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Sample records for allosteric mtor inhibitors

  1. mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, plays key roles in cell growth and proliferation, acting at the catalytic subunit of two protein kinase complexes: mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2). mTORC1 signaling is switched on by several oncogenic signaling pathways and is accordingly hyperactive in the majority of cancers. Inhibiting mTORC1 signaling has therefore attracted great attention as an anti-cancer therapy. However, progress in using inhibitors of mTOR signaling as therapeutic agents in oncology has been limited by a number of factors, including the fact that the classic mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits only some of the effects of mTOR; the existence of several feedback loops; and the crucial importance of mTOR in normal physiology. PMID:27635236

  2. mTOR Inhibitors Alone and in Combination with JAK2 Inhibitors Effectively Inhibit Cells of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Serena; Tozzi, Lorenzo; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bosi, Alberto; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dysregulated signaling of the JAK/STAT pathway is a common feature of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), usually associated with JAK2V617F mutation. Recent clinical trials with JAK2 inhibitors showed significant improvements in splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms in patients with myelofibrosis but meaningful molecular responses were not documented. Accordingly, there remains a need for exploring new treatment strategies of MPN. A potential additional target for treatment is represented by the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway that has been found constitutively activated in MPN cells; proof-of-evidence of efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 has been obtained recently in a Phase I/II trial in patients with myelofibrosis. The aim of the study was to characterize the effects in vitro of mTOR inhibitors, used alone and in combination with JAK2 inhibitors, against MPN cells. Findings Mouse and human JAK2V617F mutated cell lines and primary hematopoietic progenitors from MPN patients were challenged with an allosteric (RAD001) and an ATP-competitive (PP242) mTOR inhibitor and two JAK2 inhibitors (AZD1480 and ruxolitinib). mTOR inhibitors effectively reduced proliferation and colony formation of cell lines through a slowed cell division mediated by changes in cell cycle transition to the S-phase. mTOR inhibitors also impaired the proliferation and prevented colony formation from MPN hematopoietic progenitors at doses significantly lower than healthy controls. JAK2 inhibitors produced similar antiproliferative effects in MPN cell lines and primary cells but were more potent inducers of apoptosis, as also supported by differential effects on cyclinD1, PIM1 and BcLxL expression levels. Co-treatment of mTOR inhibitor with JAK2 inhibitor resulted in synergistic activity against the proliferation of JAK2V617F mutated cell lines and significantly reduced erythropoietin-independent colony growth in patients with polycythemia vera

  3. Discovery – Targeted Treatments and mTOR Inhibitors

    Cancer.gov

    Thanks to discovering the anticancer effects of mTOR inhibitors, cancer treatment for pNet, a rare type of pancreatic cancer, were revolutionized. Through clinical trials, NCI continues to investigate the life-saving potential of mTOR inhibitors.

  4. Differentiating the mTOR inhibitors everolimus and sirolimus in the treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    MacKeigan, Jeffrey P; Krueger, Darcy A

    2015-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic autosomal dominant disorder characterized by benign tumor-like lesions, called hamartomas, in multiple organ systems, including the brain, skin, heart, kidneys, and lung. These hamartomas cause a diverse set of clinical problems based on their location and often result in epilepsy, learning difficulties, and behavioral problems. TSC is caused by mutations within the TSC1 or TSC2 genes that inactivate the genes' tumor-suppressive function and drive hamartomatous cell growth. In normal cells, TSC1 and TSC2 integrate growth signals and nutrient inputs to downregulate signaling to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionarily conserved serine-threonine kinase that controls cell growth and cell survival. The molecular connection between TSC and mTOR led to the clinical use of allosteric mTOR inhibitors (sirolimus and everolimus) for the treatment of TSC. Everolimus is approved for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas in patients with TSC. Sirolimus, though not approved for TSC, has undergone considerable investigation to treat various aspects of the disease. Everolimus and sirolimus selectively inhibit mTOR signaling with similar molecular mechanisms, but with distinct clinical profiles. This review differentiates mTOR inhibitors in TSC while describing the molecular mechanisms, pathogenic mutations, and clinical trial outcomes for managing TSC.

  5. CC-223, a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of mTOR Kinase: In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Deborah S; Fultz, Kimberly E; Xu, Shuichan; Xu, Weiming; Packard, Garrick; Khambatta, Godrej; Gamez, James C; Leisten, Jim; Zhao, Jingjing; Apuy, Julius; Ghoreishi, Kamran; Hickman, Matt; Narla, Rama Krishna; Bissonette, Rene; Richardson, Samantha; Peng, Sophie X; Perrin-Ninkovic, Sophie; Tran, Tam; Shi, Tao; Yang, Wen Qing; Tong, Zeen; Cathers, Brian E; Moghaddam, Mehran F; Canan, Stacie S; Worland, Peter; Sankar, Sabita; Raymon, Heather K

    2015-06-01

    mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, metabolism, proliferation, and survival. mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex-2 (mTORC2) are critical mediators of the PI3K-AKT pathway, which is frequently mutated in many cancers, leading to hyperactivation of mTOR signaling. Although rapamycin analogues, allosteric inhibitors that target only the mTORC1 complex, have shown some clinical activity, it is hypothesized that mTOR kinase inhibitors, blocking both mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling, will have expanded therapeutic potential. Here, we describe the preclinical characterization of CC-223. CC-223 is a potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of mTOR kinase, demonstrating inhibition of mTORC1 (pS6RP and p4EBP1) and mTORC2 [pAKT(S473)] in cellular systems. Growth inhibitory activity was demonstrated in hematologic and solid tumor cell lines. mTOR kinase inhibition in cells, by CC-223, resulted in more complete inhibition of the mTOR pathway biomarkers and improved antiproliferative activity as compared with rapamycin. Growth inhibitory activity and apoptosis was demonstrated in a panel of hematologic cancer cell lines. Correlative analysis revealed that IRF4 expression level associates with resistance, whereas mTOR pathway activation seems to associate with sensitivity. Treatment with CC-223 afforded in vivo tumor biomarker inhibition in tumor-bearing mice, after a single oral dose. CC-223 exhibited dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition in multiple solid tumor xenografts. Significant inhibition of mTOR pathway markers pS6RP and pAKT in CC-223-treated tumors suggests that the observed antitumor activity of CC-223 was mediated through inhibition of both mTORC1 and mTORC2. CC-223 is currently in phase I clinical trials.

  6. mTOR inhibitors block Kaposi sarcoma growth by inhibiting essential autocrine growth factors and tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Debasmita; Sin, Sang-Hoon; Lucas, Amy; Venkataramanan, Raman; Wang, Ling; Eason, Anthony; Chavakula, Veenadhari; Hilton, Isaac B; Tamburro, Kristen M; Damania, Blossom; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2013-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma originates from endothelial cells and it is one of the most overt angiogenic tumors. In Sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV and the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are endemic, Kaposi sarcoma is the most common cancer overall, but model systems for disease study are insufficient. Here, we report the development of a novel mouse model of Kaposi sarcoma, where KSHV is retained stably and tumors are elicited rapidly. Tumor growth was sensitive to specific allosteric inhibitors (rapamycin, CCI-779, and RAD001) of the pivotal cell growth regulator mTOR. Inhibition of tumor growth was durable up to 130 days and reversible. mTOR blockade reduced VEGF secretion and formation of tumor vasculature. Together, the results show that mTOR inhibitors exert a direct anti-Kaposi sarcoma effect by inhibiting angiogenesis and paracrine effectors, suggesting their application as a new treatment modality for Kaposi sarcoma and other cancers of endothelial origin.

  7. Role of mTOR Inhibitors in Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kajiwara, Moto; Masuda, Satohiro

    2016-01-01

    The first compound that inhibited the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), sirolimus (rapamycin) was discovered in the 1970s as a soil bacterium metabolite collected on Easter Island (Rapa Nui). Because sirolimus showed antiproliferative activity, researchers investigated its molecular target and identified the TOR1 and TOR2. The mTOR consists of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2. Rapalogues including sirolimus, everolimus, and temsirolimus exert their effect mainly on mTORC1, whereas their inhibitory effect on mTORC2 is mild. To obtain compounds with more potent antiproliferative effects, ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR targeting both mTORC1 and mTORC2 have been developed and tested in clinical trials as anticancer drugs. Currently, mTOR inhibitors are used as anticancer drugs against several solid tumors, and immunosuppressive agents for transplantation of various organs. This review discusses the role of mTOR inhibitors in renal disease with a particular focus on renal cancer, diabetic nephropathy, and kidney transplantation. PMID:27338360

  8. mTOR inhibitor for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a central role in the regulation of cellular growth, proliferation, and survival via a cytoplasmic serine/threonine kinase. mTOR also works as a nutrition sensor to monitor cellular metabolism. mTOR is located downstream in the PI3K/Akt pathway, in which Akt and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1/2 are involved, to form a signal transduction pathway. New anticancer agents that target mTOR in the PI3K/Akt pathway of the signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation control have recently been developed and are already commercially available. A phase III clinical trial of mTOR inhibitor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is now ongoing worldwide to expand indications. RAD001 is a signal-transduction inhibitor (STI) that targets mTOR (more specifically, mTORC1). mTORC1 signaling is intricately regulated by mitogens, growth factors, energy, and nutrients. mTORC1 is a regulator essential for general protein synthesis, located downstream of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which is dysregulated in most human cancers. Inhibiting mTOR with molecules, such as RAD001, generates additive effects that accompany upstream and downstream target inhibition; alternatively, upstream receptor inhibition is compensated for by inhibiting the downstream pathway, even if some resistance develops against receptor inhibition regardless of initial or acquired resistance. In conclusion, RAD001 is a potential targeted agent for HCC and therefore final results of a phase III study are awaited.

  9. mTOR kinase inhibitors promote antibody class switching via mTORC2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Limon, Jose J; So, Lomon; Jellbauer, Stefan; Chiu, Honyin; Corado, Juana; Sykes, Stephen M; Raffatellu, Manuela; Fruman, David A

    2014-11-25

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a kinase that functions in two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. In peripheral B cells, complete deletion of mTOR suppresses germinal center B-cell responses, including class switching and somatic hypermutation. The allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin blocks proliferation and differentiation, but lower doses can promote protective IgM responses. To elucidate the complexity of mTOR signaling in B cells further, we used ATP-competitive mTOR kinase inhibitors (TOR-KIs), which inhibit both mTORC1 and mTORC2. Although TOR-KIs are in clinical development for cancer, their effects on mature lymphocytes are largely unknown. We show that high concentrations of TOR-KIs suppress B-cell proliferation and differentiation, yet lower concentrations that preserve proliferation increase the fraction of B cells undergoing class switching in vitro. Transient treatment of mice with the TOR-KI compound AZD8055 increased titers of class-switched high-affinity antibodies to a hapten-protein conjugate. Mechanistic investigation identified opposing roles for mTORC1 and mTORC2 in B-cell differentiation and showed that TOR-KIs enhance class switching in a manner dependent on forkhead box, subgroup O (FoxO) transcription factors. These observations emphasize the distinct actions of TOR-KIs compared with rapamycin and suggest that TOR-KIs might be useful to enhance production of class-switched antibodies following vaccination.

  10. mTOR inhibitors in urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Leite, R; Arantes-Rodrigues, R; Sousa, Nuno; Oliveira, P A; Santos, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite the great scientific advances that have been made in cancer treatment, there is still much to do, particularly with regard to urinary bladder cancer. Some of the drugs used in urinary bladder cancer treatment have been in use for more than 30 years and show reduced effectiveness and high recurrence rates. There have been several attempts to find new and more effective drugs, to be used alone or in combination with the drugs already in use, in order to overcome this situation.The biologically important mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is altered in cancer and mTOR inhibitors have raised many expectations as potentially important anticancer drugs. In this article, the authors will review the mTOR pathway and present their experiences of the use of some mTOR inhibitors, sirolimus, everolimus and temsirolimus, in isolation and in conjunction with non-mTOR inhibitors cisplatin and gemcitabine, on urinary bladder tumour cell lines. The non-muscle-invasive cell line, 5637, is the only one that exhibits a small alteration in the mTOR and AKT phosphorylation after rapalogs exposure. Also, there was a small inhibition of cell proliferation. With gemcitabine plus everolimus or temsirolimus, the results were encouraging as a more effective response was noticed with both combinations, especially in the 5637 and T24 cell lines. Cisplatin associated with everolimus or temsirolimus also gave promising results, as an antiproliferative effect was observed when the drugs were associated, in particular on the 5637 and HT1376 cell lines. Everolimus or temsirolimus in conjunction with gemcitabine or cisplatin could have an important role to play in urinary bladder cancer treatment, depending on the tumour grading.

  11. Rational Design of Potent, Small, Synthetic Allosteric Inhibitors of Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Preetpal Singh; Liang, Aiye; Mehta, Akul Y.; Abdel Aziz, May H.; Zhou, Qibing; Desai, Umesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Thrombin is a key enzyme targeted by the majority of current anticoagulants that are direct inhibitors. Allosteric inhibition of thrombin may offer a major advantage of finely tuned regulation. We present here sulfated benzofurans as the first examples of potent, small allosteric inhibitors of thrombin. A sulfated benzofuran library of 15 sulfated monomers and 13 sulfated dimers with different charged, polar and hydrophobic substituents was studied in this work. Synthesis of the sulfated benzofurans was achieved through a multiple step, highly branched strategy, which culminated with microwave-assisted chemical sulfation. Of the 28 potential inhibitors, eleven exhibited reasonable inhibition of human α-thrombin at pH 7.4. Structure activity relationship analysis indicated that sulfation at the 5-position of the benzofuran scaffold was essential for targeting thrombin. A t-butyl 5-sulfated benzofuran derivative was found to be the most potent thrombin inhibitor with an IC50 of 7.3 μM under physiologically relevant conditions. Michaelis-Menten studies showed an allosteric inhibition phenomenon. Plasma clotting assays indicate that the sulfated benzofurans prolong both the activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time. Overall, this work puts forward sulfated benzofurans as the first small, synthetic molecules as powerful lead compounds for the design of a new class of allosteric inhibitors of thrombin. PMID:21714536

  12. Benzofuran derivatives as anticancer inhibitors of mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Salomé, Christophe; Ribeiro, Nigel; Chavagnan, Thierry; Thuaud, Frédéric; Serova, Maria; de Gramont, Armand; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; Désaubry, Laurent

    2014-06-23

    A series of 32 derivatives and isosteres of the mTOR inhibitor 2 were synthesized and compared for their cytotoxicity in radioresistant SQ20B cancer cell line. Several of these compounds, in particular 30b, were significantly more cytotoxic than 2. Importantly, 30b was shown to block both mTORC1 and Akt signaling, suggesting insensitivity to the resistance associated to Akt overactivation observed with rapamycin derivatives currently used in clinic.

  13. mTOR inhibitors in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Shaveta; Carlson, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/mTOR) pathway is commonly dysregulated in breast cancer. In preclinical studies, hyperactivation of the PI3K pathway has been linked to resistance to both endocrine therapy and trastuzumab (Herceptin). Rapalogs, agents that primarily inhibit mTOR-raptor complex 1, have been studied in combination with endocrine therapy to overcome endocrine resistance.Trials of combination endocrine therapy and rapalogs in metastatic hormone receptor-positive breast cancer have demonstrated variable results. However, two independent trials have recently shown that combination everolimus (Afinitor) and tamoxifen or combination everolimus and exemestane (Aromasin) is more effective than either endocrine agent alone. These trials selected patients with cancer refractory to endocrine therapy, which may be important in sensitizing tumors to inhibition of this pathway. In human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer, the early clinical data with combinations of PI3K/mTOR inhibitors and anti-HER2 therapies are encouraging. Efforts to identify clinical biomarkers of response or resistance to mTOR inhibitors are ongoing. This review will summarize results of preclinical and clinical studies aswell as ongoing clinical trials with mTOR or dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors.

  14. A novel allosteric inhibitor of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF).

    PubMed

    Bai, Fengwei; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Cirillo, Pier; Ciustea, Mihai; Ledizet, Michel; Aristoff, Paul A; Leng, Lin; Koski, Raymond A; Powell, Thomas J; Bucala, Richard; Anthony, Karen G

    2012-08-31

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a catalytic cytokine and an upstream mediator of the inflammatory pathway. MIF has broad regulatory properties, dysregulation of which has been implicated in the pathology of multiple immunological diseases. Inhibition of MIF activity with small molecules has proven beneficial in a number of disease models. Known small molecule MIF inhibitors typically bind in the tautomerase site of the MIF trimer, often covalently modifying the catalytic proline. Allosteric MIF inhibitors, particularly those that associate with the protein by noncovalent interactions, could reveal novel ways to block MIF activity for therapeutic benefit and serve as chemical probes to elucidate the structural basis for the diverse regulatory properties of MIF. In this study, we report the identification and functional characterization of a novel allosteric MIF inhibitor. Identified from a high throughput screening effort, this sulfonated azo compound termed p425 strongly inhibited the ability of MIF to tautomerize 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate. Furthermore, p425 blocked the interaction of MIF with its receptor, CD74, and interfered with the pro-inflammatory activities of the cytokine. Structural studies revealed a unique mode of binding for p425, with a single molecule of the inhibitor occupying the interface of two MIF trimers. The inhibitor binds MIF mainly on the protein surface through hydrophobic interactions that are stabilized by hydrogen bonding with four highly specific residues from three different monomers. The mode of p425 binding reveals a unique way to block the activity of the cytokine for potential therapeutic benefit in MIF-associated diseases.

  15. Discovery and Characterization of Allosteric WNK Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ken; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Xie, Xiaoling; Reinhardt, Juergen; Xie, Amy Qiongshu; LaSala, Daniel; Kohls, Darcy; Yowe, David; Burdick, Debra; Yoshisue, Hajime; Wakai, Hiromichi; Schmidt, Isabel; Gunawan, Jason; Yasoshima, Kayo; Yue, Q Kimberley; Kato, Mitsunori; Mogi, Muneto; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Kreder, Natasha; Drueckes, Peter; Pandey, Pramod; Kawanami, Toshio; Huang, Waanjeng; Yagi, Yukiko I; Deng, Zhan; Park, Hyi-Man

    2016-12-16

    Protein kinases are known for their highly conserved adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding site, rendering the discovery of selective inhibitors a major challenge. In theory, allosteric inhibitors can achieve high selectivity by targeting less conserved regions of the kinases, often with an added benefit of retaining efficacy under high physiological ATP concentration. Although often overlooked in favor of ATP-site directed approaches, performing a screen at high ATP concentration or stringent hit triaging with high ATP concentration offers conceptually simple methods of identifying inhibitors that bind outside the ATP pocket. Here, we applied the latter approach to the With-No-Lysine (K) (WNK) kinases to discover lead molecules for a next-generation antihypertensive that requires a stringent safety profile. This strategy yielded several ATP noncompetitive WNK1-4 kinase inhibitors, the optimization of which enabled cocrystallization with WNK1, revealing an allosteric binding mode consistent with the observed exquisite specificity for WNK1-4 kinases. The optimized compound inhibited rubidium uptake by sodium chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) in HT29 cells, consistent with the reported physiology of WNK kinases in renal electrolyte handling.

  16. Multimodal mechanism of action of allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Kellie Ann; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is required for lentivirus replication and is a proven drug target for the prevention of AIDS in HIV-1 infected patients. While clinical strand transfer inhibitors disarm the IN active site, allosteric inhibition of enzyme activity through the disruption of IN-IN protein interfaces holds great therapeutic potential. A promising class of allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs), 2-(quinolin-3-yl) acetic acid derivatives, engage the IN catalytic core domain dimerization interface at the binding site for the host integration co-factor LEDGF/p75. ALLINIs promote IN multimerization and, independent of LEDGF/p75 protein, block the formation of the active IN-DNA complex, as well as inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction in vitro. Yet, rather unexpectedly, the full inhibitory effect of these compounds is exerted during the late phase of HIV-1 replication. ALLINIs impair particle core maturation as well as reverse transcription and integration during the subsequent round of virus infection. Recapitulating the pleiotropic phenotypes observed with numerous IN mutant viruses, ALLINIs provide insight into underlying aspects of IN biology that extend beyond its catalytic activity. Therefore, in addition to the potential to expand our repertoire of HIV-1 antiretrovirals, ALLINIs afford important structural probes to dissect the multifaceted nature of the IN protein throughout the course of HIV-1 replication. PMID:24274067

  17. Allosteric Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the AKT Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafave, D. S.

    This research addresses computational design of small druglike molecules for possible anticancer applications. AKT and SGK are kinases that control important cellular functions. They are highly homologous, having similar activators and targets. Cancers with increased SGK activity may develop resistance to AKT-specific inhibitors. Our goal was to design new molecules that would bind both AKT and SGK, thus preventing the development of drug resistance. Most kinase inhibitors target the kinase ATP-binding site. However, the high similarity in this site among kinases makes it difficult to target specifically. Furthermore, mutations in this site can cause resistance to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. We used existing AKT inhibitors as initial templates to design molecules that could potentially bind the allosteric sites of both AKT and SGK. Molecules with no implicit toxicities and optimal drug-like properties were used for docking studies. Binding energies of the stable complexes that the designed molecules formed with AKT and SGK were calculated. Possible applications of the designed putative inhibitors against cancers with overexpressed AKT/SGK is discussed.

  18. Characterization of pomiferin triacetate as a novel mTOR and translation inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bajer, Magdalena M.; Kunze, Michael M.; Blees, Johanna S.; Bokesch, Heidi R.; Chen, Hanyong; Brauß, Thilo F.; Dong, Zigang; Gustafson, Kirk R.; Biondi, Ricardo M.; Henrich, Curtis J.; McMahon, James B.; Colburn, Nancy H.; Schmid, Tobias; Brüne, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K) pathway is commonly observed in many tumors. This pathway controls proliferation, survival, and translation, and its overactivation is associated with poor prognosis for tumor-associated survival. Current efforts focus on the development of novel inhibitors of this pathway. In a cell-based high-throughput screening assay of 15 272 pure natural compounds, we identified pomiferin triacetate as a potent stabilizer of the tumor suppressor programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4). Mechanistically, pomiferin triacetate appeared as a general inhibitor of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR-p70S6K cascade. Interference with this pathway occurred downstream of Akt but upstream of p70S6K. Specifically, mTOR kinase emerged as the molecular target of pomiferin triacetate, with similar activities against mTOR complexes 1 and 2. In an in vitro mTOR kinase assay pomiferin triacetate dose-dependently inhibited mTOR with an IC50 of 6.2 µM. Molecular docking studies supported the interaction of the inhibitor with the catalytic site of mTOR. Importantly, pomiferin triacetate appeared to be highly selective for mTOR compared to a panel of 17 lipid and 50 protein kinases tested. As a consequence of the mTOR inhibition, pomiferin triacetate efficiently attenuated translation. In summary, pomiferin triacetate emerged as a novel and highly specific mTOR inhibitor with strong translation inhibitory effects. Thus, it might be an interesting lead structure for the development of mTOR- and translation-targeted anti-tumor therapies. PMID:24513322

  19. Potential impact of mTOR inhibitors on cervical squamous cell carcinoma: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Assad, Daniele Xavier; Elias, Silvia Taveira; Melo, Andréia Cristina; Ferreira, Carlos Gil; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present systematic review was to analyze the potential impact of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors on the treatment of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, PMC, Scopus, Cochrane Library, LILACS, Web of Science, Google Scholar and ScienceDirect on January 19, 2015, without time and language restrictions. Studies that evaluated women of any age with CSCC and who received mTOR inhibitors alone or in association with other treatments were considered. Randomized and non-randomized clinical trials were included, and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist was followed. Selected studies were methodologically appraised according to the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation method to assess the quality of evidence. Of 642 identified citations, 43 studies were fully reviewed; however, only 3 studies met the inclusion criteria and were used for qualitative analysis. Of these, two studies were phase 1 and one was a phase 2 clinical trial. The studies included were not conclusive with regard to the association between mTOR inhibitor treatment and cervical cancer. The main analysis of secondary endpoints revealed that individuals treated with other drugs in association with mTOR inhibitors achieved partial responses (15.4–33.3%) or stable disease (17.6–28%). Treatment with mTOR inhibitors in general was well tolerated in patients with metastatic disease. The predominant toxicities were grade 1 and 2. The phase 1 trials included in this review demonstrated that mTOR inhibitor treatments are feasible and safe. However, the currently available evidence is insufficient to determine the effect of mTOR inhibitors on CSCC, and further investigation in high-quality, randomized clinical trials is required. PMID:27895779

  20. Allosteric Inhibitors Have Distinct Effects, but Also Common Modes of Action, in the HCV Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brittny C.; Brown, Jodian A.; Thorpe, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from the Hepatitis C Virus (gene product NS5B) is a validated drug target because of its critical role in genome replication. There are at least four distinct allosteric sites on the polymerase to which several small molecule inhibitors bind. In addition, numerous crystal structures have been solved with different allosteric inhibitors bound to the polymerase. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these small molecules inhibit the enzyme have not been fully elucidated. There is evidence that allosteric inhibitors alter the intrinsic motions and distribution of conformations sampled by the enzyme. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to understand the structural and dynamic changes that result when inhibitors are bound at three different allosteric binding sites on the enzyme. We observe that ligand binding at each site alters the structure and dynamics of NS5B in a distinct manner. Nonetheless, our studies also highlight commonalities in the mechanisms of action of the different inhibitors. Each inhibitor alters the conformational states sampled by the enzyme, either by rigidifying the enzyme and preventing transitions between functional conformational states or by destabilizing the enzyme and preventing functionally relevant conformations from being adequately sampled. By illuminating the molecular mechanisms of allosteric inhibition, these studies delineate the intrinsic functional properties of the enzyme and pave the way for designing novel and more effective polymerase inhibitors. This information may also be important to understand how allosteric regulation occurs in related viral polymerases and other enzymes. PMID:25863069

  1. Potential therapeutic effects of the MTOR inhibitors for preventing ageing and progeria‐related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Camilla; Cenni, Vittoria

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is an highly conserved signal transduction axis involved in many cellular processes, such as cell growth, survival, transcription, translation, apoptosis, metabolism, motility and autophagy. Recently, this signalling pathway has come to the attention of the scientific community owing to the unexpected finding that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin, an antibiotic with immunosuppressant and chemotherapeutic properties, extends lifespan in diverse animal models. Moreover, rapamycin has been reported to rescue the cellular phenotype in a progeroid syndrome [Hutchinson–Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS)] that recapitulates most of the traits of physiological ageing. The promising perspectives raised by these results warrant a better understanding of mTOR signalling and the potential applications of mTOR inhibitors to counteract ageing‐associated diseases and increase longevity. This review is focused on these issues. PMID:26952863

  2. Prolonged autophagy by MTOR inhibitor leads radioresistant cancer cells into senescence.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hae Yun; Han, Myung Woul; Chang, Hyo Won; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Seong Who

    2013-10-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the well-established therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment. However, the emergence of cells refractory to radiation is a major obstacle to successful treatment with radiotherapy. Many reports suggest that inhibitors targeting the mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) can sensitize cancer cells to the effect of radiation, although by which mechanism MTOR inhibitors enhance the efficacy of radiation toward cancer cells remains to be elucidated. Our studies indicate that a potent and persistent activation of autophagy via inhibition of the MTOR pathway, even in cancer cells where autophagy is occurring, can trigger premature senescence, cellular proliferation arrest. Combined treatment of MTOR inhibitor and radiation induce heterochromatin formation, an irreversible growth arrest and an increase of senescence-associated GLB1 (β-galactosidase) activity, which appear to result from a constant activation of TP53 and a restoration in the activity of retinoblastoma 1 protein (RB1)-E2F1. Thus, this study provides evidence that promoting cellular senescence via inhibition of the MTOR pathway may serve as an avenue to augment radiosensitivity in cancer cells that initiate an autophagy-survival mode to radiotherapy.

  3. Characterization of Torin2, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR, ATM and ATR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingsong; Xu, Chunxiao; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Zhang, Xin; Hur, Wooyoung; Liu, Yan; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas P.; Wang, Jinhua; Westover, Kenneth D.; Gao, Peng; Ercan, Dalia; Niepel, Mario; Thoreen, Carson C.; Kang, Seong A.; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Wang, Yuchuan; Tupper, Tanya; Altabef, Abigail; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D.; Chou, Danny M.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Janne, Pasi A.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2013-01-01

    mTOR is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase that serves as a central regulator of cell growth, survival and autophagy. Deregulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway occurs commonly in cancer and numerous inhibitors targeting the ATP-binding site of these kinases are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. Here we report the characterization of Torin2, a second generation ATP-competitive inhibitor that is potent and selective for mTOR with a superior pharmacokinetic profile to previous inhibitors. Torin2 inhibited mTORC1-dependent T389 phosphorylation on S6K (RPS6KB1) with an EC50 of 250 pM with approximately 800-fold selectivity for cellular mTOR versus PI3K. Torin2 also exhibited potent biochemical and cellular activity against PIKK family kinases including ATM (EC50 28 nM), ATR (EC50 35 nM) and DNA-PK (EC50 118 nM) (PRKDC), the inhibition of which sensitized cells to Irradiation. Similar to the earlier generation compound Torin1 and in contrast to other reported mTOR inhibitors, Torin2 inhibited mTOR kinase and mTORC1 signaling activities in a sustained manner suggestive of a slow dissociation from the kinase. Cancer cell treatment with Torin2 for 24 hours resulted in a prolonged block in negative feedback and consequent T308 phosphorylation on Akt. These effects were associated with strong growth inhibition in vitro. Single agent treatment with Torin2 in vivo did not yield significant efficacy against KRAS-driven lung tumors, but the combination of Torin2 with MEK inhibitor AZD6244 yielded a significant growth inhibition. Taken together, our findings establish Torin2 as a strong candidate for clinical evaluation in a broad number of oncological settings where mTOR signaling has a pathogenic role. PMID:23436801

  4. Sulfated Pentagalloylglucoside is a Potent, Allosteric, and Selective Inhibitor of Factor XIa

    PubMed Central

    Al-Horani, Rami A.; Ponnusamy, Pooja; Mehta, Akul Y.; Gailani, David; Desai, Umesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of factor XIa (FXIa) is a novel paradigm for developing anticoagulants without major bleeding consequences. We present the discovery of sulfated pentagalloylglucoside (6) as a highly selective inhibitor of human FXIa. Biochemical screening of a focused library led to the identification of 6, a sulfated aromatic mimetic of heparin. Inhibitor 6 displayed a potency of 551 nM against FXIa, which was at least 200-fold more selective than other relevant enzymes. It also prevented activation of factor IX and prolonged human plasma and whole blood clotting. Inhibitor 6 reduced VMAX of FXIa hydrolysis of chromogenic substrate without affecting the KM suggesting an allosteric mechanism. Competitive studies showed that 6 bound in the heparin-binding site of FXIa. No allosteric small molecule has been discovered to date that exhibits equivalent potency against FXIa. Inhibitor 6 is expected to open up a major route to allosteric FXIa anticoagulants with clinical relevance. PMID:23316863

  5. Structure-based discovery of the first allosteric inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Giulio; Anighoro, Andrew; Chripkova, Martina; Carrassa, Laura; Broggini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric targeting of protein kinases via displacement of the structural αC helix with type III allosteric inhibitors is currently gaining a foothold in drug discovery. Recently, the first crystal structure of CDK2 with an open allosteric pocket adjacent to the αC helix has been described, prospecting new opportunities to design more selective inhibitors, but the structure has not yet been exploited for the structure-based design of type III allosteric inhibitors. In this work we report the results of a virtual screening campaign that resulted in the discovery of the first-in-class type III allosteric ligands of CDK2. Using a combination of docking and post-docking analyses made with our tool BEAR, 7 allosteric ligands (hit rate of 20%) with micromolar affinity for CDK2 were identified, some of them inhibiting the growth of breast cancer cell lines in the micromolar range. Competition experiments performed in the presence of the ATP-competitive inhibitor staurosporine confirmed that the 7 ligands are truly allosteric, in agreement with their design. Of these, compound 2 bound CDK2 with an EC50 value of 3 μM and inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB231 and ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells with IC50 values of approximately 20 μM, while compound 4 had an EC50 value of 71 μM and IC50 values around 4 μM. Remarkably, the most potent compound 4 was able to selectively inhibit CDK2-mediated Retinoblastoma phosphorylation, confirming that its mechanism of action is fully compatible with a selective inhibition of CDK2 phosphorylation in cells. Finally, hit expansion through analog search of the most potent inhibitor 4 revealed an additional ligand 4g with similar in vitro potency on breast cancer cells.

  6. Adenosine triphosphate-competitive mTOR inhibitors: a new class of immunosuppressive agents that inhibit allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Rosborough, B R; Raïch-Regué, D; Liu, Q; Venkataramanan, R; Turnquist, H R; Thomson, A W

    2014-09-01

    The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is inhibited clinically to suppress T cell function and prevent allograft rejection. mTOR is the kinase subunit of two mTOR-containing complexes, mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and 2. Although mTORC1 is inhibited by the macrolide immunosuppressant rapamycin (RAPA), its efficacy may be limited by its inability to block mTORC1 completely and its limited effect on mTORC2. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-competitive mTOR inhibitors are an emerging class of mTOR inhibitors that compete with ATP at the mTOR active site and inhibit any mTOR-containing complex. Since this class of compounds has not been investigated for their immunosuppressive potential, our goal was to determine the influence of a prototypic ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor on allograft survival. AZD8055 proved to be a potent suppressor of T cell proliferation. Moreover, a short, 10-day course of the agent successfully prolonged murine MHC-mismatched, vascularized heart transplant survival. This therapeutic effect was associated with increased graft-infiltrating regulatory T cells and reduced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ production. These studies establish for the first time, that ATP-competitive mTOR inhibition can prolong organ allograft survival and warrant further investigation of this next generation mTOR inhibitors.

  7. The mTOR inhibitor sirolimus suppresses renal, hepatic, and cardiac tissue cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Albawardi, Alia; Almarzooqi, Saeeda; Saraswathiamma, Dhanya; Abdul-Kader, Hidaya Mohammed; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Alfazari, Ali S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to develop a useful biomarker (e.g., cellular respiration, or mitochondrial O2 consumption) for measuring activities of mTOR inhibitors. It measured the effects of commonly used immunosuppressants (sirolimus-rapamycin, tacrolimus, and cyclosporine) on cellular respiration in target tissues (kidney, liver, and heart) from C57BL/6 mice. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine/ threonine kinase that supports nutrient-dependent cell growth and survival, is known to control energy conversion processes within the mitochondria. Consistently, inhibitors of mTOR (e.g., rapamycin, also known as sirolimus or Rapamune®) have been shown to impair mitochondrial function. Inhibitors of the calcium-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin (e.g., tacrolimus and cyclosporine), on the other hand, strictly prevent lymphokine production leading to a reduced T-cell function. Sirolimus (10 μM) inhibited renal (22%, P=0.002), hepatic (39%, P<0.001), and cardiac (42%, P=0.005) cellular respiration. Tacrolimus and cyclosporine had no or minimum effects on cellular respiration in these tissues. Thus, these results clearly demonstrate that impaired cellular respiration (bioenergetics) is a sensitive biomarker of the immunosuppressants that target mTOR.

  8. Optimization of a Dibenzodiazepine Hit to a Potent and Selective Allosteric PAK1 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of inhibitors targeting novel allosteric kinase sites is very challenging. Such compounds, however, once identified could offer exquisite levels of selectivity across the kinome. Herein we report our structure-based optimization strategy of a dibenzodiazepine hit 1, discovered in a fragment-based screen, yielding highly potent and selective inhibitors of PAK1 such as 2 and 3. Compound 2 was cocrystallized with PAK1 to confirm binding to an allosteric site and to reveal novel key interactions. Compound 3 modulated PAK1 at the cellular level and due to its selectivity enabled valuable research to interrogate biological functions of the PAK1 kinase. PMID:26191365

  9. ATP-Competitive Inhibitors of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Design and Synthesis of Highly Potent and Selective Pyrazolopyrimidines

    SciTech Connect

    Zask, Arie; Verheijen, Jeroen C.; Curran, Kevin; Kaplan, Joshua; Richard, David J.; Nowak, Pawel; Malwitz, David J.; Brooijmans, Natasja; Bard, Joel; Svenson, Kristine; Lucas, Judy; Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Hollander, Irwin; Gibbons, James J.; Abraham, Robert T.; Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Mansour, Tarek S.; Yu, Ker

    2009-09-18

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central regulator of growth, survival, and metabolism, is a validated target for cancer therapy. Rapamycin and its analogues, allosteric inhibitors of mTOR, only partially inhibit one mTOR protein complex. ATP-competitive, global inhibitors of mTOR that have the potential for enhanced anticancer efficacy are described. Structural features leading to potency and selectivity were identified and refined leading to compounds with in vivo efficacy in tumor xenograft models.

  10. Muscle wasting associated with the long-term use of mTOR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Bishal; Shimokata, Tomoya; Honda, Kazunori; Kondoh, Chihiro; Hayashi, Naomi; Yoshino, Yasushi; Sassa, Naoto; Nakano, Yasuyuki; Gotoh, Momokazu; Ando, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Some targeted therapies alter muscle mass due to interference with pathways of muscle metabolism. The effects of mammalian target of ra pamycin (mTOR) inhibitors on muscle mass have yet to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the computerized tomography (CT) scans of patients receiving mTOR inhibitors for at least 6 months taken at baseline and post-therapy were retrospectively retrieved, and body composition analyses were performed using the software, sliceOmatic version 5.0 (TomoVision, Inc., Magog, QC, Canada). The difference in body composition parameters was evaluated for significance. The time to treatment (TTF) failure was also compared between the sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic patients at the baseline. Of the 75 patients studied, 20 matched the inclusion criteria (including 16 males). The mean duration between the CT scans was 14.4±2.0 months. A total of 12 (60%) patients were sarcopenic at the baseline, whereas three more (75% in total) became sarcopenic following treatment. The use of mTOR inhibitors significantly decreased the skeletal muscle area (P=0.011) and lean body mass (P=0.007), although it had no effect on adipose tissue (P=0.163) or body weight (P=0.262). The rate of skeletal muscle wasting was 2.6 cm2/m2, or 2.3 kg in 6 months. The TTF did not differ between sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic patients, and was not significantly associated with any other parameter. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the long-term use of mTOR inhibitors induces a marked loss of muscle mass. Due to the predictive and prognostic role of sarcopenia in cancer patients, these findings may have important clinical implications. PMID:27900103

  11. mTOR inhibitors counteract tamoxifen-induced activation of breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Karthik, Govindasamy-Muralidharan; Ma, Ran; Lövrot, John; Kis, Lorand Levente; Lindh, Claes; Blomquist, Lennart; Fredriksson, Irma; Bergh, Jonas; Hartman, Johan

    2015-10-10

    Breast cancer cells with stem cell characteristics (CSC) are a distinct cell population with phenotypic similarities to mammary stem cells. CSCs are important drivers of tumorigenesis and the metastatic process. Tamoxifen is the most widely used hormonal therapy for estrogen receptor (ER) positive cancers. In our study, tamoxifen was effective in reducing proliferation of ER + adherent cancer cells, but not their CSC population. We isolated, expanded and incubated CSC from seven breast cancers with or without tamoxifen. By genome-wide transcriptional analysis we identified tamoxifen-induced transcriptional pathways associated with ribosomal biogenesis and mRNA translation, both regulated by the mTOR-pathway. We observed induction of the key mTOR downstream targets S6K1, S6RP and 4E-BP1 in-patient derived CSCs by tamoxifen on protein level. Using the mTOR inhibitors rapamycin, everolimus and PF-04691502 (a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor) and in combination with tamoxifen, significant reduction in mammosphere formation was observed. Hence, we suggest that the CSC population play a significant role during endocrine resistance through activity of the mTOR pathway. In addition, tamoxifen further stimulates the mTOR-pathway but can be antagonized using mTOR-inhibitors.

  12. Impact on Autophagy and Ultraviolet B Induced Responses of Treatment with the MTOR Inhibitors Rapamycin, Everolimus, Torin 1, and pp242 in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Song; Li, Li; Li, Min; Zhang, Mengli

    2017-01-01

    The mechanistic target of Rapamycin (MTOR) protein is a crucial signaling regulator in mammalian cells that is extensively involved in cellular biology. The function of MTOR signaling in keratinocytes remains unclear. In this study, we detected the MTOR signaling and autophagy response in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT and human epidermal keratinocytes treated with MTOR inhibitors. Moreover, we detected the impact of MTOR inhibitors on keratinocytes exposed to the common carcinogenic stressors ultraviolet B (UVB) and UVA radiation. As a result, keratinocytes were sensitive to the MTOR inhibitors Rapamycin, everolimus, Torin 1, and pp242, but the regulation of MTOR downstream signaling was distinct. Next, autophagy induction only was observed in HaCaT cells treated with Rapamycin. Furthermore, we found that MTOR signaling was insensitive to UVB but sensitive to UVA radiation. UVB treatment also had no impact on the inhibition of MTOR signaling by MTOR inhibitors. Finally, MTOR inhibition by Rapamycin, everolimus, or pp242 did not affect the series of biological events in keratinocytes exposed to UVB, including the downregulation of BiP and PERK, activation of Histone H2A and JNK, and cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP. Our study demonstrated that MTOR inhibition in keratinocytes cannot always induce autophagy, and the MTOR pathway does not play a central role in the UVB triggered cellular response.

  13. Clinical presentation and management of mTOR inhibitor-associated stomatitis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcio Augusto; Martins E Martins, Fabiana; Wang, Qian; Sonis, Stephen; Demetri, George; George, Suzanne; Butrynski, James; Treister, Nathaniel S

    2011-10-01

    Anti-cancer agents that inhibit the mTOR pathway are associated with a number of unique toxicities, with one of the most significant and potentially dose-limiting being stomatitis. The objective of this study was to report the clinical features and management outcomes of a series of cancer patients who developed painful mTOR inhibitor-associated stomatitis (mIAS). Seventeen cancer patients developed mIAS while being treated with everolimus- or ridaforolimus-containing protocols at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and were referred to the oral medicine clinic for evaluation and management. Clinical characteristics, toxicity management, and outcomes were summarized. In addition, the frequency and rationale for dose reductions and therapy discontinuation were assessed. The median duration of mTOR inhibitor therapy was 80 days (range 9-187 days). The median time to development of mouth ulcers was 10 days (range 4-25 days). Five patients required protocol-directed dose reductions due to grades 2 and 3 stomatitis and one patient discontinued cancer treatment due to mouth ulcers. Clinical improvement and pain relief was reported in 86.6% of patients following topical, intralesional, or systemic corticosteroid therapy, with side effects limited to secondary candidiasis (n=2). Mouth ulcers are a common and potentially dose limiting toxicity associated with the use of mTOR inhibitors in cancer treatment. This case series demonstrates that local and systemic corticosteroid therapy is an effective approach to managing patients with symptomatic mIAS. Prospective studies are necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment and prevention strategies with the ultimate goal of improving overall cancer treatment outcomes.

  14. Rapalogs and mTOR inhibitors as anti-aging therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lamming, Dudley W.; Ye, Lan; Sabatini, David M.; Baur, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), has the strongest experimental support to date as a potential anti-aging therapeutic in mammals. Unlike many other compounds that have been claimed to influence longevity, rapamycin has been repeatedly tested in long-lived, genetically heterogeneous mice, in which it extends both mean and maximum life spans. However, the mechanism that accounts for these effects is far from clear, and a growing list of side effects make it doubtful that rapamycin would ultimately be beneficial in humans. This Review discusses the prospects for developing newer, safer anti-aging therapies based on analogs of rapamycin (termed rapalogs) or other approaches targeting mTOR signaling. PMID:23454761

  15. Rapalogs and mTOR inhibitors as anti-aging therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lamming, Dudley W; Ye, Lan; Sabatini, David M; Baur, Joseph A

    2013-03-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), has the strongest experimental support to date as a potential anti-aging therapeutic in mammals. Unlike many other compounds that have been claimed to influence longevity, rapamycin has been repeatedly tested in long-lived, genetically heterogeneous mice, in which it extends both mean and maximum life spans. However, the mechanism that accounts for these effects is far from clear, and a growing list of side effects make it doubtful that rapamycin would ultimately be beneficial in humans. This Review discusses the prospects for developing newer, safer anti-aging therapies based on analogs of rapamycin (termed rapalogs) or other approaches targeting mTOR signaling.

  16. Allosteric Mutant IDH1 Inhibitors Reveal Mechanisms for IDH1 Mutant and Isoform Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoling; Baird, Daniel; Bowen, Kimberly; Capka, Vladimir; Chen, Jinyun; Chenail, Gregg; Cho, YoungShin; Dooley, Julia; Farsidjani, Ali; Fortin, Pascal; Kohls, Darcy; Kulathila, Raviraj; Lin, Fallon; McKay, Daniel; Rodrigues, Lindsey; Sage, David; Touré, B Barry; van der Plas, Simon; Wright, Kirk; Xu, Ming; Yin, Hong; Levell, Julian; Pagliarini, Raymond A

    2017-03-07

    Oncogenic IDH1 and IDH2 mutations contribute to cancer via production of R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here, we characterize two structurally distinct mutant- and isoform-selective IDH1 inhibitors that inhibit 2-HG production. Both bind to an allosteric pocket on IDH1, yet shape it differently, highlighting the plasticity of this site. Oncogenic IDH1(R132H) mutation destabilizes an IDH1 "regulatory segment," which otherwise restricts compound access to the allosteric pocket. Regulatory segment destabilization in wild-type IDH1 promotes inhibitor binding, suggesting that destabilization is critical for mutant selectivity. We also report crystal structures of oncogenic IDH2 mutant isoforms, highlighting the fact that the analogous segment of IDH2 is not similarly destabilized. This intrinsic stability of IDH2 may contribute to observed inhibitor IDH1 isoform selectivity. Moreover, discrete residues in the IDH1 allosteric pocket that differ from IDH2 may also guide IDH1 isoform selectivity. These data provide a deeper understanding of how IDH1 inhibitors achieve mutant and isoform selectivity.

  17. Combination of a STAT3 Inhibitor and an mTOR Inhibitor Against a Temozolomide-resistant Glioblastoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA*, HARUO; ASHIZAWA*, TADASHI; IIZUKA, AKIRA; KONDOU, RYOTA; NONOMURA, CHIZU; SUGINO, TAKASHI; URAKAMI, KENICHI; ASAI, AKIRA; HAYASHI, NAKAMASA; MITSUYA, KOICHI; NAKASU, YOKO; YAMAGUCHI, KEN; AKIYAMA, YASUTO

    2016-01-01

    Background: Temozolomide-resistant (TMZ-R) glioblastoma is very difficult to treat, and a novel approach to overcome resistance is needed. Materials and Methods: The efficacy of a combination treatment of STAT3 inhibitor, STX-0119, with rapamycin was investigated against our established TMZ-resistant U87 cell line. Results: The growth-inhibitory effect of the combination treatment was significant against the TMZ-R U87 cell line (IC50: 78 μM for STX-0119, 30.5 μM for rapamycin and 11.3 μM for combination of the two). Western blotting analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of STX-0119 on S6 and 4E-BP1 activation through regulation of YKL-40 expression occurred in addition to the inhibitory effect of rapamycin against the mTOR pathway. Conclusion: These results suggest that the STAT3 pathway is associated with the mTOR downstream pathway mediated by YKL-40 protein, and the combination therapy of the STAT3 inhibitor and rapamycin could be worth developing as a novel therapeutic approach against TMZ-resistant relapsed gliomas. Abbreviations: GB: Glioblastoma, TMZ: temozolomide, MGMT: O6-methylguanine-O6-methylguanine-DNAmethyltransferase, STAT: signal transducer and activator of transcription, mTOR: mammalian target of rapamycin, shRNA: small hairpin RNA. PMID:28031240

  18. Allosteric inhibitors of hepatitis C polymerase: discovery of potent and orally bioavailable carbon-linked dihydropyrones.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Linton, Angelica; Tatlock, John; Gonzalez, Javier; Borchardt, Allen; Abreo, Mel; Jewell, Tanya; Patel, Leena; Drowns, Matthew; Ludlum, Sarah; Goble, Mike; Yang, Michele; Blazel, Julie; Rahavendran, Ravi; Skor, Heather; Shi, Stephanie; Lewis, Cristina; Fuhrman, Shella

    2007-08-23

    The discovery and optimization of a novel class of carbon-linked dihydropyrones as allosteric HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors are presented. Replacement of the sulfur linker atom with carbon reduced compound acidity and greatly increased cell permeation. Further structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies led to the identification of compounds, exemplified by 23 and 24, with significantly improved antiviral activities in the cell-based replicon assay and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles.

  19. Overcoming EGFR T790M and C797S resistance with mutant-selective allosteric inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yong; Yun, Cai-Hong; Park, Eunyoung; Ercan, Dalia; Manuia, Mari; Juarez, Jose; Xu, Chunxiao; Rhee, Kevin; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Haikuo; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Jang, Jaebong; Lelais, Gerald; DiDonato, Michael; Bursulaya, Badry; Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Epple, Robert; Marsilje, Thomas H.; McNeill, Matthew; Lu, Wenshuo; Harris, Jennifer; Bender, Steven; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Jänne, Pasi A.; Eck, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib are approved treatments for non-small cell lung cancers harboring activating mutations in the EGFR kinase1,2, but resistance arises rapidly, most frequently due to the secondary T790M mutation within the ATP-site of the receptor.3,4 Recently developed mutant-selective irreversible inhibitors are highly active against the T790M mutant5,6, but their efficacy can be compromised by acquired mutation of C797, the cysteine residue with which they form a key covalent bond7. All current EGFR TKIs target the ATP-site of the kinase, highlighting the need for therapeutic agents with alternate mechanisms of action. Here we describe rational discovery of EAI045, an allosteric inhibitor that targets selected drug-resistant EGFR mutants but spares the wild type receptor. A crystal structure shows that the compound binds an allosteric site created by the displacement of the regulatory C-helix in an inactive conformation of the kinase. The compound inhibits L858R/T790M-mutant EGFR with low-nanomolar potency in biochemical assays, but as a single agent is not effective in blocking EGFR-driven proliferation in cells due to differential potency on the two subunits of the dimeric receptor, which interact in an asymmetric manner in the active state8. We observe dramatic synergy of EAI045 with cetuximab, an antibody therapeutic that blocks EGFR dimerization9,10, rendering the kinase uniformly susceptible to the allosteric agent. EAI045 in combination with cetuximab is effective in mouse models of lung cancer driven by L858R/T790M EGFR and by L858R/T790M/C797S EGFR, a mutant that is resistant to all currently available EGFR TKIs. More generally, our findings illustrate the utility of purposefully targeting allosteric sites to obtain mutant-selective inhibitors. PMID:27251290

  20. Identification of natural allosteric inhibitor for Akt1 protein through computational approaches and in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pragna Lakshmi, T; Kumar, Amit; Vijaykumar, Veena; Natarajan, Sakthivel; Krishna, Ramadas

    2017-03-01

    Akt, a serine/threonine protein kinase, is often hyper activated in breast and prostate cancers, but with poor prognosis. Allosteric inhibitors regulate aberrant kinase activity by stabilizing the protein in inactive conformation. Several natural compounds have been reported as inhibitors for kinases. In this study, to identify potential natural allosteric inhibitor for Akt1, we generated a seven-point pharmacophore model and screened it through natural compound library. Quercetin-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside or Q7G was found to be the best among selected molecules based on its hydrogen bond occupancy with key allosteric residues, persistent polar contacts and salt bridges that stabilize Akt1 in inactive conformation and minimum binding free energy during molecular dynamics simulation. Q7G induced dose-dependent inhibition of breast cancer cells (MDA MB-231) and arrested them in G1 and sub-G phase. This was associated with down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP. Expression of p-Akt (Ser473) was also down-regulated which might be due to Akt1 inhibition in inactive conformation. We further confirmed the Akt1 and Q7G interaction which was observed to have a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.246μM. With these computational, biological and thermodynamic studies, we suggest Q7G as a lead molecule and propose for its further optimization.

  1. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site

    PubMed Central

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T.; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  2. PML nuclear bodies contribute to the basal expression of the mTOR inhibitor DDIT4

    PubMed Central

    Salsman, Jayme; Stathakis, Alex; Parker, Ellen; Chung, Dudley; Anthes, Livia E.; Koskowich, Kara L.; Lahsaee, Sara; Gaston, Daniel; Kukurba, Kimberly R.; Smith, Kevin S.; Chute, Ian C.; Léger, Daniel; Frost, Laura D.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Lewis, Stephen M.; Eskiw, Christopher; Dellaire, Graham

    2017-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is an essential component of PML nuclear bodies (PML NBs) frequently lost in cancer. PML NBs coordinate chromosomal regions via modification of nuclear proteins that in turn may regulate genes in the vicinity of these bodies. However, few PML NB-associated genes have been identified. PML and PML NBs can also regulate mTOR and cell fate decisions in response to cellular stresses. We now demonstrate that PML depletion in U2OS cells or TERT-immortalized normal human diploid fibroblasts results in decreased expression of the mTOR inhibitor DDIT4 (REDD1). DNA and RNA immuno-FISH reveal that PML NBs are closely associated with actively transcribed DDIT4 loci, implicating these bodies in regulation of basal DDIT4 expression. Although PML silencing did reduce the sensitivity of U2OS cells to metabolic stress induced by metformin, PML loss did not inhibit the upregulation of DDIT4 in response to metformin, hypoxia-like (CoCl2) or genotoxic stress. Analysis of publicly available cancer data also revealed a significant correlation between PML and DDIT4 expression in several cancer types (e.g. lung, breast, prostate). Thus, these findings uncover a novel mechanism by which PML loss may contribute to mTOR activation and cancer progression via dysregulation of basal DDIT4 gene expression. PMID:28332630

  3. PML nuclear bodies contribute to the basal expression of the mTOR inhibitor DDIT4.

    PubMed

    Salsman, Jayme; Stathakis, Alex; Parker, Ellen; Chung, Dudley; Anthes, Livia E; Koskowich, Kara L; Lahsaee, Sara; Gaston, Daniel; Kukurba, Kimberly R; Smith, Kevin S; Chute, Ian C; Léger, Daniel; Frost, Laura D; Montgomery, Stephen B; Lewis, Stephen M; Eskiw, Christopher; Dellaire, Graham

    2017-03-23

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is an essential component of PML nuclear bodies (PML NBs) frequently lost in cancer. PML NBs coordinate chromosomal regions via modification of nuclear proteins that in turn may regulate genes in the vicinity of these bodies. However, few PML NB-associated genes have been identified. PML and PML NBs can also regulate mTOR and cell fate decisions in response to cellular stresses. We now demonstrate that PML depletion in U2OS cells or TERT-immortalized normal human diploid fibroblasts results in decreased expression of the mTOR inhibitor DDIT4 (REDD1). DNA and RNA immuno-FISH reveal that PML NBs are closely associated with actively transcribed DDIT4 loci, implicating these bodies in regulation of basal DDIT4 expression. Although PML silencing did reduce the sensitivity of U2OS cells to metabolic stress induced by metformin, PML loss did not inhibit the upregulation of DDIT4 in response to metformin, hypoxia-like (CoCl2) or genotoxic stress. Analysis of publicly available cancer data also revealed a significant correlation between PML and DDIT4 expression in several cancer types (e.g. lung, breast, prostate). Thus, these findings uncover a novel mechanism by which PML loss may contribute to mTOR activation and cancer progression via dysregulation of basal DDIT4 gene expression.

  4. Preclinical evaluation of the combination of mTOR and proteasome inhibitors with radiotherapy in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, A S; Baia, G S; Ho, J S Y; Velarde, E; Wong, J; Gallia, G L; Belzberg, A J; Kimura, E T; Riggins, G J

    2014-05-01

    About one half of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) have Neurofibromin 1 (NF1) mutations. NF1 is a tumor suppressor gene essential for negative regulation of RAS signaling. Survival for MPNST patients is poor and we sought to identify an effective combination therapy. Starting with the mTOR inhibitors rapamycin and everolimus, we screened for synergy in 542 FDA approved compounds using MPNST cells with a native NF1 loss in both alleles. We further analyzed the cell cycle and signal transduction. In vivo growth effects of the drug combination with local radiation therapy (RT) were assessed in MPNST xenografts. The synergistic combination of mTOR inhibitors with bortezomib yielded a reduction in MPNST cell proliferation. The combination of mTOR inhibitors and bortezomib also enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of radiation in vitro. In vivo, the combination of mTOR inhibitor (everolimus) and bortezomib with RT decreased tumor growth and proliferation, and augmented apoptosis. The combination of approved mTOR and proteasome inhibitors with radiation showed a significant reduction of tumor growth in an animal model and should be investigated and optimized further for MPNST therapy.

  5. Practical recommendations for the early use of m-TOR inhibitors (sirolimus) in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Campistol, Josep M; Cockwell, Paul; Diekmann, Fritz; Donati, Donato; Guirado, Luis; Herlenius, Gustaf; Mousa, Dujanah; Pratschke, Johann; San Millán, Juan Carlos Ruiz

    2009-07-01

    m-TOR inhibitors (e.g. sirolimus) are well-tolerated immunosuppressants used in renal transplantation for prophylaxis of organ rejection, and are associated with long-term graft survival. Early use of sirolimus is often advocated by clinicians, but this may be associated with a number of side-effects including impaired wound-healing, lymphoceles and delayed graft function. As transplant clinicians with experience in the use of sirolimus, we believe such side-effects can be limited by tailored clinical management. We present recommendations based on published literature and our clinical experience. Furthermore, guidance is provided on sirolimus use during surgery, both at transplantation and for subsequent operations.

  6. Biomimetic Design Results in a Potent Allosteric Inhibitor of Dihydrodipicolinate Synthase from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Skovpen, Yulia V; Conly, Cuylar J T; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2016-02-17

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS), an enzyme required for bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis, catalyzes the condensation of pyruvate and β-aspartate semialdehyde (ASA) to form a cyclic product which dehydrates to form dihydrodipicolinate. DHDPS has, for several years, been considered a putative target for novel antibiotics. We have designed the first potent inhibitor of this enzyme by mimicking its natural allosteric regulation by lysine, and obtained a crystal structure of the protein-inhibitor complex at 2.2 Å resolution. This novel inhibitor, which we named "bislysine", resembles two lysine molecules linked by an ethylene bridge between the α-carbon atoms. Bislysine is a mixed partial inhibitor with respect to the first substrate, pyruvate, and a noncompetitive partial inhibitor with respect to ASA, and binds to all forms of the enzyme with a Ki near 200 nM, more than 300 times more tightly than lysine. Hill plots show that the inhibition is cooperative, indicating that the allosteric sites are not independent despite being located on opposite sides of the protein tetramer, separated by approximately 50 Å. A mutant enzyme resistant to lysine inhibition, Y110F, is strongly inhibited by this novel inhibitor, suggesting this may be a promising strategy for antibiotic development.

  7. Discovering new mTOR inhibitors for cancer treatment through virtual screening methods and in vitro assays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Chen, Lei; Yu, Miao; Xu, Li-Hui; Cheng, Bao; Lin, Yong-Sheng; Gu, Qiong; He, Xian-Hui; Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an attractive target for new anticancer drug development. We recently developed in silico models to distinguish mTOR inhibitors and non-inhibitors. In this study, we developed an integrated strategy for identifying new mTOR inhibitors using cascaded in silico screening models. With this strategy, fifteen new mTOR kinase inhibitors including four compounds with IC50 values below 10 μM were discovered. In particular, compound 17 exhibited potent anticancer activities against four tumor cell lines, including MCF-7, HeLa, MGC-803, and C6, with IC50 values of 1.90, 2.74, 3.50 and 11.05 μM. Furthermore, cellular studies and western blot analyses revealed that 17 induces cell death via apoptosis by targeting both mTORC1 and mTORC2 within cells and arrests the cell cycle of HeLa at the G1/G0-phase. Finally, multi-nanosecond explicit solvent simulations and MM/GBSA analyses were carried out to study the inhibitory mechanisms of 13, 17, and 40 for mTOR. The potent compounds presented here are worthy of further investigation. PMID:26732172

  8. Discovering new mTOR inhibitors for cancer treatment through virtual screening methods and in vitro assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Chen, Lei; Yu, Miao; Xu, Li-Hui; Cheng, Bao; Lin, Yong-Sheng; Gu, Qiong; He, Xian-Hui; Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an attractive target for new anticancer drug development. We recently developed in silico models to distinguish mTOR inhibitors and non-inhibitors. In this study, we developed an integrated strategy for identifying new mTOR inhibitors using cascaded in silico screening models. With this strategy, fifteen new mTOR kinase inhibitors including four compounds with IC50 values below 10 μM were discovered. In particular, compound 17 exhibited potent anticancer activities against four tumor cell lines, including MCF-7, HeLa, MGC-803, and C6, with IC50 values of 1.90, 2.74, 3.50 and 11.05 μM. Furthermore, cellular studies and western blot analyses revealed that 17 induces cell death via apoptosis by targeting both mTORC1 and mTORC2 within cells and arrests the cell cycle of HeLa at the G1/G0-phase. Finally, multi-nanosecond explicit solvent simulations and MM/GBSA analyses were carried out to study the inhibitory mechanisms of 13, 17, and 40 for mTOR. The potent compounds presented here are worthy of further investigation.

  9. Attributable Risk of Infection to mTOR Inhibitors Everolimus and Temsirolimus in the Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Christine A; Wu, Shenhong

    2016-11-25

    The risk of infection attributable to mTOR inhibitors has not been determined. Databases from PubMed and abstracts presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology meetings were searched. Eligible studies included randomized controlled trials, in which everolimus or temsirolimus was compared with placebo. A total of 12 trials were included. The attributable incidences of all-grade and high-grade infections to mTOR inhibitors were 9.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.8-14.6%) and 2.3% (95% CI: 1.2-4.4%) respectively. The risk varied widely with tumor types (p <.001). There was substantial risk of infection attributable to mTOR inhibitors everolimus and temsirolimus.

  10. Herbacetin is a novel allosteric inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase with antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Oi, Naomi; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Cho, Young-Yeon; Pugliese, Angelo; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chen, Hanyong; Cho, Eun Jin; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kang, Sun Chul; Paul, Souren; Kang, Hee Eun; Jung, Ji Won; Lee, Sung-Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Reddy, Kanamata; Yeom, Young Il; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the first step of polyamine biosynthesis that is associated with cell growth and tumor formation. Existing catalytic inhibitors of ODC have lacked efficacy in clinical testing or displayed unacceptable toxicity. In this study, we report the identification of an effective and nontoxic allosteric inhibitor of ODC. Using computer docking simulation and an in vitro ODC enzyme assay, we identified herbacetin, a natural compound found in flax and other plants, as a novel ODC inhibitor. Mechanistic investigations defined aspartate 44 in ODC as critical for binding. Herbacetin exhibited potent anticancer activity in colon cancer cell lines expressing high levels of ODC. Intraperitoneal or oral administration of herbacetin effectively suppressed HCT116 xenograft tumor growth and also reduced the number and size of polyps in a mouse model of APC-driven colon cancer (ApcMin/+). Unlike the well established ODC inhibitor DFMO, herbacetin treatment was not associated with hearing loss. Taken together, our findings defined the natural product herbacetin as an allosteric inhibitor of ODC with chemopreventive and antitumor activity in preclinical models of colon cancer, prompting its further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:26676750

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation study of PTP1B with allosteric inhibitor and its application in receptor based pharmacophore modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Kwon, Yong Jung; Lee, Keun Woo

    2008-12-01

    Allosteric inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), has paved a new path to design specific inhibitors for PTP1B, which is an important drug target for the treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. The PTP1B1-282-allosteric inhibitor complex crystal structure lacks α7 (287-298) and moreover there is no available 3D structure of PTP1B1-298 in open form. As the interaction between α7 and α6-α3 helices plays a crucial role in allosteric inhibition, α7 was modeled to the PTP1B1-282 in open form complexed with an allosteric inhibitor (compound-2) and a 5 ns MD simulation was performed to investigate the relative orientation of the α7-α6-α3 helices. The simulation conformational space was statistically sampled by clustering analyses. This approach was helpful to reveal certain clues on PTP1B allosteric inhibition. The simulation was also utilized in the generation of receptor based pharmacophore models to include the conformational flexibility of the protein-inhibitor complex. Three cluster representative structures of the highly populated clusters were selected for pharmacophore model generation. The three pharmacophore models were subsequently utilized for screening databases to retrieve molecules containing the features that complement the allosteric site. The retrieved hits were filtered based on certain drug-like properties and molecular docking simulations were performed in two different conformations of protein. Thus, performing MD simulation with α7 to investigate the changes at the allosteric site, then developing receptor based pharmacophore models and finally docking the retrieved hits into two distinct conformations will be a reliable methodology in identifying PTP1B allosteric inhibitors.

  12. The novel combination of dual mTOR inhibitor AZD2014 and pan-PIM inhibitor AZD1208 inhibits growth in acute myeloid leukemia via HSF pathway suppression.

    PubMed

    Harada, Masako; Benito, Juliana; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Kaur, Surinder; Arslan, Dirim; Ramirez, Santiago; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Platanias, Leonidas; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kazuno, Saiko; Kojima, Kensuke; Tabe, Yoko; Konopleva, Marina

    2015-11-10

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is a critical pathway in the biology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Proviral integration site for moloney murine leukemia virus (PIM) serine/threonine kinase signaling takes part in various pathways exerting tumorigenic properties. We hypothesized that the combination of a PIM kinase inhibitor with an mTOR inhibitor might have complementary growth-inhibitory effects against AML. The simultaneous inhibition of the PIM kinase by pan-PIM inhibitor AZD1208 and of mTOR by selective mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor AZD2014 exerted anticancer properties in AML cell lines and in cells derived from primary AML samples with or without supportive stromal cell co-culture, leading to suppressed proliferation and increased apoptosis. The combination of AZD1208 and AZD2014 rapidly activated AMPKα, a negative regulator of translation machinery through mTORC1/2 signaling in AML cells; profoundly inhibited AKT and 4EBP1 activation; and suppressed polysome formation. Inhibition of both mTOR and PIM counteracted induction of heat-shock family proteins, uncovering the master negative regulation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), the dominant transcription factor controlling cellular stress responses. The novel combination of the dual mTOR inhibitor and pan-PIM inhibitor synergistically inhibited AML growth by effectively reducing protein synthesis through heat shock factor pathway suppression.

  13. Predictive factors of response to mTOR inhibitors in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Malandrino, Pasqualino; Ramundo, Valeria; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-03-01

    Medical treatment of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has drawn a lot of attention due to the recent demonstration of efficacy of several drugs on progression-free survival, including somatostatin analogs, small tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors (or rapalogs). The latter are approved as therapeutic agents in advanced pancreatic NETs and have been demonstrated to be effective in different types of NETs, with variable efficacy due to the development of resistance to treatment. Early detection of patients that may benefit from rapalogs treatment is of paramount importance in order to select the better treatment and avoid ineffective and expensive treatments. Predictive markers for therapeutic response are under intensive investigation, aiming at a tailored patient management and more appropriate resource utilization. This review summarizes the available data on the tissue, circulating and imaging markers that are potentially predictive of rapalog efficacy in NETs.

  14. Disruption of integrin-fibronectin complexes by allosteric but not ligand-mimetic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mould, A Paul; Craig, Susan E; Byron, Sarah K; Humphries, Martin J; Jowitt, Thomas A

    2014-12-15

    Failure of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-based inhibitors to reverse integrin-ligand binding has been reported, but the prevalence of this phenomenon among integrin heterodimers is currently unknown. In the present study we have investigated the interaction of four different RGD-binding integrins (α5β1, αVβ1, αVβ3 and αVβ6) with fibronectin (FN) using surface plasmon resonance. The ability of inhibitors to reverse ligand binding was assessed by their capacity to increase the dissociation rate of pre-formed integrin-FN complexes. For all four receptors we showed that RGD-based inhibitors (such as cilengitide) were completely unable to increase the dissociation rate. Formation of the non-reversible state occurred very rapidly and did not rely on the time-dependent formation of a high-affinity state of the integrin, or the integrin leg regions. In contrast with RGD-based inhibitors, Ca2+ (but not Mg2+) was able to greatly increase the dissociation rate of integrin-FN complexes, with a half-maximal response at ~0.4 mM Ca2+ for αVβ3-FN. The effect of Ca2+ was overcome by co-addition of Mn2+, but not Mg2+. A stimulatory anti-β1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) abrogated the effect of Ca2+ on α5β1-FN complexes; conversely, a function-blocking mAb mimicked the effect of Ca2+. These results imply that Ca2+ acts allosterically, probably through binding to the adjacent metal-ion-dependent adhesion site (ADMIDAS), and that the α1 helix in the β subunit I domain is the key element affected by allosteric modulators. The data suggest an explanation for the limited clinical efficacy of RGD-based integrin antagonists, and we propose that allosteric antagonists could prove to be of greater therapeutic benefit.

  15. A Potent, Selective and Cell-Active Allosteric Inhibitor of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3)**

    PubMed Central

    Kaniskan, H. Ümit; Szewczyk, Magdalena M.; Yu, Zhengtian; Eram, Mohammad S.; Yang, Xiaobao; Schmidt, Keith; Luo, Xiao; Dai, Miao; He, Feng; Zang, Irene; Lin, Ying; Kennedy, Steven; Li, Fengling; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Dong, Aiping; Smil, David; Min, Sun-Joon; Landon, Melissa; Lin-Jones, Jennifer; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L.; Schapira, Matthieu; Atadja, Peter; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Brown, Peter J.; Zhao, Kehao; Jin, Jian; Vedadi, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    PRMT3 catalyzes the asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues of various proteins. It is essential for maturation of ribosomes, may have a role in lipogenesis, and is implicated in several diseases. A potent, selective, and cell- active PRMT3 inhibitor would be a valuable tool for further investigating PRMT3 biology. Here we report the discovery of the first PRMT3 chemical probe, SGC707, by structure-based optimization of the allosteric PRMT3 inhibitors we reported previously, and thorough characterization of this probe in biochemical, biophysical, and cellular assays. SGC707 is a potent PRMT3 inhibitor (IC50 = 31 ± 2 nm, KD = 53 ± 2 nm) with outstanding selectivity (selective against 31 other methyltransferases and more than 250 non-epigenetic targets). The mechanism of action studies and crystal structure of the PRMT3-SGC707 complex confirm the allosteric inhibition mode. Importantly, SGC707 engages PRMT3 and potently inhibits its methyltransferase activity in cells. It is also bioavailable and suitable for animal studies. This well- characterized chemical probe is an excellent tool to further study the role of PRMT3 in health and disease. PMID:25728001

  16. Modulation of γ-secretase specificity using small molecule allosteric inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Christopher C.; Zhu, Lei; Chau, Deming; Yang, Li; Wang, Rong; Djaballah, Hakim; Zheng, Hui; Li, Yue-Ming

    2009-01-01

    γ-Secretase cleaves multiple substrates within the transmembrane domain that include the amyloid precursor protein as well as the Notch family of receptors. These substrates are associated with Alzheimer disease and cancer. Despite extensive investigation of this protease, little is known regarding the regulation of γ-secretase specificity. To discover selective inhibitors for drug development and for probing the mechanisms of γ-secretase specificity, we screened chemical libraries and consequently developed a di-coumarin family of inhibitors that preferentially inhibit γ-secretase-mediated production of Aβ42 over other cleavage activities. These coumarin dimer-based compounds interact with γ-secretase by binding to an allosteric site. By developing a multiple photo-affinity probe approach, we demonstrate that this allosteric binding causes a conformational change within the active site of γ-secretase at the S2 and S1 sub-sites that leads to selective inhibition of Aβ42. In conclusion, by using these di-coumarin compounds, we reveal a mechanism by which γ-secretase specificity is regulated and provide insights into the molecular basis by which familial presenilin mutations may affect the active site and specificity of γ-secretase. Furthermore, this class of selective inhibitors provides the basis for development of Alzheimer disease therapeutic agents. PMID:19906985

  17. Androgen receptor functions as a negative transcriptional regulator of DEPTOR, mTOR inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Zhao, Shuai; Yamashita, Naoya; Yanai, Kazuyuki; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Inouye, Yoshio

    2015-12-01

    It has been noticed that crosstalk between androgen receptor (AR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways plays a crucial role in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. To clarify this mechanism, we focused on DEPTOR, a naturally occurring inhibitor of mTOR. The treatment of a human AR-positive prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, with the AR-agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) repressed DEPTOR mRNA expression in a time-dependent manner. This repression was abrogated by treatment with the AR-antagonist bicalutamide. Knockdown of DEPTOR mRNA by siRNA resulted in the increased phosphorylation of 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K), a substrate of mTORC1, accompanied by the elevated expression of cyclin D1, a positive regulator of cell proliferation. Furthermore, the ChIP assay demonstrated that AR could bind to AR-responsible element-like region within the 4th intron of the DEPTOR gene. The amount of acetylated histone H3 (Lys9, Lys14) was reduced by the DHT treatment in this region. Taken together, these results propose that AR-dependent prostate cancer cell proliferation requires decreased DEPTOR transcription directly controlled by AR.

  18. A Review of mTOR Pathway Inhibitors in Gynecologic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Eduardo; Garces, Álvaro Henrique Ingles

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of advanced gynecologic cancers remains palliative in most of cases. Although systemic treatment has entered into the era of targeted drugs the antitumor efficacies of current therapies are still limited. In this context there is a great need for more active treatment and rationally designed targeted therapies. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR is a signaling pathway in mammal cells that coordinates important cell activities. It has a critical function in the survival, growth, and proliferation of malignant cells and was object of important research in the last two decades. The mTOR pathway emerges as an attractive therapeutic target in cancer because it serves as a convergence point for many growth stimuli and, through its downstream substrates, controls cellular processes that contribute to the initiation and maintenance of cancer. Aberrant PI3K-dependent signaling occurs frequently in a wide range of tumor types, including endometrial, cervical, and ovarian cancers. The present study reviewed the available evidence regarding the potential impact of some mTOR pathway inhibitors in the treatment of gynecological cancer. Few advances in medical management have occurred in recent years in the treatment of advanced or recurrent gynecological malignancies, and a poor prognosis remains. Rationally designed molecularly targeted therapy is an emerging and important option in this setting; then more investigation in PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway-targeted therapies is warranted. PMID:28286604

  19. Is mTOR Inhibitor Good Enough for Treatment All Tumors in TSC Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samy L; Al-Obaidi, Noor Y; Nowacki, Maciej; Pietkun, Katarzyna; Zegarska, Barbara; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Zegarski, Wojciech; Drewa, Tomasz; Medina, Edward A.; Zhao, Zhenze; Liang, Sitai

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant and multi-system genetic disorder in humans. TSC affects around 25,000 to 40,000 individuals in the United States and about 1 to 2 million individuals worldwide, with an estimated prevalence of one in 6,000 newborns. TSC occurs in all races and ethnic groups, and in both genders. TSC is caused by defects or mutations in two genes, TSC1 and TSC2. Loss of TSC1/TSC2 leads to dysregulation of mTOR, resulting in aberrant cell differentiation and development, and abnormal enlargement of cells. TSC is characterized by the development of benign and/or malignant tumors in several organs including renal/liver angiomyolipomas, facial angiofibroma, lymphangiomyomatosis, cardiac rhabdomyomas, retinal astrocytic, renal cell carcinoma, and brain subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGA). In addition, TSC disease causes disabling neurologic disorders, including epilepsy, mental retardation and autism. Particularly problematic are the development of renal angiomyolipomas, which tend to be larger, bilateral, multifocal and present at a younger age compared with sporadic forms. In addition, SEGA block the flow of fluid within the brain, causing a buildup of fluid and pressure that leads to blurred vision and seizures. In the current review, we describe the pathology of TSC disease in key organs and summarize the use of mTOR inhibitors to treat tumors in TSC patients. PMID:27698899

  20. Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Enhance the Anti-tumour Effects of the mTOR Inhibitor Everolimus against Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jie; Wu, Shan; Kong, Yan; Chi, Zhihong; Si, Lu; Sheng, Xinan; Cui, Chuanliang; Fang, Jing; Zhang, Jue; Guo, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The PI3K/mTOR/AKT pathway is activated in most melanomas, but mTOR inhibitors used singly have limited activity against advanced melanomas. The application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) is a promising cancer therapy approach. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic anti-tumour efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in conjunction with nsPEFs against melanoma. The combined treatment of nsPEFs and everolimus gradually decreased cell growth concurrent with nsPEF intensity. nsPEFs alone or combined with everolimus could promote melanoma cell apoptosis, accompanied with a loss in cellular mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in Ca2+ levels. In vivo experiments showed that a combination of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and nsPEFs improved the inhibitory effect, and all skin lesions caused by nsPEFs healed in 1 week without any observed adverse effect. Combination treatment induced caspase-dependent apoptosis through the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic factor Bax and downregulation of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2. Everolimus and nsPEFs synergistically inhibited angiogenesis by decreasing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor (VEGFR), and CD34. Our findings indicate that nsPEFs in combination with an mTOR inhibitor can be used as a potential treatment approach for advanced melanoma.

  1. Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Enhance the Anti-tumour Effects of the mTOR Inhibitor Everolimus against Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jie; Wu, Shan; Kong, Yan; Chi, Zhihong; Si, Lu; Sheng, Xinan; Cui, Chuanliang; Fang, Jing; Zhang, Jue; Guo, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The PI3K/mTOR/AKT pathway is activated in most melanomas, but mTOR inhibitors used singly have limited activity against advanced melanomas. The application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) is a promising cancer therapy approach. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic anti-tumour efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in conjunction with nsPEFs against melanoma. The combined treatment of nsPEFs and everolimus gradually decreased cell growth concurrent with nsPEF intensity. nsPEFs alone or combined with everolimus could promote melanoma cell apoptosis, accompanied with a loss in cellular mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in Ca2+ levels. In vivo experiments showed that a combination of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and nsPEFs improved the inhibitory effect, and all skin lesions caused by nsPEFs healed in 1 week without any observed adverse effect. Combination treatment induced caspase-dependent apoptosis through the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic factor Bax and downregulation of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2. Everolimus and nsPEFs synergistically inhibited angiogenesis by decreasing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor (VEGFR), and CD34. Our findings indicate that nsPEFs in combination with an mTOR inhibitor can be used as a potential treatment approach for advanced melanoma. PMID:28054548

  2. Designing Allosteric Inhibitors of Factor XIa. Lessons from the Interactions of Sulfated Pentagalloylglucopyranosides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We recently introduced sulfated pentagalloylglucopyranoside (SPGG) as an allosteric inhibitor of factor XIa (FXIa) (Al-Horani et al., J. Med Chem.2013, 56, 867–87823316863). To better understand the SPGG–FXIa interaction, we utilized eight SPGG variants and a range of biochemical techniques. The results reveal that SPGG’s sulfation level moderately affected FXIa inhibition potency and selectivity over thrombin and factor Xa. Variation in the anomeric configuration did not affect potency. Interestingly, zymogen factor XI bound SPGG with high affinity, suggesting its possible use as an antidote. Acrylamide quenching experiments suggested that SPGG induced significant conformational changes in the active site of FXIa. Inhibition studies in the presence of heparin showed marginal competition with highly sulfated SPGG variants but robust competition with less sulfated variants. Resolution of energetic contributions revealed that nonionic forces contribute nearly 87% of binding energy suggesting a strong possibility of specific interaction. Overall, the results indicate that SPGG may recognize more than one anion-binding, allosteric site on FXIa. An SPGG molecule containing approximately 10 sulfate groups on positions 2 through 6 of the pentagalloylglucopyranosyl scaffold may be the optimal FXIa inhibitor for further preclinical studies. PMID:24844380

  3. Effects of the single and combined treatment with dopamine agonist, somatostatin analog and mTOR inhibitors in a human lung carcinoid cell line: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Claudia; Rousaki, Panagoula; Negri, Mariarosaria; Sarnataro, Maddalena; Napolitano, Maria; Marino, Federica Zito; Patalano, Roberta; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Sciammarella, Concetta; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Rocco, Gaetano; Franco, Renato; Kaltsas, Gregory A; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario

    2016-09-29

    Somatostatin analogues and mTOR inhibitors have been used as medical therapy in lung carcinoids with variable results. No data are available on dopamine agonists as treatment for lung carcinoids. The main aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of the combined treatment of somatostatin analogue octreotide and the dopamine agonist cabergoline with mTOR inhibitors in an in vitro model of typical lung carcinoids: the NCI-H727 cell line. In NCI-H727 cell line, reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence were assessed to characterize the expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 and 5, dopamine receptor 2 and mTOR pathway components. Fifteen typical lung carcinoids tissue samples have been used for somatostatin receptor 2, dopamine receptor 2, and the main mTOR pathway component p70S6K expression and localization by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and western blot have been assessed to test the pharmacological effects of octreotide, cabergoline and mTOR inhibitors, and to evaluate the activation of specific cell signaling pathways in NCI-H727 cell line. NCI-H727 cell line expressed somatostatin receptor 2, somatostatin receptor 5 and dopamine receptor 2 and all mTOR pathway components at messenger and protein levels. Somatostatin receptor 2, dopamine receptor 2, and p70S6K (non phosphorylated and phosphorylated) proteins were expressed in most typical lung carcinoids tissue samples. Octreotide and cabergoline did not reduce cell viability as single agents but, when combined with mTOR inhibitors, they potentiate mTOR inhibitors effect after long-term exposure, reducing Akt and ERK phosphorylation, mTOR escape mechanisms, and increasing the expression DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4, an mTOR suppressor. In conclusion, the single use of octreotide and cabergoline is not sufficient to block cell viability but the combined approach of these agents with mTOR inhibitors

  4. Structural Basis of the Allosteric Inhibitor Interaction on the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase RNase H domain

    PubMed Central

    Christen, Martin T.; Menon, Lakshmi; Myshakina, Nataliya A.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Parniak, Michael A.; Ishima, Rieko

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has been an attractive target for the development of antiretroviral agents. Although this enzyme is bi-functional, having both DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNH) activities, there is no clinically approved inhibitor of the RNH activity. Here, we characterize the structural basis and molecular interaction of an allosteric site inhibitor, BHMP07, with the wild type (WT) RNH fragment. Solution NMR experiments for inhibitor titration on WT RNH showed relatively wide chemical shift perturbations, suggesting a long-range conformational effect on the inhibitor interaction. Comparisons of the inhibitor-induced NMR chemical-shift changes of RNH with those of RNH dimer, in the presence and absence of Mg2+, were performed to determine and verify the interaction site. The NMR results, with assistance of molecular docking, indicate that BHMP07 preferentially binds to a site that is located between the RNH active site and the region encompassing helices B and D (the “substrate-handle region”). The interaction site is consistent with the previous proposed site, identified using a chimeric RNH (p15-EC) [Gong, el (2011) Chem. Biol. Drug Des. 77, 39-47], but with slight differences that reflect the characteristics of the amino acid sequences in p15-EC compared to the WT RNH. PMID:22846652

  5. Recent Advances and Challenges of mTOR Inhibitors Use in the Treatment of Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Robalo, Conceição

    2017-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic condition characterized by the presence of benign, noninvasive, and tumor-like lesions called hamartomas that can affect multiple organ systems and are responsible for the clinical features of the disease. In the majority of cases, TSC results from mutations in the TSC1 and TSC2 genes, leading to the overactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway, which controls several cell functions, including cell growth, proliferation, and survival. The establishment of a connection between TSC and mTOR led to the clinical use of drugs known as mTOR inhibitors (like rapamycin, also known as sirolimus and everolimus), which are becoming an increasingly interesting tool in the management of TSC-associated features, such as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, renal angiomyolipomas, and also epilepsy. However, the intrinsic characteristics of these drugs and their systemic effects in such a heterogeneous condition pose many challenges in clinical practice, so that some questions remain unanswered. This article provides an overview of the pharmacological aspects of mTOR inhibitors about the clinical trials leading to their approval in TSC-related conditions and exposes current challenges and future directions associated with this promising therapeutic line. PMID:28386314

  6. Novel Inhibitors Complexed with Glutamate Dehydrogenase: ALLOSTERIC REGULATION BY CONTROL OF PROTEIN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J.; Walker, Matthew T.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2009-12-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P){sup +} as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH.

  7. Novel inhibitors complexed with glutamate dehydrogenase: allosteric regulation by control of protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J; Walker, Matthew T; Smith, Thomas J

    2009-08-21

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P)(+) as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH.

  8. An allosteric inhibitor of substrate recognition by the SCF[superscript Cdc4] ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Orlicky, Stephen; Tang, Xiaojing; Neduva, Victor; Elowe, Nadine; Brown, Eric D.; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike

    2010-09-17

    The specificity of SCF ubiquitin ligase-mediated protein degradation is determined by F-box proteins. We identified a biplanar dicarboxylic acid compound, called SCF-I2, as an inhibitor of substrate recognition by the yeast F-box protein Cdc4 using a fluorescence polarization screen to monitor the displacement of a fluorescein-labeled phosphodegron peptide. SCF-I2 inhibits the binding and ubiquitination of full-length phosphorylated substrates by SCF{sup Cdc4}. A co-crystal structure reveals that SCF-I2 inserts itself between the {beta}-strands of blades 5 and 6 of the WD40 propeller domain of Cdc4 at a site that is 25 {angstrom} away from the substrate binding site. Long-range transmission of SCF-I2 interactions distorts the substrate binding pocket and impedes recognition of key determinants in the Cdc4 phosphodegron. Mutation of the SCF-I2 binding site abrogates its inhibitory effect and explains specificity in the allosteric inhibition mechanism. Mammalian WD40 domain proteins may exhibit similar allosteric responsiveness and hence represent an extensive class of druggable target.

  9. NMR reveals the allosteric opening and closing of Abelson tyrosine kinase by ATP-site and myristoyl pocket inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Skora, Lukasz; Mestan, Jürgen; Fabbro, Doriano; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Successful treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia is based on inhibitors binding to the ATP site of the deregulated breakpoint cluster region (Bcr)–Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) fusion protein. Recently, a new type of allosteric inhibitors targeting the Abl myristoyl pocket was shown in preclinical studies to overcome ATP-site inhibitor resistance arising in some patients. Using NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering, we have analyzed the solution conformations of apo Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) and c-Abl complexes with ATP-site and allosteric inhibitors. Binding of the ATP-site inhibitor imatinib leads to an unexpected open conformation of the multidomain SH3-SH2-kinase c-Abl core, whose relevance is confirmed by cellular assays on Bcr-Abl. The combination of imatinib with the allosteric inhibitor GNF-5 restores the closed, inactivated state. Our data provide detailed insights on the poorly understood combined effect of the two inhibitor types, which is able to overcome drug resistance. PMID:24191057

  10. NMR reveals the allosteric opening and closing of Abelson tyrosine kinase by ATP-site and myristoyl pocket inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Mestan, Jürgen; Fabbro, Doriano; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2013-11-19

    Successful treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia is based on inhibitors binding to the ATP site of the deregulated breakpoint cluster region (Bcr)-Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) fusion protein. Recently, a new type of allosteric inhibitors targeting the Abl myristoyl pocket was shown in preclinical studies to overcome ATP-site inhibitor resistance arising in some patients. Using NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering, we have analyzed the solution conformations of apo Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) and c-Abl complexes with ATP-site and allosteric inhibitors. Binding of the ATP-site inhibitor imatinib leads to an unexpected open conformation of the multidomain SH3-SH2-kinase c-Abl core, whose relevance is confirmed by cellular assays on Bcr-Abl. The combination of imatinib with the allosteric inhibitor GNF-5 restores the closed, inactivated state. Our data provide detailed insights on the poorly understood combined effect of the two inhibitor types, which is able to overcome drug resistance.

  11. mTOR function and therapeutic targeting in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Stephen H; Harvey, Amanda J

    2017-01-01

    The mTOR pathway was discovered in the late 1970s after the compound and natural inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin was isolated from the bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus. mTOR is serine/threonine kinase belonging to the phosphoinositide 3-kinase related kinase (PIKK) family. It forms two distinct complexes; mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 has a key role in regulating protein synthesis and autophagy whilst mTORC2 is involved in regulating kinases of the AGC family. mTOR signaling is often over active in multiple cancer types including breast cancer. This can involve mutations in mTOR itself but more commonly, in breast cancer, this is related to an increase in activity of ErbB family receptors or alterations and mutations of PI3K signaling. Rapamycin and its analogues (rapalogues) bind to the intercellular receptor FKBP12, and then predominantly inhibit mTORC1 signaling via an allosteric mechanism. Research has shown that inhibition of mTOR is a useful strategy in tackling cancers, with it acting to slow tumor growth and limit the spread of a cancer. Rapalogues have now made their way into the clinic with the rapalogue everolimus (RAD-001/Afinitor) approved for use in conjunction with exemestane, in post-menopausal breast cancer patients with advanced disease who are HER-2 negative (normal expression), hormone receptor positive and whose prior treatment with non-steroidal aromatase inhibitors has failed. Testing across multiple trials has proven that everolimus and other rapalogues are a viable way of treating certain types of cancer. However, rapalogues have shown some drawbacks both in research and clinically, with their use often activating feedback pathways that counter their usefulness. As such, new types of inhibitors are being explored that work via different mechanisms, including inhibitors that are ATP competitive with mTOR and which act to perturb signaling from both mTOR complexes.

  12. Discovery and structural characterization of an allosteric inhibitor of bacterial cis-prenyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Danley, Dennis E; Baima, Eric T; Mansour, Mahmoud; Fennell, Kimberly F; Chrunyk, Boris A; Mueller, John P; Liu, Shenping; Qiu, Xiayang

    2015-01-01

    Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UPPs) is an essential enzyme in a key bacterial cell wall synthesis pathway. It catalyzes the consecutive condensations of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) groups on to a trans-farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) to produce a C55 isoprenoid, undecaprenyl pyrophosphate (UPP). Here we report the discovery and co-crystal structures of a drug-like UPPs inhibitor in complex with Streptococcus pneumoniae UPPs, with and without substrate FPP, at resolutions of 2.2 and 2.1 Å, respectively. The UPPs inhibitor has a low molecular weight (355 Da), but displays potent inhibition of UPP synthesis in vitro (IC50 50 nM) that translates into excellent whole cell antimicrobial activity against pathogenic strains of Streptococcal species (MIC90 0.4 µg mL(-1) ). Interestingly, the inhibitor does not compete with the substrates but rather binds at a site adjacent to the FPP binding site and interacts with the tail of the substrate. Based on the structures, an allosteric inhibition mechanism of UPPs is proposed for this inhibitor. This inhibition mechanism is supported by biochemical and biophysical experiments, and provides a basis for the development of novel antibiotics targeting Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  13. Delineating the mTOR kinase pathway using a dual TORC1/2 inhibitor, AZD8055, in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cirstea, Diana; Santo, Loredana; Hideshima, Teru; Eda, Homare; Mishima, Yuko; Nemani, Neeharika; Mahindra, Anuj; Yee, Andrew; Gorgun, Gullu; Hu, Yiguo; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Suzuki, Rikio; Cottini, Francesca; Guichard, Sylvie M; Anderson, Kenneth C; Raje, Noopur

    2014-11-01

    Despite promising preclinical results with mTOR kinase inhibitors in multiple myeloma, resistance to these drugs may arise via feedback activation loops. This concern is especially true for insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R), because IGF1R signaling is downregulated by multiple AKT and mTOR feedback mechanisms. We have tested this hypothesis in multiple myeloma using the novel selective mTOR kinase inhibitor AZD8055. We evaluated p-mTOR S(2481) as the readout for mTORC2/Akt activity in multiple myeloma cells in the context of mTOR inhibition via AZD8055 or rapamycin. We next validated AZD8055 inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 functions in multiple myeloma cells alone or in culture with bone marrow stroma cells and growth factors. Unlike rapamycin, AZD8055 resulted in apoptosis of multiple myeloma cells. AZD8055 treatment, however, induced upregulation of IGF1R phosphorylation in p-Akt S(473)-expressing multiple myeloma cell lines. Furthermore, exposure of AZD8055-treated cells to IGF1 induced p-Akt S(473) and rescued multiple myeloma cells from apoptosis despite mTOR kinase inhibition and TORC2/Akt blockage. The addition of blocking IGF1R antibody resulted in reversing this effect and increased AZD8055-induced apoptosis. Our study suggests that combination treatment with AZD8055 and IGF1R-blocking agents is a promising strategy in multiple myeloma with potential IGF1R/Akt signaling-mediated survival.

  14. Role of mTOR Inhibitors in Growth Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenomas Harboring Different FGFR4 Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Shahrzad; Monsalves, Eric; Tateno, Toru; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-09-01

    Pituitary adenomas (PAs) are common intracranial lesions. Available medical therapies are limited in PAs, and therefore, it is essential to identify treatments that control PA growth when surgery is not an option. Fibroblast growth factor 4 is implicated in PA pathogenesis; therefore, in this study, we used an isogenic mammosomatotroph cell line (GH4C1) harboring different fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-4 genotypes to establish and characterize intracranial xenograft mouse models that can be used for preclinical drug testing. We show that proliferating GH4C1 tumors have an average latency of 3 weeks to form. Histological analysis revealed that prototypic FGFR4 (G388) tumors express increased prolactin and less GH, whereas tumors possessing the polymorphic variant of FGFR4 (R388) express increased GH relative to prolactin. All tumors show abundant mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling as confirmed using phosphorylated (p)-S6 and p-4E-binding protein 1 as downstream regulators of this pathway. We subsequently demonstrate that the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 decreases tumor growth rate and reduces p-S6 but not p-4E-binding protein 1 activation, regardless of FGFR4 status. More importantly, GH activity was significantly reduced after mTOR inhibition in the R388 polymorphic variant tumors. This reduction was also associated with a concomitant reduction in serum IGF-1 levels in the R388 group. In summary, we demonstrate that the GH4C1 FGFR polymorphic xenograft is a useful model for examining PAs. Furthermore, we show that RAD001 can efficiently reduce tumor growth rate by a reduction in mTOR signaling and more importantly results in control of GH expression and IGF-1 secretion, providing further support for using mTOR inhibitors in PA patients, in particular GH-producing adenomas.

  15. Inactivation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85 complex by covalent, allosteric inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Favrot, Lorenza; Lajiness, Daniel H; Ronning, Donald R

    2014-09-05

    The rise of multidrug-resistant and totally drug-resistant tuberculosis and the association with an increasing number of HIV-positive patients developing tuberculosis emphasize the necessity to find new antitubercular targets and drugs. The antigen 85 (Ag85) complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays important roles in the biosynthesis of major components of the mycobacterial cell envelope. For this reason, Ag85 has emerged as an attractive drug target. Recently, ebselen was identified as an effective inhibitor of the Ag85 complex through covalent modification of a cysteine residue proximal to the Ag85 active site and is therefore a covalent, allosteric inhibitor. To expand the understanding of this process, we have solved the x-ray crystal structures of Ag85C covalently modified with ebselen and other thiol-reactive compounds, p-chloromercuribenzoic acid and iodoacetamide, as well as the structure of a cysteine to glycine mutant. All four structures confirm that chemical modification or mutation at this particular cysteine residue leads to the disruption of the active site hydrogen-bonded network essential for Ag85 catalysis. We also describe x-ray crystal structures of Ag85C single mutants within the catalytic triad and show that a mutation of any one of these three residues promotes the same conformational change observed in the cysteine-modified forms. These results provide evidence for active site dynamics that may afford new strategies for the development of selective and potent Ag85 inhibitors.

  16. Differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells toward the osteogenic lineage by mTOR inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Carpentieri, A; Cozzoli, E; Scimeca, M; Bonanno, E; Sardanelli, A M; Gambacurta, A

    2015-01-01

    Current hypothesis suggest that tumors can originate from adult cells after a process of 'reprogramming' driven by genetic and epigenetic alterations. These cancer cells, called cancer stem cells (CSCs), are responsible for the tumor growth and metastases. To date, the research effort has been directed to the identification, isolation and manipulation of this cell population. Independently of whether tumors were triggered by a reprogramming of gene expression or seeded by stem cells, their energetic metabolism is altered compared with a normal cell, resulting in a high aerobic glycolytic 'Warburg' phenotype and dysregulation of mitochondrial activity. This metabolic alteration is intricately linked to cancer progression.The aim of this work has been to demonstrate the possibility of differentiating a neoplastic cell toward different germ layer lineages, by evaluating the morphological, metabolic and functional changes occurring in this process. The cellular differentiation reported in this study brings to different conclusions from those present in the current literature. We demonstrate that 'in vitro' neuroblastoma cancer cells (chosen as experimental model) are able to differentiate directly into osteoblastic (by rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor) and hepatic lineage without an intermediate 'stem' cell step. This process seems owing to a synergy among few master molecules, metabolic changes and scaffold presence acting in a concerted way to control the cell fate. PMID:26561783

  17. Effects of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in murine acute lung injury models.

    PubMed

    Üstün, Sevdican; Lassnig, Caroline; Preitschopf, Andrea; Mikula, Mario; Müller, Mathias; Hengstschläger, Markus; Weichhart, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key signaling kinase associated with a variety of cellular functions including the regulation of immunological and inflammatory responses. Classic mTOR inhibitors such as rapamycin or everolimus are commonly used in transplant as well as cancer patients to prevent transplant rejection or cancer progression, respectively. Noninfectious drug-induced pneumonitis is a frequent side effect in mTOR-inhibitor-treated patients. Therefore, we tested the effects of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the novel dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in a murine lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury model. C57BL/6 mice were treated with either everolimus or NVP-BEZ235 on two consecutive days prior to intratracheal administration of LPS. LPS administration induced a significant increase in total cell, neutrophil and erythrocyte numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Histological examination revealed a serious lung injury as shown by interstitial edema, vascular congestion and mononuclear cell infiltration in these mice after 24h. Everolimus as well as NVP-BEZ235 did not noticeably affect overall histopathology of the lungs in the lung injury model. However, NVP-BEZ235 enhanced IL-6 and TNF-α expression after 24h. In contrast, everolimus did not affect IL-6 and TNF-α levels. Interestingly, both inhibitors reduced inflammatory cytokines in an LPS/oleic acid-induced lung injury model. In conclusion, the mTOR inhibitors did not worsen the overall histopathological severity, but they exerted distinct effects on proinflammatory cytokine expression in the lung depending on the lung injury model applied.

  18. [Escitalopram: a selective inhibitor and allosteric modulator of the serotonin transporter].

    PubMed

    Mnie-Filali, O; El Mansari, M; Scarna, H; Zimmer, L; Sánchez, C; Haddjeri, N

    2007-12-01

    Citalopram (Séropram) is an antidepressant of the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class, composed of equal amounts of S-enantiomer, escitalopram, and R-enantiomer, R-citalopram. Both clinical and preclinical studies have reported that escitalopram is a potent SSRI that possesses a faster onset of antidepressant activity in comparison with citalopram. Conversely, R-citalopram, although devoid of 5-HT reuptake inhibition property, was reported to counteract the effect of the S-enantiomer in several in vitro and in vivo experiments. For instance, microdialysis studies have shown that escitalopram increased the extracellular 5-HT levels in the frontal cortex and the ventral hippocampus, and this effect was prevented by concomitant injection of R-citalopram. The in vivo relevance of the antagonistic effect of R-citalopram on escitalopram efficacy was confirmed in dorsal raphe nucleus, a brain region known to be a target for SSRIs. In the later region, escitalopram was four times more potent than citalopram in suppressing the firing activity of 5-HT neurons and this effect of escitalopram was significantly prevented by R-citalopram. The antagonizing effect of R-citalopram on escitalopram efficacy was also observed in behavioural tests predictive of anxiolytic or antidepressant properties. In adult rats, R-citalopram reduced the anxiolytic-like effect of escitalopram obtained in the footshock-induced ultrasonic vocalization model, the conditioned fear model or the Vogel conflict and elevated plus maze tests. In validated chronic models with high predictive value for antidepressant activity, when escitalopram was administered for five weeks, either alone or with twice as much R-citalopram, the effect of the treatment regimens on reversal of hedonic deficit was significantly different. Importantly, chronic treatment with escitalopram reversed the decrease in cytogenesis in the rat dentate gyrus, induced by chronic mild stress. However, in naïve rats

  19. Allosteric MEK1/2 inhibitors including cobimetanib and trametinib in the treatment of cutaneous melanomas.

    PubMed

    Roskoski, Robert

    2017-03-01

    The Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK (Map kinase) cellular pathway is a highly conserved eukaryotic signaling module that transduces extracellular signals from growth factors and cytokines into intracellular regulatory events that are involved in cell growth and proliferation or the contrary pathway of cell differentiation. Dysregulation of this pathway occurs in more than one-third of all malignancies, a process that has fostered the development of targeted Map kinase pathway inhibitors. Cutaneous melanomas, which arise from skin melanocytes, are the most aggressive form of skin cancer. Mutations that activate the Map kinase pathway occur in more than 90% of these melanomas. This has led to the development of the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib or vemurafenib and cobimetanib for the treatment of BRAF V600E mutant melanomas. Dabrafenib and vemurafenib target V600E/K BRAF mutants while trametinib and cobimetanib target MEK1/2. The latter two agents bind to MEK1/2 at a site that is adjacent to, but separate from, the ATP-binding site and are therefore classified as type III allosteric protein kinase inhibitors. These agents form a hydrogen bond with a conserved β3-lysine and they make numerous hydrophobic contacts with residues within the αC-helix, the β5 strand, and within the activation segment, regions of the protein kinase domain that exhibit greater diversity than those found within the ATP-binding site. One advantage of such allosteric inhibitors is that they do not have to compete with millimolar concentrations of cellular ATP, which most FDA-approved small molecule competitive inhibitors such as imatinib must do. Owing to the wide spread activation of this pathway in numerous neoplasms, trametinib and cobimetinib are being studied in combination with other targeted and cytotoxic drugs in a variety of clinical situations. Except for BRAF and NRAS mutations, there are no other biomarkers correlated with treatment responses following MEK1/2 inhibition and the

  20. Synergistic activity of ALK and mTOR inhibitors for the treatment of NPM-ALK positive lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Sara; Ceccon, Monica; Antolini, Laura; Rigolio, Roberta; Pirola, Alessandra; Peronaci, Marco; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    ALK-positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) represents a subset of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma whose treatment benefited from crizotinib development, a dual ALK/MET inhibitor. Crizotinib blocks ALK-triggered pathways such as PI3K/AKT/mTOR, indispensable for survival of ALK-driven tumors. Despite the positive impact of targeted treatment in ALCL, resistant clones are often selected during therapy. Strategies to overcome resistance include the design of second generation drugs and the use of combined therapies that simultaneously target multiple nodes essential for cells survival. We investigated the effects of combined ALK/mTOR inhibition. We observed a specific synergistic effect of combining ALK inhibitors with an mTOR inhibitor (temsirolimus), in ALK+ lymphoma cells. The positive cooperation resulted in an increased inhibition of mTOR effectors, compared to single treatments, a block in G0/G1 phase and induction of apoptosis. The combination was able to prevent the selection of resistant clones, while long-term exposure to single agents led to the establishment of resistant cell lines, with either ALK inhibitor or temsirolimus. In vivo, mice injected with Karpas 299 cells and treated with low dose combination showed complete regression of tumors, while only partial inhibition was obtained in single agents-treated mice. Upon treatment stop the combination was able to significantly delay tumor relapses. Re-challenge of relapsed tumors at a higher dose led to full regression of xenografts in the combination group, but not in mice treated with lorlatinib alone. In conclusion, our data suggest that the combination of ALK and mTOR inhibitors could be a valuable therapeutic option for ALK+ ALCL patients. PMID:27662658

  1. Preclinical Characterization of BMS-791325, an Allosteric Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengping; Gentles, Robert G.; Ding, Min; Voss, Stacey; Pelosi, Lenore A.; Wang, Ying-Kai; Rigat, Karen L.; Mosure, Kathleen W.; Bender, John A.; Knipe, Jay O.; Colonno, Richard; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Kadow, John F.; Santone, Kenneth S.; Roberts, Susan B.; Gao, Min

    2014-01-01

    BMS-791325 is an allosteric inhibitor that binds to thumb site 1 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. BMS-791325 inhibits recombinant NS5B proteins from HCV genotypes 1, 3, 4, and 5 at 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) below 28 nM. In cell culture, BMS-791325 inhibited replication of HCV subgenomic replicons representing genotypes 1a and 1b at 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 3 nM and 6 nM, respectively, with similar (3 to 18 nM) values for genotypes 3a, 4a, and 5a. Potency against genotype 6a showed more variability (9 to 125 nM), and activity was weaker against genotype 2 (EC50, 87 to 925 nM). Specificity was demonstrated by the absence of activity (EC50s of >4 μM) against a panel of mammalian viruses, and cytotoxic concentrations (50%) were >3,000-fold above the HCV EC50. Resistance substitutions selected by BMS-791325 in genotype 1 replicons mostly mapped to a single site, NS5B amino acid 495 (P495A/S/L/T). Additive or synergistic activity was observed in combination studies using BMS-791325 with alfa interferon plus ribavirin, inhibitors of NS3 protease or NS5A, and other classes of NS5B inhibitor (palm site 2-binding or nucleoside analogs). Plasma and liver exposures in vivo in several animal species indicated that BMS-791325 has a hepatotropic disposition (liver-to-plasma ratios ranging from 1.6- to 60-fold across species). Twenty-four hours postdose, liver exposures across all species tested were ≥10-fold above the inhibitor EC50s observed with HCV genotype 1 replicons. These findings support the evaluation of BMS-791325 in combination regimens for the treatment of HCV. Phase 3 studies are ongoing. PMID:24733465

  2. Benzothiophene Carboxylate Derivatives as Novel Allosteric Inhibitors of Branched-chain α-Ketoacid Dehydrogenase Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Tso, Shih-Chia; Gui, Wen-Jun; Wu, Cheng-Yang; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Qi, Xiangbing; Skvorak, Kristen J.; Dorko, Kenneth; Wallace, Amy L.; Morlock, Lorraine K.; Lee, Brendan H.; Hutson, Susan M.; Strom, Stephen C.; Williams, Noelle S.; Tambar, Uttam K.; Wynn, R. Max; Chuang, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC) is negatively regulated by reversible phosphorylation. BCKDC kinase (BDK) inhibitors that augment BCKDC flux have been shown to reduce branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) concentrations in vivo. In the present study, we employed high-throughput screens to identify compound 3,6-dichlorobenzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid (BT2) as a novel BDK inhibitor (IC50 = 3.19 μm). BT2 binds to the same site in BDK as other known allosteric BDK inhibitors, including (S)-α-cholorophenylproprionate ((S)-CPP). BT2 binding to BDK triggers helix movements in the N-terminal domain, resulting in the dissociation of BDK from the BCKDC accompanied by accelerated degradation of the released kinase in vivo. BT2 shows excellent pharmacokinetics (terminal T½ = 730 min) and metabolic stability (no degradation in 240 min), which are significantly better than those of (S)-CPP. BT2, its analog 3-chloro-6-fluorobenzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid (BT2F), and a prodrug of BT2 (i.e. N-(4-acetamido-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl)-3,6-dichlorobenzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxamide (BT3)) significantly increase residual BCKDC activity in cultured cells and primary hepatocytes from patients and a mouse model of maple syrup urine disease. Administration of BT2 at 20 mg/kg/day to wild-type mice for 1 week leads to nearly complete dephosphorylation and maximal activation of BCKDC in heart, muscle, kidneys, and liver with reduction in plasma BCAA concentrations. The availability of benzothiophene carboxylate derivatives as stable BDK inhibitors may prove useful for the treatment of metabolic disease caused by elevated BCAA concentrations. PMID:24895126

  3. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E.; Hoyte, Ashley C.; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. PMID:27517812

  4. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Hoyte, Ashley C; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2016-11-10

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

  5. Targeting the disordered C-terminus of PTP1B with an allosteric inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Navasona; Koveal, Dorothy; Miller, Daniel H.; Xue, Bin; Akshinthala, Sai Dipikaa; Kragelj, Jaka; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Gauss, Carla-Maria; Page, Rebecca; Blackledge, Martin; Muthuswamy, Senthil K.; Peti, Wolfgang; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2014-01-01

    PTP1B, a validated therapeutic target for diabetes and obesity, plays a critical positive role in HER2 signaling in breast tumorigenesis. Efforts to develop therapeutic inhibitors of PTP1B have been frustrated by the chemical properties of the active site. We defined a novel mechanism of allosteric inhibition that targets the C-terminal, non-catalytic segment of PTP1B. We present the first ensemble structure of PTP1B containing this intrinsically disordered segment, within which we identified a binding site for the small molecule inhibitor, MSI-1436. We demonstrate binding to a second site close to the catalytic domain, with cooperative effects between the two sites locking PTP1B in an inactive state. MSI-1436 antagonized HER2 signaling, inhibited tumorigenesis in xenografts and abrogated metastasis in the NDL2 mouse model of breast cancer, validating inhibition of PTP1B as a therapeutic strategy in breast cancer. This new approach to inhibition of PTP1B emphasizes the potential of disordered segments of proteins as specific binding sites for therapeutic small molecules. PMID:24845231

  6. Divergent allosteric control of the IRE1α endoribonuclease using kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Likun; Perera, B. Gayani K.; Hari, Sanjay B.; Bhhatarai, Barun; Backes, Bradley J.; Seeliger, Markus A.; Schürer, Stephan C.; Oakes, Scott A.; Papa, Feroz R.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2012-01-01

    Under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, unfolded proteins accumulate in the ER to activate the ER transmembrane kinase/endoribonuclease (RNase)—IRE1α. IRE1α oligomerizes, autophosphorylates, and initiates splicing of XBP1 mRNA, thus triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). Here we show that IRE1α’s kinase-controlled RNase can be regulated in two distinct modes with kinase inhibitors: one class of ligands occupy IRE1α’s kinase ATP-binding site to activate RNase-mediated XBP1 mRNA splicing even without upstream ER stress, while a second class can inhibit the RNase through the same ATP-binding site, even under ER stress. Thus, alternative kinase conformations stabilized by distinct classes of ATP-competitive inhibitors can cause allosteric switching of IRE1α’s RNase—either on or off. As dysregulation of the UPR has been implicated in a variety of cell degenerative and neoplastic disorders, small molecule control over IRE1α should advance efforts to understand the UPR’s role in pathophysiology and to develop drugs for ER stress-related diseases. PMID:23086298

  7. Allosteric FBPase inhibitors gain 10(5) times in potency when simultaneously binding two neighboring AMP sites.

    PubMed

    Hebeisen, Paul; Kuhn, Bernd; Kohler, Philipp; Gubler, Marcel; Huber, Walter; Kitas, Eric; Schott, Brigitte; Benz, Jörg; Joseph, Catherine; Ruf, Armin

    2008-08-15

    Human fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase, EC 3.1.3.11) is a key gluconeogenic enzyme, responsible for the hydrolysis of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to fructose-6-phosphate, and thus presents an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutics focused on lowering the hepatic glucose production in type 2 diabetics. In its active form FBPase exists as a homotetramer and is allosterically regulated by AMP. In an HTS campaign aromatic sulfonylureas have been identified as FBPase inhibitors mimicking AMP. By bridging two adjacent allosteric binding sites using two aromatic sulfonylureas as anchor units and covalently linking them, it was possible to obtain dual binding AMP site inhibitors that exhibit a strong inhibitory effect.

  8. Overcoming EGFR(T790M) and EGFR(C797S) resistance with mutant-selective allosteric inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yong; Yun, Cai-Hong; Park, Eunyoung; Ercan, Dalia; Manuia, Mari; Juarez, Jose; Xu, Chunxiao; Rhee, Kevin; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Haikuo; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Jang, Jaebong; Lelais, Gerald; DiDonato, Michael; Bursulaya, Badry; Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Epple, Robert; Marsilje, Thomas H; McNeill, Matthew; Lu, Wenshuo; Harris, Jennifer; Bender, Steven; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Jänne, Pasi A; Eck, Michael J

    2016-06-02

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-directed tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib are approved treatments for non-small cell lung cancers harbouring activating mutations in the EGFR kinase, but resistance arises rapidly, most frequently owing to the secondary T790M mutation within the ATP site of the receptor. Recently developed mutant-selective irreversible inhibitors are highly active against the T790M mutant, but their efficacy can be compromised by acquired mutation of C797, the cysteine residue with which they form a key covalent bond. All current EGFR TKIs target the ATP-site of the kinase, highlighting the need for therapeutic agents with alternative mechanisms of action. Here we describe the rational discovery of EAI045, an allosteric inhibitor that targets selected drug-resistant EGFR mutants but spares the wild-type receptor. The crystal structure shows that the compound binds an allosteric site created by the displacement of the regulatory C-helix in an inactive conformation of the kinase. The compound inhibits L858R/T790M-mutant EGFR with low-nanomolar potency in biochemical assays. However, as a single agent it is not effective in blocking EGFR-driven proliferation in cells owing to differential potency on the two subunits of the dimeric receptor, which interact in an asymmetric manner in the active state. We observe marked synergy of EAI045 with cetuximab, an antibody therapeutic that blocks EGFR dimerization, rendering the kinase uniformly susceptible to the allosteric agent. EAI045 in combination with cetuximab is effective in mouse models of lung cancer driven by EGFR(L858R/T790M) and by EGFR(L858R/T790M/C797S), a mutant that is resistant to all currently available EGFR TKIs. More generally, our findings illustrate the utility of purposefully targeting allosteric sites to obtain mutant-selective inhibitors.

  9. Potent Allosteric Dengue Virus NS5 Polymerase Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Resistance Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Noble, Christian Guy; Seh, Cheah Chen; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; El Sahili, Abbas; Chan, Grace Kar Yarn; Lescar, Julien; Arora, Rishi; Benson, Timothy; Nilar, Shahul; Manjunatha, Ujjini; Wan, Kah Fei; Dong, Hongping; Xie, Xuping; Yokokawa, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses comprise major emerging pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV) or Zika virus (ZIKV). The flavivirus RNA genome is replicated by the RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of non-structural protein 5 (NS5). This essential enzymatic activity renders the RdRp attractive for antiviral therapy. NS5 synthesizes viral RNA via a “de novo” initiation mechanism. Crystal structures of the flavivirus RdRp revealed a “closed” conformation reminiscent of a pre-initiation state, with a well ordered priming loop that extrudes from the thumb subdomain into the dsRNA exit tunnel, close to the “GDD” active site. To-date, no allosteric pockets have been identified for the RdRp, and compound screening campaigns did not yield suitable drug candidates. Using fragment-based screening via X-ray crystallography, we found a fragment that bound to a pocket of the apo-DENV RdRp close to its active site (termed “N pocket”). Structure-guided improvements yielded DENV pan-serotype inhibitors of the RdRp de novo initiation activity with nano-molar potency that also impeded elongation activity at micro-molar concentrations. Inhibitors exhibited mixed inhibition kinetics with respect to competition with the RNA or GTP substrate. The best compounds have EC50 values of 1–2 μM against all four DENV serotypes in cell culture assays. Genome-sequencing of compound-resistant DENV replicons, identified amino acid changes that mapped to the N pocket. Since inhibitors bind at the thumb/palm interface of the RdRp, this class of compounds is proposed to hinder RdRp conformational changes during its transition from initiation to elongation. This is the first report of a class of pan-serotype and cell-active DENV RdRp inhibitors. Given the evolutionary conservation of residues lining the N pocket, these molecules offer insights to treat other serious conditions caused by flaviviruses. PMID:27500641

  10. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  11. The Role of mTOR Inhibitors in the Treatment of Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Evidence-based and Expert Opinions.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Paolo; Bjørnvold, Marit; Dill, Patricia E; Ferreira, José Carlos; Feucht, Martha; Hertzberg, Christoph; Jansen, Anna; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Kingswood, J Christopher; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Macaya, Alfons; Moavero, Romina; Nabbout, Rima; Zonnenberg, Bernard A

    2016-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disorder arising from mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. The resulting over-activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway leaves patients with TSC susceptible to the growth of non-malignant tumours in multiple organs. Previously, surgery was the main therapeutic option for TSC. However, pharmacological therapy with mTOR inhibitors such as everolimus and sirolimus is now emerging as an alternate approach. Everolimus and sirolimus have already been shown to be effective in treating subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) and renal angiomyolipoma (AML), and everolimus is currently being evaluated in treating TSC-related epilepsy. In November 2013 a group of European experts convened to discuss the current options and practical considerations for treating various manifestations of TSC. This article provides evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of SEGA, TSC-related epilepsy and renal AML, with a focus on where mTOR inhibitor therapy may be considered alongside other treatment options. Safety considerations regarding mTOR inhibitor therapy are also reviewed. With evidence of beneficial effects in neurological and non-neurological TSC manifestations, mTOR inhibitors may represent a systemic treatment for TSC.

  12. Abrogating phosphorylation of eIF4B is required for EGFR and mTOR inhibitor synergy in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Julie M; Mueller, Kelly L; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Stemmer, Paul; Mattingly, Raymond R; Boerner, Julie L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients suffer from a highly malignant and aggressive disease. They have a high rate of relapse and often develop resistance to standard chemotherapy. Many TNBCs have elevated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) but are resistant to EGFR inhibitors as monotherapy. In this study we sought to find a combination therapy that could sensitize TNBC to EGFR inhibitors. Methods Phospho-mass spectrometry was performed on the TNBC cell line, BT20, treated with 0.5 μM gefitinib. Immunoblotting measured protein levels and phosphorylation. Colony formation and growth assays analyzed the treatment on cell proliferation while MTT assays determined the synergistic effect of inhibitor combination. A dual luciferase reporter gene plasmid measured translation. All statistical analysis was done on CalucuSyn and GraphPad Prism using ANOVAs. Results Phospho-proteomics identified the mTOR pathway to be of interest in EGFR inhibitor resistance. In our studies, combining gefitinib and temsirolimus decreased cell growth and survival in a synergistic manner. Our data identified eIF4B, as a potentially key fragile point in EGFR and mTOR inhibitor synergy. Decreased eIF4B phosphorylation correlated with drops in growth, viability, clonogenic survival, and cap-dependent translation. Conclusions Taken together these data suggest EGFR and mTOR inhibitors abrogate growth, viability, and survival via disruption of eIF4B phosphorylation leading to decreased translation in TNBC cell lines. Further, including an mTOR inhibitor along with an EGFR inhibitor in TNBC with increased EGFR expression should be further explored. Additionally, translational regulation may play in important role in regulating EGFR and mTOR inhibitor synergy and warrants further investigation. PMID:25129346

  13. Benzothiazole Derivative as a Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis Shikimate Kinase Inhibitor: Identification and Elucidation of Its Allosteric Mode of Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Rukmankesh; Rajput, Vikrant Singh; Gupta, Monika; Chib, Reena; Kumar, Amit; Wazir, Priya; Khan, Inshad Ali; Nargotra, Amit

    2016-05-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate kinase (Mtb-SK) is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids through the shikimate pathway. Since it is proven to be essential for the survival of the microbe and is absent from mammals, it is a promising target for anti-TB drug discovery. In this study, a combined approach of in silico similarity search and pharmacophore building using already reported inhibitors was used to screen a procured library of 20,000 compounds of the commercially available ChemBridge database. From the in silico screening, 15 hits were identified, and these hits were evaluated in vitro for Mtb-SK enzyme inhibition. Two compounds presented significant enzyme inhibition with IC50 values of 10.69 ± 0.9 and 46.22 ± 1.2 μM. The best hit was then evaluated for the in vitro mode of inhibition where it came out to be an uncompetitive and noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to shikimate (SKM) and ATP, respectively, suggesting its binding at an allosteric site. Potential binding sites of Mtb-SK were identified which confirmed the presence of an allosteric binding pocket apart from the ATP and SKM binding sites. The docking simulations were performed at this pocket in order to find the mode of binding of the best hit in the presence of substrates and the products of the enzymatic reaction. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidated the probability of inhibitor binding at the allosteric site in the presence of ADP and shikimate-3-phosphate (S-3-P), that is, after the formation of products of the reaction. The inhibitor binding may prevent the release of the product from Mtb-SK, thereby inhibiting its activity. The binding stability and the key residue interactions of the inhibitor to this product complex were also revealed by the MD simulations. Residues ARG43, ILE45, and PHE57 were identified as crucial that were involved in interactions with the best hit. This is the first report of an allosteric binding site of Mtb-SK, which

  14. Initial Testing (Stage 1) of the Investigational mTOR Kinase Inhibitor MLN0128 by the Pediatric Preclinical Testing Program

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min H.; Reynolds, C. Patrick; Maris, John M.; Gorlick, Richard; Kolb, E. Anders; Lock, Richard; Carol, Hernan; Keir, Stephen T.; Wu, Jianrong; Lyalin, Dmitry; Kurmasheva, Raushan T.; Houghton, Peter J.; Smith, Malcolm A.

    2014-01-01

    MLN0128 is an investigational small molecule ATP-competitive inhibitor of the serine/threonine kinase mTOR. MLN0128 was tested against the in vitro panel at concentrations ranging from 0.1 nM to 1 μM and against the PPTP in vivo panels at a dose of 1 mg/kg administered orally daily x 28. In vitro the median relative IC50 concentration was 19 nM. In vivo MLN0128 induced significant differences in EFS in 24/31 (77%) solid tumor models, but 0/7 ALL xenografts. The modest activity observed for MLN0128 against the PPTP preclinical models is similar to that previously reported for another TOR kinase inhibitor. PMID:24623675

  15. Methods to identify molecular expression of mTOR pathway: a rationale approach to stratify patients affected by clear cell renal cell carcinoma for more likely response to mTOR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, Claudia; Massari, Francesco; Pedron, Serena; Sanavio, Sara; Ciccarese, Chiara; Porcaro, Antonio Benito; Artibani, Walter; Bertoldo, Francesco; Zampini, Claudia; Sava, Teodoro; Ficial, Miriam; Caliò, Anna; Chilosi, Marco; D’Amuri, Alessandro; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Tortora, Giampaolo; Scarpa, Aldo; Delahunt, Brett; Porta, Camillo; Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Since target therapy with mTOR inhibitors plays an important role in the current management of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), there is an increasing demand for predictive biomarkers, which may help to select patients that are most likely to benefit from personalized treatment. When dealing with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer tissue specimens, several techniques may be used to identify potential molecular markers, yielding different outcome in terms of accuracy. We sought to investigate and compare the capability of three main techniques to detect molecules performing an active function in mTOR pathway in RCC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), Western blot (WB) and immunofluorescence (IF) analyses were performed on FFPE RCC tissue specimens from 16 patients by using the following mTOR pathway-related: mTOR (Ser235/236), phospho-mTOR (p-mTOR/Ser2448), phospho-p70S6k (p-p70S6k/Thr389), both monoclonal and polyclonal, phospho-S6Rb (p-S6Rb) and phospho-4EBP1 (p-4EBP1/Thr37/46). No single molecule was simultaneously revealed by all three techniques. Only p-p70S6k was detected by two methods (IHC and IF) using a monoclonal antibody. The other molecules were detected exclusively by one technique, as follows: p-mTOR and polyclonal p-p70S6K by IHC, p70S6K, p-S6Rb and p-4EBP1 by WB, and, finally, mTOR by IF. We found significant differences in detecting mTOR pathway-related active biomarkers by using three common techniques such as IHC, WB and IF on RCC samples. Such results have important implications in terms of predictive biomarker testing, and need to be related to clinical end-points such as responsiveness to targeted drugs by prospective studies. PMID:25520878

  16. A Phase Ib Study of BEZ235, a Dual Inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ana M.; Lakhman, Yulia; Patil, Sujata; Woo, Kaitlin; DeLuca, John; Lee, Chung-Han; Hsieh, James J.; Feldman, Darren R.; Motzer, Robert J.; H. Voss, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Our results highlight additional toxicities of dual PI3K/mTOR inhibition in the clinical setting that were unforeseen from preclinical models. Because of toxicity and lack of efficacy, BEZ235 should not be further developed in the current formulation for patients with renal cell carcinoma. Background. Allosteric inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are approved for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Preclinical models have suggested that dual inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mTOR kinase may establish superior anticancer effect. We aimed to establish safety for BEZ235, a potent inhibitor of both PI3K and mTOR, in advanced RCC. Methods. Patients with advanced RCC who had previously failed standard therapy received escalating doses of BEZ235 in sachet formulation twice daily until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Primary endpoints were to identify the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) and to determine the recommended dose for the phase II study. Results. The study was terminated early because of high incidence of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) across all dose levels tested. Ten patients were treated with BEZ235—six with clear cell and four with non-clear cell subtypes. Five of these patients suffered DLTs: 2 of 2 patients in the original 400 mg b.i.d. cohort, 1 of 6 in the 200 mg b.i.d. cohort, and 2 of 2 in the 300 mg b.i.d. cohort. DLTs included fatigue, rash, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, mucositis, anorexia, and dysgeusia. Five patients were evaluable for response: Two had stable disease as best response, and three had progressive disease. Conclusion. BEZ235 twice daily resulted in significant toxicity without objective responses; further development of this compound will not be pursued in this disease. PMID:27286790

  17. Phase I study of the mTOR inhibitor ridaforolimus and the HDAC inhibitor vorinostat in advanced renal cell carcinoma and other solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zibelman, Matthew; Wong, Yu-Ning; Devarajan, Karthik; Malizzia, Lois; Corrigan, Alycia; Olszanski, Anthony J.; Denlinger, Crystal S.; Roethke, Susan K.; Tetzlaff, Colleen H.; Plimack, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Drugs inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) are approved in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but resistance inevitably emerges. Proposed escape pathways include increased phosphorylation of Akt, which can be down regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. We hypothesized that co-treatment with the mTOR inhibitor ridaforolimus and the HDAC inhibitor vorinostat may abrogate resistance in RCC. Methods This phase 1 study evaluated the co-administration of ridaforolimus and vorinostat in patients with advanced solid tumors. The primary objective was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in RCC patients. Although all solid tumors were allowed, prior cytotoxic chemotherapy was limited to 1 regimen. Using a modified 3+3 dose escalation design, various dose combinations were tested concurrently in separate cohorts. Efficacy was a secondary endpoint. Results Fifteen patients were treated at one of three dose levels, thirteen with RCC (10 clear cell, 3 papillary). Dosing was limited by thrombocytopenia. The MTD was determined to be ridaforolimus 20mg daily days 1–5 with vorinostat 100mg BID days 1–3 weekly, however late onset thrombocytopenia led to a lower recommended phase II dose: ridaforolimus 20mg daily days 1–5 with vorinostat 100mg daily days 1–3 weekly. Two patients, both with papillary RCC, maintained disease control for 54 and 80 weeks, respectively. Conclusions The combination of ridaforolimus and vorinostat was tolerable at the recommended phase II dose. Two patients with papillary RCC experienced prolonged disease stabilization, thus further study of combined HDAC and mTOR inhibition in this population is warranted. PMID:26091915

  18. Phase I dose-escalation study of the mTOR inhibitor sirolimus and the HDAC inhibitor vorinostat in patients with advanced malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Haeseong; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Falchook, Gerald S.; Piha-Paul, Sarina A.; Wheler, Jennifer J.; Hong, David S.; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Subbiah, Vivek; Zinner, Ralph G.; Kaseb, Ahmed O.; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Fanale, Michelle A.; Velez-Bravo, Vivianne M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kurzrock, Razelle; Janku, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical models suggest that histone deacetylase (HDAC) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors have synergistic anticancer activity. We designed a phase I study to determine the safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended phase II dose (RP2D), and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of combined mTOR inhibitor sirolimus (1 mg-5 mg PO daily) and HDAC inhibitor vorinostat (100 mg-400 mg PO daily) in patients with advanced cancer. Seventy patients were enrolled and 46 (66%) were evaluable for DLT assessment since they completed cycle 1 without dose modification unless they had DLT. DLTs comprised grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n = 6) and grade 3 mucositis (n = 1). Sirolimus 4 mg and vorinostat 300 mg was declared RP2D because MTD with sirolimus 5 mg caused significant thrombocytopenia. The grade 3 and 4 drug-related toxic effects (including DLTs) were thrombocytopenia (31%), neutropenia (8%), anemia (7%), fatigue (3%), mucositis (1%), diarrhea (1%), and hyperglycemia (1%). Of the 70 patients, 35 (50%) required dose interruption or modification and 61 were evaluable for response. Partial responses were observed in refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (−78%) and perivascular epithelioid tumor (−54%), and stable disease in hepatocellular carcinoma and fibromyxoid sarcoma. In conclusion, the combination of sirolimus and vorinostat was feasible, with thrombocytopenia as the main DLT. Preliminary anticancer activity was observed in patients with refractory Hodgkin lymphoma, perivascular epithelioid tumor, and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27589687

  19. mTOR inhibitor-induced interstitial lung disease in cancer patients: Comprehensive review and a practical management algorithm.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Annelieke E C A B; Grutters, Jan C; Gerritsen, Winald R; van Erp, Nielka P; van Herpen, Carla M L; Tol, Jolien

    2016-05-15

    Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) have clinically significant activity against various malignancies, such as renal cell carcinoma and breast cancer, but their use can be complicated by several toxicities. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an adverse event of particular importance. Mostly, mTORi-induced ILD remains asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic, but it can also lead to severe morbidity and even mortality. Therefore, careful diagnosis and management of ILD is warranted. The reported incidence of mTORi-induced ILD varies widely because of a lack of uniform diagnostic criteria and active surveillance. Because of the nonspecific clinical features, a broad differential diagnosis that includes (opportunistic) infections should be considered in case of suspicion of mTORi-induced ILD. The exact mechanism or interplay of mechanisms leading to the development of ILD remains to be defined. Suggested mechanisms are either a direct toxic effect or immune-mediated mechanisms, considering mTOR inhibitors have several effects on the immune system. The clinical course of ILD varies widely and is difficult to predict. Consequently, the discrimination between when mTOR inhibitors can be continued safely and when discontinuation is indicated is challenging. In this review, we give a comprehensive review of the incidence, clinical presentation and pathophysiology of mTORi-induced ILD in cancer patients. We present newly developed diagnostic criteria for ILD, which include clinical symptoms as well as basic pulmonary function tests and radiological abnormalities. In conjunction with these diagnostic criteria, we provide a detailed and easily applicable clinical management algorithm.

  20. PI-103, a dual inhibitor of Class IA phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase and mTOR, has antileukemic activity in AML.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Chapuis, N; Bardet, V; Tamburini, J; Gallay, N; Willems, L; Knight, Z A; Shokat, K M; Azar, N; Viguié, F; Ifrah, N; Dreyfus, F; Mayeux, P; Lacombe, C; Bouscary, D

    2008-09-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathways are frequently activated in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). mTORC1 inhibition with RAD001 induces PI3K/Akt activation and both pathways are activated independently, providing a rationale for dual inhibition of both pathways. PI-103 is a new potent PI3K/Akt and mTOR inhibitor. In human leukemic cell lines and in primary blast cells from AML patients, PI-103 inhibited constitutive and growth factor-induced PI3K/Akt and mTORC1 activation. PI-103 was essentially cytostatic for cell lines and induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. In blast cells, PI-103 inhibited leukemic proliferation, the clonogenicity of leukemic progenitors and induced mitochondrial apoptosis, especially in the compartment containing leukemic stem cells. In contrast, apoptosis was not induced with RAD001 and IC87114 association, which specifically inhibits mTORC1 and p110delta activity, respectively. PI-103 had additive proapoptotic effects with etoposide in blast cells and in immature leukemic cells. Interestingly, PI-103 did not induce apoptosis in normal CD34(+) cells and had moderate effects on their clonogenic and proliferative properties. Here, we demonstrate that multitargeted therapy against PI3K/Akt and mTOR with PI-103 may be of therapeutic value in AML.

  1. Long-term mTOR inhibitors administration evokes altered calcium homeostasis and platelet dysfunction in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    López, Esther; Berna-Erro, Alejandro; Bermejo, Nuria; Brull, José María; Martinez, Rocío; Garcia Pino, Guadalupe; Alvarado, Raul; Salido, Ginés María; Rosado, Juan Antonio; Cubero, Juan José; Redondo, Pedro Cosme

    2013-01-01

    The use of the mammal target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors has been consolidated as the therapy of election for preventing graft rejection in kidney transplant patients, despite their immunosuppressive activity is less strong than anti-calcineurin agents like tacrolimus and cyclosporine A. Furthermore, as mTOR is widely expressed, rapamycin (a macrolide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus) is recommended in patients presenting neoplasia due to its antiproliferative actions. Hence, we have investigated whether rapamycin presents side effects in the physiology of other cell types different from leucocytes, such as platelets. Blood samples were drawn from healthy volunteers and kidney transplant patients long-term medicated with rapamycin: sirolimus and everolimus. Platelets were either loaded with fura-2 or directly stimulated, and immunoassayed or fixed with Laemmli's buffer to perform the subsequent analysis of platelet physiology. Our results indicate that rapamycin evokes a biphasic time-dependent alteration in calcium homeostasis and function in platelets from kidney transplant patients under rapamycin regime, as demonstrated by the reduction in granule secretion observed and subsequent impairment of platelet aggregation in these patients compared with healthy volunteers. Platelet count was also reduced in these patients, thus 41% of patients presented thrombocytopenia. All together our results show that long-term administration of rapamycin to kidney transplant patients evokes alteration in platelet function. PMID:23577651

  2. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R.; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A.; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-01-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5–inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented. PMID:27139631

  3. Novel agents and associated toxicities of inhibitors of the pi3k/Akt/mtor pathway for the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chia, S.; Gandhi, S.; Joy, A.A.; Edwards, S.; Gorr, M.; Hopkins, S.; Kondejewski, J.; Ayoub, J.P.; Califaretti, N.; Rayson, D.; Dent, S.F.

    2015-01-01

    The pi3k/Akt/mtor (phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/ Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling pathway is an established driver of oncogenic activity in human malignancies. Therapeutic targeting of this pathway holds significant promise as a treatment strategy. Everolimus, an mtor inhibitor, is the first of this class of agents approved for the treatment of hormone receptor–positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative advanced breast cancer. Everolimus has been associated with significant improvements in progression-free survival; however, it is also associated with increased toxicity related to its specific mechanism of action. Methods A comprehensive review of the literature conducted using a focused medline search was combined with a search of current trials at http://ClinicalTrials.gov/. Summary tables of the toxicities of the various classes of pi3k/Akt/mtor inhibitors were created. A broad group of Canadian health care professionals was assembled to review the data and to produce expert opinion and summary recommendations for possible best practices in managing the adverse events associated with these pathway inhibitors. Results Differing toxicities are associated with the various classes of pi3k/Akt/mtor pathway inhibitors. The most common unique adverse events observed in everolimus clinical trials in breast cancer include stomatitis (all grades: approximately 60%), noninfectious pneumonitis (15%), rash (40%), hyperglycemia (15%), and immunosuppression (40%). To minimize grades 3 and 4 toxicities and to attempt to attain optimal outcomes, effective management of those adverse events is critical. Management should be interdisciplinary and should use approaches that include education, early recognition, active intervention, and potentially prophylactic strategies. Discussion Everolimus likely represents the first of many complex oral targeted therapies for the treatment of breast cancer. Using this agent as a template, it is essential to

  4. Conformational Changes in the Activation Loop of Mitochondrial Glutaminase C: A Direct Fluorescence Read-Out that Distinguishes the Binding of Allosteric Inhibitors from Activators.

    PubMed

    Stalnecker, Clint A; Erickson, Jon W; Cerione, Richard A

    2017-02-14

    The first step in glutamine catabolism is catalyzed by the mitochondrial enzyme glutaminase, with a specific isoform, glutaminase C (GAC), being highly expressed in cancer cells. GAC activation requires the formation of homo-tetramers, promoted by anionic allosteric activators such as inorganic phosphate. This leads to the proper orientation of a flexible loop proximal to the dimer-dimer interface that is essential for catalysis (i.e. the activation loop). A major class of allosteric inhibitors of GAC, with the prototype being BPTES (bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide), and the related molecule CB-839, binds to the activation loop and induces the formation of an inactive tetramer (2 inhibitors bound per active tetramer). Here, we describe a direct readout for monitoring the dynamics of the activation loop of GAC in response to these allosteric inhibitors, as well as allosteric activators, through the substitution of phenylalanine at position 327 with tryptophan (F327W). The tryptophan fluorescence of the GAC(F327W) mutant undergoes a marked quenching upon the binding of BPTES or CB-839, yielding titration profiles that make it possible to measure the binding affinities of these inhibitors for the enzyme. Allosteric activators like phosphate induce the opposite effect (i.e. a fluorescence enhancement). These results describe direct read-outs for the binding of the BPTES-class of allosteric inhibitors, as well as for inorganic phosphate and related activators of GAC, which should facilitate screening for additional modulators of this important metabolic enzyme.

  5. Radio-sensitization effect of an mTOR inhibitor, temsirolimus, on lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ushijima, Hiroki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Oike, Takahiro; Komachi, Mayumi; Yoshimoto, Yuya; Ando, Ken; Okonogi, Noriyuki; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-ei; Saito, Jun-ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) correlates with cell survival under hypoxia and regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a key protein in hypoxia-related events. However, the role of mTOR in radio-resistance has not been fully investigated. Therefore, the effect of mTOR on the radio-resistance of cancer cells under hypoxia was evaluated using the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. Clonogenic survival was examined in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line under normoxia or hypoxia, with or without temsirolimus. An oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was calculated using the D10 values, the doses giving 10% survival. Western blotting was performed to investigate the effect of temsirolimus on mTOR and the HIF-1α pathway under normoxia and hypoxia. A549 cells showed a radio-resistance of 5.1 and 14.2 Gy, as indicated by D10 values under normoxia and hypoxia, respectively; the OER was 2.8. The cell survival rates under hypoxia and with temsirolimus remarkably decreased compared with those under normoxia. The D10 values of the cells under normoxia and hypoxia were 4.8 and 5.4 Gy, respectively (OER = 1.1). mTOR expression was suppressed by temsirolimus under both normoxia and hypoxia. HIF-1α expression decreased under hypoxia in the presence of temsirolimus. These results suggest that temsirolimus can overcome the radio-resistance induced by hypoxia. When the fact that mTOR acts upstream of HIF-1α is considered, our data suggest that the restoration of radiation sensitivity by temsirolimus under hypoxia may be associated with the suppression of the HIF-1α pathway. Temsirolimus could therefore be used as a hypoxic cell radio-sensitizer. PMID:25887043

  6. Rapamycin Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as a New Tool to Deliver mTOR Inhibitors: Formulation and in Vitro Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Polchi, Alice; Magini, Alessandro; Mazuryk, Jarosław; Tancini, Brunella; Gapiński, Jacek; Patkowski, Adam; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Emiliani, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, in particular rapamycin (Rp), has been suggested to improve the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, as Rp is a strong immunosuppressant, specific delivery to the brain has been postulated to avoid systemic exposure. In this work, we fabricated new Rp loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (Rp-SLN) stabilized with polysorbate 80 (PS80), comparing two different methods and lipids. The formulations were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and particle tracking. In vitro release and short-term stability were assessed. Biological behavior of Rp-SLN was tested in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) was evaluated over time by a pulse-chase study compared to free Rp and Rp nanocrystals. Compritol Rp-SLN resulted more stable and possessing proper size and surface properties with respect to cetyl palmitate Rp-SLN. Rapamycin was entrapped in an amorphous form in the solid lipid matrix that showed partial crystallinity with stable Lβ, sub-Lα and Lβ′ arrangements. PS80 was stably anchored on particle surface. No drug release was observed over 24 h and Rp-SLN had a higher cell uptake and a more sustained effect over a week. The mTORC1 inhibition was higher with Rp-SLN. Overall, compritol Rp-SLN show suitable characteristics and stability to be considered for further investigation as Rp brain delivery system.

  7. Site-directed Mutagenesis of Key Residues Unveiled a Novel Allosteric Site on Human Adenosine Kinase for Pyrrolobenzoxa(thia)zepinone Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Savi, Lida; Brindisi, Margherita; Alfano, Gloria; Butini, Stefania; La Pietra, Valeria; Novellino, Ettore; Marinelli, Luciana; Lossani, Andrea; Focher, Federico; Cavella, Caterina; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Most nucleoside kinases, besides the catalytic domain, feature an allosteric domain which modulates their activity. Generally, non-substrate analogs, interacting with allosteric sites, represent a major opportunity for developing more selective and safer therapeutics. We recently developed a series of non-nucleoside non-competitive inhibitors of human adenosine kinase (hAK), based on a pyrrolobenzoxa(thia)zepinone scaffold. Based on computational analysis, we hypothesized the existence of a novel allosteric site on hAK, topographically distinct from the catalytic site. In this study, we have adopted a multidisciplinary approach including molecular modeling, biochemical studies, and site-directed mutagenesis to validate our hypothesis. Based on a three-dimensional model of interaction between hAK and our molecules, we designed, cloned, and expressed specific, single and double point mutants of hAK (Q74A, Q78A, H107A, K341A, F338A, and Q74A-F338A). Kinetic characterization of recombinant enzymes indicated that these mutations did not affect enzyme functioning; conversely, mutated enzymes are endowed of reduced susceptibility to our non-nucleoside inhibitors, while maintaining comparable affinity for nucleoside inhibitors to the wild-type enzyme. This study represents the first characterization and validation of a novel allosteric site in hAK and may pave the way to the development of novel selective and potent non-nucleoside inhibitors of hAK endowed with therapeutic potential.

  8. mTOR inhibitor-associated stomatitis (mIAS) in three patients with cancer treated with everolimus.

    PubMed

    Kalogirou, Eleni-Marina; Tosios, Konstantinos I; Piperi, Evangelia P; Sklavounou, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian targets of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR inhibitors, mTORI) are indicated for the management of several cancer types, including hormone receptor--positive or HER2-negative breast cancer, advanced renal cell carcinoma, advanced neuroendocrine tumors of pancreatic origin, and tuberous sclerosis complex-related tumors. Among the most common adverse events of mTORI medication are discrete, large, solitary or multiple, superficial ulcers, almost exclusively situated on nonkeratinized oral mucosa, described as mTORI-associated stomatitis (mIAS). We describe the clinical presentation, course, and management of mIAS in three patients receiving the mTORI everolimus (Afinitor, Novartis, East Hanover, NJ). In two patients, mIAS manifested 9 and 30 days after first using everolimus, respectively, whereas in the third patient, it recurred 3 months after re-introduction of everolimus. Oral rinses with a "magic mouthwash" solution (dexamethasone oral drops solution 2 mg/mL × 10 mL, lidocaine gel 2% × 30 g, doxycycline suspension 50 mg/5 mL × 60 mL, and sucralfate oral suspension 1000 mg/5 mL × 150 mL, dissolved in sodium chloride 0.9% × 2000 mL) four times daily proved helpful in alleviating the symptoms, and the ulcers healed in 4 to 15 days. No side effects were recorded, and dose reduction or discontinuation of everolimus was not necessitated in two cases.

  9. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Selective Allosteric Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum Drug Target, Prolyl-tRNA-synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS) is one of the few chemical-genetically validated drug targets for malaria, yet highly selective inhibitors have not been described. In this paper, approximately 40,000 compounds were screened to identify compounds that selectively inhibit PfProRS enzyme activity versus Homo sapiens (Hs) ProRS. X-ray crystallography structures were solved for apo, as well as substrate- and inhibitor-bound forms of PfProRS. We identified two new inhibitors of PfProRS that bind outside the active site. These two allosteric inhibitors showed >100 times specificity for PfProRS compared to HsProRS, demonstrating this class of compounds could overcome the toxicity related to HsProRS inhibition by halofuginone and its analogues. Initial medicinal chemistry was performed on one of the two compounds, guided by the cocrystallography of the compound with PfProRS, and the results can instruct future medicinal chemistry work to optimize these promising new leads for drug development against malaria. PMID:27798837

  10. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Selective Allosteric Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum Drug Target, Prolyl-tRNA-synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Stephen Nakazawa; Dranow, David M; Horst, Benjamin G; Abendroth, Jan A; Forte, Barbara; Hallyburton, Irene; Jansen, Chimed; Baragaña, Beatriz; Choi, Ryan; Rivas, Kasey L; Hulverson, Matthew A; Dumais, Mitchell; Edwards, Thomas E; Lorimer, Donald D; Fairlamb, Alan H; Gray, David W; Read, Kevin D; Lehane, Adele M; Kirk, Kiaran; Myler, Peter J; Wernimont, Amy; Walpole, Chris; Stacy, Robin; Barrett, Lynn K; Gilbert, Ian H; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2017-01-13

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS) is one of the few chemical-genetically validated drug targets for malaria, yet highly selective inhibitors have not been described. In this paper, approximately 40,000 compounds were screened to identify compounds that selectively inhibit PfProRS enzyme activity versus Homo sapiens (Hs) ProRS. X-ray crystallography structures were solved for apo, as well as substrate- and inhibitor-bound forms of PfProRS. We identified two new inhibitors of PfProRS that bind outside the active site. These two allosteric inhibitors showed >100 times specificity for PfProRS compared to HsProRS, demonstrating this class of compounds could overcome the toxicity related to HsProRS inhibition by halofuginone and its analogues. Initial medicinal chemistry was performed on one of the two compounds, guided by the cocrystallography of the compound with PfProRS, and the results can instruct future medicinal chemistry work to optimize these promising new leads for drug development against malaria.

  11. Discovery of Peptidomimetic Ligands of EED as Allosteric Inhibitors of PRC2.

    PubMed

    Barnash, Kimberly D; The, Juliana; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline L; Cholensky, Stephanie H; Worley, Beau M; Li, Fengling; Stuckey, Jacob I; Brown, Peter J; Vedadi, Masoud; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Frye, Stephen V; James, Lindsey I

    2017-03-13

    The function of EED within polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is mediated by a complex network of protein-protein interactions. Allosteric activation of PRC2 by binding of methylated proteins to the embryonic ectoderm development (EED) aromatic cage is essential for full catalytic activity, but details of this regulation are not fully understood. EED's recognition of the product of PRC2 activity, histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), stimulates PRC2 methyltransferase activity at adjacent nucleosomes leading to H3K27me3 propagation and, ultimately, gene repression. By coupling combinatorial chemistry and structure-based design, we optimized a low-affinity methylated jumonji, AT-rich interactive domain 2 (Jarid2) peptide to a smaller, more potent peptidomimetic ligand (Kd = 1.14 ± 0.14 μM) of the aromatic cage of EED. Our strategy illustrates the effectiveness of applying combinatorial chemistry to achieve both ligand potency and property optimization. Furthermore, the resulting ligands, UNC5114 and UNC5115, demonstrate that targeted disruption of EED's reader function can lead to allosteric inhibition of PRC2 catalytic activity.

  12. mTOR inhibitors induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells via CHOP-dependent DR5 induction on 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    He, K; Zheng, X; Li, M; Zhang, L; Yu, J

    2016-01-14

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is commonly activated in colon cancer. mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is a major downstream target of the PI3K/ATK pathway and activates protein synthesis by phosphorylating key regulators of messenger RNA translation and ribosome synthesis. Rapamycin analogs Everolimus and Temsirolimus are non-ATP-competitive mTORC1 inhibitors, and suppress proliferation and tumor angiogenesis and invasion. We now show that apoptosis plays a key role in their anti-tumor activities in colon cancer cells and xenografts through the DR5, FADD and caspase-8 axis, and is strongly enhanced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and 5-fluorouracil. The induction of DR5 by rapalogs is mediated by the ER stress regulator and transcription factor CHOP, but not the tumor suppressor p53, on rapid and sustained inhibition of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, and attenuated by eIF4E expression. ATP-competitive mTOR/PI3K inhibitors also promote DR5 induction and FADD-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells. These results establish activation of ER stress and the death receptor pathway as a novel anticancer mechanism of mTOR inhibitors.

  13. mTOR inhibitors induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells via CHOP-dependent DR5 induction upon 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    He, Kan; Zheng, Xingnan; Li, Mei; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is commonly activated in colon cancer. mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is a major downstream target of the PI3K/ATK pathway and activates protein synthesis by phosphorylating key regulators of mRNA translation and ribosome synthesis. Rapamycin analogs Everolimus and Temsirolimus are non-ATP-competitive mTORC1 inhibitors, and suppress proliferation and tumor angiogenesis and invasion. We now show that apoptosis plays a key role in their anti-tumor activities in colon cancer cells and xenografts through the DR5, FADD and caspase-8 axis, and is strongly enhanced by TRAIL and 5-fluorouracil. The induction of DR5 by rapalogs is mediated by the ER stress regulator and transcription factor CHOP, but not the tumor suppressor p53, upon rapid and sustained inhibition of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, and attenuated by eIF4E expression. ATP-competitive mTOR/PI3K inhibitors also promote DR5 induction and FADD-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells. These results establish activation of ER stress and the death receptor pathway as a novel anticancer mechanism of mTOR inhibitors. PMID:25867072

  14. MLN0128, a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, disrupts survival signaling and triggers apoptosis in AML and AML stem/ progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhihong; Wang, Rui-Yu; Qiu, Yi Hua; Mak, Duncan H; Coombes, Kevin; Yoo, Suk Young; Zhang, Qi; Jessen, Katti; Liu, Yi; Rommel, Christian; Fruman, David A; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Kornblau, Steven M; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-08-23

    mTOR activation leads to enhanced survival signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The active-site mTOR inhibitors (asTORi) represent a promising new approach to targeting mTOR in AKT/mTOR signaling. MLN0128 is an orally-administered, second-generation asTORi, currently in clinical development. We examined the anti-leukemic effects and the mechanisms of action of MLN0128 in AML cell lines and primary samples, with a particular focus on its effect in AML stem/progenitor cells. MLN0128 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in AML by attenuating the activity of mTOR complex 1 and 2. Using time-of-flight mass cytometry, we demonstrated that MLN0128 selectively targeted and functionally inhibited AML stem/progenitor cells with high AKT/mTOR signaling activity. Using the reverse-phase protein array technique, we measured expression and phosphorylation changes in response to MLN0128 in 151 proteins from 24 primary AML samples and identified several pro-survival pathways that antagonize MLN0128-induced cellular stress. A combined blockade of AKT/mTOR signaling and these pro-survival pathways facilitated AML cell killing. Our findings provide a rationale for the clinical use of MLN0128 to target AML and AML stem/progenitor cells, and support the use of combinatorial multi-targeted approaches in AML therapy.

  15. An evaluation tool for FKBP12-dependent and -independent mTOR inhibitors using a combination of FKBP-mTOR fusion protein, DSC and NMR.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Mitsuhiro; Kobashigawa, Yoshihiro; Kawasaki, Masashi; Yokochi, Masashi; Kiso, Tetsuo; Suzumura, Ken-ichi; Mori, Keitaro; Teramura, Toshio; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2011-11-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a large multidomain protein kinase, regulates cell growth and metabolism in response to environmental signals. The FKBP rapamycin-binding (FRB) domain of mTOR is a validated therapeutic target for the development of immunosuppressant and anticancer drugs but is labile and insoluble. Here we designed a fusion protein between FKBP12 and the FRB domain of mTOR. The fusion protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble form, and was purified by a simple two-step chromatographic procedure. The fusion protein exhibited increased solubility and stability compared with the isolated FRB domain, and facilitated the analysis of rapamycin and FK506 binding using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). DSC enabled the rapid observation of protein-drug interactions at the domain level, while NMR gave insights into the protein-drug interactions at the residue level. The use of the FKBP12-FRB fusion protein combined with DSC and NMR provides a useful tool for the efficient screening of FKBP12-dependent as well as -independent inhibitors of the mTOR FRB domain.

  16. MLN0128, a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, disrupts survival signaling and triggers apoptosis in AML and AML stem/ progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhihong; Wang, Rui-Yu; Qiu, Yi Hua; Mak, Duncan H.; Coombes, Kevin; Yoo, Suk Young; Zhang, Qi; Jessen, Katti; Liu, Yi; Rommel, Christian; Fruman, David A.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    mTOR activation leads to enhanced survival signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The active-site mTOR inhibitors (asTORi) represent a promising new approach to targeting mTOR in AKT/mTOR signaling. MLN0128 is an orally-administered, second-generation asTORi, currently in clinical development. We examined the anti-leukemic effects and the mechanisms of action of MLN0128 in AML cell lines and primary samples, with a particular focus on its effect in AML stem/progenitor cells. MLN0128 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in AML by attenuating the activity of mTOR complex 1 and 2. Using time-of-flight mass cytometry, we demonstrated that MLN0128 selectively targeted and functionally inhibited AML stem/progenitor cells with high AKT/mTOR signaling activity. Using the reverse-phase protein array technique, we measured expression and phosphorylation changes in response to MLN0128 in 151 proteins from 24 primary AML samples and identified several pro-survival pathways that antagonize MLN0128-induced cellular stress. A combined blockade of AKT/mTOR signaling and these pro-survival pathways facilitated AML cell killing. Our findings provide a rationale for the clinical use of MLN0128 to target AML and AML stem/progenitor cells, and support the use of combinatorial multi-targeted approaches in AML therapy. PMID:27391151

  17. The S-enantiomer of R,S-citalopram, increases inhibitor binding to the human serotonin transporter by an allosteric mechanism. Comparison with other serotonin transporter inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fenghua; Larsen, Mads Breum; Sánchez, Connie; Wiborg, Ove

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of the S- and R-enantiomers (escitalopram and R-citalopram) of citalopram, with high- and low-affinity binding sites in COS-1 cell membranes expressing human SERT (hSERT) were investigated. Escitalopram affinity for hSERT and its 5-HT uptake inhibitory potency was in the nanomolar range and approximately 40-fold more potent than R-citalopram. Escitalopram considerably stabilised the [3H]-escitalopram/SERT complex via an allosteric effect at a low-affinity binding site. The stereoselectivity between escitalopram and R-citalopram was approximately 3:1 for the [3H]-escitalopram/hSERT complex. The combined effect of escitalopram and R-citalopram was additive. Paroxetine and sertraline mainly stabilised the [3H]-paroxetine/hSERT complex. Fluoxetine, duloxetine and venlafaxine have only minor effects. 5-HT stabilised the [125I]-RTI-55, [3H]-MADAM, [3H]-paroxetine, [3H]-fluoxetine and [3H]-venlafaxine/SERT complex to some extent. Thus, escitalopram shows a unique interaction with the hSERT compared with other 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and, in addition to its 5-HT reuptake inhibitory properties, displays a pronounced effect via an affinity-modulating allosteric site.

  18. Overcoming cisplatin resistance by mTOR inhibitor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunjing; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Feun, Lynn; Kuo, Marcus Tien; Robles, Carlos; Lampidis, Theodore; Savaraj, Niramol

    2005-01-01

    Background Cisplatin resistance is complex and involves several different mechanisms. Employing cDNA microarray analysis, we have found that cisplatin resistant cells share the common characteristic of increase in ribosomal proteins and elongation factors. We hypothesize that in order to survive cisplatin treatment, cells have to synthesize DNA repair proteins, antiapoptotic proteins and growth-stimulating proteins. Thus, by blocking the translation of these proteins, one should be able to restore cisplatin sensitivity. We have studied the role of CCI-779, an ester analog of rapamycin which is known to inhibit translation by disabling mTOR, in restoring cisplatin sensitivity in a panel of cisplatin resistant cell lines. We have also determined the role of CCI-779 in P-gp1 and MRP1 mediated resistance. Results Our data show that CCI-779 possess antiproliferative effects in both cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines, but shows no effect in P-gp1 and MRP1 overexpressing cell lines. Importantly, CCI-779 at 10 ng/ml (less that 10% of the growth inhibitory effect) can increase the growth inhibition of cisplatin by 2.5–6 fold. Moreover, CCI-779 also enhances the apoptotic effect of cisplatin in cisplatin resistant cell lines. In these resistant cells, adding CCI-779 decreases the amount of 4E-BP phosphorylation and p-70S6 kinase phosphorylation as well as lower the amount of elongation factor while cisplatin alone has no effect. However, CCI-779 can only reverse P-gp mediated drug resistance at a higher dose(1 ug/ml). Conclusion We conclude that CCI-779 is able to restore cisplatin sensitivity in small cell lung cancer cell lines selected for cisplatin resistance as well as cell lines derived from patients who failed cisplatin. These findings can be further explored for future clinical use. On the other hand, CCI-779 at achievable clinical concentration, has no growth inhibitory effect in P-gp1 or MRP1 overexpressing cells. Furthermore, CCI-779 also appears to be

  19. Effects of mTOR and calcineurin inhibitors combined therapy in Epstein-Barr virus positive and negative Burkitt lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wowro, Sylvia J; Schmitt, Katharina R L; Tong, Giang; Berger, Felix; Schubert, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a severe complication in solid organ transplant recipients, which is highly associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection in pediatric patients and occasionally presents as Burkitt- or Burkitt-like lymphoma. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been described as a possible antitumor target whose inhibition may influence lymphoma development and proliferation after pediatric transplantation. We treated Epstein-Barr virus positive (Raji and Daudi) and negative (Ramos) human Burkitt lymphoma derived cells with mTOR inhibitor everolimus alone and in combination with clinically relevant immunosuppressive calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus or cyclosporin A). Cell proliferation, toxicity, and mitochondrial metabolic activity were analyzed. The effect on mTOR Complex 1 downstream targets p70 S6 kinase, eukaryotic initiation factor 4G, and S6 ribosomal protein activation was also investigated. We observed that treatment with everolimus alone significantly decreased Burkitt lymphoma cell proliferation and mitochondrial metabolic activity. Everolimus in combination with cyclosporin A had a stronger suppressive effect in Epstein-Barr virus negative but not in Epstein-Barr virus positive cells. In contrast, tacrolimus completely abolished the everolimus-mediated suppressive effects. Moreover, we showed a significant decrease in activation of mTOR Complex 1 downstream targets after treatment with everolimus that was attenuated when combined with tacrolimus, but not with cyclosporin A. For the first time we showed the competitive effect between everolimus and tacrolimus when used as combination therapy on Burkitt lymphoma derived cells. Thus, according to our in vitro data, the combination of calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A with everolimus is preferred to the combination of tacrolimus and everolimus.

  20. Mechanistically distinct cancer-associated mTOR activation clusters predict sensitivity to rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianing; Pham, Can G.; Albanese, Steven K.; Dong, Yiyu; Lee, Chung-Han; Yao, Zhan; Han, Song; Chen, David; Parton, Daniel L.; Chodera, John D.; Rosen, Neal; Cheng, Emily H.; Hsieh, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies have linked mTORC1 pathway–activating mutations with exceptional response to treatment with allosteric inhibitors of mTORC1 called rapalogs. Rapalogs are approved for selected cancer types, including kidney and breast cancers. Here, we used sequencing data from 22 human kidney cancer cases to identify the activating mechanisms conferred by mTOR mutations observed in human cancers and advance precision therapeutics. mTOR mutations that clustered in focal adhesion kinase targeting domain (FAT) and kinase domains enhanced mTORC1 kinase activity, decreased nutrient reliance, and increased cell size. We identified 3 distinct mechanisms of hyperactivation, including reduced binding to DEP domain–containing MTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR), resistance to regulatory associated protein of mTOR–mediated (RAPTOR-mediated) suppression, and altered kinase kinetics. Of the 28 mTOR double mutants, activating mutations could be divided into 6 complementation groups, resulting in synergistic Rag- and Ras homolog enriched in brain–independent (RHEB-independent) mTORC1 activation. mTOR mutants were resistant to DNA damage–inducible transcript 1–mediated (REDD1-mediated) inhibition, confirming that activating mutations can bypass the negative feedback pathway formed between HIF1 and mTORC1 in the absence of von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor expression. Moreover, VHL-deficient cells that expressed activating mTOR mutants grew tumors that were sensitive to rapamycin treatment. These data may explain the high incidence of mTOR mutations observed in clear cell kidney cancer, where VHL loss and HIF activation is pathognomonic. Our study provides mechanistic and therapeutic insights concerning mTOR mutations in human diseases. PMID:27482884

  1. The dual targeting of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor enhances the mTOR inhibitor-mediated antitumor efficacy in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pivonello, Claudia; Negri, Mariarosaria; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Napolitano, Maria; de Angelis, Cristina; Provvisiero, Donatella Paola; Cuomo, Gaia; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Simeoli, Chiara; Izzo, Francesco; Colao, Annamaria; Hofland, Leo J.; Pivonello, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation of mTOR and IGF pathways is frequent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), thus mTOR and IGF1R represent suitable therapeutic targets in HCC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of mTOR inhibitors (mTORi) and OSI-906, blocker of IGF1R/IR, on HCC cell proliferation, viability, migration and invasion, and alpha-fetoprotein (α-FP) secretion. In HepG2 and HuH-7 we evaluated, the expression of mTOR and IGF pathway components; the effects of Sirolimus, Everolimus, Temsirolimus and OSI-906 on cell proliferation; the effects of Sirolimus, OSI-906, and their combination, on cell secretion, proliferation, viability, cell cycle, apoptosis, invasion and migration. Moreover, intracellular mechanisms underlying these cell functions were evaluated in both cell lines. Our results show that HepG2 and HuH-7 present with the same mRNA expression profile with high levels of IGF2. OSI-906 inhibited cell proliferation at high concentration, while mTORi suppressed cell proliferation in a dose-time dependent manner in both cell lines. The co-treatment showed an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and viability. This effect was not related to induction of apoptosis, but to G0/G1 phase block. Moreover, the co-treatment prevented the Sirolimus-induced AKT activation as escape mechanism. Both agents demonstrated to be differently effective in inhibiting α-FP secretion. Sirolimus, OSI-906, and their combination, blocked cell migration and invasion in HuH-7. These findings indicate that, co-targeting of IGF1R/IR and mTOR pathways could be a novel therapeutic approach in the management of HCC, in order to maximize antitumoral effect and to prevent the early development of resistance mechanisms. PMID:26756219

  2. Targeting carbonic anhydrase IX improves the anti-cancer efficacy of mTOR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Faes, Seraina; Planche, Anne; Uldry, Emilie; Santoro, Tania; Pythoud, Catherine; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Horlbeck, Janine; Letovanec, Igor; Riggi, Nicolo; Datta, Dipak; Demartines, Nicolas; Dormond, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) by chemical inhibitors, such as rapamycin, has demonstrated anti-cancer activity in preclinical and clinical trials. Their efficacy is, however, limited and tumors eventually relapse through resistance formation. In this study, using two different cancer mouse models, we identify tumor hypoxia as a novel mechanism of resistance of cancer cells against mTORC1 inhibitors. Indeed, we show that the activity of mTORC1 is mainly restricted to the non-hypoxic tumor compartment, as evidenced by a mutually exclusive staining pattern of the mTORC1 activity marker pS6 and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. Consequently, whereas rapamycin reduces cancer cell proliferation in non-hypoxic regions, it has no effect in hypoxic areas, suggesting that cancer cells proliferate independently of mTORC1 under hypoxia. Targeting the hypoxic tumor compartment by knockdown of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) using short hairpin RNA or by chemical inhibition of CAIX with acetazolamide potentiates the anti-cancer activity of rapamycin. Taken together, these data emphasize that hypoxia impairs the anti-cancer efficacy of rapalogs. Therapeutic strategies targeting the hypoxic tumor compartment, such as the inhibition of CAIX, potentiate the efficacy of rapamycin and warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:27153561

  3. 3D-QSAR, molecular dynamics simulations and molecular docking studies of benzoxazepine moiety as mTOR inhibitor for the treatment of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chaube, Udit; Chhatbar, Dhara; Bhatt, Hardik

    2016-02-01

    According to WHO statistics, lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death among all other types of cancer. Many genes get mutated in lung cancer but involvement of EGFR and KRAS are more common. Unavailability of drugs or resistance to the available drugs is the major problem in the treatment of lung cancer. In the present research, mTOR was selected as an alternative target for the treatment of lung cancer which involves PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. 28 synthetic mTOR inhibitors were selected from the literature. Ligand based approach (CoMFA and CoMSIA) and structure based approach (molecular dynamics simulations assisted molecular docking study) were applied for the identification of important features of benzoxazepine moiety, responsible for mTOR inhibition. Three different alignments were tried to obtain best QSAR model, of which, distil was found to be the best method, as it gave good statistical results. In CoMFA, Leave One Out (LOO) cross validated coefficients (q(2)), conventional coefficient (r(2)) and predicted correlation coefficient (r(2)pred) values were found to be 0.615, 0.990 and 0.930, respectively. Similarly in CoMSIA, q(2), r(2)ncv and r(2)pred values were found to be 0.748, 0.986 and 0.933, respectively. Molecular dynamics and simulations study revealed that B-chain of mTOR protein was stable at and above 500 FS with respect to temperature (at and above 298 K), Potential energy (at and above 7669.72 kJ/mol) and kinetic energy (at and above 4009.77 kJ/mol). Molecular docking study was performed on simulated protein of mTOR which helped to correlate interactions of amino acids surrounded to the ligand with contour maps generated by QSAR method. Important features of benzoxazepine were identified by contour maps and molecular docking study which would be useful to design novel molecules as mTOR inhibitors for the treatment of lung cancer.

  4. The Toxoplasma pseudokinase ROP5 is an allosteric inhibitor of the immunity-related GTPases.

    PubMed

    Reese, Michael L; Shah, Niket; Boothroyd, John C

    2014-10-03

    The Red Queen hypothesis proposes that there is an evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. One possible example of such a phenomenon could be the recently discovered interaction between host defense proteins known as immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and a family of rhoptry pseudokinases (ROP5) expressed by the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Mouse IRGs are encoded by an extensive and rapidly evolving family of over 20 genes. Similarly, the ROP5 family is highly polymorphic and consists of 4-10 genes, depending on the strain of Toxoplasma. IRGs are known to be avidly bound and functionally inactivated by ROP5 proteins, but the molecular basis of this interaction/inactivation has not previously been known. Here we show that ROP5 uses a highly polymorphic surface to bind adjacent to the nucleotide-binding domain of an IRG and that this produces a profound allosteric change in the IRG structure. This has two dramatic effects: 1) it prevents oligomerization of the IRG, and 2) it alters the orientation of two threonine residues that are targeted by the Toxoplasma Ser/Thr kinases, ROP17 and ROP18. ROP5s are highly specific in the IRGs that they will bind, and the fact that it is the most highly polymorphic surface of ROP5 that binds the IRG strongly supports the notion that these two protein families are co-evolving in a way predicted by the Red Queen hypothesis.

  5. Biophysical investigation of the mode of inhibition of tetramic acids, the allosteric inhibitors of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lac V; Granda, Brian; Dean, Karl; Tao, Jianshi; Liu, Eugene; Zhang, Rui; Peukert, Stefan; Wattanasin, Sompong; Xie, Xiaoling; Ryder, Neil S; Tommasi, Ruben; Deng, Gejing

    2010-06-29

    Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UPPS) catalyzes the consecutive condensation of eight molecules of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) with farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) to generate the C(55) undecaprenyl pyrophosphate (UPP). It has been demonstrated that tetramic acids (TAs) are selective and potent inhibitors of UPPS, but the mode of inhibition was unclear. In this work, we used a fluorescent FPP probe to study possible TA binding at the FPP binding site. A photosensitive TA analogue was designed and synthesized for the study of the site of interaction of TA with UPPS using photo-cross-linking and mass spectrometry. The interaction of substrates with UPPS and with the UPPS.TA complex was investigated by protein fluorescence spectroscopy. Our results suggested that tetramic acid binds to UPPS at an allosteric site adjacent to the FPP binding site. TA binds to free UPPS enzyme but not to substrate-bound UPPS. Unlike Escherichia coli UPPS which follows an ordered substrate binding mechanism, Streptococcus pneumoniae UPPS appears to follow a random-sequential substrate binding mechanism. Only one substrate, FPP or IPP, is able to bind to the UPPS.TA complex, but the quaternary complex, UPPS.TA.FPP.IPP, cannot be formed. We propose that binding of TA to UPPS significantly alters the conformation of UPPS needed for proper substrate binding. As the result, substrate turnover is prevented, leading to the inhibition of UPPS catalytic activity. These probe compounds and biophysical assays also allowed us to quickly study the mode of inhibition of other UPPS inhibitors identified from a high-throughput screening and inhibitors produced from a medicinal chemistry program.

  6. Fully activated MEK1 exhibits compromised affinity for binding of allosteric inhibitors U0126 and PD0325901.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Payal R; Liu, Yuqi; Hesson, Thomas; Zhao, Jia; Vilenchik, Lev; Liu, Yan-Hui; Mayhood, Todd W; Le, Hung V

    2011-09-20

    Kinases catalyze the transfer of γ-phosphate from ATP to substrate protein residues triggering signaling pathways responsible for a plethora of cellular events. Isolation and production of homogeneous preparations of kinases in their fully active forms is important for accurate in vitro measurements of activity, stability, and ligand binding properties of these proteins. Previous studies have shown that MEK1 can be produced in its active phosphorylated form by coexpression with RAF1 in insect cells. In this study, using activated MEK1 produced by in vitro activation by RAF1 (pMEK1(in vitro)), we demonstrate that the simultaneous expression of RAF1 for production of activated MEK1 does not result in stoichiometric phosphorylation of MEK1. The pMEK1(in vitro) showed higher specific activity toward ERK2 protein substrate compared to the pMEK1 that was activated via coexpression with RAF1 (pMEK1(in situ)). The two pMEK1 preparations showed quantitative differences in the phosphorylation of T-loop residue serine 222 by Western blotting and mass spectrometry. Finally, pMEK1(in vitro) showed marked differences in the ligand binding properties compared to pMEK1(in situ). Contrary to previous findings, pMEK1(in vitro) bound allosteric inhibitors U0126 and PD0325901 with a significantly lower affinity than pMEK1(in situ) as well as its unphosphorylated counterpart (npMEK1) as demonstrated by thermal-shift, AS-MS, and calorimetric studies. The differences in inhibitor binding affinity provide direct evidence that unphosphorylated and RAF1-phosphorylated MEK1 form distinct inhibitor sites.

  7. mTOR inhibitors radiosensitize PTEN-deficient non-small-cell lung cancer cells harboring an EGFR activating mutation by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Bae, Sangwoo; Kang, Seongman; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Lim, Young-Bin

    2013-06-01

    Clinical resistance to gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), in patients with lung cancer has been linked to acquisition of the T790M resistance mutation in activated EGFR or amplification of MET. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss has been recently reported as a gefitinib resistance mechanism in lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with acquired gefitinib resistance caused by PTEN deficiency to suggest radiotherapy as an alternative to EGFR TKIs. PTEN deficient-mediated gefitinib resistance was generated in HCC827 cells, an EGFR TKI sensitive NSCLC cell line, by PTEN knockdown with a lentiviral vector expressing short hairpin RNA-targeting PTEN. The impact of PTEN knockdown on sensitivity to radiation in the presence or absence of PTEN downstream signaling inhibitors was investigated. PTEN knockdown conferred acquired resistance not only to gefitinib but also to radiation on HCC827 cells. mTOR inhibitors alone failed to reduce HCC827 cell viability, regardless of PTEN expression, but ameliorated PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance. PTEN knockdown-mediated radioresistance was accompanied by repression of radiation-induced cytotoxic autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors released the repression of cytotoxic autophagy to overcome PTEN knockdown-induced radioresistance in HCC827 cells. These results suggest that inhibiting mTOR signaling could be an effective strategy to radiosensitize NSCLC harboring the EGFR activating mutation that acquires resistance to both TKIs and radiotherapy due to PTEN loss or inactivation mutations.

  8. SAR405, a PIK3C3/Vps34 inhibitor that prevents autophagy and synergizes with MTOR inhibition in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2015-04-03

    Autophagy plays an important role in cancer and it has been suggested that it functions not only as a tumor suppressor pathway to prevent tumor initiation, but also as a prosurvival pathway that helps tumor cells endure metabolic stress and resist death triggered by chemotherapeutic agents. We recently described the discovery of inhibitors of PIK3C3/Vps34 (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, catalytic subunit type 3), the lipid kinase component of the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K). This PtdIns3K isoform has attracted significant attention in recent years because of its role in autophagy. Following chemical optimization we identified SAR405, a low molecular mass kinase inhibitor of PIK3C3, highly potent and selective with regard to other lipid and protein kinases. We demonstrated that inhibiting the catalytic activity of PIK3C3 disrupts vesicle trafficking from late endosomes to lysosomes. SAR405 treatment also inhibits autophagy induced either by starvation or by MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) inhibition. Finally our results show that combining SAR405 with everolimus, the FDA-approved MTOR inhibitor, results in a significant synergy on the reduction of cell proliferation using renal tumor cells. This result indicates a potential therapeutic application for PIK3C3 inhibitors in cancer.

  9. Anti-tumor agent calixarene 0118 targets human galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of carbohydrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Dings, Ruud P.M.; Miller, Michelle C.; Nesmelova, Irina; Astorgues-Xerri, Lucile; Kumar, Nigam; Serova, Maria; Chen, Xuimei; Raymond, Eric; Hoye, Thomas R.; Mayo, Kevin H.

    2012-01-01

    Calix[4]arene compound 0118 is an angiostatic agent that inhibits tumor growth in mice. Although 0118 is a topomimetic of galectin-1-targeting angiostatic amphipathic peptide anginex, we had yet to prove that 0118 targets galectin-1. Galectin-1 is involved in pathological disorders like tumor endothelial cell adhesion and migration and therefore presents a relevant target for therapeutic intervention against cancer. Here, 15N-1H HSQC NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that 0118 indeed targets galectin-1 at a site away from the lectin’s carbohydrate binding site, and thereby attenuates lactose binding to the lectin. Flow cytometry and agglutination assays show that 0118 attenuates binding of galectin-1 to cell surface glycans, and the inhibition of cell proliferation by 0118 is found to be correlated with the cellular expression of the lectin. In general, our data indicate that 0118 targets galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of glycan/carbohydrate binding. This work contributes to the clinical development of anti-tumor calixarene compound 0118. PMID:22575017

  10. Allosteric modulation of the effects of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor escitalopram on the rat hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mnie-Filali, Ouissame; El Mansari, Mostafa; Espana, Agnès; Sànchez, Connie; Haddjeri, Nasser

    2006-02-27

    The present in vivo electrophysiological studies in anesthetized rat were undertaken to assess the effects of the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram alone or in combination with the R-citalopram (the S- and R-enantiomers of citalopram), on both long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA(1) region of dorsal hippocampus and spontaneous firing activity of dorsal raphe (DR) 5-HT neurons. At the postsynaptic level, neither escitalopram (10 mg/kg, i.p.) nor R-citalopram (20 mg/kg, i.p.) modified basal synaptic transmission but only escitalopram impaired LTP expression. Importantly, R-citalopram counteracted significantly the escitalopram-induced decrease of LTP. At the pre-synaptic level, escitalopram (25-75 microg/kg, i.v.) dose-dependently suppressed the spontaneous firing activity of DR 5-HT neurons and this suppressant effect was significantly prevented by a prior injection of R-citalopram (10 mg/kg, i.p.). These results support a role of allosteric binding sites of 5-HT transporter in the regulation of long-lasting CA(1) synaptic plasticity and DR 5-HT neuronal firing activity.

  11. Active Glutaminase C Self-assembles into a Supratetrameric Oligomer That Can Be Disrupted by an Allosteric Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Amanda Petrina Scotá; Cassago, Alexandre; Gonçalves, Kaliandra de Almeida; Dias, Marília Meira; Adamoski, Douglas; Ascenção, Carolline Fernanda Rodrigues; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; de Oliveira, Juliana Ferreira; Ferreira, Igor Monteze; Fornezari, Camila; Bettini, Jefferson; Oliveira, Paulo Sérgio Lopes; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Portugal, Rodrigo Villares; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Dias, Sandra Martha Gomes

    2013-01-01

    The phosphate-dependent transition between enzymatically inert dimers into catalytically capable tetramers has long been the accepted mechanism for the glutaminase activation. Here, we demonstrate that activated glutaminase C (GAC) self-assembles into a helical, fiber-like double-stranded oligomer and propose a molecular model consisting of seven tetramer copies per turn per strand interacting via the N-terminal domains. The loop 321LRFNKL326 is projected as the major regulating element for self-assembly and enzyme activation. Furthermore, the previously identified in vivo lysine acetylation (Lys311 in humans, Lys316 in mouse) is here proposed as an important down-regulator of superoligomer assembly and protein activation. Bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide, a known glutaminase inhibitor, completely disrupted the higher order oligomer, explaining its allosteric mechanism of inhibition via tetramer stabilization. A direct correlation between the tendency to self-assemble and the activity levels of the three mammalian glutaminase isozymes was established, with GAC being the most active enzyme while forming the longest structures. Lastly, the ectopic expression of a fiber-prone superactive GAC mutant in MDA-MB 231 cancer cells provided considerable proliferative advantages to transformed cells. These findings yield unique implications for the development of GAC-oriented therapeutics targeting tumor metabolism. PMID:23935106

  12. Active glutaminase C self-assembles into a supratetrameric oligomer that can be disrupted by an allosteric inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Amanda Petrina Scotá; Cassago, Alexandre; Gonçalves, Kaliandra de Almeida; Dias, Marília Meira; Adamoski, Douglas; Ascenção, Carolline Fernanda Rodrigues; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; de Oliveira, Juliana Ferreira; Ferreira, Igor Monteze; Fornezari, Camila; Bettini, Jefferson; Oliveira, Paulo Sérgio Lopes; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Portugal, Rodrigo Villares; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Dias, Sandra Martha Gomes

    2013-09-27

    The phosphate-dependent transition between enzymatically inert dimers into catalytically capable tetramers has long been the accepted mechanism for the glutaminase activation. Here, we demonstrate that activated glutaminase C (GAC) self-assembles into a helical, fiber-like double-stranded oligomer and propose a molecular model consisting of seven tetramer copies per turn per strand interacting via the N-terminal domains. The loop (321)LRFNKL(326) is projected as the major regulating element for self-assembly and enzyme activation. Furthermore, the previously identified in vivo lysine acetylation (Lys(311) in humans, Lys(316) in mouse) is here proposed as an important down-regulator of superoligomer assembly and protein activation. Bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide, a known glutaminase inhibitor, completely disrupted the higher order oligomer, explaining its allosteric mechanism of inhibition via tetramer stabilization. A direct correlation between the tendency to self-assemble and the activity levels of the three mammalian glutaminase isozymes was established, with GAC being the most active enzyme while forming the longest structures. Lastly, the ectopic expression of a fiber-prone superactive GAC mutant in MDA-MB 231 cancer cells provided considerable proliferative advantages to transformed cells. These findings yield unique implications for the development of GAC-oriented therapeutics targeting tumor metabolism.

  13. Kinome-wide Selectivity Profiling of ATP-competitive Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Inhibitors and Characterization of Their Binding Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingsong; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Hur, Wooyoung; Niepel, Mario; Westover, Kenneth; Thoreen, Carson C.; Wang, Jinhua; Ni, Jing; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Vogel, Kurt; Riddle, Steve; Waller, David L.; Traynor, Ryan; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Kang, Seong A.; Zhao, Jean; Look, A. Thomas; Sorger, Peter K.; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2012-01-01

    An intensive recent effort to develop ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors has resulted in several potent and selective molecules such as Torin1, PP242, KU63794, and WYE354. These inhibitors are being widely used as pharmacological probes of mTOR-dependent biology. To determine the potency and specificity of these agents, we have undertaken a systematic kinome-wide effort to profile their selectivity and potency using chemical proteomics and assays for enzymatic activity, protein binding, and disruption of cellular signaling. Enzymatic and cellular assays revealed that all four compounds are potent inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2, with Torin1 exhibiting ∼20-fold greater potency for inhibition of Thr-389 phosphorylation on S6 kinases (EC50 = 2 nm) relative to other inhibitors. In vitro biochemical profiling at 10 μm revealed binding of PP242 to numerous kinases, although WYE354 and KU63794 bound only to p38 kinases and PI3K isoforms and Torin1 to ataxia telangiectasia mutated, ATM and Rad3-related protein, and DNA-PK. Analysis of these protein targets in cellular assays did not reveal any off-target activities for Torin1, WYE354, and KU63794 at concentrations below 1 μm but did show that PP242 efficiently inhibited the RET receptor (EC50, 42 nm) and JAK1/2/3 kinases (EC50, 780 nm). In addition, Torin1 displayed unusually slow kinetics for inhibition of the mTORC1/2 complex, a property likely to contribute to the pharmacology of this inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of PP242, available ATP-competitive compounds are highly selective mTOR inhibitors when applied to cells at concentrations below 1 μm and that the compounds may represent a starting point for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at developing inhibitors of other PI3K kinase-related kinases. PMID:22223645

  14. Substituted tetrahydroquinolines as potent allosteric inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and its key mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dai-Shi; Lim, John J.; Tinney, Elizabeth; Wan, Bang-Lin; Young, Mary Beth; Anderson, Kenneth D.; Rudd, Deanne; Munshi, Vandna; Bahnck, Carolyn; Felock, Peter J.; Lu, Meiqing; Lai, Ming-Tain; Touch, Sinoeun; Moyer, Gregory; DiStefano, Daniel J.; Flynn, Jessica A.; Liang, Yuexia; Sanchez, Rosa; Prasad, Sridhar; Yan, Youwei; Perlow-Poehnelt, Rebecca; Torrent, Maricel; Miller, Mike; Vacca, Joe P.; Williams, Theresa M.; Anthony, Neville J.; Merck

    2010-09-27

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key elements of multidrug regimens, called HAART (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy), that are used to treat HIV-1 infections. Elucidation of the structure-activity relationships of the thiocarbamate moiety of the previous published lead compound 2 provided a series of novel tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 RT with nanomolar intrinsic activity on the WT and key mutant enzymes and potent antiviral activity in infected cells. The SAR optimization, mutation profiles, preparation of compounds, and pharmacokinetic profile of compounds are described.

  15. Nonclassical pharmacology of the dopamine transporter: atypical inhibitors, allosteric modulators, and partial substrates.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Kyle C; Rothman, Richard B; Reith, Maarten E A

    2013-07-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a sodium-coupled symporter protein responsible for modulating the concentration of extraneuronal dopamine in the brain. The DAT is a principle target of various psychostimulant, nootropic, and antidepressant drugs, as well as certain drugs used recreationally, including the notoriously addictive stimulant cocaine. DAT ligands have traditionally been divided into two categories: cocaine-like inhibitors and amphetamine-like substrates. Whereas inhibitors block monoamine uptake by the DAT but are not translocated across the membrane, substrates are actively translocated and trigger DAT-mediated release of dopamine by reversal of the translocation cycle. Because both inhibitors and substrates increase extraneuronal dopamine levels, it is often assumed that all DAT ligands possess an addictive liability equivalent to that of cocaine. However, certain recently developed ligands, such as atypical benztropine-like DAT inhibitors with reduced or even a complete lack of cocaine-like rewarding effects, suggest that addictiveness is not a constant property of DAT-affecting compounds. These atypical ligands do not conform to the classic preconception that all DAT inhibitors (or substrates) are functionally and mechanistically alike. Instead, they suggest the possibility that the DAT exhibits some of the ligand-specific pleiotropic functional qualities inherent to G-protein-coupled receptors. That is, ligands with different chemical structures induce specific conformational changes in the transporter protein that can be differentially transduced by the cell, ultimately eliciting unique behavioral and psychological effects. The present overview discusses compounds with conformation-specific activity, useful not only as tools for studying the mechanics of dopamine transport, but also as leads for medication development in addictive disorders.

  16. The Novel mTOR Complex 1/2 Inhibitor P529 Inhibits Human Lung Myofibroblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Keith T; Torr, Elizabeth E; Bernau, Ksenija; Leet, Jonathan; Sherris, David; Sandbo, Nathan

    2017-01-11

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and deadly disorder with very few therapeutic options. Palomid 529 (8-(1-hydroxyethyl)-2-methoxy-3-(4-methoxybenzyloxy)-benzo[c]chromen-6-one; P529) is a novel dual inhibitor of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2). In these studies, we investigated the effect of P529 on TGF-β-dependent signaling and myofibroblast differentiation. TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of the mTORC1 targets, p70 S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), were both dose dependently inhibited by P529 in human lung fibroblasts with maximal inhibition occurring between 10-20 µM. mTORC2-mediated phosphorylation of Akt at the S473 site was partially inhibited with a similar dose dependency, as was TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation. Protein levels of TGF-β-induced fibronectin and collagen were similarly decreased by P529. At this dose, there was also inhibition of mRNA transcript levels for Col1 and α-SMA, suggesting inhibition of transcriptional activation. However, there was no effect of P529 on canonical TGF-β-induced Smad signaling, as assessed by receptor-associated Smad2/3 phosphorylation, Smad2/3/4 translocation, or Smad-driven gene expression, as assessed by Smad-binding element driven luciferase. Conversely, activation of mTORC1/2 signaling was dependent on TGF-β type I receptor (ALK5) signaling and on Smad2/3 expression. P529 treatment disrupted TGF-β-induced actin stress fiber formation during myofibroblast differentiation, the deposition of new extracellular fibronectin matrix, and linear wound closure by fibroblasts. Likewise, mTOR knockdown inhibited TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation. In conclusion, P529 inhibits TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation, actin stress fiber formation, and matrix protein expression and deposition. Inhibition of mTORC1/2 by P529 may be a promising approach to inhibit in vivo fibrosis. This article is

  17. Keloid disease can be inhibited by antagonizing excessive mTOR signaling with a novel dual TORC1/2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Syed, Farhatullah; Sherris, David; Paus, Ralf; Varmeh, Shohreh; Singh, Subir; Pandolfi, Pier P; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2012-11-01

    Keloid disease (KD) is a fibroproliferative lesion of unknown etiopathogenesis that possibly targets the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. We investigated whether PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitor, Palomid 529 (P529), which targets both mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC-1) and mTORC-2 signaling, could exert anti-KD effects in a novel KD organ culture assay and in keloid fibroblasts (KF). Treatment of KF with P529 significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited cell spreading, attachment, proliferation, migration, and invasive properties at a low concentration (5 ng/mL) and induced substantial KF apoptosis when compared with normal dermal fibroblasts. P529 also inhibited hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression and completely suppressed Akt, GSK3β, mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and S6 phosphorylation. P529 significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclin D and caused considerable apoptosis. Compared with rapamycin and wortmannin, P529 also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced keloid-associated phenotypic markers in KF. P529 caused tissue shrinkage, growth arrest, and apoptosis in keloid organ cultures and substantially inhibited angiogenesis. pS6, pAkt-Ser473, and mTOR phosphorylation were also suppressed in situ. P529 reduced cellularity and expression of collagen, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin (substantially more than rapamycin). These pre-clinical in vitro and ex vivo observations are evidence that the mTOR pathway is a promising target for future KD therapy and that the dual PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitor P529 deserves systematic exploration as a candidate agent for the future treatment of KD.

  18. Dietary flavonoid fisetin: A novel dual inhibitor of PI3K/Akt and mTOR for prostate cancer management

    PubMed Central

    Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Syed, Deeba; Khan, Naghma; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic and case control population based studies over the past few decades have identified diet as an important determinant of cancer risk. This evidence has kindled an interest into research on bioactive food components and has till date resulted in the identification of many compounds with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential. Among such compounds has been fisetin (3,7,3’,4’-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol and a member of the flavonoid polyphenols that also include quercetin, myricetin and kaempferol. Fisetin is commonly found in many fruits and vegetables such as apples, persimmons, grapes, kiwis, strawberries, onions and cucumbers. We evaluated the effects of fisetin against melanoma and cancers of the prostate, pancreas and the lungs. Using prostate and lung adenocarcinoma cells, we observed that fisetin acts as a dual inhibitor of the PI3K/Akt and the mTOR pathways. This is a significant finding considering the fact that mTOR is phosphorylated and its activation is more frequent in tumors with overexpression of PI3K/Akt. Dual inhibitors of PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling have been suggested as valuable agents for treating such cancers. Here, we summarize our findings on the dietary flavonoid fisetin and its effects on cancer with particular focus on prostate cancer. Our observations and findings from other laboratories suggest that fisetin could be a useful chemotherapeutic agent that could be used either alone or as an adjuvant with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs for the management of prostate and other cancers. PMID:22842629

  19. Anti-tumor activity of selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) compounds, is enhanced in non-Hodgkin lymphoma through combination with mTOR inhibitor and dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Muqbil, Irfana; Aboukameel, Amro; Elloul, Sivan; Carlson, Robert; Senapedis, William; Baloglu, Erkan; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Bhutani, Divaya; Zonder, Jeffrey; Azmi, Asfar S; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2016-12-28

    In previous studies we demonstrated that targeting the nuclear exporter protein exportin-1 (CRM1/XPO1) by a selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) compound is a viable therapeutic strategy against Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Our studies along with pre-clinical work from others led to the evaluation of the lead SINE compound, selinexor, in a phase 1 trial in patients with CLL or NHL (NCT02303392). Continuing our previous work, we studied combinations of selinexor-dexamethasone (DEX) and selinexor-everolimus (EVER) in NHL. Combination of selinexor with DEX or EVER resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity in WSU-DLCL2 and WSU-FSCCL cells which was consistent with enhanced apoptosis. Molecular analysis showed enhancement in the activation of apoptotic signaling and down-regulation of XPO1. This enhancement is consistent with the mechanism of action of these drugs in that both selinexor and DEX antagonize NF-κB (p65) and mTOR (EVER target) is an XPO1 cargo protein. SINE compounds, KPT-251 and KPT-276, showed activities similar to CHOP (cyclophosphamide-hydroxydaunorubicin-oncovin-prednisone) regimen in subcutaneous and disseminated NHL xenograft models in vivo. In both animal models the anti-lymphoma activity of selinexor is enhanced through combination with DEX or EVER. The in vivo activity of selinexor and related SINE compounds relative to 'standard of care' treatment is consistent with the objective responses observed in Phase I NHL patients treated with selinexor. Our pre-clinical data provide a rational basis for testing these combinations in Phase II NHL trials.

  20. Effects of an oral allosteric AKT inhibitor (MK-2206) on human nasopharyngeal cancer in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Fei; Yang, Yun-Peng; Huang, Yan; Zhao, Hong-Yun; Zhang, Jian-Wei; Xue, Cong; Lam, Michael H; Yan, Li; Hu, Zhi-Huang; Dinglin, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Aim Protein kinase B (AKT) signaling frequently is deregulated in human cancers and plays an important role in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). This preclinical study investigated the effect of MK-2206, a potent allosteric AKT inhibitor, on human NPC cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods The effect of MK-2206 on the growth and proliferation of CNE-1, CNE-2, HONE-1, and SUNE-1 cells was assessed by Cell Counting Kit 8 and colony formation assay. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze cell cycle and apoptosis. The effects of MK-2206 on the AKT pathway were analyzed by Western blotting. Autophagy induction was evaluated via electron microscopy and Western blot. To test the effects of MK-2206 in vivo, CNE-2 cells were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated orally with MK-2206 or placebo. Tumors were harvested for immunohistochemical analysis. Results In vitro, MK-2206 inhibited the four NPC cell line growths and reduced the sizes of the colonies in a dose-dependent manner. At 72 and 96 hours, the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of MK-2206 in CNE-1, CNE-2, and HONE-1 cell lines were 3–5 μM, whereas in SUNE-1, IC50 was less than 1 μM, and MK-2206 induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. However, our study found no evidence of apoptosis. MK-2206 induced autophagy in NPC cells, as evidenced by electron microscopy and Western blot, and inhibited the growth of tumors that were subcutaneously implanted in mice. Inhibition of downstream phosphorylation through the PRAS40 and S6 pathways seems to be the main mechanism for the MK-2206-induced growth inhibition. Conclusion Our preclinical study suggests that MK-2206’s antiproliferative effect may be useful for NPC treatment; however, strategies for reinforcing this effect are needed to maximize clinical benefit. PMID:25336925

  1. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91). PMID:26938528

  2. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91).

  3. A Small Covalent Allosteric Inhibitor of Human Cytomegalovirus DNA Polymerase Subunit Interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; Coseno, Molly; Ficarro, Scott B; Mansueto, My Sam; Komazin-Meredith, Gloria; Boissel, Sandrine; Filman, David J; Marto, Jarrod A; Hogle, James M; Coen, Donald M

    2017-02-10

    Human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase comprises a catalytic subunit, UL54, and an accessory subunit, UL44, the interaction of which may serve as a target for the development of new antiviral drugs. Using a high-throughput screen, we identified a small molecule, (5-((dimethylamino)methylene-3-(methylthio)-6,7-dihydrobenzo[c]thiophen-4(5H)-one), that selectively inhibits the interaction of UL44 with a UL54-derived peptide in a time-dependent manner, full-length UL54, and UL44-dependent long-chain DNA synthesis. A crystal structure of the compound bound to UL44 revealed a covalent reaction with lysine residue 60 and additional noncovalent interactions that cause steric conflicts that would prevent the UL44 connector loop from interacting with UL54. Analyses of the reaction of the compound with model substrates supported a resonance-stabilized conjugation mechanism, and substitution of the lysine reduced the ability of the compound to inhibit UL44-UL54 peptide interactions. This novel covalent inhibitor of polymerase subunit interactions may serve as a starting point for new, needed drugs to treat human cytomegalovirus infections.

  4. Treatment of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplant with rituximab and conversion to m-TOR inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Rios, John Fredy; Gómez de los Ríos, Sandra Milena; Ocampo-Kohn, Catalina; Aristizabal-Alzate, Arbey; Gálvez-Cárdenas, Kenny Mauricio; Zuluaga-Valencia, Gustavo Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders are serious complications of organ transplantation which treatment is not yet standardized. Objective: To describe the clinical response, overall and graft survival of patients in our center with this complication after kidney transplantation, which received rituximab as part of their treatment as well as conversion to m-TOR. Methods: Retrospective study, which included patients, diagnosed with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation from January 2011 to July 2014. Results: Eight cases were found with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Most had monomorphic histology, 85% were associated with Epstein-Barr virus, 25% of patients had tumor involvement of the renal graft, and 12.5% ​​had primary central nervous system lymphoma. All patients were managed with reduction of immunosuppression, conversion to m-TOR (except one who lost the graft at diagnosis) and rituximab-based therapy. The overall response rate was 87.5% (62.5% complete response, 25% partial response). Survival was 87.5% with a median follow-up of 34 months. An additional patient lost the graft, with chronic nephropathy already known. All the remaining patients had stable renal function. Conclusions: There are no standardized treatment regimens for lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation, but these patients can be managed successfully with reduction of immunosuppression, conversion to m-TOR and rituximab-based schemes. PMID:28293043

  5. Kinome-wide selectivity profiling of ATP-competitive mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and characterization of their binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingsong; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Hur, Wooyoung; Niepel, Mario; Westover, Kenneth; Thoreen, Carson C; Wang, Jinhua; Ni, Jing; Patricelli, Matthew P; Vogel, Kurt; Riddle, Steve; Waller, David L; Traynor, Ryan; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Kang, Seong A; Zhao, Jean; Look, A Thomas; Sorger, Peter K; Sabatini, David M; Gray, Nathanael S

    2012-03-23

    An intensive recent effort to develop ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors has resulted in several potent and selective molecules such as Torin1, PP242, KU63794, and WYE354. These inhibitors are being widely used as pharmacological probes of mTOR-dependent biology. To determine the potency and specificity of these agents, we have undertaken a systematic kinome-wide effort to profile their selectivity and potency using chemical proteomics and assays for enzymatic activity, protein binding, and disruption of cellular signaling. Enzymatic and cellular assays revealed that all four compounds are potent inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2, with Torin1 exhibiting ∼20-fold greater potency for inhibition of Thr-389 phosphorylation on S6 kinases (EC(50) = 2 nM) relative to other inhibitors. In vitro biochemical profiling at 10 μM revealed binding of PP242 to numerous kinases, although WYE354 and KU63794 bound only to p38 kinases and PI3K isoforms and Torin1 to ataxia telangiectasia mutated, ATM and Rad3-related protein, and DNA-PK. Analysis of these protein targets in cellular assays did not reveal any off-target activities for Torin1, WYE354, and KU63794 at concentrations below 1 μM but did show that PP242 efficiently inhibited the RET receptor (EC(50), 42 nM) and JAK1/2/3 kinases (EC(50), 780 nM). In addition, Torin1 displayed unusually slow kinetics for inhibition of the mTORC1/2 complex, a property likely to contribute to the pharmacology of this inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of PP242, available ATP-competitive compounds are highly selective mTOR inhibitors when applied to cells at concentrations below 1 μM and that the compounds may represent a starting point for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at developing inhibitors of other PI3K kinase-related kinases.

  6. mTOR kinase inhibitor pp242 causes mitophagy terminated by apoptotic cell death in E1A-Ras transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Gordeev, Serguei A.; Bykova, Tatiana V.; Zubova, Svetlana G.; Bystrova, Olga A.; Martynova, Marina G.; Pospelov, Valery A.; Pospelova, Tatiana V.

    2015-01-01

    mTOR is a critical target for controlling cell cycle progression, senescence and cell death in mammalian cancer cells. Here we studied the role of mTOR-dependent autophagy in implementating the antiprolifrative effect of mTORC1-specific inhibitor rapamycin and ATP-competitive mTOR kinase inhibitor pp242. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of pp242- and rapamycin-induced autophagy in ERas tumor cells. Rapamycin exerts cytostatic effect on ERas tumor cells, thus causing a temporary and reversible cell cycle arrest, activation of non-selective autophagy not accompanied by cell death. The rapamycin-treated cells are able to continue proliferation after drug removal. The ATP-competitive mTORC1/mTORC2 kinase inhibitor pp242 is highly cytotoxic by suppressing the function of mTORC1-4EBP1 axis and mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation of mTORC1 target - ULK1-Ser757 (Atg1). In contrast to rapamycin, pp242 activates the selective autophagy targeting mitochondria (mitophagy). The pp242-induced mitophagy is accompanied by accumulation of LC3 and conversion of LC3-I form to LC3-II. However reduced degradation of p62/SQSTM indicates abnormal flux of autophagic process. According to transmission electron microscopy data, short-term pp242-treated ERas cells exhibit numerous heavily damaged mitochondria, which are included in single membrane-bound autophagic/autolysophagic vacuoles (mitophagy). Despite the lack of typical for apoptosis features, ERas-treated cells with induced mitophagy revealed the activation of caspase 3, 9 and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Thus, pp242 activates autophagy with suppressed later stages, leading to impaired recycling and accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria and cell death. Better understanding of how autophagy determines the fate of a cell - survival or cell death, can help to development of new strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:26636543

  7. Icariside II, a natural mTOR inhibitor, disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis via suppressing mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis in sarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Lei; Geng, Ya-di; An, Fa-liang; Xia, Yuan-zheng; Guo, Chao; Luo, Jian-guang; Zhang, Lu-yong; Guo, Qing-long; Kong, Ling-yi

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant energy homeostasis that characterized by high rate of energy production (glycolysis) and energy consumption (mRNA translation) is associated with the development of cancer. As mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of aberrant energy homeostasis, it is an attractive target for anti-tumor intervention. The flavonoid compound Icariside II (IS) is a natural mTOR inhibitor derived from Epimedium. Koreanum. Herein, we evaluate the effect of IS on aberrant energy homeostasis. The reduction of glycolysis and mRNA translation in U2OS (osteosarcoma), S180 (fibrosarcoma) and SW1535 (chondrosarcoma) cells observed in our study, indicate that, IS inhibits aberrant energy homeostasis. This inhibition is found to be due to suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) axis through blocking the assembly of mTORC1. Furthermore, IS inhibits the cap-dependent translation of c-myc through mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis which links the relationship between mRNA translation and glycolysis. Inhibition of aberrant energy homeostasis by IS, contributes to its in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferation activity. These data indicate that IS disrupts aberrant energy homeostasis of sarcoma cells through suppression of mTORC1-4E-BP1 axis, providing a novel mechanism of IS to inhibit cell proliferation in sarcoma cells. PMID:27056897

  8. Cyclic ADP-ribose as an endogenous inhibitor of the mTOR pathway downstream of dopamine receptors in the mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Kamimura, Shin-Ya; Inoue, Takeshi; Hori, Osamu; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Lopatina, Olga; Tsuji, Chiharu

    2016-12-26

    The role of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) as a second messenger and modulator of the mTOR pathway downstream of dopamine (DA) receptors and/or CD38 was re-examined in the mouse. ADP-ribosyl activity was low in the membranes of neonates, but DA stimulated it via both D1- and D2-like receptors. ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity increased significantly during development in association with increased expression of CD38. The cADPR binding proteins, FKBP12 and FKBP12.6, were expressed in the adult mouse striatum. The ratio of phosphorylated to non-phosphorylated S6 kinase (S6K) in whole mouse striatum homogenates decreased after incubation of adult mouse striatum with extracellular cADPR for 5 min. This effect of cADPR was much weaker in MPTP-treated Parkinson's disease model mice. The inhibitory effects of cADPR and rapamycin were identical. These data suggest that cADPR is an endogenous inhibitor of the mTOR signaling pathway downstream of DA receptors in the mouse striatum and that cADPR plays a certain role in the brain in psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α: effect on radiation sensitivity and differential regulation by an mTOR inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Rupal S.; Landis, Daniel M.; Zimmer, Michael; Torregrossa, Joelle; Chen, Shaoyong; Sukhatme, Vikas P.; Iliopoulos, Othon; Balk, Steve; Bubley, Glenn J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF2α) on the sensitivity of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines to ionizing radiation and to determine if the mTOR antagonist, rapamycin, could decrease HIF2α protein levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS Cell lines expressing stable short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) encoding HIF2α shRNAs or an empty vector were transfected with a hypoxia responsive element (HRE)-driven firefly luciferase reporter gene. Two separate paired cell lines were assayed for their response to increasing doses of ionizing radiation. Proliferation and cell cycle kinetics were compared for cell lines expressing HIF2α shRNAs and empty vectors. The effect of an mTOR antagonist, rapamycin on HIF1α and HIF2α proteins levels was also assessed. RESULTS We confirmed that the 786-O RCC lines with stably integrated shRNAs against HIF2α had decreased activation of a plasmid with a HRE-driven firefly luciferase reporter gene. Lines from two separate cell clones with decreased HIF2α levels showed a significant increase in radiation sensitivity and an increase in G2 cell cycle arrest. Rapamycin, while effective in decreasing HIF1α protein levels, did not affect HIF2α levels in either of the RCC cell lines. CONCLUSIONS These results show that decreasing levels of HIF2α leads to an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. This finding may explain in part, the known resistance of RCC to radiation therapy. Although mTOR antagonists are approved for the treatment of RCC, these agents do not decrease HIF2α levels and therefore might not be effective in enhancing the radio-sensitivity of these tumours. PMID:18394010

  10. Discovery and Assembly Line Biosynthesis of the Lymphostin Pyrroloquinoline Alkaloid Family of mTOR Inhibitors in Salinispora Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Janso, Jeffrey E.; McDonald, Leonard; He, Min; Liu, Hongbo; Barbieri, Laurel; Eustáquio, Alessandra S.; Fielding, Elisha N.; Carter, Guy T.; Jensen, Paul R.; Feng, Xidong; Leighton, Margaret; Koehn, Frank E.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    The pyrroloquinoline alkaloid family of natural products that includes the immunosuppressant lymphostin has long been postulated to arise from tryptophan. We now report the molecular basis of lymphostin biosynthesis in three marine Salinispora species that maintain conserved biosynthetic gene clusters harboring a hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase central to lymphostin assembly. Through a series of experiments involving gene mutations, stable isotope profiling, and natural product discovery, we report the assembly line biosynthesis of lymphostin and nine new analogues that exhibit potent mTOR inhibitory activity. PMID:21815669

  11. Caveolin-1 and accelerated host aging in the breast tumor microenvironment: chemoprevention with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor and anti-aging drug.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Isabelle; Camacho, Jeanette; Titchen, Kanani; Gonzales, Donna M; Quann, Kevin; Bryant, Kelly G; Molchansky, Alexander; Milliman, Janet N; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Sotgia, Federica; Jasmin, Jean-François; Schwarting, Roland; Pestell, Richard G; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-07-01

    Increasing chronological age is the most significant risk factor for human cancer development. To examine the effects of host aging on mammary tumor growth, we used caveolin (Cav)-1 knockout mice as a bona fide model of accelerated host aging. Mammary tumor cells were orthotopically implanted into these distinct microenvironments (Cav-1(+/+) versus Cav-1(-/-) age-matched young female mice). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment have an increased stromal content, with vimentin-positive myofibroblasts (a marker associated with oxidative stress) that are also positive for S6-kinase activation (a marker associated with aging). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment were more than fivefold larger than tumors grown in a wild-type microenvironment. Thus, a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment provides a fertile soil for breast cancer tumor growth. Interestingly, the mammary tumor-promoting effects of a Cav-1-deficient microenvironment were estrogen and progesterone independent. In this context, chemoprevention was achieved by using the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor and anti-aging drug, rapamycin. Systemic rapamycin treatment of mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient microenvironment significantly inhibited their tumor growth, decreased their stromal content, and reduced the levels of both vimentin and phospho-S6 in Cav-1-deficient cancer-associated fibroblasts. Since stromal loss of Cav-1 is a marker of a lethal tumor microenvironment in breast tumors, these high-risk patients might benefit from treatment with mTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin or other rapamycin-related compounds (rapalogues).

  12. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  13. MLN4924, an NAE inhibitor, suppresses AKT and mTOR signaling via upregulation of REDD1 in human myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yanyan; Kaufman, Jonathan L; Bernal, Leon; Torre, Claire; Matulis, Shannon M; Harvey, R Donald; Chen, Jing; Sun, Shi-Yong; Boise, Lawrence H; Lonial, Sagar

    2014-05-22

    The function and survival of normal and malignant plasma cells depends on the elaborately regulated ubiquitin proteasome system. Proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib have proved to be highly effective in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), and their effects are related to normal protein homeostasis which is critical for plasma cell survival. Many ubiquitin ligases are regulated by conjugation with NEDD8. Therefore, neddylation may also impact survival and proliferation of malignant plasma cells. Here, we show that MLN4924, a potent NEDD8 activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor, induced cytotoxicity in MM cell lines, and its antitumor effect is associated with suppression of the AKT and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways through increased expression of REDD1. Combining MLN4924 with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces synergistic apoptosis in MM cell lines which can overcome the prosurvival effects of growth factors such as interleukin-6 and insulin-like growth factor-1. Altogether, our findings demonstrate an important function for REDD1 in MLN4924-induced cytotoxicity in MM and also provide a promising therapeutic combination strategy for myeloma.

  14. Influence of macrocyclization on allosteric, juxtamembrane-derived, stapled peptide inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Julie K-L; Schepartz, Alanna

    2014-09-19

    The hydrocarbon-stapled peptide E1(S) allosterically inhibits the kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by blocking a distant but essential protein-protein interaction: a coiled coil formed from the juxtamembrane segment (JM) of each member of the dimeric partnership.1 Macrocyclization is not required for activity: the analogous unstapled (but alkene-bearing) peptide is equipotent in cell viability, immunoblot, and bipartite display experiments to detect coiled coil formation on the cell surface.

  15. Molecular Motions as a Drug Target: Mechanistic Simulations of Anthrax Toxin Edema Factor Function Led to the Discovery of Novel Allosteric Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Élodie; Martínez, Leandro; Ladant, Daniel; Malliavin, Thérèse; Blondel, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF) is a component of Bacillus anthracis toxin essential for virulence. Its adenylyl cyclase activity is induced by complexation with the ubiquitous eukaryotic cellular protein, calmodulin (CaM). EF and its complexes with CaM, nucleotides and/or ions, have been extensively characterized by X-ray crystallography. Those structural data allowed molecular simulations analysis of various aspects of EF action mechanism, including the delineation of EF and CaM domains through their association energetics, the impact of calcium binding on CaM, and the role of catalytic site ions. Furthermore, a transition path connecting the free inactive form to the CaM-complexed active form of EF was built to model the activation mechanism in an attempt to define an inhibition strategy. The cavities at the surface of EF were determined for each path intermediate to identify potential sites where the binding of a ligand could block activation. A non-catalytic cavity (allosteric) was found to shrink rapidly at early stages of the path and was chosen to perform virtual screening. Amongst 18 compounds selected in silico and tested in an enzymatic assay, 6 thiophen ureidoacid derivatives formed a new family of EF allosteric inhibitors with IC50 as low as 2 micromolars. PMID:23012649

  16. Lipid Sulfates and Sulfonates Are Allosteric Competitive Inhibitors of the N-Terminal Phosphatase Activity of the Mammalian Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase†

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Katherine L.; Aronov, Pavel A.; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Newman, John W.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Morisseau, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    The EPXH2 gene encodes for the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a homodimeric enzyme with each monomer containing two domains with distinct activities. The C-terminal domain, containing the epoxide hydrolase activity (Cterm-EH), is involved in the metabolism of arachidonic acid epoxides, endogenous chemical mediators that play important roles in blood pressure regulation, cell growth, and inflammation. We recently demonstrated that the N-terminal domain contains a Mg2+-dependent lipid phosphate phosphatase activity (Nterm-phos). However, the biological role of this activity is unknown. The inability of known phosphatase inhibitors to inhibit the Nterm-phos constitutes a significant barrier to the elucidation of its function. We describe herein sulfate, sulfonate, and phosphonate lipids as novel potent inhibitors of Nterm-phos. These compounds are allosteric competitive inhibitors with KI in the hundred nanomolar range. These inhibitors may provide a valuable tool to investigate the biological role of the Nterm-phos. We found that polyisoprenyl phosphates are substrates of Nterm-phos, suggesting a possible role in sterol synthesis or inflammation. Furthermore, some of these compounds inhibit the C-terminal sEH activity through a noncompetitive inhibition mechanism involving a new binding site on the C-terminal domain. This novel site may play a role in the natural in vivo regulation of epoxide hydrolysis by sEH. PMID:16142916

  17. Lipid sulfates and sulfonates are allosteric competitive inhibitors of the N-terminal phosphatase activity of the mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Tran, Katherine L; Aronov, Pavel A; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Newman, John W; Hammock, Bruce D; Morisseau, Christophe

    2005-09-13

    The EPXH2 gene encodes for the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a homodimeric enzyme with each monomer containing two domains with distinct activities. The C-terminal domain, containing the epoxide hydrolase activity (Cterm-EH), is involved in the metabolism of arachidonic acid epoxides, endogenous chemical mediators that play important roles in blood pressure regulation, cell growth, and inflammation. We recently demonstrated that the N-terminal domain contains a Mg2+-dependent lipid phosphate phosphatase activity (Nterm-phos). However, the biological role of this activity is unknown. The inability of known phosphatase inhibitors to inhibit the Nterm-phos constitutes a significant barrier to the elucidation of its function. We describe herein sulfate, sulfonate, and phosphonate lipids as novel potent inhibitors of Nterm-phos. These compounds are allosteric competitive inhibitors with K(I) in the hundred nanomolar range. These inhibitors may provide a valuable tool to investigate the biological role of the Nterm-phos. We found that polyisoprenyl phosphates are substrates of Nterm-phos, suggesting a possible role in sterol synthesis or inflammation. Furthermore, some of these compounds inhibit the C-terminal sEH activity through a noncompetitive inhibition mechanism involving a new binding site on the C-terminal domain. This novel site may play a role in the natural in vivo regulation of epoxide hydrolysis by sEH.

  18. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin down-regulates the expression of the ubiquitin ligase subunit Skp2 in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Ma'anit; Kakiashvili, Eli; Rosenberg, Tzur; Hershko, Dan D

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Loss of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. The decrease in p27 levels is mainly the result of enhanced proteasome-dependent degradation mediated by its specific ubiquitin ligase subunit S phase kinase protein 2 (Skp2). The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a downstream mediator in the phosphoinositol 3' kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway that down-regulates p27 levels in breast cancer. Rapamycin was found to stabilize p27 levels in breast cancer, but whether this effect is mediated through changes in Skp2 expression is unknown. Methods The expression of Skp2 mRNA and protein levels were examined in rapamycin-treated breast cancer cell lines. The effect of rapamycin on the degradation rate of Skp2 expression was examined in cycloheximide-treated cells and in relationship to the anaphase promoting complex/Cdh1 (APC\\C) inhibitor Emi1. Results Rapamycin significantly decreased Skp2 mRNA and protein levels in a dose and time-dependent fashion, depending on the sensitivity of the cell line to rapamycin. The decrease in Skp2 levels in the different cell lines was followed by cell growth arrest at G1. In addition, rapamycin enhanced the degradation rate of Skp2 and down-regulated the expression of the APC\\C inhibitor Emi1. Conclusion These results suggest that Skp2, an important oncogene in the development and progression of breast cancer, may be a novel target for rapamycin treatment. PMID:16859513

  19. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. PMID:26800261

  20. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6.

    PubMed

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT.

  1. Novel PI3K and mTOR Inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 Radiosensitizes Breast Cancer Cell Lines under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kuger, Sebastian; Cörek, Emre; Polat, Bülent; Kämmerer, Ulrike; Flentje, Michael; Djuzenova, Cholpon S.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we assessed, if the novel dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 radiosensitizes triple negative (TN) MDA-MB-231 and estrogen receptor (ER) positive MCF-7 cells to ionizing radiation under various oxygen conditions, simulating different microenvironments as occurring in the majority of breast cancers (BCs). Irradiation (IR) of BC cells cultivated in hypoxic conditions revealed increased radioresistance compared to normoxic controls. Treatment with NVP-BEZ235 completely circumvented this hypoxia-induced effects and radiosensitized normoxic, reoxygenated, and hypoxic cells to similar extents. Furthermore, NVP-BEZ235 treatment suppressed HIF-1α expression and PI3K/mTOR signaling, induced autophagy, and caused protracted DNA damage repair in both cell lines in all tested oxygen conditions. Moreover, after incubation with NVP-BEZ235, MCF-7 cells revealed depletion of phospho-AKT and considerable signs of apoptosis, which were significantly enhanced by radiation. Our findings clearly demonstrate that NVP-BEZ235 has a clinical relevant potential as a radiosensitizer in BC treatment. PMID:24678241

  2. Co-administration strategy to enhance brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-glycoprotein (P-gp/Abcb1) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) mediated efflux with m-TOR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Minocha, Mukul; Khurana, Varun; Qin, Bin; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize the interaction of vandetanib with P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1) in vitro and in vivo (ii) to study the modulation of P-gp and BCRP mediated efflux of vandetanib with specific transport inhibitors and m-TOR inhibitors, everolimus and temsirolimus. Cellular accumulation and bi-directional transport studies in MDCKII cell monolayers were conducted to delineate the role of efflux transporters on disposition of vandetanib. Brain distribution studies were conducted in male FVB wild-type mice with vandetanib administered intravenously either alone or in the presence of specific inhibitors and m-TOR inhibitors. In vitro studies suggested that vandetanib is a high affinity substrate of Bcrp1 but is not transported by P-gp. Interestingly, in vivo brain distribution studies in FVB wild type mice indicated that vandetanib penetration into the brain is restricted by both Bcrp1 and P-gp mediated active efflux at the blood brain barrier (BBB). Co-administration of elacridar, a dual P-gp/BCRP inhibitor increased the brain to plasma concentration ratio of vandetanib upto 5 fold. Of the two m-TOR pathway inhibitors examined; everolimus showed potent effect on modulating vandetanib brain penetration whereas no significant affect on vandetanib brain uptake was observed following temsirolimus co-administration. This finding could be clinically relevant as everolimus can provide synergistic pharmacological effect in addition to primary role of vandetanib efflux modulation at BBB for the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:22633931

  3. Targeting AKT1-E17K and the PI3K/AKT Pathway with an Allosteric AKT Inhibitor, ARQ 092

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi; Savage, Ronald E.; Eathiraj, Sudharshan; Meade, Justin; Wick, Michael J.; Hall, Terence; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Schwartz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    As a critical component in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, AKT has become an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. ARQ 092 and a next generation AKT inhibitor, ARQ 751 are selective, allosteric, pan-AKT and AKT1-E17K mutant inhibitors that potently inhibit phosphorylation of AKT. Biochemical and cellular analysis showed that ARQ 092 and ARQ 751 inhibited AKT activation not only by dephosphorylating the membrane-associated active form, but also by preventing the inactive form from localizing into plasma membrane. In endometrial PDX models harboring mutant AKT1-E17K and other tumor models with an activated AKT pathway, both compounds exhibited strong anti-tumor activity. Combination studies conducted in in vivo breast tumor models demonstrated that ARQ 092 enhanced tumor inhibition of a common chemotherapeutic agent (paclitaxel). In a large panel of diverse cancer cell lines, ARQ 092 and ARQ 751 inhibited proliferation across multiple tumor types but were most potent in leukemia, breast, endometrial, and colorectal cancer cell lines. Moreover, inhibition by ARQ 092 and ARQ 751 was more prevalent in cancer cell lines containing PIK3CA/PIK3R1 mutations compared to those with wt-PIK3CA/PIK3R1 or PTEN mutations. For both ARQ 092 and ARQ 751, PIK3CA/PIK3R1 and AKT1-E17K mutations can potentially be used as predictive biomarkers for patient selection in clinical studies. PMID:26469692

  4. Systemic and CNS activity of the RET inhibitor vandetanib combined with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in KIF5B-RET re-arranged non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Berry, Jenny; Roxas, Michael; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Subbiah, Ishwaria Mohan; Ali, Siraj M; McMahon, Caitlin; Miller, Vincent; Cascone, Tina; Pai, Shobha; Tang, Zhenya; Heymach, John V

    2015-07-01

    In-frame fusion KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene)-RET transcripts have been characterized in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancers and are known oncogenic drivers. The RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, suppresses fusion-induced, anchorage-independent growth activity. In vitro studies have shown that vandetanib is a high-affinity substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) but is not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), limiting its blood-brain barrier penetration. A co-administration strategy to enhance the brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-gp/Abcb1- and Bcrp1/Abcg2-mediated efflux with mTOR inhibitors, specifically everolimus, was shown to increase the blood-brain barrier penetration. We report the first bench-to-bedside evidence that RET inhibitor combined with an mTOR inhibitor is active against brain-metastatic RET-rearranged lung cancer and the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration. A 74-year-old female with progressive adenocarcinoma of the lung (wild-type EGFR and no ALK rearrangement) presented for therapy options. A deletion of 5'RET was revealed by FISH assay, indicating RET-gene rearrangement. Because of progressive disease in the brain, she was enrolled in a clinical trial with vandetanib and everolimus (NCT01582191). Comprehensive genomic profiling revealed fusion of KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene) and RET, in addition to AKT2 gene amplification. After two cycles of therapy a repeat MRI brain showed a decrease in the intracranial disease burden and PET/CT showed systemic response as well. Interestingly, AKT2 amplification seen is a critical component of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, alterations of which has been associated with both de novo and acquired resistance to targeted therapy. The addition of everolimus may have both overcome the AKT2 amplification to produce a response in addition to its direct effects on the RET gene. Our case report forms the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration by

  5. Analogs of the Allosteric Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) Inhibitor, MKT-077, as Anti-Cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaokai; Srinivasan, Sharan R; Connarn, Jamie; Ahmad, Atta; Young, Zapporah T; Kabza, Adam M; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Sun, Duxin; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2013-11-14

    The rhodacyanine, MKT-077, has anti-proliferative activity against cancer cell lines through its ability to inhibit members of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family of molecular chaperones. However, MKT-077 is rapidly metabolized, which limits its use as either a chemical probe or potential therapeutic. We report the synthesis and characterization of MKT-077 analogs designed for greater stability. The most potent molecules, such as 30 (JG-98), were at least 3-fold more active than MKT-077 against the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 (EC50 values of 0.4 ± 0.03 μM and 0.7 ± 0.2 μM, respectively). The analogs modestly destabilized the chaperone "clients", Akt1 and Raf1, and induced apoptosis in these cells. Further, the microsomal half-life of JG-98 was improved at least 7-fold (t1/2 = 37 min) compared to MKT-077 (t1/2 < 5 min). Finally, NMR titration experiments suggested that these analogs bind an allosteric site that is known to accommodate MKT-077. These studies advance MKT-077 analogs as chemical probes for studying Hsp70's roles in cancer.

  6. Advanced malignancies treated with a combination of the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab, anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab, and the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaochun; Kambrick, Susan; Fu, Siqing; Naing, Aung; Subbiah, Vivek; Blumenschein, George R.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Kies, Merrill S.; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Wheler, Jennifer J.; Zinner, Ralph G.; Hong, David S.; Kurzrock, Razelle; Piha-Paul, Sarina A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bevacizumab and temsirolimus are active agents in advanced solid tumors. Temsirolimus inhibits mTOR in the PI3 kinase/AKT/mTOR pathway as well as CYP2A, which may be a resistance mechanism for cetuximab. In addition, temsirolimus attenuates upregulation of HIF-1α levels, which may be a resistance mechanism for bevacizumab. RESULTS The median age of patients was 60 years (range, 23-80 years). The median number of prior systemic therapies was 3 (range, 1-6). The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was determined to be bevacizumab 10 mg/kg biweekly, temsirolimus 5 mg weekly and cetuximab 100/75 mg/m2 weekly. Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were seen in 52% of patients with the highest prevalence being hyperglycemia (14%) and hypophosphatemia (14%). Eighteen of the 21 patients were evaluable for response. Three patients were taken off the study before restaging for toxicities. Partial response (PR) was observed in 2/18 patients (11%) and stable disease (SD) lasting ≥ 6 months was observed in 4/18 patients (22%) (total = 6/18 (33%)). In 8 evaluable patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) there were partial responses in 2/8 (25%) patients and SD ≥ 6 months in 1/8 (13%) patients (total = 3/8, (38%)). PATIENTS AND METHODS We analyzed safety and responses in 21 patients with advanced solid tumors treated with bevacizumab, cetuximab, and temsirolimus. CONCLUSION The combination of bevacizumab, cetuximab, and temsirolimus showed activity in HNSCC; however, there were numerous toxicities reported, which will require careful management for future clinical development. PMID:26933802

  7. Intracerebroventricular administration of ouabain, a Na/K-ATPase inhibitor, activates mTOR signal pathways and protein translation in the rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hyun; Yu, Hyun-Sook; Park, Hong Geun; Ha, Kyooseob; Kim, Yong Sik; Shin, Soon Young; Ahn, Yong Min

    2013-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of ouabain, a specific Na/K-ATPase inhibitor, induces behavioral changes in rats in a putative animal model of mania. The binding of ouabain to Na/K-ATPase affects signaling molecules in vitro, including ERK1/2 and Akt, which promote protein translation. We have also reported that ERK1/2 and Akt in the brain are involved in the ouabain-induced hyperactivity of rats. In this study, rats were given an ICV injection of ouabain, and then their frontal cortices were examined to determine the effects of ouabain on the mTOR/p70S6K/S6 signaling pathway and protein translation, which are important in modifications of neural circuits and behavior. Rats showed ouabain-induced hyperactivity up to 8h following injection, and increased phosphorylation levels of mTOR, p70S6K, S6, eIF4B, and 4E-BP at 1, 2, 4, and 8h following ouabain injection. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that increased p-S6 immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm of neurons by ouabain was evident in the prefrontal, cingulate, and orbital cortex. These findings suggested increased translation initiation in response to ouabain. The rate of protein synthesis was measured as the amount of [(3)H]-leucine incorporation in the cell-free extracts of frontal cortical tissues, and showed a significant increase at 8h after ouabain injection. These results suggest that ICV injection of ouabain induced activation of the protein translation initiation pathway regulated by ERK1/2 and Akt, and prolonged hyperactivity in rats. In conclusion, protein translation pathway could play an important role in ouabain-induced hyperactivity in a rodent model of mania.

  8. Role of mTOR inhibitors for the control of viral infection in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio; Royuela, Ana; Fernández, Ana M; Herrero, Ignacio; Delgado, Juan F; Solé, Amparo; Guirado, Lluis; Serrano, Trinidad; de la Torre-Cisneros, Julián; Moreno, Asunción; Cordero, Elisa; Gallego, Roberto; Lumbreras, Carlos; Aguado, José M

    2016-12-01

    Appropriate post-transplant immunosuppressive regimens that avoid acute rejection, while reducing risk of viral reactivation, have been sought, but remain a chimera. Recent evidence suggesting potential regulatory and antiviral effects of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) is of great interest. Although the concept of an immunosuppressive drug with antiviral properties is not new, little effort has been made to put the evidence together to assess the management of immunosuppressive therapy in the presence of a viral infection. This review was developed to gather the evidence on antiviral activity of the mTORi against the viruses that most commonly reactivate in adult solid organ recipients: cytomegalovirus (CMV), polyomavirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8), and hepatitis C virus (HCV). A rapid review methodology and evaluation of quality and consistency of evidence based on the GRADE system was used. The existing literature was variable in nature, although indicating a potential advantage of mTORi in CMV, polyomavirus, and HHV8 infection, and a most doubtful relation with EBV and HCV infection. Several recommendations about the management of these infections are presented that can change certain current patterns of immunosuppression and help to improve the prognosis of the direct and indirect effects of viral infection in solid organ recipients.

  9. The allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitor BI-D affects virion maturation but does not influence packaging of a functional RNA genome.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Nikki; van der Velden, Yme; Bonnard, Damien; Le Rouzic, Erwann; Das, Atze T; Benarous, Richard; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The viral integrase (IN) is an essential protein for HIV-1 replication. IN inserts the viral dsDNA into the host chromosome, thereby aided by the cellular co-factor LEDGF/p75. Recently a new class of integrase inhibitors was described: allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs). Although designed to interfere with the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction to block HIV DNA integration during the early phase of HIV-1 replication, the major impact was surprisingly found on the process of virus maturation during the late phase, causing a reverse transcription defect upon infection of target cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of an ALLINI are misformed with the ribonucleoprotein located outside the virus core. Virus assembly and maturation are highly orchestrated and regulated processes in which several viral proteins and RNA molecules closely interact. It is therefore of interest to study whether ALLINIs have unpredicted pleiotropic effects on these RNA-related processes. We confirm that the ALLINI BI-D inhibits virus replication and that the produced virus is non-infectious. Furthermore, we show that the wild-type level of HIV-1 genomic RNA is packaged in virions and these genomes are in a dimeric state. The tRNAlys3 primer for reverse transcription was properly placed on this genomic RNA and could be extended ex vivo. In addition, the packaged reverse transcriptase enzyme was fully active when extracted from virions. As the RNA and enzyme components for reverse transcription are properly present in virions produced in the presence of BI-D, the inhibition of reverse transcription is likely to reflect the mislocalization of the components in the aberrant virus particle.

  10. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of PDK1 in Cancer Cells: Characterization of a Selective Allosteric Kinase Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, Kumiko; Shumway, Stuart D.; Sathyanarayanan, Sriram; Chen, Albert H.; Dolinski, Brian; Xu, Youyuan; Keilhack, Heike; Nguyen, Thi; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Li, Lixia; Lutterbach, Bart A.; Chi, An; Paweletz, Cloud; Allison, Timothy; Yan, Youwei; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Klippel, Anke; Kraus, Manfred; Bobkova, Ekaterina V.; Deshmukh, Sujal; Xu, Zangwei; Mueller, Uwe; Szewczak, Alexander A.; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Richon, Victoria; Pollock, Roy; Blume-Jensen, Peter; Northrup, Alan; Andersen, Jannik N.

    2013-11-20

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is a critical activator of multiple prosurvival and oncogenic protein kinases and has garnered considerable interest as an oncology drug target. Despite progress characterizing PDK1 as a therapeutic target, pharmacological support is lacking due to the prevalence of nonspecific inhibitors. Here, we benchmark literature and newly developed inhibitors and conduct parallel genetic and pharmacological queries into PDK1 function in cancer cells. Through kinase selectivity profiling and x-ray crystallographic studies, we identify an exquisitely selective PDK1 inhibitor (compound 7) that uniquely binds to the inactive kinase conformation (DFG-out). In contrast to compounds 1-5, which are classical ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors (DFG-in), compound 7 specifically inhibits cellular PDK1 T-loop phosphorylation (Ser-241), supporting its unique binding mode. Interfering with PDK1 activity has minimal antiproliferative effect on cells growing as plastic-attached monolayer cultures (i.e. standard tissue culture conditions) despite reduced phosphorylation of AKT, RSK, and S6RP. However, selective PDK1 inhibition impairs anchorage-independent growth, invasion, and cancer cell migration. Compound 7 inhibits colony formation in a subset of cancer cell lines (four of 10) and primary xenograft tumor lines (nine of 57). RNAi-mediated knockdown corroborates the PDK1 dependence in cell lines and identifies candidate biomarkers of drug response. In summary, our profiling studies define a uniquely selective and cell-potent PDK1 inhibitor, and the convergence of genetic and pharmacological phenotypes supports a role of PDK1 in tumorigenesis in the context of three-dimensional in vitro culture systems.

  11. Identification of a Potent Allosteric Inhibitor of Human Protein Kinase CK2 by Bacterial Surface Display Library Screening

    PubMed Central

    Nienberg, Christian; Garmann, Claudia; Gratz, Andreas; Bollacke, Andre; Götz, Claudia; Jose, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Human protein kinase CK2 has emerged as promising target for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. The vast majority of kinase inhibitors known today target the ATP binding site, which is highly conserved among kinases and hence leads to limited selectivity. In order to identify non-ATP competitive inhibitors, a 12-mer peptide library of 6 × 105 variants was displayed on the surface of E. coli by autodisplay. Screening of this peptide library on variants with affinity to CK2 was performed by fluorophore-conjugated CK2 and subsequent flow cytometry. Single cell sorting of CK2-bound E. coli yielded new peptide variants, which were tested on inhibition of CK2 by a CE-based assay. Peptide B2 (DCRGLIVMIKLH) was the most potent inhibitor of both, CK2 holoenzyme and the catalytic CK2α subunit (IC50 = 0.8 µM). Using different ATP concentrations and different substrate concentrations for IC50 determination, B2 was shown to be neither ATP- nor substrate competitive. By microscale thermophoresis (MST) the KD value of B2 with CK2α was determined to be 2.16 µM, whereas no binding of B2 to CK2β-subunit was detectable. To our surprise, besides inhibition of enzymatic activity, B2 also disturbed the interaction of CK2α with CK2β at higher concentrations (≥25 µM). PMID:28067769

  12. Identification of a Potent Allosteric Inhibitor of Human Protein Kinase CK2 by Bacterial Surface Display Library Screening.

    PubMed

    Nienberg, Christian; Garmann, Claudia; Gratz, Andreas; Bollacke, Andre; Götz, Claudia; Jose, Joachim

    2017-01-05

    Human protein kinase CK2 has emerged as promising target for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. The vast majority of kinase inhibitors known today target the ATP binding site, which is highly conserved among kinases and hence leads to limited selectivity. In order to identify non-ATP competitive inhibitors, a 12-mer peptide library of 6 × 10⁵ variants was displayed on the surface of E. coli by autodisplay. Screening of this peptide library on variants with affinity to CK2 was performed by fluorophore-conjugated CK2 and subsequent flow cytometry. Single cell sorting of CK2-bound E. coli yielded new peptide variants, which were tested on inhibition of CK2 by a CE-based assay. Peptide B2 (DCRGLIVMIKLH) was the most potent inhibitor of both, CK2 holoenzyme and the catalytic CK2α subunit (IC50 = 0.8 µM). Using different ATP concentrations and different substrate concentrations for IC50 determination, B2 was shown to be neither ATP- nor substrate competitive. By microscale thermophoresis (MST) the KD value of B2 with CK2α was determined to be 2.16 µM, whereas no binding of B2 to CK2β-subunit was detectable. To our surprise, besides inhibition of enzymatic activity, B2 also disturbed the interaction of CK2α with CK2β at higher concentrations (≥25 µM).

  13. The mTOR Inhibitor Rapamycin Mitigates Perforant Pathway Neurodegeneration and Synapse Loss in a Mouse Model of Early-Stage Alzheimer-Type Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Siman, Robert; Cocca, Ryan; Dong, Yina

    2015-01-01

    The perforant pathway projection from layer II of the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampal dentate gyrus is especially important for long-term memory formation, and is preferentially vulnerable to developing a degenerative tauopathy early in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that may spread over time trans-synaptically. Despite the importance of the perforant pathway to the clinical onset and progression of AD, a therapeutic has not been identified yet that protects it from tau-mediated toxicity. Here, we used an adeno-associated viral vector-based mouse model of early-stage AD-type tauopathy to investigate effects of the mTOR inhibitor and autophagy stimulator rapamycin on the tau-driven loss of perforant pathway neurons and synapses. Focal expression of human tau carrying a P301L mutation but not eGFP as a control in layer II of the lateral entorhinal cortex triggered rapid degeneration of these neurons, loss of lateral perforant pathway synapses in the dentate gyrus outer molecular layer, and activation of neuroinflammatory microglia and astroglia in the two locations. Chronic systemic rapamycin treatment partially inhibited phosphorylation of a mechanistic target of rapamycin substrate in brain and stimulated LC3 cleavage, a marker of autophagic flux. Compared with vehicle-treated controls, rapamycin protected against the tau-induced neuronal loss, synaptotoxicity, reactive microgliosis and astrogliosis, and activation of innate neuroimmunity. It did not alter human tau mRNA or total protein levels. Finally, rapamycin inhibited trans-synaptic transfer of human tau expression to the dentate granule neuron targets for the perforant pathway, likely by preventing the synaptic spread of the AAV vector in response to pathway degeneration. These results identify systemic rapamycin as a treatment that protects the entorhinal cortex and perforant pathway projection from tau-mediated neurodegeneration, axonal and synapse loss, and neuroinflammatory reactive gliosis. The

  14. Novel Cancer Therapeutics with Allosteric Modulation of the Mitochondrial C-Raf-DAPK Complex by Raf Inhibitor Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Ta; Chuang, Mei-Jen; Tang, Shou-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Chen, Yu-Chi; Sun, Guang-Huan; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Ho, Jar-Yi; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Chen, Ming-Rong; Lin, Chung-Chih; Chang, Sun-Yran; Lin, Victor C; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Cha, Tai-Lung

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of cells. Mitochondrial C-Raf is a potential cancer therapeutic target, as it regulates mitochondrial function and is localized to the mitochondria by its N-terminal domain. However, Raf inhibitor monotherapy can induce S338 phosphorylation of C-Raf (pC-Raf(S338)) and impede therapy. This study identified the interaction of C-Raf with S308 phosphorylated DAPK (pDAPK(S308)), which together became colocalized in the mitochondria to facilitate mitochondrial remodeling. Combined use of the Raf inhibitors sorafenib and GW5074 had synergistic anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo, but targeted mitochondrial function, rather than the canonical Raf signaling pathway. C-Raf depletion in knockout MEF(C-Raf-/-) or siRNA knockdown ACHN renal cancer cells abrogated the cytotoxicity of combination therapy. Crystal structure simulation showed that GW5074 bound to C-Raf and induced a C-Raf conformational change that enhanced sorafenib-binding affinity. In the presence of pDAPK(S308), this drug-target interaction compromised the mitochondrial targeting effect of the N-terminal domain of C-Raf, which induced two-hit damages to cancer cells. First, combination therapy facilitated pC-Raf(S338) and pDAPK(S308) translocation from mitochondria to cytoplasm, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Second, ROS facilitated PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of pDAPK(S308) to DAPK. PP2A then dissociated from the C-Raf-DAPK complex and induced profound cancer cell death. Increased pDAPK(S308) modification was also observed in renal cancer tissues, which correlated with poor disease-free survival and poor overall survival in renal cancer patients. Besides mediating the anticancer effect, pDAPK(S308) may serve as a predictive biomarker for Raf inhibitors combination therapy, suggesting an ideal preclinical model that is worthy of clinical translation.

  15. Discovery of 3-benzyl-1,3-benzoxazine-2,4-dione analogues as allosteric mitogen-activated kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitors and anti-enterovirus 71 (EV71) agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Niu, Yan; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hao; Xie, Bingyu; Xu, Fengrong; Jin, Hongwei; Peng, Yihong; Liang, Lei; Xu, Ping

    2016-08-15

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a kind of RNA virus and one of the two causes of Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Inhibitors that target key components of Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway in host cells could impair replication of EV71. A series of 3-benzyl-1,3-benzoxazine-2,4-diones were designed from a specific MEK inhibitor G8935, by replacing the double bond between C3 and C4 within the coumarin scaffold with amide bond. One compound (9f) showed submicromolar inhibitory activity among the 12 derivatives. Further optimization on 9f led to two active compounds (9k and 9m) with nanomolar bioactivities (55nM and 60nM). The results of enzymatic assays also demonstrated that this series of compounds were allosteric inhibitors of unphosphorylated MEK1. The binding mode of compound 9k was predicted by molecular dynamic simulation and the key interactions were same as published MEK1/2 allosteric inhibitors. In the cell-based assays, compounds 9k and 9m could effectively suppress the ERK1/2 pathway, expression of EV71 VP1, and EV71 induced cytopathic effect (CPE) in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells.

  16. Heat Shock Protein 70 Inhibitors. 2. 2,5′-Thiodipyrimidines, 5-(Phenylthio)pyrimidines, 2-(Pyridin-3-ylthio)pyrimidines, and 3-(Phenylthio)pyridines as Reversible Binders to an Allosteric Site on Heat Shock Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and development of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) inhibitors is currently a hot topic in cancer. In the preceding paper in this issue (10.1021/jm401551n), we have described structure–activity relationship studies in the first Hsp70 inhibitor class rationally designed to bind to a novel allosteric pocket located in the N-terminal domain of the protein. These ligands contained an acrylamide to take advantage of an active cysteine embedded in the allosteric pocket and acted as covalent protein modifiers upon binding. Here, we perform chemical modifications around the irreversible inhibitor scaffold to demonstrate that covalent modification is not a requirement for activity within this class of compounds. The study identifies derivative 27c, which mimics the biological effects of the irreversible inhibitors at comparable concentrations. Collectively, the back-to-back manuscripts describe the first pharmacophores that favorably and selectively interact with a never explored pocket in Hsp70 and provide a novel blueprint for a cancer-oriented development of Hsp70-directed ligands. PMID:24548239

  17. Heat Shock Protein 70 Inhibitors. 1. 2,5′-Thiodipyrimidine and 5-(Phenylthio)pyrimidine Acrylamides as Irreversible Binders to an Allosteric Site on Heat Shock Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an important emerging cancer target whose inhibition may affect multiple cancer-associated signaling pathways and, moreover, result in significant cancer cell apoptosis. Despite considerable interest from both academia and pharmaceutical companies in the discovery and development of druglike Hsp70 inhibitors, little success has been reported so far. Here we describe structure–activity relationship studies in the first rationally designed Hsp70 inhibitor class that binds to a novel allosteric pocket located in the N-terminal domain of the protein. These 2,5′-thiodipyrimidine and 5-(phenylthio)pyrimidine acrylamides take advantage of an active cysteine embedded in the allosteric pocket to act as covalent protein modifiers upon binding. The study identifies derivatives 17a and 20a, which selectively bind to Hsp70 in cancer cells. Addition of high nanomolar to low micromolar concentrations of these inhibitors to cancer cells leads to a reduction in the steady-state levels of Hsp70-sheltered oncoproteins, an effect associated with inhibition of cancer cell growth and apoptosis. In summary, the described scaffolds represent a viable starting point for the development of druglike Hsp70 inhibitors as novel anticancer therapeutics. PMID:24548207

  18. Allosteric binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wess, Jürgen

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Molecular Pharmacology, Tränkle et al. (p. 1597) present new findings regarding the existence of a second allosteric site on the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 mAChR). The M2 mAChR is a prototypic class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that has proven to be a very useful model system to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the binding of allosteric GPCR ligands. Previous studies have identified several allosteric muscarinic ligands, including the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor tacrine and the bis-pyridinium derivative 4,4'-bis-[(2,6-dichloro-benzyloxy-imino)-methyl]-1,1'-propane-1,3-diyl-bis-pyridinium dibromide (Duo3), which, in contrast to conventional allosteric muscarinic ligands, display concentration-effect curves with slope factors >1. By analyzing the interactions of tacrine and Duo3 with other allosteric muscarinic agents predicted to bind to the previously identified ;common' allosteric binding site, Tränkle et al. provide evidence suggesting that two allosteric agents and one orthosteric ligand may be able to bind to the M2 mAChR simultaneously. Moreover, studies with mutant mAChRs indicated that the M2 receptor epitopes involved in the binding of tacrine and Duo3 may not be identical. Molecular modeling and ligand docking studies suggested that the additional allosteric site probably represents a subdomain of the receptor's allosteric binding cleft. Because allosteric binding sites have been found on many other GPCRs and drugs interacting with these sites are thought to have great therapeutic potential, the study by Tränkle et al. should be of considerable general interest.

  19. mTOR pathway activation is a favorable prognostic factor in human prostate adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stelloo, Suzan; Sanders, Joyce; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; de Jong, Jeroen; Peters, Dennis; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.; Jenster, Guido; Bergman, Andries M.; Zwart, Wilbert

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer patients with localized disease are treated with curative intent. However, the disease will recur in approximately 30% of patients with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. Prognostic biomarkers are needed to identify patients with high risk of relapse. mTOR pathway activation is reported in prostate cancer, but clinical trials testing efficacy of mTOR inhibitors were unsuccessful. To explain this clinical observation, we studied the expression and prognostic impact of mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation in localized prostate carcinomas. mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation is indicative for an activated mTOR pathway in prostate cancer. Surprisingly, the mTOR signaling pathway is activated specifically in prostate cancer patients with a favorable outcome. Since tumors from poor-outcome patients have low levels of mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation, this may explain why mTOR inhibitors proved unsuccessful in prostate cancer trials. PMID:27096957

  20. mTOR treatment in lymphangioleiomyomatosis: the role of everolimus.

    PubMed

    Yates, Deborah H

    2016-01-01

    The orphan lung disease lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) has until recently been untreatable other than by lung transplantation. However, improved understanding of underlying disease mechanisms has revealed the central role of constitutive up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in this disease. Although other pathways exist and are under investigation for treatment, several mTOR inhibitors are currently available and emerging information suggests that these may have some efficacy in preventing loss of lung function in LAM. This paper summarizes current understanding of treatment with mTOR inhibitors in LAM, and everolimus in particular. It outlines pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics relevant to the clinician, recent clinical studies, and issues with potential side effects. mTOR treatment is not yet available in most countries for LAM, but current data for treatment efficacy are impressive, and it is hoped that mTOR inhibition will soon be recognised as an important treatment of this disease.

  1. Cyclic AMP Analog Blocks Kinase Activation by Stabilizing Inactive Conformation: Conformational Selection Highlights a New Concept in Allosteric Inhibitor Design*

    PubMed Central

    Badireddy, Suguna; Yunfeng, Gao; Ritchie, Mark; Akamine, Pearl; Wu, Jian; Kim, Choel W.; Taylor, Susan S.; Qingsong, Lin; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory (R) subunit of protein kinase A serves to modulate the activity of protein kinase A in a cAMP-dependent manner and exists in two distinct and structurally dissimilar, end point cAMP-bound “B” and C-subunit-bound “H”-conformations. Here we report mechanistic details of cAMP action as yet unknown through a unique approach combining x-ray crystallography with structural proteomics approaches, amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange and ion mobility mass spectrometry, applied to the study of a stereospecific cAMP phosphorothioate analog and antagonist((Rp)-cAMPS). X-ray crystallography shows cAMP-bound R-subunit in the B form but surprisingly the antagonist Rp-cAMPS-bound R-subunit crystallized in the H conformation, which was previously assumed to be induced only by C-subunit-binding. Apo R-subunit crystallized in the B form as well but amide exchange mass spectrometry showed large differences between apo, agonist and antagonist-bound states of the R-subunit. Further ion mobility reveals the apo R-subunit as an ensemble of multiple conformations with collisional cross-sectional areas spanning both the agonist and antagonist-bound states. Thus contrary to earlier studies that explained the basis for cAMP action through “induced fit” alone, we report evidence for conformational selection, where the ligand-free apo form of the R-subunit exists as an ensemble of both B and H conformations. Although cAMP preferentially binds the B conformation, Rp-cAMPS interestingly binds the H conformation. This reveals the unique importance of the equatorial oxygen of the cyclic phosphate in mediating conformational transitions from H to B forms highlighting a novel approach for rational structure-based drug design. Ideal inhibitors such as Rp-cAMPS are those that preferentially “select” inactive conformations of target proteins by satisfying all “binding” constraints alone without inducing conformational changes necessary for activation. PMID:21081668

  2. Defining the Role of Autophagy Kinase ULK1 Signaling in Therapeutic Response of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex to mTOR Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Tuberous Sclerosis Complex tumor suppressors are known to be critical negative regulators of the mTORC1 kinase complex that controls cell growth...demonstrate that mTORC1 inactivates another kinase complex composed of the autophagy kinase ULK1 and its associated subunits. One prediction of these findings...is that in cells and tumors with TSC mutations and hyperactive mTOR, the ULK1 complex --and the process of autophagy---will be suppressed. There were

  3. Combined Targeting of mTOR and Akt Using Rapamycin and MK-2206 in The Treatment of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Shuang; Lin, Wei; Wang, Li; Ni, Zhaofei; Jin, Fuquan; Zha, Xiaojun; Fei, Guanghe

    2017-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), caused by loss-of-function mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by benign tumor formation in multiple organs. Hyperactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is the primary alteration underlying TSC tumor. Thus, rapamycin, as an mTOR specific inhibitor, has been assumed as a potential drug for the treatment of TSC. However, its application in TSC patients has been limited due to side effects. By analyzing Tsc1- or Tsc2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we found that loss of TSC1 or TSC2 led to a decreased sensitivity to MK-2206, a novel allosteric Akt inhibitor. Ectopic expression of a constitutively activated Akt (myristoylated Akt-1, myrAkt-1) sensitized Tsc2-null and Tsc1-null MEFs to MK-2206. Furthermore, MK-2206 increased the cytotoxicity of rapamycin in Tsc1-/-or Tsc2-/- MEFs. Moreover, the benefit of the combinatorial treatment was also demonstrated in a TSC xenograft mouse model. We conclude that the combination of rapamycin and MK-2206 may be utilized as a new therapeutic regimen for TSC. PMID:28367235

  4. Circadian regulation of mTOR by the ubiquitin pathway in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Naoya; Fujioka, Takashi; Okazaki, Fumiyasu; Akagawa, Yui; Tsurudome, Yuuya; Ono, Mayumi; Kuwano, Michihiko; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-01-15

    Circadian clock systems regulate many biologic functions, including cell division and hormone secretion in mammals. In this study, we explored the effects of circadian control on the pivot cell growth regulatory mTOR, the activity of which is deregulated in tumor cells compared with normal cells. Specifically, we investigated whether the antitumor effect of an mTOR inhibitor could be improved by changing its dosing schedule in RenCa tumor-bearing mice. Active, phosphorylated mTOR displayed a 24-hour rhythm, and levels of total mTOR protein (but not mRNA) also showed a circadian rhythm in RenCa tumor masses. Through investigations of the oscillation mechanism for mTOR expression, we identified the ubiquitination factor Fbxw7 as an mTOR regulator that oscillated in its expression in a manner opposite from mTOR. Fbxw7 transcription was regulated by the circadian regulator D-site-binding protein. Notably, administration of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus during periods of elevated mTOR improved survival in tumor-bearing mice. Our findings demonstrate that the circadian oscillation of mTOR activity is regulated by circadian clock systems, which influence the antitumor effect of mTOR inhibitors.

  5. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Rapamycin Benzothiazole Hybrids as mTOR Targeted Anti-cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, was firstly identified as a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) allosteric inhibitor, and its derivatives have been successfully developed as anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, finding rapamycin derivatives with better anti-cancer activity has been proved to be an effective way to discover new targeted anti-cancer drugs. In this paper, structure modification was performed at the C-43 position of rapamycin using bioisosterism and a hybrid approach: a series of novel rapamycin-benzothiazole hybrids 4a-e, 5a-c, and 9a, b have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against Caski, CNE-2, SGC-7901, PC-3, SK-NEP-1 and A-375 human cancer cell lines. Some of these compounds (4a-e, 9a, b) displayed good to excellent potency against the Caski and SK-NEP-1 cell line as compared with rapamycin. Compound 9b as the most active compound showed IC50 values of 8.3 (Caski) and 9.6 μM (SK-NEP-1), respectively. In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9b was able to cause G1 phase arrest and induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, it significantly decreased the phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein, p70S6K1 and 4EBP1, which indicated that 9b inhibited the cancer cell growth by blocking the mTOR pathway and may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor.

  6. Rapamycin, a mTOR inhibitor, induced growth inhibition in retinoblastoma Y79 cell via down-regulation of Bmi-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Dong; Su, Yong-Jing; Li, Jian-Ying; Yao, Xiang-Chao; Liang, Guang-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin is useful in the treatment of certain cancers by inhibiting mTOR(mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. Here, anticancer activity and its acting mechanisms of rapamycin were investigated in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells. CCK-8 assay showed that the IC50 value of rapamycin against human retinoblastoma Y79 cells was 0.122±0.026 μmol/L. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that rapamycin induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Western blot assay demonstrated that the mTOR pathway in Y79 cells was blocked by rapamycin. Western blot and RT-PCR assay showed that Bmi-1 was downregulated in protein and mRNA level by rapamycin treatment. Further Western blot and RNA interference assays showed that rapamycin-mediated downregulation of Bmi-1 induced decreases of cyclin E1, which accounted for rapamycin-mediated G1 cell cycle arrest in human retinoblastoma cells. Together, all these results illustrated that rapamycin induced growth inhibition of human retinoblastoma cells, and inactive of mTOR pathway and downregulation of Bmi-1 was involved in its action mechanism.

  7. Niclosamide and its analogs are potent inhibitors of Wnt/β-catenin, mTOR and STAT3 signaling in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arend, Rebecca C.; Londoño-Joshi, Angelina I.; Gangrade, Abhishek; Katre, Ashwini A.; Kurpad, Chandrika; Li, Yonghe; Samant, Rajeev S.; Li, Pui-Kai; Landen, Charles N.; Yang, Eddy S.; Hidalgo, Bertha; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Michael Straughn, John; Forero, Andres; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer mortality worldwide. Platinum-based therapy is the standard first line treatment and while most patients initially respond, resistance to chemotherapy usually arises. Major signaling pathways frequently upregulated in chemoresistant cells and important in the maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) include Wnt/β-catenin, mTOR, and STAT3. The major objective of our study was to investigate the treatment of ovarian cancer with targeted agents that inhibit these three pathways. Here we demonstrate that niclosamide, a salicylamide derivative, and two synthetically manufactured niclosamide analogs (analog 11 and 32) caused significant inhibition of proliferation of two chemoresistant ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780cp20 and SKOV3Trip2), tumorspheres isolated from the ascites of EOC patients, and cells from a chemoresistant patient-derived xenograft (PDX). This work shows that all three agents significantly decreased the expression of proteins in the Wnt/β-catenin, mTOR and STAT3 pathways and preferentially targeted cells that expressed the ovarian CSC surface protein CD133. It also illustrates the potential of drug repurposing for chemoresistant EOC and can serve as a basis for pathway-oriented in vivo studies. PMID:27888804

  8. Targeting the mTOR pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma: Current state and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Matthias S.; Decaens, Thomas; Andersen, Jesper B.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates cell growth, metabolism and aging in response to nutrients, cellular energy stage and growth factors. mTOR is frequently up-regulated in cancer including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is associated with bad prognosis, poorly differentiated tumors, and earlier recurrence. Blocking mTOR with rapamycin and first generation mTOR inhibitors, called rapalogs, has shown promising reduction of HCC tumors growth in preclinical models. Currently, rapamycin/rapalogs are used in several clinical trials for the treatment of advanced HCC, and as adjuvant therapy in HCC patients after liver transplantation and TACE. A second generation of mTOR pathway inhibitors has been developed recently, and is being tested in various clinical trials of solid cancers and has been used in preclinical HCC models. The results of series of clinical trials using mTOR inhibitors in HCC treatment will emerge in the near future. PMID:24308993

  9. An inhibitor of mTOR reduces neoplasia and normalizes p70/S6 kinase activity in Pten+/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Podsypanina, Katrina; Lee, Richard T.; Politis, Chris; Hennessy, Ian; Crane, Allison; Puc, Janusz; Neshat, Mehran; Wang, Hong; Yang, Lin; Gibbons, Jay; Frost, Phil; Dreisbach, Valley; Blenis, John; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Fisher, Peter; Sawyers, Charles; Hedrick-Ellenson, Lora; Parsons, Ramon

    2001-01-01

    PTEN phosphatase acts as a tumor suppressor by negatively regulating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. It is unclear which downstream components of this pathway are necessary for oncogenic transformation. In this report we show that transformed cells of PTEN+/− mice have elevated levels of phosphorylated Akt and activated p70/S6 kinase associated with an increase in proliferation. Pharmacological inactivation of mTOR/RAFT/FRAP reduced neoplastic proliferation, tumor size, and p70/S6 kinase activity, but did not affect the status of Akt. These data suggest that p70/S6K and possibly other targets of mTOR contribute significantly to tumor development and that inhibition of these proteins may be therapeutic for cancer patients with deranged PI3K signaling. PMID:11504907

  10. Exploiting protein flexibility to predict the location of allosteric sites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allostery is one of the most powerful and common ways of regulation of protein activity. However, for most allosteric proteins identified to date the mechanistic details of allosteric modulation are not yet well understood. Uncovering common mechanistic patterns underlying allostery would allow not only a better academic understanding of the phenomena, but it would also streamline the design of novel therapeutic solutions. This relatively unexplored therapeutic potential and the putative advantages of allosteric drugs over classical active-site inhibitors fuel the attention allosteric-drug research is receiving at present. A first step to harness the regulatory potential and versatility of allosteric sites, in the context of drug-discovery and design, would be to detect or predict their presence and location. In this article, we describe a simple computational approach, based on the effect allosteric ligands exert on protein flexibility upon binding, to predict the existence and position of allosteric sites on a given protein structure. Results By querying the literature and a recently available database of allosteric sites, we gathered 213 allosteric proteins with structural information that we further filtered into a non-redundant set of 91 proteins. We performed normal-mode analysis and observed significant changes in protein flexibility upon allosteric-ligand binding in 70% of the cases. These results agree with the current view that allosteric mechanisms are in many cases governed by changes in protein dynamics caused by ligand binding. Furthermore, we implemented an approach that achieves 65% positive predictive value in identifying allosteric sites within the set of predicted cavities of a protein (stricter parameters set, 0.22 sensitivity), by combining the current analysis on dynamics with previous results on structural conservation of allosteric sites. We also analyzed four biological examples in detail, revealing that this simple coarse

  11. Determination and validation of mTOR kinase-domain 3D structure by homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Lakhlili, Wiame; Chevé, Gwénaël; Yasri, Abdelaziz; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is considered as one of the commonly activated and deregulated signaling pathways in human cancer. mTOR is associated with other proteins in two molecular complexes: mTOR complex 1/Raptor and the mTOR complex 2/Rictor. Using the crystal structure of the related lipid kinase PI3Kγ, we built a model of the catalytic region of mTOR. The modeling of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the mTOR was performed by homology modeling program SWISS-MODEL. The quality and validation of the obtained model were performed using PROCHECK and PROVE softwares. The overall stereochemical property of the protein was assessed by the Ramachandran plot. The model validation was also done by docking of known inhibitors. In this paper, we describe and validate a 3D model for the mTOR catalytic site.

  12. Allosteric inhibition of HIV-1 integrase activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Kessl, Jacques J.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase is an important therapeutic target in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), which target the enzyme active site, have witnessed clinical success over the past 5 years, but the generation of drug resistance poses challenges to INSTI-based therapies moving forward. Integrase is a dynamic protein, and its ordered multimerization is critical to enzyme activity. The integrase tetramer, bound to viral DNA, interacts with host LEDGF/p75 protein to tether integration to active genes. Allosteric integrase inhibitors (ALLINIs) that compete with LEDGF/p75 for binding to integrase disrupt integrase assembly with viral DNA and allosterically inhibit enzyme function. ALLINIs display steep dose response curves and synergize with INSTIs ex vivo, highlighting this novel inhibitor class for clinical development. PMID:23647983

  13. Extended treatment with selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mTOR inhibitors has effects on metabolism, growth, behaviour and bone strength.

    PubMed

    Smith, Greg C; Ong, Wee-Kiat; Costa, Jessica L; Watson, Maureen; Cornish, Jillian; Grey, Andrew; Gamble, Greg D; Dickinson, Michelle; Leung, Sophie; Rewcastle, Gordon W; Han, Weiping; Shepherd, Peter R

    2013-11-01

    The class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PtdIns3Ks) mediate the effects of many hormones and growth factors on a wide range of cellular processes, and activating mutations or gene amplifications of class I PtdIns3K isoforms are known to contribute to oncogenic processes in a range of tumours. Consequently, a number of small-molecule PtdIns3K inhibitors are under development and in clinical trial. The central signalling role of PtdIns3K in many cellular processes suggests there will be on-target side effects associated with the use of these agents. To gain insights into what these might be we investigated the effect of extended daily dosing of eight small-molecule inhibitors of class Ia PtdIns3Ks. Animals were characterized in metabolic cages to analyse food intake, oxygen consumption and movement. Insulin tolerance and body composition were analysed at the end of the experiment, the latter using EchoMRI. Bone volume and strength was assessed by micro-CT and three-point bending, respectively. Surprisingly, after sustained dosing with pan-PtdIns3K inhibitors and selective inhibitors of the p110α isoform there was a resolution of the impairments in insulin tolerance observed in drug-naïve animals treated with the same drugs. However, pan-PtdIns3K inhibitors and selective inhibitors of the p110α have deleterious effects on animal growth, animal behaviour and bone volume and strength. Together, these findings identify a range of on target effects of PtdIns3K inhibitors and suggest use of these drugs in humans may have important adverse effects on metabolism, body composition, behaviour and skeletal health.

  14. A structure-guided fragment-based approach for the discovery of allosteric inhibitors targeting the lipophilic binding site of transcription factor EthR.

    PubMed

    Surade, Sachin; Ty, Nancy; Hengrung, Narin; Lechartier, Benoit; Cole, Stewart T; Abell, Chris; Blundell, Tom L

    2014-03-01

    A structure-guided fragment-based approach was used to target the lipophilic allosteric binding site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis EthR. This elongated channel has many hydrophobic residues lining the binding site, with few opportunities for hydrogen bonding. We demonstrate that a fragment-based approach involving the inclusion of flexible fragments in the library leads to an efficient exploration of chemical space, that fragment binding can lead to an extension of the cavity, and that fragments are able to identify hydrogen-bonding opportunities in this hydrophobic environment that are not exploited in Nature. In the present paper, we report the identification of a 1 μM affinity ligand obtained by structure-guided fragment linking.

  15. Pivotal Role of mTOR Signaling in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Augusto; Chiang, Derek Y.; Newell, Pippa; Peix, Judit; Thung, Swan; Alsinet, Clara; Tovar, Victoria; Roayaie, Sasan; Minguez, Beatriz; Sole, Manel; Battiston, Carlo; van Laarhoven, Stijn; Fiel, Maria I; Di Feo, Analisa; Hoshida, Yujin; Yea, Steven; Toffanin, Sara; Ramos, Alex; Martignetti, John A.; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Bruix, Jordi; Waxman, Samuel; Schwartz, Myron; Meyerson, Matthew; Friedman, Scott L.; Llovet, Josep M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The advent of targeted therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has underscored the importance of pathway characterization to identify novel molecular targets for treatment. Based on its role in cell growth and differentiation, we evaluated mTOR signaling activation in human HCC, as well as the anti-tumoral effect of a dual-level blockade of the mTOR pathway. METHODS The mTOR pathway was assessed using integrated data from mutation analysis (direct sequencing), DNA copy number changes (SNP-array), mRNA levels (qRT-PCR and gene expression microarray), and protein activation (immunostaining) in 351 human samples, including HCC (n=314), and non-tumoral tissue (n=37). Effects of dual blockade of mTOR signaling using a rapamycin analog (everolimus) and an EGFR/VEGFR inhibitor (AEE788) were evaluated in liver cancer cell lines, and in a tumor xenograft model. RESULTS Aberrant mTOR signaling (phosphorylated-RPS6) was present in half of the cases, associated with IGF pathway activation, EGF upregulation, and PTEN dysregulation. PTEN and PI3KCA-B mutations were rare events. Chromosomal gains in RICTOR (25% of patients) and positive pRPS6 staining correlated with recurrence. RICTOR-specific siRNA downregulation reduced tumor cell viability in vitro. Blockage of mTOR signaling with everolimus in vitro and in a xenograft model decelerated tumor growth and increased survival. This effect was enhanced in vivo after EGFR blockade. CONCLUSIONS MTOR signaling has a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCC, with evidence for the role of RICTOR in tumor oncogenesis. MTOR blockade with everolimus is effective in vivo. These findings establish a rationale for targeting mTOR pathway in clinical trials in HCC. PMID:18929564

  16. Experimental evidence for allosteric modifier saturation as predicted by the bi-substrate Hill equation.

    PubMed

    Hanekom, A J; Hofmeyr, J H S; Snoep, J L; Rohwer, J M

    2006-09-01

    The cooperative enzyme reaction rates predicted by the bi-substrate Hill equation and the bi-substrate Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) equation when allosterically inhibited are compared in silico. Theoretically, the Hill equation predicts that when the maximum inhibitory effect at a certain substrate condition has been reached, an increase in allosteric inhibitor concentration will have no effect on reaction rate, that is the Hill equation shows allosteric inhibitor saturation. This saturating inhibitory effect is not present in the MWC equation. Experimental in vitro data for pyruvate kinase, a bi-substrate cooperative enzyme that is allosterically inhibited, are presented. This enzyme also shows inhibitor saturation, and therefore serves as experimental evidence that the bi-substrate Hill equation predicts more realistic allosteric inhibitor behaviour than the bi-substrate MWC equation.

  17. Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) of thiazolone derivatives as hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase allosteric inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Beilei; Du, Juan; Li, Shuyan; Liu, Huanxiang; Ren, Yueying; Yao, Xiaojun

    2008-10-01

    Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models for a series of thiazolone derivatives as novel inhibitors bound to the allosteric site of hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase were developed based on CoMFA and CoMSIA analyses. Two different conformations of the template molecule and the combinations of different CoMSIA field/fields were considered to build predictive CoMFA and CoMSIA models. The CoMFA and CoMSIA models with best predictive ability were obtained by the use of the template conformation from X-ray crystal structures. The best CoMFA and CoMSIA models gave q 2 values of 0.621 and 0.685, and r 2 values of 0.950 and 0.940, respectively for the 51 compounds in the training set. The predictive ability of the two models was also validated by using a test set of 16 compounds which gave r pred 2 values of 0.685 and 0.822, respectively. The information obtained from the CoMFA and CoMSIA 3D contour maps enables the interpretation of their structure-activity relationship and was also used to the design of several new inhibitors with improved activity.

  18. New paradigm for allosteric regulation of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed

    Cockrell, Gregory M; Zheng, Yunan; Guo, Wenyue; Peterson, Alexis W; Truong, Jennifer K; Kantrowitz, Evan R

    2013-11-12

    For nearly 60 years, the ATP activation and the CTP inhibition of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) has been the textbook example of allosteric regulation. We present kinetic data and five X-ray structures determined in the absence and presence of a Mg(2+) concentration within the physiological range. In the presence of 2 mM divalent cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+)), CTP does not significantly inhibit the enzyme, while the allosteric activation by ATP is enhanced. The data suggest that the actual allosteric inhibitor of ATCase in vivo is the combination of CTP, UTP, and a divalent cation, and the actual allosteric activator is a divalent cation with ATP or ATP and GTP. The structural data reveals that two NTPs can bind to each allosteric site with a divalent cation acting as a bridge between the triphosphates. Thus, the regulation of ATCase is far more complex than previously believed and calls many previous studies into question. The X-ray structures reveal that the catalytic chains undergo essentially no alternations; however, several regions of the regulatory chains undergo significant structural changes. Most significant is that the N-terminal region of the regulatory chains exists in different conformations in the allosterically activated and inhibited forms of the enzyme. Here, a new model of allosteric regulation is proposed.

  19. Discovery of benzimidazole-diamide finger loop (Thumb Pocket I) allosteric inhibitors of HCV NS5B polymerase: Implementing parallel synthesis for rapid linker optimization.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Sylvie; Poupart, Marc-André; Gillard, James; Poirier, Martin; Kukolj, George; Beaulieu, Pierre L

    2010-01-01

    Previously described SAR of benzimidazole-based non-nucleoside finger loop (Thumb Pocket I) inhibitors of HCV NS5B polymerase was expanded. Prospecting studies using parallel synthesis techniques allowed the rapid identification of novel cinnamic acid right-hand sides that provide renewed opportunities for further optimization of these inhibitors. Novel diamide derivatives such as 44 exhibited comparable potency (enzymatic and cell-based HCV replicon) as previously described tryptophan-based inhibitors but physicochemical properties (e.g., aqueous solubility and lipophilicity) have been improved, resulting in molecules with reduced off-target liabilities (CYP inhibition) and increased metabolic stability.

  20. Tuberin, p27 and mTOR in different cells.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, S; Rosner, M; Lindengrün, C; Hanneder, M; Siegel, N; Valli, A; Fuchs, C; Hengstschläger, M

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in the genes TSC1 or TSC2 cause the autosomal dominantly inherited tumor suppressor syndrome tuberous sclerosis, which is characterized by the development of tumors, named hamartomas, in different organs. The TSC gene products, hamartin and tuberin, form a complex, of which tuberin is assumed to be the functional component. Both, hamartin and tuberin have been implicated in the control of the cell cycle by activating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 and in cell size regulation by inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) a regulator of the p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) and its target the ribosomal protein S6. The tuberin/hamartin complex was shown to protect p27 from protein degradation. Within the mTOR signaling pathway tuberin harbors GTPase activating (GAP) potential toward Rheb, which is a potent regulator of mTOR. In this study, we have analyzed the protein levels of tuberin, p27, cyclin D1, mTOR and phospho mTOR Ser2448 (activated mTOR), S6 and phospho S6 Ser240/244 (activated S6) and as controls alpha-tubulin and topoisomerase IIbeta, in ten different cells, including primary normal cells, immortalized and transformed cell lines.

  1. mTOR complex 2 signaling and functions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Won Jun; Jacinto, Estela

    2011-07-15

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a central role in cellular growth and metabolism. mTOR forms two distinct protein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. Much is known about the regulation and functions of mTORC1 due to availability of a natural compound, rapamycin, that inhibits this complex. Studies that define mTORC2 cellular functions and signaling have lagged behind. The development of pharmacological inhibitors that block mTOR kinase activity, and thereby inhibit both mTOR complexes, along with availability of mice with genetic knockouts in mTOR complex components have now provided new insights on mTORC2 function and regulation. Since prolonged effects of rapamycin can also disrupt mTORC2, it is worth re-evaluating the contribution of this less-studied mTOR complex in cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. In this review, we focus on recent developments on mammalian mTORC2 signaling mechanisms and its cellular and tissue-specific functions.

  2. A novel AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, inhibits phosphorylation of AKT downstream molecules, and activates phosphorylation of mTOR and SMG-1 dependent on the liver cancer cell type

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YUNCHENG; ZHENG, YUANWEN; FAHEEM, ALI; SUN, TIANTONG; LI, CHUNYOU; LI, ZHE; ZHAO, DIANTANG; WU, CHAO; LIU, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Due to frequent phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway dysregulation, AKT is typically accepted as a promising anticancer therapeutic target. mTOR, in particular, represents a suitable therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma, whilst suppressor with morphogenetic effect on genitalia family member-1 (SMG-1) is believed to serve a potential tumor suppressor role in human cancer. Despite SMG-1 and mTOR belonging to the same PI3K-related kinase family, the interactions between them are not yet fully understood. In the present study, a novel pyrrolopyrimidine-derived compound, AZD5363, was observed to suppress proliferation in liver cancer Hep-G2 and Huh-7 cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of downstream molecules in the AKT signal pathway, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. AZD5363 activated the phosphorylation of mTOR, dependent on the liver cancer cell type, as it may have differing effects in various liver cancer cell lines. Additionally, AZD5363 also activated SMG-1 within the same liver cancer cells types, which subsequently activated the phosphorylation of mTOR. In conclusion, the present study indicates that AZD5363 inhibited phosphorylation of AKT downstream molecules, and activated phosphorylation of mTOR and SMG-1, dependent on the liver cancer type. PMID:26998062

  3. Radiosensitization of Glioblastoma Cell Lines by the Dual PI3K and mTOR Inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 Depends on Drug-Irradiation Schedule12

    PubMed Central

    Kuger, Sebastian; Graus, Dorothea; Brendtke, Rico; Günther, Nadine; Katzer, Astrid; Lutyj, Paul; Polat, Bülent; Chatterjee, Manik; Sukhorukov, Vladimir L; Flentje, Michael; Djuzenova, Cholpon S

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the dual phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/mTOR) inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 radiosensitizes tumor cells if added shortly before ionizing radiation (IR) and kept in culture medium thereafter. The present study explores the impact of inhibitor and IR schedule on the radiosensitizing ability of NVP-BEZ235 in four human glioblastoma cell lines. Two different drug-IR treatment schedules were compared. In schedule I, cells were treated with NVP-BEZ235 for 24 hours before IR and the drug was removed before IR. In schedule II, the cells were exposed to NVP-BEZ235 1 hour before, during, and up to 48 hours after IR. The cellular response was analyzed by colony counts, expression of marker proteins of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, cell cycle, and DNA damage. We found that under schedule I, NVP-BEZ235 did not radiosensitize cells, which were mostly arrested in G1 phase during IR exposure. In addition, the drug-pretreated and irradiated cells exhibited less DNA damage but increased expressions of phospho-AKT and phospho-mTOR, compared to controls. In contrast, NVP-BEZ235 strongly enhanced the radiosensitivity of cells treated according to schedule II. Possible reasons of radiosensitization by NVP-BEZ235 under schedule II might be the protracted DNA repair, prolonged G2/M arrest, and, to some extent, apoptosis. In addition, the PI3K pathway was downregulated by the NVP-BEZ235 at the time of irradiation under schedule II, as contrasted with its activation in schedule I. We found that, depending on the drug-IR schedule, the NVP-BEZ235 can act either as a strong radiosensitizer or as a cytostatic agent in glioblastoma cells. PMID:23544169

  4. The Effect of Different Dosing Schedules of Intravitreal Sirolimus, a Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Inhibitor, in the Treatment of Non-Infectious Uveitis (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quan Dong; Sadiq, Mohammad Ali; Soliman, Mohamed Kamel; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Do, Diana V.; Sepah, Yasir J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if two different doses of intravitreal sirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, can decrease inflammation and is safe in eyes with non-infectious posterior, intermediate, or panuveitis in the Sirolimus as a Therapeutic Approach UVEitis: Protocol-2 (SAVE-2) Study. Methods: SAVE-2 is a prospective randomized, phase II, open-label interventional clinical trial conducted at 4 clinical centers in the United States. Eligible subjects were randomized into one of two treatments. Group 1 received 440µg of intravitreal sirolimus in study eyes on days 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150; group 2 received 880µg of intravitreal sirolimus on days 0, 60, and 120. Fellow eyes were also eligible to receive sirolimus (of opposite dose to that of study eye). Primary endpoint of the study was at month 6 (M6). Results: 24 subjects have been randomized in SAVE-2 and are included in the analysis. Vitreous haze decreased by ≥2 steps in 63.6% and 50% of patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively at M6 (p=0.695). Mean change in best-corrected visual acuity for subjects was +3.66 and −2.91 ETDRS letters in group 1 and 2, respectively. Among subjects with macular edema at baseline (n=13), the mean change in foveal thickness was −89.42µm in group 1 and +81.5µm in group 2 at M6. Conclusions: Both low and high doses of intravitreal sirolimus were found to decrease vitreous haze in eyes with non-infectious uveitis. Low dose (440µg) sirolimus administered monthly may be more efficacious in reducing uveitic macular edema than high dose (880µg) administered every 2 months. PMID:27630374

  5. Biaryl ethers as potent allosteric inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and its key mutant viruses: aryl substituted pyrazole as a surrogate for the pyrazolopyridine motif.

    PubMed

    Su, Dai-Shi; Lim, John J; Tinney, Elizabeth; Tucker, Thomas J; Saggar, Sandeep; Sisko, John T; Wan, Bang-Lin; Young, Mary Beth; Anderson, Kenneth D; Rudd, Deanne; Munshi, Vandna; Bahnck, Carolyn; Felock, Peter J; Lu, Meiquing; Lai, Ming-Tain; Touch, Sinoeun; Moyer, Gregory; Distefano, Daniel J; Flynn, Jessica A; Liang, Yuexia; Sanchez, Rosa; Perlow-Poehnelt, Rebecca; Miller, Mike; Vacca, Joe P; Williams, Theresa M; Anthony, Neville J

    2010-08-01

    Biaryl ethers were recently reported as potent NNRTIs. Herein, we disclose a detailed effort to modify the previously reported compound 1. We have designed and synthesized a series of novel pyrazole derivatives as a surrogate for pyrazolopyridine motif that were potent inhibitors of HIV-1 RT with nanomolar intrinsic activity on the WT and key mutant enzymes and potent antiviral activity in infected cells.

  6. mTOR plays critical roles in pancreatic cancer stem cells through specific and stemness-related functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Shyuichiro; Ding, Qiang; Miyazaki, Yumi; Kuwahata, Taisaku; Tsukasa, Koichiro; Takao, Sonshin

    2013-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by near-universal mutations in KRAS. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which functions downstream of RAS, has divergent effects on stem cells. In the present study, we investigated the significance of the mTOR pathway in maintaining the properties of pancreatic cancer stem cells. The mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, reduced the viability of CD133+ pancreatic cancer cells and sphere formation which is an index of self-renewal of stem-like cells, indicating that the mTOR pathway functions to maintain cancer stem-like cells. Further, rapamycin had different effects on CD133+ cells compared to cyclopamine which is an inhibitor of the Hedgehog pathway. Thus, the mTOR pathway has a distinct role although both pathways maintain pancreatic cancer stem cells. Therefore, mTOR might be a promising target to eliminate pancreatic cancer stem cells.

  7. Resveratrol induces autophagy by directly inhibiting mTOR through ATP competition

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dohyun; Jeong, Heeyoon; Lee, Mi Nam; Koh, Ara; Kwon, Ohman; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Noh, Jungeun; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Park, Hwangseo; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a natural polyphenol that has a beneficial effect on health, and resveratrol-induced autophagy has been suggested to be a key process in mediating many beneficial effects of resveratrol, such as reduction of inflammation and induction of cancer cell death. Although various resveratrol targets have been suggested, the molecule that mediates resveratrol-induced autophagy remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that resveratrol induces autophagy by directly inhibiting the mTOR-ULK1 pathway. We found that inhibition of mTOR activity and presence of ULK1 are required for autophagy induction by resveratrol. In line with this mTOR dependency, we found that resveratrol suppresses the viability of MCF7 cells but not of SW620 cells, which are mTOR inhibitor sensitive and insensitive cancer cells, respectively. We also found that resveratrol-induced cancer cell suppression occurred ULK1 dependently. For the mechanism of action of resveratrol on mTOR inhibition, we demonstrate that resveratrol directly inhibits mTOR. We found that resveratrol inhibits mTOR by docking onto the ATP-binding pocket of mTOR (i.e., it competes with ATP). We propose mTOR as a novel direct target of resveratrol, and inhibition of mTOR is necessary for autophagy induction. PMID:26902888

  8. The mTOR signalling cascade: paving new roads to cure neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Crino, Peter B

    2016-07-01

    Defining the multiple roles of the mechanistic (formerly 'mammalian') target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway in neurological diseases has been an exciting and rapidly evolving story of bench-to-bedside translational research that has spanned gene mutation discovery, functional experimental validation of mutations, pharmacological pathway manipulation, and clinical trials. Alterations in the dual contributions of mTOR - regulation of cell growth and proliferation, as well as autophagy and cell death - have been found in developmental brain malformations, epilepsy, autism and intellectual disability, hypoxic-ischaemic and traumatic brain injuries, brain tumours, and neurodegenerative disorders. mTOR integrates a variety of cues, such as growth factor levels, oxygen levels, and nutrient and energy availability, to regulate protein synthesis and cell growth. In line with the positioning of mTOR as a pivotal cell signalling node, altered mTOR activation has been associated with a group of phenotypically diverse neurological disorders. To understand how altered mTOR signalling leads to such divergent phenotypes, we need insight into the differential effects of enhanced or diminished mTOR activation, the developmental context of these changes, and the cell type affected by altered signalling. A particularly exciting feature of the tale of mTOR discovery is that pharmacological mTOR inhibitors have shown clinical benefits in some neurological disorders, such as tuberous sclerosis complex, and are being considered for clinical trials in epilepsy, autism, dementia, traumatic brain injury, and stroke.

  9. Promotion of ovarian follicle growth following mTOR activation: synergistic effects of AKT stimulators.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Kim, Jaehong; Li, Xiao Xiao; Hsueh, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase and mTOR signaling is important in regulating cell growth and proliferation. Recent studies using oocyte- and granulosa cell-specific deletion of mTOR inhibitor genes TSC1 or TSC2 demonstrated the important role of mTOR signaling in the promotion of ovarian follicle development. We now report that treatment of ovaries from juvenile mice with an mTOR activator MHY1485 stimulated mTOR, S6K1 and rpS6 phosphorylation. Culturing ovaries for 4 days with MHY1485 increased ovarian explant weights and follicle development. In vivo studies further demonstrated that pre-incubation of these ovaries with MHY1485 for 2 days, followed by allo-grafting into kidney capsules of adult ovariectomized hosts for 5 days, led to marked increases in graft weights and promotion of follicle development. Mature oocytes derived from MHY1485-activated ovarian grafts could be successfully fertilized, leading the delivery of healthy pups. We further treated ovaries with the mTOR activator together with AKT activators (PTEN inhibitor and phosphoinositol-3-kinase stimulator) before grafting and found additive enhancement of follicle growth. Our studies demonstrate the ability of an mTOR activator in promoting follicle growth, leading to a potential strategy to stimulate preantral follicle growth in infertile patients.

  10. Promotion of Ovarian Follicle Growth following mTOR Activation: Synergistic Effects of AKT Stimulators

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan; Kim, Jaehong; Li, Xiao Xiao; Hsueh, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase and mTOR signaling is important in regulating cell growth and proliferation. Recent studies using oocyte- and granulosa cell-specific deletion of mTOR inhibitor genes TSC1 or TSC2 demonstrated the important role of mTOR signaling in the promotion of ovarian follicle development. We now report that treatment of ovaries from juvenile mice with an mTOR activator MHY1485 stimulated mTOR, S6K1 and rpS6 phosphorylation. Culturing ovaries for 4 days with MHY1485 increased ovarian explant weights and follicle development. In vivo studies further demonstrated that pre-incubation of these ovaries with MHY1485 for 2 days, followed by allo-grafting into kidney capsules of adult ovariectomized hosts for 5 days, led to marked increases in graft weights and promotion of follicle development. Mature oocytes derived from MHY1485-activated ovarian grafts could be successfully fertilized, leading the delivery of healthy pups. We further treated ovaries with the mTOR activator together with AKT activators (PTEN inhibitor and phosphoinositol-3-kinase stimulator) before grafting and found additive enhancement of follicle growth. Our studies demonstrate the ability of an mTOR activator in promoting follicle growth, leading to a potential strategy to stimulate preantral follicle growth in infertile patients. PMID:25710488

  11. Controlling allosteric networks in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokholyan, Nikolay

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel methodology based on graph theory and discrete molecular dynamics simulations for delineating allosteric pathways in proteins. We use this methodology to uncover the structural mechanisms responsible for coupling of distal sites on proteins and utilize it for allosteric modulation of proteins. We will present examples where inference of allosteric networks and its rewiring allows us to ``rescue'' cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a protein associated with fatal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. We also use our methodology to control protein function allosterically. We design a novel protein domain that can be inserted into identified allosteric site of target protein. Using a drug that binds to our domain, we alter the function of the target protein. We successfully tested this methodology in vitro, in living cells and in zebrafish. We further demonstrate transferability of our allosteric modulation methodology to other systems and extend it to become ligh-activatable.

  12. The Role of Phospholipase D in Modulating the MTOR Signaling Pathway in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Käch, Andres; Ziegler, Urs; Ong, Albert C. M.; Wallace, Darren P.; Arcaro, Alexandre; Serra, Andreas L.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is aberrantly activated in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Emerging evidence suggests that phospholipase D (PLD) and its product phosphatidic acid (PA) regulate mTOR activity. In this study, we assessed in vitro the regulatory function of PLD and PA on the mTOR signaling pathway in PKD. We found that the basal level of PLD activity was elevated in PKD cells. Targeting PLD by small molecule inhibitors reduced cell proliferation and blocked mTOR signaling, whereas exogenous PA stimulated mTOR signaling and abolished the inhibitory effect of PLD on PKD cell proliferation. We also show that blocking PLD activity enhanced the sensitivity of PKD cells to rapamycin and that combining PLD inhibitors and rapamycin synergistically inhibited PKD cell proliferation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that targeting mTOR did not induce autophagy, whereas targeting PLD induced autophagosome formation. Taken together, our findings suggest that deregulated mTOR pathway activation is mediated partly by increased PLD signaling in PKD cells. Targeting PLD isoforms with pharmacological inhibitors may represent a new therapeutic strategy in PKD. PMID:24009738

  13. The mTOR Complex Controls HIV Latency.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Emilie; Hakre, Shweta; Kampmann, Martin; Lim, Hyung W; Hosmane, Nina N; Martin, Alyssa; Bassik, Michael C; Verschueren, Erik; Battivelli, Emilie; Chan, Jonathan; Svensson, J Peter; Gramatica, Andrea; Conrad, Ryan J; Ott, Melanie; Greene, Warner C; Krogan, Nevan J; Siliciano, Robert F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Verdin, Eric

    2016-12-14

    A population of CD4 T lymphocytes harboring latent HIV genomes can persist in patients on antiretroviral therapy, posing a barrier to HIV eradication. To examine cellular complexes controlling HIV latency, we conducted a genome-wide screen with a pooled ultracomplex shRNA library and in vitro system modeling HIV latency and identified the mTOR complex as a modulator of HIV latency. Knockdown of mTOR complex subunits or pharmacological inhibition of mTOR activity suppresses reversal of latency in various HIV-1 latency models and HIV-infected patient cells. mTOR inhibitors suppress HIV transcription both through the viral transactivator Tat and via Tat-independent mechanisms. This inhibition occurs at least in part via blocking the phosphorylation of CDK9, a p-TEFb complex member that serves as a cofactor for Tat-mediated transcription. The control of HIV latency by mTOR signaling identifies a pathway that may have significant therapeutic opportunities.

  14. Discovery of Novel Allosteric Effectors Based on the Predicted Allosteric Sites for Escherichia coli D-3-Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Qi, Yifei; Yin, Ning; Lai, Luhua

    2014-01-01

    D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH) from Escherichia coli catalyzes the first critical step in serine biosynthesis, and can be allosterically inhibited by serine. In a previous study, we developed a computational method for allosteric site prediction using a coarse-grained two-state Gō Model and perturbation. Two potential allosteric sites were predicted for E. coli PGDH, one close to the active site and the nucleotide binding site (Site I) and the other near the regulatory domain (Site II). In the present study, we discovered allosteric inhibitors and activators based on site I, using a high-throughput virtual screen, and followed by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to eliminate false positives. Compounds 1 and 2 demonstrated a low-concentration activation and high-concentration inhibition phenomenon, with IC50 values of 34.8 and 58.0 µM in enzymatic bioassays, respectively, comparable to that of the endogenous allosteric effector, L-serine. For its activation activity, compound 2 exhibited an AC50 value of 34.7 nM. The novel allosteric site discovered in PGDH was L-serine- and substrate-independent. Enzyme kinetics studies showed that these compounds influenced Km, kcat, and kcat/Km. We have also performed structure-activity relationship studies to discover high potency allosteric effectors. Compound 2-2, an analog of compound 2, showed the best in vitro activity with an IC50 of 22.3 µM. Compounds targeting this site can be used as new chemical probes to study metabolic regulation in E. coli. Our study not only identified a novel allosteric site and effectors for PGDH, but also provided a general strategy for designing new regulators for metabolic enzymes. PMID:24733054

  15. The Mechanism of Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shaoyong; Huang, Wenkang; Geng, Lv; Shen, Qiancheng; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    As the prototypical member of the PTP family, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions in type 2 diabetes. The extremely conserved catalytic site of PTP1B renders the design of selective PTP1B inhibitors intractable. Although discovered allosteric inhibitors containing a benzofuran sulfonamide scaffold offer fascinating opportunities to overcome selectivity issues, the allosteric inhibitory mechanism of PTP1B has remained elusive. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, coupled with a dynamic weighted community analysis, were performed to unveil the potential allosteric signal propagation pathway from the allosteric site to the catalytic site in PTP1B. This result revealed that the allosteric inhibitor compound-3 induces a conformational rearrangement in helix α7, disrupting the triangular interaction among helix α7, helix α3, and loop11. Helix α7 then produces a force, pulling helix α3 outward, and promotes Ser190 to interact with Tyr176. As a result, the deviation of Tyr176 abrogates the hydrophobic interactions with Trp179 and leads to the downward movement of the WPD loop, which forms an H-bond between Asp181 and Glu115. The formation of this H-bond constrains the WPD loop to its open conformation and thus inactivates PTP1B. The discovery of this allosteric mechanism provides an overall view of the regulation of PTP1B, which is an important insight for the design of potent allosteric PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:24831294

  16. Targeting mTOR in RET mutant medullary and differentiated thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gild, Matti L; Landa, Iñigo; Ryder, Mabel; Ghossein, Ronald A; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Fagin, James A

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of RET, a tyrosine kinase receptor encoded by a gene that is frequently mutated in medullary thyroid cancer, have emerged as promising novel therapies for the disease. Rapalogs and other mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are effective agents in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, which share lineage properties with medullary thyroid carcinomas. The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of mTOR activity to RET-induced signaling and cell growth and to establish whether growth suppression is enhanced by co-targeting RET and mTOR kinase activities. Treatment of the RET mutant cell lines TT, TPC-1, and MZ-CRC-1 with AST487, a RET kinase inhibitor, suppressed growth and showed profound and sustained inhibition of mTOR signaling, which was recapitulated by siRNA-mediated RET knockdown. Inhibition of mTOR with INK128, a dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 kinase inhibitor, also resulted in marked growth suppression to levels similar to those seen with RET blockade. Moreover, combined treatment with AST487 and INK128 at low concentrations suppressed growth and induced apoptosis. These data establish mTOR as a key mediator of RET-mediated cell growth in thyroid cancer cells and provide a rationale for combinatorial treatments in thyroid cancers with oncogenic RET mutations. PMID:23828865

  17. Overactive mTOR signaling leads to endometrial hyperplasia in aged women and mice.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Preety; Nielsen, Sarah; Lombard, Janine M; Rassam, Loui; Nahar, Pravin; Rueda, Bo R; Wilkinson, J Erby; Miller, Richard A; Tanwar, Pradeep S

    2017-01-31

    During aging, uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation in the uterus results in endometrial hyperplasia and/or cancer development. The mTOR signaling pathway is one of the major regulators of aging as suppression of this pathway prolongs lifespan in model organisms. Genetic alterations in this pathway via mutations and/or amplifications are often encountered in endometrial cancers. However, the exact contribution of mTOR signaling and uterine aging to endometrial pathologies is currently unclear. This study examined the role of mTOR signaling in uterine aging and its implications in the development of endometrial hyperplasia. The hyperplastic endometrium of both postmenopausal women and aged mice exhibited elevated mTOR activity as seen with increased expression of the pS6 protein. Analysis of uteri from Pten heterozygous and Pten overexpressing mice further confirmed that over-activation of mTOR signaling leads to endometrial hyperplasia. Pharmacological inhibition of mTOR signaling using rapamycin treatment suppressed endometrial hyperplasia in aged mice. Furthermore, treatment with mTOR inhibitors reduced colony size and proliferation of a PTEN negative endometrial cancer cell line in 3D culture. Collectively, this study suggests that hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway is involved in the development of endometrial hyperplasia in aged women and mice.

  18. Metformin inhibits thyroid cancer cell growth, migration, and EMT through the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Baiyu; Cui, Hanzhi; Kang, Lei; Zhang, Xuelin; Jin, Zhitao; Lu, Lanmin; Fan, Zhongyi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways have been shown to be activated in thyroid cancer. Recent evidences have demonstrated that the antidiabetic agent metformin, an activator of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase, can impair the proliferation and migration of cancer cells via inhibition of mTOR. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we show that metformin can inhibit mTOR pathway to impair growth and migration of the thyroid cancer cell lines. Cyclin D1 and c-Myc are important regulators of cancer cell growth, and we observed that treatment of thyroid cancer cells with metformin reduced c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression through suppression of mTOR and subsequent inhibition of P70S6K1 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. Metformin reduced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in thyroid carcinoma cells. Moreover, metformin regulated expression of the EMT-related markers E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and Snail. Additionally, knockdown of TSC2, the upstream regulatory molecule of mTOR pathway, or treatment of rapamycin, the mTOR inhibitor, could abolish the effects of metformin to regulate thyroid cancer cell proliferation, migration, EMT, and mTOR pathway molecules. These results indicate that metformin can suppress the proliferation, migration, and EMT of thyroid cancer cell lines by inhibiting mTOR signaling. These findings suggest that metformin and its molecular targets may be useful in thyroid carcinoma therapy.

  19. Insight into the structural mechanism for PKBα allosteric inhibition by molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-Feng; Cao, Yang; Han, Shuang; Chen, Jian-Zhong

    2014-03-01

    Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) is an attractive target for the treatment of tumor. Unlike PKB's ATP-competitive inhibitors, its allosteric inhibitors can maintain PKB's inactive state via its binding in a pocket between PH domain and kinase domain, which specifically inhibit PKB by preventing the phosphorylations of Thr308 and Ser473. In the present studies, MD simulations were performed on three allosteric inhibitors with different inhibitory potencies (IC50) to investigate the interaction modes between the inhibitors and PKBα. MM/GB(PB)SA were further applied to calculate the binding free energies of these inhibitors binding to PKBα. The computed binding free energies were consistent with the ranking of their experimental bioactivities. The key residues of PKBα interacting with the allosteric inhibitor were further discussed by analyzing the different interaction modes of these three inhibitors binding to PKBα and by calculating binding free energy contributions of corresponding residues around the binding pocket. The structural requirements were then summarized for the allosteric inhibitor binding to PKBα. A possible structural mechanism of PKBα inhibition induced by the binding of allosteric inhibitor was formulated. The current studies indicate that there should be an optimum balance between the van der Waals and total electrostatic interactions for further designing of PKBα allosteric inhibitors.

  20. Activation of mTOR: a culprit of Alzheimer’s disease?

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhiyou; Chen, Guanghui; He, Wenbo; Xiao, Ming; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by cognitive impairment in clinical presentation, and by β-amyloid (Aβ) production and the hyper-phosphorylation of tau in basic research. More highlights demonstrate that the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) enhances Aβ generation and deposition by modulating amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism and upregulating β- and γ-secretases. mTOR, an inhibitor of autophagy, decreases Aβ clearance by scissoring autophagy function. mTOR regulates Aβ generation or Aβ clearance by regulating several key signaling pathways, including phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K)/protein kinase B (Akt), glycogen synthase kinase 3 [GSK-3], AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). The activation of mTOR is also a contributor to aberrant hyperphosphorylated tau. Rapamycin, the inhibitor of mTOR, may mitigate cognitive impairment and inhibit the pathologies associated with amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles by promoting autophagy. Furthermore, the upstream and downstream components of mTOR signaling are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of AD. Hence, inhibiting the activation of mTOR may be an important therapeutic target for AD. PMID:25914534

  1. A new class of orthosteric uPAR·uPA small-molecule antagonists are allosteric inhibitors of the uPAR·vitronectin interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Wang, Bo; Knabe, William Eric; Meroueh, Samy O

    2015-06-19

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-anchored cell surface receptor that is at the center of an intricate network of protein-protein interactions. Its immediate binding partners are the serine proteinase urokinase (uPA), and vitronectin (VTN), a component of the extracellular matrix. uPA and VTN bind at distinct sites on uPAR to promote extracellular matrix degradation and integrin signaling, respectively. Here, we report the discovery of a new class of pyrrolone small-molecule inhibitors of the tight ∼1 nM uPAR·uPA protein-protein interaction. These compounds were designed to bind to the uPA pocket on uPAR. The highest affinity compound, namely 7, displaced a fluorescently labeled α-helical peptide (AE147-FAM) with an inhibition constant Ki of 0.7 μM and inhibited the tight uPAR·uPAATF interaction with an IC50 of 18 μM. Biophysical studies with surface plasmon resonance showed that VTN binding is highly dependent on uPA. This cooperative binding was confirmed as 7, which binds at the uPAR·uPA interface, also inhibited the distal VTN·uPAR interaction. In cell culture, 7 blocked the uPAR·uPA interaction in uPAR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells and impaired cell adhesion to VTN, a process that is mediated by integrins. As a result, 7 inhibited integrin signaling in MDA-MB-231 cancer cells as evidenced by a decrease in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and Rac1 GTPase activation. Consistent with these results, 7 blocked breast MDA-MB-231 cancer cell invasion with IC50 values similar to those observed in ELISA and surface plasmon resonance competition studies. Explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations show that the cooperativity between uPA and VTN is attributed to stabilization of uPAR motion by uPA. In addition, free energy calculations revealed that uPA stabilizes the VTNSMB·uPAR interaction through more favorable electrostatics and entropy. Disruption of the uPAR·VTNSMB interaction by 7 is consistent with the

  2. A New Class of Orthosteric uPAR•uPA Small-Molecule Antagonists Are Allosteric Inhibitors of the uPAR•Vitronectin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Wang, Bo; Knabe, William Eric; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2015-01-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-anchored cell surface receptor that is at the center of an intricate network of protein-protein interactions. Its immediate binding partners are the serine proteinase urokinase (uPA), and vitronectin (VTN), a component of the extracellular matrix. uPA and VTN bind at distinct sites on uPAR to promote extracellular matrix degradation and integrin signaling, respectively. Here, we report the discovery of a new class of pyrrolone small-molecule inhibitors of the tight ∼1 nM uPAR•uPA protein-protein interaction. These compounds were designed to bind to the uPA pocket on uPAR. The highest affinity compound, namely 7, displaced a fluorescently-labeled α-helical peptide (AE147-FAM) with an inhibition constant Ki of 0.7 µM and inhibited the tight uPAR•uPAATF interaction with an IC50 of 18 µM. Biophysical studies with surface plasmon resonance showed that VTN binding is highly dependent on uPA. This cooperative binding was confirmed as 7, which binds at the uPAR•uPA interface, also inhibited the distal VTN•uPAR interaction. In cell culture, 7 blocked the uPAR•uPA interaction in uPAR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells, and impaired cell adhesion to VTN, a process that is mediated by integrins. As a result, 7 inhibited integrin signaling in MDA-MB-231 cancer cells as evidenced by a decrease in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and Rac1 GTPase activation. Consistent with these results, 7 blocked breast MDA-MB-231 cancer cell invasion with IC50 values similar to those observed in ELISA and surface plasmon resonance competition studies. Explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations show that the cooperativity between uPA and VTN is attributed to stabilization of uPAR motion by uPA. In addition, free energy calculations revealed that uPA stabilizes the VTN•uPARSMB interaction through more favorable electrostatics and entropy. Disruption of the uPAR•VTNSMB interaction by 7 is consistent with the

  3. A novel allosteric mechanism in the cysteine peptidase cathepsin K discovered by computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinec, Marko; Korenč, Matevž; Caflisch, Amedeo; Ranganathan, Rama; Lenarčič, Brigita; Baici, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric modifiers have the potential to fine-tune enzyme activity. Therefore, targeting allosteric sites is gaining increasing recognition as a strategy in drug design. Here we report the use of computational methods for the discovery of the first small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of the collagenolytic cysteine peptidase cathepsin K, a major target for the treatment of osteoporosis. The molecule NSC13345 is identified by high-throughput docking of compound libraries to surface sites on the peptidase that are connected to the active site by an evolutionarily conserved network of residues (protein sector). The crystal structure of the complex shows that NSC13345 binds to a novel allosteric site on cathepsin K. The compound acts as a hyperbolic mixed modifier in the presence of a synthetic substrate, it completely inhibits collagen degradation and has good selectivity for cathepsin K over related enzymes. Altogether, these properties qualify our methodology and NSC13345 as promising candidates for allosteric drug design.

  4. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Sung; Frey, John W; Hornberger, Troy A

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA) may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k) T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  5. The emerging role of m-TOR up-regulation in brain Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Ryskalin, Larisa; Limanaqi, Fiona; Biagioni, Francesca; Frati, Alessandro; Esposito, Vincenzo; Calierno, Maria Teresa; Lenzi, Paola; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    The present manuscript is an overview of various effects of mTOR up-regulation in astrocytoma with an emphasis on its deleterious effects on the proliferation of Glioblastoma Multiforme. The manuscript reports consistent evidence indicating the occurrence of mTOR up-regulation both in experimental and human astrocytoma. The grading of human astrocytoma is discussed in relationship with mTOR up-regulation. In the second part of the manuscript, the biochemical pathways under the influence of mTOR are translated to cell phenotypes which are generated by mTOR up-regulation and reverted by its inhibition. A special section is dedicated to the prominent role of autophagy in mediating the effects of mTOR in glioblastoma. In detail, autophagy inhibition produced by mTOR up-regulation determines the fate of cancer stem cells. On the other hand, biochemical findings disclose the remarkable effects of autophagy activators as powerful inducers of cell differentiation with a strong prevalence towards neuronal phenotypes. Thus, mTOR modulation acts on the neurobiology of glioblastoma just like it operates in vivo at the level of brain stem cell niches by altering autophagy-dependent cell differentiation. In the light of such a critical role of autophagy we analyzed the ubiquitin proteasome system. The merging between autophagy and proteasome generates a novel organelle, named autophagoproteasome which is strongly induced by mTOR inhibitors in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, when mTOR is maximally inhibited the proteasome component selectively moves within autophagy vacuoles, thus making the proteasome activity dependent on the entry within autophagy compartment.

  6. MTOR inhibition attenuates DNA damage and apoptosis through autophagy-mediated suppression of CREB1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Zhongdong; Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Rongrong; Peng, Haiyong; Guo, Jing; Chen, Xinxin; Zhang, Hongbing

    2013-12-01

    Hyperactivation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) is a common feature of human cancers, and MTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin, are thus becoming therapeutics in targeting certain cancers. However, rapamycin has also been found to compromise the efficacy of chemotherapeutics to cells with hyperactive MTOR. Here, we show that loss of TSC2 or PTEN enhanced etoposide-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, which was blunted by suppression of MTOR with either rapamycin or RNA interference. cAMP response element-binding protein 1 (CREB1), a nuclear transcription factor that regulates genes involved in survival and death, was positively regulated by MTOR in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cancer cell lines. Silencing Creb1 expression with siRNA protected MTOR-hyperactive cells from DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, loss of TSC2 or PTEN impaired either etoposide or nutrient starvation-induced autophagy, which in turn, leads to CREB1 hyperactivation. We further elucidated an inverse correlation between autophagy activity and CREB1 activity in the kidney tumor tissue obtained from a TSC patient and the mouse livers with hepatocyte-specific knockout of PTEN. CREB1 induced DNA damage and subsequent apoptosis in response to etoposide in autophagy-defective cells. Reactivation of CREB1 or inhibition of autophagy not only improved the efficacy of rapamycin but also alleviated MTOR inhibition-mediated chemoresistance. Therefore, autophagy suppression of CREB1 may underlie the MTOR inhibition-mediated chemoresistance. We suggest that inhibition of MTOR in combination with CREB1 activation may be used in the treatment of cancer caused by an abnormal PI3K-PTEN-AKT-TSC1/2-MTOR signaling pathway. CREB1 activators should potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapeutics in treatment of these cancers.

  7. Allosteric modulators of the hERG K{sup +} channel

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhiyi Klaasse, Elisabeth Heitman, Laura H. IJzerman, Adriaan P.

    2014-01-01

    Drugs that block the cardiac K{sup +} channel encoded by the human ether-à-go-go gene (hERG) have been associated with QT interval prolongation leading to proarrhythmia, and in some cases, sudden cardiac death. Because of special structural features of the hERG K{sup +} channel, it has become a promiscuous target that interacts with pharmaceuticals of widely varying chemical structures and a reason for concern in the pharmaceutical industry. The structural diversity suggests that multiple binding sites are available on the channel with possible allosteric interactions between them. In the present study, three reference compounds and nine compounds of a previously disclosed series were evaluated for their allosteric effects on the binding of [{sup 3}H]astemizole and [{sup 3}H]dofetilide to the hERG K{sup +} channel. LUF6200 was identified as an allosteric inhibitor in dissociation assays with both radioligands, yielding similar EC{sub 50} values in the low micromolar range. However, potassium ions increased the binding of the two radioligands in a concentration-dependent manner, and their EC{sub 50} values were not significantly different, indicating that potassium ions behaved as allosteric enhancers. Furthermore, addition of potassium ions resulted in a concentration-dependent leftward shift of the LUF6200 response curve, suggesting positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them. In conclusion, our investigations provide evidence for allosteric modulation of the hERG K{sup +} channel, which is discussed in the light of findings on other ion channels. - Highlights: • Allosteric modulators on the hERG K{sup +} channel were evaluated in binding assays. • LUF6200 was identified as a potent allosteric inhibitor. • Potassium ions were found to behave as allosteric enhancers. • Positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them were proposed.

  8. The DPYSL2 gene connects mTOR and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Pham, X; Song, G; Lao, S; Goff, L; Zhu, H; Valle, D; Avramopoulos, D

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a schizophrenia-associated polymorphic CT di-nucleotide repeat (DNR) at the 5′-untranslated repeat (UTR) of DPYSL2, which responds to mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) signaling with allelic differences in reporter assays. Now using microarray analysis, we show that the DNR alleles interact differentially with specific proteins, including the mTOR-related protein HuD/ELAVL4. We confirm the differential binding to HuD and other known mTOR effectors by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. We edit HEK293 cells by CRISPR/Cas9 to carry the schizophrenia risk variant (13DNR) and observe a significant reduction of the corresponding CRMP2 isoform. These edited cells confirm the response to mTOR inhibitors and show a twofold shortening of the cellular projections. Transcriptome analysis of these modified cells by RNA-seq shows changes in 12.7% of expressed transcripts at a false discovery rate of 0.05. These transcripts are enriched in immunity-related genes, overlap significantly with those modified by the schizophrenia-associated gene, ZNF804A, and have a reverse expression signature from that seen with antipsychotic drugs. Our results support the functional importance of the DPYSL2 DNR and a role for mTOR signaling in schizophrenia. PMID:27801893

  9. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Selena G.; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W.; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  10. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Selena G; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors.

  11. Combined inhibition of MEK and mTOR has a synergic effect on angiosarcoma tumorgrafts

    PubMed Central

    ANDERSEN, NICHOLAS J.; BOGUSLAWSKI, ELISSA B.; KUK, CYNTHIA Y.; CHAMBERS, CHRISTOPHER M.; DUESBERY, NICHOLAS S.

    2015-01-01

    Angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare neoplasm of endothelial origin that has limited treatment options and poor five-year survival. Using tumorgraft models, we previously showed that AS is sensitive to small-molecule inhibitors that target mitogen-activated/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinases 1 and 2 (MEK). The objective of this study was to identify drugs that combine with MEK inhibitors to more effectively inhibit AS growth. We examined the in vitro synergy between the MEK inhibitor PD0325901 and inhibitors of eleven common cancer pathways in melanoma cell lines and canine angiosarcoma cell isolates. Combination indices were calculated using the Chou-Talalay method. Optimized combination therapies were evaluated in vivo for toxicity and efficacy using canine angiosarcoma tumorgrafts. Among the drugs we tested, rapamycin stood out because it showed strong synergy with PD0325901 at nanomolar concentrations. We observed that angiosarcomas are insensitive to mTOR inhibition. However, treatment with nanomolar levels of mTOR inhibitor renders these cells as sensitive to MEK inhibition as a melanoma cell line with mutant BRAF. Similar results were observed in B-Raf wild-type melanoma cells as well as in vivo, where treatment of canine AS tumorgrafts with MEK and mTOR inhibitors was more effective than monotherapy. Our data show that a low dose of an mTOR inhibitor can dramatically enhance angiosarcoma and melanoma response to MEK inhibition, potentially widening the field of applications for MEK-targeted therapy. PMID:25955301

  12. Preclinical characterization of OSI-027, a potent and selective inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2: distinct from rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Shripad V; Gokhale, Prafulla C; Crew, Andrew P; Cooke, Andy; Yao, Yan; Mantis, Christine; Kahler, Jennifer; Workman, Jennifer; Bittner, Mark; Dudkin, Lorina; Epstein, David M; Gibson, Neil W; Wild, Robert; Arnold, Lee D; Houghton, Peter J; Pachter, Jonathan A

    2011-08-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway is frequently activated in human cancers, and mTOR is a clinically validated target. mTOR forms two distinct multiprotein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, which regulate cell growth, metabolism, proliferation, and survival. Rapamycin and its analogues partially inhibit mTOR through allosteric binding to mTORC1, but not mTORC2, and have shown clinical utility in certain cancers. Here, we report the preclinical characterization of OSI-027, a selective and potent dual inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2 with biochemical IC(50) values of 22 nmol/L and 65 nmol/L, respectively. OSI-027 shows more than 100-fold selectivity for mTOR relative to PI3Kα, PI3Kβ, PI3Kγ, and DNA-PK. OSI-027 inhibits phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrates 4E-BP1 and S6K1 as well as the mTORC2 substrate AKT in diverse cancer models in vitro and in vivo. OSI-027 and OXA-01 (close analogue of OSI-027) potently inhibit proliferation of several rapamycin-sensitive and -insensitive nonengineered and engineered cancer cell lines and also, induce cell death in tumor cell lines with activated PI3K-AKT signaling. OSI-027 shows concentration-dependent pharmacodynamic effects on phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and AKT in tumor tissue with resulting tumor growth inhibition. OSI-027 shows robust antitumor activity in several different human xenograft models representing various histologies. Furthermore, in COLO 205 and GEO colon cancer xenograft models, OSI-027 shows superior efficacy compared with rapamycin. Our results further support the important role of mTOR as a driver of tumor growth and establish OSI-027 as a potent anticancer agent. OSI-027 is currently in phase I clinical trials in cancer patients.

  13. ASBench: benchmarking sets for allosteric discovery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenkang; Wang, Guanqiao; Shen, Qiancheng; Liu, Xinyi; Lu, Shaoyong; Geng, Lv; Huang, Zhimin; Zhang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Allostery allows for the fine-tuning of protein function. Targeting allosteric sites is gaining increasing recognition as a novel strategy in drug design. The key challenge in the discovery of allosteric sites has strongly motivated the development of computational methods and thus high-quality, publicly accessible standard data have become indispensable. Here, we report benchmarking data for experimentally determined allosteric sites through a complex process, including a 'Core set' with 235 unique allosteric sites and a 'Core-Diversity set' with 147 structurally diverse allosteric sites. These benchmarking sets can be exploited to develop efficient computational methods to predict unknown allosteric sites in proteins and reveal unique allosteric ligand-protein interactions to guide allosteric drug design.

  14. Rapamycin-Resistant mTOR Activity Is Required for Sensory Axon Regeneration Induced by a Conditioning Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Na; Ding, Yue; Chan, Leung Ting; Wang, Xu; Gao, Xin; Jiang, Songshan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuronal mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity is a critical determinant of the intrinsic regenerative ability of mature neurons in the adult central nervous system (CNS). However, whether its action also applies to peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons after injury remains elusive. To address this issue unambiguously, we used genetic approaches to determine the role of mTOR signaling in sensory axon regeneration in mice. We showed that deleting mTOR in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons suppressed the axon regeneration induced by conditioning lesions. To establish whether the impact of mTOR on axon regeneration results from functions of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) or 2 (mTORC2), two distinct kinase complexes, we ablated either Raptor or Rictor in DRG neurons. We found that suppressing mTORC1 signaling dramatically decreased the conditioning lesion effect. In addition, an injury to the peripheral branch boosts mTOR activity in DRG neurons that cannot be completely inhibited by rapamycin, a widely used mTOR-specific inhibitor. Unexpectedly, examining several conditioning lesion–induced pro-regenerative pathways revealed that Raptor deletion but not rapamycin suppressed Stat3 activity in neurons. Therefore, our results demonstrate that crosstalk between mTOR and Stat3 signaling mediates the conditioning lesion effect and provide genetic evidence that rapamycin-resistant mTOR activity contributes to the intrinsic axon growth capacity in adult sensory neurons after injury. PMID:28101526

  15. Age related increase in mTOR activity contributes to the pathological changes in ovarian surface epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Preety; Nagendra, Prathima B.; Nielsen, Sarah; Sahoo, Subhransu S.; Bielanowicz, Amanda; Lombard, Janine M.; Wilkinson, Erby J.; Miller, Richard A.; Tanwar, Pradeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a disease of older women. However, the molecular mechanisms of ovarian aging and their contribution to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer are currently unclear. mTOR signalling is a major regulator of aging as suppression of this pathway extends lifespan in model organisms. Overactive mTOR signalling is present in up to 80% of ovarian cancer samples and is associated with poor prognosis. This study examined the role of mTOR signalling in age-associated changes in ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). Histological examination of ovaries from both aged mice and women revealed OSE cell hyperplasia, papillary growth and inclusion cysts. These pathological lesions expressed bonafide markers of ovarian cancer precursor lesions, Pax8 and Stathmin 1, and were presented with elevated mTOR signalling. To understand whether overactive mTOR signalling is responsible for the development of these pathological changes, we analysed ovaries of the Pten trangenic mice and found significant reduction in OSE lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, pharmacological suppression of mTOR signalling significantly decreased OSE hyperplasia in aged mice. Treatment with mTOR inhibitors reduced human ovarian cancer cell viability, proliferation and colony forming ability. Collectively, we have established the role of mTOR signalling in age-related OSE pathologies and initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:27036037

  16. Allosteric Modulation of Chemoattractant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Marcello; Cesta, Maria Candida; Locati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Chemoattractants control selective leukocyte homing via interactions with a dedicated family of related G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Emerging evidence indicates that the signaling activity of these receptors, as for other GPCR, is influenced by allosteric modulators, which interact with the receptor in a binding site distinct from the binding site of the agonist and modulate the receptor signaling activity in response to the orthosteric ligand. Allosteric modulators have a number of potential advantages over orthosteric agonists/antagonists as therapeutic agents and offer unprecedented opportunities to identify extremely selective drug leads. Here, we resume evidence of allosterism in the context of chemoattractant receptors, discussing in particular its functional impact on functional selectivity and probe/concentration dependence of orthosteric ligands activities. PMID:27199992

  17. BIM and mTOR expression levels predict outcome to erlotinib in EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karachaliou, Niki; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Teixidó, Cristina; Pilotto, Sara; Drozdowskyj, Ana; Codony-Servat, Carles; Giménez-Capitán, Ana; Molina-Vila, Miguel Angel; Bertrán-Alamillo, Jordi; Gervais, Radj; Massuti, Bartomeu; Morán, Teresa; Majem, Margarita; Felip, Enriqueta; Carcereny, Enric; García-Campelo, Rosario; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Verlicchi, Alberto; Crisetti, Elisabetta; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Luis Ramírez, José; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Felipe Cardona, Andrés; de Marinis, Filippo; López-Vivanco, Guillermo; Miguel Sánchez, José; Vergnenegre, Alain; Sánchez Hernández, José Javier; Sperduti, Isabella; Bria, Emilio; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    BIM is a proapoptotic protein that initiates apoptosis triggered by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). mTOR negatively regulates apoptosis and may influence response to EGFR TKI. We examined mRNA expression of BIM and MTOR in 57 patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC from the EURTAC trial. Risk of mortality and disease progression was lower in patients with high BIM compared with low/intermediate BIM mRNA levels. Analysis of MTOR further divided patients with high BIM expression into two groups, with those having both high BIM and MTOR experiencing shorter overall and progression-free survival to erlotinib. Validation of our results was performed in an independent cohort of 19 patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC treated with EGFR TKIs. In EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with high BIM expression, concomitant high mTOR expression increased IC50 of gefitinib for cell proliferation. We next sought to analyse the signalling pattern in cell lines with strong activation of mTOR and its substrate P-S6. We showed that mTOR and phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) strongly correlate in resistant EGFR-mutant cancer cell lines. These data suggest that the combination of EGFR TKI with mTOR or PDE4 inhibitors could be adequate therapy for EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients with high pretreatment levels of BIM and mTOR. PMID:26639561

  18. BIM and mTOR expression levels predict outcome to erlotinib in EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Karachaliou, Niki; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Teixidó, Cristina; Pilotto, Sara; Drozdowskyj, Ana; Codony-Servat, Carles; Giménez-Capitán, Ana; Molina-Vila, Miguel Angel; Bertrán-Alamillo, Jordi; Gervais, Radj; Massuti, Bartomeu; Morán, Teresa; Majem, Margarita; Felip, Enriqueta; Carcereny, Enric; García-Campelo, Rosario; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Verlicchi, Alberto; Crisetti, Elisabetta; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Luis Ramírez, José; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Felipe Cardona, Andrés; de Marinis, Filippo; López-Vivanco, Guillermo; Miguel Sánchez, José; Vergnenegre, Alain; Sánchez Hernández, José Javier; Sperduti, Isabella; Bria, Emilio; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-12-07

    BIM is a proapoptotic protein that initiates apoptosis triggered by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). mTOR negatively regulates apoptosis and may influence response to EGFR TKI. We examined mRNA expression of BIM and MTOR in 57 patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC from the EURTAC trial. Risk of mortality and disease progression was lower in patients with high BIM compared with low/intermediate BIM mRNA levels. Analysis of MTOR further divided patients with high BIM expression into two groups, with those having both high BIM and MTOR experiencing shorter overall and progression-free survival to erlotinib. Validation of our results was performed in an independent cohort of 19 patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC treated with EGFR TKIs. In EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with high BIM expression, concomitant high mTOR expression increased IC50 of gefitinib for cell proliferation. We next sought to analyse the signalling pattern in cell lines with strong activation of mTOR and its substrate P-S6. We showed that mTOR and phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) strongly correlate in resistant EGFR-mutant cancer cell lines. These data suggest that the combination of EGFR TKI with mTOR or PDE4 inhibitors could be adequate therapy for EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients with high pretreatment levels of BIM and mTOR.

  19. Stem cell-like transcriptional reprogramming mediates metastatic resistance to mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mateo, F; Arenas, E J; Aguilar, H; Serra-Musach, J; de Garibay, G Ruiz; Boni, J; Maicas, M; Du, S; Iorio, F; Herranz-Ors, C; Islam, A; Prado, X; Llorente, A; Petit, A; Vidal, A; Català, I; Soler, T; Venturas, G; Rojo-Sebastian, A; Serra, H; Cuadras, D; Blanco, I; Lozano, J; Canals, F; Sieuwerts, A M; de Weerd, V; Look, M P; Puertas, S; García, N; Perkins, A S; Bonifaci, N; Skowron, M; Gómez-Baldó, L; Hernández, V; Martínez-Aranda, A; Martínez-Iniesta, M; Serrat, X; Cerón, J; Brunet, J; Barretina, M P; Gil, M; Falo, C; Fernández, A; Morilla, I; Pernas, S; Plà, M J; Andreu, X; Seguí, M A; Ballester, R; Castellà, E; Nellist, M; Morales, S; Valls, J; Velasco, A; Matias-Guiu, X; Figueras, A; Sánchez-Mut, J V; Sánchez-Céspedes, M; Cordero, A; Gómez-Miragaya, J; Palomero, L; Gómez, A; Gajewski, T F; Cohen, E E W; Jesiotr, M; Bodnar, L; Quintela-Fandino, M; López-Bigas, N; Valdés-Mas, R; Puente, X S; Viñals, F; Casanovas, O; Graupera, M; Hernández-Losa, J; Ramón Y Cajal, S; García-Alonso, L; Saez-Rodriguez, J; Esteller, M; Sierra, A; Martín-Martín, N; Matheu, A; Carracedo, A; González-Suárez, E; Nanjundan, M; Cortés, J; Lázaro, C; Odero, M D; Martens, J W M; Moreno-Bueno, G; Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Villanueva, A; Gomis, R R; Pujana, M A

    2016-12-19

    Inhibitors of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) are currently used to treat advanced metastatic breast cancer. However, whether an aggressive phenotype is sustained through adaptation or resistance to mTOR inhibition remains unknown. Here, complementary studies in human tumors, cancer models and cell lines reveal transcriptional reprogramming that supports metastasis in response to mTOR inhibition. This cancer feature is driven by EVI1 and SOX9. EVI1 functionally cooperates with and positively regulates SOX9, and promotes the transcriptional upregulation of key mTOR pathway components (REHB and RAPTOR) and of lung metastasis mediators (FSCN1 and SPARC). The expression of EVI1 and SOX9 is associated with stem cell-like and metastasis signatures, and their depletion impairs the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. These results establish the mechanistic link between resistance to mTOR inhibition and cancer metastatic potential, thus enhancing our understanding of mTOR targeting failure.Oncogene advance online publication, 19 December 2016; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.427.

  20. Hyperactive mTOR pathway promotes lymphoproliferation and abnormal differentiation in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Völkl, Simon; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Allgäuer, Andrea; Schreiner, Elisabeth; Lorenz, Myriam Ricarda; Rohr, Jan; Klemann, Christian; Fuchs, Ilka; Schuster, Volker; von Bueren, André O; Naumann-Bartsch, Nora; Gambineri, Eleonora; Siepermann, Kathrin; Kobbe, Robin; Nathrath, Michaela; Arkwright, Peter D; Miano, Maurizio; Stachel, Klaus-Daniel; Metzler, Markus; Schwarz, Klaus; Kremer, Anita N; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-07-14

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human disorder characterized by defective Fas signaling, resulting in chronic benign lymphoproliferation and accumulation of TCRαβ(+) CD4(-) CD8(-) double-negative T (DNT) cells. Although their phenotype resembles that of terminally differentiated or exhausted T cells, lack of KLRG1, high eomesodermin, and marginal T-bet expression point instead to a long-lived memory state with potent proliferative capacity. Here we show that despite their terminally differentiated phenotype, human ALPS DNT cells exhibit substantial mitotic activity in vivo. Notably, hyperproliferation of ALPS DNT cells is associated with increased basal and activation-induced phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinases Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abrogated survival and proliferation of ALPS DNT cells, but not of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in vitro. In vivo, mTOR inhibition reduced proliferation and abnormal differentiation by DNT cells. Importantly, increased mitotic activity and hyperactive mTOR signaling was also observed in recently defined CD4(+) or CD8(+) precursor DNT cells, and mTOR inhibition specifically reduced these cells in vivo, indicating abnormal programming of Fas-deficient T cells before the DNT stage. Thus, our results identify the mTOR pathway as a major regulator of lymphoproliferation and aberrant differentiation in ALPS.

  1. Critical role for hypothalamic mTOR activity in energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hiroyuki; Inoki, Ken; Münzberg, Heike; Opland, Darren; Faouzi, Miro; Villanueva, Eneida C.; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Kwiatkowski, David; MacDougald, Ormond A; Myers, Martin G.; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) promotes anabolic cellular processes in response to growth factors and metabolic cues. The TSC1 and TSC2 tumor suppressors are major upstream inhibitory regulators of mTOR signaling. Mice with Rip2/Cre-mediated deletion of Tsc1 (Rip-Tsc1cKO mice) developed hyperphagia and obesity, suggesting that hypothalamic disruption (for which Rip2/Cre is well known) of Tsc1 may dysregulate feeding circuits via mTOR activation. Indeed, Rip-Tsc1cKO mice displayed increased mTOR signaling and enlarged neuron cell size in a number of hypothalamic populations, including Pomc neurons. Furthermore, Tsc1 deletion with Pomc/Cre (Pomc-Tsc1cKO mice) resulted in dysregulation of Pomc neurons and hyperphagic obesity. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, ameliorated the hyperphagia, obesity, and the altered Pomc neuronal morphology in developing or adult Pomc-Tsc1cKO mice, and cessation of treatment reinstated these phenotypes. Thus, ongoing mTOR activation in Pomc neurons blocks the catabolic function of these neurons to promote nutrient intake and increased adiposity. PMID:19356717

  2. In Vivo Investigation of Escitalopram’s Allosteric Site on the Serotonin Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Karen E.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Owens, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Escitalopram is a commonly prescribed antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class. Clinical evidence and mapping of the serotonin transporter (SERT) identified that escitalopram, in addition to its binding to a primary uptake-blocking site, is capable of binding to the SERT via an allosteric site that is hypothesized to alter escitalopram’s kinetics at the SERT. The studies reported here examined the in vivo role of the SERT allosteric site in escitalopram action. A knockin mouse model that possesses an allosteric-null SERT was developed. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the knockin protein was expressed at a lower density than endogenous mouse SERT (approximately 10–30% of endogenous mouse SERT), but the knockin mice are a viable tool to study the allosteric site. Microdialysis studies in the ventral hippocampus found no measurable decrease in extracellular serotonin response after local escitalopram challenge in mice without the allosteric site compared to mice with the site (p = 0.297). In marble burying assays there was a modest effect of the absence of the allosteric site, with a larger systemic dose of escitalopram (10-fold) necessary for the same effect as in mice with intact SERT (p = 0.023). However, there was no effect of the allosteric site in the tail suspension test. Together these data suggest that there may be a regional specificity in the role of the allosteric site. The lack of a robust effect overall suggests that the role of the allosteric site for escitalopram on the SERT may not produce meaningful in vivo effects. PMID:26621784

  3. Multiple roles for mTOR signaling in both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Matthew C.; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in neurons integrates a variety of extracellular signals to produce appropriate translational responses. mTOR signaling is hyperactive in neurological syndromes in both humans and mouse models that are characterized by epilepsy, autism and cognitive disturbances. In addition, rapamycin, a clinically important immunosuppressant, is a specific and potent inhibitor of mTOR signaling. While mTOR is known to regulate growth and synaptic plasticity of glutamatergic neurons, its effects on basic parameters of synaptic transmission are less well studied, and its role in regulating GABAergic transmission is unexplored. We therefore performed an electrophysiological and morphological comparison of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in which mTOR signaling was either increased by loss of the repressor Pten or decreased by treatment with rapamycin. We found that hyperactive mTOR signaling increased evoked synaptic responses in both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons by approximately 50%, due to an increase in the number of synaptic vesicles available for release, the number of synapses formed and the miniature event size. Prolonged (72 hours) rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities and also decreased synaptic transmission in wild-type glutamatergic, but not GABAergic, neurons. Further analyses suggested that hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway also impairs presynaptic function, possibly by interfering with vesicle fusion. Despite this presynaptic impairment, the net effect of Pten loss is enhanced synaptic transmission in both GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, which has numerous implications – depending on where in the brain mutations of an mTOR suppressor gene takes place during development. PMID:22895726

  4. TNFAIP3 promotes survival of CD4 T cells by restricting MTOR and promoting autophagy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Yu; Oshima, Shigeru; Takahara, Masahiro; Maeyashiki, Chiaki; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Nibe, Yoichi; Nozaki, Kengo; Nagaishi, Takashi; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ma, Averil; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in metabolism, differentiation, and survival in T cells. TNFAIP3/A20 is a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that is thought to be a negative regulator of autophagy in cell lines. However, the role of TNFAIP3 in autophagy remains unclear. To determine whether TNFAIP3 regulates autophagy in CD4 T cells, we first analyzed Tnfaip3-deficient naïve CD4 T cells in vitro. We demonstrated that Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited reduced MAP1LC3/LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) puncta formation, increased mitochondrial content, and exaggerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These results indicate that TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy after T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation in CD4 T cells. We then investigated the mechanism by which TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy signaling. We found that TNFAIP3 bound to the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex and that Tnfaip3-deficient cells displayed enhanced ubiquitination of the MTOR complex and MTOR activity. To confirm the effects of enhanced MTOR activity in Tnfaip3-deficient cells, we analyzed cell survival following treatment with Torin1, an MTOR inhibitor. Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited fewer cell numbers than the control cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the impaired survival of Tnfaip3-deficient cells was ameliorated with Torin1 treatment in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Torin1 was abolished by Atg5 deficiency. Thus, enhanced MTOR activity regulates the survival of Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells. Taken together, our findings illustrate that TNFAIP3 restricts MTOR signaling and promotes autophagy, providing new insight into the manner in which MTOR and autophagy regulate survival in CD4 T cells.

  5. On the participation of mTOR in recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Myskiw, Jociane C; Rossato, Janine I; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2008-03-01

    Evidence indicates that activation of the neuronal protein synthesis machinery is required in areas of the brain relevant to memory for consolidation and persistence of the mnemonic trace. Here, we report that inhibition of hippocampal mTOR, a protein kinase involved in the initiation of mRNA translation, immediately or 180min but not 540min after training impairs consolidation of long-term object recognition memory without affecting short-term memory retention or exploratory behavior. When infused into dorsal CA1 after long-term memory reactivation in the presence of familiar objects the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin (RAP) did not affect retention. However, when given immediately after exposing animals to a novel and a familiar object, RAP impaired memory for both of them. The amnesic effect of the post-retrieval administration of RAP was long-lasting, did not happen after exposure to two novel objects or following exploration of the training arena in the absence of other stimuli, suggesting that it was contingent with reactivation of the consolidated trace in the presence of a behaviorally relevant and novel cue. Our results indicate that mTOR activity is required in the dorsal hippocampus for consolidation of object recognition memory and suggest that inhibition of this kinase after memory retrieval in the presence of a particular set of cues hinders persistence of the original recognition memory trace.

  6. Allosteric Dynamic Control of Binding

    PubMed Central

    Sumbul, Fidan; Acuner-Ozbabacan, Saliha Ece; Haliloglu, Turkan

    2015-01-01

    Proteins have a highly dynamic nature and there is a complex interrelation between their structural dynamics and binding behavior. By assuming various conformational ensembles, they perform both local and global fluctuations to interact with other proteins in a dynamic infrastructure adapted to functional motion. Here, we show that there is a significant association between allosteric mutations, which lead to high-binding-affinity changes, and the hinge positions of global modes, as revealed by a large-scale statistical analysis of data in the Structural Kinetic and Energetic Database of Mutant Protein Interactions (SKEMPI). We further examined the mechanism of allosteric dynamics by conducting studies on human growth hormone (hGH) and pyrin domain (PYD), and the results show how mutations at the hinge regions could allosterically affect the binding-site dynamics or induce alternative binding modes by modifying the ensemble of accessible conformations. The long-range dissemination of perturbations in local chemistry or physical interactions through an impact on global dynamics can restore the allosteric dynamics. Our findings suggest a mechanism for the coupling of structural dynamics to the modulation of protein interactions, which remains a critical phenomenon in understanding the effect of mutations that lead to functional changes in proteins. PMID:26338442

  7. Allosteric regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2012-03-15

    The liver enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase is responsible for conversion of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine. Phenylalanine hydroxylase is activated by phenylalanine; this activation is inhibited by the physiological reducing substrate tetrahydrobiopterin. Phosphorylation of Ser16 lowers the concentration of phenylalanine for activation. This review discusses the present understanding of the molecular details of the allosteric regulation of the enzyme.

  8. Role of HHV-8 and mTOR pathway in post-transplant Kaposi sarcoma staging.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sierra, Astrid; Rovira, Jordi; Petit, Anna; Moya-Rull, Daniel; Mazuecos, María Auxiliadora; Sánchez-Fructuoso, Ana Isabel; Errasti, Pedro; Idoate, Miguel Ángel; Cruzado, Josep María; Vidal, August; Diekmann, Fritz; Oppenheimer, Federico; Campistol, Josep M; Revuelta, Ignacio

    2016-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is one of the most frequent transplant related tumors. Several pathways are involved; however, the impact of the molecular phenotype associated to the tumor stage and the behavior-depending resultant therapy is still unknown. The aim of our study was to analyze the role of HHV-8 and mTOR pathway in tumor stages of skin KS after renal transplantation. Twelve renal transplant recipients with cutaneous KS from five transplant centers (1980-2007) under reduction of immunosuppression or conversion to mTOR inhibitor were included. The expression of HHV-8, PTEN, TGFβ, VEGF, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-P70S6K in tumoral tissue was analyzed. KS lesions were classified as patch, plaque, and nodule state. HHV-8 infection was found in all tissue samples. KS lesions showed high activation of VEGF, p-mTOR and p-P70S6K, low PTEN, and null TGFβ expression. The only pathway activated in a staging-dependent manner was mTOR with higher p-mTOR and p-P70S6K expression in nodule versus patch stage. KS lesions disappeared after 5.24 months in all converted patients without any recurrence in 14.05 years of mean follow-up. The activation of mTOR pathway according to KS stages supports the rational of the mTOR inhibitor in post-transplant Kaposi.

  9. MHY1485 activates mTOR and protects osteoblasts from dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sai; Chen, Caiyun; Wang, Shouguo; Ji, Feng; Xie, Yue

    2016-12-09

    Dexamethasone (Dex) exerts cytotoxic effects to cultured osteoblasts. The potential effect of MHY1485, a small-molecular mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activator, against the process was studied here. In both osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts, treatment with MHY1485 significantly ameliorated Dex-induced cell death and apoptosis. mTOR inhibition, through mTOR kinase inhibitor OSI-027 or mTOR shRNAs, abolished MHY1485-mediated osteoblast cytoprotection against Dex. Intriguingly, activation of mTOR complex (mTORC1), but not mTORC2, is required for MHY1485's anti-Dex activity. mTORC1 inhibitors (rapamycin and RAD001) or Raptor knockdown almost reversed MHY1485-induced osteoblast cytoprotection. mTORC2 inhibition, via shRNA knockdown of Rictor, failed to affect MHY1485's activity in MC3T3-E1 cells. Further studies showed that MHY1485 treatment in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts significantly inhibited Dex-induced mitochondrial death pathway activation, the latter was tested by mitochondrial depolarization, cyclophilin D-ANT-1 association and cytochrome C cytosol release. Together, these results suggest that MHY1485 activates mTORC1 signaling to protect osteoblasts from Dex.

  10. Coordinate Autophagy and mTOR Pathway Inhibition Enhances Cell Death in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaoqi; White, Eileen P.; Mehnert, Janice M.

    2013-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway promotes melanoma tumor growth and survival while suppressing autophagy, a catabolic process through which cells collect and recycle cellular components to sustain energy homeostasis in starvation. Conversely, inhibitors of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, in particular the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus (CCI-779), induce autophagy, which can promote tumor survival and thus, these agents potentially limit their own efficacy. We hypothesized that inhibition of autophagy in combination with mTOR inhibition would block this tumor survival mechanism and hence improve the cytotoxicity of mTOR inhibitors in melanoma. Here we found that melanoma cell lines of multiple genotypes exhibit high basal levels of autophagy. Knockdown of expression of the essential autophagy gene product ATG7 resulted in cell death, indicating that survival of melanoma cells is autophagy-dependent. We also found that the lysosomotropic agent and autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) synergizes with CCI-779 and led to melanoma cell death via apoptosis. Combination treatment with CCI-779 and HCQ suppressed melanoma growth and induced cell death both in 3-dimensional (3D) spheroid cultures and in tumor xenografts. These data suggest that coordinate inhibition of the mTOR and autophagy pathways promotes apoptosis and could be a new therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:23383069

  11. Structure–activity relationships study of mTOR kinase inhibition using QSAR and structure-based drug design approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lakhlili, Wiame; Yasri, Abdelaziz; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of clinically relevant inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) for anticancer therapy has proved to be a challenging task. The quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) approach is a very useful and widespread technique for ligand-based drug design, which can be used to identify novel and potent mTOR inhibitors. In this study, we performed two-dimensional QSAR tests, and molecular docking validation tests of a series of mTOR ATP-competitive inhibitors to elucidate their structural properties associated with their activity. The QSAR tests were performed using partial least square method with a correlation coefficient of r2=0.799 and a cross-validation of q2=0.714. The chemical library screening was done by associating ligand-based to structure-based approach using the three-dimensional structure of mTOR developed by homology modeling. We were able to select 22 compounds from two databases as inhibitors of the mTOR kinase active site. We believe that the method and applications highlighted in this study will help future efforts toward the design of selective ATP-competitive inhibitors. PMID:27980424

  12. Requirement for the eIF4E binding proteins for the synergistic down-regulation of protein synthesis by hypertonic conditions and mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Michael J; Elia, Androulla; Morley, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the phosphorylation and activity of several proteins that have the potential to control translation, including p70S6 kinase and the eIF4E binding proteins 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2. In spite of this, in exponentially growing cells overall protein synthesis is often resistant to mTOR inhibitors. We report here that sensitivity of wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to mTOR inhibitors can be greatly increased when the cells are subjected to the physiological stress imposed by hypertonic conditions. In contrast, protein synthesis in MEFs with a double knockout of 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2 remains resistant to mTOR inhibitors under these conditions. Phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and protein kinase B (Akt) is blocked by the mTOR inhibitor Ku0063794 equally well in both wild-type and 4E-BP knockout cells, under both normal and hypertonic conditions. The response of protein synthesis to hypertonic stress itself does not require the 4E-BPs. These data suggest that under certain stress conditions: (i) translation has a greater requirement for mTOR activity and (ii) there is an absolute requirement for the 4E-BPs for regulation by mTOR. Importantly, dephosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and Akt is not sufficient to affect protein synthesis acutely.

  13. An allosteric conduit facilitates dynamic multisite substrate recognition by the SCFCdc4 ubiquitin ligase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csizmok, Veronika; Orlicky, Stephen; Cheng, Jing; Song, Jianhui; Bah, Alaji; Delgoshaie, Neda; Lin, Hong; Mittag, Tanja; Sicheri, Frank; Chan, Hue Sun; Tyers, Mike; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase SCFCdc4 mediates phosphorylation-dependent elimination of numerous substrates by binding one or more Cdc4 phosphodegrons (CPDs). Methyl-based NMR analysis of the Cdc4 WD40 domain demonstrates that Cyclin E, Sic1 and Ash1 degrons have variable effects on the primary Cdc4WD40 binding pocket. Unexpectedly, a Sic1-derived multi-CPD substrate (pSic1) perturbs methyls around a previously documented allosteric binding site for the chemical inhibitor SCF-I2. NMR cross-saturation experiments confirm direct contact between pSic1 and the allosteric pocket. Phosphopeptide affinity measurements reveal negative allosteric communication between the primary CPD and allosteric pockets. Mathematical modelling indicates that the allosteric pocket may enhance ultrasensitivity by tethering pSic1 to Cdc4. These results suggest negative allosteric interaction between two distinct binding pockets on the Cdc4WD40 domain may facilitate dynamic exchange of multiple CPD sites to confer ultrasensitive dependence on substrate phosphorylation.

  14. An allosteric conduit facilitates dynamic multisite substrate recognition by the SCFCdc4 ubiquitin ligase

    PubMed Central

    Csizmok, Veronika; Orlicky, Stephen; Cheng, Jing; Song, Jianhui; Bah, Alaji; Delgoshaie, Neda; Lin, Hong; Mittag, Tanja; Sicheri, Frank; Chan, Hue Sun; Tyers, Mike; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase SCFCdc4 mediates phosphorylation-dependent elimination of numerous substrates by binding one or more Cdc4 phosphodegrons (CPDs). Methyl-based NMR analysis of the Cdc4 WD40 domain demonstrates that Cyclin E, Sic1 and Ash1 degrons have variable effects on the primary Cdc4WD40 binding pocket. Unexpectedly, a Sic1-derived multi-CPD substrate (pSic1) perturbs methyls around a previously documented allosteric binding site for the chemical inhibitor SCF-I2. NMR cross-saturation experiments confirm direct contact between pSic1 and the allosteric pocket. Phosphopeptide affinity measurements reveal negative allosteric communication between the primary CPD and allosteric pockets. Mathematical modelling indicates that the allosteric pocket may enhance ultrasensitivity by tethering pSic1 to Cdc4. These results suggest negative allosteric interaction between two distinct binding pockets on the Cdc4WD40 domain may facilitate dynamic exchange of multiple CPD sites to confer ultrasensitive dependence on substrate phosphorylation. PMID:28045046

  15. Studying the binding interactions of allosteric agonists and antagonists of the CXCR4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Planesas, Jesús M; Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I; Borrell, José I; Teixidó, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    Several examples of allosteric modulators of GPCRs have been reported recently in the literature, but understanding their molecular mechanism presents a new challenge for medicinal chemistry. For the specific case of the cellular receptor CXCR4, it is known that pepducins (lipidated fragments of intracellular GPCR loops) such as ATI-2341 modulate CXCR4 activity agonistically via an allosteric mechanism. Moreover, there are also examples of small organic molecules such as AMD11070 and GSK812397 which may also act as allosteric antagonists. However, incomplete knowledge of the ligand-binding sites has hampered a detailed molecular understanding of how these inhibitors work. Here, we attempt to answer this question by analysing the binding interactions between the CXCR4 receptor and the above-mentioned allosteric modulators. We propose two different allosteric binding sites, one located in the intracellular loops 1, 2 and 3 (ICL1, ICL2 and ICL3) which binds the pepducin agonist ATI-2341, and the other at a subsite of the main extracellular orthosteric binding pocket between extracellular loops 1 and 2 and the N-terminus, which binds the antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397. Allosteric interactions between the CXCR4 and ATI-2341 were predicted by combining different modeling approaches. First, a rotational blind docking search was applied and the best poses were subsequently refined using flexible docking methods and molecular dynamic simulations. For the AMD11070 and GSK812397 antagonists, the entire CXCR4 protein surface was explored by blind docking in order to define the binding region. A second docking analysis by subsites was then performed to refine the allosteric interactions. Finally, we identified the binding residues that appear to be essential for CXCR4 allosteric modulators.

  16. Judicious Toggling of mTOR Activity to Combat Insulin Resistance and Cancer: Current Evidence and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Pei Shi; Wang, Louis Z.; Dai, Xiaoyun; Tseng, Sheng Hsuan; Loo, Shang Jun; Sethi, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), via its two distinct multiprotein complexes, mTORC1, and mTORC2, plays a central role in the regulation of cellular growth, metabolism, and migration. A dysregulation of the mTOR pathway has in turn been implicated in several pathological conditions including insulin resistance and cancer. Overactivation of mTORC1 and disruption of mTORC2 function have been reported to induce insulin resistance. On the other hand, aberrant mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling via either genetic alterations or increased expression of proteins regulating mTOR and its downstream targets have contributed to cancer development. These underlined the attractiveness of mTOR as a therapeutic target to overcome both insulin resistance and cancer. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the notion of intermittent, low dose rapamycin for treating insulin resistance. It further highlights recent data on the continuous use of high dose rapamycin analogs and related second generation mTOR inhibitors for cancer eradication, for overcoming chemoresistance and for tumor stem cell suppression. Within these contexts, the potential challenges associated with the use of mTOR inhibitors are also discussed. PMID:27826244

  17. Che-1-induced inhibition of mTOR pathway enables stress-induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Desantis, Agata; Bruno, Tiziana; Catena, Valeria; De Nicola, Francesca; Goeman, Frauke; Iezzi, Simona; Sorino, Cristina; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Bossi, Gianluca; Federico, Vincenzo; La Rosa, Francesca; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Lesma, Elena; De Meo, Paolo D'Onorio; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Pisani, Francesco; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P Leif; Floridi, Aristide; Tonon, Giovanni; Passananti, Claudio; Blandino, Giovanni; Fanciulli, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key protein kinase that regulates cell growth, metabolism, and autophagy to maintain cellular homeostasis. Its activity is inhibited by adverse conditions, including nutrient limitation, hypoxia, and DNA damage. In this study, we demonstrate that Che-1, a RNA polymerase II-binding protein activated by the DNA damage response, inhibits mTOR activity in response to stress conditions. We found that, under stress, Che-1 induces the expression of two important mTOR inhibitors, Redd1 and Deptor, and that this activity is required for sustaining stress-induced autophagy. Strikingly, Che-1 expression correlates with the progression of multiple myeloma and is required for cell growth and survival, a malignancy characterized by high autophagy response. PMID:25770584

  18. Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) - Rapamycin and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Lamming, Dudley W.

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin is an FDA-approved immunosuppressant and anti-cancer agent discovered in the soil of Easter Island in the early 1970s. Rapamycin is a potent and selective inhibitor of the mTOR (mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin) protein kinase, which acts as a central integrator of nutrient signaling pathways. During the last decade, genetic and pharmaceutical inhibition of mTOR pathway signaling has been found to promote longevity in yeast, worms, flies and mice. In this chapter, we will discuss the molecular biology underlying the effects of rapamycin and its physiological effects; evidence for rapamycin as an anti-aging compound; mechanisms by which rapamycin may extend lifespan; and the potential limitations of rapamycin as an anti-aging molecule. Finally, we will discuss possible strategies that may allow us to inhibit mTOR signaling safely while minimizing side effects, and reap the health, social and economic benefits from slowing the aging process. PMID:27048303

  19. Inhibition of mTOR kinase via rapamycin blocks persistent predator stress-induced hyperarousal.

    PubMed

    Fifield, Kathleen; Hebert, Mark; Angel, Rebecca; Adamec, Robert; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2013-11-01

    Traumatic, stressful life events are thought to trigger acquired anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Recent data suggests that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a key role in the formation of traumatic memories. The predator stress paradigm allows us to determine whether mTOR mediates the formation of both context-dependent (associative) and context-independent (non-associative) fear memories. Predator stress involves an acute, unprotected exposure of a rat to a cat which causes long-lasting non-associative fear memories manifested as generalized hyperarousal and increased anxiety-like behavior. Here, we show that rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, attenuates predator stress-induced hyperarousal, lasting at least three weeks. In addition, rapamycin blocks a subset of anxiety-like behaviors as measured in the elevated plus maze and hole board. Furthermore, when re-exposed to the predator stress context, rapamycin-treated stressed rats showed increased activity compared to vehicle controls suggesting that rapamycin blocks predator stress-induced associative fear memory. Taken together with past research, our results indicate that mTOR regulation of protein translation is required for the formation of both associative and non-associative fear memories. Overall, these data suggest that mTOR activation may contribute to the development of acquired anxiety disorders such as PTSD.

  20. Targeting PARP-1 allosteric regulation offers therapeutic potential against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jamin D.; Tholey, Renee M.; Langelier, Marie-France; Planck, Jamie L.; Schiewer, Matthew J.; Lal, Shruti; Bildzukewicz, Nikolai A.; Yeo, Charles J.; Knudsen, Karen E.; Brody, Jonathan R.; Pascal, John M.

    2014-01-01

    PARP-1 is a nuclear protein that has important roles in maintenance of genomic integrity. During genotoxic stress, PARP-1 recruits to sites of DNA damage where PARP-1 domain architecture initiates catalytic activation and subsequent poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent DNA repair. PARP-1 inhibition is a promising new way to selectively target cancers harboring DNA repair deficiencies. However, current inhibitors target other PARPs raising important questions concerning long-term off-target effects. Here we propose a new strategy that targets PARP-1 allosteric regulation as a selective way of inhibiting PARP-1. We found that disruption of PARP-1 domain-domain contacts through mutagenesis held no cellular consequences on recruitment to DNA damage or a model system of transcriptional regulation, but prevented DNA-damage dependent catalytic activation. Further, PARP-1 mutant overexpression in a pancreatic cancer cell line (MIA PaCa-2) increased sensitivity to platinum-based anti-cancer agents. These results not only highlight the potential of a synergistic drug combination of allosteric PARP inhibitors with DNA damaging agents in genomically unstable cancer cells (regardless of homologous recombination status), but also signify important applications of selective PARP-1 inhibition. Lastly, the development of a high-throughput (HT) PARP-1 assay is described as a tool to promote discovery of novel PARP-1 selective inhibitors. PMID:24189460

  1. Targeting PARP-1 allosteric regulation offers therapeutic potential against cancer.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Jamin D; Tholey, Renee M; Langelier, Marie-France; Planck, Jamie L; Schiewer, Matthew J; Lal, Shruti; Bildzukewicz, Nikolai A; Yeo, Charles J; Knudsen, Karen E; Brody, Jonathan R; Pascal, John M

    2014-01-01

    PARP-1 is a nuclear protein that has important roles in maintenance of genomic integrity. During genotoxic stress, PARP-1 recruits to sites of DNA damage where PARP-1 domain architecture initiates catalytic activation and subsequent poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent DNA repair. PARP-1 inhibition is a promising new way to selectively target cancers harboring DNA repair deficiencies. However, current inhibitors target other PARPs, raising important questions about long-term off-target effects. Here, we propose a new strategy that targets PARP-1 allosteric regulation as a selective way of inhibiting PARP-1. We found that disruption of PARP-1 domain-domain contacts through mutagenesis held no cellular consequences on recruitment to DNA damage or a model system of transcriptional regulation, but prevented DNA-damage-dependent catalytic activation. Furthermore, PARP-1 mutant overexpression in a pancreatic cancer cell line (MIA PaCa-2) increased sensitivity to platinum-based anticancer agents. These results not only highlight the potential of a synergistic drug combination of allosteric PARP inhibitors with DNA-damaging agents in genomically unstable cancer cells (regardless of homologous recombination status), but also signify important applications of selective PARP-1 inhibition. Finally, the development of a high-throughput PARP-1 assay is described as a tool to promote discovery of novel PARP-1 selective inhibitors.

  2. Allosteric Inhibition of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Revealed by Ibudilast

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crichlow, G; Vermeire, J; Leng, L; Du, X; Hodsdon, M; Bucala, R; Cappello, M; Gross, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    AV411 (ibudilast; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine) is an antiinflammatory drug that was initially developed for the treatment of bronchial asthma but which also has been used for cerebrovascular and ocular indications. It is a nonselective inhibitor of various phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and has varied antiinflammatory activity. More recently, AV411 has been studied as a possible therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain and opioid withdrawal through its actions on glial cells. As described herein, the PDE inhibitor AV411 and its PDE-inhibition-compromised analog AV1013 inhibit the catalytic and chemotactic functions of the proinflammatory protein, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Enzymatic analysis indicates that these compounds are noncompetitive inhibitors of the p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) tautomerase activity of MIF and an allosteric binding site of AV411 and AV1013 is detected by NMR. The allosteric inhibition mechanism is further elucidated by X-ray crystallography based on the MIF/AV1013 binary and MIF/AV1013/HPP ternary complexes. In addition, our antibody experiments directed against MIF receptors indicate that CXCR2 is the major receptor for MIF-mediated chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  3. Monitoring allostery in D2O: a necessary control in studies using hydrogen/deuterium exchange to characterize allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Prasannan, Charulata B; Artigues, Antonio; Fenton, Aron W

    2011-08-01

    There is currently a renewed focus aimed at understanding allosteric mechanisms at atomic resolution. This current interest seeks to understand how both changes in protein conformations and changes in protein dynamics contribute to relaying an allosteric signal between two ligand binding sites on a protein (e.g., active and allosteric sites). Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), by monitoring protein dynamics directly, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange, by monitoring solvent accessibility of backbone amides, offer insights into protein dynamics. Unfortunately, many allosteric proteins exceed the size limitations of standard NMR techniques. Although hydrogen/deuterium exchange as detected by mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS) offers an alternative evaluation method, any application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange requires that the property being measured functions in both H(2)O and D(2)O. Due to the promising future H/DX-MS has in the evaluation of allosteric mechanisms in large proteins, we demonstrate an evaluation of allosteric regulation in D(2)O. Exemplified using phenylalanine inhibition of rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase, we find that binding of the inhibitor is greatly reduced in D(2)O, but the effector continues to elicit an allosteric response.

  4. DUAL INHIBITION OF PI3K/AKT AND mTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER CELLS BY A DIETARY FLAVONOID FISETIN

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naghma; Afaq, Farrukh; Khusro, Fatima H.; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Suh, Yewseok; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most commonly occurring malignancies. It has been reported that mTOR is phosphorylated in lung cancer and its activation was more frequent in tumors with over-expression of PI3K/Akt. Therefore, dual inhibitors of PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling could be valuable agents for treating lung cancer. In the present study, we show that fisetin, a dietary tetrahydroxyflavone inhibits cell-growth with the concomitant suppression of PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Using autodock 4, we found that fisetin physically interacts with the mTOR complex at two sites. Fisetin treatment was also found to reduce the formation of A549 cell colonies in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with fisetin caused decrease in the protein expression of PI3K (p85 and p110), inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, p70S6K1, eIF-4E and 4E-BP1. Fisetin-treated cells also exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of the constituents of mTOR signaling complex like Rictor, Raptor, GβL and PRAS40. There was increase in the phosphorylation of AMPKα and decrease in the phosphorylation of TSC2 on treatment of cells with fisetin. We also found that treatment of cells with mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and mTOR-siRNA caused decrease in phosphorylation of mTOR and its target proteins which were further downregulated on treatment with fisetin, suggesting that these effects are mediated in part, through mTOR signaling. Our results show that fisetin suppressed PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling in NSCLC cells and thus, could be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent against human lung cancer. PMID:21618507

  5. Global ischemia induces lysosomal-mediated degradation of mTOR and activation of autophagy in hippocampal neurons destined to die

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jee-Yeon; Gertner, Michael; Pontarelli, Fabrizio; Court-Vazquez, Brenda; Bennett, Michael Vander Laan; Ofengeim, Dimitry; Zukin, Ruth Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of cell growth, autophagy, translation, and survival. Dysregulation of mTOR signaling is associated with cancer, diabetes, and autism. However, a role for mTOR signaling in neuronal death is not well delineated. Here we show that global ischemia triggers a transient increase in mTOR phosphorylation at S2448, whereas decreasing p-mTOR and functional activity in selectively vulnerable hippocampal CA1 neurons. The decrease in mTOR coincides with an increase in biochemical markers of autophagy, pS317-ULK-1, pS14-Beclin-1, and LC3-II, a decrease in the cargo adaptor p62, and an increase in autophagic flux, a functional readout of autophagy. This is significant in that autophagy, a catabolic process downstream of mTORC1, promotes the formation of autophagosomes that capture and target cytoplasmic components to lysosomes. Inhibitors of the lysosomal (but not proteasomal) pathway rescued the ischemia-induced decrease in mTOR, consistent with degradation of mTOR via the autophagy/lysosomal pathway. Administration of the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin or acute knockdown of mTOR promotes autophagy and attenuates ischemia-induced neuronal death, indicating an inverse causal relation between mTOR, autophagy, and neuronal death. Our findings identify a novel and previously unappreciated mechanism by which mTOR self-regulates its own levels in hippocampal neurons in a clinically relevant model of ischemic stroke. PMID:27935582

  6. mTOR mediates human trophoblast invasion through regulation of matrix-remodeling enzymes and is associated with serine phosphorylation of STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Susann; Renaud, Stephen J.; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Graham, Charles H.; Markert, Udo R.

    2009-06-10

    The intracellular signaling molecule mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is essential for cell growth and proliferation. It is involved in mouse embryogenesis, murine trophoblast outgrowth and linked to tumor cell invasiveness. In order to assess the role of mTOR in human trophoblast invasion we analyzed the in vitro invasiveness of HTR-8/SVneo immortalized first-trimester trophoblast cells in conjunction with enzyme secretion upon mTOR inhibition and knockdown of mTOR protein expression. Additionally, we also tested the capability of mTOR to trigger signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 by its phosphorylation status. Rapamycin inhibited mTOR kinase activity as demonstrated with a lower phosphorylation level of the mTOR substrate p70 S6 kinase (S6K). With the use of rapamycin and siRNA-mediated mTOR knockdown we could show that cell proliferation, invasion and secretion of matrix-metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9, urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA) and its major physiological uPA inhibitor (PAI)-1 were inhibited. While tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 was unaffected by mTOR inhibition and knockdown, serine phosphorylation was diminished. We conclude that mTOR signaling is one major mechanism in a tightly regulated network of intracellular signal pathways including the JAK/STAT system to regulate invasion in human trophoblast cells by secretion of enzymes that remodel the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) such as MMP-2, -9, uPA and PAI-1. Dysregulation of mTOR may contribute to pregnancy-related pathologies caused through impaired trophoblast invasion.

  7. Allosteric Modulation of Purine and Pyrimidine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Göblyös, Anikó; IJzerman, Adriaan P.

    2011-01-01

    Among the purine and pyrimidine receptors, the discovery of small molecular allosteric modulators has been most highly advanced for the A1 and A3 ARs. These AR modulators have allosteric effects that are structurally separated from the orthosteric effects in SAR studies. The benzoylthiophene derivatives tend to act as allosteric agonists, as well as selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the A1 AR. A 2-amino-3-aroylthiophene derivative T-62 has been under development as a PAM of the A1 AR for the treatment of chronic pain. Several structurally distinct classes of allosteric modulators of the human A3 AR have been reported: 3-(2-pyridinyl)isoquinolines, 2,4-disubstituted quinolines, 1H-imidazo-[4,5-c]quinolin-4-amines, endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol and the food dye Brilliant Black BN. Site-directed mutagenesis of A1 and A3 ARs has identified residues associated with the allosteric effect, distinct from those that affect orthosteric binding. A few small molecular allosteric modulators have been reported for several of the P2X ligand-gated ion channels and the G protein-coupled P2Y receptor nucleotides. Metal ion modulation of the P2X receptors has been extensively explored. The allosteric approach to modulation of purine and pyrimidine receptors looks promising for development of drugs that are event-specific and site-specific in action. PMID:21586360

  8. Proangiogenic stimulation of bone marrow endothelium engages mTOR and is inhibited by simultaneous blockade of mTOR and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lara F.; Balcells, Mercedes; Edelman, Elazer R.; Nadler, Lee M.; Cardoso, Angelo A.

    2006-01-01

    Most bone marrow (BM) malignancies develop in association with an angiogenic phenotype and increased numbers of endothelial cells. The molecular mechanisms involved in the modulation and recruitment of BM endothelium are largely unknown and may provide novel therapeutic targets for neoplastic diseases. We observed that angiogenic stimulation of BM endothelial cells activates mTOR and engages its downstream pathways 4E-BP1 and S6K1, which are inhibited by the mTOR-specific blockers rapamycin and CCI-779. Both mTOR blockers significantly inhibit growth factor- and leukemia-induced proliferation of BM endothelium by inducing G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest. This effect is associated with down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cdk2 phosphorylation, and up-regulation of the cdk inhibitors p27kip1 and p21cip1. Under conditions that reproduce the biomechanical fluidic environment of the BM, CCI-779 is equally effective in inhibiting BM endothelial-cell proliferation. Finally, simultaneous blockade of mTOR and NF-κB pathways synergize to significantly inhibit or abrogate the proliferative responses of BM endothelial cells to mitogenic stimuli. This study identifies mTOR as an important pathway for the proangiogenic stimulation of BM endothelium. Modulation of this pathway may serve as a valid therapeutic intervention in BM malignancies evolving in association with an angiogenic phenotype. PMID:16141350

  9. MTOR downregulates iodide uptake in thyrocytes.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Elaine Cristina Lima; Padrón, Alvaro Souto; Braga, William Miranda Oliveira; de Andrade, Bruno Moulin; Vaisman, Mário; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Ferreira, Andrea Claudia Freitas; de Carvalho, Denise Pires

    2010-07-01

    Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition increases functional sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expression in both FRTL-5 rat thyroid cell line and papillary thyroid cancer lineages. In several cell types, the stimulation of PI3K results in downstream activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR), a serine-threonine protein kinase that is a critical regulator of cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation. MTOR activation is involved in the regulation of thyrocyte proliferation by TSH. Here, we show that MTOR inhibition by rapamycin increases iodide uptake in TSH-stimulated PCCL3 thyroid cell line, although the effect of rapamycin was less pronounced than PI3K inhibition. Thus, NIS inhibitory pathways stimulated by PI3K might also involve the activation of proteins other than MTOR. Insulin downregulates iodide uptake and NIS protein expression even in the presence of TSH, and both effects are counterbalanced by MTOR inhibition. NIS protein expression levels were correlated with iodide uptake ability, except in cells treated with TSH in the absence of insulin, in which rapamycin significantly increased iodide uptake, while NIS protein levels remained unchanged. Rapamycin avoids the activation of both p70 S6 and AKT kinases by TSH, suggesting the involvement of MTORC1 and MTORC2 in TSH effect. A synthetic analog of rapamycin (everolimus), which is clinically used as an anticancer agent, was able to increase rat thyroid iodide uptake in vivo. In conclusion, we show that MTOR kinase participates in the control of thyroid iodide uptake, demonstrating that MTOR not only regulates cell survival, but also normal thyroid cell function both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase

    PubMed Central

    Foda, Zachariah H.; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T.; Shaw, David E.; Seeliger, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity. PMID:25600932

  11. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Foda, Zachariah H; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T; Shaw, David E; Seeliger, Markus A

    2015-01-20

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity.

  12. Targeting the mTOR Complex by Everolimus in NRAS Mutant Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Michael K; Curioni-Fontecedro, Alessandra; Samaras, Panagiotis; Lang, Silvia; Scharl, Michael; Aguzzi, Adriano; Oldrige, Derek A; Maris, John M; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains lethal in about 50% of patients despite multimodal treatment. Recent attempts to identify molecular targets for specific therapies have shown that Neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) is significantly mutated in a small number of patients. However, few inhibitors for the potential treatment for NRAS mutant neuroblastoma have been investigated so far. In this in-vitro study, we show that MEK inhibitors AZD6244, MEK162 and PD0325901 block cell growth in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma cell lines but not in NRAS wild-type cell lines. Several studies show that mutant NRAS leads to PI3K pathway activation and combined inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR effectively block cell growth. However, we observed the combination of MEK inhibitors with PI3K or AKT inhibitors did not show synergestic effects on cell growth. Thus, we tested single mTOR inhibitors Everolimus and AZD8055. Interestingly, Everolimus and AZD8055 alone were sufficient to block cell growth in NRAS mutant cell lines but not in wild-type cell lines. We found that Everolimus alone induced apoptosis in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma. Furthermore, the combination of mTOR and MEK inhibitors resulted in synergistic growth inhibition. Taken together, our results show that NRAS mutant neuroblastoma can be targeted by clinically available Everolimus alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors which could impact future clinical studies.

  13. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (<500 nM) and high selectivity for thrombin (>150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  14. Fisetin induces autophagic cell death through suppression of mTOR signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yewseok; Afaq, Farrukh; Khan, Naghma; Johnson, Jeremy J.; Khusro, Fatima H.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is an important component of PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, which is frequently deregulated in prostate cancer (CaP). Recent studies suggest that targeting PTEN/PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling pathway could be an effective strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory CaP. Here, we show that the treatment of androgen-independent and PTEN-negative human CaP PC3 cells with fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, resulted in inhibition of mTOR kinase signaling pathway. Treatment of cells with fisetin inhibited mTOR activity and downregulated Raptor, Rictor, PRAS40 and GβL that resulted in loss of mTOR complexes (mTORC)1/2 formation. Fisetin also activated the mTOR repressor TSC2 through inhibition of Akt and activation of AMPK. Fisetin-mediated inhibition of mTOR resulted in hypophosphorylation of 4EBP1 and suppression of Cap-dependent translation. We also found that fisetin treatment leads to induction of autophagic-programmed cell death rather than cytoprotective autophagy as shown by small interfering RNA Beclin1-knockdown and autophagy inhibitor. Taken together, we provide evidence that fisetin functions as a dual inhibitor of mTORC1/2 signaling leading to inhibition of Cap-dependent translation and induction of autophagic cell death in PC3 cells. These results suggest that fisetin could be a useful chemotherapeutic agent in treatment of hormone refractory CaP. PMID:20530556

  15. Chronic Repression of mTOR Complex 2 Induces Changes in the Gut Microbiota of Diet-induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mi-Ja; Lee, Jina; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Min-Soo; Hyun, Dong-Wook; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Pil Soo; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota play a crucial role in host physiology and metabolism; however, the molecular pathways underlying these changes in diet-induced obesity are unclear. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Therefore, we examined whether changes in the regulation of mTOR signaling induced by diet (a high-fat diet [HFD] or normal-chow diet) and/or therapeutics (resveratrol [a specific inhibitor of mTOR complex 1] or rapamycin [an inhibitor of both mTOR complex 1 and 2]) altered the composition of the gut microbiota in mice. Oral administration of resveratrol prevented glucose intolerance and fat accumulation in HFD-fed mice, whereas rapamycin significantly impaired glucose tolerance and exacerbated intestinal inflammation. The abundance of Lactococcus, Clostridium XI, Oscillibacter, and Hydrogenoanaerobacterium increased under the HFD condition; however, the abundance of these species declined after resveratrol treatment. Conversely, the abundance of unclassified Marinilabiliaceae and Turicibacter decreased in response to a HFD or rapamycin. Taken together, these results demonstrated that changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota induced by changes in mTOR activity correlate with obese and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:27471110

  16. Interstitial Lung Disease Associated with mTOR Inhibitors in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: Results from a Large Phase III Clinical Trial Program of Everolimus and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) has been reported with the use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi). The clinical and safety databases of three Phase III trials of everolimus in de novo kidney (A2309), heart (A2310), and liver (H2304) transplant recipients (TxR) were searched using a standardized MedDRA query (SMQ) search for ILD followed by a case-by-case medical evaluation. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and EMBASE. Out of the 1,473 de novo TxR receiving everolimus in Phase III trials, everolimus-related ILD was confirmed in six cases (one kidney, four heart, and one liver TxR) representing an incidence of 0.4%. Everolimus was discontinued in three of the four heart TxR, resulting in ILD improvement or resolution. Outcome was fatal in the kidney TxR (in whom everolimus therapy was continued) and in the liver TxR despite everolimus discontinuation. The literature review identified 57 publications on ILD in solid organ TxR receiving everolimus or sirolimus. ILD presented months or years after mTORi initiation and symptoms were nonspecific and insidious. The event was more frequent in patients with a late switch to mTORi. In most cases, ILD was reversed after prompt mTORi discontinuation. ILD induced by mTORi is an uncommon and potentially fatal event warranting early recognition and drug discontinuation. PMID:25580277

  17. nanoCAGE reveals 5′ UTR features that define specific modes of translation of functionally related MTOR-sensitive mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gandin, Valentina; Masvidal, Laia; Hulea, Laura; Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Cargnello, Marie; McLaughlan, Shannon; Cai, Yutian; Balanathan, Preetika; Morita, Masahiro; Rajakumar, Arjuna; Furic, Luc; Pollak, Michael; Porco, John A.; St-Pierre, Julie; Pelletier, Jerry; Larsson, Ola; Topisirovic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of MTOR-regulated mRNA translation remains unresolved. Whereas ribosome-profiling suggested that MTOR almost exclusively stimulates translation of the TOP (terminal oligopyrimidine motif) and TOP-like mRNAs, polysome-profiling indicated that MTOR also modulates translation of mRNAs without the 5′ TOP motif (non-TOP mRNAs). We demonstrate that in ribosome-profiling studies, detection of MTOR-dependent changes in non-TOP mRNA translation was obscured by low sensitivity and methodology biases. Transcription start site profiling using nano-cap analysis of gene expression (nanoCAGE) revealed that not only do many MTOR-sensitive mRNAs lack the 5′ TOP motif but that 5′ UTR features distinguish two functionally and translationally distinct subsets of MTOR-sensitive mRNAs: (1) mRNAs with short 5′ UTRs enriched for mitochondrial functions, which require EIF4E but are less EIF4A1-sensitive; and (2) long 5′ UTR mRNAs encoding proliferation- and survival-promoting proteins, which are both EIF4E- and EIF4A1-sensitive. Selective inhibition of translation of mRNAs harboring long 5′ UTRs via EIF4A1 suppression leads to sustained expression of proteins involved in respiration but concomitant loss of those protecting mitochondrial structural integrity, resulting in apoptosis. Conversely, simultaneous suppression of translation of both long and short 5′ UTR mRNAs by MTOR inhibitors results in metabolic dormancy and a predominantly cytostatic effect. Thus, 5′ UTR features define different modes of MTOR-sensitive translation of functionally distinct subsets of mRNAs, which may explain the diverse impact of MTOR and EIF4A inhibitors on neoplastic cells. PMID:26984228

  18. Targeting Focal Adhesion Kinase and Resistance to mTOR Inhibition in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    François, Rony A.; Maeng, Kyungah; Nawab, Akbar; Kaye, Frederic J.; Hochwald, Steven N.; Zajac-Kaye, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) mediates survival of normal pancreatic islets through activation of AKT. Upon malignant transformation of islet cells into pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), AKT is frequently overexpressed and mutations in the AKT/mTOR pathway are detected. Because mTOR inhibitors rarely induce PanNET tumor regression, partly because of feedback activation of AKT, novel combination strategies are needed to target FAK/AKT/mTOR signaling. Methods: We characterized the activation of FAK in PanNETs using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis and tested the FAK inhibitor PF-04554878 in human PanNET cells in vitro and in vivo (at least three mice per group). In addition, we evaluated the effect of combined FAK and mTOR inhibition on PanNET viability and apoptosis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We found that FAK is overexpressed and hyperphosphorylated in human PanNETs and that PF-04554878 strongly inhibited FAK (Tyr397) autophosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. We found that PF-04554878 inhibited cell proliferation and clonogenicity and induced apoptosis in PanNET cells. Moreover, oral administration of PF-04554878 statistically significantly reduced tumor growth in a patient-derived xenograft model of PanNET (P = .02) and in a human PanNET xenograft model of peritoneal carcinomatosis (P = .03). Importantly, PF-04554878 synergized with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus by preventing feedback AKT activation. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that FAK is overexpressed in PanNETs and that inhibition of FAK activity induces apoptosis and inhibits PanNET proliferation. We found that the novel FAK inhibitor PF-04554878 synergizes with everolimus, a US Food and Drug Administration–approved agent for PanNETs. Our findings warrant the clinical investigation of combined FAK and mTOR inhibition in PanNETs. PMID:25971297

  19. An allosteric model for ribonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, E J; Ralston, G B; Darvey, I G

    1975-01-01

    Data from two assay systems show that the kinetics of the hydrolysis of cytidine 2':3'-cyclic monophosphate by bovine pancreatic RNAase (ribonuclease) is not consistent with conventional models. An allosteric model involving a substrate-dependent change in the equilibrium between two enzyme conformations is proposed. Such a model gives rise to a calculated curve of velocity versus substrate concentration which fits the experimental data. The model is also consistent with the results of an examination of the tryptic digestion of RNAase. Substrate analogues are able to protect RNAase against hydrolysis by trypsin and the percentage of RNAase activity which remains after digestion increases sigmoidally as the analogue concentration is increased. The model also explains the pattern seen in the Km values quoted in the literature and is consistent with strong physical evidence for a ligand-induced conformational change for RNAase reported in the literature. PMID:1167152

  20. Finding a better drug for epilepsy: The mTOR pathway as an antiepileptogenic target

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulou, Aristea S.; Gorter, Jan A.; Cepeda, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    of the mTOR pathway. In summary, mTOR dysregulation has been implicated in several genetic and acquired forms of epileptogenesis. The use of mTOR inhibitors can reverse some of these epileptogenic processes although their effects depend upon the timing and dose of administration as well as the model used. PMID:22578218

  1. Supramolecular Allosteric Cofacial Porphyrin Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveri, Christopher G.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.; Nguyen, Son Binh T.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Pink, Maren

    2008-04-12

    Nature routinely uses cooperative interactions to regulate cellular activity. For years, chemists have designed synthetic systems that aim toward harnessing the reactivity common to natural biological systems. By learning how to control these interactions in situ, one begins to allow for the preparation of man-made biomimetic systems that can efficiently mimic the interactions found in Nature. To this end, we have designed a synthetic protocol for the preparation of flexible metal-directed supramolecular cofacial porphyrin complexes which are readily obtained in greater than 90% yield through the use of new hemilabile porphyrin ligands with bifunctional ether-phosphine or thioether-phosphine substituents at the 5 and 15 positions on the porphyrin ring. The resulting architectures contain two hemilabile ligand-metal domains (Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} sites) and two cofacially aligned porphyrins (Zn{sup II} sites), offering orthogonal functionalities and allowing these multimetallic complexes to exist in two states, 'condensed' or 'open'. Combining the ether-phosphine ligand with the appropriate Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} transition-metal precursors results in 'open' macrocyclic products. In contrast, reacting the thioether-phosphine ligand with RhI or CuI precursors yields condensed structures that can be converted into their 'open' macrocyclic forms via introduction of additional ancillary ligands. The change in cavity size that occurs allows these structures to function as allosteric catalysts for the acyl transfer reaction between X-pyridylcarbinol (where X = 2, 3, or 4) and 1-acetylimidazole. For 3- and 4-pyridylcarbinol, the 'open' macrocycle accelerates the acyl transfer reaction more than the condensed analogue and significantly more than the porphyrin monomer. In contrast, an allosteric effect was not observed for 2-pyridylcarbinol, which is expected to be a weaker binder and is unfavorably constrained inside the macrocyclic cavity.

  2. mTOR regulates MAPKAPK2 translation to control the senescence-associated secretory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, Nicolás; Gallage, Suchira; Mellone, Massimiliano; Wuestefeld, Torsten; Klotz, Sabrina; Hanley, Christopher J.; Raguz, Selina; Acosta, Juan Carlos; Innes, Andrew J; Banito, Ana; Georgilis, Athena; Montoya, Alex; Wolter, Katharina; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Faull, Peter; Carroll, Thomas; Martínez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Cutillas, Pedro; Reisinger, Florian; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Miller, Richard A.; Withers, Dominic; Zender, Lars; Thomas, Gareth J.; Gil, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Senescent cells secrete a combination of factors collectively known as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). The SASP reinforces senescence and activates an immune surveillance response but it can also display pro-tumorigenic properties and contribute to age-related pathologies. In a drug screen to find novel SASP regulators, we uncovered the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin as a potent SASP suppressor. Here we report a mechanism by which mTOR controls the SASP by differentially regulating the translation of the MK2/MAPKAPK2 kinase through 4EBP1. In turn, MAPKAPK2 phosphorylates the RNA binding protein ZFP36L1 during senescence, inhibiting its ability to degrade the transcripts of numerous SASP components. Consequently, mTOR inhibition or constitutive activation of ZFP36L1 impairs the non-cell-autonomous effects of senescent cells both in tumour-suppressive and promoting-promoting contexts. Altogether, our results place regulation of the SASP as a key mechanism by which mTOR could influence cancer, age-related diseases and immune responses. PMID:26280535

  3. Trichomonas vaginalis metalloproteinase induces mTOR cleavage of SiHa cells.

    PubMed

    Quan, Juan-Hua; Choi, In-Wook; Yang, Jung-Bo; Zhou, Wei; Cha, Guang-Ho; Zhou, Yu; Ryu, Jae-Sook; Lee, Young-Ha

    2014-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis secretes a number of proteases which are suspected to be the cause of pathogenesis; however, little is understood how they manipulate host cells. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates cell growth, cell proliferation, cell motility, cell survival, protein synthesis, and transcription. We detected various types of metalloproteinases including GP63 protein from T. vaginalis trophozoites, and T. vaginalis GP63 metalloproteinase was confirmed by sequencing and western blot. When SiHa cells were stimulated with live T. vaginalis, T. vaginalis excretory-secretory products (ESP) or T. vaginalis lysate, live T. vaginalis and T. vaginalis ESP induced the mTOR cleavage in both time- and parasite load-dependent manner, but T. vaginalis lysate did not. Pretreatment of T. vaginalis with a metalloproteinase inhibitor, 1,10-phenanthroline, completely disappeared the mTOR cleavage in SiHa cells. Collectively, T. vaginalis metallopeptidase induces host cell mTOR cleavage, which may be related to survival of the parasite.

  4. mTOR masters monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice with allografts or tumors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Hao; Li, Yang; Shao, Lijuan; Wang, Ruoyu; Lu, Jun; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Junjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-02-01

    CD11b(+) Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in controlling the processes of tumors, infections, autoimmunity and graft rejection. Immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RPM), targeting on the key cellular metabolism molecule mTOR, is currently used in clinics to treat patients with allo-grafts, autoimmune diseases and tumors. However, the effect of RPM on MDSCs has not been studied. RPM significantly decreases the cell number and the immunosuppressive ability on T cells of CD11b(+) Ly6C(high) monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) in both allo-grafts-transplanted and tumor-bearing mice respectively. Mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of mTOR have poor M-MDSCs after grafting with allo-skin tissue or a tumor. Grafting of allo-skin or tumors significantly activates glycolysis pathways in myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow, which is inhibited by RPM or mTOR deletion. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway, inhibits M-MDSC differentiation from precursors, while enhancing glycolysis by metformin significantly rescues the RPM-caused deficiency of M-MDSCs. Therefore, we offer evidence supporting that mTOR is an intrinsic factor essential for the differentiation and immunosuppressive function of M-MDSCs and that these metabolism-relevant medicines may impact MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction, which is of considerable clinical importance in treating graft rejection, autoimmune diseases and cancers.

  5. Insights into significance of combined inhibition of MEK and m-TOR signalling output in KRAS mutant non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Broutin, Sophie; Stewart, Adam; Thavasu, Parames; Paci, Angelo; Bidart, Jean-Michel; Banerji, Udai

    2016-01-01

    Background: We aimed to understand the dependence of MEK and m-TOR inhibition in EGFRWT/ALKnon-rearranged NSCLC cell lines. Methods: In a panel of KRASM and KRASWT NSCLC cell lines, we determined growth inhibition (GI) following maximal reduction in p-ERK and p-S6RP caused by trametinib (MEK inhibitor) and AZD2014 (m-TOR inhibitor), respectively. Results: GI caused by maximal m-TOR inhibition was significantly greater than GI caused by maximal MEK inhibition in the cell line panel (52% vs 18%, P<10−4). There was no significant difference in GI caused by maximal m-TOR compared with maximal m-TOR+MEK inhibition. However, GI caused by the combination was significantly greater in the KRASM cell lines (79% vs 61%, P=0.017). Conclusions: m-TOR inhibition was more critical to GI than MEK inhibition in EGFRWT/ALKnon-rearranged NSCLC cells. The combination of MEK and m-TOR inhibition was most effective in KRASM cells. PMID:27441499

  6. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  7. Furoates and thenoates inhibit pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 allosterically by binding to its pyruvate regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Masini, Tiziana; Birkaya, Barbara; van Dijk, Simon; Mondal, Milon; Hekelaar, Johan; Jäger, Manuel; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C; Patel, Mulchand S; Hirsch, Anna K H; Moman, Edelmiro

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the reawakening of cancer metabolism as a therapeutic target. In particular, inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) holds remarkable promise. Dichloroacetic acid (DCA), currently undergoing clinical trials, is a unique PDK inhibitor in which it binds to the allosteric pyruvate site of the enzyme. However, the safety of DCA as a drug is compromised by its neurotoxicity, whereas its usefulness as an investigative tool is limited by the high concentrations required to exert observable effects in cell culture. Herein, we report the identification - by making use of saturation-transfer difference NMR spectroscopy, enzymatic assays and computational methods - of furoate and thenoate derivatives as allosteric pyruvate-site-binding PDK2 inhibitors. This work substantiates the pyruvate regulatory pocket as a druggable target.

  8. Allosteric Modulation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Douglas J.; Gregory, Karen J.; Rook, Jerri M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The development of receptor subtype-selective ligands by targeting allosteric sites of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has proven highly successful in recent years. One GPCR family that has greatly benefited from this approach is the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus). These family C GPCRs participate in the neuromodulatory actions of glutamate throughout the CNS, where they play a number of key roles in regulating synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. A large number of mGlu subtype-selective allosteric modulators have been identified, the majority of which are thought to bind within the transmembrane regions of the receptor. These modulators can either enhance or inhibit mGlu functional responses and, together with mGlu knockout mice, have furthered the establishment of the physiologic roles of many mGlu subtypes. Numerous pharmacological and receptor mutagenesis studies have been aimed at providing a greater mechanistic understanding of the interaction of mGlu allosteric modulators with the receptor, which have revealed evidence for common allosteric binding sites across multiple mGlu subtypes and the presence for multiple allosteric sites within a single mGlu subtype. Recent data have also revealed that mGlu allosteric modulators can display functional selectivity toward particular signal transduction cascades downstream of an individual mGlu subtype. Studies continue to validate the therapeutic utility of mGlu allosteric modulators as a potential therapeutic approach for a number of disorders including anxiety, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, and Fragile X syndrome. PMID:21907906

  9. Dissociation of the pharmacological effects of THC by mTOR blockade.

    PubMed

    Puighermanal, Emma; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Gomis-González, Maria; Marsicano, Giovanni; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2013-06-01

    The potential therapeutic benefits of cannabinoid compounds have raised interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie cannabinoid-mediated effects. We previously showed that the acute amnesic-like effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were prevented by the subchronic inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. In the present study, we assess the relevance of the mTOR pathway in other acute and chronic pharmacological effects of THC. The rapamycin derivative temsirolimus, an inhibitor of the mTOR pathway approved by the Food and Drug Administration, prevents both the anxiogenic- and the amnesic-like effects produced by acute THC. In contrast, THC-induced anxiolysis, hypothermia, hypolocomotion, and antinociception are not sensitive to the mTOR inhibition. In addition, a clear tolerance to THC-induced anxiolysis, hypothermia, hypolocomotion, and antinociception was observed after chronic treatment, but not to its anxiogenic- and amnesic-like effects. Temsirolimus pre-treatment prevented the amnesic-like effects of chronic THC without affecting the downregulation of CB1 receptors (CB1R) induced by this chronic treatment. Instead, temsirolimus blockade after chronic THC cessation did not prevent the residual cognitive deficit produced by chronic THC. Using conditional knockout mice lacking CB1R in GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, we found that GABAergic CB1Rs are mainly downregulated under chronic THC treatment conditions, and CB1-GABA-KO mice did not develop cognitive deficits after chronic THC exposure. Therefore, mTOR inhibition by temsirolimus allows the segregation of the potentially beneficial effects of cannabinoid agonists, such as the anxiolytic and antinociceptive effects, from the negative effects, such as anxiogenic- and amnesic-like responses. Altogether, these results provide new insights for targeting the endocannabinoid system in order to prevent possible side effects.

  10. Dissociation of the Pharmacological Effects of THC by mTOR Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Puighermanal, Emma; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Gomis-González, Maria; Marsicano, Giovanni; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    The potential therapeutic benefits of cannabinoid compounds have raised interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie cannabinoid-mediated effects. We previously showed that the acute amnesic-like effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were prevented by the subchronic inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. In the present study, we assess the relevance of the mTOR pathway in other acute and chronic pharmacological effects of THC. The rapamycin derivative temsirolimus, an inhibitor of the mTOR pathway approved by the Food and Drug Administration, prevents both the anxiogenic- and the amnesic-like effects produced by acute THC. In contrast, THC-induced anxiolysis, hypothermia, hypolocomotion, and antinociception are not sensitive to the mTOR inhibition. In addition, a clear tolerance to THC-induced anxiolysis, hypothermia, hypolocomotion, and antinociception was observed after chronic treatment, but not to its anxiogenic- and amnesic-like effects. Temsirolimus pre-treatment prevented the amnesic-like effects of chronic THC without affecting the downregulation of CB1 receptors (CB1R) induced by this chronic treatment. Instead, temsirolimus blockade after chronic THC cessation did not prevent the residual cognitive deficit produced by chronic THC. Using conditional knockout mice lacking CB1R in GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, we found that GABAergic CB1Rs are mainly downregulated under chronic THC treatment conditions, and CB1–GABA–KO mice did not develop cognitive deficits after chronic THC exposure. Therefore, mTOR inhibition by temsirolimus allows the segregation of the potentially beneficial effects of cannabinoid agonists, such as the anxiolytic and antinociceptive effects, from the negative effects, such as anxiogenic- and amnesic-like responses. Altogether, these results provide new insights for targeting the endocannabinoid system in order to prevent possible side effects. PMID:23358238

  11. Effects of ketamine administration on mTOR and reticulum stress signaling pathways in the brain after the infusion of rapamycin into prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; de Moura, Airam B; Matos, Danyela; Demo, Júlia P; da Silva, Júlia B I; Michels, Monique; Abatti, Mariane; Sonai, Beatriz; Dal Pizzol, Felipe; Carvalho, André F; Quevedo, João

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies show that activation of the mTOR signaling pathway is required for the rapid antidepressant actions of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists. A relationship between mTOR kinase and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway, also known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) has been shown. We evaluate the effects of ketamine administration on the mTOR signaling pathway and proteins of UPR in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens, after the inhibiton of mTOR signaling in the PFC. Male adult Wistar rats received pharmacological mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin (0.2 nmol), or vehicle into the PFC and then a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). The immunocontent of mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) homologous protein (CHOP), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) - alpha were determined in the brain. The mTOR levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with saline and ketamine in the PFC; p4EBP1 levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine in the PFC and nucleus accumbens; the levels of peEF2K were increased in the PFC in the vehicle group treated with ketamine and reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. The PERK and IRE1-alpha levels were decreased in the PFC in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. Our results suggest that mTOR signaling inhibition by rapamycin could be involved, at least in part, with the mechanism of action of ketamine; and the ketamine antidepressant on ER stress pathway could be also mediated by mTOR signaling pathway in certain brain structures.

  12. Reciprocal regulation of cilia and autophagy via the MTOR and proteasome pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixuan; Livingston, Man J; Su, Yunchao; Dong, Zheng

    2015-04-03

    Primary cilium is an organelle that plays significant roles in a number of cellular functions ranging from cell mechanosensation, proliferation, and differentiation to apoptosis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular function in biology and indispensable for cellular homeostasis. Both cilia and autophagy have been linked to different types of genetic and acquired human diseases. Their interaction has been suggested very recently, but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. We examined autophagy in cells with suppressed cilia and measured cilium length in autophagy-activated or -suppressed cells. It was found that autophagy was repressed in cells with short cilia. Further investigation showed that MTOR activation was enhanced in cilia-suppressed cells and the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin could largely reverse autophagy suppression. In human kidney proximal tubular cells (HK2), autophagy induction was associated with cilium elongation. Conversely, autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) as well as bafilomycin A1 (Baf) led to short cilia. Cilia were also shorter in cultured atg5-knockout (KO) cells and in atg7-KO kidney proximal tubular cells in mice. MG132, an inhibitor of the proteasome, could significantly restore cilium length in atg5-KO cells, being concomitant with the proteasome activity. Together, the results suggest that cilia and autophagy regulate reciprocally through the MTOR signaling pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  13. From mTOR to cognition: molecular and cellular mechanisms of cognitive impairments in tuberous sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ehninger, D.; de Vries, P. J.; Silva, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) is a multi-system disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene and is often associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms, including intellectual disability, specific neuropsychological deficits, autism, other behavioural disorders and epilepsy. Method Here, we review evidence from animal models of TSC for the role of specific molecular and cellular processes in the pathogenesis of cognitive, developmental and epilepsy-related manifestations seen in the disorder. Results Recent evidence shows that, in animal models, disinhibited mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling substantially contributes to neuropsychiatric phenotypes, including cognitive deficits and seizures. We discuss potential pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the cognitive phenotypes of TSC and present implications regarding mTOR inhibitor-based treatments for TSC-related neuropsychiatric features. Conclusions Results suggest that reversing the underlying molecular deficits of TSC with rapamycin or other mTOR inhibitors could result in clinically significant improvements of cognitive function and neurological symptoms, even if treatments are started in adulthood. PMID:19694899

  14. BMAL1-dependent regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway delays aging.

    PubMed

    Khapre, Rohini V; Kondratova, Anna A; Patel, Sonal; Dubrovsky, Yuliya; Wrobel, Michelle; Antoch, Marina P; Kondratov, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping system, has been linked with control of aging, but molecular mechanisms of regulation are not known. BMAL1 is a transcriptional factor and core component of the circadian clock; BMAL1 deficiency is associated with premature aging and reduced lifespan. Here we report that activity of mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is increased upon BMAL1 deficiency both in vivo and in cell culture. Increased mTOR signaling is associated with accelerated aging; in accordance with that, treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin increased lifespan of Bmal1-/- mice by 50%. Our data suggest that BMAL1 is a negative regulator of mTORC1 signaling. We propose that the circadian clock controls the activity of the mTOR pathway through BMAL1-dependent mechanisms and this regulation is important for control of aging and metabolism.

  15. Allosteric Inhibition of Factor XIIIa. Non-Saccharide Glycosaminoglycan Mimetics, but Not Glycosaminoglycans, Exhibit Promising Inhibition Profile

    PubMed Central

    Al-Horani, Rami A.; Karuturi, Rajesh; Lee, Michael; Afosah, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) is a transglutaminase that catalyzes the last step in the coagulation process. Orthostery is the only approach that has been exploited to design FXIIIa inhibitors. Yet, allosteric inhibition of FXIIIa is a paradigm that may offer a key advantage of controlled inhibition over orthosteric inhibition. Such an approach is likely to lead to novel FXIIIa inhibitors that do not carry bleeding risks. We reasoned that targeting a collection of basic amino acid residues distant from FXIIIa’s active site by using sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) or non-saccharide GAG mimetics (NSGMs) would lead to the discovery of the first allosteric FXIIIa inhibitors. We tested a library of 22 variably sulfated GAGs and NSGMs against human FXIIIa to discover promising hits. Interestingly, although some GAGs bound to FXIIIa better than NSGMs, no GAG displayed any inhibition. An undecasulfated quercetin analog was found to inhibit FXIIIa with reasonable potency (efficacy of 98%). Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies revealed an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. Fluorescence studies confirmed close correspondence between binding affinity and inhibition potency, as expected for an allosteric process. The inhibitor was reversible and at least 9-fold- and 26-fold selective over two GAG-binding proteins factor Xa (efficacy of 71%) and thrombin, respectively, and at least 27-fold selective over a cysteine protease papain. The inhibitor also inhibited the FXIIIa-mediated polymerization of fibrin in vitro. Overall, our work presents the proof-of-principle that FXIIIa can be allosterically modulated by sulfated non-saccharide agents much smaller than GAGs, which should enable the design of selective and safe anticoagulants. PMID:27467511

  16. Allosteric Inhibition via R-state Destabilization in ATP Sulfurylase from Penicillium chrysogenum

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, I. J.

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the cooperative hexameric enzyme ATP sulfurylase from Penicillium chrysogenum bound to its allosteric inhibitor, 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS), was determined to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This structure represents the low substrate-affinity T-state conformation of the enzyme. Comparison with the high substrate-affinity R-state structure reveals that a large rotational rearrangement of domains occurs as a result of the R-to-T transition. The rearrangement is accompanied by the 17 {angstrom} movement of a 10-residue loop out of the active site region, resulting in an open, product release-like structure of the catalytic domain. Binding of PAPS is proposed to induce the allosteric transition by destabilizing an R-state-specific salt linkage between Asp 111 in an N-terminal domain of one subunit and Arg 515 in the allosteric domain of a trans-triad subunit. Disrupting this salt linkage by site-directed mutagenesis induces cooperative inhibition behavior in the absence of an allosteric effector, confirming the role of these two residues.

  17. Characterization of the allosteric anion-binding site of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase.

    PubMed

    Tai, C H; Burkhard, P; Gani, D; Jenn, T; Johnson, C; Cook, P F

    2001-06-26

    A new crystal structure of the A-isozyme of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A (OASS) with chloride bound to an allosteric site located at the dimer interface has recently been determined [Burkhard, P., Tai, C.-H., Jansonius, J. N., and Cook, P. F. (2000) J. Mol. Biol. 303, 279-286]. Data have been obtained from steady state and presteady-state kinetic studies and from UV-visible spectral studies to characterize the allosteric anion-binding site. Data obtained with chloride and sulfate as inhibitors indicate the following: (i) chloride and sulfate prevent the formation of the external aldimines with L-cysteine or L-serine; (ii) chloride and sulfate increase the external aldimine dissociation constants for O-acetyl-L-serine, L-methionine, and 5-oxo-L-norleucine; (iii) chloride and sulfate bind to the allosteric site in the internal aldimine and alpha-aminoacrylate external aldimine forms of OASS; (iv) sulfate also binds to the active site. Sulfide behaves in a manner identical to chloride and sulfate in preventing the formation of the L-serine external aldimine. The binding of chloride to the allosteric site is pH independent over the pH range 7-9, suggesting no ionizable enzyme side chains ionize over this pH range. Inhibition by sulfide is potent (K(d) is 25 microM at pH 8) suggesting that SH(-) is the physiologic inhibitory species.

  18. Enhancing NMDA Receptor Function: Recent Progress on Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are subtype glutamate receptors that play important roles in excitatory neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Their hypo- or hyperactivation are proposed to contribute to the genesis or progression of various brain diseases, including stroke, schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Past efforts in targeting NMDARs for therapeutic intervention have largely been on inhibitors of NMDARs. In light of the discovery of NMDAR hypofunction in psychiatric disorders and perhaps Alzheimer's disease, efforts in boosting NMDAR activity/functions have surged in recent years. In this review, we will focus on enhancing NMDAR functions, especially on the recent progress in the generation of subunit-selective, allosteric positive modulators (PAMs) of NMDARs. We shall also discuss the usefulness of these newly developed NMDAR-PAMs. PMID:28163934

  19. Activation of mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, also known as mammalian target of rapamycin) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation and survival. These effects are cell-type-specific, and are elicited in response to stimulation by growth factors, hormones and cytokines, as well as to internal and external metabolic cues. Rapamycin was initially developed as an inhibitor of T-cell proliferation and allograft rejection in the organ transplant setting. Subsequently, its molecular target (mTOR) was identified as a component of two interacting complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, that regulate T-cell lineage specification and macrophage differentiation. mTORC1 drives the proinflammatory expansion of T helper (TH) type 1, TH17, and CD4−CD8− (double-negative, DN) T cells. Both mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibit the development of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory (TREG) cells and, indirectly, mTORC2 favours the expansion of Tfollicular helper (TFH) cells which, similarly to DN T cells, promote B-cell activation and autoantibody production. In contrast to this proinflammatory effect of mTORC2, mTORC1 favours, to some extent, an anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization that is protective against infections and tissue inflammation. Outside the immune system, mTORC1 controls fibroblast proliferation and chondrocyte survival, with implications for tissue fibrosis and osteoarthritis, respectively. Rapamycin (which primarily inhibits mTORC1), ATP-competitive, dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors and upstream regulators of the mTOR pathway are being developed to treat autoimmune, hyperproliferative and degenerative diseases. In this regard, mTOR blockade promises to increase life expectancy through treatment and prevention of rheumatic diseases. PMID:26698023

  20. Flavonoid myricetin inhibits TNF-α-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators by suppressing the Akt, mTOR and NF-κB pathways in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da Hee; Lee, Chung Soo

    2016-08-05

    Flavonoid myricetin has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. Nevertheless, the effect of myricetin on the TNF-α-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes has not been studied. Using human keratinocytes, we examined the effect of myricetin on the TNF-α-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in relation to the Akt, mTOR and NF-κB pathways, which regulate the transcription genes involved in immune and inflammatory responses. TNF-α stimulated production of the inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species in keratinocytes, and activation of the Akt, mTOR and NF-κB pathways in HaCaT cells and primary keratinocytes. Myricetin, Akt inhibitor, Bay 11-7085 (an inhibitor of NF-κB activation), rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor) and N-acetylcysteine attenuated TNF-α-induced activation of Akt, mTOR and NF-κB. Myricetin and N-acetylcysteine attenuated the TNF-α-stimulated production of cytokines and chemokines, and production of reactive oxygen species in keratinocytes. The results show that myricetin may reduce TNF-α-stimulated inflammatory mediator production in keratinocytes by suppressing the activation of the Akt, mTOR and NF-κB pathways. The effect of myricetin appears to be associated with inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species. Further, myricetin appears to attenuate the proinflammatory mediator-induced inflammatory skin diseases.

  1. Allosteric Inhibition Through Core Disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, James R.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-05

    Although inhibitors typically bind pre-formed sites on proteins, it is theoretically possible to inhibit by disrupting the folded structure of a protein or, in the limit, to bind preferentially to the unfolded state. Equilibria defining how such molecules act are well understood, but structural models for such binding are unknown. Two novel inhibitors of {beta}-lactamase were found to destabilize the enzyme at high temperatures, but at lower temperatures showed no preference for destabilized mutant enzymes versus stabilized mutants. X-ray crystal structures showed that both inhibitors bound to a cryptic site in {beta}-lactamase, which the inhibitors themselves created by forcing apart helixes 11 and 12. This opened up a portion of the hydrophobic core of the protein, into which these two inhibitors bind. Although this binding site is 16 {angstrom} from the center of the active site, the conformational changes were transmitted through a sequence of linked motions to a key catalytic residue, Arg244, which in the complex adopts conformations very different from those in catalytically competent enzyme conformations. These structures offer a detailed view of what has heretofore been a theoretical construct, and suggest the possibility for further design against this novel site.

  2. Rafoxanide and Closantel Inhibit SPAK and OSR1 Kinases by Binding to a Highly Conserved Allosteric Site on Their C-terminal Domains.

    PubMed

    AlAmri, Mubarak A; Kadri, Hachemi; Alderwick, Luke J; Simpkins, Nigel S; Mehellou, Youcef

    2017-03-31

    SPAK and OSR1 are two protein kinases that have emerged as attractive targets in the discovery of novel antihypertensive agents due to their role in regulating electrolyte balance in vivo. Herein we report the identification of an allosteric pocket on the highly conserved C-terminal domains of these two kinases, which influences their activity. We also show that some known WNK signaling inhibitors bind to this allosteric site. Using in silico screening, we identified the antiparasitic agent rafoxanide as a novel allosteric inhibitor of SPAK and OSR1. Collectively, this work will facilitate the rational design of novel SPAK and OSR1 kinase inhibitors that could be useful antihypertensive agents.

  3. Modulating mTOR in aging and health.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Simon C; Sangesland, Maya; Kaeberlein, Matt; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    The physiological responses to nutrient availability play a central role in aging and disease. Genetic and pharmacological studies have identified highly conserved cellular signaling pathways that influence aging by regulating the interface between nutrient and hormone cues and cellular growth and maintenance. Among these pathways, the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been most reproducibly shown to modulate aging in evolutionarily diverse organisms as reduction in mTOR activity extends life span from yeast to rodents. mTOR has been shown to play a role in a broad range of diseases, and is of particular interest to human health and aging due to the availability of clinically approved pharmacological agents targeting the mTOR complexes and other components of the mTOR signaling network. Characterizing the role of mTOR in aging and health promises to provide new avenues for intervention in human aging and disease through modulation of this signaling pathway.

  4. Activation of the mTOR Pathway by Oxaliplatin in the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Zessin, Amelia S.; Glover, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Background Standard of care treatment for colorectal cancer liver metastasis consists of a cytotoxic chemotherapy in combination with a targeted agent. Clinical trials have guided the use of these combinatory therapies, but it remains unclear what the optimal combinations of cytotoxic chemotherapy with a targeted agent are. Methods Using a genomic based approach, gene expression profiling was obtained from tumor samples of patient with colorectal cancer liver metastasis who received an oxaliplatin based therapy. Early passaged colorectal cancer liver metastasis cell lines and patient derived xenografts of colorectal cancer liver metastasis were then treated with oxaliplatin and a mTOR inhibitor. Results Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that the mTOR pathway was activated in patients receiving oxaliplatin based therapy. Treatment of early passaged colorectal cancer lines and patient derived xenografts with oxaliplatin resulted in activation of the mTOR pathway. Combination therapy with oxaliplatin and a mTOR inhibitor resulted in a synergistic effect both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion Our findings suggest a genomic based approach can be used to identify optimal combinations of cytotoxic chemotherapy with a targeted agent and that these observations can be validated both in vitro and in vivo using patient derived colorectal cancer cell lines and patient derived xenografts prior to clinical use. PMID:28060954

  5. Dual Inhibition of PI3K and mTOR Signaling Pathways Decreases Human Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor (PNET) Metastatic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Djukom, Clarisse; Porro, Laura J.; Mrazek, Amy; Townsend, Courtney M.; Hellmich, Mark R.; Chao, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) have limited therapeutic options. RAD001, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, has been shown to increase progression-free survival, but not overall survival, indicating a need to identify additional therapeutic targets. Inhibition of mTORC1 by RAD001 may induce upstream AKT upregulation. We hypothesized that dual inhibition of AKT along with mTOR will overcome the limited activity of RAD001 alone. Methods The BON cell line has been used as a model to study PNET cell biology. Western blots and cell growth assays were performed with mTOR inhibitor RAD001 (50 nM), MEK inhibitor PD0325901 (50 nM), PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (25 μM) or vehicle control. Nude mice were treated daily for 6 weeks with RAD001 (oral gavage), LY29400 (SQ) one week after intrasplenic injection of BON cells. Results Cellular proliferation was most attenuated with the combination therapy LY29400 and RAD001. Similarly, the volume of liver metastasis was lowest in the group treated with both LY29400 (100 mg/kg/week, SQ) and RAD001 (2.5 mg/kg/d) compared to vehicle (p=0.04). Conclusion The combination LY29400 and RAD001 decreased the cell growth in vitro and progression of liver metastasis in vivo compared vehicle or to single drug. PMID:24263107

  6. miR-199a Links MeCP2 with mTOR Signaling and Its Dysregulation Leads to Rett Syndrome Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Keita; Irie, Koichiro; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Egashira, Yoshihiro; Fukao, Yoichiro; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Itoh, Masayuki; Uesaka, Masahiro; Imamura, Takuya; Nakahata, Yasukazu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Takamori, Shigeo; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2015-09-22

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by MECP2 mutations. Although emerging evidence suggests that MeCP2 deficiency is associated with dysregulation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), which functions as a hub for various signaling pathways, the mechanism underlying this association and the molecular pathophysiology of RTT remain elusive. We show here that MeCP2 promotes the posttranscriptional processing of particular microRNAs (miRNAs) as a component of the microprocessor Drosha complex. Among the MeCP2-regulated miRNAs, we found that miR-199a positively controls mTOR signaling by targeting inhibitors for mTOR signaling. miR-199a and its targets have opposite effects on mTOR activity, ameliorating and inducing RTT neuronal phenotypes, respectively. Furthermore, genetic deletion of miR-199a-2 led to a reduction of mTOR activity in the brain and recapitulated numerous RTT phenotypes in mice. Together, these findings establish miR-199a as a critical downstream target of MeCP2 in RTT pathogenesis by linking MeCP2 with mTOR signaling.

  7. Patient-derived xenografts of triple-negative breast cancer reproduce molecular features of patient tumors and respond to mTOR inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is aggressive and lacks targeted therapies. Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways are frequently activated in TNBC patient tumors at the genome, gene expression and protein levels, and mTOR inhibitors have been shown to inhibit growth in TNBC cell lines. We describe a panel of patient-derived xenografts representing multiple TNBC subtypes and use them to test preclinical drug efficacy of two mTOR inhibitors, sirolimus (rapamycin) and temsirolimus (CCI-779). Methods We generated a panel of seven patient-derived orthotopic xenografts from six primary TNBC tumors and one metastasis. Patient tumors and corresponding xenografts were compared by histology, immunohistochemistry, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) sequencing; TNBC subtypes were determined. Using a previously published logistic regression approach, we generated a rapamycin response signature from Connectivity Map gene expression data and used it to predict rapamycin sensitivity in 1,401 human breast cancers of different intrinsic subtypes, prompting in vivo testing of mTOR inhibitors and doxorubicin in our TNBC xenografts. Results Patient-derived xenografts recapitulated histology, biomarker expression and global genomic features of patient tumors. Two primary tumors had PIK3CA coding mutations, and five of six primary tumors showed flanking intron single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with conservation of sequence variations between primary tumors and xenografts, even on subsequent xenograft passages. Gene expression profiling showed that our models represent at least four of six TNBC subtypes. The rapamycin response signature predicted sensitivity for 94% of basal-like breast cancers in a large dataset. Drug testing of mTOR inhibitors in our xenografts showed 77 to 99% growth inhibition, significantly more than

  8. TGF-β inhibits the activation and functions of NK cells by repressing the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Viel, Sébastien; Marçais, Antoine; Guimaraes, Fernando Souza-Fonseca; Loftus, Roisin; Rabilloud, Jessica; Grau, Morgan; Degouve, Sophie; Djebali, Sophia; Sanlaville, Amélien; Charrier, Emily; Bienvenu, Jacques; Marie, Julien C; Caux, Christophe; Marvel, Jacqueline; Town, Liam; Huntington, Nicholas D; Bartholin, Laurent; Finlay, David; Smyth, Mark J; Walzer, Thierry

    2016-02-16

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a major immunosuppressive cytokine that maintains immune homeostasis and prevents autoimmunity through its antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties in various immune cell types. We provide genetic, pharmacologic, and biochemical evidence that a critical target of TGF-β signaling in mouse and human natural killer (NK) cells is the serine and threonine kinase mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). Treatment of mouse or human NK cells with TGF-β in vitro blocked interleukin-15 (IL-15)-induced activation of mTOR. TGF-β and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin both reduced the metabolic activity and proliferation of NK cells and reduced the abundances of various NK cell receptors and the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. In vivo, constitutive TGF-β signaling or depletion of mTOR arrested NK cell development, whereas deletion of the TGF-β receptor subunit TGF-βRII enhanced mTOR activity and the cytotoxic activity of the NK cells in response to IL-15. Suppression of TGF-β signaling in NK cells did not affect either NK cell development or homeostasis; however, it enhanced the ability of NK cells to limit metastases in two different tumor models in mice. Together, these results suggest that the kinase mTOR is a crucial signaling integrator of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in NK cells. Moreover, we propose that boosting the metabolic activity of antitumor lymphocytes could be an effective strategy to promote immune-mediated tumor suppression.

  9. Novel Proteins Regulated by mTOR in Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytomas of Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex and New Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Tyburczy, Magdalena Ewa; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Pokarowski, Piotr; Mieczkowski, Jakub; Kucharska, Joanna; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Roszkowski, Maciej; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Kaminska, Bozena

    2010-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) are rare brain tumors associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a disease caused by mutations in TSC1 or TSC2, resulting in enhancement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity, dysregulation of cell growth, and tumorigenesis. Signaling via mTOR plays a role in multifaceted genomic responses, but its effectors in the brain are largely unknown. Therefore, gene expression profiling on four SEGAs was performed with Affymetrix Human Genome arrays. Of the genes differentially expressed in TSC, 11 were validated by real-time PCR on independent tumor samples and 3 SEGA-derived cultures. Expression of several proteins was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The differentially-regulated proteins were mainly involved in tumorigenesis and nervous system development. ANXA1, GPNMB, LTF, RND3, S100A11, SFRP4, and NPTX1 genes were likely to be mTOR effector genes in SEGA, as their expression was modulated by an mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, in SEGA-derived cells. Inhibition of mTOR signaling affected size of cultured SEGA cells but had no influence on their proliferation, morphology, or migration, whereas inhibition of both mTOR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways led to significant alterations of these processes. For the first time, we identified genes related to the occurrence of SEGA and regulated by mTOR and demonstrated an effective modulation of SEGA growth by pharmacological inhibition of both mTOR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways, which could represent a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:20133820

  10. Allosteric sensitization of nicotinic receptors by galantamine, a new treatment strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Maelicke, A; Samochocki, M; Jostock, R; Fehrenbacher, A; Ludwig, J; Albuquerque, E X; Zerlin, M

    2001-02-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors are the only approved drug treatment for patients with mild to moderately severe Alzheimer's disease. Interestingly, the clinical potency of these drugs does not correlate well with their activity as cholinesterase inhibitors, nor is their action as short lived as would be expected from purely symptomatic treatment. A few cholinesterase inhibitors, including galantamine, produce beneficial effects even after drug treatment has been terminated. These effects assume modes of action other than mere esterase inhibition and are capable of inducing systemic changes. We have recently discovered a mechanism that could account, at least in part, for the above-mentioned unexpected properties of some cholinesterase inhibitors. We have found that a subgroup of cholinesterase inhibitors, including galantamine but excluding tacrine, directly interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These compounds, named allosterically potentiating ligands, sensitize nicotinic receptors by increasing the probability of channel opening induced by acetylcholine and nicotinic agonists and by slowing down receptor desensitization. The allosterically potentiating ligand action, which is not necessarily associated with cholinesterase inhibition, has been demonstrated by whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to occur in natural murine and human neurons and in murine and human cell lines expressing various subtypes of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  11. Deregulation of mTOR signaling is involved in thymic lymphoma development in Atm-/- mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Xianghong; Shen, Jianjun; Wong, Paul K.Y.; Yan, Mingshan

    2009-06-05

    Abnormal thymocyte development with thymic lymphomagenesis inevitably occurs in Atm-/- mice, indicating that ATM plays a pivotal role in regulating postnatal thymocyte development and preventing thymic lymphomagenesis. The mechanism for ATM controls these processes is unclear. We have shown previously that c-Myc, an oncoprotein regulated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is overexpressed in Atm-/- thymocytes. Here, we show that inhibition of mTOR signaling with its specific inhibitor, rapamycin, suppresses normal thymocyte DNA synthesis by downregulating 4EBP1, but not S6K, and that 4EBP1 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression are coordinately increased in Atm-/- thymocytes. Administration of rapamycin to Atm-/- mice attenuates elevated phospho-4EBP1, c-Myc and cyclin D1 in their thymocytes, and delays thymic lymphoma development. These results indicate that mTOR downstream effector 4EBP1 is essential for normal thymocyte proliferation, but deregulation of 4EBP1 in Atm deficiency is a major factor driving thymic lymphomagenesis in the animals.

  12. Regulation of mTOR by mechanically induced signaling events in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Troy Alan; Sukhija, Kunal Balu; Chien, Shu

    2006-07-01

    Mechanical stimuli play a major role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and the maintenance of muscle mass contributes significantly to disease prevention and the quality of life. Although a link between mechanical stimuli and the regulation of muscle mass has been recognized for decades, the mechanisms involved in converting mechanical information into the molecular events that control this process have not been defined. Nevertheless, significant advancements are being made in this field, and it has recently been established that signaling through a rapamycin-sensitive pathway is necessary for mechanically induced growth of skeletal muscle. Since rapamycin is a highly specific inhibitor of a protein kinase called the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), many investigators have concluded that mTOR signaling is necessary for the mechanically induced growth of skeletal muscle. In this review, we have summarized the current knowledge regarding how mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling, discussed the newly discovered role of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this pathway, and considered the potential roles of PLD and PA in the mechanical regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

  13. Mutant p53 proteins counteract autophagic mechanism sensitizing cancer cells to mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cordani, Marco; Oppici, Elisa; Dando, Ilaria; Butturini, Elena; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar; Mariotto, Sofia; Cellini, Barbara; Blandino, Giovanni; Palmieri, Marta; Di Agostino, Silvia; Donadelli, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in TP53 gene play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and cancer development. Here, we report that gain-of-function mutant p53 proteins inhibit the autophagic pathway favoring antiapoptotic effects as well as proliferation of pancreas and breast cancer cells. We found that mutant p53 significantly counteracts the formation of autophagic vesicles and their fusion with lysosomes throughout the repression of some key autophagy-related proteins and enzymes as BECN1 (and P-BECN1), DRAM1, ATG12, SESN1/2 and P-AMPK with the concomitant stimulation of mTOR signaling. As a paradigm of this mechanism, we show that atg12 gene repression was mediated by the recruitment of the p50 NF-κB/mutant p53 protein complex onto the atg12 promoter. Either mutant p53 or p50 NF-κB depletion downregulates atg12 gene expression. We further correlated the low expression levels of autophagic genes (atg12, becn1, sesn1, and dram1) with a reduced relapse free survival (RFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS) of breast cancer patients carrying TP53 gene mutations conferring a prognostic value to this mutant p53-and autophagy-related signature. Interestingly, the mutant p53-driven mTOR stimulation sensitized cancer cells to the treatment with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. All these results reveal a novel mechanism through which mutant p53 proteins promote cancer cell proliferation with the concomitant inhibition of autophagy.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of the stress response by mTOR.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, Jose; Ortells, M Carmen; Tejedor, Sonia; Buxadé, Maria; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation that integrates inputs from growth factor receptors, nutrient availability, intracellular ATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate), and a variety of stressors. Since early works in the mid-1990s uncovered the role of mTOR in stimulating protein translation, this kinase has emerged as a rather multifaceted regulator of numerous processes. Whereas mTOR is generally activated by growth- and proliferation-stimulating signals, its activity can be reduced and even suppressed when cells are exposed to a variety of stress conditions. However, cells can also adapt to stress while maintaining their growth capacity and mTOR function. Despite knowledge accumulated on how stress represses mTOR, less is known about mTOR influencing stress responses. In this review, we discuss the capability of mTOR, in particular mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), to activate stress-responsive transcription factors, and we outline open questions for future investigation.

  15. Putrescine stimulates the mTOR signaling pathway and protein synthesis in porcine trophectoderm cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangfeng; Wang, Xiaoqiu; Yin, Yulong; Li, Xilong; Gao, Haijun; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-11-01

    Insufficient placental growth is a major factor contributing to intrauterine growth retardation in mammals. There is growing evidence that putrescine produced from arginine (Arg) and proline via ornithine decarboxylase is a key regulator of angiogenesis, embryogenesis, as well as placental and fetal growth. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that putrescine stimulates protein synthesis by activating the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in porcine trophectoderm cell line 2 cells. The cells were cultured for 2 to 4 days in customized Arg-free Dulbecco modified Eagle Ham medium containing 0, 10, 25, or 50 μM putrescine or 100 μM Arg. Cell proliferation, protein synthesis, and degradation, as well as the abundance of total and phosphorylated mTOR, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4EBP1), were determined. Our results indicate that putrescine promotes cell proliferation and protein synthesis in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was inhibited by difluoro-methylornithine (an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase). Moreover, supplementation of culture medium with putrescine increased the abundance of phosphorylated mTOR and its downstream targets, 4EBP1 and p70 S6K1 proteins. Collectively, these findings reveal a novel and important role for putrescine in regulating the mTOR signaling pathway in porcine placental cells. We suggest that dietary supplementation with or intravenous administration of putrescine may provide a new and effective strategy to improve survival and growth of embryos/fetuses in mammals.

  16. Akt- or MEK-mediated mTOR inhibition suppresses Nf1 optic glioma growth

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Aparna; Toonen, Joseph A.; Cimino, Patrick J.; Gianino, Scott M.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop optic pathway gliomas, which result from impaired NF1 protein regulation of Ras activity. One obstacle to the implementation of biologically targeted therapies is an incomplete understanding of the individual contributions of the downstream Ras effectors (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase [MEK], Akt) to optic glioma maintenance. This study was designed to address the importance of MEK and Akt signaling to Nf1 optic glioma growth. Methods Primary neonatal mouse astrocyte cultures were employed to determine the consequence of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MEK inhibition on Nf1-deficient astrocyte growth. Nf1 optic glioma–bearing mice were used to assess the effect of Akt and MEK inhibition on tumor volume, proliferation, and retinal ganglion cell dysfunction. Results Both MEK and Akt were hyperactivated in Nf1-deficient astrocytes in vitro and in Nf1 murine optic gliomas in vivo. Pharmacologic PI3K or Akt inhibition reduced Nf1-deficient astrocyte proliferation to wild-type levels, while PI3K inhibition decreased Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Akt inhibition of Nf1-deficient astrocyte and optic glioma growth reflected Akt-dependent activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Sustained MEK pharmacologic blockade also attenuated Nf1-deficient astrocytes as well as Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Importantly, these MEK inhibitory effects resulted from p90RSK-mediated, Akt-independent mTOR activation. Finally, both PI3K and MEK inhibition reduced optic glioma–associated retinal ganglion cell loss and nerve fiber layer thinning. Conclusion These findings establish that the convergence of 2 distinct Ras effector pathways on mTOR signaling maintains Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth, supporting the evaluation of pharmacologic inhibitors that target mTOR function in future human NF1–optic pathway glioma clinical trials. PMID:25534823

  17. Inhibitory Effect of mTOR Activator MHY1485 on Autophagy: Suppression of Lysosomal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeon Ja; Park, Yun Jung; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Kim, Dae Hyun; Ha, Young Mi; Kim, Ji Min; Song, Yu Min; Heo, Hyoung-Sam; Yu, Byung Pal; Chun, Pusoon; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Chung, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a major degradative process responsible for the disposal of cytoplasmic proteins and dysfunctional organelles via the lysosomal pathway. During the autophagic process, cells form double-membraned vesicles called autophagosomes that sequester disposable materials in the cytoplasm and finally fuse with lysosomes. In the present study, we investigated the inhibition of autophagy by a synthesized compound, MHY1485, in a culture system by using Ac2F rat hepatocytes. Autophagic flux was measured to evaluate the autophagic activity. Autophagosomes were visualized in Ac2F cells transfected with AdGFP-LC3 by live-cell confocal microscopy. In addition, activity of mTOR, a major regulatory protein of autophagy, was assessed by western blot and docking simulation using AutoDock 4.2. In the result, treatment with MHY1485 suppressed the basal autophagic flux, and this inhibitory effect was clearly confirmed in cells under starvation, a strong physiological inducer of autophagy. The levels of p62 and beclin-1 did not show significant change after treatment with MHY1485. Decreased co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes in confocal microscopic images revealed the inhibitory effect of MHY1485 on lysosomal fusion during starvation-induced autophagy. These effects of MHY1485 led to the accumulation of LC3II and enlargement of the autophagosomes in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Furthermore, MHY1485 induced mTOR activation and correspondingly showed a higher docking score than PP242, a well-known ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, in docking simulation. In conclusion, MHY1485 has an inhibitory effect on the autophagic process by inhibition of fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes leading to the accumulation of LC3II protein and enlarged autophagosomes. MHY1485 also induces mTOR activity, providing a possibility for another regulatory mechanism of autophagy by the MHY compound. The significance of this study is the finding of a novel inhibitor of autophagy

  18. Inhibitory effect of mTOR activator MHY1485 on autophagy: suppression of lysosomal fusion.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeon Ja; Park, Yun Jung; Park, Ji Young; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Kim, Dae Hyun; Ha, Young Mi; Kim, Ji Min; Song, Yu Min; Heo, Hyoung-Sam; Yu, Byung Pal; Chun, Pusoon; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Chung, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a major degradative process responsible for the disposal of cytoplasmic proteins and dysfunctional organelles via the lysosomal pathway. During the autophagic process, cells form double-membraned vesicles called autophagosomes that sequester disposable materials in the cytoplasm and finally fuse with lysosomes. In the present study, we investigated the inhibition of autophagy by a synthesized compound, MHY1485, in a culture system by using Ac2F rat hepatocytes. Autophagic flux was measured to evaluate the autophagic activity. Autophagosomes were visualized in Ac2F cells transfected with AdGFP-LC3 by live-cell confocal microscopy. In addition, activity of mTOR, a major regulatory protein of autophagy, was assessed by western blot and docking simulation using AutoDock 4.2. In the result, treatment with MHY1485 suppressed the basal autophagic flux, and this inhibitory effect was clearly confirmed in cells under starvation, a strong physiological inducer of autophagy. The levels of p62 and beclin-1 did not show significant change after treatment with MHY1485. Decreased co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes in confocal microscopic images revealed the inhibitory effect of MHY1485 on lysosomal fusion during starvation-induced autophagy. These effects of MHY1485 led to the accumulation of LC3II and enlargement of the autophagosomes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, MHY1485 induced mTOR activation and correspondingly showed a higher docking score than PP242, a well-known ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, in docking simulation. In conclusion, MHY1485 has an inhibitory effect on the autophagic process by inhibition of fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes leading to the accumulation of LC3II protein and enlarged autophagosomes. MHY1485 also induces mTOR activity, providing a possibility for another regulatory mechanism of autophagy by the MHY compound. The significance of this study is the finding of a novel inhibitor of autophagy

  19. Effects of structural analogues of the substrate and allosteric regulator of the human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Su, Kuo-Liang; Chang, Kuan-Yu; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2009-08-01

    Fumarate, a four-carbon trans dicarboxylic acid, is the allosteric activator of the human mitochondrial NAD(P)(+)-dependent malic enzyme (m-NAD(P)-ME). In this paper, we discuss the effects of the structural analogues of fumarate on human m-NAD(P)-ME. Succinate, a dicarboxylic acid with a carbon-carbon single bond, can also activate the enzyme, but the activating effect of succinate is less than that of fumarate. Succinamide, a diamide of succinate, cannot activate the enzyme and is a poor active-site inhibitor. The cis isomer of fumarate, maleic acid, significantly inhibits the ME activity, suggesting that the trans configuration of fumarate is crucial for operating the allosteric regulation of the enzyme. Other dicarboxylic acids, including glutaconic acid, malonic acid and alpha-ketoglutarate, cannot activate the enzyme and inversely inhibit enzyme activity. Our data suggest that these structural analogues are mainly active-site inhibitors, although they may enter the allosteric site to inhibit the enzyme. Furthermore, these data also suggest that the dicarboxylic acid must be in a trans conformation for allosteric activation of the enzyme.

  20. Wide spectrum of developmental brain disorders from megalencephaly to focal cortical dysplasia and pigmentary mosaicism caused by mutations of MTOR

    PubMed Central

    Solovieff, Nadia; Goold, Carleton; Jansen, Laura A.; Menon, Suchithra; Timms, Andrew E.; Conti, Valerio; Biag, Jonathan D.; Adams, Carissa; Boyle, Evan August; Collins, Sarah; Ishak, Gisele; Poliachik, Sandra; Girisha, Katta M.; Yeung, Kit San; Chung, Brian Hon Yin; Rahikkala, Elisa; Gunter, Sonya A.; McDaniel, Sharon S.; Macmurdo, Colleen Forsyth; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Martin, Beth; Leary, Rebecca; Mahan, Scott; Liu, Shanming; Weaver, Molly; Doerschner, Michael; Jhangiani, Shalini; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Shendure, Jay; Saneto, Russell P.; Novotny, Edward J.; Wilson, Christopher J.; Sellers, William R.; Morrissey, Michael; Hevner, Robert F.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Guerrini, Renzo; Murphy, Leon O.; Winckler, Wendy; Dobyns, William B.

    2016-01-01

    fractions with an epicenter in the most epileptogenic area. When expressed in cultured neurons, all MTOR mutations identified here drive constitutive activation of mTORC1 and enlarged neuronal size, establishing a link between the MTOR mutations and neuronal hypertrophy found in patients. The mTORC1 inhibitor RAD001 ameliorated these phenotypes. Conclusions and Relevance Our data show that mutations of MTOR are associated with a spectrum of brain overgrowth phenotypes extending from FCD type 2 to diffuse megalencephaly, distinguished by different mutations and levels of mosaicism. These mutations are sufficient to cause cellular hypertrophy in cultured neurons. Our data also provide a compelling demonstration of the pattern of mosaicism in brain, and substantiate the link between mosaic mutations of MTOR and pigmentary mosaicism in skin. PMID:27159400

  1. Inversion of the allosteric response of Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-P deaminase to N-acetylglucosamine 6-P, by single amino acid replacements.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, David A; Montero-Morán, Gabriela M; Lara-González, Samuel; Calcagno, Mario L

    2004-01-01

    Amino acid replacements in the active site of glucosamine-6-P deaminase from Escherichia coli (GlcN6P deaminase, EC 3.5.99.6) involving the residues D141 and E148 produce atypical allosteric kinetics. These residues are located in the chain segment 139-156 which is part of the active site and which also forms several intersubunit contacts close to the allosteric site. In the D141N and E148Q mutant forms of this deaminase, there is an inversion of the effect of its physiological allosteric effector, N-acetylglucosamine 6-P, which becomes an inhibitor at substrate concentrations above a critical value. For both mutants, this particular point appears at low substrate concentration and the inhibition by the allosteric activator is the dominant effect in velocity versus substrate curves. These effects are analyzed as a particular case of the concerted allosteric model, assuming that the R state, the conformer displaying the higher affinity for the substrate, is the less catalytic state, thus producing an inverted allosteric response.

  2. Regulation of FANCD2 by the mTOR pathway contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Changxian; Oswald, Duane; Phelps, Doris; Cam, Hakan; Pelloski, Christopher E; Pang, Qishen; Houghton, Peter J

    2013-06-01

    Deregulation of the mTOR pathway is closely associated with tumorigenesis. Accordingly, mTOR inhibitors such as rapamycin and mTOR-selective kinase inhibitors have been tested as cancer therapeutic agents. Inhibition of mTOR results in sensitization to DNA-damaging agents; however, the molecular mechanism is not well understood. We found that an mTOR-selective kinase inhibitor, AZD8055, significantly enhanced sensitivity of a pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma xenograft to radiotherapy and sensitized rhabdomyosarcoma cells to the DNA interstrand cross-linker (ICL) melphalan. Sensitization correlated with drug-induced downregulation of a key component of the Fanconi anemia pathway, FANCD2 through mTOR regulation of FANCD2 gene transcripts via mTORC1-S6K1. Importantly, we show that FANCD2 is required for the proper activation of ATM-Chk2 checkpoint in response to ICL and that mTOR signaling promotes ICL-induced ATM-Chk2 checkpoint activation by sustaining FANCD2. In FANCD2-deficient lymphoblasts, FANCD2 is essential to suppress endogenous and induced DNA damage, and FANCD2-deficient cells showed impaired ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1 activation, which was rescued by reintroduction of wild-type FANCD2. Pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K-mTOR-AKT pathway in Rh30 rhabdomyosarcoma cells attenuated ICL-induced activation of ATM, accompanied with the decrease of FANCD2. These data suggest that the mTOR pathway may promote the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by sustaining FANCD2 and provide a novel mechanism of how the Fanconi anemia pathway modulates DNA damage response and repair.

  3. Downregulation of cancer stem cell properties via mTOR signaling pathway inhibition by rapamycin in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    YANG, CHUNGUANG; ZHANG, YUE; ZHANG, YU; ZHANG, ZIHENG; PENG, JIANHUA; LI, ZHI; HAN, LIANG; YOU, QUANJIE; CHEN, XIAOYU; RAO, XINGWANG; ZHU, YI; LIAO, ZHISU

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling inhibitor, inhibits cancer cell proliferation and tumor formation, including in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), which we proved in a previous study. However, whether rapamycin affects cancer stem cells (CSCs) is unclear. In examining samples of NPCs, we found regions of CD44-positive cancer cells co-expressing the stem cell biomarker OCT4, suggesting the presence of CSCs. Following this, we used double-label immunohistochemistry to identify whether the mTOR signaling pathway was activated in CD44-positive CSCs in NPCs. We used a CCK-8 assay and western blotting to explore whether the stem cell biomarkers CD44 and SOX2 and the invasion protein MMP-2 could be suppressed by treatment with rapamycin in cultured primary NPC cells and secondary tumors in BALB/c nude mice. Interestingly, we found that rapamycin inhibited mTOR signaling in addition to simultaneously downregulating the expression of CD44, SOX2 and MMP-2 and that it affected cell growth and tumor size and weight both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, we confirmed for the first time that CSC properties are reduced and invasion potential is restrained in response to mTOR signaling inhibition in NPC. This evidence indicates that the targeted inhibition of CSC properties may provide a novel strategy to treat cancer. PMID:26202311

  4. Alleviation of neuronal energy deficiency by mTOR inhibition as a treatment for mitochondria-related neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xinde; Boyer, Leah; Jin, Mingji; Kim, Yongsung; Fan, Weiwei; Bardy, Cedric; Berggren, Travis; Evans, Ronald M; Gage, Fred H; Hunter, Tony

    2016-01-01

    mTOR inhibition is beneficial in neurodegenerative disease models and its effects are often attributable to the modulation of autophagy and anti-apoptosis. Here, we report a neglected but important bioenergetic effect of mTOR inhibition in neurons. mTOR inhibition by rapamycin significantly preserves neuronal ATP levels, particularly when oxidative phosphorylation is impaired, such as in neurons treated with mitochondrial inhibitors, or in neurons derived from maternally inherited Leigh syndrome (MILS) patient iPS cells with ATP synthase deficiency. Rapamycin treatment significantly improves the resistance of MILS neurons to glutamate toxicity. Surprisingly, in mitochondrially defective neurons, but not neuroprogenitor cells, ribosomal S6 and S6 kinase phosphorylation increased over time, despite activation of AMPK, which is often linked to mTOR inhibition. A rapamycin-induced decrease in protein synthesis, a major energy-consuming process, may account for its ATP-saving effect. We propose that a mild reduction in protein synthesis may have the potential to treat mitochondria-related neurodegeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13378.001 PMID:27008180

  5. mTOR is involved in 17β-estradiol-induced, cultured immature boar Sertoli cell proliferation via regulating the expression of SKP2, CCND1, and CCNE1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Rong; Wang, Yong; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Jia-Hua; Lu, Cheng; Wang, Xian-Zhong

    2015-04-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is known to be involved in mammalian cell proliferation, while S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (SKP2) plays a vital role in the cell cycle. Within the testis, estrogen also plays an important role in Sertoli cell proliferation, although it is not clear how. The present study asked if mTOR is involved in 17β-estradiol-dependent Sertoli cell proliferation. We specifically assessed if extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and/or phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) exert convergent effects toward the activation of mTOR signaling, and if this signaling regulates the expression of SKP2 through retinoblastoma (RB) and early mitotic inhibitor 1 (EMI1) protein and on CCNE1 and CCND1 mRNA levels. Treatment with 17β-estradiol for 15-90 min activated mTOR, with mTOR phosphorylation peaking after 30 min. U0126 (5 μM), a specific inhibitor of (MEK1/2), and 10-DEBC (2 μM), a selective inhibitor of AKT, both significantly reduced 17β-estradiol-induced phosphorylation of mTOR. Rapamycin suppressed 17β-estradiol-induced Sertoli cell proliferation, appearing to act by reducing the abundance of SKP2, CCND1, and CCNE1 mRNA as well as RB and EMI1 protein. These data indicated that 17β-estradiol enhances Sertoli cell proliferation via mTOR activation, which involves both ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling. Activated mTOR subsequently increases SKP2 mRNA and protein expression by enhancing the expression of CCND1 and CCNE1, and inhibits SKP2 protein degradation by increasing EMI1 abundance.

  6. An engineered chorismate mutase with allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Wilson, David B; Ganem, Bruce

    2003-07-17

    Besides playing a central role in phenylalanine biosynthesis, the bifunctional P-protein in Eschericia coli provides a unique model system for investigating whether allosteric effects can be engineered into protein catalysts using modular regulatory elements. Previous studies have established that the P-protein contains three distinct domains whose functions are preserved, even when separated: chorismate mutase (residues 1-109), prephenate dehydratase (residues 101-285), and an allosteric domain (residues 286-386) for feedback inhibition by phenylalanine. By deleting the prephenate dehydrase domain, a functional chorismate mutase linked directly to the phenylalanine binding domain has been engineered and overexpressed. This manuscript reports the catalytic properties of the mutase in the absence and presence of phenylalanine.

  7. THE ANTIPSYCHOTIC POTENTIAL OF MUSCARINIC ALLOSTERIC MODULATION

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Thomas M.; LeBois, Evan P.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Wood, Michael R.; Jones, Carrie K.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The cholinergic hypothesis of schizophrenia emerged over 50 years ago based on clinical observations with both anticholinergics and pan-muscarinic agonists. Not until the 1990s did the cholinergic hypothesis of schizophrenia receive renewed enthusiasm based on clinical data with xanomeline, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1/M4-preferring orthosteric agonist. In a clinical trial with Alzheimer’s patients, xanomeline not only improved cognitive performance, but also reduced psychotic behaviors. This encouraging data spurred a second clinical trial in schizophrenic patients, wherein xanomeline significantly improved the positive, negative and cognitive symptom clusters. However, the question remained: Was the antipsychotic efficacy due to activation of M1, M4 or both M1/M4? Classical orthosteric ligands lacked the muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity required to address this key question. More recently, functional assays have allowed for the discovery of ligands that bind at allosteric sites, binding sites distinct from the orthosteric (acetylcholine) site, which are structurally less conserved and thereby afford high levels of receptor subtype selectivity. Recently, allosteric ligands, with unprecedented selectivity for either M1 or M4, have been discovered and have demonstrated comparable efficacy to xanomeline in preclinical antipsychotic and cognition models. These data suggest that selective allosteric activation of either M1 or M4 has antipsychotic potential through distinct, yet complimentary mechanisms. PMID:20520852

  8. mTOR signaling in growth control and disease

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, Mathieu; Sabatini, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway senses and integrates a variety of environmental cues to regulate organismal growth and homeostasis. The pathway regulates many major cellular processes and is implicated in an increasing number of pathological conditions, including cancer, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the mTOR pathway and its role in health and disease as well as aging. We further discuss pharmacological approaches to treat human pathologies linked to mTOR deregulation. PMID:22500797

  9. Inhibition of mTOR pathway restrains astrocyte proliferation, migration and production of inflammatory mediators after oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Yu; Li, Xiao; Liu, Shuang-Feng; Qu, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Wei; Tian, Dai-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Glial scar is a major impediment to axonal regeneration in central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Overcoming this physical and biochemical barrier might be crucial for axonal regeneration and functional compensation during the progression of CNS disorders. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase, involved in process of cell proliferation, migration, autophagy and protein synthesis. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR signaling, can exert neuroprotective effects in several CNS diseases. However, its role in the process of reactive astrogliosis including cell proliferation, migration and cytokine production after cerebral ischemia still remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of mTOR blockade in cultured astrocytes exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R), a wildly used cellular ischemia model which mimics ideally cerebral ischemia model in vivo. We found that astrocytes became activated after OGD/R, characterized by change of astrocytic morphology, upregulation of GFAP expression, the increase number of Edu positive cells, and accompanied with phosphorylation of mTOR protein and its substrate S6K1. Rapamycin significantly inhibited mTOR signal pathway, suppressed proliferation of astrocytes via modulation of cell cycle progression. Moreover, rapamycin attenuated astrocytic migration and mitigated production of inflammatory factors such as TNF-α and iNOS induced by astrocytes exposed to OGD/R. Taken together, our findings indicated that mTOR blockade by rapamycin attenuates astrocyte migration, proliferation and production of inflammation mediators. We suggest that targeting mTOR pathway in astrocyte activation may represent a potentially new therapeutic strategy against deleterious neurotoxic processes of reactive astrogliosis in CNS disorders such as ischemic stroke.

  10. Delayed mTOR Inhibition with Low Dose of Everolimus Reduces TGFβ Expression, Attenuates Proteinuria and Renal Damage in the Renal Mass Reduction Model

    PubMed Central

    Kurdián, Melania; Herrero-Fresneda, Inmaculada; Lloberas, Nuria; Gimenez-Bonafe, Pepita; Coria, Virginia; Grande, María T.; Boggia, José; Malacrida, Leonel; Torras, Joan; Arévalo, Miguel A.; González-Martínez, Francisco; López-Novoa, José M.; Grinyó, Josep; Noboa, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Background The immunosuppressive mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are widely used in solid organ transplantation, but their effect on kidney disease progression is controversial. mTOR has emerged as one of the main pathways regulating cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of delayed inhibition of mTOR pathway with low dose of everolimus on progression of renal disease and TGFβ expression in the 5/6 nephrectomy model in Wistar rats. Methods This study evaluated the effects of everolimus (0.3 mg/k/day) introduced 15 days after surgical procedure on renal function, proteinuria, renal histology and mechanisms of fibrosis and proliferation. Results Everolimus treated group (EveG) showed significantly less proteinuria and albuminuria, less glomerular and tubulointerstitial damage and fibrosis, fibroblast activation cell proliferation, when compared with control group (CG), even though the EveG remained with high blood pressure. Treatment with everolimus also diminished glomerular hypertrophy. Everolimus effectively inhibited the increase of mTOR developed in 5/6 nephrectomy animals, without changes in AKT mRNA or protein abundance, but with an increase in the pAKT/AKT ratio. Associated with this inhibition, everolimus blunted the increased expression of TGFβ observed in the remnant kidney model. Conclusion Delayed mTOR inhibition with low dose of everolimus significantly prevented progressive renal damage and protected the remnant kidney. mTOR and TGFβ mRNA reduction can partially explain this anti fibrotic effect. mTOR can be a new target to attenuate the progression of chronic kidney disease even in those nephropathies of non-immunologic origin. PMID:22427849

  11. FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK and downregulates mTOR signaling in hepatocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Gebhardt, Rolf; Weiss, Thomas S.; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-03-06

    Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the key enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway starting from nicotinamide. Cancer cells have an increased demand for NAD due to their high proliferation and DNA repair rate. Consequently, NAMPT is considered as a putative target for anti-cancer therapies. There is evidence that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) become dysregulated during the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the effects of NAMPT inhibition by its specific inhibitor FK866 on the viability of hepatocarcinoma cells and analyzed the effects of FK866 on the nutrient sensor AMPK and mTOR complex1 (mTORC1) signaling. Results: FK866 markedly decreased NAMPT activity and NAD content in hepatocarcinoma cells (Huh7 cells, Hep3B cells) and led to delayed ATP reduction which was associated with increased cell death. These effects could be abrogated by administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzyme product of NAMPT. Our results demonstrated a dysregulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to non-cancerous hepatocytes with a higher expression of mTOR and a lower AMPKα activation in hepatocarcinoma cells. We found that NAMPT inhibition by FK866 significantly activated AMPKα and inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream targets p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Non-cancerous hepatocytes were less sensitive to FK866 and did not show changes in AMPK/mTOR signaling after FK866 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings reveal an important role of the NAMPT-mediated NAD salvage pathway in the energy homeostasis of hepatocarcinoma cells and suggest NAMPT inhibition as a potential treatment option for HCC. - Highlights: • FK866 increases cell death in p53-deficient hepatocarcinoma cells. • AMPK/mTOR signaling is dysregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells. • FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK

  12. Phosphorylation of mTOR Ser2481 is a key target limiting the efficacy of rapalogs for treating hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Tomohiro; Noda, Masaki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Akiba, Jun; Murakami, Yuichi; Yano, Hirohisa; Kuwano, Michihiko; Ono, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although recent studies facilitate the identification of crucial genes and relevant regulatory pathways, therapeutic approaches against advanced HCC are insufficiently effective. Therefore, we aimed here to develop potent therapeutics to provide a reliable biomarker for the therapeutic efficacy in patients with HCC. To this end, we first compared the cytotoxic effects of various anti-cancer drugs between well differentiated (HAK-1A) and poorly differentiated (HAK-1B) cell lines established from a single HCC tumor. Of various drug screened, HAK-1B cells were more sensitive by a factor of 2,000 to the mTORC1 inhibitors (rapalogs), rapamycin and everolimus, than HAK-1A cells. Although rapalogs inhibited phosphorylation of mTOR Ser2448 in HAK-1A and HAK-1B cells, phosphorylation of mTOR Ser2481 was specifically inhibited only in HAK-1B cells. Silencing of Raptor induced apoptosis and inhibited the growth of only HAK-1B cells. Further, three other cell lines established independently from the tumors of three patients with HCC were also approximately 2,000-fold times more sensitive to rapamycin, which correlated closely with the inhibition of mTOR Ser2481 phosphorylation by rapamycin. Treatment with everolimus markedly inhibited the growth of tumors induced by poorly differentiated HAK-1B and KYN-2 cells and phosphorylation of mTOR Ser2481 in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that the phosphorylation of mTOR Ser2481 is selectively inhibited by rapalogs in mTORC1-addicted HCC cells and may be a potential reliable biomarker for the therapeutic efficacy of rapalogs for treating HCC patients. PMID:27329724

  13. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  14. The metabolic checkpoint kinase mTOR is essential for interleukin-15 signaling during NK cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Marçais, Antoine; Degouve, Sophie; Viel, Sébastien; Fenis, Aurore; Rabilloud, Jessica; Mayol, Katia; Tavares, Armelle; Bienvenu, Jacques; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Gilson, Eric; Vivier, Eric; Walzer, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) controls both the homeostasis and the peripheral activation of Natural Killer (NK) cells. The molecular basis for this duality of action remains unknown. Here we report that the metabolic checkpoint kinase mTOR is activated and boosts bioenergetic metabolism upon NK cell exposure to high concentrations of IL-15 whereas low doses of IL-15 only triggers the phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT5. mTOR stimulates NK cell growth and nutrient uptake and positively feeds back onto the IL-15 receptor. This process is essential to sustain NK cell proliferation during development and acquisition of cytolytic potential upon inflammation or virus infection. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin inhibits NK cell cytotoxicity both in mouse and human, which likely contribute to the immunosuppressant activities of this drug in different clinical settings. PMID:24973821

  15. Identification of Allosteric Disulfides from Prestress Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Beifei; Baldus, Ilona B.; Li, Wenjin; Edwards, Scott A.; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide bonds serve to form physical cross-links between residues in protein structures, thereby stabilizing the protein fold. Apart from this purely structural role, they can also be chemically active, participating in redox reactions, and they may even potentially act as allosteric switches controlling protein functions. Specific types of disulfide bonds have been identified in static protein structures from their distinctive pattern of dihedral bond angles, and the allosteric function of such bonds is purported to be related to the torsional strain they store. Using all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations for ∼700 disulfide bonded proteins, we analyzed the intramolecular mechanical forces in 20 classes of disulfide bonds. We found that two particular classes, the −RHStaple and the −/+RHHook disulfides, are indeed more stressed than other disulfide bonds, but the stress is carried primarily by stretching of the S-S bond and bending of the neighboring bond angles, rather than by dihedral torsion. This stress corresponds to a tension force of magnitude ∼200 pN, which is balanced by repulsive van der Waals interactions between the cysteine Cα atoms. We confirm stretching of the S-S bond to be a general feature of the −RHStaples and the −/+RHHooks by analyzing ∼20,000 static protein structures. Given that forced stretching of S-S bonds is known to accelerate their cleavage, we propose that prestress of allosteric disulfide bonds has the potential to alter the reactivity of a disulfide, thereby allowing us to readily switch between functional states. PMID:25099806

  16. Targeting allosteric disulphide bonds in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Philip J

    2013-06-01

    Protein action in nature is generally controlled by the amount of protein produced and by chemical modification of the protein, and both are often perturbed in cancer. The amino acid side chains and the peptide and disulphide bonds that bind the polypeptide backbone can be post-translationally modified. Post-translational cleavage or the formation of disulphide bonds are now being identified in cancer-related proteins and it is timely to consider how these allosteric bonds could be targeted for new therapies.

  17. mTOR Inhibition by Everolimus Does Not Impair Closure of Punch Biopsy Wounds in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Shelley B.; Gonzales, Josephine; Boyett, Megan; Costanzo, Anne; Han, Peggy P.; Steinberg, Steven; McKay, Dianne B.; Jameson, Julie M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are approved to prevent allograft rejection and control malignancy. Unfortunately, they are associated with adverse effects, such as wound healing complications that detract from more extensive use. There is a lack of prospective wound healing studies to monitor patients treated with mTOR inhibitors, such as everolimus or sirolimus, especially in nondiabetics. Methods Patients receiving everolimus with standard immunosuppressant therapy or standard immunosuppressant therapy without everolimus were administered 3-mm skin biopsy punch wounds in the left scapular region. Homeostatic gene expression was examined in the skin obtained from the biopsy and wound surface area was examined on day 7. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were examined for cytokine production. Results There are no significant changes in autophagy related 13, epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3, IL-2, kruppel-like factor 4, and TGFB1 gene expression in the skin suggesting that there is little impact of everolimus on these genes within nonwounded skin. Peripheral blood T cells are more sensitive to cell death in everolimus-treated patients, but they retain the ability to produce proinflammatory cytokines required for efficient wound repair. Importantly, there is no delay in the closure of biopsy wounds in patients receiving everolimus as compared to those not receiving mTOR inhibition. Conclusions Everolimus treatment is not associated with impaired closure of skin biopsy wounds in kidney transplant recipients. These data highlight the importance of exploring whether larger surgical wounds would show a similar result and how other factors, such as diabetes, impact wound healing complications associated with mTOR suppression.

  18. Refined molecular hinge between allosteric and catalytic domain determines allosteric regulation and stability of fungal chorismate mutase.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Heinrich, Gabriele; Lipscomb, William N; Braus, Gerhard H

    2002-05-14

    The yeast chorismate mutase is regulated by tyrosine as feedback inhibitor and tryptophan as crosspathway activator. The monomer consists of a catalytic and a regulatory domain covalently linked by the loop L220s (212-226), which functions as a molecular hinge. Two monomers form the active dimeric enzyme stabilized by hydrophobic interactions in the vicinity of loop L220s. The role of loop L220s and its environment for enzyme regulation, dimerization, and stability was analyzed. Substitution of yeast loop L220s in place of the homologous loop from the corresponding and similarly regulated Aspergillus enzyme (and the reverse substitution) changed tyrosine inhibition to activation. Yeast loop L220s substituted into the Aspergillus enzyme resulted in a tryptophan-inhibitable enzyme. Monomeric yeast chorismate mutases could be generated by substituting two hydrophobic residues in and near the hinge region. The resulting Thr-212-->Asp-Phe-28-->Asp enzyme was as stable as wild type, but lost allosteric regulation and showed reduced catalytic activity. These results underline the crucial role of this molecular hinge for inhibition, activation, quaternary structure, and stability of yeast chorismate mutase.

  19. Dietary and donepezil modulation of mTOR signaling and neuroinflammation in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Dasuri, Kalavathi; Zhang, Le; Kim, Sun OK Fernandez; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical and laboratory evidences suggest that high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity and its associated metabolic syndrome conditions promotes neuropathology in aging and age-related neurological disorders. However, the effects of high fat diet on brain pathology are poorly understood, and the effective strategies to overcome these effects remain elusive. In the current study, we examined the effects of HFD on brain pathology and further evaluated whether donepezil, an AChE inhibitor with neuroprotective functions, could suppress the ongoing HFD induced pathological changes in the brain. Our data demonstrates that HFD induced obesity results in increased neuroinflammation and increased AChE activity in the brain when compared with the mice fed on low fat diet (LFD). HFD administration to mice activated mTOR pathway resulting in increased phosphorylation of mTORser2448, AKTthr308 and S6K proteins involved in the signaling. Interestingly, donepezil administration with HFD suppressed HFD induced increases in AChE activity, and partially reversed HFD effects on microglial reactivity and the levels of mTOR signaling proteins in the brain when compared to the mice on LFD alone. However, gross levels of synaptic proteins were not altered in the brain tissues of mice fed either diet with or without donepezil. In conclusion, these results present a new insight in to the detrimental effects of HFD on brain via microglial activation and involvement of mTOR pathway, and further demonstrates the possible therapeutic role for donepezil in ameliorating the early effects of HFD that could help preserve the brain function in metabolic syndrome conditions. PMID:26554604

  20. Salvinorin A: allosteric interactions at the mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Richard B; Murphy, Daniel L; Xu, Heng; Godin, Jonathan A; Dersch, Christina M; Partilla, John S; Tidgewell, Kevin; Schmidt, Matthew; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2007-02-01

    Salvinorin A [(2S,4aR,6aR,7R,9S,10aS,10bR)-9-(acetyloxy)-2-(3-furanyl)-dodecahydro-6a,10b-dimethyl-4,10-dioxo-2h-naphtho[2,1-c]pyran-7-carboxylic acid methyl ester] is a hallucinogenic kappa-opioid receptor agonist that lacks the usual basic nitrogen atom present in other known opioid ligands. Our first published studies indicated that Salvinorin A weakly inhibited mu-receptor binding, and subsequent experiments revealed that Salvinorin A partially inhibited mu-receptor binding. Therefore, we hypothesized that Salvinorin A allosterically modulates mu-receptor binding. To test this hypothesis, we used Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the cloned human opioid receptor. Salvinorin A partially inhibited [(3)H]Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-Me-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) (0.5, 2.0, and 8.0 nM) binding with E(MAX) values of 78.6, 72.1, and 45.7%, respectively, and EC(50) values of 955, 1124, and 4527 nM, respectively. Salvinorin A also partially inhibited [(3)H]diprenorphine (0.02, 0.1, and 0.5 nM) binding with E(MAX) values of 86.2, 64, and 33.6%, respectively, and EC(50) values of 1231, 866, and 3078 nM, respectively. Saturation binding studies with [(3)H]DAMGO showed that Salvinorin A (10 and 30 microM) decreased the mu-receptor B(max) and increased the K(d) in a dose-dependent nonlinear manner. Saturation binding studies with [(3)H]diprenorphine showed that Salvinorin A (10 and 40 microM) decreased the mu-receptor B(max) and increased the K(d) in a dose-dependent nonlinear manner. Similar findings were observed in rat brain with [(3)H]DAMGO. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that Salvinorin A altered the dissociation kinetics of both [(3)H]DAMGO and [(3)H]diprenorphine binding to mu receptors. Furthermore, Salvinorin A acted as an uncompetitive inhibitor of DAMGO-stimulated guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)-triphosphate binding. Viewed collectively, these data support the hypothesis that Salvinorin A allosterically modulates the mu-opioid receptor.

  1. Emerging Computational Methods for the Rational Discovery of Allosteric Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric drug development holds promise for delivering medicines that are more selective and less toxic than those that target orthosteric sites. To date, the discovery of allosteric binding sites and lead compounds has been mostly serendipitous, achieved through high-throughput screening. Over the past decade, structural data has become more readily available for larger protein systems and more membrane protein classes (e.g., GPCRs and ion channels), which are common allosteric drug targets. In parallel, improved simulation methods now provide better atomistic understanding of the protein dynamics and cooperative motions that are critical to allosteric mechanisms. As a result of these advances, the field of predictive allosteric drug development is now on the cusp of a new era of rational structure-based computational methods. Here, we review algorithms that predict allosteric sites based on sequence data and molecular dynamics simulations, describe tools that assess the druggability of these pockets, and discuss how Markov state models and topology analyses provide insight into the relationship between protein dynamics and allosteric drug binding. In each section, we first provide an overview of the various method classes before describing relevant algorithms and software packages. PMID:27074285

  2. Expression, purification and characterization of human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) allosteric regulatory mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Hsu, Betty Y L; MacMullen, Courtney M; Poncz, Mortimer; Smith, Thomas J; Stanley, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in the mitochondrial matrix. In mammals, this enzyme is highly regulated by allosteric effectors. The major allosteric activator and inhibitor are ADP and GTP, respectively; allosteric activation by leucine may play an important role in amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion. The physiological significance of this regulation has been highlighted by the identification of children with an unusual hyperinsulinism/hyperammonaemia syndrome associated with dominant mutations in GDH that cause a loss in GTP inhibition. In order to determine the effects of these mutations on the function of the human GDH homohexamer, we studied the expression, purification and characterization of two of these regulatory mutations (H454Y, which affects the putative GTP-binding site, and S448P, which affects the antenna region) and a mutation designed to alter the putative binding site for ADP (R463A). The sensitivity to GTP inhibition was impaired markedly in the purified H454Y (ED(50), 210 microM) and S448P (ED(50), 3.1 microM) human GDH mutants compared with the wild-type human GDH (ED(50), 42 nM) or GDH isolated from heterozygous patient cells (ED(50), 290 and 280 nM, respectively). Sensitivity to ADP or leucine stimulation was unaffected by these mutations, confirming that they interfere specifically with the inhibitory GTP-binding site. Conversely, the R463A mutation completely eliminated ADP activation of human GDH, but had little effect on either GTP inhibition or leucine activation. The effects of these three mutations on ATP regulation indicated that this nucleotide inhibits human GDH through binding of its triphosphate tail to the GTP site and, at higher concentrations, activates the enzyme through binding of the nucleotide to the ADP site. These data confirm the assignment of the GTP and ADP allosteric regulatory sites on GDH based on X-ray crystallography and provide

  3. Activation of mTOR signaling leads to orthopedic surgery-induced cognitive decline in mice through β-amyloid accumulation and tau phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wenzhen; Lu, Keliang; Wang, Jiawan; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a serious complication following surgery, however, the mechanism of POCD remains to be elucidated. Previous evidence has revealed that POCD may be associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative processes. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has been reported to be crucial in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the implications of mTOR in POCD remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, western blotting and enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay were used to determine the expression of mTOR and any associated downstream targets; contextual fear conditioning was used to estimate the learning and memory ability of mice. Using an animal model of orthopedic surgery, it was found that surgical injury impaired hippocampal‑dependent memory and enhanced the levels of phosphorylated mTOR at Serine‑2448, phosphorylated 70‑kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) at Threonine‑389 with accumulation of β‑amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau at Serine-396, compared with the control group. Pretreatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, restored the abnormal mTOR/p70S6K signaling induced by surgery, attenuated the accumulation of Aβ and reduced the phosphorylation of tau protein. Rapamycin also reversed the surgery‑induced cognitive dysfunction. The results of the present study suggested that the surgical stimulus activated mTOR/p70S6K signaling excessively, and that the inhibition of mTOR signaling with rapamycin may prevent postoperative cognitive deficits, partly through attenuating the accumulation of Aβ and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein.

  4. mTOR Signaling Regulates Protective Activity of Transferred CD4+Foxp3+ T Cells in Repair of Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guochun; Dong, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Liu, Yu; Duan, Shaobin; Liu, Yinghong; Liu, Fuyou; Chen, Huihui

    2016-11-15

    CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are required for normal immune homeostasis. Recent studies suggested that Treg transfer facilitates recovery from acute kidney injury (AKI), but the molecular events that maintain Treg function after adoptive transfer remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the Treg-mediated therapeutic effect on ischemic AKI. We noted significant Treg expansion in C57BL/6 mouse kidney, with enhanced immunosuppressive capacity after renal ischemia/reperfusion. mTOR inhibition significantly increased the frequency of Tregs in cultured CD4(+) T cells, with enhanced production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, which, conversely, was reduced by mTOR activation. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR, was transiently administered to C57BL/6 mice before ischemia/reperfusion surgery. No beneficial effect of rapamycin treatment was seen in the early recovery of AKI as a result of its inhibitory effect on tubular regeneration. However, rapamycin markedly enhanced the expansion of kidney Tregs, with increased mRNA expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Adoptive transfer of rapamycin-treated Tregs markedly suppressed conventional T cells, responder myeloid cells, and reactive myofibroblasts; however, it promoted host Tregs and alternative macrophages, leading to better renal function and less kidney fibrosis. Taken together, Treg transfer with mTOR inhibition markedly improves outcomes of ischemic AKI. These findings reveal an important role for mTOR signaling in maintaining Treg activity after adoptive transfer and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Tregs in acute and chronic kidney disease.

  5. Regulation on Beclin-1 expression by mTOR in CoCl2-induced HT22 cell ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Li, Dongbo; Liu, Feng; Qi, Lei; Yan, Ge; Wang, Maode

    2015-07-21

    It has been reported that cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury can activate autophagy. However, the role of autophagy in cerebral I/R injury remains controversy. Two major proteins, mTOR and Beclin-1, govern the formation of autophagosomes to regulate autophagy activity. However, the cross-talking between Beclin-1 and mTOR in cerebral I/R injury remains elusive. In this study, global cerebral I/R injury animal model and focal cerebral I/R injury animal model were induced to test the variation of Beclin-1 level in vivo. To further confirm the variation of Beclin-1 level and investigate the cross-talking between Beclin-1 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in I/R injury, we used cobalt chloride (CoCl2) to develop an I/R injury cell model in HT22 cell line. Our data showed that the levels of Beclin-1 and phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) were clearly induced by I/R injury in vitro. And the time course studies suggested that the Beclin-1 and mTOR may have coordinated regulation in ischemia stages but not in reperfusion stages. Moreover, inhibitor of mTOR could prevent Beclin-1 decreasing, but this prevention may play opposite roles in different stages of I/R injury. We conclude that this study represents a major advance in our understanding of the cross-talking of two key proteins, Beclin-1 and mTOR, in autophagy and the role of autophagy in cerebral I/R injury.

  6. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) drives mTOR pathway activation and proliferation of human melanoma by reversible nitrosylation of TSC2

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Jayaraman, Padmini; Parikh, Falguni; Davies, Michael A.; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Milton, Denái R.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.; Estrada, Yeriel; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the cancers of fastest-rising incidence in the world. iNOS is overexpressed in melanoma and other cancers, and previous data suggest that iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) drive survival and proliferation of human melanoma cells. However, specific mechanisms through which this occurs are poorly defined. One candidate is the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which plays a major role in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis of melanoma and other cancers. We used the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay to test the hypothesis that melanoma growth is regulated by iNOS-dependent mTOR pathway activation. Both pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA-mediated gene silencing of iNOS suppressed melanoma proliferation and in vivo growth on the CAM in human melanoma models. This was associated with strong downregulation of mTOR pathway activation by Western blot analysis of p-mTOR, p-P70S6K, p-S6RP, and p-4EBP1. iNOS expression and NO were associated with reversible nitrosylation of TSC2, and inhibited dimerization of TSC2 with its inhibitory partner TSC1, enhancing GTPase activity of its target Rheb, a critical activator of mTOR signaling. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from stage III melanoma patients showed a significant correlation between iNOS expression levels and expression of mTOR pathway members. Exogenously-supplied NO was also sufficient to reverse mTOR pathway inhibition by the B-Raf inhibitor Vemurafenib. In summary, covalent modification of TSC2 by iNOS-derived NO is associated with impaired TSC2/TSC1 dimerization, mTOR pathway activation, and proliferation of human melanoma. This model is consistent with the known association of iNOS overexpression and poor prognosis in melanoma and other cancers. PMID:24398473

  7. Cyclin B Translation Depends on mTOR Activity after Fertilization in Sea Urchin Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Boulben, Sandrine; Glippa, Virginie; Morales, Julia; Cormier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin B/CDK1 complex is a key regulator of mitotic entry. Using PP242, a specific ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR kinase, we provide evidence that the mTOR signalling pathway controls cyclin B mRNA translation following fertilization in Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus. We show that PP242 inhibits the degradation of the cap-dependent translation repressor 4E-BP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-Binding Protein). PP242 inhibits global protein synthesis, delays cyclin B accumulation, cyclin B/CDK1 complex activation and consequently entry into the mitotic phase of the cell cycle triggered by fertilization. PP242 inhibits cyclin B mRNA recruitment into active polysomes triggered by fertilization. An amount of cyclin B mRNA present in active polysomes appears to be insensitive to PP242 treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that, following sea urchin egg fertilization, cyclin B mRNA translation is controlled by two independent mechanisms: a PP242-sensitive and an additional PP242-insentitive mechanism. PMID:26962866

  8. Cyclin B Translation Depends on mTOR Activity after Fertilization in Sea Urchin Embryos.

    PubMed

    Chassé, Héloïse; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Boulben, Sandrine; Glippa, Virginie; Morales, Julia; Cormier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin B/CDK1 complex is a key regulator of mitotic entry. Using PP242, a specific ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR kinase, we provide evidence that the mTOR signalling pathway controls cyclin B mRNA translation following fertilization in Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus. We show that PP242 inhibits the degradation of the cap-dependent translation repressor 4E-BP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-Binding Protein). PP242 inhibits global protein synthesis, delays cyclin B accumulation, cyclin B/CDK1 complex activation and consequently entry into the mitotic phase of the cell cycle triggered by fertilization. PP242 inhibits cyclin B mRNA recruitment into active polysomes triggered by fertilization. An amount of cyclin B mRNA present in active polysomes appears to be insensitive to PP242 treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that, following sea urchin egg fertilization, cyclin B mRNA translation is controlled by two independent mechanisms: a PP242-sensitive and an additional PP242-insentitive mechanism.

  9. CDK1 substitutes for mTOR kinase to activate mitotic cap-dependent protein translation

    PubMed Central

    Shuda, Masahiro; Velásquez, Celestino; Cheng, Erdong; Cordek, Daniel G.; Kwun, Hyun Jin; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Mitosis is commonly thought to be associated with reduced cap-dependent protein translation. Here we show an alternative control mechanism for maintaining cap-dependent translation during mitosis revealed by a viral oncoprotein, Merkel cell polyomavirus small T (MCV sT). We find MCV sT to be a promiscuous E3 ligase inhibitor targeting the anaphase-promoting complex, which increases cell mitogenesis. MCV sT binds through its Large T stabilization domain region to cell division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20) and, possibly, cdc20 homolog 1 (Cdh1) E3 ligase adapters. This activates cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 (CDK1/CYCB1) to directly hyperphosphorylate eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein (4E-BP1) at authentic sites, generating a mitosis-specific, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor-resistant δ phospho-isoform not present in G1-arrested cells. Recombinant 4E-BP1 inhibits capped mRNA reticulocyte translation, which is partially reversed by CDK1/CYCB1 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1. eIF4G binding to the eIF4E–m7GTP cap complex is resistant to mTOR inhibition during mitosis but sensitive during interphase. Flow cytometry, with and without sT, reveals an orthogonal pH3S10+ mitotic cell population having higher inactive p4E-BP1T37/T46+ saturation levels than pH3S10– interphase cells. Using a Click-iT flow cytometric assay to directly measure mitotic protein synthesis, we find that most new protein synthesis during mitosis is cap-dependent, a result confirmed using the eIF4E/4G inhibitor drug 4E1RCat. For most cell lines tested, cap-dependent translation levels were generally similar between mitotic and interphase cells, and the majority of new mitotic protein synthesis was cap-dependent. These findings suggest that mitotic cap-dependent translation is generally sustained during mitosis by CDK1 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 even under conditions of reduced mTOR signaling. PMID:25883264

  10. CDK1 substitutes for mTOR kinase to activate mitotic cap-dependent protein translation.

    PubMed

    Shuda, Masahiro; Velásquez, Celestino; Cheng, Erdong; Cordek, Daniel G; Kwun, Hyun Jin; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S

    2015-05-12

    Mitosis is commonly thought to be associated with reduced cap-dependent protein translation. Here we show an alternative control mechanism for maintaining cap-dependent translation during mitosis revealed by a viral oncoprotein, Merkel cell polyomavirus small T (MCV sT). We find MCV sT to be a promiscuous E3 ligase inhibitor targeting the anaphase-promoting complex, which increases cell mitogenesis. MCV sT binds through its Large T stabilization domain region to cell division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20) and, possibly, cdc20 homolog 1 (Cdh1) E3 ligase adapters. This activates cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 (CDK1/CYCB1) to directly hyperphosphorylate eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein (4E-BP1) at authentic sites, generating a mitosis-specific, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor-resistant δ phospho-isoform not present in G1-arrested cells. Recombinant 4E-BP1 inhibits capped mRNA reticulocyte translation, which is partially reversed by CDK1/CYCB1 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1. eIF4G binding to the eIF4E-m(7)GTP cap complex is resistant to mTOR inhibition during mitosis but sensitive during interphase. Flow cytometry, with and without sT, reveals an orthogonal pH3(S10+) mitotic cell population having higher inactive p4E-BP1(T37/T46+) saturation levels than pH3(S10-) interphase cells. Using a Click-iT flow cytometric assay to directly measure mitotic protein synthesis, we find that most new protein synthesis during mitosis is cap-dependent, a result confirmed using the eIF4E/4G inhibitor drug 4E1RCat. For most cell lines tested, cap-dependent translation levels were generally similar between mitotic and interphase cells, and the majority of new mitotic protein synthesis was cap-dependent. These findings suggest that mitotic cap-dependent translation is generally sustained during mitosis by CDK1 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 even under conditions of reduced mTOR signaling.

  11. Dynamic coupling and allosteric behavior in a non-allosteric protein†

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Michael W.; Gilmore, Steven A.; Edgell, Marshall H.; Lee, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Long-range intraprotein interactions give rise to many important protein behaviors. Understanding how energy is transduced through protein structures to either transmit a signal or elicit conformational changes is therefore a current challenge in structural biology. In an effort to understand such linkages, multiple V→A mutations were made in the small globular protein eglin c. The physical responses, as mapped by NMR spin relaxation, residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), and scalar couplings, illustrate that the interior of this non-allosteric protein forms a dynamic network and that local perturbations are transmitted as dynamic and structural changes to distal sites as far as 16 Å away. Two basic types of propagation responses were observed: contiguous pathways of enhanced (attenuated) dynamics with no change in structure; and dispersed (non-contiguous) changes in methyl rotation rates that appear to result from subtle deformation of backbone structure. In addition, energy transmission is found to be unidirectional. In one mutant, an allosteric conformational change of a side chain is seen in the context of a pathway of propagated changes in ps-ns dynamics. The observation of so many long-range interactions in a small, rigid system lends experimental weight to the idea that all well-folded proteins inherently possess allosteric features [Gunasekaran et al. (2004) Proteins 57, 433−443], and that dynamics are a rich source of information for mapping and gaining mechanistic insight into communication pathways in individual proteins. PMID:16784220

  12. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a small-molecule multi-FGF receptor blocker with allosteric properties.

    PubMed

    Bono, Françoise; De Smet, Frederik; Herbert, Corentin; De Bock, Katrien; Georgiadou, Maria; Fons, Pierre; Tjwa, Marc; Alcouffe, Chantal; Ny, Annelii; Bianciotto, Marc; Jonckx, Bart; Murakami, Masahiro; Lanahan, Anthony A; Michielsen, Christof; Sibrac, David; Dol-Gleizes, Frédérique; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Zacchigna, Serena; Herault, Jean-Pascal; Fischer, Christian; Rigon, Patrice; Ruiz de Almodovar, Carmen; Claes, Filip; Blanc, Isabelle; Poesen, Koen; Zhang, Jie; Segura, Inmaculada; Gueguen, Geneviève; Bordes, Marie-Françoise; Lambrechts, Diether; Broussy, Roselyne; van de Wouwer, Marlies; Michaux, Corinne; Shimada, Toru; Jean, Isabelle; Blacher, Silvia; Noel, Agnès; Motte, Patrick; Rom, Eran; Rakic, Jean-Marie; Katsuma, Susumu; Schaeffer, Paul; Yayon, Avner; Van Schepdael, Ann; Schwalbe, Harald; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Carmeliet, Geert; Rozensky, Jef; Dewerchin, Mieke; Simons, Michael; Christopoulos, Arthur; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Carmeliet, Peter

    2013-04-15

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) are targets for anticancer drug development. To date, only RTK inhibitors that block orthosteric binding of ligands and substrates have been developed. Here, we report the pharmacologic characterization of the chemical SSR128129E (SSR), which inhibits fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling by binding to the extracellular FGFR domain without affecting orthosteric FGF binding. SSR exhibits allosteric properties, including probe dependence, signaling bias, and ceiling effects. Inhibition by SSR is highly conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Oral delivery of SSR inhibits arthritis and tumors that are relatively refractory to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 antibodies. Thus, orally-active extracellularly acting small-molecule modulators of RTKs with allosteric properties can be developed and may offer opportunities to improve anticancer treatment.

  13. A MAP4 kinase related to Ste20 is a nutrient-sensitive regulator of mTOR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Greg M.; Yan, Lijun; Procter, Julia; Mieulet, Virginie; Lamb, Richard F.

    2007-01-01

    The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling pathway is a key regulator of cell growth and is controlled by growth factors and nutrients such as amino acids. Although signalling pathways from growth factor receptors to mTOR have been elucidated, the pathways mediating signalling by nutrients are poorly characterized. Through a screen for protein kinases active in the mTOR signalling pathway in Drosophila we have identified a Ste20 family member (MAP4K3) that is required for maximal S6K (S6 kinase)/4E-BP1 [eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E)-binding protein 1] phosphorylation and regulates cell growth. Importantly, MAP4K3 activity is regulated by amino acids, but not the growth factor insulin and is not regulated by the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. Our results therefore suggest a model whereby nutrients signal to mTORC1 via activation of MAP4K3. PMID:17253963

  14. DDX5 promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo through mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Du, Cheng; Li, Dan-qi; Li, Na; Chen, Li; Li, Shi-sen; Yang, Yang; Hou, Ming-xiao; Xie, Man-jiang; Zheng, Zhen-dong

    2017-01-01

    DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box helicase 5 (DDX5) is an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that is overexpressed in various malignancies. Increasing evidence suggests that DDX5 participates in carcinogenesis and cancer progression via promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. However, the functional role of DDX5 in gastric cancer is largely unknown. In this study, we observed that DDX5 was significantly up-regulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with the paired adjacent normal tissues. The expression of DDX5 correlated strongly with Ki67 index and pathological stage of gastric cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies suggested that knockdown of DDX5 inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and xenografts growth, whereas ectopic expression of DDX5 promoted these cellular functions. Mechanically, DDX5 induced gastric cancer cell growth by activating mTOR/S6K1. Treatment of everolimus, the specific mTOR inhibitor, significantly attenuated DDX5-mediated cell proliferation. Interestingly, the expression of DDX5 and p-mTOR in gastric cancer tissues demonstrated a positive correlation. Taken together, these results revealed a novel role of DDX5 in gastric cancer cell proliferation via the mTOR pathway. Therefore, DDX5 may serve as a therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:28216662

  15. Targeting mTOR in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Iriana, Sentia; Ahmed, Shahzad; Gong, Jun; Annamalai, Alagappan Anand; Tuli, Richard; Hendifar, Andrew Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options for advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are limited; however, new therapies targeting specific tumor-related molecular characteristics may help certain patient cohorts. Emerging preclinical data have shown that inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in specific KRAS-dependent PDAC subtypes leads to inhibition of tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Early phase II studies of mono-mTOR inhibition have not shown promise. However, studies have shown that combined inhibition of multiple steps along the mTOR signaling pathway may lead to sustained responses by targeting mechanisms of tumor resistance. Coordinated inhibition of mTOR along with specific KRAS-dependent mutations in molecularly defined PDAC subpopulations may offer a viable alternative for treatment in the future. PMID:27200288

  16. Triple negative breast cancer: shedding light onto the role of pi3k/akt/mtor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fanale, Daniele; Perez, Alessandro; Castiglia, Marta; Incorvaia, Lorena; Listì, Angela; Rizzo, Sergio; Cicero, Giuseppe; Bazan, Viviana; Castorina, Sergio; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most widespread carcinoma and one of the main causes of cancer-related death worldwide, especially in women aged between 35 and 75 years. Among the different subtypes, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by the total absence of the estrogen-receptor (ER) and progesteron-receptor (PR) expression as well as the lack of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression or gene amplification. These biological characteristics confer to TNBC a higher aggressiveness and relapse risk along with poorer prognosis compared to other subtypes. Indeed, 5-years survival rate is still low and almost all patients die, despite any adjuvant treatment which at moment represents the heading pharmacological approach. To date, several clinical trials have been designed to investigate the potential role of some molecular markers, such as VEGF, EGFR, Src and mTOR, for targeted treatments in TNBC. In fact, many inhibitors of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, frequently de-regulated in TNBC, are acquiring a growing interest and several inhibitors are in preclinical development or already in early phase clinical trials. In this Review, we investigated the role of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in TNBC patients, by summarizing the molecular features that led to the distinction of different histotypes of TNBC. Furthermore, we provided an overview of the inhibition mechanisms of the mTOR and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, highlighting the importance of integrating biological and clinical data for the development of mTOR inhibitors in order to implement targeted therapies for TNBC patients. PMID:27474173

  17. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  18. RICTOR amplification identifies a subgroup in small cell lung cancer and predicts response to drugs targeting mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Sakre, Nneha; Wildey, Gary; Behtaj, Mohadese; Kresak, Adam; Yang, Michael; Fu, Pingfu; Dowlati, Afshin

    2017-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive cancer that represents ~15% of all lung cancers. Currently there are no targeted therapies to treat SCLC. Our genomic analysis of a metastatic SCLC cohort identified recurrent RICTOR amplification. Here, we examine the translational potential of this observation. RICTOR was the most frequently amplified gene observed (~14% patients), and co-amplified with FGF10 and IL7R on chromosome 5p13. RICTOR copy number variation correlated with RICTOR protein expression in SCLC cells. In parallel, cells with RICTOR copy number (CN) gain showed increased sensitivity to three mTOR inhibitors, AZD8055, AZD2014 and INK128 in cell growth assays, with AZD2014 demonstrating the best inhibition of downstream signaling. SCLC cells with RICTOR CN gain also migrated more rapidly in chemotaxis and scratch wound assays and were again more sensitive to mTOR inhibitors. The overall survival in SCLC patients with RICTOR amplification was significantly decreased (p = 0.021). Taken together, our results suggest that SCLC patients with RICTOR amplification may constitute a clinically important subgroup because of their potential response to mTORC1/2 inhibitors. PMID:27863413

  19. Combined therapy with RAD001 e BEZ235 overcomes resistance of PET immortalized cell lines to mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Passacantilli, Ilaria; Capurso, Gabriele; Archibugi, Livia; Calabretta, Sara; Caldarola, Sara; Loreni, Fabrizio; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Sette, Claudio

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) are characterised by an indolent behaviour in terms of tumor growth. However, most patients display metastasis at diagnosis and no cure is currently available. Since the PI3K/AKT/mTOR axis is deregulated in PETs, the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 represents the first line treatment. Nevertheless, some patients do not respond to treatments and most acquire resistance. Inhibition of mTOR leads to feedback re-activation of PI3K activity, which may promote resistance to RAD001. Thus, PI3K represents a novel potential target for PETs. We tested the impact of three novel PI3K inhibitors (BEZ235, BKM120 and BYL719) on proliferation of PET cells that are responsive (BON-1) or unresponsive (QGP-1) to RAD001. BEZ235 was the most efficient in inhibiting proliferation in PET cells. Furthermore, combined treatment with BEZ235 and RAD001 exhibited synergic effects and was also effective in BON-1 that acquired resistance to RAD001 (BON-1 RR). Analysis of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway showed that RAD001 and BEZ235 only partially inhibited mTOR-dependent phosphorylation of 4EBP1. By contrast, combined therapy with the two inhibitors strongly inhibited phosphorylation of 4EBP1, assembly of the translational initiation complex and protein synthesis. Thus, combined treatment with BEZ235 may represent suitable therapy to counteract primary and acquired resistance to RAD001 in PETs.

  20. Combined therapy with RAD001 e BEZ235 overcomes resistance of PET immortalized cell lines to mTOR inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Passacantilli, Ilaria; Capurso, Gabriele; Archibugi, Livia; Calabretta, Sara; Caldarola, Sara; Loreni, Fabrizio; Fave, Gianfranco Delle; Sette, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) are characterised by an indolent behaviour in terms of tumor growth. However, most patients display metastasis at diagnosis and no cure is currently available. Since the PI3K/AKT/mTOR axis is deregulated in PETs, the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 represents the first line treatment. Nevertheless, some patients do not respond to treatments and most acquire resistance. Inhibition of mTOR leads to feedback re-activation of PI3K activity, which may promote resistance to RAD001. Thus, PI3K represents a novel potential target for PETs. We tested the impact of three novel PI3K inhibitors (BEZ235, BKM120 and BYL719) on proliferation of PET cells that are responsive (BON-1) or unresponsive (QGP-1) to RAD001. BEZ235 was the most efficient in inhibiting proliferation in PET cells. Furthermore, combined treatment with BEZ235 and RAD001 exhibited synergic effects and was also effective in BON-1 that acquired resistance to RAD001 (BON-1 RR). Analysis of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway showed that RAD001 and BEZ235 only partially inhibited mTOR-dependent phosphorylation of 4EBP1. By contrast, combined therapy with the two inhibitors strongly inhibited phosphorylation of 4EBP1, assembly of the translational initiation complex and protein synthesis. Thus, combined treatment with BEZ235 may represent suitable therapy to counteract primary and acquired resistance to RAD001 in PETs. PMID:25026292

  1. The Role of mTOR Signaling in the Regulation of RAG Expression and Genomic Stability During B Lymphocyte Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    physiological or when become malignant. We have also revealed a combination retreatment for leukemia cells with both mTORC2 inhibitor and molecular chaperon...unknown function of mTORC2 through a GSK3-involved c-Myc expression in B cells. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Sin1, mTOR, Rag1/2, p53, B cells, leukemia and...innovative new Sin1/mTORC2 deficient progenitor B cell lines and B cell leukemia cell models. Furthermore, we have explored the role of Sin1 in B cell

  2. A Recollection of mTOR Signaling in Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, Tyson E.; McCamphill, Patrick K.; Sossin, Wayne S.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamcyin (mTOR) is a central player in cell growth throughout the organism. However, mTOR takes on an additional, more specialized role in the developed neuron, where it regulates the protein synthesis-dependent, plastic changes underlying learning and memory. mTOR is sequestered in two multiprotein complexes (mTORC1 and…

  3. Cannabinoid modulation of hippocampal long-term memory is mediated by mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Puighermanal, Emma; Marsicano, Giovanni; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Lutz, Beat; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2009-09-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the most important negative consequences associated with cannabis consumption. We found that CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) activation transiently modulated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70S6K pathway and the protein synthesis machinery in the mouse hippocampus, which correlated with the amnesic properties of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In addition, non-amnesic doses of either the mTOR blocker rapamycin or the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin abrogated the amnesic-like effects of THC, pointing to a mechanism involving new protein synthesis. Moreover, using pharmacological and genetic tools, we found that THC long-term memory deficits were mediated by CB1Rs expressed on GABAergic interneurons through a glutamatergic mechanism, as both the amnesic-like effects and p70S6K phosphorylation were reduced in GABA-CB1R knockout mice and by NMDA blockade.

  4. Allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhuang; Li, Linlang; Zheng, Long-Tai; Xu, Zhihong; Guo, Lin; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that sigma-1 receptor orthodox agonists can inhibit neuroinflammation. SKF83959 (3-methyl-6-chloro-7,8-hydroxy-1-[3-methylphenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine), an atypical dopamine receptor-1 agonist, has been recently identified as a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of SKF83959 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. Our results indicated that SKF83959 significantly suppressed the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species. All of these responses were blocked by selective sigma-1 receptor antagonists (BD1047 or BD1063) and by ketoconazole (an inhibitor of enzyme cytochrome c17 to inhibit the synthesis of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA). Additionally, we found that SKF83959 promoted the binding activity of DHEA with sigma-1 receptors, and enhanced the inhibitory effects of DHEA on LPS-induced microglia activation in a synergic manner. Furthermore, in a microglia-conditioned media system, SKF83959 inhibited the cytotoxicity of conditioned medium generated by LPS-activated microglia toward HT-22 neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation. SKF83959 is a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Our results indicated that SKF83959 enhanced the activity of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a synergic manner, and inhibited the activation of BV2 microglia and the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).

  5. Selective regulation of YB-1 mRNA translation by the mTOR signaling pathway is not mediated by 4E-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Lyabin, D. N.; Ovchinnikov, L. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is a key regulator of gene expression at the level of both translation and transcription. The mode of its action on cellular events depends on its subcellular distribution and the amount in the cell. So far, the regulatory mechanisms of YB-1 synthesis have not been adequately studied. Our previous finding was that selective inhibition of YB-1 mRNA translation was caused by suppression of activity of the mTOR signaling pathway. It was suggested that this event may be mediated by phosphorylation of the 4E-binding protein (4E-BP). Here, we report that 4E-BP alone can only slightly inhibit YB-1 synthesis both in the cell and in vitro, although it essentially decreases binding of the 4F-group translation initiation factors to mRNA. With inhibited mTOR kinase, the level of mRNA binding to the eIF4F-group factors was decreased, while that to 4E-BP1 was increased, as was observed for both mTOR kinase-sensitive mRNAs and those showing low sensitivity. This suggests that selective inhibition of translation of YB-1 mRNA, and probably some other mRNAs as well, by mTOR kinase inhibitors is not mediated by the action of the 4E-binding protein upon functions of the 4F-group translation initiation factors. PMID:26931209

  6. Selective regulation of YB-1 mRNA translation by the mTOR signaling pathway is not mediated by 4E-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Lyabin, D N; Ovchinnikov, L P

    2016-03-02

    The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is a key regulator of gene expression at the level of both translation and transcription. The mode of its action on cellular events depends on its subcellular distribution and the amount in the cell. So far, the regulatory mechanisms of YB-1 synthesis have not been adequately studied. Our previous finding was that selective inhibition of YB-1 mRNA translation was caused by suppression of activity of the mTOR signaling pathway. It was suggested that this event may be mediated by phosphorylation of the 4E-binding protein (4E-BP). Here, we report that 4E-BP alone can only slightly inhibit YB-1 synthesis both in the cell and in vitro, although it essentially decreases binding of the 4F-group translation initiation factors to mRNA. With inhibited mTOR kinase, the level of mRNA binding to the eIF4F-group factors was decreased, while that to 4E-BP1 was increased, as was observed for both mTOR kinase-sensitive mRNAs and those showing low sensitivity. This suggests that selective inhibition of translation of YB-1 mRNA, and probably some other mRNAs as well, by mTOR kinase inhibitors is not mediated by the action of the 4E-binding protein upon functions of the 4F-group translation initiation factors.

  7. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway in abdominal aortic aneurysm: implication of smooth muscle cell contractile phenotype, inflammation and aneurysm expansion.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangxin; Qin, Lingfeng; Wang, Lei; Li, Xuan; Caulk, Alexander W; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Pei-Yu; Xin, Shijie

    2017-02-17

    The development of effective pharmacological treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) potentially offers great benefit to patients with pre-aneurysmal aortic dilation by slowing the expansion of aneurysms and reducing the need for surgery. To date, therapeutic targets for slowing aortic dilation have had low efficacy. Thus, in this study, we aim to elucidate possible mechanisms driving aneurysm progression in order to identify potential targets for pharmacological intervention. We demonstrate that mTOR signaling is over activated in aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) which contributes to murine AAA. Rapamycin, a typical mTOR pathway inhibitor, dramatically limits the expansion of the abdominal aorta following intraluminal elastase perfusion. Furthermore, reduction of aortic diameter is achieved by inhibition of the mTOR pathway, which preserves and/or restores the contractile phenotype of SMCs and downregulates macrophage infiltration, MMPs expression, and inflammatory cytokine production. Taken together, these results highlight the important role of the mTOR cascade in aneurysm progression and the potential application of rapamycin as a therapeutic candidate for AAA.

  8. Ryanodine Receptor Allosteric Coupling and the Dynamics of Calcium Sparks

    PubMed Central

    Groff, Jeffrey R.; Smith, Gregory D.

    2008-01-01

    Puffs and sparks are localized intracellular Ca2+ elevations that arise from the cooperative activity of Ca2+-regulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and ryanodine receptors clustered at Ca2+ release sites on the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum or the sarcoplasmic reticulum. While the synchronous gating of Ca2+-regulated Ca2+ channels can be mediated entirely though the buffered diffusion of intracellular Ca2+, interprotein allosteric interactions also contribute to the dynamics of ryanodine receptor (RyR) gating and Ca2+ sparks. In this article, Markov chain models of Ca2+ release sites are used to investigate how the statistics of Ca2+ spark generation and termination are related to the coupling of RyRs via local [Ca2+] changes and allosteric interactions. Allosteric interactions are included in a manner that promotes the synchronous gating of channels by stabilizing neighboring closed-closed and/or open-open channel pairs. When the strength of Ca2+-mediated channel coupling is systematically varied (e.g., by changing the Ca2+ buffer concentration), simulations that include synchronizing allosteric interactions often exhibit more robust Ca2+ sparks; however, for some Ca2+ coupling strengths the sparks are less robust. We find no evidence that the distribution of spark durations can be used to distinguish between allosteric interactions that stabilize closed channel pairs, open channel pairs, or both in a balanced fashion. On the other hand, the changes in spark duration, interspark interval, and frequency observed when allosteric interactions that stabilize closed channel pairs are gradually removed from simulations are qualitatively different than the changes observed when open or both closed and open channel pairs are stabilized. Thus, our simulations clarify how changes in spark statistics due to pharmacological washout of the accessory proteins mediating allosteric coupling may indicate the type of synchronizing allosteric interactions exhibited

  9. Allosteric inhibition of factor XIa. Sulfated non-saccharide glycosaminoglycan mimetics as promising anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Al-Horani, Rami A; Gailani, David; Desai, Umesh R

    2015-08-01

    Recent development of sulfated non-saccharide glycosaminoglycan mimetics, especially sulfated pentagalloyl glucopyranoside (SPGG), as potent inhibitors of factor XIa (FXIa) (J. Med. Chem. 2013; 56:867-878 and J. Med. Chem. 2014; 57:4805-4818) has led to a strong possibility of developing a new line of factor XIa-based anticoagulants. In fact, SPGG represents the first synthetic, small molecule inhibitor that appears to bind in site remote from the active site. Considering that allosteric inhibition of FXIa is a new mechanism for developing a distinct line of anticoagulants, we have studied SPGG's interaction with FXIa with a goal of evaluating its pre-clinical relevance. Comparative inhibition studies with several glycosaminoglycans revealed the importance of SPGG's non-saccharide backbone. SPGG did not affect the activity of plasma kallikrein, activated protein C and factor XIIIa suggesting that SPGG-based anticoagulation is unlikely to affect other pathways connected with coagulation factors. SPGG's effect on APTT of citrated human plasma was also not dependent on antithrombin or heparin cofactor II. Interestingly, SPGG's anticoagulant potential was diminished by serum albumin as well as factor XI, while it could be reversed by protamine or polybrene, which implies possible avenues for developing antidote strategy. Studies with FXIa mutants indicated that SPGG engages Lys529, Arg530 and Arg532, but not Arg250, Lys252, Lys253 and Lys255. Finally, SPGG competes with unfractionated heparin, but not with polyphosphates and/or glycoprotein Ibα, for binding to FXIa. These studies enhance understanding on the first allosteric inhibitor of FXIa and highlight its value as a promising anticoagulant.

  10. Allosteric Voltage Gating of Potassium Channels I

    PubMed Central

    Horrigan, Frank T.; Cui, Jianmin; Aldrich, Richard W.

    1999-01-01

    Activation of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels is controlled by both cytoplasmic Ca2+ and membrane potential. To study the mechanism of voltage-dependent gating, we examined mSlo Ca2+-activated K+ currents in excised macropatches from Xenopus oocytes in the virtual absence of Ca2+ (<1 nM). In response to a voltage step, IK activates with an exponential time course, following a brief delay. The delay suggests that rapid transitions precede channel opening. The later exponential time course suggests that activation also involves a slower rate-limiting step. However, the time constant of IK relaxation [τ(IK)] exhibits a complex voltage dependence that is inconsistent with models that contain a single rate limiting step. τ(IK) increases weakly with voltage from −500 to −20 mV, with an equivalent charge (z) of only 0.14 e, and displays a stronger voltage dependence from +30 to +140 mV (z = 0.49 e), which then decreases from +180 to +240 mV (z = −0.29 e). Similarly, the steady state GK–V relationship exhibits a maximum voltage dependence (z = 2 e) from 0 to +100 mV, and is weakly voltage dependent (z ≅ 0.4 e) at more negative voltages, where Po = 10−5–10−6. These results can be understood in terms of a gating scheme where a central transition between a closed and an open conformation is allosterically regulated by the state of four independent and identical voltage sensors. In the absence of Ca2+, this allosteric mechanism results in a gating scheme with five closed (C) and five open (O) states, where the majority of the channel's voltage dependence results from rapid C–C and O–O transitions, whereas the C–O transitions are rate limiting and weakly voltage dependent. These conclusions not only provide a framework for interpreting studies of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel voltage gating, but also have important implications for understanding the mechanism of Ca2+ sensitivity. PMID:10436003

  11. An Integrated Model of RAF Inhibitor Action Predicts Inhibitor Activity against Oncogenic BRAF Signaling.

    PubMed

    Karoulia, Zoi; Wu, Yang; Ahmed, Tamer A; Xin, Qisheng; Bollard, Julien; Krepler, Clemens; Wu, Xuewei; Zhang, Chao; Bollag, Gideon; Herlyn, Meenhard; Fagin, James A; Lujambio, Amaia; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Poulikakos, Poulikos I

    2016-09-12

    The complex biochemical effects of RAF inhibitors account for both the effectiveness and mechanisms of resistance to these drugs, but a unified mechanistic model has been lacking. Here we show that RAF inhibitors exert their effects via two distinct allosteric mechanisms. Drug resistance due to dimerization is determined by the position of the αC helix stabilized by inhibitor, whereas inhibitor-induced RAF priming and dimerization are the result of inhibitor-induced formation of the RAF/RAS-GTP complex. The biochemical effect of RAF inhibitor in cells is the combined outcome of the two mechanisms. Therapeutic strategies including αC-helix-IN inhibitors are more effective in multiple mutant BRAF-driven tumor models, including colorectal and thyroid BRAF(V600E) cancers, in which first-generation RAF inhibitors have been ineffective.

  12. Allosteric drug discrimination is coupled to mechanochemical changes in the kinesin-5 motor core.

    PubMed

    Kim, Elizabeth D; Buckley, Rebecca; Learman, Sarah; Richard, Jessica; Parke, Courtney; Worthylake, David K; Wojcik, Edward J; Walker, Richard A; Kim, Sunyoung

    2010-06-11

    Essential in mitosis, the human Kinesin-5 protein is a target for >80 classes of allosteric compounds that bind to a surface-exposed site formed by the L5 loop. Not established is why there are differing efficacies in drug inhibition. Here we compare the ligand-bound states of two L5-directed inhibitors against 15 Kinesin-5 mutants by ATPase assays and IR spectroscopy. Biochemical kinetics uncovers functional differences between individual residues at the N or C termini of the L5 loop. Infrared evaluation of solution structures and multivariate analysis of the vibrational spectra reveal that mutation and/or ligand binding not only can remodel the allosteric binding surface but also can transmit long range effects. Changes in L5-localized 3(10) helix and disordered content, regardless of substitution or drug potency, are experimentally detected. Principal component analysis couples these local structural events to two types of rearrangements in beta-sheet hydrogen bonding. These transformations in beta-sheet contacts are correlated with inhibitory drug response and are corroborated by wild type Kinesin-5 crystal structures. Despite considerable evolutionary divergence, our data directly support a theorized conserved element for long distance mechanochemical coupling in kinesin, myosin, and F(1)-ATPase. These findings also suggest that these relatively rapid IR approaches can provide structural biomarkers for clinical determination of drug sensitivity and drug efficacy in nucleotide triphosphatases.

  13. Interdomain allosteric regulation of Polo kinase by Aurora B and Map205 is required for cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Kachaner, David; Pinson, Xavier; El Kadhi, Khaled Ben; Normandin, Karine; Talje, Lama; Lavoie, Hugo; Lépine, Guillaume; Carréno, Sébastien; Kwok, Benjamin H; Hickson, Gilles R; Archambault, Vincent

    2014-10-27

    Drosophila melanogaster Polo and its human orthologue Polo-like kinase 1 fulfill essential roles during cell division. Members of the Polo-like kinase (Plk) family contain an N-terminal kinase domain (KD) and a C-terminal Polo-Box domain (PBD), which mediates protein interactions. How Plks are regulated in cytokinesis is poorly understood. Here we show that phosphorylation of Polo by Aurora B is required for cytokinesis. This phosphorylation in the activation loop of the KD promotes the dissociation of Polo from the PBD-bound microtubule-associated protein Map205, which acts as an allosteric inhibitor of Polo kinase activity. This mechanism allows the release of active Polo from microtubules of the central spindle and its recruitment to the site of cytokinesis. Failure in Polo phosphorylation results in both early and late cytokinesis defects. Importantly, the antagonistic regulation of Polo by Aurora B and Map205 in cytokinesis reveals that interdomain allosteric mechanisms can play important roles in controlling the cellular functions of Plks.

  14. Structural basis for the allosteric regulation and substrate recognition of human cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II.

    PubMed

    Walldén, Karin; Nordlund, Pär

    2011-05-13

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II) catalyzes the dephosphorylation of 6-hydroxypurine nucleoside 5'-monophosphates and participates in the regulation of purine nucleotide pools within the cell. It interferes with the phosphorylation-dependent activation of nucleoside analogues used in the treatment of cancer and viral diseases. It is allosterically activated by a number of phosphate-containing cellular metabolites such as ATP, diadenosine polyphosphates, and 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, which couple its activity with the metabolic state of the cell. We present seven high-resolution structures of human cN-II, including a ligand-free form and complexes with various substrates and effectors. These structures reveal the structural basis for the allosteric activation of cN-II, uncovering a mechanism where an effector-induced disorder-to-order transition generates rearrangements within the catalytic site and the subsequent coordination of the catalytically essential magnesium. Central to the activation is the large transition of the catalytically essential Asp356. This study also provides the structural basis for the substrate specificity of cN-II, where Arg202, Asp206, and Phe157 seem to be important residues for purine/pyrimidine selectivity. These structures provide a comprehensive structural basis for the design of cN-II inhibitors. They also contribute to the understanding of how the nucleotide salvage pathway is regulated at a molecular level.

  15. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  16. Human eosinophil major basic protein is an endogenous allosteric antagonist at the inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, D B; Gleich, G J; Fryer, A D

    1993-01-01

    The effect of human eosinophil major basic protein (MBP) as well as other eosinophil proteins, on binding of [3H]N-methyl-scopolamine ([3H]NMS: 1 x 10(-10) M) to muscarinic M2 receptors in heart membranes and M3 receptors in submandibular gland membranes was studied. MBP inhibited specific binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors but not to M3 receptors. MBP also inhibited atropine-induced dissociation of [3H]NMS-receptor complexes in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating that the interaction of MBP with the M2 muscarinic receptor is allosteric. This effect of MBP suggests that it may function as an endogenous allosteric inhibitor of agonist binding to the M2 muscarinic receptor. Inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by MBP was reversible by treatment with heparin, which binds and neutralizes MBP. Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) also inhibited specific binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors but not to M3 receptors and inhibited atropine-induced dissociation of [3H]NMS-receptor complexes. On a molar basis, EPO is less potent than MBP. Neither eosinophil cationic protein nor eosinophil-derived neurotoxin affected binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors. Thus both MBP and EPO are selective allosteric antagonists at M2 receptors. The effects of these proteins may be important causes of M2 receptor dysfunction and enhanced vagally mediated bronchoconstriction in asthma. Images PMID:8473484

  17. Six1 induces protein synthesis signaling expression in duck myoblasts mainly via up-regulation of mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haohan; Li, Xinxin; Liu, Hehe; Sun, Lingli; Zhang, Rongping; Li, Liang; Wangding, Mincheng; Wang, Jiwen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As a critical transcription factor, Six1 plays an important role in the regulation of myogenesis and muscle development. However, little is known about its regulatory mechanism associated with muscular protein synthesis. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of overexpression ofSix1 on the expression of key protein metabolism-related genes in duck myoblasts. Through an experimental model where duck myoblasts were transfected with a pEGFP-duSix1 construct, we found that overexpression of duckSix1 could enhance cell proliferation activity and increase mRNA expression levels of key genes involved in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, while the expression of FOXO1, MuRF1and MAFbx was not significantly altered, indicating thatSix1 could promote protein synthesis in myoblasts through up-regulating the expression of several related genes. Additionally, in duck myoblasts treated with LY294002 and rapamycin, the specific inhibitors ofPI3K and mTOR, respectively, the overexpression of Six1 could significantly ameliorate inhibitive effects of these inhibitors on protein synthesis. Especially, the mRNA expression levels of mTOR and S6K1 were observed to undergo a visible change, and a significant increase in protein expression of S6K1 was seen. These data suggested that Six1plays an important role in protein synthesis, which may be mainly due to activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27007909

  18. Allosteric regulation of rhomboid intramembrane proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Skiba, Pauline M; Gale, Nicola; Mak, Michelle W; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-09-01

    Proteolysis within the lipid bilayer is poorly understood, in particular the regulation of substrate cleavage. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that harbour a buried active site and are known to cleave transmembrane substrates with broad specificity. In vitro gel and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based kinetic assays were developed to analyse cleavage of the transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii). We demonstrate significant differences in catalytic efficiency (kcat/K0.5) values for transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii) cleavage for three rhomboids: AarA from P. stuartii, ecGlpG from Escherichia coli and hiGlpG from Haemophilus influenzae demonstrating that rhomboids specifically recognize this substrate. Furthermore, binding of psTatA occurs with positive cooperativity. Competitive binding studies reveal an exosite-mediated mode of substrate binding, indicating allostery plays a role in substrate catalysis. We reveal that exosite formation is dependent on the oligomeric state of rhomboids, and when dimers are dissociated, allosteric substrate activation is not observed. We present a novel mechanism for specific substrate cleavage involving several dynamic processes including positive cooperativity and homotropic allostery for this interesting class of intramembrane proteases.

  19. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong; Jiang, Qinyang; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-07-17

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7{sup CreER} and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes. - Highlights: • Pax7{sup CreER} was used to delete Mtor gene in satellite cells. • Satellite cell specific deletion of Mtor impairs muscle regeneration. • mTOR is necessary for satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. • Deletion of Mtor leads to reduced expression of key myogenic genes.

  20. mTOR activity in AIDS-related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Perez, Julio A.; Preziosi, Michael; King, Charles C.; Jones, George A.; Jain, Sonia; Sun, Xiaoying; Reid, Erin G.; VandenBerg, Scott; Wang, Huan-You

    2017-01-01

    for pPTEN was positively correlated with p70S6K levels (p = 0.016 for 235/236 and p = 0.007 for 240/244). High levels of pPRAS40 were observed in the majority of the cases evaluated (64.3%), but no correlation was found with either pPTEN (p = 0.9) or p70S6K (p = 0.9) levels. Conclusion AR-DLBCL frequently contain p70S6K, a main downstream effector of the mTOR pathway. The presence of p70S6K is positively correlated with pPTEN, an inactive form of PTEN, which makes mTORC1 activated. The presence of p70S6K was independent of HIV viral load or CD4 (+) counts. These results suggest that the mTOR pathway is active in the majority of AR-DLBCL, and p70S6K, particularly the Ser240/244 epitope immunohistochemistry is an excellent surrogate biomarker, which could be used to identify cases expected to be responsive to mTOR inhibitors. PMID:28192480

  1. Recent development of ATP-competitive small molecule phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Wan, Wen-zhu; Li, Yan; Zhou, Guan-lian; Liu, Xin-guang

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase (PI3K) is the potential anticancer target in the PI3K/Akt/ mTOR pathway. Here we reviewed the ATP-competitive small molecule PI3K inhibitors in the past few years, including the pan Class I PI3K inhibitors, the isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors and/or the PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitors. PMID:27769061

  2. Inhibition of mTOR Pathway by Rapamycin Decreases P-glycoprotein Expression and Spontaneous Seizures in Pharmacoresistant Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xiaosa; Huang, Cheng; Li, Rui; Wang, Wei; Wu, Mengqian; Li, Jinmei; Zhou, Dong

    2017-04-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been demonstrated to mediate multidrug resistance in various tumors by inducing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression. Here, we investigated the correlation between the mTOR pathway and P-gp expression in pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Temporal cortex specimens were obtained from patients with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) and age-matched controls who underwent surgeries at West China Hospital of Sichuan University between June 2014 and May 2015. We established a rat model of epilepsy kindled by coriaria lactone (CL) and screened pharmacoresistant rats (non-responders) using phenytoin. Non-responders were treated for 4 weeks with vehicle only or with the mTOR pathway inhibitor rapamycin at doses of 1, 3, and 6 mg/kg. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression of phospho-S6 (P-S6) and P-gp at different time points (1 h, 8 h, 1 day, 3 days, 1 weeks, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks) after the onset of treatment. Overexpression of P-S6 and P-gp was detected in both refractory mTLE patients and non-responder rats. Rapamycin showed an inhibitory effect on P-S6 and P-gp expression 1 week after treatment in rats. In addition, the expression levels of P-S6 and P-gp in the 6 mg/kg group were significantly lower than those in the 1 mg/kg or the 3 mg/kg group at the same time points (all P < 0.05). Moreover, rapamycin decreased the duration and number of CL-induced seizures, as well as the stage of non-responders (all P < 0.05). The current study indicates that the mTOR signaling pathway plays a critical role in P-gp expression in drug-resistant epilepsy. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway by rapamycin may be a potential therapeutic approach for pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  3. Evidence for two different mechanisms triggering the change in quaternary structure of the allosteric enzyme, glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Jaimes, Ismael; Ramírez-Costa, Montserrat; De Anda-Aguilar, Lorena; Hinojosa-Ocaña, Pilar; Calcagno, Mario L

    2005-02-01

    The generation and propagation of conformational changes associated with ligand binding in the allosteric enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase (GlcN6P deaminase, EC 3.5.99.6) from Escherichia coli were analyzed by fluorescence measurements. Single-tryptophan mutant forms of the enzyme were constructed on the basis of previous structural and functional evidence and used as structural-change probes. The reporter residues were placed in the active-site lid (position 174) and in the allosteric site (254 and 234); in addition, signals from the natural Trp residues (15 and 224) were also studied as structural probes. The structural changes produced by the occupation of either the allosteric or the active site by site-specific ligands were monitored through changes in the spectral center of mass (SCM) of their steady-state emission fluorescence spectra. Binding of the allosteric activator produces only minimal signals in titration experiments. In contrast, measurable spectral signals were found when the active site was occupied by a dead-end inhibitor. The results reveal that the two binary complexes, enzyme-activator (R(A)) and enzyme-inhibitor (R(S)) complexes, have structural differences and that they also differ from the ternary complex (R(AS)). The mobility of the active-site lid motif is shown to be independent of the allosteric transition. The active-site ligand induces cooperative SCM changes even in the enzyme-activator complex, indicating that the propagation pathway of the conformational relaxation triggered from the active site is different from that involved in the heterotropic activation. Analysis of the complete set of mutants shows that the occupation of the active site generates structural perturbations, which are propagated to the whole of the monomer and extend to the other subunits. The accumulative effect of these propagated changes should be responsible for the change in the sign of the DeltaG degrees ' of the T to R transition associated with

  4. Allosteric Modulators for the Treatment of Schizophrenia: Targeting Glutamatergic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Menniti, Frank S.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Pandit, Jayvardhan; Zagouras, Panayiotis; Volkmann, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly debilitating mental disorder which afflicts approximately 1% of the global population. Cognitive and negative deficits account for the lifelong disability associated with schizophrenia, whose symptoms are not effectively addressed by current treatments. New medicines are needed to treat these aspects of the disease. Neurodevelopmental, neuropathological, genetic, and behavioral pharmacological data indicate that schizophrenia stems from a dysfunction of glutamate synaptic transmission, particularly in frontal cortical networks. A number of novel pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms affecting glutamatergic synaptic transmission have emerged as viable targets for schizophrenia. While developing orthosteric glutamatergic agents for these targets has proven extremely difficult, targeting allosteric sites of these targets has emerged as a promising alternative. From a medicinal chemistry perspective, allosteric sites provide an opportunity of finding agents with better drug-like properties and greater target specificity. Furthermore, allosteric modulators are better suited to maintaining the highly precise temporal and spatial aspects of glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Herein, we review neuropathological and genomic/genetic evidence underscoring the importance of glutamate synaptic dysfunction in the etiology of schizophrenia and make a case for allosteric targets for therapeutic intervention. We review progress in identifying allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors, NMDA receptors, and metabotropic glutamate receptors, all with the aim of restoring physiological glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Challenges remain given the complexity of schizophrenia and the difficulty in studying cognition in animals and humans. Nonetheless, important compounds have emerged from these efforts and promising preclinical and variable clinical validation has been achieved. PMID:23409764

  5. Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibition Blocks Chronic Stress-Induced Depressive-Like Behaviors via Activation of mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Peng; Wang, Wei; Pan, Bin; Liu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhen; Long, Jonathan Z; Zhang, Han-ting; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Liu, Qing-song

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system regulates mood, emotion, and stress coping, and dysregulation of the eCB system is critically involved in pathophysiology of depression. The eCB ligand 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is inactivated by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). Using chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUS) as a mouse model of depression, we examined how 2-AG signaling in the hippocampus was altered in depressive-like states and how this alteration contributed to depressive-like behavior. We report that CUS led to impairment of depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, and this deficiency in 2-AG-mediated retrograde synaptic depression was rescued by MAGL inhibitor JZL184. CUS induced depressive-like behaviors and decreased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation in the hippocampus, and these biochemical and behavioral abnormalities were ameliorated by chronic JZL184 treatments. The effects of JZL184 were mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Genetic deletion of mTOR with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying the Cre recombinase in the hippocampus of mTORf/f mice recapitulated depressive-like behaviors induced by CUS and abrogated the antidepressant-like effects of chronic JZL184 treatments. Our results suggest that CUS decreases eCB-mTOR signaling in the hippocampus, leading to depressive-like behaviors, whereas MAGL inhibitor JZL184 produces antidepressant-like effects through enhancement of eCB-mTOR signaling. PMID:24476943

  6. Targeting JAK1/2 and mTOR in murine xenograft models of Ph-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Tasian, Sarah K.; Vincent, Tiffaney; Hall, Junior W.; Sheen, Cecilia; Roberts, Kathryn G.; Seif, Alix E.; Barrett, David M.; Chen, I-Ming; Collins, J. Racquel; Mullighan, Charles G.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Harvey, Richard C.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Fridman, Jordan S.; Loh, Mignon L.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2012-01-01

    CRLF2 rearrangements, JAK1/2 point mutations, and JAK2 fusion genes have been identified in Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a recently described subtype of pediatric high-risk B-precursor ALL (B-ALL) which exhibits a gene expression profile similar to Ph-positive ALL and has a poor prognosis. Hyperactive JAK/STAT and PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is common in this high-risk subset. We, therefore, investigated the efficacy of the JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin in xenograft models of 8 pediatric B-ALL cases with and without CRLF2 and JAK genomic lesions. Ruxolitinib treatment yielded significantly lower peripheral blast counts compared with vehicle (P < .05) in 6 of 8 human leukemia xenografts and lower splenic blast counts (P < .05) in 8 of 8 samples. Enhanced responses to ruxolitinib were observed in samples harboring JAK-activating lesions and higher levels of STAT5 phosphorylation. Rapamycin controlled leukemia burden in all 8 B-ALL samples. Survival analysis of 2 representative B-ALL xenografts demonstrated prolonged survival with rapamycin treatment compared with vehicle (P < .01). These data demonstrate preclinical in vivo efficacy of ruxolitinib and rapamycin in this high-risk B-ALL subtype, for which novel treatments are urgently needed, and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeted kinase inhibition in Ph-like ALL. PMID:22955920

  7. CDK2 and mTOR are direct molecular targets of isoangustone A in the suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eunjung; Son, Joe Eun; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yeong A; Liu, Kangdong; Kim, Jiyoung; Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2013-10-01

    Licorice extract which is used as a natural sweetener has been shown to possess inhibitory effects against prostate cancer, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Here, we report a compound, isoangustone A (IAA) in licorice that potently suppresses the growth of aggressive prostate cancer and sought to clarify its mechanism of action. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on the growth of PTEN-deleted human prostate cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Administration of IAA significantly attenuated the growth of prostate cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. These effects were found to be attributable to inhibition of the G1/S phase cell cycle transition and the accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. The elevated p27{sup kip1} expression levels were concurrent with the decrease of its phosphorylation at threonine 187 through suppression of CDK2 kinase activity and the reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473 by diminishing the kinase activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Further analysis using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitated cell lysates determined that IAA exerts suppressive effects against CDK2 and mTOR kinase activity by direct binding with both proteins. These findings suggested that the licorice compound IAA is a potent molecular inhibitor of CDK2 and mTOR, with strong implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, licorice-derived extracts with high IAA content warrant further clinical investigation for nutritional sources for prostate cancer patients. - Highlights: • Isoangustone A suppresses growth of PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. • Administration of isoangustone A inhibits tumor growth in mice. • Treatment of isoangustone A induces cell cycle arrest and accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. • Isoangustone A inhibits CDK2 and mTOR activity. • Isoangustone A directly binds with CDK2 and mTOR complex in prostate cancer cells.

  8. Anti-Breast Cancer Potential of Quercetin via the Akt/AMPK/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling Cascade.

    PubMed

    Rivera Rivera, Amilcar; Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Gerena, Yamil; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2016-01-01

    The Akt/adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has emerged as a critical signaling nexus for regulating cellular metabolism, energy homeostasis, and cell growth. Thus, dysregulation of this pathway contributes to the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2diabetes, and cancer. We previously reported that a combination of grape polyphenols (resveratrol, quercetin and catechin: RQC), at equimolar concentrations, reduces breast cancer (BC) growth and metastasis in nude mice, and inhibits Akt and mTOR activities and activates AMPK, an endogenous inhibitor of mTOR, in metastatic BC cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the contribution of individual polyphenols to the effect of combined RQC on mTOR signaling. Metastatic BC cells were treated with RQC individually or in combination, at various concentrations, and the activities (phosphorylation) of AMPK, Akt, and the mTOR downstream effectors, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and 4E binding protein (4EBP1), were determined by Western blot. Results show that quercetin was the most effective compound for Akt/mTOR inhibition. Treatment with quercetin at 15μM had a similar effect as the RQC combination in the inhibition of BC cell proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. However, cell cycle analysis showed that the RQC treatment arrested BC cells in the G1 phase, while quercetin arrested the cell cycle in G2/M. In vivo experiments, using SCID mice with implanted tumors from metastatic BC cells, demonstrated that administration of quercetin at 15mg/kg body weight resulted in a ~70% reduction in tumor growth. In conclusion, quercetin appears to be a viable grape polyphenol for future development as an anti BC therapeutic.

  9. Anti-Breast Cancer Potential of Quercetin via the Akt/AMPK/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Rivera Rivera, Amilcar; Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Gerena, Yamil; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2016-01-01

    The Akt/adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has emerged as a critical signaling nexus for regulating cellular metabolism, energy homeostasis, and cell growth. Thus, dysregulation of this pathway contributes to the development of metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2diabetes, and cancer. We previously reported that a combination of grape polyphenols (resveratrol, quercetin and catechin: RQC), at equimolar concentrations, reduces breast cancer (BC) growth and metastasis in nude mice, and inhibits Akt and mTOR activities and activates AMPK, an endogenous inhibitor of mTOR, in metastatic BC cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the contribution of individual polyphenols to the effect of combined RQC on mTOR signaling. Metastatic BC cells were treated with RQC individually or in combination, at various concentrations, and the activities (phosphorylation) of AMPK, Akt, and the mTOR downstream effectors, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and 4E binding protein (4EBP1), were determined by Western blot. Results show that quercetin was the most effective compound for Akt/mTOR inhibition. Treatment with quercetin at 15μM had a similar effect as the RQC combination in the inhibition of BC cell proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. However, cell cycle analysis showed that the RQC treatment arrested BC cells in the G1 phase, while quercetin arrested the cell cycle in G2/M. In vivo experiments, using SCID mice with implanted tumors from metastatic BC cells, demonstrated that administration of quercetin at 15mg/kg body weight resulted in a ~70% reduction in tumor growth. In conclusion, quercetin appears to be a viable grape polyphenol for future development as an anti BC therapeutic. PMID:27285995

  10. Activation of protein synthesis in mouse uterine epithelial cells by estradiol-17β is mediated by a PKC-ERK1/2-mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Zhu, Liyin; Kuokkanen, Satu; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-17

    The uterine epithelium of mice and humans undergoes cyclical waves of cell proliferation and differentiation under the regulation of estradiol-17β (E2) and progesterone (P4). These epithelial cells respond to E2 with increased protein and DNA synthesis, whereas P4 inhibits only the E2-induced DNA synthetic response. Here we show that E2 regulates protein synthesis in these epithelial cells through activating PKC that in turn stimulates ERK1/2 to phosphorylate and thereby activate the central regulator of protein synthesis mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). This mTOR pathway is not inhibited by P4. Inhibitor studies with an estrogen receptor (ESR1) antagonist showed the dependence of this mTOR pathway on ESR1 but that once activated, a phosphorylation cascade independent of ESR1 propagates the pathway. E2 also stimulates an IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) to PI3 kinase to AKT to GSK-3β pathway required for activation of the canonical cell cycle machinery that is inhibited by P4. PKC activation did not stimulate this pathway nor does inhibition of PKC or ERK1/2 affect it. These studies therefore indicate a mechanism whereby DNA and protein synthesis are regulated by two ESR1-activated pathways that run in parallel with only the one responsible for the initiation of DNA synthesis blocked by P4. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin in vivo resulted in inhibition of E2-induced protein and DNA synthesis. Proliferative diseases of the endometrium such as endometriosis and cancer are common and E2 dependent. Thus, defining this mTOR pathway suggests that local (intrauterine or peritoneal) rapamycin administration might be a therapeutic option for these diseases.

  11. Allosteric dynamics of SAMHD1 studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, K. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-10-01

    SAMHD1 is a human cellular enzyme that blocks HIV-1 infection in myeloid cells and non-cycling CD4+T cells. The enzyme is an allosterically regulated triphosphohydrolase that modulates the level of cellular dNTP. The virus restriction is attributed to the lowering of the pool of dNTP in the cell to a point where reverse-transcription is impaired. Mutations in SAMHD1 are also implicated in Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome. A mechanistic understanding of the allosteric activation of the enzyme is still elusive. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations to examine the allosteric site dynamics of the protein and to examine the connection between the stability of the tetrameric complex and the Allosite occupancy.

  12. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong; Jiang, Qinyang; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Kuang, Shihuan

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7(CreER) and Mtor(flox/flox) mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes.

  13. mTOR Enhances Foam Cell Formation by Suppressing the Autophagy Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingxia; Niu, Xiaolin; Dang, Xiaoyan; Li, Ping; Qu, Li; Bi, Xiaoju; Gao, Yanxia; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Manxiang; Qiao, Wanhai; Peng, Zhuo; Pan, Longfei

    2014-01-01

    Recently, autophagy has drawn more attention in cardiovascular disease as it has important roles in lipid metabolism. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of autophagy; however, its effect on atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanism remains undefined. In this study, an obvious upregulation of mTOR and p-mTOR protein was observed in macrophage-derived foam cells. Blocking mTOR expression with specific small interference RNA (siRNA) dramatically suppressed foam cell formation, accompanied by a decrease of lipid deposition. Further mechanistic analysis indicated that suppressing mTOR expression significantly upregulated autophagic marker LC3 expression and downregulated autophagy substrate p62 levels, indicating that mTOR silencing triggered autophagosome formation. Moreover, blocking mTOR expression obviously accelerated neutral lipid delivery to lysosome and cholesterol efflux from foam cells, implying that mTOR could induce macrophage foam cell formation by suppressing autophagic pathway. Further, mTOR silencing significantly upregulated ULK1 expression, which was accounted for mTOR-induced foam cell formation via autophagic pathway as treatment with ULK1 siRNA dampened LC3-II levels and increased p62 expression, concomitant with lipid accumulation and decreased cholesterol efflux from foam cells. Together, our data provide an insight into how mTOR accelerates the pathological process of atherosclerosis. Accordingly, blocking mTOR levels may be a promising therapeutic agent against atherosclerotic complications. PMID:24512183

  14. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mammalian TOR (mTOR). mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid) synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  15. Targeting mTOR and p53 signaling inhibits muscle invasive bladder cancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Mohammed, Altaf; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yuting; Biddick, Laura; Patlolla, Jagan M.R.; Lightfoot, Stan; Towner, Rheal A.; Wu, Xue-Ru; Steele, Vernon E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Urothelial tumors, accompanied by mutations of the tumor suppressor protein TP53 and dysregulation of mTOR signaling, are frequently associated with aggressive growth and invasiveness. We investigated whether targeting these two pathways would inhibit urothelial tumor growth and progression. Six-week-old transgenic UPII-SV40T male mice (n=15/group) were fed control diet (AIN-76A) or experimental diets containing mTOR inhibitor (rapamycin, 8 or 16 ppm), p53 stabilizing agent (CP31398 [CP], 150 ppm), or a combination. Mice were euthanized at 40 weeks of age. Urinary bladders were collected and evaluated to determine tumor weight and histopathology. Each agent alone, and in combination, significantly inhibited tumor growth. Treatment with rapamycin alone decreased tumor weight up to 67% (p<0.0001). Similarly, CP showed ~77% (p<0.0001) suppression of tumor weight. The combination of low-dose rapamycin and CP led to ~83% (p<0.0001) inhibition of tumor weight. There was no significant difference in tumor weights between rapamycin and CP treatments (p>0.05). However, there was a significant difference between 8 ppm rapamycin and the combination treatment. Tumor invasion was also significantly inhibited in 53% (p<0.005) and 66% (p<0.0005) mice after 8 ppm and 16 ppm rapamycin respectively. While tumor invasion was suppressed in 73% (p<0.0001) mice when CP was combined with 8 ppm rapamycin. These results suggest that targeting two or more pathways achieve better treatment efficacy than a single-agent high-dose strategy that could increase the risk of side effects. A combination of CP and rapamycin may be a promising method of inhibiting muscle-invasive urothelial TCC. PMID:26577454

  16. A Novel Allosteric Activator of Free Fatty Acid 2 Receptor Displays Unique Gi-functional Bias*

    PubMed Central

    Bolognini, Daniele; Moss, Catherine E.; Nilsson, Karolina; Petersson, Annika U.; Donnelly, Iona; Sergeev, Eugenia; König, Gabriele M.; Kostenis, Evi; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Miller, Ashley; Dekker, Niek; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    The short chain fatty acid receptor FFA2 is able to stimulate signaling via both Gi- and Gq/G11-promoted pathways. These pathways are believed to control distinct physiological end points but FFA2 receptor ligands appropriate to test this hypothesis have been lacking. Herein, we characterize AZ1729, a novel FFA2 regulator that acts as a direct allosteric agonist and as a positive allosteric modulator, increasing the activity of the endogenously produced short chain fatty acid propionate in Gi-mediated pathways, but not at those transduced by Gq/G11. Using AZ1729 in combination with direct inhibitors of Gi and Gq/G11 family G proteins demonstrated that although both arms contribute to propionate-mediated regulation of phospho-ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling in FFA2-expressing 293 cells, the Gq/G11-mediated pathway is predominant. We extend these studies by employing AZ1729 to dissect physiological FFA2 signaling pathways. The capacity of AZ1729 to act at FFA2 receptors to inhibit β-adrenoreceptor agonist-promoted lipolysis in primary mouse adipocytes and to promote chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils confirmed these as FFA2 processes mediated by Gi signaling, whereas, in concert with blockade by the Gq/G11 inhibitor FR900359, the inability of AZ1729 to mimic or regulate propionate-mediated release of GLP-1 from mouse colonic preparations defined this physiological response as an end point transduced via activation of Gq/G11. PMID:27385588

  17. Diosgenin, a naturally occurring steroid, suppresses fatty acid synthase expression in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells through modulating Akt, mTOR and JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chun-Te; Way, Tzong-Der; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2007-12-22

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) expression is markedly elevated in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. In this study, diosgenin, a plant-derived steroid, was found to be effective in suppressing FAS expression in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Diosgenin preferentially inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, diosgenin inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR, and enhanced phosphorylation of JNK. The use of pharmacological inhibitors revealed that the modulation of Akt, mTOR and JNK phosphorylation was required for diosgenin-induced FAS suppression. Finally, we showed that diosgenin could enhance paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. These results suggested that diosgenin has the potential to advance as chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent for cancers that overexpress HER2.

  18. A novel PKB/Akt inhibitor, MK-2206, effectively inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism and protein synthesis in isolated rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Chiang; Liu, Yang; Jacobs, Roxane; Rider, Mark H

    2012-10-01

    PKB (protein kinase B), also known as Akt, is a key component of insulin signalling. Defects in PKB activation lead to insulin resistance and metabolic disorders, whereas PKB overactivation has been linked to tumour growth. Small-molecule PKB inhibitors have thus been developed for cancer treatment, but also represent useful tools to probe the roles of PKB in insulin action. In the present study, we examined the acute effects of two allosteric PKB inhibitors, MK-2206 and Akti 1/2 (Akti) on PKB signalling in incubated rat soleus muscles. We also assessed the effects of the compounds on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, glycogen and protein synthesis. MK-2206 dose-dependently inhibited insulin-stimulated PKB phosphorylation, PKBβ activity and phosphorylation of PKB downstream targets (including glycogen synthase kinase-3α/β, proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa and Akt substrate of 160 kDa). Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis and glycogen synthase activity were also decreased by MK-2206 in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation with high doses of MK-2206 (10 μM) inhibited insulin-induced p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1) phosphorylation associated with increased eEF2 (eukaryotic elongation factor 2) phosphorylation. In contrast, Akti only modestly inhibited insulin-induced PKB and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling, with little or no effect on glucose uptake and protein synthesis. MK-2206, rather than Akti, would thus be the tool of choice for studying the role of PKB in insulin action in skeletal muscle. The results point to a key role for PKB in mediating insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle.

  19. Physical limits on computation by assemblies of allosteric proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, John

    2009-03-01

    Assemblies of allosteric proteins are the principle information processing devices in biology. Using the Ca^2+-sensitive cardiac regulatory assembly as a paradigm for Brownian computation, we examine how system complexity and system resetting impose physical limits on computation. Nearest-neighbor-limited interactions among assembly components constrains the topology of the system's macrostate free energy landscape and produces degenerate transition probabilities. As a result, signaling fidelity and deactivation kinetics can not be simultaneously optimized. This imposes an upper limit on the rate of information processing by assemblies of allosteric proteins that couple to a single ligand type.

  20. Physical Limits on Computation by Assemblies of Allosteric Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, John M.

    2008-10-01

    Assemblies of allosteric proteins are the principle information processing devices in biology. Using the Ca2+-sensitive cardiac regulatory assembly as a paradigm for Brownian computation, I examine how system complexity and system resetting impose physical limits on computation. Nearest-neighbor-limited interactions among assembly components constrain the topology of the system’s macrostate free energy landscape and produce degenerate transition probabilities. As a result, signaling fidelity and deactivation kinetics cannot be simultaneously optimized. This imposes an upper limit on the rate of information processing by assemblies of allosteric proteins that couple to a single ligand type.

  1. Allosteric Inhibition of the Neuropeptidase Neurolysin*

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Christina S.; Ray, Kallol; Schmidt, Jack J.; Xiong, Fei; Feenstra, Rolf W.; Pras-Raves, Mia; de Moes, Jan Peter; Lange, Jos H. M.; Melikishvili, Manana; Fried, Michael G.; Mortenson, Paul; Charlton, Michael; Patel, Yogendra; Courtney, Stephen M.; Kruse, Chris G.; Rodgers, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptidases specialize in the hydrolysis of the small bioactive peptides that play a variety of signaling roles in the nervous and endocrine systems. One neuropeptidase, neurolysin, helps control the levels of the dopaminergic circuit modulator neurotensin and is a member of a fold group that includes the antihypertensive target angiotensin converting enzyme. We report the discovery of a potent inhibitor that, unexpectedly, binds away from the enzyme catalytic site. The location of the bound inhibitor suggests it disrupts activity by preventing a hinge-like motion associated with substrate binding and catalysis. In support of this model, the inhibition kinetics are mixed, with both noncompetitive and competitive components, and fluorescence polarization shows directly that the inhibitor reverses a substrate-associated conformational change. This new type of inhibition may have widespread utility in targeting neuropeptidases. PMID:25378390

  2. Allosteric inhibition of the neuropeptidase neurolysin.

    PubMed

    Hines, Christina S; Ray, Kallol; Schmidt, Jack J; Xiong, Fei; Feenstra, Rolf W; Pras-Raves, Mia; de Moes, Jan Peter; Lange, Jos H M; Melikishvili, Manana; Fried, Michael G; Mortenson, Paul; Charlton, Michael; Patel, Yogendra; Courtney, Stephen M; Kruse, Chris G; Rodgers, David W

    2014-12-19

    Neuropeptidases specialize in the hydrolysis of the small bioactive peptides that play a variety of signaling roles in the nervous and endocrine systems. One neuropeptidase, neurolysin, helps control the levels of the dopaminergic circuit modulator neurotensin and is a member of a fold group that includes the antihypertensive target angiotensin converting enzyme. We report the discovery of a potent inhibitor that, unexpectedly, binds away from the enzyme catalytic site. The location of the bound inhibitor suggests it disrupts activity by preventing a hinge-like motion associated with substrate binding and catalysis. In support of this model, the inhibition kinetics are mixed, with both noncompetitive and competitive components, and fluorescence polarization shows directly that the inhibitor reverses a substrate-associated conformational change. This new type of inhibition may have widespread utility in targeting neuropeptidases.

  3. An allosteric binding site at the human serotonin transporter mediates the inhibition of escitalopram by R-citalopram: kinetic binding studies with the ALI/VFL-SI/TT mutant.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Huailing; Hansen, Kasper B; Boyle, Noel J; Han, Kiho; Muske, Galina; Huang, Xinyan; Egebjerg, Jan; Sánchez, Connie

    2009-10-25

    The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) has primary and allosteric binding sites for escitalopram and R-citalopram. Previous studies have established that the interaction of these two compounds at a low affinity allosteric binding site of hSERT can affect the dissociation of [(3)H]escitalopram from hSERT. The allosteric binding site involves a series of residues in the 10th, 11th, and 12th trans-membrane domains of hSERT. The low affinity allosteric activities of escitalopram and R-citalopram are essentially eliminated in a mutant hSERT with changes in some of these residues, namely A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T, as measured in dissociation binding studies. We confirm that in association binding experiments, R-citalopram at clinically relevant concentrations reduces the association rate of [(3)H]escitalopram as a ligand to wild type hSERT. We demonstrate that the ability of R-citalopram to reduce the association rate of escitalopram is also abolished in the mutant hSERT (A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T), along with the expected disruption the low affinity allosteric function on dissociation binding. This suggests that the allosteric binding site mediates both the low affinity and higher affinity interactions between R-citalopram, escitalopram, and hSERT. Our data add an additional structural basis for the different efficacies of escitalopram compared to racemic citalopram reported in animal studies and clinical trials, and substantiate the hypothesis that hSERT has complex allosteric mechanisms underlying the unexplained in vivo activities of its inhibitors.

  4. mTOR and the health benefits of exercise.

    PubMed

    Watson, Kurt; Baar, Keith

    2014-12-01

    Exercise is the greatest physiological stress that our bodies experience. For example, during maximal endurance exercise in elite athlete's cardiac output can increase up to 8-fold and the working muscles receive 21-times more blood each minute than at rest. Given the physiological stress associated with exercise and the adaptations that occur to handle this stress, it is not surprising that exercise training is known to prevent or effectively treat a multitude of degenerative conditions including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, depression, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and many others. Many of the health benefits of exercise are mediated by the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), either in complex 1 or 2, not only within the working muscle, but also in distant tissues such as fat, liver, and brain. This review will discuss how exercise activates mTOR in diverse tissues and the ways that mTOR is important in the adaptive response that makes us bigger, stronger, and healthier as a result of exercise.

  5. Resveratrol as a novel treatment for diseases with mTOR pathway hyperactivation.

    PubMed

    Alayev, Anya; Berger, Sara Malka; Holz, Marina K

    2015-08-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway is hyperactivated in a variety of cancers and tumor syndromes. Therefore, mTORC1 inhibitors are being actively investigated for treatment of neoplasms. The concern with the monotherapy use of mTORC1 inhibitors, such as rapamycin, is that they cause upregulation of autophagy, a cell survival mechanism, and suppress the negative feedback loop to the oncogene Akt. In turn, Akt promotes cell survival, causing the therapy to be partially effective, but relapse occurs upon cessation of treatment. In this review, we describe the current literature on resveratrol as well as our work, which uses rapamycin in combination with resveratrol. We found that this combination treatment efficiently blocked upregulation of autophagy and restored inhibition of Akt in different cancer and tumor models. Interestingly, the combination of rapamycin and resveratrol selectively promoted apoptosis of cells with mTOR pathway hyperactivation. Moreover, this combination prevented tumor growth and lung metastasis when tested in mouse models. Finally, mass spectrometry-based identification of cellular targets of resveratrol provided mechanistic insight into the mode of action of resveratrol. The addition of resveratrol to rapamycin treatment may be a promising option for selective and targeted therapy for diseases with mTORC1 hyperactivation.

  6. Acyl-CoA synthetase-4, a new regulator of mTOR and a potential therapeutic target for enhanced estrogen receptor function in receptor-positive and -negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dattilo, Melina A.; Solano, Angela R.; Maloberti, Paula M.; Podesta, Ernesto J.

    2015-01-01

    Although the role of acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) in mediating an aggressive phenotype is well accepted, there is little evidence as to the early steps through which ACSL4 increases tumor growth and progression. In this study, and by means of the stable transfection of MCF-7 cells with ACSL4 using the tetracycline Tet-Off system (MCF-7 Tet-Off/ACSL4), we identify the mTOR pathway as one of the main specific signatures of ACSL4 expression and demonstrate the partial involvement of the lipoxygenase pathway in the activation of mTOR. The specificity of ACSL4 action on mTOR signaling is also determined by doxycycline inhibition of ACSL4 expression in MCF-7 Tet-Off/ACSL4 cells, by the expression of ACSL4 in the non-aggressive T47D breast cancer cell line and by knocking down this enzyme expression in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which constitutively express ACSL4. ACSL4 regulates components of the two complexes of the mTOR pathway (mTORC1/2), along with upstream regulators and substrates. We show that mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and ACSL4 inhibitor rosiglitazone can act in combination to inhibit cell growth. In addition, we demonstrate a synergistic effect on cell growth inhibition by the combination of rosiglitazone and tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor α (ERα) inhibitor. Remarkably, this synergistic effect is also evident in the triple negative MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that ACSL4 could be a target to restore tumor hormone dependence in tumors with poor prognosis for disease-free and overall survival, in which no effective specifically targeted therapy is readily available. PMID:26536660

  7. Acyl-CoA synthetase-4, a new regulator of mTOR and a potential therapeutic target for enhanced estrogen receptor function in receptor-positive and -negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Ulises D; Castillo, Ana F; Dattilo, Melina A; Solano, Angela R; Maloberti, Paula M; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2015-12-15

    Although the role of acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) in mediating an aggressive phenotype is well accepted, there is little evidence as to the early steps through which ACSL4 increases tumor growth and progression. In this study, and by means of the stable transfection of MCF-7 cells with ACSL4 using the tetracycline Tet-Off system (MCF-7 Tet-Off/ACSL4), we identify the mTOR pathway as one of the main specific signatures of ACSL4 expression and demonstrate the partial involvement of the lipoxygenase pathway in the activation of mTOR. The specificity of ACSL4 action on mTOR signaling is also determined by doxycycline inhibition of ACSL4 expression in MCF-7 Tet-Off/ACSL4 cells, by the expression of ACSL4 in the non-aggressive T47D breast cancer cell line and by knocking down this enzyme expression in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which constitutively express ACSL4. ACSL4 regulates components of the two complexes of the mTOR pathway (mTORC1/2), along with upstream regulators and substrates.We show that mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and ACSL4 inhibitor rosiglitazone can act in combination to inhibit cell growth. In addition, we demonstrate a synergistic effect on cell growth inhibition by the combination of rosiglitazone and tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor α (ERα) inhibitor. Remarkably, this synergistic effect is also evident in the triple negative MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro and in vivo.These results suggest that ACSL4 could be a target to restore tumor hormone dependence in tumors with poor prognosis for disease-free and overall survival, in which no effective specifically targeted therapy is readily available.

  8. Differential effects of rapalogues, dual kinase inhibitors on human ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rogers-Broadway, Karly-Rai; Chudasama, Dimple; Pados, George; Tsolakidis, Dimitris; Goumenou, Anastasia; Hall, Marcia; Karteris, Emmanouil

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the second most common gynaecological malignancy and was diagnosed in over 7,000 women in 2011 in the UK. There are currently no reliable biomarkers available for use in a regular screening assay for ovarian cancer and due to characteristic late presentation (78% in stages III and IV) ovarian cancer has a low survival rate (35% after 10 years). The mTOR pathway is a central regulator of growth, proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis; providing balance between available resources such as amino acids and growth factors, and stresses such as hypoxia, to control cellular behaviour accordingly. Emerging data links mTOR with the aetiopathogenesis of ovarian cancer. We hypothesised that mTOR inhibitors could play a therapeutic role in ovarian cancer treatment. In this study we began by validating the expression of four main mTOR pathway components, mTOR, DEPTOR, rictor and raptor, at gene and protein level in in vitro models of endometrioid (MDAH‑2774) and clear cell (SKOV3) ovarian cancer using qPCR and ImageStream technology. Using a wound healing assay we show that inhibition of the mTOR pathway using rapamycin, rapalogues, resveratrol and NVP BEZ-235 induces a cytostatic and not cytotoxic response up to 18 h in these cell lines. We extended these findings up to 72 h with a proliferation assay and show that the effects of inhibition of the mTOR pathway are primarily mediated by the dephosphorylation of p70S6 kinase. We show that mTOR inhibition does not involve alteration of mTOR pathway components or induce caspase 9 cleavage. Preclinical studies including ovarian tissue of ovarian cancer patients, unaffected controls and patients with unrelated gynaecological conditions show that DEPTOR is reliably upregulated in ovarian cancer.

  9. NMR reveals a dynamic allosteric pathway in thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Lindsey D.; Fuglestad, Brian; Stearns, Kyle; Tonelli, Marco; Fenwick, R. Bryn; Markwick, Phineus R. L.; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Although serine proteases are found ubiquitously in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, and they comprise the largest of all of the peptidase families, their dynamic motions remain obscure. The backbone dynamics of the coagulation serine protease, apo-thrombin (S195M-thrombin), were compared to the substrate-bound form (PPACK-thrombin). R1, R2, 15N-{1H}NOEs, and relaxation dispersion NMR experiments were measured to capture motions across the ps to ms timescale. The ps-ns motions were not significantly altered upon substrate binding. The relaxation dispersion data revealed that apo-thrombin is highly dynamic, with μs-ms motions throughout the molecule. The region around the N-terminus of the heavy chain, the Na+-binding loop, and the 170 s loop, all of which are implicated in allosteric coupling between effector binding sites and the active site, were dynamic primarily in the apo-form. Most of the loops surrounding the active site become more ordered upon PPACK-binding, but residues in the N-terminal part of the heavy chain, the γ-loop, and anion-binding exosite 1, the main allosteric binding site, retain μs-ms motions. These residues form a dynamic allosteric pathway connecting the active site to the main allosteric site that remains in the substrate-bound form. PMID:28059082

  10. The ketogenic diet inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Sharon S; Rensing, Nicholas R; Thio, Liu Lin; Yamada, Kelvin A; Wong, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for epilepsy, but its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We investigated the hypothesis that the KD inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway signaling. The expression of pS6 and pAkt, markers of mTOR pathway activation, was reduced in hippocampus and liver of rats fed KD. In the kainate model of epilepsy, KD blocked the hippocampal pS6 elevation that occurs after status epilepticus. Because mTOR signaling has been implicated in epileptogenesis, these results suggest that the KD may have anticonvulsant or antiepileptogenic actions via mTOR pathway inhibition.

  11. Adapting the Stress Response: Viral Subversion of the mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Le Sage, Valerie; Cinti, Alessandro; Amorim, Raquel; Mouland, Andrew J

    2016-05-24

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of gene expression, translation and various metabolic processes. Multiple extracellular (growth factors) and intracellular (energy status) molecular signals as well as a variety of stressors are integrated into the mTOR pathway. Viral infection is a significant stress that can activate, reduce or even suppress the mTOR signaling pathway. Consequently, viruses have evolved a plethora of different mechanisms to attack and co-opt the mTOR pathway in order to make the host cell a hospitable environment for replication. A more comprehensive knowledge of different viral interactions may provide fruitful targets for new antiviral drugs.

  12. Efficacy of selective PDE4D negative allosteric modulators in the object retrieval task in female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Jane S; Beaumont, Vahri; Watson, James M; Chew, Chang Sing; Beconi, Maria; Hutcheson, Daniel M; Dominguez, Celia; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signalling plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and information processing in the hippocampal and basal ganglia systems. The augmentation of cAMP signalling through the selective inhibition of phosphodiesterases represents a viable strategy to treat disorders associated with dysfunction of these circuits. The phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 4 inhibitor rolipram has shown significant pro-cognitive effects in neurological disease models, both in rodents and primates. However, competitive non-isoform selective PDE4 inhibitors have a low therapeutic index which has stalled their clinical development. Here, we demonstrate the pro-cognitive effects of selective negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of PDE4D, D159687 and D159797 in female Cynomolgous macaques, in the object retrieval detour task. The efficacy displayed by these NAMs in a primate cognitive task which engages the corticostriatal circuitry, together with their suitable pharmacokinetic properties and safety profiles, suggests that clinical development of these allosteric modulators should be considered for the treatment of a variety of brain disorders associated with cognitive decline.

  13. Efficacy of Selective PDE4D Negative Allosteric Modulators in the Object Retrieval Task in Female Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Jane S.; Beaumont, Vahri; Watson, James M.; Chew, Chang Sing; Beconi, Maria; Hutcheson, Daniel M.; Dominguez, Celia; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signalling plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and information processing in the hippocampal and basal ganglia systems. The augmentation of cAMP signalling through the selective inhibition of phosphodiesterases represents a viable strategy to treat disorders associated with dysfunction of these circuits. The phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 4 inhibitor rolipram has shown significant pro-cognitive effects in neurological disease models, both in rodents and primates. However, competitive non-isoform selective PDE4 inhibitors have a low therapeutic index which has stalled their clinical development. Here, we demonstrate the pro-cognitive effects of selective negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of PDE4D, D159687 and D159797 in female Cynomolgous macaques, in the object retrieval detour task. The efficacy displayed by these NAMs in a primate cognitive task which engages the corticostriatal circuitry, together with their suitable pharmacokinetic properties and safety profiles, suggests that clinical development of these allosteric modulators should be considered for the treatment of a variety of brain disorders associated with cognitive decline. PMID:25050979

  14. mTOR pathway activation in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumour cells: pomalidomide enhances cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling of mTOR protein

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmelli, Tommasina; Giugliano, Emilia; Brunetto, Vanessa; Rapa, Ida; Cappia, Susanna; Giorcelli, Jessica; Rrodhe, Sokol; Papotti, Mauro; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    mTOR is a protein kinase that plays a central role in regulating critical cellular processes. We evaluated the activation and cellular localization of the mTOR pathway in multiple myeloma (MM) and analyzed the role of pomalidomide in regulating mTOR. By immunohistochemistry cytoplasmic p-mTOR stained positive in 57 out 101 (57.6%) cases with a nuclear p-mTOR localization in 14 out 101 samples (13.8%). In the 70 MM samples analyzed for the entire pathway, p-mTOR expression significantly correlated with p-AKT, p-P70S6K, and p-4E-BP1 suggesting that the AKT/mTOR pathway is activated in a subset of MM patients. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that mTOR protein is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and the nucleus at baseline in MM cell lines and in plasma cells of 13 MM patients and that pomalidomide facilitated the shift of the mTOR protein in the nucleus. By western blotting, treatment with pomalidomide increased nuclear mTOR and p-mTOR expression levels in the nucleus with a concomitant decrease of the cytoplasmic fractions while does not seem to affect significantly AKT phosphorylation status. In MM cells the anti-myeloma activity of pomalidomide may be mediated by the regulation of the mTOR pathway. PMID:26097872

  15. Allosteric mechanisms can be distinguished using structural mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dyachenko, Andrey; Gruber, Ranit; Shimon, Liat; Horovitz, Amnon; Sharon, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The activity of many proteins, including metabolic enzymes, molecular machines, and ion channels, is often regulated by conformational changes that are induced or stabilized by ligand binding. In cases of multimeric proteins, such allosteric regulation has often been described by the concerted Monod–Wyman–Changeux and sequential Koshland–Némethy–Filmer classic models of cooperativity. Despite the important functional implications of the mechanism of cooperativity, it has been impossible in many cases to distinguish between these various allosteric models using ensemble measurements of ligand binding in bulk protein solutions. Here, we demonstrate that structural MS offers a way to break this impasse by providing the full distribution of ligand-bound states of a protein complex. Given this distribution, it is possible to determine all the binding constants of a ligand to a highly multimeric cooperative system, and thereby infer its allosteric mechanism. Our approach to the dissection of allosteric mechanisms relies on advances in MS—which provide the required resolution of ligand-bound states—and in data analysis. We validated our approach using the well-characterized Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL, a double-heptameric ring containing 14 ATP binding sites, which has become a paradigm for molecular machines. The values of the 14 binding constants of ATP to GroEL were determined, and the ATP-loading pathway of the chaperone was characterized. The methodology and analyses presented here are directly applicable to numerous other cooperative systems and are therefore expected to promote further research on allosteric systems. PMID:23589876

  16. Combined MTOR and autophagy inhibition: phase I trial of hydroxychloroquine and temsirolimus in patients with advanced solid tumors and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Rangwala, Reshma; Chang, Yunyoung C; Hu, Janice; Algazy, Kenneth M; Evans, Tracey L; Fecher, Leslie A; Schuchter, Lynn M; Torigian, Drew A; Panosian, Jeffrey T; Troxel, Andrea B; Tan, Kay-See; Heitjan, Daniel F; DeMichele, Angela M; Vaughn, David J; Redlinger, Maryann; Alavi, Abass; Kaiser, Jonathon; Pontiggia, Laura; Davis, Lisa E; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    The combination of temsirolimus (TEM), an MTOR inhibitor, and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an autophagy inhibitor, augments cell death in preclinical models. This phase 1 dose-escalation study evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, preliminary activity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of HCQ in combination with TEM in cancer patients. In the dose escalation portion, 27 patients with advanced solid malignancies were enrolled, followed by a cohort expansion at the top dose level in 12 patients with metastatic melanoma. The combination of HCQ and TEM was well tolerated, and grade 3 or 4 toxicity was limited to anorexia (7%), fatigue (7%), and nausea (7%). An MTD was not reached for HCQ, and the recommended phase II dose was HCQ 600 mg twice daily in combination with TEM 25 mg weekly. Other common grade 1 or 2 toxicities included fatigue, anorexia, nausea, stomatitis, rash, and weight loss. No responses were observed; however, 14/21 (67%) patients in the dose escalation and 14/19 (74%) patients with melanoma achieved stable disease. The median progression-free survival in 13 melanoma patients treated with HCQ 1200mg/d in combination with TEM was 3.5 mo. Novel 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) measurements predicted clinical outcome and provided further evidence that the addition of HCQ to TEM produced metabolic stress on tumors in patients that experienced clinical benefit. Pharmacodynamic evidence of autophagy inhibition was evident in serial PBMC and tumor biopsies only in patients treated with 1200 mg daily HCQ. This study indicates that TEM and HCQ is safe and tolerable, modulates autophagy in patients, and has significant antitumor activity. Further studies combining MTOR and autophagy inhibitors in cancer patients are warranted.

  17. Decreased mTOR signalling reduces mitochondrial ROS in brain via accumulation of the telomerase protein TERT within mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Tengfei; Bell, Amy; Hill, Kirsten N.; von Zglinicki, Thomas; Saretzki, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase in its canonical function maintains telomeres in dividing cells. In addition, the telomerase protein TERT has non-telomeric functions such as shuttling to mitochondria resulting in a decreased oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. TERT protein persists in adult neurons and can co-localise to mitochondria under various stress conditions. We show here that TERT expression decreased in mouse brain during aging while release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the mitochondrial electron transport chain increased. Dietary restriction (DR) caused accumulation of TERT protein in mouse brain mitochondria correlating to decreased ROS release and improved learning and spatial short-term memory. Decreased mTOR signalling is a mediator of DR. Accordingly, feeding mice with rapamycin increased brain mitochondrial TERT and reduced ROS release. Importantly, the beneficial effects of rapamycin on mitochondrial function were absent in brains and fibroblasts from first generation TERT −/− mice, and when TERT shuttling was inhibited by the Src kinase inhibitor bosutinib. Taken together, our data suggests that the mTOR signalling pathway impinges on the mitochondrial localisation of TERT protein, which might in turn contribute to the protection of the brain by DR or rapamycin against age-associated mitochondrial ROS increase and cognitive decline. PMID:27777385

  18. Targeting mTOR pathway inhibits tumor growth in different molecular subtypes of triple-negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hatem, Rana; Botty, Rania El; Chateau-Joubert, Sophie; Servely, Jean-Luc; Labiod, Dalila; de Plater, Ludmilla; Assayag, Franck; Coussy, Florence; Callens, Céline; Vacher, Sophie; Reyal, Fabien; Cosulich, Sabina; Diéras, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are characterized by frequent alterations in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. In this study, we analyzed PI3K pathway activation in 67 patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of breast cancer and investigated the anti-tumor activity of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in 15 TNBC PDX with different expression and mutational status of PI3K pathway markers. Expression of the tumor suppressors PTEN and INPP4B was lost in 55% and 76% of TNBC PDX, respectively, while mutations in PIK3CA and AKT1 genes were rare. In 7 PDX treatment with everolimus resulted in a tumor growth inhibition higher than 50%, while 8 models were classified as low responder or resistant. Basal-like, LAR (Luminal AR), mesenchymal and HER2-enriched tumors were present in both responder and resistant groups, suggesting that tumor response to everolimus is not restricted to a specific TNBC subtype. Analysis of treated tumors showed a correlation between tumor response and post-treatment phosphorylation of AKT, increased in responder PDX, while PI3K pathway markers at baseline were not sufficient to predict everolimus response. In conclusion, targeting mTOR decreased tumor growth in 7 out of 15 TNBC PDX tested. Response to everolimus occurred in different TNBC subtypes and was associated with post-treatment increase of P-AKT. PMID:27374081

  19. Allosteric-Site and Catalytic-Site Ligand Effects on PDE5 Functions are Associated with Distinct Changes in Physical Form of the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Jackie D.; Zoraghi, Roya; Francis, Sharron H.

    2009-01-01

    Native phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) homodimer contains distinct non-catalytic cGMP allosteric sites and catalytic sites for cGMP hydrolysis. Purified recombinant PDE5 was activated by pre-incubation with cGMP. Relatively low concentrations of cGMP produced a Native PAGE gel-shift of PDE5 from a single band position (lower band) to a band with decreased mobility (upper band); higher concentrations of cGMP produced a band of intermediate mobility (middle band) in addition to the upper band. Two point mutations (G659A and G659P) near the catalytic site that reduced affinity for cGMP substrate retained allosteric cGMP-binding affinity like that of WT PDE5 but displayed cGMP-induced gel-shift only to the middle-band position. The upper band could represent a form produced by cGMP binding to the catalytic site, while the middle band could represent a form produced by cGMP binding to the allosteric site. Millimolar cGMP was required for gel-shift of PDE5 when added to the pre-incubation before native PAGE, presumably due to removal of most of the cGMP during electrophoresis, but micromolar cGMP was sufficient for this effect if cGMP was included in the native gel buffer. cGMP-induced gel-shift was associated with stimulation of PDE5 catalytic activity, and the rates of onset and reversibility of this effect suggested that it was due to cGMP binding to the allosteric site. Incubation of PDE5 with non-hydrolyzable, catalytic site-specific, substrate analogs such as the inhibitors sildenafil and tadalafil, followed by dilution, did not produce activation of catalytic activity like that obtained with cGMP, although both inhibitors produced a similar gel-shift to the upper band as that obtained with cGMP. This implied that occupation of the catalytic site alone can produce a gel-shift to the upper band. PDE5 activation or gel-shift was reversed by lowering cGMP with dilution followed by at least one hour of incubation. Such slow reversibility could prolong effects of cGMP on PDE

  20. Skeletal myocyte hypertrophy requires mTOR kinase activity and S6K1

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In-Hyun . E-mail: ihpark@uiuc.edu; Erbay, Ebru; Nuzzi, Paul; Chen Jie

    2005-09-10

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell proliferation and growth, with the ribosomal subunit S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) as one of the key downstream signaling effectors. A critical role of mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle differentiation has been identified recently, and an unusual regulatory mechanism independent of mTOR kinase activity and S6K1 is revealed. An mTOR pathway has also been reported to regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy, but the regulatory mechanism is not completely understood. Here, we report the investigation of mTOR's function in insulin growth factor I (IGF-I)-induced C2C12 myotube hypertrophy. Added at a later stage when rapamycin no longer had any effect on normal myocyte differentiation, rapamycin completely blocked myocyte hypertrophy as measured by myotube diameter. Importantly, a concerted increase of average myonuclei per myotube was observed in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes, which was also inhibited by rapamycin added at a time when it no longer affected normal differentiation. The mTOR protein level, its catalytic activity, its phosphorylation on Ser2448, and the activity of S6K1 were all found increased in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes compared to unstimulated myotubes. Using C2C12 cells stably expressing rapamycin-resistant forms of mTOR and S6K1, we provide genetic evidence for the requirement of mTOR and its downstream effector S6K1 in the regulation of myotube hypertrophy. Our results suggest distinct mTOR signaling mechanisms in different stages of skeletal muscle development: While mTOR regulates the initial myoblast differentiation in a kinase-independent and S6K1-independent manner, the hypertrophic function of mTOR requires its kinase activity and employs S6K1 as a downstream effector.

  1. MicroRNA-101 mediates the suppressive effect of laminar shear stress on mTOR expression in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kui; Fan, Wendong; Wang, Xing; Ke, Xiao; Wu, Guifu; Hu, Chengheng

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laminar shear stress upregulates miR-101 expression in vascular endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-101 represses mTOR expression through a specific 3 Prime UTR binding site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-101 inhibits G1/S transition and endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blockade of miR-101 attenuates the suppressive effect of laminar flow on mTOR expression. -- Abstract: Shear stress associated with blood flow plays an important role in regulating gene expression and cell function in endothelial cells (ECs). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are highly conserved, small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate the expression of target genes by binding to the mRNA 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime UTR) at the posttranscriptional level involved in diverse cellular processes. This study demonstrates that microRNA-101 in response to laminar shear stress (LSS) is involved in the flow regulation of gene expression in ECs. qRT-PCR analysis showed that miR-101 expression was significantly upregulated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to 12 dyn/cm{sup 2} laminar shear stress for 12 h. We found that transfection of miR-101 significantly decreased the luciferase activity of plasmid reporter containing the 3 Prime UTR of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) gene. Western analysis revealed that the protein level of mTOR was significantly reduced in ECs transfected with miR-101. Furthermore, miR-101 overexpression induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition and suppressed endothelial cell proliferation. Finally, transfection of miR-101 inhibitors attenuated the suppressive effects of LSS on mTOR expression, which identified the efficacy of loss-of-function of miR-101 in laminar flow-treated ECs. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that upregulation of miR-101 in response to LSS contributes to the suppressive effects of LSS on mTOR expression and EC

  2. Inducible nitric oxide synthase drives mTOR pathway activation and proliferation of human melanoma by reversible nitrosylation of TSC2.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Jayaraman, Padmini; Parikh, Falguni; Davies, Michael A; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Milton, Denái R; Chipuk, Jerry E; Grimm, Elizabeth A; Estrada, Yeriel; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Sikora, Andrew G

    2014-02-15

    Melanoma is one of the cancers of fastest-rising incidence in the world. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is overexpressed in melanoma and other cancers, and previous data suggest that iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) drive survival and proliferation of human melanoma cells. However, specific mechanisms through which this occurs are poorly defined. One candidate is the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway, which plays a major role in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis of melanoma and other cancers. We used the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay to test the hypothesis that melanoma growth is regulated by iNOS-dependent mTOR pathway activation. Both pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA-mediated gene silencing of iNOS suppressed melanoma proliferation and in vivo growth on the CAM in human melanoma models. This was associated with strong downregulation of mTOR pathway activation by Western blot analysis of p-mTOR, p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p-P70S6K), p-S6RP, and p-4EBP1. iNOS expression and NO were associated with reversible nitrosylation of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 2, and inhibited dimerization of TSC2 with its inhibitory partner TSC1, enhancing GTPase activity of its target Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb), a critical activator of mTOR signaling. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from stage III melanoma patients showed a significant correlation between iNOS expression levels and expression of the mTOR pathway members. Exogenously supplied NO was also sufficient to reverse the mTOR pathway inhibition by the B-Raf inhibitor vemurafenib. In summary, covalent modification of TSC2 by iNOS-derived NO is associated with impaired TSC2/TSC1 dimerization, mTOR pathway activation, and proliferation of human melanoma. This model is consistent with the known association of iNOS overexpression and poor prognosis in melanoma and other cancers.

  3. Role of a Novel PH-Kinase Domain Interface in PKB/Akt Regulation: Structural Mechanism for Allosteric Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Peter J; Larijani, Banafshé

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) belongs to the AGC superfamily of related serine/threonine protein kinases. It is a key regulator downstream of various growth factors and hormones and is involved in malignant transformation and chemo-resistance. Full-length PKB protein has not been crystallised, thus studying the molecular mechanisms that are involved in its regulation in relation to its structure have not been simple. Recently, the dynamics between the inactive and active conformer at the molecular level have been described. The maintenance of PKB's inactive state via the interaction of the PH and kinase domains prevents its activation loop to be phosphorylated by its upstream activator, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1). By using a multidisciplinary approach including molecular modelling, classical biochemical assays, and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)/two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), a detailed model depicting the interaction between the different domains of PKB in its inactive conformation was demonstrated. These findings in turn clarified the molecular mechanism of PKB inhibition by AKT inhibitor VIII (a specific allosteric inhibitor) and illustrated at the molecular level its selectivity towards different PKB isoforms. Furthermore, these findings allude to the possible function of the C-terminus in sustaining the inactive conformer of PKB. This study presents essential insights into the quaternary structure of PKB in its inactive conformation. An understanding of PKB structure in relation to its function is critical for elucidating its mode of activation and discovering how to modulate its activity. The molecular mechanism of inhibition of PKB activation by the specific drug AKT inhibitor VIII has critical implications for determining the mechanism of inhibition of other allosteric inhibitors and for opening up opportunities for the design of new generations of modulator drugs. PMID:19166270

  4. Computational Tools for Allosteric Drug Discovery: Site Identification and Focus Library Design.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenkang; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Allostery is an intrinsic phenomenon of biological macromolecules involving regulation and/or signal transduction induced by a ligand binding to an allosteric site distinct from a molecule's active site. Allosteric drugs are currently receiving increased attention in drug discovery because drugs that target allosteric sites can provide important advantages over the corresponding orthosteric drugs including specific subtype selectivity within receptor families. Consequently, targeting allosteric sites, instead of orthosteric sites, can reduce drug-related side effects and toxicity. On the down side, allosteric drug discovery can be more challenging than traditional orthosteric drug discovery due to difficulties associated with determining the locations of allosteric sites and designing drugs based on these sites and the need for the allosteric effects to propagate through the structure, reach the ligand binding site and elicit a conformational change. In this study, we present computational tools ranging from the identification of potential allosteric sites to the design of "allosteric-like" modulator libraries. These tools may be particularly useful for allosteric drug discovery.

  5. Cell size and fat content of dietary-restricted Caenorhabditis elegans are regulated by ATX-2, an mTOR repressor

    PubMed Central

    Charar, Chayki; Dorfman, Jehudith; Yadid, Tam; Tafforeau, Lionel; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) is a metabolic intervention that extends the lifespan of multiple species, including yeast, flies, nematodes, rodents, and, arguably, rhesus monkeys and humans. Hallmarks of lifelong DR are reductions in body size, fecundity, and fat accumulation, as well as slower development. We have identified atx-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of the human ATXN2L and ATXN2 genes, as the regulator of these multiple DR phenotypes. Down-regulation of atx-2 increases the body size, cell size, and fat content of dietary-restricted animals and speeds animal development, whereas overexpression of atx-2 is sufficient to reduce the body size and brood size of wild-type animals. atx-2 regulates the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, downstream of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and upstream of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and mTOR complex 1 (TORC1), by its direct association with Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor β, which likely regulates RHEB shuttling between GDP-bound and GTP-bound forms. Taken together, this work identifies a previously unknown mechanism regulating multiple aspects of DR, as well as unknown regulators of the mTOR pathway. They also extend our understanding of diet-dependent growth retardation, and offers a potential mechanism to treat obesity. PMID:27457958

  6. Co-targeting of Bcl-2 and mTOR pathway triggers synergistic apoptosis in BH3 mimetics resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Matteo; Mirabilii, Simone; Licchetta, Roberto; Bergamo, Paola; Rinaldo, Cinzia; Zeuner, Ann; Foà, Robin; Milella, Michele; McCubrey, James A.; Martelli, Alberto M.; Tafuri, Agostino

    2015-01-01

    Several chemo-resistance mechanisms including the Bcl-2 protein family overexpression and constitutive activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling have been documented in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), encouraging targeted approaches to circumvent this clinical problem. Here we analyzed the activity of the BH3 mimetic ABT-737 in ALL, exploring the synergistic effects with the mTOR inhibitor CCI-779 on ABT-737 resistant cells. We showed that a low Mcl-1/Bcl-2 plus Bcl-xL protein ratio determined ABT-737 responsiveness. ABT-737 exposure further decreased Mcl-1, inducing apoptosis on sensitive models and primary samples, while not affecting resistant cells. Co-inhibition of Bcl-2 and the mTOR pathway resulted cytotoxic on ABT-737 resistant models, by downregulating mTORC1 activity and Mcl-1 in a proteasome-independent manner. Although Mcl-1 seemed to be critical, ectopic modulation did not correlate with apoptosis changes. Importantly, dual targeting proved effective on ABT-737 resistant samples, showing additive/synergistic effects. Together, our results show the efficacy of BH3 mimetics as single agent in the majority of the ALL samples and demonstrate that resistance to ABT-737 mostly correlated with Mcl-1 overexpression. Co-targeting of the Bcl-2 protein family and mTOR pathway enhanced drug-induced cytotoxicity by suppressing Mcl-1, providing a novel therapeutic approach to overcome BH3 mimetics resistance in ALL. PMID:26392332

  7. Apocynin inhibits Toll-like receptor-4-mediated activation of NF-κB by suppressing the Akt and mTOR pathways.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Arum; Sohn, Dong Suep; Lee, Chung Soo

    2016-12-01

    Microbial product lipopolysaccharide has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. Apocynin has demonstrated to have an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of apocynin on the Toll-like receptor-4-dependent activation of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway, which is involved in productions of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes, has not been studied. Using human keratinocytes, we investigated the effect of apocynin on the inflammatory mediator production in relation to the Toll-like receptor-4-mediated-Akt/mTOR and NF-κB pathways, which regulates the transcription genes involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Apocynin, Akt inhibitor SH-5, Bay 11-7085 and N-acetylcysteine each attenuated the lipopolysaccharide-induced production of cytokines, PGE2, and chemokines, changes in the levels of Toll-like receptor-4, p-Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB, and production of reactive oxygen species in keratinocytes. The results show that apocynin appears to attenuate the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes by suppressing the Toll-like receptor-4-mediated activation of the Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB pathways. The effect of apocynin appears to be attributed to its inhibitory effect on the production of reactive oxygen species. Apocynin appears to attenuate the microbial product-mediated inflammatory skin diseases.

  8. Activation of Both the Calpain and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems Contributes to Septic Cardiomyopathy through Dystrophin Loss/Disruption and mTOR Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Ana Caroline Silva; Figueiredo, Maria Jose; Campos, Erica Carolina; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; Ramos, Simone Gusmao; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction caused by the impairment of myocardial contractility has been recognized as an important factor contributing to the high mortality in sepsis. Calpain activation in the heart takes place in response to increased intracellular calcium influx resulting in proteolysis of structural and contractile proteins with subsequent myocardial dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that increased levels of calpain in the septic heart leads to disruption of structural and contractile proteins and that administration of calpain inhibitor-1 (N-acetyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-norleucinal (ALLN)) after sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture prevents cardiac protein degradation. We also tested the hypothesis that calpain plays a role in the modulation of protein synthesis/degradation through the activation of proteasome-dependent proteolysis and inhibition of the mTOR pathway. Severe sepsis significantly increased heart calpain-1 levels and promoted ubiquitin and Pa28β over-expression with a reduction in the mTOR levels. In addition, sepsis reduced the expression of structural proteins dystrophin and β-dystroglycan as well as the contractile proteins actin and myosin. ALLN administration prevented sepsis-induced increases in calpain and ubiquitin levels in the heart, which resulted in decreased of structural and contractile proteins degradation and basal mTOR expression levels were re-established. Our results support the concept that increased calpain concentrations may be part of an important mechanism of sepsis-induced cardiac muscle proteolysis. PMID:27880847

  9. Inhibition of mTOR down-regulates scavenger receptor, class B, type I (SR-BI) expression, reduces endothelial cell migration and impairs nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Krieger, Sigurd; Winter, Katharina; Rosner, Margit; Mikula, Mario; Weichhart, Thomas; Bittman, Robert; Hengstschläger, Markus; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibiting drug rapamycin (Sirolimus) has severe side effects in patients including hyperlipidemia, an established risk factor for atherosclerosis. Recently, it was shown that rapamycin decreases hepatic LDL receptor (LDL-R) expression, which likely contributes to hypercholesterolemia. Scavenger receptor, class B, type I (SR-BI) is the major HDL receptor and consequently regulating HDL-cholesterol levels and the athero-protective effects of HDL. By using the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, we show that SR-BI is down-regulated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). This reduction of SR-BI protein as well as mRNA levels by about 50% did not alter HDL particle uptake or HDL-derived lipid transfer. However, rapamycin reduced HDL-induced activation of eNOS and stimulation of endothelial cell migration. The effects on cell migration could be counteracted by SR-BI overexpression, indicating that decreased SR-BI expression is in part responsible for the rapamycin-induced effects. We demonstrate that inhibition of mTOR leads to endothelial cell dysfunction and decreased SR-BI expression, which may contribute to atherogenesis during rapamycin treatment.

  10. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling in the Insular Cortex Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minjee; Han, Jeongsoo; Kim, Un Jeng; Cha, Myeounghoon; Um, Sun Woo; Bai, Sun Joon; Hong, Seong-Karp; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Injury of peripheral nerves can trigger neuropathic pain, producing allodynia and hyperalgesia via peripheral and central sensitization. Recent studies have focused on the role of the insular cortex (IC) in neuropathic pain. Because the IC is thought to store pain-related memories, translational regulation in this structure may reveal novel targets for controlling chronic pain. Signaling via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is known to control mRNA translation and influence synaptic plasticity, has been studied at the spinal level in neuropathic pain, but its role in the IC under these conditions remains elusive. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the role of mTOR signaling in neuropathic pain and to assess the potential therapeutic effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, in the IC of rats with neuropathic pain. Mechanical allodynia was assessed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after neuropat