Science.gov

Sample records for allowable bending stress

  1. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  2. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  3. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  4. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  5. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  6. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.440 Section 154.440 Shipping COAST... Tank Type A § 154.440 Allowable stress. (a) The allowable stresses for an independent tank type A must... Commandant (CG-522). (b) A greater allowable stress than required in paragraph (a)(1) of this section may...

  7. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  8. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  9. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  10. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  11. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  12. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  13. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  14. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  15. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  16. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  17. Bend stresses arising from ion-exchange diffusion in glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Babukova, M.V.; Glebov, L.B.; Nikonorov, N.V.; Petrovskii, G.T.

    1985-11-01

    This paper demonstrates experimental confirmation of the presence of gigastresses arising under ion exchange, for the purpose of providing data relating to the magnitudes of stress greater than 1 GPa in these ion-exchange layers. To determine the stresses, a bend method was used on a specimen under nonuniform load. Small values of bend were determined on an IT-70 inferometer. With larger values of bend the radius of curvature of the surface was determined by measuring the focal distance in the beam of a He-Ne laser reflected from the specimen. Bending is observed in silicate glass subjected to unilateral ion-exchange diffusion of K/sup +/. It is shown that the bending of the specimens is caused by compressive stresses arising in the diffusion layer and having a value of greater than 1.5 GPa. The changes in the refractive index (RI) in the diffusion layer are determined primarily by the photoelastic effect.

  18. The effect of bending on the stresses in adhesive joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuceoglu, U.; Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of stress distribution in adhesive joints where two orthotropic plates are bonded through a flexible adhesive layer is analyzed. It is shown that the effect of bending of the adherends on the stresses in the adhesive layer is very significant. The transverse shear deformations of the adherends appear to have little influence on the adhesive layer stresses. The maximum transverse normal stress in the adhesive is shown to be larger than the maximum longitudinal shear stress. The method of solution is applied to several examples of specific joint geometries and material combinations, and is proven to be applicable to other related problems.

  19. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  20. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  1. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  2. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  3. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the...

  4. Bending stresses due to torsion in cantilever box beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1935-01-01

    The paper beings with a brief discussion on the origin of the bending stresses in cantilever box beams under torsion. A critical survey of existing theory is followed by a summary of design formulas; this summary is based on the most complete solution published but omits all refinements considered unnecessary at the present state of development. Strain-gage tests made by NACA to obtained some experimental verification of the formulas are described next. Finally, the formulas are applied to a series of box beams previously static-tested by the U.S. Army Air Corps; the results show that the bending stresses due to torsion are responsible to a large extent for the free-edge type of failure frequently experienced in these tests.

  5. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  6. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  7. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  8. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  9. 46 CFR 64.13 - Allowable stress; tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress; tank. 64.13 Section 64.13 Shipping... CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.13 Allowable stress; tank. (a) The calculated stress in... not exceed the allowable stress listed in Division 1 of section VIII of the ASME Code, for a...

  10. Experimental Stress Analysis of Stiffened Cylinders with Cutouts : Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlechte, Floyd R; Rosecrans, Richard

    1954-01-01

    Bending tests were made on a cylindrical semimonocoque shell of circular cross section. The cylinder was tested without a cutout and then with a rectangular cutout which was successively enlarged through six sizes varying from 30 degrees to 130 degrees in circumference and from 1 to 2 bays in length. Strain measurements were made with resistance-type wire strain gages near the cutout on the stringers, the skin, and the rings for each size of cutout, and the stresses obtained are presented in tables. (author)

  11. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  12. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  13. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  14. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  15. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  16. 46 CFR 64.15 - Allowable stress; framework.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress; framework. 64.15 Section 64.15... AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.15 Allowable stress; framework. The calculated stress for the framework must be 80 percent or less of the minimum yield stress of the framework...

  17. Xyloglucan for generating tensile stress to bend tree stem.

    PubMed

    Baba, Kei'ichi; Park, Yong Woo; Kaku, Tomomi; Kaida, Rumi; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Yoshida, Masato; Hosoo, Yoshihiro; Ojio, Yasuhisa; Okuyama, Takashi; Taniguchi, Toru; Ohmiya, Yasunori; Kondo, Teiji; Shani, Ziv; Shoseyov, Oded; Awano, Tatsuya; Serada, Satoshi; Norioka, Naoko; Norioka, Shigemi; Hayashi, Takahisa

    2009-09-01

    In response to environmental variation, angiosperm trees bend their stems by forming tension wood, which consists of a cellulose-rich G (gelatinous)-layer in the walls of fiber cells and generates abnormal tensile stress in the secondary xylem. We produced transgenic poplar plants overexpressing several endoglycanases to reduce each specific polysaccharide in the cell wall, as the secondary xylem consists of primary and secondary wall layers. When placed horizontally, the basal regions of stems of transgenic poplars overexpressing xyloglucanase alone could not bend upward due to low strain in the tension side of the xylem. In the wild-type plants, xyloglucan was found in the inner surface of G-layers during multiple layering. In situ xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity showed that the incorporation of whole xyloglucan, potentially for wall tightening, began at the inner surface layers S1 and S2 and was retained throughout G-layer development, while the incorporation of xyloglucan heptasaccharide (XXXG) for wall loosening occurred in the primary wall of the expanding zone. We propose that the xyloglucan network is reinforced by XET to form a further connection between wall-bound and secreted xyloglucans in order to withstand the tensile stress created within the cellulose G-layer microfibrils. PMID:19825666

  18. Relaxation of bending stresses and the reversibility of residual stresses in amorphous soft magnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil’nikov, P. S.

    2015-06-15

    The reversibility of residual bending stresses is revealed in ribbon samples of cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys Co{sub 69}Fe{sub 3.7}Cr{sub 3.8}Si{sub 12.5}B{sub 11} and Fe{sub 57}Co{sub 31}Si{sub 2.9}B{sub 9.1}: the ribbons that are free of applied stresses and bent under the action of residual stresses become completely or incompletely straight upon annealing at the initial temperatures. The influence of annealing on the relaxation of bending stresses is studied. Preliminary annealing is found to sharply decrease the relaxation rate of bending stresses, and the initial stage of fast relaxation of these stresses is absent. Complete straightening of preliminarily annealed ribbons is shown to occur at significantly higher temperatures than that of the initial ribbons. Incomplete straightening of the ribbons is explained by the fact that bending stresses relaxation at high annealing temperatures proceeds due to both reversible anelastic deformation and viscous flow, which is a fully irreversible process. Incomplete reversibility is also caused by irreversible processes, such as the release of excess free volume and clustering (detected by small-angle X-ray scattering). The revealed differences in the relaxation processes that occur in the cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys are discussed in terms of different atomic diffusion mobilities in these alloys.

  19. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-06

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  20. An investigation of the behavior of the clamp-induced bending stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S. N.

    1991-12-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is a demonstration and test facility for the sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. Insulated pipe clamps are used in the heat transport and safety related systems. This investigation determines whether the clamp induced pipe stresses should be classified as primary or secondary stresses. Three finite element models were developed using the ANSYS computer program. Inelastic analyses were performed to investigate the behavior of meridional bending stress and hoop bending stress. The double exponential creep law of 316 stainless steel was used in the creep analysis. Results indicate that pipe bending stresses do not completely relax with time. Therefore, a portion of the meridional bending stress and the hoop bending stress should be classified as primary stress.

  1. The effect of bending on the normalized stress at roots of threaded connectors

    SciTech Connect

    Burguete, R.L.; Patterson, E.A. . Dept. of Mechanical and Process Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    Three-dimensional photoelasticity was used to analyze the effect of bending on the normalized stress at the roots of threaded connectors. Loading was effected by steel cages and a combination of eccentric weights (to provide the bending load) and concentric weights (to provide the axial load). The ratio of the bending stress to the axial stress was determined and various levels of this stress ratio, R[sub o], were tested. The connections were analyzed by taking thin slices in the plane of bending and perpendicular to it. The position of the maximum fringe order at the roots was determined using Mesnager's theorem and the maximum fringe order found by Tardy compensation. The fringe orders were normalized using the nominal axial stress and compared to those in connections without bending, exhibit a lower and broader peak of normalized stress values plotted against the helix length. The normalized stress values are also periodic in relation to the bending plane due to the variation in stress around the longitudinal axis of the bolt. It was found that bending in connectors will affect the normalized stress and that it is possible to determine this effect in a similar way to the method used for axially loaded connections.

  2. Proposal of improvement of debonding bending moment for pre-stressed CFRP bonded steel member

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Masaru; Ishikawa, Toshiyuki; Hattori, Atsushi; Kawano, Hirotaka

    Recently, some research reports on the application of pre-stressed CFRP plate on steel members have been published. However, the shear and peeling stresses in adhesive at the end of CFRP plates are induced by releasing the pre-tension as well as bending moment. Therefore, in the strengthening of steel members with the pre-stressed CFRP plate, the CFRP plate tends to have debonding in the lower bending moment. In this study, to reduce the shear and peeling stresses in adhesive by releasing the pre-tension of CFRP plates, installation of non pre-stressed regions in CFRP plate was proposed. By installing the non pre-stressed regions in CFRP plate, dividing the locations of higher stresses in adhesive by releasing the pre-tension and bending moment were revealed. Additionally, the design equation of length of non pre-stressed regions was also presented.

  3. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Basalt/Epoxy Composites under Bending Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrieh, Mahmood M.; Memar, Mahdi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the stress corrosion behavior of basalt/epoxy composites under bending loading and submerged in 5% sulfuric acid corrosive medium. There are limited numbers of research in durability of fiber reinforced polymer composites. Moreover, studies on basalt fibers and its composites are very limited. In this research, mechanical property degradation of basalt/epoxy composites under bending loading and submerged in acidic corrosive medium is investigated. Three states of stress, equal to 30%, 50% and 70% of the ultimate strength of composites, are applied on samples. High stress states are applied to the samples to accelerate the testing procedure. Mechanical properties degradation consists of bending strength, bending modulus of elasticity and fracture energy of samples are examined. Also, a normalized strength degradation model for stress corrosion condition is presented. Finally, microscopic images of broken cross sections of samples are examined.

  4. Assessment of Bending Fatigue Strength of Crankshaft Sections with Consideration of Quenching Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, W. J.; Dong, C.; Li, X.

    2016-03-01

    High-cycle bending fatigue is the primary failure mode of crankshafts in engines. Compressive residual stresses are often introduced by induction quenching to improve the fatigue strength of crankshafts. The residual stresses, which are commonly obtained by numerical methods, such as the finite element method (FEM), should be included in fatigue failure analysis to predict the fatigue strength of crankshafts accurately. In this study, the simulation method and theory of quenching process are presented and applied to investigate the residual stresses of a diesel engine crankshaft. The coupling calculation of temperature, microstructure, and stress fields of the crankshaft section is conducted by FEM. Then, the fatigue strength of the crankshaft section is analytically assessed by Susmel and Lazzarin's criterion based on the critical plane approach that superimposes the residual stresses onto the bending stresses. The resonant bending fatigue tests of the crankshaft sections are conducted, and the tests and analytical assessments yield consistent results.

  5. Effects of bending stresses and tube curvature on remote field eddy current signals

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.; Atherton, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of bending stresses and tube curvature on remote field eddy current signals were investigated. This technique is a recognized method for the nondestructive evaluation of ferromagnetic tubing, as used in heat exchangers and boiler systems. Different stress states were examined (elastic stress, plastic deformation, and residual stress) and found to give distinctive behavior. Elastic and residual stresses can appear as wall loss, depending on the operating frequency and baseline used for inspection and interpretation.

  6. ZERODUR: bending strength data for tensile stress loaded support structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizjak, Tanja; Hartmann, Peter; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    In the past ZERODUR® was mainly used for mirror and substrate applications, where mechanical loads were given by its own weight. Nowadays substrates become more sophisticated and subject to higher stresses as consequences of high operational accelerations or vibrations. The integrity of structures such as reticle and wafer stages e.g. must be guaranteed with low failure probability over their full intended life time. Their design requires statistically relevant strength data and information. The usual way determining the design strength employs statistical Weibull distributions obtained from a set of experimental data extrapolating the results to low acceptable failure probability values. However, in many cases this led to allowable stress values too low for the intended application. Moreover, the experimental basis has been found to be too small for reliable calculations. For these reasons measurement series on the strength of ZERODUR® have been performed with different surface conditions employing a standardized ring-on-ring test setup. The numbers of specimens per sample have been extended from about 20 to 100 or even much more. The results for surfaces ground with different diamond grain sizes D151, D64 and D25 as well as for etched surfaces are presented in this paper. Glass ceramics like all glassy materials exhibit some strength reduction when being exposed to loads above a tensile stress threshold over long time periods. The strength change of ZERODUR® with time will be discussed on the basis of known and newly determined stress corrosion data. The results for samples with large numbers of specimens contribute new aspects to the common practice of extrapolation to low failure probability, since they provide evidence for the existence of minimum strength values depending on the structures surface conditions. For ground surfaces the evidence for minimum strength values is quite obvious. For etched surfaces minimum values are to be expected also. However

  7. Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Tooth Bending Stress of Aerospace Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Bibel, George D.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study to investigate the bending stress in aerospace-quality spiral bevel gears was performed. Tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis Spiral Bevel Gear Test Facility. Multiple teeth on the spiral bevel pinion were instrumented with strain gages and tests were conducted from static (slow roll) to 14400 RPM at power levels to 540kW (720 hp). Effects of changing speed and load on the bending stress were measured. Experimental results are compared to those found by three-dimensional finite element analysis.

  8. Stress relaxation and recovery behaviour of composite orthodontic archwires in bending.

    PubMed

    Zufall, S W; Kusy, R P

    2000-02-01

    The viscoelastic behaviour of prototype composite orthodontic archwires was evaluated using a bend stress relaxation test. Archwires having 10 different volume fractions of reinforcement were subjected to constant bending radii in a water bath at 37 degrees C for time periods of up to 90 days. The wires were subsequently released and left unconstrained for the same testing conditions. Creep-induced changes in the unconstrained bending radii of the wires were measured at specific times during both phases (stress relaxation and recovery) of the test. The statistical analysis showed that stress relaxation behaviour was strongly correlated with the archwire reinforcement level. The final relaxation varied, with decreasing reinforcement, from 2 to 8 per cent. Archwire recovery was not correlated with reinforcement level, and revealed a final viscous loss of only 1 per cent. The relaxed elastic moduli in bending of the composite wires were similar to the elastic moduli in bending of several conventional orthodontic archwire materials. Losses that were associated with the viscoelastic behaviour varied with decreasing reinforcement level from 1.2 to 1.7 GPa. Because these modulus losses were minimal, each archwire retained sufficient resilience to be applicable to the early and intermediate stages of orthodontic treatment. PMID:10721240

  9. A Microbeam Bending Method for Studying Stress-Strain Relations for Metal Thin Films on Silicon Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Florando, J N; Nix, W D

    2004-02-12

    We have developed a microbeam bending technique for determining elastic-plastic, stress-strain relations for thin metal films on silicon substrates. The method is similar to previous microbeam bending techniques, except that triangular silicon microbeams are used in place of rectangular beams. The triangular beam has the advantage that the entire film on the top surface of the beam is subjected to a uniform state of plane strain as the beam is deflected, unlike the standard rectangular geometry where the bending is concentrated at the support. We present a method of analysis for determining two Ramberg-Osgood parameters for describing the stress-strain relation for the film. These parameters are obtained by fitting the elastic-plastic model to the measured load-displacement data, and utilizing the known elastic properties of both film and substrate. As a part of the analysis we compute the position of the neutral plane for bending, which changes as the film deforms plastically. This knowledge, in turn, allows average stress-strain relations to be determined accurately without forcing the film to closely follow the Ramberg-Osgood law. The method we have developed can be used to determine the elastic-plastic properties of thin metal films on silicon substrates up to strains of about 1%. Utilizing this technique, both yielding and strain hardening of Cu thin films on silicon substrates have been investigated. Copper films with dual crystallographic textures and different grain sizes, as well as others with strong <111> textures have been studied. Three strongly textured <111> films were studied to examine the effect of film thickness on the deformation properties of the film. These films show very high rates of work hardening, and an increase in the yield stress and work hardening rate with decreasing film thickness, consistent with current dislocation models.

  10. Laser bending of pre-stressed thin-walled nickel micro-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Jamil, M. S.; Imam Fauzi, E. R.; Juinn, C. S.; Sheikh, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Laser forming is an innovative technique of producing bending, spatial forming and alignment of both metallic and non-metallic parts by introducing thermal stresses into a work piece with a laser beam. It involves a complex interaction of process parameters to mechanical and thermal characteristics of materials. This paper presents a comprehensive experimental and numerical study of laser bending process of thin-walled micro-tubes. The effect of input parameters, namely laser power, pulse length and pre-stress constraint, on the process and the final product characteristics are investigated. Results of the analysis show that the bending angle of the tube increases considerably when a constraint is imposed at the tube's free end during the heating period. The introduction of compressive pre-stresses (from mechanical bending) in the irradiated region increases the final deformation which varies almost linearly with the amount of pre-stress. Due to high thermal conductivity and thin-walled structure of the tube, the heat dissipates quickly from the irradiated region to its surrounding material. Therefore, a combination of short pulse duration and high power is preferable to generate a higher thermal gradient and induce plastic strain. Design of experiment and regression analysis are implemented to develop an empirical model based on simulation results. Sensitivity analysis is also performed to determine the influence of independent variables on output response. It is evident that initial displacement and pulse length have a stronger positive effect on the output response as compared to laser power.

  11. Research on relation between bending stress and characteristic frequency of H-shaped beam by free vibration deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2014-05-27

    In order to investigate a relation between a bending stress and a characteristic frequency of a beam, 4-point loading which had constant moment region was conducted to a beam with H shape configuration experimentally and numerically. H-shaped beam has many characteristic deformation modes. Axial tensile stress in the beam made its characteristic frequency higher, and compressive stress lower. In the experiment, some characteristic frequencies got higher by a bending stress, and the others stayed in a small frequency fluctuation. The distinction is anticipated as a capability to measure a bending stress of a beam by its characteristic frequencies.

  12. Kerr microscopy studies of the effects of bending stress on galfenola)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunath, Ganesh; Marana, Michael; Na, Suok-Min; Flatau, Alison

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with using a magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) microscope to optically analyze the evolution of magnetic domains in a rolled and Goss textured galfenol (Fe81Ga19 + 1.0% NbC) sample when subjected to a bending stress. The initial magnetization state of the cantilevered sample was fixed along its length by a 0.3 T permanent magnet. The magnetic state was monitored with the MOKE microscope as a tip load was applied to bend the sample. The magnetic state of galfenol depends on its magneto-elastic properties. A finite element model that incorporates an energy based formulation of magnetostriction [W. D. Armstrong, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 263(1-2), 208-218 (2003)] was used to investigate the stresses in the sample and the corresponding change in the magnetic induction as bending occurred. A qualitative comparison with the domain pictures is presented, and the experimental micromagnetic behavior results are shown to correlate well to the macro scale bending stress and magnetization results obtained in the FEM simulations.

  13. Nucleation and Crystallization as Induced by Bending Stress in Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reis, Signo T.; Kim, Cheol W.; Brow, Richard K.; Ray, Chandra S.

    2003-01-01

    Glass Fibers of Li2O.2SiO2 (LS2) and Li2O.1.6SiO2 (LS1.6) compositions were heated near, but below, the glass transition temperature for different times while subjected to a constant bending stress of about 1.2 GPa. The nucleation density and the crystallization tendency estimated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) of a glass sample in the vicinity of the maximum of the bending stress increased relative to that of stress-free glass fibers. LS2 glass fibers were found more resistant to nucleation and crystallization than the Ls1.6 glass fibers. These results are discussed in regards to shear thinning effects on glass stability.

  14. Stress Intensity Factors of Semi-Circular Bend Specimens with Straight-Through and Chevron Notches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayatollahi, M. R.; Mahdavi, E.; Alborzi, M. J.; Obara, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Semi-circular bend specimen is one of the useful test specimens for determining fracture toughness of rock and geo-materials. Generally, in rock test specimens, initial cracks are produced in two shapes: straight-edge cracks and chevron notches. In this study, the minimum dimensionless stress intensity factors of semi-circular bend specimen (SCB) with straight-through and chevron notches are calculated. First, using finite element analysis, a suitable relation for the dimensionless stress intensity factor of SCB with straight-through crack is presented based on the normalized crack length and half-distance between supports. For evaluating the validity and accuracy of this relation, the obtained results are then compared with numerical and experimental results reported in the literature. Subsequently, by performing some experiments and also finite element analysis of the SCB specimen with chevron notch, the minimum dimensionless stress intensity factor of this specimen is obtained. Using the new equation for the dimensionless stress intensity factor of SCB with straight-through crack and an analytical method, i.e., Bluhm's slice synthesis method, the minimum (critical) dimensionless stress intensity factor of chevron notched semi-circular bend specimens is calculated. Good agreement is observed between the results of two mentioned methods.

  15. An Experimental Study of Fatigue Crack Growth in Aluminum Sheet Subjected to Combined Bending and Membrane Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of combined bending and membrane cyclic stresses on the fatigue crack growth behavior of aluminum sheet material. The materials used in the tests were 0.040-in.- thick 2024-T3 alclad and 0.090-in.-thick 2024-T3 bare sheet. In the tests, the membrane stresses were applied as a constant amplitude loading at a stress ratio (minimum to maximum stress) of 0.02, and the bending stresses were applied as a constant amplitude deflection in phase with the membrane stresses. Tests were conducted at ratios of bending to membrane stresses (B/M) of 0, 0.75, and 1.50. The general trends of the results were for larger effects of bending for the higher B/M ratios, the lower membrane stresses, and the thicker material. The addition of cyclic bending stresses to a test with cyclic membrane stresses had only a small effect on the growth rates of through-thickness cracks in the thin material, but had a significant effect on the crack growth rates of through-thickness cracks in the thick material. Adding bending stresses to a test had the most effect on the initiation and early growth of cracks and had less effect on the growth of long through-thickness cracks.

  16. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. 230... Boilers and Appurtenances Allowable Stress § 230.25 Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. The maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  17. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. 230... Boilers and Appurtenances Allowable Stress § 230.25 Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. The maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  18. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. 230... Boilers and Appurtenances Allowable Stress § 230.25 Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. The maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  19. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. 230... Boilers and Appurtenances Allowable Stress § 230.25 Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. The maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  20. 49 CFR 230.25 - Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. 230... Boilers and Appurtenances Allowable Stress § 230.25 Maximum allowable stress on stays and braces. The maximum allowable stress per square inch of net cross sectional area on fire box and combustion...

  1. Bend stress relaxation and tensile primary creep of a polycrystalline alpha-SiC fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hee Man, Yun; Goldsby, Jon C.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the thermomechanical behavior (creep and stress relaxation) of ceramic fibers is of both practical and basic interest. On the practical level, ceramic fibers are the reinforcement for ceramic matrix composites which are being developed for use in high temperature applications. It is important to understand and model the total creep of fibers at low strain levels where creep is predominantly in the primary stage. In addition, there are many applications where the component will only be subjected to thermal strains. Therefore, the stress relaxation of composite consituents in such circumstances will be an important factor in composite design and performance. The objective of this paper is to compare and analyze bend stress relaxation and tensile creep data for alpha-SiC fibers produced by the Carborundum Co. (Niagara Falls, NY). This fiber is of current technical interest and is similar in composition to bulk alpha-SiC which has been studied under compressive creep conditions. The temperature, time, and stress dependences will be discussed for the stress relaxation and creep results. In addition, some creep and relaxation recovery experiments were performed in order to understand the complete viscoelastic behavior, i.e. both recoverable and nonrecoverable creep components of these materials. The data will be presented in order to model the deformation behavior and compare relaxation and/or creep behavior for relatively low deformation strain conditions of practical concern. Where applicable, the tensile creep results will be compared to bend stress relaxation data.

  2. Interpretation of bend strength increase of graphite by the couple-stress theory. [HTGR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, P.Y.

    1981-05-01

    This paper presents a continued evaluation of the applicability of the couple-stress constitutive theory to graphite. The evaluation is performed by examining four-point bend and uniaxial tensile data of various sized cylindrical and square specimens for three grades of graphites. These data are superficially inconsistent and, usually, at variance with the predictions of classical theories. Nevertheless, this evaluation finds that they can be consistently interpreted by the couple-stress theory. This is compatible with results of an initial evaluation that considered one size of cylindrical specimen for H-451 graphite.

  3. Transient thermal stress analysis and bending behavior of an angle-ply laminated slab

    SciTech Connect

    Ootao, Y.; Tanigawa, Y.; Murakami, H. Osaka Prefecture Univ., Sakai California Univ., La Jolla )

    1990-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a theoretical treatment of thermal stress and bending behavior in a transient state of a multilayered nonisotropic laminated slab. Consideration is given to an infinitely long laminated slab which consists of obliquely directed layers with orthotropic material properties. The thermoelastic problem for the slab under the condition of uniformly distributed heat supply from its one surface is solved in order to obtain the temperature solution and to evaluate the thermal stresses in a transient state. As an example, numerical calculations are carried out for the five-layered angle-ply laminate.

  4. A two-dimensional stress analysis of single lap joints subjected to external bending moments

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, Toshiyuki; Nakano, Katsuyuki; Toratani, Hiroshi

    1995-11-01

    The stress distribution of single lap adhesive joints subjected to external bending moments are analyzed as a three-body contact problem by using a two-dimensional theory of elasticity. In the analysis, two similar adherends and an adhesive are replaced by finite strips, respectively. In the numerical calculations, the effects of the ratio of Young;s modulus of adherends to that of adhesive and the adhesive thickness on the stress distribution at the interface are examined. As the results, it is seen that the stress singularity causes at the edges of the interfaces and the peel stress at the edges of the interface increases with a decrease of Young`s modulus of the adherends. In addition, photoelastic experiments are carried out. A fairly good agreement is seen between the analytical and the experimental results.

  5. Minimizing tooth bending stress in spur gears with simplified shapes of fillet and tool shape determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, N. L.

    2015-06-01

    The strength of a gear is typically defined relative to durability (pitting) and load capacity (tooth-breakage). Tooth-breakage is controlled by the root shape and this gear part can be designed because there is no contact between gear pairs here. The shape of gears is generally defined by different standards, with the ISO standard probably being the most common one. Gears are manufactured using two principally different tools: rack tools and gear tools. In this work, the bending stress of involute teeth is minimized by shape optimization made directly on the final gear. This optimized shape is then used to find the cutting tool (the gear envelope) that can create this optimized gear shape. A simple but sufficiently flexible root parameterization is applied and emphasis is put on the importance of separating the shape parameterization from the finite element analysis of stresses. Large improvements in the stress level are found.

  6. Measuring permeability and stress relaxation of young cement paste by beam bending

    SciTech Connect

    Vichit-Vadakan, W.; Scherer, George W

    2003-12-01

    When a saturated rod of a porous material is deflected in three-point bending, two types of time-dependent relaxation processes occur simultaneously: hydrodynamic relaxation, caused by the flow of liquid in the porous body, and viscoelastic (VE) relaxation of the solid network. By measuring the decrease in the force required to sustain a constant deflection, it is possible to obtain the permeability from the hydrodynamic relaxation function, in addition to the VE stress relaxation function of the sample. We report the early-age evolution of permeability, elastic modulus, and stress relaxation function for Type III Portland cement paste with water-cement (w/c) ratios of 0.45, 0.50, and 0.55. The stress relaxation function is shown to preserve its shape during aging; that function is numerically transformed into the creep function.

  7. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  8. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  9. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  10. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  11. 46 CFR 54.05-30 - Allowable stress values at low temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress values at low temperatures. 54.05-30... PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-30 Allowable stress values at low temperatures. (a) The Coast... nonferrous materials at low temperature for the purpose of establishing allowable stress values for...

  12. Three-point bending analysis of doubly clamped silicon nanowire beams; Young's modulus, initial stress, and crystal orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Yaish, Y. E. Calahorra, Y.; Shtempluck, O.; Kotchetkov, V.

    2015-04-28

    A non-linear model is introduced describing the force-deflection relation of doubly clamped beams, including initial stress. Several approximations for the exact model are developed and compared, revealing the importance of considering the initial stress during 3-point bending measurements analysis. A novel approximation is found to be better than others, and both the exact model and this approximation are in perfect agreement with finite element simulations. A brief experimental example of silicon nanowires is presented in which the Young's modulus, the initial stress, and the crystallographic growth orientation are extracted by 3-point bending analysis.

  13. Stress intensity and displacement coefficients for radially cracked ring segments subject to three-point bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The boudary collocation method was used to generate Mode 1 stress intensity and crack mouth displacement coefficients for internally and externally radially cracked ring segments (arc bend specimens) subjected to three point radial loading. Numerical results were obtained for ring segment outer to inner radius ratios (R sub o/ R sub i) ranging from 1.10 to 2.50 and crack length to width ratios (a/W) ranging from 0.1 to 0.8. Stress intensity and crack mouth displacement coefficients were found to depend on the ratios R sub o/R sub i and a/W as well as the included angle between the directions of the reaction forces.

  14. New insights on stress rotations from a forward regional model of the San Andreas fault system near its Big Bend in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzenz, D. D.; Miller, S. A.

    2004-08-01

    Understanding the stress field surrounding and driving active fault systems is an important component of mechanistic seismic hazard assessment. We develop and present results from a time-forward three-dimensional (3-D) model of the San Andreas fault system near its Big Bend in southern California. The model boundary conditions are assessed by comparing model and observed tectonic regimes. The model of earthquake generation along two fault segments is used to target measurable properties (e.g., stress orientations, heat flow) that may allow inferences on the stress state on the faults. It is a quasi-static model, where GPS-constrained tectonic loading drives faults modeled as mostly sealed viscoelastic bodies embedded in an elastic half-space subjected to compaction and shear creep. A transpressive tectonic regime develops southwest of the model bend as a result of the tectonic loading and migrates toward the bend because of fault slip. The strength of the model faults is assessed on the basis of stress orientations, stress drop, and overpressures, showing a departure in the behavior of 3-D finite faults compared to models of 1-D or homogeneous infinite faults. At a smaller scale, stress transfers from fault slip transiently induce significant perturbations in the local stress tensors (where the slip profile is very heterogeneous). These stress rotations disappear when subsequent model earthquakes smooth the slip profile. Maps of maximum absolute shear stress emphasize both that (1) future models should include a more continuous representation of the faults and (2) that hydrostatically pressured intact rock is very difficult to break when no material weakness is considered.

  15. New insights on stress rotations from a forward regional model of the San Andreas fault system near its Big Bend in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzenz, D.D.; Miller, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the stress field surrounding and driving active fault systems is an important component of mechanistic seismic hazard assessment. We develop and present results from a time-forward three-dimensional (3-D) model of the San Andreas fault system near its Big Bend in southern California. The model boundary conditions are assessed by comparing model and observed tectonic regimes. The model of earthquake generation along two fault segments is used to target measurable properties (e.g., stress orientations, heat flow) that may allow inferences on the stress state on the faults. It is a quasi-static model, where GPS-constrained tectonic loading drives faults modeled as mostly sealed viscoelastic bodies embedded in an elastic half-space subjected to compaction and shear creep. A transpressive tectonic regime develops southwest of the model bend as a result of the tectonic loading and migrates toward the bend because of fault slip. The strength of the model faults is assessed on the basis of stress orientations, stress drop, and overpressures, showing a departure in the behavior of 3-D finite faults compared to models of 1-D or homogeneous infinite faults. At a smaller scale, stress transfers from fault slip transiently induce significant perturbations in the local stress tensors (where the slip profile is very heterogeneous). These stress rotations disappear when subsequent model earthquakes smooth the slip profile. Maps of maximum absolute shear stress emphasize both that (1) future models should include a more continuous representation of the faults and (2) that hydrostatically pressured intact rock is very difficult to break when no material weakness is considered. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Irradiation Creep of Chemically Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide as Estimated by Bend Stress Relaxation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Kondo, Sosuke; Kohyama, Akira

    2007-01-01

    The bend stress relaxation technique was applied for an irradiation creep study of high purity, chemically vapor-deposited beta-phase silicon carbide (CVD SiC) ceramic. A constant bend strain was applied to thin strip samples during neutron irradiation to fluences 0.2-4.2 dpa at various temperatures in the range {approx}400 to {approx}1080 C. Irradiation creep strain at <0.7 dpa exhibited only a weak dependence on irradiation temperature. However, the creep strain dependence on fluence was non-linear due to the early domination of the initial transient creep, and a transition in creep behavior was found between 950 and 1080 C. Steady-state irradiation creep compliances of polycrystalline CVD SiC at doses >0.7 dpa were estimated to be 2.7({+-}2.6) x 10{sup -7} and 1.5({+-}0.8) x 10{sup -6} (MPa dpa){sup -1} at {approx}600 to {approx}950 C and {approx}1080 C, respectively, whereas linear-averaged creep compliances of 1-2 x 10{sup -6} (MPa dpa){sup -1} were obtained for doses of 0.6-0.7 dpa at all temperatures. Monocrystalline 3C SiC samples exhibited significantly smaller transient creep strain and greater subsequent deformation when loaded along <0 1 1> direction.

  17. Determination of the bending and buckling effect in the stress analysis of shell structures accessible from one side only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dose, A

    1941-01-01

    The present report describes a device for ascertaining the bending and buckling effect in stress measurements on shell structures accessible from one side only. Beginning with a discussion of the relationship between flexural strain and certain parameters, the respective errors of the test method for great or variable skin curvature within the test range are analyzed and illustrated by specimen example.

  18. Stress and stress relaxation behaviors of multi-layered polarizer structures under a reliability test condition characterized by use of a bending beam technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Taiy-In; Hsieh, Chih-Yung; Li, I.-Yin; Leu, Jihperng

    2015-04-01

    The bending curvature, stresses, and stress relaxation of various multi-layered structures with different adhesive layers pertaining to the polarizer in a thin-film transistor liquid-crystal display (TFT-LCD) have been successfully characterized by using bending beam technique under reliability test. To be more specific, three different types of pressure-sensitive adhesive (hard-, middle-, and soft-type) and various poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) stretched directions are devised to examine to key stress contributors and correlations with light leakage. The shrinkage stress in stretched PVA film and stress relaxation ability of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSA) layers are found to be the key factors determining the stress distribution and out-of-plane displacement of a polarizer stack. For hard-type PSA, its polarizer stack generates the highest bending curvature with maximum out-of-plane displacement but minimum in-plane displacement, leading to anisotropic stress distribution with high stress around the edges. On the other hand, polarizer stack with soft-type PSA yields the maximum in-plane displacement but the minimum out-of-plane displacement, resulting in isotropic stress distribution.

  19. An investigation of the bending stiffness of and the plane stresses generated by a flanged external fixator pin.

    PubMed

    Oni, O O; Capper, M; Soutis, C

    1995-02-01

    In an attempt to reduce pin loosening, a flanged external fixator pin has been designed and its bending stiffness has been compared with that of a standard pin. The pins were inserted into pilot holes previously drilled into a piece of teak hardwood. Loads of different magnitudes were applied at a fixed moment arm and force-deflection curves were obtained. Thereafter, percentage stiffness increase was calculated for each pilot hole size. The results show that the addition of a collar to the external fixator pin increases its stiffness and its ability to resist bending forces. In a parallel study, the stresses generated at the pin-bone interface by this pin and a standard pin were compared using finite element analysis techniques. The results show that the flange significantly reduced the stresses generated at the pin-bone interface. In addition, stresses were dissipated over a wider area. PMID:7714660

  20. Experimental thermo-stress analysis for a bending shape control of composite beams embedded with SMA wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Gang; Lloyd, Peter

    2009-07-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to design and fabricate smart composite beams embedded with prestrained nitinol wire actuators. The fabrication process developed allowed both quasi-isotropic E-glass/epoxy and carbon/epoxy hosts to be eccentrically embedded with 10 parallel prestrained wires with a purpose-made alignment device and cured successfully in an autoclave. Smart composite beams of three different lengths were made for each type of host. Both single-cycle and multi-cycle thermomechanical bending actuations of these beams in the cantilever set-up were characterised experimentally by applying various levels of electric current to the nitinol wires. The performance characteristics showed that the present fabrication process was repeatable and reliable. While the end deflections of up to 41 mm were easily achieved from smart E-glass/epoxy beams, the limited end deflections were observed from the smart carbon/epoxy beams due primarily to our inability to insulate the nitinol wires. Moreover, it seemed necessary to overheat the prestrained wires to much higher temperatures beyond the complete reverse transformation in order to generate recovery stress.

  1. Bending and Shear Stresses Developed by the Instantaneous Arrest of the Root of a Moving Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, Elbridge, Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation has been made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in transverse motion when its root is suddenly brought to rest. Equations are given for determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that arise in the beam as a result of the impact. The theoretical equations, which have been confirmed experimentally, reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam, whereas the shear stresses vary inversely with the length.

  2. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  3. Flexibility of branch connections and B31.3 allowable stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Rodabaugh, E.C.; Wais, E.A.

    1996-12-01

    The guidance for flexibility factors for branch connections contained in ASME piping Codes, B31.1 and B31.3 are reviewed and suggestions for modification are provided. Examples are provided which demonstrate potential conservatism in the Code methodology. Other items are discussed including branch connection stress intensification factors, B31.1 allowable stresses including margins on stress. Recommendations are provided for consideration by B31 Code Committees.

  4. Tectonic stress evolution in the Pan-African Lufilian Arc and its foreland (Katanga, DRC): orogenic bending, late orogenic extensional collapse and transition to rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipata, M. L.; Delvaux, D.; Sebagenzi, M. N.; Cailteux, J.; Sintubin, M.

    2012-04-01

    Between the paroxysm of the Lufilian orogeny at ~ 550 Ma and the late Neogene to Quaternary development of the south-western branch of the East African rift system, the tectonic evolution of the Lufilian Arc and Kundelungu foreland in the Katanga region of the Democratic Republic of Congo remains poorly unknown although it caused important Cu-dominated mineral remobilizations leading to world-class ore deposits. This long period is essentially characterized by brittle tectonic deformations that have been investigated by field studies in open mines spread over the entire arc and foreland. Paleostress tensors were computed for a database of 1450 fault-slip data by interactive stress tensor inversion and data subset separation, and the relative succession of 8 brittle deformation events established. The oldest brittle structures observed are related to the Lufilian brittle compressional climax (stage 1). They have been re-oriented during the orogenic bending that led to the arcuate shape of the belt. Unfolding the stress directions from the first stage allows to reconstruct a consistent NE-SW direction of compression for this stage. Constrictional deformation occurred in the central part of the arc, probably during orogenic bending (Stage 2). After the orogenic bending, a sequence of 3 deformation stages marks the progressive onset of late-orogenic extension: strike-slip deformations (stages 3-4) and late-orogenic arc-parallel extension (stage 5). It is proposed that these 3 stages correspond to orogenic collapse. In early Mesozoic, NW-SE compression was induced by a transpressional inversion, interpreted as induced by far-field stresses generated at the southern active margin of Gondwana (stage 6). Since then, this region was affected by rift-related extension, successively in a NE-SW direction (stage 7, Tanganyika trend) and NW-SE direction (stage 8, Moero trend).

  5. Length and Width Effects of Metal Films on Stress-Induced Bending of Surface Micromachined Cantilever Curved Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ju-Nan

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the length and width effects of metal films on the stress-induced bending of a surface micromachined cantilever curved grating are systematically investigated. A characterization of cantilever curved gratings with various lengths and widths was conducted to observe out-of-plane deformation. A finite element model was established to analyze the deformation. Finite element analysis and experimental results indicate that the commonly used beam theory formula for predicting the deformation of surface micromachined cantilever curved gratings is not valid for these devices. Experiments show that the shape of a cantilever curved grating and residual stress have a close relationship. As the length increases, the residual stress of the metal increases, resulting in a larger out-of-plane deformation of the cantilever curved grating. The tip deflection gradually decreases as the length-to-width ratio of the cantilever curved grating increases. A more reliable shape design of metal films on the stress-induced bending of surface micromachined cantilever curved gratings can thus be achieved.

  6. Stress concentrations for straight-shank and countersunk holes in plates subjected to tension, bending, and pin loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A three dimensional stress concentration analysis was conducted on straight shank and countersunk (rivet) holes in a large plate subjected to various loading conditions. Three dimensional finite element analysis were performed with 20 node isoparametric elements. The plate material was assumed to be linear elastic and isotropic, with a Poisson ratio of 0.3. Stress concentration along the bore of the hole were computed for several ratios of hole radius to plate thickness (0.1 to 2.5) and ratios of countersink depth to plate thickness (0.25 to 1). The countersink angles were varied from 80 to 100 degrees in some typical cases, but the angle was held constant at 100 degrees for most cases. For straight shank holes, three types of loading were considered: remote tension, remote bending, and wedge loading in the hole. Results for remote tension and wedge loading were used to estimate stress concentration for simulated rivet in pin loading. For countersunk holes only remote tension and bending were considered. Based on the finite element results, stress concentration equations were developed. Whenever possible, the present results were compared with other numerical solutions and experimental results from the literature.

  7. Bending and shear stresses developed by the instantaneous arrest of the root of a cantilever beam rotating with constant angular velocity about a transverse axis through the root

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, Elbridge Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in rotational motion about a transverse axis through the root determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that occur in the beam as a result of the arrest of motion. The equations for bending and shear stress reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip and at a given trip velocity, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam and the shear stresses vary inversely with the length. When examined with respect to a given angular velocity instead of a given tip velocity, the equations reveal that the bending stress is proportional to the length of the beam whereas the shear stress is independent of the length. Sufficient experimental verification of the theory has previously been given in connection with another problem of the same type.

  8. Stress-intensity factors for circumferential surface cracks in pipes and rods under tension and bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present stress-intensity factors for a wide range of nearly semi-elliptical surface cracks in pipes and rods. The configurations were subjected to either remote tension or bending loads. For pipes, the ratio of crack depth to crack length (a/c) ranged from 0.6 to 1; the ratio of crack depth to wall thickness (a/t) ranged from 0.2 to 0.8; and the ratio of internal radius to wall thickness (R/t) ranged from 1 to 10. For rods, the ratio of crack depth to crack length also ranged from 0.6 to 1; and the ratio of crack depth to rod diameter (a/D) ranged from 0.05 to 0.35. These particular crack configurations were chosen to cover the range of crack shapes (a/c) that have been observed in experiments conducted on pipes and rods under tension and bending fatigue loads. The stress-intensity factors were calculated by a three-dimensional finite-element method. The finite-element models employed singularity elements along the crack front and linear-strain elements elsewhere. The models had about 6500 degrees of freedom. The stress-intensity factors were evaluated using a nodal-force method.

  9. A Global Model of Mantle Convection that Incorporates Plate Bending Forces, Slab Pull, and Seismic Constraints on the Plate Stress.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K.; Buffett, B.; Becker, T.

    2008-12-01

    We introduce a global mantle convection model employing mantle density anomalies inferred from seismic tomography to determine present day plate motions. Our approach addresses two aspects that are not usually considered in previous work. First, we include forces associated with the bending of subducting plates. The bending forces oppose the plate motion, and may be comparable in magnitude to other important forces at subduction zones, including slab pull. Second, our model incorporates data from the Global CMT Catalog. We use the focal mechanisms of earthquakes associated with subducting slabs to estimate the relative occurrence of compressional and tensional axes in the down-dip direction of subducting slabs. This information is used to infer the state of stress in the subducting slab, which we use to calculate slab pull forces. We investigate regional variations in slab pull by comparing plate motions derived using seismic constraints with those derived using slab pull forces based solely on the age of subducting plates. Furthermore, we constrain the rheology of subducted plates by comparing plate motions predicted with and without bending forces. Although our current model uses only radial variations in mantle viscosity, we include the capability of permitting lateral variations in viscosity by calculating buoyancy and plate-driven flows using Citcom

  10. Bending stress determination in pipes using a radial in-plane digital speckle pattern interferometer combined with instrumented indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Filipe; Viotti, Matias R.; Albertazzi G., Armando, Jr.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a modular device based on digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) combined with an instrumented indenter. The system is divided in two modules, the interferometric and the indentation module. The former uses a diffractive optical element (DOE) to obtain radial in-plane sensitivity. This module measures the whole shallow displacement field generated by the indentation print on the surface of the material under testing. The latter module is sized suitably with the interferometric module. The indentation module uses a mechanical/hydraulic scheme to provide the system a high loading capability. A piezoelectric loading cell and an inductive transducer are used to simultaneously measure the load applied on the ball indenter and its penetration on the material. For the experimental tests, a bench capable to apply in a specific pipe a very well-known bending moment was used. This bench is mounted with two 12- meters pipes disposed horizontally. A transverse load is applied in the central cross-section of both pipes. The load application is made by a hydraulic actuator and measured with a load cell. Strain-gages are also used in a half-bridge configuration to measure the strain in the 8 cross-sections distributed along the pipe length. Each cross-section was measured by the proposed instrumented indentation system and compared with the strain-gages and load cell measurements. The results obtained show an uncertainty level around 20-30% of the measured bending stress. Good agreement was found between the computed bending stress using the strain-gages, load cell and the proposed method using the instrumented indentation system.

  11. Modeling of the bending strain dependence of the critical current in Bi2223/Ag composite tapes based on the damage stress of the superconducting filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Xiaofan; Shen, Qiang

    2012-05-01

    An analysis model of the bending strain dependence of the critical current in multifilamentary Bi2223/Ag composite tapes is presented. To investigate the effect of the mechanical properties of the Bi2223 superconducting filament, the actual part for carrying current, its damage stress and elastic modulus are introduced. The calculated result of the variation of the critical current with the bending strain is well agreed with the experimental one. The further studies find that the mechanical properties of the filament have a remarkable effect on the bending strain dependence of the critical current. Specifically, the larger the damage stress and elastic modulus of the filament are, the higher the critical current is, when the bending strain increases to a larger value beyond the critical one.

  12. Analysis of residual stress and hardness in regions of pre-manufactured and manual bends in fixation plates for maxillary advancement.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marcelo Marotta; Lauria, Andrezza; Mendes, Marcelo Breno Meneses; Claro, Ana Paula Rosifini Alves; Claro, Cristiane Aparecida de Assis; Moreira, Roger William Fernandes

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze, through Vickers hardness test and photoelasticity analysis, pre-bent areas, manually bent areas, and areas without bends of 10-mm advancement pre-bent titanium plates (Leibinger system). The work was divided into three groups: group I-region without bend, group II-region of 90° manual bend, and group III-region of 90° pre-fabricated bends. All the materials were evaluated through hardness analysis by the Vickers hardness test, stress analysis by residual images obtained in a polariscope, and photoelastic analysis by reflection during the manual bending. The data obtained from the hardness tests were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's tests at a significance level of 5 %. The pre-bent plate (group III) showed hardness means statistically significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the other groups (I-region without bends, II-90° manually bent region). Through the study of photoelastic reflection, it was possible to identify that the stress gradually increased, reaching a pink color (1.81 δ / λ), as the bending was performed. A general analysis of the results showed that the bent plate region of pre-bent titanium presented the best results. PMID:25944727

  13. Induction of optical vortex in the crystals subjected to bending stresses.

    PubMed

    Skab, Ihor; Vasylkiv, Yurij; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2012-08-20

    We describe a method for generation of optical vortices that relies on bending of transparent parallelepiped-shaped samples fabricated from either glass or crystalline solid materials. It is shown that the induced singularity of optical indicatrix rotation leads in general to appearance of a mixed screw-edge dislocation of the phase front of outgoing optical beam. At the same time, some specified geometrical parameters of the sample can ensure generation of a purely screw dislocation of the phase front and, as a result, a singly charged canonical optical vortex. PMID:22907006

  14. Effects of chirality and surface stresses on the bending and buckling of chiral nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Shan; Shimada, Takahiro; Wang, Gang-Feng; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Due to their superior optical, elastic and electrical properties, chiral nanowires have many applications as sensors, probes, and building blocks of nanoelectromechanical systems. In this paper, we develop a refined Euler-Bernoulli beam model for chiral nanowires with surface effects and material chirality incorporated. This refined model is employed to investigate the bending and buckling of chiral nanowires. It is found that surface effects and material chirality significantly affect the elastic behaviour of chiral nanowires. This study is helpful not only for understanding the size-dependent behaviour of chiral nanowires, but also for characterizing their mechanical properties.

  15. Results of u-bend stress-corrosion-cracking specimen exposures in coal-liquefaction pilot plants

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Keiser, J.R.; Allen, M.D.; Howell, M.; Newsome, J.F.

    1982-04-01

    Pilot plants with capacities of up to 600 tons/d are currently demonstrating the engineering feasibility of several coal liquefaction processes including Solvent Refined Coal (SRC), Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS), and H-Coal. These plants are the first step toward commercial production of synthetic fuels. Among other factors, development of the technology depends on reliable materials performance. A concern is the application of those austenitic stainless steels necessary for general corrosion resistance, because they are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. This cracking results from tensile stresses in combination with offensive agents such as polythionic acids, chlorides, and caustics. To screen candidate construction materials for resistance to stress corrosion cracking, we exposed racks of stressed U-bend specimens in welded and as-wrought conditions at four coal liquefaction pilot plants. Results from exposures through June 1980 were described in a previous report for exposures in the SRC plants. This report summarizes the on-site test results from June 1980 through October 1981 for the two SRC pilot plants and the H-Coal and Exxon coal liquefaction pilot plants.

  16. Bending fatigue tests on SiC-Al tapes under alternating stress at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a testing method for fatigue tests on SiC-Al tapes containing a small amount of SiC filaments under alternating stress is reported. The fatigue strength curves resulting for this composite are discussed. They permit an estimate of its behavior under continuous stress and in combination with various other matrices, especially metal matrices.

  17. Effects of magnetomechanical vibrations and bending stresses on three-phase three-leg transformers with amorphous cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chang-Hung; Chang, Yeong-Hwa; Lee, Chun-Yao; Yao, Chia-Shiang; He, Yan-Lou; Chu, Huei-Lung; Chang, Chia-Wen; Chan, Wei-Shou

    2012-04-01

    This paper explores the influence of bending stresses on the magnetic characteristics of three-phase transformers with amorphous cores. Different types of core structures, including C-cores and toroidal cores, and their magnetic properties are compared using VSM and XRD. The losses in the magnetic core of the three-phase transformer are analyzed using the finite element analysis for both design and measurement. In addition, experimental results indicated that amorphous-core transformers with rectangular corners had higher audible noise and vibration intensities. This is because the condensed distribution of magnetic flux lines in the corners of the core may create high magnetic inductions associated with high magnetostriction. Finally, experiments with three-phase amorphous-core transformers were performed to study the effects of magnetism and magnetostriction on their performance in terms of core loss, vibration, and audible noise.

  18. Flow Stress Analysis and Hot Bending of P11 Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fu-ye; Jin, Kai; Wang, Hui; Pei, Wen-Jiao; Tang, Xiao-Bin; Tao, Jie; Guo, Xun-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Based on the growing application value of the P11 alloy steel in the nuclear power field, its dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behavior was firstly investigated by means of isothermal hot compression experiments, under the conditions of a testing temperature range between 800 and 950 °C, and a strain rate range between 0.01 and 2/s. Furthermore, optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were also employed to analyze the effect of the mechanism of the strain rate on DRX. The results indicated that the grain size could be significantly refined with the increase of strain rate. Also, the recrystallized volume fraction was increased and the dislocation density decreased with the decrease of strain rate, for the same strain values. Subsequently, numerical simulations, under the assistance of experimental results on DRX behavior, were successfully used to study the hot push bending process and simultaneously obtain the processing parameters of the actual work-pieces. Finally, some comparative analyses were performed and discussed in parallel with the deformed actual work-pieces. The EBSD results on the deformed P11 alloy steel were emphasized for exploring the forming properties of this alloy steel.

  19. Shallow Flaws Under Biaxial Loading Conditions, Part II: Application of a Weibull Stress Analysis of the Cruciform Bend Specimen Using a Hydrostatic Stress Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.

    1999-08-01

    Cruciform beam fracture mechanics specimensl have been developed in the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a prototypic, far- field, out-of-plane biaxird bending stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear biaxial stresses resulting from pressurized-thernxd-shock or pressure-temperature loading of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shtdlow, surface flaws. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. Two and three- parameter Weibull models have been calibrated using a new scheme (developed at the University of Illinois) that maps toughness data from test specimens with distinctly different levels of crack-tip constraint to a small scale yielding (SSY) Weibull stress space. These models, using the new hydrostatic stress criterion in place of the more commonly used maximum principal stress in the kernel of the OW integral definition, have been shown to correlate the experimentally observed biaxiaI effect in cruciform specimens, thereby providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states.

  20. Sensing cantilever beam bending by the optical lever technique and its application to surface stress.

    PubMed

    Evans, Drew R; Craig, Vincent S J

    2006-03-23

    Cantilever beams, both microscopic and macroscopic, are used as sensors in a great variety of applications. An optical lever system is commonly employed to determine the deflection and thereby the profile of the cantilever under load. The sensitivity of the optical lever must be calibrated, and this is usually achieved by application of a known load or deflection to the free end of the cantilever. When the sensing operation involves a different type of load or a combination of types of loadings, the calibration and the deflection values derived from it become invalid. Here we develop a master equation that permits the true deflection of the cantilever to be obtained simply from the measurement of the apparent deflection for uniformly distributed loadings and end-moment loadings. These loadings are relevant to the uniform adsorption or application of material to the cantilever or the application of a surface stress to the cantilever and should assist experimentalists using the optical lever, such as in the atomic force microscope, to measure cantilever deflections in a great variety of sensing applications. We then apply this treatment to the experimental evaluation of surface stress. Three forms of Stoney's equation that relate the apparent deflection to the surface stress, which is valid for both macroscopic and microscopic experiments, are derived. Analysis of the errors arising from incorrect modeling of the loading conditions of the cantilever currently applied in experiments is also presented. It is shown that the reported literature values for surface stress in microscopic experiments are typically 9% smaller than their true value. For macroscopic experiments, we demonstrate that the added mass of the film or coating generally dominates the measured deflection and must be accounted for accurately if surface stress measurements are to be made. Further, the reported measurements generally use a form of Stoney's equation that is in error, resulting in an

  1. A finite-difference program for stresses in anisotropic, layered plates in bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamon, N. J.

    1975-01-01

    The interlaminar stresses induced in a layered laminate that is bent into a cylindrical surface are studied. The laminate is modeled as a continuum, and the resulting elasticity equations are solved using the finite difference method. The report sets forth the mathematical framework, presents some preliminary results, and provides a listing and explanation of the computer program. Significant among the results are apparent symmetry relationships that will reduce the numerical size of certain problems and an interlaminar stress behavior having a sharp rise at the free edges.

  2. Bending strain tolerance of MgB2 superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, P.; Hušek, I.; Melišek, T.; Kulich, M.; Kopera, L.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the strain tolerance of MgB2 superconductors subjected to variable bending stresses. Bending of MgB2 wire was done at room temperature in different modes: (i) direct bending of straight annealed samples to variable diameters and by (ii) indirect bending by straightening of bent and annealed samples. I c-bending strain characteristics of samples made by in situ PIT and by the internal magnesium diffusion (IMD) process were measured at 4.2 K. The results show a good agreement between the direct and indirect bending mode, which allows easier estimation of limits important for the winding process of MgB2 superconductors with brittle filaments. A comparison of MgB2 wires made by in situ PIT and IMD processes showed improved strain tolerance for IMD due to better grain connectivity the low annealing temperature, which does not appear to reduce the mechanical strength of sheath material.

  3. Variable-load stress analysis of threaded connections of high-strength materials with allowance for process-induced residual stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. F.; Konovalov, G. V.; Minin, B. V.; Kirpichev, V. A.

    Results of residual stress measurements and fatigue tests are presented for bolts of VT16 titanium alloy manufactured by various methods. A method is proposed for plotting the maximum-amplitude diagram of the stress cycle of a threaded joint with allowance for the residual stresses in the thread grooves. The calculated results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  4. Combined bending-torsion fatigue reliability of AISI 4340 steel shafting with K sub t = 2.34. [stress concentration factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kececioglu, D.; Chester, L. B.; Dodge, T. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results generated by three, unique fatigue reliability research machines which can apply reversed bending loads combined with steady torque are presented. Six-inch long, AISI 4340 steel, grooved specimens with a stress concentration factor of 2.34 and R sub C 35/40 hardness were subjected to various combinations of these loads and cycled to failure. The generated cycles-to-failure and stress-to-failure data are statistically analyzed to develop distributional S-N and Goodman diagrams. Various failure theories are investigated to determine which one represents the data best. The effect of the groove and of the various combined bending-torsion loads on the S-N and Goodman diagrams are determined. Three design applications are presented. The third one illustrates the weight savings that may be achieved by designing for reliability.

  5. The Alternative Role of Enterobactin as an Oxidative Stress Protector Allows Escherichia coli Colony Development

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Daiana R.; Pomares, María Fernanda; de Cristóbal, Ricardo E.; Vincent, Paula A.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bacteria have evolved different iron uptake systems with the ability to make use of their own and heterologous siderophores. However, there is growing evidence attributing alternative roles for siderophores that might explain the potential adaptive advantages of microorganisms having multiple siderophore systems. In this work, we show the requirement of the siderophore enterobactin for Escherichia coli colony development in minimal media. We observed that a strain impaired in enterobactin production (entE mutant) was unable to form colonies on M9 agar medium meanwhile its growth was normal on LB agar medium. Given that, neither iron nor citrate supplementation restored colony growth, the role of enterobactin as an iron uptake-facilitator would not explain its requirement for colony development. The absence of colony development was reverted either by addition of enterobactin, the reducing agent ascorbic acid or by incubating in anaerobic culture conditions with no additives. Then, we associated the enterobactin requirement for colony development with its ability to reduce oxidative stress, which we found to be higher in media where the colony development was impaired (M9) compared with media where the strain was able to form colonies (LB). Since oxyR and soxS mutants (two major stress response regulators) formed colonies in M9 agar medium, we hypothesize that enterobactin could be an important piece in the oxidative stress response repertoire, particularly required in the context of colony formation. In addition, we show that enterobactin has to be hydrolyzed after reaching the cell cytoplasm in order to enable colony development. By favoring iron release, hydrolysis of the enterobactin-iron complex, not only would assure covering iron needs, but would also provide the cell with a molecule with exposed hydroxyl groups (hydrolyzed enterobactin). This molecule would be able to scavenge radicals and therefore reduce oxidative stress. PMID:24392154

  6. A global-local higher order theory including interlaminar stress continuity and C0 plate bending element for cross-ply laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Wu; Wanji, Chen

    2010-04-01

    A C0-type global-local higher order theory including interlaminar stress continuity is proposed for the cross-ply laminated composite and sandwich plates in this paper, which is able to a priori satisfy the continuity conditions of transverse shear stresses at interfaces. Moreover, total number of unknowns involved in the model is independent of number of layers. Compared to other higher-order theories satisfying the continuity conditions of transverse shear stresses at interfaces, merit of the proposed model is that the first derivatives of transverse displacement w have been taken out from the in-plane displacement fields, so that the C0 interpolation functions is only required during its finite element implementation. To verify the present model, a C0 three-node triangular element is used for bending analysis of laminated composite and sandwich plates. It ought to be shown that all variables involved in present model are discretized by only using linear interpolation functions within an element. Numerical results show that the C0 plate element based on the present theory may accurately calculate transverse shear stresses without any postprocessing, and the present results agree well with those obtained from the C1-type higher order theory. Compared with the C1 plate bending element, the present finite element is simple, convenient to use and accurate enough.

  7. HIF1α represses cell stress pathways to allow proliferation of hypoxic fetal cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães-Camboa, Nuno; Stowe, Jennifer; Aneas, Ivy; Sakabe, Noboru; Cattaneo, Paola; Henderson, Lindsay; Kilberg, Michael S.; Johnson, Randall S.; Chen, Ju; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Evans, Sylvia M.; Zambon, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional mediators of cell stress pathways, including HIF1α, ATF4, and p53, are key to normal development and play critical roles in disease, including ischemia and cancer. Despite their importance, mechanisms by which pathways mediated by these transcription factors interact with each other are not fully understood. In addressing the controversial role of HIF1α in cardiomyocytes (CMs) during heart development, we have discovered a mid-gestational requirement for HIF1α for proliferation of hypoxic CMs, involving metabolic switching and a complex interplay between HIF1α, ATF4 and p53. Loss of HIF1α resulted in activation of ATF4 and p53, the latter inhibiting CM proliferation. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses revealed unexpected mechanisms by which HIF1α intersects with ATF4 and p53 pathways. Our results highlight previously undescribed roles of HIF1α and interactions between major cell stress pathways that could be targeted to enhance proliferation of CMs in ischemia, and may have relevance to other diseases, including cancer. PMID:26028220

  8. Thermoelastoplastic stress state of a cylindrical vessel in the vicinity of an annular weld with allowance for loading history

    SciTech Connect

    Piskun, V.V.

    1985-11-01

    The present study numerically investigates the axisymmetric thermoelastoplastic stress state of a discretely nonuniform cylindrical shell in the region of an annular weld with allowance for the history of mechanical and thermal loading. This is based on the assumption that there are no residual stresses and strains after welding and creep strain can be ignored. The authors assume that the shell is a component part of a closed cylindrical vessel which is under internal pressure. They examine a loading process, consiting of three stages. Two calculations are performed with the loading history described in the paper.

  9. Increasing the Oxidative Stress Response Allows Escherichia coli To Overcome Inhibitory Effects of Condensed Tannins

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexandra H.; Imlay, James A.; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2003-01-01

    Tannins are plant-derived polyphenols with antimicrobial effects. The mechanism of tannin toxicity towards Escherichia coli was determined by using an extract from Acacia mearnsii (Black wattle) as a source of condensed tannins (proanthocyanidins). E. coli growth was inhibited by tannins only when tannins were exposed to oxygen. Tannins auto-oxidize, and substantial hydrogen peroxide was generated when they were added to aerobic media. The addition of exogenous catalase permitted growth in tannin medium. E. coli mutants that lacked HPI, the major catalase, were especially sensitive to tannins, while oxyR mutants that constitutively overexpress antioxidant enzymes were resistant. A tannin-resistant mutant was isolated in which a promoter-region point mutation increased the level of HPI by 10-fold. Our results indicate that wattle condensed tannins are toxic to E. coli in aerobic medium primarily because they generate H2O2. The oxidative stress response helps E. coli strains to overcome their inhibitory effect. PMID:12788743

  10. Modulation of oxidative stress and subsequent induction of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress allows citral to decrease cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Arvinder; Felder, Mildred; Fass, Lucas; Kaur, Justanjot; Czarnecki, Austin; Rathi, Kavya; Zeng, San; Osowski, Kathryn Kalady; Howell, Colin; Xiong, May P; Whelan, Rebecca J; Patankar, Manish S

    2016-01-01

    The monoterpenoid, citral, when delivered through PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles inhibits in vivo growth of 4T1 breast tumors. Here, we show that citral inhibits proliferation of multiple human cancer cell lines. In p53 expressing ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 but not in p53-deficient SKOV-3 cells, citral induces G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and increased cleaved caspase3 and Bax and decreased Bcl-2. In SKOV-3 cells, citral induces the ER stress markers CHOP, GADD45, EDEM, ATF4, Hsp90, ATG5, and phospho-eIF2α. The molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid attenuates citral activity in SKOV-3 but not in ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 cells. In p53-expressing cells, citral increases phosphorylation of serine-15 of p53. Activation of p53 increases Bax, PUMA, and NOXA expression. Inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α, attenuates citral-mediated apoptosis. Citral increases intracellular oxygen radicals and this leads to activation of p53. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis by L-buthionine sulfoxamine increases potency of citral. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine decreases phosphorylation of p53 in citral-treated ECC-1 and OVCAR-3. These results define a p53-dependent, and in the absence of p53, ER stress-dependent mode of action of citral. This study indicates that citral in PEG-b-PCL nanoparticle formulation should be considered for treatment of breast and other tumors. PMID:27270209

  11. Modulation of oxidative stress and subsequent induction of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress allows citral to decrease cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Arvinder; Felder, Mildred; Fass, Lucas; Kaur, Justanjot; Czarnecki, Austin; Rathi, Kavya; Zeng, San; Osowski, Kathryn Kalady; Howell, Colin; Xiong, May P.; Whelan, Rebecca J.; Patankar, Manish S.

    2016-01-01

    The monoterpenoid, citral, when delivered through PEG-b-PCL nanoparticles inhibits in vivo growth of 4T1 breast tumors. Here, we show that citral inhibits proliferation of multiple human cancer cell lines. In p53 expressing ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 but not in p53-deficient SKOV-3 cells, citral induces G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and increased cleaved caspase3 and Bax and decreased Bcl-2. In SKOV-3 cells, citral induces the ER stress markers CHOP, GADD45, EDEM, ATF4, Hsp90, ATG5, and phospho-eIF2α. The molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid attenuates citral activity in SKOV-3 but not in ECC-1 and OVCAR-3 cells. In p53-expressing cells, citral increases phosphorylation of serine-15 of p53. Activation of p53 increases Bax, PUMA, and NOXA expression. Inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α, attenuates citral-mediated apoptosis. Citral increases intracellular oxygen radicals and this leads to activation of p53. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis by L-buthionine sulfoxamine increases potency of citral. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine decreases phosphorylation of p53 in citral-treated ECC-1 and OVCAR-3. These results define a p53-dependent, and in the absence of p53, ER stress-dependent mode of action of citral. This study indicates that citral in PEG-b-PCL nanoparticle formulation should be considered for treatment of breast and other tumors. PMID:27270209

  12. Effect of bending stresses on the high-frequency magnetic properties and their time stability in a cobalt-based amorphous alloy with an extremely low magnetostriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil'nikov, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    An unusual effect of the stresses of bending (toroidal sample diameter D) on the hysteretic magnetic properties ( H c , μ5) of an amorphous Co69Fe3.7Cr3.8Si12B11 alloy with an extremely low magnetostriction (|λ s | ≤ 10-7) is revealed. These properties are measured in a dynamic regime at a magnetic-field frequency f = 0.1-20 kHz. The coercive force of the alloy H c weakly depends on D at low frequencies ( f < 1 kHz), and permeability μ5 ( H = 5 mOe), in contrast, is independent of D at high frequencies and is dependent on D at low frequencies. The samples subjected to high-temperature (390°C) annealing followed by water quenching exhibit "anomalous" dependences: permeability μ5 increases with decreasing toroidal sample radius, i.e., with increasing bending stresses. The detected dependences are related to the fact that magnetization reversal via the displacement of rigid domain walls is predominant at low frequencies and during static measurements and magnetization reversal via the displacement of flexible domain walls is predominant at high frequencies.

  13. The effect of contact stresses in four-point bend testing of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PMR-15 composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.

    1992-01-01

    The results of in-plane four-point bend experiments on unidirectionally reinforced composite beams are presented for graphite/epoxy (T300/934) and graphite/polyimide (G30-500/PMR-15) composites. The maximum load and the location of cracks formed during failure were measured for testpieces with fibers oriented at various angles to the beam axis. Since most of the beams failed near one or more of the load points, the strength of the beams was evaluated in terms of a proposed model, for the local stress distribution. In this model, an exact solution to the problem of a localized contact force acting on a unidirectionally reinforced half plane is used to describe the local stress field. The stress singularity at the load points is treated in a manner similar to the stress singularity at a crack tip in fracture mechanisms problems. Using this approach, the effect of fiber angle and elastic material properties on the strength of the beam is described in terms of a load intensity factor. For fiber angles less than 45 deg from the beam axis, a single crack is initiated near one of the load points at a critical value of the load intensity factor. The critical load intensity factor decreases with the increasing fiber angle. For larger fiber angles, multiple cracks occur at locations both near and away from the load points, and the load intensity factor at failure increases sharply with increasing fiber angle.

  14. Effect of contact stresses in four-point bend testing of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PMR-15 composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, W. K.; Roberts, G. D.; Papadopoulos, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The results of in-plane four-point bend experiments on unidirectionally reinforced composite beams are presented for graphite/epoxy (T300/934) and graphite/polyimide (G30-500/PMR-15) composites. The maximum load and the location of cracks formed during failure were measured for testpieces with fibers oriented at various angles to the beam axis. Since most of the beams failed near one or more of the load points, the strength of the beams was evaluated in terms of a proposed model for the local stress distribution. In this model, an exact solution to the problem of a localized contact force acting on a unidirectionally reinforced half plane is used to describe the local stress field. The stress singularity at the load points is treated in a manner similar to the stress singularity at a crack tip in fracture mechanisms problems. Using this approach, the effect of fiber angle and elastic material properties on the strength of the beam is described in terms of a load intensity factor. For fiber angles less than 45 deg from the beam axis, a single crack is initiated near one of the load points at a critical value of the load intensity factor. The critical load intensity factor decreases with increasing fiber angle. For larger fiber angles, multiple cracks occur at locations both near and away from the load points, and the load intensity factor at failure increases sharply with increasing fiber angle.

  15. Stress-anneal-induced magnetic anisotropy in highly textured Fe-Ga and Fe-Al magnetostrictive strips for bending-mode vibrational energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung Jin; Na, Suok-Min; Raghunath, Ganesh; Flatau, Alison B.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetostrictive Fe-Ga and Fe-Al alloys are promising materials for use in bending-mode vibrational energy harvesters. For this study, 50.8 mm × 5.0 mm × 0.5 mm strips of Fe-Ga and Fe-Al were cut from 0.50-mm thick rolled sheet. An atmospheric anneal was used to develop a Goss texture through an abnormal grain growth process. The anneal lead to large (011) grains that covered over 90% of sample surface area. The resulting highly-textured Fe-Ga and Fe-Al strips exhibited saturation magnetostriction values (λsat = λ∥ - λ⊥) of ˜280 ppm and ˜130 ppm, respectively. To maximize 90° rotation of magnetic moments during bending of the strips, we employed compressive stress annealing (SA). Samples were heated to 500°C, and a 100-150 MPa compressive stress was applied while at 500°C for 30 minutes and while being cooled. The effectiveness of the SA on magnetic moment rotation was inferred by comparing post-SA magnetostriction with the maximum possible yield of rotated magnetic moments, which is achieved when λ∥ = λsat and λ⊥ = 0. The uniformity of the SA along the sample length and the impact of the SA on sensing/energy harvesting performance were then assessed by comparing pre- and post-SA bending-stress-induced changes in magnetization at five different locations along the samples. The SA process with a 150 MPa compressive load improved Fe-Ga actuation along the sample length from 170 to 225 ppm (from ˜60% to within ˜80% of λsat). The corresponding sensing/energy harvesting performance improved by as much as a factor of eight in the best sample, however the improvement was not at all uniform along the sample length. The SA process with a 100 MPa compressive load improved Fe-Al actuation along the sample length from 60 to 73 ppm (from ˜46% to ˜56% of λsat, indicating only a marginally effective SA and suggesting the need for modification of the SA protocol. In spite of this, the SA was effective at improving the sensing/energy harvesting

  16. Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

    2007-11-30

    The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

  17. Mixed-Mode-Bending Delamination Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, John H., Jr.; Reeder, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Mixed-mode-bending delamination apparatus generates two types of delamination stress simultaneously in specimen from single externally applied point load. In technique, indivial mode I and mode II contributions to delamination in specimen analyzed by use of simple beam-theory equations, eliminating need for time-consuming, difficult numerical analysis. Allows wider range of mode I/mode II ratios than possible with many other methods. Mixed-mode delamination testing of interest in all fields utilizing composite materials, used mostly in aerospace field, but also used in automobiles, lightweight armored military vehicles, boats, and sporting equipment. Useful in general lumber, plywood, and adhesive industries, as well.

  18. Numerical procedures for the calculation of the stresses in monocoques III : calculation of the bending moments in fuselage frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, N J; Libby, Paul A; Klein, Bertran

    1946-01-01

    This report deals with the calculation of the bending moments in and the distortions of fuselage rings upon which known concentrated and distributed loads are acting. In the procedure suggested, the ring is divided into a number of beams each having a constant radius of curvature. The forces and moments caused in the end sections of the beams by individual unit displacements of the end sections are listed in a table designated as the operations table in conformity with Southwell's nomenclature. The operations table and the external loads are equivalent to a set of linear equations. For their solution the following three procedures are presented: 1) Southwell's method of systematic relaxations. This is a step-by-step approximation procedure guided by the physical interpretation of the changes in the values of the unknown. 2) The growing unit procedure in which the individual beams are combined successively into beams of increasing length until finally the entire ring becomes a single beam. In each step of the procedure a set of not more than three simultaneous linear equations is solved. 3) Solution of the entire set of simultaneous equations by the methods of the matrix calculus. In order to demonstrate the manner in which the calculations may be carried out, the following numerical examples are worked out: 1) Curved beam with both its end sections rigidly fixed. The load is a concentrated force. 2) Egg-shape ring with symmetric concentrated loads. 3) Circular ring with antisymmetric concentrated loads and shear flow (torsion of the fuselage). 4) Same with V-braces incorporated in the ring. 5) Egg-shape ring with antisymmetric concentrated loads and shear flow (torsion of the fuselage). 6) Same with V-braces incorporated in the ring. The results of these calculations are checked, whenever possible, by calculations carried out according to known methods of analysis. The agreement is found to be good. The amount of work necessary for the solution of ring problems by

  19. Contact and Bending Durability Calculation for Spiral-Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayakar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this project is to extend the capabilities of the gear contact analysis solver Calyx, and associated packages Transmission3D, HypoidFaceMilled, HypoidFaceHobbed. A calculation process for the surface durability was implemented using the Dowson-Higginson correlation for fluid film thickness. Comparisons to failure data from NASA's Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue rig were carried out. A bending fatigue calculation has been implemented that allows the use of the stress-life calculation at each individual fillet point. The gears in the NASA test rig did not exhibit any bending fatigue failure, so the bending fatigue calculations are presented in this report by using significantly lowered strength numbers.

  20. Fatigue life prediction in bending from axial fatigue information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Muralidharan, U.

    1982-01-01

    Bending fatigue in the low cyclic life range differs from axial fatigue due to the plastic flow which alters the linear stress-strain relation normally used to determine the nominal stresses. An approach is presented to take into account the plastic flow in calculating nominal bending stress (S sub bending) based on true surface stress. These functions are derived in closed form for rectangular and circular cross sections. The nominal bending stress and the axial fatigue stress are plotted as a function of life (N sub S) and these curves are shown for several materials of engineering interest.

  1. Stresses in and General Instability of Monocoque Cylinders with Cutouts I : Experimental Investigation of Cylinders with a Symmetric Cutout Subjected to Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, N J; Boley, Bruno A

    1946-01-01

    Ten 24S-T alclad cylinders of 20-inch diameter, 45- or 58-inch length, and 0.012-inch wall thickness, reinforced with 24S-T aluminum alloy stringers and rings were tested in pure bending. In the middle of the compression side of the cylinders there was a cutout extending over 19 inches in the longitudinal direction, and over an angle of 45 degrees, 90 degrees, or 135 degrees in the circumferential direction. The strain in the stringers and in the sheet covering was measured with metal electric strain gages. The stress distribution in the cylinders deviate considerably from the linear law valid for cylinders without a cutout. The maximum strain measured was about four-thirds of the value calculated from the Mc/I formula when I was taken as the moment of inertia of the cross section of the portion of the cylinder where the cutout was situated. A diagram is presented containing the strain factors defined as the ratios of measured strain to strain calculated with the Mc/I formula. All the 10 cylinders tested failed in general instability. Two symmetric and one antisymmetric pattern of buckling were observed and the buckling load appeared to be independent of the method of manufacture and the length of the cylinder. The buckling load of the cylinders having cutouts extending over 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 135 degrees was 66, 47, and 31 percent, respectively, of the buckling load of the cylinder without a cutout.

  2. NESC VII European project: demonstration of warm pre-stressing effect in biaxial loading conditions - Bending tests on 18MND5 cruciform specimens and their interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquemoud, C.; Yuritzinn, T.; Marie, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the NESC VII European project, a large experimental program has been dedicated to characterize the Warm Pre-Stressing (WPS) effect in different testing configurations. One of the CEA (France) contributions to this project is the realization of five point bending tests on large cruciform specimens considering different WPS loading cycles. The five cruciform specimens, sponsored by EDF (France) and IRSN (France), are made of 18MND5 steel. Two of them have been tested on a same LCF (Load-Cool-Fracture) loading cycle and two others on the same LCTF (Load-Cool-Transient-Fracture) loading cycle. The experimental results presented in this paper give a successful demonstration of the WPS effect in biaxial loading conditions either on a LCF or on a LCTF cycle. During the test interpretations, different models have then been tested and compared in order to evaluate their ability to predict the cleavage fracture in the case of different WPS loading cycles. They all provide very conservative predictions whatever loading cycle is concerned. (authors)

  3. Bending fracture in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wen-Shyong; Lu, Hsin-Fang

    2008-12-10

    A novel approach was adopted to incur bending fracture in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Expanded graphite (EG) was made by intercalating and exfoliating natural graphite flakes. The EG was deposited with nickel particles, from which CNTs were grown by chemical vapor deposition. The CNTs were tip-grown, and their roots were fixed on the EG flakes. The EG flakes were compressed, and many CNTs on the surface were fragmented due to the compression-induced bending. Two major modes of the bending fracture were observed: cone-shaped and shear-cut. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the crack growth within the graphene layers. The bending fracture is characterized by two-region crack growth. An opening crack first appears around the outer-tube due to the bending-induced tensile stress. The crack then branches to grow along an inclined direction toward the inner-tube due to the presence of the shear stress in between graphene layers. An inner-tube pullout with inclined side surface is formed. The onset and development of the crack in these two regions are discussed. PMID:21730690

  4. Viscous flow of amorphous Fe{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}Si{sub 6}B{sub 14} studied by direct creep measurements and relaxation of bend stresses under nonisothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Russew, K.; Hey, P. de; Sietsma, J.; Beukel, A. van den

    1997-05-01

    The nonisothermal viscous flow behavior of amorphous Fe{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}Si{sub 6}B{sub 14} alloy was studied by direct viscosity measurements in the temperature range between 630 K and 740 K at a heating rate of 20 K/min, and by the relaxation of bend stresses in the low temperature range up to 650 K at heating rates ranging between 0.31 K/min and 20 K/min. It is shown that fully irreversible viscous flow and fully reversible anelastic strain take place during the bend stress relaxation. A distinction between both time dependent strain contributions could be made, providing the possibility for their separate analysis. The irreversible viscous flow contribution of the bend stress relaxation and the viscosity measurements could be adequately described by the free Volume Model with a single set of parameters. The conclusion is drawn that the Free Volume Model remains a useful tool for describing the irreversible relaxation phenomena in glassy metals at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature T{sub g}.

  5. Bend Properties of Sapphire Fibers at Elevated Temperatures. 1; Bend Survivability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Sayir, Haluk

    1995-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the bend radius that a c-axis-oriented sapphire fiber can withstand was determined for fibers of various diameter. Bend stress rupture tests were performed for times of 1-100 h and temperatures of 300-1700 C. Fibers would survive the bend test undeformed, would fracture or would deform. The bend survival radius was determined to be the radius above which no fibers fractured or deformed for a given time-temperature treatment. It was found that the ability of fibers to withstand curvature decreases substantially with time and increasing temperature and that fibers of smaller diameter (46-83 micron) withstood smaller bend radii than would be expected from just a difference in fiber diameter when compared with the bend results of the fibers of large diameter (144 micron). This was probably due to different flaw populations, causing high temperature bend failure for the tested sapphire fibers of different diameters.

  6. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  7. Mechanics of the eukaryotic flagellar axoneme: Evidence for structural distortion during bending.

    PubMed

    Lesich, Kathleen A; dePinho, Tania G; Pelle, Dominic W; Lindemann, Charles B

    2016-05-01

    The sliding doublet mechanism is the established explanation that allows us to understand the process of ciliary and flagellar bending. In this study, we apply the principles of the sliding doublet mechanism to analyze the mechanics of the counterbend phenomenon in sea urchin sperm flagella. When a passive, vanadate-treated, flagellum is forced into a bend with a glass microprobe, the portion of the flagellum distal to the probe exhibits a bend of opposite curvature (counterbend) to the imposed bend. This phenomenon was shown to be caused by the induction of inter-doublet shear and is dependent on the presence of an inter-doublet shear resistance. Here we report that in sea urchin flagella there is systematically less shear induced in the distal flagellum than is predicted by the sliding doublet mechanism, if we follow the assumption that the diameter of the flagellum is uniform. To account for the reduced shear that is observed, the likeliest and most direct interpretation is that the portion of the axoneme that is forced to bend undergoes substantial compression of the axoneme in the bending plane. A compression of 30-50 nm would be sufficient to account for the shear reduction from a bend of 2 radians. A compression of this magnitude would require considerable flexibility in the axoneme structure. This would necessitate that the radial spokes and/or the central pair apparatus are easily compressed by transverse stress. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27001352

  8. Ultraviolet and photosynthetically active radiation can both induce photoprotective capacity allowing barley to overcome high radiation stress.

    PubMed

    Klem, Karel; Holub, Petr; Štroch, Michal; Nezval, Jakub; Špunda, Vladimír; Tříska, Jan; Jansen, Marcel A K; Robson, T Matthew; Urban, Otmar

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the effects of acclimation to ultraviolet (UV) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) on photoprotective mechanisms in barley leaves. Barley plants were acclimated for 7 days under three combinations of high or low UV and PAR treatments ([UV-PAR-], [UV-PAR+], [UV+PAR+]). Subsequently, plants were exposed to short-term high radiation stress (HRS; defined by high intensities of PAR - 1000 μmol m(-2) s(-1), UV-A - 10 W m(-2) and UV-B 2 W m(-2) for 4 h), to test their photoprotective capacity. The barley variety sensitive to photooxidative stress (Barke) had low constitutive flavonoid content compared to the resistant variety (Bonus) under low UV and PAR intensities. The accumulation of lutonarin and 3-feruloylquinic acid, but not of saponarin, was greatly enhanced by high PAR and further increased by UV exposure. Acclimation of plants to both high UV and PAR intensities also increased the total pool of xanthophyll-cycle pigments (VAZ). Subsequent exposure to HRS revealed that prior acclimation to UV and PAR was able to ameliorate the negative consequences of HRS on photosynthesis. Both total contents of epidermal flavonols and the total pool of VAZ were closely correlated with small reductions in light-saturated CO2 assimilation rate and maximum quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry caused by HRS. Based on these results, we conclude that growth under high PAR can substantially increase the photoprotective capacity of barley plants compared with plants grown under low PAR. However, additional UV radiation is necessary to fully induce photoprotective mechanisms in the variety Barke. This study demonstrates that UV-exposure can lead to enhanced photoprotective capacity and can contribute to the induction of tolerance to high radiation stress in barley. PMID:25583309

  9. Stress-vs-time signals allow the prediction of structurally catastrophic events during fracturing of immature cartilage and predetermine the biomechanical, biochemical, and structural impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rolauffs, Bernd; Kurz, Bodo; Felka, Tino; Rothdiener, Miriam; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Aurich, Matthias; Frank, Eliot; Bahrs, Christian; Badke, Andreas; Stöckle, Ulrich; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Trauma-associated cartilage fractures occur in children and adolescents with clinically significant incidence. Several studies investigated biomechanical injury by compressive forces but the injury-related stress has not been investigated extensively. In this study, we hypothesized that the biomechanical stress occurring during compressive injury predetermines the biomechanical, biochemical, and structural consequences. We specifically investigated whether the stress-vs-time signal correlated with the injurious damage and may allow prediction of cartilage matrix fracturing. Methods Superficial and deeper zones disks (SZDs, DZDs; immature bovine cartilage) were biomechanically characterized, injured (50% compression, 100%/sec strain-rate), and re-characterized. Correlations of the quantified functional, biochemical and histological damage with biomechanical parameters were zonally investigated. Results Injured SZDs exhibited decreased dynamic stiffness (by 93.04 ± 1.72%), unresolvable equilibrium moduli, structural damage (2.0 ± 0.5 on a 5-point-damage-scale), and 1.78-fold increased sGAG loss. DZDs remained intact. Measured stress-vs-time-curves during injury displayed 4 distinct shapes, which correlated with histological damage (p<0.001), loss of dynamic stiffness and sGAG (p<0.05). Damage prediction in a blinded experiment using stress-vs-time grades was 100%-correct and sensitive to differentiate single/complex matrix disruptions. Correlations of the dissipated energy and maximum stress rise with the extent of biomechanical and biochemical damage reached significance when SZDs and DZDs were analyzed as zonal composites but not separately. Conclusion The biomechanical stress that occurs during compressive injury predetermines the biomechanical, biochemical, and structural consequences and, thus, the structural and functional damage during cartilage fracturing. A novel biomechanical method based on the interpretation of compressive yielding allows the

  10. ZERODUR: bending strength data for etched surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Leys, Antoine; Carré, Antoine; Kerz, Franca; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    In a continuous effort since 2007 a considerable amount of new data and information has been gathered on the bending strength of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR®. By fitting a three parameter Weibull distribution to the data it could be shown that for homogenously ground surfaces minimum breakage stresses exist lying much higher than the previously applied design limits. In order to achieve even higher allowable stress values diamond grain ground surfaces have been acid etched, a procedure widely accepted as strength increasing measure. If surfaces are etched taking off layers with thickness which are comparable to the maximum micro crack depth of the preceding grinding process they also show statistical distributions compatible with a three parameter Weibull distribution. SCHOTT has performed additional measurement series with etch solutions with variable composition testing the applicability of this distribution and the possibility to achieve further increase of the minimum breakage stress. For long term loading applications strength change with time and environmental media are important. The parameter needed for prediction calculations which is combining these influences is the stress corrosion constant. Results from the past differ significantly from each other. On the basis of new investigations better information will be provided for choosing the best value for the given application conditions.

  11. Evaluation of the electromechanical properties in GdBCO coated conductor tapes under low cyclic loading and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyung-Seop; Gorospe, Alking; Bautista, Zhierwinjay; Dedicatoria, Marlon J.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of low cyclic loading on the critical current, I c, under uniaxial and transverse loadings, and bending deformations in GdBCO coated conductor (CC) tapes were evaluated. Under monotonic continuous bending deformation, CC tapes exhibit a high tolerance of I c up to the lowest bending diameter of 12 mm using the Goldacker bending test rig. However, when the CC tape was subjected to alternate tension-compression bending, a lower irreversible bending strain limit was measured. This was also observed when cyclic bending was applied to the CC tapes which showed a significant decrease in I c just after 10 cycles of alternate tension-compression bending at 20 mm bending diameter. Such different I c degradation behavior under different bending deformation procedures gave insight into the proper handling of CC tapes from manufacturing, coiling and up to operating conditions. In the case of uniaxial tension, when electromechanical properties of CC tape were evaluated by repeated loading based on a critical stress level obtained under monotonic loading, I c also did not show significant change in its degradation behavior up to the irreversible stress limit. The GdBCO CC tape adopted can allow cyclic loading up to 100 cycles without significant irreversible degradation below the monotonic irreversible limit. In the case of the transverse cyclic test, with regard to the large scattering of data especially in the tensile direction, a different cyclic loading procedure was established. For 10 repeated loadings, the mechanical and electromechanical properties of the GdBCO CC tapes showed similar values within the reversible range under the monotonic loading. I c degraded abruptly indicating that no delamination occurred at the REBCO film during the subcritical cyclic loading. Different fracture morphologies were observed under cyclic loading depicting branch-like patterns of the remaining REBCO layer on the substrate of the CC tape.

  12. Compliance measurements of chevron notched four point bend specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony; Bubsey, Raymond; Ghosn, Louis J.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental stress intensity factors for various chevron notched four point bend specimens are presented. The experimental compliance is verified using the analytical solution for a straight through crack four point bend specimen and the boundary integral equation method for one chevron geometry. Excellent agreement is obtained between the experimental and analytical results. In this report, stress intensity factors, loading displacements and crack mouth opening displacements are reported for different crack lengths and different chevron geometries, under four point bend loading condition.

  13. Tension, compression, and bending of superelastic shape memory alloy tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedlunn, Benjamin; Churchill, Christopher B.; Nelson, Emily E.; Shaw, John A.; Daly, Samantha H.

    2014-02-01

    While many uniaxial tension experiments of shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been published in the literature, relatively few experimental studies address their behavior in compression or bending, despite the prevalence of this latter deformation mode in applications. In this study, superelastic NiTi tubes from a single lot of material were characterized in tension, compression, and pure bending, which allowed us to make direct comparisons between the deformation modes for the first time. Custom built fixtures were used to overcome some long-standing experimental difficulties with performing well-controlled loading and accurate measurements during uniaxial compression (avoiding buckling) and large-rotation bending. In all experiments, the isothermal, global, mechanical responses were measured, and stereo digital image correlation (DIC) was used to measure the evolution of the strain fields on the tube's outer surface.As is characteristic of textured NiTi, our tubes exhibited significant tension-compression asymmetry in their uniaxial responses. Stress-induced transformations in tension exhibited flat force plateaus accompanied by strain localization and propagation. No such localization, however, was observed in compression, and the stress "plateaus" during compression always maintained a positive tangent modulus. While our uniaxial results are similar to the observations of previous researchers, the DIC strain measurements provided details of localized strain behavior with more clarity and allowed more quantitative measurements to be made. Consistent with the tension-compression asymmetry, our bending experiments showed a significant shift of the neutral axis towards the compression side. Furthermore, the tube exhibited strain localization on the tension side, but no localization on the compression side during bending. This is a new observation that has not been explored before. Detailed analysis of the strain distribution across the tube diameter revealed that the

  14. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer

    Oglesby, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  15. Discovering Gee's Bend Quilts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Gee's Bend is a small community near Selma, Alabama where cotton plantations filled the land before the Civil War. After the war, the freed slaves of the plantations worked as tenant farmers and founded an African-American community. In 2002, the women of this community brought international attention and acclaim to Gee's Bend through the art of…

  16. Microelectromechanical systems contact stress sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2007-12-25

    A microelectromechanical systems stress sensor comprising a microelectromechanical systems silicon body. A recess is formed in the silicon body. A silicon element extends into the recess. The silicon element has limited freedom of movement within the recess. An electrical circuit in the silicon element includes a piezoresistor material that allows for sensing changes in resistance that is proportional to bending of the silicon element.

  17. A transparent bending-insensitive pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungwon; Reuveny, Amir; Reeder, Jonathan; Lee, Sunghoon; Jin, Hanbit; Liu, Qihan; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke; Suo, Zhigang; Someya, Takao

    2016-05-01

    Measuring small normal pressures is essential to accurately evaluate external stimuli in curvilinear and dynamic surfaces such as natural tissues. Usually, sensitive and spatially accurate pressure sensors are achieved through conformal contact with the surface; however, this also makes them sensitive to mechanical deformation (bending). Indeed, when a soft object is pressed by another soft object, the normal pressure cannot be measured independently from the mechanical stress. Here, we show a pressure sensor that measures only the normal pressure, even under extreme bending conditions. To reduce the bending sensitivity, we use composite nanofibres of carbon nanotubes and graphene. Our simulations show that these fibres change their relative alignment to accommodate bending deformation, thus reducing the strain in individual fibres. Pressure sensitivity is maintained down to a bending radius of 80 μm. To test the suitability of our sensor for soft robotics and medical applications, we fabricated an integrated sensor matrix that is only 2 μm thick. We show real-time (response time of ∼20 ms), large-area, normal pressure monitoring under different, complex bending conditions.

  18. A transparent bending-insensitive pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungwon; Reuveny, Amir; Reeder, Jonathan; Lee, Sunghoon; Jin, Hanbit; Liu, Qihan; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke; Suo, Zhigang; Someya, Takao

    2016-05-01

    Measuring small normal pressures is essential to accurately evaluate external stimuli in curvilinear and dynamic surfaces such as natural tissues. Usually, sensitive and spatially accurate pressure sensors are achieved through conformal contact with the surface; however, this also makes them sensitive to mechanical deformation (bending). Indeed, when a soft object is pressed by another soft object, the normal pressure cannot be measured independently from the mechanical stress. Here, we show a pressure sensor that measures only the normal pressure, even under extreme bending conditions. To reduce the bending sensitivity, we use composite nanofibres of carbon nanotubes and graphene. Our simulations show that these fibres change their relative alignment to accommodate bending deformation, thus reducing the strain in individual fibres. Pressure sensitivity is maintained down to a bending radius of 80 μm. To test the suitability of our sensor for soft robotics and medical applications, we fabricated an integrated sensor matrix that is only 2 μm thick. We show real-time (response time of ∼20 ms), large-area, normal pressure monitoring under different, complex bending conditions. PMID:26809055

  19. Peeling, sliding, pulling and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, John; Peng, Gunnar

    2015-11-01

    The peeling of an elastic sheet away from thin layer of viscous fluid is a simply-stated and generic problem, that involves complex interactions between the flow and elastic deformation on a range of length scales. Consider an analogue of capillary spreading, where a blister of injected viscous fluid spreads due to tension in the overlying elastic sheet. Here the tension is coupled to the deformation of the sheet, and thus varies in time and space. A key question is whether or not viscous shear stresses ahead of the blister are sufficient to prevent the sheet sliding inwards and relieving the tension. Our asymptotic analysis reveals a dichotomy between fast and slow spreading, and between two-dimensional and axisymmetric spreading. In combination with bending stresses and gravity, which may dominate parts of the flow but not others, there is a plethora of dynamical regimes.

  20. Dispersion suppressors with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    Dispersion suppressors of two main types are usually used. In one the cell quadrupole focussing structure is the same as in normal cells but some of the dipoles are replaced by drifts. In the other, the quadrupole strengths and/or spacings are different from those of the normal cells, but the bending is about the same as it is in the cells. In SSC designs to date, dispersion suppressors of the former type have been used, consisting of two cells with bending equivalent to one. In this note a suppressor design with normal bending and altered focussing is presented. The advantage of this scheme is that circumference is reduced. The disadvantages are that additional special quadrupoles must be provided (however, they need not be adjustable), and the maximum beta values within them are about 30% higher than the cell maxima.

  1. Springback After the Lateral Bending of T-Section Rails of Work-Hardening Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Youshuo; Yu, Zhonghua

    2013-11-01

    This paper studies the springback after the lateral bending of T-section rails, considering the work-hardening materials. A linear-hardening model and an elastic-plastic power-exponent hardening model of the material are adopted and compared with the real experimental stress-strain curve obtained from the uniaxial tension tests. The analytical formulas for the springback and residual curvatures are given. The numerical results indicate that the material hardening directly affects the accuracy of springback prediction compared with the experimental results. Besides, springback prediction is not sensitive to hardening parameters in the beginning of elastic-plastic bending deformation. Although there is an apparent yield stage in the true stress-strain curve, the adopted hardening models can achieve an allowable relative error, if hardening parameters are properly selected.

  2. Right-angle slot waveguide bends with high bending efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changbao; Zhang, Qun; Van Keuren, Edward

    2008-09-15

    Two right-angle bends for nanoscale slot waveguides with high bending efficiency based on a corner mirror and different resonant cavities are presented, one with a triangular cavity and the other with a square cavity. Through two-dimensional parametric scanning of the position of the mirror and the dimension of the cavity, a maximum bending efficiency calculated using mode overlap integral (MOI) of 94.3% is achieved for the bend with the triangular cavity and 93.1% is achieved for the bend with the square cavity. Although they both have similar bending performance, the position of the mirror is different between the two cases. PMID:18794968

  3. Mechanism of bending electrostriction in thermoplastic polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Wong, Y. W.; Shin, F. G.

    2004-07-01

    The mechanism of bending electrostriction in polyurethane films is discussed and elucidated through a numerical calculation. The simulations are carried out on a model in which charge carriers are assumed to be electrons injected from the cathode by the Schottky effect, and the positive charges are immobile. Under a dc field, our simulation results show that the electrons go out of the anode, leaving behind a large quantity of positive charge around the anode. As a result, the electric field near the anode eventually becomes much larger than that near the cathode. The asymmetrical electric field distribution leads to an asymmetrical stress distribution through the electrostriction effect and thus to bending of the polyurethane film under the application of a dc electric field. The results can also explain the gradual change in bending direction after reversing the polarity of the electric field.

  4. Bending strength of piezoelectric ceramics and single crystals for multifunctional load-bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Anton, Steven R; Erturk, Alper; Inman, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    The topic of multifunctional material systems using active or smart materials has recently gained attention in the research community. Multifunctional piezoelectric systems present the ability to combine multiple functions into a single active piezoelectric element, namely, combining sensing, actuation, or energy conversion ability with load-bearing capacity. Quantification of the bending strength of various piezoelectric materials is, therefore, critical in the development of load-bearing piezoelectric systems. Three-point bend tests are carried out on a variety of piezoelectric ceramics including soft monolithic piezoceramics (PZT-5A and PZT-5H), hard monolithic ceramics (PZT-4 and PZT-8), single-crystal piezoelectrics (PMN-PT and PMN-PZT), and commercially packaged composite devices (which contain active PZT-5A layers). A common 3-point bend test procedure is used throughout the experimental tests. The bending strengths of these materials are found using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to be 44.9 MPa for PMN-PZT, 60.6 MPa for PMN-PT, 114.8 MPa for PZT- 5H, 123.2 MPa for PZT-4, 127.5 MPa for PZT-8, 140.4 MPa for PZT-5A, and 186.6 MPa for the commercial composite. The high strength of the commercial configuration is a result of the composite structure that allows for shear stresses on the surfaces of the piezoelectric layers, whereas the low strength of the single-crystal materials is due to their unique crystal structure, which allows for rapid propagation of cracks initiating at flaw sites. The experimental bending strength results reported, which are linear estimates without nonlinear ferroelastic considerations, are intended for use in the design of multifunctional piezoelectric systems in which the active device is subjected to bending loads. PMID:22711404

  5. Evolving efficiency of restraining bends within wet kaolin analog experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatem, Alexandra E.; Cooke, Michele L.; Madden, Elizabeth H.

    2015-03-01

    Restraining bends along strike-slip fault systems evolve by both propagation of new faults and abandonment of fault segments. Scaled analog modeling using wet kaolin allows for qualitative and quantitative observations of this evolution. To explore how bend geometry affects evolution, we model bends with a variety of initial angles, θ, from θ = 0° for a straight fault to θ = 30°. High-angle restraining bends (θ ≥ 20°) overcome initial inefficiencies by abandoning unfavorably oriented restraining segments and propagating multiple new, inwardly dipping, oblique-slip faults that are well oriented to accommodate convergence within the bend. Restraining bends with 0° < θ ≤ 15° maintain activity along the restraining bend segment and grow a single new oblique slip fault on one side of the bend. In all restraining bends, the first new fault propagates at ~5 mm of accumulated convergence. Particle Image Velocimetry analysis provides a complete velocity field throughout the experiments. From these data, we quantify the strike-slip efficiency of the system as the percentage of applied plate-parallel velocity accommodated as slip in the direction of plate motion along faults within the restraining bend. Bends with small θ initially have higher strike-slip efficiency compared to bends with large θ. Although they have different fault geometries, all systems with a 5 cm bend width reach a steady strike-slip efficiency of 80% after 50 mm of applied plate displacement. These experimental restraining bends resemble crustal faults in their asymmetric fault growth, asymmetric topographic gradient, and strike-slip efficiency.

  6. Measuring graphene's bending stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blees, Melina; Barnard, Arthur; Roberts, Samantha; Kevek, Joshua W.; Ruyack, Alexander; Wardini, Jenna; Ong, Peijie; Zaretski, Aliaksandr; Wang, Siping; McEuen, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    Graphene's unusual combination of in-plane strength and out-of-plane flexibility makes it promising for mechanical applications. A key value is the bending stiffness, which microscopic theories and measurements of phonon modes in graphite put at κ0 = 1.2 eV.1 However, theories of the effects of thermal fluctuations in 2D membranes predict that the bending stiffness at longer length scales could be orders of magnitude higher.2,3 This macroscopic value has not been measured. Here we present the first direct measurement of monolayer graphene's bending stiffness, made by mechanically lifting graphene off a surface in a liquid and observing both motion induced by thermal fluctuations and the deflection caused by gravity's effect on added weights. These experiments reveal a value κeff = 12 keV at room temperature -- four orders of magnitude higher than κ0. These results closely match theoretical predictions of the effects of thermally-induced fluctuations which effectively thicken the membrane, dramatically increasing its bending stiffness at macroscopic length scales.

  7. Probing the elastic limit of DNA bending

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tung T.; Kim, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Sharp bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) plays an essential role in genome structure and function. However, the elastic limit of dsDNA bending remains controversial. Here, we measured the opening rates of small dsDNA loops with contour lengths ranging between 40 and 200 bp using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer. The relationship of loop lifetime to loop size revealed a critical transition in bending stress. Above the critical loop size, the loop lifetime changed with loop size in a manner consistent with elastic bending stress, but below it, became less sensitive to loop size, indicative of softened dsDNA. The critical loop size increased from ∼60 bp to ∼100 bp with the addition of 5 mM magnesium. We show that our result is in quantitative agreement with the kinkable worm-like chain model, and furthermore, can reproduce previously reported looping probabilities of dsDNA over the range between 50 and 200 bp. Our findings shed new light on the energetics of sharply bent dsDNA. PMID:25122748

  8. Improving the quality of rolled pipe steel products by minimizing the bending of the ends of plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salganik, V. M.; Chikishev, D. N.; Denisov, S. V.; Stekanov, P. A.; Shmakov, A. V.; Fomichev, A. V.

    2013-11-01

    The causes of the vertical bending of the front ends of plates during hot rolling are revealed. A finite-element mathematical model is developed to describe the state of stress of the metal in an asymmetric deformation zone with allowance for solving a temperature problem, and the model is adapted to the conditions of the 5000 rolling mill in OAO MMK. It is found that, in rolling with mismatched work roll speeds, the direction of bending of the front strip end is determined by the strip thickness and the deformation zone shape. The main cause of the bending of the front plate end at the stage of finishing stage of rolling is shown to be the difference between the roller bed level and the rolling line. New asymmetric deformation regimes are developed with allowance for the effect of the deformation zone shape on the direction of bending of the front strip end. The developed technological regimes of asymmetric rolling make it possible to decrease the mill downtime because of the bending of the breakdown bar ends and to reduce the metal volume rejected because of violated temperature regimes of the thermomechanical treatment of plates.

  9. [Effect of bending on shot peened and polished osteosynthesis plates].

    PubMed

    Starker, M; Fröhling, M; Hirsch, T

    1991-03-01

    Shot peening can increase the fatigue strength of commercially available surgical plates made of 1.4435 alloy by 40% even in a corrosive environment. Our investigations show that residual stresses resulting from shot peening are reduced by additional bending of the plates. In such plates smaller tensile residual stresses were found than after polishing of the plates. Bending of polished plates results in considerable tensile residual stresses. The hardening achieved by shot peening is not reduced by bending. As the fatigue strength of soft materials depends mainly on the hardening and less on the residual stresses, only little influence of the changed residual stresses on the fatigue strength can be expected. Shot peening of surgical implants thus means an improvement in quality. PMID:2054460

  10. Insights into the damage zones in fault-bend folds from geomechanical models and field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wei; Hou, Guiting; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the rock mass deformation and stress states, the fracture development and distribution are critical to a range of endeavors including oil and gas exploration and development, and geothermal reservoir characterization and management. Geomechanical modeling can be used to simulate the forming processes of faults and folds, and predict the onset of failure and the type and abundance of deformation features along with the orientations and magnitudes of stresses. This approach enables the development of forward models that incorporate realistic mechanical stratigraphy (e.g., the bed thickness, bedding planes and competence contrasts), include faults and bedding-slip surfaces as frictional sliding interfaces, reproduce the geometry of the fold structures, and allow tracking strain and stress through the whole deformation process. In this present study, we combine field observations and finite element models to calibrate the development and distribution of fractures in the fault-bend folds, and discuss the mechanical controls (e.g., the slip displacement, ramp cutoff angle, frictional coefficient of interlayers and faults) that are able to influence the development and distribution of fractures during fault-bend folding. A linear relationship between the slip displacement and the fracture damage zone, the ramp cutoff angle and the fracture damage zone, and the frictional coefficient of interlayers and faults and the fracture damage zone was established respectively based on the geomechanical modeling results. These mechanical controls mentioned above altogether contribute to influence and control the development and distribution of fractures in the fault-bend folds.

  11. Combined bending-torsion fatigue reliability. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kececioglu, D.; Chester, L. B.; Nolf, C. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results generated by three, unique fatigue reliability research machines which can apply reversed bending loads combined with steady torque are presented. AISI 4340 steel, grooved specimens with a stress concentration factor of 1.42 and 2.34, and Rockwell C hardness of 35/40 were subjected to various combinations of these loads and cycled to failure. The generated cycles-to-failure and stress-to-failure data are statistically analyzed to develop distributional S-N and Goodman diagrams. Various failure theories are investigated to determine which one represents the data best. The effects of the groove, and of the various combined bending-torsion loads, on the S-N and Goodman diagrams are determined. Two design applications are presented which illustrate the direct useability and value of the distributional failure governing strength and cycles-to-failure data in designing for specified levels of reliability and in predicting the reliability of given designs.

  12. Local Deplanation Of Double Reinforced Beam Cross Section Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltov, Anguel; Yanakieva, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Bending of beams, double reinforced by means of thin composite layers, is considered in the study. Approximate numerical solution is proposed, considering transitional boundary areas, where smooth quadratic transition of the elasticity modulus and deformations take place. Deplanation of the cross section is also accounted for in the areas. Their thickness is found equalizing the total stiffness of the cross section and the layer stiffness. Deplanation of the cross section of the transitional area is determined via the longitudinal deformation in the reinforcing layer, accounting for the equilibrium between the internal and the external moment, generated by the longitudinal stresses in the cross section. A numerical example is given as an illustration demonstrating model's plausibility. The model allows the design and the calculation of recycled concrete beams double reinforced by means of thin layers. The approach is in agreement with modern design of nearly zero energy buildings (NZEB).

  13. High-pressure sensor using piezoelectric bending resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Takano, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    A novel design of pressure sensor based on piezoelectric bending resonator is described in this paper. The resonator is isolated from and mechanically coupled to the surrounding fluid using a sealed enclosure. The pressure applied to the enclosure induces a compressive stress to the resonator and reduces its resonance frequency. In principle the mechanism allows for achieving large resonance frequency shifts close to 100% of the resonance frequency. A high-pressure sensor based on the mechanism was designed for down-hole pressure monitoring in oil wells. The sensor is potentially remotely-readable via the transmission of an electromagnetic signal down a waveguide formed by the pipes in the oil well. The details of the pressure sensor design and verification by FE analysis and initial test results of a preliminary prototype are presented in this paper.

  14. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization of the matrix and the fibers.

  15. Transient Pinning and Pulling: A Mechanism for Bending Microtubules.

    PubMed

    Kent, Ian A; Rane, Parag S; Dickinson, Richard B; Ladd, Anthony J C; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules have a persistence length of the order of millimeters in vitro, but inside cells they bend over length scales of microns. It has been proposed that polymerization forces bend microtubules in the vicinity of the cell boundary or other obstacles, yet bends develop even when microtubules are polymerizing freely, unaffected by obstacles and cell boundaries. How these bends are formed remains unclear. By tracking the motions of microtubules marked by photobleaching, we found that in LLC-PK1 epithelial cells local bends develop primarily by plus-end directed transport of portions of the microtubule contour towards stationary locations (termed pinning points) along the length of the microtubule. The pinning points were transient in nature, and their eventual release allowed the bends to relax. The directionality of the transport as well as the overall incidence of local bends decreased when dynein was inhibited, while myosin inhibition had no observable effect. This suggests that dynein generates a tangential force that bends microtubules against stationary pinning points. Simulations of microtubule motion and polymerization accounting for filament mechanics and dynein forces predict the development of bends of size and shape similar to those observed in cells. Furthermore, simulations show that dynein-generated bends at a pinning point near the plus end can cause a persistent rotation of the tip consistent with the observation that bend formation near the tip can change the direction of microtubule growth. Collectively, these results suggest a simple physical mechanism for the bending of growing microtubules by dynein forces accumulating at pinning points. PMID:26974838

  16. Transient Pinning and Pulling: A Mechanism for Bending Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Ian A.; Rane, Parag S.; Dickinson, Richard B.; Ladd, Anthony J. C.; Lele, Tanmay P.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules have a persistence length of the order of millimeters in vitro, but inside cells they bend over length scales of microns. It has been proposed that polymerization forces bend microtubules in the vicinity of the cell boundary or other obstacles, yet bends develop even when microtubules are polymerizing freely, unaffected by obstacles and cell boundaries. How these bends are formed remains unclear. By tracking the motions of microtubules marked by photobleaching, we found that in LLC-PK1 epithelial cells local bends develop primarily by plus-end directed transport of portions of the microtubule contour towards stationary locations (termed pinning points) along the length of the microtubule. The pinning points were transient in nature, and their eventual release allowed the bends to relax. The directionality of the transport as well as the overall incidence of local bends decreased when dynein was inhibited, while myosin inhibition had no observable effect. This suggests that dynein generates a tangential force that bends microtubules against stationary pinning points. Simulations of microtubule motion and polymerization accounting for filament mechanics and dynein forces predict the development of bends of size and shape similar to those observed in cells. Furthermore, simulations show that dynein-generated bends at a pinning point near the plus end can cause a persistent rotation of the tip consistent with the observation that bend formation near the tip can change the direction of microtubule growth. Collectively, these results suggest a simple physical mechanism for the bending of growing microtubules by dynein forces accumulating at pinning points. PMID:26974838

  17. Active vibration control of structures undergoing bending vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An active vibration control subassembly for a structure (such as a jet engine duct or a washing machine panel) undergoing bending vibrations caused by a source (such as the clothes agitator of the washing machine) independent of the subassembly. A piezoceramic actuator plate is vibratable by an applied electric AC signal. The plate is connected to the structure such that vibrations in the plate induced by the AC signal cause canceling bending vibrations in the structure and such that the plate is compressively pre-stressed along the structure when the structure is free of any bending vibrations. The compressive prestressing increases the amplitude of the canceling bending vibrations before the critical tensile stress level of the plate is reached. Preferably, a positive electric DC bias is also applied to the plate in its poling direction.

  18. Damage Analysis of Rectangular Section Composite Beam under Pure Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiping; Xiao, Fan; Liu, Zejia; Tang, Liqun; Fang, Daining

    2013-02-01

    Laminated composite beams are commonly used in engineering applications involving macro to nano structures. Based on the assumption that plain sections remain plain after deformation, this paper analyzes stress distributions in cross-ply laminated composite beams with rectangular cross-sections, and formulates the basic damage equations through Kachanov's damage definition and Janson's failure criterion. The location of the neutral axis and the ultimate bending moment are obtained for pure bending cases. The effect of the elastic modulus of the two layers on the damage evolution is analyzed; a reasonable damage composite beam model is proposed to predict the ultimate bending moment.

  19. Relating tensile, bending, and shear test data of asphalt binders to pavement performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.S.; Tsai, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    Eight different asphalt binders representing a wide range of applications for pavement construction were tested in uniaxial tension, bending, and shear stresses. Theoretical analyses were performed in this study to covert the data from the three engineering tests to stiffness moduli for predicting pavement performance. At low temperatures, high asphalt stiffness may induce pavement thermal cracking; thus, the allowable maximum stiffness was set at 1,000 MPa. At high temperatures, low asphalt stiffness may lead to pavement rutting (ruts in the road); master curves were constructed to rank the potential for rutting in the asphalts. All three viscoelastic functions were shown to be interchangeable within the linear viscoelastic region. When subjected to large deformation in the direct tension test, asphalt binders behaved nonlinear viscoelastic in which the data under bending, shear and tension modes were not comparable. The asphalts were, however, found toe exhibit linear viscoelasticity up to the failure point in the steady-state strain region.

  20. Genome Wide Analysis of the Apple MYB Transcription Factor Family Allows the Identification of MdoMYB121 Gene Confering Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong-Kai; Zhang, Rui-Fen; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The MYB proteins comprise one of the largest families of transcription factors (TFs) in plants. Although several MYB genes have been characterized to play roles in secondary metabolism, the MYB family has not yet been identified in apple. In this study, 229 apple MYB genes were identified through a genome-wide analysis and divided into 45 subgroups. A computational analysis was conducted using the apple genomic database to yield a complete overview of the MYB family, including the intron-exon organizations, the sequence features of the MYB DNA-binding domains, the carboxy-terminal motifs, and the chromosomal locations. Subsequently, the expression of 18 MYB genes, including 12 were chosen from stress-related subgroups, while another 6 ones from other subgroups, in response to various abiotic stresses was examined. It was found that several of these MYB genes, particularly MdoMYB121, were induced by multiple stresses. The MdoMYB121 was then further functionally characterized. Its predicted protein was found to be localized in the nucleus. A transgenic analysis indicated that the overexpression of the MdoMYB121 gene remarkably enhanced the tolerance to high salinity, drought, and cold stresses in transgenic tomato and apple plants. Our results indicate that the MYB genes are highly conserved in plant species and that MdoMYB121 can be used as a target gene in genetic engineering approaches to improve the tolerance of plants to multiple abiotic stresses. PMID:23950843

  1. Calibration of combined bending-torsion fatigue reliability data reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kececioglu, D.; Mcconnell, J. B.

    1969-01-01

    The combined bending-torsion fatigue reliability research machines are described. Three such machines are presently in operation. The calibration of these machines is presented in depth. Fatigue data generated with these machines for SAE 4340 steel grooved specimens subjected to reversed bending and steady torque loading are given. The data reduction procedure is presented. Finally, some comments are made about notch sensitivity and stress concentration as applied to combined fatigue.

  2. Bending properties of nickel electrodes for nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, Bradley

    1995-04-01

    Recent changes in manufacturing have resulted in nickel-hydrogen batteries which fail prematurely by electrical shorting. This is believed to be a result of a blistering problem in the nickel electrodes. This study investigates the bending properties of nickel electrodes in an attempt to correlate the bending properties with the propensity of the electrode to blister. Nickel electrodes from three different batches of material were tested in both the as-received and impregnated forms. Effects of specimen curvature and position within the electrode on the bending strength were studied and within-electrode and batch-to-batch variation were addressed. Two color imaging techniques were employed which allowed differentiation of phases within the electrodes. These techniques aided in distinguishing the relative amounts of nickel hydroxide surface loading on each electrode, relating surface loading to bend strength. Bend strength was found to increase with the amount of surface loading.

  3. Bending properties of nickel electrodes for nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley

    1995-01-01

    Recent changes in manufacturing have resulted in nickel-hydrogen batteries which fail prematurely by electrical shorting. This is believed to be a result of a blistering problem in the nickel electrodes. This study investigates the bending properties of nickel electrodes in an attempt to correlate the bending properties with the propensity of the electrode to blister. Nickel electrodes from three different batches of material were tested in both the as-received and impregnated forms. Effects of specimen curvature and position within the electrode on the bending strength were studied and within-electrode and batch-to-batch variation were addressed. Two color imaging techniques were employed which allowed differentiation of phases within the electrodes. These techniques aided in distinguishing the relative amounts of nickel hydroxide surface loading on each electrode, relating surface loading to bend strength. Bend strength was found to increase with the amount of surface loading.

  4. A phase-field approach to nonequilibrium phase transformations in elastic solids via an intermediate phase (melt) allowing for interface stresses.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Kasra; Levitas, Valery I

    2016-04-28

    A phase-field approach for phase transformations (PTs) between three different phases at nonequilibrium temperatures is developed. It includes advanced mechanics, thermodynamically consistent interfacial stresses, and interface interactions. A thermodynamic Landau-Ginzburg potential developed in terms of polar order parameters satisfies the desired instability and equilibrium conditions for homogeneous phases. The interfacial stresses were introduced with some terms from large-strain formulation even though the small-strain assumption was utilized. The developed model is applied to study the PTs between two solid phases via a highly disordered intermediate phase (IP) or an intermediate melt (IM) hundreds of degrees below the melting temperature. In particular, the β ↔ δ PTs in HMX energetic crystals via IM are analyzed. The effects of various parameters (temperature, ratios of widths and energies of solid-solid (SS) to solid-melt (SM) interfaces, elastic energy, and interfacial stresses) on the formation, stability, and structure of the IM within a propagating SS interface are studied. Interfacial and elastic stresses within a SS interphase and their relaxation and redistribution with the appearance of a partial or complete IM are analyzed. The energy and structure of the critical nucleus (CN) of the IM are studied as well. In particular, the interfacial stresses increase the aspect-ratio of the CN. Although including elastic energy can drastically reduce the energy of the CN of the IM, the activation energy of the CN of the IM within the SS interface increases when interfacial tension is taken into account. The developed thermodynamic potential can also be modified to model other multiphase physical phenomena, such as multi-variant martensitic PTs, grain boundary and surface-induced pre-melting and PTs, as well as developing phase diagrams for IPs. PMID:27078783

  5. Modeling of magnetostrictive Galfenol sensor and validation using four point bending test

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Supratik; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Flatau, Alison B.

    2007-05-01

    A magnetomechanical bending model has been developed to predict the magnetic induction, elastic, and magnetostrictive strain and bending stress in a magnetostrictive member subjected simultaneously to bending load and dc magnetic bias field. This model was obtained by coupling Euler-Bernoulli beam theory with an energy-based statistical model. The bending model predictions were within 10% of the experimental results obtained from a uniquely devised four point bending test of Galfenol (nominal composition of 84 at. % Fe and 16 at. % Ga) performed under different magnetic bias fields.

  6. Phase trombones with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    The phase shifting trombones considered up to now for SSC application consisted of sets of evenly spaced quadrupoles separated by drift spaces. One such trombone was placed between a dispersion suppressor and a crossing insertion, so that the trombone had zero dispersion. With such trombones, it is possible to change {beta}{sup *} at constant tune, or to change the tunes by several units without altering the cell phase advances in the arcs. An objection to the above type of phase trombone is that it adds to the circumference, since no bending is included. This objection may or may not be valid depending on the potential usefulness of the drift spaces in them. In this note the authors show an alternative trombone design in which dipoles are included between the quadrupoles as in the normal arc cells. Since these trombones have dispersion, they are placed at the ends of the arcs, to be followed in turn by the dispersion suppressors and crossing insertions.

  7. Turbulent flow computation in a circular U-Bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloud, Abdelkrim; Aounallah, Mohammed; Belkadi, Mustapha; Adjlout, Lahouari; Imine, Omar; Imine, Bachir

    2014-03-01

    Turbulent flows through a circular 180° curved bend with a curvature ratio of 3.375, defined as the the bend mean radius to pipe diameter is investigated numerically for a Reynolds number of 4.45×104. The computation is performed for a U-Bend with full long pipes at the entrance and at the exit. The commercial ANSYS FLUENT is used to solve the steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The performances of standard k-ɛ and the second moment closure RSM models are evaluated by comparing their numerical results against experimental data and testing their capabilities to capture the formation and extend this turbulence driven vortex. It is found that the secondary flows occur in the cross-stream half-plane of such configurations and primarily induced by high anisotropy of the cross-stream turbulent normal stresses near the outer bend.

  8. Effect of materials and manufacturing on the bending stiffness of vaulting poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. L.; Kukureka, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    The increase in the world record height achieved in pole vaulting can be related to the improved ability of the athletes, in terms of their fitness and technique, and to the change in materials used to construct the pole. For example in 1960 there was a change in vaulting pole construction from bamboo to glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. The lighter GFRP pole enabled the athletes to have a faster run-up, resulting in a greater take-off speed, giving them more kinetic energy to convert into potential energy and hence height. GFRP poles also have a much higher failure stress than bamboo, so the poles were engineered to bend under the load of the athlete, thereby storing elastic strain energy that can be released as the pole straightens, resulting in greater energy efficiency. The bending also allowed athletes to change their vaulting technique from a style that involved the body remaining almost upright during the vault to one where the athlete goes over the bar with their feet upwards. Modern vaulting poles can be made from GFRP and/or carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. The addition of carbon fibres maintains the mechanical properties of the pole, but allows a reduction in the weight. The number and arrangement of the fibres determines the mechanical properties, in particular the bending stiffness. Vaulting poles are also designed for an individual athlete to take into account each athlete’s ability and physical characteristics. The poles are rated by ‘weight’ to allow athletes to select an appropriate pole for their ability. This paper will review the development of vaulting poles and the requirements to maximize performance. The properties (bending stiffness and pre-bend) and microstructure (fibre volume fraction and lay-up) of typical vaulting poles will be discussed. Originally published as Davis C L and Kukureka S N (2004) Effect of materials and manufacturing on the bending stiffness of vaulting poles The Engineering of

  9. Environmental Stresses of Field Growth Allow Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase-Deficient Nicotiana attenuata Plants to Compensate for their Structural Deficiencies1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harleen; Shaker, Kamel; Heinzel, Nicolas; Ralph, John; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2012-01-01

    The organized lignocellulosic assemblies of cell walls provide the structural integrity required for the large statures of terrestrial plants. Silencing two CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (CAD) genes in Nicotiana attenuata produced plants (ir-CAD) with thin, red-pigmented stems, low CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity, low lignin contents, and rubbery, structurally unstable stems when grown in the glasshouse (GH). However, when planted into their native desert habitat, ir-CAD plants produced robust stems that survived wind storms as well as the wild-type plants. Despite efficient silencing of NaCAD transcripts and enzymatic activity, field-grown ir-CAD plants had delayed and restricted spread of red stem pigmentation, a color change reflecting blocked lignification by CAD silencing, and attained wild-type-comparable total lignin contents. The rubbery GH phenotype was largely restored when field-grown ir-CAD plants were protected from wind, herbivore attack, and ultraviolet B exposure and grown in restricted rooting volumes; conversely, it was lost when ir-CAD plants were experimentally exposed to wind, ultraviolet B, and grown in large pots in growth chambers. Transcript and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight analysis revealed that these environmental stresses enhanced the accumulation of various phenylpropanoids in stems of field-grown plants; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the lignin of field-grown ir-CAD plants had GH-grown comparable levels of sinapaldehyde and syringaldehyde cross-linked into their lignins. Additionally, field-grown ir-CAD plants had short, thick stems with normal xylem element traits, which collectively enabled field-grown ir-CAD plants to compensate for the structural deficiencies associated with CAD silencing. Environmental stresses play an essential role in regulating lignin biosynthesis in lignin-deficient plants. PMID:22645069

  10. Condition and residual life assessment of seamless steam pipe bends

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, L.B.

    1995-12-01

    The majority of steam pipe bends in Dutch power plants are seamless. Reliable assessment of the condition of seamless bends after {approximately}100,000 hours of operation and beyond is a very complex and sometime frustrating procedure. Complex because external pipe forces can influence the damage and/or strain distribution in the bend. Besides, metallurgical, wall thickness and ovality variations are present anyhow, making the damage distribution in fact unknown. In accordance with a Dutch authority rule, a seamless bend is tested using a magnetic particles and investigated metallurgically with the aid of five surface replicas. Sometime more replicas are investigated and wall thickness and diameter measurements are performed as well. Occasionally, strain measurements are executed by applying capacitive strain gauges and the speckle correlation technique. In rare cases samples are taken from the first bend near the boiler outlet in order to perform isostress creep tests, allowing the determination of the condition and the residual life of other bends in the pipe systems. Based on years of experience the authors have learned that there is no single method or technique capable of assessing the condition and residual life of seamless steam pipe bends. Some experiences will be highlighted, together with recent developments in the field of quantified creep (void) damage--in order to determine inspection intervals--and the field of the speckle correlation technique.

  11. Dancing Discs: Bending and Twisting of Soft Materials by Anisotropic Swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Douglas; Roché, Matthieu; Sinha, Tarun; Stone, Howard

    2011-03-01

    Soft materials, e.g. biological tissues and gels, undergo morphological changes, motion, and instabilities when subjected to external stimuli. Tissues can exhibit residual internal stresses induced by growth, and generate elastic deformations to move in response to light or touch, curl articular cartilage, aid in seed dispersal, and actuate hygromorphs, such as pine cones. Understanding the dynamics of such osmotically driven movements, in the influence of geometry and boundary conditions, is crucial to the controlled deformation of soft materials. We examine how thin elastic plates undergo rapid bending and buckling instabilities after anisotropic exposure to a favorable solvent that swells the network. An unconstrained beam bends along its length, while a circular disc bends and buckles with multiple curvatures. In the case of a disc, a large-amplitude transverse travelling wave rotates azimuthally around the disc. Theoretical interpretations inspired by the complementary thermal expansion problem of transient shape changes triggered by time-dependent heating are presented and allow collapse of time-dependent data on universal curves. Understanding the dynamics of strain-driven shape changes provides new insight into natural systems and control of advanced functional materials.

  12. The use of experimental bending tests to more accurate numerical description of TBC damage process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, T.; Golewski, P.

    2016-04-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been extensively used in aircraft engines to protect critical engine parts such as blades and combustion chambers, which are exposed to high temperatures and corrosive environment. The blades of turbine engines are additionally exposed to high mechanical loads. These loads are created by the high rotational speed of the rotor (30 000 rot/min), causing the tensile and bending stresses. Therefore, experimental testing of coated samples is necessary in order to determine strength properties of TBCs. Beam samples with dimensions 50×10×2 mm were used in those studies. The TBC system consisted of 150 μm thick bond coat (NiCoCrAlY) and 300 μm thick top coat (YSZ) made by APS (air plasma spray) process. Samples were tested by three-point bending test with various loads. After bending tests, the samples were subjected to microscopic observation to determine the quantity of cracks and their depth. The above mentioned results were used to build numerical model and calibrate material data in Abaqus program. Brittle cracking damage model was applied for the TBC layer, which allows to remove elements after reaching criterion. Surface based cohesive behavior was used to model the delamination which may occur at the boundary between bond coat and top coat.

  13. Strain Engineering of Phosphorene via Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepti; Dumitrica, Traian

    Phosphorene (PE) - the newly discovered 2D derivative of Phosphorus - has an inherent band gap and a high current on/off ratio. Manipulating strain in PE films - strain engineering (SE) - will offer the opportunity to further tailor its electronic properties. Using objective boundary conditions (OBC) coupled with density functional tight binding model (DFTB), we calculate bending rigidity of PE and its 2D allotropes by modeling bent PE as large diameter nanotubes (PNTs). OBCs not only allow for drastic reductions in the number of atoms in simulations but also enable simulations of chiral PNTs, which is impossible with periodic boundary conditions. At the same time, the method describes how bending influences the electronic structure. We establish a robust platform for achieving SE for anisotropic 2D films. Using results from our calculations and orthotropic thin shell model we develop equivalent continuum structure (ECS) for PE and its allotropes upon bending. The developed ECS can be used for performing finite element simulations of PE films on substrates.

  14. Passive, achromatic, nearly isochronous bending system

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Yunn, Byung C.

    2004-05-18

    A particle beam bending system having a geometry that applies active bending only beyond the chord of the orbit for any momentum component. Using this bending configuration, all momentum components emerge dispersed in position only; all trajectories are parallel by construction. Combining a pair of such bends with reflective symmetry produces a bend cell that is, by construction, achromatic to all orders. By the particular choice of 45.degree. individual bends, a pair of such achromats can be used as the basis of a 180.degree. recirculation arc. Other rational fractions of a full 180.degree. bend serve equally well (e.g., 2 bends/cell.times.90.degree./bend.times.1 cell /arc; 2 bends/cell.times.30.degree./bend.times.3 cells/arc, etc), as do combinations of multiple bending numerologies (e.g., 2 bends/cell.times.22.5.degree./bend.times.2 cells+2 bends/cell.times.45.degree./bend.times.1 cell). By the choice of entry pole face rotation of the first magnet and exit pole face rotation of the second magnet (with a value to be determined from the particular beam stability requirements imposed by the choice of bending angle and beam properties to be used in any particular application), desirable focusing properties can be introduced and beam stability can be insured.

  15. Vibration analysis of horizontal self-weighted beams and cables with bending stiffness subjected to thermal loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treyssède, Fabien

    2010-04-01

    This paper aims at proposing an analytical model for the vibration analysis of horizontal beams that are self-weighted and thermally stressed. Geometrical nonlinearities are taken into account on the basis of large displacement and small rotation. Natural frequencies are obtained from a linearization of equilibrium equations. Thermal force and thermal bending moment are both included in the analysis. Torsional and axial springs are considered at beam ends, allowing various boundary conditions. A dimensionless analysis is performed leading to only four parameters, respectively, related to the self-weight, thermal force, thermal bending moment and torsional spring stiffness. It is shown that the proposed model can be efficiently used for cable problems with small sag-to-span ratios (typically <{1}/{8}, as in Irvine's theory). For beam problems, the model is validated thanks to finite element solutions and a parametric study is conducted in order to highlight the combined effects of thermal loads and self-weight on natural frequencies. For cable problems, solutions are first compared with existing results in the literature obtained without thermal effects or bending stiffness. Good agreement is found. A parametric study combining the effects of sag-extensibility, thermal change and bending stiffness is finally given.

  16. Bending of light in quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N E J; Donoghue, John F; Holstein, Barry R; Planté, Ludovic; Vanhove, Pierre

    2015-02-13

    We consider the scattering of lightlike matter in the presence of a heavy scalar object (such as the Sun or a Schwarzschild black hole). By treating general relativity as an effective field theory we directly compute the nonanalytic components of the one-loop gravitational amplitude for the scattering of massless scalars or photons from an external massive scalar field. These results allow a semiclassical computation of the bending angle for light rays grazing the Sun, including long-range ℏ contributions. We discuss implications of this computation, in particular, the violation of some classical formulations of the equivalence principle. PMID:25723201

  17. The Study of Optically Induced Effects due to Bending and Twisting using Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Dacles-Mariani, J; Rodrigue, G

    2005-05-11

    We study the effects of macroscopic bends and twists in an optical waveguide and how they influence the transmission capabilities of a waveguide. These mechanical stresses and strains distort the optical indicatrix of the medium producing optical anisotropy. The spatially varying refractive indices are incorporated into the full-wave Maxwell's equations. The governing equations are discretized using a vector finite element method cast in a high-order finite element approximation. This approach allows us to study the complexities of the mechanical deformation within a framework of a high-order formulation which can in turn, reduce the computational requirement without degrading its performance. The optical activities generated, total energy produced and power loss due to the mechanical stresses and strains are reported and discussed.

  18. Origin of bending in uncoated microcantilever - Surface topography?

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshmoji, K.; Prabakar, K.; Tripura Sundari, S. Jayapandian, J.; Tyagi, A. K.; Sundar, C. S.

    2014-01-27

    We provide direct experimental evidence to show that difference in surface topography on opposite sides of an uncoated microcantilever induces bending, upon exposure to water molecules. Examination on opposite sides of the microcantilever by atomic force microscopy reveals the presence of localized surface features on one side, which renders the induced stress non-uniform. Further, the root mean square inclination angle characterizing the surface topography shows a difference of 73° between the opposite sides. The absence of deflection in another uncoated microcantilever having similar surface topography confirms that in former microcantilever bending is indeed induced by differences in surface topography.

  19. Elastostatic bending of a bimaterial plate with a circular interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbonna, Nkem

    2015-08-01

    The elastostatic bending of an arbitrarily loaded bimaterial plate with a circular interface is analysed. It is shown that the deflections in the composite solid are directly related to the deflection in the corresponding homogeneous material by integral and differential operators. It is further shown that, by a simple transformation of elastic constants, the Airy stress function induced in the composite by a stretching singularity can be deduced from the deflection induced by a bending singularity. This result is significant for reduction of mathematical labour and for systematic construction of solutions for more complex structures with circular geometry.

  20. Is the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend Coeval for all Pacific Seamount Trails?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.

    2004-12-01

    By far the largest number of hotspots can be found in the South Pacific Thermal and Isotopic Anomaly (SOPITA). Its Cretaceous counterpart is preserved in a large range of seamounts and guyots found in the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP). The seamounts in these regions display very distinct and long-lived isotopic signatures (Staudigel et al., 1991; Koppers et al., 2003) that can be used to combine source region chemistry and seamount geochronology to map out mantle melting anomalies over geological time. These mappings may resolve many important questions regarding the stationary character, continuity and longevity of the hotspots in the South Pacific mantle. Most importantly, it may also answer the question whether the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend (HEB) is coeval for all Pacific Seamount trails at 47 Ma? Fixed hotspots should be expressed in volcanic trails on the lithospheric plates revealing absolute rates of motion from their age progressions and the direction of motion based on their azimuths. By definition, bends in these hotspot trails thus should give an indication of changing plate motion happening simultaneously across individual lithospheric plates. Based on the morphology of seamounts in the Pacific, the Hawaiian-Emperor, Louisville, Gilbert Ridge and Tokelau seamount trails may be identified as the only hotspot trails to exhibit a clear HEB-type bend (Kroenke et al. 2004). Of these, the Louisville seamount trail only displays a faint bend that may be coeval with the sharp 60 degree bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor trail (Koppers et al. 2004) at 47 Ma. However, new 40Ar/39Ar analyses indicate that the HEB-type bends in the Gilberts Ridge and Tokelau seamount trails are asynchronous around 67 Ma and 57 Ma, respectively. We argue, therefore, that plate motion alone cannot explain these age systematics, but that both hotspot motion and changing lithospheric stress regimes may play an important role in their creation. The simple and elegant hotspot model that

  1. Bending rules for animal propulsion.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Kelsey N; Johnson, Nathan; Beaulieu, Wesley T; Cathcart, Eric; Tirrell, Gregory; Colin, Sean P; Gemmell, Brad J; Dabiri, John O; Costello, John H

    2014-01-01

    Animal propulsors such as wings and fins bend during motion and these bending patterns are believed to contribute to the high efficiency of animal movements compared with those of man-made designs. However, efforts to implement flexible designs have been met with contradictory performance results. Consequently, there is no clear understanding of the role played by propulsor flexibility or, more fundamentally, how flexible propulsors should be designed for optimal performance. Here we demonstrate that during steady-state motion by a wide range of animals, from fruit flies to humpback whales, operating in either air or water, natural propulsors bend in similar ways within a highly predictable range of characteristic motions. By providing empirical design criteria derived from natural propulsors that have convergently arrived at a limited design space, these results provide a new framework from which to understand and design flexible propulsors. PMID:24548870

  2. Method for uniformly bending conduits

    DOEpatents

    Dekanich, S.J.

    1984-04-27

    The present invention is directed to a method for bending metal tubing through various radii while maintaining uniform cross section of the tubing. The present invention is practical by filling the tubing to a sufficient level with water, freezing the water to ice and bending the ice-filled tubing in a cooled die to the desired radius. The use of the ice as a filler material provides uniform cross-sectional bends of the tubing and upon removal of the ice provides an uncontaminated interior of the tubing which will enable it to be used in its intended application without encountering residual contaminants in the tubing due to the presence of the filler material.

  3. ACHRO: A program to help design achromatic bends

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoi, D.

    1993-01-01

    ACHRO is a very simple 2000-line. FORTRAN code that provides help for the designer of the achromatic bend. Given a beam momentum, the program calculates the required drift lengths and dipole parameters which it will apply to any one of several different types of achromats. The types of achromats that the code helps to design include the Enge dual-270,'' the Brown 2-dipole, the Leboutet 3-dipole, and the Enge 4-dipole, as well as the periodic systems which can be designed to any order in symmetric, nonsymmetric and stair-step varieties. Given the dimensions into which a bend must fit, ACHRO will calculate the geometrical parameters in an X-Y plane for a single or multiple achromat, and for achromatic S-bend'' configurations where possible. ACHRO makes it very easy to optimize a bend with respect to drift lengths and magnet parameters by allowing the user to change parameter values and see the resulting calculation. Used in conjunction with a beam-transport code, ACHRO makes it possible for a designer to consider various types of achromatic bends in the same beamline layout in order to compare important bend characteristics such as dispersion, Isochronicity, sensitivity, geometric and chromatic aberrations, aperture requirements, space for diagnostics, etc., all of which are largely a function of the geometry and the type of achromat selected.

  4. ACHRO: A program to help design achromatic bends

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoi, D.

    1993-03-01

    ACHRO is a very simple 2000-line. FORTRAN code that provides help for the designer of the achromatic bend. Given a beam momentum, the program calculates the required drift lengths and dipole parameters which it will apply to any one of several different types of achromats. The types of achromats that the code helps to design include the Enge dual-270,`` the Brown 2-dipole, the Leboutet 3-dipole, and the Enge 4-dipole, as well as the periodic systems which can be designed to any order in symmetric, nonsymmetric and stair-step varieties. Given the dimensions into which a bend must fit, ACHRO will calculate the geometrical parameters in an X-Y plane for a single or multiple achromat, and for achromatic ``S-bend`` configurations where possible. ACHRO makes it very easy to optimize a bend with respect to drift lengths and magnet parameters by allowing the user to change parameter values and see the resulting calculation. Used in conjunction with a beam-transport code, ACHRO makes it possible for a designer to consider various types of achromatic bends in the same beamline layout in order to compare important bend characteristics such as dispersion, Isochronicity, sensitivity, geometric and chromatic aberrations, aperture requirements, space for diagnostics, etc., all of which are largely a function of the geometry and the type of achromat selected.

  5. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: (1) For tank web frames, stringers, or girders of carbon manganese steel or aluminum alloys, meet σB... in appendix A of this part. (c) Tank plating must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's deep...

  6. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: (1) For tank web frames, stringers, or girders of carbon manganese steel or aluminum alloys, meet σB... in appendix A of this part. (c) Tank plating must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's deep...

  7. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: (1) For tank web frames, stringers, or girders of carbon manganese steel or aluminum alloys, meet σB... in appendix A of this part. (c) Tank plating must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's deep...

  8. 46 CFR 154.440 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: (1) For tank web frames, stringers, or girders of carbon manganese steel or aluminum alloys, meet σB... in Appendix A of this part. (c) Tank plating must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's deep...

  9. Geometrical effects of fault bends on fault frictional and mechanical behavior: insights from Distinct Element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Morgan, J.

    2006-12-01

    Strike slip and transform faults often consist of nonlinear segments, i.e., restraining bends and releasing bends that have significant impacts on stress pattern, strain accumulation, slip rate, and therefore the variation of seismicity along these faults. In order to study the geometrical effects of nonlinear faults on fault frictional and mechanical behavior during fault loading and slip, we simulate the rupture process of faults with bends using the Distinct Element Method (DEM) in 2-dimensions. Breakable elastic bonds were added between adjacent, closely packed circular particles to generate fault blocks. A nonlinear fault surface with a restraining bend and a releasing bend that are symmetrically distributed was defined in the middle of the fault blocks. Deformation was introduced by pulling a spring attached on one of fault zone boundaries at a constant velocity and keeping another boundary fixed, producing compression and contraction along the restraining bend, and tension and dilation along the releasing bend. Significant strain is accommodated adjacent to the restraining bend by formation of secondary faults and slip along them. The slip rates, fault frictional strengths, and rupture processes are affected by multiple parameters, including bond strength, loading velocity, bend angle and amplitude. Among these parameters, bend geometry plays a more important role in determining spatial and temporal distribution of contact slip and failure of our simulated nonlinear faults.

  10. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  11. Characterization of bending EAP beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Sherrit, Stewart

    2004-01-01

    Electroactive polymers are attractive actuation materials because of their large deformation, flexibility, and lightweight. A CCD camera system was constructed to record the curved shapes of bending during the activation of EAP films and image-processing software was developed to digitize the bending curves. A computer program was developed to solve the invese problem of cantilever EAP beams with tip position limiter. using the developed program and acquired curves without tip position limiter as well as the corresponding tip force, the EAP material properties of voltage-strain sensitivity and Young's modulus were determined.

  12. Bending-induced Symmetry Breaking of Lithiation in Germanium Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meng; Yang, Hui; Perea, Daniel E.; Zhang, Jiguang; Zhang, Sulin; Wang, Chong M.

    2014-08-01

    From signal transduction of living cells to oxidation and corrosion of metals, mechanical stress intimately couples with chemical reactions, regulating these biological and physiochemical processes. The coupled effect is particularly evident in electrochemical lithiation/delithiation cycling of high-capacity electrodes, such as silicon (Si), where on one hand lithiation-generated stress mediates lithiation kinetics, and on the other electrochemical reaction rate regulates stress generation and mechanical failure of the electrodes. Here we report for the first time the evidence on the controlled lithiation in germanium nanowires (GeNWs) through external bending. Contrary to the symmetric core-shell lithiation in free-standing GeNWs, we show bending GeNWs breaks the lithiation symmetry, speeding up lithaition at the tensile side while slowing down at the compressive side of the GeNWs. The bending-induced symmetry breaking of lithiation in GeNWs is further corroborated by chemomechanical modeling. In the light of the coupled effect between lithiation kinetics and mechanical stress in the electrochemical cycling, our findings shed light on strain/stress engineering of durable high-rate electrodes and energy harvesting through mechanical motion.

  13. Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness Traumatic stress, which happens when you ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  14. Modeling of bend effects on fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadusch, Peter J.; Thompson, Alexander C.; Stoddart, Paul R.; Wade, Scott A.

    2012-02-01

    Sensing and telecommunication applications requiring the bending of optical fibers to small diameters are on the increase. Recent work has shown that the centre wavelength of fiber Bragg gratings has a bend dependence the magnitude of which varies with the type of fiber in which the grating is written. In this work the basis of the centre wavelength shift is investigated by modeling the effects of several potential causes for standard and depressed cladding fiber designs. The majority of the expected affects, including bend induced stress and mode field deformation, were found to result in small wavelength shifts in the opposite direction to those observed experimentally. However, a new account of the shift, based on simplistic geometrical optics, does show wavelength changes in the observed direction, of up to -0.15 nm, which is in the range of the experimentally measured shifts.

  15. Texture and Strain Measurements from Bending of NiTi Shape Memory Alloy Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carl, Matthew; Zhang, Baozhuo; Young, Marcus L.

    2016-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are a new generation of materials that exhibit unique nonlinear deformations due to a phase transformation which allows the material to return to its original shape after removal of stress or a change in temperature. These unique properties are the result of a martensitic/austenitic phase transformation through the application of temperature changes or applied stress. Many technological applications of austenitic SMAs involve cyclical mechanical loading and unloading in order to take advantage of pseudoelasticity, but are limited due to poor fatigue life. In this paper, commercial pseudoelastic NiTi SMA wires (50.7 at.% Ni) were placed under different bending strains and examined using scanning electron microscopy and high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD). By observing the microstructure, phase transformation temperatures, surface texture and diffraction patterns along the wire, it is shown that the wire exhibits a strong anisotropic behavior whether on the tensile or compressive side of the bending axis and that the initiation of micro-cracks in the wires is localized on the compression side, but that crack propagation will still happen if the wire is reloaded in the opposite direction. In addition, lattice strains are examined for both the austenite and martensite phases.

  16. Characterization of bending magnetostriction in iron-gallium alloys for nanowire sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, Patrick Ramon

    This research explores the possibility of using electrochemically deposited nanowires of magnetostrictive iron-gallium (Galfenol) to mimic the sensing capabilities of biological cilia. Sensor design calls for incorporating Galfenol nanowires cantilevered from a membrane and attached to a conventional magnetic field sensor. As the wires deflect in response to acoustic, air flow, or tactile excitation, the resultant bending stresses induce changes in magnetization that due to the scale of the nanowires offer the potential for excellent spatial resolution and frequency bandwidth. In order to determine the suitability for using Galfenol nanowires in this role, the first task was experimentally characterizing magnetostrictive transduction in bending beam structures, as this means of operation has been unattainable in previous materials research due to low tensile strengths in conventional alloys such as Terfenol-D. Results show that there is an appreciable sensing response from cantilevered Galfenol beams and that this phenomenon can be accurately modeled with an energy based formulation. For progressing experiments to the nanowire scale, a nanomanipulation instrument was designed and constructed that interfaces within a scanning electron microscope and allows for real time characterization of individual wires with diameters near 100 nm. The results of mechanical tensile testing and dynamic resonance identification reveal that the Galfenol nanowires behave similarly to the bulk material with the exception of a large increase in ultimate tensile strength. The magnetic domain structure of the nanowires was theoretically predicted and verified with magnetic force microscopy. An experimental methodology was developed to observe the coupling between bending stress and magnetization that is critical for accurate sensing, and the key results indicate that specific structural modifications need to be made to reduce the anisotropy in the nanowires in order to improve the

  17. Bending behavior of lapped plastic ehv cables

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, G H; Muller, A C

    1980-01-01

    One of the factors delaying the development of lapped polymeric cables has been their reputed poor bending characteristics. Complementary programs were begun at BNL several years ago to mathematically model the bending of synthetic tape cables and to develop novel plastic tapes designed to have moduli more favorable to bending. A series of bend tests was recently completed to evaluate the bending performance of several tapes developed for use in experimental superconducting cables. The program is discussed and the results of the bend tests are summarized.

  18. Hormonal regulation of gravitropic bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Cui, D.; Xu, X.; Hu, L.; Cai, W.

    Gravitropic bending is an important subject in the research of plant Recent data support the basics of the Cholodny-Went hypothesis indicating that differential growth in gravitropism is due to redistribution of auxin to the lower sides of gravistimulated roots but little is known regarding the molecular details of such effects So we carried a series of work surround the signals induced by auxin end center We found the endogenous signaling molecules nitric oxide NO and cGMP mediate responses to gravistimulation in primary roots of soybean Glycine max Horizontal orientation of soybean roots caused the accumulation of both NO and cGMP in the primary root tip Fluorescence confocal microcopy revealed that the accumulation of NO was asymmetric with NO concentrating in the lower side of the root Auxin induced NO accumulation in root protoplasts and asymmetric NO accumulation in root tips Gravistimulation NO and auxin also induced the accumulation of cGMP a response inhibited by removal of NO or by inhibitors of guanylyl cyclase compounds that also reduced gravitropic bending Asymmetric NO accumulation and gravitropic bending were both inhibited by an auxin transport inhibitor and the inhibition of bending was overcome by treatment with NO or 8-bromo-cGMP a cell-permeable analog of cGMP These data indicate that auxin-induced NO and cGMP mediate gravitropic curvature in soybean roots From Hu et al Plant Physiol 2005 137 663-670 The asymmetric distribution of auxin plays a fundamental role in plant gravitropic bending

  19. Membrane Bending by Protein Crowding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne

    2014-03-01

    From endosomes and synaptic vesicles to the cristae of the mitochondria and the annulus of the nuclear pore, highly curved membranes are fundamental to the structure and physiology of living cells. The established view is that specific families of proteins are able to bend membranes by binding to them. For example, inherently curved proteins are thought to impose their structure on the membrane surface, while membrane-binding proteins with hydrophobic motifs are thought to insert into the membrane like wedges, driving curvature. However, computational models have recently revealed that these mechanisms would require specialized membrane-bending proteins to occupy nearly 100% of a curved membrane surface, an improbable physiological situation given the immense density and diversity of membrane-bound proteins, and the low expression levels of these specialized proteins within curved regions of the membrane. How then does curvature arise within the complex and crowded environment of cellular membranes? Our recent work using proteins involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, as well as engineered protein-lipid interactions, has suggested a new hypothesis - that lateral pressure generated by collisions between membrane-bound proteins can drive membrane bending. Specifically, by correlating membrane bending with quantitative optical measurements of protein density on synthetic membrane surfaces and simple physical models of collisions among membrane-bound proteins, we have demonstrated that protein-protein steric interactions can drive membrane curvature. These findings suggest that a simple imbalance in the concentration of membrane-bound proteins across a membrane surface can drive a membrane to bend, providing an efficient mechanism by which essentially any protein can contribute to shaping membranes.

  20. Effect of bending on the mechanical properties of gold wrought-wire clasps: a non-linear finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Oda, Nobusuke; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Yoneyama, Takayuki; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of bending of dental gold alloy wires on the mechanical characteristics of wrought-wire clasps. We conducted a simulation of large deformation in straight wires by means of non-linear finite element (FE) analysis. A bending force increased the principal tensile stress on the outer surface of the bending corner and the compressive stress on the inner surface of the bending corner to their maximum values. After unloading with springback, a residual tensile stress was produced on the inner surface. A gold alloy wire clasp exhibited a relatively greater flexibility with small permanent deformation after the clasp tip deflection as compared to previously reported data for Co-Cr wires; this suggests that it is suitable for periodontally compromised teeth. Wire clasps are more susceptible to failure as compared to straight wrought wires because of the residual stress produced during the bending process. PMID:19280977

  1. Bending analysis of laminated composite box beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathy, A.K.; Patel, H.J.; Pang, S.S. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Box beams are widely used in weight reduction structures such as aircraft wings. The use of composite box beams further reduces the weight factor for such structures with the same deflection and stress as that of isotropic box beams. The difference in the behavior of composite box beam with different fiber orientation, number of plies, and number of stringers also provides a wide range of designing parameters to achieve the required performance for a given problem. A bending analysis has been carried out for the study of deflections and stresses for box beams of different material (isotropic and laminated composites), size, and number of stringers subjected to different kinds of loading conditions. A finite element model has been developed based on the strain energy principle, and the results are compared with an available commercial code COSMOS/M.'' Experiments using aluminum and scotchply composite laminates were conducted to verify the results. An optimal design for size and number of stiffeners for a given loading condition has been achieved. Investigations have also been carried out to find the effect of transverse shear on the span-wise normal stress.

  2. Static Fatigue of Optical Fibers in Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D.; Cuellar, E.; Middleman, L.; Zucker, J.

    1987-02-01

    While delayed fracture, or static fatigue, of optical fibers is well known, it is not well understood, and the prediction of the time to failure under a given set of conditions can be problematic. Unlike short term fracture, which is quite well understood and quantified in terms of the theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics, the long term strength remains empirical. The goal of this study is to determine the design criteria for optical fibers subjected to long term applied mechanical loads. One difficulty in making lifetime predictions, as pointed out by Matthewson (Reference 1) and others, is that predictions made from data taken in tension and in bending do not agree. Another difficulty is the statistical nature of the fracture of glass. In making lifetime predictions it becomes important therefore that one (a) have ample data for statistical analysis and (b) have data for the loading configuration of interest. This is the purpose of our work. Since there is less data available in bending, and since several applications (such as wiring in aircraft and missiles) require bending, the data are taken in that configuration. The most significant finding in our work so far is the very large difference in static fatigue behavior between buffer coatings. Chandan and Kalish (Reference 2) and others have reported static fatigue curves, log (time to failure) versus log (applied stress), which are not linear, but rather bimodal. Our study confirms this result, but so far only for acrylate coated fibers. Silicone coated fibers show unimodal behavior. That is, the log (time to failure) versus log (applied stress) curve is linear, at least on the time scale studied so far. Data for acrylate coated fibers at 80°C in water are linear only for time scales of about one day, where a pronounced "knee" is observed. Data for silicone coated fibers under the same conditions are linear up to at least 6 months. Longer time scale tests and tests on fibers with other buffer materials

  3. How protein-making machine bends without breaking

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Scientists from several institutions including the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. They derived atomic-scale resolution structures of the cell's protein-making machine, the ribosome, at key stages of its job. The ability to bend but not break comes from this hinge within transfer RNA, which allows it to bend as much as 70 degrees when it passes through the ribosome during protein synthesis. The structures, developed primarily at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, reveal that the ribosome's ability to rotate an incredible amount without falling apart is due to the never-before-seen springiness of molecular widgets that hold it together.

  4. Bend ductility of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwell, W.E.; Garnich, M.R.; Dudder, G.B.; Lavender, C.A.

    1992-11-01

    A bend ductility test is used to indicate the formability of tungsten heavy alloys sheet. The primary test bends a notchless Charpy impact specimen to a bend angle of approximately 100C. This can be augmented by a bend-completion test. Finite element modeling as well as strain-gaged bend specimens elucidate the strain distribution in the specimen as a function of material thickness and bend angle. The bend ductilities of 70%W, 807.W and 90%W alloys are characterized. As expected, decreasing thickness or tungsten content enhances bend ductility. Oxidation is not detrimental; therefore, controlled atmosphere is not required for cooling. The potentially detrimental effects of mechanical working (e.g., rolling, roller-leveling, grit blasting, and peening) and machining (e.g., cutting and sanding) are illustrated.

  5. Improved Method Of Bending Concentric Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, James E.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed method for bending two concentric pipes simultaneously while maintaining void between them replaces present tedious, messy, and labor-intensive method. Array of rubber tubes inserted in gap between concentric pipes. Tubes then inflated with relatively incompressible liquid to fill gap. Enables bending to be done faster and more cleanly, and amenable to automation of significant portion of bending process on computer numerically controlled (CNC) tube-bending machinery.

  6. Guided Wave Travel Time Tomography for Bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; Bloom, Joost

    2011-06-01

    The concept of predictive maintenance using permanent sensors that monitor the integrity of an installation is an interesting addition to the current method of periodic inspections. Guided wave tomography has been developed to map the wall thickness using the travel times of guided waves. The method has been demonstrated for straight pipes. The extension of this method to bends is not straightforward because natural focusing occurs due to geometrical path differences. This yields a phase jump, which complicates travel time picking. Because ray-tracing is no longer sufficient to predict the travel times a recursive wave field extrapolation has been developed. The method uses a short spatial convolution operator to propagate a wave field through a bend. The method allows to calculate the wave field at the detector ring, including the phase jump as a consequence of the natural focusing. The recursive wave field extrapolation is done in the space-frequency domain. Therefore dispersion effects can be included easily in the forward modeling. Comparison with measurements shows the accuracy of the method.

  7. Effect of the flap and edgewise bending moment phase relationships on the fatigue loads of a typical HAWT blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, H. J.

    The load spectrum unposed upon a horizontal-axis wind turbine blade is typically decomposed into two primary bending moments; flap and edgewise bending. The critical fatigue loads (stress cycles) imposed on the blade may not be on one of these axes, especially if die two bending loads are in-phase with one another. To quantify the correlation of these two bending moments and determine the impact of this correlation on off-axis fatigue loads, an extensive data set for a typical wind turbine blade is examined. The results are compared using their respective cycle count matrices. These results illustrate that the harmonic components of die principal bending stresses are correlated, and that the random components are not. The analysis techniques described in the paper provide the turbine designer with a spectral technique for combining primary bending spectra into off-axis fatigue loads.

  8. Stretching and bending in cross-linked biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heussinger, Claus; Frey, Erwin

    2007-03-01

    The elastic response of cross-linked biopolymer networks is usually interpreted in terms of affine stretching models, adopted from the theory of rubber-elasticity valid for flexible polymer gels. Unlike flexible polymers, however, stiff polymers have a highly anisotropic elastic response, where the low-energy elastic excitations are actually of bending nature. As a consequence, similar to springs connected in series, one would expect the softer bending mode to dominate the elastic energy rather than the stiff stretching mode. We propose a theory that, unlike recent affine models, properly accounts for the soft bending response of stiff polymers. It allows calculating the macroscopic elastic moduli starting from a microscopic characterization of the (non-affine) deformation field. The calculated scaling properties for the shear modulus are in excellent agreement with the results of recent simulations obtained in simple two-dimensional model networks, and can also be applied to rationalize bulk rheological data in reconstituted actin networks.

  9. Ultrathin 90-degree sharp bends for spoof surface plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yihao; Chen, Hongsheng; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N Asger; Zhang, Jingjing

    2015-07-27

    At low frequencies outside the plasmonic range, strongly confined surface waves can be achieved on periodically structured metal surfaces, thereby allowing for the design of compact electromagnetic guiding devices. Here, we propose an approach to realize highly efficient transmission of spoof surface plasmons around 90-degree sharp bends on ultrathin metallic films in the microwave regime. We demonstrate that by judiciously engineering the structure, the dispersion relation can be designed to reduce the scattering. Furthermore, the reflection can be suppressed by proper structural decoration at the bending corner. A one-dimensional scattering theory is employed to understand and verify the transmission properties of our waveguide bend structure. Our design scheme is not restricted to the specific structure we propose here but can be applied to other guiding components built up on two dimensional metal surfaces. PMID:26367570

  10. Flexible thick-film glucose biosensor: influence of mechanical bending on the performance.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Min-Chieh; Yang, Yang-Li; Tseng, Ta-Feng; Chou, Tzuyang; Lou, Shyh-Liang; Wang, Joseph

    2010-04-15

    The influence of the bending-induced mechanical stress of flexible Nafion/GOx/carbon screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) upon the performance of such glucose biosensors has been examined. Surprisingly, such flexible enzyme/polymer-SPEs operate well following a severe bending-induced mechanical stress (including a 180 degrees pinch), and actually display a substantial sensitivity enhancement following their mechanical bending. The bending-induced sensitivity enhancement is observed only for the amperometric detection of the glucose substrate but not for measurements of hydrogen peroxide, catechol or ferrocyanide at coated or bare SPEs. These (and additional) data indicate that the bending effect is associated primarily with changes in the biocatalytic activity. Such sensitivity enhancement is more pronounced at elevated glucose levels, reflecting the bending-induced changes in the biocatalytic reaction. Factors affecting the bending-induced changes in the performance are examined. While our data clearly indicate that flexible enzyme/polymer-SPEs can tolerate a severe mechanical stress and hold promise as wearable glucose biosensors, delivering the sample to the active sensor surface remains the major challenge for such continuous health monitoring. PMID:20188880

  11. Bending Stiffness of Multiwall Sandwich

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study was carried out to understand the extensional and flexural behavior of multiwall sandwich, a metallic insulation composed of alternate layers of flat and dimpled foil. The multiwall sandwich was structurally analyzed by using several simplifying assumptions combined with a finite element analysis. The simplifying assumptions made in this analysis were evaluated by bending and tensile tests. Test results validate the assumption that flat sheets in compression do not significantly contribute to the flexural stiffness of multiwall sandwich for the multiwall geometry tested. However, calculations show that thicker flat sheets may contribute significantly to bending stiffness and cannot be ignored. Results of this analytical approach compare well with test data; both show that the extensional stiffness of the dimpled sheet in he 0 deg direction is about 30 percent of that for a flat sheet, and that in the 45 deg direction, it is about 10 percent. The analytical and experimental multiwall bending stiffness showed good agreement for the particular geometry tested.

  12. Interaction between bending and tension forces in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, T W

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the bending mechanics of a membrane consisting of two tightly-coupled leaflets, each of which shears and bends readily but strongly resists area changes. Structures of this type have been proposed to model biological membranes such as red blood cell membrane. It is shown that when such a membrane is bent, anisotropic components of resultant membrane tension (shear stresses) are induced, even when the tension in each leaflet is isotropic. The induced shear stresses increase as the square of the membrane curvature, and become significant for moderate curvatures (when the radius of curvature is much larger than the distance between the leaflets). This effect has implications for the analysis of shape and deformation of freely suspended and flowing red blood cells. PMID:3224154

  13. Rupture termination at restraining bends: The last great earthquake on the Altyn Tagh Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Austin J.; Oskin, Michael E.; Liu-Zeng, Jing; Shao, Yanxiu

    2015-04-01

    Strike-slip rupture propagation falters where changes in fault strike increase Coulomb failure stress. Numerical models of this phenomenon offer predictions of rupture extent based on bend geometry, but have not been verified with field data. To test model predictions of rupture barriers, we examine rupture extent along a section of the sinistral Altyn Tagh Fault punctuated by three major double bends. We measure 3-8 m offsets and map >95 km of continuous scarps that define the most recent surface rupture. We document the eastern terminus of this rupture within the Aksay bend, where an undeformed Pleistocene alluvial fan we mapped and dated overlaps the fault. We conclude, based on this geomorphologic evidence, that multiple Holocene ruptures have stopped in the Aksay bend. Our field data validate model predictions of rupture termination at a >18° restraining bend and support use of geometric parameters to define expected earthquake sizes in seismic hazard models.

  14. Development of finite element analysis method for three-dimensional hot bending and direct quench (3DQ) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Hiroaki; Tomizawa, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Okada, Nobuhiro

    2013-05-01

    The automotive industry has been focusing on developing lighter vehicles to improve fuel economy and crash safety. In order to meet these requirements, Three Dimensional Hot Bending and Direct Quench (3DQ) Technology has been developed, which enables a manufacturer to form hollow tubular automotive parts with a tensile strength of 1,470 MPa or over. 3DQ is a type of consecutive forming that allows bending and quenching at the same time, with a tube feeding device, an induction heater, a cooling device, and a bending device. In this research, a coupled thermomechanical-metallurgical finite element analysis (FEA) method has been developed to investigate the deformation behavior and to predict the forming capability of 3DQ. In the developed FEA procedure, the temperature distribution was calculated with electro magnetic and heat transfer analysis, and the flow stress was defined by transformation models and linear mixture rule. An experimental formula was used to track the ferrite-austenite transformation, and a Koistinen-Marburger relationship was employed to describe austenite-martensite change. The simulated results were compared with the experimental measurements, and the effectiveness of the developed FEA method was confirmed. Furthermore, the deformation characteristics of 3DQ, such as the wrinkling limit and the thickness change, were investigated, and simple equations to describe them were proposed.

  15. Continuous Curvilinear Capsulorhexis in Cataract Surgery Using a Modified 3-Bend Cystotome

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yuan; Gao, Jian-hua

    2015-01-01

    We modified a 2-bend cystotome for continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) in manual or phacoemulsification cataract surgery to improve the safety and ease of performance. A 26G needle was converted into a cystotome with 3 bends. In this retrospective study, the performance of modified 3-bend cystotome was compared with conventional 2-bend cystotome. During cataract surgery, in the 3-bend cystotome group, mean completion time of CCC was shorter, mean times of viscoelastic agent supplement were less, and CCC success rate was higher than that in 2-bend group. Complication incidence, such as postoperative transient corneal edema and irreparable V-shaped tear, was also lower in 3-bend group. No posterior capsular rupture or no other complication was observed in either group. A polymethyl methacrylate intraocular lens or a hydrogel intraocular lens was implanted in the capsular bag in all eyes. We conclude that it is safe and efficient to accomplish a CCC using the 3-bend cystotome due to its ability to sustain the anterior chamber depth (ACD) and keep the posterior lip intact. Using the 3-bend cystotome also allowed for an adequate view into the anterior chamber from lack of wound deformation. PMID:26509078

  16. Continuous Curvilinear Capsulorhexis in Cataract Surgery Using a Modified 3-Bend Cystotome.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yuan; Gao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    We modified a 2-bend cystotome for continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) in manual or phacoemulsification cataract surgery to improve the safety and ease of performance. A 26G needle was converted into a cystotome with 3 bends. In this retrospective study, the performance of modified 3-bend cystotome was compared with conventional 2-bend cystotome. During cataract surgery, in the 3-bend cystotome group, mean completion time of CCC was shorter, mean times of viscoelastic agent supplement were less, and CCC success rate was higher than that in 2-bend group. Complication incidence, such as postoperative transient corneal edema and irreparable V-shaped tear, was also lower in 3-bend group. No posterior capsular rupture or no other complication was observed in either group. A polymethyl methacrylate intraocular lens or a hydrogel intraocular lens was implanted in the capsular bag in all eyes. We conclude that it is safe and efficient to accomplish a CCC using the 3-bend cystotome due to its ability to sustain the anterior chamber depth (ACD) and keep the posterior lip intact. Using the 3-bend cystotome also allowed for an adequate view into the anterior chamber from lack of wound deformation. PMID:26509078

  17. Distributed microbend optical sensor with directional swelling and optimal bending frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Antonio; Rosas Molina, Armando T.; Marquez Lucero, Alfredo

    2002-02-01

    This work describes the performance of a new optical distributed sensor. This new sensor is capable of detecting and locating liquid hydrocarbon leakage on long pipelines. It is an improvement over the current fiber bending distributed sensors that use a polymeric filament that interacts with an optical fiber by means of a helicoidal wire. When a liquid or gas compatible with the polymeric filament within this type of sensor comes in contact with it, the liquid is absorbed and causes the swelling of the filament and the concomitant compression of the optical fiber against the helicoidal wire. This phenomena cause the fiber to bend and generate an increase on the optical attenuation signal that travels through the fiber. The signal attenuation permits the detection of a specific liquid presence in the vicinity of the sensor and the reflection of the same signal allows to pinpoint the location of this event. The new sensor has the following advantages over similar devices: a) the swelling of the polymeric filament is conducted in a preferential direction permitting to concentrate the osmotic pressure towards the optical fiber. This improves significantly the response speed of the sensor. b) The fiber is placed within a capillary channel located eccentrically in the polymer filament; therefore, no additional protection is needed to prevent damage to the fiber. Of even greater importance, the signal attenuation provoked by stress and deformations due to direct contact of the fiber with the helicoidal wire is avoided. And finally, c) an optimal bending period that take in count the polymer nature to improve the sensor response was found and employed. An experimental prototype of this sensor was fabricated using a multimode optical fiber attached to a polybutadiene filament. The experimental results confirm the benefits of this new design.

  18. Bending strength model for internal spur gear teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Michael; Rubadeux, K. L.; Coe, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    Internal spur gear teeth are normally stronger than pinion teeth of the same pitch and face width since external teeth are smaller at the base. However, ring gears which are narrower have an unequal addendum or are made of a material with a lower strength than that of the meshing pinion may be loaded more critically in bending. In this study, a model for the bending strength of an internal gear tooth as a function of the applied load pressure angle is presented which is based on the inscribed Lewis constant strength parabolic beam. The bending model includes a stress concentration factor and an axial compression term which are extensions of the model for an external gear tooth. The geometry of the Lewis factor determination is presented, the iteration to determine the factor is described, and the bending strength J factor is compared to that of an external gear tooth. This strength model will assist optimal design efforts for unequal addendum gears and gears of mixed materials.

  19. Where the Granular Flows Bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenko, E.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Solanki, S. K.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Gandorfer, A.; Bonet, J. A.; Domingo, V.; Schmidt, W.; Barthol, P.; Knölker, M.

    2010-11-01

    Based on IMaX/SUNRISE data, we report on a previously undetected phenomenon in solar granulation. We show that in a very narrow region separating granules and intergranular lanes, the spectral line width of the Fe I 5250.2 Å line becomes extremely small. We offer an explanation of this observation with the help of magneto-convection simulations. These regions with extremely small line widths correspond to the places where the granular flows bend from upflow in granules to downflow in intergranular lanes. We show that the resolution and image stability achieved by IMaX/SUNRISE are important requisites to detect this interesting phenomenon.

  20. Experimental and analytical investigation of a monocoque wing model loaded in bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schapitz, E; Feller, H; Koller, H

    1939-01-01

    Bending tests with transverse loads and with pure bending were undertaken on a double-web monocoque wing model in order to establish the relation between the state of stress and the results from the elementary bending theory. The longitudinal stresses in the stiffeners were measured with tensiometers and the shear stresses in the sheet were calculated from them. The measurements were made at both moderate loads with no buckles in the covering and at loads with which the critical stress in the individual panels was exceeded. For the comparison, the wing skin was considered as stiffened sheet according to the shear panel scheme. In this way, the statistically indeterminate calculation was confirmed by the test results.

  1. Charge-induced reversible bending in nanoporous alumina-aluminum composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuan; Ngan, A. H. W.

    2013-05-01

    Upon electrical charging, reversible bending was found in nanoporous anodic alumina-aluminum foil composites, as directly observed by an optical microscope and detected by in situ nanoindentation. The bending is thought to be the result of charge-induced surface stresses in the nanoporous alumina. The results suggest the possibility of a type of composite foil materials for applications as micro-scale actuators to transform electrical energy into mechanical energy.

  2. PERMEABILITY OF SALTSTONE MEASUREMENT BY BEAM BENDING

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-01-30

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and, quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone mixes. A performance property for Saltstone mixes that is important but not routinely measured is the liquid permeability or saturated hydraulic conductivity of the cured Saltstone mix. The value for the saturated hydraulic conductivity is an input into the Performance Assessment for the SRS Z-Area vaults. Therefore, it is important to have a method available that allows for an accurate and reproducible measurement of permeability quickly and inexpensively. One such method that could potentially meet these requirements for the measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity is the technique of beam bending, developed by Professor George Scherer at Princeton University. In order to determine the feasibility of this technique for Saltstone mixes, a summer student, David Feliciano, was hired to work at Princeton under the direction of George Scherer. This report details the results of this study which demonstrated the feasibility and applicability of the beam bending method to measurement of permeability of Saltstone samples. This research effort used samples made at Princeton from a Modular Caustic side solvent extraction Unit based simulant (MCU) and premix at a water to premix ratio of 0.60. The saturated hydraulic conductivities for these mixes were measured by the beam bending technique and the values determined were of the order of 1.4 to 3.4 x 10{sup -9} cm/sec. These values of hydraulic conductivity are consistent with independently measured values of this property on similar MCU based mixes by Dixon and Phifer. These values are also consistent with the hydraulic conductivity of a generic Saltstone mix measured by Langton in 1985. The high water to premix ratio used for Saltstone along with the relatively low degree of hydration for

  3. Solution structure of an A-tract DNA bend.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, D; Herbert, K; Zhang, X; Pologruto, T; Lu, P; Polgruto, T

    2001-03-01

    The solution structure of a DNA dodecamer d(GGCAAAAAACGG)/d(CCGTTTTTTGCC) containing an A-tract has been determined by NMR spectroscopy with residual dipolar couplings. The structure shows an overall helix axis bend of 19 degrees in a geometry consistent with solution and gel electrophoresis experiments. Fourteen degrees of the bending occurs in the GC regions flanking the A-tract. The remaining 5 degrees is spread evenly over its six AT base-pairs. The A-tract is characterized by decreasing minor groove width from the 5' to the 3' direction along the A strand. This is a result of propeller twist in the AT pairs and the increasing negative inclination of the adenine bases at the 3' side of the run of adenine bases. The four central thymine bases all have negative inclination throughout the A-tract with an average value of -6.1 degrees. Although this negative inclination makes the geometry of the A-tract different from all X-ray structures, the proton on N6 of adenine and the O4 of thymine one step down the helix are within distance to form bifurcated hydrogen bonds. The 5' bend of 4 degrees occurs at the junction between the GC flank and the A-tract through a combination of tilt and roll. The larger 3' bend, 10 degrees, occurs in two base steps: the first composed of tilt, -4.1 degrees, and the second a combination of tilt, -4.2 degrees, and roll, 6.0 degrees. This second step is a direct consequence of the change in inclination between an adjacent cytosine base, which has an inclination of -12 degrees, and the next base, a guanine, which has 3 degrees inclination. This bend is a combination of tilt and roll. The large change in inclination allows the formation of a hydrogen bond between the protons of N4 of the 3' cytosine and the O6 of the next 3' base, a guanine, stabilizing the roll component in the bend. These structural features differ from existing models for A-tract bends.For comparison, we also determined the structure of the control sequence, d

  4. How two-dimensional bending can extraordinarily stiffen thin sheets.

    PubMed

    Pini, V; Ruz, J J; Kosaka, P M; Malvar, O; Calleja, M; Tamayo, J

    2016-01-01

    Curved thin sheets are ubiquitously found in nature and manmade structures from macro- to nanoscale. Within the framework of classical thin plate theory, the stiffness of thin sheets is independent of its bending state for small deflections. This assumption, however, goes against intuition. Simple experiments with a cantilever sheet made of paper show that the cantilever stiffness largely increases with small amounts of transversal curvature. We here demonstrate by using simple geometric arguments that thin sheets subject to two-dimensional bending necessarily develop internal stresses. The coupling between the internal stresses and the bending moments can increase the stiffness of the plate by several times. We develop a theory that describes the stiffness of curved thin sheets with simple equations in terms of the longitudinal and transversal curvatures. The theory predicts experimental results with a macroscopic cantilever sheet as well as numerical simulations by the finite element method. The results shed new light on plant and insect wing biomechanics and provide an easy route to engineer micro- and nanomechanical structures based on thin materials with extraordinary stiffness tunability. PMID:27403938

  5. How two-dimensional bending can extraordinarily stiffen thin sheets

    PubMed Central

    Pini, V.; Ruz, J. J.; Kosaka, P. M.; Malvar, O.; Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J.

    2016-01-01

    Curved thin sheets are ubiquitously found in nature and manmade structures from macro- to nanoscale. Within the framework of classical thin plate theory, the stiffness of thin sheets is independent of its bending state for small deflections. This assumption, however, goes against intuition. Simple experiments with a cantilever sheet made of paper show that the cantilever stiffness largely increases with small amounts of transversal curvature. We here demonstrate by using simple geometric arguments that thin sheets subject to two-dimensional bending necessarily develop internal stresses. The coupling between the internal stresses and the bending moments can increase the stiffness of the plate by several times. We develop a theory that describes the stiffness of curved thin sheets with simple equations in terms of the longitudinal and transversal curvatures. The theory predicts experimental results with a macroscopic cantilever sheet as well as numerical simulations by the finite element method. The results shed new light on plant and insect wing biomechanics and provide an easy route to engineer micro- and nanomechanical structures based on thin materials with extraordinary stiffness tunability. PMID:27403938

  6. How two-dimensional bending can extraordinarily stiffen thin sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, V.; Ruz, J. J.; Kosaka, P. M.; Malvar, O.; Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J.

    2016-07-01

    Curved thin sheets are ubiquitously found in nature and manmade structures from macro- to nanoscale. Within the framework of classical thin plate theory, the stiffness of thin sheets is independent of its bending state for small deflections. This assumption, however, goes against intuition. Simple experiments with a cantilever sheet made of paper show that the cantilever stiffness largely increases with small amounts of transversal curvature. We here demonstrate by using simple geometric arguments that thin sheets subject to two-dimensional bending necessarily develop internal stresses. The coupling between the internal stresses and the bending moments can increase the stiffness of the plate by several times. We develop a theory that describes the stiffness of curved thin sheets with simple equations in terms of the longitudinal and transversal curvatures. The theory predicts experimental results with a macroscopic cantilever sheet as well as numerical simulations by the finite element method. The results shed new light on plant and insect wing biomechanics and provide an easy route to engineer micro- and nanomechanical structures based on thin materials with extraordinary stiffness tunability.

  7. Influence of test methods on critical current degradation of Bi-2223/Ag superconductor tapes by bending strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Tsuneo; Katagiri, Kazumune; Shin, Hyung-Seop; Itoh, Kikuo; Kumakura, Hiroaki; Wada, Hitoshi

    2005-12-01

    The results of two test methods were compared among three laboratories to determine a standard measurement method of critical current (Ic) as a function of bending strain for Ag-sheathed Bi-2223 superconductors. The VAMAS round-robin-test method (RRT) and the bending-rig method developed by Goldacker were used. The Ic degradation started with less bending strain for RRT than for bending-rig. Average irreversible strains (ɛirr) were 0.30% for RRT and 0.37% for bending-rig. Another test identified parameters that affected the results. A modified RRT method, with a current connection between the sample and the electrode, was used to avoid some thermal stresses of the test procedure. The ɛirr values increased to the level of the bending-rig, but the modified RRT Ic degradation rate with bending strain was higher. The stress states during sample bending differed between these methods. The shear stress was examined as a source of the Ic degradation rate differences with strain in terms of the crack propagation and delamination defects of oxide filaments from the Ag sheath.

  8. Impact compressive and bending behaviour of rocks accompanied by electromagnetic phenomena.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Horikawa, Keitaro; Ogawa, Kinya; Watanabe, Keiko

    2014-08-28

    It is well known that electromagnetic phenomena are often observed preceding earthquakes. However, the mechanism by which these electromagnetic waves are generated during the fracture and deformation of rocks has not been fully identified. Therefore, in order to examine the relationship between the electromagnetic phenomena and the mechanical properties of rocks, uniaxial compression and three-point bending tests for two kinds of rocks with different quartz content, granite and gabbro, have been carried out at quasi-static and dynamic rates. Especially, in the bending tests, pre-cracked specimens of granite were also tested. Using a split Hopkinson pressure bar and a ferrite-core antenna in close proximity to the specimens, both the stress-strain (load-displacement) curve and simultaneous electromagnetic wave magnitude were measured. It was found that the dynamic compressive and bending strengths and the stress increase slope of both rocks were higher than those observed in static tests; therefore, there is a strain-rate dependence in their strength and stress increase rate. It was found from the tests using the pre-cracked bending specimens that the intensity of electromagnetic waves measured during crack extension increased almost proportionally to the increase of the maximum stress intensity factor of specimens. This tendency was observed in both the dynamic and quasi-static three-point bending tests for granite. PMID:25071241

  9. Long-term strength and allowable stresses of grade 10Kh9MFB and X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91/P91) chromium heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorobogatykh, V. N.; Danyushevskiy, I. A.; Schenkova, I. A.; Prudnikov, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Currently, grade X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91, P91) and 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh) chromium steels are widely applied in equipment manufacturing for thermal power plants in Russia and abroad. Compilation and comparison of tensile, impact, and long-term strength tests results accumulated for many years of investigations of foreign grade X10CrMoVNb9-1, T91, P91, and domestic grade 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh) steels is carried out. The property identity of metals investigated is established. High strength and plastic properties of steels, from which pipes and other products are made, for operation under creep conditions are confirmed. Design characteristics of long-term strength on the basis of tests with more than one million of hour-samples are determined ( and at temperatures of 500-650°C). The table of recommended allowable stresses for grade 10Kh9MFB, 10Kh9MFB-SH, X10CrMoVNb9-1, T91, and P91 steels is developed. The long-time properties of pipe welded joints of grade 10Kh9MFB+10Kh9MFB, 10Kh9MFB-Sh+10Kh9MFB-Sh, X10CrMoVNb9-1+X10CrMoVNb9-1, P91+P91, T91+T91, 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh)+X10CrMoVNb9-1(T/P91) steels is researched. The welded joint reduction factor is experimentally determined.

  10. Reconciliation and interpretation of Big Bend National Park particulate sulfur source apportionment: results from the Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational Study--part I.

    PubMed

    Schichtel, Bret A; Gebhart, Kristi A; Malm, William C; Barna, Michael G; Pitchford, Marc L; Knipping, Eladio M; Tombach, Ivar H

    2005-11-01

    The Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) study was an intensive monitoring study from July through October 1999 followed by extensive assessments to determine the causes and sources of haze in Big Bend National Park, located in Southwestern Texas. Particulate sulfate compounds are the largest contributor of haze at Big Bend, and chemical transport models (CTMs) and receptor models were used to apportion the sulfate concentrations at Big Bend to North American source regions and the Carbón power plants, located 225 km southeast of Big Bend in Mexico. Initial source attribution methods had contributions that varied by a factor of > or =2. The evaluation and comparison of methods identified opposing biases between the CTMs and receptor models, indicating that the ensemble of results bounds the true source attribution results. The reconciliation of these differences led to the development of a hybrid receptor model merging the CTM results and air quality data, which allowed a nearly daily source apportionment of the sulfate at Big Bend during the BRAVO study. The best estimates from the reconciliation process resulted in sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from U.S. and Mexican sources contributing approximately 55% and 38%, respectively, of sulfate at Big Bend. The distribution among U.S. source regions was Texas, 16%; the Eastern United States, 30%; and the Western United States, 9%. The Carbón facilities contributed 19%, making them the largest single contributing facility. Sources in Mexico contributed to the sulfate at Big Bend on most days, whereas contributions from Texas and Eastern U.S. sources were episodic, with their largest contributions during Big Bend sulfate episodes. On the 20% of the days with the highest sulfate concentrations, U.S. and Mexican sources contributed approximately 71% and 26% of the sulfate, respectively. However, on the 20% of days with the lowest sulfate concentrations, Mexico contributed 48% compared with 40

  11. Internal and edge cracks in a plate of finite width under bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boduroglu, H.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    Internal and edge cracks were studied by using Reissner's transverse shear theory. The effect of stress-free boundaries on the stress intensity factors in plates under bending were investigated. Among the results found, particularly interesting are those relating to the limiting cases of the crack geometries. The numerical results are given for a single internal crack, two collinear cracks, and two edge cracks. The effect of Poisson's ratio on the stress intensity factors was studied.

  12. High precision thermal stress study on flip chips by synchrotron polychromatic x-ray microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Tang, Wei; Kunz, Martin; Chou, Yi-Chia; Tu, King-Ning; Lai, Yi-Shao

    2010-01-01

    The bending and residual stress of flip chips caused by the mismatch of thermal expansion between the chip and the substrate have been measured by polychromatic microfocused synchrotron x-ray beam. Precise orientation information as a function of position on the chip was obtained from Laue diffraction patterns, so that the bending angle with respect to a reference position at the center of the chip can be calculated at each position. This in turn allows deducing the local curvature of the entire flip chip. Local stress distribution was then mapped by applying a modified Stoney's stress-strain equation to the measured curvature. Our study shows that thermal stress on the circuits and the solder joints in a flip chip strongly depend on temperature and the distance from the center of the chip, indicating that interconnects at the corner and edge of a flip chip are of reliability concerns.

  13. 46 CFR 56.80-5 - Bending.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....1 of ASME B31.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). This shall not prohibit the use of..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Bending and Forming § 56.80-5 Bending. Pipe may be bent by any hot or cold method and to any radius which will...

  14. Stress.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    We all experience stress as a regular, and sometimes damaging and sometimes useful, part of our daily lives. In our normal ups and downs, we have our share of exhaustion, despondency, and outrage--matched with their corresponding positive moods. But burnout and workaholism are different. They are chronic, dysfunctional, self-reinforcing, life-shortening habits. Dentists, nurses, teachers, ministers, social workers, and entertainers are especially susceptible to burnout; not because they are hard-working professionals (they tend to be), but because they are caring perfectionists who share control for the success of what they do with others and perform under the scrutiny of their colleagues (they tend to). Workaholics are also trapped in self-sealing cycles, but the elements are ever-receding visions of control and using constant activity as a barrier against facing reality. This essay explores the symptoms, mechanisms, causes, and successful coping strategies for burnout and workaholism. It also takes a look at the general stress response on the physiological level and at some of the damage American society inflicts on itself. PMID:18846841

  15. Wire and Cable Cold Bending Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    One of the factors in assessing the applicability of wire or cable on the lunar surface is its flexibility under extreme cold conditions. Existing wire specifications did not address their mechanical behavior under cold, cryogenic temperature conditions. Therefore tests were performed to provide this information. To assess this characteristic 35 different insulated wire and cable pieces were cold soaked in liquid nitrogen. The segments were then subjected to bending and the force was recorded. Any failure of the insulation or jacketing was also documented for each sample tested. The bending force tests were performed at room temperature to provide a comparison to the change in force needed to bend the samples due to the low temperature conditions. The results from the bending tests were plotted and showed how various types of insulated wire and cable responded to bending under cold conditions. These results were then used to estimate the torque needed to unroll the wire under these low temperature conditions.

  16. Bending of light in conformal Weyl gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2010-06-01

    We reexamine the bending of light issue associated with the metric of the static, spherically symmetric solution of Weyl gravity discovered by Mannheim and Kazanas (1989). To this end we employ the procedure used recently by Rindler and Ishak to obtain the bending angle of light by a centrally concentrated spherically symmetric matter distribution in a Schwarzschild-de Sitter background. In earlier studies the term γr in the metric led to the paradoxical result of a bending angle proportional to the photon impact parameter, when using the usual formalism appropriate to asymptotically flat space-times. However, employing the approach of light bending of Rindler and Ishak we show that the effects of this term are in fact insignificant, with the discrepancy between the two procedures attributed to the definition of the bending angle between the asymptotically flat and nonflat spaces.

  17. Waveguiding and bending modes in a plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Waveguiding and bending modes are investigated in a fully tunable plasma photonic crystal. The plasma device actively controls the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X band of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes form a square crystal lattice exhibiting a well-defined bandgap, with individual active switching of the plasma elements to allow for waveguiding and bending modes to be generated dynamically. We show, through simulations and experiments, the existence of transverse electric (TE) mode waveguiding and bending modes.

  18. Development of a new model for plane strain bending and springback analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.T.; Lee, D.

    1995-06-01

    A new mathematical model is presented for plane strain bending and springback analysis in sheet metal forming. This model combines effects associated with bending and stretching, considers stress and strain distributions and different thickness variations in the thickness direction, and takes force equilibrium into account. An elastic-plastic material model and Hill`s nonquadratic yield function are incorporated in the model. The model is used to obtain force, bending moment, and springback curvature. A typical two-dimensional draw bending part is divided into five regions along the strip, and the forces and moments acting on each region and the deformation history of each region are examined. Three different methods are applied to the two-dimensional draw bending problems: the first using the new model, the second using the new model but also including a kinematic directional hardening material model to consider the bending and unbending deformation in the wall, and the third using membrane theory plus bending strain. Results from these methods, including those from the recent benchmark program, are compared.

  19. Enhanced film conductance of silver nanowire-based flexible transparent & conductive networks by bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xingda; Yang, Bingchu; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Conghua

    2015-07-01

    Bending is usually used to test durability of flexible transparent and conductive films. Due to the large stress incurred by this technique, bending has always been observed to deteriorate conductance of electrodes such as indium tin oxide film. In contrast, we here demonstrate that bending could be used to improve conductance of silver nanowire-based flexible transparent and conductive films. The enhanced conductance is due to improved contact between nanowires, which was favored by the hydrogen bond formed between residential polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on silver nanowire and TiOx nanoparticles pre-coated on the substrate. The enhanced conductance was found to be affected by bending direction; bending towards the substrate not only yielded quicker decrease in sheet resistance, but also showed better film conductance than bending towards the nanowires. Then, with assistance of surface modification of substrate and ultra-long silver nanowires (averaged at 124 μm, maximum at 438 μm), optoelectronic performance of 90.2% (transmittance at 550 nm) and 12.5 Ω sq-1 (sheet resistance) has been achieved by bending. Such performance was better than commercialized flexible ITO films, and even competed with that obtained from thermal annealing at temperature of 200 °C. Moreover, Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy study showed strong coordination between C=O (heterocyclic ring of PVP) and silver atoms, showing obvious capping behavior of PVP on silver nanowires.

  20. Bio-inspired bending actuator for controlling conical nose shape using piezoelectric patches.

    PubMed

    Na, Tae-Won; Jung, Jin-Young; Oh, Ii-Kwon

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a bio-inspired bending actuator was designed and fabricated using piezoelectric patches and cantilever-shaped beam for controlling nose shape. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of the bending actuator. PZT and single crystal PMN-PT actuators were used to generate translational strain and shear stress. The piezoelectric patches were attached on the clamped cantilever beam to convert their translational strains to bending motion of the beam. First, finite element analysis was performed to identify and to make an accurate estimate of the feasibility on the bending actuation by applying various voltages and frequencies. Based on the results of the FEM analysis, the experiments were also performed. Static voltages and dynamic voltages with various frequencies were applied to the bending actuators with PZTs and PMN-PTs, and the rotation angles of the nose connected to the top of bending actuators were measured, respectively. As the results, the bending actuator using PMN-PT patches showed better performances in all cases. With the increases of signal frequency and input voltage, the rotation angle also found to be increased. Especially at the frequency of 5 Hz and input voltage of 600 V, the nose generated the maximum rotation angle of 3.15 degree. PMID:25942810

  1. Numerical investigation on the effect of skin passing and roller leveling on the bending behaviour of mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnette, Jascha; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    The common grades of steel used in roll forming are: hot rolled, high strength low alloy and recovery annealed cold rolled sheet. These steels are prone to ageing and are often skin passed and/or roller leveled to eliminate ageing as this can lead to problems in forming. Shape defects such as bow, twist and camber can be increased due to a change of the elastic-plastic transition point of the material. In consideration of this effect the knowledge of the material properties in the elastic plastic transition range is necessary if the processes are to be modelled accurately. Previous studies have indicated that residual stresses are not well identified in the standard tensile test, but were shown clearly in a bending test. The elastic plastic transition in bending and the moment curvature characteristic were changed significantly by a light cold rolling reduction. In this work the FEA package Abaqus is used to investigate the effect of residual stresses introduced through skin passing and/or roller leveling on the bending/yielding behaviour of mild steel. Therefore, a skin passing/ roller leveling process is simulated, followed by a subsequent bending test. Residual stress free sheet is compared in bending to just "skin passed", "roller leveled" and a combined "skin passed and roller leveled" strip. Skin passing significantly reduces the bending yield stress due to residual stresses. This has a softening effect on subsequent bending operations. A roller level process prior to roll forming can restore the bending yield stress by reducing the residual stress across the thickness. This has implications for forming aged material.

  2. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  3. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  4. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  5. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  6. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  7. 49 CFR 195.212 - Bending of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bending of pipe. 195.212 Section 195.212... PIPELINE Construction § 195.212 Bending of pipe. (a) Pipe must not have a wrinkle bend. (b) Each field bend must comply with the following: (1) A bend must not impair the serviceability of the pipe. (2)...

  8. Gravitropic bending of fruit bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Bertold

    Fruit bodies of basidiomycetes exhibit a unique mechanism of gravitropic bending, related to their specific architecture. The gravisensitive region of the stipe directly below the cap coincides with the bending zone. The hyphae of this region are equipped with the ability to generate positional information and translate it into differential growth. A model is introduced with the fundamental characteristics of agent-based modeling as it is applied in robotics and artificial intelligence. The hyphae are equivalent to autonomous decision-making agents on the basis of a simple set of rules. Repetitive interactions between the agents, i.e. the hyphae, permit the correct adjustment of the fruit body independent from its relative position in space. This model is based on the following structural as well as biochemical data derived from the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes. A statolith-mediated mechanism in each individual hypha of the gravisensitive region accounts for graviperception. Cell nuclei with a density of 1.22 g cm-3 are considered the most likely candidates for gravity-induced sedimentation (statoliths). The number of nuclei in this zone is increased from 2 to up to 10 individual nuclei within each hyphal compartment. The nuclei are suspended in a web of actin filaments anchored in the plasma membrane. Any shift from the vertical position is converted into a change in the gravitational pull exerted on the plasma membrane. This leads to a functional distinction of the upper and lower flanks of each hypha. Each hypha is equipped with the ability to generate and amplify a positional signal perpendicular to the axis of the gravisensitive zone. This signal coordinates different hyphal extension of the upper and lower flank of the stipe: upper flank hyphae grow slower than lower flank hyphae. Hyphal growth requires continued turgor pressure and depends on the expansion of the vacuolar compartment. This vacuolation is conspicuously increased in lower flank

  9. Bending effects of unsymmetric adhesively bonded composite repairs on cracked aluminum panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Cory; Sun, C. T.

    1994-01-01

    The bending effects of unsymmetrically bonded composite repairs on cracked aluminum panels were quantified using a plate linear finite element model. Stress intensity factors and strain energy release rates were obtained from the model twice, once with out-of-plane displacement suppressed and another time without these restrictions. Several configurations were examined, crack growth stability was identified, and the effect of a debond was considered. The maximum stress intensity factor was also analyzed. Previous work by other authors was found to underpredict the bending effect.

  10. Experimental study on centrifugal concrete-filled steel tubes under bending and torsion.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wei-liang; Qu, Chen; Yu, Yi

    2003-01-01

    A real-size experiment on 11 tubes was done to study the performance of centrifugal concrete-filled steel tubes under bending and torsion. This paper first introduces the relevant operating method, equipment, subjects and processes. The factors that affect deformation and stiffness and the break mechanism under different loading were studied. Experimental stress analysis showed that the values of practical critical stress of steel tubes accorded well with the MISES Yielding Rule. The correlative equation (on the bearing capacity of a structural member under bending and torsion) deduced in this study may provide valuable reference for the design of this structural member. PMID:12958716

  11. Bending Fatigue of Carburized Steel at Very Long Lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. V.; Long, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The bending fatigue behavior of two carburized steels is investigated for lives between approximately 105 and 108 cycles. Cracks are observed to start at sub-surface inclusions and develop features on fracture surfaces resembling "fish eyes" in appearance. This type of sub-surface cracking tends to govern fatigue strength at long lives. Previous studies of "fish eye" fatigue in carburized steel have been relatively few and have mainly considered failures originating at depths beneath a carburized case, where compressive residual stresses are minimal and hardness values approach those in the core. This study provides fatigue data for cracks originating within cases at various depths where compressive residual stresses are substantial and hardness is much higher than in the core. Fatigue strength is predicted by a simple model, accounting for the influence of residual stresses and hardness values at the different depths at which cracks started. Predictions of fatigue strength are compared with data generated in this study.

  12. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Shiheido, Hirokazu Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND3{sub 56–58}, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. - Highlights: • BEND3 localizes to the nucleus. • The N-terminal 60 amino acids region of BEND3 contains NLS. • Amino acids located between 56 and 58 of BEND3 (KRK) are part of NLS. • KRK motif is highly conserved among BEND3 homologs.

  13. Correlation between cyclic fatigue and the bending properties of nickel titanium endodontic instruments.

    PubMed

    Piao, Jindan; Miyara, Kana; Ebihara, Arata; Nomura, Naoyuki; Hanawa, Takao; Suda, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The effects of cyclic fatigue on bending properties of NiTi endodontic instruments were investigated. Sixteen Profiles(®) were divided into two groups (A, and B). The sequence of cantilever bending test and cyclic fatigue test was alternated repeatedly until file separation occurred. In the cyclic fatigue test, the instrument curvature was 19° in group A and 38° in group B. Fractographic examination was performed to determine fracture patterns. In group A, there were significant differences between the bending load values measured before the cyclic fatigue test and the last cantilever bending test before instrument fracture at each deflection (p<0.05). Fractographic examination showed the specific patterns of cyclic fatigue fracture. The stress required to induce martensitic transformation might be reduced due to the softening behavior caused by the cyclic fatigue under the relaxation condition of the superelasticity range (group A). The SEM images were able to display specific patterns indicating cyclic fatigue fracture. PMID:25087661

  14. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND356-58, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. PMID:25600804

  15. Experiments and analyses on undermatched interleaf specimens in bending

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, D.M.; Ganti, S.; McClintock, F.A.; Epstein, J.S.; Lloyd, L.R.; Reuter, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    Model weldment fracture specimens have been fabricated, tested, and analyzed using finite elements. The specimens consist of an interleaf of commercially pure titanium diffusion-bonded to a harder alloy titanium. A deep edge crack is introduced symmetrically into the interleaf, and the specimens are loaded in pure bending. Variation of the thickness (2h) of the soft interleaf layer provides insight into effects of weld geometry in strongly undermatched weldments tested in plane strain bending. Ductile crack growth (beyond blunting) initiated at loads giving J {doteq} 95 kJ/m{sup 2} in all specimens. In the thickest interleaf geometries, stable tearing was obtained, but in the thinnest interleaf (2h {doteq} 3mm), crack initiation resulted in a massive pop-in of 5.4 mm across an initial ligament of 12 mm. Finite element studies show that the thinnest interleaf geometry had slightly higher peak stress triaxiality at the beginning of cracking, and that the highest triaxiality extended over a larger region than in the thicker interleaf specimens loaded to the same initiation J-values. More importantly, the blockage of plastic straining above and below the crack tip in the 3 mm interleaf specimen forced higher values of plastic strain to spread forward into the {+-} 45{degree} sector of highest stress triaxiality directly ahead of the crack tip. The higher strains, in conjunction with the slightly higher stress triaxiality, led to the unstable pop-in initiation.

  16. How a short double-stranded DNA bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Lee, O.-Chul; Sung, Wokyung

    2015-04-01

    A recent experiment using fluorescence microscopy showed that double-stranded DNA fragments shorter than 100 base pairs loop with the probabilities higher by the factor of 102-106 than predicted by the worm-like chain (WLC) model [R. Vafabakhsh and T. Ha, Science 337, 1101(2012)]. Furthermore, the looping probabilities were found to be nearly independent of the loop size. The results signify a breakdown of the WLC model for DNA mechanics which works well on long length scales and calls for fundamental understanding for stressed DNA on shorter length scales. We develop an analytical, statistical mechanical model to investigate what emerges to the short DNA under a tight bending. A bending above a critical level initiates nucleation of a thermally induced bubble, which could be trapped for a long time, in contrast to the bubbles in both free and uniformly bent DNAs, which are either transient or unstable. The trapped bubble is none other than the previously hypothesized kink, which releases the bending energy more easily as the contour length decreases. It leads to tremendous enhancement of the cyclization probabilities, in a reasonable agreement with experiment.

  17. Cyclic Bending and Stationary Drawing Deformation of Metal Sheets : Experiments and Associated Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, L.P.; Romao, E.C.; Vieira, L.C.A.; Ferron, G.; Sampaio, A.P.

    2005-08-05

    A simple bend-draw experimental device is employed to analyze the behavior of narrow strips submitted to a nearly cyclic bending deformation mode followed by a steady state drawing. In this bending-drawing experiment, the strip is firstly bent over a central bead and two lateral beads by applying a controlled holding load and then is pulled out of device throughout the bead radii by a drawing load. The apparatus is mounted in a standard tensile test machine where the holding and drawing loads are recorded with an acquisition data system. The specimen is a rectangular strip cut with 320 mm long and 7 mm wide. The longitudinal (1) and width (w) strip plastic strains are determined from two hardness marks 120 mm spaced whereas the corresponding thickness (t) strain is obtained by volume conservation. Previous experiments showed a correlation between the plastic strain ({epsilon}w/{epsilon}t)BD resulting from the bending-drawing and the Lankford R-values obtained from the uniaxial tensile test. However, previous 3D numerical simulations based upon Hill's quadratic and Ferron's yield criteria revealed a better correlation between the ({epsilon}w/{epsilon}t)BD and the stress ratio {sigma}PS/{sigma}({alpha}), where {sigma}PS stands for the plane-strain tension yield stress and {sigma}({alpha}) for the uniaxial yield stress in uniaxial tension along the drawing direction making an angle {alpha} with the rolling direction. In the present work, the behavior of an IF steel sheet is firstly evaluated by means of uniaxial tensile and drawing-bending experiments conducted at every 15 degrees with respect to the rolling direction. Afterwards, the bending-drawing experiment is investigated with the commercial finite element (FE) code ABAQUS/Standard in an attempt to assess the influence of cyclic loadings upon the bending-drawing strain-ratios.

  18. Structural effects of three-dimensional angle-interlock woven composite undergoing bending cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, LiMin; Yao, Yao; Yu, YiMin; Rotich, Gideon; Sun, BaoZhong; Gu, BoHong

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports the structural effects of three-dimensional (3-D) angle-interlock woven composite (3DAWC) undergoing three-point bending cyclic loading from experimental and finite element analysis (FEA) approaches. In experiment, the fatigue tests were conducted to measure the bending deflection and to observe the damage morphologies. By the FEA approach, a micro-structural unit-cell model of the 3DAWC was established at the yarn level to simulate the fatigue damage. The stress degradation at the loading condition of constant deformation amplitude was calculated to show the degradation of mechanical properties. In addition, the stress distribution, fatigue damage evolution and critical damage regions were also obtained to qualitatively reveal the structural effects and damage mechanisms of the 3DAWC subjected to three-point bending cyclic loading.

  19. Initial Ares I Bending Filter Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Hall, Robert; Norris, H. Lee; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The Ares-I launch vehicle represents a challenging flex-body structural environment for control system design. Software filtering of the inertial sensor output will be required to ensure control system stability and adequate performance. This paper presents a design methodology employing numerical optimization to develop the Ares-I bending filters. The filter design methodology was based on a numerical constrained optimization approach to maximize stability margins while meeting performance requirements. The resulting bending filter designs achieved stability by adding lag to the first structural frequency and hence phase stabilizing the first Ares-I flex mode. To minimize rigid body performance impacts, a priority was placed via constraints in the optimization algorithm to minimize bandwidth decrease with the addition of the bending filters. The bending filters provided here have been demonstrated to provide a stable first stage control system in both the frequency domain and the MSFC MAVERIC time domain simulation.

  20. Thermal static bending of deployable interlocked booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staugaitis, C. L.; Predmore, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Metal ribbons processed with a heat-forming treatment are enabled to form tubelike structures when deployed from a roll. Deployable booms of this have been utilized for gravity-gradient stabilization on the RAE, ATS, and Nimbus D satellites. An experimental thermal-mechanics test apparatus was developed to measure the thermal static bending and twist of booms up to 3 meters long. The apparatus was calibrated by using the correlation between calculated and observed thermal bending of a seamless tube. Thermal static bending values of 16 interlocked deployable booms were observed to be within a factor of 2.5 of the values calculated from seamless-tube theory. Out-of-Sun-plane thermal bending was caused by complex heat transfer across the interlocked seam. Significant thermal static twisting was not observed.

  1. Turbulent flow analysis on bend and downstream of the bend for different curvature ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Rana Roy; Biswas, Suranjan; Alam, Md. Mahbubul; Islam, A. K. M. Sadrul

    2016-07-01

    A CFD analysis on the bend and downstream of the bend has been carried out for turbulent flow through 90 degree bend pipe with different curvature ratios using standard k-epsilon turbulence model. Numerical results are compared with the existing experimental results, and then a detailed study has been performed to investigate the flow characteristics. For different curvature ratios, the static pressure distributions along inner, outer wall and pressure loss factor with different Reynolds number is analyzed. The obtained results show that pressure distribution and pressure loss factor are dependent for different Reynolds number and curvature ratio throughout the bend. Again, It is observed that the disturbance of the flow due to bend exists for a downstream distance of 50D from the central plane of the bend.

  2. Bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, K; Kibi, M; Ono, T; Nokubi, T

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the bending profiles of composite resin coating cast clasps. The cobalt-chromium alloy cast clasps were made using tapered wax pattern. Silane coupling method (Silicoater MD, Kulzer Co.) was used to attach composite resin to metal surface. The breakage and the bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps were evaluated. Results were as follows: 1) After the repeated bending test to the tips of clasp arm at 10,000 times in 0.25 mm deflection, neither crack on composite resin surface nor separation at resin/metal interface was observed in any specimen. 2) There was no significant difference in the bending rigidity of clasp arms between before and after composite resin coating. From these results, it was demonstrated that the composite resin coating cast clasp was available in clinical cases and coating with composite resin had little influence on the bending rigidity of clasp arms. Therefore, it was suggested that our clasp designing and fabricating system to control the bending rigidity of clasp arms could be applied to composite resin coating clasps. PMID:8935086

  3. Denali in a box: analog experiments modeled after a natural setting provide insight on gentle restraining bend deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendick, Anne; Bemis, Sean; Toeneboehn, Kevin; Cooke, Michele; Benowitz, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    topography while migrating bends do not allow for topography to build. The migration of the stepover segment and advection of crust through the bend in the analog model correspond with this migration, suggesting that migrating bends are of capable of producing extreme topography. This study broadens our understanding of restraining bend deformation and highlights the importance and exploitability of this type of analog modeling, such as understanding how the tallest peak in North America formed.

  4. In situ bending of an Au nanowire monitored by micro Laue diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Leclere, Cédric; Cornelius, Thomas W.; Ren, Zhe; Davydok, Anton; Micha, Jean-Sébastien; Robach, Odile; Richter, Gunther; Belliard, Laurent; Thomas, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    This article1 reports on the first successful combination of micro Laue (µLaue) diffraction with an atomic force microscope for in situ nanomechanical tests of individual nanostructures. In situ three-point bending on self-suspended gold nanowires was performed on the BM32 beamline at the ESRF using a specially designed atomic force microscope. During the bending process of the self-suspended wire, the evolution of µLaue diffraction patterns was monitored, allowing for extraction of the bending angle of the nanowire. This bending compares well with finite element analysis taking into account elastic constant bulk values and geometric nonlinearities. This novel experimental setup opens promising perspectives for studying mechanical properties at the nanoscale. PMID:26089751

  5. Coherent thermoelectric transport in single, double, and U-bend structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pye, A. J.; Faux, D. A.; Kearney, M. J.

    2015-02-14

    Coherent, i.e., ballistic, thermoelectric transport in electron waveguide structures containing right-angle bends in single, double, and U-bend configurations is investigated. A theory based on Green's functions is used to derive the transmission function (and from that the transport coefficients) and allows for the inclusion of realistic models of spatially distributed imperfections. The results for the single and double-bend structures are presented in more detail than elsewhere in the literature. In the U-bend structure, sharp resonances in the stop-band region of the transmission function lead to large-magnitude peaks in the thermopower and consequently a large thermoelectric figure of merit (of order ten in some instances). These properties are still readily apparent even in the presence of moderate edge roughness or Anderson disorder.

  6. Measuring the bending of asymmetric planar EAP structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Florian M.; Zhao, Xue; Thalmann, Peter; Deyhle, Hans; Urwyler, Prabitha; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2013-04-01

    The geometric characterization of low-voltage dielectric electro-active polymer (EAP) structures, comprised of nanometer thickness but areas of square centimeters, for applications such as artificial sphincters requires methods with nanometer precision. Direct optical detection is usually restricted to sub-micrometer resolution because of the wavelength of the light applied. Therefore, we propose to take advantage of the cantilever bending system with optical readout revealing a sub-micrometer resolution at the deflection of the free end. It is demonstrated that this approach allows us to detect bending of rather conventional planar asymmetric, dielectric EAP-structures applying voltages well below 10 V. For this purpose, we built 100 μm-thin silicone films between 50 nm-thin silver layers on a 25 μm-thin polyetheretherketone (PEEK) substrate. The increase of the applied voltage in steps of 50 V until 1 kV resulted in a cantilever bending that exhibits only in restricted ranges the expected square dependence. The mean laser beam displacement on the detector corresponded to 6 nm per volt. The apparatus will therefore become a powerful mean to analyze and thereby improve low-voltage dielectric EAP-structures to realize nanometer-thin layers for stack actuators to be incorporated into artificial sphincter systems for treating severe urinary and fecal incontinence.

  7. Effects of repetitive bending on the magnetoresistance of a flexible spin-valve

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J.-H.; Kwak, W.-Y.; Cho, B. K.; Choi, H. Y.; Kim, G. H.

    2015-05-07

    A positive magnetostrictive single layer (CoFe) and top-pinned spin-valve structure with positive magnetostrictive free (NiFe) and pinned (CoFe) layers were deposited on flexible polyethylene terephthalate film to investigate the changes in the magnetic properties in flexible environments, especially with a repetitive bending process. It was found that the stress, applied by repetitive bending, changes significantly the magnetic anisotropy of both layers in a single and spin-valve structure depending on the direction of applied stress. The changes in magnetic anisotropy were understood in terms of the inverse magnetostriction effect (the Villari effect) and the elastic recovery force from the flexibility of the polymer substrate. Repetitive bending with tensile stress transverse (or parallel) to the magnetic easy axis was found to enhance (or reduce) the magnetic anisotropy and, consequently, the magnetoresistance ratio of a spin-valve. The observed effects of bending stress in this study should be considered for the practical applications of electro-magnetic devices, especially magneto-striction sensor.

  8. Kic size effect study on two high-strength steels using notched bend specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonesifer, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    Five methods are used to calculate plane strain fracture toughness (K sub Q) values for bend-specimens of various sizes from two high-strength steels. None of the methods appeared to satisfactorily predict valid stress intensity factor (K sub IC) values from specimens of sizes well below that required by E399 standard tests.

  9. Modelling The Bending Test Behaviour Of Carbon Fibre Reinforced SiC By Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.; Koch, D.; Voggenreiter, H.

    2012-07-01

    Liquid silicon infiltrated carbon fibre reinforced SiC, has shown to be a high-potential material for thermal protection systems. The tensile and bending behaviour of the ceramic-matrix composite, C/C-SiC, were investigated in varying orientations relative to the 0/90° woven carbon fibres. The ratio of bending to tensile strength was about 1.7 to 2 depending on the loading direction. With the goal to understand this large difference finite element analyses (FEA) of the bending tests were performed. The different stress-strain behaviour of C/C-SiC under tensile and compression load were included in the FEA. Additionally the bending failure of the CMC-material was modelled by Cohesive Zone Elements (CZE) accounting for the directional tensile strength and Work of Fracture (WOF). The WOF was determined by Single Edge Notched Bending (SENB) tests. Comparable results from FEA and bending test were achieved. The presented approach could also be adapted for the design of C/C-SiC-components and structures.

  10. Small bending and stretching of sandwich-type shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reissner, Eric

    1950-01-01

    A theory has been developed for small bending and stretching of sandwich-type shells. This theory is an extension of the known theory of homogeneous thin elastic shells. It was found that two effects are important in the present problem, which are not normally of importance in the theory of curved shells: (1) the effect of transverse shear deformation and (2) the effect of transverse normal stress deformation. The first of these two effects has been known to be of importance in the theory of plates and beams. The second effect was found to occur in a manner which is typical for shells and has no counterpart in flat-plate theory. The general results of this report have been applied to the solution of problems concerning flat plates, circular rings, circular cylindrical shells, and spherical shells. In each case numerical examples have been given, illustrating the magnitude of the effects of transverse shear and normal stress deformation.

  11. Rheology of a Twist-bend Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salili, Seyyed Muhammad; Kim, Chanjoong; Sprunt, Samuel; Gleeson, James; Parri, Owain; Jakli, Antal; Kim Lab Team; Merck Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    First detailed flow shear alignment studies and rheological measurements in the twist-bend nematic (Ntb) liquid crystalline phase of odd numbered flexible dimer molecules is presented. It is found that the Ntb phase is strongly shear-thinning. At shear stresses below 1 Pa the apparent viscosity of the Ntb phase is 1000 times larger than in the nematic phase. At stresses above 10 Pa the Ntb viscosity drops by two orders of magnitude and the material exhibits Newtonian fluid behavior. The results are consistent with the behavior of a system with pseudo-layer structure with layer spacing determined by the heliconical pitch. From the measurements of dynamic modulus we estimate the compression modulus of the pseudo-layers to be B ~ 2 kPa this value is discussed within the context of a simple theoretical model based upon a coarse-grained elastic free energy. www.jakligroup.com.

  12. Dynamic hysteretic sensing model of bending-mode Galfenol transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Shuying Zheng, Jiaju; Sang, Jie; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Bowen; Huang, Wenmei

    2015-05-07

    A dynamic hysteretic sensing model has been developed to predict the dynamic responses of the magnetic induction, the stress, and the output voltage for a bending-mode Galfenol unimorph transducer subjected simultaneously to acceleration and bias magnetic field. This model is obtained by coupling the hysteretic Armstrong model and the structural dynamic model of the Galfenol unimorph beam. The structural dynamic model of the beam is founded based on the Euler-Bernouli beam theory, the nonlinear constitutive equations, and the Faraday law of electromagnetic induction. Comparisons between the calculated and measured results show the model can describe dynamic nonlinear voltage characteristics of the device, and can predict hysteretic behaviors between the magnetic induction and the stress. Moreover, the model can effectively analyze the effects of the bias magnetic field, the acceleration amplitude, and frequency on the root mean square voltage of the device.

  13. Buoyancy, bending, and seismic visibility in deep slab stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, Craig R.; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Suetsugu, D.; Bina, C.; Inoue, T.; Wiens, D.; Jellinek, M.

    2010-11-01

    The petrological consequences of deep subhorizontal deflection ("stagnation") of subducting slabs should affect both apparent seismic velocity structures and slab morphology. We construct kinematic thermal models of stagnant slabs and perform thermodynamic modeling of the consequent perturbation of high-pressure phase transitions in mantle minerals, focusing upon Japan as our study area. We calculate associated thermo-petrological buoyancy forces and bending moments which (along with other factors such as viscosity variations and rollback dynamics) may contribute to slab deformation. We consider effects of variations in depth of stagnation, post-stagnation dip angle, phase transition sharpness, transition triplication due to multiple intersection of geotherms with phase boundaries, and potential persistence of metastable phases due to kinetic hindrance. We also estimate seismic velocity anomalies, as might be imaged by seismic tomography, and corresponding seismic velocity gradients, as might be imaged by receiver-function analysis. We find that buoyant bending moment gradients of petrological origin at the base of the transition zone may contribute to slab stagnation. Such buoyancy forces vary with the depth at which stagnation occurs, so that slabs may seek an equilibrium slab stagnation depth. Metastable phase bending moment gradients further enhance slab stagnation, but they thermally decay after ∱/4600•700 km of horizontal travel, potentially allowing stagnant slabs to descend into the lower mantle. Stagnant slabs superimpose zones of negative velocity gradient onto a depressed 660-km seismic discontinuity, affecting the seismological visibility of such features. Seismologically resolvable details should depend upon both stagnation depth and the nature of the imaging technique (travel-time tomography vs. boundary-interaction phases). While seismic tomography appears to yield images of stagnant slabs, discontinuity topography beneath Japan resolved by

  14. Microstructure-Based RVE Approach for Stretch-Bending of Dual-Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng; He, ChunFeng; Zhao, YiXi

    2016-03-01

    Fracture behavior and micro-failure mechanism in stretch-bending of dual-phase (DP) steels are still unclear. Representative volume elements (RVE) have been proved to be an applicable approach for describing microstructural deformation in order to reveal the micro-failure mechanism. In this paper, 2D RVE models are built. The deformation behavior of DP steels under stretch-bending is investigated by means of RVE models based on the metallographic graphs with particle geometry, distribution, and morphology. Microstructural failure modes under different loading conditions in stretch-bending tests are studied, and different failure mechanisms in stretch-bending are analyzed. The computational results and stress-strain distribution analysis indicate that in the RVE models, the strain mostly occurs in ferrite phase, while martensite phase undertakes most stress without significant strain. The failure is the results of the deformation inhomogeneity between martensite phase and ferrite phase. The various appearance and growth of initial voids are different depending on the bending radius.

  15. Analysis of Basal Plane Bending and Basal Plane Dislocations in 4H-SiC Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Noboru; Katsuno, Masakazu; Fujimoto, Tatsuo; Nakabayashi, Masashi; Tsuge, Hiroshi; Yashiro, Hirokatsu; Aigo, Takashi; Hirano, Hosei; Hoshino, Taizo; Ohashi, Wataru

    2009-06-01

    4H-SiC single crystals were grown by the physical vapor transport (PVT) growth method under different thermoelastic stress conditions, and the degree of basal plane bending in the crystals was characterized by the peak shift measurement of X-ray rocking curves. The results indicate that the degree of basal plane bending largely depends on the magnitude of the thermoelastic stresses imposed on the crystals during PVT growth. Quantitative analysis of basal plane bending revealed that the density of basal plane dislocations (BPDs) estimated from basal plane bending is much smaller than that obtained from defect-selective etching. It was also found that the BPD density is correlated with the threading screw dislocation (TSD) density in PVT-grown SiC crystals. These aspects of BPDs were discussed in terms of the BPD multiplication process triggered by the intersection of BPDs with a forest of TSDs extending along the c-axis.

  16. Autogenic Scour and Channel Widening in Sharp Bends of the River Mahakam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoitink, T.; Vermeulen, B.; van Berkum, S.; Hidayat, H.; Labeur, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Field evidence of the River Mahakam reveals autogenic scour and channel widening in a series of sharp bends. An integral analysis of a 300 km reach of the river is presented, including a comprehensive survey of the river banks, delineation of the river corridor from radar observations, Large Eddy Simulations of observed flow patterns, and a geometric analysis of planform and depth information. Scour depths strongly exceed what can be expected based on existing understanding of sharp bends, and are highly correlated with curvature. Histograms of the occurrence of erosive, stable, advancing, and bar-type banks as a function of curvature quantify the switch from a mildly curved bend regime to a sharp bend regime. In mild bends, outer banks erode and inner banks advance. In sharp bends the erosion pattern inverts. Outer banks stabilize or advance, while inner banks erode. In sharply curved river bends, bars occur near the outer banks that become less erosive for higher curvatures. Inner banks become more erosive for higher curvatures, but nevertheless accommodate the larger portion of exposed bars. Soil processes may play a crucial role in the formation of sharp bends, which is inferred from iron and manganese concretions observed in the riverbanks, indicating ferric horizons and early stages of the formation of plinthic horizons. Historical topographic maps show the planform activity of the river is low, which may relate to the scours slowing down planimetric development. The occurrence of exceptionally deep scours is attributed to downflow near the scour exceeding 12 cm/s, increasing the bed shear stress. The downflow, in turn, is explained from the cross-sectional area increase, which is shown to be important in generating adverse surface gradients driving flow recirculation in the Large Eddy Simulations. Strong secondary flow distorts the vertical pressure distribution that is no longer hydrostatic. The downflow advects longitudinal momentum, moving the core of the

  17. Numerical Simulation Of Steel Plate Bending Process Using Stationary Laser Beam By A Coupled Finite Element Thermal Mechanical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kheloufi, Karim; Amara, El Hachemi

    2008-09-23

    We analyze the deformation induced by focusing a CW high power laser beam on stainless steel plate. A non-linear 3D finite element approach is used to simulate the thermo-elastoplastic deformation, the heat conduction, and stresses. Material properties including density, yield stress, Young modulus, specific heat, and thermal expansion coefficient are considered as temperature-dependent. The effect of heating time on transient temperatures, stresses, strains and bending angles during the process is studied, and the process parameters affecting the bending angles were also investigated.

  18. The effect of skin passing on the material behavior of metal strip in pure bending and tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Matthias; Ryan, Will; Rolfe, Bernard; Yang, Chunhui

    2010-06-01

    The metal strip used in roll forming has often been preprocessed by (tension or roller) leveling or by skin-pass rolling, and as a consequence, may contain residual stresses. These stresses are not well observed by the tensile test, but could have a significant effect on the bending and springback behavior. With the advent of improved process design techniques for roll forming, including advanced finite element techniques, the need for precise material property data has become important. The major deformation mode of roll forming is that of bending combined with unloading and reverse bending, and hence property data derived from bend tests could be more relevant than that from tensile testing. This work presents a numerical study on the effect of skin passing on the material behavior of stainless steel strip in pure bending and tension. A two dimensional (2-D) numerical model was developed using Abaqus Explicit to analyze the affect of skin passing on the residual stress profile across a section for various working conditions. The deformed meshes and their final stress fields were then imported as pre-defined fields into Abaqus Standard, and the post-skin passing material behavior in pure bending was determined. The results show that a residual stress profile is introduced into the steel strip during skin passing, and that its shape and stress level depend on the overall thickness reduction as well as the number of rolling passes used in the skin passing process. The material behavior in bending and the amount of springback changed significantly depending on the skin pass condition.

  19. Experiments in a high-amplitude Kinoshita meandering channel: 1. Implications of bend orientation on mean and turbulent flow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, Jorge D.; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2009-02-01

    Meandering rivers exhibit complex planform patterns with both upstream and downstream valley oriented meander bends. In order to describe the effects of bend orientation on long-term river evolution, it is of great importance to be able to describe bend orientation (curvature) effects on the hydrodynamics of the flow as a first approximation. Mean flow and turbulence characteristics were investigated experimentally in a periodic, asymmetric, meandering channel herein called "the Kinoshita channel". The channel planform configuration retains high-order harmonic modes. Upstream and downstream valley oriented meander bends can be studied by reversing the flow. A flat, smooth bed (without sediment) condition has been considered to avoid further complexity. Spatial distributions of mean flow (e.g., velocities) and turbulence parameters (Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy) were observed at several cross sections along the meander wavelength. Measurements show that at the bend apex, the core of maximum velocity is found near the inner bank for both planform orientations. At the same cross section, observations show that when bends are oriented upstream valley, the secondary flow is not as well developed as in the case where bends are oriented downstream valley. Furthermore, for the upstream condition the energy gradient is smaller than that for the downstream condition, suggesting that the friction (i.e., flow resistance) due to curvature is higher for the downstream-skewed condition. Implications about having upstream and downstream bends in the meandering river migration framework are also discussed herein.

  20. Laser assisted die bending: a new application of high power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuöcker, D.; Schumi, T.; Spitzer, O.; Bammer, F.; Schuöcker, G.; Sperrer, G.

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays high power lasers are mainly used for cutting of sheet metals, for welding, hardening and rapid prototyping. In the forming of sheet metals as bending or deep drawing lasers are not used. Nevertheless a few years ago a new application of high power lasers has been invented, where bending of materials that break at room temperature becomes possible by heating them along the bending edge with high power lasers thus allowing their treatment without cracks and rupture. For this purpose a large number of diode lasers are arranged in the bottom tool of a bending machine (a V-shaped die) which heat up the initially flat sheet metal during the bending process what is performed by pressing it into the die with a knife shaped upper tool where due to the laser heating the material is softened and thus cracks are avoided. For the technical realization of the new process of laser assisted die bending, modules equipped with numerous laser diodes and a total beam power of 2,5 kW are used. The light emitted by these modules enters a tool with a length of 15cm and is deflected towards the workpiece. By using ten of these modules with adjacent dies and by integrating those in a bending press a bending edge of sheet metals with a length of 1500mm can be realized. Such a bending press with laser assistance also needs energization with a power of practically 50kW, a respective water flow, a heat exchanger system and also a control for all functions of this system. Special measures have also been developed to avoid radiating of those tools that are not covered by a workpiece in the case of bending edges shorter than the full length of the bending tools whereas individual short circuiting of diode modules can be performed. Specific measures to ensure a safe operation without any harm to the operational person have been realized. Exploitation of the bending process has been carried out for titanium, where material thicknesses up to 3mm have been bent successfully.

  1. Form of developing bends in reactivated sperm flagella.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S F

    1976-02-01

    1. Dark-field, multiple-exposure photographs of reactivated tritonated sea urchin sperm flagella swimming under a variety of conditions were analysed. 2. The length, radius and subtended angle of bends increased during bend development. The pattern of development was essentially the same under all conditions observed. 3. The angles of the two bends nearest the base tend to increase at the same rate, cancelling one another, so that the development of new bends causes little if any net microtubular sliding. 4. The direction of microtubular sliding within a bend is initially in the same direction as that within the preceding bend, and reverses as the bend develops. PMID:1270988

  2. Combined implementation of holographic and speckle interferometry for comparative local stress analysis at different vibration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Sergey A.; Pisarev, Vladimir S.; Dzuba, Alexander S.; Grigoriev, Vladimir D.

    1998-09-01

    New capability of combined application of time-averaged holographic interferometry and defocused speckle photography, allowing us a comparative analysis of local stresses corresponding to different vibration modes, is considered. The main aspects of the technique developed are illustrated by using as an example bending oscillations of thin square plate with a large central circular hole. Experimental results are compared with corresponding numerical data obtained by means of the MSC/NASTRAN software.

  3. Multifiber optical catheter with bending control of distal end: Applications of Raman biospectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, C. J.; Simões, M.; Silveira, L.; Silveira, F. L.; Villaverde, A. B.; Pacheco, M. T. T.

    2007-01-01

    This work demonstrates a multifiber optical catheter with bending control of the distal end, whose main use is to collect Raman signal for biospectroscopy. Also, a method for fiber background subtraction is presented, allowing removal of fiber emission peaks from gross Raman spectrum. The fiber optic catheter with seven fiber optics wrapped up in a resin and a biocompatible flexible teflon tube has been modified to incorporate a mechanical device with gauntlet, which allows bending of the distal extremity to access a desired location obeying the anatomy of the organ. The mechanical device (gauntlet) was built halfway from the catheter proximal excitation tip, allowing the bending of the distal end of about 38 mm diameter. Dispersive Raman spectra at 785 nm excitation wavelength from samples were measured without and with bending (from 120 mm decreasing to 14 mm) of the distal end of the catheter. An optical catheter without the gauntlet was used as a reference. Results demonstrated that both catheters (with bending mechanism and standard one) had about the same Raman signal when the device was bent semicircularly to 38 mm diameter (bending limit for the mechanism), with negligible implication to the Raman signal-to-noise relation (SNR) from sample. When both catheters were bent in a full turn, the Raman signal decreased to about 40% when bending reached 14 mm diameter, mainly due to losses introduced by changes in the fiber total internal reflection. The background removal was efficient, with minimum residual from fiber peaks. This optical catherer could be very useful in laser diagnosis and clinical applications, introducing a way to control the fiber tip position and angle on the tissue or organ.

  4. A Novel Circular TE01-Mode Bend

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S

    2004-04-19

    Future Linear Colliders and Accelerators require rf systems and components that are capable of handling hundreds of megawatts power levels at x-band frequencies and higher. Standard rf components that have been in use for a long time such as waveguide bends, directional couplers and hybrids, can not be used because of peak field considerations. Indeed, one has to reinvent most of these components taking into account the constraints imposed by ultra-high-power operation. Here, we present a new design for circular waveguides bends propagating the low-loss TE{sub 01} mode. The bend has smooth walls and low field levels. We present a simple synthesis process for designing such device. The general philosophy of this technique can be applied to other components as well. We describe the detailed design of the bend and compare our design with finite element simulations and experimental data. The bend has very low ohmic losses, and the TE{sub 01} mode is transmitted with virtually perfect mode purity.

  5. Sharp bends of phononic crystal surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Ahmet; Salman, Aysevil; Adem Kaya, Olgun; Ulug, Bulent

    2015-12-01

    Sharp bending of surface waves at the interface of a two-dimensional phononic crystal (PnC) of steel cylinders in air and the method of using a diagonally offset cylindrical scatterer are numerically demonstrated by finite-element method simulations. The radii of the diagonally offset scatterer and the cylinder at the PnC corner, along with the distance between them, are treated as optimization parameters in the genetic algorithm optimization of sharp bends. Surface wave transmittance of at most 5% for the unmodified sharp bend is significantly enhanced to approximately 75% as a result of optimization. A series of transmittance peaks whose maxima increase exponentially, as their widths reduce, with increasing frequency is observed for the optimized sharp bend. The transmittance peaks appear at frequencies corresponding to integer plus half-beat periods, depending on the finite surface length. The optimal parameters are such that the cylinder radius at the PnC corner is not significantly modified, whereas a diagonally offset scatterer having a diameter of almost two periods and a shortest distance of about 0.7 periods between them is required for the strongest transmittance peak. Utilization of PnC surface sharp bends as acoustic ring resonators is demonstrated.

  6. Tunable thermoelectric properties in bended graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang-Ning, Pan; Jun, He; Mao-Fa, Fang

    2016-07-01

    The ballistic thermoelectric properties in bended graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are systematically investigated by using atomistic simulation of electron and phonon transport. We find that the electron resonant tunneling effect occurs in the metallic–semiconducting linked ZZ-GNRs (the bended GNRs with zigzag edge leads). The electron-wave quantum interference effect occurs in the metallic–metallic linked AA-GNRs (the bended GNRs with armchair edge leads). These different physical mechanisms lead to the large Seebeck coefficient S and high electron conductance in bended ZZ-GNRs/AA-GNRs. Combined with the reduced lattice thermal conduction, the significant enhancement of the figure of merit ZT is predicted. Moreover, we find that the ZTmax (the maximum peak of ZT) is sensitive to the structural parameters. It can be conveniently tuned by changing the interbend length of bended GNRs. The magnitude of ZT ranges from the 0.15 to 0.72. Geometry-controlled ballistic thermoelectric effect offers an effective way to design thermoelectric devices such as thermocouples based on graphene. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61401153) and the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province, China (Grant Nos. 2015JJ2050 and 14JJ3126).

  7. Creep and stress relaxation modeling of polycrystalline ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of high performance polycrystalline ceramic fibers are currently being considered as reinforcement for high temperature ceramic matrix composites. However, under mechanical loading about 800 C, these fibers display creep related instabilities which can result in detrimental changes in composite dimensions, strength, and internal stress distributions. As a first step toward understanding these effects, this study examines the validity of a mechanism-based empirical model which describes primary stage tensile creep and stress relaxation of polycrystalline ceramic fibers as independent functions of time, temperature, and applied stress or strain. To verify these functional dependencies, a simple bend test is used to measure stress relaxation for four types of commercial ceramic fibers for which direct tensile creep data are available. These fibers include both nonoxide (SCS-6, Nicalon) and oxide (PRD-166, FP) compositions. The results of the Bend Stress Relaxation (BSR) test not only confirm the stress, time, and temperature dependencies predicted by the model, but also allow measurement of model empirical parameters for the four fiber types. In addition, comparison of model tensile creep predictions based on the BSR test results with the literature data show good agreement, supporting both the predictive capability of the model and the use of the BSR text as a simple method for parameter determination for other fibers.

  8. Creep and stress relaxation modeling of polycrystalline ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1991-01-01

    A variety of high performance polycrystalline ceramic fibers are currently being considered as reinforcement for high temperature ceramic matrix composites. However, under mechanical loading above 800 C, these fibers display creep-related instabilities which can result in detrimental changes in composite dimensions, strength, and internal stress distributions. As a first step toward understanding these effects, this study examines the validity of mechanistic-based empirical model which describes primary stage tensile creep and stress relaxation of polycrystalline ceramic fibers as independent functions of time, temperature, and applied stress or strain. To verify these functional dependencies, a simple bend test is used to measure stress relaxation for four types of commercial ceramic fibers for which direct tensile creep data are available. These fibers include both nonoxide (SCS-6, Nicalon) and oxide (PRD-166, FP) compositions. The results of the bend stress relaxation (BSR) test not only confirm the stress, time, and temperature dependencies predicted by the model but also allow measurement of model empirical parameters for the four fiber types. In addition, comparison of model predictions and BSR test results with the literature tensile creep data show good agreement, supporting both the predictive capability of the model and the use of the BSR test as a simple method for parameter determination for other fibers.

  9. Frictionless contact of an elastic punch subject to the normal load and bending moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Shao, G.; Zhu, L.

    2016-03-01

    A two-dimensional contact problem of a trapezium shaped punch pressed into a frictionless, elastically similar half-plane and subject sequentially to the normal load and bending moment is considered. The model of a tilted flat punch is used to evaluate the pressure distribution and the contact deformation within the contact zone. Comparisons of the results generated by the analytical technique to those computed by the finite element method demonstrate the high level of accuracy attained by both methods. The presented numerical results illustrate the effects of the normal load, bending moment, and internal angles of the punch geometry on the contact stresses.

  10. Effect of cyclic outer and inner bending on the fatigue behavior of a multi-layer metal film on a polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung-Joon; Shin, Hae-A.-Seul; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Joo, Young-Chang

    2016-06-01

    The electrical reliability of a multi-layer metal film on a polymer substrate during cyclic inner bending and outer bending is investigated using a bending fatigue system. The electrical resistance of a Cu film on a polymer substrate during cyclic outer bending increases due to fatigue damage formation, such as cracks and extrusion. Cyclic inner bending also leads to fatigue damage and a similar increase in the electrical resistance. In a sample having a NiCr under-layer, however, the electrical resistance increases significantly during outer bending but not during inner bending mode. Cross-sectional observations reveal that brittle cracking in the hard under-layer results in different fatigue behaviors according to the stress mode. By applying an Al over-layer, the fatigue resistance is improved during both outer bending and inner bending by suppressing fatigue damage formation. The effects of the position, materials, and thickness of the inter-layer on the electrical reliability of a multi-layer sample are also investigated. This study can provide meaningful information for designing a multi-layer structure under various mechanical deformations including tensile and compressive stress.

  11. Critical Currents of MgB2 Wire and Tape in Magnetic Field under Bending Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abin, D. A.; Mineev, N. A.; Osipov, M. A.; Pokrovsky, S. V.; Rudnev, I. A.

    Nowadays MgB2 wires are attractive for designing real devices like motors and magnets. The latest production technologies allow to increase critical current value of wires. However, there is a problem of wire performance degradation under bending strain. Thus, there is a problem of manufacturing solenoids with small diameters, especially from ex situ MgB2 wires produced by powder-in-tube (PIT) technology. In this work, influence of bending on critical current Ic multifilament PIT ex situ MgB2 tape and wire has been studied. Critical current dependencies on external magnetic field Ic(H) were measured at liquid helium temperature in the range of fields from 2.5 T up to 8 T. Measurements were carried out in parallel (H||), and perpendicular (H⊥) orientation of external magnetic field to the sample surface. Voltage current characteristics (V-I) on tape samples were measured with bending on diameters D=30; 40; 60; 70; 80; 90;100 mm. It was shown that critical current density (Jc) decreases by 24% and by 28% for tape and wire respectively with decreasing bending diameter from 100 mm to 60 mm. It was found that the tape still had superconductive properties even with bending diameter D=30 mm, but its Jc decreased by 44% in comparison with Jc(D=100 mm). One more feature that was found is the appearance of resistive component in the voltage current characteristics for all bend diameters in magnetic fields H>3.5 T.

  12. Photomechanical bending mechanics of polydomain azobenzene liquid crystal polymer network films

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Liang; Torres, Yanira; Oates, William S.; Lee, Kyung Min; McClung, Amber J.; Baur, Jeffery; White, Timothy J.

    2012-07-01

    Glassy, polydomain azobenzene liquid crystal polymer networks (azo-LCNs) have been synthesized, characterized, and modeled to understand composition dependence on large amplitude, bidirectional bending, and twisting deformation upon irradiation with linearly polarized blue-green (440-514 nm) light. These materials exhibit interesting properties for adaptive structure applications in which the shape of the photoresponsive material can be rapidly reconfigured with light. The basis for the photomechanical output observed in these materials is absorption of actinic light by azobenzene, which upon photoisomerization dictates an internal stress within the local polymer network. The photoinduced evolution of the underlying liquid crystal microstructure is manifested as macroscopic deformation of the glassy polymer film. Accordingly, this work examines the polarization-controlled bidirectional bending of highly concentrated azo-LCN materials and correlates the macroscopic output (observed as bending) to measured blocked stresses upon irradiation with blue-green light of varying polarization. The resulting photomechanical output is highly dependent on the concentration of crosslinked azobenzene mesogens employed in the formulation. Experiments that quantify photomechanical bending and photogenerated stress are compared to a large deformation photomechanical shell model to quantify the effect of polarized light interactions with the material during static and dynamic polarized light induced deformation. The model comparisons illustrate differences in internal photostrain and deformation rates as a function of composition and external mechanical constraints.

  13. Effects of bending and bending angular momentum on reaction of NO2+ with C2H2: a quasi-classical trajectory study.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Jason M; Liu, Jianbo; Anderson, Scott L

    2009-04-23

    A large set of quasi-classical trajectories were calculated at the PBE1PBE/6-311G** level of theory, in an attempt to understand the mechanistic origins of the large, mode-specific enhancement of the O-transfer reaction by NO2+ bending vibration and the surprisingly large suppressing effect of bending angular momentum. The trajectories reproduce the magnitude of the absolute reaction cross section, and also get the dependence of reactivity on NO2+ vibrational state, and the vibrational state dependent scattering behavior qualitatively correct. Analysis of the trajectories shows that the bending effect is not simply a consequence of enhanced reactivity in bent geometries but, rather, that excitation of bending motion allows reaction in a wider range of orientation angles, even if the NO2+ is not bent at the onset of the collisional interaction. There is a strong interplay between NO2+ bending and transient charge transfer during the collisions. Such charge transfer enhances reactivity, but only if the reactants are oriented correctly. PMID:19182967

  14. Cracking and Spalling Behavior of HVOF Thermally Sprayed WC-Co-Cr Coating in Bend and Axial Fatigue Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, M.; Eybel, R.; Asselin, B.; Monerie-Moulin, F.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, WC-10Co-4Cr coating was sprayed by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) process on Almen strip and axial fatigue coupon. Three-point bend test was used to bend Almen strip coating specimens with tensile and compressive stress applied to the coating. Axial fatigue coating specimens were tested at a load stress of 1250 MPa and a stress ratio of R = -1. Process condition of Thermal spraying was found to have an effect on spalling performance of the coating in the fatigue test. The mechanism of cracking and spalling process in the coating was studied in bend and fatigue conditions. Based on deformation difference between the coating and the substrate, the factors, especially coating thickness, to impact the coating spalling behavior in axial fatigue test are discussed. HVOF-sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr coating matches the deformation of base substrate by cracking when tensile stress is applied in bend and fatigue tests because the coating has very limit deformation capability. In axial fatigue test of WC-10Co-4Cr coating specimen, the substrate works in a stress-to-strain manner; however the coating works in a strain-to-stress manner and is stressed due to the substrate deformation.

  15. Robotic Arm Comprising Two Bending Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehling, Joshua S.; Difler, Myron A.; Ambrose, Robert O.; Chu, Mars W.; Valvo, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The figure shows several aspects of an experimental robotic manipulator that includes a housing from which protrudes a tendril- or tentacle-like arm 1 cm thick and 1 m long. The arm consists of two collinear segments, each of which can be bent independently of the other, and the two segments can be bent simultaneously in different planes. The arm can be retracted to a minimum length or extended by any desired amount up to its full length. The arm can also be made to rotate about its own longitudinal axis. Some prior experimental robotic manipulators include single-segment bendable arms. Those arms are thicker and shorter than the present one. The present robotic manipulator serves as a prototype of future manipulators that, by virtue of the slenderness and multiple- bending capability of their arms, are expected to have sufficient dexterity for operation within spaces that would otherwise be inaccessible. Such manipulators could be especially well suited as means of minimally invasive inspection during construction and maintenance activities. Each of the two collinear bending arm segments is further subdivided into a series of collinear extension- and compression-type helical springs joined by threaded links. The extension springs occupy the majority of the length of the arm and engage passively in bending. The compression springs are used for actively controlled bending. Bending is effected by means of pairs of antagonistic tendons in the form of spectra gel spun polymer lines that are attached at specific threaded links and run the entire length of the arm inside the spring helix from the attachment links to motor-driven pulleys inside the housing. Two pairs of tendons, mounted in orthogonal planes that intersect along the longitudinal axis, are used to effect bending of each segment. The tendons for actuating the distal bending segment are in planes offset by an angle of 45 from those of the proximal bending segment: This configuration makes it possible to

  16. The surface crack problem in an orthotropic plate under bending and tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Bing-Hua; Erdogan, F.

    1987-01-01

    The elasticity problem for an infinite orthotropic flat plate containing a series of through and part through cracks and subjected to bending and tension loads is considered. The problem is formulated by using Reissner's plate bending theory and considering three-dimensional material orthotropy. The Line-spring model developed by Rice and Levy is used to formulate the surface crack problem in which a total of nine material constants were used. The effects of material orthotropy on the stress intensity factors was determined, the interaction between two asymmetrically arranged collinear cracks was investigated, and extensive numerical results regarding the stress intensity factors are provided. The problem is reduced to a system of singular integral equations which is solved by using the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature formulas. The calculated results show that the material orthotropy does have a significant effect on the stress intensity factor.

  17. The surface crack problem in an orthotropic plate under bending and tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, B. H.; Erdogan, F.

    1986-01-01

    The elasticity problem for an infinite orthotropic flat plate containing a series of through and part-through cracks and subjected to bending and tension loads is considered. The problem is formulated by using Reissner's plate bending theory and considering three dimensional materials orthotropy. The Line-spring model developed by Rice and Levy is used to formulate the surface crack problem in which a total of nine material constants has been used. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of material orthotropy on the stress intensity factors, to investigate the interaction between two asymmetrically arranged collinear cracks, and to provide extensive numerical results regarding the stress intensity factors. The problem is reduced to a system of singular integral equations which is solved by using the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature formulas. The calculated results show that the material orthotropy does have a significant effect on the stress intensity factor.

  18. Damage states in laminated composite three-point bend specimens: An experimental-analytical correlation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starbuck, J. Michael; Guerdal, Zafer; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Poe, Clarence C.

    1990-01-01

    Damage states in laminated composites were studied by considering the model problem of a laminated beam subjected to three-point bending. A combination of experimental and theoretical research techniques was used to correlate the experimental results with the analytical stress distributions. The analytical solution procedure was based on the stress formulation approach of the mathematical theory of elasticity. The solution procedure is capable of calculating the ply-level stresses and beam displacements for any laminated beam of finite length using the generalized plane deformation or plane stress state assumption. Prior to conducting the experimental phase, the results from preliminary analyses were examined. Significant effects in the ply-level stress distributions were seen depending on the fiber orientation, aspect ratio, and whether or not a grouped or interspersed stacking sequence was used. The experimental investigation was conducted to determine the different damage modes in laminated three-point bend specimens. The test matrix consisted of three-point bend specimens of 0 deg unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic stacking sequences. The dependence of the damage initiation loads and ultimate failure loads were studied, and their relation to damage susceptibility and damage tolerance of the mean configuration was discussed. Damage modes were identified by visual inspection of the damaged specimens using an optical microscope. The four fundamental damage mechanisms identified were delaminations, matrix cracking, fiber breakage, and crushing. The correlation study between the experimental results and the analytical results were performed for the midspan deflection, indentation, damage modes, and damage susceptibility.

  19. Simulation of thick-walled submarine pipeline collapse under bending and hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sharif, A.M.; Preston, R.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of submarine pipeline buckling or collapse as a result of bending and external pressure is investigated by numerical modeling using finite element analysis. The model takes into account the initial variability of material properties, the effect of cold-work on the pipe material properties and initial geometric imperfections. It is capable of simulating the nonlinear behavior, and structural instability due to the combined effects of bending and pressure. The solution algorithm and verification against experimental results are presented. In addition, a deterministic model for collapse under combined pressure and bending based on measured stress-strain behavior and pipe geometry is derived. Results from both finite element and deterministic models for different parameter sensitivities are examined.

  20. The first ANDES elements: 9-DOF plate bending triangles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Militello, Carmelo; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    New elements are derived to validate and assess the assumed natural deviatoric strain (ANDES) formulation. This is a brand new variant of the assumed natural strain (ANS) formulation of finite elements, which has recently attracted attention as an effective method for constructing high-performance elements for linear and nonlinear analysis. The ANDES formulation is based on an extended parametrized variational principle developed in recent publications. The key concept is that only the deviatoric part of the strains is assumed over the element whereas the mean strain part is discarded in favor of a constant stress assumption. Unlike conventional ANS elements, ANDES elements satisfy the individual element test (a stringent form of the patch test) a priori while retaining the favorable distortion-insensitivity properties of ANS elements. The first application of this formulation is the development of several Kirchhoff plate bending triangular elements with the standard nine degrees of freedom. Linear curvature variations are sampled along the three sides with the corners as gage reading points. These sample values are interpolated over the triangle using three schemes. Two schemes merge back to conventional ANS elements, one being identical to the Discrete Kirchhoff Triangle (DKT), whereas the third one produces two new ANDES elements. Numerical experiments indicate that one of the ANDES element is relatively insensitive to distortion compared to previously derived high-performance plate-bending elements, while retaining accuracy for nondistorted elements.

  1. Composite failure prediction of π-joint structures under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hong-mei; Yuan, Shen-fang

    2012-03-01

    In this article, the composite -joint is investigated under bending loads. The "L" preform is the critical component regarding composite -joint failure. The study is presented in the failure detection of a carbon fiber composite -joint structure under bending loads using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. Firstly, based on the general finite element method (FEM) software, the 3-D finite element (FE) model of composite -joint is established, and the failure process and every lamina failure load of composite -joint are investigated by maximum stress criteria. Then, strain distributions along the length of FBG are extracted, and the reflection spectra of FBG are calculated according to the strain distribution. Finally, to verify the numerical results, a test scheme is performed and the experimental spectra of FBG are recorded. The experimental results indicate that the failure sequence and the corresponding critical loads of failure are consistent with the numerical predictions, and the computational error of failure load is less than 6.4%. Furthermore, it also verifies the feasibility of the damage detection system.

  2. Electrical Bending and Mechanical Buckling Instabilities in Electrospinning Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Reneker, Darrell H.

    2007-03-01

    The electrospinning jet was a continuous fluid flow ejected from the surface of a fluid when the applied electrical force overcomes the surface tension. The jet moved straight away from the tip and then became unstable and bent into coils. This phenomenon is the electrical bending instability [1]. When the distance between the tip and collector was reduced to less than the maximal straight segment length, the electrical bending instability did not occur. The periodic buckling of a fluid jet incident onto a surface is a striking fluid mechanical instability [2]. When axial compressive stress along the jet reached a sufficient value, it produced the fluid mechanics analogue to the buckling of a slender solid column. In the electrospinning, the buckling instability occurred just above the collector where the jet was compressed as it encountered the collector. The buckling frequencies of these jets are in the range of 10^4 to 10^5 Hz. The buckling lengths of these jets are in the range of 10 to 100μm. *Reneker,D.H.; Yarin, A. L.; Fong, H.; Koombhongse, S., Journal of Applied Physics, 87, 4531, 2000 *Tchavdarov B.; Yarin, A. L.; Radev S., Journal of Fluid Mechanics; 253, 593,1993

  3. Anharmonic effects in the optical and acoustic bending modes of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, R.; Chacón, E.; Herrero, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    The out-of-plane fluctuations of carbon atoms in a graphene sheet have been studied by means of classical molecular dynamic simulations with an empirical force field as a function of temperature. The Fourier analysis of the out-of-plane fluctuations often applied to characterize the acoustic bending mode of graphene is extended to the optical branch, whose polarization vector is perpendicular to the graphene layer. This observable is inaccessible in a continuous elastic model of graphene but it is readily obtained by the atomistic treatment. Our results suggest that the long-wavelength limit of the acoustic out-of-plane fluctuations of a free layer without stress is qualitatively similar to that predicted by a harmonic model under a tensile stress. This conclusion is a consequence of the anharmonicity of both in-plane and out-of-plane vibrational modes of the lattice. The most striking anharmonic effect is the presence of a linear term, ωA=vAk , in the dispersion relation of the acoustic bending band of graphene at long wavelengths (k →0 ). This term implies a strong reduction of the amplitude of out-of-plane oscillations in comparison to a flexural mode with a k2 dependence in the long-wavelength limit. Our simulations show an increase of the sound velocity associated to the bending mode, as well as an increase of its bending constant, κ , as the temperature increases. Moreover, the frequency of the optical bending mode, ωO(Γ ), also increases with the temperature. Our results are in agreement with recent analytical studies of the bending modes of graphene using either perturbation theory or an adiabatic approximation in the framework of continuous layer models.

  4. Interdisciplinary Invitations: Exploring Gee's Bend Quilts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Whitin, Phyllis; Whitin, David

    2012-01-01

    Engaging with the quilts of Gee's Bend offers a rich opportunity for students in grades four through eight to develop appreciation for pattern, rhythm, and innovation while learning about history, entrepreneurship, and political activism. By easily accessing print, film, and Internet resources teachers can include these vibrant quilts and…

  5. Aerosol deposition in bends with turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, A.R.; Gong, H.; Wente, W.B.

    1997-08-01

    The losses of aerosol particles in bends were determined numerically for a broad range of design and operational conditions. Experimental data were used to check the validity of the numerical model, where the latter employs a commercially available computational fluid dynamics code for characterizing the fluid flow field and Lagrangian particle tracking technique for characterizing aerosol losses. Physical experiments have been conducted to examine the effect of curvature ratio and distortion of the cross section of bends. If it curvature ratio ({delta} = R/a) is greater than about 4, it has little effect on deposition, which is in contrast with the recommendation given in ANSI N13.1-1969 for a minimum curvature ratio of 10. Also, experimental results show that if the tube cross section is flattened by 25% or less, the flattening also has little effect on deposition. Results of numerical tests have been used to develop a correlation of aerosol penetration through a bend as a function of Stokes number (Stk), curvature ratio ({delta}) and the bend angle ({theta}). 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. UV - BIG BEND NATIONAL PARK TX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brewer 130 is located in Big Bend NP, measuring ultraviolet solar radiation. Irradiance and column ozone are derived from this data. Ultraviolet solar radiation is measured with a Brewer Mark IV, single-monochrometer, spectrophotometer manufactured by SCI-TEC Instruments, Inc. of...

  7. The Hungarian-Americans of South Bend.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Darlene; Rasmussen, Karen, Ed.

    Developed as part of an ethnic heritage studies program, this historical narrative of Hungarian Americans in South Bend, Indiana, is intended to increase cultural awareness and appreciation. The document is divided into three sections. Section I offers a brief history of Hungary and describes the background of the three emigrant groups; lower…

  8. Bending of skew plates of variable rigidity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willems, N.; Mahmood, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    Description of an analytical procedure for studying the bending of thin skew plates of a thickness varying in one direction, under arbitrary lateral loading. The analysis was programmed for execution on an electronic computer for various conditions and types of loading. The results obtained suggest that the proposed analytical procedure is more accurate than the finite-difference technique used in earlier investigations.

  9. Age of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Clague, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age data on alkalic and tholeiitic basalts from Diakakuji and Kinmei Seamounts in the vicinity of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend indicate that these volcanoes are about 41 and 39 m.y. old, respectively. Combined with previously published age data on Yuryaku and Ko??ko Seamounts, the new data indicate that the best age for the bend is 42.0 ?? 1.4 m.y. Petrochemical data indicate that the volcanic rocks recovered from bend seamounts are indistinguishable from Hawaiian volcanic rocks, strengthening the hypothesis that the Hawaiian-Emperor bend is part of the Hawaiian volcanic chain. 40Ar/39Ar total fusion ages on altered whole-rock basalt samples are consistent with feldspar ages and with 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating data and appear to reflect the crystallization ages of the samples even though conventional K-Ar ages are significantly younger. The cause of this effect is not known but it may be due to low-temperature loss of 39Ar from nonretentive montmorillonite clays that have also lost 40Ar. ?? 1976.

  10. CFD Application to Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Feeder Bends

    SciTech Connect

    Pietralik, John M.; Smith, Bruce A.W.

    2006-07-01

    Feeder piping in CANDU{sup R} plants experiences a thinning degradation mechanism called Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC). The piping is made of carbon steel and has high water flow speeds. Although the water chemistry is highly alkaline with room-temperature pH in a range of 10.0-10.5, the piping has FAC rates exceeding 0.1 mm/year in some locations, e.g., in bends. One of the most important parameters affecting the FAC rate is the mass transfer coefficient for convective mass transport of ferrous ions. The ions are created at the pipe wall as a result of corrosion, diffuse through the oxide layer, and are transported from the oxide-layer/water interface to the bulk water by mass transport. Consequently, the local flow characteristics contribute to the highly turbulent convective mass transfer. Plant data and laboratory experiments indicate that the mass transfer step dominates FAC under feeder conditions. In this study, the flow and mass transfer in a feeder bend under operating conditions were simulated using the Fluent{sup TM} computer code. Because the flow speed is very high, with the Reynolds numbers in a range of several millions, and because the geometry is complex, experiments in a 1:1 scale were conducted with the main objective to validate flow simulations. The experiments measured pressure at several key locations and visualized the flow. The flow and mass transfer models were validated using available friction-factor and mass transfer correlations and literature experiments on mass transfer in a bend. The validation showed that the turbulence model that best predicts the experiments is the realizable k-{epsilon} model. Other two-equation turbulence models, as well as one-equation models and Reynolds stress models were tried. The near-wall treatment used the non-equilibrium wall functions. The wall functions were modified for surface roughness when necessary. A comparison of the local mass transfer coefficient with measured FAC rate in plant specimens

  11. Nonlinear bend stiffener analysis using a simple formulation and finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Dong Jin; Low, Ying Min; Sheehan, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Flexible marine risers are commonly used in deepwater floating systems. Bend stiffeners are designed to protect flexible risers against excessive bending at the connection with the hull. The structure is usually analyzed as a cantilever beam subjected to an inclined point load. As deflections are large and the bend stiffener material exhibits nonlinear stress-strain characteristics, geometric and material nonlinearities are important considerations. A new approach has been developed to solve this nonlinear problem. Its main advantage is its simplicity; in fact the present method can be easily implemented on a spreadsheet. Finite element analysis using ABAQUS is performed to validate the method. Solid elements are used for the bend stiffener and flexible pipe. To simulate the near inextensibility of flexible risers, a simple and original idea of using truss elements is proposed. Through a set of validation studies, the present method is found to be in a good agreement with the finite element analysis. Further, parametric studies are performed by using both methods to identify the key parameters and phenomena that are most critical in design. The most important finding is that the common practice of neglecting the internal steel sleeve in the bend stiffener analysis is non-conservative and therefore needs to be reassessed.

  12. The influence of bending strains on AC power losses in multifilamentary BSCCO-2223/Ag tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, O.; Ciszek, M.; Suzuki, H.; Ogawa, J.

    2006-08-01

    Recent advances in the manufacturing of multifilamentary high temperature superconducting composite wires allow for wider practical applications of the conductors, e.g. in power transmission cables, transformers and motors. The wires, based mainly on BSCCO-2223 and YBCO-123 cuprates, are used in the forms of variously shaped coils; therefore they are subjected to different kinds of mechanical stresses and strains. These, in turn, lead to some changes in the physical parameters of the superconducting material, mainly in the critical current density, and thus in the dissipated electromagnetic energy, when subjected to changing magnetic fields and transport currents. In this work we report some experimental results related to the AC loss characteristics of Bi-2223/Ag multifilamentary tapes and their dependences on bending strains. These losses are compared to the losses of virgin, straight tapes. The total AC losses, i.e. transport current and magnetization losses, in the Bi-2223/Ag tapes, were measured by means of the electrical and calorimetric methods. The experimental data obtained are compared with the critical state model predictions for AC loss behaviour in the experimental conditions presented here.

  13. Guidelines and Recommendations on the Use of Higher Order Finite Elements for Bending Analysis of Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, E.; Miglioretti, F.; Petrolo, M.

    2011-11-01

    This paper compares and evaluates various plate finite elements to analyse the static response of thick and thin plates subjected to different loading and boundary conditions. Plate elements are based on different assumptions for the displacement distribution along the thickness direction. Classical (Kirchhoff and Reissner-Mindlin), refined (Reddy and Kant), and other higher-order displacement fields are implemented up to fourth-order expansion. The Unified Formulation UF by the first author is used to derive finite element matrices in terms of fundamental nuclei which consist of 3×3 arrays. The MITC4 shear-locking free type formulation is used for the FE approximation. Accuracy of a given plate element is established in terms of the error vs. thickness-to-length parameter. A significant number of finite elements for plates are implemented and compared using displacement and stress variables for various plate problems. Reduced models that are able to detect the 3D solution are built and a Best Plate Diagram (BPD) is introduced to give guidelines for the construction of plate theories based on a given accuracy and number of terms. It is concluded that the UF is a valuable tool to establish, for a given plate problem, the most accurate FE able to furnish results within a certain accuracy range. This allows us to obtain guidelines and recommendations in building refined elements in the bending analysis of plates for various geometries, loadings, and boundary conditions.

  14. Bending Rigidities and Interdomain Forces in Membranes with Coexisting Lipid Domains.

    PubMed

    Kollmitzer, Benjamin; Heftberger, Peter; Podgornik, Rudolf; Nagle, John F; Pabst, Georg

    2015-06-16

    To precisely quantify the fundamental interactions between heterogeneous lipid membranes with coexisting liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) domains, we performed detailed osmotic stress small-angle x-ray scattering experiments by exploiting the domain alignment in raft-mimicking lipid multibilayers. Performing a Monte Carlo-based analysis allowed us to determine with high reliability the magnitude and functional dependence of interdomain forces concurrently with the bending elasticity moduli. In contrast to previous methodologies, this approach enabled us to consider the entropic undulation repulsions on a fundamental level, without having to take recourse to crudely justified mean-field-like additivity assumptions. Our detailed Hamaker-coefficient calculations indicated only small differences in the van der Waals attractions of coexisting Lo and Ld phases. In contrast, the repulsive hydration and undulation interactions differed significantly, with the latter dominating the overall repulsions in the Ld phase. Thus, alignment of like domains in multibilayers appears to originate from both, hydration and undulation repulsions. PMID:26083923

  15. Bending Rigidities and Interdomain Forces in Membranes with Coexisting Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Kollmitzer, Benjamin; Heftberger, Peter; Podgornik, Rudolf; Nagle, John F.; Pabst, Georg

    2015-01-01

    To precisely quantify the fundamental interactions between heterogeneous lipid membranes with coexisting liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) domains, we performed detailed osmotic stress small-angle x-ray scattering experiments by exploiting the domain alignment in raft-mimicking lipid multibilayers. Performing a Monte Carlo-based analysis allowed us to determine with high reliability the magnitude and functional dependence of interdomain forces concurrently with the bending elasticity moduli. In contrast to previous methodologies, this approach enabled us to consider the entropic undulation repulsions on a fundamental level, without having to take recourse to crudely justified mean-field-like additivity assumptions. Our detailed Hamaker-coefficient calculations indicated only small differences in the van der Waals attractions of coexisting Lo and Ld phases. In contrast, the repulsive hydration and undulation interactions differed significantly, with the latter dominating the overall repulsions in the Ld phase. Thus, alignment of like domains in multibilayers appears to originate from both, hydration and undulation repulsions. PMID:26083923

  16. Internal and edge cracks in a plate of finite width under bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boduroglu, H.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper the title problem is studied by using Reissner's transverse shear theory. The main purpose of the paper is to investigate the effect of stress-free boundaries on the stress intensity factors in plates under bending. Among the results found particularly interesting are those relating to the limiting cases of the crack geometries. The numerical results are given for a single internal crack, two collinear cracks, and two edge cracks. Also studied is the effect of Poisson's ratio on the stress intensity factors.

  17. Spring-back of flexible roll forming bending process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kim, D. H.; Jung, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    Simulations are now widely used in the field of roll forming because of their convenience. Simulations provide a low cost, secure and fast analysis tool. Flexible roll forming provides the desired shapes with a one time forming process. For roll forming, the velocity of the sheet and friction are important factors to attain an ideal shape. Because it is a complicated process, simulations provide a better understanding of the roll forming process. Simulations were peformed using ABAQUS software linked to elastic-plastic modules which we developed taking into account of interactions between these fields [1]. The application of this method makes it possible to highlight the strain-stress and mechanical behaviour laws and the spring-back. Thus, the flexible roll forming and bending process can bewell described by the simulation software and guide the actual machine.

  18. Bending Fatigue Strength of Austempered Ductile Iron Spur Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Masashi; Tamura, Ryo; Inoue, Katsumi; Narita, Yukihito

    This paper deals with an experimental evaluation of bending fatigue strength for austempered ductile iron (ADI) spur gears. The module is 2.5 and the number of teeth is 26 in the test gears. The material of the test gears corresponds to Japan Industrial Standard (JIS) FCAD1100-15. Some gears are processed by one of two types of fine particle bombarding (FPB). The surface roughness is slightly increased by FPB. The obtained strengths are 623 MPa for the as-austempered gears, and 1011 and 1085 MPa for the gears after FPB. The strength is expressed by the fillet stress level, which is calculated by FEM. The strength of a gear with the same dimensions made of carburized SCr420H alloy steel is 1205 MPa, and the strength of the ADI gear is approximately half that of the carburized steel gear. The FPB process has a significant effect on the ADI gear, improving its strength by 62-74%.

  19. Wing spar stress charts and wing truss proportions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1926-01-01

    In order to simplify the calculation of beams continuous over three supports, a series of charts have been calculated giving the bending moments at all the critical points and the reactions at all supports for such members. Using these charts as a basis, calculations of equivalent bending moments, representing the total stresses acting in two bay-wing trusses of proportions varying over a wide range, have been determined, both with and without allowance for column effect. This leads finally to the determination of the best proportions for any particular truss or the best strut locations in any particular airplane. The ideal proportions are found to vary with the thickness of the wing section used, the aspect ratio, and the ratio of gap to chord.

  20. A study of primary stress indices for piping elbows

    SciTech Connect

    Macfarlane, D.M.; Boyle, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    The behavior of pipe bends under moment loading is investigated in a parametric study using the elastic compensation technique for finite element analysis. The use of an Ilyushin formulation allows elastic compensation to be applied to shell elements (Boyle et al., 1993). Elastic compensation develops a lower bound limit load, which can be equated to the ASME B{sub 2} stress indices for pipe elbows. Experiments by Touboul et al. (1987) have developed formulae for normalized limit moment and the corresponding B{sub 2} indices for pipe bends in terms of the pipe parameter. This study supports the values for in-plane moment loading and suggests a modification of the formula for out of plane moments. The results for the Ilyushin formulation for elastic compensation are shown to compare well with those of a full elastic-plastic analysis.

  1. Mode-Area Scaling of Helical-Core, Dual-Clad Fiber Lasers and Amplifiers Using an Improved Bend-Loss Model

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Z.; Marciante, J.R.

    2006-09-28

    For small-bend radii, the waveguide condition for total internal reflection is violated in a large angular spread of incident angles at the interface of the fiber core. To account for this, we derived an improved semi-analytic bend-loss model that allows for the propagation of radiated fields outside the plane of the fiber bend. This new model is applied to large-mode-area helical-core fibers (which require small-bend radii) for use as high-power fiber lasers and amplifiers. In particular, the limits of scaling the mode area while maintaining good beam quality are explored.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of channel-bend hydraulics influenced by vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bywater-Reyes, S.; Manners, R.; McDonald, R.; Wilcox, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Alternating bars influence hydraulics by changing the force balance of channels as part of a morphodynamic feedback loop that dictates channel geometry. Pioneer woody riparian trees recruit on river bars and may steer flow, alter cross-stream and downstream force balances, and ultimately change channel morphology. Quantifying the influence of vegetation on stream hydraulics is difficult, and researchers increasingly rely on two-dimensional hydraulic models. In many cases, channel characteristics (channel drag and lateral eddy viscosity) and vegetation characteristics (density, frontal area, and drag coefficient) are uncertain. This study uses a beta version of FaSTMECH that models vegetation explicitly as a drag force to test the sensitivity of channel-bend hydraulics to riparian vegetation. We use a simplified, scale model of a meandering river with bars and conduct a global sensitivity analysis that ranks the influence of specified channel characteristics (channel drag and lateral eddy viscosity) against vegetation characteristics (density, frontal area, and drag coefficient) on cross-stream hydraulics. The primary influence on cross-stream velocity and shear stress is channel drag (i.e., bed roughness), followed by the near-equal influence of all vegetation parameters and lateral eddy viscosity. To test the implication of the sensitivity indices on bend hydraulics, we hold calibrated channel characteristics constant for a wandering gravel-bed river with bars (Bitterroot River, MT), and vary vegetation parameters on a bar. For a dense vegetation scenario, we find flow to be steered away from the bar, and velocity and shear stress to be reduced within the thalweg. This provides insight into how the morphodynamic evolution of vegetated bars differs from unvegetated bars.

  3. Characterization of the Bauschinger effect in sheet metal undergoing large strain reversals in bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzon, Drew Wyatt

    This work consists on the quantification of sheet metal uniaxial stress-strain reversals from pure bending tests. Bending strains to approximately 10% were measured by strain gages and interferometry. Bending-unbending moments and strains were modeled and compared closely to the experimental data. The reverse uniaxial stress-strains curves were determined from the optimal fit of the model. Bauschinger effects were described by the reverse uniaxial response at the elasto-plastic range, between the elastic and the large strain, power fit ranges. Arc and straight line fittings on the lnsigma-lnepsilon scale proved accurate to describe the elasto-plastic behavior. Reverse uniaxial data determined for DP590 and DP780 steels and two Aluminum alloys showed significant Bauschinger effects with distinct features. For the DP steels the magnitudes of the reverse compressive sigma-epsilon curves compared moderately higher, and merging to a power curve with parameters K, n previously defined by tension testing. Bauschinger effects at small reversed strains were less pronounced for the aluminum alloys. However, at higher strains the reverse elasto-plastic response softened considerably, and during the unbending span the magnitudes of the reverse compressive strains remained below the corresponding K, n tensile values. The results showed pure bending as an efficient, simple to use technique to generate sigma-epsilon data for sheet metal at large reverse strains without the complicating restraining hardware required by direct compression methods.

  4. Investigation of Low-Cycle Bending Fatigue of AISI 9310 Steel Spur Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Krantz, Timothy L.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Burke, Christopher S.

    2007-01-01

    An investigation of the low-cycle bending fatigue of spur gears made from AISI 9310 gear steel was completed. Tests were conducted using the single-tooth bending method to achieve crack initiation and propagation. Tests were conducted on spur gears in a fatigue test machine using a dedicated gear test fixture. Test loads were applied at the highest point of single tooth contact. Gear bending stresses for a given testing load were calculated using a linear-elastic finite element model. Test data were accumulated from 1/4 cycle to several thousand cycles depending on the test stress level. The relationship of stress and cycles for crack initiation was found to be semilogarithmic. The relationship of stress and cycles for crack propagation was found to be linear. For the range of loads investigated, the crack propagation phase is related to the level of load being applied. Very high loads have comparable crack initiation and propagation times whereas lower loads can have a much smaller number of cycles for crack propagation cycles as compared to crack initiation.

  5. Investigation of Low-Cycle Bending Fatigue of AISI 9310 Steel Spur Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Krantz, Timothy L.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Burke, Christopher S.

    2007-01-01

    An investigation of the low-cycle bending fatigue of spur gears made from AISI 9310 gear steel was completed. Tests were conducted using the single-tooth bending method to achieve crack initiation and propagation. Tests were conducted on spur gears in a fatigue test machine using a dedicated gear test fixture. Test loads were applied at the highest point of single tooth contact. Gear bending stresses for a given testing load were calculated using a linear-elastic finite element model. Test data were accumulated from 1/4 cycle to several thousand cycles depending on the test stress level. The relationship of stress and cycles for crack initiation was found to be semi-logarithmic. The relationship of stress and cycles for crack propagation was found to be linear. For the range of loads investigated, the crack propagation phase is related to the level of load being applied. Very high loads have comparable crack initiation and propagation times whereas lower loads can have a much smaller number of cycles for crack propagation cycles as compared to crack initiation.

  6. Inelastic models of lithospheric stress - II. Implications for outer-rise seismicity and dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, S.; Spence, W.; Choy, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Outer-rise seismicity and dynamics are examined using inelastic models of lithospheric deformation, which allow a more realistic characterization of stress distributions and failure behaviour. We conclude that thrust- and normal-faulting outer-rise earthquakes represent substantially different states of stress within the oceanic lithosphere. Specifically, the normal-faulting events occur in response to downward plate bending, which establishes the 'standard', bending-dominated state of outer-rise stress, and the thrust-faulting events occur in response to an elevated level of in-plane compression, which develops only in response to exceptional circumstances. This interpretation accounts for the observation that normal-faulting outer-rise earthquakes occur more frequently and are more widely distributed than their thrust-faulting counterparts, an observation for which the simple bending model offers no explanation. In addition, attributing both thrust- and normal-faulting outer-rise earthquakes to plate bending implies that both classes of events should occur within relatively close lateral proximity to one another because both are allegedly a manifestation of the same bending-dominated stress distribution, whereas, in reality, this is not observed. We propose that the tendency for thrust-faulting outer-rise earthquakes to exhibit greater source depths than their normal-faulting counterparts (an observation that is frequently cited in support of the bending interpretation of the former) is merely a consequence of the fact that bending-induced tension is confined to the upper lithosphere. Our model predicts that outer-rise in-plane-force variations may promote thrust-faulting outer-rise activity prior to an underthrusting interplate subduction earthquake and normal-faulting outer-rise activity following such an earthquake, but that both forms of outer-rise activity are unlikely to be associated with the same subduction earthquake. A corollary implication of our model

  7. Effect of Solder Joint Length on Fracture Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Saeed; Nourani, Amir; Spelt, Jan K.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture tests were conducted on copper-solder-copper joints of various lengths using double-cantilever-beam (DCB) specimens under mode I loading conditions. The thickness and length of the solder joints were large enough to neglect any anisotropy associated with the solder microstructure. It was found that the critical strain energy release rate at crack initiation, G ci, was insensitive to the length of the solder joint; however, for joints shorter than a characteristic length which was a function of the thickness and the mechanical properties of the solder layer and the substrates, the fracture load increased with increasing solder joint length. A sandwich model was developed for the analysis of the stress and strain in solder joints, taking into account the influence of both the bending deformation and the shear deformation of the substrates on the solder joint stresses. Consistent with the experimental results, it was found that solder joints longer than the characteristic length have a maximum peel stress that remains unchanged with joint length, causing the joint strength to become independent of the joint length. A closed-form analytical solution was developed for the characteristic length of DCB specimens under mode I loading. The experimental results were in good agreement with the analytical model and with finite element results. The generality of the G ci failure criterion was demonstrated by comparing the experimental results and the fracture load predictions of mode I DCB solder joints with different lengths.

  8. A Bending Test for Determining the Atterberg Plastic Limit in Soils.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Maroto, José Manuel; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto

    2016-01-01

    The thread rolling test is the most commonly used method to determine the plastic limit (PL) in soils. It has been widely criticized, because a considerable subjective judgment from the operator that carries out the test is involved during its performance, which may affect the final result significantly. Different alternative methods have been put forward, but they cannot compete with the standard rolling test in speed, simplicity and cost. In an earlier study by the authors, a simple method with a simple device to determine the PL was presented (the "thread bending test" or simply "bending test"); this method allowed the PL to be obtained with minimal operator interference. In the present paper a version of the original bending test is shown. The experimental basis is the same as the original bending test: soil threads which are 3 mm in diameter and 52 mm long are bent until they start to crack, so that both the bending produced and its related moisture content are determined. However, this new version enables the calculation of PL from an equation, so it is not necessary to plot any curve or straight line to obtain this parameter and, in fact, the PL can be achieved with only one experimental point (but two experimental points are recommended). The PL results obtained with this new version are very similar to those obtained through the original bending test and the standard rolling test by a highly experienced operator. Only in particular cases of high plasticity cohesive soils, there is a greater difference in the result. Despite this, the bending test works very well for all types of soil, both cohesive and very low plasticity soils, where the latter are the most difficult to test via the standard thread rolling method. PMID:27404389

  9. Design of bending multi-layer electroactive polymer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrisnan, Bavani; Nacev, Alek; Smela, Elisabeth

    2015-04-01

    The effects of layer thickness and stiffness on multilayer bending actuator performance were investigated with an analytical mechanical model. Performance was evaluated in terms of curvature, blocked force, and work. Multilayer device designs corresponding to dielectric elastomer actuator, ionic polymer metal composite, and conjugated polymer structures were examined. Normalized plots of the performance metrics as functions of relative layer thickness and stiffness are presented that should allow initial, starting-point estimates for designs for particular applications. The results show that to achieve high curvature, layer thickness and stiffness may need to be set above or below particular bounds, or varied together, depending on the device configuration; often there is a broad plateau of combinations that work equally well. There is a conflict between achieving high bending and high force: the former requires the device to behave as much as possible like a simple bilayer with optimal ratios of thickness and modulus, while the latter requires thicker layers and shows little dependence on their moduli. Finally, to maximize work there are areas in the thickness-modulus plane that should be avoided, these areas varying with the configuration in sometimes surprising ways.

  10. Stress polishing demonstrator for ELT M1 segments and industrialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Bernard, Anaïs.; Laslandes, Marie; Floriot, Johan; Dufour, Thibaut; Fappani, Denis; Combes, Jean Marc; Ferrari, Marc

    2014-07-01

    After two years of research and development under ESO support, LAM and Thales SESO present the results of their experiment for the fast and accurate polishing under stress of ELT 1.5 meter segments as well as the industrialization approach for mass production. Based on stress polishing, this manufacturing method requires the conception of a warping harness able to generate extremely accurate bending of the optical surface of the segments during the polishing. The conception of the warping harness is based on finite element analysis and allowed a fine tuning of each geometrical parameter of the system in order to fit an error budget of 25nm RMS over 300μm of bending peak to valley. The optimisation approach uses the simulated influence functions to extract the system eigenmodes and characterise the performance. The same approach is used for the full characterisation of the system itself. The warping harness has been manufactured, integrated and assembled with the Zerodur 1.5 meter segment on the LAM 2.5meter POLARIS polishing facility. The experiment consists in a cross check of optical and mechanical measurements of the mirrors bending in order to develop a blind process, ie to bypass the optical measurement during the final industrial process. This article describes the optical and mechanical measurements, the influence functions and eigenmodes of the system and the full performance characterisation of the warping harness.

  11. Dynamic Rupture Simulation of Bending Faults With a Finite Difference Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Virieux, J.; Operto, S.

    2002-12-01

    fields separately in only two staggered grids. This permit an efficient treatment of boundary conditions to impose the shear stress drop in the nodes where the stresses are located. On the other hand, the stencil allows the four order Cartesian differential operators being decoupled into two different 45 degrees rotated operators. This procedure reduces numerical anisotropy along preferred directions and provides stable solutions for any fault orientation. Numerical solutions of dynamical fracture still exhibit large oscillations coming from local discretization effects and integration procedures. These perturbations can strongly alter the rupture front velocity and the average slip rate behind the crack tip. We controlled this phenomenon by applying a smoothing Laplacian operator to velocity equations. Such a mathematical tool, provided that suitable input parameters are supplied, helps to vanish these oscillations. Specifying a fault thickness in simulations yields similar results as we scale down numerical parameters, if the same fault geometry is kept. A simple definition of the fault is done placing it in the middle of the grid without using any adhoc numerical ghost plane often used in FD approaches. The fault is a sum of source points taken as close as possible to the hypothetical fault line. Simulations of irregular fault geometry (e.g., bending faults) are possible using the superposition technique. Spontaneous and velocity fixed rupture propagation will be presented with abrupt stress drop, as well as with time- and slip- weakening constitutive laws. Analysis of arbitrarily heterogeneous media surrounding the fault region in the dynamics of seismic sources evolution is possible.

  12. Residual Field Correction of Pulsed Bending Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Junpei; Igarashi, Susumu; Kamikubota, Norihiko; Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Sato, Kenichi; Shirakata, Masashi; Yamada, Shuei

    The Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) has an accelerator chain, Linac, Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS), and Main Ring (MR). The RCS accelerates the proton beam up to 3 GeV every 40 msec. After the beam is extracted from the RCS, it is delivered to a beam transport line, which is 3NBT for the Material and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF). Some bunches of the proton beam are bended from the 3NBT to another beam transport line, which is 3-50BT for the MR, by using a pulsed bending magnet (PB) [1]. However, the beam orbit in the 3NBT is kicked by the residual magnetic field of the PB. In order to correct the residual magnetic field, additional coils had been wound on the PB poles. As a result of scanning the current pattern of the correction coils, the orbit distortion in the 3NBT has been reduced.

  13. Monitoring thermoplastic composites under cyclic bending tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, Simone; Meola, Carosena; Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; Simeoli, Giorgio; Acierno, Domenico; Russo, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    This work is concerned with the use of infrared thermography to visualize temperature variations linked to thermo-elastic effects developing over the surface of a specimen undergoing deflection under bending tests. Several specimens are herein considered, which involve change of matrix and/or reinforcement. More specifically, the matrix is either a pure polypropylene, or a polypropylene added with a certain percentage of compatibilizing agent; the reinforcement is made of glass, or jute. Cyclic bending tests are carried out by the aid of an electromechanical actuator. Each specimen is viewed, during deflection, from one surface by an infrared imaging device. As main finding the different specimens display surface temperature variations which depend on the type of material in terms of both matrix and reinforcement.

  14. Torsion and transverse bending of cantilever plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reissner, Eric; Stein, Manuel

    1951-01-01

    The problem of combined bending and torsion of cantilever plates of variable thickness, such as might be considered for solid thin high-speed airplane or missile wings, is considered in this paper. The deflections of the plate are assumed to vary linearly across the chord; minimization of the potential energy by means of the calculus of variations then leads to two ordinary linear differential equations for the bending deflections and the twist of the plate. Because the cantilever is analyzed as a plate rather than as a beam, the effect of constraint against axial warping in torsion is inherently included. The application of this method to specific problems involving static deflection, vibration, and buckling of cantilever plates is presented. In the static-deflection problems, taper and sweep are considered.

  15. Fracture of surface cracks loaded in bending

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.J.; Reuter, W.G.

    1997-12-31

    Theoretical background of the constraint effect in brittle fracture of solids is reviewed. Fracture test data from D6-aC, a high strength steel, using three-point-bend (SE(B)) specimens and surface cracked plate (SC(B)) specimens under bending are presented. It is shown that the SE(B) data has an elevated fracture toughness for increasing a/W, i.e., a crack geometry with a larger T/K corresponds to a higher K{sub c} which is consistent with the theoretical prediction. The fundamental fracture properties, i.e., the critical strain and the critical distance, determined from the SE(B) test data are then applied to the interpretation and prediction of the SC(B) test data. Reasonable agreement is achieved for the crack growth initiation site and the load.

  16. Effect of confinements: Bending in Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddins, Aja; Yang, Sung; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-02-01

    Paramecium is a unicellular eukaryote which by coordinated beating of cilia, generates metachronal waves which causes it to execute a helical trajectory. We investigate the swimming parameters of the organism in rectangular PDMS channels and try to quantify its behavior. Surprisingly a swimming Paramecium in certain width of channels executes a bend of its flexible body (and changes its direction of swimming) by generating forces using the cilia. Considering a simple model of beam constrained between two walls, we predict the bent shapes of the organism and the forces it exerts on the walls. Finally we try to explain how bending (by sensing) can occur in channels by conducting experiments in thin film of fluid and drawing analogy to swimming behavior observed in different cases.

  17. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  18. Molecular Origin of Model Membrane Bending Rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtisovski, Erol; Taulier, Nicolas; Waks, Marcel; Ober, Raymond; Urbach, Wladimir

    2007-06-22

    The behavior of the bending modulus {kappa} of bilayers in lamellar phases was studied by Small Angle X-ray Scattering technique for various nonionic C{sub i}E{sub j} surfactants. The bilayers are either unswollen and dispersed in water or swollen by water and dispersed in dodecane. For unswollen bilayers, the values of {kappa} decrease with both an increase in the area per surfactant molecule and in the polar head length. They increase when the aliphatic chain length increases at constant area per surfactant molecule. Whereas for water-swollen membranes, the values of {kappa} decrease as the content of water increases converging to the value of the single monolayer bending modulus. Such a behavior results from the decoupling of the fluctuations of the two surfactant membrane monolayers. Our results emphasize the determinant contribution of the surfactant conformation to {kappa}.

  19. Molecular Origin of Model Membrane Bending Rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtisovski, Erol; Taulier, Nicolas; Ober, Raymond; Waks, Marcel; Urbach, Wladimir

    2007-06-01

    The behavior of the bending modulus κ of bilayers in lamellar phases was studied by Small Angle X-ray Scattering technique for various nonionic CiEj surfactants. The bilayers are either unswollen and dispersed in water or swollen by water and dispersed in dodecane. For unswollen bilayers, the values of κ decrease with both an increase in the area per surfactant molecule and in the polar head length. They increase when the aliphatic chain length increases at constant area per surfactant molecule. Whereas for water-swollen membranes, the values of κ decrease as the content of water increases converging to the value of the single monolayer bending modulus. Such a behavior results from the decoupling of the fluctuations of the two surfactant membrane monolayers. Our results emphasize the determinant contribution of the surfactant conformation to κ

  20. Bending influence of the electrocaloric effect in a ferroelectric/paraelectric bilayer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Lin, S. P.; Wang, Y. J.; Ma, D. C.; Wang, Biao

    2016-02-01

    The influence of bending behavior on the electricaloric (EC) effect is investigated by adopting a thermodynamic model of ferroelectric (FE)/paraelectric (PE) bilayer. The polarization transitions driven by the bending effect occur at a certain temperature range, glass-like transitions, which are found to dramatically impact the EC response. A large range of EC response can be obtained from the FE/PE bilayer which is attributed to the varying misfit strain across the film thickness arising from the bending effect. The results suggest that careful choice of thickness ratio between FE and PE layers allows one to harness the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to obtain the optimized EC response, which presents great potential for solid refrigeration application.

  1. Big Bend National Park, TX, USA, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Sierra del Carmen of Mexico, across the Rio Grande River from Big Bend National Park, TX, (28.5N, 104.0W) is centered in this photo. The Rio Grande River bisects the scene; Mexico to the east, USA to the west. The thousand ft. Boquillas limestone cliff on the Mexican side of the river changes colors from white to pink to lavender at sunset. This severely eroded sedimentary landscape was once an ancient seabed later overlaid with volcanic activity.

  2. A Unidirectional Cell Switching Gate by Engineering Grating Length and Bending Angle

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shu Fan; Gopalakrishnan, Singaram; Xu, Yuan Hao; Yang, Jie; Lam, Yun Wah; Pang, Stella W.

    2016-01-01

    On a microgrooved substrate, cells migrate along the pattern, and at random positions, reverse their directions. Here, we demonstrate that these reversals can be controlled by introducing discontinuities to the pattern. On “V-shaped grating patterns”, mouse osteogenic progenitor MC3T3-E1 cells reversed predominately at the bends and the ends. The patterns were engineered in a way that the combined effects of angle- and length-dependence could be examined in addition to their individual effects. Results show that when the bend was placed closer to one end, migration behaviour of cells depends on their direction of approach. At an obtuse bend (135°), more cells reversed when approaching from the long segment than from the short segment. But at an acute bend (45°), this relationship was reversed. Based on this anisotropic behaviour, the designed patterns effectively allowed cells to move in one direction but blocked migrations in the opposing direction. This study demonstrates that by the strategic placement of bends and ends on grating patterns, we can engineer effective unidirectional switching gates that can control the movement of adherent cells. The knowledge developed in this study could be utilised in future cell sorting or filtering platforms without the need for chemotaxis or microfluidic control. PMID:26821058

  3. Forming and Bending of Metal Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebosky, Paul; Tyszka, Daniel; Niebur, Glen; Schmid, Steven

    2004-06-01

    This study examines the formability of a porous tantalum foam, known as trabecular metal (TM). Used as a bone ingrowth surface on orthopedic implants, TM is desirable due to its combination of high strength, low relative density, and excellent osteoconductive properties. This research aims to develop bend and stretch forming as a cost-effective alternative to net machining and EDM for manufacturing thin parts made of TM. Experimentally, bending about a single axis using a wiping die was studied by observing cracking and measuring springback. It was found that die radius and clearance strongly affect the springback properties of TM, while punch speed, embossings, die radius and clearance all influence cracking. Depending on the various combinations of die radius and clearance, springback factor ranged from .70-.91. To examine the affect of the foam microstructure, bending also was examined numerically using a horizontal hexagonal mesh. As the hexagonal cells were elongated along the sheet length, elastic springback decreased. This can be explained by the earlier onset of plastic hinging occurring at the vertices of the cells. While the numerical results matched the experimental results for the case of zero clearance, differences at higher clearances arose due to an imprecise characterization of the post-yield properties of tantalum. By changing the material properties of the struts, the models can be modified for use with other open-cell metallic foams.

  4. Controlled impact demonstration airframe bending bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltis, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    The calibration of the KRASH and DYCAST models for transport aircraft is discussed. The FAA uses computer analysis techniques to predict the response of controlled impact demonstration (CID) during impact. The moment bridges can provide a direct correlation between the predictive loads or moments that the models will predict and what was experienced during the actual impact. Another goal is to examine structural failure mechanisms and correlate with analytical predictions. The bending bridges did achieve their goals and objectives. The data traces do provide some insight with respect to airframe loads and structural response. They demonstrate quite clearly what's happening to the airframe. A direct quantification of metal airframe loads was measured by the moment bridges. The measured moments can be correlated with the KRASH and DYCAST computer models. The bending bridge data support airframe failure mechanisms analysis and provide residual airframe strength estimation. It did not appear as if any of the bending bridges on the airframe exceeded limit loads. (The observed airframe fracture was due to the fuselage encounter with the tomahawk which tore out the keel beam.) The airframe bridges can be used to estimate the impact conditions and those estimates are correlating with some of the other data measurements. Structural response, frequency and structural damping are readily measured by the moment bridges.

  5. Analysis of three-point-bend test for materials with unequal tension and compression properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis capability is described for the three-point-bend test applicable to materials of linear but unequal tensile and compressive stress-strain relations. The capability consists of numerous equations of simple form and their graphical representation. Procedures are described to examine the local stress concentrations and failure modes initiation. Examples are given to illustrate the usefulness and ease of application of the capability. Comparisons are made with materials which have equal tensile and compressive properties. The results indicate possible underestimates for flexural modulus or strength ranging from 25 to 50 percent greater than values predicted when accounting for unequal properties. The capability can also be used to reduce test data from three-point-bending tests, extract material properties useful in design from these test data, select test specimen dimensions, and size structural members.

  6. 76 FR 81992 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... COMMISSION PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption 1.0..., Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This reactor is to be identified as Bell Bend Nuclear... application is based upon the U.S. EPR reference COL (RCOL) application for UniStar's Calvert Cliffs...

  7. Plate and butt-weld stresses beyond elastic limit, material and structural modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1991-01-01

    Ultimate safety factors of high performance structures depend on stress behavior beyond the elastic limit, a region not too well understood. An analytical modeling approach was developed to gain fundamental insights into inelastic responses of simple structural elements. Nonlinear material properties were expressed in engineering stresses and strains variables and combined with strength of material stress and strain equations similar to numerical piece-wise linear method. Integrations are continuous which allows for more detailed solutions. Included with interesting results are the classical combined axial tension and bending load model and the strain gauge conversion to stress beyond the elastic limit. Material discontinuity stress factors in butt-welds were derived. This is a working-type document with analytical methods and results applicable to all industries of high reliability structures.

  8. Semi-analytical solution of groundwater flow in a leaky aquifer system subject to bending effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chia-Chi; Yang, Shaw-Yang; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2013-04-01

    SummaryThe bending of aquitard like a plate due to aquifer pumping and compression is often encountered in many practical problems of subsurface flow. This reaction will have large influence on the release of the volume of water from the aquifer, which is essential for the planning and management of groundwater resources in aquifers. However, the groundwater flow induced by pumping in a leaky aquifer system is often assumed that the total stress of aquifer maintains constant all the time and the mechanical behavior of the aquitard formation is negligible. Therefore, this paper devotes to the investigation of the effect of aquitard bending on the drawdown distribution in a leaky aquifer system, which is obviously of interest in groundwater hydrology. Based on the work of Wang et al. (2004) this study develops a mathematical model for investigating the impacts of aquitard bending and leakage rate on the drawdown of the confined aquifer due to a constant-rate pumping in the leaky aquifer system. This model contains three equations; two flow equations delineate the transient drawdown distributions in the aquitard and the confined aquifer, while the other describes the vertical displacement in response to the aquitard bending. For the case of no aquitard bending, this new solution can reduce to the Hantush Laplace-domain solution (Hantush, 1960). On the other hand, this solution without the leakage effect can reduce to the time domain solution of Wang et al. (2004). The results show that the aquifer drawdown is influenced by the bending effect at early time and by the leakage effect at late time. The results of sensitivity analysis indicate that the aquifer compaction is sensitive only at early time, causing less amount of water released from the pumped aquifer than that predicted by the traditional groundwater theory. The dimensionless drawdown is rather sensitive to aquitard's hydraulic conductivity at late time. Additionally, both the hydraulic conductivity and

  9. The inward bulge type buckling of monocoque cylinders II : experimental investigation of the buckling in combined bending and compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, N J; Fuchs, S J; Cirillo, Adam J

    1944-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a series of reports on the inward bulge type buckling of monocoque cylinders. It presents the results of an experimental investigation of buckling in combined bending and compression. In the investigation it was found that the theory developed in part I of the present series predicts the buckling load in combined bending and compression with the same degree of accuracy as the older theory does in pure bending. In the realm covered by the experiments no systematic variation of the parameter N was observed. The analysis of the test results afforded a check on the theories of buckling of a curved panel. The agreement between experiment and theory was reasonably good. In addition, the effect of the end conditions upon the stress distribution under loads and upon initial stresses was investigated.

  10. Springback Analysis of Draw-Bending of 980 MPa Cold Rolled Steel Sheet and Its Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noma, Nobuyasu; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Draw-bending experiment is carried out using a 1.2 mm-thick high strength steel sheet with a tensile strength of 980 MPa and the residual curvature of the draw-bent specimens are precisely measured. The die profile of the draw-bending testing machine rotates, so that the effect of friction force on the curvature data after springback can be neglected. Moreover, in order to quantitatively evaluate the Bauschinger effect of the test material, stress reversal tests are performed using an in-plane stress reversal testing machine. Furthermore, the finite element analyses (FEA) of the draw-bending experiment are carried out. The effect of the work hardening models (isotropic or combined), element types (shell or solid), and the number of integration points in the through-thickness direction on the amount of springback (residual curvature) are investigated in detail.

  11. Analysis of surface cracks in finite plates under tension or bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1979-01-01

    Stress-intensity factors calculated with a three-dimensional, finite-element analysis for shallow and deep semielliptical surface cracks in finite elastic isotropic plates subjected to tension or bending loads are presented. A wide range of configuration parameters was investigated. The ratio of crack depth to plate thickness ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 and the ratio of crack depth to crack length ranged from 0.2 to 2.0. The effects of plate width on stress-intensity variations along the crack front was also investigated. A wide-range equation for stress-intensity factors along the crack front as a function of crack depth, crack length, plate thickness, and plate width was developed for tension and bending loads. The equation was used to predict patterns of surface-crack growth under tension or bending fatigue loads. A modified form of the equation was also used to correlate surface-crack fracture data for a brittle epoxy material within + or - 10 percent for a wide range of crack shapes and crack sizes.

  12. Weibull statistical analysis of Krouse type bending fatigue of nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidyrah, Ahmed S.; Newkirk, Joseph W.; Castaño, Carlos H.

    2016-03-01

    A bending fatigue mini-specimen (Krouse-type) was used to study the fatigue properties of nuclear materials. The objective of this paper is to study fatigue for Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel using a mini-specimen (Krouse-type) suitable for reactor irradiation studies. These mini-specimens are similar in design (but smaller) to those described in the ASTM B593 standard. The mini specimen was machined by waterjet and tested as-received. The bending fatigue machine was modified to test the mini-specimen with a specially designed adapter. The cycle bending fatigue behavior of Grade 91 was studied under constant deflection. The S-N curve was created and mean fatigue life was analyzed using mean fatigue life. In this study, the Weibull function was predicted probably for high stress to low stress at 563, 310 and 265 MPa. The commercial software Minitab 17 was used to calculate the distribution of fatigue life under different stress levels. We have used 2 and 3- parameters Weibull analysis to introduce the probability of failure. The plots indicated that the 3- parameter Weibull distribution fits the data well.

  13. On the deformation behavior of human dentin under compression and bending.

    PubMed

    Zaytsev, Dmitry; Ivashov, Alexander S; Mandra, Julia V; Panfilov, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The cause of difference in deformation behavior of human dentin under compression and bending is discussed. Mechanical properties of dentin under these deformation schemes are compared. Microstructural study of fracture surfaces of samples and cracks in dentin is carried out, too. Dentin behaves like a brittle solid under bending, whereas it exhibits various types of response from brittle to highly deformable under compression that depended on the geometry of sample (d/h ratio of a cubic sample). It is shown that the quantity of cracks on the compressed sample increases when its elasticity and plasticity grow up, whereas under bending the failure of sample occurs due to the advancement of dominant crack. Deformation and crack growth are the channels for the accommodation of applied stress in dentin. Crack growth is the leading one when the level of tensile stress in sample is dominant, whereas deformation becomes the leading channel when compression stress is dominant. However, in both cases contribution of the concurrent channel cannot be ignored. This feature is caused by the ductile fracture mode of dentin on the mesoscopic level. PMID:24907741

  14. Determination of dynamic fracture-initiation toughness using a novel impact bend test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T. . Faculty of Engineering Okayama Univ. of Science . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    A novel impact bend test procedure is described for determining the dynamic fracture-initiation toughness, K[sub Id], at a loading rate (stress intensity factor rate), K[sub I], of the order of 10[sup 6] MPa [radical]m/s. A special arrangement of the split Hopkinson pressure bar is adopted to measure accurately dynamic loads applied to a fatigue-precracked bend specimen. The dynamic stress intensity factor history for the bend specimen is evaluated by means of a dynamic finite element technique. The onset of crack initiation is detected using a string gage attached on the side of the specimen near a crack tip. The value of K[sub Id] is determined from the critical dynamic stress intensity factor at crack initiation. A series of dynamic fracture tests is carried out on a 7075-T6 aluminum alloy, a Ti-6246 alloy and an AISI 4340 steel. The K[sub Id] values obtained for the three structural materials are compared with the corresponding values obtained under quasi-static loading conditions.

  15. Design of a 90{degree} overmoded waveguide bend

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, C.; Kroll, N.M.; Nelson, E.M.

    1993-04-01

    A design for a 90{degree} bend for the TE{sub 01} mode in over-moded circular waveguide is presented. A pair of septa, symmetrically placed perpendicular to the plane of the bend, are adiabatically introduced into the waveguide before the bend and removed after it. Introduction of the curvature excites five propagating modes in the curved section. The finite element field solver YAP is used to calculate the propagation constants of these modes in the bend, and the guide diameter, septum depth, septum thickness, and bend radius are set so that the phase advances of all five modes through the bend are equal modulo 2{pi}. To a good approximation these modes are expected to recombine to form a pure mode at the end of the bend.

  16. Characterization of bending loss in hollow flexible terahertz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Doradla, Pallavi; Joseph, Cecil S; Kumar, Jayant; Giles, Robert H

    2012-08-13

    Attenuation characteristics of hollow, flexible, metal and metal/dielectric coated polycarbonate waveguides were investigated using an optically pumped far infrared (FIR) laser at 215 µm. The bending loss of silver coated polycarbonate waveguides were measured as a function of various bending angles, bending radii, and bore diameters. Minimal propagation losses of 1.77, 0.96 dB/m were achieved by coupling the lowest loss TE11 mode into the silver or gold coated waveguide, and HE11 mode into the silver/polystyrene coated waveguides respectively. The maximal bending loss was found to be less than 1 dB/m for waveguides of 2 to 4.1 mm bore diameters, with a 6.4 cm bend radius, and up to 150° bending angle. The investigation shows the preservation of single laser mode in smaller bore waveguides even at greater bending angles. PMID:23038558

  17. Cricket antennae shorten when bending (Acheta domesticus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Loudon, Catherine; Bustamante, Jorge; Kellogg, Derek W.

    2014-01-01

    Insect antennae are important mechanosensory and chemosensory organs. Insect appendages, such as antennae, are encased in a cuticular exoskeleton and are thought to bend only between segments or subsegments where the cuticle is thinner, more flexible, or bent into a fold. There is a growing appreciation of the dominating influence of folds in the mechanical behavior of a structure, and the bending of cricket antennae was considered in this context. Antennae will bend or deflect in response to forces, and the resulting bending behavior will affect the sensory input of the antennae. In some cricket antennae, such as in those of Acheta domesticus, there are a large number (>100) of subsegments (flagellomeres) that vary in their length. We evaluated whether these antennae bend only at the joints between flagellomeres, which has always been assumed but not tested. In addition we questioned whether an antenna undergoes a length change as it bends, which would result from some patterns of joint deformation. Measurements using light microscopy and SEM were conducted on both male and female adult crickets (Acheta domesticus) with bending in four different directions: dorsal, ventral, medial, and lateral. Bending occurred only at the joints between flagellomeres, and antennae shortened a comparable amount during bending, regardless of sex or bending direction. The cuticular folds separating antennal flagellomeres are not very deep, and therefore as an antenna bends, the convex side (in tension) does not have a lot of slack cuticle to “unfold” and does not lengthen during bending. Simultaneously on the other side of the antenna, on the concave side in compression, there is an increasing overlap in the folded cuticle of the joints during bending. Antennal shortening during bending would prevent stretching of antennal nerves and may promote hemolymph exchange between the antenna and head. PMID:25018734

  18. Bending analysis of a general cross-ply laminate using 3D elasticity solution and layerwise theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani Sarvestani, H.; Naghashpour, A.; Heidari-Rarani, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the analytical solution of interlaminar stresses near the free edges of a general (symmetric and unsymmetric layups) cross-ply composite laminate subjected to pure bending loading is presented based on Reddy's layerwise theory (LWT) for the first time. First, the reduced form of displacement field is obtained for a general cross-ply composite laminate subjected to a bending moment by elasticity theory. Then, first-order shear deformation theory of plates and LWT is utilized to determine the global and local deformation parameters appearing in the displacement fields, respectively. One of the main advantages of the developed solution based on the LWT is exact prediction of interlaminar stresses at the boundary layer regions. To show the accuracy of this solution, three-dimensional elasticity bending problem of a laminated composite is solved for special set of boundary conditions as well. Finally, LWT results are presented for edge-effect problems of several symmetric and unsymmetric cross-ply laminates under the bending moment. The obtained results indicate high stress gradients of interlaminar stresses near the edges of laminates.

  19. A numerical study of strike-slip bend formation with application to the Salton Sea pull-apart basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jiyang; Liu, Mian; Wang, Hui

    2015-03-01

    How stepovers of strike-slip faults connect to form bends is a question important for understanding the formation of push-up ranges (restraining bends) and pull-apart basins (releasing bends). We investigated the basic mechanics of this process in a simple three-dimensional viscoelastoplastic finite element model. Our model predicts localized plastic strain within stepovers that may eventually lead to the formation of strike-slip bends. Major parameters controlling strain localization include the relative fault strength, geometry of the fault system, and the plasticity model assumed. Using the Drucker-Prager plasticity model, in which the plastic yield strength of the crust depends on both shear and normal stresses, our results show that a releasing bend is easier to develop than a restraining bend under similar conditions. These results may help explain the formation of the Salton Sea pull-apart basin in Southern California 0.5-0.1 Ma ago, when the stepover between the Imperial Fault and the San Andreas Fault was connected by the Brawley seismic zone.

  20. Accuracy of third-order bends of nickel-titanium wires and the effect of high and low pressure during memorizing heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Thomas; Hohoff, Ariane; Wiechmann, Dirk; Sütfeld, Jan; Helm, Dirk

    2004-10-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of third-order bends of nickel-titanium wires and determined the effect of high and low pressure for maintaining the wire shape during memorizing heat treatment. A computer-aided bending machine was used to incorporate 200 randomly determined torsional angles between 0 degrees and 60 degrees into 30 linear 0.016 x 0.022-in NeoSentalloy F80 (GAC International, Central Islip, NY) wires. The torsional bendings were randomized into 2 groups. Bends assigned to group 1 (n = 100) received heat treatment of 1.6 MPa (16 bar) pressure, and bends assigned to group 2 (n = 100) received heat treatment of 50 MPa (500 bar) pressure. Cross-sectional cuts from the bent wires were prepared by using standard metallurgical techniques, and the torsional angles were analyzed under computer control. The results of our study show that third-order bends bends > 30 degrees but bends > 40 degrees , the bending error with both methods is clinically unacceptable. In addition to the variability in the dimension and composition of nickel-titanium wires, the scale of the incorporated plastic deformations makes a substantial contribution to the bending error. As far as permitted by the clinical situation, then, the bend should be distributed over the maximum possible wire length. Third-order bends in the first rectangular pseudoelastic nickel-titanium wires represent an efficient means of effecting torque at an early stage. This individualization allows the full therapeutic potential of these archwires to be exploited right from the initial phase of treatment. PMID:15470351

  1. Contribution of Elasticity in Slab Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourel, L.; Goes, S. D. B.; Morra, G.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that plate rheology exerts a dominant control on the shape and velocity of subducting plates. Here, we perform a systematic investigation of the, often disregarded, role of elasticity in slab bending at the trench, using simple, yet fully dynamic, set of 2.5D models where an elastic, visco-elastic or visco-elasto-plastic plate subducts freely into a purely viscous mantle. We derive a scaling relationship between the bending radius of visco-elastic slabs and the Deborah number, De, which is the ratio of Maxwell time over deformation time. We show that De controls the ratio of elastically stored energy over viscously dissipated energy and find that at De exceeding 10-2, it requires substantially less energy to bend a visco-elastic slab to the same shape as a purely viscous slab with the same viscosity (90% less for De=0.1). Elastically stored energy at higher De facilitates slab unbending and hence favours retreating modes of subduction, while trench advance only occurs for some cases with De<10-2. We use our scaling relation to estimate apparent Deborah numbers, Deapp, from a global compilation of subduction-zone parameters. Values range from 10-3 to >1, where most zones have low Deapp<10-2, but a few young plates have Deapp>0.1. Slabs with Deapp ≤ 10-2 either have very low viscosities, ≤10 times mantle viscosity, or they may be yielding, in which case our apparent Deborah number may underestimate actual De by up to an order of magnitude. If a significant portion of the low Deapp slabs yield, then elastically stored energy may actually be important in quite a large number of subduction zones. Interestingly, increasing Deapp correlates with increasing proportion of larger seismic events (b-value) in both instrumental and historic catalogues, indicating that increased contribution of elasticity may facilitate rupture in larger, less frequent earthquakes.

  2. Displacement analysis of a bend plate test with mechanical loading and laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.S.

    1997-09-01

    The surface displacment of a steel plate caused by a permanent deformation as a result of local yielding was modeled by a finite element analysis. The local yielding occurs when a small area of the plate is heated by a laser beam. The calculated displacments are in good agreement with the preliminary experimental data obtained using a bend specimen with laser heating at the University of Alabama at Huntsville. It has been shown computuationally and optically that the relative displacments are less than 1mm near the laser heated area of the specimen. The results demonstrate that the experimental approach is a feasible technique for determining the residual stress under multiaxial stress field.

  3. Great Bend tornadoes of August 30, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umenhofer, T. A.; Fujita, T. T.; Dundas, R.

    1977-01-01

    Photogrammetric analyses of movies and still pictures taken of the Great Bend, Kansas Tornado series have been used to develop design specifications for nuclear power plants and facilities. A maximum tangential velocity of 57 m/sec and a maximum vertical velocity of 27 m/sec are determined for one suction vortex having a translational velocity of 32 m/sec. Three suction vortices with radii in the 20 to 30 m range are noted in the flow field of one tornado; these suction vortices apparently form a local convergence of inflow air inside the outer portion of the tornado core.

  4. Self-bending symmetric cusp beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Wei-Wei; Lu, Yao; Li, Yin-Mei; Ren, Yu-Xuan

    2015-12-07

    A type of self-bending symmetric cusp beams with four accelerating intensity maxima is theoretically and experimentally presented. Distinguished from the reported regular polygon beams, the symmetric cusp beams simultaneously exhibit peculiar features of natural autofocusing and self-acceleration during propagation. Further, such beams take the shape of a fine longitudinal needle-like structure at the focal region and possess the strong ability of self-healing over obstacles. All these intriguing properties were verified experimentally. Particularly, the spatial profile of the reconstructed beam exhibits spatially sculpted optical structure with four siamesed curved arms. Thus, we anticipate that the structured beam will benefit optical guiding and optofluidics in surprising ways.

  5. Self-bending symmetric cusp beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Wei-Wei; Ren, Yu-Xuan; Lu, Yao; Li, Yin-Mei

    2015-12-01

    A type of self-bending symmetric cusp beams with four accelerating intensity maxima is theoretically and experimentally presented. Distinguished from the reported regular polygon beams, the symmetric cusp beams simultaneously exhibit peculiar features of natural autofocusing and self-acceleration during propagation. Further, such beams take the shape of a fine longitudinal needle-like structure at the focal region and possess the strong ability of self-healing over obstacles. All these intriguing properties were verified experimentally. Particularly, the spatial profile of the reconstructed beam exhibits spatially sculpted optical structure with four siamesed curved arms. Thus, we anticipate that the structured beam will benefit optical guiding and optofluidics in surprising ways.

  6. Bending and buckling of wet paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minhee; Kim, Seungho; Kim, Ho-Young; Mahadevan, L.

    2016-04-01

    Flat paper stained with water buckles and wrinkles as it swells and deforms out of the original plane. Here we quantify the geometry and mechanics of a strip of paper that swells when it imbibes water from a narrow capillary. Characterizing the hygroexpansive nature of paper shows that thickness-wise swelling is much faster than in-plane water imbibition, leading to a simple picture for the process by which the strip of paper bends out of the plane. We model the out-of-plane deformation using a quasi-static theory and show that our results are consistent with quantitative experiments.

  7. Improved design of a three roll tube bending process under geometrical uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, Matteo; Colosimo, Bianca Maria; Castillo, Enrique Del

    2011-05-01

    In the tube bending industry a process is considered flexible if it allows the forming of different curvature radii, without the need for a machine setup or a tool change. This is possible by numerically controlling one or more moving dies or rolls which are able to produce different radii. Unlike conventional tube bending processes, where the tube is clamped at its end and bent around a fixed die, bending with variable radius generally requires that the tube is axially fed into the forming area. A flexible bending operation is traditionally operated by dividing it into an opening phase (the bending roll is moving) and a steady phase (the bending roll is on hold and the tube is axially fed). A technological limit of the process is its intrinsic variability, e.g. measured in terms of repeatability of the obtained bent angle. An FEM based sensitivity analysis is shown in the paper in order to verify which input parameters of the incoming tubes (dimensions, material properties, etc.) are more influential on the results in terms of repeatability. The presence of the two opening and steady phases, with different mechanical conditions is an obstacle to the production of an aesthetic tube with a constant, uniform curvature radius. As a result, the real curvature radius moving along the tube spine will have some variations, which may also transform into defects, such as wrinkling or bumps. A modification of the traditionally operated control curves is proposed in the paper in order to improve the uniformity of the obtained curvature radius. Finally, a method is proposed for optimizing the control curves, under the presence of noise factors.

  8. Multifiber optical bend sensor to aid colonoscope navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, Jessica E.; Gavalis, Robb M.; Wong, Peter Y.; Cao, Caroline G. L.

    2011-12-01

    A colonoscopy's near-blind navigation process frequently causes disorientation for the scope operator, leading to harm for the patient. Navigation can be improved if real-time colonoscope shape, location, and orientation information is provided by a shape-tracking aid, such as a fiber optic bend sensor. Fiber optic bend sensors provide advantages over conventional electromechanical shape-trackers, including low cost and ease of integration. However, current fiber optic bend sensors lack either the ability to detect both bending direction and curvature, or the ability to detect multiple localized bends. An inexpensive multifiber bend sensor was developed to aid users in navigation during colonoscopy. The bend sensor employs active-cladding optical fibers modified with fluorescent quantum dots, bandpass filters, and a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor imager as key components. Results from three-fiber sensors demonstrate the bend sensor's ability to measure curvature (error of 0.01 mm), direction (100% accuracy), and location (predetermined distance) of a bend in the fiber bundle. Comparison with spectroscopy data further confirmed the accuracy of the bending direction measurement for a three-fiber sensor. Future work includes improvements in fiber manufacturing to increase sensor sensitivity and consistency. An expanded 31 fiber bundle would be needed to track the full length of a colonoscope.

  9. The design of an agent to bend DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, T; Hogan, M E

    1996-01-01

    An artificial DNA bending agent has been designed to assess helix flexibility over regions as small as a protein binding site. Bending was obtained by linking a pair of 15-base-long triple helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) by an adjustable polymeric linker. By design, DNA bending was introduced into the double helix within a 10-bp spacer region positioned between the two sites of 15-base triple helix formation. The existence of this bend has been confirmed by circular permutation and phase-sensitive electrophoresis, and the directionality of the bend has been determined as a compression of the minor helix groove. The magnitude of the resulting duplex bend was found to be dependent on the length of the polymeric linker in a fashion consistent with a simple geometric model. Data suggested that a 50-70 degrees bend was achieved by binding of the TFO chimera with the shortest linker span (18 rotatable bonds). Equilibrium analysis showed that, relative to a chimera which did not bend the duplex, the stability of the triple helix possessing a 50-70 degrees bend was reduced by less than 1 kcal/mol of that of the unbent complex. Based upon this similarity, it is proposed that duplex DNA may be much more flexible with respect to minor groove compression than previously assumed. It is shown that this unusual flexibility is consistent with recent quantitation of protein-induced minor groove bending. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8901543

  10. An integrated approach to investigate the reach-averaged bend scale dynamics of large meandering rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monegaglia, Federico; Henshaw, Alex; Zolezzi, Guido; Tubino, Marco

    2016-04-01

    quantitative assessment of the location and movement of river point bars and mid-channel bars along evolving meander bends is also performed through a coordinate mapping that allows to express morphological features in an intrinsic reference system and therefore to compare their topographical structure in subsequent years. A novel bend-scale reach-averaging concept of evolutionary parameters is proposed and performed by adopting bend sinuosity as a proxy of evolutionary time. This allows to extract comparable metrics to those predicted by nonlinear morphodynamic theories that are typically developed at the meander bend scale. The proposed approach allows to develop a consistent comparison between observed evolution and predictions from morphodynamic theories.

  11. Nonlinear Bending Stiffness of Plates Clamped by Bolted Joints under Bending Moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, Tomohiro; Shibutani, Yoji

    Equivalent stiffness of plates clamped by bolted joints for designing should be evaluated according to not only the strength of bolted joints but also the deformation and vibration characteristics of the structures. When the applied external axial load or the bending moment is sufficiently small, the contact surfaces of the bolted joint are stuck together, and thus both the bolt and the clamped plates deform linearly. Although the sophisticated VDI 2230 code gives the appropriate stiffness of clamped plates for the infinitesimal deformation, the stiffness may vary nonlinearly with increasing the loading because of changing the contact state. Therefore, the present paper focuses on the nonlinear behaviour of the bending stiffness of clamped plates by using Finite Element (FE) analyses, taking the contact condition on bearing surfaces and between the plates into account. The FE models of the plates with thicknesses of 3.2, 4.5, 6.0 and 9.0 mm tightened with M8, 10, 12 and 16 bolts were constructed. The relation between bending moment and bending compliance of clamped plates is found to be categorized into three regions, namely, (i) constant compliance with fully stuck contact surfaces, (ii) transition showing the nonlinear compliance, and (iii) constant compliance with one-side contact surfaces. The mechanical models for these three regions are proposed and compared with FEM solutions. The prediction on the bounds of three regions is in a fairly good agreement except the case with smaller bolts and thicker plates.

  12. Precision Small Angle Bending of Sheet Metals Using Shear Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Kenji; Mori, Yorifumi

    This paper deals with a new method to bend sheet metals at a small angle precisely, in which a sheet metal is slightly bent by shear deformation at negative punch-die clearance. Deformation behavior and key factors affecting on the bend angle were studied in detail with pure aluminum sheets. It was proved that the bend angle was changed in proportion to both punch penetration and negative punch-die clearance within a certain range. The same was true for high-strength steel and phosphor bronze, which are difficult to bend precisely by conventional methods due to large springback after unloading. By using this relationship as a control law, four kinds of sheet metals were precisely bent within a few degrees. This method was applied to correct the angular errors in U-bend products of high-strength steel and to bend leaf springs of phosphor bronze at an arbitrary small angle.

  13. Local sorting, bend curvature, and particle mobility in meandering gravel bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Jordan A.

    2010-02-01

    Hydraulic, grain scale sorting of mixed bed sediment influences the mobility of grains in discrete areas of river channels. To assess this effect, local values of surface grain size sorting were compared with measurements of bed load at corresponding locations in a bend of the Colorado River in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP), and the distribution of local Shields stress through the reach was derived from a two-dimensional flow model. With decreasing degrees of local sorting, the relative mobility of the fine- and coarse-size fractions of the load appeared to decrease and increase, respectively. Furthermore, back-calculated critical Shields stress values for sediment entrainment decreased with values of local sorting, particularly for the upstream portion of the reach where particles were more poorly sorted and coarse grains had higher relative exposure. To evaluate the pervasiveness of these and other patterns of sorting in gravel rivers, detailed field measurements of channel topography and surface grain size (317 pebble counts) were obtained for seven additional reaches of differing curvature (radius of curvature/width from 1 to 28) near the headwaters of the Colorado and Fall rivers in RMNP. Moderately curved and tight bends (radius of curvature/width ≤ 7) were significantly better sorted than comparatively straight reaches. Values of local sorting decreased with distance downstream for the majority of curved channels, reflecting a reduction in the standard deviation of surface grain sizes toward the lower end of the reach; this effect increased slightly with bend sharpness.

  14. Bending response of single layer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Si; Cao, Guoxin

    2016-03-11

    Using molecular mechanics (or dynamics) simulations, three different approaches, including the targeted molecular mechanics, four-point bending and nanotube methods, are employed to investigate the bending response of single layer MoS2 (SLMoS2), among which four-point bending is the most accurate approach to determine the bending stiffness according to the continuum theory. It is found that when the bending curvature radius is large enough (e.g. >4 nm), three approaches will give the same bending stiffness of SLMoS2 and the bending behavior is isotropic for SLMoS2, whereas the nanotube method with small tubes (e.g. <4 nm) cannot give the correct bending stiffness. Compared with the reported result from the MoS2 nanotube calculated by density functional theory, the revised Stillinger-Weber (SW) and reactive empirical bond-order (REBO) potentials can give the reasonable bending stiffness of SLMoS2 (8.7-13.4 eV) as well as the effective deformed conformation. In addition, since the Mo-S bond deformation of SLMoS2 under bending is similar to that under in-plane tension/compression, the continuum bending theory can quite accurately predict the bending stiffness of SLMoS2 if a reasonable thickness of SLMoS2 is given. For SLMoS2, the reasonable thickness should be larger than the distance between its two S atomic planes and lower than the distance between two Mo atomic planes of bulk MoS2 crystal, e.g. 0.375-0.445 nm. PMID:26861930

  15. The mechanics of gravitropic bending in leafy dicot stems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Mueller, W. J.; Blotter, P. T.; Harris, C. S.; White, R. G.; Gillespie, L. S.; Sliwinski, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of the gravitropic bending in stems of the cocklebur and castor bean are investigated. The results of these experiments demonstrate the quick stopping of growth and the increased tensions on the upper layer of a horizontal stem. It is suggested that bending apparently occurs as the resistance of the upper surface layers is extended to the inner cells below. A model of stem bending is developed which can explain the asymmetry of the stem-cell response.

  16. BEND3 mediates transcriptional repression and heterochromatin organization.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abid; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-01-01

    Transcription repression plays a central role in gene regulation. Transcription repressors utilize diverse strategies to mediate transcriptional repression. We have recently demonstrated that BEND3 (BANP, E5R and Nac1 domain) protein represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component. We discuss the role of BEND3 as a global regulator of gene expression and propose a model whereby BEND3 associates with chromatin remodeling complexes to modulate gene expression and heterochromatin organization. PMID:26507581

  17. Bending response of single layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Si; Cao, Guoxin

    2016-03-01

    Using molecular mechanics (or dynamics) simulations, three different approaches, including the targeted molecular mechanics, four-point bending and nanotube methods, are employed to investigate the bending response of single layer MoS2 (SLMoS2), among which four-point bending is the most accurate approach to determine the bending stiffness according to the continuum theory. It is found that when the bending curvature radius is large enough (e.g. >4 nm), three approaches will give the same bending stiffness of SLMoS2 and the bending behavior is isotropic for SLMoS2, whereas the nanotube method with small tubes (e.g. <4 nm) cannot give the correct bending stiffness. Compared with the reported result from the MoS2 nanotube calculated by density functional theory, the revised Stillinger-Weber (SW) and reactive empirical bond-order (REBO) potentials can give the reasonable bending stiffness of SLMoS2 (8.7-13.4 eV) as well as the effective deformed conformation. In addition, since the Mo-S bond deformation of SLMoS2 under bending is similar to that under in-plane tension/compression, the continuum bending theory can quite accurately predict the bending stiffness of SLMoS2 if a reasonable thickness of SLMoS2 is given. For SLMoS2, the reasonable thickness should be larger than the distance between its two S atomic planes and lower than the distance between two Mo atomic planes of bulk MoS2 crystal, e.g. 0.375-0.445 nm.

  18. Theoretical and experimental study of the bending influence on the capacitance of interdigitated micro-electrodes patterned on flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Molina-Lopez, F.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Kinkeldei, T.; Tröster, G.

    2013-11-07

    Interdigitated electrodes are common structures in the fields of microelectronics and MEMS. Recent developments in flexible electronics compel an understanding of such structures under bending constraints. In this work, the behavior of interdigitated micro-electrodes when subjected to circular bending has been theoretically and experimentally studied through changes in capacitance. An analytical model has been developed to calculate the expected variation in capacitance of such structures while undergoing outward and inward bending along the direction perpendicular to the electrodes. The model combines conformal mapping techniques to account for the electric field redistribution and fundamental aspects of solid mechanics in order to define the geometrical deformation of the electrodes while bending. To experimentally verify our theoretical predictions, several interdigitated electrode structures with different geometries were fabricated on polymeric substrates by means of photolithography. The samples, placed in a customized bending setup, were bent to controlled radii of curvature while measuring their capacitance. A maximum variation in capacitance of less than 3% was observed at a minimum radius of curvature of 2.5 mm for all the devices tested with very thin electrodes whereas changes of up to 7% were found on stiffer, plated electrodes. Larger or smaller variations would be possible, in theory, by adjusting the geometry of the device. This work establishes a useful predictive tool for the design and evaluation of truly flexible/bendable electronics consisting of interdigitated structures, allowing one to tune the bending influence on the capacitance value through geometrical design.

  19. Non-linear infrared spectroscopy of the water bending mode: Direct experimental evidence of hydration shell reorganization?

    PubMed Central

    Chuntonov, Lev; Kumar, Revati

    2014-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of liquid water are further studied by investigating the bend vibrational mode of HDO/D2O and pure H2O via two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) and linear absorption. The experimental findings and theoretical calculations support a picture in which the HDO bend is localized and the H2O bend is delocalized. The HDO and H2O bends present a loss of the frequency-frequency correlation in subpicosecond time scale. While the loss of correlation for the H2O bend is likely to be associated with the vibrational dynamics of a delocalized transition, the loss of the correlation in the localized HDO bend appears to arise from the fluctuations/rearrangements of the local environment. Interestingly, analysis of the HDO 2D-IR spectra shows the presence of multiple overlapping inhomogeneous distributions of frequencies that interchange in a few picoseconds. Theoretical calculations allow us to propose an atomistic model of the observed vibrational dynamics in which the different in homogeneous distributions and their interchange are assigned to water molecules with different hydrogen-bond states undergoing chemical exchange. The frequency shifts as well as the concentration of the water molecules with single and double hydrogen-bonds as donors derived from the theory are in good agreement with our experimental findings. PMID:24871901

  20. Bending waves and the structure of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The surface mass density profiles at four locations within Saturn's rings are calculated using Voyager spacecraft images of spiral bending waves. The identification of a feature in Saturn's outer B ring as Mimas's 4:2 bending waves is confirmed, and these 4:2 waves are analyzed to determine the surface density in Saturn's B ring. A fourth set of bending waves, the Mimas 7:4, located in the inner A ring, is identified and analyzed. Mimas's 5:3 and 8:5 bending waves, observed in the middle and outer A ring respectively, are reanalyzed.

  1. GENERAL VIEW OF TUMALO FEED CANAL (RIGHT) AND BEND FEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF TUMALO FEED CANAL (RIGHT) AND BEND FEED CANAL (LEFT) INTERSECTION. LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Tumalo Irrigation District, Tumalo Project, West of Deschutes River, Tumalo, Deschutes County, OR

  2. Sorting of bed load sediment by flow in meander bends.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, G.; Andrews, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    Equilibrium sorting of coarse mobile bed load sediment in meander bends is considered. A theory of two-dimensional bed load transport of graded material, including the effects of gravity on lateral slopes and secondary currents, is developed. This theory is coupled with a simple tratement of flow in bends, an analytically determined bend shape, and the condition of continuity of each grain size range in transport to describe sorting. The theory indicates that the locus of coarse sediment shifts from the inside bank to the outside bank near the bend apex, as is observed.-Authors

  3. Adaptive waveguide bends with homogeneous, nonmagnetic, and isotropic materials.

    PubMed

    Han, Tiancheng; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Tang, Xiaohong

    2011-01-15

    We propose a method for adaptive waveguide bends using homogeneous, nonmagnetic, and isotropic materials, which simplifies the parameters of the bends to the utmost extent. The proposed bend has an adaptive and compact shape because of all the flat boundaries. The nonmagnetic property is realized by selecting OB'/OC = 0.5. Only two nonmagnetic isotropic dielectrics are needed throughout, and the transmission is not sensitive to nonmagnetic isotropic dielectrics. Results validate and illustrate these functionalities, which make the bend much easier to fabricate and apply, owing to its simple parameters, compact shape, and versatility in connecting different waveguides. PMID:21263493

  4. SRI CAT Section 1 bending magnet beamline description

    SciTech Connect

    Srajer, G.; Rodricks, B.; Assoufid, L.; Mills, D.M.

    1994-03-10

    This report discusses: APS bending magnet source; beamline layout; beamline optical components; beamline operation; time-resolved studies station; polarization studies station; and commissioning and operational schedule.

  5. Using the Semi-Circular Bending Test to Investigate the Interaction Between Hydraulic and Natural Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Olson, J. E.; Prodanovic, M.

    2014-12-01

    Micro-seismic data shows that hydraulic fracture propagation is a complex process. When hydraulic fractures interact with pre-existing natural fractures, it can result in a complex fracture network. The interaction depends on in-situ stresses, rock and natural fracture mechanical properties, approach angle and hydraulic fracture treatment parameters. Most simulation studies treat natural fractures as frictional interfaces with cohesive properties. However, from core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented natural fractures are widely present and it is not clear that whether they fit the common description or not. In this study, semi-circular bending experiments are utilized to examine the fracture propagation paths. Synthetic hydrostone samples with embedded inclusions of different mechanical properties are used to mimic rock and cemented natural fractures. Simulation results are generated using finite element software ABAQUS. The extended finite element method (XFEM) capability of ABAQUS allows the fracture initiation and propagation along a solution dependent path without the need for re-meshing. The simulation results are used to explain the experimental observations. In a series of experiment and modeling work, we assess the influence of the fracture approach angle, inclusion strength, and inclusion thickness on fracture propagation. Current results indicate the fracture propagation direction is strongly influenced by pre-existing inclusions. The propagating fractures tend to cross the inclusion when the approach angle is high and divert into the inclusion when the approach angle is low. The crossing surface is thus not a clean cut, but with a jog distance that depends on the inclusion thickness and approach angle. Results imply that if hydraulic fractures have lower approach angles to pre-existing natural fractures, the ultimate fracture network is going to have higher complexity. The thickness of natural fractures can also add to the complexity.

  6. Bending Tests of Circular Cylinders of Corrugated Aluminum-alloy Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckwalter, John C; Reed, Warren D; Niles, Alfred S

    1937-01-01

    Bending tests were made of two circular cylinders of corrugated aluminum-alloy sheet. In each test failure occurred by bending of the corrugations in a plane normal to the skin. It was found, after analysis of the effect of short end bays, that the computed stress on the extreme fiber of a corrugated cylinder is in excess of that for a flat panel of the same basic pattern and panel length tested as a pin-ended column. It is concluded that this increased strength was due to the effects of curvature of the pitch line. It is also concluded from the tests that light bulkheads closely spaced strengthen corrugated cylinders very materially.

  7. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Response of Unidirectional Polymeric Laminated Composite Plates Under Bending Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falahatgar, S. R.; Salehi, Manouchehr

    2011-12-01

    Nonlinear bending analysis of polymeric laminated composite plate is examined considering material nonlinearity for viscoelastic matrix material through a Micro-macro approach. The micromechanical Simplified Unit Cell Method (SUCM) in three-dimensional closed-form solution is used for the overall behavior of the unidirectional composite in any combination of loading conditions. The elastic fibers are transversely isotropic where Schapery single integral equation in multiaxial stress state describes the matrix material by recursive-iterative formulation. The finite difference Dynamic Relaxation (DR) method is utilized to study the bending behavior of Mindlin annular sector plate including geometric nonlinearity under uniform lateral pressure with clamped and hinged edge constraints. The unsymmetrical laminated plate deflection is predicted for different thicknesses and also various pressures in different time steps and they are compared with elastic finite element results. As a main objective, the deflection results of viscoelastic laminated sector plate are obtained for various fiber volume fractions in the composite system.

  8. Separation of blood in microchannel bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattert, Christoph; Jurischka, Reinhold; Schoth, Andreas; Kerth, Paul; Menz, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Biological applications of micro assay devices require integrated on-chip microfluidics for separation of plasma or serum from blood. This is achieved by a new blood separation technique based on a microchannel bend structure developed within the collaborative Micro-Tele-BioChip (μTBC) project co-funded by the German Ministry For Education and Research (BMBF). Different prototype polymer chips have been manufactured with an UV-LIGA process and hot embossing technology. The separation efficiency of these chips has been determined by experimental measurements using human whole blood. Results show different separation efficiencies for cells and plasma depending on microchannel geometry and blood sample characteristics and suggest an alternative blood separation method as compared to existing micro separation technologies.

  9. Separation of blood in microchannel bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattert, Christoph; Jurischka, Reinhold; Schoth, Andreas; Kerth, Paul; Menz, Wolfgang

    2003-12-01

    Biological applications of micro assay devices require integrated on-chip microfluidics for separation of plasma or serum from blood. This is achieved by a new blood separation technique based on a microchannel bend structure developed within the collaborative Micro-Tele-BioChip (μTBC) project co-funded by the German Ministry For Education and Research (BMBF). Different prototype polymer chips have been manufactured with an UV-LIGA process and hot embossing technology. The separation efficiency of these chips has been determined by experimental measurements using human whole blood. Results show different separation efficiencies for cells and plasma depending on microchannel geometry and blood sample characteristics and suggest an alternative blood separation method as compared to existing micro separation technologies.

  10. Bending the Cost Curve in Childhood Cancer.

    PubMed

    Russell, Heidi; Bernhardt, M Brooke

    2016-08-01

    Healthcare for children with cancer costs significantly more than other children. Cost reduction efforts aimed toward relatively small populations of patients that use a disproportionate amount of care, like childhood cancer, could have a dramatic impact on healthcare spending. The aims of this review are to provide stakeholders with an overview of the drivers of financial costs of childhood cancer and to identify possible directions to curb or decrease these costs. Costs are incurred throughout the spectrum of care. Recent trends in pharmaceutical costs, evidence identifying the contribution of administration costs, and overuse of surveillance studies are described. Awareness of cost and value, i.e., the outcome achieved per dollar or burden spent, in delivery of care and research is necessary to bend the cost curve. Incorporation of these dimensions of care requires methodology development, prioritization, and ethical balance. PMID:27193602

  11. A comparison of needle bending models.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Goksel, Orcun; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2006-01-01

    Modeling the deflection of flexible needles is an essential part of needle insertion simulation and path planning. In this paper, three models are compared in terms of accuracy in simulating the bending of a prostate brachytherapy needle. The first two utilize the finite element method, one using geometric non-linearity and triangular plane elements, the other using non-linear beam elements. The third model uses angular springs to model cantilever deflection. The simulations are compared with the experimental bent needle configurations. The models are assessed in terms of geometric conformity using independently identified and pre-identified model parameters. The results show that the angular spring model, which is also the simplest, simulates the needle more accurately than the others. PMID:17354904

  12. Pure bending of a solid cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renton, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    The problems of torsion, axial loading and shear of a solid cone were solved around the turn of the century by Michell and Föppl. Surprisingly, no solution to the problem of the elastic response of a cone to the only other possible resultant applied to its apex seems to have been published until now. The method used here is based on certain theoretical considerations related to the author's work on generalizing the engineering theory of beams. This means that the result is derived rather than being the result of a trial-and-error process. A comparison is made with the usual engineering theory as modified for variable bending stiffness. The two analyses give the same results at the limit as the cone angle tends to zero.

  13. Light bending in f(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2016-05-01

    In the framework of f(T) gravity, we focus on a weak-field and spherically symmetric solution for the Lagrangian f(T) = T + αT2, where α is a small constant which parametrizes the departure from general relativity (GR). In particular, we study the propagation of light and obtain the correction to the general relativistic bending angle. Moreover, we discuss the impact of this correction on some gravitational lensing observables, and evaluate the possibility of constraining the theory parameter α by means of observations. In particular, on taking into account the astrometric accuracy in the Solar System, we obtain that |α|≤ 1.85 × 105m2; this bound is looser than those deriving from the analysis of Solar System dynamics, e.g. |α|≤ 5 × 10‑1m2 [L. Iorio, N. Radicella and M. L. Ruggiero, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 1508 (2015) 021, arXiv:1505.06996 [gr-qc].], |α|≤ 1.8 × 104m2 [L. Iorio and E. N. Saridakis, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 427 (2012) 1555, arXiv:1203.5781 [gr-qc].] or |α|≤ 1.2 × 102m2 [Y. Xie and X. M. Deng, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 433 (2013) 3584, arXiv:1312.4103 [gr-qc].]. However, we suggest that, since the effect only depends on the impact parameter, better constraints could be obtained by studying light bending from planetary objects.

  14. Laser-Assisted Bending of Sharp Angles With Small Fillet Radius on Stainless Steel Sheets: Analysis of Experimental Set-Up and Processing Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisario, Annamaria; Barletta, Massimiliano; Venettacci, Simone; Veniali, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Achievement of sharp bending angles with small fillet radius on stainless steel sheets by mechanical bending requires sophisticated bending device and troublesome operational procedures, which can involve expensive molds, huge presses and large loads. In addition, springback is always difficult to control, thus often leading to final parts with limited precision and accuracy. In contrast, laser-assisted bending of metals is an emerging technology, as it often allows to perform difficult and multifaceted manufacturing tasks with relatively small efforts. In the present work, laser-assisted bending of stainless steel sheets to achieve sharp angles is thus investigated. First, bending trials were performed by combining laser irradiation with an auxiliary bending device triggered by a pneumatic actuator and based on kinematic of deformable quadrilaterals. Second, laser operational parameters, that is, scanning speed, power and number of passes, were varied to identify the most suitable processing settings. Bending angles and fillet radii were measured by coordinate measurement machine. Experimental data were elaborated by combined ANalysis Of Mean (ANOM) and ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA). Based on experimental findings, the best strategy to achieve an aircraft prototype from a stainless steel sheet was designed and implemented.

  15. Study on bending behaviour of nickel–titanium rotary endodontic instruments by analytical and numerical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, C C; Liou, J U; Wen, P H; Peng, C C; Liu, T S

    2013-01-01

    Aim To develop analytical models and analyse the stress distribution and flexibility of nickel–titanium (NiTi) instruments subject to bending forces. Methodology The analytical method was used to analyse the behaviours of NiTi instruments under bending forces. Two NiTi instruments (RaCe and Mani NRT) with different cross-sections and geometries were considered. Analytical results were derived using Euler–Bernoulli nonlinear differential equations that took into account the screw pitch variation of these NiTi instruments. In addition, the nonlinear deformation analysis based on the analytical model and the finite element nonlinear analysis was carried out. Numerical results are obtained by carrying out a finite element method. Results According to analytical results, the maximum curvature of the instrument occurs near the instrument tip. Results of the finite element analysis revealed that the position of maximum von Mises stress was near the instrument tip. Therefore, the proposed analytical model can be used to predict the position of maximum curvature in the instrument where fracture may occur. Finally, results of analytical and numerical models were compatible. Conclusion The proposed analytical model was validated by numerical results in analysing bending deformation of NiTi instruments. The analytical model is useful in the design and analysis of instruments. The proposed theoretical model is effective in studying the flexibility of NiTi instruments. Compared with the finite element method, the analytical model can deal conveniently and effectively with the subject of bending behaviour of rotary NiTi endodontic instruments. PMID:23173762

  16. Higher Accurate Estimation of Axial and Bending Stiffnesses of Plates Clamped by Bolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, Tomohiro; Shibutani, Yoji

    Equivalent stiffness of clamped plates should be prescribed not only to evaluate the strength of bolted joints by the scheme of “joint diagram” but also to make structural analyses for practical structures with many bolted joints. We estimated the axial stiffness and bending stiffness of clamped plates by using Finite Element (FE) analyses while taking the contact condition on bearing surfaces and between the plates into account. The FE models were constructed for bolted joints tightened with M8, 10, 12 and 16 bolts and plate thicknesses of 3.2, 4.5, 6.0 and 9.0 mm, and the axial and bending compliances were precisely evaluated. These compliances of clamped plates were compared with those from VDI 2230 (2003) code, in which the equivalent conical compressive stress field in the plate has been assumed. The code gives larger axial stiffness for 11% and larger bending stiffness for 22%, and it cannot apply to the clamped plates with different thickness. Thus the code shall give lower bolt stress (unsafe estimation). We modified the vertical angle tangent, tanφ, of the equivalent conical by adding a term of the logarithm of thickness ratio t1/t2 and by fitting to the analysis results. The modified tanφ can estimate the axial compliance with the error from -1.5% to 6.8% and the bending compliance with the error from -6.5% to 10%. Furthermore, the modified tanφ can take the thickness difference into consideration.

  17. Evaluation of ultimate tensile strength using Miniature Disk Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kundan; Pooleery, Arun; Madhusoodanan, K.; Singh, R. N.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Shriwastaw, R. S.; Dutta, B. K.; Sinha, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    Correlations for evaluation of Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) using Miniature Disk Bend Test (MDBT) or Small Punch Test (SPT) has been an open issue since the development of the techniques. The larger plastic strains, in tri-axial state of stress during SPT, make the translation to the equivalent uniaxial parameter less certain. Correlations based on Pmax of load-displacement curve are also in disagreement as the point corresponding to Pmax does not represent a necking situation as in case of UTS, in a uniaxial tensile test. In present work, an attempt has been made for locating necking zone, which appears prior to Pmax, through experiments and FEM analyses. Experimental results on disk specimens from 20MnMoNi55, CrMoV ferritic steel and SS304LN materials along with FEM analyses found that load corresponding to 0.48 mm displacement is to be very close to the necking zone, and gives best fit for a UTS correlation.

  18. Metamaterial-waveguide bends with effective bend radius < λ₀/2.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2015-12-15

    We designed, fabricated, and characterized broadband, efficient, all-dielectric metamaterial-waveguide bends (MWBs) that redirect light by 180 deg. The footprint of each MWB is 3  μm×3  μm and redirection is achieved for single-mode waveguides spaced by 1.3 μm, which corresponds to an effective bend radius of 0.65 μm (<λ₀/2 for λ₀=1.55  μm). The designed and measured transmission efficiencies are >80% and ∼70%, respectively. Furthermore, the MWBs have an operating bandwidth >66 nm (design) and >56  nm (experiments). Our design methodology that incorporates fabrication constraints enables highly robust devices. The methodology can be extended to the general routing of light in tight spaces for large-scale photonic integration. PMID:26670503

  19. Quasi-static characterization and modeling of the bending behavior of single crystal galfenol for magnetostrictive sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Supratik

    2009-12-01

    Iron-gallium alloys (Galfenol) are structural magnetostrictive materials that exhibit high free-strain at low magnetic fields, high stress-sensitivity and useful thermo-mechanical properties. Galfenol, like smart materials in general, is attractive for use as a dynamic actuator and/or sensor material and can hence find use in active shape and vibration control, real-time structural health monitoring and energy harvesting applications. Galfenol possesses significantly higher yield strength and greater ductility than most smart materials, which are generally limited to use under compressive loads. The unique structural attributes of Galfenol introduce opportunities for use of a smart material in applications that involve tension, bending, shear or torsion. A principal motivation for the research presented in this dissertation is that bending and shear loads lead to development of non-uniform stress and magnetic fields in Galfenol which introduce significantly more complexity to the considerations to be modeled, compared to modeling of purely axial loads. This dissertation investigates the magnetostrictive response of Galfenol under different stress and magnetic field conditions which is essential for understanding and modeling Galfenol's behavior under bending, shear or torsion. Experimental data are used to calculate actuator and sensor figures of merit which can aid in design of adaptive structures. The research focuses on the bending behavior of Galfenol alloys as well as of laminated composites having Galfenol attached to other structural materials. A four-point bending test under magnetic field is designed, built and conducted on a Galfenol beam to understand its performance as a bending sensor. An extensive experimental study is conducted on Galfenol-Aluminum laminated composites to evaluate the effect of magnetic field, bending moment and Galfenol-Aluminum thickness ratio on actuation and sensing performance. A generalized recursive algorithm is presented for

  20. Investigation of band bending in n- and p-type gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foussekis, Michael Alexander

    appears that heating the p-type GaN samples allows for band bending values larger than 1 eV to fully restore. Pre-heating of samples was of paramount importance to measure the correct value of band bending in p-type GaN. The slope of the dependence of the SPV on excitation intensity at low temperatures was larger than expected; however, once the temperature exceeded 500 K, the slope began to reach values that are in agreement with a thermionic model.

  1. Numerical Modeling for Hole-Edge Cracking of Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) Components in the Static Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Mohr, William; Yang, Yu-Ping; Zelenak, Paul; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    Numerical modeling of local formability, such as hole-edge cracking and shear fracture in bending of AHSS, is one of the challenging issues for simulation engineers for prediction and evaluation of stamping and crash performance of materials. This is because continuum-mechanics-based finite element method (FEM) modeling requires additional input data, "failure criteria" to predict the local formability limit of materials, in addition to the material flow stress data input for simulation. This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting hole-edge failures during static bend tests of AHSS structures. A local-strain-based failure criterion and a stress-triaxiality-based failure criterion were developed and implemented in LS-DYNA simulation code to predict hole-edge failures in component bend tests. The holes were prepared using two different methods: mechanical punching and water-jet cutting. In the component bend tests, the water-jet trimmed hole showed delayed fracture at the hole-edges, while the mechanical punched hole showed early fracture as the bending angle increased. In comparing the numerical modeling and test results, the load-displacement curve, the displacement at the onset of cracking, and the final crack shape/length were used. Both failure criteria also enable the numerical model to differentiate between the local formability limit of mechanical-punched and water-jet-trimmed holes. The failure criteria and static bend test developed here are useful to evaluate the local formability limit at a structural component level for automotive crash tests.

  2. 36 CFR 7.41 - Big Bend National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Big Bend National Park. 7.41 Section 7.41 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.41 Big Bend National Park. (a) Fishing; closed...

  3. COASTAL BEND BAYS & ESTUARIES PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION REVIEW 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries Program, Inc. (CBBEP) is a nonprofit 501(c)(3)organization. The CBBEP project area encompasses 12 counties coincident with the Coastal Bend Council of Governments and extends from the Land-Cut in the Laguna Madre, through the Corpus Christi Bay s...

  4. Regulation of transcription by synthetic DNA-bending agents.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, David; Firestine, Steven M

    2006-11-01

    Gene expression is regulated by a complex interplay between binding and the three-dimensional arrangement of transcription factors with RNA polymerase and DNA. Previous studies have supported a direct role for DNA bending and conformation in gene expression, which suggests that agents that induce bends in DNA might be able to control gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of triple-helix-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) bending agents on the transcription of luciferase in an in vitro transcriptional/translational system. We find that transcription is regulated only by a TFO that induces a bend in the DNA. Related TFOs that do not induce bends in DNA have no effect on transcription. Reporter expression can be increased by as much as 80 % or decreased by as much as 50 % depending on the phasing of the upstream bend relative to the promoter. We interpret the results as follows: when the bend is positioned such that the upstream DNA is curved toward the RNA polymerase on the same DNA face, transcription is enhanced. When the upstream DNA is curved away, transcription is attenuated. These results support the hypothesis that DNA-bending agents might have the capability to regulate gene expression, thereby opening up a previously undervalued avenue in research on the artificial control of gene expression. PMID:17004274

  5. General plan, bending machinge, Johnson Company, Johnstown, Pa. Scale 3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General plan, bending machinge, Johnson Company, Johnstown, Pa. Scale 3 inches - 1 ft, March 13th 1893, drawing number 15384 (photograph of drawing of rail bending machine held at the Johnstown Corporation General Office, Johnstown, Pennsylvania) - Johnson Steel Street Rail Company, 525 Central Avenue, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  6. View north of tube bending shop in boilermakers department located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north of tube bending shop in boilermakers department located in southeast corner of the structural shop building (building 57). The computer controlled tube bender can be programmed to bend boiler tubing to nearly any required configuration - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Structure Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. Observation and Modeling of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Bend Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Anantram, M. P.; Jaffe, R. L.; Kong, J.; Dai, H.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bends, with diameters from approx. 1.0 to 2.5 nm and bend angles from 18 deg. to 34 deg., are observed in catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons at 600 - 1200 C. An algorithm using molecular dynamics simulation (MD) techniques is developed to model these structures that are considered to be SWNT junctions formed by topological defects (i.e. pentagon-heptagon pairs). The algorithm is used to predict the tube helicities and defect configurations for bend junctions using the observed tube diameters and bend angles. The number and arrangement of the defects at the junction interfaces are found to depend on the tube helicities and bend angle. The structural and energetic calculations using the Brenner potential show a number of stable junction configurations for each bend angle with the 34 deg. bends being more stable than the others. Tight binding calculations for local density of state (LDOS) and transmission coefficients are carried out to investigate electrical properties of the bend junctions.

  8. 49 CFR 195.212 - Bending of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.212 Bending of pipe. (a) Pipe must not have a wrinkle bend. (b) Each field...

  9. 49 CFR 195.212 - Bending of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.212 Bending of pipe. (a) Pipe must not have a wrinkle bend. (b) Each field...

  10. 49 CFR 195.212 - Bending of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.212 Bending of pipe. (a) Pipe must not have a wrinkle bend. (b) Each field...

  11. 49 CFR 195.212 - Bending of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.212 Bending of pipe. (a) Pipe must not have a wrinkle bend. (b) Each field...

  12. Actuators Help Correct For Gravitational Bending Of Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Roy; Strain, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    Force-actuator scheme devised to help correct for decrease, caused by gravitational bending, in gain of 34-m-diameter paraboloidal microwave antenna reflector used for tracking distant spacecraft and observing celestial radio sources. Also applicable to other antennas bending significantly under own weight, with consequent degradation of performance.

  13. BENDING SHOP & OVEN. United Engineering Co., Alameda, California. Plan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BENDING SHOP & OVEN. United Engineering Co., Alameda, California. Plan, two elevations, sections, and details. Alben Froberg, Architect, Oakland, California. Sheet no. 1 of 1. Various scales. December 15, 1941. pencil on tracing paper - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Bending Shop & Oven, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  14. Stress Analysis and Fracture in Nanolaminate Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2008-01-01

    A stress analysis is performed on a nanolaminate subjected to bending. A composite mechanics computer code that is based on constituent properties and nanoelement formulation is used to evaluate the nanolaminate stresses. The results indicate that the computer code is sufficient for the analysis. The results also show that when a stress concentration is present, the nanolaminate stresses exceed their corresponding matrix-dominated strengths and the nanofiber fracture strength.

  15. A new biophysical decompression model for estimating the risk of articular bends during and after decompression.

    PubMed

    Hugon, J; Rostain, J-C; Gardette, B

    2011-08-21

    The biophysical models that intend to predict the risk of decompression sickness after a change of pressure are not numerous. Few approaches focus in particular on joints as target tissues, with the aim to describe properly the mechanisms inducing pain. Nevertheless, for this type of decompression incidents, called articular bends, no model proved to fit the empirical results for a broad range of exposures and decompression procedures. We present here an original biophysical decompression model for describing the occurrence of articular bends. A target joint is broken down into two parts that exchange inert gases with the blood by perfusion and with each other by diffusion over distances of a few millimetres. This diffusion pathway allows the slow amplification of microbubbles growing during and after decompression, consistent with the possible delayed occurrence of bends. The diffusion coefficients introduced into this model are larger than those introduced into most modern decompression models. Their value remains physical (#10(-9)m(2)/s). Inert gas exchanges and the formation, amplification and resorption of microbubbles during and after decompression were simulated. We used a critical gas volume criterion for predicting the occurrence of bends. A risk database extracted from COMEX experience and other published studies were used for the correlation of model parameters not known a priori. We considered a large range of exposure, and the commonly used inert gases nitrogen and helium. This correlation phase identified the worst biophysical conformations most likely to lead to the formation, in tissues such as tendons, of a large number of microbubbles recruited from pre-existing gas nuclei during decompression. The risk of bends occurrence was found to be linked to the total separated gas volume generated during and after decompression. A clamping phenomenon occurs soon after the start of decompression, greatly slowing the gas exchanges controlled especially by

  16. Limits of stability in supported graphene nanoribbons subject to bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Topi; Koskinen, Pekka

    2016-06-01

    Graphene nanoribbons are prone to in-plane bending even when supported on flat substrates. However, the amount of bending that ribbons can stably withstand remains poorly known. Here, by using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the stability limits of 0.5-1.9-nm-wide armchair and zigzag graphene nanoribbons subject to bending. We observe that the limits for maximum stable curvatures are below ˜10 deg /nm in case the bending is externally forced and the limit is caused by buckling instability. Furthermore, it turns out that the limits for maximum stable curvatures are also below ˜10 deg /nm in case the bending is not forced and the limit arises only from the corrugated potential-energy landscape due to the substrate. Both of the stability limits lower rapidly when ribbons widen. These results agree with recent experiments and can be understood by means of transparent elasticity models.

  17. Bending Properties of Nickel Electrodes for Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad A.; Wilson, Richard M.; Keller, Dennis; Corner, Ralph

    1995-01-01

    Recent changes in manufacturing have resulted in nickel-hydrogen batteries that fail prematurely by electrical shorting, This failure is believed to be a result of a blistering problem in the nickel electrodes. In this study the bending properties of nickel electrodes are investigated in an attempt to correlate the bending properties of the electrode with its propensity to blister. Nickel electrodes from three different batches of material were tested in both the as-received and impregnated forms. The effects of specimen curvature and position within the electrode on the bending strength were studied, and within-electrode and batch-to-batch variations were addressed. Two color-imaging techniques were employed to differentiate between the phases within the electrodes. These techniques aided in distinguishing the relative amounts of nickel hyroxide surface loading on each electrode, thereby relating surface loading to bend strength. Bend strength was found to increase with the amount of surface loading.

  18. Ultimate bending capacity of strain hardening steel pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-fei; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Hong; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jing; Cao, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Based on Hencky's total strain theory of plasticity, ultimate bending capacity of steel pipes can be determined analytically assuming an elastic-linear strain hardening material, the simplified analytical solution is proposed as well. Good agreement is observed when ultimate bending capacities obtained from analytical solutions are compared with experimental results from full-size tests of steel pipes. Parametric study conducted as part of this paper indicates that the strain hardening effect has significant influence on the ultimate bending capacity of steel pipes. It is shown that pipe considering strain hardening yields higher bending capacity than that of pipe assumed as elastic-perfectly plastic material. Thus, the ignorance of strain hardening effect, as commonly assumed in current codes, may underestimate the ultimate bending capacity of steel pipes. The solutions proposed in this paper are applicable in the design of offshore/onshore steel pipes, supports of offshore platforms and other tubular structural steel members.

  19. Electronic and optical properties of carbon nanotubes under pure bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Pekka

    2010-11-01

    The high aspect ratio of carbon nanotubes makes them prone to bending. To know how bending affects the tubes is therefore crucial for tube identification and for electrical component design. Very few studies, however, have investigated tubes under small bending well below the buckling limit, because of technical problems due to broken translational symmetry. In this Brief Report a cost-effective and exact modeling of singe-walled nanotubes under such small bending is enabled by revised periodic boundary conditions, combined with density-functional tight-binding. The resulting, bending-induced changes in electronic and optical properties fall in clear chirality-dependent trend families. While the correct trends require full structural relaxation, they can be understood by one general argument. To know these trends fills a fundamental gap in our understanding of the properties of carbon nanotubes.

  20. Mechanical properties of graphynes under shearing and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Lijun; Zhang, Yingyan; Feng, Xiqiao; Chang, Tienchong; Wang, Ji; Du, Jianke; Zhou, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    Graphynes are the allotrope of graphene. In this work, extensive molecular dynamics simulations are performed on four different graphynes ( α - , β - , γ - , and 6,6,12-graphynes) to explore their mechanical properties (shear modulus, shear strength, and bending rigidity) under shearing and bending. While the shearing properties are anisotropic, the bending rigidity is almost independent of the chirality of graphynes. We also find that the shear modulus and shear fracture strength of graphynes decrease with increasing temperature. The effect of the percentage of the acetylenic linkages on the shear mechanical properties and bending rigidity is investigated. It is shown that the fracture shear strengths and bending rigidities of the four types of graphynes decrease, while the fracture shear strain increases, with increasing percentages of the acetylenic linkages. Significant wrinkling is observed in graphyne under shear strain. The influence of the temperatures and percentages of the acetylenic linkages on the ratio of amplitude-to-wavelength in the wrinkles are examined.

  1. Vietnam recommended dietary allowances 2007.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nguyen Cong; Hoan, Pham Van

    2008-01-01

    It has been well acknowledged that Vietnam is undergoing a nutrition transition. With a rapid change in the country's reform and economic growth, food supply at the macronutrient level has improved. Changes of the Vietnamese diet include significantly more foods of animal origin, and an increase of fat/oils, and ripe fruits. Consequently, nutritional problems in Vietnam now include not only malnutrition but also overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome and other chronic diseases related to nutrition and lifestyles. The recognition of these shifts, which is also associated with morbidity and mortality, was a major factor in the need to review and update the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for the Vietnamese population. This revised RDA established an important science-based tool for evaluation of nutrition adequacy, for teaching, and for scientific communications within Vietnam. It is expected that the 2007 Vietnam RDA and its conversion to food-based dietary guidelines will facilitate education to the public, as well as the policy implementation of programs for prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases and addressing the double burden of both under and over nutrition. PMID:18460440

  2. Study of concrete's behavior under 4-point bending load using Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Abraham, O.; Chapeleau, X.; Cottineau, L.-M.; Tournat, V.; Le Duff, A.; Lascoup, B.; Durand, O.

    2013-01-01

    Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI) is an ultrasonic NDT method suitable for complex material such as concrete that can precisely measure small propagation velocity variation (10-2%). By measuring variation of propagation velocity in concrete caused by acoustoelasticity phenomena, CWI analysis can be used to monitor concrete's internal stress level. For the first time, CWI is used to measure propagation velocity variations due to a stress field in a concrete beam under four-points bending test, which contains simultaneously compressive and tensile stress. Embedded optical-fiber sensors, strain gauges are used in the experiment, in order to confirm and validate the CWI analysis result. Thermocouples are also embedded into concrete beams for monitoring internal temperature fluctuations.

  3. Probabilistic-graphical and phenomenological analysis of combined bending-torsion fatigue reliability data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kececioglu, D.; Broome, H.

    1969-01-01

    Fatigue data generated by three combined bending-torsion fatigue reliability research machines at The University of Arizona are probabilistic-graphically and phenomenologically analyzed. Distributions that are applicable to fatique life and static strength data are discussed. Phenomenological justifications for the use of these distributions are presented. It is found that the normal distribution represents the cycles-to-failure data at the highest stress levels best. The lognormal distribution appears to fit the cycles-to-failure data at the lower stress levels best and quite well at all stress levels including the highest. A regression analysis and least-squares goodness-of-fit test was performed for normal and lognormal plots. In most cases, the correlation coefficient gave a better fit to the data using the normal distribution, but the difference between the two was so slight that positive discrimination could not be made.

  4. A Higher-Order Bending Theory for Laminated Composite and Sandwich Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Geoffrey M.

    1997-01-01

    A higher-order bending theory is derived for laminated composite and sandwich beams. This is accomplished by assuming a special form for the axial and transverse displacement expansions. An independent expansion is also assumed for the transverse normal stress. Appropriate shear correction factors based on energy considerations are used to adjust the shear stiffness. A set of transverse normal correction factors is introduced, leading to significant improvements in the transverse normal strain and stress for laminated composite and sandwich beams. A closed-form solution to the cylindrical elasticity solutions for a wide range of beam aspect ratios and commonly used material systems. Accurate shear stresses for a wide range of laminates, including the challenging unsymmetric composite and sandwich laminates, are obtained using an original corrected integration scheme. For application of the theory to a wider range of problems, guidelines for finite element approximations are presented.

  5. A photoelastic investigation of asymmetric four point bend shear test for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.; Sawyer, W.

    1986-01-01

    The shear stress fringe value of orthotropic birefringent model materials is presently used in an asymmetric four-point bend test that employs a notched specimen and is a modification of the Iosipescu test (1967). While in the case of a unidirectionally reinforced glass-polyester model material, shear stress fringe values obtained from 90- and 120-deg (sharp and radiused) notches are reasonably close to the values obtained for an off-axis tensile specimen, no conclusions can be drawn on the influence of the notch parameters, due to the peculiarities of the photoelastic response of the inhomogeneous orthotropic model material. The failure modes nevertheless indicate that a notch radius, and the 120-deg notch angle, reduce the stress concentration. Comparisons are made with finite element results.

  6. Nonlinear bending models for beams and plates

    PubMed Central

    Antipov, Y. A.

    2014-01-01

    A new nonlinear model for large deflections of a beam is proposed. It comprises the Euler–Bernoulli boundary value problem for the deflection and a nonlinear integral condition. When bending does not alter the beam length, this condition guarantees that the deflected beam has the original length and fixes the horizontal displacement of the free end. The numerical results are in good agreement with the ones provided by the elastica model. Dynamic and two-dimensional generalizations of this nonlinear one-dimensional static model are also discussed. The model problem for an inextensible rectangular Kirchhoff plate, when one side is clamped, the opposite one is subjected to a shear force, and the others are free of moments and forces, is reduced to a singular integral equation with two fixed singularities. The singularities of the unknown function are examined, and a series-form solution is derived by the collocation method in terms of the associated Jacobi polynomials. The procedure requires solving an infinite system of linear algebraic equations for the expansion coefficients subject to the inextensibility condition. PMID:25294960

  7. Occipital bending (Yakovlevian torque) in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Maller, Jerome J; Anderson, Rodney; Thomson, Richard H; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-01-30

    Differing levels of occipital lobe asymmetry and enlarged lateral ventricles have been reported within patients with bipolar disorder (BD) compared with healthy controls, suggesting different rates of occipital bending (OB). This may exert pressure on subcortical structures, such as the hippocampus, reduced among psychiatric patients. We investigated OB prevalence in 35 patients with BD and 36 healthy controls, and ventricular and occipital volumes. Prevalence was four times higher among BD patients (12/35 [34.3%]) than in control subjects (3/36 [8.3%]), as well as larger lateral ventricular volumes (LVVs). Furthermore, we found OB to relate to left-to-right ventricular and occipital lobe volume (OLV) ratios. Those with OB also had reduced left-to-right hippocampal volume ratios. The results suggest that OB is more common among BD patients than healthy subjects, and prevalent in both BD Type I and Type II patients. We posit that anomalies in neural pruning or ventricular enlargement may precipitate OB, consequently resulting in one occipital lobe twisting around the other. Although the clinical implications of these results are unclear, the study suggests that asymmetrical ventricular volume matched with a pattern of oppositely asymmetrical occipital volume is related to OB and may be a marker of psychiatric illness. PMID:25480522

  8. Large Deformation Dynamic Bending of Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derian, E. J.; Hyer, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the large deformation response of composite beams subjected to a dynamic axial load. The beams were loaded with a moderate eccentricity to promote bending. The study was primarily experimental but some finite element results were obtained. Both the deformation and the failure of the beams were of interest. The static response of the beams was also studied to determine potential differences between the static and dynamic failure. Twelve different laminate types were tested. The beams tested were 23 in. by 2 in. and generally 30 plies thick. The beams were loaded dynamically with a gravity-driven impactor traveling at 19.6 ft/sec and quasi-static tests were conducted on identical beams in a displacement controlled manner. For laminates of practical interest, the failure modes under static and dynamic loadings were identical. Failure in most of the laminate types occurred in a single event involving 40% to 50% of the plies. However, failure in laminates with 300 or 150 off-axis plies occurred in several events. All laminates exhibited bimodular elastic properties. The compressive flexural moduli in some laminates was measured to be 1/2 the tensile flexural modulus. No simple relationship could be found among the measured ultimate failure strains of the different laminate types. Using empirically determined flexural properties, a finite element analysis was reasonably accurate in predicting the static and dynamic deformation response.

  9. Bidirectional bending of laminated composite plates using an improved zig-zag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. H.; Lin, W. Z.; Chow, S. T.

    The behaviour of simply supported rectangular symmetric cross-ply laminated composite plates subjected to bidirectional bending is determined using an improved zig-zag displacement model. The zig-zag model is based upon a layerwise cubic variation of the in-plane displacements and a parabolic variation of the transverse shear stresses with zero values at the free surfaces. By satisfying the continuity conditions of the in-plane displacements and the transverse shear stresses at the interfaces, the number of variables is shown to be the same as that in the first-order shear deformation theory of Mindlin, independent of the number of layers in the laminate. The accuracy of the model and its suitability for use in engineering design is examined by applying it to four established bidirectional bending problems which have been solved by Pagano using exact elasticity theory. The numerical results indicate that the present model predicts very accurate results for displacements and stresses for symmetric cross-ply laminates, even for small length-to-thickness ratios.

  10. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin. PMID:27255427

  11. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Rodolfo I; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin. PMID:27255427

  12. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin.

  13. Bending Flexibility of Actin Filaments during Motor-Induced Sliding

    PubMed Central

    Vikhorev, Petr G.; Vikhoreva, Natalia N.; Månsson, Alf

    2008-01-01

    Muscle contraction and other forms of cell motility occur as a result of cyclic interactions between myosin molecules and actin filaments. Force generation is generally attributed to ATP-driven structural changes in myosin, whereas a passive role is ascribed to actin. However, some results challenge this view, predicting structural changes in actin during motor activity, e.g., when the actin filaments slide on a myosin-coated surface in vitro. Here, we analyzed statistical properties of the sliding filament paths, allowing us to detect changes of this type. It is interesting to note that evidence for substantial structural changes that led to increased bending flexibility of the filaments was found in phalloidin-stabilized, but not in phalloidin-free, actin filaments. The results are in accordance with the idea that a high-flexibility structural state of actin is a prerequisite for force production, but not the idea that a low-to-high flexibility transition of the actin filament should be an important component of the force-generating step per se. Finally, our data challenge the general view that phalloidin-stabilized filaments behave as native actin filaments in their interaction with myosin. This has important implications, since phalloidin stabilization is a routine procedure in most studies of actomyosin function. PMID:18835897

  14. Analytical and Numerical Results for an Adhesively Bonded Joint Subjected to Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Lundgren, Eric

    2006-01-01

    A one-dimensional, semi-analytical methodology that was previously developed for evaluating adhesively bonded joints composed of anisotropic adherends and adhesives that exhibit inelastic material behavior is further verified in the present paper. A summary of the first-order differential equations and applied joint loading used to determine the adhesive response from the methodology are also presented. The method was previously verified against a variety of single-lap joint configurations from the literature that subjected the joints to cases of axial tension and pure bending. Using the same joint configuration and applied bending load presented in a study by Yang, the finite element analysis software ABAQUS was used to further verify the semi-analytical method. Linear static ABAQUS results are presented for two models, one with a coarse and one with a fine element meshing, that were used to verify convergence of the finite element analyses. Close agreement between the finite element results and the semi-analytical methodology were determined for both the shear and normal stress responses of the adhesive bondline. Thus, the semi-analytical methodology was successfully verified using the ABAQUS finite element software and a single-lap joint configuration subjected to pure bending.

  15. Development of a finite element based delamination analysis for laminates subject to extension, bending, and torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, Steven J.

    1989-01-01

    Delamination is a common failure mode of laminated composite materials. This type of failure frequently occurs at the free edges of laminates where singular interlaminar stresses are developed due to the difference in Poisson's ratios between adjacent plies. Typically the delaminations develop between 90 degree plies and adjacent angle plies. Edge delamination has been studied by several investigators using a variety of techniques. Recently, Chan and Ochoa applied the quasi-three-dimensional finite element model to the analysis of a laminate subject to bending, extension, and torsion. This problem is of particular significance relative to the structural integrity of composite helicopter rotors. The task undertaken was to incorporate Chan and Ochoa's formulation into a Raju Q3DG program. The resulting program is capable of modeling extension, bending, and torsional mechanical loadings as well as thermal and hygroscopic loadings. The addition of the torsional and bending loading capability will provide the capability to perform a delamination analysis of a general unsymmetric laminate containing four cracks, each of a different length. The solutions obtained using this program are evaluated by comparing them with solutions from a full three-dimensional finite element solution. This comparison facilitates the assessment of three dimensional affects such as the warping constraint imposed by the load frame grips. It wlso facilitates the evaluation of the external load representation employed in the Q3D formulation. Finally, strain energy release rates computed from the three-dimensional results are compared with those predicted using the quasi-three-dimensional formulation.

  16. Assessment of Local Wall Thinned Pipeline Under Combined Bending and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, D. J.; Choi, J. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, J. W.; Park, C. Y.

    Failure of a pipeline due to local wall thinning is getting more attention in the nuclear power plant industry. Although guidelines such as ANSI/ASME B31G are still useful for assessing the integrity of a wall thinned pipeline, there are some limitations in these guidelines. For instance, these guidelines consider only pressure loading and thus neglect bending loading. However, most pipelines in nuclear power plants are subjected to internal pressure and bending moment due to dead-weight loads and seismic loads. Therefore, an assessment procedure for locally wall thinned pipeline subjected to combined loading is needed. In this paper, three-dimensional finite element (FE) analyses were performed to simulate full-scale pipe tests conducted for various shapes of wall thinned area under internal pressure and bending moment. Maximum moments based on true ultimate stress (σu,t) were obtain from FE results to predict the failure of the pipe. These results were compared with test results, which showed good agreement. Additional finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effect of key parameters, such as wall thinned depth, wall thinned angle and wall thinned length, on maximum moment. Also, the effect of internal pressure on maximum moment was investigated. Change of internal pressure did not show significant effect on the maximum moment.

  17. Springback Prediction Model Considering the Variable Young's Modulus for the Bending Rectangular 3A21 Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. L.; Zhu, Y. X.; Dong, W. Q.; Yang, H.

    2013-01-01

    Springback is inevitable for thin-walled rectangular 3A21 tube in rotary-draw bending process, and Young's modulus is a crucial material property parameter affecting springback simulation. Therefore, to improve the springback prediction precision, the variation of Young's modulus with plastic deformation for 3A21 material is studied through a repeated loading-unloading experiment, and a piecewise linear function is given out to describe the relationship between Young's modulus and plastic strain, which is considered into a new material constitutive model combined with the Von-Mises yield function and the Swift isotropic hardening rule. Furthermore, a finite element springback prediction model is established by means of this new constitutive model for rotary-draw bending process of thin-walled rectangular 3A21 tube, and its reliability is validated experimentally. Comparisons between simulation results and experimental data show that, the accuracy of springback prediction can be improved significantly by 18.02% when the variation of Young's modulus is considered. On the basis of the established model, the stress distribution field of thin-walled rectangular 3A21 tube in the whole rotary-draw bending process is obtained and analyzed.

  18. Theory of magnetoelectric effect for bending modes in magnetostrictive-piezoelectric bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. M.; Srinivasan, G.; Bichurin, M. I.; Galkina, T. A.

    2009-03-01

    In a magnetostrictive-piezoelectric bilayer the interaction between the magnetic and electric subsystems occurs through mechanical deformation. A model is discussed here for the resonance enhancement of such magnetoelectric (ME) interactions at frequencies corresponding to bending oscillations. The thickness dependence of stress, strain, and magnetic and electric fields within a sample are taken into account so that the bending deformations could be considered in an applied magnetic or electric field. The frequency dependence for longitudinal and transverse ME voltage coefficients have obtained by solving electrostatic, magnetostatic, and elastodynamic equations. We consider boundary conditions corresponding to bilayers that are free to vibrate at both ends, or simply supported at both ends, or fixed at one end. It is shown that the bending resonance and consequent enhancement in ME coupling occurs at the lowest frequency for a bilayer that is fixed at one end and free at the other end. The model is applied to a specific case of permendur-lead zinconate titanate bilayer. The theory is in very good agreement with representative data.

  19. Growth and molecular responses to long-distance stimuli in poplars: bending vs flame wounding.

    PubMed

    Tixier, Aude; Badel, Eric; Franchel, Jerome; Lakhal, Wassim; Leblanc-Fournier, Nathalie; Moulia, Bruno; Julien, Jean-Louis

    2014-02-01

    Inter-organ communication is essential for plants to coordinate development and acclimate to mechanical environmental fluctuations. The aim of this study was to investigate long-distance signaling in trees. We compared on young poplars the short-term effects of local flame wounding and of local stem bending for two distal responses: (1) stem primary growth and (2) the expression of mechanoresponsive genes in stem apices. We developed a non-contact measurement method based on the analysis of apex images in order to measure the primary growth of poplars. The results showed a phased stem elongation with alternating nocturnal circumnutation phases and diurnal growth arrest phases in Populus tremula × alba clone INRA 717-1B4. We applied real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplifications in order to evaluate the PtaZFP2, PtaTCH2, PtaTCH4, PtaACS6 and PtaJAZ5 expressions. The flame wounding inhibited primary growth and triggered remote molecular responses. Flame wounding induced significant changes in stem elongation phases, coupled with inhibition of circumnutation. However, the circadian rhythm of phases remained unaltered and the treated plants were always phased with control plants during the days following the stress. For bent plants, the stimulated region of the stem showed an increased PtaJAZ5 expression, suggesting the jasmonates may be involved in local responses to bending. No significant remote responses to bending were observed. PMID:24032360

  20. Lumbar spine side bending is reduced in end range extension compared to neutral and end range flexion postures.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Ryan; Campbell, Amity; Kemp-Smith, Kevin; O'Sullivan, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Lumbar side bending movements coupled with extension or flexion is a known low back pain (LBP) risk factor in certain groups, for example, athletes participating in sports such as hockey, tennis, gymnastics, rowing and cricket. Previous research has shown that sagittal spinal postures influence the degree of spinal rotation, with less rotation demonstrated at end of range extension and flexion. To date it is unknown whether sagittal spinal postures influence side bending. The aim of this study was to determine whether side bend range of motion (ROM) of the lumbar spine is decreased in end-range flexion and extension postures compared to a neutral spine. Twenty subjects between 18 and 55 years of age [mean age = 22.8 yrs (6.8)] with no history of LBP were recruited for this study. Upper (L1-L3) and lower (L3-L5) lumbar side bend, were measured utilising a 14 camera system (Vicon, Oxford metrics, inc.) in end-range flexion, extension and neutral postures, in both sitting and standing positions. The results revealed no statistically significant difference in upper and lower lumbar side bend ROM in an end-range flexion posture compared to a neutral spinal posture. A reduction was found in the range of upper and lower lumbar side bend ROM in an end-range extended posture (p < 0.05), compared to neutral and end range flexion postures. This ROM reduction was found in sitting and standing. These findings allow clinicians to better interpret combined movements involving side bending of the lumbar spine in clinical and real life settings. PMID:24315299

  1. Creep bending of thin-walled shells and plates by consideration of finite deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbach, H.; Naumenko, K.

    A phenomenological constitutive model for the characterization of creep-damage processes of metals is applied to the numerical analysis of thin-walled shells and plates. The governing equations of the theory of shallow shells are used taking into account geometrical nonlinearities connected with finite time-dependent deflections by moderate bending. The solutions of the initial-boundary value problem are obtained for thin rectangular plates in order to show the influence of geometrical nonlinearity on results of time-dependent deformation and stress redistribution as well as on estimations of the failure time.

  2. Reworking of structural inheritance at strike-slip restraining-bends: templates from sandbox analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, Yago; Storti, Fabrizio; Cavozzi, Cristian; Magistroni, Corrado; Meda, Marco; Piero Righetti, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    Structural inheritance plays a fundamental role during crustal deformation because pre-existing fault and shear zones typically provide weakness zone suitable to fail again when affected by a new regional stress field. Re-activation of structural inheritance is expected to unavoidably increase the complexity of structural architectures, whose geometric and kinematic patterns can significantly deviate from what expected in newly deformed crustal sectors. Availability of templates from analogue models can provide a very effective tool to help unraveling such a structural complexity. For this purpose, we simulated the reworking of a set of basement hosted pre-existing fault zones at strike-slip restraining fault bends. In the models, the mechanical stratigraphy consists of a basement, made of a mixture of dry kaolin and sand to slightly increase cohesion, and a sedimentary cover made by pure dry sand. Inherited fault zones are confined to the basement and coated by a thin veneer of silicone putty. In the experimental programme, the geometry of the left-lateral restraining bend is maintained the same, with a bending angle of 30° of the restraining fault segment. The strike of the inherited fault zones, measured counterclockwise with respect to that of the master strike-slip fault zone outside the restraining bend, was 0°, 30°, and 60° in different experiments, respectively. An end member experiment without inheritance was also run for comparison. Our experimental results show that the angle that the inherited fault zones make with the restraining bend plays a fundamental role in governing the deformation pattern. When structural inheritance is near parallel to the master strike-slip fault zone, synthetic shears form and severely compartmentalize the transpressional pop-up anticline growing on top of the restraining bend. Fault-bounded blocks undergo sinistral escape during transpression. On the other hand, when structural inheritance makes a high angle to the

  3. Atmospheric Refractive Electromagnetic Wave Bending and Propagation Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangum, Jeffrey G.; Wallace, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In this tutorial we summarize the physics and mathematics behind refractive electromagnetic wave bending and delay. Refractive bending and delay through the Earth's atmosphere at both radio/millimetric and optical/IR wavelengths are discussed, but with most emphasis on the former, and with Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) applications in mind. As modern astronomical measurements often require subarcsecond position accuracy, care is required when selecting refractive bending and delay algorithms. For the spherically-uniform model atmospheres generally used for all refractive bending and delay algorithms, positional accuracies lsim1'' are achievable when observing at zenith angles lsim75°. A number of computationally economical approximate methods for atmospheric refractive bending and delay calculation are presented, appropriate for astronomical observations under these conditions. For observations under more realistic atmospheric conditions, for zenith angles lsim75°, or when higher positional accuracy is required, more rigorous refractive bending and delay algorithms must be employed. For accurate calculation of the refractive bending, we recommend the Auer and Standish method, using numerical integration to ray-trace through a two-layer model atmosphere, with an atmospheric model determination of the atmospheric refractivity. For the delay calculation we recommend numerical integration through a model atmosphere.

  4. The stresses in columns under combined axial and side loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnstein, Karl

    1922-01-01

    The problem before us is to determine the total stresses in an axially loaded column of any degree of restraint which is also subject to transverse bending both from a uniformly distributed load and from concentrated loads.

  5. The spanwise distribution of lift for minimum induced drag of wings having a given lift and a given bending moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1950-01-01

    The problem of the minimum induced drag of wings having a given lift and a given span is extended to include cases in which the bending moment to be supported by the wing is also given. The theory is limited to lifting surfaces traveling at subsonic speeds. It is found that the required shape of the downwash distribution can be obtained in an elementary way which is applicable to a variety of such problems. Expressions for the minimum drag and the corresponding spanwise load distributions are also given for the case in which the lift and the bending moment about the wing root are fixed while the span is allowed to vary. The results show a 15-percent reduction of the induced drag with a 15-percent increase in span as compared with results for an elliptically loaded wing having the same total lift and bending moment.

  6. Bending Electrostriction in Polyurethanes Containing Ions as Contaminants or Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masashi; Kato, Takahiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Amaike, Yoichi; Hirai, Toshihiro

    1999-08-01

    We demonstrated that the bending electrostriction in polyurethane films is controlled by the ions contained as contaminants or additives. The sample film used in this investigation was composed of a segmented polyester-polyurethane and was coated with a thin gold electrode on each surface by ion-sputtering. Although the application of an electric field (2 MV/m) can caused bending deformation of the film, removal of the ionic contaminants from the polyurethane by electrodialysis reduced the degree of deformation. On the other hand, the addition of a small amount of lithium bromide changed the bending direction.

  7. Integration of high power lasers in bending tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bammer, F.; Holzinger, B.; Humenberger, G.; Schuöcker, D.; Schumi, T.

    The integration of high power lasers into bending tools creates a possibility to bend brittle materials with conventional presses. A diode laser, which is based on 200W-laser-bars and a solid state laser with 3 kW are used in this work. By heating the material within a narrow zone the ductility is increased and the forming process can be enabled. The assembly of the heat source within the bending tools is a prerequisite in order to feed energy into the workpiece before, during and after the forming process. As a result the heating and forming process can be optimized regarding any material.

  8. Coupled composite rotor blades under bending and torsional loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    This paper presents an analytical-cum-experimental study of the structural response of composite rotor blades with elastic couplings. Vlasov theory is expanded to analyze two-cell composite rotor blades made out of general composite laminates including the transverse shear deformation of the cross-section. In order to validate this analysis, two-cell graphite-epoxy composite blades with bending-torsion coupling were fabricated using matched-die molding technique. These blades were tested under tip bending and torsional loads, and their structural response in terms of bending slope and twist was measured with a laser optical system. Good correlation between theory and experiment is achieved.

  9. Propagating director bend fluctuations in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Humpert, Anja; Allen, Michael P

    2015-01-16

    We show, by molecular simulation, that for a range of standard, coarse-grained, nematic liquid crystal models, the director bend fluctuation is a propagating mode. This is in contrast to the generally accepted picture of nematic hydrodynamics, in which all the director modes (splay, twist, bend, and combinations thereof) are overdamped. By considering the various physical parameters that enter the equations of nematodynamics, we propose an explanation of this effect and conclude that propagating bend fluctuations may be observable in some experimental systems. PMID:25635566

  10. Lithospheric bending at subduction zones based on depth soundings and satellite gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, Daniel A.; Sandwell, David T.

    1995-01-01

    A global study of trench flexure was performed by simultaneously modeling 117 bathymetric profiles (original depth soundings) and satellite-derived gravity profiles. A thin, elastic plate flexure model was fit to each bathymetry/gravity profile by minimization of the L(sub 1) norm. The six model parameters were regional depth, regional gravity, trench axis location, flexural wavelength, flexural amplitude, and lithospheric density. A regional tilt parameter was not required after correcting for age-related trend using a new high-resolution age map. Estimates of the density parameter confirm that most outer rises are uncompensated. We find that flexural wavelength is not an accurate estimate of plate thickness because of the high curvatures observed at a majority of trenches. As in previous studies, we find that the gravity data favor a longer-wavelength flexure than the bathymetry data. A joint topography-gravity modeling scheme and fit criteria are used to limit acceptable parameter values to models for which topography and gravity yield consistent results. Even after the elastic thicknesses are converted to mechanical thicknesses using the yield strength envelope model, residual scatter obscures the systematic increase of mechanical thickness with age; perhaps this reflects the combination of uncertainties inherent in estimating flexural wavelength, such as extreme inelastic bending and accumulated thermoelastic stress. The bending moment needed to support the trench and outer rise topography increases by a factor of 10 as lithospheric age increases from 20 to 150 Ma; this reflects the increase in saturation bending moment that the lithosphere can maintain. Using a stiff, dry-olivine rheology, we find that the lithosphere of the GDH1 thermal model (Stein and Stein, 1992) is too hot and thin to maintain the observed bending moments. Moreover, the regional depth seaward of the oldest trenches (approximately 150 Ma) exceeds the GDH1 model depths by about 400 m.

  11. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Time Dependent Allowables

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Julie Knibloe

    2015-06-01

    Time dependent allowable stresses are required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for design of components in the temperature range where time dependent deformation (i.e., creep) is expected to become significant. There are time dependent allowable stresses in Section IID of the Code for use in the non-nuclear construction codes, however, there are additional criteria that must be considered in developing time dependent allowables for nuclear components. These criteria are specified in Section III NH. St is defined as the lesser of three quantities: 100% of the average stress required to obtain a total (elastic, plastic, primary and secondary creep) strain of 1%; 67% of the minimum stress to cause rupture; and 80% of the minimum stress to cause the initiation of tertiary creep. The values are reported for a range of temperatures and for time increments up to 100,000 hours. These values are determined from uniaxial creep tests, which involve the elevated temperature application of a constant load which is relatively small, resulting in deformation over a long time period prior to rupture. The stress which is the minimum resulting from these criteria is the time dependent allowable stress St. In this report data from a large number of creep and creep-rupture tests on Alloy 617 are analyzed using the ASME Section III NH criteria. Data which are used in the analysis are from the ongoing DOE sponsored high temperature materials program, form Korea Atomic Energy Institute through the Generation IV VHTR Materials Program and historical data from previous HTR research and vendor data generated in developing the alloy. It is found that the tertiary creep criterion determines St at highest temperatures, while the stress to cause 1% total strain controls at low temperatures. The ASME Section III Working Group on Allowable Stress Criteria has recommended that the uncertainties associated with determining the onset of tertiary creep and the lack of significant

  12. Effects of subcritical crack growth on fracture toughness of ceramics assessed in chevron-notched three-point bend tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, L. Y.; Singh, D.; Shetty, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical computational study was carried out to assess the effects of subcritical crack growth on crack stability in the chevron-notched three-point bend specimens. A power-law relationship between the subcritical crack velocity and the applied stress intensity were used along with compliance and stress-intensity relationships for the chevron-notched bend specimen to calculate the load response under fixed deflection rate and a machine compliance. The results indicate that the maximum load during the test occurs at the same crack length for all the deflection rates; the maximum load, however, is dependent on the deflection rate for rates below the critical rate. The resulting dependence of the apparent fracture toughness on the deflection rate is compared to experimental results on soda-lime glass and polycrystalline alumina.

  13. Optimum design of ninety degree bends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modi, Vijay; Cabuk, Hayri; Huan, Jian-Chun; Quadracci, Richard

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for the optimum design of an internal flow component to obtain the maximum pressure rise is presented. Maximum pressure rise in a duct with simultaneous turning and diffusion is shown to be related to the control of flow separation on the passage walls. Such a flow is usually associated with downstream conditions that are desirable in turbomachinery and propulsion applications to ensure low loss and stable performance. The algorithm requires the solution of an 'adjoint' problem in addition to the 'direct' equations governing the flow in a body, which in the present analysis are assumed to be the laminar Navier-Stokes equations. The theoretical framework and computational algorithms presented in this study are for the steady Navier-Stokes equations. A procedure is developed for the numerical solution of the adjoint equations. This procedure is coupled with a direct solver in a design iteration loop, that provides a new shape with a higher pressure rise. This procedure is first validated for the design of optimum plane diffusers in two-dimensional flow. The direct Navier-Stokes and the 'adjoint' equations are solved using a finite volume formulation for spatial discretization in an artificial compressibility framework. A simplified version of the above approach is then utilized to design ninety degree diffusing bends. Calculations were carried out for a mean radius ratio at inlet of 2.5 and Reynolds numbers varying from 100 to 500. While at this stage laminar flows is assumed, it is shown that a similar approach can be conceived for turbulent flows.

  14. Stress echocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    Echocardiography stress test; Stress test - echocardiography; CAD - stress echocardiography; Coronary artery disease - stress Echocardiography; Chest pain - stress echocardiography; Angina - stress echocardiography; ...

  15. Stress intensity and crack displacement for small edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The weight function method was used to derive stress intensity factors and crack mouth displacement coefficients for small edge cracks (less than 20 percent of the specimen width) in common fracture specimen configurations. Contact stresses due to point application of loads were found to be small but significant for three-point bending and insignificant for four-point bending. The results are compared with available equations and numerical solutions from the literature and with unpublished boundary collocation results.

  16. Advantages of customer/supplier involvement in the upgrade of River Bend`s IST program

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, R.L.; Addison, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    At River Bend Station, IST testing had problems. Operations could not perform the test with the required repeatability; engineering could not reliably trend test data to detect degradation; licensing was heavily burdened with regulatory concerns; and maintenance could not do preventative maintenance because of poor prediction of system health status. Using Energy`s Total Quality principles, it was determined that the causes were: lack of ownership, inadequate test equipment usage, lack of adequate procedures, and lack of program maintenance. After identifying the customers and suppliers of the IST program data, Energy management put together an upgrade team to address these concerns. These customers and suppliers made up the IST upgrade team. The team`s mission was to supply River Bend with a reliable, functional, industry correct and user friendly IST program. The IST program in place went through a verification process that identified and corrected over 400 individual program discrepancies. Over 200 components were identified for improved testing methods. An IST basis document was developed. The operations department was trained on ASME Section XI testing. All IST tests have been simplified and shortened, due to heavy involvement by operations in the procedure development process. This significantly reduced testing time, resulting in lower cost, less dose and greater system availability.

  17. Shoot bending promotes flower bud formation by miRNA-mediated regulation in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.).

    PubMed

    Xing, Libo; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Caiping; Li, Youmei; Ma, Juanjuan; An, Na; Han, Mingyu

    2016-02-01

    Flower induction in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) trees plays an important life cycle role, but young trees produce fewer and inferior quality flower buds. Therefore, shoot bending has become an important cultural practice, significantly promoting the capacity to develop more flower buds during the growing seasons. Additionally, microRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles in plant growth, flower induction and stress responses. In this study, we identified miRNAs potentially involved in the regulation of bud growth, and flower induction and development, as well as in the response to shoot bending. Of the 195 miRNAs identified, 137 were novel miRNAs. The miRNA expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of 68 and 27 known miRNAs were down-regulated and up-regulated, respectively, in response to shoot bending, and that the 31 differentially expressed novel miRNAs between them formed five major clusters. Additionally, a complex regulatory network associated with auxin, cytokinin, abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) plays important roles in cell division, bud growth and flower induction, in which related miRNAs and targets mediated regulation. Among them, miR396, 160, 393, and their targets associated with AUX, miR159, 319, 164, and their targets associated with ABA and GA, and flowering-related miRNAs and genes, regulate bud growth and flower bud formation in response to shoot bending. Meanwhile, the flowering genes had significantly higher expression levels during shoot bending, suggesting that they are involved in this regulatory process. This study provides a framework for the future analysis of miRNAs associated with multiple hormones and their roles in the regulation of bud growth, and flower induction and formation in response to shoot bending in apple trees. PMID:26133232

  18. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  19. DESIGN MANUAL: SWIRL AND HELICAL BEND POLLUTION CONTROL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This design manual contains descriptions of design procedures and operating experience to date, including results obtained, for secondary flow pollution control devices. Two types of combined sewer overflow regulators are described: the swirl and the helical bend regulator/separa...

  20. Technique cuts time and cost of bending jacketed piping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Technique uses a stiff medium in the annular space between inner and outer pipes of jacketed piping in transfer lines. The process eliminates splitting and welding and makes possible the use of standard pipe-bending tools.

  1. Thickness-dependent bending modulus of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun; Bando, Yoshio; Zhi, Chunyi; Huang, Yang; Golberg, Dmitri

    2009-09-01

    Bending modulus of exfoliation-made single-crystalline hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) with thicknesses of 25-300 nm and sizes of 1.2-3.0 µm were measured using three-point bending tests in an atomic force microscope. BNNSs suspended on an SiO2 trench were clamped by a metal film via microfabrication based on electron beam lithography. Calculated by the plate theory of a doubly clamped plate under a concentrated load, the bending modulus of BNNSs was found to increase with the decrease of sheet thickness and approach the theoretical C33 value of a hexagonal BN single crystal in thinner sheets (thickness<50 nm). The thickness-dependent bending modulus was suggested to be due to the layer distribution of stacking faults which were also thought to be responsible for the layer-by-layer BNNS exfoliation.

  2. GENERAL VIEW ROUTE OF BEND FEED CANAL FLUME #4 REPLACEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW ROUTE OF BEND FEED CANAL FLUME #4 REPLACEMENT SIPHON FROM WEST BANK TUMALO CREEK. LOOKING EAST - Tumalo Irrigation District, Tumalo Project, West of Deschutes River, Tumalo, Deschutes County, OR

  3. VIEW OF BEND FEED CANAL FLUME #4 REPLACEMENT SIPHON OUTLET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BEND FEED CANAL FLUME #4 REPLACEMENT SIPHON OUTLET STRUCTURE ON WEST BANK OF TUMALO CREEK. LOOKING EAST - Tumalo Irrigation District, Tumalo Project, West of Deschutes River, Tumalo, Deschutes County, OR

  4. VIEW OF NORTHWEST BEND IN BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHWEST BEND IN BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. POU proteins bend DNA via the POU-specific domain.

    PubMed Central

    Verrijzer, C P; van Oosterhout, J A; van Weperen, W W; van der Vliet, P C

    1991-01-01

    POU proteins constitute a family of ubiquitous as well as cell type-specific transcription factors that share the conserved POU DNA binding domain. This domain consists of two distinct subdomains, a POU-specific domain and a POU homeodomain, that are both required for high affinity sequence-specific DNA binding. In a circular permutation assay, several POU proteins, including Oct-1, Oct-2A, Oct-6 and Pit-1, demonstrated a position dependent mobility of the protein-DNA complexes, suggesting induction of DNA bending. This was confirmed by detection of relative bend direction, using pre-bent DNA, and by enhanced ligase mediated cyclization. Bending was caused by interaction with the POU domain. By contrast, binding of the POU homeodomain did not distort the DNA structure, indicating that the POU-specific domain confers DNA bending. Images PMID:1915275

  6. Bending Properties of Nickel Electrodes for Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad A.; Wilson, Richard M.; Keller, Dennis; Corner, Ralph

    1996-01-01

    Recent changes in manufacturing have resulted in nickel-hydrogen batteries that fail prematurely by electrical shorting. This failure is believed to be a result of a blistering problem in the nickel electrodes. In this study, the bending properties of nickel electrodes are investigated in an attempt to correlate the bending properties of the electrode with its propensity to blister. Nickel electrodes from three different batches of material were tested in both the as-received and impregnated forms. The effects of specimen curvature and position within the electrode on the bending strength were studied, and within-electrode and batch-to-batch variations were addressed. Bend strength was found to increase with the amount of surface loading.

  7. 9. NORTH SIDE, FROM A BOAT. THE TWO BENDING SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. NORTH SIDE, FROM A BOAT. THE TWO BENDING SHOP AND OVEN BUILDINGS ARE VISIBLE AT THE RIGHT. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Engineering Building, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  8. Magnetostrictive bending of cantilever beams and plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Victor H.; Wetherhold, Robert C.

    2003-11-01

    The models currently used to determine strains, stresses, and deflections in beams and plates made of magnetostrictive films deposited on nonmagnetic substrates are based on the assumption that the film is relatively thin compared to the substrate. Despite the lack of self-consistency and the limitations of these models, they can be used to calculate approximate strains and deflections when the ratio of the thickness of the film to the thickness of the substrate is smaller than about 0.001; even then they do not consistently predict stresses or energies. Unfortunately, the large deflections required in modern applications are only achievable with films that do not satisfy this assumption of relative film thinness, and the results obtained with the traditional models show large errors. In these circumstances it is necessary to introduce robust methods that can be applied regardless of the relative magnitude of the thickness of the film. In this article, one such method is presented. The method represents a self-consistent approach based on the minimization of the total internal energy of a film-substrate system, performed based on the assumption that the magnetostrictive strains can be modeled as anisotropic expansional strains. The expressions obtained using this approach can be used to calculate strains, stresses, deflections, and energies in an accurate way. The method is suitable for generalization to the cases in which the deformation of beams and plates is produced not only due to magnetostriction in the films, but may also include thermal, piezoelectric, or hygroscopic strains.

  9. Study on load relaxation based on hot bending and sizing of Ti6Al4V alloy sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po, Liu; Yingying, Zong; Debin, Shan; Bin, Guo

    2013-05-01

    The mechanism of hot sizing following sheet thermal forming of titanium alloy is considered as stress relaxation based on creep flow. A certain amount of internal stress in sheet metal parts can be relaxed during hot-sizing stage and hence the springback can be markedly reduced. Hot v-bending of Ti6Al4V sheet were carried out to study the behavior of load relaxation and springback in specimens after hot sizing, also known as shape retention. Experimental results reveal that load relaxation occurs during hot sizing following sheet v-bending. Reduction of springback angle obtained using hot sizing is obviously larger than that obtained without hot sizing under the same thermal environment. During hot sizing, springback angle decreases with increase in temperature and time, respectively. Load relaxation behavior is affected by loading method, namely constant velocity and two step loading. The linear relation between creep rate and load relaxation rate was deduced in hot-sizing stage. The calculated ratio shows good agreement with experimental data obtained by two-step loading. V-bending and sizing together with appropriate loading method are demonstrated as a good approach for stress relaxation analysis.

  10. The high temperature three point bend testing of proton irradiated 316L stainless steel and Mod 9Cr 1Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Zubelewicz, A.; Romero, T.; James, M. R.; Sommer, W. F.; Dai, Y.

    2005-08-01

    The predicted operating conditions for a lead-bismuth eutectic target to be used in an accelerator driven system for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative span a temperature range of 300-600 °C while being irradiated by a high energy (˜600 MeV) proton beam. Such spallation conditions lead to high displacement rates coupled with high accumulation rates of helium and hydrogen up to 150 appm/dpa. Some candidate materials for these applications include Mod9Cr-1Mo and 316L stainless steel. To investigate the effect of irradiation on these materials, the mechanical properties are being measured through three point bend testing on Mod 9Cr-1Mo and 316L at 25, 250, 350 and 500 °C after irradiation in a high energy proton beam (500-800 MeV) to a dose of 9.8 dpa at temperatures from 200 to 320 °C. By comparing measurements made in bending to tensile measurements measured on identically irradiated materials, a measurement of 0.2% offset yield stress was obtained from 0.05% offset yield stress measured in three point bend testing. Yield stress increased by more than a factor of two after irradiation to 9.8 dpa. Observation of the outer fiber surface of 316L showed very localized deformation when tested after irradiation at 70 °C and deformation on multiple slip systems when tested after irradiation at 250-320 °C.

  11. Theory of bending waves with applications to disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory of bending waves is surveyed which provides an explanation for the required amplification of the warp in the Milky Way. It also provides for self-generated warps in isolated external galaxies. The shape of observed warps and partly their existence in isolated galaxies are indicative of substantial spheroidal components. The theory also provides a plausible explanation for the bending of the inner disk (<2 kpc) of the Milky Way.

  12. Bending strength studies on hot-pressed silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegesmann, J.

    1984-01-01

    The 4-point bending strength of 4 grades of hot-pressed SiC was determined at different temperatures. With a transgranular mode of fracture the values for bending strength are retained up to high temperatures. For intergranular fracture the decrease of strength is governed by subcritical crack growth. The intergranular fracture is caused by a high content of silicate glassy phase at the grain boundaries of hot-pressed SiC.

  13. Tunable characteristics of bending resonance frequency in magnetoelectric laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Li, Ping; Wen, Yu-Mei; Zhu, Yong

    2013-07-01

    As the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in piezoelectric/magnetostrictive laminated composites is mediated by mechanical deformation, the ME effect is significantly enhanced in the vicinity of resonance frequency. The bending resonance frequency (fr) of bilayered Terfenol-D/PZT (MP) laminated composites is studied, and our analysis predicts that (i) the bending resonance frequency of an MP laminated composite can be tuned by an applied dc magnetic bias (Hdc) due to the ΔE effect; (ii) the bending resonance frequency of the MP laminated composite can be controlled by incorporating FeCuNbSiB layers with different thicknesses. The experimental results show that with Hdc increasing from 0 Oe (1 Oe=79.5775 A/m) to 700 Oe, the bending resonance frequency can be shifted in a range of 32.68 kHz <= fr <= 33.96 kHz. In addition, with the thickness of the FeCuNbSiB layer increasing from 0 μm to 90 μm, the bending resonance frequency of the MP laminated composite gradually increases from 33.66 kHz to 39.18 kHz. This study offers a method of adjusting the strength of dc magnetic bias or the thicknesses of the FeCuNbSiB layer to tune the bending resonance frequency for ME composite, which plays a guiding role in the ME composite design for real applications.

  14. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    A study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all laminates considered, the results show that the differences between results obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that, in some cases, neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and, in other cases, results in an overestimation.

  15. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    An analytical, parametric study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers or edge effects in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated thin cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize and quantify the effects of laminate orthotropy and laminate anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general and encompassing manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all the laminate constructions considered, the results show that the differences between results that were obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that in some cases neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and in other cases it results in an overestimation.

  16. Bending of Light in Modified Gravity at Large Distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the bending of light in a recent model for gravity at large distances containing a Rindler type acceleration proposed by Grumiller. We consider the static, spherically symmetric metric with cosmological constant and Rindler-like term 2ar presented in this model, and we use the procedure by Rindler and Ishak. to obtain the bending angle of light in this metric. Earlier work on light bending in this model by Carloni, Grumiller, and Preis, using the method normally employed for asymptotically flat space-times, led to a conflicting result (caused by the Rindler-like term in the metric) of a bending angle that increases with the distance of closest approach r(sub 0) of the light ray from the centrally concentrated spherically symmetric matter distribution. However, when using the alternative approach for light bending in nonasymptotically flat space-times, we show that the linear Rindler-like term produces a small correction to the general relativistic result that is inversely proportional to r(sub 0). This will in turn affect the bounds on Rindler acceleration obtained earlier from light bending and casts doubts on the nature of the linear term 2ar in the metric

  17. Coupled torsional and bending motions in s-cis methyl vinyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Rolf; Ha, Tae-Kyu; Oldani, Markus; Caminati, Walther

    1987-02-01

    New microwave measurements on s-cis methyl vinyl ether and a study of the interactions among skeletal and methyl torsions and COC bending are reported. Using pulsed microwave Fourier transform spectroscopy, the small methyl torsional A-E splitting (0.16 MHz) in the vibrational ground state has been resolved for the first time. Large splittings are observed in the first excited states of skeletal torsion and COC bending. Ab initio results on the torsional coupling, allowing for structural relaxation, are reported and used to specify, in part, a flexible model for the torsional and bending motions. The spectroscopic properties of this three-dimensional model sytem, as estimated from the results for the one-dimensional and two-dimensional subsystems, explain the relevant experimental data. The gearing type torsional interaction predicted ab initio is confirmed by this treatment. The adjusted potential function as well as the structural relaxations upon torsion suggest repulsive interaction between the methyl hydrogen atoms and the methylenic hydrogen atom next to the methyl group.

  18. Piping stress handbook. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Helguero, V.

    1986-01-01

    This abridged volume contains the following: Coefficients of thermal expansion. Allowable stress range for ANSI/ASME Power Piping Code B31.1. Stress intensification and flexibility factors. Pressure and stress ratios. Design criteria for allowable loads, moment, and stresses. Properties of pipe. Weight and dimensions of pipe and components. Pipe support selection and design. Fundamentals of expansion joints. Index.

  19. The Effect of Composite Patches on the Failure of Adhesively-Bonded Joints Under Bending Moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpinar, Salih

    2013-12-01

    In this study, it was aimed to compare mechanical behavior of double-strap joints with aluminum (AA2024-T3) or 16-ply laminate of carbon/epoxy composite (T300/934) patches of different orientation angles at their overlap area subjected to bending moment. For this purpose, AA2024-T3 aluminum was used as adherend, while the adhesive was a two-part paste (DP 460). Six different types of joint samples were subjected to bending moment. The effect of patch material on failure load and stress distribution was examined experimentally and numerically. In the numerical analysis, the composite patches were assumed to behave linearly elastic, while adherend and adhesive layers were assumed to be nonlinear. It was found that the data obtained from 3-D finite element analysis were coherent with experimental results. Meanwhile, experiments showed that fiber orientation angles of the patches markedly affected the failure load of joints, failure mode and stress distributions appeared in adhesive and composite.

  20. An analytical and experimental investigation of edge delamination in laminates subjected to tension, bending, and torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Wen S.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated two-dimensional finite element was developed to calculate interlaminar stresses and strain energy release rates for the study of delamination in composite laminates subjected to uniaxial tension, bending, and torsion loads. Addressed are the formulation, implementation, and verification of the model. Parametric studies were conducted on the effect of Poisson's ratio mismatch between plies and the stacking sequence on interlaminar stress, and on the effect of delamination opening height and delamination length, due to bending, on strain energy release rate for various laminates. A comparison of strain energy release rates in all-graphite and graphite/glass hybrid laminates is included. The preliminary results of laminates subjected to torsion are also included. Fatigue tension tests were conducted on Mode 1 and mixed mode edge-delamination coupons to establish the relationship between fatigue load vs. onset of delamination cycle. The effect on the fatigue delamination onset of different frequencies (1 and 5 Hz) was investigated for glass, graphite,and their hybrid laminates. Although a 20 percent increase in the static onset-of-delamination strength and a 10 percent increase in ultimate strength resulted from hybridizing the all-graphite laminate with a 90 deg glass ply, the fatigue onset is lower in the hybrid laminate than in the all-graphite laminate.

  1. Molecular Mechanics of the α-Actinin Rod Domain: Bending, Torsional, and Extensional Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Golji, Javad; Collins, Robert; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2009-01-01

    α-Actinin is an actin crosslinking molecule that can serve as a scaffold and maintain dynamic actin filament networks. As a crosslinker in the stressed cytoskeleton, α-actinin can retain conformation, function, and strength. α-Actinin has an actin binding domain and a calmodulin homology domain separated by a long rod domain. Using molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis, we suggest that the α-actinin rod domain has flexible terminal regions which can twist and extend under mechanical stress, yet has a highly rigid interior region stabilized by aromatic packing within each spectrin repeat, by electrostatic interactions between the spectrin repeats, and by strong salt bridges between its two anti-parallel monomers. By exploring the natural vibrations of the α-actinin rod domain and by conducting bending molecular dynamics simulations we also predict that bending of the rod domain is possible with minimal force. We introduce computational methods for analyzing the torsional strain of molecules using rotating constraints. Molecular dynamics extension of the α-actinin rod is also performed, demonstrating transduction of the unfolding forces across salt bridges to the associated monomer of the α-actinin rod domain. PMID:19436721

  2. Self-crumpling elastomers: bending motion induced by a drying stimulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulogne, François; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-11-01

    Capillary forces exerted by a liquid drop can bend elastic slender structures such as fibers or sheets. However, to successfully achieve capillary origami with sheets, it is important to make sure that the adhesion of the elastomer with the surface is low. We report an experimental study of the drying-induced peeling of a bilayer consisting of an elastomeric disk coated with a suspension of nanoparticles. We show that where capillary forces associated with the scale of the droplet can not compete with the adhesion of the elastomer on a surface, nevertheless large tensile stress developed in the coating, which resulted in a moment bending the bilayer. We attribute this stress to the nano-menisci in the pores of the colloidal material and we propose a model that describes successfully the early stage curvature of the bilayer. Thus, we show that the peeling can be conveniently controlled by the particle size and the coating thickness. We believe that such systems can be employed in various situations where delicate surfaces are involved such as in applications with optical and electronic components or in restoration of photographies, painting, wallpaper, fragile collectibles from contamination by dust, pollen, dirt, etc. The research leading to these results received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA Grant Agreement 623541.

  3. A Study On Critical Thinning In Thin-walled Tube Bending Of Al-Alloy 5052O Via Coupled Ductile Fracture Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Li Heng; Yang He; Zhan Mei

    2010-06-15

    Thin-walled tube bending(TWTB) method of Al-alloy tube has attracted wide applications in aerospace, aviation and automobile,etc. While, under in-plane double tensile stress states at the extrados of bending tube, the over-thinning induced ductile fracture is one dominant defect in Al-alloy tube bending. The main objective of this study is to predict the critical wall-thinning of Al-alloy tube bending by coupling two ductile fracture criteria(DFCs) into FE simulation. The DFCs include Continuum Damage Mechanics(CDM)-based model and GTN porous model. Through the uniaxial tensile test of the curved specimen, the basic material properties of the Al-alloy 5052O tube is obtained; via the inverse problem solution, the damage parameters of both the two fracture criteria are interatively determined. Thus the application study of the above DFCs in the TWTB is performed, and the more reasonable one is selected to obtain the critical thinning of Al-alloy tube in bending. The virtual damage initiation and evolution (when and where the ductile fracture occurs) in TWTB are investigated, and the fracture mechanisms of the voided Al-alloy tube in tube bending are consequently discussed.

  4. Effect of bending and tension on the voltage-current relation of Bi-2223/Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahoranta, Maria; Lehtonen, Jorma; Kováč, Pavol; Hušek, Imrich; Melišek, Tibor

    2004-01-01

    The critical current in a strained HTS tape degrades due to filament cracking. Here, the voltage-current characteristics of bent and tensioned Bi-2223/Ag tapes have been measured. In the case of tension the voltage characteristics were also measured over different sections of the sample to obtain local curves. Because the crack formation is stochastic the influence of stress on the distribution of the critical current along the tape length is studied with statistical methods. Attention is paid on the effect of different stress distribution caused by bending and tension. Because the local properties cannot be uniquely determined from the measured voltage-current characteristics the limits of applicability for these models are discussed. In the analysis emphasis is put on the dynamic n-value.

  5. On various refined theories in the bending analysis of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savithri, S.; Varadan, T. K.

    1992-05-01

    The accuracies of six shear-deformation theories are compared by analyzing the bending of angle-ply laminates and studying the results in the light of exact solutions. The shear-deformation theories used are those by: Ren (1986), Savithri and Varadan (1990), Bhaskar and Varadan (1991), Murakami (1986), and Pandya and Kant (1988), and combinations of these. The analytical methods are similar in that the number of unknown variables in the displacement field is independent of the number of layers in the laminate. The model by Ren is based on a parabolic distribution of transverse shear stresses in each laminate layer. This model is shown to give good predictions of deflections and stresses in two-layer antisymmetric and three-layer symmetric angle-ply laminates.

  6. 5 CFR 591.305 - Allowance rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowance rates. 591.305 Section 591.305 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ALLOWANCES AND DIFFERENTIALS Allowance Based on Duty at Remote Worksites § 591.305 Allowance rates. (a) General. An allowance rate may not exceed $10 a day....

  7. Nonlinear Curvature Expressions for Combined Flapwise Bending, Chordwise Bending, Torsion and Extension of Twisted Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, R. G.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1976-01-01

    The nonlinear curvature expressions for a twisted rotor blade or a beam undergoing transverse bending in two planes, torsion, and extension were developed. The curvature expressions were obtained using simple geometric considerations. The expressions were first developed in a general manner using the geometrical nonlinear theory of elasticity. These general nonlinear expressions were then systematically reduced to four levels of approximation by imposing various simplifying assumptions, and in each of these levels the second degree nonlinear expressions were given. The assumptions were carefully stated and their implications with respect to the nonlinear theory of elasticity as applied to beams were pointed out. The transformation matrices between the deformed and undeformed blade-fixed coordinates, which were needed in the development of the curvature expressions, were also given for three of the levels of approximation. The present curvature expressions and transformation matrices were compared with corresponding expressions existing in the literature.

  8. Coupled bending-bending-torsion flutter of a mistuned cascade with nonuniform blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, K. R. V.; Kielb, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    A set of aeroelastic equations describing the motion of an arbitrarily mistuned cascade with flexible, pretwisted, nonuniform blades is developed using an extended Hamilton's principle. The derivation of the equations has its basis in the geometric nonlinear theory of elasticity in which the elongations and shears are negligible compared to unity. A general expression for foreshortening of a blade is derived and is explicity used in the formulation. The blade aerodynamic loading in the subsonic and supersonic flow regimes is obtained from two dimensional, unsteady, cascade theories. The aerodynamic, inertial and structural coupling between the bending (in two planes) and torsional motions of the blade is included. The equations are used to investigate the aeroelastic stability and to quantify the effect of frequency mistuning on flutter in turbofans. Results indicate that a moderate amount of intentional mistuning has enough potential to alleviate flutter problems in unshrouded, high aspect ratio turbofans.

  9. Cytherean crustal bending at Salme Dorsa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitala, J.; Kauhanen, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Salme ridge belt can be interpreted as being the leading edge of a venusian crustal unit that moved against the highland foreland unit. It is indicative of a compressional zone, with a thrust front facing west. The Salme ridge belt with adjoining structures is an evident indication of lateral stresses and adjoining crustal movements on Venus. It supports the idea of southeast compression against and over the foreland planitia, which has bent under the load and/or lateral stress, resulting in trough and bulge formation in front of the ridge belt. The origin of the driving force for the movements remains masked. Laima Tessera is located in the direction from which the thrust is thought to apply but there are no appropriate candidates for a rift zone although a thrust from the southeast would be in good agreement with structures of Laima Tessera. The temperature gradient suggests that the lithosphere is approximately 12 km thick, while its elastic layer is approximately 3 km thick based either on the load-induced flexure model or on the compressional buckling model.

  10. The statistical difference between bending arcs and regular polar arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullen, A.; Fear, R. C.; Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Karlsson, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the Polar UVI data set by Kullen et al. (2002) of 74 polar arcs is reinvestigated, focusing on bending arcs. Bending arcs are typically faint and form (depending on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By direction) on the dawnside or duskside oval with the tip of the arc splitting off the dayside oval. The tip subsequently moves into the polar cap in the antisunward direction, while the arc's nightside end remains attached to the oval, eventually becoming hook-shaped. Our investigation shows that bending arcs appear on the opposite oval side from and farther sunward than most regular polar arcs. They form during By-dominated IMF conditions: typically, the IMF clock angle increases from 60 to 90° about 20 min before the arc forms. Antisunward plasma flows from the oval into the polar cap just poleward of bending arcs are seen in Super Dual Auroral Radar Network data, indicating dayside reconnection. For regular polar arcs, recently reported characteristics are confirmed in contrast to bending arcs. This includes plasma flows along the nightside oval that originate close to the initial arc location and a significant delay in the correlation between IMF By and initial arc location. In our data set, the highest correlations are found with IMF By appearing at least 1-2 h before arc formation. In summary, bending arcs are distinctly different from regular arcs and cannot be explained by existing polar arc models. Instead, these results are consistent with the formation mechanism described in Carter et al. (2015), suggesting that bending arcs are caused by dayside reconnection.

  11. Ultra low bending loss equiangular spiral photonic crystal fibers in the terahertz regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Arti; Kejalakshmy, N.; Uthman, M.; Rahman, B. M. A.; Kumar, A.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2012-06-01

    An Equiangular Spiral Photonic Crystal Fiber (ES-PCF) design in Topas® for use in the Terahertz regime is presented. The design shows ultra low bending loss and very low confinement loss compared to conventional Hexagonal PCF (H-PCF). The ES-PCF has excellent modal confinement properties, together with several parameters to allow the optimization of the performance over a range of important characteristics. A full vector Finite Element simulation has been used to characterize the design which can be fabricated by a range of techniques including extrusion and drilling.

  12. An adaptation of modal analysis to the computation of steady bending loads on a rotating beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, J.; Sadler, G.; Yuce, Mithat

    Modal summation or modal displacement methods are not capable of computing the steady bending moments on a rotating beam. Even if it were possible to use an infinite number of blade modes, it would not be possible to obtain a correct solution. There is a way to circumvent this problem by properly combining a force integration formulation with a modal summation approach. At Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., modifications have been made in the blade loads methodology which allow for the computation of steady loads. The methodology was recently enhanced further to accommodate all types of rotor hubs.

  13. Laser Doppler measurements of laminar and turbulent flow in a pipe bend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enayet, M. M.; Gibson, M. M.; Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Yianneskis, M.

    1982-01-01

    The streamwise components of velocity in the flow through a ninety degree bend of circular cross section for which the ratio of radius of curvature to diameter is 2.8 were measured. The development of strong pressure driven secondary flow in the form of a pair of counter rotating vortices in the steamwise direction is shown. Refractive index matching at the fluid wall interface was not employed; the displacement of the measurement volume due to refraction is allowed for in simple geometrical calculations.

  14. [Relationship between hardness, abrasion and bending strength of UV-polymerizable adhesives].

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, K J; Vahl, J

    1978-04-01

    These experiments were undertaken to explore the influence of hardening on bending and bending strength of photopolymerisable adhesives. It was shown that light sources at present in use only influence the bending strength to a small degree but enable 40% variation in bending. The use of more intensive light sources not yet in commercial use led to further improvements. PMID:274282

  15. Seismic Reflection Imaging of Subduction Bending-Related Faults at Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Carbotte, S. M.; Carton, H. D.; Gibson, J. C.; Canales, J. P.; Nedimovic, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The hydration state of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is important to a number of subduction processes at Cascadia, yet is poorly known. As oceanic plates subduct, faults develop at the outer rise due to flexural bending and have been shown to facilitate plate hydration near the trench. We present pre-stack time migrated (PSTM) images of two cross-plate transects offshore Oregon and Washington to characterize faulting within the Juan de Fuca Plate. Basement faulting evident from vertical offsets in the sediment section is observed as far as 200 km seaward of the deformation front, and may result from complex intraplate stresses within the JdF plate. Along the Oregon margin, bright fault plane reflections within the crust are observed beginning ~40 km seaward of the deformation front. They are sparsely spaced, form in conjugate pairs, and cut completely through the crust. We suggest they are related to plate bending. Within the same region, a set of mantle reflections, possibly originating from the continuations at depth of some of the crustal faults, extend as deep as ~6 km beneath the Moho. The waveforms of the fault plane reflections vary with depth, implying variation of the internal structure and/or pore fluid pressure within the fault zones. Along the Washington margin, densely spaced faults that may be bending-related are confined to the upper and middle crust and most of them are seaward dipping. Mantle reflections are not observed on this transect. In the lower crust, a set of dipping events is imaged, they are spaced at 1-2 km, dip ~ 30° towards the ridge and shoal into the Moho reflection. The crust in which these reflections are observed is 6-8 Ma old. Lower crustal reflections with similar characteristics are also observed in crust of same age on our Oregon transect, suggesting they are related to accretionary processes at the JdF Ridge during this time period. We conclude that different faulting patterns at Oregon and Washington margin result

  16. How do spin waves pass through a bend?

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiangjun; Yu, Yongli; Li, Shuwei; Huang, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    Spin-wave devices hold great promise to be used in future information processing. Manipulation of spin-wave propagation inside the submicrometer waveguides is at the core of promoting the practical application of these devices. Just as in today's silicon-based chips, bending of the building blocks cannot be avoided in real spin-wave circuits. Here, we examine spin-wave transport in bended magnonic waveguides at the submicron scale using micromagnetic simulations. It is seen that the impact of the bend is relevant to the frequency of the passing spin wave. At the lowest frequencies, the spin wave continuously follows the waveguide in the propagation process. At the higher frequencies, however the bend acts as a mode converter for the passing spin wave, causing zigzag-like propagation path formed in the waveguide behind the bend. Additionally, we demonstrate a logic-NOT gate based on such a waveguide, which could be combined to perform logic-NAND operation. PMID:24129823

  17. Bending-induced phase transition in monolayer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dou-Xing; Wang, Tzu-Chiang; Guo, Wan-Lin

    2015-08-01

    Bending-induced phase transition in monolayer black phosphorus is investigated through first principles calculations. By wrapping the layer into nanotubes along armchair and zigzag directions with different curvatures, it is found that phase transitions of the tubes occur when radius of curvature is smaller than 5 Å in bending along the zigzag direction, while the tubes remain stable along the armchair direction. Small zigzag tubes with odd numbered monolayer unit cells tend to transfer toward armchair-like phases, but the tubes with even numbered monolayer unit cells transfer into new complex bonding structures. The mechanism for the bending-induced phase transition is revealed by the comprehensive analyses of the bending strain energies, electron density distributions, and band structures. The results show significant anisotropic bending stability of black phosphorus and should be helpful for its mechanical cleavage fabrication in large size. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11021262, 11172303, and 11132011) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No.2012CB937500).

  18. Performance evaluation of bending actuators made from electrostrictive graft elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ji; Costen, Robert C.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Newbury, Kenneth M.; Leo, Donald J.

    2002-07-01

    Recently a new class of electrostrictive polymers, called electrostrictive graft elastomers, was developed at NASA Langley Research Center. In this work, the output force of a bending actuator made from electrostrictive graft elastomer was measured and modeled to understand the dependence of performance on device configuration. This understanding should lead to better actuator design and fabrication. The prototype bending actuator is 47micrometers thick and 8 mm wide. The output bending force at the tip was measured as a function of applied voltage and the distance from the tip to the holding stage. The output force at 2.1 kV increases from 124(mu) N at a length of 33.5 mm to 662(mu) N at 7 mm. Accourding to a small displacement, 5-layer, a strength-of- materials model, the output bending force of the actuator varies inversely with its length and directly with the square of the applied voltage. Consequently, the output bending force can be about 5 mN when the length of the actuator is reduced to 1 mm for application to micro- electromechanical (MEMS) devices. The experimental results will be presented and a method for enhancing the performance will also be discussed.

  19. Hysteresis of the resonance frequency of magnetostrictive bending cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Michael; Kremer, Ramona; Sutor, Alexander; Lerch, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    Magnetostrictive bending cantilevers are applicable for wirelessly measuring physical quantities such as pressure and strain. Exploiting the ΔE-effect, the resonance frequency of the cantilevers is shifted because of a change in the magnetic biasing field. The biasing field, in turn, depends on the applied pressure or strain, respectively. With a view to the application as a reliable sensor, maximum sensitivity but minimum hysteresis in the biasing field/resonance frequency dependence is preferred. In this contribution, monomorph bending cantilevers fabricated using magnetostrictive Fe49Co49V2 and Metglas 2605SA1 are investigated regarding their applicability for future sensors. For this purpose, the biasing field-dependent polarization of the magnetostrictive materials and bending of the cantilevers are determined. Furthermore, a setup to magnetically bias the cantilevers and determine the bending resonance frequency is presented. Here, the resonance frequency is identified by measuring the impulse response employing a laser Doppler vibrometer. The measurement results reveal that cantilevers made of Fe49Co49V2 possess a distinct hysteretic behaviour at low magnetic biasing field magnitudes. This is ascribed to the polarization and bending hysteresis. Cantilevers fabricated using Metglas 2605SA1 feature a lower resonance frequency shift compared to cantilevers with Fe49Co49V2, which would result in a lower sensitivity of the sensor. However, their resonance frequency hysteresis is almost negligible.

  20. 49 CFR 266.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 266.11 Section 266.11... TRANSPORTATION ACT § 266.11 Allowable costs. Allowable costs include only the following costs which are properly allocable to the work performed: Planning and program operation costs which are allowed under...