain of NBD1 in Pgp, is altered by the conformational changes that occur during ATP hydrolysis.

  13. Allosteric binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wess, Jürgen

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Molecular Pharmacology, Tränkle et al. (p. 1597) present new findings regarding the existence of a second allosteric site on the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 mAChR). The M2 mAChR is a prototypic class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that has proven to be a very useful model system to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the binding of allosteric GPCR ligands. Previous studies have identified several allosteric muscarinic ligands, including the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor tacrine and the bis-pyridinium derivative 4,4'-bis-[(2,6-dichloro-benzyloxy-imino)-methyl]-1,1'-propane-1,3-diyl-bis-pyridinium dibromide (Duo3), which, in contrast to conventional allosteric muscarinic ligands, display concentration-effect curves with slope factors >1. By analyzing the interactions of tacrine and Duo3 with other allosteric muscarinic agents predicted to bind to the previously identified ;common' allosteric binding site, Tränkle et al. provide evidence suggesting that two allosteric agents and one orthosteric ligand may be able to bind to the M2 mAChR simultaneously. Moreover, studies with mutant mAChRs indicated that the M2 receptor epitopes involved in the binding of tacrine and Duo3 may not be identical. Molecular modeling and ligand docking studies suggested that the additional allosteric site probably represents a subdomain of the receptor's allosteric binding cleft. Because allosteric binding sites have been found on many other GPCRs and drugs interacting with these sites are thought to have great therapeutic potential, the study by Tränkle et al. should be of considerable general interest.

  14. KINETIC AND STRUCTURAL INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE ALLOSTERIC AND PH EFFECT ON SUBSTRATE SPECIFICITY OF HUMAN EPITHELIAL 15-LIPOXYGENASE-2

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Netra; Hoobler, Eric K.; Perry, Steven; Diaz, Giovanni; Fox, Brian; Holman, Theodore R.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoxygenases, important enzymes in inflammation, can regulate their substrate specificity by allosteric interactions with its own hydroperoxide products. In the current work, addition of both 13-(S) hydroxy-9Z,11E-octadecadienoic acid (13-(S)-HODE) and 13-(S)-hydroperoxy-6Z,9Z,11E-octadecatrienoic acid (13-(S)-HOTrE) to human epithelial 15-lipoxygenase-2 (15-LOX-2) increases the kcat/KM substrate specificity ratio of arachidonic acid (AA) and (γ)-linolenic acid (GLA) by 4-fold. 13-(S)-HODE achieves this change by activating kcat/KM AA but inhibiting kcat/KM GLA, which indicates that the allosteric structural changes at the active site discriminates between the length and unsaturation differences of AA and GLA to achieve opposite kinetics effects. The substrate specificity ratio is further increased, 11-fold total, by increasing pH, suggesting mechanistic differences between the pH and allosteric effects. Interestingly, the loss of the PLAT domain affects substrate specificity, but does not eliminate the allosteric properties of 15-LOX-2, indicating that the allosteric site is located in the catalytic domain. However, the removal of the PLAT domain does change the magnitude of the allosteric effect. These data suggest that the PLAT domain moderates the communication pathway between the allosteric and catalytic sites, thus affecting substrate specificity. These results are discussed in the context of protein dimerization and other structural changes. PMID:24171444

  15. Capturing Earth Science Learning Dynamics: Communication Interactions of ESE Teachers and Children Occurring in Online, Classroom, and Small-Group Environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, C. W.; Prince, B. L.

    2002-12-01

    While the processes of schooling in science are usually measured in the resulting skills and products that students acquire or generate, another way to understand science learning is to explore the interactions and discourse that occur during actual learning activities. To investigate the dynamics of inquiry-based learning of earth science, we have explored the patterns that emerge in several learning environments: when teachers create dialog with other teachers in online ESE courses; when they teach earth science lessons in their classrooms; when they discuss their teaching perspectives in interviews; and when small groups of children engage in learning earth science together. By observing and scoring lesson exchanges, preserving online discussions, and documenting words and interactions in audio or video recordings, we are able to distinguish communication configurations that occur when teachers and children engage in the learning of earth science that would otherwise be invisible.

  16. Quantifying the allosteric interactions within a G-protein-coupled receptor heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Giraldo, Jesús

    2017-07-27

    G-protein-coupled receptors are central to signal transduction and cell communication. The possibility that cells use receptor heteromerization to modulate individual receptor pathways is a surmise that cannot be precluded. Given the complexity of these processes, mathematical models contribute to understanding how receptors and their respective ligands regulate signaling. Here, a mathematical model is presented that quantifies the allosteric interactions within a receptor heterodimer. The model is based on the operational model of allosterism including constitutive receptor activity, which provides the pharmacological analysis of heteromerization with well-established and widely used modeling and fitting procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibitory mechanism of an allosteric antibody targeting the glucagon receptor.

    PubMed

    Mukund, Susmith; Shang, Yonglei; Clarke, Holly J; Madjidi, Azadeh; Corn, Jacob E; Kates, Lance; Kolumam, Ganesh; Chiang, Vicky; Luis, Elizabeth; Murray, Jeremy; Zhang, Yingnan; Hötzel, Isidro; Koth, Christopher M; Allan, Bernard B

    2013-12-13

    Elevated glucagon levels and increased hepatic glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling contribute to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We have identified a monoclonal antibody that inhibits GCGR, a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), through a unique allosteric mechanism. Receptor inhibition is mediated by the binding of this antibody to two distinct sites that lie outside of the glucagon binding cleft. One site consists of a patch of residues that are surface-exposed on the face of the extracellular domain (ECD) opposite the ligand-binding cleft, whereas the second binding site consists of residues in the αA helix of the ECD. A docking model suggests that the antibody does not occlude the ligand-binding cleft. We solved the crystal structure of GCGR ECD containing a naturally occurring G40S mutation and found a shift in the register of the αA helix that prevents antibody binding. We also found that alterations in the αA helix impact the normal function of GCGR. We present a model for the allosteric inhibition of GCGR by a monoclonal antibody that may form the basis for the development of allosteric modulators for the treatment of diabetes and other class B GPCR-related diseases.

  18. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  19. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-07-02

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel's ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators.

  20. Inhibitory Mechanism of an Allosteric Antibody Targeting the Glucagon Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Mukund, Susmith; Shang, Yonglei; Clarke, Holly J.; Madjidi, Azadeh; Corn, Jacob E.; Kates, Lance; Kolumam, Ganesh; Chiang, Vicky; Luis, Elizabeth; Murray, Jeremy; Zhang, Yingnan; Hötzel, Isidro; Koth, Christopher M.; Allan, Bernard B.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated glucagon levels and increased hepatic glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling contribute to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We have identified a monoclonal antibody that inhibits GCGR, a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), through a unique allosteric mechanism. Receptor inhibition is mediated by the binding of this antibody to two distinct sites that lie outside of the glucagon binding cleft. One site consists of a patch of residues that are surface-exposed on the face of the extracellular domain (ECD) opposite the ligand-binding cleft, whereas the second binding site consists of residues in the αA helix of the ECD. A docking model suggests that the antibody does not occlude the ligand-binding cleft. We solved the crystal structure of GCGR ECD containing a naturally occurring G40S mutation and found a shift in the register of the αA helix that prevents antibody binding. We also found that alterations in the αA helix impact the normal function of GCGR. We present a model for the allosteric inhibition of GCGR by a monoclonal antibody that may form the basis for the development of allosteric modulators for the treatment of diabetes and other class B GPCR-related diseases. PMID:24189067

  1. Communication between Physicians and Family Caregivers about Care at the End of Life: When Do Discussions Occur and What Is Said?

    PubMed Central

    CHERLIN, EMILY; FRIED, TERRI; PRIGERSON, HOLLY G.; SCHULMAN-GREEN, DENA; JOHNSON-HURZELER, ROSEMARY; BRADLEY, ELIZABETH H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined physician-family caregiver communication at the end of life, despite the important role families have in end-of-life care decisions. We examined family caregiver reports of physician communication about incurable illness, life expectancy, and hospice; the timing of these discussions; and subsequent family understanding of these issues. Design: Mixed methods study using a closed-ended survey of 206 family caregivers and open-ended, in-depth interviews with 12 additional family caregivers. Setting/Subjects: Two hundred eighteen primary family caregivers of patients with cancer enrolled with hospice between October 1999 and June 2002 Measurements: Family caregiver reports provided at the time of hospice enrollment of physician discussions of incurable illness, life expectancy, and hospice. Results: Many family caregivers reported that a physician never told them the patient’s illness could not be cured (20.8%), never provided life expectancy (40% of those reportedly told illness was incurable), and never discussed using hospice (32.2%). Caregivers reported the first discussion of the illness being incurable and of hospice as a possibility occurred within 1 month of the patient’s death in many cases (23.5% and 41.1%, respectively). In open-ended interviews, however, family caregivers expressed ambivalence about what they wanted to know, and their difficulty comprehending and accepting “bad news” was apparent in both qualitative and quantitative data. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that ineffective communication about end-of-life issues likely results from both physician’s lack of discussion and family caregiver’s difficulty hearing the news. Future studies should examine strategies for optimal physician-family caregiver communication about incurable illness, so that families and patients can begin the physical, emotional, and spiritual work that can lead to acceptance of the irreversible condition. PMID:16351531

  2. An allosteric model for ribonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, E J; Ralston, G B; Darvey, I G

    1975-01-01

    Data from two assay systems show that the kinetics of the hydrolysis of cytidine 2':3'-cyclic monophosphate by bovine pancreatic RNAase (ribonuclease) is not consistent with conventional models. An allosteric model involving a substrate-dependent change in the equilibrium between two enzyme conformations is proposed. Such a model gives rise to a calculated curve of velocity versus substrate concentration which fits the experimental data. The model is also consistent with the results of an examination of the tryptic digestion of RNAase. Substrate analogues are able to protect RNAase against hydrolysis by trypsin and the percentage of RNAase activity which remains after digestion increases sigmoidally as the analogue concentration is increased. The model also explains the pattern seen in the Km values quoted in the literature and is consistent with strong physical evidence for a ligand-induced conformational change for RNAase reported in the literature. PMID:1167152

  3. Long-Range Coupling in an Allosteric Receptor Revealed by Mutant Cycle Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gleitsman, Kristin R.; Shanata, Jai A.P.; Frazier, Shawnalea J.; Lester, Henry A.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The functional coupling of residues that are far apart in space is the quintessential property of allosteric proteins. For example, in Cys-loop receptors, the gating of an intrinsic ion channel is allosterically regulated by the binding of small molecule neurotransmitters 50–60 Å from the channel gate. Some residues near the binding site must have as their primary function the communication of the binding event to the gating region. These gating pathway residues are essential to function, but their identification and characterization can be challenging. This work introduces a simple strategy, derived from mutant cycle analysis, for identifying gating pathway residues using macroscopic measurements alone. In the exemplar Cys-loop receptor, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, a well-characterized reporter mutation (βL9′S) known to impact gating, was combined with mutations of target residues in the ligand-binding domain hypothesized or previously found to be functionally significant. A mutant cycle analysis of the macroscopic EC50 measurements can then provide insights into the role of the target residue. This new method, elucidating long-range functional coupling in allosteric receptors, can be applied to several reporter mutations in a wide variety of receptors to identify previously characterized and novel mutations that impact the gating pathway. We support our interpretation of macroscopic data with single-channel studies. Elucidating long-range functional coupling in allosteric receptors should be broadly applicable to determining functional roles of residues in allosteric receptors. PMID:19383461

  4. Metalloregulatory Proteins: Metal Selectivity and Allosteric Switching

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Hermes Reyes; Campanello, Gregory C.; Giedroc, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Prokaryotic organisms have evolved an impressive capacity to quickly adapt to a changing and challenging microenvironment in which the availability of both biologically required and non-essential transition metal ions can vary dramatically. In all bacteria, a panel of metalloregulatory proteins control the expression of genes encoding membrane transporters and metal trafficking proteins, that collectively manage metal homeostasis and resistance. These “metal sensors” are specialized allosteric proteins, in which the direct binding of a specific or small number of “cognate” metal ion(s) drives a conformational change in the regulator that allosterically activates or inhibits operator DNA binding, or alternatively, distorts the promoter structure thereby converting a poor promoter to a strong one. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the features that control metal specificity of the allosteric response in these systems, and the role that structure, thermodynamics and conformational dynamics play in mediating allosteric activation or inhibition of DNA binding. PMID:21511390

  5. Allosteric regulation of rhomboid intramembrane proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Skiba, Pauline M; Gale, Nicola; Mak, Michelle W; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-09-01

    Proteolysis within the lipid bilayer is poorly understood, in particular the regulation of substrate cleavage. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that harbour a buried active site and are known to cleave transmembrane substrates with broad specificity. In vitro gel and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based kinetic assays were developed to analyse cleavage of the transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii). We demonstrate significant differences in catalytic efficiency (kcat/K0.5) values for transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii) cleavage for three rhomboids: AarA from P. stuartii, ecGlpG from Escherichia coli and hiGlpG from Haemophilus influenzae demonstrating that rhomboids specifically recognize this substrate. Furthermore, binding of psTatA occurs with positive cooperativity. Competitive binding studies reveal an exosite-mediated mode of substrate binding, indicating allostery plays a role in substrate catalysis. We reveal that exosite formation is dependent on the oligomeric state of rhomboids, and when dimers are dissociated, allosteric substrate activation is not observed. We present a novel mechanism for specific substrate cleavage involving several dynamic processes including positive cooperativity and homotropic allostery for this interesting class of intramembrane proteases.

  6. Allosteric Modulation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Douglas J.; Gregory, Karen J.; Rook, Jerri M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The development of receptor subtype-selective ligands by targeting allosteric sites of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has proven highly successful in recent years. One GPCR family that has greatly benefited from this approach is the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus). These family C GPCRs participate in the neuromodulatory actions of glutamate throughout the CNS, where they play a number of key roles in regulating synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. A large number of mGlu subtype-selective allosteric modulators have been identified, the majority of which are thought to bind within the transmembrane regions of the receptor. These modulators can either enhance or inhibit mGlu functional responses and, together with mGlu knockout mice, have furthered the establishment of the physiologic roles of many mGlu subtypes. Numerous pharmacological and receptor mutagenesis studies have been aimed at providing a greater mechanistic understanding of the interaction of mGlu allosteric modulators with the receptor, which have revealed evidence for common allosteric binding sites across multiple mGlu subtypes and the presence for multiple allosteric sites within a single mGlu subtype. Recent data have also revealed that mGlu allosteric modulators can display functional selectivity toward particular signal transduction cascades downstream of an individual mGlu subtype. Studies continue to validate the therapeutic utility of mGlu allosteric modulators as a potential therapeutic approach for a number of disorders including anxiety, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, and Fragile X syndrome. PMID:21907906

  7. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Andre

    The following essays on communication are presented: communication as a condition of survival, communication for special purposes, the means of transmission of communication, communication within social and economic structures, the teaching of communication through the press, the teaching of modern languages, communication as a point of departure,…

  8. Allosteric sensitization of proapoptotic BAX.

    PubMed

    Pritz, Jonathan R; Wachter, Franziska; Lee, Susan; Luccarelli, James; Wales, Thomas E; Cohen, Daniel T; Coote, Paul; Heffron, Gregory J; Engen, John R; Massefski, Walter; Walensky, Loren D

    2017-09-01

    BCL-2-associated X protein (BAX) is a critical apoptotic regulator that can be transformed from a cytosolic monomer into a lethal mitochondrial oligomer, yet drug strategies to modulate it are underdeveloped due to longstanding difficulties in conducting screens on this aggregation-prone protein. Here, we overcame prior challenges and performed an NMR-based fragment screen of full-length human BAX. We identified a compound that sensitizes BAX activation by binding to a pocket formed by the junction of the α3-α4 and α5-α6 hairpins. Biochemical and structural analyses revealed that the molecule sensitizes BAX by allosterically mobilizing the α1-α2 loop and BAX BH3 helix, two motifs implicated in the activation and oligomerization of BAX, respectively. By engaging a region of core hydrophobic interactions that otherwise preserve the BAX inactive state, the identified compound reveals fundamental mechanisms for conformational regulation of BAX and provides a new opportunity to reduce the apoptotic threshold for potential therapeutic benefit.

  9. Allosteric cross-talk in chromatin can mediate drug-drug synergy

    PubMed Central

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Palermo, Giulia; Riedel, Tina; Ma, Zhujun; Muhammad, Reyhan; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2017-01-01

    Exploitation of drug–drug synergism and allostery could yield superior therapies by capitalizing on the immensely diverse, but highly specific, potential associated with the biological macromolecular landscape. Here we describe a drug–drug synergy mediated by allosteric cross-talk in chromatin, whereby the binding of one drug alters the activity of the second. We found two unrelated drugs, RAPTA-T and auranofin, that yield a synergistic activity in killing cancer cells, which coincides with a substantially greater number of chromatin adducts formed by one of the compounds when adducts from the other agent are also present. We show that this occurs through an allosteric mechanism within the nucleosome, whereby defined histone adducts of one drug promote reaction of the other drug at a distant, specific histone site. This opens up possibilities for epigenetic targeting and suggests that allosteric modulation in nucleosomes may have biological relevance and potential for therapeutic interventions. PMID:28358030

  10. Allosteric cross-talk in chromatin can mediate drug-drug synergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Palermo, Giulia; Riedel, Tina; Ma, Zhujun; Muhammad, Reyhan; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2017-03-01

    Exploitation of drug-drug synergism and allostery could yield superior therapies by capitalizing on the immensely diverse, but highly specific, potential associated with the biological macromolecular landscape. Here we describe a drug-drug synergy mediated by allosteric cross-talk in chromatin, whereby the binding of one drug alters the activity of the second. We found two unrelated drugs, RAPTA-T and auranofin, that yield a synergistic activity in killing cancer cells, which coincides with a substantially greater number of chromatin adducts formed by one of the compounds when adducts from the other agent are also present. We show that this occurs through an allosteric mechanism within the nucleosome, whereby defined histone adducts of one drug promote reaction of the other drug at a distant, specific histone site. This opens up possibilities for epigenetic targeting and suggests that allosteric modulation in nucleosomes may have biological relevance and potential for therapeutic interventions.

  11. Allosteric cross-talk in chromatin can mediate drug-drug synergy.

    PubMed

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Palermo, Giulia; Riedel, Tina; Ma, Zhujun; Muhammad, Reyhan; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J; Davey, Curt A

    2017-03-30

    Exploitation of drug-drug synergism and allostery could yield superior therapies by capitalizing on the immensely diverse, but highly specific, potential associated with the biological macromolecular landscape. Here we describe a drug-drug synergy mediated by allosteric cross-talk in chromatin, whereby the binding of one drug alters the activity of the second. We found two unrelated drugs, RAPTA-T and auranofin, that yield a synergistic activity in killing cancer cells, which coincides with a substantially greater number of chromatin adducts formed by one of the compounds when adducts from the other agent are also present. We show that this occurs through an allosteric mechanism within the nucleosome, whereby defined histone adducts of one drug promote reaction of the other drug at a distant, specific histone site. This opens up possibilities for epigenetic targeting and suggests that allosteric modulation in nucleosomes may have biological relevance and potential for therapeutic interventions.

  12. Dynamic Coupling and Allosteric Networks in the α Subunit of Heterotrimeric G Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xin-Qiu; Malik, Rabia U.; Griggs, Nicholas W.; Skjærven, Lars; Traynor, John R.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Grant, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    G protein α subunits cycle between active and inactive conformations to regulate a multitude of intracellular signaling cascades. Important structural transitions occurring during this cycle have been characterized from extensive crystallographic studies. However, the link between observed conformations and the allosteric regulation of binding events at distal sites critical for signaling through G proteins remain unclear. Here we describe molecular dynamics simulations, bioinformatics analysis, and experimental mutagenesis that identifies residues involved in mediating the allosteric coupling of receptor, nucleotide, and helical domain interfaces of Gαi. Most notably, we predict and characterize novel allosteric decoupling mutants, which display enhanced helical domain opening, increased rates of nucleotide exchange, and constitutive activity in the absence of receptor activation. Collectively, our results provide a framework for explaining how binding events and mutations can alter internal dynamic couplings critical for G protein function. PMID:26703464

  13. The Role of Protein-Ligand Contacts in Allosteric Regulation of the Escherichia coli Catabolite Activator Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Philip D.; Rodgers, Thomas L.; Glover, Laura C.; Korhonen, Heidi J.; Richards, Shane A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R.; Hodgson, David R. W.; McLeish, Tom C. B.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distant site. Both experimental and theoretical evidence demonstrate that allostery can be communicated through altered slow relaxation protein dynamics without conformational change. The catabolite activator protein (CAP) of Escherichia coli is an exemplar for the analysis of such entropically driven allostery. Negative allostery in CAP occurs between identical cAMP binding sites. Changes to the cAMP-binding pocket can therefore impact the allosteric properties of CAP. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of coarse-grained modeling, isothermal calorimetry, and structural analysis, that decreasing the affinity of CAP for cAMP enhances negative cooperativity through an entropic penalty for ligand binding. The use of variant cAMP ligands indicates the data are not explained by structural heterogeneity between protein mutants. We observe computationally that altered interaction strength between CAP and cAMP variously modifies the change in allosteric cooperativity due to second site CAP mutations. As the degree of correlated motion between the cAMP-contacting site and a second site on CAP increases, there is a tendency for computed double mutations at these sites to drive CAP toward noncooperativity. Naturally occurring pairs of covarying residues in CAP do not display this tendency, suggesting a selection pressure to fine tune allostery on changes to the CAP ligand-binding pocket without a drive to a noncooperative state. In general, we hypothesize an evolutionary selection pressure to retain slow relaxation dynamics-induced allostery in proteins in which evolution of the ligand-binding site is occurring. PMID:26187469

  14. Markov propagation of allosteric effects in biomolecular systems: application to GroEL–GroES

    PubMed Central

    Chennubhotla, Chakra; Bahar, Ivet

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for elucidating the potential pathways of allosteric communication in biomolecular systems. The methodology, based on Markov propagation of ‘information' across the structure, permits us to partition the network of interactions into soft clusters distinguished by their coherent stochastics. Probabilistic participation of residues in these clusters defines the communication patterns inherent to the network architecture. Application to bacterial chaperonin complex GroEL–GroES, an allostery-driven structure, identifies residues engaged in intra- and inter-subunit communication, including those acting as hubs and messengers. A number of residues are distinguished by their high potentials to transmit allosteric signals, including Pro33 and Thr90 at the nucleotide-binding site and Glu461 and Arg197 mediating inter- and intra-ring communication, respectively. We propose two most likely pathways of signal transmission, between nucleotide- and GroES-binding sites across the cis and trans rings, which involve several conserved residues. A striking observation is the opposite direction of information flow within cis and trans rings, consistent with negative inter-ring cooperativity. Comparison with collective modes deduced from normal mode analysis reveals the propensity of global hinge regions to act as messengers in the transmission of allosteric signals. PMID:16820777

  15. Allosteric regulation of epigenetic modifying enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zucconi, Beth E; Cole, Philip A

    2017-08-01

    Epigenetic enzymes including histone modifying enzymes are key regulators of gene expression in normal and disease processes. Many drug development strategies to target histone modifying enzymes have focused on ligands that bind to enzyme active sites, but allosteric pockets offer potentially attractive opportunities for therapeutic development. Recent biochemical studies have revealed roles for small molecule and peptide ligands binding outside of the active sites in modulating the catalytic activities of histone modifying enzymes. Here we highlight several examples of allosteric regulation of epigenetic enzymes and discuss the biological significance of these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A network of allosterically coupled residues in the bacteriophage T4 Mre11-Rad50 complex.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Meyer, Jennifer R; Nelson, Scott W

    2016-11-01

    The Mre11-Rad50 (MR) protein complex, made up of a nuclease and ATPase, respectively, is involved in the processing of double-strand breaks as part of an intricate mechanism for their repair. Although it is clear that the MR complex is subject to allosteric regulation and that there is communication between the nuclease and ATPase active sites, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We performed statistical coupling analysis on Mre11 and Rad50 to predict linked residues based on their evolutionary correlation. This analysis predicted a coevolving sector of six residues that may be allosterically coupled. The prediction was tested using double-mutant cycle analysis of nuclease and ATPase activity. The results indicate that a tyrosine residue located near the active site of Mre11 is allosterically coupled to several Rad50 residues located over 40 Å away. This allosteric coupling may be the basis for the reciprocal regulation of the ATPase and nuclease activities of the complex. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  17. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    PubMed Central

    Amor, B. R. C.; Schaub, M. T.; Yaliraki, S. N.; Barahona, M.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental mechanism of biological regulation, in which binding of a molecule at a distant location affects the active site of a protein. Allosteric sites provide targets to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methodologies to predict them. Here we present an efficient graph-theoretical framework to reveal allosteric interactions (atoms and communication pathways strongly coupled to the active site) without a priori information of their location. Using an atomistic graph with energy-weighted covalent and weak bonds, we define a bond-to-bond propensity quantifying the non-local effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. Significant interactions are then identified using quantile regression. We exemplify our method with three biologically important proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting key allosteric interactions, whose significance is additionally confirmed against a reference set of 100 proteins. The almost-linear scaling of our method renders it suitable for high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites. PMID:27561351

  18. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, B. R. C.; Schaub, M. T.; Yaliraki, S. N.; Barahona, M.

    2016-08-01

    Allostery is a fundamental mechanism of biological regulation, in which binding of a molecule at a distant location affects the active site of a protein. Allosteric sites provide targets to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methodologies to predict them. Here we present an efficient graph-theoretical framework to reveal allosteric interactions (atoms and communication pathways strongly coupled to the active site) without a priori information of their location. Using an atomistic graph with energy-weighted covalent and weak bonds, we define a bond-to-bond propensity quantifying the non-local effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. Significant interactions are then identified using quantile regression. We exemplify our method with three biologically important proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting key allosteric interactions, whose significance is additionally confirmed against a reference set of 100 proteins. The almost-linear scaling of our method renders it suitable for high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites.

  19. Differential Modulation of Functional Dynamics and Allosteric Interactions in the Hsp90-Cochaperone Complexes with p23 and Aha1: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Blacklock, Kristin; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2013-01-01

    Allosteric interactions of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 with a large cohort of cochaperones and client proteins allow for molecular communication and event coupling in signal transduction networks. The integration of cochaperones into the Hsp90 system is driven by the regulatory mechanisms that modulate the progression of the ATPase cycle and control the recruitment of the Hsp90 clientele. In this work, we report the results of computational modeling of allosteric regulation in the Hsp90 complexes with the cochaperones p23 and Aha1. By integrating protein docking, biophysical simulations, modeling of allosteric communications, protein structure network analysis and the energy landscape theory we have investigated dynamics and stability of the Hsp90-p23 and Hsp90-Aha1 interactions in direct comparison with the extensive body of structural and functional experiments. The results have revealed that functional dynamics and allosteric interactions of Hsp90 can be selectively modulated by these cochaperones via specific targeting of the regulatory hinge regions that could restrict collective motions and stabilize specific chaperone conformations. The protein structure network parameters have quantified the effects of cochaperones on conformational stability of the Hsp90 complexes and identified dynamically stable communities of residues that can contribute to the strengthening of allosteric interactions. According to our results, p23-mediated changes in the Hsp90 interactions may provide “molecular brakes” that could slow down an efficient transmission of the inter-domain allosteric signals, consistent with the functional role of p23 in partially inhibiting the ATPase cycle. Unlike p23, Aha1-mediated acceleration of the Hsp90-ATPase cycle may be achieved via modulation of the equilibrium motions that facilitate allosteric changes favoring a closed dimerized form of Hsp90. The results of our study have shown that Aha1 and p23 can modulate the Hsp90-ATPase activity

  20. Detecting Allosteric Networks Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, S; Wereszczynski, J

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric networks allow enzymes to transmit information and regulate their catalytic activities over vast distances. In principle, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be used to reveal the mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon; in practice, it can be difficult to discern allosteric signals from MD trajectories. Here, we describe how MD simulations can be analyzed to reveal correlated motions and allosteric networks, and provide an example of their use on the coagulation enzyme thrombin. Methods are discussed for calculating residue-pair correlations from atomic fluctuations and mutual information, which can be combined with contact information to identify allosteric networks and to dynamically cluster a system into highly correlated communities. In the case of thrombin, these methods show that binding of the antagonist hirugen significantly alters the enzyme's correlation landscape through a series of pathways between Exosite I and the catalytic core. Results suggest that hirugen binding curtails dynamic diversity and enforces stricter venues of influence, thus reducing the accessibility of thrombin to other molecules. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Metalloregulatory proteins: metal selectivity and allosteric switching.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Caballero, Hermes; Campanello, Gregory C; Giedroc, David P

    2011-07-01

    Prokaryotic organisms have evolved the capacity to quickly adapt to a changing and challenging microenvironment in which the availability of both biologically required and non-essential transition metal ions can vary dramatically. In all bacteria, a panel of metalloregulatory proteins controls the expression of genes encoding membrane transporters and metal trafficking proteins that collectively manage metal homeostasis and resistance. These "metal sensors" are specialized allosteric proteins, in which the direct binding of a specific or small number of "cognate" metal ion(s) drives a conformational change in the regulator that allosterically activates or inhibits operator DNA binding, or alternatively, distorts the promoter structure thereby converting a poor promoter to a strong one. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the features that control metal specificity of the allosteric response in these systems, and the role that structure, thermodynamics and conformational dynamics play in mediating allosteric activation or inhibition of DNA binding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. MCPath: Monte Carlo path generation approach to predict likely allosteric pathways and functional residues

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Cihan; Armutlulu, Andac; Ekesan, Solen; Haliloglu, Turkan

    2013-01-01

    Allosteric mechanism of proteins is essential in biomolecular signaling. An important aspect underlying this mechanism is the communication pathways connecting functional residues. Here, a Monte Carlo (MC) path generation approach is proposed and implemented to define likely allosteric pathways through generating an ensemble of maximum probability paths. The protein structure is considered as a network of amino acid residues, and inter-residue interactions are described by an atomistic potential function. PDZ domain structures are presented as case studies. The analysis for bovine rhodopsin and three myosin structures are also provided as supplementary case studies. The suggested pathways and the residues constituting the pathways are maximally probable and mostly agree with the previous studies. Overall, it is demonstrated that the communication pathways could be multiple and intrinsically disposed, and the MC path generation approach provides an effective tool for the prediction of key residues that mediate the allosteric communication in an ensemble of pathways and functionally plausible residues. The MCPath server is available at http://safir.prc.boun.edu.tr/clbet_server. PMID:23742907

  3. Quantifying Correlations Between Allosteric Sites in Thermodynamic Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Christopher L.; Friedland, Gregory; Mobley, David L.; Amirkhani, Homeira; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    Allostery describes altered protein function at one site due to a perturbation at another site. One mechanism of allostery involves correlated motions, which can occur even in the absence of substantial conformational change. We present a novel method, “MutInf”, to identify statistically significant correlated motions from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Our approach analyzes both backbone and sidechain motions using internal coordinates to account for the gear-like twists that can take place even in the absence of the large conformational changes typical of traditional allosteric proteins. We quantify correlated motions using a mutual information metric, which we extend to incorporate data from multiple short simulations and to filter out correlations that are not statistically significant. Applying our approach to uncover mechanisms of cooperative small molecule binding in human interleukin-2, we identify clusters of correlated residues from 50 ns of molecular dynamics simulations. Interestingly, two of the clusters with the strongest correlations highlight known cooperative small-molecule binding sites and show substantial correlations between these sites. These cooperative binding sites on interleukin-2 are correlated not only through the hydrophobic core of the protein but also through a dynamic polar network of hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions. Since this approach identifies correlated conformations in an unbiased, statistically robust manner, it should be a useful tool for finding novel or “orphan” allosteric sites in proteins of biological and therapeutic importance. PMID:20161451

  4. Coupled Dynamics and Entropic Contribution to the Allosteric Mechanism of Pin1.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-08-25

    Allosteric communication in proteins regulates a plethora of downstream processes in subcellular signaling pathways. Describing the effects of cooperative ligand binding on the atomic level is a key to understanding many regulatory processes involving biomolecules. Here, we use microsecond-long molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the allosteric mechanism of Pin1, a potential therapeutic target and a phosphorylated-Ser/Thr dependent peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that regulates several subcellular processes and has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer's. Experimental studies suggest that the catalytic domain and the noncatalytic WW domain are allosterically coupled; however, an atomic level description of the dynamics associated with the interdomain communication is lacking. We show that binding of the substrate to the WW domain is directly coupled to the dynamics of the catalytic domain, causing rearrangement of the residue-residue contact dynamics from the WW domain to the catalytic domain. The binding affinity of the substrate in the catalytic domain is also enhanced upon binding of the substrate to the WW domain. Modulation of the dynamics of the catalytic domain upon binding of the substrate to the WW domain leads to prepayment of the entropic cost of binding the substrate to the catalytic domain. This study shows that Ile 28 at the interfacial region between the catalytic and WW domains is certainly one of the residues responsible for bridging the communication between the two domains. The results complement previous experiments and provide valuable atomistic insights into the role of dynamics and possible entropic contribution to the allosteric mechanism of proteins.

  5. Allosteric Inhibition via R-state Destabilization in ATP Sulfurylase from Penicillium chrysogenum

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, I. J.

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the cooperative hexameric enzyme ATP sulfurylase from Penicillium chrysogenum bound to its allosteric inhibitor, 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS), was determined to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This structure represents the low substrate-affinity T-state conformation of the enzyme. Comparison with the high substrate-affinity R-state structure reveals that a large rotational rearrangement of domains occurs as a result of the R-to-T transition. The rearrangement is accompanied by the 17 {angstrom} movement of a 10-residue loop out of the active site region, resulting in an open, product release-like structure of the catalytic domain. Binding of PAPS is proposed to induce the allosteric transition by destabilizing an R-state-specific salt linkage between Asp 111 in an N-terminal domain of one subunit and Arg 515 in the allosteric domain of a trans-triad subunit. Disrupting this salt linkage by site-directed mutagenesis induces cooperative inhibition behavior in the absence of an allosteric effector, confirming the role of these two residues.

  6. The different ways through which specificity works in orthosteric and allosteric drugs.

    PubMed

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there are two types of drugs on the market: orthosteric, which bind at the active site; and allosteric, which bind elsewhere on the protein surface, and allosterically change the conformation of the protein binding site. In this perspective we argue that the different mechanisms through which the two drug types affect protein activity and their potential pitfalls call for different considerations in drug design. The key problem facing orthosteric drugs is side effects which can occur by drug binding to homologous proteins sharing a similar binding site. Hence, orthosteric drugs should have very high affinity to the target; this would allow a low dosage to selectively achieve the goal of target-only binding. By contrast, allosteric drugs work by shifting the free energy landscape. Their binding to the protein surface perturbs the protein surface atoms, and the perturbation propagates like waves, finally reaching the binding site. Effective drugs should have atoms in good contact with the 'right' protein atoms; that is, the contacts should elicit propagation waves optimally reaching the protein binding site target. While affinity is important, the design should consider the protein conformational ensemble and the preferred propagation states. We provide examples from functional in vivo scenarios for both types of cases, and suggest how high potency can be achieved in allosteric drug development.

  7. Elucidation of direct competition and allosteric modulation of small-molecular-weight protein ligands using surface plasmon resonance methods.

    PubMed

    Huber, Walter; Sinopoli, Alessandro; Kohler, Josiane; Hug, Melanie; Ruf, Armin; Huber, Sylwia

    2015-08-01

    The present work introduces a surface plasmon resonance-based method for the discrimination of direct competition and allosteric effects that occur in ternary systems comprising a receptor protein and two small-molecular-weight ligands that bind to it. Fatty acid binding protein 4, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and human serum albumin were used as model receptor molecules to demonstrate the performance of the method. For each of the receptor molecules, pairs of ligand molecules were selected for which either direct competition or an allosteric effect had already been determined by other methods. The method of discrimination introduced here is based on the surface plasmon resonance responses observed at equilibrium when an immobilized receptor protein is brought into contact with binary mixtures of interacting ligands. These experimentally determined responses are compared with the responses calculated using a theoretical model that considers both direct competition and allosteric ligand interaction modes. This study demonstrates that the allosteric ternary complex model, which enables calculation of the fractional occupancy of the protein by each ligand in such ternary systems, is well suited for the theoretical calculation of these types of responses. For all of the ternary systems considered in this work, the experimental and calculated responses in the chosen concentration ratio range were identical within a five-σ confidence interval when the calculations considered the correct interaction mode of the ligands (direct competition or different types of allosteric regulation), and in case of allosteric modulation, also the correct strength of this effect. This study also demonstrates that the allosteric ternary complex model-based calculations are well suited to predict the ideal concentration ratio range or even single concentration ratios that can serve as hot spots for discrimination, and such hot spots can drastically reduce the numbers of measurements needed

  8. An engineered chorismate mutase with allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Wilson, David B; Ganem, Bruce

    2003-07-17

    Besides playing a central role in phenylalanine biosynthesis, the bifunctional P-protein in Eschericia coli provides a unique model system for investigating whether allosteric effects can be engineered into protein catalysts using modular regulatory elements. Previous studies have established that the P-protein contains three distinct domains whose functions are preserved, even when separated: chorismate mutase (residues 1-109), prephenate dehydratase (residues 101-285), and an allosteric domain (residues 286-386) for feedback inhibition by phenylalanine. By deleting the prephenate dehydrase domain, a functional chorismate mutase linked directly to the phenylalanine binding domain has been engineered and overexpressed. This manuscript reports the catalytic properties of the mutase in the absence and presence of phenylalanine.

  9. Allosteric inhibition of HIV-1 integrase activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Kessl, Jacques J.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase is an important therapeutic target in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), which target the enzyme active site, have witnessed clinical success over the past 5 years, but the generation of drug resistance poses challenges to INSTI-based therapies moving forward. Integrase is a dynamic protein, and its ordered multimerization is critical to enzyme activity. The integrase tetramer, bound to viral DNA, interacts with host LEDGF/p75 protein to tether integration to active genes. Allosteric integrase inhibitors (ALLINIs) that compete with LEDGF/p75 for binding to integrase disrupt integrase assembly with viral DNA and allosterically inhibit enzyme function. ALLINIs display steep dose response curves and synergize with INSTIs ex vivo, highlighting this novel inhibitor class for clinical development. PMID:23647983

  10. Allosteric Regulation of E-Cadherin Adhesion*

    PubMed Central

    Shashikanth, Nitesh; Petrova, Yuliya I.; Park, Seongjin; Chekan, Jillian; Maiden, Stephanie; Spano, Martha; Ha, Taekjip; Gumbiner, Barry M.; Leckband, Deborah E.

    2015-01-01

    Cadherins are transmembrane adhesion proteins that maintain intercellular cohesion in all tissues, and their rapid regulation is essential for organized tissue remodeling. Despite some evidence that cadherin adhesion might be allosterically regulated, testing of this has been hindered by the difficulty of quantifying altered E-cadherin binding affinity caused by perturbations outside the ectodomain binding site. Here, measured kinetics of cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion demonstrated quantitatively that treatment with activating, anti-E-cadherin antibodies or the dephosphorylation of a cytoplasmic binding partner, p120ctn, increased the homophilic binding affinity of E-cadherin. Results obtained with Colo 205 cells, which express inactive E-cadherin and do not aggregate, demonstrated that four treatments, which induced Colo 205 aggregation and p120ctn dephosphorylation, triggered quantitatively similar increases in E-cadherin affinity. Several processes can alter cell aggregation, but these results directly demonstrated the allosteric regulation of cell surface E-cadherin by p120ctn dephosphorylation. PMID:26175155

  11. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, Donald D.

    1990-01-01

    Communication in its many forms is a critical component for an effective Space Grant Program. Good communication is needed within individual Space Grant College/Consortia, for example between consortium affiliates and the consortium program office. Effective communication between the several programs, NASA Headquarters, and NASA field centers also is required. Further, communication among the above program elements, industry, local and state government, and the public also are necessary for meeting program objectives.

  12. Allosteric regulation of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels: an emerging mechanistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Taly, Antoine; Hénin, Jérôme; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) play a central role in intercellular communications in the nervous system by converting the binding of a chemical messenger—a neurotransmitter—into an ion flux through the postsynaptic membrane. They are oligomeric assemblies that provide prototypical examples of allosterically regulated integral membrane proteins. Here, we present an overview of the most recent advances on the signal transduction mechanism based on the X-ray structures of both prokaryotic and invertebrate eukaryotic pLGICs and atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations. The present results suggest that ion gating involves a large structural reorganization of the molecule mediated by two distinct quaternary transitions, a global twisting and the blooming of the extracellular domain, which can be modulated by ligand binding at the topographically distinct orthosteric and allosteric sites. The emerging model of gating is consistent with a wealth of functional studies and will boost the development of novel pharmacological strategies.

  13. Mapping a molecular link between allosteric inhibition and activation of the glycine receptor.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul S; Topf, Maya; Smart, Trevor G

    2008-10-01

    Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels mediate rapid neurotransmission throughout the central nervous system. They possess agonist recognition sites and allosteric sites where modulators regulate ion channel function. Using strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, we identified a scaffold of hydrophobic residues enabling allosteric communication between glycine-agonist binding loops A and D, and the Zn(2+)-inhibition site. Mutating these hydrophobic residues disrupted Zn(2+) inhibition, generating novel Zn(2+)-activated receptors and spontaneous channel activity. Homology modeling and electrophysiology revealed that these phenomena are caused by disruption to three residues on the '-' loop face of the Zn(2+)-inhibition site, and to D84 and D86, on a neighboring beta3 strand, forming a Zn(2+)-activation site. We provide a new view for the activation of a Cys-loop receptor where, following agonist binding, the hydrophobic core and interfacial loops reorganize in a concerted fashion to induce downstream gating.

  14. THE ANTIPSYCHOTIC POTENTIAL OF MUSCARINIC ALLOSTERIC MODULATION

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Thomas M.; LeBois, Evan P.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Wood, Michael R.; Jones, Carrie K.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The cholinergic hypothesis of schizophrenia emerged over 50 years ago based on clinical observations with both anticholinergics and pan-muscarinic agonists. Not until the 1990s did the cholinergic hypothesis of schizophrenia receive renewed enthusiasm based on clinical data with xanomeline, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1/M4-preferring orthosteric agonist. In a clinical trial with Alzheimer’s patients, xanomeline not only improved cognitive performance, but also reduced psychotic behaviors. This encouraging data spurred a second clinical trial in schizophrenic patients, wherein xanomeline significantly improved the positive, negative and cognitive symptom clusters. However, the question remained: Was the antipsychotic efficacy due to activation of M1, M4 or both M1/M4? Classical orthosteric ligands lacked the muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity required to address this key question. More recently, functional assays have allowed for the discovery of ligands that bind at allosteric sites, binding sites distinct from the orthosteric (acetylcholine) site, which are structurally less conserved and thereby afford high levels of receptor subtype selectivity. Recently, allosteric ligands, with unprecedented selectivity for either M1 or M4, have been discovered and have demonstrated comparable efficacy to xanomeline in preclinical antipsychotic and cognition models. These data suggest that selective allosteric activation of either M1 or M4 has antipsychotic potential through distinct, yet complimentary mechanisms. PMID:20520852

  15. Identifiability, reducibility, and adaptability in allosteric macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Gergő; Venkataraman, Gaurav

    2017-05-01

    The ability of macromolecules to transduce stimulus information at one site into conformational changes at a distant site, termed "allostery," is vital for cellular signaling. Here, we propose a link between the sensitivity of allosteric macromolecules to their underlying biophysical parameters, the interrelationships between these parameters, and macromolecular adaptability. We demonstrate that the parameters of a canonical model of the mSlo large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) ion channel are non-identifiable with respect to the equilibrium open probability-voltage relationship, a common functional assay. We construct a reduced model with emergent parameters that are identifiable and expressed as combinations of the original mechanistic parameters. These emergent parameters indicate which coordinated changes in mechanistic parameters can leave assay output unchanged. We predict that these coordinated changes are used by allosteric macromolecules to adapt, and we demonstrate how this prediction can be tested experimentally. We show that these predicted parameter compensations are used in the first reported allosteric phenomena: the Bohr effect, by which hemoglobin adapts to varying pH. © 2017 Bohner and Venkataraman.

  16. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Alan

    An informal introduction to the study of communication deals with the major topics in the field. It presents basic theories of communication and language, reviews how language takes on meaning, explains the stimulus-response and Piaget theories of learning, and presents major theories dealing with communications and society. These theories include…

  17. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Alan

    An informal introduction to the study of communication deals with the major topics in the field. It presents basic theories of communication and language, reviews how language takes on meaning, explains the stimulus-response and Piaget theories of learning, and presents major theories dealing with communications and society. These theories include…

  18. Exploiting protein flexibility to predict the location of allosteric sites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allostery is one of the most powerful and common ways of regulation of protein activity. However, for most allosteric proteins identified to date the mechanistic details of allosteric modulation are not yet well understood. Uncovering common mechanistic patterns underlying allostery would allow not only a better academic understanding of the phenomena, but it would also streamline the design of novel therapeutic solutions. This relatively unexplored therapeutic potential and the putative advantages of allosteric drugs over classical active-site inhibitors fuel the attention allosteric-drug research is receiving at present. A first step to harness the regulatory potential and versatility of allosteric sites, in the context of drug-discovery and design, would be to detect or predict their presence and location. In this article, we describe a simple computational approach, based on the effect allosteric ligands exert on protein flexibility upon binding, to predict the existence and position of allosteric sites on a given protein structure. Results By querying the literature and a recently available database of allosteric sites, we gathered 213 allosteric proteins with structural information that we further filtered into a non-redundant set of 91 proteins. We performed normal-mode analysis and observed significant changes in protein flexibility upon allosteric-ligand binding in 70% of the cases. These results agree with the current view that allosteric mechanisms are in many cases governed by changes in protein dynamics caused by ligand binding. Furthermore, we implemented an approach that achieves 65% positive predictive value in identifying allosteric sites within the set of predicted cavities of a protein (stricter parameters set, 0.22 sensitivity), by combining the current analysis on dynamics with previous results on structural conservation of allosteric sites. We also analyzed four biological examples in detail, revealing that this simple coarse

  19. Allosteric pathway identification through network analysis: from molecular dynamics simulations to interactive 2D and 3D graphs.

    PubMed

    Allain, Ariane; Chauvot de Beauchêne, Isaure; Langenfeld, Florent; Guarracino, Yann; Laine, Elodie; Tchertanov, Luba

    2014-01-01

    Allostery is a universal phenomenon that couples the information induced by a local perturbation (effector) in a protein to spatially distant regulated sites. Such an event can be described in terms of a large scale transmission of information (communication) through a dynamic coupling between structurally rigid (minimally frustrated) and plastic (locally frustrated) clusters of residues. To elaborate a rational description of allosteric coupling, we propose an original approach - MOdular NETwork Analysis (MONETA) - based on the analysis of inter-residue dynamical correlations to localize the propagation of both structural and dynamical effects of a perturbation throughout a protein structure. MONETA uses inter-residue cross-correlations and commute times computed from molecular dynamics simulations and a topological description of a protein to build a modular network representation composed of clusters of residues (dynamic segments) linked together by chains of residues (communication pathways). MONETA provides a brand new direct and simple visualization of protein allosteric communication. A GEPHI module implemented in the MONETA package allows the generation of 2D graphs of the communication network. An interactive PyMOL plugin permits drawing of the communication pathways between chosen protein fragments or residues on a 3D representation. MONETA is a powerful tool for on-the-fly display of communication networks in proteins. We applied MONETA for the analysis of communication pathways (i) between the main regulatory fragments of receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs), KIT and CSF-1R, in the native and mutated states and (ii) in proteins STAT5 (STAT5a and STAT5b) in the phosphorylated and the unphosphorylated forms. The description of the physical support for allosteric coupling by MONETA allowed a comparison of the mechanisms of (a) constitutive activation induced by equivalent mutations in two RTKs and (b) allosteric regulation in the activated and non

  20. Discovery of positive allosteric modulators and silent allosteric modulators of the μ-opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Burford, Neil T.; Clark, Mary J.; Wehrman, Tom S.; Gerritz, Samuel W.; Banks, Martyn; O’Connell, Jonathan; Traynor, John R.; Alt, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    μ-Opioid receptors are among the most studied G protein-coupled receptors because of the therapeutic value of agonists, such as morphine, that are used to treat chronic pain. However, these drugs have significant side effects, such as respiratory suppression, constipation, allodynia, tolerance, and dependence, as well as abuse potential. Efforts to fine tune pain control while alleviating the side effects of drugs, both physiological and psychological, have led to the development of a wide variety of structurally diverse agonist ligands for the μ-opioid receptor, as well as compounds that target κ- and δ-opioid receptors. In recent years, the identification of allosteric ligands for some G protein-coupled receptors has provided breakthroughs in obtaining receptor subtype-selectivity that can reduce the overall side effect profiles of a potential drug. However, positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) can also have the specific advantage of only modulating the activity of the receptor when the orthosteric agonist occupies the receptor, thus maintaining spatial and temporal control of receptor signaling in vivo. This second advantage of allosteric modulators may yield breakthroughs in opioid receptor research and could lead to drugs with improved side-effect profiles or fewer tolerance and dependence issues compared with orthosteric opioid receptor agonists. Here, we describe the discovery and characterization of μ-opioid receptor PAMs and silent allosteric modulators, identified from high-throughput screening using a β-arrestin–recruitment assay. PMID:23754417

  1. Communicate!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Stuart

    This ten chapter book is designed to provide high school students with an understanding of basic communication processes. The first five chapters include discussions of language development, function, and acquisition in relation to both human and non-human communication. The sixth chapter contains specimen linguistic analyses of speech and…

  2. Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James

    2010-01-01

    NASA s communication work for the UAS Command and Control area will build upon work currently being conducted under NASA Recovery Act funds. Communication portions of UAS NextGen ConOps, Stateof- the-Art assessment, and Gap Analysis. Preliminary simulations for UAS CNPC link scalability assessment. Surrogate UAS aircraft upgrades. This work will also leverage FY10 in-guide funding for communication link model development. UAS are currently managed through exceptions and are operating using DoD frequencies for line-of-sight (LOS) and satellite-based communications links, low-power LOS links in amateur bands, or unlicensed Instrument/Scientific/Medical (ISM) frequencies. None of these frequency bands are designated for Safety and Regularity of Flight. No radio-frequency (RF) spectrum has been allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) specifically for UAS command and control links, for either LOS or Beyond LOS (BLOS) communication.

  3. Identification of Allosteric Disulfides from Prestress Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Beifei; Baldus, Ilona B.; Li, Wenjin; Edwards, Scott A.; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bonds serve to form physical cross-links between residues in protein structures, thereby stabilizing the protein fold. Apart from this purely structural role, they can also be chemically active, participating in redox reactions, and they may even potentially act as allosteric switches controlling protein functions. Specific types of disulfide bonds have been identified in static protein structures from their distinctive pattern of dihedral bond angles, and the allosteric function of such bonds is purported to be related to the torsional strain they store. Using all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations for ∼700 disulfide bonded proteins, we analyzed the intramolecular mechanical forces in 20 classes of disulfide bonds. We found that two particular classes, the −RHStaple and the −/+RHHook disulfides, are indeed more stressed than other disulfide bonds, but the stress is carried primarily by stretching of the S-S bond and bending of the neighboring bond angles, rather than by dihedral torsion. This stress corresponds to a tension force of magnitude ∼200 pN, which is balanced by repulsive van der Waals interactions between the cysteine Cα atoms. We confirm stretching of the S-S bond to be a general feature of the −RHStaples and the −/+RHHooks by analyzing ∼20,000 static protein structures. Given that forced stretching of S-S bonds is known to accelerate their cleavage, we propose that prestress of allosteric disulfide bonds has the potential to alter the reactivity of a disulfide, thereby allowing us to readily switch between functional states. PMID:25099806

  4. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and its prokaryotic homologues: Structure, conformational transitions & allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Marco; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) play a central role in intercellular communications in the nervous system by converting the binding of a chemical messenger - a neurotransmitter - into an ion flux through the postsynaptic membrane. Here, we present an overview of the most recent advances on the signal transduction mechanism boosted by X-ray crystallography of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic homologues of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in conjunction with time-resolved analyses based on single-channel electrophysiology and Molecular Dynamics simulations. The available data consistently point to a global mechanism of gating that involves a large reorganization of the receptor mediated by two distinct quaternary transitions: a global twisting and a radial expansion/contraction of the extracellular domain. These transitions profoundly modify the organization of the interface between subunits, which host several sites for orthosteric and allosteric modulatory ligands. The same mechanism may thus mediate both positive and negative allosteric modulations of pLGICs ligand binding at topographically distinct sites. The emerging picture of signal transduction is expected to pave the way to new pharmacological strategies for the development of allosteric modulators of nAChR and pLGICs in general. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-08-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  6. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Donald A; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T; Stock, Ann M

    2015-08-06

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  7. The Conserved Lysine-265 Allosterically Modulates Nucleotide- and Actin-binding Site Coupling in Myosin-2.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Vincent A; Münnich, Stefan; Adler-Gunzelmann, Georg; Thiel, Claudia; Henn, Arnon; Latham, Sharissa L; Taft, Manuel H

    2017-08-09

    Myosin motor proteins convert chemical energy into force and movement through their interactions with nucleotide and filamentous actin (F-actin). The evolutionarily conserved lysine-265 (K265) of the myosin-2 motor from Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd) is proposed to be a key residue in an allosteric communication pathway that mediates actin-nucleotide coupling. To better understand the role of K265, point mutations were introduced within the Dd myosin-2 M765-2R framework, replacing this lysine with alanine (K265A), glutamic acid (K265E) or glutamine (K265Q), and the functional and kinetic properties of the resulting myosin motors were assessed. The alanine and glutamic acid substitutions reduced actin-activated ATPase activity, slowed the in vitro sliding velocity and attenuated the inhibitory potential of the allosteric myosin inhibitor pentabromopseudilin (PBP). However, glutamine substitution did not substantially change these parameters. Structural modelling suggests that K265 interacts with D590 and Q633 to establish a pivotal allosteric branching point. Based on our results, we propose: (1) that the K265-D590 interaction functions to reduce myosins basal ATPase activity in the absence of F-actin, and (2) that the dynamic formation of the K265-Q633 salt bridge upon actin cleft closure regulates the activation of product release by actin filaments.

  8. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin. PMID:26246073

  9. Targeting allosteric disulphide bonds in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Philip J

    2013-06-01

    Protein action in nature is generally controlled by the amount of protein produced and by chemical modification of the protein, and both are often perturbed in cancer. The amino acid side chains and the peptide and disulphide bonds that bind the polypeptide backbone can be post-translationally modified. Post-translational cleavage or the formation of disulphide bonds are now being identified in cancer-related proteins and it is timely to consider how these allosteric bonds could be targeted for new therapies.

  10. Molecular Basis of Enhanced Activity in Factor VIIa-Trypsin Variants Conveys Insights into Tissue Factor-mediated Allosteric Regulation of Factor VIIa Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, Anders B.; Madsen, Jesper J.; Svensson, L. Anders; Pedersen, Anette A.; Østergaard, Henrik; Overgaard, Michael T.; Olsen, Ole H.; Gandhi, Prafull S.

    2016-01-01

    The complex of coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa), a trypsin-like serine protease, and membrane-bound tissue factor (TF) initiates blood coagulation upon vascular injury. Binding of TF to FVIIa promotes allosteric conformational changes in the FVIIa protease domain and improves its catalytic properties. Extensive studies have revealed two putative pathways for this allosteric communication. Here we provide further details of this allosteric communication by investigating FVIIa loop swap variants containing the 170 loop of trypsin that display TF-independent enhanced activity. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that the introduced 170 loop from trypsin directly interacts with the FVIIa active site, stabilizing segment 215–217 and activation loop 3, leading to enhanced activity. Molecular dynamics simulations and novel fluorescence quenching studies support that segment 215–217 conformation is pivotal to the enhanced activity of the FVIIa variants. We speculate that the allosteric regulation of FVIIa activity by TF binding follows a similar path in conjunction with protease domain N terminus insertion, suggesting a more complete molecular basis of TF-mediated allosteric enhancement of FVIIa activity. PMID:26694616

  11. Polypharmacology within CXCR4: Multiple binding sites and allosteric behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planesas, Jesús M.; Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I.; Borrell, José I.; Teixidó, Jordi

    2014-10-01

    CXCR4 is a promiscuous receptor, which binds multiple diverse ligands. As usual in promiscuous proteins, CXCR4 has a large binding site, with multiple subsites, and high flexibility. Hence, it is not surprising that it is involved in the phenomenon of allosteric modulation. However, incomplete knowledge of allosteric ligand-binding sites has hampered an in-depth molecular understanding of how these inhibitors work. For example, it is known that lipidated fragments of intracellular GPCR loops, so called pepducins, such as pepducin ATI-2341, modulate CXCR4 activity using an agonist allosteric mechanism. Nevertheless, there are also examples of small organic molecules, such as AMD11070 and GSK812397, which may act as antagonist allosteric modulators. Here, we give new insights into this issue by proposing the binding interactions between the CXCR4 receptor and the above-mentioned allosteric modulators. We propose that CXCR4 has minimum two topographically different allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site would be in the intracellular loop 1 (ICL1) where pepducin ATI-2341 would bind to CXCR4, and the second one, in the extracellular side of CXCR4 in a subsite into the main orthosteric binding pocket, delimited by extracellular loops n° 1, 2, and the N-terminal end, where antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397 would bind. Prediction of allosteric interactions between CXCR4 and pepducin ATI-2341 were studied first by rotational blind docking to determine the main binding region and a subsequent refinement of the best pose was performed using flexible docking methods and molecular dynamics. For the antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397, the entire CXCR4 protein surface was explored by blind docking to define the binding region. A second docking analysis by subsites of the identified binding region was performed to refine the allosteric interactions. Finally, we identified the binding residues that appear to be essential for CXCR4 (agonists and antagonists) allosteric

  12. Allosteric transitions of the maltose transporter studied by an elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun Hua; Yang, Yong Xiao; Su, Ji Guo; Liu, Bin; Tan, Jian Jun; Zhang, Xiao Yi; Wang, Cun Xin

    2014-07-01

    The maltose transporter from Escherichia coli is one of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that utilize the energy from ATP hydrolysis to translocate substrates across cellular membranes. Until 2011, three crystal structures have been determined for maltose transporter at different states in the process of transportation. Here, based on these crystal structures, the allosteric pathway from the resting state (inward-facing) to the catalytic intermediate state (outward-facing) is studied by applying an adaptive anisotropic network model. The results suggest that the allosteric transitions proceed in a coupled way. The closing of the nucleotide-binding domains occurs first, and subsequently this conformational change is propagated to the transmembrane domains (TMD) via the EAA and EAS loops, and then to the maltose-binding protein, which facilitates the translocation of the maltose. It is also found that there exist nonrigid-body and asymmetric movements in the TMD. The cytoplasmic gate may only play the role of allosteric propagation during the transition from the pretranslocation to outward-facing states. In addition, the results show that the movment of the helical subdomain towards the RecA-like subdomain mainly occurs in the earlier stages of the transition. These results can provide some insights into the understanding of the mechanism of ABC transporters.

  13. Small-Molecule Allosteric Activators of Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, David A.; Guarente, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian sirtuins (SIRT1–7) are NAD+-dependent lysine deacylases that play central roles in cell survival, inflammation, energy metabolism, and aging. Members of this family of enzymes are considered promising pharmaceutical targets for the treatment of age-related diseases including cancer, type 2 diabetes, inflammatory disorders, and Alzheimer’s disease. SIRT1-activating compounds (STACs), which have been identified from a variety of chemical classes, provide health benefits in animal disease models. Recent data point to a common mechanism of allosteric activation by natural and synthetic STACs that involves the binding of STACs to a conserved N-terminal domain in SIRT1. Compared with polyphenols such as resveratrol, the synthetic STACs show greater potency, solubility, and target selectivity. Although considerable progress has been made regarding SIRT1 allosteric activation, key questions remain, including how the molecular contacts facilitate SIRT1 activation, whether other sirtuin family members will be amenable to activation, and whether STACs will ultimately prove safe and efficacious in humans. PMID:24160699

  14. Emerging Computational Methods for the Rational Discovery of Allosteric Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric drug development holds promise for delivering medicines that are more selective and less toxic than those that target orthosteric sites. To date, the discovery of allosteric binding sites and lead compounds has been mostly serendipitous, achieved through high-throughput screening. Over the past decade, structural data has become more readily available for larger protein systems and more membrane protein classes (e.g., GPCRs and ion channels), which are common allosteric drug targets. In parallel, improved simulation methods now provide better atomistic understanding of the protein dynamics and cooperative motions that are critical to allosteric mechanisms. As a result of these advances, the field of predictive allosteric drug development is now on the cusp of a new era of rational structure-based computational methods. Here, we review algorithms that predict allosteric sites based on sequence data and molecular dynamics simulations, describe tools that assess the druggability of these pockets, and discuss how Markov state models and topology analyses provide insight into the relationship between protein dynamics and allosteric drug binding. In each section, we first provide an overview of the various method classes before describing relevant algorithms and software packages. PMID:27074285

  15. New paradigm for allosteric regulation of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed

    Cockrell, Gregory M; Zheng, Yunan; Guo, Wenyue; Peterson, Alexis W; Truong, Jennifer K; Kantrowitz, Evan R

    2013-11-12

    For nearly 60 years, the ATP activation and the CTP inhibition of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) has been the textbook example of allosteric regulation. We present kinetic data and five X-ray structures determined in the absence and presence of a Mg(2+) concentration within the physiological range. In the presence of 2 mM divalent cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+)), CTP does not significantly inhibit the enzyme, while the allosteric activation by ATP is enhanced. The data suggest that the actual allosteric inhibitor of ATCase in vivo is the combination of CTP, UTP, and a divalent cation, and the actual allosteric activator is a divalent cation with ATP or ATP and GTP. The structural data reveals that two NTPs can bind to each allosteric site with a divalent cation acting as a bridge between the triphosphates. Thus, the regulation of ATCase is far more complex than previously believed and calls many previous studies into question. The X-ray structures reveal that the catalytic chains undergo essentially no alternations; however, several regions of the regulatory chains undergo significant structural changes. Most significant is that the N-terminal region of the regulatory chains exists in different conformations in the allosterically activated and inhibited forms of the enzyme. Here, a new model of allosteric regulation is proposed.

  16. Are AMPA Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators Potential Pharmacotherapeutics for Addiction?

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Lucas R.; Olive, M. Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  17. Allosteric Signal Transduction in HIV-1 Restriction Factor SAMHD1 proceeds via Reciprocal Handshake across Monomers.

    PubMed

    Patra, Kajwal Kumar; Bhattacharya, Akash; Bhattacharya, Swati

    2017-09-28

    The sterile alpha motif and histidine-aspartate domain-containing protein 1 (or SAMHD1), a human dNTP-triphosphohydrolase, contributes to HIV-1 restriction in select terminally differentiated cells of the immune system. The catalytically active form of the protein is an allosterically triggered tetramer, whose HIV-1 restriction properties are attributed to its dNTP - triphosphohydrolase activity. The tetramer itself is assembled by a GTP/dNTP combination. This enzyme uses the strategy of deoxynucleotide starvation, which is thought to prevent effective reverse transcription of the retroviral genome - hence restricting HIV-1 propagation. HIV-2 and SIV have evolved defences against SAMHD1, underscoring its role in restriction. Previous studies have provided high-resolution structures of GTP/dNTP bound enzyme complexes, but have not been able to provide information on dynamics. In this study, we have used correlation network analysis along with MD techniques to study the flow of allosteric information across the active complex. We have found evidence of a reciprocal allosteric "handshake" occurring across monomeric units. We have also uncovered a short linker region as the nexus for funnelling the regulatory signal from phosphorylation at T592 from the surface to the interior core of the protein.

  18. Allosteric drugs: the interaction of antitumor compound MKT-077 with human Hsp70 chaperones.

    PubMed

    Rousaki, Aikaterini; Miyata, Yoshinari; Jinwal, Umesh K; Dickey, Chad A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Zuiderweg, Erik R P

    2011-08-19

    Hsp70 (heat shock protein 70 kDa) chaperones are key to cellular protein homeostasis. However, they also have the ability to inhibit tumor apoptosis and contribute to aberrant accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in neuronal cells affected by tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Hence, Hsp70 chaperones are increasingly becoming identified as targets for therapeutic intervention in these widely abundant diseases. Hsp70 proteins are allosteric machines and offer, besides classical active-site targets, also opportunities to target the mechanism of allostery. In this work, it is demonstrated that the action of the potent anticancer compound MKT-077 (1-ethyl-2-[[3-ethyl-5-(3-methylbenzothiazolin-2-yliden)]-4-oxothiazolidin-2-ylidenemethyl] pyridinium chloride) occurs through a differential interaction with Hsp70 allosteric states. MKT-077 is therefore an "allosteric drug." Using NMR spectroscopy, we identify the compound's binding site on human HSPA8 (Hsc70). The binding pose is obtained from NMR-restrained docking calculations, subsequently scored by molecular-dynamics-based energy and solvation computations. Suggestions for the improvement of the compound's properties are made on the basis of the binding location and pose.

  19. Engineering allosteric regulation into the hinge region of a circularly permuted TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Valéry; Fastrez, Jacques; Soumillion, Patrice

    2010-09-01

    In nature, the activity of many enzymes involved in important biochemical pathways is controlled by binding a ligand in a site remote from the active site. The allosteric sites are frequently located in hinge regulatory subunits, in which a conformational change can occur and propagate to the active site. The enzymatic activity is then enhanced or decreased depending on the type of effectors. Many artificial binding sites have been created to engineer an allosteric regulation. Generally, these sites were engineered near the active site in loops or at the surface of contiguous helices or strands but rarely in hinge regions. This work aims at exploring the possibility of regulating a monomeric enzyme whose active site is located at the interface between two domains. We anticipated that binding of a ligand in the hinge region linking the domains would modify their positioning and, consequently, modulate the activity. Here, we describe the design of two mutants in a circularly permuted TEM-1 (cpTEM-1) beta-lactamase. The first one, cpTEM-1-His(3) was created by a rational design. It shows little regulation upon metal ion binding except for a weak activation with Zn(2+). The second one, cpTEM-1-3M-His(2), was selected by a directed evolution strategy. It is allosterically down-regulated by Zn(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+) with binding affinities around 300 microM.

  20. Enzymatic function of hemoglobin as a nitrite reductase that produces NO under allosteric control

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhi; Shiva, Sruti; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Ringwood, Lorna A.; Irby, Cynthia E.; Huang, Kris T.; Ho, Chien; Hogg, Neil; Schechter, Alan N.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxic vasodilation is a fundamental, highly conserved physiological response that requires oxygen and/or pH sensing coupled to vasodilation. While this process was first characterized more than 80 years ago, the precise identity and mechanism of the oxygen sensor and mediators of vasodilation remain uncertain. In support of a possible role for hemoglobin (Hb) as a sensor and effector of hypoxic vasodilation, here we show biochemical evidence that Hb exhibits enzymatic behavior as a nitrite reductase, with maximal NO generation rates occurring near the oxy-to-deoxy (R-to-T) allosteric structural transition of the protein. The observed rate of nitrite reduction by Hb deviates from second-order kinetics, and sigmoidal reaction progress is determined by a balance between 2 opposing chemistries of the heme in the R (oxygenated conformation) and T (deoxygenated conformation) allosteric quaternary structures of the Hb tetramer — the greater reductive potential of deoxyheme in the R state tetramer and the number of unligated deoxyheme sites necessary for nitrite binding, which are more plentiful in the T state tetramer. These opposing chemistries result in a maximal nitrite reduction rate when Hb is 40–60% saturated with oxygen (near the Hb P50), an apparent ideal set point for hypoxia-responsive NO generation. These data suggest that the oxygen sensor for hypoxic vasodilation is determined by Hb oxygen saturation and quaternary structure and that the nitrite reductase activity of Hb generates NO gas under allosteric and pH control. PMID:16041407

  1. Chromatin Loops as Allosteric Modulators of Enhancer-Promoter Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Boryana; Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Imakaev, Maxim; Mirny, Leonid A.

    2014-01-01

    The classic model of eukaryotic gene expression requires direct spatial contact between a distal enhancer and a proximal promoter. Recent Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) studies show that enhancers and promoters are embedded in a complex network of looping interactions. Here we use a polymer model of chromatin fiber to investigate whether, and to what extent, looping interactions between elements in the vicinity of an enhancer-promoter pair can influence their contact frequency. Our equilibrium polymer simulations show that a chromatin loop, formed by elements flanking either an enhancer or a promoter, suppresses enhancer-promoter interactions, working as an insulator. A loop formed by elements located in the region between an enhancer and a promoter, on the contrary, facilitates their interactions. We find that different mechanisms underlie insulation and facilitation; insulation occurs due to steric exclusion by the loop, and is a global effect, while facilitation occurs due to an effective shortening of the enhancer-promoter genomic distance, and is a local effect. Consistently, we find that these effects manifest quite differently for in silico 3C and microscopy. Our results show that looping interactions that do not directly involve an enhancer-promoter pair can nevertheless significantly modulate their interactions. This phenomenon is analogous to allosteric regulation in proteins, where a conformational change triggered by binding of a regulatory molecule to one site affects the state of another site. PMID:25340767

  2. Agonist activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jaskiran K; Savolainen, Mari; Young, Gareth T; Zwart, Ruud; Sher, Emanuele; Millar, Neil S

    2011-04-05

    Conventional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, such as acetylcholine, act at an extracellular "orthosteric" binding site located at the interface between two adjacent subunits. Here, we present evidence of potent activation of α7 nAChRs via an allosteric transmembrane site. Previous studies have identified a series of nAChR-positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that lack agonist activity but are able to potentiate responses to orthosteric agonists, such as acetylcholine. It has been shown, for example, that TQS acts as a conventional α7 nAChR PAM. In contrast, we have found that a compound with close chemical similarity to TQS (4BP-TQS) is a potent allosteric agonist of α7 nAChRs. Whereas the α7 nAChR antagonist metyllycaconitine acts competitively with conventional nicotinic agonists, metyllycaconitine is a noncompetitive antagonist of 4BP-TQS. Mutation of an amino acid (M253L), located in a transmembrane cavity that has been proposed as being the binding site for PAMs, completely blocks agonist activation by 4BP-TQS. In contrast, this mutation had no significant effect on agonist activation by acetylcholine. Conversely, mutation of an amino acid located within the known orthosteric binding site (W148F) has a profound effect on agonist potency of acetylcholine (resulting in a shift of ∼200-fold in the acetylcholine dose-response curve), but had little effect on the agonist dose-response curve for 4BP-TQS. Computer docking studies with an α7 homology model provides evidence that both TQS and 4BP-TQS bind within an intrasubunit transmembrane cavity. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that agonist activation of nAChRs can occur via an allosteric transmembrane site.

  3. Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  4. Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  5. Allosteric activation of coagulation factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Persson, Egon; Olsen, Ole Hvilsted

    2011-06-01

    Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) is present at subnanomolar concentration and represents a small percentage of the total amount of FVII in the circulation. FVIIa is poised to initiate blood clotting when it encounters its pivotal cofactor tissue factor (TF) which becomes exposed to blood upon vascular rupture. The requirement for complex formation with TF in order for FVIIa to express procoagulant activity ensures thrombin and fibrin generation at the right time and place. Thus TF acts as a guardian of safety of paramount importance to blood coagulation by providing localization to the site of injury and at the same time inducing maturation of zymogen-like free FVIIa to the active cofactor-bound enzyme. This review gives an account of the accumulated knowledge about the structure, function and TF dependence of FVIIa to arrive at a plausible allosteric mechanism by which TF induces maturation of the active conformation of FVIIa.

  6. An evolution-based strategy for engineering allosteric regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincus, David; Resnekov, Orna; Reynolds, Kimberly A.

    2017-04-01

    Allosteric regulation provides a way to control protein activity at the time scale of milliseconds to seconds inside the cell. An ability to engineer synthetic allosteric systems would be of practical utility for the development of novel biosensors, creation of synthetic cell signaling pathways, and design of small molecule pharmaceuticals with regulatory impact. To this end, we outline a general approach—termed rational engineering of allostery at conserved hotspots (REACH)—to introduce novel regulation into a protein of interest by exploiting latent allostery that has been hard-wired by evolution into its structure. REACH entails the use of statistical coupling analysis (SCA) to identify ‘allosteric hotspots’ on protein surfaces, the development and implementation of experimental assays to test hotspots for functionality, and a toolkit of allosteric modulators to impinge on endogenous cellular circuitry. REACH can be broadly applied to rewire cellular processes to respond to novel inputs.

  7. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  8. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  9. Approaches for Probing Allosteric Interactions at 7 Transmembrane Spanning Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michael T.; Vinson, Paige N.; Niswender, Colleen M.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, allosteric modulation of 7 transmembrane spanning receptors (7TMRs) has become a highly productive and exciting field of receptor pharmacology and drug discovery efforts. Positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively) present a number of pharmacological and therapeutic advantages over conventional orthosteric ligands, including improved receptor-subtype selectivity, a lower propensity to induce receptor desensitization, the preservation of endogenous temporal and spatial activation of receptors, greater chemical flexibility for optimization of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic parameters, and saturability of effect at target receptors, thus improving safety concerns and risk of overdose. Additionally, the relatively new concept of allosteric modulator-mediated receptor signal bias opens up a number of intriguing possibilities for PAMs, NAMs, and allosteric agonists, including the potential to selectively activate therapeutically beneficial signaling cascades, which could yield a superior tissue selectivity and side effect profile of allosteric modulators. However, there are a number of considerations and caveats that must be addressed when screening for and characterizing the properties of 7TMR allosteric modulators. Mode of pharmacology, methodology used to monitor receptor activity, detection of appropriate downstream analytes, selection of orthosteric probe, and assay time-course must all be considered when implementing any high-throughput screening campaign or when characterizing the properties of active compounds. Yet compared to conventional agonist/antagonist drug discovery programs, these elements of assay design are often a great deal more complicated when working with 7TMRs allosteric modulators. Moreover, for classical pharmacological methodologies and analyses, like radioligand binding and the assessment of compound affinity, the properties of allosteric modulators yield data that are more nuanced than

  10. A secreted salivary inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase from a blood-feeding insect: allosteric activation by soluble phosphoinositides and phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Andersen, John F; Ribeiro, José M C

    2006-05-02

    Type II inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (IPPs) act on both soluble inositol phosphate and phosphoinositide substrates. In many cases, these enzymes occur as multidomain proteins in which the IPP domain is linked to lipid-binding or additional catalytic domains. Rhodnius prolixus IPPRp exists as an isolated IPP domain which is secreted into the saliva of this blood-feeding insect. It shows selectivity for soluble and lipid substrates having a 1,4,5-trisphosphate substitution pattern while only poorly hydrolyzing substrates containing a D3 phosphate. With soluble diC8 PI(4,5)P(2) as a substrate, sigmoidal kinetics were observed, suggesting the presence of allosteric activation sites. Surprisingly, IPPRp-mediated hydrolysis of PI(4,5)P(2) and PI(3,4,5)P(3) was also stimulated up to 100-fold by diC8 PI(4)P and diC8 phosphatidylserine (PS). The activation kinetics were again sigmoidal, demonstrating that the allosteric sites recognize nonsubstrate phospholipids. Activation was positively cooperative, and analysis by the Hill equation suggests that at least three to four allosteric sites are present. In a vesicular system, hydrolysis of PI(4,5)P(2) followed a surface dilution kinetic model, and as expected, PS was found to be strongly stimulatory. If allosteric activation of type II IPPs by PI(4)P and PS is a widespread feature of the group, it may represent a novel regulatory mechanism for these important enzymes.

  11. Computational Study on the Inhibitor Binding Mode and Allosteric Regulation Mechanism in Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Weiwei; Yang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    HCV NS3/4A protein is an attractive therapeutic target responsible for harboring serine protease and RNA helicase activities during the viral replication. Small molecules binding at the interface between the protease and helicase domains can stabilize the closed conformation of the protein and thus block the catalytic function of HCV NS3/4A protein via an allosteric regulation mechanism. But the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, we aimed to provide some insight into the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein by using computational methods. Four simulation systems were investigated. They include: apo state of HCV NS3/4A protein, HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with an allosteric inhibitor and the truncated form of the above two systems. The molecular dynamics simulation results indicate HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 4VA adopts a closed conformation (inactive state), while the truncated apo protein adopts an open conformation (active state). Further residue interaction network analysis suggests the communication of the domain-domain interface play an important role in the transition from closed to open conformation of HCV NS3/4A protein. However, the inhibitor stabilizes the closed conformation through interaction with several key residues from both the protease and helicase domains, including His57, Asp79, Asp81, Asp168, Met485, Cys525 and Asp527, which blocks the information communication between the functional domains interface. Finally, a dynamic model about the allosteric regulation and conformational changes of HCV NS3/4A protein was proposed and could provide fundamental insights into the allosteric mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein function regulation and design of new potent inhibitors. PMID:24586263

  12. Dynamical network of residue-residue contacts reveals coupled allosteric effects in recognition, catalysis, and mutation.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Urmi; Holliday, Michael J; Eisenmesser, Elan Z; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-04-26

    Detailed understanding of how conformational dynamics orchestrates function in allosteric regulation of recognition and catalysis remains ambiguous. Here, we simulate CypA using multiple-microsecond-long atomistic molecular dynamics in explicit solvent and carry out NMR experiments. We analyze a large amount of time-dependent multidimensional data with a coarse-grained approach and map key dynamical features within individual macrostates by defining dynamics in terms of residue-residue contacts. The effects of substrate binding are observed to be largely sensed at a location over 15 Å from the active site, implying its importance in allostery. Using NMR experiments, we confirm that a dynamic cluster of residues in this distal region is directly coupled to the active site. Furthermore, the dynamical network of interresidue contacts is found to be coupled and temporally dispersed, ranging over 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Finally, using network centrality measures we demonstrate the changes in the communication network, connectivity, and influence of CypA residues upon substrate binding, mutation, and during catalysis. We identify key residues that potentially act as a bottleneck in the communication flow through the distinct regions in CypA and, therefore, as targets for future mutational studies. Mapping these dynamical features and the coupling of dynamics to function has crucial ramifications in understanding allosteric regulation in enzymes and proteins, in general.

  13. Dynamical network of residue–residue contacts reveals coupled allosteric effects in recognition, catalysis, and mutation

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Urmi; Holliday, Michael J.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Detailed understanding of how conformational dynamics orchestrates function in allosteric regulation of recognition and catalysis remains ambiguous. Here, we simulate CypA using multiple-microsecond-long atomistic molecular dynamics in explicit solvent and carry out NMR experiments. We analyze a large amount of time-dependent multidimensional data with a coarse-grained approach and map key dynamical features within individual macrostates by defining dynamics in terms of residue–residue contacts. The effects of substrate binding are observed to be largely sensed at a location over 15 Å from the active site, implying its importance in allostery. Using NMR experiments, we confirm that a dynamic cluster of residues in this distal region is directly coupled to the active site. Furthermore, the dynamical network of interresidue contacts is found to be coupled and temporally dispersed, ranging over 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Finally, using network centrality measures we demonstrate the changes in the communication network, connectivity, and influence of CypA residues upon substrate binding, mutation, and during catalysis. We identify key residues that potentially act as a bottleneck in the communication flow through the distinct regions in CypA and, therefore, as targets for future mutational studies. Mapping these dynamical features and the coupling of dynamics to function has crucial ramifications in understanding allosteric regulation in enzymes and proteins, in general. PMID:27071107

  14. The allosteric mechanism of yeast chorismate mutase: a dynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yifei; Ma, Jianpeng; Karplus, Martin; Lipscomb, William N

    2006-02-10

    The effector-regulated allosteric mechanism of yeast chorismate mutase (YCM) was studied by normal mode analysis and targeted molecular dynamics. The normal mode analysis shows that the conformational change between YCM in the R state and in the T state can be represented by a relatively small number of low-frequency modes. This suggests that the transition is coded in the structure and is likely to have a low energetic barrier. Quantitative comparisons (i.e. frequencies) between the low-frequency modes of YCM with and without effectors (modeled structures) reveal that the binding of Trp increases the global flexibility, whereas Tyr decreases global flexibility. The targeted molecular dynamics simulation of substrate analog release from the YCM active site suggests that a series of residues are critical for orienting and "recruiting" the substrate. The simulation led to the switching of a series of substrate-release-coupled salt-bridge partners in the ligand-binding domain; similar changes occur in the transition between YCM R-state and T-state crystal structures. Thus, the normal mode analysis and targeted molecular dynamics results provide evidence that the effectors regulate YCM activity by influencing the global flexibility. The change in flexibility is coupled to the binding of substrate to the T state and release of the product from the R state, respectively.

  15. Allosteric water and phosphate effects in Hoplosternum littorale hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Peres, Patricia; de Azevedo Júnior, Walter F; Bonilla-Rodriguez, Gustavo O

    2004-11-01

    This paper reports the results obtained using the osmotic stress method applied to the purified cathodic and anodic hemoglobins (Hbs) from the catfish Hoplosternum littorale, a species that displays facultative accessorial air oxygenation. We demonstrate that water potential affects the oxygen affinity of H. littorale Hbs in the presence of an inert solute (sucrose). Oxygen affinity increases when water activity increases, indicating that water molecules stabilize the high-affinity state of the Hb. This effect is the same as that observed in tetrameric vertebrate Hbs. We show that both anodic and cathodic Hbs show conformational substrates similar to other vertebrate Hbs. For both Hbs, addition of anionic effectors, especially chloride, strongly increases the number of water molecules bound, although anodic Hb did not exhibit sensitivity to saturating levels of ATP. Accordingly, for both Hbs, we propose that the deoxy conformations coexist in at least two anion-dependent allosteric states, T(o) and T(x), as occurs for human Hb. We found a single phosphate binding site for the cathodic Hb.

  16. Discovery of Novel Allosteric Effectors Based on the Predicted Allosteric Sites for Escherichia coli D-3-Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Qi, Yifei; Yin, Ning; Lai, Luhua

    2014-01-01

    D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH) from Escherichia coli catalyzes the first critical step in serine biosynthesis, and can be allosterically inhibited by serine. In a previous study, we developed a computational method for allosteric site prediction using a coarse-grained two-state Gō Model and perturbation. Two potential allosteric sites were predicted for E. coli PGDH, one close to the active site and the nucleotide binding site (Site I) and the other near the regulatory domain (Site II). In the present study, we discovered allosteric inhibitors and activators based on site I, using a high-throughput virtual screen, and followed by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to eliminate false positives. Compounds 1 and 2 demonstrated a low-concentration activation and high-concentration inhibition phenomenon, with IC50 values of 34.8 and 58.0 µM in enzymatic bioassays, respectively, comparable to that of the endogenous allosteric effector, L-serine. For its activation activity, compound 2 exhibited an AC50 value of 34.7 nM. The novel allosteric site discovered in PGDH was L-serine- and substrate-independent. Enzyme kinetics studies showed that these compounds influenced Km, kcat, and kcat/Km. We have also performed structure-activity relationship studies to discover high potency allosteric effectors. Compound 2-2, an analog of compound 2, showed the best in vitro activity with an IC50 of 22.3 µM. Compounds targeting this site can be used as new chemical probes to study metabolic regulation in E. coli. Our study not only identified a novel allosteric site and effectors for PGDH, but also provided a general strategy for designing new regulators for metabolic enzymes. PMID:24733054

  17. Synaptotagmin I's Intrinsically Disordered Region Interacts with Synaptic Vesicle Lipids and Exerts Allosteric Control over C2A.

    PubMed

    Fealey, Michael E; Mahling, Ryan; Rice, Anne M; Dunleavy, Katie; Kobany, Stephanie E G; Lohese, K Jean; Horn, Benjamin; Hinderliter, Anne

    2016-05-31

    Synaptotagmin I (Syt I) is a vesicle-localized integral membrane protein that senses the calcium ion (Ca(2+)) influx to trigger fast synchronous release of neurotransmitter. How the cytosolic domains of Syt I allosterically communicate to propagate the Ca(2+) binding signal throughout the protein is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether the intrinsically disordered region (IDR) between Syt I's transmembrane helix and first C2 domain (C2A) plays an important role in allosteric modulation of Ca(2+) binding. Moreover, the structural propensity of this IDR with respect to membrane lipid composition is unknown. Using differential scanning and isothermal titration calorimetry, we found that inclusion of the IDR does indeed allosterically modulate Ca(2+) binding within the first C2 domain. Additionally through application of nuclear magnetic resonance, we found that Syt I's IDR interacts with membranes whose lipid composition mimics that of a synaptic vesicle. These findings not only indicate that Syt I's IDR plays a role in regulating Syt I's Ca(2+) sensing but also indicate the IDR is exquisitely sensitive to the underlying membrane lipids. The latter observation suggests the IDR is a key route for communication of lipid organization to the adjacent C2 domains.

  18. Ryanodine Receptor Allosteric Coupling and the Dynamics of Calcium Sparks

    PubMed Central

    Groff, Jeffrey R.; Smith, Gregory D.

    2008-01-01

    Puffs and sparks are localized intracellular Ca2+ elevations that arise from the cooperative activity of Ca2+-regulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and ryanodine receptors clustered at Ca2+ release sites on the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum or the sarcoplasmic reticulum. While the synchronous gating of Ca2+-regulated Ca2+ channels can be mediated entirely though the buffered diffusion of intracellular Ca2+, interprotein allosteric interactions also contribute to the dynamics of ryanodine receptor (RyR) gating and Ca2+ sparks. In this article, Markov chain models of Ca2+ release sites are used to investigate how the statistics of Ca2+ spark generation and termination are related to the coupling of RyRs via local [Ca2+] changes and allosteric interactions. Allosteric interactions are included in a manner that promotes the synchronous gating of channels by stabilizing neighboring closed-closed and/or open-open channel pairs. When the strength of Ca2+-mediated channel coupling is systematically varied (e.g., by changing the Ca2+ buffer concentration), simulations that include synchronizing allosteric interactions often exhibit more robust Ca2+ sparks; however, for some Ca2+ coupling strengths the sparks are less robust. We find no evidence that the distribution of spark durations can be used to distinguish between allosteric interactions that stabilize closed channel pairs, open channel pairs, or both in a balanced fashion. On the other hand, the changes in spark duration, interspark interval, and frequency observed when allosteric interactions that stabilize closed channel pairs are gradually removed from simulations are qualitatively different than the changes observed when open or both closed and open channel pairs are stabilized. Thus, our simulations clarify how changes in spark statistics due to pharmacological washout of the accessory proteins mediating allosteric coupling may indicate the type of synchronizing allosteric interactions exhibited

  19. Allosteric Voltage Gating of Potassium Channels I

    PubMed Central

    Horrigan, Frank T.; Cui, Jianmin; Aldrich, Richard W.

    1999-01-01

    Activation of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels is controlled by both cytoplasmic Ca2+ and membrane potential. To study the mechanism of voltage-dependent gating, we examined mSlo Ca2+-activated K+ currents in excised macropatches from Xenopus oocytes in the virtual absence of Ca2+ (<1 nM). In response to a voltage step, IK activates with an exponential time course, following a brief delay. The delay suggests that rapid transitions precede channel opening. The later exponential time course suggests that activation also involves a slower rate-limiting step. However, the time constant of IK relaxation [τ(IK)] exhibits a complex voltage dependence that is inconsistent with models that contain a single rate limiting step. τ(IK) increases weakly with voltage from −500 to −20 mV, with an equivalent charge (z) of only 0.14 e, and displays a stronger voltage dependence from +30 to +140 mV (z = 0.49 e), which then decreases from +180 to +240 mV (z = −0.29 e). Similarly, the steady state GK–V relationship exhibits a maximum voltage dependence (z = 2 e) from 0 to +100 mV, and is weakly voltage dependent (z ≅ 0.4 e) at more negative voltages, where Po = 10−5–10−6. These results can be understood in terms of a gating scheme where a central transition between a closed and an open conformation is allosterically regulated by the state of four independent and identical voltage sensors. In the absence of Ca2+, this allosteric mechanism results in a gating scheme with five closed (C) and five open (O) states, where the majority of the channel's voltage dependence results from rapid C–C and O–O transitions, whereas the C–O transitions are rate limiting and weakly voltage dependent. These conclusions not only provide a framework for interpreting studies of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel voltage gating, but also have important implications for understanding the mechanism of Ca2+ sensitivity. PMID:10436003

  20. Allosteric interactions at adenosine A1 and A3 receptors: new insights into the role of small molecules and receptor dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Stephen J; May, Lauren T; Kellam, Barrie; Woolard, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    The purine nucleoside adenosine is present in all cells in tightly regulated concentrations. It is released under a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions to facilitate protection and regeneration of tissues. Adenosine acts via specific GPCRs to either stimulate cyclic AMP formation, as exemplified by Gs-protein-coupled adenosine receptors (A2A and A2B), or inhibit AC activity, in the case of Gi/o-coupled adenosine receptors (A1 and A3). Recent advances in our understanding of GPCR structure have provided insights into the conformational changes that occur during receptor activation following binding of agonists to orthosteric (i.e. at the same binding site as an endogenous modulator) and allosteric regulators to allosteric sites (i.e. at a site that is topographically distinct from the endogenous modulator). Binding of drugs to allosteric sites may lead to changes in affinity or efficacy, and affords considerable potential for increased selectivity in new drug development. Herein, we provide an overview of the properties of selective allosteric regulators of the adenosine A1 and A3 receptors, focusing on the impact of receptor dimerization, mechanistic approaches to single-cell ligand-binding kinetics and the effects of A1- and A3-receptor allosteric modulators on in vivo pharmacology. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24024783

  1. Allosteric Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kushol; Brady, Troy; Dyer, Benjamin M.; Malani, Nirav; Hwang, Young; Male, Frances; Nolte, Robert T.; Wang, Liping; Velthuisen, Emile; Jeffrey, Jerry; Van Duyne, Gregory D.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the presence of antiviral agents results in evolution of drug-resistant variants, motivating the search for additional drug classes. Here we report studies of GSK1264, which was identified as a compound that disrupts the interaction between HIV-1 integrase (IN) and the cellular factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75. GSK1264 displayed potent antiviral activity and was found to bind at the site occupied by LEDGF/p75 on IN by x-ray crystallography. Assays of HIV replication in the presence of GSK1264 showed only modest inhibition of the early infection steps and little effect on integration targeting, which is guided by the LEDGF/p75·IN interaction. In contrast, inhibition of late replication steps was more potent. Particle production was normal, but particles showed reduced infectivity. GSK1264 promoted aggregation of IN and preformed LEDGF/p75·IN complexes, suggesting a mechanism of inhibition. LEDGF/p75 was not displaced from IN during aggregation, indicating trapping of LEDGF/p75 in aggregates. Aggregation assays with truncated IN variants revealed that a construct with catalytic and C-terminal domains of IN only formed an open polymer associated with efficient drug-induced aggregation. These data suggest that the allosteric inhibitors of IN are promising antiviral agents and provide new information on their mechanism of action. PMID:24904063

  2. Tunable Allosteric Behavior in Random Spring Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocks, Jason W.; Pashine, Nidhi; Bischofberger, Irmgard; Goodrich, Carl P.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Liu, Andrea J.

    Many proteins and other macromolecules exhibit allosteric behavior in which the binding of a ligand to one site affects the activity at a second distant site. Inspired by this biological process, we present an algorithm to tune disordered spring networks to exhibit allostery-like behavior. When the positions of a pair of nodes at one site in a network are perturbed, we can precisely tune the response of nodes located at another distant site in the system by removing only a small fraction of the bonds. This algorithm can be used to create a wide variety of different response types: response nodes can be located far away from each other, a large number of response sites can be simultaneously controlled, and even multiple independent responses can be tuned into the system. In addition, this algorithm can be generalized to account for bond bending, geometric nonlinearities and nonlinear bond potentials. However, even linear calculations match surprisingly well with macroscopic experimental realizations made by laser cutting or 3D printing.

  3. Convergent Transmission of RNAi Guide-Target Mismatch Information across Argonaute Internal Allosteric Network

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Thomas T.; Osman, Roman

    2012-01-01

    In RNA interference, a guide strand derived from a short dsRNA such as a microRNA (miRNA) is loaded into Argonaute, the central protein in the RNA Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) that silences messenger RNAs on a sequence-specific basis. The positions of any mismatched base pairs in an miRNA determine which Argonaute subtype is used. Subsequently, the Argonaute-guide complex binds and silences complementary target mRNAs; certain Argonautes cleave the target. Mismatches between guide strand and the target mRNA decrease cleavage efficiency. Thus, loading and silencing both require that signals about the presence of a mismatched base pair are communicated from the mismatch site to effector sites. These effector sites include the active site, to prevent target cleavage; the binding groove, to modify nucleic acid binding affinity; and surface allosteric sites, to control recruitment of additional proteins to form the RISC. To examine how such signals may be propagated, we analyzed the network of internal allosteric pathways in Argonaute exhibited through correlations of residue-residue interactions. The emerging network can be described as a set of pathways emanating from the core of the protein near the active site, distributed into the bulk of the protein, and converging upon a distributed cluster of surface residues. Nucleotides in the guide strand “seed region” have a stronger relationship with the protein than other nucleotides, concordant with their importance in sequence selectivity. Finally, any of several seed region guide-target mismatches cause certain Argonaute residues to have modified correlations with the rest of the protein. This arises from the aggregation of relatively small interaction correlation changes distributed across a large subset of residues. These residues are in effector sites: the active site, binding groove, and surface, implying that direct functional consequences of guide-target mismatches are mediated through the cumulative

  4. Structure of human nSMase2 reveals an interdomain allosteric activation mechanism for ceramide generation.

    PubMed

    Airola, Michael V; Shanbhogue, Prajna; Shamseddine, Achraf A; Guja, Kip E; Senkal, Can E; Maini, Rohan; Bartke, Nana; Wu, Bill X; Obeid, Lina M; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2017-07-11

    Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2, product of the SMPD3 gene) is a key enzyme for ceramide generation that is involved in regulating cellular stress responses and exosome-mediated intercellular communication. nSMase2 is activated by diverse stimuli, including the anionic phospholipid phosphatidylserine. Phosphatidylserine binds to an integral-membrane N-terminal domain (NTD); however, how the NTD activates the C-terminal catalytic domain is unclear. Here, we identify the complete catalytic domain of nSMase2, which was misannotated because of a large insertion. We find the soluble catalytic domain interacts directly with the membrane-associated NTD, which serves as both a membrane anchor and an allosteric activator. The juxtamembrane region, which links the NTD and the catalytic domain, is necessary and sufficient for activation. Furthermore, we provide a mechanistic basis for this phenomenon using the crystal structure of the human nSMase2 catalytic domain determined at 1.85-Å resolution. The structure reveals a DNase-I-type fold with a hydrophobic track leading to the active site that is blocked by an evolutionarily conserved motif which we term the "DK switch." Structural analysis of nSMase2 and the extended N-SMase family shows that the DK switch can adopt different conformations to reposition a universally conserved Asp (D) residue involved in catalysis. Mutation of this Asp residue in nSMase2 disrupts catalysis, allosteric activation, stimulation by phosphatidylserine, and pharmacological inhibition by the lipid-competitive inhibitor GW4869. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the DK switch regulates ceramide generation by nSMase2 and is governed by an allosteric interdomain interaction at the membrane interface.

  5. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonelle, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Communications in any system is one of the last technologies to be considered, and sometimes it is considered too late to impact the system. This was somewhat the impression on reviewing the NASA budget for two mission scenarios for the space station. However, that budget fortunately was well spent, and the money was spent to get the most benefit per dollar. Another thing that is very often forgotten is that technology is not produced in a vacuum. In fact, in conducting independent research and development (IR&D), the first phase is to define the requirements which must be time phased, becuase very often the conditions will change during the life of the system. From the requirements, a set of architectures that are at least representative of that era are produced. If the exact requirements were not established, at least boundaries are set on the requirements for that architecture. When this is completed, then the technology that is really needed is defined. The major criticism of the work that was presented to the panel is the lack of a firm set of requirements.

  6. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonelle, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Communications in any system is one of the last technologies to be considered, and sometimes it is considered too late to impact the system. This was somewhat the impression on reviewing the NASA budget for two mission scenarios for the space station. However, that budget fortunately was well spent, and the money was spent to get the most benefit per dollar. Another thing that is very often forgotten is that technology is not produced in a vacuum. In fact, in conducting independent research and development (IR&D), the first phase is to define the requirements which must be time phased, becuase very often the conditions will change during the life of the system. From the requirements, a set of architectures that are at least representative of that era are produced. If the exact requirements were not established, at least boundaries are set on the requirements for that architecture. When this is completed, then the technology that is really needed is defined. The major criticism of the work that was presented to the panel is the lack of a firm set of requirements.

  7. Allosteric Learning Model in English Lesson: Teachers' Views, the Instructions of Curriculum and Course Book, a Sample of Daily Lesson Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkant, Hasan Güner; Baysal, Seda

    2017-01-01

    The changes which occur during the learning process have been explained by many teaching-learning models and theories. One of these models is allosteric learning model (ALM) which was developed by André Giordan in 1989. This model was derived from a biological metaphor related to proteins. The interaction between individual and environment in a…

  8. Allosteric Modulators for the Treatment of Schizophrenia: Targeting Glutamatergic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Menniti, Frank S.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Pandit, Jayvardhan; Zagouras, Panayiotis; Volkmann, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly debilitating mental disorder which afflicts approximately 1% of the global population. Cognitive and negative deficits account for the lifelong disability associated with schizophrenia, whose symptoms are not effectively addressed by current treatments. New medicines are needed to treat these aspects of the disease. Neurodevelopmental, neuropathological, genetic, and behavioral pharmacological data indicate that schizophrenia stems from a dysfunction of glutamate synaptic transmission, particularly in frontal cortical networks. A number of novel pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms affecting glutamatergic synaptic transmission have emerged as viable targets for schizophrenia. While developing orthosteric glutamatergic agents for these targets has proven extremely difficult, targeting allosteric sites of these targets has emerged as a promising alternative. From a medicinal chemistry perspective, allosteric sites provide an opportunity of finding agents with better drug-like properties and greater target specificity. Furthermore, allosteric modulators are better suited to maintaining the highly precise temporal and spatial aspects of glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Herein, we review neuropathological and genomic/genetic evidence underscoring the importance of glutamate synaptic dysfunction in the etiology of schizophrenia and make a case for allosteric targets for therapeutic intervention. We review progress in identifying allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors, NMDA receptors, and metabotropic glutamate receptors, all with the aim of restoring physiological glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Challenges remain given the complexity of schizophrenia and the difficulty in studying cognition in animals and humans. Nonetheless, important compounds have emerged from these efforts and promising preclinical and variable clinical validation has been achieved. PMID:23409764

  9. Allosteric dynamics of SAMHD1 studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, K. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-10-01

    SAMHD1 is a human cellular enzyme that blocks HIV-1 infection in myeloid cells and non-cycling CD4+T cells. The enzyme is an allosterically regulated triphosphohydrolase that modulates the level of cellular dNTP. The virus restriction is attributed to the lowering of the pool of dNTP in the cell to a point where reverse-transcription is impaired. Mutations in SAMHD1 are also implicated in Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome. A mechanistic understanding of the allosteric activation of the enzyme is still elusive. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations to examine the allosteric site dynamics of the protein and to examine the connection between the stability of the tetrameric complex and the Allosite occupancy.

  10. Pharmacological property optimization for allosteric ligands: A medicinal chemistry perspective.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Shawn; Albert, Jeffrey S

    2017-06-01

    New strategies to potentially improve drug safety and efficacy emerge with allosteric programs. Biased allosteric modulators can be designed with high subtype selectivity and defined receptor signaling endpoints, however, selecting the most meaningful parameters for optimization can be perplexing. Historically, "potency hunting" at the expense of physicochemical and pharmacokinetic optimization has led to numerous tool compounds with excellent pharmacological properties but no path to drug development. Conversely, extensive physicochemical and pharmacokinetic screening with only post hoc bias and allosteric characterization has led to inefficacious compounds or compounds with on-target toxicities. This field is rapidly evolving with new mechanistic understanding, changes in terminology, and novel opportunities. The intent of this digest is to summarize current understanding and debates within the field. We aim to discuss, from a medicinal chemistry perspective, the parameter choices available to drive SAR. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel Inhibitors Complexed with Glutamate Dehydrogenase: ALLOSTERIC REGULATION BY CONTROL OF PROTEIN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J.; Walker, Matthew T.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2009-12-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P){sup +} as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH.

  12. Novel inhibitors complexed with glutamate dehydrogenase: allosteric regulation by control of protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J; Walker, Matthew T; Smith, Thomas J

    2009-08-21

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P)(+) as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH.

  13. Assembly of the Sos1-Grb2-Gab1 Ternary Signaling Complex Is Under Allosteric Control

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Caleb B.; Seldeen, Kenneth L.; Deegan, Brian J.; Bhat, Vikas; Farooq, Amjad

    2009-01-01

    Allostery has evolved as a form of local communication between interacting protein partners allowing them to quickly sense changes in their immediate vicinity in response to external cues. Herein, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in conjunction with circular dichroism (CD) and macromolecular modeling (MM), we show that the binding of Grb2 adaptor — a key signaling molecule involved in the activation of Ras GTPase — to its downstream partners Sos1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor and Gab1 docker is under tight allosteric regulation. Specifically, our findings reveal that the binding of one molecule of Sos1 to the nSH3 domain allosterically induces a conformational change within Grb2 such that the loading of a second molecule of Sos1 onto the cSH3 domain is blocked and, in so doing, allows Gab1 access to the cSH3 domain in an exclusively non-competitive manner to generate the Sos1-Grb2-Gab1 ternary signaling complex. PMID:20005866

  14. Unexpected Allosteric Network Contributes to LRH-1 Co-regulator Selectivity*

    PubMed Central

    Musille, Paul M.; Kossmann, Bradley R.; Kohn, Jeffrey A.; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Ortlund, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipids (PLs) are unusual signaling hormones sensed by the nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1), which has evolved a novel allosteric pathway to support appropriate interaction with co-regulators depending on ligand status. LRH-1 plays an important role in controlling lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and is a potential target for the treatment of metabolic and neoplastic diseases. Although the prospect of modulating LRH-1 via small molecules is exciting, the molecular mechanism linking PL structure to transcriptional co-regulator preference is unknown. Previous studies showed that binding to an activating PL ligand, such as dilauroylphosphatidylcholine, favors LRH-1's interaction with transcriptional co-activators to up-regulate gene expression. Both crystallographic and solution-based structural studies showed that dilauroylphosphatidylcholine binding drives unanticipated structural fluctuations outside of the canonical activation surface in an alternate activation function (AF) region, encompassing the β-sheet-H6 region of the protein. However, the mechanism by which dynamics in the alternate AF influences co-regulator selectivity remains elusive. Here, we pair x-ray crystallography with molecular modeling to identify an unexpected allosteric network that traverses the protein ligand binding pocket and links these two elements to dictate selectivity. We show that communication between the alternate AF region and classical AF2 is correlated with the strength of the co-regulator interaction. This work offers the first glimpse into the conformational dynamics that drive this unusual PL-mediated nuclear hormone receptor activation. PMID:26553876

  15. Hotspot Mutations in KIT Receptor Differentially Modulate Its Allosterically Coupled Conformational Dynamics: Impact on Activation and Drug Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chauvot de Beauchêne, Isaure; Allain, Ariane; Panel, Nicolas; Laine, Elodie; Trouvé, Alain; Dubreuil, Patrice; Tchertanov, Luba

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase KIT controls many signal transduction pathways and represents a typical allosterically regulated protein. The mutation-induced deregulation of KIT activity impairs cellular physiological functions and causes serious human diseases. The impact of hotspots mutations (D816H/Y/N/V and V560G/D) localized in crucial regulatory segments, the juxtamembrane region (JMR) and the activation (A-) loop, on KIT internal dynamics was systematically studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The mutational outcomes predicted in silico were correlated with in vitro and in vivo activation rates and drug sensitivities of KIT mutants. The allosteric regulation of KIT in the native and mutated forms is described in terms of communication between the two remote segments, JMR and A-loop. A strong correlation between the communication profile and the structural and dynamical features of KIT in the native and mutated forms was established. Our results provide new insight on the determinants of receptor KIT constitutive activation by mutations and resistance of KIT mutants to inhibitors. Depiction of an intra-molecular component of the communication network constitutes a first step towards an integrated description of vast communication pathways established by KIT in physiopathological contexts. PMID:25079768

  16. Allosteric conformational change cascade in cytoplasmic dynein revealed by structure-based molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Shintaroh; Li, Wenfei; Takada, Shoji

    2017-09-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a giant ATP-driven molecular motor that proceeds to the minus end of the microtubule (MT). Dynein hydrolyzes ATP in a ring-like structure, containing 6 AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) modules, which is ~15 nm away from the MT binding domain (MTBD). This architecture implies that long-distance allosteric couplings exist between the AAA+ ring and the MTBD in order for dynein to move on the MT, although little is known about the mechanisms involved. Here, we have performed comprehensive molecular simulations of the dynein motor domain based on pre- and post- power-stroke structural information and in doing so we address the allosteric conformational changes that occur during the power-stroke and recovery-stroke processes. In the power-stroke process, the N-terminal linker movement was the prerequisite to the nucleotide-dependent AAA1 transition, from which a transition cascade propagated, on average, in a circular manner on the AAA+ ring until it reached the AAA6/C-terminal module. The recovery-stroke process was initiated by the transition of the AAA6/C-terminal, from which the transition cascade split into the two directions of the AAA+ ring, occurring both clockwise and anti-clockwise. In both processes, the MTBD conformational change was regulated by the AAA4 module and the AAA5/Strut module.

  17. Studying the allosteric energy cycle by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Julvez, Marta; Abian, Olga; Vega, Sonia; Medina, Milagros; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful biophysical technique which allows a complete thermodynamic characterization of protein interactions with other molecules. The possibility of dissecting the Gibbs energy of interaction into its enthalpic and entropic contributions, as well as the detailed additional information experimentally accessible on the intermolecular interactions (stoichiometry, cooperativity, heat capacity changes, and coupled equilibria), make ITC a suitable technique for studying allosteric interactions in proteins. Two experimental methodologies for the characterization of allosteric heterotropic ligand interactions by ITC are described in this chapter, illustrated with two proteins with markedly different structural and functional features: a photosynthetic electron transfer protein and a drug target viral protease.

  18. Physical limits on computation by assemblies of allosteric proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, John

    2009-03-01

    Assemblies of allosteric proteins are the principle information processing devices in biology. Using the Ca^2+-sensitive cardiac regulatory assembly as a paradigm for Brownian computation, we examine how system complexity and system resetting impose physical limits on computation. Nearest-neighbor-limited interactions among assembly components constrains the topology of the system's macrostate free energy landscape and produces degenerate transition probabilities. As a result, signaling fidelity and deactivation kinetics can not be simultaneously optimized. This imposes an upper limit on the rate of information processing by assemblies of allosteric proteins that couple to a single ligand type.

  19. Physical Limits on Computation by Assemblies of Allosteric Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, John M.

    2008-10-01

    Assemblies of allosteric proteins are the principle information processing devices in biology. Using the Ca2+-sensitive cardiac regulatory assembly as a paradigm for Brownian computation, I examine how system complexity and system resetting impose physical limits on computation. Nearest-neighbor-limited interactions among assembly components constrain the topology of the system’s macrostate free energy landscape and produce degenerate transition probabilities. As a result, signaling fidelity and deactivation kinetics cannot be simultaneously optimized. This imposes an upper limit on the rate of information processing by assemblies of allosteric proteins that couple to a single ligand type.

  20. Allosteric Block of KCa2 Channels by Apamin*

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Cédric; Goodchild, Samuel J.; Weatherall, Kate L.; Jane, David E.; Liégeois, Jean-François; Seutin, Vincent; Marrion, Neil V.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of small conductance calcium-activated potassium (KCa2) channels can regulate neuronal firing and synaptic plasticity. They are characterized by their high sensitivity to the bee venom toxin apamin, but the mechanism of block is not understood. For example, apamin binds to both KCa2.2 and KCa2.3 with the same high affinity (KD ∼ 5 pm for both subtypes) but requires significantly higher concentrations to block functional current (IC50 values of ∼100 pm and ∼5 nm, respectively). This suggests that steps beyond binding are needed for channel block to occur. We have combined patch clamp and binding experiments on cell lines with molecular modeling and mutagenesis to gain more insight into the mechanism of action of the toxin. An outer pore histidine residue common to both subtypes was found to be critical for both binding and block by the toxin but not for block by tetraethylammonium (TEA) ions. These data indicated that apamin blocks KCa2 channels by binding to a site distinct from that used by TEA, supported by a finding that the onset of block by apamin was not affected by the presence of TEA. Structural modeling of ligand-channel interaction indicated that TEA binds deep within the channel pore, which contrasted with apamin being modeled to interact with the channel outer pore by utilizing the outer pore histidine residue. This multidisciplinary approach suggested that apamin does not behave as a classical pore blocker but blocks using an allosteric mechanism that is consistent with observed differences between binding affinity and potency of block. PMID:20562108

  1. Structural dynamics and energetics underlying allosteric inactivation of the cannabinoid receptor CB1

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Jonathan F.; Farrens, David L.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are surprisingly flexible molecules that can do much more than simply turn on G proteins. Some even exhibit biased signaling, wherein the same receptor preferentially activates different G-protein or arrestin signaling pathways depending on the type of ligand bound. Why this behavior occurs is still unclear, but it can happen with both traditional ligands and ligands that bind allosterically outside the orthosteric receptor binding pocket. Here, we looked for structural mechanisms underlying these phenomena in the marijuana receptor CB1. Our work focused on the allosteric ligand Org 27569, which has an unusual effect on CB1—it simultaneously increases agonist binding, decreases G-protein activation, and induces biased signaling. Using classical pharmacological binding studies, we find that Org 27569 binds to a unique allosteric site on CB1 and show that it can act alone (without need for agonist cobinding). Through mutagenesis studies, we find that the ability of Org 27569 to bind is related to how much receptor is in an active conformation that can couple with G protein. Using these data, we estimated the energy differences between the inactive and active states. Finally, site-directed fluorescence labeling studies show the CB1 structure stabilized by Org 27569 is different and unique from that stabilized by antagonist or agonist. Specifically, transmembrane helix 6 (TM6) movements associated with G-protein activation are blocked, but at the same time, helix 8/TM7 movements are enhanced, suggesting a possible mechanism for the ability of Org 27569 to induce biased signaling. PMID:26100912

  2. Biased allosteric modulation at the CaS receptor engendered by structurally diverse calcimimetics

    PubMed Central

    Cook, A E; Mistry, S N; Gregory, K J; Furness, S G B; Sexton, P M; Scammells, P J; Conigrave, A D; Christopoulos, A; Leach, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Clinical use of cinacalcet in hyperparathyroidism is complicated by its tendency to induce hypocalcaemia, arising partly from activation of calcium-sensing receptors (CaS receptors) in the thyroid and stimulation of calcitonin release. CaS receptor allosteric modulators that selectively bias signalling towards pathways that mediate desired effects [e.g. parathyroid hormone (PTH) suppression] rather than those mediating undesirable effects (e.g. elevated serum calcitonin), may offer better therapies. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We characterized the ligand-biased profile of novel calcimimetics in HEK293 cells stably expressing human CaS receptors, by monitoring intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) mobilization, inositol phosphate (IP)1 accumulation, ERK1/2 phosphorylation (pERK1/2) and receptor expression. KEY RESULTS Phenylalkylamine calcimimetics were biased towards allosteric modulation of Ca2+i mobilization and IP1 accumulation. S,R-calcimimetic B was biased only towards IP1 accumulation. R,R-calcimimetic B and AC-265347 were biased towards IP1 accumulation and pERK1/2. Nor-calcimimetic B was unbiased. In contrast to phenylalkylamines and calcimimetic B analogues, AC-265347 did not promote trafficking of a loss-of-expression, naturally occurring, CaS receptor mutation (G670E). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The ability of R,R-calcimimetic B and AC-265347 to bias signalling towards pERK1/2 and IP1 accumulation may explain their suppression of PTH levels in vivo at concentrations that have no effect on serum calcitonin levels. The demonstration that AC-265347 promotes CaS receptor receptor signalling, but not trafficking reveals a novel profile of ligand-biased modulation at CaS receptors The identification of allosteric modulators that bias CaS receptor signalling towards distinct intracellular pathways provides an opportunity to develop desirable biased signalling profiles in vivo for mediating selective physiological responses. PMID:25220431

  3. Disruption of integrin-fibronectin complexes by allosteric but not ligand-mimetic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mould, A Paul; Craig, Susan E; Byron, Sarah K; Humphries, Martin J; Jowitt, Thomas A

    2014-12-15

    Failure of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-based inhibitors to reverse integrin-ligand binding has been reported, but the prevalence of this phenomenon among integrin heterodimers is currently unknown. In the present study we have investigated the interaction of four different RGD-binding integrins (α5β1, αVβ1, αVβ3 and αVβ6) with fibronectin (FN) using surface plasmon resonance. The ability of inhibitors to reverse ligand binding was assessed by their capacity to increase the dissociation rate of pre-formed integrin-FN complexes. For all four receptors we showed that RGD-based inhibitors (such as cilengitide) were completely unable to increase the dissociation rate. Formation of the non-reversible state occurred very rapidly and did not rely on the time-dependent formation of a high-affinity state of the integrin, or the integrin leg regions. In contrast with RGD-based inhibitors, Ca2+ (but not Mg2+) was able to greatly increase the dissociation rate of integrin-FN complexes, with a half-maximal response at ~0.4 mM Ca2+ for αVβ3-FN. The effect of Ca2+ was overcome by co-addition of Mn2+, but not Mg2+. A stimulatory anti-β1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) abrogated the effect of Ca2+ on α5β1-FN complexes; conversely, a function-blocking mAb mimicked the effect of Ca2+. These results imply that Ca2+ acts allosterically, probably through binding to the adjacent metal-ion-dependent adhesion site (ADMIDAS), and that the α1 helix in the β subunit I domain is the key element affected by allosteric modulators. The data suggest an explanation for the limited clinical efficacy of RGD-based integrin antagonists, and we propose that allosteric antagonists could prove to be of greater therapeutic benefit.

  4. Allosteric models for multimeric proteins: oxygen-linked effector binding in hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Menze, Michael A; Hellmann, Nadja; Decker, Heinz; Grieshaber, Manfred K

    2005-08-02

    In many crustaceans, changing concentrations of several low molecular weight compounds modulates hemocyanin oxygen binding, resulting in lower or higher oxygen affinities of the pigment. The nonphysiological effector caffeine and the physiological modulator urate, the latter accumulating in the hemolymph of the lobster Homarus vulgaris during hypoxia, increase hemocyanin oxygen affinity and decrease cooperativity of oxygen binding. To derive a model that describes the mechanism of allosteric interaction between hemocyanin and oxygen in the presence of urate or caffeine, studies of oxygen, urate, and caffeine binding to hemocyanin were performed. Exposure of lobster hemocyanin to various pH values between 7.25 and 8.15 resulted in a decrease of p50. In this pH interval, p50 decreases from 95 to 11 Torr without effectors and from 49 to 6 Torr and from 34 to 5 Torr in the presence of 1 mM urate or caffeine, respectively. Thus, the allosteric effects induced by protons and urate or caffeine are coupled. In contrast, isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal any differences in binding enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) for urate or caffeine under either normoxic or hypoxic conditions at different pH values. Despite these apparently conflicting results, they can be explained by the nested MWC model if two different types of modulator binding sites are assumed, an allosteric and a nonallosteric type of site. Simulations of in vivo conditions with this model indicate that the naturally occurring modulator urate is physiologically relevant in H. vulgaris only during hypoxic conditions, i.e., either during environmental oxygen limitation or extensive exercise.

  5. Allosteric modulation of nicotinic and GABAA receptor subtypes differentially modify autism-like behaviors in the BTBR mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryan F; Tran, Minhtam B; Hogenkamp, Derk J; Ayala, Narielle L; Johnstone, Timothy; Dunnigan, Andrew J; Gee, Timothy K; Gee, Kelvin W

    2017-08-24

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with two core symptoms (social communication deficits and stereotyped repetitive behaviors) in addition to a number of comorbidities. There are no FDA-approved drugs for the core symptoms and the changes that underlie these behaviors are not fully understood. One hypothesis is an imbalance of the excitation (E)/inhibition (I) ratio with excessive E and diminished I occurring in specific neuronal circuits. Data suggests that both gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) significantly impact E/I. BTBR T(+)tf/J (BTBR) mice are a model that display an autism-like phenotype with impaired social interaction and stereotyped behavior. A β2/3-subunit containing GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subtype selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM), 2-261, and an α7 nAChR subtype selective PAM, AVL-3288, were tested in social approach and repetitive self-grooming paradigms. 2-261 was active in the social approach but not the self-grooming paradigm, whereas AVL-3288 was active in both. Neither compound impaired locomotor activity. Modulating α7 nAChRs alone may be sufficient to correct these behavioral and cognitive deficits. GABAergic and nicotinic compounds are already in various stages of clinical testing for treatment of the core symptoms and comorbidities associated with ASD. Our findings and those of others suggest that compounds that have selective activities at GABAAR subtypes and the α7 nAChR may address not only the core symptoms, but many of the associated comorbidities as well and warrant further investigation in other models of ASD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rational Design of Potent, Small, Synthetic Allosteric Inhibitors of Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Preetpal Singh; Liang, Aiye; Mehta, Akul Y.; Abdel Aziz, May H.; Zhou, Qibing; Desai, Umesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Thrombin is a key enzyme targeted by the majority of current anticoagulants that are direct inhibitors. Allosteric inhibition of thrombin may offer a major advantage of finely tuned regulation. We present here sulfated benzofurans as the first examples of potent, small allosteric inhibitors of thrombin. A sulfated benzofuran library of 15 sulfated monomers and 13 sulfated dimers with different charged, polar and hydrophobic substituents was studied in this work. Synthesis of the sulfated benzofurans was achieved through a multiple step, highly branched strategy, which culminated with microwave-assisted chemical sulfation. Of the 28 potential inhibitors, eleven exhibited reasonable inhibition of human α-thrombin at pH 7.4. Structure activity relationship analysis indicated that sulfation at the 5-position of the benzofuran scaffold was essential for targeting thrombin. A t-butyl 5-sulfated benzofuran derivative was found to be the most potent thrombin inhibitor with an IC50 of 7.3 μM under physiologically relevant conditions. Michaelis-Menten studies showed an allosteric inhibition phenomenon. Plasma clotting assays indicate that the sulfated benzofurans prolong both the activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time. Overall, this work puts forward sulfated benzofurans as the first small, synthetic molecules as powerful lead compounds for the design of a new class of allosteric inhibitors of thrombin. PMID:21714536

  7. NMR reveals a dynamic allosteric pathway in thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Lindsey D.; Fuglestad, Brian; Stearns, Kyle; Tonelli, Marco; Fenwick, R. Bryn; Markwick, Phineus R. L.; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Although serine proteases are found ubiquitously in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, and they comprise the largest of all of the peptidase families, their dynamic motions remain obscure. The backbone dynamics of the coagulation serine protease, apo-thrombin (S195M-thrombin), were compared to the substrate-bound form (PPACK-thrombin). R1, R2, 15N-{1H}NOEs, and relaxation dispersion NMR experiments were measured to capture motions across the ps to ms timescale. The ps-ns motions were not significantly altered upon substrate binding. The relaxation dispersion data revealed that apo-thrombin is highly dynamic, with μs-ms motions throughout the molecule. The region around the N-terminus of the heavy chain, the Na+-binding loop, and the 170 s loop, all of which are implicated in allosteric coupling between effector binding sites and the active site, were dynamic primarily in the apo-form. Most of the loops surrounding the active site become more ordered upon PPACK-binding, but residues in the N-terminal part of the heavy chain, the γ-loop, and anion-binding exosite 1, the main allosteric binding site, retain μs-ms motions. These residues form a dynamic allosteric pathway connecting the active site to the main allosteric site that remains in the substrate-bound form. PMID:28059082

  8. Molecular mechanism of allosteric substrate activation in a thiamine diphosphate-dependent decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Versées, Wim; Spaepen, Stijn; Wood, Martin D H; Leeper, Finian J; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steyaert, Jan

    2007-11-30

    Thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes are involved in a wide variety of metabolic pathways. The molecular mechanism behind active site communication and substrate activation, observed in some of these enzymes, has since long been an area of debate. Here, we report the crystal structures of a phenylpyruvate decarboxylase in complex with its substrates and a covalent reaction intermediate analogue. These structures reveal the regulatory site and unveil the mechanism of allosteric substrate activation. This signal transduction relies on quaternary structure reorganizations, domain rotations, and a pathway of local conformational changes that are relayed from the regulatory site to the active site. The current findings thus uncover the molecular mechanism by which the binding of a substrate in the regulatory site is linked to the mounting of the catalytic machinery in the active site in this thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme.

  9. Calcium-Independent Activation of an Allosteric Network in Langerin by Heparin Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hanske, Jonas; Wawrzinek, Robert; Geissner, Andreas; Wamhoff, Eike-Christian; Sellrie, Katrin; Schmidt, Henrik; Seeberger, Peter H; Rademacher, Christoph

    2017-07-04

    The C-type lectin receptor Langerin is a glycan-binding protein that serves as an uptake receptor on Langerhans cells and is essential for the formation of Birbeck granules. Whereas most Langerin ligands are recognized by a canonical Ca(2+) -dependent binding site, heparins have been proposed to make additional contacts to a secondary, Ca(2+) -independent site. Glycan array screening and biomolecular NMR spectroscopy were employed to investigate the molecular mechanism of these interactions. We observed that binding of heparin hexasaccharides to a secondary site did not require the presence of Ca(2+) and activated a previously identified intradomain allosteric network of Langerin (thus far only associated with Ca(2+) affinity and release). We propose a communication hub between these two binding sites, which sheds new light on modulatory functions of Langerin-heparin interactions. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Allosteric mechanisms can be distinguished using structural mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dyachenko, Andrey; Gruber, Ranit; Shimon, Liat; Horovitz, Amnon; Sharon, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The activity of many proteins, including metabolic enzymes, molecular machines, and ion channels, is often regulated by conformational changes that are induced or stabilized by ligand binding. In cases of multimeric proteins, such allosteric regulation has often been described by the concerted Monod–Wyman–Changeux and sequential Koshland–Némethy–Filmer classic models of cooperativity. Despite the important functional implications of the mechanism of cooperativity, it has been impossible in many cases to distinguish between these various allosteric models using ensemble measurements of ligand binding in bulk protein solutions. Here, we demonstrate that structural MS offers a way to break this impasse by providing the full distribution of ligand-bound states of a protein complex. Given this distribution, it is possible to determine all the binding constants of a ligand to a highly multimeric cooperative system, and thereby infer its allosteric mechanism. Our approach to the dissection of allosteric mechanisms relies on advances in MS—which provide the required resolution of ligand-bound states—and in data analysis. We validated our approach using the well-characterized Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL, a double-heptameric ring containing 14 ATP binding sites, which has become a paradigm for molecular machines. The values of the 14 binding constants of ATP to GroEL were determined, and the ATP-loading pathway of the chaperone was characterized. The methodology and analyses presented here are directly applicable to numerous other cooperative systems and are therefore expected to promote further research on allosteric systems. PMID:23589876

  11. Allosteric sensitization of nicotinic receptors by galantamine, a new treatment strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Maelicke, A; Samochocki, M; Jostock, R; Fehrenbacher, A; Ludwig, J; Albuquerque, E X; Zerlin, M

    2001-02-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors are the only approved drug treatment for patients with mild to moderately severe Alzheimer's disease. Interestingly, the clinical potency of these drugs does not correlate well with their activity as cholinesterase inhibitors, nor is their action as short lived as would be expected from purely symptomatic treatment. A few cholinesterase inhibitors, including galantamine, produce beneficial effects even after drug treatment has been terminated. These effects assume modes of action other than mere esterase inhibition and are capable of inducing systemic changes. We have recently discovered a mechanism that could account, at least in part, for the above-mentioned unexpected properties of some cholinesterase inhibitors. We have found that a subgroup of cholinesterase inhibitors, including galantamine but excluding tacrine, directly interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These compounds, named allosterically potentiating ligands, sensitize nicotinic receptors by increasing the probability of channel opening induced by acetylcholine and nicotinic agonists and by slowing down receptor desensitization. The allosterically potentiating ligand action, which is not necessarily associated with cholinesterase inhibition, has been demonstrated by whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to occur in natural murine and human neurons and in murine and human cell lines expressing various subtypes of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  12. Thermal activation of ‘allosteric-like’ large-scale motions in a eukaryotic Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Katava, Marina; Maccarini, Marco; Villain, Guillaume; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Sztucki, Michael; Ivanova, Oxana; Madern, Dominique; Sterpone, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Conformational changes occurring during the enzymatic turnover are essential for the regulation of protein functionality. Individuating the protein regions involved in these changes and the associated mechanical modes is still a challenge at both experimental and theoretical levels. We present here a detailed investigation of the thermal activation of the functional modes and conformational changes in a eukaryotic Lactate Dehydrogenase enzyme (LDH). Neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics simulations were used to uncover the characteristic length- and timescales of the LDH nanoscale motions in the apo state. The modes involving the catalytic loop and the mobile region around the binding site are activated at room temperature, and match the allosteric reorganisation of bacterial LDHs. In a temperature window of about 15 degrees, these modes render the protein flexible enough and capable of reorganising the active site toward reactive configurations. On the other hand an excess of thermal excitation leads to the distortion of the protein matrix with a possible anti-catalytic effect. Thus, the temperature activates eukaryotic LDHs via the same conformational changes observed in the allosteric bacterial LDHs. Our investigation provides an extended molecular picture of eukaryotic LDH’s conformational landscape that enriches the static view based on crystallographic studies alone. PMID:28112231

  13. Allosteric control of an ionotropic glutamate receptor with an optical switch.

    PubMed

    Volgraf, Matthew; Gorostiza, Pau; Numano, Rika; Kramer, Richard H; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Trauner, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The precise regulation of protein activity is fundamental to life. The allosteric control of an active site by a remote regulatory binding site is a mechanism of regulation found across protein classes, from enzymes to motors to signaling proteins. We describe a general approach for manipulating allosteric control using synthetic optical switches. Our strategy is exemplified by a ligand-gated ion channel of central importance in neuroscience, the ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR). Using structure-based design, we have modified its ubiquitous clamshell-type ligand-binding domain to develop a light-activated channel, which we call LiGluR. An agonist is covalently tethered to the protein through an azobenzene moiety, which functions as the optical switch. The agonist is reversibly presented to the binding site upon photoisomerization, initiating clamshell domain closure and concomitant channel gating. Photoswitching occurs on a millisecond timescale, with channel conductances that reflect the photostationary state of the azobenzene at a given wavelength. Our device has potential uses not only in biology but also in bioelectronics and nanotechnology.

  14. Thermal activation of 'allosteric-like' large-scale motions in a eukaryotic Lactate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Katava, Marina; Maccarini, Marco; Villain, Guillaume; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Sztucki, Michael; Ivanova, Oxana; Madern, Dominique; Sterpone, Fabio

    2017-01-23

    Conformational changes occurring during the enzymatic turnover are essential for the regulation of protein functionality. Individuating the protein regions involved in these changes and the associated mechanical modes is still a challenge at both experimental and theoretical levels. We present here a detailed investigation of the thermal activation of the functional modes and conformational changes in a eukaryotic Lactate Dehydrogenase enzyme (LDH). Neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics simulations were used to uncover the characteristic length- and timescales of the LDH nanoscale motions in the apo state. The modes involving the catalytic loop and the mobile region around the binding site are activated at room temperature, and match the allosteric reorganisation of bacterial LDHs. In a temperature window of about 15 degrees, these modes render the protein flexible enough and capable of reorganising the active site toward reactive configurations. On the other hand an excess of thermal excitation leads to the distortion of the protein matrix with a possible anti-catalytic effect. Thus, the temperature activates eukaryotic LDHs via the same conformational changes observed in the allosteric bacterial LDHs. Our investigation provides an extended molecular picture of eukaryotic LDH's conformational landscape that enriches the static view based on crystallographic studies alone.

  15. De Novo Design of an Allosteric Metalloprotein Assembly with Strained Disulfide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Churchfield, Lewis A; Medina-Morales, Annette; Brodin, Jeffrey D; Perez, Alfredo; Tezcan, F Akif

    2016-10-12

    A major goal in metalloprotein design is to build protein scaffolds from scratch that allow precise control over metal coordination. A particular challenge in this regard is the construction of allosteric systems in which metal coordination equilibria are coupled to other chemical events that take place elsewhere in the protein scaffold. We previously developed a metal-templated self-assembly strategy (MeTIR) to build supramolecular protein complexes with tailorable interfaces from monomeric building blocks. Here, using this strategy, we have incorporated multiple disulfide bonds into the interfaces of a Zn-templated cytochrome cb562 assembly in order to create mechanical strain on the quaternary structural level. Structural and biophysical analyses indicate that this strain leads to an allosteric system in which Zn(2+) binding and dissociation are remotely coupled to the formation and breakage of a disulfide bond over a distance of >14 Å. The breakage of this strained bond upon Zn(2+) dissociation occurs in the absence of any reductants, apparently through a hydrolytic mechanism that generates a sulfenic acid/thiol pair.

  16. Allosteric role of the large-scale domain opening in biological catch-binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2009-05-01

    The proposed model demonstrates the allosteric role of the two-domain region of the receptor protein in the increased lifetimes of biological receptor/ligand bonds subjected to an external force. The interaction between the domains is represented by a bounded potential, containing two minima corresponding to the attached and separated conformations of the two protein domains. The dissociative potential with a single minimum describing receptor/ligand binding fluctuates between deep and shallow states, depending on whether the domains are attached or separated. A number of valuable analytic expressions are derived and are used to interpret experimental data for two catch bonds. The P-selectin/P-selectin-glycoprotein-ligand-1 (PSGL-1) bond is controlled by the interface between the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and lectin domains of P-selectin, and the type 1 fimbrial adhesive protein (FimH)/mannose bond is governed by the interface between the lectin and pilin domains of FimH. Catch-binding occurs in these systems when the external force stretches the receptor proteins and increases the interdomain distance. The allosteric effect is supported by independent measurements, in which the domains are kept separated by attachment of another ligand. The proposed model accurately describes the experimentally observed anomalous behavior of the lifetimes of the P-selectin/PSGL-1 and FimH/mannose complexes as a function of applied force and provides valuable insights into the mechanism of catch-binding.

  17. Computational Tools for Allosteric Drug Discovery: Site Identification and Focus Library Design.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenkang; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Allostery is an intrinsic phenomenon of biological macromolecules involving regulation and/or signal transduction induced by a ligand binding to an allosteric site distinct from a molecule's active site. Allosteric drugs are currently receiving increased attention in drug discovery because drugs that target allosteric sites can provide important advantages over the corresponding orthosteric drugs including specific subtype selectivity within receptor families. Consequently, targeting allosteric sites, instead of orthosteric sites, can reduce drug-related side effects and toxicity. On the down side, allosteric drug discovery can be more challenging than traditional orthosteric drug discovery due to difficulties associated with determining the locations of allosteric sites and designing drugs based on these sites and the need for the allosteric effects to propagate through the structure, reach the ligand binding site and elicit a conformational change. In this study, we present computational tools ranging from the identification of potential allosteric sites to the design of "allosteric-like" modulator libraries. These tools may be particularly useful for allosteric drug discovery.

  18. Naturally occurring chemical carcinogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural products are chemicals found in nature which have unique pharmacological effects. Humans are exposed to many of these bioactive naturally occurring chemicals via the air breathed, the water drunk and the food eaten. Exposure also occurs in clinical settings. Naturally occurring chemicals ...

  19. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors.

  20. Surface Sites for Engineering Allosteric Control in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeeyeon; Natarajan, Madhusudan; Nashine, Vishal C.; Socolich, Michael; Vo, Tina; Russ, William P.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Ranganathan, Rama

    2010-01-01

    Statistical analyses of protein families reveal networks of coevolving amino acids that functionally link distantly positioned functional surfaces. Such linkages suggest a concept for engineering allosteric control into proteins: The intramolecular networks of two proteins could be joined across their surface sites such that the activity of one protein might control the activity of the other. We tested this idea by creating PAS-DHFR, a designed chimeric protein that connects a light-sensing signaling domain from a plant member of the Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) family of proteins with Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). With no optimization, PAS-DHFR exhibited light-dependent catalytic activity that depended on the site of connection and on known signaling mechanisms in both proteins. PAS-DHFR serves as a proof of concept for engineering regulatory activities into proteins through interface design at conserved allosteric sites. PMID:18927392

  1. [G-protein-coupled receptors targeting: the allosteric approach].

    PubMed

    Sebag, Julien A; Pantel, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are a major family of drug targets. Essentially all drugs targeting these receptors on the market compete with the endogenous ligand (agonists or antagonists) for binding the receptor. Recently, non-competitive compounds binding to distinct sites from the cognate ligand were documented in various classes of these receptors. These compounds, called allosteric modulators, generally endowed of a better selectivity are able to modulate specifically the endogenous signaling of the receptor. To better understand the promising potential of this class of GPCRs targeting compounds, this review highlights the properties of allosteric modulators, the strategies used to identify them and the challenges associated with the development of these compounds.

  2. An allosteric photoredox catalyst inspired by photosynthetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Lifschitz, Alejo M; Young, Ryan M; Mendez-Arroyo, Jose; Stern, Charlotte L; McGuirk, C Michael; Wasielewski, Michael R; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-03-30

    Biological photosynthetic machinery allosterically regulate light harvesting via conformational and electronic changes at the antenna protein complexes as a response to specific chemical inputs. Fundamental limitations in current approaches to regulating inorganic light-harvesting mimics prevent their use in catalysis. Here we show that a light-harvesting antenna/reaction centre mimic can be regulated by utilizing a coordination framework incorporating antenna hemilabile ligands and assembled via a high-yielding, modular approach. As in nature, allosteric regulation is afforded by coupling the conformational changes to the disruptions in the electrochemical landscape of the framework upon recognition of specific coordinating analytes. The hemilabile ligands enable switching using remarkably mild and redox-inactive inputs, allowing one to regulate the photoredox catalytic activity of the photosynthetic mimic reversibly and in situ. Thus, we demonstrate that bioinspired regulatory mechanisms can be applied to inorganic light-harvesting arrays displaying switchable catalytic properties and with potential uses in solar energy conversion and photonic devices.

  3. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors. PMID:26823026

  4. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-05

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action.

  5. Macrolide antibiotics allosterically predispose the ribosome for translation arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sothiselvam, Shanmugapriya; Liu, Bo; Han, Wei; Ramu, Haripriya; Klepacki, Dorota; Atkinson, Gemma Catherine; Brauer, Age; Remm, Maido; Tenson, Tanel; Schulten, Klaus; Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Translation arrest directed by nascent peptides and small cofactors controls expression of important bacterial and eukaryotic genes, including antibiotic resistance genes, activated by binding of macrolide drugs to the ribosome. Previous studies suggested that specific interactions between the nascent peptide and the antibiotic in the ribosomal exit tunnel play a central role in triggering ribosome stalling. However, here we show that macrolides arrest translation of the truncated ErmDL regulatory peptide when the nascent chain is only three amino acids and therefore is too short to be juxtaposed with the antibiotic. Biochemical probing and molecular dynamics simulations of erythromycin-bound ribosomes showed that the antibiotic in the tunnel allosterically alters the properties of the catalytic center, thereby predisposing the ribosome for halting translation of specific sequences. Our findings offer a new view on the role of small cofactors in the mechanism of translation arrest and reveal an allosteric link between the tunnel and the catalytic center of the ribosome. PMID:24961372

  6. An alternative allosteric pathway in thermophilic methylglyoxal synthase.

    PubMed

    Atabakhshi-Kashi, Mona; Mohammadi, Malihe; Mirhassani, Reihaneh; Dabirmanesh, Bahareh; Sajedi, Reza H; Khajeh, Khosro

    2016-12-01

    Methylglyoxal synthase (MGS) is a homohexameric enzyme responsible for converting dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to methylglyoxal and phosphate in the methylglyoxal bypass of glycolysis. Phosphate acts as an allosteric inhibitor and strong regulator for this enzyme. Previous studies on MGS from Thermus sp. GH5 (TMGS) had indicated a pathway for transmitting the signal through Pro82, Arg97 and Val101 to the active site. The necessity of these residues for heterotropic negative cooperativity between subunits of TMGS were also proposed. In this study, it has been shown that a path via a salt bridge between Arg80 and Asp100 in the narrow dimer interface provides an alternative pathway for transmission of the allosteric inhibitory signal through subunit interfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ensemble Properties of Network Rigidity Reveal Allosteric Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Donald J.; Livesay, Dennis R.; Mottonen, James M.; Vorov, Oleg K.; Istomin, Andrei Y.; Verma, Deeptak

    2015-01-01

    The distance constraint model (DCM) is a unique computational modeling paradigm that integrates mechanical and thermodynamic descriptions of macromolecular structure. That is, network rigidity calculations are used to account for nonadditivity within entropy components, thus restoring the utility of free energy decomposition. The DCM outputs a large number of structural characterizations that collectively allow for quantified stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR) to be identified. In this review, we describe the theoretical underpinnings of the DCM and introduce several common QSFR metrics. Application of the DCM across protein families highlights the sensitivity within the set of protein structure residue-to-residue couplings. Further, we have developed a perturbation method to identify putative allosteric sites, where large changes in QSFR upon rigidification (mimicking ligand-binding) detect sites likely to invoke allosteric changes. PMID:22052496

  8. Looking for the Origin of Allosteric Cooperativity in Metallopolymers.

    PubMed

    Babel, Lucille; Hoang, Thi Nhu Y; Guénée, Laure; Besnard, Céline; Wesolowski, Tomasz A; Humbert-Droz, Marie; Piguet, Claude

    2016-06-06

    The basic concept of allosteric cooperativity used in biology, chemistry and physics states that any change in the intermolecular host-guest interactions operating in multisite receptors can be assigned to intersite interactions. Using lanthanide metals as guests and linear multi-tridentate linear oligomers of variable lengths and geometries as hosts, this work shows that the quantitative modeling of metal loadings requires the consideration of a novel phenomenon originating from solvation processes. It stepwise modulates the intrinsic affinity of each isolated site in multisite receptors, and this without resorting to allosteric cooperativity. An easy-to-handle additive model predicts a negative power law dependence of the intrinsic affinity on the length of the linear metallopolymer. Applied to lanthanidopolymers, the latter common analysis overestimates cooperativity factors by more than two orders of magnitude. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Light-activated DNA binding in a designed allosteric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, Devin; Moffat, Keith; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2008-09-03

    An understanding of how allostery, the conformational coupling of distant functional sites, arises in highly evolvable systems is of considerable interest in areas ranging from cell biology to protein design and signaling networks. We reasoned that the rigidity and defined geometry of an {alpha}-helical domain linker would make it effective as a conduit for allosteric signals. To test this idea, we rationally designed 12 fusions between the naturally photoactive LOV2 domain from Avena sativa phototropin 1 and the Escherichia coli trp repressor. When illuminated, one of the fusions selectively binds operator DNA and protects it from nuclease digestion. The ready success of our rational design strategy suggests that the helical 'allosteric lever arm' is a general scheme for coupling the function of two proteins.

  10. Novel bivalent positive allosteric modulators of AMPA receptor.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, M I; Grigor'ev, V V; Bachurin, S O; Palyulin, V A; Zefirov, N S

    2015-01-01

    A positive allosteric modulator of AMPA receptors has been designed using computer-aided molecular modeling techniques. It possessed a record high experimentally confirmed potency in the picomolar concentration range and belongs to a new type of bivalent AMPA receptor ligands containing bicyclo[3.3.1]nonane scaffold. The suggested structure could serve as a basis for further optimization and development of drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, cognition enhancement, and improvement of memory.

  11. Discovery of a Negative Allosteric Modulator of GABAB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Initialized from the scaffold of CGP7930, an allosteric agonist of GABAB receptors, a series of noncompetitive antagonists were discovered. Among these compounds, compounds 3, 6, and 14 decreased agonist GABA-induced maximal effect of IP3 production in HEK293 cells overexpressing GABAB receptors and Gqi9 proteins without changing the EC50. Compounds 3, 6, and 14 not only inhibited agonist baclofen-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation but also blocked CGP7930-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in HEK293 cells overexpressing GABAB receptors. The results suggested that compounds 3, 6, and 14 are negative allosteric modulators of GABAB receptors. The representative compound 14 decreased GABA-induced IP3 production with IC50 of 37.9 μM and had no effect on other GPCR Class C members such as mGluR1, mGluR2, and mGluR5. Finally, we showed that compound 14 did not bind to the orthosteric binding sites of GABAB receptors, demonstrating that compound 14 negatively modulated GABAB receptors activity as a negative allosteric modulator. PMID:25050158

  12. CGP7930: a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor.

    PubMed

    Adams, C L; Lawrence, A J

    2007-01-01

    CGP7930 (3-(3',5'-Di-tert-butyl-4'-hydroxy)phenyl-2,2-dimethylpropanol) is a positive allosteric modulator of the metabotropic GABAB receptor. CGP7930 has been found to modulate the GABAB receptor in the open, or high affinity, state increasing agonist affinity for the receptor and signal transduction efficacy following agonist stimulation. The GABAB heteromeric subunit B2, involved in signal transduction but not ligand binding, seems to be the site of action of CGP7930 and similar allosteric modulators. When administered alone in naïve animals, CGP7930 acts as an anxiolytic in rodents without other overt behavioral effects and has also been demonstrated to reduce self-administration of nicotine, cocaine, or alcohol in rodents, suggesting that "fine tuning" of the GABAB receptor by positive allosteric modulators may be able to regulate abuse of these drugs. Baclofen, the GABAB agonist, is currently finding use in treating addiction and various other disorders, but this can result in off-target effects and tolerance. CGP7930 when co-administered with baclofen enhances its potency, which could in theory minimize deleterious effects. Further study of CGP7930 is required, but this compound, and others like it, holds potential in a clinical setting.

  13. Dynamics of allosteric transitions in GroEL

    PubMed Central

    Hyeon, Changbong; Lorimer, George H.; Thirumalai, D.

    2006-01-01

    The chaperonin GroEL-GroES, a machine that helps proteins to fold, cycles through a number of allosteric states, the T state, with high affinity for substrate proteins, the ATP-bound R state, and the R″ (GroEL–ADP–GroES) complex. Here, we use a self-organized polymer model for the GroEL allosteric states and a general structure-based technique to simulate the dynamics of allosteric transitions in two subunits of GroEL and the heptamer. The T → R transition, in which the apical domains undergo counterclockwise motion, is mediated by a multiple salt-bridge switch mechanism, in which a series of salt-bridges break and form. The initial event in the R → R″ transition, during which GroEL rotates clockwise, involves a spectacular outside-in movement of helices K and L that results in K80-D359 salt-bridge formation. In both the transitions there is considerable heterogeneity in the transition pathways. The transition state ensembles (TSEs) connecting the T, R, and R″ states are broad with the TSE for the T → R transition being more plastic than the R → R″ TSE. PMID:17135353

  14. Use of binding enthalpy to drive an allosteric transition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick H; Beckett, Dorothy

    2005-03-01

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor is an allosteric DNA binding protein and is activated by the small molecule bio-5'-AMP. Binding of this small molecule promotes transcription repression complex assembly between the repressor and the biotin operator of the biotin biosynthetic operon. The ability of the adenylate to activate the assembly process reflects its effect on biotin repressor dimerization. Thus concomitant with small molecule binding the free energy of repressor dimerization becomes more favorable by approximately -4 kcal/mol. The structural, dynamic, and energetic changes in the repressor monomer that accompany allosteric activation are not known. In this work the thermodynamics of binding of four allosteric activators to the repressor have been characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry. While binding of two of the effectors results in relatively modest activation of the dimerization process, binding of the other two small molecules, including the physiological effector, leads to large changes in repressor dimerization energetics. Results of the calorimetric measurements indicate that strong effector binding is accompanied by an enthalpically costly transition in the protein. This transition is "paid for" by the enthalpy that would have otherwise been realized from the formation of noncovalent bonds between the ligand and repressor monomer.

  15. Signal peptides are allosteric activators of the protein translocase

    PubMed Central

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Gelis, Ioannis; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.; Economou, Anastassios

    2010-01-01

    Extra-cytoplasmic polypeptides are usually synthesized as “preproteins” carrying aminoterminal, cleavable signal peptides1 and secreted across membranes by translocases. The main bacterial translocase comprises the SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the peripheral ATPase motor SecA2,3. Most proteins destined for the periplasm and beyond are exported post-translationally by SecA2,3. Preprotein targeting to SecA is thought to involve signal peptides4 and chaperones like SecB5,6. Here we reveal that signal peptides have a novel role beyond targeting: they are essential allosteric activators of the translocase. Upon docking on their binding groove on SecA, signal peptides act in trans to drive three successive states: first, “triggering” that drives the translocase to a lower activation energy state; then “trapping” that engages non-native preprotein mature domains docked with high affinity on the secretion apparatus and, finally, “secretion” during which trapped mature domains undergo multiple turnovers of translocation in segments7. A significant contribution by mature domains renders signal peptides less critical in bacterial secretory protein targeting than currently assumed. Rather, it is their function as allosteric activators of the translocase that renders signal peptides essential for protein secretion. A role for signal peptides and targeting sequences as allosteric activators may be universal in protein translocases. PMID:19924216

  16. Allosteric indicator displacement enzyme assay for a cyanogenic glycoside.

    PubMed

    Jose, D Amilan; Elstner, Martin; Schiller, Alexander

    2013-10-18

    Indicator displacement assays (IDAs) represent an elegant approach in supramolecular analytical chemistry. Herein, we report a chemical biosensor for the selective detection of the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin in aqueous solution. The hybrid sensor consists of the enzyme β-glucosidase and a boronic acid appended viologen together with a fluorescent reporter dye. β-Glucosidase degrades the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin into hydrogen cyanide, glucose, and benzaldehyde. Only the released cyanide binds at the allosteric site of the receptor (boronic acid) thereby inducing changes in the affinity of a formerly bound fluorescent indicator dye at the other side of the receptor. Thus, the sensing probe performs as allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) for cyanide in water. Interference studies with inorganic anions and glucose revealed that cyanide is solely responsible for the change in the fluorescent signal. DFT calculations on a model compound revealed a 1:1 binding ratio of the boronic acid and cyanide ion. The fluorescent enzyme assay for β-glucosidase uses amygdalin as natural substrate and allows measuring Michaelis-Menten kinetics in microtiter plates. The allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) probe can also be used to detect cyanide traces in commercial amygdalin samples.

  17. Conformationally Selective RNA Aptamers Allosterically Modulate the β2-Adrenoceptor

    PubMed Central

    Kahsai, Alem W.; Wisler, James W.; Lee, Jungmin; Ahn, Seungkirl; Cahill, Thomas J.; Dennison, S. Moses; Staus, Dean P.; Thomsen, Alex R. B.; Anasti, Kara M.; Pani, Biswaranjan; Wingler, Laura M.; Desai, Hemant; Bompiani, Kristin M.; Strachan, Ryan T.; Qin, Xiaoxia; Alam, S. Munir; Sullenger, Bruce A.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands function by stabilizing multiple, functionally distinct receptor conformations. This property underlies how “biased agonists” activate specific subsets of a given receptor’s signaling profile. However, stabilization of distinct active GPCR conformations to enable structural characterization of mechanisms underlying GPCR activation remains difficult. These challenges have accentuated the need for receptor tools that allosterically stabilize and regulate receptor function via unique, previously unappreciated mechanisms. Here, utilizing a highly diverse RNA library combined with advanced selection strategies involving state-of-the-art next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics analyses, we identify RNA aptamers that bind a prototypical GPCR, β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR). Using biochemical, pharmacological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that these aptamers bind with nanomolar affinity at defined surfaces of the receptor, allosterically stabilizing active, inactive, and ligand-specific receptor conformations. The discovery of RNA aptamers as allosteric GPCR modulators significantly expands the diversity of ligands available to study the structural and functional regulation of GPCRs. PMID:27398998

  18. Prediction of allosteric sites on protein surfaces with an elastic-network-model-based thermodynamic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ji Guo; Qi, Li Sheng; Li, Chun Hua; Zhu, Yan Ying; Du, Hui Jing; Hou, Yan Xue; Hao, Rui; Wang, Ji Hua

    2014-08-01

    Allostery is a rapid and efficient way in many biological processes to regulate protein functions, where binding of an effector at the allosteric site alters the activity and function at a distant active site. Allosteric regulation of protein biological functions provides a promising strategy for novel drug design. However, how to effectively identify the allosteric sites remains one of the major challenges for allosteric drug design. In the present work, a thermodynamic method based on the elastic network model was proposed to predict the allosteric sites on the protein surface. In our method, the thermodynamic coupling between the allosteric and active sites was considered, and then the allosteric sites were identified as those where the binding of an effector molecule induces a large change in the binding free energy of the protein with its ligand. Using the proposed method, two proteins, i.e., the 70 kD heat shock protein (Hsp70) and GluA2 alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor, were studied and the allosteric sites on the protein surface were successfully identified. The predicted results are consistent with the available experimental data, which indicates that our method is a simple yet effective approach for the identification of allosteric sites on proteins.

  19. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin.

    PubMed

    Eghorn, Laura F; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Bay, Tina; Higgins, David; Frølund, Bente; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-10-05

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA function at δ-containing GABAA receptors, and the naturally occurring flavonoid catechin. These compounds increased [3H]NCS-382 binding to 185-272% in high micromolar concentrations. Monastrol and (+)-catechin significantly reduced [3H]NCS-382 dissociation rates and induced conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed modulation was critically probe-dependent. Both monastrol and (+)-catechin were agonists at recombinant α4β3δ receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. When monastrol and GHB were co-applied no changes were seen compared to the individual responses. In summary, we have identified the compounds monastrol and catechin as the first allosteric modulators of GHB high-affinity binding sites. Despite their relatively weak affinity, these compounds may aid in further characterization of the GHB high-affinity sites that are likely to represent certain GABAA receptors.

  20. A Mechanistic Understanding of Allosteric Immune Escape Pathways in the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Anurag; Tian, Jianhui; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Korber, Bette; Gnanakaran, S.

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope (Env) spike, which consists of a compact, heterodimeric trimer of the glycoproteins gp120 and gp41, is the target of neutralizing antibodies. However, the high mutation rate of HIV-1 and plasticity of Env facilitates viral evasion from neutralizing antibodies through various mechanisms. Mutations that are distant from the antibody binding site can lead to escape, probably by changing the conformation or dynamics of Env; however, these changes are difficult to identify and define mechanistically. Here we describe a network analysis-based approach to identify potential allosteric immune evasion mechanisms using three known HIV-1 Env gp120 protein structures from two different clades, B and C. First, correlation and principal component analyses of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations identified a high degree of long-distance coupled motions that exist between functionally distant regions within the intrinsic dynamics of the gp120 core, supporting the presence of long-distance communication in the protein. Then, by integrating MD simulations with network theory, we identified the optimal and suboptimal communication pathways and modules within the gp120 core. The results unveil both strain-dependent and -independent characteristics of the communication pathways in gp120. We show that within the context of three structurally homologous gp120 cores, the optimal pathway for communication is sequence sensitive, i.e. a suboptimal pathway in one strain becomes the optimal pathway in another strain. Yet the identification of conserved elements within these communication pathways, termed inter-modular hotspots, could present a new opportunity for immunogen design, as this could be an additional mechanism that HIV-1 uses to shield vulnerable antibody targets in Env that induce neutralizing antibody breadth. PMID:23696718

  1. A naturally occurring insertion of a single amino acid rewires transcriptional regulation by glucocorticoid receptor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Watson, Lisa C; Cooper, Samantha B; Pufall, Miles A; Liu, Jennifer S; Borzym, Katja; Vingron, Martin; Yamamoto, Keith R; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2013-10-29

    In addition to guiding proteins to defined genomic loci, DNA can act as an allosteric ligand that influences protein structure and activity. Here we compared genome-wide binding, transcriptional regulation, and, using NMR, the conformation of two glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoforms that differ by a single amino acid insertion in the lever arm, a domain that adopts DNA sequence-specific conformations. We show that these isoforms differentially regulate gene expression levels through two mechanisms: differential DNA binding and altered communication between GR domains. Our studies suggest a versatile role for DNA in both modulating GR activity and also in directing the use of GR isoforms. We propose that the lever arm is a "fulcrum" for bidirectional allosteric signaling, conferring conformational changes in the DNA reading head that influence DNA sequence selectivity, as well as conferring changes in the dimerization domain that connect functionally with remote regulatory surfaces, thereby influencing which genes are regulated and the magnitude of their regulation.

  2. Allosteric Regulation of the Hsp90 Dynamics and Stability by Client Recruiter Cochaperones: Protein Structure Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Blacklock, Kristin; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental role of the Hsp90 chaperone in supporting functional activity of diverse protein clients is anchored by specific cochaperones. A family of immune sensing client proteins is delivered to the Hsp90 system with the aid of cochaperones Sgt1 and Rar1 that act cooperatively with Hsp90 to form allosterically regulated dynamic complexes. In this work, functional dynamics and protein structure network modeling are combined to dissect molecular mechanisms of Hsp90 regulation by the client recruiter cochaperones. Dynamic signatures of the Hsp90-cochaperone complexes are manifested in differential modulation of the conformational mobility in the Hsp90 lid motif. Consistent with the experiments, we have determined that targeted reorganization of the lid dynamics is a unifying characteristic of the client recruiter cochaperones. Protein network analysis of the essential conformational space of the Hsp90-cochaperone motions has identified structurally stable interaction communities, interfacial hubs and key mediating residues of allosteric communication pathways that act concertedly with the shifts in conformational equilibrium. The results have shown that client recruiter cochaperones can orchestrate global changes in the dynamics and stability of the interaction networks that could enhance the ATPase activity and assist in the client recruitment. The network analysis has recapitulated a broad range of structural and mutagenesis experiments, particularly clarifying the elusive role of Rar1 as a regulator of the Hsp90 interactions and a stability enhancer of the Hsp90-cochaperone complexes. Small-world organization of the interaction networks in the Hsp90 regulatory complexes gives rise to a strong correspondence between highly connected local interfacial hubs, global mediator residues of allosteric interactions and key functional hot spots of the Hsp90 activity. We have found that cochaperone-induced conformational changes in Hsp90 may be determined by specific

  3. Selective GABAA α5 Positive Allosteric Modulators Improve Cognitive Function in Aged Rats with Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ming Teng; Rosenzweig-Lipson, Sharon; Gallagher, Michela

    2012-01-01

    A condition of excess activity in the hippocampal formation is observed in the aging brain and in conditions that confer additional risk during aging for Alzheimer’s disease. Compounds that act as positive allosteric modulators at GABAA α5 receptors might be useful in targeting this condition because GABAA α5 receptors mediate tonic inhibition of principal neurons in the affected network. While agents to improve cognitive function in the past focused on inverse agonists, which are negative allosteric modulators at GABAA α5 receptors, research supporting that approach used only young animals and predated current evidence for excessive hippocampal activity in age-related conditions of cognitive impairment. Here, we used two compounds, Compound 44 [6,6-dimethyl-3-(3-hydroxypropyl)thio-1-(thiazol-2-yl)-6,7-dihydro-2-benzothiophen-4(5H)-one] and Compound 6 [methyl 3,5-diphenylpyridazine-4-carboxylate], with functional activity as potentiators of γ-aminobutyric acid at GABAA α5 receptors, to test their ability to improve hippocampal-dependent memory in aged rats with identified cognitive impairment. Improvement was obtained in aged rats across protocols differing in motivational and performance demands and across varying retention intervals. Significant memory improvement occurred after either intracereboventricular infusion with Compound 44 (100 μg) in a water maze task or systemic administration with Compound 6 (3 mg/kg) in a radial arm maze task. Furthermore, systemic administration improved behavioral performance at dosing shown to provide drug exposure in the brain and in vivo receptor occupancy in the hippocampus. These data suggest a novel approach to improve neural network function in clinical conditions of excess hippocampal activity. PMID:22732440

  4. Use of acetylcholine mustard to study allosteric interactions at the M2 muscarinic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hinako; Figueroa, Katherine W.; Ehlert, Frederick J.

    2008-01-01

    We explored the interaction of a nitrogen mustard derivative of acetylcholine with the human M2 muscarinic receptor expressed in CHO cells using the muscarinic radioligand, [3H]N-methylscopolamine. Acetylcholine mustard caused a concentration-dependent, first order loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding at 37°C, with the half maximal rate constant occurring at 24 µM and a maximal rate constant of 0.16 min−1. We examined the effects of various ligands on the rate of alkylation of M2 receptors by acetylcholine mustard. N-methylscopolamine and McN-A-343 (4-(trimethylamino)-2-butynyl-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamate) competitively slowed the rate of alkylation, whereas the inhibition by gallamine reached a plateau at high concentrations, indicating allosteric inhibition. In contrast, WIN 51708 (17-β-hydroxy-17-α-ethynyl-5-α-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole) had no effect. We also measured the inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by acetylcholine mustard at 0°C, conditions under which there is little or no detectable covalent binding. In these experiments, the dissociation constant of the aziridinium ion of acetylcholine mustard was estimated to be 12.3 µM. In contrast, the parent mustard and alcoholic hydrolysis product of acetylcholine mustard were without effect. Our results show that measurement of the effects of ligands on the rate of inactivation of the orthosteric site by a small site-directed electrophile is a powerful method for discriminating competitive inhibition from allosterism. PMID:18682569

  5. Allosteric Modulation of Hormone Release from Thyroxine and Corticosteroid-binding Globulins*

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaoqiang; Loiseau, François; Chan, Wee Lee; Yan, Yahui; Wei, Zhenquan; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Myers, Rebecca M.; Ley, Steven V.; Read, Randy J.; Carrell, Robin W.; Zhou, Aiwu

    2011-01-01

    The release of hormones from thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is regulated by movement of the reactive center loop in and out of the β-sheet A of the molecule. To investigate how these changes are transmitted to the hormone-binding site, we developed a sensitive assay using a synthesized thyroxine fluorophore and solved the crystal structures of reactive loop cleaved TBG together with its complexes with thyroxine, the thyroxine fluorophores, furosemide, and mefenamic acid. Cleavage of the reactive loop results in its complete insertion into the β-sheet A and a substantial but incomplete decrease in binding affinity in both TBG and CBG. We show here that the direct interaction between residue Thr342 of the reactive loop and Tyr241 of the hormone binding site contributes to thyroxine binding and release following reactive loop insertion. However, a much larger effect occurs allosterically due to stretching of the connecting loop to the top of the D helix (hD), as confirmed in TBG with shortening of the loop by three residues, making it insensitive to the S-to-R transition. The transmission of the changes in the hD loop to the binding pocket is seen to involve coherent movements in the s2/3B loop linked to the hD loop by Lys243, which is, in turn, linked to the s4/5B loop, flanking the thyroxine-binding site, by Arg378. Overall, the coordinated movements of the reactive loop, hD, and the hormone binding site allow the allosteric regulation of hormone release, as with the modulation demonstrated here in response to changes in temperature. PMID:21325280

  6. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of a Mechanism of Allosteric Signal Transmission in Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Makarov, G I; Golovin, A V; Sumbatyan, N V; Bogdanov, A A

    2015-08-01

    The ribosome is a molecular machine that synthesizes all cellular proteins via translation of genetic information encoded in polynucleotide chain of messenger RNA. Transition between different stages of the ribosome working cycle is strictly coordinated by changes in structure and mutual position both of subunits of the ribosome and its ligands. Therein, information regarding structural transformations is transmitted between functional centers of the ribosome through specific signals. Usually, functional centers of ribosomes are located at a distance reaching up to several tens of angstroms, and it is believed that such signals are transduced allosterically. In our study, we attempted to answer the question of how allosteric signal can be transmitted from one of the so-called sensory elements of ribosomal tunnel (RT) to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC). A segment of RT wall from the E. coli ribosome composed of nucleotide residues A2058, A2059, m(2)A2503, G2061, A2062, and C2063 of its 23S rRNA was examined by molecular dynamics simulations. It was found that a potential signal transduction pathway A2058-C2063 acted as a dynamic ensemble of interdependent conformational states, wherein cascade-like changes can occur. It was assumed that structural rearrangement in the A2058-C2063 RT segment results in reversible inactivation of PTC due to a strong stacking contact between functionally important U2585 residue of the PTC and nucleotide residue C2063. A potential role for the observed conformational transition in the A2058-C2063 segment for regulating ribosome activity is discussed.

  7. Kinetic response of a photoperturbed allosteric protein.

    PubMed

    Buchli, Brigitte; Waldauer, Steven A; Walser, Reto; Donten, Mateusz L; Pfister, Rolf; Blöchliger, Nicolas; Steiner, Sandra; Caflisch, Amedeo; Zerbe, Oliver; Hamm, Peter

    2013-07-16

    By covalently linking an azobenzene photoswitch across the binding groove of a PDZ domain, a conformational transition, similar to the one occurring upon ligand binding to the unmodified domain, can be initiated on a picosecond timescale by a laser pulse. The protein structures have been characterized in the two photoswitch states through NMR spectroscopy and the transition between them through ultrafast IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The binding groove opens on a 100-ns timescale in a highly nonexponential manner, and the molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the process is governed by the rearrangement of the water network on the protein surface. We propose this rearrangement of the water network to be another possible mechanism of allostery.

  8. The Second Extracellular Loop of the Adenosine A1 Receptor Mediates Activity of Allosteric Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Dylan P.; McRobb, Fiona M.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Purdy, Michael; Figler, Heidi; Marshall, Melissa A.; Chordia, Mahendra; Figler, Robert; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric enhancers of the adenosine A1 receptor amplify signaling by orthosteric agonists. Allosteric enhancers are appealing drug candidates because their activity requires that the orthosteric site be occupied by an agonist, thereby conferring specificity to stressed or injured tissues that produce adenosine. To explore the mechanism of allosteric enhancer activity, we examined their action on several A1 receptor constructs, including (1) species variants, (2) species chimeras, (3) alanine scanning mutants, and (4) site-specific mutants. These findings were combined with homology modeling of the A1 receptor and in silico screening of an allosteric enhancer library. The binding modes of known docked allosteric enhancers correlated with the known structure-activity relationship, suggesting that these allosteric enhancers bind to a pocket formed by the second extracellular loop, flanked by residues S150 and M162. We propose a model in which this vestibule controls the entry and efflux of agonists from the orthosteric site and agonist binding elicits a conformational change that enables allosteric enhancer binding. This model provides a mechanism for the observations that allosteric enhancers slow the dissociation of orthosteric agonists but not antagonists. PMID:24217444

  9. Discovery of multiple hidden allosteric sites by combining Markov state models and experiments.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Gregory R; Bolin, Eric R; Hart, Kathryn M; Maguire, Brendan C; Marqusee, Susan

    2015-03-03

    The discovery of drug-like molecules that bind pockets in proteins that are not present in crystallographic structures yet exert allosteric control over activity has generated great interest in designing pharmaceuticals that exploit allosteric effects. However, there have only been a small number of successes, so the therapeutic potential of these pockets--called hidden allosteric sites--remains unclear. One challenge for assessing their utility is that rational drug design approaches require foreknowledge of the target site, but most hidden allosteric sites are only discovered when a small molecule is found to stabilize them. We present a means of decoupling the identification of hidden allosteric sites from the discovery of drugs that bind them by drawing on new developments in Markov state modeling that provide unprecedented access to microsecond- to millisecond-timescale fluctuations of a protein's structure. Visualizing these fluctuations allows us to identify potential hidden allosteric sites, which we then test via thiol labeling experiments. Application of these methods reveals multiple hidden allosteric sites in an important antibiotic target--TEM-1 β-lactamase. This result supports the hypothesis that there are many as yet undiscovered hidden allosteric sites and suggests our methodology can identify such sites, providing a starting point for future drug design efforts. More generally, our results demonstrate the power of using Markov state models to guide experiments.

  10. The impact of ions on allosteric functions in human liver pyruvate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Alontaga, Aileen Y.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental designs used to monitor the magnitude of an allosteric response can greatly influence observed values. We report here the impact of buffer, monovalent cation, divalent cation and anion on the magnitude of the allosteric regulation of the affinity of human liver pyruvate kinase (hL-PYK) for substrate, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The magnitudes of the allosteric activation by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (Fru-1,6-BP) and the allosteric inhibition by alanine are independent of most, but not all buffers tested. However, these magnitudes are dependent on whether Mg2+ or Mn2+ is included as the divalent cation. In the presence of Mn2+, any change in Kapp-PEP caused by Fru-1,6-BP is minimal. hL-PYK activity does not appear to require monovalent cation. Monovalent cation binding in the active site impacts PEP affinity with minimum influence on the magnitude of allosteric coupling. However, Na+ and Li+ reduce the magnitude of the allosteric response to Fru-1,6-BP, likely due to mechanisms outside of the active site. Which anion is used to maintain a constant monovalent cation concentration also influences the magnitude of the allosteric response. The value of determining the impact of ions on allosteric function can be appreciated by considering that representative structures used in comparative studies have often been determined using protein crystals grown in diverse buffer and salt conditions. PMID:21609859

  11. Prepaying the entropic cost for allosteric regulation in KIX.

    PubMed

    Law, Sean M; Gagnon, Jessica K; Mapp, Anna K; Brooks, Charles L

    2014-08-19

    The kinase-inducible domain interacting (KIX) domain of the CREB binding protein (CBP) is capable of simultaneously binding two intrinsically disordered transcription factors, such as the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) and c-Myb peptides, at isolated interaction sites. In vitro, the affinity for binding c-Myb is approximately doubled when KIX is in complex with MLL, which suggests a positive cooperative binding mechanism, and the affinity for MLL is also slightly increased when KIX is first bound by c-Myb. Expanding the scope of recent NMR and computational studies, we explore the allosteric mechanism at a detailed molecular level that directly connects the microscopic structural dynamics to the macroscopic shift in binding affinities. To this end, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of free KIX, KIX-c-Myb, MLL-KIX, and MLL-KIX-c-Myb using a topology-based Gō-like model. Our results capture an increase in affinity for the peptide in the allosteric site when KIX is prebound by a complementary effector and both peptides follow an effector-independent folding-and-binding mechanism. More importantly, we discover that MLL binding lowers the entropic cost for c-Myb binding, and vice versa, by stabilizing the L12-G2 loop and the C-terminal region of the α3 helix on KIX. This work demonstrates the importance of entropy in allosteric signaling between promiscuous molecular recognition sites and can inform the rational design of small molecule stabilizers to target important regions of conformationally dynamic proteins.

  12. Designing allosteric control into enzymes by chemical rescue of structure.

    PubMed

    Deckert, Katelyn; Budiardjo, S Jimmy; Brunner, Luke C; Lovell, Scott; Karanicolas, John

    2012-06-20

    Ligand-dependent activity has been engineered into enzymes for purposes ranging from controlling cell morphology to reprogramming cellular signaling pathways. Where these successes have typically fused a naturally allosteric domain to the enzyme of interest, here we instead demonstrate an approach for designing a de novo allosteric effector site directly into the catalytic domain of an enzyme. This approach is distinct from traditional chemical rescue of enzymes in that it relies on disruption and restoration of structure, rather than active site chemistry, as a means to achieve modulate function. We present two examples, W33G in a β-glycosidase enzyme (β-gly) and W492G in a β-glucuronidase enzyme (β-gluc), in which we engineer indole-dependent activity into enzymes by removing a buried tryptophan side chain that serves as a buttress for the active site architecture. In both cases, we observe a loss of function, and in both cases we find that the subsequent addition of indole can be used to restore activity. Through a detailed analysis of β-gly W33G kinetics, we demonstrate that this rescued enzyme is fully functionally equivalent to the corresponding wild-type enzyme. We then present the apo and indole-bound crystal structures of β-gly W33G, which together establish the structural basis for enzyme inactivation and rescue. Finally, we use this designed switch to modulate β-glycosidase activity in living cells using indole. Disruption and recovery of protein structure may represent a general technique for introducing allosteric control into enzymes, and thus may serve as a starting point for building a variety of bioswitches and sensors.

  13. Heme Regulates Allosteric Activation of the Slo1 BK Channel

    PubMed Central

    Horrigan, Frank T.; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2005-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-dependent (Slo1 BK) channels are allosterically activated by membrane depolarization and divalent cations, and possess a rich modulatory repertoire. Recently, intracellular heme has been identified as a potent regulator of Slo1 BK channels (Tang, X.D., R. Xu, M.F. Reynolds, M.L. Garcia, S.H. Heinemann, and T. Hoshi. 2003. Nature. 425:531–535). Here we investigated the mechanism of the regulatory action of heme on heterologously expressed Slo1 BK channels by separating the influences of voltage and divalent cations. In the absence of divalent cations, heme generally decreased ionic currents by shifting the channel's G–V curve toward more depolarized voltages and by rendering the curve less steep. In contrast, gating currents remained largely unaffected by heme. Simulations suggest that a decrease in the strength of allosteric coupling between the voltage sensor and the activation gate and a concomitant stabilization of the open state account for the essential features of the heme action in the absence of divalent ions. At saturating levels of divalent cations, heme remained similarly effective with its influence on the G–V simulated by weakening the coupling of both Ca2+ binding and voltage sensor activation to channel opening. The results thus show that heme dampens the influence of allosteric activators on the activation gate of the Slo1 BK channel. To account for these effects, we consider the possibility that heme binding alters the structure of the RCK gating ring and thereby disrupts both Ca2+- and voltage-dependent gating as well as intrinsic stability of the open state. PMID:15955873

  14. Heme regulates allosteric activation of the Slo1 BK channel.

    PubMed

    Horrigan, Frank T; Heinemann, Stefan H; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2005-07-01

    Large conductance calcium-dependent (Slo1 BK) channels are allosterically activated by membrane depolarization and divalent cations, and possess a rich modulatory repertoire. Recently, intracellular heme has been identified as a potent regulator of Slo1 BK channels (Tang, X.D., R. Xu, M.F. Reynolds, M.L. Garcia, S.H. Heinemann, and T. Hoshi. 2003. Nature. 425:531-535). Here we investigated the mechanism of the regulatory action of heme on heterologously expressed Slo1 BK channels by separating the influences of voltage and divalent cations. In the absence of divalent cations, heme generally decreased ionic currents by shifting the channel's G-V curve toward more depolarized voltages and by rendering the curve less steep. In contrast, gating currents remained largely unaffected by heme. Simulations suggest that a decrease in the strength of allosteric coupling between the voltage sensor and the activation gate and a concomitant stabilization of the open state account for the essential features of the heme action in the absence of divalent ions. At saturating levels of divalent cations, heme remained similarly effective with its influence on the G-V simulated by weakening the coupling of both Ca(2+) binding and voltage sensor activation to channel opening. The results thus show that heme dampens the influence of allosteric activators on the activation gate of the Slo1 BK channel. To account for these effects, we consider the possibility that heme binding alters the structure of the RCK gating ring and thereby disrupts both Ca(2+)- and voltage-dependent gating as well as intrinsic stability of the open state.

  15. Allosteric regulation of glycogen synthase in liver. A physiological dilemma.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, F Q; Gannon, M C

    1993-06-25

    Glycogen synthase catalyzes the transfer of the glucosyl moiety from UDP-glucose to the terminal branch of the glycogen molecule and is considered to be the rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen synthesis. However, under ideal assay conditions, i.e. 37 degrees C with saturating concentrations of UDP-glucose and the activator, glucose-6-P, the maximal catalytic activity of glycogen synthase was only 78% of the in vivo glycogen synthetic rate. Using concentrations of UDP-glucose and glucose-6-P likely to be present in vivo, the rate was only approximately 30%. This prompted us to reassess a possible role of allosteric effectors on synthase activity. Glycogen synthase was assayed at 37 degrees C using dilute, pH 7.0, buffered extracts, initial rate conditions, and UDP-glucose and glucose-6-P concentrations, which approximate those calculated to be present in total liver cell water. Several allosteric effectors were tested. Magnesium and AMP had little effect on activity. Pi, ADP, ATP, and UTP inhibited activity. When a combination of effectors were added at concentrations approximating those present in cell water, synthase activity could account for only 2% of the glycogen synthetic rate. Thus, although allosteric effectors are likely to be playing a major role in regulating synthase enzymic activity in liver cells, to date, a metabolite that can stimulate activity and/or overcome nucleotide inhibition has yet to be identified. If such a metabolite cannot be identified, an additional or alternative pathway for glycogen synthesis must be considered.

  16. Designing Allosteric Control into Enzymes by Chemical Rescue of Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Deckert, Katelyn; Budiardjo, S. Jimmy; Brunner, Luke C.; Lovell, Scott; Karanicolas, John

    2012-08-07

    Ligand-dependent activity has been engineered into enzymes for purposes ranging from controlling cell morphology to reprogramming cellular signaling pathways. Where these successes have typically fused a naturally allosteric domain to the enzyme of interest, here we instead demonstrate an approach for designing a de novo allosteric effector site directly into the catalytic domain of an enzyme. This approach is distinct from traditional chemical rescue of enzymes in that it relies on disruption and restoration of structure, rather than active site chemistry, as a means to achieve modulate function. We present two examples, W33G in a {beta}-glycosidase enzyme ({beta}-gly) and W492G in a {beta}-glucuronidase enzyme ({beta}-gluc), in which we engineer indole-dependent activity into enzymes by removing a buried tryptophan side chain that serves as a buttress for the active site architecture. In both cases, we observe a loss of function, and in both cases we find that the subsequent addition of indole can be used to restore activity. Through a detailed analysis of {beta}-gly W33G kinetics, we demonstrate that this rescued enzyme is fully functionally equivalent to the corresponding wild-type enzyme. We then present the apo and indole-bound crystal structures of {beta}-gly W33G, which together establish the structural basis for enzyme inactivation and rescue. Finally, we use this designed switch to modulate {beta}-glycosidase activity in living cells using indole. Disruption and recovery of protein structure may represent a general technique for introducing allosteric control into enzymes, and thus may serve as a starting point for building a variety of bioswitches and sensors.

  17. Experimental evidence for allosteric modifier saturation as predicted by the bi-substrate Hill equation.

    PubMed

    Hanekom, A J; Hofmeyr, J H S; Snoep, J L; Rohwer, J M

    2006-09-01

    The cooperative enzyme reaction rates predicted by the bi-substrate Hill equation and the bi-substrate Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) equation when allosterically inhibited are compared in silico. Theoretically, the Hill equation predicts that when the maximum inhibitory effect at a certain substrate condition has been reached, an increase in allosteric inhibitor concentration will have no effect on reaction rate, that is the Hill equation shows allosteric inhibitor saturation. This saturating inhibitory effect is not present in the MWC equation. Experimental in vitro data for pyruvate kinase, a bi-substrate cooperative enzyme that is allosterically inhibited, are presented. This enzyme also shows inhibitor saturation, and therefore serves as experimental evidence that the bi-substrate Hill equation predicts more realistic allosteric inhibitor behaviour than the bi-substrate MWC equation.

  18. A novel allosteric mechanism in the cysteine peptidase cathepsin K discovered by computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinec, Marko; Korenč, Matevž; Caflisch, Amedeo; Ranganathan, Rama; Lenarčič, Brigita; Baici, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric modifiers have the potential to fine-tune enzyme activity. Therefore, targeting allosteric sites is gaining increasing recognition as a strategy in drug design. Here we report the use of computational methods for the discovery of the first small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of the collagenolytic cysteine peptidase cathepsin K, a major target for the treatment of osteoporosis. The molecule NSC13345 is identified by high-throughput docking of compound libraries to surface sites on the peptidase that are connected to the active site by an evolutionarily conserved network of residues (protein sector). The crystal structure of the complex shows that NSC13345 binds to a novel allosteric site on cathepsin K. The compound acts as a hyperbolic mixed modifier in the presence of a synthetic substrate, it completely inhibits collagen degradation and has good selectivity for cathepsin K over related enzymes. Altogether, these properties qualify our methodology and NSC13345 as promising candidates for allosteric drug design.

  19. "Naturally occurring asbestos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnard, F.; Lahondère, D.; Blein, O.; Lahfid, A.; Wille, G.

    2012-04-01

    The term asbestos refers to six silicate minerals from amphibole and serpentine groups. By definition, it consists in bundles of thin and flexible long fibers, with high-tensile strength, and chemical and heat resistance. In contrast to asbestos found within commercial products and mining, the specific term ''naturally occurring asbestos'' (NOA) refers to asbestiform minerals occurring within rocks or soils that can be released by human activities or weathering processes. The fact that the exposure to asbestos is related to lung pathologies is now widely demonstrated (e.g. asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer). However, if health risks associated with exposure to NOA exist, they are not yet well documented. The crystallization of natural asbestos occurs in specific Mg-rich lithologies associated with peculiar structural and metamorphic conditions. By recognizing and combining such specific geologic criteria, the presence or the absence of asbestos in bedrock terrains can be reasonably predicted and maps of NOA hazard can be drawn. We present here new results of geological mapping and petrological study concerning the evaluation of the NOA hazard in the Alps and Corsica, in France. The three folds approach consists in (1) a determination of lithologies with potential NOA from a bibliographic compilation and extraction of target zones from a geological geodatabase (2) a geological mapping of the target zones followed by a petrological characterization of sampled asbestiform minerals in the laboratory (optical microscopy, TEM, SEM, and Raman spectroscopy technics), and (3) the drawing of the final map of NOA hazard, at regional-scale. Occurrence criteria can be retained as follows: 1. NOA are abundant in the internal zones of the Alps and Corsica, especially within ophiolitic complexes. Natural asbestos are mostly concentrated within ultramafic rocks but can also occur within basic lithologies such as Mg-metagabbros, metabasalts and meta-pillow-lavas, 2. Asbestos

  20. Bioinformatic scaling of allosteric interactions in biomedical isozymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-09-01

    Allosteric (long-range) interactions can be surprisingly strong in proteins of biomedical interest. Here we use bioinformatic scaling to connect prior results on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to promising new drugs that inhibit cancer cell metabolism. Many parallel features are apparent, which explain how even one amino acid mutation, remote from active sites, can alter medical results. The enzyme twins involved are cyclooxygenase (aspirin) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). The IDH results are accurate to 1% and are overdetermined by adjusting a single bioinformatic scaling parameter. It appears that the final stage in optimizing protein functionality may involve leveling of the hydrophobic limits of the arms of conformational hydrophilic hinges.

  1. The allosteric modulation of lipases and its possible biological relevance

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Jens; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Background During the development of an enantioselective synthesis using the lipase from Mucor miehei an unusual reaction course was observed, which was analyzed precisely. For the first time an allosteric modulation of a lipase changing its selectivity was shown. Theory Considering the biological relevance of the discovered regulation mechanism we developed a theory that describes the regulation of energy homeostasis and fat metabolism. Conclusion This theory represents a new approach to explain the cause of the metabolic syndrome and provides an innovative basis for further research activity. PMID:17825093

  2. Mapping Heat Exchange in an Allosteric Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shaweta; Auerbach, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are synaptic ion channels that spontaneously isomerize (i.e., gate) between resting and active conformations. We used single-molecule electrophysiology to measure the temperature dependencies of mouse neuromuscular AChR gating rate and equilibrium constants. From these we estimated free energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes caused by mutations of amino acids located between the transmitter binding sites and the middle of the membrane domain. The range of equilibrium enthalpy change (13.4 kcal/mol) was larger than for free energy change (5.5 kcal/mol at 25°C). For two residues, the slope of the rate-equilibrium free energy relationship (Φ) was approximately constant with temperature. Mutant cycle analysis showed that both free energies and enthalpies are additive for energetically independent mutations. We hypothesize that changes in energy associated with changes in structure mainly occur close to the site of the mutation, and, hence, that it is possible to make a residue-by-residue map of heat exchange in the AChR gating isomerization. The structural correlates of enthalpy changes are discussed for 12 different mutations in the protein. PMID:21320434

  3. Allosteric modulators of the hERG K{sup +} channel

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhiyi Klaasse, Elisabeth Heitman, Laura H. IJzerman, Adriaan P.

    2014-01-01

    Drugs that block the cardiac K{sup +} channel encoded by the human ether-à-go-go gene (hERG) have been associated with QT interval prolongation leading to proarrhythmia, and in some cases, sudden cardiac death. Because of special structural features of the hERG K{sup +} channel, it has become a promiscuous target that interacts with pharmaceuticals of widely varying chemical structures and a reason for concern in the pharmaceutical industry. The structural diversity suggests that multiple binding sites are available on the channel with possible allosteric interactions between them. In the present study, three reference compounds and nine compounds of a previously disclosed series were evaluated for their allosteric effects on the binding of [{sup 3}H]astemizole and [{sup 3}H]dofetilide to the hERG K{sup +} channel. LUF6200 was identified as an allosteric inhibitor in dissociation assays with both radioligands, yielding similar EC{sub 50} values in the low micromolar range. However, potassium ions increased the binding of the two radioligands in a concentration-dependent manner, and their EC{sub 50} values were not significantly different, indicating that potassium ions behaved as allosteric enhancers. Furthermore, addition of potassium ions resulted in a concentration-dependent leftward shift of the LUF6200 response curve, suggesting positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them. In conclusion, our investigations provide evidence for allosteric modulation of the hERG K{sup +} channel, which is discussed in the light of findings on other ion channels. - Highlights: • Allosteric modulators on the hERG K{sup +} channel were evaluated in binding assays. • LUF6200 was identified as a potent allosteric inhibitor. • Potassium ions were found to behave as allosteric enhancers. • Positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them were proposed.

  4. A Transient Interaction between the Phosphate Binding Loop and Switch I Contributes to the Allosteric Network between Receptor and Nucleotide in Gαi1*

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Tarjani M.; Sarwar, Maruf; Preininger, Anita M.; Hamm, Heidi E.; Iverson, T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-mediated activation of the Gα subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins requires allosteric communication between the receptor binding site and the guanine nucleotide binding site, which are separated by >30 Å. Structural changes in the allosteric network connecting these sites are predicted to be transient in the wild-type Gα subunit, making studies of these connections challenging. In the current work, site-directed mutants that alter the energy barriers between the activation states are used as tools to better understand the transient features of allosteric signaling in the Gα subunit. The observed differences in relative receptor affinity for intact Gαi1 subunits versus C-terminal Gαi1 peptides harboring the K345L mutation are consistent with this mutation modulating the allosteric network in the protein subunit. Measurement of nucleotide exchange rates, affinity for metarhodopsin II, and thermostability suggest that the K345L Gαi1 variant has reduced stability in both the GDP-bound and nucleotide-free states as compared with wild type but similar stability in the GTPγS-bound state. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal conformational changes accompanying the destabilization of the GDP-bound state. Of these, the conformation for Switch I was stabilized by an ionic interaction with the phosphate binding loop. Further site-directed mutagenesis suggests that this interaction between Switch I and the phosphate binding loop is important for receptor-mediated nucleotide exchange in the wild-type Gαi1 subunit. PMID:24596087

  5. Engineering alternate cooperative-communications in the lactose repressor protein scaffold.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sarai; Ramot, Roee; Kishore Inampudi, Krishna; Luo, Beibei; Lin, Chenyu; Amere, Swathi; Wilson, Corey J

    2013-06-01

    To expand our understanding of the hallmarks of allosteric control we used directed-evolution to engineer alternate cooperative communication in the lactose repressor protein (LacI) scaffold. Starting with an I(s) type LacI mutant D88A (i.e. a LacI variant that is insensitive to the exogenous ligand isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and remains bound to operator DNA, + or -IPTG) we used error-prone polymerase chain reaction to introduce compensatory mutations to restore modulated DNA binding function to the allosterically 'dead' I(s)(D88A) background. Five variants were generated, three variants (C4, C32 and C80) with wild-type like function and two co-repressor variants (C101 and C140) that are functionally inverted. To better resolve the residues that define new allosteric networks in the LacI variants, we conducted mutational tolerance analysis via saturation mutagenesis at each of the evolved positions to assess sensitivity to mutation--a hallmark of allosteric residues. To better understand the physicochemical bases of alternate allosteric function, variant LacI(C80) was characterized to assess IPTG ligand binding at equilibrium, kinetically using stopped-flow, and via isothermal titration calorimetry. These data suggest that the conferred modulated DNA binding function observed for LacI(C80), while thermodynamically similar to wild-type LacI, is mechanistically different from the wild-type repressor, suggesting a new allosteric network and communication route.

  6. Naturally occurring insecticides.

    PubMed Central

    Soloway, S B

    1976-01-01

    Naturally occurring insecticides are abundant and varied in their effects, though but a few are articles of commerce. Even for these, pyrethrum, nicotine, rotenone, hellebore, ryania, and sabadilla, there is a paucity of information on mammalian toxicology and environmental effects. In general, these materials are characterized favorably by low acute toxicity and ready dissipation in nature. Unfavorable aspects of natural insecticides are the contained mixture of active and inactive components and the low active ingredient content on a crop yield basis pointing to a high unit cost. Natural insecticides can serve additionally as leads to unnatural mimics, of which the commercially successful synthetic pyrethroids are prime examples. The chemical nature, relationship of insecticidal activity to chemical structure, occurrence, production, and utilization, registered uses, metabolism, and insect and mammalian toxicity are reviewed. PMID:789058

  7. Targeting PARP-1 allosteric regulation offers therapeutic potential against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jamin D.; Tholey, Renee M.; Langelier, Marie-France; Planck, Jamie L.; Schiewer, Matthew J.; Lal, Shruti; Bildzukewicz, Nikolai A.; Yeo, Charles J.; Knudsen, Karen E.; Brody, Jonathan R.; Pascal, John M.

    2014-01-01

    PARP-1 is a nuclear protein that has important roles in maintenance of genomic integrity. During genotoxic stress, PARP-1 recruits to sites of DNA damage where PARP-1 domain architecture initiates catalytic activation and subsequent poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent DNA repair. PARP-1 inhibition is a promising new way to selectively target cancers harboring DNA repair deficiencies. However, current inhibitors target other PARPs raising important questions concerning long-term off-target effects. Here we propose a new strategy that targets PARP-1 allosteric regulation as a selective way of inhibiting PARP-1. We found that disruption of PARP-1 domain-domain contacts through mutagenesis held no cellular consequences on recruitment to DNA damage or a model system of transcriptional regulation, but prevented DNA-damage dependent catalytic activation. Further, PARP-1 mutant overexpression in a pancreatic cancer cell line (MIA PaCa-2) increased sensitivity to platinum-based anti-cancer agents. These results not only highlight the potential of a synergistic drug combination of allosteric PARP inhibitors with DNA damaging agents in genomically unstable cancer cells (regardless of homologous recombination status), but also signify important applications of selective PARP-1 inhibition. Lastly, the development of a high-throughput (HT) PARP-1 assay is described as a tool to promote discovery of novel PARP-1 selective inhibitors. PMID:24189460

  8. Modulation of hemoglobin dynamics by an allosteric effector

    PubMed Central

    Maccarini, Marco; Fouquet, Peter; Ho, Nancy T.; Ho, Chien; Makowski, Lee

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hemoglobin (Hb) is an extensively studied paradigm of proteins that alter their function in response to allosteric effectors. Models of its action have been used as prototypes for structure‐function relationships in many proteins, and models for the molecular basis of its function have been deeply studied and extensively argued. Recent reports suggest that dynamics may play an important role in its function. Relatively little is known about the slow, correlated motions of hemoglobin subunits in various structural states because experimental and computational strategies for their characterization are challenging. Allosteric effectors such as inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) bind to both deoxy‐Hb and HbCO, albeit at different sites, leading to a lowered oxygen affinity. The manner in which these effectors impact oxygen binding is unclear and may involve changes in structure, dynamics or both. Here we use neutron spin echo measurements accompanied by wide‐angle X‐ray scattering to show that binding of IHP to HbCO results in an increase in the rate of coordinated motions of Hb subunits relative to one another with little if any change in large scale structure. This increase of large‐scale dynamics seems to be coupled with a decrease in the average magnitude of higher frequency modes of individual residues. These observations indicate that enhanced dynamic motions contribute to the functional changes induced by IHP and suggest that they may be responsible for the lowered oxygen affinity triggered by these effectors. PMID:27977887

  9. Concerted dynamics link allosteric sites in the PBX homeodomain.

    PubMed

    Farber, Patrick J; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2011-01-21

    The PBX1 homeodomain (PBX-HD) cooperatively binds DNA with Hox transcription factors and helps to regulate gene expression during vertebrate development. Allostery plays an important role in these interactions. DNA binding on one surface of PBX-HD enhances interactions with Hox proteins at a different interface. In addition, DNA binding causes a 15-residue extension at the C-terminus of PBX-HD to undergo a disorder-to-helix transition, although this region does not directly contact the DNA. Deletion of the C-terminal extension reduces both the DNA affinity of PBX-HD and the cooperativity of forming the DNA/Hox/PBX-HD ternary complex. To better understand the mechanism underlying these allosteric interactions, we used NMR relaxation dispersion dynamics experiments to characterize millisecond-timescale motions in PBX-HD over a range of temperatures. The data show that the C-terminal extension folds to form a fourth α-helix to a level of 5-10%, even in the absence of binding partners. This suggests that PBX-HD transiently preorganizes prior to binding DNA, reminiscent of the "conformational selection" model of molecular recognition. Folding of the C-terminal extension in the unbound protein is accompanied by structural rearrangements in both the DNA binding site and the Hox binding site, suggesting a possible role for these dynamics in the allosteric mechanism of PBX-HD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Allosteric activation of ADAMTS13 by von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Muia, Joshua; Zhu, Jian; Gupta, Garima; Haberichter, Sandra L; Friedman, Kenneth D; Feys, Hendrik B; Deforche, Louis; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Westfield, Lisa A; Roth, Robyn; Tolia, Niraj Harish; Heuser, John E; Sadler, J Evan

    2014-12-30

    The metalloprotease ADAMTS13 cleaves von Willebrand factor (VWF) within endovascular platelet aggregates, and ADAMTS13 deficiency causes fatal microvascular thrombosis. The proximal metalloprotease (M), disintegrin-like (D), thrombospondin-1 (T), Cys-rich (C), and spacer (S) domains of ADAMTS13 recognize a cryptic site in VWF that is exposed by tensile force. Another seven T and two complement C1r/C1s, sea urchin epidermal growth factor, and bone morphogenetic protein (CUB) domains of uncertain function are C-terminal to the MDTCS domains. We find that the distal T8-CUB2 domains markedly inhibit substrate cleavage, and binding of VWF or monoclonal antibodies to distal ADAMTS13 domains relieves this autoinhibition. Small angle X-ray scattering data indicate that distal T-CUB domains interact with proximal MDTCS domains. Thus, ADAMTS13 is regulated by substrate-induced allosteric activation, which may optimize VWF cleavage under fluid shear stress in vivo. Distal domains of other ADAMTS proteases may have similar allosteric properties.

  11. Modulation of hemoglobin dynamics by an allosteric effector

    DOE PAGES

    Lal, Jyotsana; Maccarini, Marco; Fouquet, Peter; ...

    2016-12-15

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is an extensively studied paradigm of proteins that alter their function in response to allosteric effectors. Models of its action have been used as prototypes for structure-function relationships in many proteins, and models for the molecular basis of its function have been deeply studied and extensively argued. Recent reports suggest that dynamics may play an important role in its function. Relatively little is known about the slow, correlated motions of hemoglobin subunits in various structural states because experimental and computational strategies for their characterization are challenging. Allosteric effectors such as inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) bind to both deoxy-Hb andmore » HbCO, albeit at different sites, leading to a lowered oxygen affinity. The manner in which these effectors impact oxygen binding is unclear and may involve changes in structure, dynamics or both. Here we use neutron spin echo (NSE) measurements accompanied by wideangle x-ray scattering (WAXS) to show that binding of IHP to HbCO results in an increase in the rate of coordinated motions of Hb subunits relative to one another with little if any change in large scale structure. This increase of large-scale dynamics seems to be coupled with a decrease in the average magnitude of higher frequency modes of individual residues. Furthermore, these observations indicate that enhanced dynamic motions contribute to the functional changes induced by IHP and suggest that they may be responsible for the lowered oxygen affinity triggered by these effectors.« less

  12. Allosteric Inhibition of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Revealed by Ibudilast

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crichlow, G; Vermeire, J; Leng, L; Du, X; Hodsdon, M; Bucala, R; Cappello, M; Gross, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    AV411 (ibudilast; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine) is an antiinflammatory drug that was initially developed for the treatment of bronchial asthma but which also has been used for cerebrovascular and ocular indications. It is a nonselective inhibitor of various phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and has varied antiinflammatory activity. More recently, AV411 has been studied as a possible therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain and opioid withdrawal through its actions on glial cells. As described herein, the PDE inhibitor AV411 and its PDE-inhibition-compromised analog AV1013 inhibit the catalytic and chemotactic functions of the proinflammatory protein, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Enzymatic analysis indicates that these compounds are noncompetitive inhibitors of the p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) tautomerase activity of MIF and an allosteric binding site of AV411 and AV1013 is detected by NMR. The allosteric inhibition mechanism is further elucidated by X-ray crystallography based on the MIF/AV1013 binary and MIF/AV1013/HPP ternary complexes. In addition, our antibody experiments directed against MIF receptors indicate that CXCR2 is the major receptor for MIF-mediated chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  13. A novel allosteric inhibitor of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF).

    PubMed

    Bai, Fengwei; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Cirillo, Pier; Ciustea, Mihai; Ledizet, Michel; Aristoff, Paul A; Leng, Lin; Koski, Raymond A; Powell, Thomas J; Bucala, Richard; Anthony, Karen G

    2012-08-31

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a catalytic cytokine and an upstream mediator of the inflammatory pathway. MIF has broad regulatory properties, dysregulation of which has been implicated in the pathology of multiple immunological diseases. Inhibition of MIF activity with small molecules has proven beneficial in a number of disease models. Known small molecule MIF inhibitors typically bind in the tautomerase site of the MIF trimer, often covalently modifying the catalytic proline. Allosteric MIF inhibitors, particularly those that associate with the protein by noncovalent interactions, could reveal novel ways to block MIF activity for therapeutic benefit and serve as chemical probes to elucidate the structural basis for the diverse regulatory properties of MIF. In this study, we report the identification and functional characterization of a novel allosteric MIF inhibitor. Identified from a high throughput screening effort, this sulfonated azo compound termed p425 strongly inhibited the ability of MIF to tautomerize 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate. Furthermore, p425 blocked the interaction of MIF with its receptor, CD74, and interfered with the pro-inflammatory activities of the cytokine. Structural studies revealed a unique mode of binding for p425, with a single molecule of the inhibitor occupying the interface of two MIF trimers. The inhibitor binds MIF mainly on the protein surface through hydrophobic interactions that are stabilized by hydrogen bonding with four highly specific residues from three different monomers. The mode of p425 binding reveals a unique way to block the activity of the cytokine for potential therapeutic benefit in MIF-associated diseases.

  14. Targeting PARP-1 allosteric regulation offers therapeutic potential against cancer.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Jamin D; Tholey, Renee M; Langelier, Marie-France; Planck, Jamie L; Schiewer, Matthew J; Lal, Shruti; Bildzukewicz, Nikolai A; Yeo, Charles J; Knudsen, Karen E; Brody, Jonathan R; Pascal, John M

    2014-01-01

    PARP-1 is a nuclear protein that has important roles in maintenance of genomic integrity. During genotoxic stress, PARP-1 recruits to sites of DNA damage where PARP-1 domain architecture initiates catalytic activation and subsequent poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent DNA repair. PARP-1 inhibition is a promising new way to selectively target cancers harboring DNA repair deficiencies. However, current inhibitors target other PARPs, raising important questions about long-term off-target effects. Here, we propose a new strategy that targets PARP-1 allosteric regulation as a selective way of inhibiting PARP-1. We found that disruption of PARP-1 domain-domain contacts through mutagenesis held no cellular consequences on recruitment to DNA damage or a model system of transcriptional regulation, but prevented DNA-damage-dependent catalytic activation. Furthermore, PARP-1 mutant overexpression in a pancreatic cancer cell line (MIA PaCa-2) increased sensitivity to platinum-based anticancer agents. These results not only highlight the potential of a synergistic drug combination of allosteric PARP inhibitors with DNA-damaging agents in genomically unstable cancer cells (regardless of homologous recombination status), but also signify important applications of selective PARP-1 inhibition. Finally, the development of a high-throughput PARP-1 assay is described as a tool to promote discovery of novel PARP-1 selective inhibitors.

  15. Structural Analysis of Iac Repressor Bound to Allosteric Effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Daber,R.; Stayrook, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Lewis, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lac operon is a model system for understanding how effector molecules regulate transcription and are necessary for allosteric transitions. The crystal structures of the lac repressor bound to inducer and anti-inducer molecules provide a model for how these small molecules can modulate repressor function. The structures of the apo repressor and the repressor bound to effector molecules are compared in atomic detail. All effectors examined here bind to the repressor in the same location and are anchored to the repressor through hydrogen bonds to several hydroxyl groups of the sugar ring. Inducer molecules form a more extensive hydrogen-bonding network compared to anti-inducers and neutral effector molecules. The structures of these effector molecules suggest that the O6 hydroxyl on the galactoside is essential for establishing a water-mediated hydrogen bonding network that bridges the N-terminal and C-terminal sub-domains. The altered hydrogen bonding can account in part for the different structural conformations of the repressor, and is vital for the allosteric transition.

  16. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage-sensing lipid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sasha S; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-04-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We found that the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), has not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD). Using fast fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage-clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we found that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage-sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This two-step allosteric control over a dual-specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility, endocytosis and exocytosis.

  17. An allosteric photoredox catalyst inspired by photosynthetic machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lifschitz, Alejo M.; Young, Ryan M.; Mendez-Arroyo, Jose; Stern, Charlotte L.; McGuirk, C. Michael; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Biological photosynthetic machinery allosterically regulate light harvesting via conformational and electronic changes at the antenna protein complexes as a response to specific chemical inputs. Fundamental limitations in current approaches to regulating inorganic light-harvesting mimics prevent their use in catalysis. Here we show that a light-harvesting antenna/reaction centre mimic can be regulated by utilizing a coordination framework incorporating antenna hemilabile ligands and assembled via a high-yielding, modular approach. As in nature, allosteric regulation is afforded by coupling the conformational changes to the disruptions in the electrochemical landscape of the framework upon recognition of specific coordinating analytes. The hemilabile ligands enable switching using remarkably mild and redox-inactive inputs, allowing one to regulate the photoredox catalytic activity of the photosynthetic mimic reversibly and in situ. Thus, we demonstrate that bioinspired regulatory mechanisms can be applied to inorganic light-harvesting arrays displaying switchable catalytic properties and with potential uses in solar energy conversion and photonic devices. PMID:25817586

  18. Regulation of DNA Strand Displacement Using Allosteric DNA Toehold.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolong; Tang, Yanan; Traynor, Sarah M; Li, Feng

    2016-10-05

    Toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement is the fundamental basis for the construction and operation of diverse DNA devices, including circuits, machines, sensors, and reconfigurable structures. Controllable activation and regulation of toeholds are critical to construct devices with multistep, autonomous, and complex behaviors. A handful of unique toehold activation mechanisms, including toehold-exchange, associative toehold, and remote toehold, have been developed and are often combined to achieve desired strand displacement behaviors and functions. Here we report an allosteric DNA toehold (A-toehold) design that allows the flexible regulation of DNA strand displacement by splitting an input strand into an A-toehold and branch migration domain. Because of its simplicity, the A-toehold mechanism can be a useful addition to the current toolbox of DNA strand displacement techniques. We demonstrated that A-toehold enabled a number of interesting functions that were previously shown using more sophisticated DNA strand displacement systems, including 1) continuously tuning the rate of strand displacement, 2) dynamic control of strand displacement reactions, and 3) selective activation of multiple strand displacement reactions. Moreover, by combining A-toehold and toehold-exchange mechanisms, we have successfully constructed a non-covalent DNA catalysis network that resembles an allosteric enzyme.

  19. Multimodal mechanism of action of allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Kellie Ann; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is required for lentivirus replication and is a proven drug target for the prevention of AIDS in HIV-1 infected patients. While clinical strand transfer inhibitors disarm the IN active site, allosteric inhibition of enzyme activity through the disruption of IN-IN protein interfaces holds great therapeutic potential. A promising class of allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs), 2-(quinolin-3-yl) acetic acid derivatives, engage the IN catalytic core domain dimerization interface at the binding site for the host integration co-factor LEDGF/p75. ALLINIs promote IN multimerization and, independent of LEDGF/p75 protein, block the formation of the active IN-DNA complex, as well as inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction in vitro. Yet, rather unexpectedly, the full inhibitory effect of these compounds is exerted during the late phase of HIV-1 replication. ALLINIs impair particle core maturation as well as reverse transcription and integration during the subsequent round of virus infection. Recapitulating the pleiotropic phenotypes observed with numerous IN mutant viruses, ALLINIs provide insight into underlying aspects of IN biology that extend beyond its catalytic activity. Therefore, in addition to the potential to expand our repertoire of HIV-1 antiretrovirals, ALLINIs afford important structural probes to dissect the multifaceted nature of the IN protein throughout the course of HIV-1 replication. PMID:24274067

  20. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage sensing lipid phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Sasha S.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We find the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), to have not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage sensing domain (VSD). Using fast FRET reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we find that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This novel 2-step allosteric control over a dual specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility and endo/exocytosis. PMID:26878552

  1. Discovery and Characterization of Allosteric WNK Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ken; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Xie, Xiaoling; Reinhardt, Juergen; Xie, Amy Qiongshu; LaSala, Daniel; Kohls, Darcy; Yowe, David; Burdick, Debra; Yoshisue, Hajime; Wakai, Hiromichi; Schmidt, Isabel; Gunawan, Jason; Yasoshima, Kayo; Yue, Q Kimberley; Kato, Mitsunori; Mogi, Muneto; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Kreder, Natasha; Drueckes, Peter; Pandey, Pramod; Kawanami, Toshio; Huang, Waanjeng; Yagi, Yukiko I; Deng, Zhan; Park, Hyi-Man

    2016-12-16

    Protein kinases are known for their highly conserved adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding site, rendering the discovery of selective inhibitors a major challenge. In theory, allosteric inhibitors can achieve high selectivity by targeting less conserved regions of the kinases, often with an added benefit of retaining efficacy under high physiological ATP concentration. Although often overlooked in favor of ATP-site directed approaches, performing a screen at high ATP concentration or stringent hit triaging with high ATP concentration offers conceptually simple methods of identifying inhibitors that bind outside the ATP pocket. Here, we applied the latter approach to the With-No-Lysine (K) (WNK) kinases to discover lead molecules for a next-generation antihypertensive that requires a stringent safety profile. This strategy yielded several ATP noncompetitive WNK1-4 kinase inhibitors, the optimization of which enabled cocrystallization with WNK1, revealing an allosteric binding mode consistent with the observed exquisite specificity for WNK1-4 kinases. The optimized compound inhibited rubidium uptake by sodium chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) in HT29 cells, consistent with the reported physiology of WNK kinases in renal electrolyte handling.

  2. Differentiating a Ligand's Chemical Requirements for Allosteric Interactions from Those for Protein Binding. Phenylalanine Inhibition of Pyruvate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Williams,R.; Holyoak, T.; McDonald, G.; Gui, C.; Fenton, A.

    2006-01-01

    The isoform of pyruvate kinase from brain and muscle of mammals (M1-PYK) is allosterically inhibited by phenylalanine. Initial observations in this model allosteric system indicate that Ala binds competitively with Phe, but elicits a minimal allosteric response. Thus, the allosteric ligand of this system must have requirements for eliciting an allosteric response in addition to the requirements for binding. Phe analogues have been used to dissect what chemical properties of Phe are responsible for eliciting the allosteric response. We first demonstrate that the L-2-aminopropanaldehyde substructure of the amino acid ligand is primarily responsible for binding to M1-PYK. Since the allosteric response to Ala is minimal and linear addition of methyl groups beyond the -carbon increase the magnitude of the allosteric response, we conclude that moieties beyond the -carbon are primarily responsible for allostery. Instead of an all-or-none mechanism of allostery, these findings support the idea that the bulk of the hydrophobic side chain, but not the aromatic nature, is the primary determinant of the magnitude of the observed allosteric inhibition. The use of these results to direct structural studies has resulted in a 1.65 Angstroms structure of M1-PYK with Ala bound. The coordination of Ala in the allosteric amino acid binding site confirms the binding role of the L-2-aminopropanaldehyde substructure of the ligand. Collectively, this study confirms that a ligand can have chemical regions specific for eliciting the allosteric signal in addition to the chemical regions necessary for binding.

  3. Communicating up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Chief communicators at many U.S. institutions are interested in forging closer ties with governing boards. Proponents say such relationships can increase board trust and confidence in communicators before a crisis occurs, making it easier to manage the institution's reputation and limit negative publicity when one does. At some institutions, such…

  4. Communicating up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Chief communicators at many U.S. institutions are interested in forging closer ties with governing boards. Proponents say such relationships can increase board trust and confidence in communicators before a crisis occurs, making it easier to manage the institution's reputation and limit negative publicity when one does. At some institutions, such…

  5. Naturally Occurring Food Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Laurie C.; Matulka, Ray A.; Burdock, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Although many foods contain toxins as a naturally-occurring constituent or, are formed as the result of handling or processing, the incidence of adverse reactions to food is relatively low. The low incidence of adverse effects is the result of some pragmatic solutions by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory agencies through the creative use of specifications, action levels, tolerances, warning labels and prohibitions. Manufacturers have also played a role by setting limits on certain substances and developing mitigation procedures for process-induced toxins. Regardless of measures taken by regulators and food producers to protect consumers from natural food toxins, consumption of small levels of these materials is unavoidable. Although the risk for toxicity due to consumption of food toxins is fairly low, there is always the possibility of toxicity due to contamination, overconsumption, allergy or an unpredictable idiosyncratic response. The purpose of this review is to provide a toxicological and regulatory overview of some of the toxins present in some commonly consumed foods, and where possible, discuss the steps that have been taken to reduce consumer exposure, many of which are possible because of the unique process of food regulation in the United States. PMID:22069686

  6. Naturally occurring food toxins.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Laurie C; Matulka, Ray A; Burdock, George A

    2010-09-01

    Although many foods contain toxins as a naturally-occurring constituent or, are formed as the result of handling or processing, the incidence of adverse reactions to food is relatively low. The low incidence of adverse effects is the result of some pragmatic solutions by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory agencies through the creative use of specifications, action levels, tolerances, warning labels and prohibitions. Manufacturers have also played a role by setting limits on certain substances and developing mitigation procedures for process-induced toxins. Regardless of measures taken by regulators and food producers to protect consumers from natural food toxins, consumption of small levels of these materials is unavoidable. Although the risk for toxicity due to consumption of food toxins is fairly low, there is always the possibility of toxicity due to contamination, overconsumption, allergy or an unpredictable idiosyncratic response. The purpose of this review is to provide a toxicological and regulatory overview of some of the toxins present in some commonly consumed foods, and where possible, discuss the steps that have been taken to reduce consumer exposure, many of which are possible because of the unique process of food regulation in the United States.

  7. They seldom occur alone.

    PubMed

    Crous, Pedro W; Groenewald, Johannes Z

    2016-11-01

    Species of Coleophoma have been reported as plant pathogenic, saprobic or endophytic on a wide host range. The genus is characterised by having pycnidial conidiomata, phialidic conidiogenous cells intermingled among paraphyses, and cylindrical conidia. Coleophoma has had a confusing taxonomic history with numerous synonyms, and its phylogeny has remained unresolved. The aim of the present study was to use a polyphasic approach incorporating morphology, ecology, and molecular data of the partial large subunit of nrDNA (LSU), the internal transcribed spacer region with intervening 5.8S nrDNA (ITS), partial β-tubulin (tub2), and translation elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1) gene sequences to resolve its taxonomy and phylogeny. Based on these results the genus was found to be polyphyletic, with taxa tentatively identified as Coleophoma clustering in Dothideomycetes and Leotiomycetes. Species corresponding to the concept of Coleophoma s.str. (Dermateaceae, Helotiales, Leotiomycetes) were found to form a distinct clade, with five new species. Furthermore, Coleophoma was found to be linked to the newly established sexual genus, Parafabraea, which is reduced to synonymy. Isolates occurring on Ilex aquifolium in the Netherlands also clustered in Dermateaceae, representing a novel genus, Davidhawksworthia. In the Dothideomycetes, several taxa clustered in Dothiora (Dothideaceae, Dothideales), which is shown to have Dothichiza and Hormonema-like asexual morphs, with four new species. Furthermore, Pseudocamaropycnis is introduced as a new genus (Mytilinidiaceae, Mytilinidiales), along with Briansuttonomyces (Didymellaceae, Pleosporales) and Dimorphosporicola (Pleosporaceae, Pleosporales). Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Allosteric Modulation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Structural Insights and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J.; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Meiler, Jens; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Allosteric modulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represents a novel approach to the development of probes and therapeutics that is expected to enable subtype-specific regulation of central nervous system target receptors. The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus) are class C GPCRs that play important neuromodulatory roles throughout the brain, as such they are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention for a number of psychiatric and neurological disorders including anxiety, depression, Fragile X Syndrome, Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Over the last fifteen years, selective allosteric modulators have been identified for many members of the mGlu family. The vast majority of these allosteric modulators are thought to bind within the transmembrane-spanning domains of the receptors to enhance or inhibit functional responses. A combination of mutagenesis-based studies and pharmacological approaches are beginning to provide a better understanding of mGlu allosteric sites. Collectively, when mapped onto a homology model of the different mGlu subtypes based on the β2-adrenergic receptor, the previous mutagenesis studies suggest commonalities in the location of allosteric sites across different members of the mGlu family. In addition, there is evidence for multiple allosteric binding pockets within the transmembrane region that can interact to modulate one another. In the absence of a class C GPCR crystal structure, this approach has shown promise with respect to the interpretation of mutagenesis data and understanding structure-activity relationships of allosteric modulator pharmacophores. PMID:20637216

  9. Allosteric Modulation: An Alternate Approach Targeting the Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy; Li, Jun-Xu; Thomas, Brian F; Wiley, Jenny L; Kenakin, Terry P; Zhang, Yanan

    2016-11-23

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor is a G protein coupled receptor and plays an important role in many biological processes and physiological functions. A variety of CB1 receptor agonists and antagonists, including endocannabinoids, phytocannabinoids, and synthetic cannabinoids, have been discovered or developed over the past 20 years. In 2005, it was discovered that the CB1 receptor contains allosteric site(s) that can be recognized by small molecules or allosteric modulators. A number of CB1 receptor allosteric modulators, both positive and negative, have since been reported and importantly, they display pharmacological characteristics that are distinct from those of orthosteric agonists and antagonists. Given the psychoactive effects commonly associated with CB1 receptor agonists and antagonists/inverse agonists, allosteric modulation may offer an alternate approach to attain potential therapeutic benefits while avoiding inherent side effects of orthosteric ligands. This review details the complex pharmacological profiles of these allosteric modulators, their structure-activity relationships, and efforts in elucidating binding modes and mechanisms of actions of reported CB1 allosteric modulators. The ultimate development of CB1 receptor allosteric ligands could potentially lead to improved therapies for CB1-mediated neurological disorders.

  10. Allosteric modulation in monomers and oligomers of a G protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shivnaraine, Rabindra V; Kelly, Brendan; Sankar, Krishana S; Redka, Dar'ya S; Han, Yi Rang; Huang, Fei; Elmslie, Gwendolynne; Pinto, Daniel; Li, Yuchong; Rocheleau, Jonathan V; Gradinaru, Claudiu C; Ellis, John; Wells, James W

    2016-01-01

    The M2 muscarinic receptor is the prototypic model of allostery in GPCRs, yet the molecular and the supramolecular determinants of such effects are unknown. Monomers and oligomers of the M2 muscarinic receptor therefore have been compared to identify those allosteric properties that are gained in oligomers. Allosteric interactions were monitored by means of a FRET-based sensor of conformation at the allosteric site and in pharmacological assays involving mutants engineered to preclude intramolecular effects. Electrostatic, steric, and conformational determinants of allostery at the atomic level were examined in molecular dynamics simulations. Allosteric effects in monomers were exclusively negative and derived primarily from intramolecular electrostatic repulsion between the allosteric and orthosteric ligands. Allosteric effects in oligomers could be positive or negative, depending upon the allosteric-orthosteric pair, and they arose from interactions within and between the constituent protomers. The complex behavior of oligomers is characteristic of muscarinic receptors in myocardial preparations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11685.001 PMID:27151542

  11. Allosteric Modulation of Alpha7 Nicotinic Receptors: Mechanistic Insight through Metadynamics and Essential Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Grazioso, Giovanni; Sgrignani, Jacopo; Capelli, Romina; Matera, Carlo; Dallanoce, Clelia; De Amici, Marco; Cavalli, Andrea

    2015-12-28

    Increasing attention has recently been devoted to allosteric modulators, as they can provide inherent advantages over classic receptor agonists. In the field of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), the main advantage is that allosteric modulators can trigger pharmacological responses, limiting receptor desensitization. Most of the known allosteric ligands are "positive allosteric modulators" (PAMs), which increase both sensitivity to receptor agonists and current amplitude. Intriguingly, some allosteric modulators are also able to activate the α7 receptor (α7-nAChR) even in the absence of orthosteric agonists. These compounds have been named "ago-allosteric modulators" and GAT107 has been studied in depth because of its unique mechanism of action. We here investigate by molecular dynamics simulations, metadynamics, and essential dynamics the activation mechanism of α7-nAChR, in the presence of different nicotinic modulators. We determine the free energy profiles associated with the closed-to-open motion of the loop C, and we highlight mechanistic differences observed in the presence of different modulators. In particular, we demonstrate that GAT107 triggers conformational motions and cross-talk similar to those observed when the α7-nACh receptor is in complex with both an agonist and an allosteric modulator.

  12. The Mechanism of Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shaoyong; Huang, Wenkang; Geng, Lv; Shen, Qiancheng; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    As the prototypical member of the PTP family, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions in type 2 diabetes. The extremely conserved catalytic site of PTP1B renders the design of selective PTP1B inhibitors intractable. Although discovered allosteric inhibitors containing a benzofuran sulfonamide scaffold offer fascinating opportunities to overcome selectivity issues, the allosteric inhibitory mechanism of PTP1B has remained elusive. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, coupled with a dynamic weighted community analysis, were performed to unveil the potential allosteric signal propagation pathway from the allosteric site to the catalytic site in PTP1B. This result revealed that the allosteric inhibitor compound-3 induces a conformational rearrangement in helix α7, disrupting the triangular interaction among helix α7, helix α3, and loop11. Helix α7 then produces a force, pulling helix α3 outward, and promotes Ser190 to interact with Tyr176. As a result, the deviation of Tyr176 abrogates the hydrophobic interactions with Trp179 and leads to the downward movement of the WPD loop, which forms an H-bond between Asp181 and Glu115. The formation of this H-bond constrains the WPD loop to its open conformation and thus inactivates PTP1B. The discovery of this allosteric mechanism provides an overall view of the regulation of PTP1B, which is an important insight for the design of potent allosteric PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:24831294

  13. In Vivo Investigation of Escitalopram’s Allosteric Site on the Serotonin Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Karen E.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Owens, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Escitalopram is a commonly prescribed antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class. Clinical evidence and mapping of the serotonin transporter (SERT) identified that escitalopram, in addition to its binding to a primary uptake-blocking site, is capable of binding to the SERT via an allosteric site that is hypothesized to alter escitalopram’s kinetics at the SERT. The studies reported here examined the in vivo role of the SERT allosteric site in escitalopram action. A knockin mouse model that possesses an allosteric-null SERT was developed. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the knockin protein was expressed at a lower density than endogenous mouse SERT (approximately 10–30% of endogenous mouse SERT), but the knockin mice are a viable tool to study the allosteric site. Microdialysis studies in the ventral hippocampus found no measurable decrease in extracellular serotonin response after local escitalopram challenge in mice without the allosteric site compared to mice with the site (p = 0.297). In marble burying assays there was a modest effect of the absence of the allosteric site, with a larger systemic dose of escitalopram (10-fold) necessary for the same effect as in mice with intact SERT (p = 0.023). However, there was no effect of the allosteric site in the tail suspension test. Together these data suggest that there may be a regional specificity in the role of the allosteric site. The lack of a robust effect overall suggests that the role of the allosteric site for escitalopram on the SERT may not produce meaningful in vivo effects. PMID:26621784

  14. Allosteric signalling in the outer membrane translocation domain of PapC usher

    PubMed Central

    Farabella, Irene; Pham, Thieng; Henderson, Nadine S; Geibel, Sebastian; Phan, Gilles; Thanassi, David G; Delcour, Anne H; Waksman, Gabriel; Topf, Maya

    2014-01-01

    PapC ushers are outer-membrane proteins enabling assembly and secretion of P pili in uropathogenic E. coli. Their translocation domain is a large β-barrel occluded by a plug domain, which is displaced to allow the translocation of pilus subunits across the membrane. Previous studies suggested that this gating mechanism is controlled by a β-hairpin and an α-helix. To investigate the role of these elements in allosteric signal communication, we developed a method combining evolutionary and molecular dynamics studies of the native translocation domain and mutants lacking the β-hairpin and/or the α-helix. Analysis of a hybrid residue interaction network suggests distinct regions (residue ‘communities’) within the translocation domain (especially around β12–β14) linking these elements, thereby modulating PapC gating. Antibiotic sensitivity and electrophysiology experiments on a set of alanine-substitution mutants confirmed functional roles for four of these communities. This study illuminates the gating mechanism of PapC ushers and its importance in maintaining outer-membrane permeability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03532.001 PMID:25271373

  15. Virus Assembly and Maturation: Auto-regulation Through Allosteric Molecular Switches

    PubMed Central

    Domitrovic, Tatiana; Movahed, Navid; Brian, Bothner; Matsui, Tsutomu; Wang, Qiu; Doerschuk, Peter; Johnson, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We generalize the concept of allostery from the traditional non active-site control of enzymes to virus maturation. Virtually all animal viruses transition from a procapsid, non infectious state, to a mature infectious state. The procapsid contains an encoded chemical program that is executed following an environmental cue. We developed an exceptionally accessible virus system for the study of the activators of maturation and the down stream consequences that result in particle stability and infectivity. Nudaurelia Capensis Omegavirus (NωV) is a T=4 icosahedral virus that undergoes a dramatic maturation in which the 490Å spherical procapsid condenses to a 400Å icosahedral shaped capsid with associated specific auto-proteolysis and stabilization. Employing X-ray crystallography, time resolved electron cryo-microscopy and hydrogen/deuterium exchange as well as biochemistry it was possible to define the mechanisms of allosteric communication among the 4 quasi-equivalent subunits in the icosahedral asymmetric unit. These gene products undergo proteolysis at different rates, dependent on quaternary structure environment, while particle stability is conferred globally following only a few local subunit transitions. We show that there is a close similarity between the concepts of tensegrity, associated with geodesic domes and mechanical engineering, and allostery, associated with biochemical control mechanisms. PMID:23485419

  16. Role of protein dynamics in ion selectivity and allosteric coupling in the NaK channel

    PubMed Central

    Brettmann, Joshua B.; Urusova, Darya; Tonelli, Marco; Silva, Jonathan R.; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Flux-dependent inactivation that arises from functional coupling between the inner gate and the selectivity filter is widespread in ion channels. The structural basis of this coupling has only been well characterized in KcsA. Here we present NMR data demonstrating structural and dynamic coupling between the selectivity filter and intracellular constriction point in the bacterial nonselective cation channel, NaK. This transmembrane allosteric communication must be structurally different from KcsA because the NaK selectivity filter does not collapse under low-cation conditions. Comparison of NMR spectra of the nonselective NaK and potassium-selective NaK2K indicates that the number of ion binding sites in the selectivity filter shifts the equilibrium distribution of structural states throughout the channel. This finding was unexpected given the nearly identical crystal structure of NaK and NaK2K outside the immediate vicinity of the selectivity filter. Our results highlight the tight structural and dynamic coupling between the selectivity filter and the channel scaffold, which has significant implications for channel function. NaK offers a distinct model to study the physiologically essential connection between ion conduction and channel gating. PMID:26621745

  17. Role of protein dynamics in ion selectivity and allosteric coupling in the NaK channel.

    PubMed

    Brettmann, Joshua B; Urusova, Darya; Tonelli, Marco; Silva, Jonathan R; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A

    2015-12-15

    Flux-dependent inactivation that arises from functional coupling between the inner gate and the selectivity filter is widespread in ion channels. The structural basis of this coupling has only been well characterized in KcsA. Here we present NMR data demonstrating structural and dynamic coupling between the selectivity filter and intracellular constriction point in the bacterial nonselective cation channel, NaK. This transmembrane allosteric communication must be structurally different from KcsA because the NaK selectivity filter does not collapse under low-cation conditions. Comparison of NMR spectra of the nonselective NaK and potassium-selective NaK2K indicates that the number of ion binding sites in the selectivity filter shifts the equilibrium distribution of structural states throughout the channel. This finding was unexpected given the nearly identical crystal structure of NaK and NaK2K outside the immediate vicinity of the selectivity filter. Our results highlight the tight structural and dynamic coupling between the selectivity filter and the channel scaffold, which has significant implications for channel function. NaK offers a distinct model to study the physiologically essential connection between ion conduction and channel gating.

  18. Virus assembly and maturation: auto-regulation through allosteric molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Domitrovic, Tatiana; Movahed, Navid; Bothner, Brian; Matsui, Tsutomu; Wang, Qiu; Doerschuk, Peter C; Johnson, John E

    2013-05-13

    We generalize the concept of allostery from the traditional non-active-site control of enzymes to virus maturation. Virtually, all animal viruses transition from a procapsid noninfectious state to a mature infectious state. The procapsid contains an encoded chemical program that is executed following an environmental cue. We developed an exceptionally accessible virus system for the study of the activators of maturation and the downstream consequences that result in particle stability and infectivity. Nudaurelia capensis omega virus (NωV) is a T=4 icosahedral virus that undergoes a dramatic maturation in which the 490-Å spherical procapsid condenses to a 400-Å icosahedral-shaped capsid with associated specific auto-proteolysis and stabilization. Employing X-ray crystallography, time-resolved electron cryo-microscopy and hydrogen/deuterium exchange as well as biochemistry, it was possible to define the mechanisms of allosteric communication among the four quasi-equivalent subunits in the icosahedral asymmetric unit. These gene products undergo proteolysis at different rates, dependent on quaternary structure environment, while particle stability is conferred globally following only a few local subunit transitions. We show that there is a close similarity between the concepts of tensegrity (associated with geodesic domes and mechanical engineering) and allostery (associated with biochemical control mechanisms).

  19. Structural insights into Ca2+-activated long-range allosteric channel gating of RyR1

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Risheng; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yan; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Xinrui; Jing, Shan; Liu, Congcong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Guangyu; Xu, Yaofang; Zhu, Sujie; Williams, Alan J; Sun, Fei; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a class of giant ion channels with molecular mass over 2.2 mega-Daltons. These channels mediate calcium signaling in a variety of cells. Since more than 80% of the RyR protein is folded into the cytoplasmic assembly and the remaining residues form the transmembrane domain, it has been hypothesized that the activation and regulation of RyR channels occur through an as yet uncharacterized long-range allosteric mechanism. Here we report the characterization of a Ca2+-activated open-state RyR1 structure by cryo-electron microscopy. The structure has an overall resolution of 4.9 Å and a resolution of 4.2 Å for the core region. In comparison with the previously determined apo/closed-state structure, we observed long-range allosteric gating of the channel upon Ca2+ activation. In-depth structural analyses elucidated a novel channel-gating mechanism and a novel ion selectivity mechanism of RyR1. Our work not only provides structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of channel gating and regulation of RyRs, but also sheds light on structural basis for channel-gating and ion selectivity mechanisms for the six-transmembrane-helix cation channel family. PMID:27573175

  20. Interrogation of the intersubunit interface of the open Hv1 proton channel with a probe of allosteric coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Liang; Singh, Vikrant; Wulff, Heike; Tombola, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The Hv1 voltage-gated proton channel is a dimeric complex consisting of two voltage-sensing domains (VSDs), each containing a gated proton permeation pathway. Dimerization is controlled by a cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain. The transitions from the closed to the open state in the two VSDs are known to occur cooperatively; however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Intersubunit interfaces play a critical role in allosteric processes; but, such interfaces have not been determined in the open Hv1 channel. Here we show that 2-guanidinothiazole derivatives block the two Hv1 VSDs in a cooperative way, and use one of the compounds as a probe of allosteric coupling between open subunits. We find that the extracellular ends of the first transmembrane segments of the VSDs form the intersubunit interface that mediates coupling between binding sites, while the coiled-coil domain does not directly participate in the process. We also find strong evidence that the channel’s proton selectivity filter controls blocker binding cooperativity. PMID:26365828

  1. Structural insights into Ca(2+)-activated long-range allosteric channel gating of RyR1.

    PubMed

    Wei, Risheng; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yan; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Xinrui; Jing, Shan; Liu, Congcong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Guangyu; Xu, Yaofang; Zhu, Sujie; Williams, Alan J; Sun, Fei; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a class of giant ion channels with molecular mass over 2.2 mega-Daltons. These channels mediate calcium signaling in a variety of cells. Since more than 80% of the RyR protein is folded into the cytoplasmic assembly and the remaining residues form the transmembrane domain, it has been hypothesized that the activation and regulation of RyR channels occur through an as yet uncharacterized long-range allosteric mechanism. Here we report the characterization of a Ca(2+)-activated open-state RyR1 structure by cryo-electron microscopy. The structure has an overall resolution of 4.9 Å and a resolution of 4.2 Å for the core region. In comparison with the previously determined apo/closed-state structure, we observed long-range allosteric gating of the channel upon Ca(2+) activation. In-depth structural analyses elucidated a novel channel-gating mechanism and a novel ion selectivity mechanism of RyR1. Our work not only provides structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of channel gating and regulation of RyRs, but also sheds light on structural basis for channel-gating and ion selectivity mechanisms for the six-transmembrane-helix cation channel family.

  2. Pepcan-12 (RVD-hemopressin) is a CB2 receptor positive allosteric modulator constitutively secreted by adrenals and in liver upon tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Vanessa; Chicca, Andrea; Glasmacher, Sandra; Paloczi, Janos; Cao, Zongxian; Pacher, Pal; Gertsch, Jürg

    2017-08-25

    Pepcan-12 (RVD-hemopressin; RVDPVNFKLLSH) is the major peptide of a family of endogenous peptide endocannabinoids (pepcans) shown to act as negative allosteric modulators (NAM) of cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Noradrenergic neurons have been identified to be a specific site of pepcan production. However, it remains unknown whether pepcans occur in the periphery and interact with peripheral CB2 cannabinoid receptors. Here, it is shown that pepcan-12 acts as a potent (K i value ~50 nM) hCB2 receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM). It significantly potentiated the effects of CB2 receptor agonists, including the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), for [35S]GTPγS binding and cAMP inhibition (5-10 fold). In mice, the putative precursor pepcan-23 (SALSDLHAHKLRVDPVNFKLLSH) was identified with pepcan-12 in brain, liver and kidney. Pepcan-12 was increased upon endotoxemia and ischemia reperfusion damage where CB2 receptors play a protective role. The adrenals are a major endocrine site of production/secretion of constitutive pepcan-12, as shown by its marked loss after adrenalectomy. However, upon I/R damage pepcan-12 was strongly increased in the liver (from ~100 pmol/g to ~500 pmol/g) independent of adrenals. The wide occurrence of this endogenous hormone-like CB2 receptor PAM, with unforeseen opposite allosteric effects on cannabinoid receptors, suggests its potential role in peripheral pathophysiological processes.

  3. Simulations of stressosome activation emphasize allosteric interactions between RsbR and RsbT.

    PubMed

    Liebal, Ulf W; Millat, Thomas; Marles-Wright, Jon; Lewis, Richard J; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2013-01-15

    The stressosome is a bacterial signalling complex that responds to environmental changes by initiating a protein partner switching cascade, which leads to the release of the alternative sigma factor, σB. Stress perception increases the phosphorylation of the stressosome sensor protein, RsbR, and the scaffold protein, RsbS, by the protein kinase, RsbT. Subsequent dissociation of RsbT from the stressosome activates the σB cascade. However, the sequence of physical events that occur in the stressosome during signal transduction is insufficiently understood. Here, we use computational modelling to correlate the structure of the stressosome with the efficiency of the phosphorylation reactions that occur upon activation by stress. In our model, the phosphorylation of any stressosome protein is dependent upon its nearest neighbours and their phosphorylation status. We compare different hypotheses about stressosome activation and find that only the model representing the allosteric activation of the kinase RsbT, by phosphorylated RsbR, qualitatively reproduces the experimental data. Our simulations and the associated analysis of published data support the following hypotheses: (i) a simple Boolean model is capable of reproducing stressosome dynamics, (ii) different stressors induce identical stressosome activation patterns, and we also confirm that (i) phosphorylated RsbR activates RsbT, and (ii) the main purpose of RsbX is to dephosphorylate RsbS-P.

  4. Allosteric MEK1/2 inhibitors including cobimetanib and trametinib in the treatment of cutaneous melanomas.

    PubMed

    Roskoski, Robert

    2017-03-01

    The Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK (Map kinase) cellular pathway is a highly conserved eukaryotic signaling module that transduces extracellular signals from growth factors and cytokines into intracellular regulatory events that are involved in cell growth and proliferation or the contrary pathway of cell differentiation. Dysregulation of this pathway occurs in more than one-third of all malignancies, a process that has fostered the development of targeted Map kinase pathway inhibitors. Cutaneous melanomas, which arise from skin melanocytes, are the most aggressive form of skin cancer. Mutations that activate the Map kinase pathway occur in more than 90% of these melanomas. This has led to the development of the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib or vemurafenib and cobimetanib for the treatment of BRAF V600E mutant melanomas. Dabrafenib and vemurafenib target V600E/K BRAF mutants while trametinib and cobimetanib target MEK1/2. The latter two agents bind to MEK1/2 at a site that is adjacent to, but separate from, the ATP-binding site and are therefore classified as type III allosteric protein kinase inhibitors. These agents form a hydrogen bond with a conserved β3-lysine and they make numerous hydrophobic contacts with residues within the αC-helix, the β5 strand, and within the activation segment, regions of the protein kinase domain that exhibit greater diversity than those found within the ATP-binding site. One advantage of such allosteric inhibitors is that they do not have to compete with millimolar concentrations of cellular ATP, which most FDA-approved small molecule competitive inhibitors such as imatinib must do. Owing to the wide spread activation of this pathway in numerous neoplasms, trametinib and cobimetinib are being studied in combination with other targeted and cytotoxic drugs in a variety of clinical situations. Except for BRAF and NRAS mutations, there are no other biomarkers correlated with treatment responses following MEK1/2 inhibition and the

  5. Protons Regulate Vesicular Glutamate Transporters through an Allosteric Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jacob; Chang, Roger; McGregor, Matt; Silm, Katlin; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Edwards, Robert H

    2016-05-18

    The quantal nature of synaptic transmission requires a mechanism to transport neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles without promoting non-vesicular efflux across the plasma membrane. Indeed, the vesicular transport of most classical transmitters involves a mechanism of H(+) exchange, which restricts flux to acidic membranes such as synaptic vesicles. However, vesicular transport of the principal excitatory transmitter glutamate depends primarily on membrane potential, which would drive non-vesicular efflux, and the role of protons is unclear. Adapting electrophysiology to record currents associated with the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), we characterize a chloride conductance that is gated by lumenal protons and chloride and supports glutamate uptake. Rather than coupling stoichiometrically to glutamate flux, lumenal protons and chloride allosterically activate vesicular glutamate transport. Gating by protons serves to inhibit what would otherwise be substantial non-vesicular glutamate efflux at the plasma membrane, thereby restricting VGLUT activity to synaptic vesicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural Basis for Allosteric Regulation of GPCRs by Sodium Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Chun, Eugene; Thompson, Aaron A.; Chubukov, Pavel; Xu, Fei; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Roth, Christopher B.; Heitman, Laura H.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2012-08-31

    Pharmacological responses of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be fine-tuned by allosteric modulators. Structural studies of such effects have been limited due to the medium resolution of GPCR structures. We reengineered the human A{sub 2A} adenosine receptor by replacing its third intracellular loop with apocytochrome b{sub 562}RIL and solved the structure at 1.8 angstrom resolution. The high-resolution structure allowed us to identify 57 ordered water molecules inside the receptor comprising three major clusters. The central cluster harbors a putative sodium ion bound to the highly conserved aspartate residue Asp{sup 2.50}. Additionally, two cholesterols stabilize the conformation of helix VI, and one of 23 ordered lipids intercalates inside the ligand-binding pocket. These high-resolution details shed light on the potential role of structured water molecules, sodium ions, and lipids/cholesterol in GPCR stabilization and function.

  7. Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Noah D; Garruss, Alexander S; Moretti, Rocco; Chan, Sum; Arbing, Mark A; Cascio, Duilio; Rogers, Jameson K; Isaacs, Farren J; Kosuri, Sriram; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Church, George M; Raman, Srivatsan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic regulatory proteins inducible by small molecules are useful synthetic biology tools as sensors and switches. Bacterial allosteric transcription factors (aTFs) are a major class of regulatory proteins, but few aTFs have been redesigned to respond to new effectors beyond natural aTF-inducer pairs. Altering inducer specificity in these proteins is difficult because substitutions that affect inducer binding may also disrupt allostery. We engineered an aTF, the Escherichia coli lac repressor, LacI, to respond to one of four new inducer molecules: fucose, gentiobiose, lactitol or sucralose. Using computational protein design, single-residue saturation mutagenesis or random mutagenesis, along with multiplex assembly, we identified new variants comparable in specificity and induction to wild-type LacI with its inducer, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The ability to create designer aTFs will enable applications including dynamic control of cell metabolism, cell biology and synthetic gene circuits. PMID:26689263

  8. Enhancing NMDA Receptor Function: Recent Progress on Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are subtype glutamate receptors that play important roles in excitatory neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Their hypo- or hyperactivation are proposed to contribute to the genesis or progression of various brain diseases, including stroke, schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Past efforts in targeting NMDARs for therapeutic intervention have largely been on inhibitors of NMDARs. In light of the discovery of NMDAR hypofunction in psychiatric disorders and perhaps Alzheimer's disease, efforts in boosting NMDAR activity/functions have surged in recent years. In this review, we will focus on enhancing NMDAR functions, especially on the recent progress in the generation of subunit-selective, allosteric positive modulators (PAMs) of NMDARs. We shall also discuss the usefulness of these newly developed NMDAR-PAMs. PMID:28163934

  9. Allosteric properties of PH domains in Arf regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Roy, Neeladri Sekhar; Yohe, Marielle E; Randazzo, Paul A; Gruschus, James M

    2016-01-01

    Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domains bind phospholipids and proteins. They are critical regulatory elements of a number enzymes including guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for Ras-superfamily guanine nucleotide binding proteins such as ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs). Recent studies have indicated that many PH domains may bind more than one ligand cooperatively. Here we discuss the molecular basis of PH domain-dependent allosteric behavior of 2 ADP-ribosylation factor exchange factors, Grp1 and Brag2, cooperative binding of ligands to the PH domains of Grp1 and the Arf GTPase-activating protein, ASAP1, and the consequences for activity of the associated catalytic domains.

  10. Taurine allosterically modulates flunitrazepam binding to synaptic membranes.

    PubMed

    Quinn, M R; Miller, C L

    1992-09-01

    Taurine is hypothesized to exert its inhibitory neuromodulatory effects, in part, by interaction with the GABAA receptor. Although taurine displaces GABA agonist binding to synaptic membranes, its allosteric effects on the benzodiazepine recognition site of the GABAA receptor complex is unsettled. We determined the effects of taurine on [3H]flunitrazepam (Flu) binding to well-washed, frozen-thawed synaptic membranes prepared from rat cortex. Comparative binding studies were conducted at 37 degrees C and on ice (0-4 degrees C). At 37 degrees C taurine increased Flu binding in a concentration dependent way by interaction with a bicuculline sensitive site, similar to GABA. Taurine increased Flu binding by causing a decrease in KD. The maximal effectiveness of taurine on Flu binding could not be increased further by addition of GABA. In contrast, the maximal stimulation of Flu binding by GABA was decreased by addition of taurine to the level attained by taurine alone. These mixed agonist/antagonist effects of taurine are pharmacologically specific and qualify taurine as a partial GABA agonist in this type of allosteric interaction. However, taurine causes opposite effects on Flu binding when measured at 0-4 degrees C: taurine interacts with a bicuculline insensitive site to inhibit Flu binding by increasing the KD. Taurine inhibition of Flu binding is not overcome by increasing concentrations of GABA. Although the mechanism of taurine inhibition of Flu binding at 0-4 degrees C is unclear, it may be an indirect effect of taurine interaction with membrane phospholipids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Structure-Based Network Analysis of Activation Mechanisms in the ErbB Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: The Regulatory Spine Residues Are Global Mediators of Structural Stability and Allosteric Interactions

    PubMed Central

    James, Kevin A.; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2014-01-01

    The ErbB protein tyrosine kinases are among the most important cell signaling families and mutation-induced modulation of their activity is associated with diverse functions in biological networks and human disease. We have combined molecular dynamics simulations of the ErbB kinases with the protein structure network modeling to characterize the reorganization of the residue interaction networks during conformational equilibrium changes in the normal and oncogenic forms. Structural stability and network analyses have identified local communities integrated around high centrality sites that correspond to the regulatory spine residues. This analysis has provided a quantitative insight to the mechanism of mutation-induced “superacceptor” activity in oncogenic EGFR dimers. We have found that kinase activation may be determined by allosteric interactions between modules of structurally stable residues that synchronize the dynamics in the nucleotide binding site and the αC-helix with the collective motions of the integrating αF-helix and the substrate binding site. The results of this study have pointed to a central role of the conserved His-Arg-Asp (HRD) motif in the catalytic loop and the Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) motif as key mediators of structural stability and allosteric communications in the ErbB kinases. We have determined that residues that are indispensable for kinase regulation and catalysis often corresponded to the high centrality nodes within the protein structure network and could be distinguished by their unique network signatures. The optimal communication pathways are also controlled by these nodes and may ensure efficient allosteric signaling in the functional kinase state. Structure-based network analysis has quantified subtle effects of ATP binding on conformational dynamics and stability of the EGFR structures. Consistent with the NMR studies, we have found that nucleotide-induced modulation of the residue interaction networks is not limited to the

  12. Allosteric Optical Control of a Class B G‐Protein‐Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Broichhagen, Johannes; Johnston, Natalie R.; von Ohlen, Yorrick; Meyer‐Berg, Helena; Jones, Ben J.; Bloom, Stephen R.; Rutter, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Allosteric regulation promises to open up new therapeutic avenues by increasing drug specificity at G‐protein‐coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, drug discovery efforts are at present hampered by an inability to precisely control the allosteric site. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and testing of PhotoETP, a light‐activated positive allosteric modulator of the glucagon‐like peptide‐1 receptor (GLP‐1R), a class B GPCR involved in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis in humans. PhotoETP potentiates Ca2+, cAMP, and insulin responses to glucagon‐like peptide‐1 and its metabolites following illumination of cells with blue light. PhotoETP thus provides a blueprint for the production of small‐molecule class B GPCR allosteric photoswitches, and may represent a useful tool for understanding positive cooperativity at the GLP‐1R. PMID:27059784

  13. A Random Forest Model for Predicting Allosteric and Functional Sites on Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ava S-Y; Westwood, Nicholas J; Brear, Paul; Rogers, Graeme W; Mavridis, Lazaros; Mitchell, John B O

    2016-04-01

    We created a computational method to identify allosteric sites using a machine learning method trained and tested on protein structures containing bound ligand molecules. The Random Forest machine learning approach was adopted to build our three-way predictive model. Based on descriptors collated for each ligand and binding site, the classification model allows us to assign protein cavities as allosteric, regular or orthosteric, and hence to identify allosteric sites. 43 structural descriptors per complex were derived and were used to characterize individual protein-ligand binding sites belonging to the three classes, allosteric, regular and orthosteric. We carried out a separate validation on a further unseen set of protein structures containing the ligand 2-(N-cyclohexylamino) ethane sulfonic acid (CHES).

  14. Biased signalling and allosteric machines: new vistas and challenges for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kenakin, Terry P

    2012-03-01

    Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) are nature's prototype allosteric proteins made to bind molecules at one location to subsequently change their shape to affect the binding of another molecule at another location. This paper attempts to describe the divergent 7TMR behaviours (i.e. third party allostery, receptor oligomerization, biased agonism) observed in pharmacology in terms of a homogeneous group of allosteric behaviours. By considering the bodies involved as a vector defined by a modulator, conduit and guest, these activities can all be described by a simple model of functional allostery made up of the Ehlert allosteric model and the Black/Leff operational model. It will be shown how this model yields parameters that can be used to characterize the activity of any ligand or protein producing effect through allosteric interaction with a 7TMR.

  15. Crystal structure of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius aspartate carbamoyltransferase in complex with its allosteric activator CTP.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Dirk; Xu, Ying; Aerts, Tony; Van Petegem, Filip; Van Beeumen, Jozef J

    2008-07-18

    Aspartate carbamoyltransferase (ATCase) is a paradigm for allosteric regulation of enzyme activity. B-class ATCases display very similar homotropic allosteric behaviour, but differ extensively in their heterotropic patterns. The ATCase from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, for example, is strongly activated by its metabolic pathway's end product CTP, in contrast with Escherichia coli ATCase which is inhibited by CTP. To investigate the structural basis of this property, we have solved the crystal structure of the S. acidocaldarius enzyme in complex with CTP. Structure comparison reveals that effector binding does not induce similar large-scale conformational changes as observed for the E. coli ATCase. However, shifts in sedimentation coefficients upon binding of the bi-substrate analogue PALA show the existence of structurally distinct allosteric states. This suggests that the so-called "Nucleotide-Perturbation model" for explaining heterotropic allosteric behaviour, which is based on global conformational strain, is not a general mechanism of B-class ATCases.

  16. Discovery and Characterization of Biased Allosteric Agonists of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR3.

    PubMed

    Milanos, Lampros; Brox, Regine; Frank, Theresa; Poklukar, Gašper; Palmisano, Ralf; Waibel, Reiner; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Dürr, Maximilian; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Larsen, Olav; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie; Tschammer, Nuska

    2016-03-10

    In this work we report a design, synthesis, and detailed functional characterization of unique strongly biased allosteric agonists of CXCR3 that contain tetrahydroisoquinoline carboxamide cores. Compound 11 (FAUC1036) is the first strongly biased allosteric agonist of CXCR3 that selectively induces weak chemotaxis and leads to receptor internalization and the β-arrestin 2 recruitment with potency comparable to that of the chemokine CXCL11 without any activation of G proteins. A subtle structural change (addition of a methoxy group, 14 (FAUC1104)) led to a contrasting biased allosteric partial agonist that activated solely G proteins, induced chemotaxis, but failed to induce receptor internalization or β-arrestin 2 recruitment. Concomitant structure-activity relationship studies indicated very steep structure-activity relationships, which steer the ligand bias between the β-arrestin 2 and G protein pathway. Overall, the information presented provides a powerful platform for further development and rational design of strongly biased allosteric agonists of CXCR3.

  17. Studying the binding interactions of allosteric agonists and antagonists of the CXCR4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Planesas, Jesús M; Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I; Borrell, José I; Teixidó, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    Several examples of allosteric modulators of GPCRs have been reported recently in the literature, but understanding their molecular mechanism presents a new challenge for medicinal chemistry. For the specific case of the cellular receptor CXCR4, it is known that pepducins (lipidated fragments of intracellular GPCR loops) such as ATI-2341 modulate CXCR4 activity agonistically via an allosteric mechanism. Moreover, there are also examples of small organic molecules such as AMD11070 and GSK812397 which may also act as allosteric antagonists. However, incomplete knowledge of the ligand-binding sites has hampered a detailed molecular understanding of how these inhibitors work. Here, we attempt to answer this question by analysing the binding interactions between the CXCR4 receptor and the above-mentioned allosteric modulators. We propose two different allosteric binding sites, one located in the intracellular loops 1, 2 and 3 (ICL1, ICL2 and ICL3) which binds the pepducin agonist ATI-2341, and the other at a subsite of the main extracellular orthosteric binding pocket between extracellular loops 1 and 2 and the N-terminus, which binds the antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397. Allosteric interactions between the CXCR4 and ATI-2341 were predicted by combining different modeling approaches. First, a rotational blind docking search was applied and the best poses were subsequently refined using flexible docking methods and molecular dynamic simulations. For the AMD11070 and GSK812397 antagonists, the entire CXCR4 protein surface was explored by blind docking in order to define the binding region. A second docking analysis by subsites was then performed to refine the allosteric interactions. Finally, we identified the binding residues that appear to be essential for CXCR4 allosteric modulators.

  18. Ultrahigh Enzyme Activity Assembled in Layered Double Hydroxides via Mg(2+)-Allosteric Effector.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Huang, Shu-Wan; Xu, Dan; Bao, Wen-Jing; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2015-06-02

    It is well-known that some metal ions could be allosteric effectors of allosteric enzymes to activate/inhibit the catalytic activities of enzymes. In nanobiocatalytic systems constructed based on the positive metal ion-induced allosteric effect, the incorporated enzymes will be activated and thus exhibit excellent catalytic performance. Herein, we present an environmentally friendly strategy to construct a novel allosteric effect-based β-galactosidase/Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (β-gal/Mg-Al-LDH) nanobiocatalytic system via the delamination-reconstruction method. The intercalated β-gal in the LDH galleries changes its conformation significantly due to the Mg(2+)-induced allosteric interactions and other weak interactions, which causes the activation of enzymatic activity. The β-gal/Mg-Al-LDH nanobiocatalytic system shows much higher catalytic activity and affinity toward its substrate and about 30 times higher catalytic reaction velocity than the free β-gal, which suggests that Mg(2+)-induced allosteric effect plays a vital role in the improvement of enzymatic performance.

  19. Allosteric Inhibitors at the Heterodimer Interface of Imidazole Glycerol Phosphate Synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeberger, Ning-Shiuan Nicole

    Imidazole glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS) from Thermotoga maritima is a heterodimeric enzyme composed of the HisH and HisF proteins. It is attractive as a pathological target since it is absent in mammals but found in plant and opportunistic human pathogens. IGPS was experimentally determined to be a V-type allosteric enzyme that is involved in an essential biosynthetic pathway of microorganisms. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to form NH3 in the HisH protein, followed by cyclization of NH3 with N'-[(5'-phosphoribulosyl)imino]-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-ribonucleotide (PRFAR) in the HisF subunit, forming imidazole glycerol phosphate (IGP) and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribotide (AICAR) that enter the histidine and purine biosynthetic pathways. Allosteric motions induced upon the binding of the effector PRFAR to HisF propagate through the non-covalent HisH/HisF interface and synchronize catalytic activity at the two distant active sites. However, the nature of the allosteric pathway and the feasibility of manipulating signal transduction by using allosteric drug-like molecules remain to be established. Molecular docking studies of commercial drugs at the HisH/HisF interface were used to identify stable candidates with a potential allosteric effect on the reaction mechanism. Molecular dynamic simulations and calculations of NMR chemical shifts were combined to elucidate the allosteric pathway of IGPS.

  20. Leveraging Reciprocity to Identify and Characterize Unknown Allosteric Sites in Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Cui, Danica S; Beaumont, Victor; Ginther, Patrick S; Lipchock, James M; Loria, J Patrick

    2017-07-21

    Drug-like molecules targeting allosteric sites in proteins are of great therapeutic interest; however, identification of potential sites is not trivial. A straightforward approach to identify hidden allosteric sites is demonstrated in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) by creation of single alanine mutations in the catalytic acid loop of PTP1B and VHR. This approach relies on the reciprocal interactions between an allosteric site and its coupled orthosteric site. The resulting NMR chemical shift perturbations (CSPs) of each mutant reveal clusters of distal residues affected by acid loop mutation. In PTP1B and VHR, two new allosteric clusters were identified in each enzyme. Mutations in these allosteric clusters altered phosphatase activity with changes in kcat/KM ranging from 30% to nearly 100-fold. This work outlines a simple method for identification of new allosteric sites in PTP, and given the basis of this method in thermodynamics, it is expected to be generally useful in other systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biased signaling of lipids and allosteric actions of synthetic molecules for GPR119.

    PubMed

    Hassing, Helle A; Fares, Suzan; Larsen, Olav; Pad, Hamideh; Hauge, Maria; Jones, Robert M; Schwartz, Thue W; Hansen, Harald S; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2016-11-01

    GPR119 is a Gαs-coupled lipid-sensor in the gut, where it mediates release of incretin hormones from the enteroendocrine cells and in pancreatic α-cells, where it releases insulin. Naturally occurring lipids such as monoacylglycerols (MAGs) and N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), like oleoylethanolamide (OEA), activate GPR119, and multiple synthetic ligands have been described. Here, we extend the GPR119 signaling profile to Gαq and Gαi in addition to β-arrestin recruitment and the downstream transcription factors CRE (cAMP response element), SRE (serum response element) and NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells). The endogenous OEA and the synthetic AR231453 were full agonists in all pathways except for NFAT, where no ligand-modulation was observed. The potency of AR231453 varied <16-fold (EC50 from 6 to 95nM) across the different signaling pathways, whereas that of OEA varied >175-fold (from 85nM to 15μM) indicating a biased signaling for OEA. The degree of constitutive activity was 1-10%, 10-30% and 30-70% of OEA-induced Emax in Gαi, Gαq and Gαs-driven pathways, respectively. This coincided with the lowest and highest OEA potency observed in Gαi and Gαs-driven pathways, respectively. Incubation for 2h with the 2-MAG-lipase inhibitor JZL84 doubled the constitutive activity, indicating that endogenous lipids contribute to the apparent constitutive activity. Finally, besides being an agonist, AR231453 acted as a positive allosteric modulator of OEA and increased its potency by 54-fold at 100nM AR231453. Our studies uncovering broad and biased signaling, masked constitutive activity by endogenous MAGs, and ago-allosteric properties of synthetic ligands may explain why many GPR119 drug-discovery programs have failed so far. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Allosteric inhibition of aminopeptidase N functions related to tumor growth and virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, César; Mudgal, Gaurav; Reguera, Juan; Recacha, Rosario; Albrecht, Sébastien; Enjuanes, Luis; Casasnovas, José M.

    2017-01-01

    Cell surface aminopeptidase N (APN) is a membrane-bound ectoenzyme that hydrolyzes proteins and peptides and regulates numerous cell functions. APN participates in tumor cell expansion and motility, and is a target for cancer therapies. Small drugs that bind to the APN active site inhibit catalysis and suppress tumor growth. APN is also a major cell entry receptor for coronavirus, which binds to a region distant from the active site. Three crystal structures that we determined of human and pig APN ectodomains defined the dynamic conformation of the protein. These structures offered snapshots of closed, intermediate and open APN, which represent distinct functional states. Coronavirus envelope proteins specifically recognized the open APN form, prevented ectodomain progression to the closed form and substrate hydrolysis. In addition, drugs that bind the active site inhibited both coronavirus binding to cell surface APN and infection; the drugs probably hindered APN transition to the virus-specific open form. We conclude that allosteric inhibition of APN functions occurs by ligand suppression of ectodomain motions necessary for catalysis and virus cell entry, as validated by locking APN with disulfides. Blocking APN dynamics can thus be a valuable approach to development of drugs that target this ectoenzyme. PMID:28393915

  3. FRET-Based Sensors Unravel Activation and Allosteric Modulation of the GABAB Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lecat-Guillet, Nathalie; Monnier, Carine; Rovira, Xavier; Kniazeff, Julie; Lamarque, Laurent; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Trinquet, Eric; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Rondard, Philippe

    2017-03-06

    The main inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), modulates many synapses by activating the G protein-coupled receptor GABAB, which is a target for various therapeutic applications. It is an obligatory heterodimer made of GB1 and GB2 that can be regulated by positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). The molecular mechanism of activation of the GABAB receptor remains poorly understood. Here, we have developed FRET-based conformational GABAB sensors compatible with high-throughput screening. We identified conformational changes occurring within the extracellular and transmembrane domains upon receptor activation, which are smaller than those observed in the related metabotropic glutamate receptors. These sensors also allow discrimination between agonists of different efficacies and between PAMs that have different modes of action, which has not always been possible using conventional functional assays. Our study brings important new information on the activation mechanism of the GABAB receptor and should facilitate the screening and identification of new chemicals targeting this receptor.

  4. Allosteric action in real time: Time-resolved crystallographic studies of a cooperative dimeric hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, James E.; Pahl, Reinhard; Šrajer, Vukica; Royer, William E.

    2006-01-01

    Protein allostery provides mechanisms for regulation of biological function at the molecular level. We present here an investigation of global, ligand-induced allosteric transition in a protein by time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The study provides a view of structural changes in single crystals of Scapharca dimeric hemoglobin as they proceed in real time, from 5 ns to 80 μs after ligand photodissociation. A tertiary intermediate structure forms rapidly (<5 ns) as the protein responds to the presence of an unliganded heme within each R-state protein subunit, with key structural changes observed in the heme groups, neighboring residues, and interface water molecules. This intermediate lays a foundation for the concerted tertiary and quaternary structural changes that occur on a microsecond time scale and are associated with the transition to a low-affinity T-state structure. Reversal of these changes shows a considerable lag as a T-like structure persists well after ligand rebinding, suggesting a slow T-to-R transition. PMID:16684887

  5. Allosteric inhibition of aminopeptidase N functions related to tumor growth and virus infection.

    PubMed

    Santiago, César; Mudgal, Gaurav; Reguera, Juan; Recacha, Rosario; Albrecht, Sébastien; Enjuanes, Luis; Casasnovas, José M

    2017-04-10

    Cell surface aminopeptidase N (APN) is a membrane-bound ectoenzyme that hydrolyzes proteins and peptides and regulates numerous cell functions. APN participates in tumor cell expansion and motility, and is a target for cancer therapies. Small drugs that bind to the APN active site inhibit catalysis and suppress tumor growth. APN is also a major cell entry receptor for coronavirus, which binds to a region distant from the active site. Three crystal structures that we determined of human and pig APN ectodomains defined the dynamic conformation of the protein. These structures offered snapshots of closed, intermediate and open APN, which represent distinct functional states. Coronavirus envelope proteins specifically recognized the open APN form, prevented ectodomain progression to the closed form and substrate hydrolysis. In addition, drugs that bind the active site inhibited both coronavirus binding to cell surface APN and infection; the drugs probably hindered APN transition to the virus-specific open form. We conclude that allosteric inhibition of APN functions occurs by ligand suppression of ectodomain motions necessary for catalysis and virus cell entry, as validated by locking APN with disulfides. Blocking APN dynamics can thus be a valuable approach to development of drugs that target this ectoenzyme.

  6. Dissecting Enzyme Regulation by Multiple Allosteric Effectors: Nucleotide Regulation of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase†

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Hsiao, Jennifer J.; Gryncel, Kimberly R.; Kantrowitz, Evan R.; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Genyuan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-01-01

    The enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase, EC 2.1.3.2 of Escherichia coli), which catalyzes the committed step of pyrimidine biosynthesis, is allosterically regulated by all four ribonucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) in a nonlinear manner. Here, we dissect this regulation using the recently developed approach of random sampling–high-dimensional model representation (RS–HDMR). ATCase activity was measured in vitro at 300 random NTP concentration combinations, each involving (consistent with in vivo conditions) all four NTPs being present. These data were then used to derive a RS–HDMR model of ATCase activity over the full four-dimensional NTP space. The model accounted for 90% of the variance in the experimental data. Its main elements were positive ATCase regulation by ATP and negative by CTP, with the negative effects of CTP dominating the positive ones of ATP when both regulators were abundant (i.e., a negative cooperative effect of ATP × CTP). Strong sensitivity to both ATP and CTP concentrations occurred in their physiological concentration ranges. UTP had only a slight effect, and GTP had almost none. These findings support a predominant role of CTP and ATP in ATCase regulation. The general approach provides a new paradigm for dissecting multifactorial regulation of biological molecules and processes. PMID:18454556

  7. Salvinorin A: allosteric interactions at the mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Richard B; Murphy, Daniel L; Xu, Heng; Godin, Jonathan A; Dersch, Christina M; Partilla, John S; Tidgewell, Kevin; Schmidt, Matthew; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2007-02-01

    Salvinorin A [(2S,4aR,6aR,7R,9S,10aS,10bR)-9-(acetyloxy)-2-(3-furanyl)-dodecahydro-6a,10b-dimethyl-4,10-dioxo-2h-naphtho[2,1-c]pyran-7-carboxylic acid methyl ester] is a hallucinogenic kappa-opioid receptor agonist that lacks the usual basic nitrogen atom present in other known opioid ligands. Our first published studies indicated that Salvinorin A weakly inhibited mu-receptor binding, and subsequent experiments revealed that Salvinorin A partially inhibited mu-receptor binding. Therefore, we hypothesized that Salvinorin A allosterically modulates mu-receptor binding. To test this hypothesis, we used Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the cloned human opioid receptor. Salvinorin A partially inhibited [(3)H]Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-Me-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) (0.5, 2.0, and 8.0 nM) binding with E(MAX) values of 78.6, 72.1, and 45.7%, respectively, and EC(50) values of 955, 1124, and 4527 nM, respectively. Salvinorin A also partially inhibited [(3)H]diprenorphine (0.02, 0.1, and 0.5 nM) binding with E(MAX) values of 86.2, 64, and 33.6%, respectively, and EC(50) values of 1231, 866, and 3078 nM, respectively. Saturation binding studies with [(3)H]DAMGO showed that Salvinorin A (10 and 30 microM) decreased the mu-receptor B(max) and increased the K(d) in a dose-dependent nonlinear manner. Saturation binding studies with [(3)H]diprenorphine showed that Salvinorin A (10 and 40 microM) decreased the mu-receptor B(max) and increased the K(d) in a dose-dependent nonlinear manner. Similar findings were observed in rat brain with [(3)H]DAMGO. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that Salvinorin A altered the dissociation kinetics of both [(3)H]DAMGO and [(3)H]diprenorphine binding to mu receptors. Furthermore, Salvinorin A acted as an uncompetitive inhibitor of DAMGO-stimulated guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)-triphosphate binding. Viewed collectively, these data support the hypothesis that Salvinorin A allosterically modulates the mu-opioid receptor.

  8. Bupivacaine Blocks N-Type Inactivating Kv Channels in the Open State: No Allosteric Effect on Inactivation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Johanna; Madeja, Michael; Elinder, Fredrik; Århem, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Local anesthetics bind to ion channels in a state-dependent manner. For noninactivating voltage-gated K channels the binding mainly occurs in the open state, while for voltage-gated inactivating Na channels it is assumed to occur mainly in inactivated states, leading to an allosterically caused increase in the inactivation probability, reflected in a negative shift of the steady-state inactivation curve, prolonged recovery from inactivation, and a frequency-dependent block. How local anesthetics bind to N-type inactivating K channels is less explored. In this study, we have compared bupivacaine effects on inactivating (Shaker and Kv3.4) and noninactivating (Shaker-IR and Kv3.2) channels, expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Bupivacaine was found to block these channels time-dependently without shifting the steady-state inactivation curve markedly, without a prolonged recovery from inactivation, and without a frequency-dependent block. An analysis, including computational testing of kinetic models, suggests binding to the channel mainly in the open state, with affinities close to those estimated for corresponding noninactivating channels (300 and 280 μM for Shaker and Shaker-IR, and 60 and 90 μM for Kv3.4 and Kv3.2). The similar magnitudes of Kd, as well as of blocking and unblocking rate constants for inactivating and noninactivating Shaker channels, most likely exclude allosteric interactions between the inactivation mechanism and the binding site. The relevance of these results for understanding the action of local anesthetics on Na channels is discussed. PMID:18790854

  9. Allosteric reversion of Haemophilus influenzae β-carbonic anhydrase via a proline shift.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Katherine M; Million-Perez, H Rachael; Merkhofer, Richard; Nicholson, Hilary; Rowlett, Roger S

    2015-01-20

    Haemophilus influenzae β-carbonic anhydrase (HICA) has been reverse-engineered in the allosteric site region to resemble the nonallosteric Pisum sativum enzyme in order to identify critical features of allostery and intersusbunit communication. Three variants (W39V/G41A, P48S/A49P, and W39V/G41A/P48S/A49P) were identified, through a comparison with a crystal structure of nonallosteric P. sativum β-carbonic anhydrase (PSCA, PDB 1EKJ ), to potentially revert HICA to a nonallosteric enzyme. The W39V/G41A and P48S/A49P mutations decreased the apparent kcat/Km proton dependence from 4 to 2 and 1, respectively, increasing the overall maximal kcat/Km to 16 ± 2 μM(-1) s(-1) (380% of wild type) and 17 ± 3 μM(-1) s(-1) (405% of wild type). The pKa values of the metal-bound water molecule based on the pH-rate profile kinetics (8.32 ± 0.04 for W39V/G41A and 8.3 ± 0.1 for P48S/A49P) were also slightly higher than that for the wild-type enzyme (7.74 ± 0.04). The P48S/A49P variant has lost all pH-rate cooperativity. The W39V/G41A/P48S/A49P variant's kinetics were unusual and were fit with a log-linear function with a slope 0.9 ± 0.2. The crystal structure of the W39V/G41A variant revealed an active site very similar to the T-state wild-type oligomer with bicarbonate trapped in the escort site. By contrast, the X-ray crystal structure of a proline shift variant (P48S/A49P) reveals that it has adopted an active site conformation nearly identical to that of nonallosteric β-carbonic anhydrase (R-state) for one chain, including a tight association with the dimer-exchanged N-terminal helices; the second chain in the asymmetric unit is associated in a biologically relevant oligomer, but it adopts a T-state conformation that is not capped by dimer-exchanged N-terminal helices. The hybrid R/T nature of HICA P48S/A49P structurally recapitulates the interruption of pH-rate cooperativity observed for this variant. Comparison of the conformations of the R and T chains of P48S/A49P

  10. ASSESSMENT OF SUBUNIT-DEPENDENT DIRECT GATING AND ALLOSTERIC MODULATORY EFFECTS OF CARISOPRODOL AT GABAA RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; González, Lorie A.; Dillon, Glenn H.

    2016-01-01

    Carisoprodol is a widely prescribed muscle relaxant, abuse of which has grown considerably in recent years. It directly activates and allosterically modulates α1β2γ2 GABAARs, although the site(s) of action are unknown. To gain insight into the actions of carisoprodol, subunit-dependent effects of this drug were assessed. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from HEK293 cells expressing α1β2, α1β3 or αxβzγ2 (where x = 1–6 and z = 1–3) GABAARs, and in receptors incorporating the δ subunit (modeling extrasynaptic receptors). The ability to directly gate and allosterically potentiate GABA-gated currents was observed for all configurations. Presence or absence of the γ2 subunit did not affect the ability of carisoprodol to directly gate or allosterically modulate the receptor. Presence of the β1 subunit conferred highest efficacy for direct activation relative to maximum GABA currents, while presence of the β2 subunit conferred highest efficacy for allosteric modulation of the GABA response. With regard to α subunits, carisoprodol was most efficacious at enhancing the actions of GABA in receptors incorporating the α1 subunit. The ability to directly gate the receptor was generally comparable regardless of the α subunit isoform, although receptors incorporating the α3 subunit showed significantly reduced direct gating efficacy and affinity. In extrasynaptic (α1β3δ and α4β3δ) receptors, carisoprodol had greater efficacy than GABA as a direct gating agonist. In addition, carisoprodol allosterically potentiated both EC20 and saturating GABA concentrations in these receptors. In assessing voltage-dependence, we found direct gating and inhibitory effects were insensitive to membrane voltage, whereas allosteric modulatory effects were affected by membrane voltage. Our findings demonstrate direct and allosteric effects of carisoprodol at synaptic and extrasynpatic GABAARs and that subunit isoform influences these effects. PMID:25896767

  11. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Transmembrane Mutations Convert Ivermectin from a Positive to a Negative Allosteric Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Toby

    2010-01-01

    Ivermectin is a macrocyclic lactone that acts as a positive allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) but has no modulatory activity on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) type 3 (5-HT3) receptors. By examining the influence of ivermectin on subunit chimeras containing domains from the nAChR α7 subunit and the 5-HT3A subunit, we have concluded that the transmembrane domains play a critical role in influencing allosteric modulation by ivermectin. A series of mutations located within the α-helical transmembrane domains of the α7 subunit were examined, and seven were found to have significant effects on allosteric modulation by ivermectin. Four mutations (A225D, Q272V, T456Y, and C459Y) caused a significant reduction in the potency of ivermectin as an allosteric potentiator. Compared with wild-type α7 nAChRs, potentiation by ivermectin was reduced dramatically (by 89–97%) by these mutations. Somewhat unexpectedly, three mutations (S222M, M253L, and S276V located in TM1, TM2, and TM3) converted ivermectin from a positive allosteric modulator into an antagonist. Levels of inhibition of 56, 84, and 89% were observed on M253L, S276V, and S222M, respectively. Antagonism by ivermectin was insurmountable and had no effect on EC50 of acetylcholine, indicating that it is acting noncompetitively. The seven mutations that influence allosteric modulation by ivermectin are located near a predicted intrasubunit transmembrane cavity. Computer docking simulations provide support for the hypothesis that ivermectin binds in close proximity to this cavity. We conclude that transmembrane mutations in α7 nAChRs are able to convert ivermectin from a positive to a negative allosteric modulator. PMID:20463059

  12. Structure-based discovery of the first allosteric inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Giulio; Anighoro, Andrew; Chripkova, Martina; Carrassa, Laura; Broggini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric targeting of protein kinases via displacement of the structural αC helix with type III allosteric inhibitors is currently gaining a foothold in drug discovery. Recently, the first crystal structure of CDK2 with an open allosteric pocket adjacent to the αC helix has been described, prospecting new opportunities to design more selective inhibitors, but the structure has not yet been exploited for the structure-based design of type III allosteric inhibitors. In this work we report the results of a virtual screening campaign that resulted in the discovery of the first-in-class type III allosteric ligands of CDK2. Using a combination of docking and post-docking analyses made with our tool BEAR, 7 allosteric ligands (hit rate of 20%) with micromolar affinity for CDK2 were identified, some of them inhibiting the growth of breast cancer cell lines in the micromolar range. Competition experiments performed in the presence of the ATP-competitive inhibitor staurosporine confirmed that the 7 ligands are truly allosteric, in agreement with their design. Of these, compound 2 bound CDK2 with an EC50 value of 3 μM and inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB231 and ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells with IC50 values of approximately 20 μM, while compound 4 had an EC50 value of 71 μM and IC50 values around 4 μM. Remarkably, the most potent compound 4 was able to selectively inhibit CDK2-mediated Retinoblastoma phosphorylation, confirming that its mechanism of action is fully compatible with a selective inhibition of CDK2 phosphorylation in cells. Finally, hit expansion through analog search of the most potent inhibitor 4 revealed an additional ligand 4g with similar in vitro potency on breast cancer cells.

  13. Lipid-Mediated Regulation of Embedded Receptor Kinases via Parallel Allosteric Relays.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Madhubrata; Wang, Loo Chien; Ramesh, Ranita; Morgan, Leslie K; Kenney, Linda J; Anand, Ganesh S

    2017-02-28

    Membrane-anchored receptors are essential cellular signaling elements for stimulus sensing, propagation, and transmission inside cells. However, the contributions of lipid interactions to the function and dynamics of embedded receptor kinases have not been described in detail. In this study, we used amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, a sensitive biophysical approach, to probe the dynamics of a membrane-embedded receptor kinase, EnvZ, together with functional assays to describe the role of lipids in receptor kinase function. Our results reveal that lipids play an important role in regulating receptor function through interactions with transmembrane segments, as well as through peripheral interactions with nonembedded domains. Specifically, the lipid membrane allosterically modulates the activity of the embedded kinase by altering the dynamics of a glycine-rich motif that is critical for phosphotransfer from ATP. This allostery in EnvZ is independent of membrane composition and involves direct interactions with transmembrane and periplasmic segments, as well as peripheral interactions with nonembedded domains of the protein. In the absence of the membrane-spanning regions, lipid allostery is propagated entirely through peripheral interactions. Whereas lipid allostery impacts the phosphotransferase function of the kinase, extracellular stimulus recognition is mediated via a four-helix bundle subdomain located in the cytoplasm, which functions as the osmosensing core through osmolality-dependent helical stabilization. Our findings emphasize the functional modularity in a membrane-embedded kinase, separated into membrane association, phosphotransferase function, and stimulus recognition. These components are integrated through long-range communication relays, with lipids playing an essential role in regulation.

  14. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-08-24

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes.

  15. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    DOE PAGES

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; ...

    2015-08-24

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics,more » the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes.« less

  16. Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Noah D.; Garruss, Alexander S.; Moretti, Rocco; Chan, Sum; Arbing, Mark A.; Cascio, Duilio; Rogers, Jameson K.; Isaacs, Farren J.; Kosuri, Sriram; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Church, George M.; Raman, Srivatsan

    2015-12-21

    Genetic regulatory proteins inducible by small molecules are useful synthetic biology tools as sensors and switches. Bacterial allosteric transcription factors (aTFs) are a major class of regulatory proteins, but few aTFs have been redesigned to respond to new effectors beyond natural aTF-inducer pairs. Altering inducer specificity in these proteins is difficult because substitutions that affect inducer binding may also disrupt allostery. In this paper, we engineered an aTF, the Escherichia coli lac repressor, LacI, to respond to one of four new inducer molecules: fucose, gentiobiose, lactitol and sucralose. Using computational protein design, single-residue saturation mutagenesis or random mutagenesis, along with multiplex assembly, we identified new variants comparable in specificity and induction to wild-type LacI with its inducer, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Finally, the ability to create designer aTFs will enable applications including dynamic control of cell metabolism, cell biology and synthetic gene circuits.

  17. Coarse-grained molecular simulations of allosteric cooperativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj; Portman, John J.

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between a protein and a ligand are often accompanied by a redistribution of the population of thermally accessible conformations. This dynamic response of the protein's functional energy landscape enables a protein to modulate binding affinities and control binding sensitivity to ligand concentration. In this paper, we investigate the structural origins of binding affinity and allosteric cooperativity of binding two Ca2+ ions to each domain of Calmodulin (CaM) through simulations of a simple coarse-grained model. In this model, the protein's conformational transitions between open and closed conformational ensembles are simulated explicitly and ligand binding and unbinding are treated implicitly within the grand canonical ensemble. Ligand binding is cooperative because the binding sites are coupled through a shift in the dominant conformational ensemble upon binding. The classic Monod-Wyman-Changeux model of allostery with appropriate binding free energies to the open and closed ensembles accurately describes the simulated binding thermodynamics. The simulations predict that the two domains of CaM have distinct binding affinity and cooperativity. In particular, the C-terminal domain binds Ca2+ with higher affinity and greater cooperativity than the N-terminal domain. From a structural point of view, the affinity of an individual binding loop depends sensitively on the loop's structural compatibility with the ligand in the bound ensemble, as well as the conformational flexibility of the binding site in the unbound ensemble.

  18. The therapeutic promise of positive allosteric modulation of nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Uteshev, Victor V.

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, deficits in cholinergic neurotransmission correlate with decreased attention and cognitive impairment, while stimulation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves attention, cognitive performance and neuronal resistance to injury as well as produces robust analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. The rational basis for the therapeutic use of orthosteric agonists and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of nicotinic receptors arises from the finding that functional nicotinic receptors are ubiquitously expressed in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues including brain regions highly vulnerable to traumatic and ischemic types of injury (e.g., cortex and hippocampus). Moreover, functional nicotinic receptors do not vanish in age-, disease- and trauma-related neuropathologies, but their expression and/or activation levels decline in a subunit- and brain region-specific manner. Therefore, augmenting the endogenous cholinergic tone by nicotinic agents is possible and may offset neurological impairments associated with cholinergic hypofunction. Importantly, because neuronal damage elevates extracellular levels of choline (a selective agonist of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors) near the site of injury, α7-PAM-based treatments may augment pathology-activated α7-dependent auto-therapies where and when they are most needed (i.e., in the penumbra, post-injury). Thus, the nicotinic-PAM-based treatments are expected to be highly efficacious with fewer side effects as compared to a more indiscriminate action of exogenous orthosteric agonists. In this review, I will summarize the existing trends in therapeutic applications of nicotinic PAMs. PMID:24530419

  19. Allosteric Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the AKT Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafave, D. S.

    This research addresses computational design of small druglike molecules for possible anticancer applications. AKT and SGK are kinases that control important cellular functions. They are highly homologous, having similar activators and targets. Cancers with increased SGK activity may develop resistance to AKT-specific inhibitors. Our goal was to design new molecules that would bind both AKT and SGK, thus preventing the development of drug resistance. Most kinase inhibitors target the kinase ATP-binding site. However, the high similarity in this site among kinases makes it difficult to target specifically. Furthermore, mutations in this site can cause resistance to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. We used existing AKT inhibitors as initial templates to design molecules that could potentially bind the allosteric sites of both AKT and SGK. Molecules with no implicit toxicities and optimal drug-like properties were used for docking studies. Binding energies of the stable complexes that the designed molecules formed with AKT and SGK were calculated. Possible applications of the designed putative inhibitors against cancers with overexpressed AKT/SGK is discussed.

  20. Allosteric Inhibition of Anti-Apoptotic MCL-1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Susan; Wales, Thomas E.; Escudero, Silvia; Cohen, Daniel T.; Luccarelli, James; Gallagher, Catherine; Cohen, Nicole A.; Huhn, Annissa J.; Bird, Gregory H.; Engen, John R.; Walensky, Loren D.

    2016-01-01

    MCL-1 is an anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family protein that has emerged as a major pathogenic factor in human cancer. Like BCL-2, MCL-1 bears a surface groove whose function is to sequester the BH3 killer domains of pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family members, a mechanism harnessed by cancer cells to establish formidable apoptotic blockades. Whereas drugging the BH3-binding groove has been achieved for BCL-2, translating this approach to MCL-1 has been challenging. Here, we report an alternative mechanism for MCL-1 inhibition by small molecule covalent modification of C286 at a novel interaction site distant from the BH3-binding groove. Our structure-function analyses revealed that the BH3-binding capacity of MCL-1 and its suppression of BAX are impaired by molecular engagement, a phenomenon recapitulated by C286W mutagenic mimicry in vitro and in cells. Thus, we characterize an allosteric mechanism for disrupting the anti-apoptotic, BH3-binding activity of MCL-1, informing a new strategy for disarming MCL-1 in cancer. PMID:27159560

  1. The autophagy initiator ULK1 sensitizes AMPK to allosteric drugs.

    PubMed

    Dite, Toby A; Ling, Naomi X Y; Scott, John W; Hoque, Ashfaqul; Galic, Sandra; Parker, Benjamin L; Ngoei, Kevin R W; Langendorf, Christopher G; O'Brien, Matthew T; Kundu, Mondira; Viollet, Benoit; Steinberg, Gregory R; Sakamoto, Kei; Kemp, Bruce E; Oakhill, Jonathan S

    2017-09-18

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic stress-sensing enzyme responsible for maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. Activation of AMPK by salicylate and the thienopyridone A-769662 is critically dependent on phosphorylation of Ser108 in the β1 regulatory subunit. Here, we show a possible role for Ser108 phosphorylation in cell cycle regulation and promotion of pro-survival pathways in response to energy stress. We identify the autophagy initiator Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1) as a β1-Ser108 kinase in cells. Cellular β1-Ser108 phosphorylation by ULK1 was dependent on AMPK β-subunit myristoylation, metabolic stress associated with elevated AMP/ATP ratio, and the intrinsic energy sensing capacity of AMPK; features consistent with an AMP-induced myristoyl switch mechanism. We further demonstrate cellular AMPK signaling independent of activation loop Thr172 phosphorylation, providing potential insight into physiological roles for Ser108 phosphorylation. These findings uncover new mechanisms by which AMPK could potentially maintain cellular energy homeostasis independently of Thr172 phosphorylation.AMPK is involved in sensing of metabolic stress. The authors show that the autophagy initiator ULK1 phosphorylates β1-Ser108 on the regulatory β1-subunit, sensitizing AMPK to allosteric drugs, and activates signaling pathways that appear independent of Thr172 phosphorylation in the kinase activation loop.

  2. Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Noah D.; Garruss, Alexander S.; Moretti, Rocco; ...

    2015-12-21

    Genetic regulatory proteins inducible by small molecules are useful synthetic biology tools as sensors and switches. Bacterial allosteric transcription factors (aTFs) are a major class of regulatory proteins, but few aTFs have been redesigned to respond to new effectors beyond natural aTF-inducer pairs. Altering inducer specificity in these proteins is difficult because substitutions that affect inducer binding may also disrupt allostery. In this paper, we engineered an aTF, the Escherichia coli lac repressor, LacI, to respond to one of four new inducer molecules: fucose, gentiobiose, lactitol and sucralose. Using computational protein design, single-residue saturation mutagenesis or random mutagenesis, along withmore » multiplex assembly, we identified new variants comparable in specificity and induction to wild-type LacI with its inducer, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Finally, the ability to create designer aTFs will enable applications including dynamic control of cell metabolism, cell biology and synthetic gene circuits.« less

  3. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes. PMID:26305940

  4. Ignavine: a novel allosteric modulator of the μ opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Miyagi, Chika; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Mizuno, Keita; Omiya, Yuji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Warabi, Eiji; Sudo, Yuka; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Miyano, Kanako; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Processed Aconiti tuber (PAT) is used to treat pain associated with various disorders. Although it has been demonstrated that the κ opioid receptor (KOR) signaling pathway is a mediator of the analgesic effect of PAT, active components affecting opioid signaling have not yet been identified. In this study, we explored candidate components of PAT by pharmacokinetic analysis and identified ignavine, which is a different structure from aconitine alkaloids. A receptor binding assay of opioid receptors showed that ignavine specifically binds the μ opioid receptor (MOR), not the KOR. Receptor internalization assay in MOR-expressing cell lines revealed that ignavine augmented the responses produced by D-Ala(2)-N-Me-Phe(4)-Gly-ol(5)-enkephalin (DAMGO), a representative MOR agonist, at a low concentration and inhibited it at a higher concentration. Ignavine also exerted positive modulatory activity for DAMGO, endomorphin-1 and morphine in cAMP assay. Additionally, ignavine alone showed an analgesic effect in vivo. In silico simulation analysis suggested that ignavine would induce a unique structural change distinguished from those induced by a representative MOR agonist and antagonist. These data collectively suggest the possibility that ignavine could be a novel allosteric modulator of the MOR. The present results may open the way for the development of a novel pain management strategy. PMID:27530869

  5. Allosteric receptor activation by the plant peptide hormone phytosulfokine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jizong; Li, Hongju; Han, Zhifu; Zhang, Heqiao; Wang, Tong; Lin, Guangzhong; Chang, Junbiao; Yang, Weicai; Chai, Jijie

    2015-09-10

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) is a disulfated pentapeptide that has a ubiquitous role in plant growth and development. PSK is perceived by its receptor PSKR, a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK). The mechanisms underlying the recognition of PSK, the activation of PSKR and the identity of the components downstream of the initial binding remain elusive. Here we report the crystal structures of the extracellular LRR domain of PSKR in free, PSK- and co-receptor-bound forms. The structures reveal that PSK interacts mainly with a β-strand from the island domain of PSKR, forming an anti-β-sheet. The two sulfate moieties of PSK interact directly with PSKR, sensitizing PSKR recognition of PSK. Supported by biochemical, structural and genetic evidence, PSK binding enhances PSKR heterodimerization with the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinases (SERKs). However, PSK is not directly involved in PSKR-SERK interaction but stabilizes PSKR island domain for recruitment of a SERK. Our data reveal the structural basis for PSKR recognition of PSK and allosteric activation of PSKR by PSK, opening up new avenues for the design of PSKR-specific small molecules.

  6. Functional impact of allosteric agonist activity of selective positive allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 in regulating central nervous system function.

    PubMed

    Noetzel, Meredith J; Rook, Jerri M; Vinson, Paige N; Cho, Hyekyung P; Days, Emily; Zhou, Y; Rodriguez, Alice L; Lavreysen, Hilde; Stauffer, Shaun R; Niswender, Colleen M; Xiang, Zixiu; Daniels, J Scott; Jones, Carrie K; Lindsley, Craig W; Weaver, C David; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu(5)) have emerged as an exciting new approach for the treatment of schizophrenia and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Of interest, some mGlu(5) PAMs act as pure PAMs, only potentiating mGlu(5) responses to glutamate whereas others [allosteric agonists coupled with PAM activity (ago-PAMs)] potentiate responses to glutamate and have intrinsic allosteric agonist activity in mGlu(5)-expressing cell lines. All mGlu(5) PAMs previously shown to have efficacy in animal models act as ago-PAMs in cell lines, raising the possibility that allosteric agonist activity is critical for in vivo efficacy. We have now optimized novel mGlu(5) pure PAMs that are devoid of detectable agonist activity and structurally related mGlu(5) ago-PAMs that activate mGlu(5) alone in cell lines. Studies of mGlu(5) PAMs in cell lines revealed that ago-PAM activity is dependent on levels of mGlu(5) receptor expression in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, whereas PAM potency is relatively unaffected by levels of receptor expression. Furthermore, ago-PAMs have no agonist activity in the native systems tested, including cortical astrocytes and subthalamic nucleus neurons and in measures of long-term depression at the hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse. Finally, studies with pure PAMs and ago-PAMs chemically optimized to provide comparable CNS exposure revealed that both classes of mGlu(5) PAMs have similar efficacy in a rodent model predictive of antipsychotic activity. These data suggest that the level of receptor expression influences the ability of mGlu(5) PAMs to act as allosteric agonists in vitro and that ago-PAM activity observed in cell-based assays may not be important for in vivo efficacy.

  7. Allosteric modulation of the effect of escitalopram, paroxetine and fluoxetine: in-vitro and in-vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Mansari, Mostafa El; Wiborg, Ove; Mnie-Filali, Ouissame; Benturquia, Nadia; Sánchez, Connie; Haddjeri, Nasser

    2007-02-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that the effect of citalopram on serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibition and its antidepressant activity resides in the S-enantiomer. In addition, using a variety of in-vivo and in-vitro paradigms, it was shown that R-citalopram counteracts the effect of escitalopram. This effect was suggested to occur via an allosteric modulation at the level of the 5-HT transporter. Using in-vitro binding assays at membranes from COS-1 cells expressing the human 5-HT transporter (hSERT) and in-vivo electrophysiological and microdialysis techniques in rats, the present study was directed at determining whether R-citalopram modifies the action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) known to act on allosteric sites namely escitalopram, and to a lesser extent paroxetine, compared to fluoxetine, which has no affinity for these sites. In-vitro binding studies showed that R-citalopram attenuated the association rates of escitalopram and paroxetine to the 5-HT transporter, but had no effect on the association rates of fluoxetine, venlafaxine or sertraline. In the rat dorsal raphe nucleus, R-citalopram (250 microg/kg i.v.) blocked the suppressant effect on neuronal firing activity of both escitalopram (100 microg/kg i.v.) and paroxetine (500 microg/kg i.v.), but not fluoxetine (10 mg/kg i.v.). Interestingly, administration of R-citalopram (8 mg/kg i.p.) attenuated the increase of extracellular levels of 5-HT ([5-HT]ext) in the ventral hippocampus induced by both escitalopram (0.28 microM) and paroxetine (0.75 microM), but not fluoxetine (10 microM). In conclusion, the present in-vitro and in-vivo studies show that R-citalopram counteracts the activity of escitalopram and paroxetine, but not fluoxetine, by acting at the allosteric binding site of the 5-HT transporter, either located in the dorsal raphe nucleus or post-synaptically in the ventral hippocampus. This conclusion is strengthened by the observation that the inhibitory effect of

  8. Inversion of allosteric effect of arginine on N-acetylglutamate synthase, a molecular marker for evolution of tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, Nantaporn; Panglao, Maria; Qu, Qiuhao; Majumdar, Himani; Cabrera-Luque, Juan; Morizono, Hiroki; Tuchman, Mendel; Caldovic, Ljubica

    2008-01-01

    Background The efficient conversion of ammonia, a potent neurotoxin, into non-toxic metabolites was an essential adaptation that allowed animals to move from the aquatic to terrestrial biosphere. The urea cycle converts ammonia into urea in mammals, amphibians, turtles, snails, worms and many aquatic animals and requires N-acetylglutamate (NAG), an essential allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in mammals and amphibians, and carbamylphosphate synthetase III (CPSIII) in fish and invertebrates. NAG-dependent CPSI and CPSIII catalyze the formation of carbamylphosphate in the first and rate limiting step of ureagenesis. NAG is produced enzymatically by N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), which is also found in bacteria and plants as the first enzyme of arginine biosynthesis. Arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of microbial and plant NAGS, and allosteric activator of mammalian NAGS. Results Information from mutagenesis studies of E. coli and P. aeruginosa NAGS was combined with structural information from the related bacterial N-acetylglutamate kinases to identify four residues in mammalian NAGS that interact with arginine. Substitutions of these four residues were engineered in mouse NAGS and into the vertebrate-like N-acetylglutamate synthase-kinase (NAGS-K) of Xanthomonas campestris, which is inhibited by arginine. All mutations resulted in arginine losing the ability to activate mouse NAGS, and inhibit X. campestris NAGS-K. To examine at what point in evolution inversion of arginine effect on NAGS occur, we cloned NAGS from fish and frogs and examined the arginine response of their corresponding proteins. Fish NAGS were partially inhibited by arginine and frog NAGS were activated by arginine. Conclusion Difference in arginine effect on bacterial and mammalian NAGS most likely stems from the difference in the type of conformational change triggered by arginine binding to these proteins. The change from arginine inhibition of NAGS to activation

  9. Chemical shift imprint of intersubunit communication in a symmetric homodimer

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Bradley T.; Sapienza, Paul J.; Lee, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric communication is critical for protein function and cellular homeostasis, and it can be exploited as a strategy for drug design. However, unlike many protein–ligand interactions, the structural basis for the long-range communication that underlies allostery is not well understood. This lack of understanding is most evident in the case of classical allostery, in which a binding event in one protomer is sensed by a second symmetric protomer. A primary reason why study of interdomain signaling is challenging in oligomeric proteins is the difficulty in characterizing intermediate, singly bound species. Here, we use an NMR approach to isolate and characterize a singly ligated state (“lig1”) of a homodimeric enzyme that is otherwise obscured by rapid exchange with apo and saturated forms. Mixed labeled dimers were prepared that simultaneously permit full population of the lig1 state and isotopic labeling of either protomer. Direct visualization of peaks from lig1 yielded site-specific ligand-state multiplets that provide a convenient format for assessing mechanisms of intersubunit communication from a variety of NMR measurements. We demonstrate this approach on thymidylate synthase from Escherichia coli, a homodimeric enzyme known to be half-the-sites reactive. Resolving the dUMP1 state shows that active site communication occurs not upon the first dUMP binding, but upon the second. Surprisingly, for many sites, dUMP1 peaks are found beyond the limits set by apo and dUMP2 peaks, indicating that binding the first dUMP pushes the enzyme ensemble to further conformational extremes than the apo or saturated forms. The approach used here should be generally applicable to homodimers. PMID:27466406

  10. Allosterically driven self-assemblies of interlocked calix[6]arene receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Gac, Stéphane; Picron, Jean-François; Reinaud, Olivia; Jabin, Ivan

    2011-04-07

    The construction of self-assembled receptors based on flexible concave subunits is a challenging task and constitutes an interesting approach to mimic binding processes occurring in biological systems. The receptors studied herein are based on flexible calix[6]arene skeletons bearing three (or more) acid-base functionalities at their narrow rim. When complementary, they self-assemble in a tail-to-tail manner to give a diabolo-like complex, provided that each calixarene subunit hosts a guest. The allosterically-driven multi-recognition pattern is highly selective and leads to stable quaternary adducts. In order to evaluate the scope of this system, various polyamino and polyacidic calix[6]arenes have been studied. It is shown that modifications of the nature of the wide rim substituents do not alter the efficiency of the quaternary self-assembling process, even with the more flexible macrocycles that lack tBu substituents. On the contrary, the replacement of the latter by smaller groups led to receptors with broader scope, as larger guests such as tryptamine and dopamine derivatives were stabilized in the cavities. Implementation of extra-functionalities at the narrow rim were revealed also to be of high interest. Indeed, it is shown that secondary interactions take place between the two calix-subunits when they present additional and complementary functions such as carboxylate and ureido moieties. The ureido arms are also capable of binding the counter anion Cl(-) of the ammonium guest, thus leading to a quinternary neutral complex. Such remarkable behavior is due to the versatility of the calix[6]arene platform, which allows the implementation of a high number of functions, leading to multiple non-covalent attractive interactions, whereas the macrocycle remains flexible, thus allowing induced-fit processes to occur.

  11. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Selena G; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors.

  12. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Selena G.; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W.; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation of Hsp90 by Designed Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Sattin, Sara; Tao, Jiahui; Agard, David A.; Bernardi, Anna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Controlling biochemical pathways through chemically designed modulators may provide novel opportunities to develop therapeutic drugs and chemical tools. The underlying challenge is to design new molecular entities able to act as allosteric chemical switches that selectively turn on/off functions by modulating the conformational dynamics of their target protein. We examine the origins of the stimulation of ATPase and closure kinetics in the molecular chaperone Hsp90 by allosteric modulators through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. In particular, we focus on the cross-talk between allosteric ligands and protein conformations and its effect on the dynamic properties of the chaperone’s active state. We examine the impact of different allosteric modulators on the stability, structural and internal dynamics properties of Hsp90 closed state. A critical aspect of this study is the development of a quantitative model that correlates Hsp90 activation to the presence of a certain compound, making use of information on the dynamic adaptation of protein conformations to the presence of the ligand, which allows to capture conformational states relevant in the activation process. We discuss the implications of considering the conformational dialogue between allosteric ligands and protein conformations for the design of new functional modulators.

  14. Structural basis for modulation of a G-protein-coupled receptor by allosteric drugs.

    PubMed

    Dror, Ron O; Green, Hillary F; Valant, Celine; Borhani, David W; Valcourt, James R; Pan, Albert C; Arlow, Daniel H; Canals, Meritxell; Lane, J Robert; Rahmani, Raphaël; Baell, Jonathan B; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Shaw, David E

    2013-11-14

    The design of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) allosteric modulators, an active area of modern pharmaceutical research, has proved challenging because neither the binding modes nor the molecular mechanisms of such drugs are known. Here we determine binding sites, bound conformations and specific drug-receptor interactions for several allosteric modulators of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor), a prototypical family A GPCR, using atomic-level simulations in which the modulators spontaneously associate with the receptor. Despite substantial structural diversity, all modulators form cation-π interactions with clusters of aromatic residues in the receptor extracellular vestibule, approximately 15 Å from the classical, 'orthosteric' ligand-binding site. We validate the observed modulator binding modes through radioligand binding experiments on receptor mutants designed, on the basis of our simulations, either to increase or to decrease modulator affinity. Simulations also revealed mechanisms that contribute to positive and negative allosteric modulation of classical ligand binding, including coupled conformational changes of the two binding sites and electrostatic interactions between ligands in these sites. These observations enabled the design of chemical modifications that substantially alter a modulator's allosteric effects. Our findings thus provide a structural basis for the rational design of allosteric modulators targeting muscarinic and possibly other GPCRs.

  15. Structural basis for modulation of a G-protein-coupled receptor by allosteric drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Ron O.; Green, Hillary F.; Valant, Celine; Borhani, David W.; Valcourt, James R.; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Canals, Meritxell; Lane, J. Robert; Rahmani, Raphaël; Baell, Jonathan B.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Shaw, David E.

    2013-11-01

    The design of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) allosteric modulators, an active area of modern pharmaceutical research, has proved challenging because neither the binding modes nor the molecular mechanisms of such drugs are known. Here we determine binding sites, bound conformations and specific drug-receptor interactions for several allosteric modulators of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor), a prototypical family A GPCR, using atomic-level simulations in which the modulators spontaneously associate with the receptor. Despite substantial structural diversity, all modulators form cation-π interactions with clusters of aromatic residues in the receptor extracellular vestibule, approximately 15Å from the classical, `orthosteric' ligand-binding site. We validate the observed modulator binding modes through radioligand binding experiments on receptor mutants designed, on the basis of our simulations, either to increase or to decrease modulator affinity. Simulations also revealed mechanisms that contribute to positive and negative allosteric modulation of classical ligand binding, including coupled conformational changes of the two binding sites and electrostatic interactions between ligands in these sites. These observations enabled the design of chemical modifications that substantially alter a modulator's allosteric effects. Our findings thus provide a structural basis for the rational design of allosteric modulators targeting muscarinic and possibly other GPCRs.

  16. Molecular Switches of Allosteric Modulation of the Metabotropic Glutamate 2 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Benito, Laura; Doornbos, Maarten L J; Cordomí, Arnau; Peeters, Luc; Lavreysen, Hilde; Pardo, Leonardo; Tresadern, Gary

    2017-07-05

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) crucial for CNS function and important drug discovery targets. Glutamate triggers receptor activation from an extracellular domain binding site while allosteric modulators bind in the seven-transmembrane domain. Little is known about how allosteric modulators produce their functional effects at the molecular level. Here we address this topic with combined experimental and computational approaches and reveal that mGlu receptor allosteric modulators interact with the homologous "trigger switch" and "transmission switch" amino acids as seen in class A GPCRs, in short, the characteristic hallmarks of class A agonist activation translate to the mGlu allosteric modulator. The proposed "trigger switch" for the mGlu2 involves the side chains of F643(3.36a.40c), N735(5.47a.47c), and W773(6.48a.50c), whereas the "transmission switch" involves the Y647(3.40a.44c), L738(5.50a.50c), and T769(6.44a.46c) amino acids. The work has wide impact on understanding mGlu GPCR function and for future allosteric modulator drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Scalable rule-based modelling of allosteric proteins and biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, Julien F; Shahrezaei, Vahid; Swain, Peter S

    2010-11-04

    Much of the complexity of biochemical networks comes from the information-processing abilities of allosteric proteins, be they receptors, ion-channels, signalling molecules or transcription factors. An allosteric protein can be uniquely regulated by each combination of input molecules that it binds. This "regulatory complexity" causes a combinatorial increase in the number of parameters required to fit experimental data as the number of protein interactions increases. It therefore challenges the creation, updating, and re-use of biochemical models. Here, we propose a rule-based modelling framework that exploits the intrinsic modularity of protein structure to address regulatory complexity. Rather than treating proteins as "black boxes", we model their hierarchical structure and, as conformational changes, internal dynamics. By modelling the regulation of allosteric proteins through these conformational changes, we often decrease the number of parameters required to fit data, and so reduce over-fitting and improve the predictive power of a model. Our method is thermodynamically grounded, imposes detailed balance, and also includes molecular cross-talk and the background activity of enzymes. We use our Allosteric Network Compiler to examine how allostery can facilitate macromolecular assembly and how competitive ligands can change the observed cooperativity of an allosteric protein. We also develop a parsimonious model of G protein-coupled receptors that explains functional selectivity and can predict the rank order of potency of agonists acting through a receptor. Our methodology should provide a basis for scalable, modular and executable modelling of biochemical networks in systems and synthetic biology.

  18. Novel Electrophilic and Photoaffinity Covalent Probes for Mapping the Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Allosteric Site(s)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable side effects associated with orthosteric agonists/antagonists of cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R), a tractable target for treating several pathologies affecting humans, have greatly limited their translational potential. Recent discovery of CB1R negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) has renewed interest in CB1R by offering a potentially safer therapeutic avenue. To elucidate the CB1R allosteric binding motif and thereby facilitate rational drug discovery, we report the synthesis and biochemical characterization of first covalent ligands designed to bind irreversibly to the CB1R allosteric site. Either an electrophilic or a photoactivatable group was introduced at key positions of two classical CB1R NAMs: Org27569 (1) and PSNCBAM-1 (2). Among these, 20 (GAT100) emerged as the most potent NAM in functional assays, did not exhibit inverse agonism, and behaved as a robust positive allosteric modulator of binding of orthosteric agonist CP55,940. This novel covalent probe can serve as a useful tool for characterizing CB1R allosteric ligand-binding motifs. PMID:26529344

  19. Conformational flexibility and the mechanisms of allosteric transitions in topologically similar proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Portman, John J.

    2011-08-01

    Conformational flexibility plays a central role in allosteric transition of proteins. In this paper, we extend the analysis of our previous study [S. Tripathi and J. J. Portman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 2104 (2009)] to investigate how relatively minor structural changes of the meta-stable states can significantly influence the conformational flexibility and allosteric transition mechanism. We use the allosteric transitions of the domains of calmodulin as an example system to highlight the relationship between the transition mechanism and the inter-residue contacts present in the meta-stable states. In particular, we focus on the origin of transient local unfolding (cracking), a mechanism that can lower free energy barriers of allosteric transitions, in terms of the inter-residue contacts of the meta-stable states and the pattern of local strain that develops during the transition. We find that the magnitude of the local strain in the protein is not the sole factor determining whether a region will ultimately crack during the transition. These results emphasize that the residue interactions found exclusively in one of the two meta-stable states is the key in understanding the mechanism of allosteric conformational change.

  20. Conformational flexibility and the mechanisms of allosteric transitions in topologically similar proteins.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Portman, John J

    2011-08-21

    Conformational flexibility plays a central role in allosteric transition of proteins. In this paper, we extend the analysis of our previous study [S. Tripathi and J. J. Portman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 2104 (2009)] to investigate how relatively minor structural changes of the meta-stable states can significantly influence the conformational flexibility and allosteric transition mechanism. We use the allosteric transitions of the domains of calmodulin as an example system to highlight the relationship between the transition mechanism and the inter-residue contacts present in the meta-stable states. In particular, we focus on the origin of transient local unfolding (cracking), a mechanism that can lower free energy barriers of allosteric transitions, in terms of the inter-residue contacts of the meta-stable states and the pattern of local strain that develops during the transition. We find that the magnitude of the local strain in the protein is not the sole factor determining whether a region will ultimately crack during the transition. These results emphasize that the residue interactions found exclusively in one of the two meta-stable states is the key in understanding the mechanism of allosteric conformational change.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation of Hsp90 by Designed Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Sattin, Sara; Tao, Jiahui; Agard, David A.; Bernardi, Anna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Controlling biochemical pathways through chemically designed modulators may provide novel opportunities to develop therapeutic drugs and chemical tools. The underlying challenge is to design new molecular entities able to act as allosteric chemical switches that selectively turn on/off functions by modulating the conformational dynamics of their target protein. We examine the origins of the stimulation of ATPase and closure kinetics in the molecular chaperone Hsp90 by allosteric modulators through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. In particular, we focus on the cross-talk between allosteric ligands and protein conformations and its effect on the dynamic properties of the chaperone’s active state. We examine the impact of different allosteric modulators on the stability, structural and internal dynamics properties of Hsp90 closed state. A critical aspect of this study is the development of a quantitative model that correlates Hsp90 activation to the presence of a certain compound, making use of information on the dynamic adaptation of protein conformations to the presence of the ligand, which allows to capture conformational states relevant in the activation process. We discuss the implications of considering the conformational dialogue between allosteric ligands and protein conformations for the design of new functional modulators. PMID:27032695

  2. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (<500 nM) and high selectivity for thrombin (>150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  3. Allosteric modulation of glycine receptors is more efficacious for partial rather than full agonists.

    PubMed

    Bíró, Tímea; Maksay, Gábor

    2004-06-01

    Allosteric modulation of [3H]strychnine binding to glycine receptors (GlyRs) was examined in synaptosomal membranes of rat spinal cord. An allosteric model enabled us to determine the cooperativity factors of the allosteric agents with [3H]strychnine and glycine bindings (alpha and beta, respectively). We modified the allosteric model with a slope factor because the slope values of the displacement curves of partial agonists (beta-alanine, taurine and gamma-aminobutyric acid) were beyond unity. The slope factor was reduced only by 100 microM propofol. Further, propofol showed positive cooperativity (beta < 1) stronger with taurine than with glycine. The extent of the positive cooperativity of propofol was nearly independent from the potencies and structures of partial agonists. The steroidal alphaxalone and minaxolone also potentiated taurine better than glycine. Alphaxalone exerted weak negative cooperativity with [3H]strychnine binding. Displacement by taurine is attenuated by granisetron and m-chlorophenylbiguanide representing negative cooperativity (beta > 1) greater than with glycine. The results suggest a developmental role of elevated perinatal levels of taurine and neurosteroids as well as a better allosteric modulation of decreased agonist efficacies for impaired glycine receptor-ionophores.

  4. Proposed Mode of Binding and Action of Positive Allosteric Modulators at Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Available crystal structures of opioid receptors provide a high-resolution picture of ligand binding at the primary (“orthosteric”) site, that is, the site targeted by endogenous ligands. Recently, positive allosteric modulators of opioid receptors have also been discovered, but their modes of binding and action remain unknown. Here, we use a metadynamics-based strategy to efficiently sample the binding process of a recently discovered positive allosteric modulator of the δ-opioid receptor, BMS-986187, in the presence of the orthosteric agonist SNC-80, and with the receptor embedded in an explicit lipid–water environment. The dynamics of BMS-986187 were enhanced by biasing the potential acting on the ligand–receptor distance and ligand–receptor interaction contacts. Representative lowest-energy structures from the reconstructed free-energy landscape revealed two alternative ligand binding poses at an allosteric site delineated by transmembrane (TM) helices TM1, TM2, and TM7, with some participation of TM6. Mutations of amino acid residues at these proposed allosteric sites were found to either affect the binding of BMS-986187 or its ability to modulate the affinity and/or efficacy of SNC-80. Taken together, these combined experimental and computational studies provide the first atomic-level insight into the modulation of opioid receptor binding and signaling by allosteric modulators. PMID:26841170

  5. A Monod-Wyman-Changeux mechanism can explain G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Canals, Meritxell; Lane, J Robert; Wen, Adriel; Scammells, Peter J; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2012-01-02

    The Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model was initially proposed to describe the allosteric properties of regulatory enzymes and subsequently extended to receptors. Yet despite GPCRs representing the largest family of receptors and drug targets, no study has systematically evaluated the MWC mechanism as it applies to GPCR allosteric ligands. We reveal how the recently described allosteric modulator, benzyl quinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA), behaves according to a strict, two-state MWC mechanism at the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). Despite having a low affinity for the M1 mAChR, BQCA demonstrated state dependence, exhibiting high positive cooperativity with orthosteric agonists in a manner that correlated with efficacy but negative cooperativity with inverse agonists. The activity of BQCA was significantly increased at a constitutively active M1 mAChR but abolished at an inactive mutant. Interestingly, BQCA possessed intrinsic signaling efficacy, ranging from near-quiescence to full agonism depending on the coupling efficiency of the chosen intracellular pathway. This latter cellular property also determined the difference in magnitude of positive cooperativity between BQCA and the orthosteric agonist, carbachol, across pathways. The lack of additional, pathway-biased, allosteric modulation by BQCA was confirmed in genetically engineered yeast strains expressing different chimeras between the endogenous yeast G(pa1) protein and human Gα subunits. These findings define a chemical biological framework that can be applied to the study and classification of allosteric modulators across different GPCR families.

  6. Positive allosteric modulators of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGluR4): Part I. Discovery of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines as novel mGluR4 positive allosteric modulators

    PubMed Central

    Niswender, Colleen M.; Lebois, Evan P.; Luo, Qingwei; Kim, Kwangho; Muchalski, Hubert; Yin, Huiyong; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2011-01-01

    This Letter describes the synthesis and SAR, developed through an iterative analogue library approach, of an mGluR4 positive allosteric modulator lead based on a pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine scaffold. Despite tremendous therapeutic potential, Compound 7, VU0080421, and related congeners represent only a handful of mGluR4 positive allosteric modulators ever described. PMID:18793851

  7. Refined molecular hinge between allosteric and catalytic domain determines allosteric regulation and stability of fungal chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Heinrich, Gabriele; Lipscomb, William N; Braus, Gerhard H

    2002-05-14

    The yeast chorismate mutase is regulated by tyrosine as feedback inhibitor and tryptophan as crosspathway activator. The monomer consists of a catalytic and a regulatory domain covalently linked by the loop L220s (212-226), which functions as a molecular hinge. Two monomers form the active dimeric enzyme stabilized by hydrophobic interactions in the vicinity of loop L220s. The role of loop L220s and its environment for enzyme regulation, dimerization, and stability was analyzed. Substitution of yeast loop L220s in place of the homologous loop from the corresponding and similarly regulated Aspergillus enzyme (and the reverse substitution) changed tyrosine inhibition to activation. Yeast loop L220s substituted into the Aspergillus enzyme resulted in a tryptophan-inhibitable enzyme. Monomeric yeast chorismate mutases could be generated by substituting two hydrophobic residues in and near the hinge region. The resulting Thr-212-->Asp-Phe-28-->Asp enzyme was as stable as wild type, but lost allosteric regulation and showed reduced catalytic activity. These results underline the crucial role of this molecular hinge for inhibition, activation, quaternary structure, and stability of yeast chorismate mutase.

  8. Molecular dynamics approach to probe the allosteric inhibition of PTP1B by chlorogenic and cichoric acid.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Sarath Kumar; Goswami, Nabajyoti; Selvaraj, Sudhagar; Muthusamy, Velusamy Shanmuganathan; Lakshmi, Baddireddi Subhadra

    2012-08-27

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a major negative regulator of the insulin and leptin signaling pathway, is a potential target for therapeutic intervention against diabetes and obesity. The recent discovery of an allosteric site in PTP1B has created an alternate strategy in the development of PTP1B targeted therapy. The current study investigates the molecular interactions between the allosteric site of PTP1B with two caffeoyl derivatives, chlorogenic acid (CGA) and cichoric acid (CHA), using computational strategies. Molecular docking analysis with CGA and CHA at the allosteric site of PTP1B were performed and the resulting protein-ligand complexes used for molecular dynamics simulation studies for a time scale of 10 ns. Results show stable binding of CGA and CHA at the allosteric site of PTP1B. The flexibility of the WPD loop was observed to be constrained by CGA and CHA in the open (inactive), providing molecular mechanism of allosteric inhibition. The allosteric inhibition of CGA and CHA of PTP1B was shown to be favorable due to no restriction by the α-7 helix in the binding of CGA and CHA at the allosteric binding site. In conclusion, our results exhibit an inhibitory pattern of CGA and CHA against PTP1B through potent binding at the allosteric site.

  9. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  10. SAR studies on carboxylic acid series M(1) selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs).

    PubMed

    Kuduk, Scott D; Beshore, Douglas C

    2014-01-01

    There is mounting evidence from preclinical and early proof-of-concept studies suggesting that selective modulation of the M1 muscarinic receptor is efficacious in cognitive models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A number of nonselective M1 muscarinic agonists have previously shown positive effects on cognitive function in AD patients, but were limited due to cholinergic adverse events thought to be mediated by pan activation of the M2 to M5 sub-types. Thus, there is a need to identify selective activators of the M1 receptor to evaluate their potential in cognitive disorders. One strategy to confer selectivity for M1 is the identification of allosteric agonists or positive allosteric modulators, which would target an allosteric site on the M1 receptor rather than the highly conserved orthosteric acetylcholine binding site. BQCA has been identified as a highly selective carboxylic acid M1 PAM and this review focuses on an extensive lead optimization campaign undertaken on this compound.

  11. The concept of allosteric interaction and its consequences for the chemistry of the brain.

    PubMed

    Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2013-09-20

    Throughout this Reflections article, I have tried to follow up on the genesis in the 1960s and subsequent evolution of the concept of allosteric interaction and to examine its consequences within the past decades, essentially in the field of the neuroscience. The main conclusion is that allosteric mechanisms built on similar structural principles operate in bacterial regulatory enzymes, gene repressors (and the related nuclear receptors), rhodopsin, G-protein-coupled receptors, neurotransmitter receptors, ion channels, and so on from prokaryotes up to the human brain yet with important features of their own. Thus, future research on these basic cybernetic sensors is expected to develop in two major directions: at the elementary level, toward the atomic structure and molecular dynamics of the conformational changes involved in signal recognition and transduction, but also at a higher level of organization, the contribution of allosteric mechanisms to the modulation of brain functions.

  12. Allosteric activation of membrane-bound glutamate receptors using coordination chemistry within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryou; Michibata, Yukiko; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Numata, Tomohiro; Inoue, Ryuji; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-10-01

    The controlled activation of proteins in living cells is an important goal in protein-design research, but to introduce an artificial activation switch into membrane proteins through rational design is a significant challenge because of the structural and functional complexity of such proteins. Here we report the allosteric activation of two types of membrane-bound neurotransmitter receptors, the ion-channel type and the G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors, using coordination chemistry in living cells. The high programmability of coordination chemistry enabled two His mutations, which act as an artificial allosteric site, to be semirationally incorporated in the vicinity of the ligand-binding pockets. Binding of Pd(2,2‧-bipyridine) at the allosteric site enabled the active conformations of the glutamate receptors to be stabilized. Using this approach, we were able to activate selectively a mutant glutamate receptor in live neurons, which initiated a subsequent signal-transduction pathway.

  13. The Concept of Allosteric Interaction and Its Consequences for the Chemistry of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Throughout this Reflections article, I have tried to follow up on the genesis in the 1960s and subsequent evolution of the concept of allosteric interaction and to examine its consequences within the past decades, essentially in the field of the neuroscience. The main conclusion is that allosteric mechanisms built on similar structural principles operate in bacterial regulatory enzymes, gene repressors (and the related nuclear receptors), rhodopsin, G-protein-coupled receptors, neurotransmitter receptors, ion channels, and so on from prokaryotes up to the human brain yet with important features of their own. Thus, future research on these basic cybernetic sensors is expected to develop in two major directions: at the elementary level, toward the atomic structure and molecular dynamics of the conformational changes involved in signal recognition and transduction, but also at a higher level of organization, the contribution of allosteric mechanisms to the modulation of brain functions. PMID:23878193

  14. Recent progress in the development of allosteric modulators of mGluR5.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alice L; Williams, Richard

    2007-11-01

    Allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) have been developed for their therapeutic potential in a variety of disorders including schizophrenia, drug abuse, fragile X syndrome and anxiety. Modulation of the receptor through an allosteric mechanism provides a high degree of selectivity and avoids many of the pitfalls that are associated with direct acting ligands, such as receptor desensitization. Drug discovery activities in this field have advanced rapidly in recent years, with the development of lead compounds often being accelerated through a variety of novel technologies. The promising effects observed for allosteric modulators of mGluR5 in preclinical studies suggest that their continued development may provide therapeutic options for a range of psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  15. Sulfated Pentagalloylglucoside is a Potent, Allosteric, and Selective Inhibitor of Factor XIa

    PubMed Central

    Al-Horani, Rami A.; Ponnusamy, Pooja; Mehta, Akul Y.; Gailani, David; Desai, Umesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of factor XIa (FXIa) is a novel paradigm for developing anticoagulants without major bleeding consequences. We present the discovery of sulfated pentagalloylglucoside (6) as a highly selective inhibitor of human FXIa. Biochemical screening of a focused library led to the identification of 6, a sulfated aromatic mimetic of heparin. Inhibitor 6 displayed a potency of 551 nM against FXIa, which was at least 200-fold more selective than other relevant enzymes. It also prevented activation of factor IX and prolonged human plasma and whole blood clotting. Inhibitor 6 reduced VMAX of FXIa hydrolysis of chromogenic substrate without affecting the KM suggesting an allosteric mechanism. Competitive studies showed that 6 bound in the heparin-binding site of FXIa. No allosteric small molecule has been discovered to date that exhibits equivalent potency against FXIa. Inhibitor 6 is expected to open up a major route to allosteric FXIa anticoagulants with clinical relevance. PMID:23316863

  16. Towards the identification of the allosteric Phe-binding site in phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Carluccio, Carla; Fraternali, Franca; Salvatore, Francesco; Fornili, Arianna; Zagari, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is defective in the inherited disorder phenylketonuria. PAH, a tetrameric enzyme, is highly regulated and displays positive cooperativity for its substrate, Phe. Whether Phe binds to an allosteric site is a matter of debate, despite several studies worldwide. To address this issue, we generated a dimeric model for Phe-PAH interactions, by performing molecular docking combined with molecular dynamics simulations on human and rat wild-type sequences and also on a human G46S mutant. Our results suggest that the allosteric Phe-binding site lies at the dimeric interface between the regulatory and the catalytic domains of two adjacent subunits. The structural and dynamical features of the site were characterized in depth and described. Interestingly, our findings provide evidence for lower allosteric Phe-binding ability of the G46S mutant than the human wild-type enzyme. This also explains the disease-causing nature of this mutant.

  17. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  18. Tuning the endocannabinoid system: allosteric modulators of the CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ross, R A

    2007-11-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists are novel therapeutics with potential for the treatment of a number of conditions including obesity, nicotine addition and metabolic syndrome. In 2005, Price et al. demonstrated that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor contains an allosteric-binding site which binds synthetic small molecules. In this issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology, Horswill et al. have extended these observations. They demonstrate that a structurally similar small molecule allosterically modulates the cannabinoid CB1 receptor and reduces body weight and food intake in an acute feeding model. Allosteric modulation now contends as a new strategy in the therapeutic exploitation of cannabinoid receptors that may offer certain advantages over the more familiar small molecules targeting the orthosteric site.

  19. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase

    PubMed Central

    Foda, Zachariah H.; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T.; Shaw, David E.; Seeliger, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity. PMID:25600932

  20. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Foda, Zachariah H; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T; Shaw, David E; Seeliger, Markus A

    2015-01-20

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity.

  1. Dual allosteric activation mechanisms in monomeric human glucokinase.

    PubMed

    Whittington, A Carl; Larion, Mioara; Bowler, Joseph M; Ramsey, Kristen M; Brüschweiler, Rafael; Miller, Brian G

    2015-09-15

    Cooperativity in human glucokinase (GCK), the body's primary glucose sensor and a major determinant of glucose homeostatic diseases, is fundamentally different from textbook models of allostery because GCK is monomeric and contains only one glucose-binding site. Prior work has demonstrated that millisecond timescale order-disorder transitions within the enzyme's small domain govern cooperativity. Here, using limited proteolysis, we map the site of disorder in unliganded GCK to a 30-residue active-site loop that closes upon glucose binding. Positional randomization of the loop, coupled with genetic selection in a glucokinase-deficient bacterium, uncovers a hyperactive GCK variant with substantially reduced cooperativity. Biochemical and structural analysis of this loop variant and GCK variants associated with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia reveal two distinct mechanisms of enzyme activation. In α-type activation, glucose affinity is increased, the proteolytic susceptibility of the active site loop is suppressed and the (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) spectrum of (13)C-Ile-labeled enzyme resembles the glucose-bound state. In β-type activation, glucose affinity is largely unchanged, proteolytic susceptibility of the loop is enhanced, and the (1)H-(13)C HMQC spectrum reveals no perturbation in ensemble structure. Leveraging both activation mechanisms, we engineer a fully noncooperative GCK variant, whose functional properties are indistinguishable from other hexokinase isozymes, and which displays a 100-fold increase in catalytic efficiency over wild-type GCK. This work elucidates specific structural features responsible for generating allostery in a monomeric enzyme and suggests a general strategy for engineering cooperativity into proteins that lack the structural framework typical of traditional allosteric systems.

  2. The therapeutic promise of positive allosteric modulation of nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Uteshev, Victor V

    2014-03-15

    In the central nervous system, deficits in cholinergic neurotransmission correlate with decreased attention and cognitive impairment, while stimulation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves attention, cognitive performance and neuronal resistance to injury as well as produces robust analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. The rational basis for the therapeutic use of orthosteric agonists and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of nicotinic receptors arises from the finding that functional nicotinic receptors are ubiquitously expressed in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues including brain regions highly vulnerable to traumatic and ischemic types of injury (e.g., cortex and hippocampus). Moreover, functional nicotinic receptors do not vanish in age-, disease- and trauma-related neuropathologies, but their expression and/or activation levels decline in a subunit- and brain region-specific manner. Therefore, augmenting the endogenous cholinergic tone by nicotinic agents is possible and may offset neurological impairments associated with cholinergic hypofunction. Importantly, because neuronal damage elevates extracellular levels of choline (a selective agonist of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors) near the site of injury, α7-PAM-based treatments may augment pathology-activated α7-dependent auto-therapies where and when they are most needed (i.e., in the penumbra, post-injury). Thus, nicotinic-PAM-based treatments are expected to augment the endogenous cholinergic tone in a spatially and temporally restricted manner creating the potential for differential efficacy and improved safety as compared to exogenous orthosteric nicotinic agonists that activate nicotinic receptors indiscriminately. In this review, I will summarize the existing trends in therapeutic applications of nicotinic PAMs.

  3. Fatty acid DSF binds and allosterically activates histidine kinase RpfC of phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris to regulate quorum-sensing and virulence.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhen; Yuan, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Huan; Pan, Yue; Wu, Yao; Tian, Xiu-Qi; Wang, Fang-Fang; Wang, Li; Qian, Wei

    2017-04-01

    As well as their importance to nutrition, fatty acids (FA) represent a unique group of quorum sensing chemicals that modulate the behavior of bacterial population in virulence. However, the way in which full-length, membrane-bound receptors biochemically detect FA remains unclear. Here, we provide genetic, enzymological and biophysical evidences to demonstrate that in the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, a medium-chain FA diffusible signal factor (DSF) binds directly to the N-terminal, 22 amino acid-length sensor region of a receptor histidine kinase (HK), RpfC. The binding event remarkably activates RpfC autokinase activity by causing an allosteric change associated with the dimerization and histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) and catalytic ATP-binding (CA) domains. Six residues were found essential for sensing DSF, especially those located in the region adjoining to the inner membrane of cells. Disrupting direct DSF-RpfC interaction caused deficiency in bacterial virulence and biofilm development. In addition, two amino acids within the juxtamembrane domain of RpfC, Leu172 and Ala178, are involved in the autoinhibition of the RpfC kinase activity. Replacements of them caused constitutive activation of RpfC-mediated signaling regardless of DSF stimulation. Therefore, our results revealed a biochemical mechanism whereby FA activates bacterial HK in an allosteric manner, which will assist in future studies on the specificity of FA-HK recognition during bacterial virulence regulation and cell-cell communication.

  4. Fatty acid DSF binds and allosterically activates histidine kinase RpfC of phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris to regulate quorum-sensing and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huan; Pan, Yue; Wu, Yao; Tian, Xiu-Qi; Wang, Fang-Fang; Wang, Li

    2017-01-01

    As well as their importance to nutrition, fatty acids (FA) represent a unique group of quorum sensing chemicals that modulate the behavior of bacterial population in virulence. However, the way in which full-length, membrane-bound receptors biochemically detect FA remains unclear. Here, we provide genetic, enzymological and biophysical evidences to demonstrate that in the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, a medium-chain FA diffusible signal factor (DSF) binds directly to the N-terminal, 22 amino acid-length sensor region of a receptor histidine kinase (HK), RpfC. The binding event remarkably activates RpfC autokinase activity by causing an allosteric change associated with the dimerization and histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) and catalytic ATP-binding (CA) domains. Six residues were found essential for sensing DSF, especially those located in the region adjoining to the inner membrane of cells. Disrupting direct DSF-RpfC interaction caused deficiency in bacterial virulence and biofilm development. In addition, two amino acids within the juxtamembrane domain of RpfC, Leu172 and Ala178, are involved in the autoinhibition of the RpfC kinase activity. Replacements of them caused constitutive activation of RpfC-mediated signaling regardless of DSF stimulation. Therefore, our results revealed a biochemical mechanism whereby FA activates bacterial HK in an allosteric manner, which will assist in future studies on the specificity of FA-HK recognition during bacterial virulence regulation and cell-cell communication. PMID:28369120

  5. Allosteric coupling between proximal C-terminus and selectivity filter is facilitated by the movement of transmembrane segment 4 in TREK-2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Ren-Gong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Zheng, Jian-Quan; Wei, Xiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    TREK-2, a member of two-pore-domain potassium channel family, regulates cellular excitability in response to diverse stimuli. However, how such stimuli control channel function remains unclear. Here, by characterizing the responses of cytosolic proximal C-terminus deletant (ΔpCt) and transmembrane segment 4 (M4)-glycine hinge mutant (G312A) to 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an activator of TREK-2, we show that the transduction initiated from pCt domain is allosterically coupled with the conformation of selectivity filter (SF) via the movements of M4, without depending on the original status of SF. Moreover, ΔpCt and G312A also exhibited blunted responses to extracellular alkalization, a model to induce SF conformational transition. These results suggest that the coupling between pCt domain and SF is bidirectional, and M4 movements are involved in both processes. Further mechanistic exploration reveals that the function of Phe316, a residue close to the C-terminus of M4, is associated with such communications. However, unlike TREK-2, M4-hinge of TREK-1 only controls the transmission from pCt to SF, rather than SF conformational changes triggered by pHo changes. Together, our findings uncover the unique gating properties of TREK-2, and elucidate the mechanisms for how the extracellular and intracellular stimuli harness the pore gating allosterically. PMID:26879043

  6. Co(II)-substituted Haemophilus influenzae β-Carbonic Anhydrase: Spectral Evidence for Allosteric Regulation by pH and Bicarbonate Ion

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Katherine M.; Samardzic, Dejan; van den Heever, Katherine; Rowlett, Roger S.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt(II)-substituted Haemophilus influenzae β-carbonic anhydrase (HICA) has been produced by overexpression in minimal media supplemented with CoCl2, enabling kinetic, structural, and spectroscopic characterization. Co(II)-substituted HICA (Co-HICA) has comparable catalytic activity to that of wild-type enzyme with kcat = 82 ± 19 ms-1 (120% of wild-type). The X-ray crystal structure of Co-HICA was determined to 2.5 Å resolution, and is similar to the zinc enzyme. The absorption spectrum of Co-HICA is consistent with four-coordinate geometry. pH-dependent changes in the absorption spectrum of Co-HICA, including an increase in molar absorptivity and a red shift of a 580 nm peak with decreasing pH, correlate with the pH dependence of kcat/Km. The absence of isosbestic points in the pH-dependent absorption spectra suggest that more than two absorbing species are present. The addition of bicarbonate ion at pH 8.0 triggers spectral changes in the metal coordination sphere that mimic that of lowering pH, supporting its hypothesized role as an allosteric inhibitor of HICA. Homogeneously (99 ± 1% Co) and heterogeneously (52 ± 5% Co) substituted Co-HICA have distinctly different colors and absorption spectra, suggesting that the metal ions in the active sites in the allosteric dimer of Co-HICA engage in intersubunit communication. PMID:21531201

  7. Cooperative Electronic and Structural Regulation in a Bioinspired Allosteric Photoredox Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lifschitz, Alejo M; Young, Ryan M; Mendez-Arroyo, Jose; McGuirk, C Michael; Wasielewski, Michael R; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-09-06

    Herein, we report the first allosteric photoredox catalyst regulated via constructively coupled structural and electronic control. While often synergistically exploited in nature, these two types of control mechanisms have only been applied independently in the vast majority of allosteric enzyme mimics and receptors in the literature. By embedding a model of photosystem II in a supramolecular coordination complex that responds to chloride as an allosteric effector, we show that distance and electronic control of light harvesting can be married to maximize allosteric regulation of catalytic activity. This biomimetic system is composed of a Bodipy photoantenna, which is capable of transferring excited-state energy to a photoredox pair, wherein the excitation energy is used to generate a catalytically active charge-separated state. The structural aspect of allosteric regulation is achieved by toggling the coordination chemistry of an antenna-functionalized hemilabile ligand via partial displacement from a Rh(I) structual node using chloride. In doing so, the distance between the antenna and the central photoredox catalyst is increased, lowering the inherent efficiency of through-space energy transfer. At the same time, coordination of chloride lowers both the charge of the Rh(I) node and the reduction potential of the Rh(II/I) couple, to the extent that electronic quenching of the antenna excited state is possible via photoinduced electron transfer from the metal center. Compared to a previously developed system that operates solely via electronic regulation, the present system demonstrates that coupling electronic and structural approaches to allosteric regulation gives rise to improved switching ratios between catalytically active and inactive states. Contributions from both structural and electronic control mechanisms are probed via nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, electrochemical, spectroelectrochemical, and transient absorption studies. Overall

  8. Structure-Based Ligand Discovery Targeting Orthosteric and Allosteric Pockets of Dopamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lane, J. Robert; Chubukov, Pavel; Liu, Wei; Canals, Meritxell; Cherezov, Vadim; Abagyan, Ruben; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Small molecules targeting allosteric pockets of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) have a great therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurologic and other chronic disorders. Here we performed virtual screening for orthosteric and putative allosteric ligands of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) using two optimized crystal-structure–based models: the receptor with an empty binding pocket (D3RAPO), and the receptor complex with dopamine (D3RDopa). Subsequent biochemical and functional characterization revealed 14 novel ligands with a binding affinity of better than 10 μM in the D3RAPO candidate list (56% hit rate), and 8 novel ligands in the D3RDopa list (32% hit rate). Most ligands in the D3RAPO model span both orthosteric and extended pockets and behave as antagonists at D3R, with compound 7 showing the highest potency of dopamine inhibition (IC50 = 7 nM). In contrast, compounds identified by the D3RDopa model are predicted to occupy an allosteric site at the extracellular extension of the pocket, and they all lack the anchoring amino group. Compounds targeting the allosteric site display a variety of functional activity profiles, where behavior of at least two compounds (23 and 26) is consistent with noncompetitive allosteric modulation of dopamine signaling in the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 phosphorylation and β-arrestin recruitment assays. The high affinity and ligand efficiency of the chemically diverse hits identified in this study suggest utility of structure-based screening targeting allosteric sites of GPCRs. PMID:24021214

  9. SAR studies on mGlu5 receptor positive allosteric modulators (2003- 2013).

    PubMed

    Hao, Junliang; Xiong, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) is a class C G-protein-coupled receptor which possesses a large extracellular N-terminal domain (ATD) connected to the seven-transmembrane (7-TM) domain. In contrast to the glutamate and its close analogs binding at the orthosteric site on the ATD region, allosteric modulators bind at topographically distinct sites in the 7-TM region. Activation of mGlu5 receptors at either the orthosteric or allosteric sites results in enhancement of NMDA receptor function and represents a promising opportunity for the treatment of schizophrenia. Since the disclosure of the first mGlu5 positive allosteric modulators (PAM) in 2003, there have been intense industry-wide efforts to discover and develop safe and efficacious agents capable of selectively enhancing mGlu5 receptor function at the allosteric sites. Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been made, and multiple chemical scaffolds have been identified as mGlu5 PAMs, possibly binding to different allosteric sites on the 7-TM domain. These ligands have helped gain novel insights into the biology of mGlu5 receptor allosteric activation. Here we provide a comprehensive review on the structure-activity relationship (SAR) progress on the mGlu5 PAMs reported in the primary literature and include appropriate and complementary examples from the patent literature. Important in vivo studies of select compounds from individual scaffolds are highlighted, and challenges facing the clinical development of mGlu5 receptor PAMs are discussed.

  10. Organism-Adapted Specificity of the Allosteric Regulation of Pyruvate Kinase in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Veith, Nadine; Feldman-Salit, Anna; Cojocaru, Vlad; Henrich, Stefan; Kummer, Ursula; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PYK) is a critical allosterically regulated enzyme that links glycolysis, the primary energy metabolism, to cellular metabolism. Lactic acid bacteria rely almost exclusively on glycolysis for their energy production under anaerobic conditions, which reinforces the key role of PYK in their metabolism. These organisms are closely related, but have adapted to a huge variety of native environments. They include food-fermenting organisms, important symbionts in the human gut, and antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In contrast to the rather conserved inhibition of PYK by inorganic phosphate, the activation of PYK shows high variability in the type of activating compound between different lactic acid bacteria. System-wide comparative studies of the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria are required to understand the reasons for the diversity of these closely related microorganisms. These require knowledge of the identities of the enzyme modifiers. Here, we predict potential allosteric activators of PYKs from three lactic acid bacteria which are adapted to different native environments. We used protein structure-based molecular modeling and enzyme kinetic modeling to predict and validate potential activators of PYK. Specifically, we compared the electrostatic potential and the binding of phosphate moieties at the allosteric binding sites, and predicted potential allosteric activators by docking. We then made a kinetic model of Lactococcus lactis PYK to relate the activator predictions to the intracellular sugar-phosphate conditions in lactic acid bacteria. This strategy enabled us to predict fructose 1,6-bisphosphate as the sole activator of the Enterococcus faecalis PYK, and to predict that the PYKs from Streptococcus pyogenes and Lactobacillus plantarum show weaker specificity for their allosteric activators, while still having fructose 1,6-bisphosphate play the main activator role in vivo. These differences in the specificity of allosteric activation may

  11. Myasis occuring in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Obasa, Temitope O.; Sowunmi, Funmilola Olusola

    2012-01-01

    Myasis is the infestation of skin by larvae or maggots of a variety of flies. It is a condition that occurs more commonly in adults who are living and/or have visited tropical countries. It rarely occurs in neonates, and even when seen, only few larvae are extracted. This case report describes myasis occurring in an 11-day-old female who had 47 larvae in her skin. PMID:23355934

  12. Allosteric Regulation of Lactobacillus plantarum Xylulose 5-Phosphate/Fructose 6-Phosphate Phosphoketolase (Xfp)

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Katie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Xylulose 5-phosphate/fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase (Xfp), which catalyzes the conversion of xylulose 5-phosphate (X5P) or fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) to acetyl phosphate, plays a key role in carbohydrate metabolism in a number of bacteria. Recently, we demonstrated that the fungal Cryptococcus neoformans Xfp2 exhibits both substrate cooperativity for all substrates (X5P, F6P, and Pi) and allosteric regulation in the forms of inhibition by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), oxaloacetic acid (OAA), and ATP and activation by AMP (K. Glenn, C. Ingram-Smith, and K. S. Smith. Eukaryot Cell 13:657–663, 2014). Allosteric regulation has not been reported previously for the characterized bacterial Xfps. Here, we report the discovery of substrate cooperativity and allosteric regulation among bacterial Xfps, specifically the Lactobacillus plantarum Xfp. L. plantarum Xfp is an allosteric enzyme inhibited by PEP, OAA, and glyoxylate but unaffected by the presence of ATP or AMP. Glyoxylate is an additional inhibitor to those previously reported for C. neoformans Xfp2. As with C. neoformans Xfp2, PEP and OAA share the same or possess overlapping sites on L. plantarum Xfp. Glyoxylate, which had the lowest half-maximal inhibitory concentration of the three inhibitors, binds at a separate site. This study demonstrates that substrate cooperativity and allosteric regulation may be common properties among bacterial and eukaryotic Xfp enzymes, yet important differences exist between the enzymes in these two domains. IMPORTANCE Xylulose 5-phosphate/fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase (Xfp) plays a key role in carbohydrate metabolism in a number of bacteria. Although we recently demonstrated that the fungal Cryptococcus Xfp is subject to substrate cooperativity and allosteric regulation, neither phenomenon has been reported for a bacterial Xfp. Here, we report that the Lactobacillus plantarum Xfp displays substrate cooperativity and is allosterically inhibited by

  13. Optimization of a Dibenzodiazepine Hit to a Potent and Selective Allosteric PAK1 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of inhibitors targeting novel allosteric kinase sites is very challenging. Such compounds, however, once identified could offer exquisite levels of selectivity across the kinome. Herein we report our structure-based optimization strategy of a dibenzodiazepine hit 1, discovered in a fragment-based screen, yielding highly potent and selective inhibitors of PAK1 such as 2 and 3. Compound 2 was cocrystallized with PAK1 to confirm binding to an allosteric site and to reveal novel key interactions. Compound 3 modulated PAK1 at the cellular level and due to its selectivity enabled valuable research to interrogate biological functions of the PAK1 kinase. PMID:26191365

  14. Structural Basis of the Lactate-dependent Allosteric Regulation of Oxygen Binding in Arthropod Hemocyanin*

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Shun; Tanaka, Naoki; Mičetić, Ivan; Di Muro, Paolo; Nagao, Satoshi; Kitagishi, Hiroaki; Kano, Koji; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Peisach, Jack; Beltramini, Mariano; Bubacco, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Hemocyanin (Hc) is an oxygen carrier protein in which oxygen binding is regulated by allosteric effectors such as H+ and l-lactate. Isothermal titration calorimetric measurements showed that l-lactate binds to dodecameric and heterohexameric Hc and to the CaeSS3 homohexamer but not to the CaeSS2 monomer. The binding of lactate caused no change in the optical absorption and x-ray absorption spectra of either oxy- or deoxy-Hc, suggesting that no structural rearrangement of the active site occurred. At pH 6.5, the oxygen binding rate constant kobs obtained by flash photolysis showed a significant increase upon addition of l-lactate, whereas l-lactate addition had little effect at pH 8.3. Lactate binding caused a concentration-dependent shift in the interhexameric distances at pH 6.5 based on small angle x-ray scattering measurements. These results show that l-lactate affects oxygen affinity at pH 6.5 by modulating the global structure of Hc without affecting its binuclear copper center (the active site). In contrast to this, the active site structure of deoxy-Hc is affected by changes in pH (Hirota, S., Kawahara, T., Beltramini, M., Di Muro, P., Magliozzo, R. S., Peisach, J., Powers, L. S., Tanaka, N., Nagao, S., and Bubacco, L. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 31941–31948). Upon addiction of lactate, the kinetic behavior of oxygen rebinding for Hc was heterogeneous under low oxygen concentrations at pH 6.5 due to changes in the T and R state populations, and the equilibrium was found to shift from the T toward the R state with addition of lactate. PMID:20406810

  15. Allosteric interactions coordinate catalytic activity between successive metabolic enzymes in the tryptophan synthase bienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Brzović, P S; Ngo, K; Dunn, M F

    1992-04-21

    Tryptophan synthase from enteric bacteria is an alpha 2 beta 2 bienzyme complex that catalyzes the final two reactions in the biosynthesis of L-tryptophan (L-Trp) from 3-indole-D-glycerol 3'-phosphate (IGP) and L-serine (L-Ser). The bienzyme complex exhibits reciprocal ligand-mediated allosteric interactions between the heterologous subunits [Houben, K., & Dunn, M. F. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 2421-2429], but the relationship between allostery and catalysis had not been completely defined. We have utilized rapid-scanning stopped-flow (RSSF) UV-visible spectroscopy to study the relationship between allostery and catalysis in the alpha beta-reaction catalyzed by the bienzyme complex from Salmonella typhimurium. The pre-steady-state spectral changes that occur when L-Ser and IGP are mixed simultaneously with the alpha 2 beta 2 complex show that IGP binding to the alpha-site accelerates the formation of alpha-aminoacrylate [E(A-A)] from L-Ser at the beta-site. Through the use of L-Ser analogues, we show herein that the formation of the E(A-A) intermediate is the chemical signal which triggers the conformational transition that activates the alpha-subunit. beta-subunit ligands, such as L-Trp, that react to form covalent intermediates at the beta-site, but are incapable of E(A-A) formation, do not stimulate the activity of the alpha-subunit. Titration experiments show that the affinity of G3P and GP at the alpha-site is dependent upon the nature of the chemical intermediate present at the beta-active site.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. An antibody that prevents serpin polymerisation acts by inducing a novel allosteric behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Jagger, Alistair M.; Liedtke, Maximilian; Faull, Sarah V.; Nanda, Arjun Scott; Salvadori, Enrico; Wort, Joshua L.; Kay, Christopher W.M.; Heyer-Chauhan, Narinder; Miranda, Elena; Perez, Juan; Ordóñez, Adriana; Haq, Imran; Irving, James A.; Lomas, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Serpins are important regulators of proteolytic pathways with an antiprotease activity that involves a conformational transition from a metastable to a hyperstable state. Certain mutations permit the transition to occur in the absence of a protease; when associated with an intermolecular interaction, this yields linear polymers of hyperstable serpin molecules, which accumulate at the site of synthesis. This is the basis of many pathologies termed the serpinopathies. We have previously identified a monoclonal antibody (mAb4B12) that, in single-chain form, blocks α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) polymerisation in cells. Here, we describe the structural basis for this activity. The mAb4B12 epitope was found to encompass residues Glu32, Glu39 and His43 on helix A and Leu306 on helix I. This is not a region typically associated with the serpin mechanism of conformational change, and correspondingly the epitope was present in all tested structural forms of the protein. Antibody binding rendered β-sheet A — on the opposite face of the molecule — more liable to adopt an ‘open’ state, mediated by changes distal to the breach region and proximal to helix F. The allosteric propagation of induced changes through the molecule was evidenced by an increased rate of peptide incorporation and destabilisation of a preformed serpin–enzyme complex following mAb4B12 binding. These data suggest that prematurely shifting the β-sheet A equilibrium towards the ‘open’ state out of sequence with other changes suppresses polymer formation. This work identifies a region potentially exploitable for a rational design of ligands that is able to dynamically influence α1-AT polymerisation. PMID:27407165

  17. Structural Basis of the Lactate-dependent Allosteric Regulation of Oxygen Binding in Arthropod Hemocyanin

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, S.; Tanaka, N; Micetic, I; Di Muro, P; Nagao, S; Kitagishi, H; Magliozzo, R; Peisach, J; Beltramini, M; Bubacco, L

    2010-01-01

    Hemocyanin (Hc) is an oxygen carrier protein in which oxygen binding is regulated by allosteric effectors such as H{sup +} and L-lactate. Isothermal titration calorimetric measurements showed that L-lactate binds to dodecameric and heterohexameric Hc and to the CaeSS3 homohexamer but not to the CaeSS2 monomer. The binding of lactate caused no change in the optical absorption and x-ray absorption spectra of either oxy- or deoxy-Hc, suggesting that no structural rearrangement of the active site occurred. At pH 6.5, the oxygen binding rate constant k{sub obs} obtained by flash photolysis showed a significant increase upon addition of L-lactate, whereas L-lactate addition had little effect at pH 8.3. Lactate binding caused a concentration-dependent shift in the interhexameric distances at pH 6.5 based on small angle x-ray scattering measurements. These results show that L-lactate affects oxygen affinity at pH 6.5 by modulating the global structure of Hc without affecting its binuclear copper center (the active site). In contrast to this, the active site structure of deoxy-Hc is affected by changes in pH (Hirota, S., Kawahara, T., Beltramini, M., Di Muro, P., Magliozzo, R. S., Peisach, J., Powers, L. S., Tanaka, N., Nagao, S., and Bubacco, L. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 31941-31948). Upon addiction of lactate, the kinetic behavior of oxygen rebinding for Hc was heterogeneous under low oxygen concentrations at pH 6.5 due to changes in the T and R state populations, and the equilibrium was found to shift from the T toward the R state with addition of lactate.

  18. Motion of proximal histidine and structural allosteric transition in soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Lamarre, Isabelle; Martin, Jean-Louis; Rappaport, Fabrice; Negrerie, Michel

    2015-04-07

    We investigated the changes of heme coordination in purified soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by time-resolved spectroscopy in a time range encompassing 11 orders of magnitude (from 1 ps to 0.2 s). After dissociation, NO either recombines geminately to the 4-coordinate (4c) heme (τG1 = 7.5 ps; 97 ± 1% of the population) or exits the heme pocket (3 ± 1%). The proximal His rebinds to the 4c heme with a 70-ps time constant. Then, NO is distributed in two approximately equal populations (1.5%). One geminately rebinds to the 5c heme (τG2 = 6.5 ns), whereas the other diffuses out to the solution, from where it rebinds bimolecularly (τ = 50 μs with [NO] = 200 μM) forming a 6c heme with a diffusion-limited rate constant of 2 × 10(8) M(-1)⋅s(-1). In both cases, the rebinding of NO induces the cleavage of the Fe-His bond that can be observed as an individual reaction step. Saliently, the time constant of bond cleavage differs depending on whether NO binds geminately or from solution (τ5C1 = 0.66 μs and τ5C2 = 10 ms, respectively). Because the same event occurs with rates separated by four orders of magnitude, this measurement implies that sGC is in different structural states in both cases, having different strain exerted on the Fe-His bond. We show here that this structural allosteric transition takes place in the range 1-50 μs. In this context, the detection of NO binding to the proximal side of sGC heme is discussed.

  19. Motion of proximal histidine and structural allosteric transition in soluble guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Lamarre, Isabelle; Martin, Jean-Louis; Rappaport, Fabrice; Negrerie, Michel

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the changes of heme coordination in purified soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by time-resolved spectroscopy in a time range encompassing 11 orders of magnitude (from 1 ps to 0.2 s). After dissociation, NO either recombines geminately to the 4-coordinate (4c) heme (τG1 = 7.5 ps; 97 ± 1% of the population) or exits the heme pocket (3 ± 1%). The proximal His rebinds to the 4c heme with a 70-ps time constant. Then, NO is distributed in two approximately equal populations (1.5%). One geminately rebinds to the 5c heme (τG2 = 6.5 ns), whereas the other diffuses out to the solution, from where it rebinds bimolecularly (τ = 50 μs with [NO] = 200 μM) forming a 6c heme with a diffusion-limited rate constant of 2 × 108 M−1⋅s−1. In both cases, the rebinding of NO induces the cleavage of the Fe-His bond that can be observed as an individual reaction step. Saliently, the time constant of bond cleavage differs depending on whether NO binds geminately or from solution (τ5C1 = 0.66 μs and τ5C2 = 10 ms, respectively). Because the same event occurs with rates separated by four orders of magnitude, this measurement implies that sGC is in different structural states in both cases, having different strain exerted on the Fe-His bond. We show here that this structural allosteric transition takes place in the range 1–50 μs. In this context, the detection of NO binding to the proximal side of sGC heme is discussed. PMID:25831539

  20. An Allosteric Pathway Revealed in the Ribosome Binding Stress Factor BipA

    SciTech Connect

    Makanji, H.; deLivron, M; Robinson, V

    2009-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions as a master regulator of stress and virulence processes in bacteria. It is a member of the translational factor family of GTPases along with EF-G, IF-2 and LepA. Structural and biochemical data suggest that ribosome binding specificity for each member of this family lies in an effector domain. As with other bacterial GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of this protein are tightly coupled. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is still unknown. A series of experiments have been designed to probe structural features of the protein to see if we can pinpoint specific areas of BipA, perhaps even individual residues, which are important to its association with the ribosome. Included in the list are the C-terminal effector domain of the protein, which is distinct to the BipA family of proteins, and amino acid residues in the switch I and II regions of the G domain. Using sucrose density gradients, we have shown that the C-terminal domain is required in order for BipA to bind to the ribosome. Moreover, deletion of this domain increases the GTP hydrolysis rates of the protein, likely through relief of inhibitory contacts. Additional evidence has revealed an allosteric connection between the conformationally flexible switch II region and the C-terminal domain of BipA. Site directed mutagenesis, sucrose gradients and malachite green assays are being used to elucidate the details of this coupling.

  1. Shift in the Equilibrium between On and Off States of the Allosteric Switch in Ras-GppNHp Affected by Small Molecules and Bulk Solvent Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Holzapfel, Genevieve; Buhrman, Greg; Mattos, Carla

    2012-08-31

    Ras GTPase cycles between its active GTP-bound form promoted by GEFs and its inactive GDP-bound form promoted by GAPs to affect the control of various cellular functions. It is becoming increasingly apparent that subtle regulation of the GTP-bound active state may occur through promotion of substates mediated by an allosteric switch mechanism that induces a disorder to order transition in switch II upon ligand binding at an allosteric site. We show with high-resolution structures that calcium acetate and either dithioerythritol (DTE) or dithiothreitol (DTT) soaked into H-Ras-GppNHp crystals in the presence of a moderate amount of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can selectively shift the equilibrium to the 'on' state, where the active site appears to be poised for catalysis (calcium acetate), or to what we call the 'ordered off' state, which is associated with an anticatalytic conformation (DTE or DTT). We also show that the equilibrium is reversible in our crystals and dependent on the nature of the small molecule present. Calcium acetate binding in the allosteric site stabilizes the conformation observed in the H-Ras-GppNHp/NOR1A complex, and PEG, DTE, and DTT stabilize the anticatalytic conformation observed in the complex between the Ras homologue Ran and Importin-{beta}. The small molecules are therefore selecting biologically relevant conformations in the crystal that are sampled by the disordered switch II in the uncomplexed GTP-bound form of H-Ras. In the presence of a large amount of PEG, the ordered off conformation predominates, whereas in solution, in the absence of PEG, switch regions appear to remain disordered in what we call the off state, unable to bind DTE.

  2. Molecular mechanism of allosteric modulation at GPCRs: insight from a binding kinetics study at the human A1 adenosine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Venhorst, Suzanne N; Massink, Arnault; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; Vauquelin, Georges; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many GPCRs can be allosterically modulated by small-molecule ligands. This modulation is best understood in terms of the kinetics of the ligand–receptor interaction. However, many current kinetic assays require at least the (radio)labelling of the orthosteric ligand, which is impractical for studying a range of ligands. Here, we describe the application of a so-called competition association assay at the adenosine A1 receptor for this purpose. Experimental Approach We used a competition association assay to examine the binding kinetics of several unlabelled orthosteric agonists of the A1 receptor in the absence or presence of two allosteric modulators. We also tested three bitopic ligands, in which an orthosteric and an allosteric pharmacophore were covalently linked with different spacer lengths. The relevance of the competition association assay for the binding kinetics of the bitopic ligands was also explored by analysing simulated data. Key Results The binding kinetics of an unlabelled orthosteric ligand were affected by the addition of an allosteric modulator and such effects were probe- and concentration-dependent. Covalently linking the orthosteric and allosteric pharmacophores into one bitopic molecule had a substantial effect on the overall on- or off-rate. Conclusion and Implications The competition association assay is a useful tool for exploring the allosteric modulation of the human adenosine A1 receptor. This assay may have general applicability to study allosteric modulation at other GPCRs as well. PMID:25040887

  3. Monitoring allostery in D2O: a necessary control in studies using hydrogen/deuterium exchange to characterize allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Prasannan, Charulata B; Artigues, Antonio; Fenton, Aron W

    2011-08-01

    There is currently a renewed focus aimed at understanding allosteric mechanisms at atomic resolution. This current interest seeks to understand how both changes in protein conformations and changes in protein dynamics contribute to relaying an allosteric signal between two ligand binding sites on a protein (e.g., active and allosteric sites). Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), by monitoring protein dynamics directly, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange, by monitoring solvent accessibility of backbone amides, offer insights into protein dynamics. Unfortunately, many allosteric proteins exceed the size limitations of standard NMR techniques. Although hydrogen/deuterium exchange as detected by mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS) offers an alternative evaluation method, any application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange requires that the property being measured functions in both H(2)O and D(2)O. Due to the promising future H/DX-MS has in the evaluation of allosteric mechanisms in large proteins, we demonstrate an evaluation of allosteric regulation in D(2)O. Exemplified using phenylalanine inhibition of rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase, we find that binding of the inhibitor is greatly reduced in D(2)O, but the effector continues to elicit an allosteric response.

  4. Characterization of the allosteric anion-binding site of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase.

    PubMed

    Tai, C H; Burkhard, P; Gani, D; Jenn, T; Johnson, C; Cook, P F

    2001-06-26

    A new crystal structure of the A-isozyme of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A (OASS) with chloride bound to an allosteric site located at the dimer interface has recently been determined [Burkhard, P., Tai, C.-H., Jansonius, J. N., and Cook, P. F. (2000) J. Mol. Biol. 303, 279-286]. Data have been obtained from steady state and presteady-state kinetic studies and from UV-visible spectral studies to characterize the allosteric anion-binding site. Data obtained with chloride and sulfate as inhibitors indicate the following: (i) chloride and sulfate prevent the formation of the external aldimines with L-cysteine or L-serine; (ii) chloride and sulfate increase the external aldimine dissociation constants for O-acetyl-L-serine, L-methionine, and 5-oxo-L-norleucine; (iii) chloride and sulfate bind to the allosteric site in the internal aldimine and alpha-aminoacrylate external aldimine forms of OASS; (iv) sulfate also binds to the active site. Sulfide behaves in a manner identical to chloride and sulfate in preventing the formation of the L-serine external aldimine. The binding of chloride to the allosteric site is pH independent over the pH range 7-9, suggesting no ionizable enzyme side chains ionize over this pH range. Inhibition by sulfide is potent (K(d) is 25 microM at pH 8) suggesting that SH(-) is the physiologic inhibitory species.

  5. 2013 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship: drug discovery targeting allosteric sites.

    PubMed

    Lindsley, Craig W

    2014-09-25

    The identification of sites on receptors topographically distinct from the orthosteric sites, so-called allosteric sites, has heralded novel approaches and modes of pharmacology for target modulation. Over the past 20 years, our understanding of allosteric modulation has grown significantly, and numerous advantages, as well as caveats (e.g., flat structure-activity relationships, species differences, "molecular switches"), have been identified. For multiple receptors and proteins, numerous examples have been described where unprecedented levels of selectivity are achieved along with improved physiochemical properties. While not a panacea, these novel approaches represent exciting opportunities for tool compound development to probe the pharmacology and therapeutic potential of discrete molecular targets, as well as new medicines. In this Perspective, in commemoration of the 2013 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship ( Lindsley , C. W. Adventures in allosteric drug discovery . Presented at the 246th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Indianapolis, IN, September 10, 2013 ; The 2013 Portoghese Lectureship ), several vignettes of drug discovery campaigns targeting novel allosteric mechanisms will be recounted, along with lessons learned and guidelines that have emerged for successful lead optimization.

  6. Structural and functional characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis uridine monophosphate kinase: insights into the allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Labesse, Gilles; Benkali, Khaled; Salard-Arnaud, Isabelle; Gilles, Anne-Marie; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène

    2011-04-01

    Nucleoside Monophosphate Kinases (NMPKs) family are key enzymes in nucleotide metabolism. Bacterial UMPKs depart from the main superfamily of NMPKs. Having no eukaryotic counterparts they represent attractive therapeutic targets. They are regulated by GTP and UTP, while showing different mechanisms in Gram(+), Gram(-) and archaeal bacteria. In this work, we have characterized the mycobacterial UMPK (UMPKmt) combining enzymatic and structural investigations with site-directed mutagenesis. UMPKmt exhibits cooperativity toward ATP and an allosteric regulation by GTP and UTP. The crystal structure of the complex of UMPKmt with GTP solved at 2.5 Å, was merely identical to the modelled apo-form, in agreement with SAXS experiments. Only a small stretch of residues was affected upon nucleotide binding, pointing out the role of macromolecular dynamics rather than major structural changes in the allosteric regulation of bacterial UMPKs. We further probe allosteric regulation by site-directed mutagenesis. In particular, a key residue involved in the allosteric regulation of this enzyme was identified.

  7. Glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from beef kidney is an allosteric system of the V-type.

    PubMed

    Lara-Lemus, R; Calcagno, M L

    1998-10-14

    The enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from beef kidney has been purified to homogeneity by allosteric-site affinity chromatography. Its amino acid composition and the N-terminal sequence (1-42), were obtained. The amino acid sequence of this segment is essentially identical to the corresponding regions of the human and hamster glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminases. The beef enzyme is a hexamer of 32.5 kDa subunits; this is nearly 2.5 kDa higher than the molecular mass of the homologous enzyme from Escherichia coli. Beef kidney deaminase exhibits a notable difference from the bacterial enzyme in its allosteric activation by N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate This metabolite, which is also is the allosteric activator of the bacterial glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase, activates the enzyme by increasing its kcat without any change in the Km values for glucosamine 6-phosphate, over a wide range of activator concentration. This observation places beef kidney deaminase in the class of V-type allosteric systems.

  8. 2013 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship: Drug Discovery Targeting Allosteric Sites†

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The identification of sites on receptors topographically distinct from the orthosteric sites, so-called allosteric sites, has heralded novel approaches and modes of pharmacology for target modulation. Over the past 20 years, our understanding of allosteric modulation has grown significantly, and numerous advantages, as well as caveats (e.g., flat structure–activity relationships, species differences, “molecular switches”), have been identified. For multiple receptors and proteins, numerous examples have been described where unprecedented levels of selectivity are achieved along with improved physiochemical properties. While not a panacea, these novel approaches represent exciting opportunities for tool compound development to probe the pharmacology and therapeutic potential of discrete molecular targets, as well as new medicines. In this Perspective, in commemoration of the 2013 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship (LindsleyC. W.Adventures in allosteric drug discovery. Presented at the 246th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Indianapolis, IN, September 10, 2013; The 2013 Portoghese Lectureship), several vignettes of drug discovery campaigns targeting novel allosteric mechanisms will be recounted, along with lessons learned and guidelines that have emerged for successful lead optimization. PMID:25180768

  9. Allosteric Regulation Points Control the Conformational Dynamics of the Molecular Chaperone Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Rehn, Alexandra; Moroni, Elisabetta; Zierer, Bettina K; Tippel, Franziska; Morra, Giulia; John, Christine; Richter, Klaus; Colombo, Giorgio; Buchner, Johannes

    2016-11-06

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone responsible for the activation, maturation, and trafficking of several hundred client proteins in the cell. It is well known that (but not understood how) residues far away from Hsp90's nucleotide binding pocket can regulate its ATPase activity, a phenomenon called allosteric regulation. Here, the computational design of allosteric mutations was combined with in vitro and in vivo experiments to unravel nucleotide-responsive hot spots in the regulation of Hsp90. With this approach, we identified both activating and inhibiting regulation points and show that changes in those amino acids affect the conformational dynamics and ATPase activity of Hsp90 in vitro. Our observations that activating mutations loosen and inhibiting mutations rigidify the protein explain for the first time how Hsp90 changes in response to allosteric mutations. Additionally, mutations of these allosteric regulation points can be controlled by the interplay with Hsp90 co-chaperones, thus providing cells with an efficient mechanism of modifying Hsp90's intrinsic properties via different layers of regulation. Altogether, our results show that a framework for transmitting conformational information exists in the Hsp90 structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In silico mapping of allosteric ligand binding sites in type-1 cannabinoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Sabatucci, Annalaura; Tortolani, Daniel; Dainese, Enrico; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2017-08-17

    The recent resolution of the crystal structure of type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1 ), and the discovery of novel modulators for this target open the way to the possibility of elucidating the structural requirements for CB1 binding, and thereby facilitate a rational drug design. Compounds that target the orthosteric site of CB1 in some cases have shown side effects. Allosteric modulators could potentially avoid these side effects by influencing binding and/or efficacy of orthosteric ligands. Here, we summarize and compare previous data on different putative allosteric binding sites observed in CB1 homology models with an in silico docking study of the recently published crystal structure of the same receptor on endogenous and natural hydrophobic ligands that act as positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) and negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of CB1 . In particular, a lipid-exposed pocket targeted by most of the tested molecules is reported and discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Allosteric modulation of ATP-gated P2X receptor channels

    PubMed Central

    Coddou, Claudio; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Seven mammalian purinergic receptor subunits, denoted P2X1 to P2X7, and several spliced forms of these subunits have been cloned. When heterologously expressed, these cDNAs encode ATP-gated non-selective cation channels organized as trimers. All activated receptors produce cell depolarization and promote Ca2+ influx through their pores and indirectly by activating voltage-gated calcium channels. However, the biophysical and pharmacological properties of these receptors differ considerably, and the majority of these subunits are also capable of forming heterotrimers with other members of the P2X receptor family, which confers further different properties. These channels have three ATP binding domains, presumably located between neighboring subunits, and occupancy of at least two binding sites is needed for their activation. In addition to the orthosteric binding sites for ATP, these receptors have additional allosteric sites that modulate the agonist action at receptors, including sites for trace metals, protons, neurosteroids, reactive oxygen species and phosphoinositides. The allosteric regulation of P2X receptors is frequently receptor-specific and could be a useful tool to identify P2X members in native tissues and their roles in signaling. The focus of this review is on common and receptor-specific allosteric modulation of P2X receptors and the molecular base accounting for allosteric binding sites. PMID:21639805

  12. Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation and Inhibition of the Deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphate Triphosphohydrolase from Enterococcus faecalis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Vorontsov, Ivan I.; Wu, Ying; DeLucia, Maria; Minasov, George; Mehrens, Jennifer; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Anderson, Wayne F.; Ahn, Jinwoo

    2014-01-01

    EF1143 from Enterococcus faecalis, a life-threatening pathogen that is resistant to common antibiotics, is a homo-tetrameric deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) triphosphohydrolase (dNTPase), converting dNTPs into the deoxyribonucleosides and triphosphate. The dNTPase activity of EF1143 is regulated by canonical dNTPs, which simultaneously act as substrates and activity modulators. Previous crystal structures of apo-EF1143 and the protein bound to both dGTP and dATP suggested allosteric regulation of its enzymatic activity by dGTP binding at four identical allosteric sites. However, whether and how other canonical dNTPs regulate the enzyme activity was not defined. Here, we present the crystal structure of EF1143 in complex with dGTP and dTTP. The new structure reveals that the tetrameric EF1143 contains four additional secondary allosteric sites adjacent to the previously identified dGTP-binding primary regulatory sites. Structural and enzyme kinetic studies indicate that dGTP binding to the first allosteric site, with nanomolar affinity, is a prerequisite for substrate docking and hydrolysis. Then, the presence of a particular dNTP in the second site either enhances or inhibits the dNTPase activity of EF1143. Our results provide the first mechanistic insight into dNTP-mediated regulation of dNTPase activity. PMID:24338016

  13. Allosteric ligands for the pharmacologically dark receptors GPR68 and GPR65

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xi-Ping; Karpiak, Joel; Kroeze, Wesley K.; Zhu, Hu; Chen, Xin; Moy, Sheryl S.; Saddoris, Kara A.; Nikolova, Viktoriya; Farrell, Martilias S.; Wang, Sheng; Mangano, Thomas J.; Deshpande, Deepak A.; Jiang, Alice; Penn, Raymond B.; Jin, Jian; Koller, Beverly H.; Kenakin, Terry; Shoichet, Brian K.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2016-01-01

    At least 120 non-olfactory G protein-coupled receptors in the human genome are ”orphans” for which endogenous ligands are unknown, and many have no selective ligands, hindering elucidation of their biological functions and clinical relevance. Among these is GPR68, a proton receptor that lacks small molecule modulators for probing its biology. Yeast-based screens against GPR68 identified the benzodiazepine drug lorazepam as a non-selective GPR68 positive allosteric modulator. Over 3000 GPR68 homology models were refined to recognize lorazepam in a putative allosteric site. Docking 3.1 million molecules predicted new GPR68 modulators many of which were confirmed in functional assays. One potent GPR68 modulator—ogerin– suppressed recall in fear conditioning in wild-type, but not in GPR68 knockout mice. The same approach led to the discovery of allosteric agonists and negative allosteric modulators for GPR65. Combining physical and structure-based screening may be broadly useful for ligand discovery for understudied and orphan GPCRs. PMID:26550826

  14. Nootropic alpha7 nicotinic receptor allosteric modulator derived from GABAA receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Ng, Herman J; Whittemore, Edward R; Tran, Minhtam B; Hogenkamp, Derk J; Broide, Ron S; Johnstone, Timothy B; Zheng, Lijun; Stevens, Karen E; Gee, Kelvin W

    2007-05-08

    Activation of brain alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7 nAChRs) has broad therapeutic potential in CNS diseases related to cognitive dysfunction, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. In contrast to direct agonist activation, positive allosteric modulation of alpha7 nAChRs would deliver the clinically validated benefits of allosterism to these indications. We have generated a selective alpha7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator (PAM) from a library of GABAA receptor PAMs. Compound 6 (N-(4-chlorophenyl)-alpha-[[(4-chloro-phenyl)amino]methylene]-3-methyl-5-isoxazoleacet-amide) evokes robust positive modulation of agonist-induced currents at alpha7 nAChRs, while preserving the rapid native characteristics of desensitization, and has little to no efficacy at other ligand-gated ion channels. In rodent models, it corrects sensory-gating deficits and improves working memory, effects consistent with cognitive enhancement. Compound 6 represents a chemotype for allosteric activation of alpha7 nAChRs, with therapeutic potential in CNS diseases with cognitive dysfunction.

  15. "Molecular Switches" on mGluR Allosteric Ligands That Modulate Modes of Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Michael R.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Brogan, John T.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    G-Protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of drug targets, accounting for more than 40% of marketed drugs; however, discovery efforts for many GPCRs have failed to provide viable drug candidates. Historically, drug discovery efforts have focused on developing ligands that act at the orthosteric site of the endogenous agonist. Recently, efforts have focused on functional assay paradigms and the discovery of ligands that act at allosteric sites to modulate receptor function in either a positive, negative, or neutral manner. Allosteric modulators have numerous advantages over orthosteric ligands, including high subtype selectivity; the ability to mimic physiological conditions; the lack of densensitization, downregulation, and internalization; and reduced side effects. Despite these virtues, challenging issues have now arisen for allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs): shallow SAR, ligand-directed trafficking, and the identification of subtle “molecular switches” that modulate the modes of pharmacology. Here, we will discuss the impact of modest structural changes to multiple mGluR allosteric ligands scaffolds that unexpectedly modulate pharmacology and raise concerns over metabolism and the pharmacology of metabolites. PMID:21341760

  16. Disruption of Allosteric Response as an Unprecedented Mechanism of Resistance to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ceftaroline, a recently approved β-lactam antibiotic for treatment of infections by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is able to inhibit penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) by triggering an allosteric conformational change that leads to the opening of the active site. The opened active site is now vulnerable to inhibition by a second molecule of ceftaroline, an event that impairs cell-wall biosynthesis and leads to bacterial death. The triggering of the allosteric effect takes place by binding of the first antibiotic molecule 60 Å away from the active site of PBP2a within the core of the allosteric site. We document, by kinetic studies and by determination of three X-ray structures of the mutant variants of PBP2a that result in resistance to ceftaroline, that the effect of these clinical mutants is the disruption of the allosteric trigger in this important protein in MRSA. This is an unprecedented mechanism for antibiotic resistance. PMID:24955778

  17. FUNCTIONAL INSIGHT INTO DEVELOPMENT OF POSITIVE ALLOSTERIC MODULATORS OF AMPA RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Autumn M.; Harms, Jonathan E.; Partin, Kathryn M.; Benveniste, Morris

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) ionotropic glutamate receptors facilitate synaptic plasticity and contribute essentially to learning and memory, properties which make AMPA receptors targets for drug discovery and development. One region at which several different classes of positive allosteric modulators bind lies at the dimer interface between the ligand-binding core of the second, membrane-proximal, extracellular domain of AMPA receptors. This solvent-accessible binding pocket has been the target of drug discovery efforts, leading to the recent delineation of five “subsites” which differentially allow access to modulator moieties, and for which distinct modulator affinities and apparent efficacies are attributed. Here we use the voltage-clamp technique in conjunction with rapid drug application to study the effects of mutants lining subsites “A” and “B” of the allosteric modulator pocket to assess affinity and efficacy of allosteric modulation by cyclothiazide, CX614, CMPDA and CMPDB. A novel analysis of the decay of current produced by the onset of desensitization has allowed us to estimate both affinity and efficacy from single concentrations of modulator. Such an approach may be useful for effective high throughput screening of new target compounds. PMID:24878241

  18. Functional insight into development of positive allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Autumn M; Harms, Jonathan E; Partin, Kathryn M; Benveniste, Morris

    2014-10-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) ionotropic glutamate receptors facilitate synaptic plasticity and contribute essentially to learning and memory, properties which make AMPA receptors targets for drug discovery and development. One region at which several different classes of positive allosteric modulators bind lies at the dimer interface between the ligand-binding core of the second, membrane-proximal, extracellular domain of AMPA receptors. This solvent-accessible binding pocket has been the target of drug discovery efforts, leading to the recent delineation of five "subsites" which differentially allow access to modulator moieties, and for which distinct modulator affinities and apparent efficacies are attributed. Here we use the voltage-clamp technique in conjunction with rapid drug application to study the effects of mutants lining subsites "A" and "B" of the allosteric modulator pocket to assess affinity and efficacy of allosteric modulation by cyclothiazide, CX614, CMPDA and CMPDB. A novel analysis of the decay of current produced by the onset of desensitization has allowed us to estimate both affinity and efficacy from single concentrations of modulator. Such an approach may be useful for effective high throughput screening of new target compounds.

  19. Anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 is an endogenous allosteric enhancer of CB1 cannabinoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Pamplona, Fabricio A.; Ferreira, Juliano; Menezes de Lima, Octávio; Duarte, Filipe Silveira; Bento, Allisson Freire; Forner, Stefânia; Villarinho, Jardel G.; Bellocchio, Luigi; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Lerner, Raissa; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat; Canetti, Claudio; Matias, Isabelle; Calixto, João Batista; Marsicano, Giovanni; Guimarães, Marilia Z. P.; Takahashi, Reinaldo N.

    2012-01-01

    Allosteric modulation of G-protein–coupled receptors represents a key goal of current pharmacology. In particular, endogenous allosteric modulators might represent important targets of interventions aimed at maximizing therapeutic efficacy and reducing side effects of drugs. Here we show that the anti-inflammatory lipid lipoxin A4 is an endogenous allosteric enhancer of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. Lipoxin A4 was detected in brain tissues, did not compete for the orthosteric binding site of the CB1 receptor (vs. 3H-SR141716A), and did not alter endocannabinoid metabolism (as opposed to URB597 and MAFP), but it enhanced affinity of anandamide at the CB1 receptor, thereby potentiating the effects of this endocannabinoid both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, lipoxin A4 displayed a CB1 receptor-dependent protective effect against β-amyloid (1–40)-induced spatial memory impairment in mice. The discovery of lipoxins as a class of endogenous allosteric modulators of CB1 receptors may foster the therapeutic exploitation of the endocannabinoid system, in particular for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23150578

  20. Anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 is an endogenous allosteric enhancer of CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Pamplona, Fabricio A; Ferreira, Juliano; Menezes de Lima, Octávio; Duarte, Filipe Silveira; Bento, Allisson Freire; Forner, Stefânia; Villarinho, Jardel G; Bellocchio, Luigi; Bellochio, Luigi; Wotjak, Carsten T; Lerner, Raissa; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat; Canetti, Claudio; Matias, Isabelle; Calixto, João Batista; Marsicano, Giovanni; Guimarães, Marilia Z P; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2012-12-18

    Allosteric modulation of G-protein-coupled receptors represents a key goal of current pharmacology. In particular, endogenous allosteric modulators might represent important targets of interventions aimed at maximizing therapeutic efficacy and reducing side effects of drugs. Here we show that the anti-inflammatory lipid lipoxin A(4) is an endogenous allosteric enhancer of the CB(1) cannabinoid receptor. Lipoxin A(4) was detected in brain tissues, did not compete for the orthosteric binding site of the CB(1) receptor (vs. (3)H-SR141716A), and did not alter endocannabinoid metabolism (as opposed to URB597 and MAFP), but it enhanced affinity of anandamide at the CB1 receptor, thereby potentiating the effects of this endocannabinoid both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, lipoxin A(4) displayed a CB(1) receptor-dependent protective effect against β-amyloid (1-40)-induced spatial memory impairment in mice. The discovery of lipoxins as a class of endogenous allosteric modulators of CB(1) receptors may foster the therapeutic exploitation of the endocannabinoid system, in particular for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Novel selective allosteric and bitopic ligands for the S1P(3) receptor.

    PubMed

    Jo, Euijung; Bhhatarai, Barun; Repetto, Emanuela; Guerrero, Miguel; Riley, Sean; Brown, Steven J; Kohno, Yasushi; Roberts, Edward; Schürer, Stephan C; Rosen, Hugh

    2012-12-21

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid signaling molecule that regulates important biological functions, including lymphocyte trafficking and vascular development, by activating G protein-coupled receptors for S1P, namely, S1P(1) through S1P(5). Here, we map the S1P(3) binding pocket with a novel allosteric agonist (CYM-5541), an orthosteric agonist (S1P), and a novel bitopic antagonist (SPM-242). With a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, ligand competition assay, and molecular modeling, we concluded that S1P and CYM-5541 occupy different chemical spaces in the ligand binding pocket of S1P(3). CYM-5541 allowed us to identify an allosteric site where Phe263 is a key gate-keeper residue for its affinity and efficacy. This ligand lacks a polar moiety, and the novel allosteric hydrophobic pocket permits S1P(3) selectivity of CYM-5541 within the highly similar S1P receptor family. However, a novel S1P(3)-selective antagonist, SPM-242, in the S1P(3) pocket occupies the ligand binding spaces of both S1P and CYM-5541, showing its bitopic mode of binding. Therefore, our coordinated approach with biochemical data and molecular modeling, based on our recently published S1P(1) crystal structure data in a highly conserved set of related receptors with a shared ligand, provides a strong basis for the successful optimization of orthosteric, allosteric, and bitopic modulators of S1P(3).

  2. Structural basis for cAMP-mediated allosteric control of the catabolite activator protein.

    PubMed

    Popovych, Nataliya; Tzeng, Shiou-Ru; Tonelli, Marco; Ebright, Richard H; Kalodimos, Charalampos G

    2009-04-28

    The cAMP-mediated allosteric transition in the catabolite activator protein (CAP; also known as the cAMP receptor protein, CRP) is a textbook example of modulation of DNA-binding activity by small-molecule binding. Here we report the structure of CAP in the absence of cAMP, which, together with structures of CAP in the presence of cAMP, defines atomic details of the cAMP-mediated allosteric transition. The structural changes, and their relationship to cAMP binding and DNA binding, are remarkably clear and simple. Binding of cAMP results in a coil-to-helix transition that extends the coiled-coil dimerization interface of CAP by 3 turns of helix and concomitantly causes rotation, by approximately 60 degrees , and translation, by approximately 7 A, of the DNA-binding domains (DBDs) of CAP, positioning the recognition helices in the DBDs in the correct orientation to interact with DNA. The allosteric transition is stabilized further by expulsion of an aromatic residue from the cAMP-binding pocket upon cAMP binding. The results define the structural mechanisms that underlie allosteric control of this prototypic transcriptional regulatory factor and provide an illustrative example of how effector-mediated structural changes can control the activity of regulatory proteins.

  3. Quantitative analysis of receptor allosterism and its implication for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rumin; Kavana, Michael

    2015-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptors represent the largest class of druggable targets and are known to be modulated by both orthosteric agonists and positive/negative allosteric modulators (PAMs/NAMs). Proper experimental design and data analysis for the dose matrix between an agonist and PAM or NAM are critical to elucidate the key parameters for understanding molecular mechanism and structure-activity relationship (SAR) in drug discovery. The authors provide an overview and best practice recommendations on the quantitative analysis of receptor allosterism. The authors propose a simple classification system for receptor modulators on the basis of their efficacy and affinity modifiers. The authors also outline the optimal assay designs for both fixed dose screening and dose matrix study of receptor modulators. The authors recommend the global curve fitting approach to reliably yield system- and modulator-specific parameters for SAR ranking. Furthermore, the authors suggest that the uncertainty in maximal system response has insignificant impact on SAR ranking. The authors anticipate that systems pharmacology models integrating both binding kinetics and functional allosterism will be needed to address the inherent limitations of current allosterism models.

  4. Identification of the Allosteric Site for Phenylalanine in Rat Phenylalanine Hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengnan; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2016-04-01

    Liver phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) is an allosteric enzyme that requires activation by phenylalanine for full activity. The location of the allosteric site for phenylalanine has not been established. NMR spectroscopy of the isolated regulatory domain (RDPheH(25-117) is the regulatory domain of PheH lacking residues 1-24) of the rat enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine is consistent with formation of a side-by-side ACT dimer. Six residues in RDPheH(25-117) were identified as being in the phenylalanine-binding site on the basis of intermolecular NOEs between unlabeled phenylalanine and isotopically labeled protein. The location of these residues is consistent with two allosteric sites per dimer, with each site containing residues from both monomers. Site-specific variants of five of the residues (E44Q, A47G, L48V, L62V, and H64N) decreased the affinity of RDPheH(25-117) for phenylalanine based on the ability to stabilize the dimer. Incorporation of the A47G, L48V, and H64N mutations into the intact protein increased the concentration of phenylalanine required for activation. The results identify the location of the allosteric site as the interface of the regulatory domain dimer formed in activated PheH.

  5. Controlling the rate of organic reactions: rational design of allosteric Diels-Alderase ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Amontov, Sergey; Jäschke, Andres

    2006-01-01

    Allosteric mechanisms are widely used in nature to control the rates of enzymatic reactions, but little is known about RNA catalysts controlled by these principles. The only natural allosteric ribozyme reported to date catalyzes an RNA cleavage reaction, and so do almost all artificial systems. RNA has, however, been shown to accelerate a much wider range of chemical reactions. Here we report that RNA catalysts for organic reactions can be put under the stringent control of effector molecules by straight-forward rational design. This approach uses known RNA sequences with catalytic and ligand-binding properties, and exploits weakly conserved sequence elements and available structural information to induce the formation of alternative, catalytically inactive structures. The potential and general applicability is demonstrated by the design of three different systems in which the rate of a catalytic carbon-carbon bond forming reaction is positively regulated up to 2100-fold by theophylline, tobramycin and a specific mRNA sequence, respectively. Although smaller in size than a tRNA, all three ribozymes show typical features of allosteric metabolic enzymes, namely high rate acceleration and tight allosteric regulation. Not only do these findings demonstrate RNA's power as a catalyst, but also highlight on RNA's capabilities as signaling components in regulatory networks.

  6. Controlling the rate of organic reactions: rational design of allosteric Diels-Alderase ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Amontov, Sergey; Jäschke, Andres

    2006-01-01

    Allosteric mechanisms are widely used in nature to control the rates of enzymatic reactions, but little is known about RNA catalysts controlled by these principles. The only natural allosteric ribozyme reported to date catalyzes an RNA cleavage reaction, and so do almost all artificial systems. RNA has, however, been shown to accelerate a much wider range of chemical reactions. Here we report that RNA catalysts for organic reactions can be put under the stringent control of effector molecules by straight-forward rational design. This approach uses known RNA sequences with catalytic and ligand-binding properties, and exploits weakly conserved sequence elements and available structural information to induce the formation of alternative, catalytically inactive structures. The potential and general applicability is demonstrated by the design of three different systems in which the rate of a catalytic carbon–carbon bond forming reaction is positively regulated up to 2100-fold by theophylline, tobramycin and a specific mRNA sequence, respectively. Although smaller in size than a tRNA, all three ribozymes show typical features of allosteric metabolic enzymes, namely high rate acceleration and tight allosteric regulation. Not only do these findings demonstrate RNA's power as a catalyst, but also highlight on RNA's capabilities as signaling components in regulatory networks. PMID:16990253

  7. Elucidation of a four-site allosteric network in fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huaibin; Marsiglia, William M; Cho, Min-Kyu; Huang, Zhifeng; Deng, Jingjing; Blais, Steven P; Gai, Weiming; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Neubert, Thomas A; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2017-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling is tightly regulated by protein allostery within the intracellular tyrosine kinase domains. Yet the molecular determinants of allosteric connectivity in tyrosine kinase domain are incompletely understood. By means of structural (X-ray and NMR) and functional characterization of pathogenic gain-of-function mutations affecting the FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase domain, we elucidated a long-distance allosteric network composed of four interconnected sites termed the ‘molecular brake’, ‘DFG latch’, ‘A-loop plug’, and ‘αC tether’. The first three sites repress the kinase from adopting an active conformation, whereas the αC tether promotes the active conformation. The skewed design of this four-site allosteric network imposes tight autoinhibition and accounts for the incomplete mimicry of the activated conformation by pathogenic mutations targeting a single site. Based on the structural similarity shared among RTKs, we propose that this allosteric model for FGFR kinases is applicable to other RTKs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21137.001 PMID:28166054

  8. Allosteric transition and binding of small molecule effectors causes curvature change in central β-sheets of selected enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tolonen, Ellen; Bueno, Brenda; Kulshreshta, Sanjeev; Cieplak, Piotr; Argáez, Miguel; Velázquez, Leticia

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative description of allosteric transition remains a significant science challenge. Many allosteric enzymes contain a central β-sheet in their catalytic domain. When an allosteric protein undergoes the transition between T (tense) and R (relaxed) allosteric states, this central β-sheet undergoes a conformational change. A traditional method of measuring this change, the root mean square deviation (RMSD), appears to be inadequate to describe such changes in meaningful quantitative manner. We designed a novel quantitative method to demonstrate this conformational transition by measuring the change in curvature of the central β-sheet when enzymes transition between allosteric states. The curvature was established by calculating the semiaxes of a 3-D hyperboloid fitted by least squares to the Cα atomic positions of the β-sheet. The two enzymes selected for this study, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) from pig kidney and aspartate carbamoyltransferase (ATCase) from E. coli, showed while transitioning between the allosteric states (T ⇔ R) a notable change in β-sheet curvature (∼5%) that results in a large lateral shift at the sheet's edge, which is necessary to convey the signal. The results suggest that the β-sheet participates in storing elastic energy associated with the transition. Establishing a tentative link between the energetics of the β-sheet in different allosteric states provides a more objective basis for the naming convention of allosteric states (tense or relaxed), and provides insight into the hysteretic nature of the transition. The approach presented here allows for a better understanding of the internal dynamics of allosteric enzymes by defining the domains that directly participate in the transition. PMID:20602244

  9. Allosteric transition and binding of small molecule effectors causes curvature change in central β-sheets of selected enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Ellen; Bueno, Brenda; Kulshreshta, Sanjeev; Cieplak, Piotr; Argáez, Miguel; Velázquez, Leticia; Stec, Boguslaw

    2011-04-01

    A quantitative description of allosteric transition remains a significant science challenge. Many allosteric enzymes contain a central β-sheet in their catalytic domain. When an allosteric protein undergoes the transition between T (tense) and R (relaxed) allosteric states, this central β-sheet undergoes a conformational change. A traditional method of measuring this change, the root mean square deviation (RMSD), appears to be inadequate to describe such changes in meaningful quantitative manner. We designed a novel quantitative method to demonstrate this conformational transition by measuring the change in curvature of the central β-sheet when enzymes transition between allosteric states. The curvature was established by calculating the semiaxes of a 3-D hyperboloid fitted by least squares to the Cα atomic positions of the β-sheet. The two enzymes selected for this study, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) from pig kidney and aspartate carbamoyltransferase (ATCase) from E. coli, showed while transitioning between the allosteric states (T ⇔ R) a notable change in β-sheet curvature (∼5%) that results in a large lateral shift at the sheet's edge, which is necessary to convey the signal. The results suggest that the β-sheet participates in storing elastic energy associated with the transition. Establishing a tentative link between the energetics of the β-sheet in different allosteric states provides a more objective basis for the naming convention of allosteric states (tense or relaxed), and provides insight into the hysteretic nature of the transition. The approach presented here allows for a better understanding of the internal dynamics of allosteric enzymes by defining the domains that directly participate in the transition.

  10. Animal communication.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gisela

    2014-11-01

    Animal communication is first and foremost about signal transmission and aims to understand how communication occurs. It is a field that has contributed to and been inspired by other fields, from information technology to neuroscience, in finding ever better methods to eavesdrop on the actual 'message' that forms the basis of communication. Much of this review deals with vocal communication as an example of the questions that research on communication has tried to answer and it provides an historical overview of the theoretical arguments proposed. Topics covered include signal transmission in different environments and different species, referential signaling, and intentionality. The contention is that animal communication may reveal significant thought processes that enable some individuals in a small number of species so far investigated to anticipate what conspecifics might do, although some researchers think of such behavior as adaptive or worth dismissing as anthropomorphizing. The review further points out that some species are more likely than others to develop more complex communication patterns. It is a matter of asking how animals categorize their world and which concepts require cognitive processes and which are adaptive. The review concludes with questions of life history, social learning, and decision making, all criteria that have remained relatively unexplored in communication research. Long-lived, cooperative social animals have so far offered especially exciting prospects for investigation. There are ample opportunities and now very advanced technologies as well to tap further into expressions of memory of signals, be they vocal or expressed in other modalities. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:661-677. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1321 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. CB(1) receptor allosteric modulators display both agonist and signaling pathway specificity.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Gemma L; Horswill, James G; Anavi-Goffer, Sharon; Reggio, Patricia H; Bolognini, Daniele; Abood, Mary E; McAllister, Sean; Strange, Phillip G; Stephens, Gary J; Pertwee, Roger G; Ross, Ruth A

    2013-02-01

    We have previously identified allosteric modulators of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor (Org 27569, PSNCBAM-1) that display a contradictory pharmacological profile: increasing the specific binding of the CB(1) receptor agonist [(3)H]CP55940 but producing a decrease in CB(1) receptor agonist efficacy. Here we investigated the effect one or both compounds in a broad range of signaling endpoints linked to CB(1) receptor activation. We assessed the effect of these compounds on CB(1) receptor agonist-induced [(35)S]GTPγS binding, inhibition, and stimulation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and β-arrestin recruitment. We also investigated the effect of these allosteric modulators on CB(1) agonist binding kinetics. Both compounds display ligand dependence, being significantly more potent as modulators of CP55940 signaling as compared with WIN55212 and having little effect on [(3)H]WIN55212 binding. Org 27569 displays biased antagonism whereby it inhibits: agonist-induced guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding, simulation (Gα(s)-mediated), and inhibition (Gα(i)-mediated) of cAMP production and β-arrestin recruitment. In contrast, it acts as an enhancer of agonist-induced ERK phosphorylation. Alone, the compound can act also as an allosteric agonist, increasing cAMP production and ERK phosphorylation. We find that in both saturation and kinetic-binding experiments, the Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1 appeared to influence only orthosteric ligand maximum occupancy rather than affinity. The data indicate that the allosteric modulators share a common mechanism whereby they increase available high-affinity CB(1) agonist binding sites. The receptor conformation stabilized by the allosterics appears to induce signaling and also selectively traffics orthosteric agonist signaling via the ERK phosphorylation pathway.

  12. Human CD4 Metastability Is a Function of the Allosteric Disulfide Bond in Domain 2.

    PubMed

    Owen, Gavin R; Channell, Jennifer A; Forsyth, V Trevor; Haertlein, Michael; Mitchell, Edward P; Capovilla, Alexio; Papathanasopoulos, Maria; Cerutti, Nichole M

    2016-04-19

    CD4 is expressed on the surface of specific leukocytes where it plays a key role in the activation of immunostimulatory T-cells and acts as a primary receptor for HIV-1 entry. CD4 has four ecto-domains (D1-D4) of which D1, D2, and D4 contain disulfide bonds. Although disulfide bonds commonly serve structural or catalytic functions, a rare class of disulfide bonds possessing unusually high dihedral strain energy and a relative ease of reduction can impact protein function by shuffling their redox state. D2 of CD4 possesses one such "allosteric" disulfide. While it is becoming accepted that redox exchange of the D2 allosteric disulfide plays an essential role in regulating CD4 activity, the biophysical consequences of its reduction remain incompletely understood. By analyzing the hydrodynamic volume, secondary structure, and thermal stability of the reduced and nonreduced forms of the single D1 and D2 domains, as well as the various redox isomers of two domain CD4, we have shown that ablation of the allosteric disulfide bond in domain 2 results in both a favorable structural collapse and an increase in the stability of CD4. Conversely, ablating the structural disulfide of D1 results in destabilizing structural rearrangements in CD4. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms by which oxidoreduction of the D2 allosteric disulfide regulates CD4 function; they reveal the intrinsic disulfide-dependent metastability of D2 and illustrate that redox shuffling of the allosteric disulfide results in previously undescribed conformational changes in CD4 that are likely important for its interaction with its protein partners.

  13. CB1 Receptor Allosteric Modulators Display Both Agonist and Signaling Pathway Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Gemma L.; Horswill, James G.; Anavi-Goffer, Sharon; Reggio, Patricia H.; Bolognini, Daniele; Abood, Mary E.; McAllister, Sean; Strange, Phillip G.; Stephens, Gary J.; Pertwee, Roger G.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified allosteric modulators of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (Org 27569, PSNCBAM-1) that display a contradictory pharmacological profile: increasing the specific binding of the CB1 receptor agonist [3H]CP55940 but producing a decrease in CB1 receptor agonist efficacy. Here we investigated the effect one or both compounds in a broad range of signaling endpoints linked to CB1 receptor activation. We assessed the effect of these compounds on CB1 receptor agonist–induced [35S]GTPγS binding, inhibition, and stimulation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and β-arrestin recruitment. We also investigated the effect of these allosteric modulators on CB1 agonist binding kinetics. Both compounds display ligand dependence, being significantly more potent as modulators of CP55940 signaling as compared with WIN55212 and having little effect on [3H]WIN55212 binding. Org 27569 displays biased antagonism whereby it inhibits: agonist-induced guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding, simulation (Gαs-mediated), and inhibition (Gαi-mediated) of cAMP production and β-arrestin recruitment. In contrast, it acts as an enhancer of agonist-induced ERK phosphorylation. Alone, the compound can act also as an allosteric agonist, increasing cAMP production and ERK phosphorylation. We find that in both saturation and kinetic-binding experiments, the Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1 appeared to influence only orthosteric ligand maximum occupancy rather than affinity. The data indicate that the allosteric modulators share a common mechanism whereby they increase available high-affinity CB1 agonist binding sites. The receptor conformation stabilized by the allosterics appears to induce signaling and also selectively traffics orthosteric agonist signaling via the ERK phosphorylation pathway. PMID:23160940

  14. Boronic acids as probes for investigation of allosteric modulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3.

    PubMed

    Bernat, Viachaslau; Admas, Tizita Haimanot; Brox, Regine; Heinemann, Frank W; Tschammer, Nuska

    2014-11-21

    The chemokine receptor CXCR3 is a G protein-coupled receptor, which conveys extracellular signals into cells by changing its conformation upon agonist binding. To facilitate the mechanistic understanding of allosteric modulation of CXCR3, we combined computational modeling with the synthesis of novel chemical tools containing boronic acid moiety, site-directed mutagenesis, and detailed functional characterization. The design of boronic acid derivatives was based on the predictions from homology modeling and docking. The choice of the boronic acid moiety was dictated by its unique ability to interact with proteins in a reversible covalent way, thereby influencing conformational dynamics of target biomolecules. During the synthesis of the library we have developed a novel approach for the purification of drug-like boronic acids. To validate the predicted binding mode and to identify amino acid residues responsible for the transduction of signal through CXCR3, we conducted a site-directed mutagenesis study. With the use of allosteric radioligand RAMX3 we were able to establish the existence of a second allosteric binding pocket in CXCR3, which enables different binding modes of structurally closely related allosteric modulators of CXCR3. We have also identified residues Trp109(2.60) and Lys300(7.35) inside the transmembrane bundle of the receptor as crucial for the regulation of the G protein activation. Furthermore, we report the boronic acid 14 as the first biased negative allosteric modulator of the receptor. Overall, our data demonstrate that boronic acid derivatives represent an outstanding tool for determination of key receptor-ligand interactions and induction of ligand-biased signaling.

  15. Allosteric and hyperekplexic mutant phenotypes investigated on an α1 glycine receptor transmembrane structure.

    PubMed

    Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Sauguet, Ludovic; Huon, Christèle; Malherbe, Laurie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Murail, Samuel; Taly, Antoine; Baaden, Marc; Delarue, Marc; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2015-03-03

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) mediating inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is the target of allosteric modulators such as general anesthetics and ethanol and is a major locus for hyperekplexic congenital mutations altering the allosteric transitions of activation or desensitization. We previously showed that the TMD of the human α1GlyR could be fused to the extracellular domain of GLIC, a bacterial pLGIC, to form a functional chimera called Lily. Here, we overexpress Lily in Schneider 2 insect cells and solve its structure by X-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. The TMD of the α1GlyR adopts a closed-channel conformation involving a single ring of hydrophobic residues at the center of the pore. Electrophysiological recordings show that the phenotypes of key allosteric mutations of the α1GlyR, scattered all along the pore, are qualitatively preserved in this chimera, including those that confer decreased sensitivity to agonists, constitutive activity, decreased activation kinetics, or increased desensitization kinetics. Combined structural and functional data indicate a pore-opening mechanism for the α1GlyR, suggesting a structural explanation for the effect of some key hyperekplexic allosteric mutations. The first X-ray structure of the TMD of the α1GlyR solved here using GLIC as a scaffold paves the way for mechanistic investigation and design of allosteric modulators of a human receptor.

  16. Toward Allosterically Increased Catalytic Activity of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme against Amyloid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kurochkin, Igor V; Guarnera, Enrico; Wong, Jin H; Eisenhaber, Frank; Berezovsky, Igor N

    2017-01-10

    The physiological role of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) in the intracytosolic clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) and other amyloid-like peptides supports a hypothesis that human IDE hyperactivation could be therapeutically beneficial for the treatment of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). The major challenge standing in the way of this goal is increasing the specific catalytic activity of IDE against the Aβ substrate. There were previous indications that the allosteric mode of IDE activity regulation could potentially provide a highly specific path toward degradation of amyloid-like peptides, while not dramatically affecting activity against other substrates. Recently developed theoretical concepts are used here to explore potential allosteric modulation of the IDE activity as a result of single-residue mutations. Five candidates are selected for experimental follow-up and allosteric free energy calculations: Ser137Ala, Lys396Ala, Asp426Ala, Phe807Ala, and Lys898Ala. Our experiments show that three mutations (Ser137Ala, Phe807Ala, and Lys898Ala) decrease the Km of the Aβ substrate. Mutation Lys898Ala results in increased catalytic activity of IDE; on the other hand, Lys364Ala does not change the activity and Asp426Ala diminishes it. Quantifying effects of mutations in terms of allosteric free energy, we show that favorable mutations lead to stabilization of the catalytic sites and other function-relevant distal sites as well as increased dynamics of the IDE-N and IDE-C halves that allow efficient substrate entrance and cleavage. A possibility for intramolecular upregulation of IDE activity against amyloid peptides via allosteric mutations calls for further investigations in this direction. Ultimately, we are hopeful it will lead to the development of IDE-based drugs for the treatment of the late-onset form of AD characterized by an overall impairment of Aβ clearance.

  17. Allosteric and hyperekplexic mutant phenotypes investigated on an α1 glycine receptor transmembrane structure

    PubMed Central

    Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Sauguet, Ludovic; Huon, Christèle; Malherbe, Laurie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Murail, Samuel; Taly, Antoine; Baaden, Marc; Delarue, Marc; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2015-01-01

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) mediating inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is the target of allosteric modulators such as general anesthetics and ethanol and is a major locus for hyperekplexic congenital mutations altering the allosteric transitions of activation or desensitization. We previously showed that the TMD of the human α1GlyR could be fused to the extracellular domain of GLIC, a bacterial pLGIC, to form a functional chimera called Lily. Here, we overexpress Lily in Schneider 2 insect cells and solve its structure by X-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. The TMD of the α1GlyR adopts a closed-channel conformation involving a single ring of hydrophobic residues at the center of the pore. Electrophysiological recordings show that the phenotypes of key allosteric mutations of the α1GlyR, scattered all along the pore, are qualitatively preserved in this chimera, including those that confer decreased sensitivity to agonists, constitutive activity, decreased activation kinetics, or increased desensitization kinetics. Combined structural and functional data indicate a pore-opening mechanism for the α1GlyR, suggesting a structural explanation for the effect of some key hyperekplexic allosteric mutations. The first X-ray structure of the TMD of the α1GlyR solved here using GLIC as a scaffold paves the way for mechanistic investigation and design of allosteric modulators of a human receptor. PMID:25730860

  18. In vitro binding of a radio-labeled positive allosteric modulator for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5.

    PubMed

    Zysk, John R; Spear, Nathan; Fieles, William; Stein, Mark M; Sygowski, Linda S; King, Megan M; Hoesch, Valerie; Hastings, Richard; Brockel, Becky; Do, Mylinh; Ström, Peter; Gadient, Reto; Chhajlani, Vijay; Elmore, Charles S; Maier, Donna L

    2013-03-01

    The positive allosteric modulator (PAM) binding site for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu(5)) lacks a readily available radio-labeled tracer fordetailed structure-activity studies. This communication describes a selective mGlu(5) compound, 7-methyl-2-(4-(pyridin-2-yloxy)benzyl)-5-(pyridin-3-yl)isoindolin-1-one (PBPyl) that binds with high affinity to human mGlu(5) and exhibits functional PAM activity. Analysis of PBPyl by FLIPR revealed an EC(50) of 87 nM with an 89% effect in transfected HEK293 cells and an EC(50) of 81 nM with a 42% effect in rat primary neurons. PBPyl exhibited 5-fold higher functional selectivity for mGlu(5) in a full mGlu receptor panel. Unlabeled PBPyl was tested for specific binding using a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS)-based filtration binding assay and exhibited 40% specific binding in recombinant membranes, a value higher than any candidate compound tested. In competition binding studies with [(3)H]MPEP, the mGlu(5) receptor negative allosteric modulator (NAM), PBPyl exhibited a k(i) value of 34 nM. PBPyl also displaced [(3)H]ABP688, a mGluR(5) receptor NAM, in tissue sections from mouse and rat brain using autoradiography. Areas of specific binding included the frontal cortex, striatum and nucleus accumbens. PBPyl was radiolabeled to a specific activity of 15 Ci/mmol and tested for specific binding in a filter plate format. In recombinant mGlu(5b) membranes, [(3)H] PBPyl exhibited saturable binding with a K(d) value of 18.6 nM. In competition binding experiments, [(3)H] PBPyl was displaced by high affinity mGlu(5) positive and negative modulators. Further tests showed that PBPyl displays less than optimal characteristics as an in vivo tool, including a high volume of distribution and ClogP, making it more suitable as an in vitro compound. However, as a first report of direct binding of an mGlu(5) receptor PAM, this study offers value toward the development of novel PET imaging agents for this important

  19. Repetition Blindness Occurs in Nonwords

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Catherine L.; Morris, Alison L.

    2004-01-01

    Theorists have predicted that repetition blindness (RB) should be absent for nonwords because they do not activate preexisting mental types. The authors hypothesized that RB would be observed for nonwords because RB can occur at a sublexical level. Four experiments showed that RB is observed for word-nonword pairs (noon noof), orthographically…

  20. Dissecting intrinsic and ligand-induced structural communication in the β3 headpiece of integrins.

    PubMed

    Felline, Angelo; Ghitti, Michela; Musco, Giovanna; Fanelli, Francesca

    2017-09-01

    Graph theory is widely used to dissect structural communication in biomolecular systems. Here, graph theory-based approaches were applied to the headpiece of integrins, adhesion cell-surface receptors that transmit signals across the plasma membranes. Protein Structure Network (PSN) analysis incorporating dynamic information either from molecular dynamics simulations or from Elastic Network Models was applied to the β3 domains from integrins αVβ3 and αIIbβ3 in their apo and ligand-bound states. Closed and open states of the β headpiece are characterized by distinct allosteric communication pathways involving highly conserved amino acids at the two different α/β interfaces in the βI domain, the closed state being prompted to the closed-to-open transition. In the closed state, pure antagonism is associated with the establishment of communication pathways that start from the ligand, pass through the β1/α3,α4 interface, and end up in the hybrid domain by involving the Y110-Q82 link, which is weakened in the agonist-bound states. Allosteric communication in integrins relies on highly conserved and functionally relevant amino acid residues. The αβα-sandwich architecture of integrin βI domain dictates the structural communication between ligand binding site and hybrid domain. Differently from agonists, pure antagonists are directly involved in allosteric communication pathways and exert long-distance strengthening of the βI/hybrid interface. Release of the structure network in the ligand binding site is associated with the close-to-open transition accompanying the activation process. The study strengthens the power of graph-based analyses to decipher allosteric communication intrinsic to protein folds and modified by functionally different ligands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  2. Communicative Competence vs. Communicative Cognizance: Jakobson's Model Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James W.

    1984-01-01

    Jakobson's communication model, grounded in semiotic theory, provides an excellent point of departure for developing specific pedagogical approaches to the constituent elements of all communicative acts, verbal or nonverbal. True communication occurs only when students and teachers are cognizant of the features and functions of communication as…

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation study of PTP1B with allosteric inhibitor and its application in receptor based pharmacophore modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Kwon, Yong Jung; Lee, Keun Woo

    2008-12-01

    Allosteric inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), has paved a new path to design specific inhibitors for PTP1B, which is an important drug target for the treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. The PTP1B1-282-allosteric inhibitor complex crystal structure lacks α7 (287-298) and moreover there is no available 3D structure of PTP1B1-298 in open form. As the interaction between α7 and α6-α3 helices plays a crucial role in allosteric inhibition, α7 was modeled to the PTP1B1-282 in open form complexed with an allosteric inhibitor (compound-2) and a 5 ns MD simulation was performed to investigate the relative orientation of the α7-α6-α3 helices. The simulation conformational space was statistically sampled by clustering analyses. This approach was helpful to reveal certain clues on PTP1B allosteric inhibition. The simulation was also utilized in the generation of receptor based pharmacophore models to include the conformational flexibility of the protein-inhibitor complex. Three cluster representative structures of the highly populated clusters were selected for pharmacophore model generation. The three pharmacophore models were subsequently utilized for screening databases to retrieve molecules containing the features that complement the allosteric site. The retrieved hits were filtered based on certain drug-like properties and molecular docking simulations were performed in two different conformations of protein. Thus, performing MD simulation with α7 to investigate the changes at the allosteric site, then developing receptor based pharmacophore models and finally docking the retrieved hits into two distinct conformations will be a reliable methodology in identifying PTP1B allosteric inhibitors.

  4. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal.

  5. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J.; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  6. Insight into the structural mechanism for PKBα allosteric inhibition by molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-Feng; Cao, Yang; Han, Shuang; Chen, Jian-Zhong

    2014-03-01

    Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) is an attractive target for the treatment of tumor. Unlike PKB's ATP-competitive inhibitors, its allosteric inhibitors can maintain PKB's inactive state via its binding in a pocket between PH domain and kinase domain, which specifically inhibit PKB by preventing the phosphorylations of Thr308 and Ser473. In the present studies, MD simulations were performed on three allosteric inhibitors with different inhibitory potencies (IC50) to investigate the interaction modes between the inhibitors and PKBα. MM/GB(PB)SA were further applied to calculate the binding free energies of these inhibitors binding to PKBα. The computed binding free energies were consistent with the ranking of their experimental bioactivities. The key residues of PKBα interacting with the allosteric inhibitor were further discussed by analyzing the different interaction modes of these three inhibitors binding to PKBα and by calculating binding free energy contributions of corresponding residues around the binding pocket. The structural requirements were then summarized for the allosteric inhibitor binding to PKBα. A possible structural mechanism of PKBα inhibition induced by the binding of allosteric inhibitor was formulated. The current studies indicate that there should be an optimum balance between the van der Waals and total electrostatic interactions for further designing of PKBα allosteric inhibitors.

  7. Allosteric transition and substrate binding are entropy-driven in glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Jaimes, I; Calcagno, M L

    2001-10-15

    Glucosamine-6P-deaminase (EC 3.5.99.6, formerly glucosamine-6-phosphate isomerase, EC 5.3.1.10) from Escherichia coli is an attractive experimental model for the study of allosteric transitions because it is both kinetically and structurally well-known, and follows rapid equilibrium random kinetics, so that the kinetic K(m) values are true thermodynamic equilibrium constants. The enzyme is a typical allosteric K-system activated by N-acetylglucosamine 6-P and displays an allosteric behavior that can be well described by the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model. This thermodynamic study based on the temperature dependence of allosteric parameters derived from this model shows that substrate binding and allosteric transition are both entropy-driven processes in E. coli GlcN6P deaminase. The analysis of this result in the light of the crystallographic structure of the enzyme implicates the active-site lid as the structural motif that could contribute significantly to this entropic component of the allosteric transition because of the remarkable change in its crystallographic B factors.

  8. Cholesterol-mediated allosteric regulation of the mitochondrial translocator protein structure.

    PubMed

    Jaipuria, Garima; Leonov, Andrei; Giller, Karin; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Jaremko, Łukasz; Jaremko, Mariusz; Linser, Rasmus; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2017-03-30

    Cholesterol is an important regulator of membrane protein function. However, the exact mechanisms involved in this process are still not fully understood. Here we study how the tertiary and quaternary structure of the mitochondrial translocator protein TSPO, which binds cholesterol with nanomolar affinity, is affected by this sterol. Residue-specific analysis of TSPO by solid-state NMR spectroscopy reveals a dynamic monomer-dimer equilibrium of TSPO in the membrane. Binding of cholesterol to TSPO's cholesterol-recognition motif leads to structural changes across the protein that shifts the dynamic equilibrium towards the translocator monomer. Consistent with an allosteric mechanism, a mutation within the oligomerization interface perturbs transmembrane regions located up to 35 Å away from the interface, reaching TSPO's cholesterol-binding motif. The lower structural stability of the intervening transmembrane regions provides a mechanistic basis for signal transmission. Our study thus reveals an allosteric signal pathway that connects membrane protein tertiary and quaternary structure with cholesterol binding.

  9. Computer Simulations of the Retinoid X Receptor: Conformational Dynamics and Allosteric Networks.

    PubMed

    van der Vaart, Arjan; Lorkowski, Alexander; Ma, Ning; Gray, Geoffrey M

    2017-01-01

    As the heterodimerization partner for a large number of nuclear receptors, the retinoid X receptor (RXR) is important for a large and diverse set of biochemical pathways. Activation and regulation of RXR heterodimers is achieved by complex allosteric mechanisms, which involve the binding of ligands, DNA, coactivators and corepressors, and entail large and subtle conformational motions. Complementing experiments, computer simulations have provided detailed insights into the origins of the allostery by investigating the changes in structure, motion, and interactions upon dimerization, ligand and cofactor binding. This review will summarize a number of simulation studies that have furthered the understanding of the conformational dynamics and the allosteric activation and control of RXR complexes. While the review focuses on the RXR and RXR heterodimers, relevant simulation studies of other nuclear receptors will be discussed as well.

  10. Allosteric ACTion: the varied ACT domains regulating enzymes of amino-acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lang, Eric J M; Cross, Penelope J; Mittelstädt, Gerd; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Parker, Emily J

    2014-12-01

    Allosteric regulation of enzyme activity plays important metabolic roles. Here we review the allostery of enzymes of amino-acid metabolism conferred by a discrete domain known as the ACT domain. This domain of 60-70 residues has a βαββαβ topology leading to a four-stranded β4β1β3β2 antiparallel sheet with two antiparallel helices on one face. Extensive sequence variation requires a combined sequence/structure/function analysis for identification of the ACT domain. Common features include highly varied modes of self-association of ACT domains, ligand binding at domain interfaces, and transmittal of allosteric signals through conformational changes and/or the manipulation of quaternary equilibria. A recent example illustrates the relatively facile adoption of this versatile module of allostery by gene fusion.

  11. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  12. Construction of Allosteric Protein Switches by Alternate Frame Folding and Intermolecular Fragment Exchange.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jeung-Hoi; Loh, Stewart N

    2017-01-01

    Alternate frame folding (AFF) and protein/fragment exchange (FREX) are related technologies for engineering allosteric conformational changes into proteins that have no pre-existing allosteric properties. One of their chief purposes is to turn an ordinary protein into a biomolecular switch capable of transforming an input event into an optical or functional readout. Here, we present a guide for converting an arbitrary binding protein into a fluorescent biosensor with Förster resonance energy transfer output. Because the AFF and FREX mechanisms are founded on general principles of protein structure and stability rather than a property that is idiosyncratic to the target protein, the basic design steps-choice of permutation/cleavage sites, molecular biology, and construct optimization-remain the same for any target protein. We highlight effective strategies as well as common pitfalls based on our experience with multiple AFF and FREX constructs.

  13. Furoates and thenoates inhibit pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 allosterically by binding to its pyruvate regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Masini, Tiziana; Birkaya, Barbara; van Dijk, Simon; Mondal, Milon; Hekelaar, Johan; Jäger, Manuel; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C; Patel, Mulchand S; Hirsch, Anna K H; Moman, Edelmiro

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the reawakening of cancer metabolism as a therapeutic target. In particular, inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) holds remarkable promise. Dichloroacetic acid (DCA), currently undergoing clinical trials, is a unique PDK inhibitor in which it binds to the allosteric pyruvate site of the enzyme. However, the safety of DCA as a drug is compromised by its neurotoxicity, whereas its usefulness as an investigative tool is limited by the high concentrations required to exert observable effects in cell culture. Herein, we report the identification - by making use of saturation-transfer difference NMR spectroscopy, enzymatic assays and computational methods - of furoate and thenoate derivatives as allosteric pyruvate-site-binding PDK2 inhibitors. This work substantiates the pyruvate regulatory pocket as a druggable target.

  14. Allosteric regulation of catalytic activity: Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase versus yeast chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedt, K; Krappmann, S; Braus, G H

    2001-09-01

    Allosteric regulation of key metabolic enzymes is a fascinating field to study the structure-function relationship of induced conformational changes of proteins. In this review we compare the principles of allosteric transitions of the complex classical model aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from Escherichia coli, consisting of 12 polypeptides, and the less complicated chorismate mutase derived from baker's yeast, which functions as a homodimer. Chorismate mutase presumably represents the minimal oligomerization state of a cooperative enzyme which still can be either activated or inhibited by different heterotropic effectors. Detailed knowledge of the number of possible quaternary states and a description of molecular triggers for conformational changes of model enzymes such as ATCase and chorismate mutase shed more and more light on allostery as an important regulatory mechanism of any living cell. The comparison of wild-type and engineered mutant enzymes reveals that current textbook models for regulation do not cover the entire picture needed to describe the function of these enzymes in detail.

  15. Development of a photoactivatable allosteric ligand for the m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Davie, Briana J; Sexton, Patrick M; Capuano, Ben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Scammells, Peter J

    2014-10-15

    The field of G protein-coupled receptor drug discovery has benefited greatly from the structural and functional insights afforded by photoactivatable ligands. One G protein-coupled receptor subfamily for which photoactivatable ligands have been developed is the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor family, though, to date, all such ligands have been designed to target the orthosteric (endogenous ligand) binding site of these receptors. Herein we report the synthesis and pharmacological investigation of a novel photoaffinity label, MIPS1455 (4), designed to bind irreversibly to an allosteric site of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor; a target of therapeutic interest for the treatment of cognitive deficits. MIPS1455 may be a valuable molecular tool for further investigating allosteric interactions at this receptor.

  16. Signaling within Allosteric Machines: Signal Transmission Pathways Inside G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Bartuzi, Damian; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Matosiuk, Dariusz

    2017-07-15

    In recent years, our understanding of function of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has changed from a picture of simple signal relays, transmitting only a particular signal to a particular G protein heterotrimer, to versatile machines, capable of various responses to different stimuli and being modulated by various factors. Some recent reports provide not only the data on ligands/modulators and resultant signals induced by them, but also deeper insights into exact pathways of signal migration and mechanisms of signal transmission through receptor structure. Combination of these computational and experimental data sheds more light on underlying mechanisms of signal transmission and signaling bias in GPCRs. In this review we focus on available clues on allosteric pathways responsible for complex signal processing within GPCRs structures, with particular emphasis on linking compatible in silico- and in vitro-derived data on the most probable allosteric connections.

  17. An ATP-competitive inhibitor modulates the allosteric function of the HER3 pseudokinase

    PubMed Central

    Littlefield, Peter; Moasser, Mark M.; Jura, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that lacks catalytic activity, but is essential for cellular homeostasis due to its ability to allosterically activate EGFR/HER2. Though catalytically inactive, HER3 binds ATP tightly, hinting at a possible role of the nucleotide-binding pocket in modulating HER3 function. We report a structure of the HER3 pseudokinase bound to the ATP-competitive inhibitor bosutinib. Previously solved structures show that bosutinib can potently interact with multiple kinase domain conformations. In complex with HER3, bosutinib binds to yet another conformation, which is nearly identical to that observed in the HER3/ATP complex. Interestingly, occupation of the ATP-binding site by bosutinib improves the ability of HER3 to act as an allosteric activator of EGFR in vitro by increasing the affinity of the HER3/EGFR heterodimer in a membrane-dependent manner. PMID:24656791

  18. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Thomas T.

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  19. Allosteric modulation by benzodiazepines of GABA-gated chloride channels of an identified insect motor neurone.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Steven D; Higashino, Yoshiaki; Sattelle, David B

    2009-11-01

    The actions of benzodiazepines were studied on the responses to GABA of the fast coxal depressor (D(f)) motor neurone of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Ro5-4864, diazepam and clonazepam were investigated. Responses to GABA receptors were enhanced by both Ro5-4864 and diazepam, whereas clonazepam, a potent-positive allosteric modulator of human GABA(A) receptors, was ineffective on the native insect GABA receptors of the D(f) motor neurone. Thus, clear pharmacological differences exist between insect and mammalian native GABA-gated chloride channels with respect to the actions of benzodiazepines. The results enhance our understanding of invertebrate GABA-gated chloride channels which have recently proved important in (a) comparative studies aimed at identifying human allosteric drug-binding sites and (b) understanding the actions of compounds used to control ectoparasites and insect crop pests.

  20. A phospho-BAD BH3 helix activates glucokinase by a mechanism distinct from that of allosteric activators

    PubMed Central

    Szlyk, Benjamin; Braun, Craig R.; Ljubicic, Sanda; Patton, Elaura; Bird, Gregory H.; Osundiji, Mayowa A.; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Walensky, Loren D.; Danial, Nika N.

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase is a glucose-phosphorylating enzyme that regulates insulin release and hepatic metabolism, and its loss-of-function is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Glucokinase activators (GKAs) are attractive therapeutics in diabetes, however, clinical data indicate that their benefits can be offset by hypoglycemia due to marked allosteric enhancement of the enzyme’s glucose affinity. We show that a phospho-mimetic of the BCL-2 homology 3 (BH3) alpha-helix derived from human BAD, a glucokinase binding partner, increases the enzyme catalytic rate without dramatically changing glucose affinity, providing a new mechanism for pharmacologic activation of glucokinase. Remarkably, BAD BH3 phospho-mimetic mediates these effects by engaging a novel region near the enzyme’s active site. This interaction increases insulin secretion in human islets and restores the function of naturally-occurring human glucokinase mutants at the active site. Thus, BAD phospho-mimetics may serve as a novel class of GKAs. PMID:24317490

  1. Mutant Analysis Reveals Allosteric Regulation of ClpB Disaggregase

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Kamila B.; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The members of the hexameric AAA+ disaggregase of E. coli and S. cerevisiae, ClpB, and Hsp104, cooperate with the Hsp70 chaperone system in the solubilization of aggregated proteins. Aggregate solubilization relies on a substrate threading activity of ClpB/Hsp104 fueled by ATP hydrolysis in both ATPase rings (AAA-1, AAA-2). ClpB/Hsp104 ATPase activity is controlled by the M-domains, which associate to the AAA-1 ring to downregulate ATP hydrolysis. Keeping M-domains displaced from the AAA-1 ring by association with Hsp70 increases ATPase activity due to enhanced communication between protomers. This communication involves conserved arginine fingers. The control of ClpB/Hsp104 activity is crucial, as hyperactive mutants with permanently dissociated M-domains exhibit cellular toxicity. Here, we analyzed AAA-1 inter-ring communication in relation to the M-domain mediated ATPase regulation, by subjecting a conserved residue of the AAA-1 domain subunit interface of ClpB (A328) to mutational analysis. While all A328X mutants have reduced disaggregation activities, their ATPase activities strongly differed. ClpB-A328I/L mutants have reduced ATPase activity and when combined with the hyperactive ClpB-K476C M-domain mutation, suppress cellular toxicity. This underlines that ClpB ATPase activation by M-domain dissociation relies on increased subunit communication. The ClpB-A328V mutant in contrast has very high ATPase activity and exhibits cellular toxicity on its own, qualifying it as novel hyperactive ClpB mutant. ClpB-A328V hyperactivity is however, different from that of M-domain mutants as M-domains stay associated with the AAA-1 ring. The high ATPase activity of ClpB-A328V primarily relies on the AAA-2 ring and correlates with distinct conformational changes in the AAA-2 catalytic site. These findings characterize the subunit interface residue A328 as crucial regulatory element to control ATP hydrolysis in both AAA rings. PMID:28275610

  2. Mutant Analysis Reveals Allosteric Regulation of ClpB Disaggregase.

    PubMed

    Franke, Kamila B; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The members of the hexameric AAA+ disaggregase of E. coli and S. cerevisiae, ClpB, and Hsp104, cooperate with the Hsp70 chaperone system in the solubilization of aggregated proteins. Aggregate solubilization relies on a substrate threading activity of ClpB/Hsp104 fueled by ATP hydrolysis in both ATPase rings (AAA-1, AAA-2). ClpB/Hsp104 ATPase activity is controlled by the M-domains, which associate to the AAA-1 ring to downregulate ATP hydrolysis. Keeping M-domains displaced from the AAA-1 ring by association with Hsp70 increases ATPase activity due to enhanced communication between protomers. This communication involves conserved arginine fingers. The control of ClpB/Hsp104 activity is crucial, as hyperactive mutants with permanently dissociated M-domains exhibit cellular toxicity. Here, we analyzed AAA-1 inter-ring communication in relation to the M-domain mediated ATPase regulation, by subjecting a conserved residue of the AAA-1 domain subunit interface of ClpB (A328) to mutational analysis. While all A328X mutants have reduced disaggregation activities, their ATPase activities strongly differed. ClpB-A328I/L mutants have reduced ATPase activity and when combined with the hyperactive ClpB-K476C M-domain mutation, suppress cellular toxicity. This underlines that ClpB ATPase activation by M-domain dissociation relies on increased subunit communication. The ClpB-A328V mutant in contrast has very high ATPase activity and exhibits cellular toxicity on its own, qualifying it as novel hyperactive ClpB mutant. ClpB-A328V hyperactivity is however, different from that of M-domain mutants as M-domains stay associated with the AAA-1 ring. The high ATPase activity of ClpB-A328V primarily relies on the AAA-2 ring and correlates with distinct conformational changes in the AAA-2 catalytic site. These findings characterize the subunit interface residue A328 as crucial regulatory element to control ATP hydrolysis in both AAA rings.

  3. Oxygen binding and its allosteric control in hemoglobin of the primitive branchiopod crustacean Triops cancriformis.

    PubMed

    Pirow, Ralph; Hellmann, Nadja; Weber, Roy E

    2007-07-01

    Branchiopod crustaceans are endowed with extracellular, high-molecular-mass hemoglobins (Hbs), the functional and allosteric properties of which have largely remained obscure. The Hb of the phylogenetically ancient Triops cancriformis (Notostraca) revealed moderate oxygen affinity, cooperativity and pH dependence (Bohr effect) coefficients: P(50) = 13.3 mmHg, n(50) = 2.3, and Phi = -0.18, at 20 degrees C and pH 7.44 in Tris buffer. The in vivo hemolymph pH was 7.52. Bivalent cations increased oxygen affinity, Mg(2+) exerting a greater effect than Ca(2+). Analysis of cooperative oxygen binding in terms of the nested Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model revealed an allosteric unit of four oxygen-binding sites and functional coupling of two to three allosteric units. The predicted 2 x 4 and 3 x 4 nested structures are in accord with stoichiometric models of the quarternary structure. The allosteric control mechanism of protons comprises a left shift of the upper asymptote of extended Hill plots which is ascribable to the displacement of the equilibrium between (at least) two high-affinity (relaxed) states, similar to that found in extracellular annelid and pulmonate molluscan Hbs. Remarkably, Mg(2+) ions increased oxygen affinity solely by displacing the equilibrium between the tense and relaxed conformations towards the relaxed states, which accords with the original MWC concept, but appears to be unique among Hbs. This effect is distinctly different from those of ionic effectors (bivalent cations, protons and organic phosphates) on annelid, pulmonate and vertebrate Hbs, which involve changes in the oxygen affinity of the tense and/or relaxed conformations.

  4. Overcoming EGFR T790M and C797S resistance with mutant-selective allosteric inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yong; Yun, Cai-Hong; Park, Eunyoung; Ercan, Dalia; Manuia, Mari; Juarez, Jose; Xu, Chunxiao; Rhee, Kevin; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Haikuo; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Jang, Jaebong; Lelais, Gerald; DiDonato, Michael; Bursulaya, Badry; Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Epple, Robert; Marsilje, Thomas H.; McNeill, Matthew; Lu, Wenshuo; Harris, Jennifer; Bender, Steven; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Jänne, Pasi A.; Eck, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib are approved treatments for non-small cell lung cancers harboring activating mutations in the EGFR kinase1,2, but resistance arises rapidly, most frequently due to the secondary T790M mutation within the ATP-site of the receptor.3,4 Recently developed mutant-selective irreversible inhibitors are highly active against the T790M mutant5,6, but their efficacy can be compromised by acquired mutation of C797, the cysteine residue with which they form a key covalent bond7. All current EGFR TKIs target the ATP-site of the kinase, highlighting the need for therapeutic agents with alternate mechanisms of action. Here we describe rational discovery of EAI045, an allosteric inhibitor that targets selected drug-resistant EGFR mutants but spares the wild type receptor. A crystal structure shows that the compound binds an allosteric site created by the displacement of the regulatory C-helix in an inactive conformation of the kinase. The compound inhibits L858R/T790M-mutant EGFR with low-nanomolar potency in biochemical assays, but as a single agent is not effective in blocking EGFR-driven proliferation in cells due to differential potency on the two subunits of the dimeric receptor, which interact in an asymmetric manner in the active state8. We observe dramatic synergy of EAI045 with cetuximab, an antibody therapeutic that blocks EGFR dimerization9,10, rendering the kinase uniformly susceptible to the allosteric agent. EAI045 in combination with cetuximab is effective in mouse models of lung cancer driven by L858R/T790M EGFR and by L858R/T790M/C797S EGFR, a mutant that is resistant to all currently available EGFR TKIs. More generally, our findings illustrate the utility of purposefully targeting allosteric sites to obtain mutant-selective inhibitors. PMID:27251290

  5. Identifying Cytochrome P450 Functional Networks and Their Allosteric Regulatory Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-03

    Adx is a small iron - sulfur protein that transfers electrons from NADPH to terminal CYP as part of the overall metabolic processing of substrates. We...needed to create a systematic approach that allows us to identify putative allosteric sites. Here, we present combined co-evolutionary analysis and...isoform. The cysteine residue, which connects to iron , is conserved among the isoforms, implying that the catalytic function is co- evolved and similar for

  6. Allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors elicits anti-seizure activities

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lin; Chen, Yanke; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Guanghui; Friedman, Eitan; Zhang, Ao; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Application of orthosteric sigma-1 receptor agonists as anti-seizure drugs has been hindered by questionable efficacy and potential adverse effects. Here, we have investigated the anti-seizure effects of the novel and potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptors, SKF83959 and its derivative SOMCL-668 (3-methyl-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-benzo[d]azepin-7-ol). Experimental Approach The anti-seizure effects of SKF83959 were investigated in three mouse models, maximal electroshock seizures, pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions and kainic acid-induced ‘status epilepticus’. Also, in rats, the cortical epileptiform activity induced by topical application of picrotoxin was recorded in electrocorticograms. In rat hippocampal brain slices, effects of the drugs on the high potassium-evoked epileptiform local field potentials were studied. Anti-seizure activities of SOMCL-668, a newly developed sigma-1 receptor selective allosteric modulator, were also investigated. Key Results SKF83959 (20, 40 mg·kg−1) exhibited anti –seizure actitity in the three mouse models and reduced the cortical epileptiform activity without alteration of spontaneous motor activity and motor coordination. These effects were blocked by the sigma-1 receptor antagonist BD1047, but not the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390. SKF83959 alone did not directly inhibit the epileptiform firing of CA3 neurons induced by high potassium in hippocampal slices, but did potentiate inhibition by the orthosteric sigma-1 receptor agonist SKF10047. Lastly, a selective sigma-1 receptor allosteric modulator SOMCL-668, which does not bind to dopamine receptors, exerted similar anti-seizure activities. Conclusions and Implications SKF83959 and SOMCL-668 displayed anti-seizure activities, indicating that allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors may provide a novel approach for discovering new anti-seizure drugs. PMID:25989224

  7. Potentiation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Young, Gareth T; Zwart, Ruud; Walker, Alison S; Sher, Emanuele; Millar, Neil S

    2008-09-23

    Positive allosteric modulators of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have attracted considerable interest as potential tools for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, despite the potential therapeutic usefulness of these compounds, little is known about their mechanism of action. Here, we have examined two allosteric potentiators of alpha7 nAChRs (PNU-120596 and LY-2087101). From studies with a series of subunit chimeras, we have identified the transmembrane regions of alpha7 as being critical in facilitating potentiation of agonist-evoked responses. Furthermore, we have identified five transmembrane amino acids that, when mutated, significantly reduce potentiation of alpha7 nAChRs. The amino acids we have identified are located within the alpha-helical transmembrane domains TM1 (S222 and A225), TM2 (M253), and TM4 (F455 and C459). Mutation of either A225 or M253 individually have particularly profound effects, reducing potentiation of EC(20) concentrations of acetylcholine to a tenth of the level seen with wild-type alpha7. Reference to homology models of the alpha7 nAChR, based on the 4A structure of the Torpedo nAChR, indicates that the side chains of all five amino acids point toward an intrasubunit cavity located between the four alpha-helical transmembrane domains. Computer docking simulations predict that the allosteric compounds such as PNU-120596 and LY-2087101 may bind within this intrasubunit cavity, much as neurosteroids and volatile anesthetics are thought to interact with GABA(A) and glycine receptors. Our findings suggest that this is a conserved modulatory allosteric site within neurotransmitter-gated ion channels.

  8. Allosteric “beta-blocker” isolated from a DNA-encoded small molecule library

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seungkirl; Kahsai, Alem W.; Pani, Biswaranjan; Wang, Qin-Ting; Zhao, Shuai; Wall, Alissa L.; Strachan, Ryan T.; Staus, Dean P.; Wingler, Laura M.; Sun, Lillian D.; Sinnaeve, Justine; Choi, Minjung; Cho, Ted; Xu, Thomas T.; Hansen, Gwenn M.; Burnett, Michael B.; Lamerdin, Jane E.; Bassoni, Daniel L.; Gavino, Bryant J.; Husemoen, Gitte; Olsen, Eva K.; Franch, Thomas; Costanzi, Stefano; Chen, Xin; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) has been a model system for understanding regulatory mechanisms of G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) actions and plays a significant role in cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. Because all known β-adrenergic receptor drugs target the orthosteric binding site of the receptor, we set out to isolate allosteric ligands for this receptor by panning DNA-encoded small-molecule libraries comprising 190 million distinct compounds against purified human β2AR. Here, we report the discovery of a small-molecule negative allosteric modulator (antagonist), compound 15 [([4-((2S)-3-(((S)-3-(3-bromophenyl)-1-(methylamino)-1-oxopropan-2-yl)amino)-2-(2-cyclohexyl-2-phenylacetamido)-3-oxopropyl)benzamide], exhibiting a unique chemotype and low micromolar affinity for the β2AR. Binding of 15 to the receptor cooperatively enhances orthosteric inverse agonist binding while negatively modulating binding of orthosteric agonists. Studies with a specific antibody that binds to an intracellular region of the β2AR suggest that 15 binds in proximity to the G-protein binding site on the cytosolic surface of the β2AR. In cell-signaling studies, 15 inhibits cAMP production through the β2AR, but not that mediated by other Gs-coupled receptors. Compound 15 also similarly inhibits β-arrestin recruitment to the activated β2AR. This study presents an allosteric small-molecule ligand for the β2AR and introduces a broadly applicable method for screening DNA-encoded small-molecule libraries against purified GPCR targets. Importantly, such an approach could facilitate the discovery of GPCR drugs with tailored allosteric effects. PMID:28130548

  9. An allosteric modulator to control endogenous G protein-coupled receptors with light.

    PubMed

    Pittolo, Silvia; Gómez-Santacana, Xavier; Eckelt, Kay; Rovira, Xavier; Dalton, James; Goudet, Cyril; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Llobet, Artur; Giraldo, Jesús; Llebaria, Amadeu; Gorostiza, Pau

    2014-10-01

    Controlling drug activity with light offers the possibility of enhancing pharmacological selectivity with spatial and temporal regulation, thus enabling highly localized therapeutic effects and precise dosing patterns. Here we report on the development and characterization of what is to our knowledge the first photoswitchable allosteric modulator of a G protein-coupled receptor. Alloswitch-1 is selective for the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu5 and enables the optical control of endogenous mGlu5 receptors.

  10. Allosteric inhibitors of hepatitis C polymerase: discovery of potent and orally bioavailable carbon-linked dihydropyrones.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Linton, Angelica; Tatlock, John; Gonzalez, Javier; Borchardt, Allen; Abreo, Mel; Jewell, Tanya; Patel, Leena; Drowns, Matthew; Ludlum, Sarah; Goble, Mike; Yang, Michele; Blazel, Julie; Rahavendran, Ravi; Skor, Heather; Shi, Stephanie; Lewis, Cristina; Fuhrman, Shella

    2007-08-23

    The discovery and optimization of a novel class of carbon-linked dihydropyrones as allosteric HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors are presented. Replacement of the sulfur linker atom with carbon reduced compound acidity and greatly increased cell permeation. Further structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies led to the identification of compounds, exemplified by 23 and 24, with significantly improved antiviral activities in the cell-based replicon assay and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles.

  11. A triazole-bearing picket fence type nickel porphyrin as a cyanide selective allosteric host.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyeong-Im; Yoon, Hongsik; Jang, Woo-Dong

    2015-05-01

    A triazole-bearing picket fence type nickel porphyrin (1) has been synthesized as a host compound for anion binding. Among the various anionic species examined, cyanide was the only one that affected a spectral change of 1. Moreover, 1 exhibited strong homotropic positive allosterism against cyanide binding due to an electronic effect as well as multiple hydrogen bonds formed between cyanide and the triazole groups.

  12. Internalization of the chemokine receptor CCR4 can be evoked by orthosteric and allosteric receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ajram, Laura; Begg, Malcolm; Slack, Robert; Cryan, Jenni; Hall, David; Hodgson, Simon; Ford, Alison; Barnes, Ashley; Swieboda, Dawid; Mousnier, Aurelie; Solari, Roberto

    2014-04-15

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 has at least two natural agonist ligands, MDC (CCL22) and TARC (CCL17) which bind to the same orthosteric site with a similar affinity. Both ligands are known to evoke chemotaxis of CCR4-bearing T cells and also elicit CCR4 receptor internalization. A series of small molecule allosteric antagonists have been described which displace the agonist ligand, and inhibit chemotaxis. The aim of this study was to determine which cellular coupling pathways are involved in internalization, and if antagonists binding to the CCR4 receptor could themselves evoke receptor internalization. CCL22 binding coupled CCR4 efficiently to β-arrestin and stimulated GTPγS binding however CCL17 did not couple to β-arrestin and only partially stimulated GTPγS binding. CCL22 potently induced internalization of almost all cell surface CCR4, while CCL17 showed only weak effects. We describe four small molecule antagonists that were demonstrated to bind to two distinct allosteric sites on the CCR4 receptor, and while both classes inhibited agonist ligand binding and chemotaxis, one of the allosteric sites also evoked receptor internalization. Furthermore, we also characterize an N-terminally truncated version of CCL22 which acts as a competitive antagonist at the orthosteric site, and surprisingly also evokes receptor internalization without demonstrating any agonist activity. Collectively this study demonstrates that orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of the CCR4 receptor are capable of evoking receptor internalization, providing a novel strategy for drug discovery against this class of target.

  13. Positive allosteric modulators for mGluR2 receptors: a medicinal chemistry perspective.

    PubMed

    Szabó, György; Keserű, György Miklós

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes drug discovery efforts on mGluR2 positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) from 2000 to 2013. Medicinal chemistry programs and the identified 21 chemotypes are analyzed and compared in terms of their biological activity and ligand efficiency. Comparative analysis of ligand efficiency metrics including ligand efficiency and lipophilic ligand efficiency allowed us to identify the most promising chemotypes. The perspective of their clinical development was evaluated in the light of recent human data.

  14. Allosteric mechanisms within the adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Sergi; Bonaventura, Jordi; Tomasi, Dardo; Navarro, Gemma; Moreno, Estefanía; Cortés, Antonio; Lluís, Carme; Casadó, Vicent; Volkow, Nora D

    2016-05-01

    The structure constituted by a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) homodimer and a G protein provides a main functional unit and oligomeric entities can be viewed as multiples of dimers. For GPCR heteromers, experimental evidence supports a tetrameric structure, comprised of two different homodimers, each able to signal with its preferred G protein. GPCR homomers and heteromers can act as the conduit of allosteric interactions between orthosteric ligands. The well-known agonist/agonist allosteric interaction in the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromer, by which A2AR agonists decrease the affinity of D2R agonists, gave the first rationale for the use of A2AR antagonists in Parkinson's disease. We review new pharmacological findings that can be explained in the frame of a tetrameric structure of the A2AR-D2R heteromer: first, ligand-independent allosteric modulations by the D2R that result in changes of the binding properties of A2AR ligands; second, differential modulation of the intrinsic efficacy of D2R ligands for G protein-dependent and independent signaling; third, the canonical antagonistic Gs-Gi interaction within the frame of the heteromer; and fourth, the ability of A2AR antagonists, including caffeine, to also exert the same allosteric modulations of D2R ligands than A2AR agonists, while A2AR agonists and antagonists counteract each other's effects. These findings can have important clinical implications when evaluating the use of A2AR antagonists. They also call for the need of monitoring caffeine intake when evaluating the effect of D2R ligands, when used as therapeutic agents in neuropsychiatric disorders or as probes in imaging studies. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Sparse networks of directly coupled, polymorphic, and functional side chains in allosteric proteins.

    PubMed

    Soltan Ghoraie, Laleh; Burkowski, Forbes; Zhu, Mu

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the role of coupled side-chain fluctuations alone in the allosteric behavior of proteins. Moreover, examination of X-ray crystallography data has recently revealed new information about the prevalence of alternate side-chain conformations (conformational polymorphism), and attempts have been made to uncover the hidden alternate conformations from X-ray data. Hence, new computational approaches are required that consider the polymorphic nature of the side chains, and incorporate the effects of this phenomenon in the study of information transmission and functional interactions of residues in a molecule. These studies can provide a more accurate understanding of the allosteric behavior. In this article, we first present a novel approach to generate an ensemble of conformations and an efficient computational method to extract direct couplings of side chains in allosteric proteins, and provide sparse network representations of the couplings. We take the side-chain conformational polymorphism into account, and show that by studying the intrinsic dynamics of an inactive structure, we are able to construct a network of functionally crucial residues. Second, we show that the proposed method is capable of providing a magnified view of the coupled and conformationally polymorphic residues. This model reveals couplings between the alternate conformations of a coupled residue pair. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first computational method for extracting networks of side chains' alternate conformations. Such networks help in providing a detailed image of side-chain dynamics in functionally important and conformationally polymorphic sites, such as binding and/or allosteric sites. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Allosteric "beta-blocker" isolated from a DNA-encoded small molecule library.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seungkirl; Kahsai, Alem W; Pani, Biswaranjan; Wang, Qin-Ting; Zhao, Shuai; Wall, Alissa L; Strachan, Ryan T; Staus, Dean P; Wingler, Laura M; Sun, Lillian D; Sinnaeve, Justine; Choi, Minjung; Cho, Ted; Xu, Thomas T; Hansen, Gwenn M; Burnett, Michael B; Lamerdin, Jane E; Bassoni, Daniel L; Gavino, Bryant J; Husemoen, Gitte; Olsen, Eva K; Franch, Thomas; Costanzi, Stefano; Chen, Xin; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2017-02-14

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) has been a model system for understanding regulatory mechanisms of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) actions and plays a significant role in cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. Because all known β-adrenergic receptor drugs target the orthosteric binding site of the receptor, we set out to isolate allosteric ligands for this receptor by panning DNA-encoded small-molecule libraries comprising 190 million distinct compounds against purified human β2AR. Here, we report the discovery of a small-molecule negative allosteric modulator (antagonist), compound 15 [([4-((2S)-3-(((S)-3-(3-bromophenyl)-1-(methylamino)-1-oxopropan-2-yl)amino)-2-(2-cyclohexyl-2-phenylacetamido)-3-oxopropyl)benzamide], exhibiting a unique chemotype and low micromolar affinity for the β2AR. Binding of 15 to the receptor cooperatively enhances orthosteric inverse agonist binding while negatively modulating binding of orthosteric agonists. Studies with a specific antibody that binds to an intracellular region of the β2AR suggest that 15 binds in proximity to the G-protein binding site on the cytosolic surface of the β2AR. In cell-signaling studies, 15 inhibits cAMP production through the β2AR, but not that mediated by other Gs-coupled receptors. Compound 15 also similarly inhibits β-arrestin recruitment to the activated β2AR. This study presents an allosteric small-molecule ligand for the β2AR and introduces a broadly applicable method for screening DNA-encoded small-molecule libraries against purified GPCR targets. Importantly, such an approach could facilitate the discovery of GPCR drugs with tailored allosteric effects.

  17. Selective activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor achieved by allosteric potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei; Seager, Matthew A.; Wittmann, Marion; Jacobson, Marlene; Bickel, Denise; Burno, Maryann; Jones, Keith; Graufelds, Valerie Kuzmick; Xu, Guangping; Pearson, Michelle; McCampbell, Alexander; Gaspar, Renee; Shughrue, Paul; Danziger, Andrew; Regan, Christopher; Flick, Rose; Pascarella, Danette; Garson, Susan; Doran, Scott; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Veng, Lone; Lindsley, Craig W.; Shipe, William; Kuduk, Scott; Sur, Cyrille; Kinney, Gene; Seabrook, Guy R.; Ray, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The forebrain cholinergic system promotes higher brain function in part by signaling through the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). During Alzheimer's disease (AD), these cholinergic neurons degenerate, therefore selectively activating M1 receptors could improve cognitive function in these patients while avoiding unwanted peripheral responses associated with non-selective muscarinic agonists. We describe here benzyl quinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA), a highly selective allosteric potentiator of the M1 mAChR. BQCA reduces the concentration of ACh required to activate M1 up to 129-fold with an inflection point value of 845 nM. No potentiation, agonism, or antagonism activity on other mAChRs is observed up to 100 μM. Furthermore studies in M1−/− mice demonstrates that BQCA requires M1 to promote inositol phosphate turnover in primary neurons and to increase c-fos and arc RNA expression and ERK phosphorylation in the brain. Radioligand-binding assays, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicate that BQCA acts at an allosteric site involving residues Y179 and W400. BQCA reverses scopolamine-induced memory deficits in contextual fear conditioning, increases blood flow to the cerebral cortex, and increases wakefulness while reducing delta sleep. In contrast to M1 allosteric agonists, which do not improve memory in scopolamine-challenged mice in contextual fear conditioning, BQCA induces β-arrestin recruitment to M1, suggesting a role for this signal transduction mechanism in the cholinergic modulation of memory. In summary, BQCA exploits an allosteric potentiation mechanism to provide selectivity for the M1 receptor and represents a promising therapeutic strategy for cognitive disorders. PMID:19717450

  18. Analysis of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor subtypes using isosteric and allosteric ligands.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    The GABAA receptors (GABAARs) play an important role in inhibitory transmission in the brain. The GABAARs could be identified using a medicinal chemistry approach to characterize with a series of chemical structural analogues, some identified in nature, some synthesized, to control the structural conformational rigidity/flexibility so as to define the 'receptor-specific' GABA agonist ligand structure. In addition to the isosteric site ligands, these ligand-gated chloride ion channel proteins exhibited modulation by several chemotypes of allosteric ligands, that help define structure and function. The channel blocker picrotoxin identified a noncompetitive channel blocker site in GABAARs. This ligand site is located in the transmembrane channel pore, whereas the GABA agonist site is in the extracellular domain at subunit interfaces, a site useful for low energy coupled conformational changes of the functional channel domain. Also in the trans-membrane domain are allosteric modulatory ligand sites, mostly positive, for diverse chemotypes with general anesthetic efficacy, namely, the volatile and intravenous agents: barbiturates, etomidate, propofol, long-chain alcohols, and neurosteroids. The last are apparent endogenous positive allosteric modulators of GABAARs. These binding sites depend on the GABAAR heteropentameric subunit composition, i.e., subtypes. Two classes of pharmacologically very important allosteric modulatory ligand binding site reside in the extracellular domain at modified agonist sites at other subunit interfaces: the benzodiazepine site, and the low-dose ethanol site. The benzodiazepine site is specific for certain subunit combination subtypes, mainly synaptically localized. In contrast, the low-dose (high affinity) ethanol site(s) is found at a modified benzodiazepine site on different, extrasynaptic, subtypes.

  19. Allosteric ligands and their binding sites define γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) mediate rapid inhibitory transmission in the brain. GABA(A)Rs are ligand-gated chloride ion channel proteins and exist in about a dozen or more heteropentameric subtypes exhibiting variable age and brain regional localization and thus participation in differing brain functions and diseases. GABA(A)Rs are also subject to modulation by several chemotypes of allosteric ligands that help define structure and function, including subtype definition. The channel blocker picrotoxin identified a noncompetitive channel blocker site in GABA(A)Rs. This ligand site is located in the transmembrane channel pore, whereas the GABA agonist site is in the extracellular domain at subunit interfaces, a site useful for low energy coupled conformational changes of the functional channel domain. Two classes of pharmacologically important allosteric modulatory ligand binding sites reside in the extracellular domain at modified agonist sites at other subunit interfaces: the benzodiazepine site and the high-affinity, relevant to intoxication, ethanol site. The benzodiazepine site is specific for certain GABA(A)R subtypes, mainly synaptic, while the ethanol site is found at a modified benzodiazepine site on different, extrasynaptic, subtypes. In the transmembrane domain are allosteric modulatory ligand sites for diverse chemotypes of general anesthetics: the volatile and intravenous agents, barbiturates, etomidate, propofol, long-chain alcohols, and neurosteroids. The last are endogenous positive allosteric modulators. X-ray crystal structures of prokaryotic and invertebrate pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, and the mammalian GABA(A)R protein, allow homology modeling of GABA(A)R subtypes with the various ligand sites located to suggest the structure and function of these proteins and their pharmacological modulation. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Discovery and Development of Small Molecule Allosteric Modulators of Glycoprotein Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nataraja, Selvaraj G.; Yu, Henry N.; Palmer, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Glycoprotein hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) are heterodimeric proteins with a common α-subunit and hormone-specific β-subunit. These hormones are dominant regulators of reproduction and metabolic processes. Receptors for the glycoprotein hormones belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. FSH receptor (FSHR) and LH receptor are primarily expressed in somatic cells in ovary and testis to promote egg and sperm production in women and men, respectively. TSH receptor is expressed in thyroid cells and regulates the secretion of T3 and T4. Glycoprotein hormones bind to the large extracellular domain of the receptor and cause a conformational change in the receptor that leads to activation of more than one intracellular signaling pathway. Several small molecules have been described to activate/inhibit glycoprotein hormone receptors through allosteric sites of the receptor. Small molecule allosteric modulators have the potential to be administered orally to patients, thus improving the convenience of treatment. It has been a challenge to develop a small molecule allosteric agonist for glycoprotein hormones that can mimic the agonistic effects of the large natural ligand to activate similar signaling pathways. However, in the past few years, there have been several promising reports describing distinct chemical series with improved potency in preclinical models. In parallel, proposal of new structural model for FSHR and in silico docking studies of small molecule ligands to glycoprotein hormone receptors provide a giant leap on the understanding of the mechanism of action of the natural ligands and new chemical entities on the receptors. This review will focus on the current status of small molecule allosteric modulators of glycoprotein hormone receptors, their effects on common signaling pathways in cells, their utility for clinical application as demonstrated in preclinical models

  1. Evidence for an active T-state pig kidney fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase: interface residue Lys-42 is important for allosteric inhibition and AMP cooperativity.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, G.; Stec, B.; Giroux, E. L.; Kantrowitz, E. R.

    1996-01-01

    During the R-->T transition in the tetrameric pig kidney fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (Fru-1,6-P2ase, EC 3.1.3.11) a major change in the quaternary structure of the enzyme occurs that is induced by the binding of the allosteric inhibitor AMP (Ke HM, Liang JY, Zhang Y, Lipscomb WN, 1991, Biochemistry 30:4412-4420). The change in quaternary structure involving the rotation of the upper dimer by 17 degrees relative to the lower dimer is coupled to a series of structural changes on the secondary and tertiary levels. The structural data indicate that Lys-42 is involved in a complex set of intersubunit interactions across the dimer-dimer interface with residues of the 190's loop, a loop located at the pivot of the allosteric rotation. In order to test the function of Lys-42, we have replaced it with alanine using site-specific mutagenesis. The kcat and K(m) values for Lys-42-->Ala Fru-1,6-P2ase were 11 s-1 and 3.3 microM, respectively, resulting in a mutant enzyme that was slightly less efficient catalytically than the normal pig kidney enzyme. Although the Lys-42-->Ala Fru-1,6-P2ase was similar kinetically in terms of K(m) and kcat, the response to inhibition by AMP was significantly different than that of the normal pig kidney enzyme. Not only was AMP inhibition no longer cooperative, but also it occurred in two stages, corresponding to high- and low-affinity binding sites. Saturation of the high-affinity sites only reduced the activity by 30%, compared to 100% for the wild-type enzyme. In order to determine in what structural state the enzyme was after saturation of the high-affinity sites, the Lys-42-->Ala enzyme was crystallized in the presence of Mn2+, fructose-6-phosphate (Fru-6-P), and 100 microM AMP and the data collected to 2.3 A resolution. The X-ray structure showed the T state with AMP binding with full occupancy to the four regulatory sites and the inhibitor Fru-6-P bound at the active sites. The results reported here suggest that, in the normal pig kidney

  2. Behavior change communication strategies.

    PubMed

    Aggleton, P

    1997-04-01

    Appropriate and effective communication is central to the success of interventions to reduce the risk of HIV infection. This paper reviews what has been learned about the nature of communication in the behavior change process. It examines the contexts in which communication occurs, as well as the contribution of communication theory, social marketing theory, and structural intervention theory to intervention development. Guidance is offered on the most appropriate ways in which to communicate with different groups and audiences, and future priorities for research and intervention are identified.

  3. The N-terminal Domain Allosterically Regulates Cleavage and Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Pradeep; Buchner, Ginka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Dang, Yan L.; He, Hong; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Kubelka, Jan; Gentzsch, Martina; Stutts, M. Jackson; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is activated upon endoproteolytic cleavage of specific segments in the extracellular domains of the α- and γ-subunits. Cleavage is accomplished by intracellular proteases prior to membrane insertion and by surface-expressed or extracellular soluble proteases once ENaC resides at the cell surface. These cleavage events are partially regulated by intracellular signaling through an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here, using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, we show that the intracellular N terminus of γ-ENaC undergoes secondary structural transitions upon interaction with phosphoinositides. From ab initio folding simulations of the N termini in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), we found that PIP2 increases α-helical propensity in the N terminus of γ-ENaC. Electrophysiology and mutation experiments revealed that a highly conserved cluster of lysines in the γ-ENaC N terminus regulates accessibility of extracellular cleavage sites in γ-ENaC. We also show that conditions that decrease PIP2 or enhance ubiquitination sharply limit access of the γ-ENaC extracellular domain to proteases. Further, the efficiency of allosteric control of ENaC proteolysis is dependent on Tyr370 in γ-ENaC. Our findings provide an allosteric mechanism for ENaC activation regulated by the N termini and sheds light on a potential general mechanism of channel and receptor activation. PMID:24973914

  4. The structure of brain glycogen phosphorylase-from allosteric regulation mechanisms to clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cécile; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues Lima, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is the key enzyme that regulates glycogen mobilization in cells. GP is a complex allosteric enzyme that comprises a family of three isozymes: muscle GP (mGP), liver GP (lGP), and brain GP (bGP). Although the three isozymes display high similarity and catalyze the same reaction, they differ in their sensitivity to the allosteric activator adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Moreover, inactivating mutations in mGP and lGP have been known to be associated with glycogen storage diseases (McArdle and Hers disease, respectively). The determination, decades ago, of the structure of mGP and lGP have allowed to better understand the allosteric regulation of these two isoforms and the development of specific inhibitors. Despite its important role in brain glycogen metabolism, the structure of the brain GP had remained elusive. Here, we provide an overview of the human brain GP structure and its relationship with the two other members of this key family of the metabolic enzymes. We also summarize how this structure provides valuable information to understand the regulation of bGP and to design specific ligands of potential pharmacological interest. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Discovery of Allosteric and Selective Inhibitors of Inorganic Pyrophosphatase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Allan H; Garzan, Atefeh; Larsen, Martha J; McQuade, Thomas J; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2016-11-18

    Inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPiase) is an essential enzyme that hydrolyzes inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), driving numerous metabolic processes. We report a discovery of an allosteric inhibitor (2,4-bis(aziridin-1-yl)-6-(1-phenylpyrrol-2-yl)-s-triazine) of bacterial PPiases. Analogues of this lead compound were synthesized to target specifically Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) PPiase (MtPPiase). The best analogue (compound 16) with a Ki of 11 μM for MtPPiase is a species-specific inhibitor. Crystal structures of MtPPiase in complex with the lead compound and one of its analogues (compound 6) demonstrate that the inhibitors bind in a nonconserved interface between monomers of the hexameric MtPPiase in a yet unprecedented pairwise manner, while the remote conserved active site of the enzyme is occupied by a bound PPi substrate. Consistent with the structural studies, the kinetic analysis of the most potent inhibitor has indicated that it functions uncompetitively, by binding to the enzyme-substrate complex. The inhibitors appear to allosterically lock the active site in a closed state causing its dysfunctionalization and blocking the hydrolysis. These inhibitors are the first examples of allosteric, species-selective inhibitors of PPiases, serving as a proof-of-principle that PPiases can be selectively targeted.

  6. Negative allosteric modulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors blocks nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryan F; Hogenkamp, Derk J; Li, Wen Y; Tran, Minhtam B; Belluzzi, James D; Whittemore, Edward R; Leslie, Frances M; Gee, Kelvin W

    2007-12-01

    Drugs that antagonize nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) can be used to inhibit nicotine-induced behavior in both humans and animals. The aim of our experiments is to establish a proof-of-principle that antagonism of nAChRs by negative allosteric modulation can alter behavior in a relevant animal model of addiction, nicotine self-administration. We have identified a novel, negative allosteric modulator of nAChRs, UCI-30002 [N-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthyl)-4-nitroaniline], with selectivity for the major neuronal nAChR subtypes over muscle-type nAChRs. After systemic administration, UCI-30002 significantly reduces nicotine self-administration in rats on both fixed ratio and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement. The minimum effective dose that significantly alters nicotine self-administration corresponds to brain concentrations of UCI-30002 that produce at least 30% inhibition of the major neuronal nAChR subtypes measured in vitro. UCI-30002 has no effect on responding for food reinforcement in rats on either type of schedule, indicating that there is no effect on general responding or natural reward. UCI-30002 represents validation of the concept that negative allosteric modulators may have significant benefits as a strategy for treating nicotine addiction and encourages the development of subtype-selective modulators.

  7. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site

    PubMed Central

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T.; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  8. Development of Photoactivatable Allosteric Modul