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Sample records for allowable flaw sizes

  1. Determination of Flaw Size from Thermographic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of delaminations tend to overestimate the size of the flaw. Since the heat diffuses in the plane parallel to the surface, the resulting temperature profile over the flaw is larger than the flaw. A variational method is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for the flaw that is much closer to the true size of the flaw. The size is determined from the spatial thermal response of the exterior surface above the flaw and a constraint on the length of the contour surrounding the flaw. The technique is applied to experimental data acquired on a flat bottom hole composite specimen.

  2. Critical Initial Flaw Size Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Cheston, Derrick J.

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). The USS consists of several "tuna can" segments that are approximately 216 inches in diameter, 115 inches tall, and 0.5 inches thick. A 6 inch wide by 1 inch thick flange is welded to the skin and is used to fasten adjacent tuna cans. A schematic of a "tuna can" and the location of the flange-to-skin weld are shown in Figure 1. Gussets (shown in yellow in Figure 1) are welded to the skin and flange every 10 degrees around the circumference of the "tuna can". The flange-to-skin weld is a flux core butt weld with a fillet weld on the inside surface, as illustrated in Figure 2. The welding process may create loss of fusion defects in the weld that could develop into fatigue cracks and jeopardize the structural integrity of the Ares I-X vehicle. The CIFS analysis was conducted to determine the largest crack in the weld region that will not grow to failure within 4 lifetimes, as specified by NASA standard 5001 & 5019 [1].

  3. Flaw depth sizing using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Adam C.; Fisher, Jay L.

    2016-02-01

    Guided wave inspection technology is most often applied as a survey tool for pipeline inspection, where relatively low frequency ultrasonic waves, compared to those used in conventional ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods, propagate along the structure; discontinuities cause a reflection of the sound back to the sensor for flaw detection. Although the technology can be used to accurately locate a flaw over long distances, the flaw sizing performance, especially for flaw depth estimation, is much poorer than other, local NDE approaches. Estimating flaw depth, as opposed to other parameters, is of particular interest for failure analysis of many structures. At present, most guided wave technologies estimate the size of the flaw based on the reflected signal amplitude from the flaw compared to a known geometry reflection, such as a circumferential weld in a pipeline. This process, however, requires many assumptions to be made, such as weld geometry and flaw shape. Furthermore, it is highly dependent on the amplitude of the flaw reflection, which can vary based on many factors, such as attenuation and sensor installation. To improve sizing performance, especially depth estimation, and do so in a way that is not strictly amplitude dependent, this paper describes an approach to estimate the depth of a flaw based on a multimodal analysis. This approach eliminates the need of using geometric reflections for calibration and can be used for both pipeline and plate inspection applications. To verify the approach, a test set was manufactured on plate specimens with flaws of different widths and depths ranging from 5% to 100% of total wall thickness; 90% of these flaws were sized to within 15% of their true value. A description of the initial multimodal sizing strategy and results will be discussed.

  4. Critical flaw size in silicon nitride ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, George Arthur

    Aircraft engine and bearing manufacturers have been aggressively pursuing advanced materials technology systems solutions to meet main shaft-bearing needs of advanced military aircraft engines. Ceramic silicon nitride hybrid bearings are being developed for such high performance applications. Though silicon nitride exhibits many favorable properties such as high compressive strength, high hardness, a third of the density of steel, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and high corrosion and temperature resistance, they also have low fracture toughness and are susceptible to failure from fatigue spalls emanating from pre-existing surface flaws that can grow under rolling contact fatigue (RCF). Rolling elements and raceways are among the most demanding components in aircraft engines due to a combination of high cyclic contact stresses, long expected component lifetimes, corrosive environment, and the high consequence of fatigue failure. The cost of these rolling elements increases exponentially with the decrease in allowable flaw size for service applications. Hence the range of 3D non-planar surface flaw geometries subject to RCF is simulated to determine the critical flaw size (CFS) or the largest allowable flaw that does not grow under service conditions. This dissertation is a numerical and experimental investigation of surface flaws in ceramic balls subjected to RCF and has resulted in the following analyses: Crack Shape Determination: the nucleation of surface flaws from ball impact that occurs during the manufacturing process is simulated. By examining the subsurface Hertzian stresses between contacting spheres, their applicability to predicting and characterizing crack size and shape is established. It is demonstrated that a wide range of cone and partial cone cracks, observed in practice, can be generated using the proposed approaches. RCF Simulation: the procedure and concerns in modeling nonplanar 3D cracks subject to RCF using FEA for stress intensity

  5. Reliably Detectable Flaw Size for NDE Methods that Use Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2017-01-01

    Probability of detection (POD) analysis is used in assessing reliably detectable flaw size in nondestructive evaluation (NDE). MIL-HDBK-1823 and associated mh1823 POD software gives most common methods of POD analysis. In this paper, POD analysis is applied to an NDE method, such as eddy current testing, where calibration is used. NDE calibration standards have known size artificial flaws such as electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches and flat bottom hole (FBH) reflectors which are used to set instrument sensitivity for detection of real flaws. Real flaws such as cracks and crack-like flaws are desired to be detected using these NDE methods. A reliably detectable crack size is required for safe life analysis of fracture critical parts. Therefore, it is important to correlate signal responses from real flaws with signal responses form artificial flaws used in calibration process to determine reliably detectable flaw size.

  6. Residual Stresses and Critical Initial Flaw Size Analyses of Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Raju, Ivatury, S.; Dawocke, David S.; Cheston, Derrick

    2009-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). A series of weld analyses are performed to determine the residual stresses in a critical region of the USS. Weld residual stresses both increase constraint and mean stress thereby having an important effect on the fatigue life. The purpose of the weld analyses was to model the weld process using a variety of sequences to determine the 'best' sequence in terms of weld residual stresses and distortions. The many factors examined in this study include weld design (single-V, double-V groove), weld sequence, boundary conditions, and material properties, among others. The results of this weld analysis are included with service loads to perform a fatigue and critical initial flaw size evaluation.

  7. Technical Letter Report Development of Flaw Size Distribution Tables Including Effects of Flaw Depth Sizing Errors for Draft 10CFR 50.61a (Alternate PTS Rule) JCN-N6398, Task 4

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Fredric A.; Gosselin, Stephen R.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2013-04-22

    This document describes a new method to determine whether the flaws in a particular reactor pressure vessel are consistent with the assumptions regarding the number and sizes of flaws used in the analyses that formed the technical justification basis for the new voluntary alternative Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) rule (Draft 10 CFR 50.61a). The new methodology addresses concerns regarding prior methodology because ASME Code Section XI examinations do not detect all fabrication flaws, they have higher detection performance for some flaw types, and there are flaw sizing errors always present (e.g., significant oversizing of small flaws and systematic under sizing of larger flaws). The new methodology allows direct comparison of ASME Code Section XI examination results with values in the PTS draft rule Tables 2 and 3 in order to determine if the number and sizes of flaws detected by an ASME Code Section XI examination are consistent with those assumed in the probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations performed in support of the development of 10 CFR 50.61a.

  8. Modeling the X-ray Process, and X-ray Flaw Size Parameter for POD Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2014-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method reliability can be determined by a statistical flaw detection study called probability of detection (POD) study. In many instances, the NDE flaw detectability is given as a flaw size such as crack length. The flaw is either a crack or behaving like a crack in terms of affecting the structural integrity of the material. An alternate approach is to use a more complex flaw size parameter. The X-ray flaw size parameter, given here, takes into account many setup and geometric factors. The flaw size parameter relates to X-ray image contrast and is intended to have a monotonic correlation with the POD. Some factors such as set-up parameters, including X-ray energy, exposure, detector sensitivity, and material type that are not accounted for in the flaw size parameter may be accounted for in the technique calibration and controlled to meet certain quality requirements. The proposed flaw size parameter and the computer application described here give an alternate approach to conduct the POD studies. Results of the POD study can be applied to reliably detect small flaws through better assessment of effect of interaction between various geometric parameters on the flaw detectability. Moreover, a contrast simulation algorithm for a simple part-source-detector geometry using calibration data is also provided for the POD estimation.

  9. Modeling the X-Ray Process, and X-Ray Flaw Size Parameter for POD Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khoshti, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method reliability can be determined by a statistical flaw detection study called probability of detection (POD) study. In many instances the NDE flaw detectability is given as a flaw size such as crack length. The flaw is either a crack or behaving like a crack in terms of affecting the structural integrity of the material. An alternate approach is to use a more complex flaw size parameter. The X-ray flaw size parameter, given here, takes into account many setup and geometric factors. The flaw size parameter relates to X-ray image contrast and is intended to have a monotonic correlation with the POD. Some factors such as set-up parameters including X-ray energy, exposure, detector sensitivity, and material type that are not accounted for in the flaw size parameter may be accounted for in the technique calibration and controlled to meet certain quality requirements. The proposed flaw size parameter and the computer application described here give an alternate approach to conduct the POD studies. Results of the POD study can be applied to reliably detect small flaws through better assessment of effect of interaction between various geometric parameters on the flaw detectability. Moreover, a contrast simulation algorithm for a simple part-source-detector geometry using calibration data is also provided for the POD estimation.

  10. Probabilistic Estimation of Critical Flaw Sizes in the Primary Structure Welds of the Ares I-X Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Hoge, Peter A.; Patel, B. M.; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    2009-01-01

    The primary structure of the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS) launch vehicle is constructed of welded mild steel plates. There is some concern over the possibility of structural failure due to welding flaws. It was considered critical to quantify the impact of uncertainties in residual stress, material porosity, applied loads, and material and crack growth properties on the reliability of the welds during its pre-flight and flight. A criterion--an existing maximum size crack at the weld toe must be smaller than the maximum allowable flaw size--was established to estimate the reliability of the welds. A spectrum of maximum allowable flaw sizes was developed for different possible combinations of all of the above listed variables by performing probabilistic crack growth analyses using the ANSYS finite element analysis code in conjunction with the NASGRO crack growth code. Two alternative methods were used to account for residual stresses: (1) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 41 ksi and a limit was set on the net section flow stress during crack propagation. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if this limit was exceeded during four complete flight cycles, and (2) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 49.6 ksi (the parent material s yield strength) and the net section flow stress limit was ignored. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if catastrophic crack growth occurred during four complete flight cycles. Both surface-crack models and through-crack models were utilized to characterize cracks in the weld toe.

  11. Flaw Sizing in Pipes Using Long-Range Guided Wave Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. M.; Catton, P. P.

    2011-06-01

    The absence of adequate inspection data from difficult-to-access areas on pipelines, such as cased-road crossings, makes determination of fitness for continued service and compliance with increasingly stringent regulatory requirements problematic. Screening for corrosion using long-range guided wave testing is a relatively new inspection technique. The complexity of the possible modes of vibration means the technique can be difficult to implement effectively but this also means that it has great potential for both detecting and characterizing flaws. The ability to determine flaw size would enable the direct application of standard procedures for determining fitness-for-service, such as ASME B31G, RSTRENG, or equivalent for tens of metres of pipeline from a single inspection location. This paper presents a new technique for flaw sizing using guided wave inspection data. The technique has been developed using finite element models and experimentally validated on 6″ Schedule 40 steel pipe. Some basic fitness-for-service assessments have been carried out using the measured values and the maximum allowable operating pressure was accurately determined.

  12. Equivalent flaw time-of-flight diffraction sizing with ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic phased array transducers can be used to extend traditional time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) crack sizing, resulting in more quantitative information about the crack being obtained. Traditional TOFD yields a single length parameter, while the equivalent flaw time-of-flight diffraction crack sizing method (EFTOFD) described here uses data from multiple look-angles to fit an equivalent degenerate ellipsoid to the crack. The size and orientation of the equivalent flaw can be used to estimate the actual crack size.

  13. On the initial flaw sizes of uPVC pipe materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.S. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-12-20

    It is well known that flaws in unplasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (uPVC) pipes are generated during processing. The flaws include inclusions, gas bubbles, and results from poor fusion between PVC grains and extrusion additives. uPVC pipes are often used for water reticulation, subjected to an alternating pressure superimposed on a mean pressure. uPVC pipe samples have been found to fail in fatigue from a small semicircular flaw on the inside bore of the pipe. In designing uPVC pipes against fatigue failure due to pressure variation, it is essential to determine the initial flaw size. Truss attempted to estimate the lifespan of uPVC pipes and showed that predictions and experimental data are in good agreement.

  14. Determination of Flaw Size and Depth From Temporal Evolution of Thermal Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Cramer, Elliott; Howell, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Simple methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of flaws have tended to be based on either the spatial or temporal response. This independent assessment limits the accuracy of characterization. A variational approach is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for a flaw that incorporates both the temporal and spatial response to improve the characterization. The size and depth are determined from both the temporal and spatial thermal response of the exterior surface above a flaw and constraints on the length of the contour surrounding the delamination. Examples of the application of the technique to simulation and experimental data acquired are presented to investigate the limitations of the technique.

  15. Probabilistic fatigue life prediction using ultrasonic inspection data considering equivalent initial flaw size uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X.; Zhang, J.; Kadau, K.; Zhou, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a systematical method for probabilistic fatigue life prediction using ultrasonic inspection data. A probabilistic model to correlate the ultrasonic inspection reported size and the actual size is proposed based on historical data of rotor flaw sizing. Both of the reported size and the actual size are quantified in terms of the equivalent reflector diameter. The equivalent initial flaw size (EIFS) is then calculated based on the actual size for fatigue propagation analysis. All major uncertainties, such as EIFS uncertainty, fatigue crack growth model parameter uncertainty, and experimental data measurement uncertainty are explicitly included in the fatigue life prediction. Bayesian parameter estimation is used to estimate fatigue crack growth model parameters and measurement uncertainties using a limited number of fatigue testing data points. The overall procedure is demonstrated using a Cr-Mo-V rotor segment with ultrasonic inspection data. Interpretations of the probabilistic prediction results are given.

  16. The competing roles of microstructure and flaw size on the fatigue limit of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreevy, Timothy Edward

    1998-12-01

    Slip band and crack formation, propagation, and arrest are the active mechanisms in the fatigue process as was first observed in 1903. However, engineers relied on macroscopic properties such as hardness and tensile strength to predict fatigue limits since analytical tools to model the process did not exist. Many empirical modifications to the fatigue limit have since been made to account for variables such as surface roughness, state of stress, inclusion content, environmental effects, etc. A method is proposed to qualitatively and quantitatively predict the effects of several of these parameters on the fatigue limit of metals, specifically steels. Research includes the development and verification of an analytical model that addresses the fatigue process, namely the threshold condition of non-propagating cracks. Two parameters are identified to govern the fatigue resistance: non-propagating crack size and crack barrier strength. The concept of three defect types associated with three different flaw dominated fatigue regimes is introduced. Furthermore, application of the model to fatigue mechanisms in high strength steels, synergistic effects of surface finish and intergranular cracks, competition between surface and subsurface fatigue nucleation, and unexplained observations and scatter in fatigue behavior is demonstrated. Overall, the model is proven as a simple and robust tool for qualifying and statistically quantifying material behavior. In addition, the model can be implemented in material screening, selection, and processing as well as a guide for future material research and design.

  17. Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Critical Flaw Size in ARES I-X Flange-to-Skin Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chell, G. Graham; Hudak, Stephen J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Ares 1 Upper Stage Simulator (USS) is being fabricated from welded A516 steel. In order to insure the structural integrity of these welds it is of interest to calculate the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) to establish rational inspection requirements. The CIFS is in turn dependent on the critical final flaw size (CFS), as well as fatigue flaw growth resulting from transportation, handling and service-induced loading. These calculations were made using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), which are thought to be conservative because they are based on a lower bound, so called elastic, fracture toughness determined from tests that displayed significant plasticity. Nevertheless, there was still concern that the yield magnitude stresses generated in the flange-to-skin weld by the combination of axial stresses due to axial forces, fit-up stresses, and weld residual stresses, could give rise to significant flaw-tip plasticity, which might render the LEFM results to be non-conservative. The objective of the present study was to employ Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM) to determine CFS values, and then compare these values to CFS values evaluated using LEFM. CFS values were calculated for twelve cases involving surface and embedded flaws, EPFM analyses with and without plastic shakedown of the stresses, LEFM analyses, and various welding residual stress distributions. For the cases examined, the computed CFS values based on elastic analyses were the smallest in all instances where the failures were predicted to be controlled by the fracture toughness. However, in certain cases, the CFS values predicted by the elastic-plastic analyses were smaller than those predicted by the elastic analyses; in these cases the failure criteria were determined by a breakdown in stress intensity factor validity limits for deep flaws (a greater than 0.90t), rather than by the fracture toughness. Plastic relaxation of stresses accompanying shakedown always increases the

  18. Quantitative flaw characterization with ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady John

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is a critical diagnostic tool in many industries. It is used to characterize potentially dangerous flaws in critical components for aerospace, automotive, and energy applications. The use of phased array transducers allows for the extension of traditional techniques and the introduction of new methods for quantitative flaw characterization. An equivalent flaw sizing technique for use in time-of-flight diffraction setups is presented that provides an estimate of the size and orientation of isolated cracks, surface-breaking cracks, and volumetric flaws such as voids and inclusions. Experimental validation is provided for the isolated crack case. A quantitative imaging algorithm is developed that corrects for system effects and wave propagation, making the images formed directly related to the properties of the scatterer present. Simulated data is used to form images of cylindrical and spherical inclusions. The contributions of different signals to the image formation process are discussed and examples of the quantitative nature of the images are shown.

  19. Ultrasonic Phased Array Technique for Accurate Flaw Sizing in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan D Buttram

    2005-03-11

    Described is a manual,portable non-destructive technique to determine the through wall height of cracks present in dissimilar metal welds used in the primary coolling systems of pressure water and boiler light water reactors. Current manual methods found in industry have proven not to exhibit the sizing accuracy required by ASME inspection requirement. The technique described demonstrated an accuracy approximately three times that required to ASME Section XI, Appendix 8 qualification.

  20. Applicability of a Conservative Margin Approach for Assessing NDE Flaw Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, ajay M.

    2007-01-01

    Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) procedures are required to detect flaws in structures with a high percentage detectability and high confidence. Conventional Probability of Detection (POD) methods are statistical in nature and require detection data from a relatively large number of flaw specimens. In many circumstances, due to the high cost and long lead time, it is impractical to build the large set of flaw specimens that is required by the conventional POD methodology. Therefore, in such situations it is desirable to have a flaw detectability estimation approach that allows for a reduced number of flaw specimens but provides a high degree of confidence in establishing the flaw detectability size. This paper presents an alternative approach called the conservative margin approach (CMA). To investigate the applicability of the CMA approach, flaw detectability sizes determined by the CMA and POD approaches have been compared on actual datasets. The results of these comparisons are presented and the applicability of the CMA approach is discussed.

  1. Quantifying Flaw Characteristics from IR NDE Data

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W; Philips, N R; Burke, M W; Robbins, C L

    2003-02-14

    Work is presented which allows flaw characteristics to be quantified from the transient IR NDE signature. The goal of this effort was to accurately determine the type, size and depth of flaws revealed with IR NDE, using sonic IR as the example IR NDE technique. Typically an IR NDE experiment will result in a positive qualitative indication of a flaw such as a cold or hot spot in the image, but will not provide quantitative data thereby leaving the practitioner to make educated guesses as to the source of the signal. The technique presented here relies on comparing the transient IR signature to exact heat transfer analytical results for prototypical flaws, using the flaw characteristics as unknown fitting parameters. A nonlinear least squares algorithm is used to evaluate the fitting parameters, which then provide a direct measure of the flaw characteristics that can be mapped to the imaged surface for visual reference. The method uses temperature data for the heat transfer analysis, so radiometric calibration of the IR signal is required. The method provides quantitative data with a single thermal event (e.g. acoustic pulse or flash), as compared to phase-lock techniques that require many events. The work has been tested with numerical data but remains to be validated by experimental data, and that effort is underway.

  2. Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator Structural Analyses Supporting the NESC Critical Initial Flaw Size Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2008-01-01

    The structural analyses described in the present report were performed in support of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Critical Initial Flaw Size (CIFS) assessment for the ARES I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS) common shell segment. The structural analysis effort for the NESC assessment had three thrusts: shell buckling analyses, detailed stress analyses of the single-bolt joint test; and stress analyses of two-segment 10 degree-wedge models for the peak axial tensile running load. Elasto-plastic, large-deformation simulations were performed. Stress analysis results indicated that the stress levels were well below the material yield stress for the bounding axial tensile design load. This report also summarizes the analyses and results from parametric studies on modeling the shell-to-gusset weld, flange-surface mismatch, bolt preload, and washer-bearing-surface modeling. These analyses models were used to generate the stress levels specified for the fatigue crack growth assessment using the design load with a factor of safety.

  3. Modeling the Effects of Beam Size and Flaw Morphology on Ultrasonic Pulse/Echo Sizing of Delaminations in Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margetan, Frank J.; Leckey, Cara A.; Barnard, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The size and shape of a delamination in a multi-layered structure can be estimated in various ways from an ultrasonic pulse/echo image. For example the -6dB contours of measured response provide one simple estimate of the boundary. More sophisticated approaches can be imagined where one adjusts the proposed boundary to bring measured and predicted UT images into optimal agreement. Such approaches require suitable models of the inspection process. In this paper we explore issues pertaining to model-based size estimation for delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced laminates. In particular we consider the influence on sizing when the delamination is non-planar or partially transmitting in certain regions. Two models for predicting broadband sonic time-domain responses are considered: (1) a fast "simple" model using paraxial beam expansions and Kirchhoff and phase-screen approximations; and (2) the more exact (but computationally intensive) 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT). Model-to-model and model-to experiment comparisons are made for delaminations in uniaxial composite plates, and the simple model is then used to critique the -6dB rule for delamination sizing.

  4. Study Thermographic Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermographic inspection methods for use on aerospace structures is under investigation. Several different material systems, structural geometries and defect types have been included in this study so as to establish a baseline from which future Infrared Thermography(IRT) testing can be made. This study examines various thermal loading techniques in an attempt to enhance the likelihood of capturing and identifying critically sized flaws under 'non laboratory' actual working conditions. Qualification techniques and calibration standards are also being investigated to standardize the thermographic method. In conjunction with the thermographic inspections, advanced image processing techniques including digital filtering and neural networks have been investigated to increase the ability of detecting and sizing flaws. Here, the digitized thermographic images are mathematically manipulated through various filtering techniques and/or artificial neural mapping schemes to enhance its overall quality, permitting accurate flaw identification even when the signal-to-noise ratio is low.

  5. Study Thermographic Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermographic inspection methods for use on aerospace structures is under investigation. Several different material systems, structural geometries and defect types have been included in this study so as to establish a baseline from which future IRT testing can be made. This study examines various thermal loading techniques in an attempt to enhance the likelihood of capturing and identifying critically sized flaws under 'non-laboratory' actual working conditions. Qualification techniques and calibration standards are also being investigated to standardize the thermographic method. In conjunction with the thermographic inspections, advanced image processing techniques including digital filtering and neural networks have been investigated to increase the ability of 91 detecting and sizing flaws. Here, the digitized thermographic images are mathematically manipulated through various filtering techniques and/or artificial neural mapping schemes to enhance its overall quality, permitting accurate flaw identification even when the signal-to-noise ratio is low.

  6. Method to Determine Maximum Allowable Sinterable Silver Interconnect Size

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, A. A.; Modugno, M. C.; Waters, S. B.; DeVoto, D. J.; Paret, P. P.

    2016-05-01

    The use of sintered-silver for large-area interconnection is attractive for some large-area bonding applications in power electronics such as the bonding of metal-clad, electrically-insulating substrates to heat sinks. Arrays of different pad sizes and pad shapes have been considered for such large area bonding; however, rather than arbitrarily choosing their size, it is desirable to use the largest size possible where the onset of interconnect delamination does not occur. If that is achieved, then sintered-silver's high thermal and electrical conductivities can be fully taken advantage of. Toward achieving this, a simple and inexpensive proof test is described to identify the largest achievable interconnect size with sinterable silver. The method's objective is to purposely initiate failure or delamination. Copper and invar (a ferrous-nickel alloy whose coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is similar to that of silicon or silicon carbide) disks were used in this study and sinterable silver was used to bond them. As a consequence of the method's execution, delamination occurred in some samples during cooling from the 250 degrees C sintering temperature to room temperature and bonding temperature and from thermal cycling in others. These occurrences and their interpretations highlight the method's utility, and the herein described results are used to speculate how sintered-silver bonding will work with other material combinations.

  7. Individual increase in inbreeding allows estimating effective sizes from pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Cervantes, Isabel; Molina, Antonio; Valera, Mercedes; Goyache, Félix

    2008-01-01

    We present here a simple approach to obtain reliable estimates of the effective population size in real world populations via the computation of the increase in inbreeding for each individual (delta Fi) in a given population. The values of delta Fi are computed as t-root of 1 - (1 - Fi) where Fi is the inbreeding coefficient and t is the equivalent complete generations for each individual. The values of delta F computed for a pre-defined reference subset can be averaged and used to estimate effective size. A standard error of this estimate of Ne can be further computed from the standard deviation of the individual increase in inbreeding. The methodology is demonstrated by applying it to several simulated examples and to a real pedigree in which other methodologies fail when considering reference subpopulations. The main characteristics of the approach and its possible use are discussed both for predictive purposes and for analyzing genealogies. PMID:18558071

  8. Flaw detection and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, Robert S.; Sturges, Jr., Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a method of and apparatus for optically inspecting nuclear fuel pellets for surface flaws. The inspection system includes a prism and lens arrangement for scanning the surface of each pellet as the same is rotated. The resulting scan produces data indicative of the extent and shape of each flaw which is employed to generate a flaw quality index for each detected flaw. The flaw quality indexes from all flaws are summed and compared with an acceptable surface quality index. The result of the comparison is utilized to control the acceptance or rejection of the pellet.

  9. The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

    2008-10-24

    In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

  10. Automatic inspection technique for optical surface flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, GuoGuang; Gao, Wenliang; Cheng, Shangyi

    1991-01-01

    Industrial inspection of optical component surface flaws requires objective, high efficient and fast measurement methods and instruments. In this paper, a novel method, which is practical for on- line inspecting optical component surface flaws in manufacturing industry, is discribed. Laser beam goes through a lean- placed mirror with a slot in center onto the surface of the specimen. The imformation of surface flaws is obtained through analysing the frequency spectrum of reflective light which is detected by a photomultiplier, the specimen scanning control and signal processing are finished by a low - cost and handy single- board microcomputer. The theory that applies the scanning frequency spectrum method , the method for determining flaw size and measuring sensitivity as well as control model for various specimen are analysed in detail .A system has been built according to the idea discribed above. By using the system, several specimen are measured, the comparison and analysis between exprimental results and actual flaw conditions are given. The minimum detectable flaw is 3 micrometer, the measuring error is also given.

  11. Fluorescent Detection of Flaws.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In a method for detecting flaws in the surface of a workpiece, initially microcapsules containing a fluorescent dye are deposited on the surface...After removal of excess microcapsules from the surface in order to reduce background fluorescence, the surface is visually inspected under ultraviolet

  12. In-service Inspection Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density and Size Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.; Norris, Wallace

    2012-09-17

    Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events are system transients in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in which there is a rapid operating temperature cool-down that results in cold vessel temperatures with or without repressurization of the vessel. The rapid cooling of the inside surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) causes thermal stresses that can combine with stresses caused by high pressure. The aggregate effect of these stresses is an increase in the potential for fracture if a pre-existing flaw is present in a material susceptible to brittle failure. The ferritic, low alloy steel of the reactor vessel beltline adjacent to the core, where neutron radiation gradually embrittles the material over the lifetime of the plant, can be susceptible to brittle fracture. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), “Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events,” adopted on July 23, 1985, establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed a rule, §50.61a, published on January 4, 2010, entitled “Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events” (75 FR 13). Use of the new rule by licensees is optional. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants. These analyses are intended to determine if the actual flaw density and size distribution in the licensee’s reactor vessel beltline welds are bounded

  13. Using flaw implants to qualify nuclear NDE personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Pherigo, G.L.; Pherigo, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    Intentionally flawed piping and vessel specimens are now required to simulate potential flawed conditions in nuclear power plants. These specimens will be used in a practical examination ``Performance Demonstration`` to verify the capabilities of ultrasonic testing (UT) personnel, procedures and equipment. ASME Section 11, Appendix 8, ``Performance Demonstration for Ultrasonic Examination Systems,`` was introduced into the Code to help substantiate the capability of NDE to detect and size flaws in nuclear power plant components. This paper is a brief discussion of some of the current methods used to implant flaws and will describe and evaluate the manufacturing techniques used to implant thermal fatigue cracks in stainless steel pipe and carbon steel vessel material. The accurate placement of flaw implants is critical and this paper will describe in some detail the tolerances applied to the flaw implant technology.

  14. Quantitative flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.; Roth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Surface roughness and diffraction are two factors that have been observed to affect the accuracy of flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy. In accuracies can arise when the surface of the test sample is acoustically rough. It is shown that, in this case, Snell's law is no longer valid for determining the direction of sound propagation within the sample. The relationship between the direction of sound propagation within the sample, the apparent flaw depth, and the sample's surface roughness is investigated. Diffraction effects can mask the acoustic images of minute flaws and make it difficult to establish their size, depth, and other characteristics. It is shown that for Fraunhofer diffraction conditions the acoustic image of a subsurface defect corresponds to a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Transforms based on simulated flaws are used to infer the size and shape of the actual flaw.

  15. Quantitative flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Generazio, E.R.; Roth, D.J.

    1986-06-01

    Surface roughness and diffraction are two factors that have been observed to affect the accuracy of flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy. Inaccuracies can arise when the surface of the test sample is acoustically rough. It is shown that, in this case, Snell's law is no longer valid for determining the direction of sound propagation within the sample. The relationship between the direction of sound propagation within the sample, the apparent flaw depth, and the sample's surface roughness is investigated. Diffraction effects can mask the acoustic images of minute flaws and make it difficult to establish their size, depth, and other characteristics. It is shown that for Fraunhofer diffraction conditions the acoustic image of a subsurface defect corresponds to a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Transforms based on simulated flaws are used to infer the size and shape of the actual flaw. 15 references.

  16. Quantitative flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.; Roth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Surface roughness and diffraction are two factors that have been observed to affect the accuracy of flaw characterization with scanning laser acoustic microscopy. Inaccuracies can arise when the surface of the test sample is acoustically rough. It is shown that, in this case, Snell's law is no longer valid for determining the direction of sound propagation within the sample. The relationship between the direction of sound propagation within the sample, the apparent flaw depth, and the sample's surface roughness is investigated. Diffraction effects can mask the acoustic images of minute flaws and make it difficult to establish their size, depth, and other characteristics. It is shown that for Fraunhofer diffraction conditions the acoustic image of a subsurface defect corresponds to a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Transforms based on simulated flaws are used to infer the size and shape of the actual flaw.

  17. Development of a methodology for the assessment of shallow-flaw fracture in nuclear reactor pressure vessels: Generation of biaxial shallow-flaw fracture toughness data

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow-surface flaws. Shallow-flaw fracture toughness of RPV material has been shown to be higher than that for deep flaws, because of the relaxation of crack-tip constraint. This report describes the preliminary test results for a series of cruciform specimens with a uniform depth surface flaw. These specimens are all of the same size with the same depth flaw. Temperature and biaxial load ratio are the independent variables. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading could have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. Through that temperature range, the effect of full biaxial (1:1) loading on uniaxial, shallow-flaw toughness varied from no effect near the lower shelf to a reduction of approximately 58% at higher temperatures.

  18. Estimating probable flaw distributions in PWR steam generator tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, J.A.; Turner, A.P.L.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes methods for estimating the number and size distributions of flaws of various types in PWR steam generator tubes. These estimates are needed when calculating the probable primary to secondary leakage through steam generator tubes under postulated accidents such as severe core accidents and steam line breaks. The paper describes methods for two types of predictions: (1) the numbers of tubes with detectable flaws of various types as a function of time, and (2) the distributions in size of these flaws. Results are provided for hypothetical severely affected, moderately affected and lightly affected units. Discussion is provided regarding uncertainties and assumptions in the data and analyses.

  19. Allowable aperture size of the front end for the high-heat-load undulator beamlines of SPring-8.

    PubMed

    Oura, M; Sakae, H; Sakurai, Y; Kitamura, H

    1998-05-01

    A systematic study to determinine the allowable aperture size of the front end for the SPring-8 high-heat-load undulator beamlines has been performed, from the viewpoint of protecting the front-end Be window from thermomechanical failure, and based on the results of ANSYS finite-element analyses. These results have revealed that the allowable aperture size of the front end ranges approximately from 1.06 mm(2) to 3.2 mm(2) depending on the K-parameter and the filter thickness.

  20. Pocket-size imaging devices allow for reliable bedside screening for femoral artery access site complications.

    PubMed

    Filipiak-Strzecka, Dominika; Michalski, Błażej; Kasprzak, Jarosław D; Lipiec, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to validate pocket-size imaging devices (PSIDs) as a fast screening tool for detecting complications after femoral artery puncture. Forty patients undergoing femoral artery puncture for arterial access related to percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled. Twenty-four hours after percutaneous coronary intervention, the involved inguinal region was assessed with PSIDs enabling 2-D gray-scale and color Doppler imaging. Subsequently, examination with a stationary high-end ultrasound system was performed to verify the findings of bedside examination in all patients. In 37 patients, PSID imaging had good diagnostic quality. False aneurysms (one asymptomatic) occurred in four patients, and all were recognized during bedside screening with PSID. One case of femoral artery thrombosis was confirmed with PSID and during standard ultrasonographic examination. Physical examination augmented with the quick bedside PSID examination had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 91%. PSID facilitated rapid bedside detection of serious access site complications in the vast majority of patients, including asymptomatic cases.

  1. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in Piping Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission supported the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop empirical data on the density and distribution of fabrication flaws in nuclear reactor components. These data are needed to support probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations and studies on component structural integrity. PNNL performed nondestructive examination inspections and destructive testing on archived piping welds to determine the fabrication flaw size and distribution characteristics of the flaws in nuclear power plant piping weldments. Eight different processes and product forms in piping weldments were studied including wrought stainless steel and dissimilar metal weldments. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit was performed on the data. Results were created as a function of the through-wall size of the fabrication flaws as well as the length distribution. The results are compared and contrasted with those developed for reactor pressure vessel processes and product forms. The most significant findings were that the density of fabrication flaws versus through-wall size was higher in piping weldments than that for the reactor pressure vessel weldments, and the density of fabrication flaws versus through-wall size in both reactor pressure vessel weld repairs and piping weldments were greater than the density in the original weldments. Curves showing these distributions are presented.

  2. Probabilistic simulation for flaw acceptance by dye-penetrant inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. A.; Keremes, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the problems encountered in assessing the reliability of dye-penetrant nondestructive inspection (NDI) techniques in preventing failures due to undetected surface flaws, as well as from flaw acceptance (Fitness-For-Purpose). A Monte Carlo simulation procedure which includes the major variables of the problem is presented as a means of quantifying reliability. Some issues associated with distribution selection are examined. A methodology for selecting the penetrant type and flaw acceptance size for the specific components analyzed using the simulation is proposed. Current methodology limitations are discussed along with possible future effort. Penetrant selection and acceptable sizes of detected flaws are based on a probabilistic assessment of the effect of component and dye-penetrant system variables on structural reliability.

  3. Nutrient reserves may allow for genome size increase: evidence from comparison of geophytes and their sister non-geophytic relatives

    PubMed Central

    Veselý, Pavel; Bureš, Petr; Šmarda, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The genome size of an organism is determined by its capacity to tolerate genome expansion, given the species' life strategy and the limits of a particular environment, and the ability for retrotransposon suppression and/or removal. In some giant-genomed bulb geophytes, this tolerance is explained by their ability to pre-divide cells in the dormant stages or by the selective advantage of larger cells in the rapid growth of their fleshy body. In this study, a test shows that the tendency for genome size expansion is a more universal feature of geophytes, and is a subject in need of more general consideration. Methods Differences in monoploid genome sizes were compared using standardized phylogenetically independent contrasts in 47 sister pairs of geophytic and non-geophytic taxa sampled across all the angiosperms. The genome sizes of 96 species were adopted from the literature and 53 species were newly measured using flow cytometry with propidium iodide staining. Key Results The geophytes showed increased genome sizes compared with their non-geophytic relatives, regardless of the storage organ type and regardless of whether or not vernal geophytes, polyploids or annuals were included in the analyses. Conclusions The universal tendency of geophytes to possess a higher genome size suggests the presence of a universal mechanism allowing for genome expansion. It is assumed that this is primarily due to the nutrient and energetic independence of geophytes perhaps allowing continuous synthesis of DNA, which is known to proceed in the extreme cases of vernal geophytes even in dormant stages. This independence may also be assumed as a reason for allowing large genomes in some parasitic plants, as well as the nutrient limitation of small genomes of carnivorous plants. PMID:23960044

  4. Grounding Moralism: Moral Flaws and Aesthetic Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smuts, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Can moral flaws lessen an artwork's aesthetic value? Answering yes to this question requires both that artworks can be morally flawed and that moral flaws within a work of art can have an aesthetic impact. For present purposes, the author will assume that artworks can be morally flawed by such means as endorsing immoral perspectives, culpably…

  5. Spectroscopic metrics allow in situ measurement of mean size and thickness of liquid-exfoliated few-layer graphene nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backes, Claudia; Paton, Keith R.; Hanlon, Damien; Yuan, Shengjun; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Houston, James; Smith, Ronan J.; McCloskey, David; Donegan, John F.; Coleman, Jonathan N.

    2016-02-01

    Liquid phase exfoliation is a powerful and scalable technique to produce defect-free mono- and few-layer graphene. However, samples are typically polydisperse and control over size and thickness is challenging. Notably, high throughput techniques to measure size and thickness are lacking. In this work, we have measured the extinction, absorption, scattering and Raman spectra for liquid phase exfoliated graphene nanosheets of various lateral sizes (90 <= <= 810 nm) and thicknesses (2.7 <= <= 10.4). We found all spectra to show well-defined dependences on nanosheet dimensions. Measurements of extinction and absorption spectra of nanosheet dispersions showed both peak position and spectral shape to vary with nanosheet thickness in a manner consistent with theoretical calculations. This allows the development of empirical metrics to extract the mean thickness of liquid dispersed nanosheets from an extinction (or absorption) spectrum. While the scattering spectra depended on nanosheet length, poor signal to noise ratios made the resultant length metric unreliable. By analyzing Raman spectra measured on graphene nanosheet networks, we found both the D/G intensity ratio and the width of the G-band to scale with mean nanosheet length allowing us to establish quantitative relationships. In addition, we elucidate the variation of 2D/G band intensities and 2D-band shape with the mean nanosheet thickness, allowing us to establish quantitative metrics for mean nanosheet thickness from Raman spectra.Liquid phase exfoliation is a powerful and scalable technique to produce defect-free mono- and few-layer graphene. However, samples are typically polydisperse and control over size and thickness is challenging. Notably, high throughput techniques to measure size and thickness are lacking. In this work, we have measured the extinction, absorption, scattering and Raman spectra for liquid phase exfoliated graphene nanosheets of various lateral sizes (90 <= <= 810 nm) and

  6. Effects of group size and floor space allowance on grouped sows: aggression, stress, skin injuries, and reproductive performance.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, P H; Rice, M; Nash, J; Giri, K; Butler, K L; Tilbrook, A J; Morrison, R S

    2013-10-01

    A total of 3,120 sows, in 4 time replicates, were used to determine the effects of group size and floor space on sow welfare using behavioral, physiological, health, and fitness variables. Within 1 to 7 d postinsemination, sows were assigned randomly to treatments of a 3 by 6 factorial arrangement, with 3 group sizes (10, 30, or 80 sows/pen) and 6 floor space allowances (1.4, 1.8, 2.0, 2.2, 2.4, or 3.0 m(2)/sow). Sows were housed on partially slatted concrete floors, and overhead feeders delivered 4 times/day to provide a total of 2.5 kg of feed/sow. As pen space increased from 1.4 to 3.0 m(2)/sow, aggression at feeding decreased from about 9 to 7 bouts/sow (linear, P = 0.029) and plasma cortisol concentrations decreased from about 28 to 21 ng/mL (linear, P = 0.0089) at 2 d. Although the results are in accord with a linear decline from 1.4 to 3 m(2)/sow, the results are also in accord with a decline in these measurements from 1.4 to 1.8 m(2)/sow and no further decline greater than 1.8 m(2)/sow. Farrowing rate (percentage of inseminated sows that farrowed) also increased from about 60 to 75% as space increased from 1.4 to 3.0 m(2)/sow (linear, P = 0.012). Group size was related to skin injuries on d 9 (P = 0.0017), 23 (P = 0.0046), and 51 (P = 0.0006), with groups of 10 consistently having the lowest number of total injuries over this period. Based on the aggression and cortisol results, it is credible to judge that, within the range of floor space allowances studied, sow welfare improves with increased space. However, from a sow welfare perspective, the experiment had insufficient precision to determine what is an adequate space allowance for sows. Thus, although the results definitely support a space allowance of 1.4 m(2)/sow being too small, it is not possible to give guidance on an actual space allowance at mixing that is adequate.

  7. Combined use of leaf size and economics traits allows direct comparison of hydrophyte and terrestrial herbaceous adaptive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Simon; Brusa, Guido; Sartori, Matteo; Cerabolini, Bruno E. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Hydrophytes generally exhibit highly acquisitive leaf economics. However, a range of growth forms is evident, from small, free-floating and rapidly growing Lemniden to large, broad-leaved Nymphaeiden, denoting variability in adaptive strategies. Traits used to classify adaptive strategies in terrestrial species, such as canopy height, are not applicable to hydrophytes. We hypothesize that hydrophyte leaf size traits and economics exhibit sufficient overlap with terrestrial species to allow a common classification of plant functional types, sensu Grime's CSR theory. Methods Leaf morpho-functional traits were measured for 61 species from 47 water bodies in lowland continental, sub-alpine and alpine bioclimatic zones in southern Europe and compared against the full leaf economics spectrum and leaf size range of terrestrial herbs, and between hydrophyte growth forms. Key Results Hydrophytes differed in the ranges and mean values of traits compared with herbs, but principal components analysis (PCA) demonstrated that both groups shared axes of trait variability: PCA1 encompassed size variation (area and mass), and PCA2 ranged from relatively dense, carbon-rich leaves to nitrogen-rich leaves of high specific leaf area (SLA). Most growth forms exhibited trait syndromes directly equivalent to herbs classified as R adapted, although Nymphaeiden ranged between C and SR adaptation. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that hydrophyte adaptive strategy variation reflects fundamental trade-offs in economics and size that govern all plants, and that hydrophyte adaptive strategies can be directly compared with terrestrial species by combining leaf economics and size traits. PMID:22337079

  8. Flawed Mathematical Conceptualizations: Marlon's Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Lauretta

    2013-01-01

    Adult developmental mathematics students often work under great pressure to complete the mathematics sequences designed to help them achieve success (Bryk & Treisman, 2010). Results of a teaching experiment demonstrate how the ability to reason can be impeded by flaws in students' mental representations of mathematics. The earnestness of the…

  9. Classification of flaw severity using pattern recognition for guided wave-based structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Miller, Corey A; Hinders, Mark K

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present a formal classification routine to characterize flaw severity in an aircraft-grade aluminum plate using Lamb waves. A rounded rectangle flat-bottom hole is incrementally introduced into the plate, and at each depth multi-mode Lamb wave signals are collected to study the changes in received signal due to mode conversion and scattering from the flaw. Lamb wave tomography reconstructions are used to locate and size the flaw at each depth, however information about the severity of the flaw is obscured when the flaw becomes severe enough that scattering effects dominate. The dynamic wavelet fingerprint is then used to extract features from the raw Lamb wave signals, and supervised pattern classification techniques are used to identify flaw severity with up to 80.7% accuracy for a training set and up to 51.7% accuracy on a series of validation data sets extracted from independent plate samples.

  10. Digital ultrasonics signal processing: Flaw data post processing use and description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buel, V. E.

    1981-01-01

    A modular system composed of two sets of tasks which interprets the flaw data and allows compensation of the data due to transducer characteristics is described. The hardware configuration consists of two main units. A DEC LSI-11 processor running under the RT-11 sngle job, version 2C-02 operating system, controls the scanner hardware and the ultrasonic unit. A DEC PDP-11/45 processor also running under the RT-11, version 2C-02, operating system, stores, processes and displays the flaw data. The software developed the Ultrasonics Evaluation System, is divided into two catagories; transducer characterization and flaw classification. Each category is divided further into two functional tasks: a data acquisition and a postprocessor ask. The flaw characterization collects data, compresses its, and writes it to a disk file. The data is then processed by the flaw classification postprocessing task. The use and operation of a flaw data postprocessor is described.

  11. Digital ultrasonics signal processing: Flaw data post processing use and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buel, V. E.

    1981-09-01

    A modular system composed of two sets of tasks which interprets the flaw data and allows compensation of the data due to transducer characteristics is described. The hardware configuration consists of two main units. A DEC LSI-11 processor running under the RT-11 sngle job, version 2C-02 operating system, controls the scanner hardware and the ultrasonic unit. A DEC PDP-11/45 processor also running under the RT-11, version 2C-02, operating system, stores, processes and displays the flaw data. The software developed the Ultrasonics Evaluation System, is divided into two catagories; transducer characterization and flaw classification. Each category is divided further into two functional tasks: a data acquisition and a postprocessor ask. The flaw characterization collects data, compresses its, and writes it to a disk file. The data is then processed by the flaw classification postprocessing task. The use and operation of a flaw data postprocessor is described.

  12. Surface flaw detection in structural ceramics by scanning photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Heitman, P. W.; Wakefield, T. D.; Silversmith, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser-scanned photoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect tightly closed surface cracks in three structural ceramic materials: sintered silicon nitride, reaction-bonded silicon nitride, and sintered silicon carbide. It is found that the amplitude of the photoacoustic signal from the flaws is greater for the silicon nitrides than for silicon carbide, which is attributed to the lower thermal diffusivity of silicon nitride as well as differences in the grain size distribution and chemical composition. Signal amplitude, reproducibility, and signal-to-noise ratio are acceptable for effective flaw detection

  13. Effects of group-size-floor space allowance during the nursery phase of production on growth, physiology, and hematology in replacement gilts.

    PubMed

    Callahan, S R; Cross, A J; DeDecker, A E; Lindemann, M D; Estienne, M J

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to determine effects of nursery group-size-floor space allowance on growth, physiology, and hematology of replacement gilts. A 3 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments was used wherein gilts classified as large, medium, or small ( = 2537; BW = 5.6 ± 0.6 kg) from 13 groups of weaned pigs were placed in pens of 14, 11, or 8 pigs resulting in floor space allowances of 0.15, 0.19, or 0.27 m/pig, respectively. Pigs were weighed on d 0 (weaning) and d 46 (exit from nursery). The ADG was affected by group-size-floor space allowance × pig size ( = 0.04). Large- and medium-size gilts allowed the most floor space had greater ( < 0.05) ADG than similar size gilts allowed the least floor space but for small size gilts there was no effect ( > 0.05) of group size-floor space allowance. Mortality in the nursery was not affected ( > 0.05) by treatment, size, or treatment × size and overall was approximately 2.1%. Complete blood counts and blood chemistry analyses were performed on samples collected at d 6 and 43 from a subsample of gilts ( = 18/group-size-floor space allowance) within a single group. The concentration ( < 0.01) and percentage ( = 0.03) of reticulocytes was the least and red blood cell distribution width the greatest ( < 0.01) in gilts allowed 0.15 m floor space (effects of treatment). Blood calcium was affected by treatment ( = 0.02) and concentrations for gilts allowed the greatest and intermediate amounts of floor space were greater ( < 0.05) than for gilts allowed the least floor space. Serum concentrations of cortisol were not affected by treatment × day ( = 0.27). Cortisol concentrations increased from d 6 to d 43 in all groups and were affected by day ( < 0.01) but not treatment ( = 0.53). Greater space allowance achieved by placing fewer pigs per pen in the nursery affected blood parameters and resulted in large- and medium-size replacement gilts displaying increased ADG. Further study will determine if these effects influence

  14. Numerical simulations of electromagnetic behavior and AC loss in rectangular bulk superconductor with an elliptical flaw under AC magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jing; Zhou, Youhe

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a finite element model based on the H-formulation to solve the electromagnetic behavior and AC loss in rectangular bulk superconductor with an elliptical flaw in AC external field condition. Both the interior flaw and the edge flaw are considered. A modified E-J power law which is valid for an arbitrary current density range is adopted in order to predict the strong local enhancement of the current density in the vicinity of the flaw tip. The results for the usual E-J power law are calculated for comparison as well. The simulation results show that the existence of the flaw significantly blocks the flow of the induced current and forces the current to redistribute around it. Meanwhile, the strong local enhancement of the current density is observed in the vicinity of the flaw tip. Furthermore, the influences of the size and position of the flaw on the local enhancement of the current density in the vicinity of the flaw tip are investigated. In addition, it is found that the influence of the flaw on the AC loss of the sample is slight for both cases of the interior flaw and the edge flaw.

  15. Optical tracer size differences allow quantitation of active pumping rate versus Stokes-Einstein diffusion in lymphatic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-10-01

    Lymphatic uptake of interstitially administered agents occurs by passive convective-diffusive inflow driven by interstitial concentration and pressure, while the downstream lymphatic transport is facilitated by active propulsive contractions of lymphatic vessel walls. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging in mice was used to measure these central components of lymphatic transport for the first time, using two different-sized molecules-methylene blue (MB) and fluorescence-labeled antibody immunoglobulin G (IgG)-IRDye 680RD. This work confirms the hypothesis that lymphatic passive inflow and active propulsion rates can be separated based upon the relative differences in Stokes-Einstein diffusion coefficient. This coefficient specifically affects the passive-diffusive uptake when the interstitial volume and pressure are constant. Parameters such as mean time-to-peak signal, overall fluorescence signal intensities, and number of active peristaltic pulses, were estimated from temporal imaging data. While the mean time to attain peak signal representative of diffusion-dominated flow in the lymph vessels was 0.6±0.2 min for MB and 8±6 min for IgG, showing a size dependence, the active propulsion rates were 3.4±0.8 pulses/min and 3.3±0.5 pulses/min, respectively, appearing size independent. The propulsion rates for both dyes decreased with clearance from the interstitial injection-site, indicating intrinsic control of the smooth muscles in response to interstitial pressure. This approach to size-comparative agent flow imaging of lymphatic function can enable noninvasive characterization of diseases related to uptake and flow in lymph networks.

  16. Ultrasonic imaging of material flaws exploiting multipath information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xizhong; Zhang, Yimin D.; Demirli, Ramazan; Amin, Moeness G.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we consider ultrasonic imaging for the visualization of flaws in a material. Ultrasonic imaging is a powerful nondestructive testing (NDT) tool which assesses material conditions via the detection, localization, and classification of flaws inside a structure. Multipath exploitations provide extended virtual array apertures and, in turn, enhance imaging capability beyond the limitation of traditional multisensor approaches. We utilize reflections of ultrasonic signals which occur when encountering different media and interior discontinuities. The waveforms observed at the physical as well as virtual sensors yield additional measurements corresponding to different aspect angles. Exploitation of multipath information addresses unique issues observed in ultrasonic imaging. (1) Utilization of physical and virtual sensors significantly extends the array aperture for image enhancement. (2) Multipath signals extend the angle of view of the narrow beamwidth of the ultrasound transducers, allowing improved visibility and array design flexibility. (3) Ultrasonic signals experience difficulty in penetrating a flaw, thus the aspect angle of the observation is limited unless access to other sides is available. The significant extension of the aperture makes it possible to yield flaw observation from multiple aspect angles. We show that data fusion of physical and virtual sensor data significantly improves the detection and localization performance. The effectiveness of the proposed multipath exploitation approach is demonstrated through experimental studies.

  17. Specific features of the spectral properties of a photonic crystal with a nanocomposite defect with allowance for the size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrov, S. Ya.; Pankin, P. S.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2015-07-01

    The spectral properties of a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) with a structure defect (a layer of isotropic nanocomposite inserted between two multilayer dielectric mirrors) have been investigated. The nanocomposite consists of spherical gold nanoparticles dispersed in a transparent matrix; it is characterized by effective resonant permittivity. The dependence of the transmission and absorption spectra on the size and concentration of nanoparticles is analyzed. It is shown that the transmission spectrum contains, along with the band gap caused by Bragg diffraction of light, an additional nontransmission band due to the nanocomposite absorption near the resonant frequency.

  18. Lifetime Predictions of a Titanium Silicate Glass with Machined Flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly

    2003-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate glass to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure and to compare the results with those of a previous study. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions. The material strength and lifetime was seen to increase due to the removal of residual stress through grinding and polishing. Influence on time-to-failure is addressed for the case with and without residual stress present. Titanium silicate glass otherwise known as ultra-low expansion (ULE)* glass is a candidate for use in applications requiring low thermal expansion characteristics such as telescope mirrors. The Hubble Space Telescope s primary mirror was manufactured from ULE glass. ULE contains 7.5% titanium dioxide which in combination with silica results in a homogenous glass with a linear expansion coefficient near zero. delayed failure . This previous study was based on a 230/270 grit surface. The grinding and polishing process reduces the surface flaw size and subsurface damage, and relieves residual stress by removing the material with successively smaller grinding media. This results in an increase in strength of the optic during the grinding and polishing sequence. Thus, a second study was undertaken using samples with a surface finish typically achieved for mirror elements, to observe the effects of surface finishing on the time-to-failure predictions. An allowable stress can be calculated for this material based upon modulus of rupture data; however, this does not take into account the problem of delayed failure, most likely due to stress corrosion, which can significantly shorten lifetime. Fortunately, a theory based on fracture mechanics has been developed enabling lifetime predictions to be made for brittle materials susceptible to delayed failure. Knowledge of the factors governing the rate of subcritical flaw growth in a given environment enables the development of

  19. SAFT inspections for developing empirical database of fabrication flaws in nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Pardini, Allan F.

    1998-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a methodology for estimating the size and density distribution of fabrication flaws in U.S. nuclear reactor pressure vessels. This involves the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of reactor pressure vessel materials and the destructive validation of the flaws found. NDE has been performed on reactor pressure vessel material made by Babcock & Wilcox and Combustion Engineering. A metallographic analysis is being performed to validate the flaw density and size distributions estimated from the 2500 indications of fabrication flaws that were detected and characterized in the very sensitive SAFT-UT (synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing) inspection data from the Pressure Vessel Research User Facility (PVRUF) vessel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Research plans are also described for expanding the work to include other reactor pressure vessel materials.

  20. Does prey size matter? Novel observations of feeding in the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) allow a test of predator-prey size relationships.

    PubMed

    Fossette, Sabrina; Gleiss, Adrian C; Casey, James P; Lewis, Andrew R; Hays, Graeme C

    2012-06-23

    Optimal foraging models predict that large predators should concentrate on large prey in order to maximize their net gain of energy intake. Here, we show that the largest species of sea turtle, Dermochelys coriacea, does not strictly adhere to this general pattern. Field observations combined with a theoretical model suggest that a 300 kg leatherback turtle would meet its energetic requirements by feeding for 3-4 h a day on 4 g jellyfish, but only if prey were aggregated in high-density patches. Therefore, prey abundance rather than prey size may, in some cases, be the overriding parameter for foraging leatherbacks. This is a classic example where the presence of small prey in the diet of a large marine predator may reflect profitable foraging decisions if the relatively low energy intake per small individual prey is offset by high encounter rates and minimal capture and handling costs. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantitative estimates of intake rate for this species.

  1. Development of an optical fiber interferometer for detection of surface flaws in aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective was to demonstrate the potential of using an optical fiber interferometer (OFI) to detect surface flaws in aluminum samples. Standard ultrasonic excitation was used to generate Rayleigh surface waves. After the waves interacted with a defect, the modified responses were detected using the OFI and the results were analyzed for time-of-flight and frequency content to predict the size and location of the flaws.

  2. Flaw Tolerance In Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Len; Flom, Yury

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results of the second part of an on-going effort to gain better understanding of defect tolerance in braze joints. In the first part of this three-part series, we mechanically tested and modeled the strength of the lap joints as a function of the overlap distance. A failure criterion was established based on the zone damage theory, which predicts the dependence of the lap joint shear strength on the overlap distance, based on the critical size of a finite damage zone or an overloaded region in the joint. In this second part of the study, we experimentally verified the applicability of the damage zone criterion on prediction of the shear strength of the lap joint and introduced controlled flaws into the lap joints. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the lap joint strength as a function of flaw size and its location through mechanical testing and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) employing damage zone criterion for definition of failure. The results obtained from the second part of the investigation confirmed that the failure of the ductile lap shear brazed joints occurs when the damage zone reaches approximately 10% of the overlap width. The same failure criterion was applicable to the lap joints containing flaws.

  3. On flaw tolerance of nacre: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yue; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-03-06

    As a natural composite, nacre has an elegant staggered 'brick-and-mortar' microstructure consisting of mineral platelets glued by organic macromolecules, which endows the material with superior mechanical properties to achieve its biological functions. In this paper, a microstructure-based crack-bridging model is employed to investigate how the strength of nacre is affected by pre-existing structural defects. Our analysis demonstrates that owing to its special microstructure and the toughening effect of platelets, nacre has a superior flaw-tolerance feature. The maximal crack size that does not evidently reduce the tensile strength of nacre is up to tens of micrometres, about three orders higher than that of pure aragonite. Through dimensional analysis, a non-dimensional parameter is proposed to quantify the flaw-tolerance ability of nacreous materials in a wide range of structural parameters. This study provides us some inspirations for optimal design of advanced biomimetic composites.

  4. NON-DESTRUCTIVE METHOD AND MEANS FOR FLAW DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Hochschild, R.

    1959-03-10

    BS>An improved method is presented for the nondestructive detection of flaws in olectrictilly conductivc articles using magnetic field. According to thc method a homogoneous mignetic field is established in the test article;it right angle" to the artyicle. A probe is aligned with its axis transverse to the translates so hat th4 probe scans the surface of the test article while the axis of the robe is transverse to the direction of translation of the article. In this manner any output current obtained in thc probe is an indication of the size and location of a flaw in the article under test, with a miiiimum of signal pick- up in the probe from the established magnetic field.

  5. On flaw tolerance of nacre: a theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yue; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-01-01

    As a natural composite, nacre has an elegant staggered ‘brick-and-mortar’ microstructure consisting of mineral platelets glued by organic macromolecules, which endows the material with superior mechanical properties to achieve its biological functions. In this paper, a microstructure-based crack-bridging model is employed to investigate how the strength of nacre is affected by pre-existing structural defects. Our analysis demonstrates that owing to its special microstructure and the toughening effect of platelets, nacre has a superior flaw-tolerance feature. The maximal crack size that does not evidently reduce the tensile strength of nacre is up to tens of micrometres, about three orders higher than that of pure aragonite. Through dimensional analysis, a non-dimensional parameter is proposed to quantify the flaw-tolerance ability of nacreous materials in a wide range of structural parameters. This study provides us some inspirations for optimal design of advanced biomimetic composites. PMID:24402917

  6. Inspection of surface flaws by comparator microscopy.

    PubMed

    Baker, L R

    1988-11-15

    The increasing attention paid in recent years to control of surface quality has exposed the lack of objectivity of existing standards relating to flaws such as digs and scratches. The present requirements of the customer and supplier of optical components for improved standards are discussed, and recent attempts to satisfy these requirements are reviewed. It is concluded that a technique, described as comparator microscopy, in which a width of line or slit is identified which removes from a transmitted or reflected beam the same amount of light as the flaw under examination, has much in its favor in terms of user needs. The method, which is under consideration as the basis of an ISO standard, is described, and results are presented indicating how this concept of line-equivalent width can be used to compare different national standard flaws. Extending this technique to measure flaws and polish on-machine is suggested as a future possibility.

  7. NON-DESTRUCTIVE FLAW DETECTION APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Stateman, M.J.; Holloway, H.R.

    1957-12-17

    An apparatus is described for the non-destructive detection of flaws in electrical conducting articles. The particular feature of the detection apparatus is that a flaw in the front or back of the test article will not be masked by signals caused by the passage of the end and front of the article through the detection apparatus. The present invention alleviates the above problem by mounting detection coils on directly opposite sides of the test passageway so that the axes of the pickup coils are perpendicular to the axis of an energizing coil through which the article is passed. A flaw in the article will cause a change in the voltage induced in one pickup coil, but passage of the end or front of the article will not produce unequal signals. The signals are compared in appropriate electrical circuitry to actuate a recorder only when unequal signals are present, indicating the presence of a flaw.

  8. ULTRASONIC FLAW DETECTION METHOD AND MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Worlton, D.C.

    1961-08-15

    A method of detecting subsurface flaws in an object using ultrasonic waves is described. An ultnasonic wave of predetermined velocity and frequency is transmitted to engage the surface of the object at a predetermined angle of inci dence thereto. The incident angle of the wave to the surface is determined with respect to phase velocity, incident wave velocity, incident wave frequency, and the estimated depth of the flaw so that Lamb waves of a particular type and mode are induced only in the portion of the object between the flaw and the surface. These Lamb waves are then detected as they leave the object at an angle of exit equal to the angle of incidence. No waves wlll be generated in the object and hence received if no flaw exists beneath the surface. (AEC)

  9. Detection and Characterization of Flaws in Sprayed on Foam Insulation with Pulsed Terahertz Frequency Electromagnetic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2005-01-01

    The detection and repair of flaws such as voids and delaminations in the sprayed on foam insulation of the external tank reduces the probability of foam debris during shuttle ascent. The low density of sprayed on foam insulation along with it other physical properties makes detection of flaws difficult with conventional techniques. An emerging technology that has application for quantitative evaluation of flaws in the foam is pulsed electromagnetic waves at terahertz frequencies. The short wavelengths of these terahertz pulses make them ideal for imaging flaws in the foam. This paper examines the application of terahertz pulses for flaw detection in foam characteristic of the foam insulation of the external tank. Of particular interest is the detection of voids and delaminations, encapsulated in the foam or at the interface between the foam and a metal backing. The technique is shown to be capable of imaging small voids and delaminations through as much as 20 cm of foam. Methods for reducing the temporal responses of the terahertz pulses to improve flaw detection and yield quantitative characterizations of the size and location of the flaws are discussed.

  10. Thermography And Ultrasonics Find Flaws In Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Smith, Barry T.; Winfree, William P.

    1993-01-01

    Flaws first located in infrared imagery, then probed ultrasonically to reveal details. Thermographic and ultrasonic techniques, applied sequentially, constitute basis of developmental method of nondestructive inspection of structures made of lightweight composite materials like carbon-fiber/epoxy-matrix laminates. Method enables rapid detection and evaluation of damage and other flaws in composite structures. Does not require access to both sides of structure to be inspected.

  11. Full waveform inversion for ultrasonic flaw identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Robert; Rank, Ernst

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic Nondestructive Testing is concerned with detecting flaws inside components without causing physical damage. It is possible to detect flaws using ultrasound measurements but usually no additional details about the flaw like position, dimension or orientation are available. The information about these details is hidden in the recorded experimental signals. The idea of full waveform inversion is to adapt the parameters of an initial simulation model of the undamaged specimen by minimizing the discrepancy between these simulated signals and experimentally measured signals of the flawed specimen. Flaws in the structure are characterized by a change or deterioration in the material properties. Commonly, full waveform inversion is mostly applied in seismology on a larger scale to infer mechanical properties of the earth. We propose to use acoustic full waveform inversion for structural parameters to visualize the interior of the component. The method is adapted to US NDT by combining multiple similar experiments on the test component as the typical small amount of sensors is not sufficient for a successful imaging. It is shown that the combination of simulations and multiple experiments can be used to detect flaws and their position, dimension and orientation in emulated simulation cases.

  12. Flaw tolerance promoted by dissipative deformation mechanisms between material building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verho, Tuukka; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-09-01

    Novel high-performance composite materials often draw inspiration from natural materials such as bone or mollusc shells. A prime feature of such composites is that they are, like their natural counterparts, quasibrittle. They are tolerant to material flaws up to a certain characteristic flaw-tolerant size scale, exhibiting high strength and toughness, but start to behave in a brittle manner when sufficiently large flaws are present. Here, we establish that better flaw tolerance can be achieved by maximizing fracture toughness relative to the maximum elastic energy available in the material, and we demonstrate this concept with simple two-dimensional coarse-grained simulations where the transition from brittle to quasibrittle behaviour is examined.

  13. Building better flaws for thermographic qualification and quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, James L.; Russell, Samuel S.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-11-01

    The concurrent inspection of calibrated test panels manufactured with artificially created, although realistically behaving flaws is essential to providing confidence in the thermographic inspection process of advanced composite structure. For honeycomb type composite structures of principle interest is identifying delamination and disbond type defects along the bondline between the core and faceplate, as well as within the faceplate itself. To ensure that these types of flaws will be caught during the inspection cycle of a structural component the test panels must have similar behaving artificial defects. A common practice for the manufacture of artificial flaws in test panels is the use of embedded Teflon tape, or other release agents, for force an unbond condition within the laminate. These procedures though, yield results that are questionable, since one is not sure whether or not the inspection process is identifying the unbond or the inserted materials. Several fabrication methods are compared and contrasted in this paper, for controlling the degree of disbond to simulate defects resulting from mishandling or manufacturing errors without the need for inserting foreign materials in the laminate. These results are also compared to those obtained by inspecting a composite inter-tank test structure which used Teflon tape as the means to simulate critically sized defects.

  14. Fatigue loading and R-curve behavior of a dental glass-ceramic with multiple flaw distributions

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Gaurav V.; Duan, Yuanyuan; Bona, Alvaro Della; Hill, Thomas J.; John, Kenneth St.; Griggs, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effects of surface finish and mechanical loading on the rising toughness curve (R-curve) behavior of a fluorapatite glass-ceramic (IPS e.max ZirPress) and to determine a statistical model for fitting fatigue lifetime data with multiple flaw distributions. Materials and Methods Rectangular beam specimens were fabricated by pressing. Two groups of specimens (n=30) with polished (15 μm) or air abraded surface were tested under rapid monotonic loading in oil. Additional polished specimens were subjected to cyclic loading at 2 Hz (n=44) and 10 Hz (n=36). All fatigue tests were performed using a fully articulated four-point flexure fixture in 37°C water. Fractography was used to determine the critical flaw size and estimate fracture toughness. To prove the presence of R-curve behavior, non-linear regression was used. Forward stepwise regression was performed to determine the effects on fracture toughness of different variables, such as initial flaw type, critical flaw size, critical flaw eccentricity, cycling frequency, peak load, and number of cycles. Fatigue lifetime data were fit to an exclusive flaw model. Results There was an increase in fracture toughness values with increasing critical flaw size for both loading methods (rapid monotonic loading and fatigue). The values for the fracture toughness ranged from 0.75 to 1.1 MPa·m1/2 reaching a plateau at different critical flaw sizes based on loading method. Significance Cyclic loading had a significant effect on the R-curve behavior. The fatigue lifetime distribution was dependent on the flaw distribution, and it fit well to an exclusive flaw model. PMID:24034441

  15. Midland reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1993-12-01

    The results of laboratory nondestructive examination (NDE), and destructive cross-sectioning of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor pressure vessel were analyzed per a previously developed methodology in order to develop a flaw distribution. The flaw distributions developed from the NDE results obtained by two different ultrasonic test (UT) inspections (Electric Power Research Institute NDE Center and Pacific Northwest Laboratories) were not statistically significantly different. However, the distribution developed from the NDE Center`s (destructive) cross-sectioning-based data was found to be significantly different than those obtained through the UT inspections. A fracture mechanics-based comparison of the flaw distributions showed that the cross-sectioning-based data, conservatively interpreted (all defects considered as flaws), gave a significantly lower vessel failure probability when compared with the failure probability values obtained using the UT-based distributions. Given that the cross-sectioning data were reportedly biased toward larger, more significant-appearing (by UT) indications, it is concluded that the nondestructive examinations produced definitively conservative results. In addition to the Midland vessel inspection-related analyses, a set of twenty-seven numerical simulations, designed to provide a preliminary quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the flaw distribution method used here, were conducted. The calculations showed that, in more than half the cases, the analysis produced reasonably accurate predictions.

  16. Simulating the X-Ray Image Contrast to Set-Up Techniques with Desired Flaw Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper provides simulation data of previous work by the author in developing a model for estimating detectability of crack-like flaws in radiography. The methodology is being developed to help in implementation of NASA Special x-ray radiography qualification, but is generically applicable to radiography. The paper describes a method for characterizing X-ray detector resolution for crack detection. Applicability of ASTM E 2737 resolution requirements to the model are also discussed. The paper describes a model for simulating the detector resolution. A computer calculator application, discussed here, also performs predicted contrast and signal-to-noise ratio calculations. Results of various simulation runs in calculating x-ray flaw size parameter and image contrast for varying input parameters such as crack depth, crack width, part thickness, x-ray angle, part-to-detector distance, part-to-source distance, source sizes, and detector sensitivity and resolution are given as 3D surfaces. These results demonstrate effect of the input parameters on the flaw size parameter and the simulated image contrast of the crack. These simulations demonstrate utility of the flaw size parameter model in setting up x-ray techniques that provide desired flaw detectability in radiography. The method is applicable to film radiography, computed radiography, and digital radiography.

  17. Compassionate Allowances

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to content Social Security Search Menu Languages Sign in / up Compassionate Allowances Featured Items Compassionate Allowances Conditions CAL conditions are selected using information received ...

  18. Flaw Growth in Complex Structure. Volume 1. Technical Discussion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    SJ2a a+R) (29)I 1.1215 By definition the corner flaw correction factor ’co times K1 () (from(co) Ths Equation (18)) equals K I Thus, K (co)KI co - K...STRUCTURE WHILE INTACT *ASSUMED INITIAL DAMAGE SIZE aLT DIM TYPICAL INSPECTIONT,, INTER VAL T,~ I DESIGN [lES:GN LIFETIME L ET ME . REQUIRED MINIMUM 4F...INSPECTABILITY T THROUGH PERIOD XTX FE In-Flight Evident Return to Base PFE 2GE Ground Evident 1 Flight P GE 2WV Walkaround 50 Flights PWV SV Special

  19. Glass breaking strength: The role of surface flaws and treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D.

    1985-01-01

    Although the intrinsic strength of silicon dioxide glass is of the order of 10 to the 6th power lb/sq in, the practical strength is roughly two orders of magnitude below this theoretical limit, and depends almost entirely on the surface condition of the glass, that is, the number and size of flaws and the residual surface compression (temper) in the glass. Glass parts always fail in tension when these flaws grow under sustained loading to some critical size. Research associated with glass encapsulated crystalline-Si photovoltaic (PV) modules has greatly expanded our knowledge of glass breaking strength and developed sizeable data base for commercially available glass types. A detailed design algorithm is developed for thickness sizing of rectangular glass plates subject to pressure loads. Additional studies examine the strength of glass under impact loading conditions such as that caused by hail. Although the fundamentals of glass breakage are directly applicable to thin film modules, the fracture strength of typical numerical glass must be replaced with data that reflect the high temperature tin oxide processing, laser scribing, and edge processing peculiar to thin film modules. The fundamentals of glass breakage applicable to thin film modules and preliminary fracture strength data for a variety of 1 ft square glass specimens representing preprocessed and post processed sheets from current amorphous-Si module manufacturers are presented.

  20. Ultrasonic Phased Array Evaluations Of Implanted And In-Situ Grown Flaws In Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2011-07-31

    A set of circumferentially oriented thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs) were implanted into three cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) pressurizer (PZR) surge-line specimen welds (pipe-to-elbow configuration) that were salvaged from a U.S. commercial nuclear power plant that had not been operated. Thus, these welds were fabricated using vintage CASS materials that were formed in the 1970s. Additionally, in-situ grown TFCs were placed in the adjacent CASS base material of one of these specimens. Ultrasonic phased-array responses from both types of flaws (implanted and in-situ grown) were analyzed for detection and characterization based on sizing and signal-to-noise determination. Multiple probes were employed covering the 0.8 to 2.0 MHz frequency range. To further validate the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) findings, an independent in-service inspection (ISI) supplier evaluated the flaws with their American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code, Section XI, Appendix VIII-qualified procedure. The results obtained by PNNL personnel compared favorably to the ISI supplier results. All examined flaws were detected and sized within the ASME Code-allowable limits.

  1. Window flaw detection by backscatter lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, L. K.; Minton, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portable fiber-optic probe detects tiny flaws in transparent materials. Probe transmits light through surface to illuminate interior of material by backscattering off its edges. Light-sensitive contact paper records scratch pattern. Technique can be used for rapid visual checks. Flexible fiber optics are safely used in explosive or flammable areas; they present no hazard of breakage or contamination in controlled environments.

  2. NCLB Transfer Policy Seen as Flawed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrie, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    This article examines what some people see as flaws in the transfer policy provision of the No Child Left Behind law. Advocates of the policy are calling for providing schools with incentives to accept transfers and for giving parents more time, information, and options, among other changes. States need to hold districts' feet to the fire, those…

  3. Prevention of design flaws in multicomputer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Multicomputer configurations and redundancy management techniques used in various airborne systems were investigated to determine methods to prevent and/or treat generic design flaws. The findings are intended for use in the design of a computer system for use in the space shuttle orbiter.

  4. Steam generator tube integrity flaw acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Cochet, B.

    1997-02-01

    The author discusses the establishment of a flaw acceptance criteria with respect to flaws in steam generator tubing. The problem is complicated because different countries take different approaches to the problem. The objectives in general are grouped in three broad areas: to avoid the unscheduled shutdown of the reactor during normal operation; to avoid tube bursts; to avoid excessive leak rates in the event of an accidental overpressure event. For each degradation mechanism in the tubes it is necessary to know answers to an array of questions, including: how well does NDT testing perform against this problem; how rapidly does such degradation develop; how well is this degradation mechanism understood. Based on the above information it is then possible to come up with a policy to look at flaw acceptance. Part of this criteria is a schedule for the frequency of in-service inspection and also a policy for when to plug flawed tubes. The author goes into a broad discussion of each of these points in his paper.

  5. Power and sample size for the S:T repeated measures design combined with a linear mixed-effects model allowing for missing data.

    PubMed

    Tango, Toshiro

    2017-02-13

    Tango (Biostatistics 2016) proposed a new repeated measures design called the S:T repeated measures design, combined with generalized linear mixed-effects models and sample size calculations for a test of the average treatment effect that depend not only on the number of subjects but on the number of repeated measures before and after randomization per subject used for analysis. The main advantages of the proposed design combined with the generalized linear mixed-effects models are (1) it can easily handle missing data by applying the likelihood-based ignorable analyses under the missing at random assumption and (2) it may lead to a reduction in sample size compared with the simple pre-post design. In this article, we present formulas for calculating power and sample sizes for a test of the average treatment effect allowing for missing data within the framework of the S:T repeated measures design with a continuous response variable combined with a linear mixed-effects model. Examples are provided to illustrate the use of these formulas.

  6. Method for fabricating prescribed flaws in the interior of metals

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, David K.; Thompson, Donald O.

    1989-03-07

    The method for fabricating a metal body having a flaw of predetermined size and shape located therein comprises placing half of the metal powder required to make the metal body in the die of a press and pressing it to create a flat upper surface thereon. A piece of copper foil is cut to the size and shape of the desired interior crack and placed on the upper surface of the powder and centered in position. The remaining powder is then placed in the die to cover the copper foil. The powder is first cold pressed and removed from the press. The powder metal piece is then sintered in a furnace at a temperature above the melting point of the copper and below the melting point of the metal. It is then removed from the furnace, cooled to room temperature, and placed back in the die and pressed further. This procedure results in an interior flaw or crack. Modified forms of the method involve using a press-sinter-press-sinter cycle with the first sinter being below the melting point of the copper and the second sinter being above the melting point of the copper and below the melting point of the metal.

  7. Procedure for flaw detection in cast stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.

    1988-01-01

    A method of ultrasonic flaw detection in cast stainless steel components incorporating the steps of determining the nature of the microstructure of the cast stainless steel at the site of the flaw detection measurements by ultrasonic elements independent of the component thickness at the site; choosing from a plurality of flaw detection techniques, one such technique appropriate to the nature of the microstructure as determined and detecting flaws by use of the chosen technique.

  8. Apparatus and method for detecting flaws in conductive material

    SciTech Connect

    Hockey, Ronald L.; Riechers, Douglas M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an improved sensing unit for detecting flaws in conductive material wherein the sensing coil is positioned away from a datum of either the datum point, the datum orientation, or a combination thereof. Position of the sensing coil away from a datum increases sensitivity for detecting flaws having a characteristic volume less than about 1 mm.sup.3, and further permits detection of subsurface flaws. Use of multiple sensing coils permits quantification of flaw area or volume.

  9. Apparatus and method for detecting flaws in conductive material

    SciTech Connect

    Hockey, R.L.; Riechers, D.M.

    1999-11-16

    The present invention is an improved sensing unit for detecting flaws in conductive material wherein the sensing coil is positioned away from a datum of either the datum point, the datum orientation, or a combination thereof. Position of the sensing coil away from a datum increases sensitivity for detecting flaws having a characteristic volume less than about 1 mm{sup 3}, and further permits detection of subsurface flaws. Use of multiple sensing coils permits quantification of flaw area or volume.

  10. Effect of Flaw Removal on Billets in Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kazunari; Shinohara, Tetsuo

    2007-05-01

    High-quality wires, which are used for components such as valve springs of automobiles, are fabricated by rolling and drawing. Even a minute flaw on the surface of the wire leads to a significant decrease in fatigue strength. It is possible to decrease the number of surface flaws during some of the rolling processes; however in most cases, it is difficult to remove flaws. Under such circumstances, high-quality wires are fabricated, at many wire manufacturing factories, by rolling and drawing after removing surface flaws on the raw material. However, the flaw removal process is carried out relying on the experience of onsite workers; many of the mechanisms underlying flaw removal have not been clarified. In this study, billet and wire that have traces formed during flaw removal were subjected to rolling to investigate the behavior of deformation and the recovery of the flaw-removal traces. When flaw-removal traces exist on a billet surface that comes into contact with the roll used in rolling, the traces are removed without difficulty. However, when the flaw-removal traces exist on a surface that does not come into contact with the roll, the traces tend to become wrinkles due to compression from the upper and lower directions. Therefore, when removing the surface flaw on billet before rolling, it is important to remove flaw part thinly.

  11. A two-scale algorithm for detection of multiple flaws in structures modeled with XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Waisman, Haim; Betti, Raimondo

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for detection of multiple flaws in structures as an inverse process, where the forward problem is based on eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM). The proposed algorithm can be applied to quantify any flaw with arbitrary shape and size (e.g., cracks, voids, or their combination) whose number is unknown beforehand, and is shown to be significantly more efficient than other methods proposed in the literature. The basic concept is to employ a two-scale optimization framework, where first a coarse flaw region is detected and then fine scale convergence is used to zoom in on the flaw. Both optimization steps rely on a forward problem in which an XFEM model with both circular and elliptical enrichments is used. The advantage of XFEM is in the alleviation of costly remeshing techniques when candidate flaws keep updating with the optimization process. The proposed hierarchical optimizers include both heuristic and gradient-based algorithms, such as the discrete artificial bee colony (DABC) algorithms and the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) method. In details, the first step employs a DABC optimization as a coarse-scale search where the optimizer is limited to specific solutions that correspond to locations and shapes of flaws, thus converting a continuous optimization problem into a discrete optimization with a small number of choices. The results of the first step provide local subdomains and rough identified flaw parameters, which can be considered as search space reduction and initial guess for a fine tuning optimization step. This solution zooming is carried out by the BFGS method and leads to a fast converging method as illustrated on two benchmark detection examples.

  12. Experimental quantum key distribution with source flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feihu; Wei, Kejin; Sajeed, Shihan; Kaiser, Sarah; Sun, Shihai; Tang, Zhiyuan; Qian, Li; Makarov, Vadim; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-09-01

    Decoy-state quantum key distribution (QKD) is a standard technique in current quantum cryptographic implementations. Unfortunately, existing experiments have two important drawbacks: the state preparation is assumed to be perfect without errors and the employed security proofs do not fully consider the finite-key effects for general attacks. These two drawbacks mean that existing experiments are not guaranteed to be proven to be secure in practice. Here, we perform an experiment that shows secure QKD with imperfect state preparations over long distances and achieves rigorous finite-key security bounds for decoy-state QKD against coherent attacks in the universally composable framework. We quantify the source flaws experimentally and demonstrate a QKD implementation that is tolerant to channel loss despite the source flaws. Our implementation considers more real-world problems than most previous experiments, and our theory can be applied to general discrete-variable QKD systems. These features constitute a step towards secure QKD with imperfect devices.

  13. Ultrasonic Imaging and Automated Flaw Detection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    imager sold by Searle Ultrasound. An LSI-11 microcomputer is interfaced to the imager with custom designed modules. Ultrasonic image data is loaded...phased array ultrasonic imager, an LSI-11 microcomputer , and an assortment of custom-designed electronic modules. There is also a CRT display terminal...AD CONTRACTOR REPORT ARCCB-CR-86011 ULTRASONIC IMAGING AND AUTOMATED FLAW DETECTION SYSTEM L. JONES DTIC3ZLECTE J. F. MC DONALD JUNCTE G.P

  14. Magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil's longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multilayer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  15. Magnetoresistive Flux Focusing Eddy Current Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil s longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multi-layer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  16. Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessel Repair Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of reactor pressure vessels. This work indicates that the large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the repair ends. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using high sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing, validation by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and complemented by destructive testing.

  17. A Comparison of Ultrasonic Flaw Responses as Observed through Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess ultrasonic techniques for detection and sizing of flaws from the opposite side of wrought austenitic piping welds. A series of stainless steel specimens with implanted flaws were examined using phased-array ultrasonic probes. These examinations were conducted from both sides of the full-penetration structural piping welds, with emphasis on comparing the responses from the far-side inspection. The types of flaws examined include thermal fatigue cracks, saw cuts, and service-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC). The flaws were examined using three phased-array probes: a 2-MHz shear-wave probe, a 1.5-MHz longitudinal-wave probe, and a “mini” 2-MHz longitudinal-wave probe. The sound fields for each probe were modeled in stainless steel to assure proper insonification at the depths and angles used in the tests. This paper describes the results of the sound field modeling, and compares the responses of the various flaws from the near and far side of the welds.

  18. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multi-purpose canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Poh -Sang; Sindelar, Robert L.

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic in-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  19. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multiple-purpose canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic In-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  20. Application of elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods to surface flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccabe, Donald E.; Ernst, Hugo A.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Fuel tanks that are a part of the External Tank assembly for the Space Shuttle are made of relatively thin 2219-T87 aluminum plate. These tanks contain about 917 m of fusion weld seam, all of which is nondestructively inspected for flaws and all those found are repaired. The tanks are subsequently proof-tested to a pressure that is sufficiently severe to cause weld metal yielding in a few local regions of the weld seam. The work undertaken in the present project was to develop a capability to predict flaw growth from undetected surface flaws that are assumed to be located in the highly stressed regions. The technical challenge was to develop R-curve prediction capability for surface cracks in specimens that contain the flaws of unusual sizes and shapes deemed to be of interest. The test techniques developed and the elastic-plastic analysis concepts adopted are presented. The flaws of interest were quite small surface cracks that were narrow-deep ellipses that served to exacerbate the technical difficulties involved.

  1. Application of elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods to surface flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Donald E.; Ernst, Hugo A.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    Fuel tanks that are a part of the External Tank assembly for the Space Shuttle are made of relatively thin 2219-T87 aluminum plate. These tanks contain about 917 m of fusion weld seam, all of which is nondestructively inspected for flaws and all those found are repaired. The tanks are subsequently proof-tested to a pressure that is sufficiently severe to cause weld metal yielding in a few local regions of the weld seam. The work undertaken in the present project was to develop a capability to predict flaw growth from undetected surface flaws that are assumed to be located in the highly stressed regions. The technical challenge was to develop R-curve prediction capability for surface cracks in specimens that contain the flaws of unusual sizes and shapes deemed to be of interest. The test techniques developed and the elastic-plastic analysis concepts adopted are presented. The flaws of interest were quite small surface cracks that were narrow-deep ellipses that served to exacerbate the technical difficulties involved.

  2. Characterization of flaws in a tube bundle mock-up for reliability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Bakhtiari, S.

    1997-02-01

    As part of an assessment of in-service inspection of steam generator tubes, the authors will assemble a steam generator mock-up for round robin studies and use as a test bed in evaluating emerging technologies. Progress is reported on the characterization of flaws that will be part of the mock-up. Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques are being evaluated as a means to characterize the flaws in the mock-up tubes before final assembly. Twenty Inconel 600 tubes with laboratory-grown cracks, typical of those to be used in the mock-up, were provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for laboratory testing. After the tubes were inspected with eddy current and ultrasonic techniques, they were destructively analyzed to establish the actual depths, lengths, and profiles of the cracks. The analysis of the results will allow the best techniques to be used for characterizing the flaws in the mock-up tubes.

  3. Natural stiffening increases flaw tolerance of biological fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesa, Tristan; Pugno, Nicola M.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2012-10-01

    Many fibers in biomaterials such as tendon, elastin, or silk feature a nonlinear stiffening behavior of the stress-strain relationship, where the rigidity of the material increases severely as the material is being stretched. Here we show that such nonlinear stiffening is beneficial for a fiber's ability to withstand cracks, leading to a flaw tolerant state in which stress concentrations around cracks are diminished. Our findings, established by molecular mechanics and the derivation of a theoretical scaling law, explain experimentally observed fiber sizes in a range of biomaterials and point to the importance of nonlinear stiffening to enhance their fracture properties. Our study suggests that nonlinear stiffening provides a mechanism by which nanoscale mechanical properties can be scaled up, providing a means towards bioinspired fibrous material and structural design.

  4. Commentary: Flawed scientific-evidence standards delay diesel regulations.

    PubMed

    Pusateri, Antoinette; Shrader-Frechette, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Of 188 government-monitored air toxics, diesel particulate matter (DPM) causes seven times more cancer than all the other 187 air toxics combined, including benzene, lead, and mercury. Yet, DPM is the only air toxic not regulated more stringently under the Clean Air Act, as a hazardous air pollutant (HAP). One reason is that regulators use flawed standards of scientific evidence. The article argues (1) that DPM meets all six specified evidentiary criteria, any one of which is sufficient for HAP regulation and (2) that regulators' standards of evidence for denying HAP status to DPM (no DPM unit-risk estimate, inadequate dose-response data, alleged weak mechanistic data) err logically and scientifically, set the evidence bar too high, delay regulation, and allow 21,000 avoidable DPM deaths annually in the U.S.

  5. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B. ); Takahashi, Y. ); Ainsworth, R.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Described is the background work performed jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan and Nuclear Electric plc in the United Kingdom with the purpose of developing a high-temperature flaw assessment procedure for reactor components. Existing creep-fatigue crack-growth models are reviewed, and the most promising methods are identified. Sources of material data are outlined, and results of the fundamental deformation and crack-growth tests are discussed. Results of subcritical crack-growth exploratory tests, creep-fatigue crack-growth tests under repeated thermal transient conditions, and exploratory failure tests are presented and contrasted with the analytical modeling. Crack-growth assessment methods are presented and applied to a typical liquid-metal reactor component. The research activities presented herein served as a foundation for the Flaw Assessment Guide for High-Temperature Reactor Components Subjected to Creep-Fatigue Loading published separately. 30 refs., 108 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. Growth and stability of interacting surface flaws of arbitrary shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, Y.; Nemat-Nasser, S.

    1983-01-01

    Growth regimes of interacting surface flaws of arbitrary shape are analyzed with the aid of the body force method, and the stability of the process is assessed on the basis of the variation of the load during the growth. It is shown that irregularly shaped flaws are often associated with very high stress intensity factors locally, which tend to change as the flaws grow into more regular shapes. Several examples of various flaw shapes are worked out for illustration, and it is shown that a simple formula seems to provide an accurate estimate of the maximum stress intensity factor for surface flaws of various shapes, which are not very slender. The formula involves the overall maximum tension, as well as the area of the projection of the flaw on the plane normal to the maximum tension.

  7. Reliability after inspection. [of flaws on laminate surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The investigation is concerned with the derivation of relationships between the probability of having manufacturing defects, the probability of detecting a flaw, and the final reliability. Equations for the simple situation in which only one flaw can be present are used to introduce the relationships in a Bayes' theorem approach to the assessment of the final reliability. Situations which are prevalent in composites manufacturing are considered. Attention is given to a case involving the random occurrence of flaws on a laminate surface.

  8. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in Weld Repairs

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a generalized flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in the U. S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different cancelled reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs which are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. Construction records where available were reviewed. It is difficult to make conclusions due to the limited number of construction records reviewed. However, the records reviewed to date show a significant change in repair frequency over the years when the components in this study were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance.

  9. Vitamin D and Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Comparing Studies with and without Biological Flaws

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy of Vitamin D supplements in depression is controversial, awaiting further literature analysis. Biological flaws in primary studies is a possible reason meta-analyses of Vitamin D have failed to demonstrate efficacy. This systematic review and meta-analysis of Vitamin D and depression compared studies with and without biological flaws. The systematic review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The literature search was undertaken through four databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Studies were critically appraised for methodological quality and biological flaws, in relation to the hypothesis and study design. Meta-analyses were performed for studies according to the presence of biological flaws. The 15 RCTs identified provide a more comprehensive evidence-base than previous systematic reviews; methodological quality of studies was generally good and methodology was diverse. A meta-analysis of all studies without flaws demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in depression with Vitamin D supplements (+0.78 CI +0.24, +1.27). Studies with biological flaws were mainly inconclusive, with the meta-analysis demonstrating a statistically significant worsening in depression by taking Vitamin D supplements (−1.1 CI −0.7, −1.5). Vitamin D supplementation (≥800 I.U. daily) was somewhat favorable in the management of depression in studies that demonstrate a change in vitamin levels, and the effect size was comparable to that of anti-depressant medication. PMID:24732019

  10. Origin of flaw-tolerance in nacre

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zaiwang; Li, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decades, our understanding of nacre's toughening origin has long stayed at the level of crack deflection along the biopolymer interface between aragonite platelets. It has been widely thought that the ceramic aragonite platelets in nacre invariably remain shielded from the propagating crack. Here we report an unexpected experimental observation that the propagating crack, surprisingly, invades the aragonite platelet following a zigzag crack propagation trajectory. The toughening origin of previously-thought brittle aragonite platelet is ascribed to its unique nanoparticle-architecture, which tunes crack propagation inside the aragonite platelet in an intergranular manner. For comparison, we also investigated the crack behavior in geologic aragonite mineral (pure monocrystal) and found that the crack propagates in a cleavage fashion, in sharp contrast with the intergranular cracking in the aragonite platelet of nacre. These two fundamentally different cracking mechanisms uncover a new toughening strategy in nacre's hierarchical flaw-tolerance design. PMID:23603788

  11. Origin of flaw-tolerance in nacre.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zaiwang; Li, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decades, our understanding of nacre's toughening origin has long stayed at the level of crack deflection along the biopolymer interface between aragonite platelets. It has been widely thought that the ceramic aragonite platelets in nacre invariably remain shielded from the propagating crack. Here we report an unexpected experimental observation that the propagating crack, surprisingly, invades the aragonite platelet following a zigzag crack propagation trajectory. The toughening origin of previously-thought brittle aragonite platelet is ascribed to its unique nanoparticle-architecture, which tunes crack propagation inside the aragonite platelet in an intergranular manner. For comparison, we also investigated the crack behavior in geologic aragonite mineral (pure monocrystal) and found that the crack propagates in a cleavage fashion, in sharp contrast with the intergranular cracking in the aragonite platelet of nacre. These two fundamentally different cracking mechanisms uncover a new toughening strategy in nacre's hierarchical flaw-tolerance design.

  12. Origin of flaw-tolerance in nacre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zaiwang; Li, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decades, our understanding of nacre's toughening origin has long stayed at the level of crack deflection along the biopolymer interface between aragonite platelets. It has been widely thought that the ceramic aragonite platelets in nacre invariably remain shielded from the propagating crack. Here we report an unexpected experimental observation that the propagating crack, surprisingly, invades the aragonite platelet following a zigzag crack propagation trajectory. The toughening origin of previously-thought brittle aragonite platelet is ascribed to its unique nanoparticle-architecture, which tunes crack propagation inside the aragonite platelet in an intergranular manner. For comparison, we also investigated the crack behavior in geologic aragonite mineral (pure monocrystal) and found that the crack propagates in a cleavage fashion, in sharp contrast with the intergranular cracking in the aragonite platelet of nacre. These two fundamentally different cracking mechanisms uncover a new toughening strategy in nacre's hierarchical flaw-tolerance design.

  13. Three-dimensional dynamic thermal imaging of structural flaws by dual-band infrared computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Dolan, K.W.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Kornblum, B.T.; Perkins, D.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1993-04-01

    We discuss three-dimensional (3D) dynamic thermal imaging of structure flaws using dual-band infrared (DBIR) computed tomography. Conventional thermography provides single-band infrared images which are difficult to interpret. Standard procedures yield imprecise (or qualitative) information about subsurface flaw sites which are typically masked by surface clutter. We use a DBIR imaging unique pioneered at LLNL to capture the time history of surface temperature difference for flash-heated targets. We relate these patterns to the location, size, shape and depth of subsurface flaws. We have demonstrated temperature accuracies of 0.2{degree}C, timing synchronizations of 3 ms (after onset of heat flash) and intervals of 42 ms, between images, during an 8 s cooling (and hearing) interval characterizing the front (and back) surface temperature-time history of an epoxy-glue disbond site in a flash-heated aluminum lap joint. This type of disbond played a significant role in causing damage to the Aloha Aircraft fuselage on the aged Boeing 737 jetliner. By ratioing DBIR images (near 5 and 10 micron), we located surface temperature patterns (generated by weak heat flow anomalies at subsurface flaw sites) and removed the emissivity mask (from surface roughness variations). We compared measurements with calculations from the three-dimensional, finite element computer code: TOPAZ3D. We combined infrared, ultrasound and x-ray imaging methods to characterize the lap joint disbond site spatial, bond quality, and material differences.

  14. On the tensile strength of a fiberreinforced ceramic composite containing a crack-like flaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiansky, Bernard; Cui, Yingqing Lawrence

    1994-01-01

    T HE TENSILE STRENGTH of a fiber-reinforced ceramic composite containing a through-the-fiber flaw in the form of a sharp crack is studied. The strength of a brittle unreinforced ceramic containing a sharp crack of length 2 a0, subjected to uniaxial load in the direction normal to the crack plane, is given by linear elastic fracture mechanics as σ s = Km/√π a0, where km is the fracture toughness of the material. However, for a fiber-reinforced ceramic, the strength can only be determined on the basis of a full analysis of crack growth in the matrix and the failure of crack-bridging fibers. The tensile strength of a flawed ceramic material that is reinforced by fibers aligned in the direction perpendicular to the flaw surfaces is studied in this paper. Crack-bridging fibers are assumed to slip relative to the matrix when a critical interface shear stress is reached. The orthotropy of the composite produced by the presence of aligned fibers is rigorously accounted for in the analysis. The dependence of the composite tensile strength on fiber tensile strength, matrix toughness, flaw-size and frictional shear stress at the fiber-matrix interface is determined and described in terms of a universal set of non-dimensional parameters.

  15. Flaw strength distributions and statistical parameters for ceramic fibers: The normal distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R'Mili, M.; Godin, N.; Lamon, J.

    2012-05-01

    The present paper investigates large sets of ceramic fibre failure strengths (500 to 1000 data) produced using tensile tests on tows that contained either 500 or 1000 filaments. The probability density function was determined through acoustic emission monitoring which allowed detection and counting of filament fractures. The statistical distribution of filament strengths was described using the normal distribution. The Weibull equation was then fitted to this normal distribution for estimation of statistical parameters. A perfect agreement between both distributions was obtained, and a quite negligible scatter in statistical parameters was observed, as opposed to the wide variability that is reported in the literature. Thus it was concluded that flaw strengths are distributed normally and that the statistical parameters that were derived are the true ones. In a second step, the conventional method of estimation of Weibull parameters was applied to these sets of data and, then, to subsets selected randomly. The influence of other factors involved in the conventional method of determination of statistical parameters is discussed. It is demonstrated that selection of specimens, sample size, and method of construction of so-called Weibull plots are responsible for statistical parameters variability.

  16. Influence of initial flaws on the mechanical properties of nacre.

    PubMed

    Anup, S

    2015-06-01

    Nacre is a bio-composite made up of hard mineral and soft protein, and has excellent mechanical properties. This paper examines the effect of naturally occurring defects (initial flaws) in nacre on its mechanical properties such as toughness and strength. A random fuse model is developed incorporating initial flaws. Numerical simulations show that initial flaws affect different mechanical properties at different rates. The variation in the experimentally obtained mechanical properties of nacre reported in the literature is shown to be due to initial flaws. The stress in the mineral and protein increases due to initial flaws, but by different amounts. The results obtained in this study are useful for gaining insight into the failure of nacre and development of nacre-inspired composites.

  17. The behavior of shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, S.T. )

    1991-11-01

    Both analytical and experimental studies have shown that the effect of crack length, a, on the elastic-plastic toughness of structural steels is significant. The objective of this report is to recommend those research investigations that are necessary to understand the phenomenon of shallow behavior as it affects fracture toughness so that the results can be used properly in the structural margin assessment of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) with flaws. Preliminary test results of A 533 B steel show an elevated crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) toughness similar to that observed for structural steels tested at the University of Kansas. Thus, the inherent resistance to fracture initiation of A 533 B steel with shallow flaws appears to be higher than that used in the current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) design curves based on testing fracture mechanics specimens with deep flaws. If this higher toughness of laboratory specimens with shallow flaws can be transferred to a higher resistance to failure in RPV design or analysis, then the actual margin of safety in nuclear vessels with shallow flaws would be greater than is currently assumed on the basis of deep-flaw test results. This elevation in toughness and greater resistance to fracture would be a very desirable situation, particularly for the pressurized-thermal shock (PTS) analysis in which shallow flaws are assumed to exist. Before any advantage can be taken of this possible increase in initiation toughness, numerous factors must be analyzed to ensure the transferability of the data. This report reviews those factors and makes recommendations of studies that are needed to assess the transferability of shallow-flaw toughness test results to the structural margin assessment of RPV with shallow flaws. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Subsurface flaw detection in metals by photoacoustic microscopya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Pouch, J. J.; Wong, Y. H.; Favro, L. D.; Kuo, P. K.; Rosencwaig, Allan

    1980-02-01

    The scanning photoacoustic microscope (SPAM) is used in both the conventional and phase-contrast modes to detect a well-characterized subsurface flaw in Al. The physical mechanism is that of thermal diffusion, with a subsurface probe depth and flaw resolution length of approximately one thermal-diffusion length. Comparison of the dependences of the photoacoustic signal upon chopping frequency from the different regions of the sample confirm that the differential signal from the flaw corresponds to a transition from thermally thick to thermally thin boundary conditions. Experimental results are in good agreement with calculations based upon a three-dimensional thermal-diffusion model.

  19. Development of portable phased array UT system for real-time flaw imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, M.

    1995-08-01

    Many functions and features of phased array UT technology must be useful for NDE in the industrial field. Some phased array UT systems have been developed for the inspection of nuclear pressure vessel and turbine components. However, phased array UT is still a special NDE technique and it has not been used widely in the past. The reasons of that are system size, cost, operator performance, equipment design and others. TOSHIBA has newly developed PC controlled portable phased array system to solve those problems. The portable phased array UT system is very compact and light but it is able to drive up to 32-channel linear array probe, to display real-time linear/sector B-scan, to display accumulated B-scan with an encoder and to display profile overlaid B-scan. The first applications were turbine component inspections for precise flaw investigation and flaw image data recording.

  20. Computational Reduction of Specimen Noise to Enable Improved Thermography Characterization of Flaws in Graphite Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Flaw detection and characterization with thermographic techniques in graphite polymer composites are often limited by localized variations in the thermographic response. Variations in properties such as acceptable porosity, fiber volume content and surface polymer thickness result in variations in the thermal response that in general cause significant variations in the initial thermal response. These result in a "noise" floor that increases the difficulty of detecting and characterizing deeper flaws. A method is presented for computationally removing a significant amount of the "noise" from near surface porosity by diffusing the early time response, then subtracting it from subsequent responses. Simulations of the thermal response of a composite are utilized in defining the limitations of the technique. This method for reducing the data is shown to give considerable improvement characterizing both the size and depth of damage. Examples are shown for data acquired on specimens with fabricated delaminations and impact damage.

  1. Ultrasonic detection of flaws in fusion butt welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, B. T.; Hanna, K. J.; Tooley, W. M.

    1970-01-01

    Reliable and accurate Delta technique, a nondestructive ultrasonics method, uses redirection of energy to detect randomly oriented imperfections in fusion butt welds. Data on flaws can be read from either an oscilloscope or a printout.

  2. Effect of thermal profile on cyclic flaw growth in aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engstrom, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Surface flawed and single edge notch tension specimens of 2219-T851 and -T87 aluminum were tested to determine static fracture characteristics and base line (constant amplitude, constant temperature) cyclic flaw growth behavior. Subsequent testing was then conducted in which flawed specimens were subjected to a thermal profile in which the applied stress was varied simultaneously with the temperature. The profile used represents a simplified space shuttle orbiter load/temperature flight cycle. Test temperatures included the range from 144K (-200 F) up to 450K (350 F). The measured flaw growth rates obtained from the thermal profile tests were then compared with rates predicted by assuming linear cumulative damage of base line rates.

  3. Evaluation of constraint methodologies applied to a shallow-flaw cruciform bend specimen tested under biaxial loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.; Pennell, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow surface flaws. Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shallow surface flaws. The cruciform beam specimens were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a prototypic, far-field. out-of-plane biaxial stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear stresses resulting from pressurized-thermal-shock or pressure-temperature loading of an RPV. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. The cruciform fracture toughness data were used to evaluate fracture methodologies for predicting the observed effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Initial emphasis was placed on assessment of stress-based methodologies. namely, the J-Q formulation, the Dodds-Anderson toughness scaling model, and the Weibull approach. Applications of these methodologies based on the hydrostatic stress fracture criterion indicated an effect of loading-biaxiality on fracture toughness, the conventional maximum principal stress criterion indicated no effect.

  4. Pre-referral rectal artesunate in severe malaria: flawed trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Immediate injectable treatment is essential for severe malaria. Otherwise, the afflicted risk lifelong impairment or death. In rural areas of Africa and Asia, appropriate care is often miles away. In 2009, Melba Gomes and her colleagues published the findings of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of rectal artesunate for suspected severe malaria in such remote areas. Enrolling nearly 18,000 cases, the aim was to evaluate whether, as patients were in transit to a health facility, a pre-referral artesunate suppository blocked disease progression sufficiently to reduce these risks. The affirmative findings of this, the only trial on the issue thus far, have led the WHO to endorse rectal artesunate as a pre-referral treatment for severe malaria. In the light of its public health importance and because its scientific quality has not been assessed for a systematic review, our paper provides a detailed evaluation of the design, conduct, analysis, reporting, and practical features of this trial. Results We performed a checklist-based and an in-depth evaluation of the trial. The evaluation criteria were based on the CONSORT statement for reporting clinical trials, the clinical trial methodology literature, and practice in malaria research. Our main findings are: The inclusion and exclusion criteria and the sample size justification are not stated. Many clearly ineligible subjects were enrolled. The training of the recruiters does not appear to have been satisfactory. There was excessive between center heterogeneity in design and conduct. Outcome evaluation schedule was not defined, and in practice, became too wide. Large gaps in the collection of key data were evident. Primary endpoints were inconsistently utilized and reported; an overall analysis of the outcomes was not done; analyses of time to event data had major flaws; the stated intent-to-treat analysis excluded a third of the randomized subjects; the design-indicated stratified or multi

  5. Combined effects of weld-induced residual stresses and flaws on the fracture strength of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    The combined effects of weld-induced residual stresses and flaws on fracture strength were experimentally evaluated by testing Ti-5Al-2.5Sn surface flawed specimens at -320F (-195C) in liquid nitrogen. Flaws were located in weld metal with crack planes either parallel to or perpendicular to gas tungsten arc weld centerlines, and in base metal with the crack plane perpendicular to the rolling direction. Tests were conducted using two different flaw sizes to effect fracture stresses at two different levels including one level either at or near, and one level well below the tensile yield strength. Three different residual stress levels were generated, measured, and tested. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics theory.

  6. Ultrasonic Flaw Detection of Cracks and Machined Flaws as Observed Through Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2009-07-01

    Piping welds in the pressure boundary of light water reactors (LWRs) are subject to a volumetric examination based on Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Due to access limitations and high background radiation levels, the technique used is primarily ultrasonic rather than radiographic. Many of the austenitic welds in safety-related piping systems provide limited access to both sides of the weld, so a far-side examination is necessary. Historically, far-side inspections have performed poorly because of the coarse and elongated grains that make up the microstructures of austenitic weldments. The large grains cause the ultrasound to be scattered, attenuated, and redirected. Additionally, grain boundaries or weld geometry may reflect coherent ultrasonic echoes, making flaw detection and discrimination a more challenging endeavor. Previous studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on ultrasonic far-side examinations in austenitic piping welds involved the application of conventional transducers, use of low-frequency Synthetic Aperture Focusing Techniques (SAFT), and ultrasonic phased-array (PA) methods on specimens containing implanted thermal fatigue cracks and machined reflectors [1-2]. From these studies, PA inspection provided the best results, detecting nearly all of the flaws from the far side. These results were presented at the Fifth International Conference on NDE in Relation to Structural Integrity for Nuclear and Pressurised Components in 2006. This led to an invitation to examine field-removed specimens containing service-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC) at the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Center, in Charlotte, North Carolina. Results from this activity are presented.

  7. Improved Flaw Detection and Characterization with Difference Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Flaw detection and characterization with thermographic techniques in graphite polymer composites is often limited by localized variations in the thermographic response. Variations in properties such as acceptable porosity, variations in fiber volume content and surface polymer thickness result in variations in the thermal response that in general cause significant variations in the initial thermal response. These variations result in a noise floor that increases the difficulty of detecting and characterizing deeper flaws. The paper investigates comparing thermographic responses taken before and after a change in state in a composite to improve the detection of subsurface flaws. A method is presented for registration of the responses before finding the difference. A significant improvement in the detectability is achieved by comparing the differences in response. Examples of changes in state due to application of a load and impact are presented.

  8. Interdisciplinary Program for Quantitative Flaw Definition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    materials. In ordinary eddy current testing a small search coil, having in some cases a ferrite core for field concentration, is placed near the metal...a block approximately 1"x1"xO.25" in size, containing small samarium cobalt magnets and a 15 mil diameter pure YIG sphere mounted with its center

  9. Insensitivity to Flaws Leads to Damage Tolerance in Brittle Architected Meta-Materials.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, L C; Wong, W H; Zhang, Y-W; Greer, J R

    2016-02-03

    Cellular solids are instrumental in creating lightweight, strong, and damage-tolerant engineering materials. By extending feature size down to the nanoscale, we simultaneously exploit the architecture and material size effects to substantially enhance structural integrity of architected meta-materials. We discovered that hollow-tube alumina nanolattices with 3D kagome geometry that contained pre-fabricated flaws always failed at the same load as the pristine specimens when the ratio of notch length (a) to sample width (w) is no greater than 1/3, with no correlation between failure occurring at or away from the notch. Samples with (a/w) > 0.3, and notch length-to-unit cell size ratios of (a/l) > 5.2, failed at a lower peak loads because of the higher sample compliance when fewer unit cells span the intact region. Finite element simulations show that the failure is governed by purely tensile loading for (a/w) < 0.3 for the same (a/l); bending begins to play a significant role in failure as (a/w) increases. This experimental and computational work demonstrates that the discrete-continuum duality of architected structural meta-materials may give rise to their damage tolerance and insensitivity of failure to the presence of flaws even when made entirely of intrinsically brittle materials.

  10. Insensitivity to Flaws Leads to Damage Tolerance in Brittle Architected Meta-Materials

    PubMed Central

    Montemayor, L. C.; Wong, W. H.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Greer, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular solids are instrumental in creating lightweight, strong, and damage-tolerant engineering materials. By extending feature size down to the nanoscale, we simultaneously exploit the architecture and material size effects to substantially enhance structural integrity of architected meta-materials. We discovered that hollow-tube alumina nanolattices with 3D kagome geometry that contained pre-fabricated flaws always failed at the same load as the pristine specimens when the ratio of notch length (a) to sample width (w) is no greater than 1/3, with no correlation between failure occurring at or away from the notch. Samples with (a/w) > 0.3, and notch length-to-unit cell size ratios of (a/l) > 5.2, failed at a lower peak loads because of the higher sample compliance when fewer unit cells span the intact region. Finite element simulations show that the failure is governed by purely tensile loading for (a/w) < 0.3 for the same (a/l); bending begins to play a significant role in failure as (a/w) increases. This experimental and computational work demonstrates that the discrete-continuum duality of architected structural meta-materials may give rise to their damage tolerance and insensitivity of failure to the presence of flaws even when made entirely of intrinsically brittle materials. PMID:26837581

  11. Determination of Flaw Type and Location Using an Expert Module in Ultrasonic Nondestructive Testing for Weld Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, D.; Zolfaghari, A.; Masoumi, F.

    2011-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation is explained as nondestructive testing, nondestructive inspection, and nondestructive examination. It is a desire to determine some characteristic of the object or to determine whether the object contains irregularities, discontinuities, or flaws. Ultrasound based inspection techniques are used extensively throughout industry for detection of flaws in engineering materials. The range and variety of imperfections encountered is large, and critical assessment of location, size, orientation and type is often difficult. In addition, increasing quality requirements of new standards and codes of practice relating to fitness for purpose are placing higher demands on operators. Applying of an expert knowledge-based analysis in ultrasonic examination is a powerful tool that can help assure safety, quality, and reliability; increase productivity; decrease liability; and save money. In this research, an expert module system is coupled with ultrasonic examination (A-Scan Procedure) to determine and evaluate type and location of flaws that embedded during welding parts. The processing module of this expert system is implemented based on EN standard to classify welding defects, acceptance condition and measuring of their location via echo static pattern and image processing. The designed module introduces new system that can automate evaluating of the results of A-scan method according to EN standard. It can simultaneously recognize the number and type of defects, and determine flaw position during each scan.

  12. The detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. [fatigue crack formation in aluminum alloy test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Mullen, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and X-radiographic techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens in integrally stiffened panel, and weld panel configurations. Fatigue cracks in integrally stiffened panels, lack-of-fusion in weld panels, and fatigue cracks in weld panels were the flaw types used for evaluation. A 2319 aluminum alloy weld filler rod was used for all welding to produce the test specimens. Forty seven integrally stiffened panels containing a total of 146 fatigue cracks, ninety three lack-of-penetration (LOP) specimens containing a total of 239 LOP flaws, and one-hundred seventeen welded specimens containing a total of 293 fatigue cracks were evaluated. Nondestructive test detection reliability enhancement was evaluated during separate inspection sequences in the specimens in the 'as-machined or as-welded', post etched and post proof loaded conditions. Results of the nondestructive test evaluations were compared to the actual flaw size obtained by measurement of the fracture specimens after completing all inspection sequences. Inspection data were then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determining the flaw detection reliability.

  13. Unit-Sphere Anisotropic Multiaxial Stochastic-Strength Model Probability Density Distribution for the Orientation of Critical Flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel

    2013-01-01

    Models that predict the failure probability of monolithic glass and ceramic components under multiaxial loading have been developed by authors such as Batdorf, Evans, and Matsuo. These "unit-sphere" failure models assume that the strength-controlling flaws are randomly oriented, noninteracting planar microcracks of specified geometry but of variable size. This report develops a formulation to describe the probability density distribution of the orientation of critical strength-controlling flaws that results from an applied load. This distribution is a function of the multiaxial stress state, the shear sensitivity of the flaws, the Weibull modulus, and the strength anisotropy. Examples are provided showing the predicted response on the unit sphere for various stress states for isotropic and transversely isotropic (anisotropic) materials--including the most probable orientation of critical flaws for offset uniaxial loads with strength anisotropy. The author anticipates that this information could be used to determine anisotropic stiffness degradation or anisotropic damage evolution for individual brittle (or quasi-brittle) composite material constituents within finite element or micromechanics-based software

  14. Five Flaws of Staff Development and the Future Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Student learning and development do not occur without teacher learning and development. Not any teacher development will do, though. The old flaws of weak and wayward staff development are well-known--no staff development, in which trial and error are assumed to be enough; staff development that is all ideas and no implementation, i.e. the…

  15. Detection of flaws in hazelnuts using VIS/NIR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The feasibility of VIS/NIR spectroscopy for detection of flaws in hazelnut kernels was demonstrated. Feature datasets comprising raw absorbance values, raw absorbance Ratios (Abs['1] : Abs['2]) and Differences (Abs['1] – Abs['2]) for all possible pairs of wavelengths from 306.5 nm to 1710.9 nm were ...

  16. Major email security flaws discovered: how to protect your data.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1998-08-21

    AIDS organizations need to pay special attention to possible flaws in email systems that may compromise confidentiality of client information. Three email software programs are singled out as particularly vulnerable. Information for finding instructions on fixing the software programs is provided.

  17. Bayesian flaw characterization from eddy current measurements with grain noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Jerry A.; Aldrin, John C.; Shell, Eric; Oneida, Erin

    2017-02-01

    The Bayesian approach to inference from measurement data has the potential to provide highly reliable characterizations of flaw geometry by quantifying the confidence in the estimate results. The accuracy of these confidence estimates depends on the accuracy of the model for the measurement error. Eddy current measurements of electrically anisotropic metals, such as titanium, exhibit a phenomenon called grain noise in which the measurement error is spatially correlated even with no flaw present. We show that the most commonly used statistical model for the measurement error, which fails to account for this correlation, results in overconfidence in the flaw geometry estimates from eddy current data, thereby reducing the effectiveness of the Bayesian approach. We then describe a method of modeling the grain noise as a Gaussian process (GP) using spectral mixture kernels, a type of non-parametric model for the covariance kernel of a GP This provides a broadly applicable, data-driven way of modeling correlation in measurement error. Our results show that incorporation of this noise model results in a more reliable estimate of the flaw and better agreement with the available validation data.

  18. Ultrasonic beam fluctuation and flaw signal variance in inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Roberts, R.; Margetan, F.

    2000-05-01

    This paper examines the effect of forward scattering on ultrasonic beam propagation and flaw signal amplitude in inhomogeneous material microstructures. A beam propagating through a weakly-scattering, randomly inhomogeneous medium will display random fluctuations in amplitude and phase, attributable to forward scattering. Correspondingly, the signal received from a given flaw at a given position in the beam volume will fluctuate as the beam and flaw are simultaneously scanned throughout the volume of an inhomogeneous host medium. These effects have been prominently observed in the inspection of titanium. For example, maps of beam amplitude profiles after transmission through titanium reveal severe distortion of beam amplitude and phase. Similarly, signals from "identical" flat bottom holes (FBH) at equal depths but different lateral positions in titanium display a random variation in amplitude. Interestingly, it has been noted that this FBH signal variance varies inversely to the beam diameter, that is, signal variance normalized to the mean signal amplitude is a minimum when the flaw is in the focal zone of a focused bearn. As this observation has great significance to the inspection of titanium, a model, prediction of this phenomenon is being sought. In the work reported here, beam propagation is formulated as a volumetric integral equation employing the Green function for the homogeneous spatial mean of the medium. The integral equation is solved using iterative methods. Preliminary work considering scalar two-dimensional propagation in inhomogeneous media has predicted a flaw signal variance that displays an inverse relation to beam diameter, thus reproducing the qualitative behavior seen in experimental data in titanium. Current work is extending the preliminary two-dimensional scalar result to three-dimensional elasticity, representing propagation in an actual titanium microstructure. Progress on this effort will be reported.

  19. Fracture assessment of HSST Plate 14 shallow-flaw cruciform bend specimens tested under biaxial loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.; Pennell, W.E.

    1998-06-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow surface flaws. Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shallow, surface flaws. The cruciform beam specimens were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a far-field, out-of-plane biaxial stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear stresses resulting from pressurized-thermal-shock or pressure-temperature loading of an RPV. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for an RPV material. The cruciform fracture toughness data were used to evaluate fracture methodologies for predicting the observed effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Initial emphasis was placed on assessment of stress-based methodologies, namely, the J-Q formulation, the Dodds-Anderson toughness scaling model, and the Weibull approach. Applications of these methodologies based on the hydrostatic stress fracture criterion indicated an effect of loading-biaxiality on fracture toughness; the conventional maximum principal stress criterion indicated no effect. A three-parameter Weibull model based on the hydrostatic stress criterion is shown to correlate the experimentally observed biaxial effect on cleavage fracture toughness by providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states.

  20. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

    2008-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

  1. Geophysics Fatally Flawed by False Fundamental Philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, L. S.

    2004-05-01

    For two centuries scientists have failed to realize Laplace's nebular hypothesis \\(1796\\) of Earth's creation is false. As a consequence, geophysicists today are misinterpreting and miscalculating many fundamental aspects of the Earth and Solar System. Why scientists have deluded themselves for so long is a mystery. The greatest error is the assumption Earth was created 4.6 billion years ago as a molten protoplanet in its present size, shape and composition. This assumption ignores daily accretion of more than 200 tons/day of meteorites and dust, plus unknown volumes of solar insolation that created coal beds and other biomass that increased Earth's mass and diameter over time! Although the volume added daily is minuscule compared with Earth's total mass, logic and simple addition mandates an increase in mass, diameter and gravity. Increased diameter from accretion is proved by Grand Canyon stratigraphy that shows a one kilometer increase in depth and planetary radius at a rate exceeding three meters \\(10 ft\\) per Ma from start of the Cambrian \\(540 Ma\\) to end of the Permian \\(245 Ma\\)-each layer deposited onto Earth's surface. This is unequivocal evidence of passive external growth by accretion, part of a dual growth and expansion process called "Accreation" \\(creation by accretion\\). Dynamic internal core expansion, the second stage of Accreation, did not commence until the protoplanet reached spherical shape at 500-600 km diameter. At that point, gravity-powered compressive heating initiated core melting and internal expansion. Expansion quickly surpassed the external accretion growth rate and produced surface volcanoes to relieve explosive internal tectonic pressure and transfer excess mass (magma)to the surface. Then, 200-250 Ma, expansion triggered Pangaea's breakup, first sundering Asia and Australia to form the Pacific Ocean, followed by North and South America to form the Atlantic Ocean, by the mechanism of midocean ridges, linear underwater

  2. Marine Corps Body Composition Program: The Flawed Measurement System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-07

    Marine Corps’ Body Composition Program (BCP) is designed to shift focus in the weight control program from height/weight to body fat measurements in...Marine’s body fat percentage is the least accurate of all methods currently being utilized in the medical world. It’s a flaw that is easily... Body fat will be estimated using the circumference- based method with one set of measurements for each gender (Males: height, neck circumference, and

  3. Flaw Tolerance in Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Liqin; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum brazing is a viable process to achieve strong permanent and hermetic joints in space. As in any joining process, brazed Joints have various imperfections and defects. It is important to understand the impact that flaws have on the load carrying capacity and performance of the brazed joints. This study focuses on the behavior of lap shear joints due to their engineering importance in brazed aerospace structures. In Part 1 an average shear strength capabilitY and failure modes of the single lap joints are explored. Specimens comprised of 0.090 inch thick 347 stainless steel sheet brazed with pure silver are tested in accordance with the AWS C3.2 standard. Comparison of the measured loads and average shear stresses at failure with the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the same specimens as a function of the overlap lengths shows excellent correlation between the experimental and calculated values for the defect-free lap joints. In Part 2, various flaws will be introduced in the test specimens to simulate lack of braze coverage in the lap joints. Mechanical testing and FEA will be performed on these joints to verify if behavior of ductile ]appoints containing flaws is similar to the joints with the reduced braze area. Finally, in Part 3, the results obtained in Part 1 and 2 will be applied to the brazed assembly to evaluate a load carrying capability of the structural lap joint containing defects.

  4. Seven Pervasive Statistical Flaws in Cognitive Training Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, David; Kirk, Ian J.; Waldie, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of enhancing cognition is undoubtedly among the most exciting research questions currently bridging psychology, neuroscience, and evidence-based medicine. Yet, convincing claims in this line of work stem from designs that are prone to several shortcomings, thus threatening the credibility of training-induced cognitive enhancement. Here, we present seven pervasive statistical flaws in intervention designs: (i) lack of power; (ii) sampling error; (iii) continuous variable splits; (iv) erroneous interpretations of correlated gain scores; (v) single transfer assessments; (vi) multiple comparisons; and (vii) publication bias. Each flaw is illustrated with a Monte Carlo simulation to present its underlying mechanisms, gauge its magnitude, and discuss potential remedies. Although not restricted to training studies, these flaws are typically exacerbated in such designs, due to ubiquitous practices in data collection or data analysis. The article reviews these practices, so as to avoid common pitfalls when designing or analyzing an intervention. More generally, it is also intended as a reference for anyone interested in evaluating claims of cognitive enhancement. PMID:27148010

  5. Ultrasonic stress measurement using PC based and commercial flaw detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Auteliano A.; Bray, Don E.

    2000-09-01

    The determination of the stress field inside metallic parts is one of the most important challenges to the designer. Although the prediction of the stress distribution can be done by several numerical and empirical methods, the real stress value is almost always unknown. Several destructive and nondestructive techniques have been tested to accomplish this task, including the application of x rays, saw cut, neutron diffraction and so on, but none of them seems to have a suitable correlation between cost and applicability. Ultrasonic techniques have been used for flaw detection since the 1950s. The main application was in the identification of cracks and voids. In this work we present the application of ultrasound in the evaluation of a one-dimensional stress field using the longitudinal critically refracted waves (LCR). A new ultrasonic LCR probe is presented and its performance is evaluated using PC based instrumentation. Also, the LCR waves' sensitivity is verified using a low cost commercial flaw detector. The results show that the technique can be applied to quantify the magnitude of the stresses in bars, using either the PC based or the commercial flaw detector system, as long as the high sensitivity longitudinal critically refracted waves are used.

  6. Effect of size on cracking of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glucklick, J.

    1971-01-01

    Brittle behavior of large mild steel elements, glass plasticity, and fatigue specimen size sensitivity are manifestations of strain-energy size effect. Specimens physical size effect on material cracking initiation occurs according to flaw distribution statistics. Fracture size effect depends on stability or instability of crack propagation.

  7. Experimental study on crack coalescence mechanisms of pre-existing flaws under blast loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Zhong-wen; Yang, Ren-shu; Ma, Xin-min; Guo, Dong-ming

    2008-11-01

    The PMMA model transmission-type experiment of dynamic caustics was carried out to simulate the fracture blasting process of material containing pre-existing flaws using the dynamic caustic-test system. The mechanism of the fracture coalescence among four prefabricated flaws with echelon geometry distribution was studied under blast loading. The experiment results show that two wing cracks respectively coalescing with the flaw F2 and flaw F3 appear at both tips of the flaw F1 closest to the blasthole. Whereas the flaw F4 doesn't produce wing cracks, the flaw F2 and flaw F3 also respectively generate two wing cracks which don't link up the flaw F4. Crack propagation is greatly affected by preexisting flaws. During the whole fracture process, the wing crack velocity oscillates with the increase of crack propagating time. The value of dynamic stress intensity factor reaches the maximum in a moment and then gradually decreases. The changes of dynamic stress intensity factor also oscillate in the whole time. Furthermore, the value of dynamic stress intensity factor KdII is smaller than that of dynamic stress intensity factor KdI. The results of the present research can provide the theoretical basis for the study on blasting of rock containing flaws.

  8. Fracture and Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Surface Flaws and Flaws Originating at Fastener Holes. Volume 1. Results and Discussion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-05-01

    to the number of overloads. The dark bands are illustrated in Figure 41 where the fracture surfaces of the three flaws in Specimen SPOTA -2 are shown...Specimen SPOTA -2 was subjected to five tensile over- loads having peak stress levels of 36 ksi, including one at the outset of the test and one every...upper part of Figure 72. An unplanned change in overload frequency during the testing of Specimen SPOTA -1 yielded an interesting result. The first

  9. Fan beam and double crosshole Lamb wave tomography for mapping flaws in aging aircraft structures.

    PubMed

    Malyarenko, E V; Hinders, M K

    2000-10-01

    As the worldwide aviation fleet continues to age, methods for accurately predicting the presence of structural flaws-such as hidden corrosion and disbonds-that compromise airworthiness become increasingly necessary. Ultrasonic guided waves, Lamb waves, allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. The work summarized here focuses on a variety of different tomographic reconstruction techniques to graphically represent the Lamb wave data in quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on thickness, for example, the traveltimes of the fundamental Lamb modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspection region. This article describes two potentially practical implementations of Lamb wave tomographic imaging techniques that can be optimized for in-the-field testing of large-area aircraft structures. Laboratory measurements discussed here demonstrate that Lamb wave tomography using either a ring of transducers with fan beam reconstructions, or a square array of transducers with algebraic reconstruction tomography, is appropriate for detecting flaws in multilayer aircraft materials. The speed and fidelity of the reconstruction algorithms as well as practical considerations for person-portable array-based systems are discussed in this article.

  10. A comparative assessment of the wall thickness margin taking into account the initial flaws in steam line elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladshtein, V. I.

    2011-02-01

    A procedure for estimating the wall thickness margin for operation during a specified design service life under creep conditions if the metal of articles contains initial flaws is presented. The analysis is carried out taking as an example parts of steam lines made of two different grades of steel: a cast elbow with the size d = 426 × 30 mm made of 15Kh1M1FL low-alloy steel and a pipe bend with the size d = 219 × 32 mm made of EI-756 12% chromium steel. The calculated assessments are compared with the results obtained from long-term operation.

  11. Experiments in ultrasonic flaw detection using a MEMS transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Akash; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2003-08-01

    In earlier work we developed a MEMS phased array transducer, fabricated in the MUMPs process, and we reported on initial experimental studies in which the device was affixed into contact with solids. We demonstrated the successful detection of signals from a conventional ultrasonic source, and the successful localization of the source in an off-axis geometry using phased array signal processing. We now describe the predicted transmission and coupling characteristics for such devices in contact with solids, demonstrating reasonable agreement with experimental behavior. We then describe the results of flaw detection experiments, as well as results for fluid-coupled detectors.

  12. MOEs for Drug Interdiction: Simple Tests Expose Critical Flaws

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    DTIC gN In MOEs for Drug Interdiction: Simple Tests Expose Critical Flaws Michael R. Anderberg 92-15393 92 6 1 2 0 5 3 U CENTER FOR NAVAL ANALYSES ...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Center for Naval Analyses CRM 91-48 4401 Ford Avenue Alexandria, Virginia 22302-0268 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...S%& 2MS.18 ECENTER FOR NAVAL ANALYSES 4401 Ford Avenue • Post Office Box 16268 • Alexandria, Virginia 22302-0268 * (703) 824-2000 10 October 1991

  13. A Taxonomy of Computer Program Security Flaws, with Examples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-19

    Books, New York. NY, 1992). 2. N.G. Leveson and C.S. Turner, "An Investigation of the Therac - 25 Accidents," UCI 17? 92- 108. Inf. and Comp. Sci. Dept...Trojar, horse in the sense defined above, but the two terms are usually distinguished 119]. Thompson [ 25 ] describes a method for building a Trojan horse...Thompson’s example [ 25 ] and a limited defense posed by McDermott [301). A Taxonomy of Computer Program Security Flaws 11 The original designers and

  14. MILITARY RESEARCH: Researchers Target Flaws in Ballistic Missile Defense Plan.

    PubMed

    Malakoff, D; Cho, A

    2000-06-16

    More than three dozen scientists journeyed to Washington, D.C., this week to warn lawmakers that a proposed $60 billion U.S. missile defense system, designed to knock incoming warheads out of the sky, is technically flawed because it can't pick out real warheads from decoys. Pentagon officials heatedly deny a new report by one scientist that contractors have rigged trials to hide the problem, although they admit that some tests were simplified to save time. In the wake of these events, a leading Democrat is urging President Bill Clinton to delay a pending decision on building the system.

  15. Gun bore flaw image matching based on improved SIFT descriptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Luan; Xiong, Wei; Zhai, You

    2013-01-01

    In order to increase the operation speed and matching ability of SIFT algorithm, the SIFT descriptor and matching strategy are improved. First, a method of constructing feature descriptor based on sector area is proposed. By computing the gradients histogram of location bins which are parted into 6 sector areas, a descriptor with 48 dimensions is constituted. It can reduce the dimension of feature vector and decrease the complexity of structuring descriptor. Second, it introduce a strategy that partitions the circular region into 6 identical sector areas starting from the dominate orientation. Consequently, the computational complexity is reduced due to cancellation of rotation operation for the area. The experimental results indicate that comparing with the OpenCV SIFT arithmetic, the average matching speed of the new method increase by about 55.86%. The matching veracity can be increased even under some variation of view point, illumination, rotation, scale and out of focus. The new method got satisfied results in gun bore flaw image matching. Keywords: Metrology, Flaw image matching, Gun bore, Feature descriptor

  16. Rotating flux-focusing eddy current probe for flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks about circular fasteners and other circular inhomogeneities in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil, The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. By rotating the probe in a path around a circular fastener such as a rivet while maintaining a constant distance between the probe and the center of a rivet, the signal due to current flow about the rivet can be held constant. Any further changes in the current distribution, such as due to a fatigue crack at the rivet joint, can be detected as an increase in the output voltage above that due to the flow about the rivet head.

  17. Eddy current probe and method for flaw detection in metals

    DOEpatents

    Watjen, John P.

    1987-06-23

    A flaw detecting system is shown which includes a probe having a pair of ferrite cores with in-line gaps in close proximity to each other. An insulating, non-magnetic, non-conducting holder fills the gaps and supports the ferrite cores in a manner such that the cores form a generally V-shape. Each core is provided with an excitation winding and a detection winding. The excitation windings are connected in series or parallel with an rf port for connection thereof to a radio frequency source. The detection windings, which are differentially wound, are connected in series circuit to a detector port for connection to a voltage measuring instrument. The ferrite cores at the in-line gaps directly engage the metal surface of a test piece, and the probe is scanned along the test piece. In the presence of a flaw in the metal surface the detection winding voltages are unbalanced, and the unbalance is detected by the voltage measuring instrument. The insulating holder is provided with a profile which conforms to that of a prominent feature of the test piece to facilitate movement of the probe along the feature, typically an edge or a corner.

  18. Eddy current probe and method for flaw detection in metals

    DOEpatents

    Watjen, J.P.

    1987-06-23

    A flaw detecting system is shown which includes a probe having a pair of ferrite cores with in-line gaps in close proximity to each other. An insulating, non-magnetic, non-conducting holder fills the gaps and supports the ferrite cores in a manner such that the cores form a generally V-shape. Each core is provided with an excitation winding and a detection winding. The excitation windings are connected in series or parallel with an rf port for connection thereof to a radio frequency source. The detection windings, which are differentially wound, are connected in series circuit to a detector port for connection to a voltage measuring instrument. The ferrite cores at the in-line gaps directly engage the metal surface of a test piece, and the probe is scanned along the test piece. In the presence of a flaw in the metal surface the detection winding voltages are unbalanced, and the unbalance is detected by the voltage measuring instrument. The insulating holder is provided with a profile which conforms to that of a prominent feature of the test piece to facilitate movement of the probe along the feature, typically an edge or a corner. 9 figs.

  19. Fatigue flaw growth behavior in stiffened and unstiffened panels loaded in biaxial tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect was investigated of biaxial loading on the flaw growth rate of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy that would be typical of Space Shuttle cryogenic tankage design. The stress distribution and stress concentration factors for several integrally stiffened panels under various loading conditions were obtained. The flaw growth behavior of both stiffened and unstiffened panels under biaxial loading conditions was determined. The effect of a complex stress state was studied by introducing flaws in fillet areas of biaxially loaded stiffened panels.

  20. Assessment of item-writing flaws in multiple-choice questions.

    PubMed

    Nedeau-Cayo, Rosemarie; Laughlin, Deborah; Rus, Linda; Hall, John

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the quality of multiple-choice questions used in a hospital's e-learning system. Constructing well-written questions is fraught with difficulty, and item-writing flaws are common. Study results revealed that most items contained flaws and were written at the knowledge/comprehension level. Few items had linked objectives, and no association was found between the presence of objectives and flaws. Recommendations include education for writing test questions.

  1. Detecting flaws in Portland cement concrete using TEM horn antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qadi, Imad L.; Riad, Sedki M.; Su, Wansheng; Haddad, Rami H.

    1996-11-01

    To understand the dielectric properties of PCC and better correlate them with type and severity of PCC internal defects, a study was conducted to evaluate PCC complex permittivity and magnetic permeability over a wideband of frequencies using both time domain and frequency domain techniques. Three measuring devices were designed and fabricated: a parallel plate capacitor, a coaxial transmission line, and transverse electromagnetic (TEM) horn antennae. The TEM horn antenna covers the microwave frequencies. The measurement technique involves a time domain setup that was verified by a frequency domain measurement. Portland cement concrete slabs, 60 by 75 by 14 cm, were cast; defects include delamination, delamination filled with water, segregation, and chloride contamination. In this paper, measurements using the TEM horn antennae and the feasibility of detecting flaws at microwave frequency are presented.

  2. Experimental characterization of yield induced by surface flaws.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. H.; Davidson, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Recent experimental findings related to the surface deformation and plastic zones associated with a deep surface flaw in Mode I tension loading are surveyed. Results of front and back surface dimpling, as determined by replica profiling and interferometry, are presented. The stresses required to initiate back surface dimpling are inversely related both to the crack depth and to the crack length. The plastic zone at the crack tip is described using results obtained from Fe-3Si specimens which have been studied with the electrolytic etching technique. It is shown that the plastic zone may be identified with a state of plane strain around the entire crack perimeter, except for the very thin layer near the crack tips on the front surface, where the deformation state approximates plane stress.

  3. Profitable failure: antidepressant drugs and the triumph of flawed experiments.

    PubMed

    McGoey, Linsey

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on an analysis of Irving Kirsch and colleagues' controversial 2008 article in "PLoS [Public Library of Science] Magazine" on the efficacy of SSRI antidepressant drugs such as Prozac, I examine flaws within the methodologies of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have made it difficult for regulators, clinicians and patients to determine the therapeutic value of this class of drug. I then argue, drawing analogies to work by Pierre Bourdieu and Michael Power, that it is the very limitations of RCTs -- their inadequacies in producing reliable evidence of clinical effects -- that help to strengthen assumptions of their superiority as methodological tools. Finally, I suggest that the case of RCTs helps to explore the question of why failure is often useful in consolidating the authority of those who have presided over that failure, and why systems widely recognized to be ineffective tend to assume greater authority at the very moment when people speak of their malfunction.

  4. Extensive burn injury caused by fundamental electronic cigarette design flaw

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, S.; Almarzouqi, F.; Pallua, N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Currently, electronic cigarette (EC) devices are widely used as an alternative to conventional smoking. The underlying technical principle is an electric coil-based vaporizer unit, which vaporizes various solutions for inhalation purposes with a rechargeable lithium battery unit as power source. We report a case of extensive burn injury resulting from the thermal explosion of a battery unit within an EC device. Though internal thermal instabilities of lithium ion batteries are a known safety issue, the unique feature here is a pronounced amplification of the extent of burn injury due to an additional scalding burn mechanism that resulted from heating of the liquid reservoir adjacent to the battery. Thus, we demonstrate a relevant design flaw in various EC devices, which in the authors’ opinion needs to be addressed both by manufacturers and safety regulations. PMID:28149256

  5. 'Moral distress'--time to abandon a flawed nursing construct?

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Hutchinson, Alison

    2015-02-01

    Moral distress has been characterised in the nursing literature as a major problem affecting nurses in all healthcare systems. It has been portrayed as threatening the integrity of nurses and ultimately the quality of patient care. However, nursing discourse on moral distress is not without controversy. The notion itself is conceptually flawed and suffers from both theoretical and practical difficulties. Nursing research investigating moral distress is also problematic on account of being methodologically weak and disparate. Moreover, the ultimate purpose and significance of the research is unclear. In light of these considerations, it is contended that the notion of moral distress ought to be abandoned and that concerted attention be given to advancing inquiries that are more conducive to improving the quality and safety of moral decision-making, moral conduct and moral outcomes in nursing and healthcare domains.

  6. Sizing defects using annular-array techniques with an automatic ultrasonic data-acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Gieske, J.H.; Stoker, G.C.; Walkington, P.D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of sizing internal flaws by a annular phased array technique are presented. The data was taken using a microprocessor controlled phased array pulser/receiver operated with a minicomputer ultrasonic data acquisition system. Flat bottom holes of two sizes which were machined in an aluminum block at various depths were used as targets. Sizing of these targets by the annular array technique is compared with sizing by conventional flat and focused single transducer techniques. The results show that the measured flaw size determined by the annular array technique is to a large extent independent of echo amplitude and flaw depth.

  7. Flaw Tolerance in Lap Shear Brazed Joints. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury; Wang, Li-Qin

    2003-01-01

    Furnace brazing is a joining process used in the aerospace and other industries to produce strong permanent and hermetic structural joints. As in any joining process, brazed joints have various imperfections and defects. At the present time, our understanding of the influence of the internal defects on the strength of the brazed joints is not adequate. The goal of this 3-part investigation is to better understand the properties and failure mechanisms of the brazed joints containing defects. This study focuses on the behavior of the brazed lap shear joints because of their importance in manufacturing aerospace structures. In Part 1, an average shear strength capability and failure modes of the single lap joints are explored. Stainless steel specimens brazed with pure silver are tested in accordance with the AWS C3.2 standard. Comparison of the failure loads and the ultimate shear strength with the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the same specimens as a function of the overlap widths shows excellent correlation between the experimental and calculated values for the defect-free lap joints. A damage zone criterion is shown to work quite well in understanding the failure of the braze joints. In Part 2, the findings of the Part 1 will be verified on the larger test specimens. Also, various flaws will be introduced in the test specimens to simulate lack of braze coverage in the lap joints. Mechanical testing and FEA will be performed on these joints to verify that behavior of the flawed ductile lap joints is similar to joints with a reduced braze area. Finally, in Part 3, the results obtained in Parts 1 and 2 will be applied to the actual brazed structure to evaluate the load-carrying capability of a structural lap joint containing discontinuities. In addition, a simplified engineering procedure will be offered for the laboratory testing of the lap shear specimens.

  8. Stress intensity factors for long, deep surface flaws in plates under extensional fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, A. E.; Smith, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Using a singular solution for a part circular crack, a Taylor Series Correction Method (TSCM) was verified for extracting stress intensity factors from photoelastic data. Photoelastic experiments were then conducted on plates with part circular and flat bottomed cracks for flaw depth to thickness ratios of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 and for equivalent flaw depth to equivalent ellipse length values ranging from 0.066 to 0.319. Experimental results agreed well with the Smith theory but indicated that the use of the ''equivalent'' semi-elliptical flaw results was not valid for a/2c less than 0.20. Best overall agreement for the moderate (a/t approximately 0.5) to deep flaws (a/t approximatelly 0.75) and a/2c greater than 0.15 was found with a semi-empirical theory, when compared on the basis of equivalent flaw depth and area.

  9. Holographic and ultrasonic detection of bond flaws in aluminum panels reinforced with boron-epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, R. J., Jr.; Thurston, L. B., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the application of holographic interferometry to the nondestructive detection of unbonded areas (flaws) in bonded panels. Flaw detection results were compared with results obtained with an ultrasonic flaw detector. Holography, with panel deformation accomplished by a reduction in ambient pressure, is less sensitive for flaws beneath 5 and 10 plies of boron-epoxy than the ultrasonic method, though it does have its operational advantages. A process for the manufacture of bonded panels which incorporate known unbonded areas was also developed. The unbonded areas were formed without the use of foreign materials, which makes the method suitable for the construction of reference standards for bonded panels whenever needed for the proper setup of ultrasonic flaw-detection instruments.

  10. No Scissors Allowed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Once, in the author's continual quest for unique and varied art projects, she was inspired by a colorful Kleenex[R] box which was covered with faces in a variety of sizes, ages, shapes and colors. What a fun idea to have her class create their own portraits using only construction paper, glue and one's fingers. As she shared an examplar rip-art…

  11. What went wrong? The flawed concept of cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Valdueza, José M; Doepp, Florian; Schreiber, Stephan J; van Oosten, Bob W; Schmierer, Klaus; Paul, Friedemann; Wattjes, Mike P

    2013-05-01

    In 2006, Zamboni reintroduced the concept that chronic impaired venous outflow of the central nervous system is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), coining the term of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency ('CCSVI'). The diagnosis of 'CCSVI' is based on sonographic criteria, which he found exclusively fulfilled in MS. The concept proposes that chronic venous outflow failure is associated with venous reflux and congestion and leads to iron deposition, thereby inducing neuroinflammation and degeneration. The revival of this concept has generated major interest in media and patient groups, mainly driven by the hope that endovascular treatment of 'CCSVI' could alleviate MS. Many investigators tried to replicate Zamboni's results with duplex sonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and catheter angiography. The data obtained here do generally not support the 'CCSVI' concept. Moreover, there are no methodologically adequate studies to prove or disprove beneficial effects of endovascular treatment in MS. This review not only gives a comprehensive overview of the methodological flaws and pathophysiologic implausibility of the 'CCSVI' concept, but also summarizes the multimodality diagnostic validation studies and open-label trials of endovascular treatment. In our view, there is currently no basis to diagnose or treat 'CCSVI' in the care of MS patients, outside of the setting of scientific research.

  12. Medical equipment donations in Haiti: flaws in the donation process.

    PubMed

    Dzwonczyk, Roger; Riha, Chris

    2012-04-01

    The magnitude 7.0 earthquake that struck Haiti on 12 January 2010 devastated the capital city of Port-au-Prince and the surrounding area. The area's hospitals suffered major structural damage and material losses. Project HOPE sought to rebuild the medical equipment and clinical engineering capacity of the country. A team of clinical engineers from the United States of America and Haiti conducted an inventory and assessment of medical equipment at seven public hospitals affected by the earthquake. The team found that only 28% of the equipment was working properly and in use for patient care; another 28% was working, but lay idle for technical reasons; 30% was not working, but repairable; and 14% was beyond repair. The proportion of equipment in each condition category was similar regardless of whether the equipment was present prior to the earthquake or was donated afterwards. This assessment points out the flaws that existed in the medical equipment donation process and reemphasizes the importance of the factors, as delineated by the World Health Organization more than a decade ago, that constitute a complete medical equipment donation.

  13. Light-induced stress relief to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Kevin N.; Dunn, Martin L.; Scott, Timothy F.; Turpin, Lucas P.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2010-03-15

    We demonstrate the ability to use photoactivated stress relaxation to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers. Unlike most self-healing polymers, which effectively close flaws by locally introducing healing agents (such as uncured resins), here light is used to relax elevated stresses around a flaw before it reaches a critical state, which reduces the threat that the flaw poses to the structural integrity of the material. In this study, we fabricate specimens with well-defined flaws and uniaxially stretch them to failure. By irradiating the specimens with UV light (365 nm) before failure, the nominal strain at failure is increased by 70% and the corresponding nominal stress is increased by 30% compared with nonirradiated specimens. To better understand the phenomena that occur at the multiaxial stress state at the flaw, we model the photomechanics using a recently developed finite element approach that accurately describes the light propagation, photochemistry, radical-induced network evolution, and the mechanical behavior of the material. Model predictions agree well with the experimental results and elucidate the role that photoinduced stress relaxation has on improving flaw tolerance.

  14. Usability Flaws in Medication Alerting Systems: Impact on Usage and Work System

    PubMed Central

    Ammenwerth, E.; Roehrer, E.; Pelayo, S.; Vasseur, F.; Beuscart-Zéphir, M.-C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Previous research has shown that medication alerting systems face usability issues. There has been no previous attempt to systematically explore the consequences of usability flaws in such systems on users (i.e. usage problems) and work systems (i.e. negative outcomes). This paper aims at exploring and synthesizing the consequences of usability flaws in terms of usage problems and negative outcomes on the work system. Methods A secondary analysis of 26 papers included in a prior systematic review of the usability flaws in medication alerting was performed. Usage problems and negative outcomes were extracted and sorted. Links between usability flaws, usage problems, and negative outcomes were also analyzed. Results Poor usability generates a large variety of consequences. It impacts the user from a cognitive, behavioral, emotional, and attitudinal perspective. Ultimately, usability flaws have negative consequences on the workflow, the effectiveness of the technology, the medication management process, and, more importantly, patient safety. Only few complete pathways leading from usability flaws to negative outcomes were identified. Conclusion Usability flaws in medication alerting systems impede users, and ultimately their work system, and negatively impact patient safety. Therefore, the usability dimension may act as a hidden explanatory variable that could explain, at least partly, the (absence of) intended outcomes of new technology. PMID:26123906

  15. Light-induced stress relief to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Kevin N.; Dunn, Martin L.; Scott, Timothy F.; Turpin, Lucas P.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the ability to use photoactivated stress relaxation to improve flaw tolerance in network polymers. Unlike most self-healing polymers, which effectively close flaws by locally introducing healing agents (such as uncured resins), here light is used to relax elevated stresses around a flaw before it reaches a critical state, which reduces the threat that the flaw poses to the structural integrity of the material. In this study, we fabricate specimens with well-defined flaws and uniaxially stretch them to failure. By irradiating the specimens with UV light (365 nm) before failure, the nominal strain at failure is increased by 70% and the corresponding nominal stress is increased by 30% compared with nonirradiated specimens. To better understand the phenomena that occur at the multiaxial stress state at the flaw, we model the photomechanics using a recently developed finite element approach that accurately describes the light propagation, photochemistry, radical-induced network evolution, and the mechanical behavior of the material. Model predictions agree well with the experimental results and elucidate the role that photoinduced stress relaxation has on improving flaw tolerance.

  16. Numerical Study on Coalescence of Pre-Existing Flaw Pairs in Rock-Like Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan-Qiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2014-11-01

    The present numerical study, which is an extension of our previous numerical analysis on cracking processes of a single pre-existing flaw, focuses on the coalescence of two pre-existing parallel open flaws in rock subjected to a uniaxial compressive loading. To facilitate a systematic investigation, the arrangements of the flaw pair are classified into 11 categories. Simulations engaging AUTODYN are conducted on each category. The numerical results are compared with some published physical experimental test results. Eleven typical coalescence patterns are obtained, which are in good agreement with the experimental results, which include two coalescence patterns obtained in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (VIII″) not being reported in previous studies. The information gathered in the simulations helps identify the type (tensile/shear) of each crack segment involved in the coalescence. Most of the coalescence cracks initiate at or around the flaw tips, except those in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (IX') with a very short ligament length, in which the coalescence cracks initiate on the flaw surfaces away from the flaw tip regions. Based on the numerical simulation results, the properties of the 11 coalescence patterns are obtained. Except those in flaw pair arrangements (II) and (IX'), the other coalescence patterns can be interpreted with respect to the basic crack types—tensile wing crack, horsetail crack and anti-wing crack. In addition, based on the type of crack segments involved in coalescence, namely tensile and shear, the coalescence can be classified into T mode (tensile mode), S mode (shear mode) and TS mode (mixed tensile-shear mode).

  17. Determination of Critical Flaw Size in Gun Launch 40-mm GRENADE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    fuze components. " Johnson - Cook model parameters were used and are not available for open dissemination. Boundary Conditions, Loads, and Constraints...Introduction 1 Modeling and Simulation 1 Modeling Approach 1 Model Geometry 1 Material Properties and Assignments 3 Boundary Conditions, Loads, and...been omitted in the model in order to save computation time. The absent mass was accounted for by increasing the density of the housing material , thus

  18. Characterization of constraint effects on flaw growth. [in graphite-epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeung, P. C.; Stinchcomb, W. W.; Reifsnider, K. L.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results have been presented for the case of a flawed unidirectional lamina constrained by off-axis unflawed plies under static and fatigue loading. Flaw growth in the interior of the laminate, around the embedded flaw, was followed by nondestructive testing methods including video-thermographs and ultrasonic C-scan schemes. Two aspects of the results were distinctive. There was an effort of lamination on damage development which was independent of the presence of the notch, and effects which were directly related to the influence of the notch on the local situation. The results are compared with sectioning studies, surface replication, and stiffness change measurements.

  19. A taxonomy of reasoning flaws in the anti-vaccine movement.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; Targonski, Paul V; Poland, Gregory A

    2007-04-20

    In a scholarly analysis of widely held misconceptions, Gilovich provides a classification scheme of common flaws in reasoning seen in contemporary society. He broadly categorizes these flaws as having cognitive determinants or in having motivational and social determinants. In this survey, the authors examine the various claims against routine childhood and adult vaccines as made by the more public and more organized entities of the anti-vaccine movement as well as those made apparent by surveys of parents and other groups of individuals. The claims illustrate the breadth of reasoning flaws while providing a basis for anticipating and correcting them.

  20. Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

    1991-10-01

    This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  1. A comparison of 1D and 1.5D arrays for imaging volumetric flaws in small bore pipework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, T. S.; Wilcox, P. D.; Nixon, A. D.

    2015-03-01

    1.5D arrays can be seen as a potentially ideal compromise between 1D arrays and 2D matrix arrays in terms of focusing capability, element density, weld coverage and data processing time. This paper presents an initial study of 1D and 1.5D arrays for high frequency (15MHz) imaging of volumetric flaws in small-bore (30-60mm outer diameter) thin-walled (3-8mm) pipework. A combination of 3D modelling and experimental work is used to determine Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) improvement with a strong relationship between SNR and the longer dimension of element size observed. Similar behavior is demonstrated experimentally rendering a 1mm diameter Flat Bottom Hole (FBH) in Copper-Nickel alloy undetectable using a larger array element. A 3-5dB SNR increase is predicted when using a 1.5D array assuming a spherical reflector and a 2dB increase was observed on experimental trials with a FBH. It is argued that this improvement is likely to be a lower bound estimate due to the specular behavior of a FBH with future trials planned on welded samples with realistic flaws.

  2. Fracture characteristics of structural aerospace alloys containing deep surface flaws. [aluminum-titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, J. N.; Bixler, W. D.; Finger, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Conditions controlling the growth and fracture of deep surface flaws in aerospace alloys were investigated. Static fracture tests were performed on 7075-T651 and 2219-T87 aluminum, and 6Ai-4V STA titanium . Cyclic flaw growth tests were performed on the two latter alloys, and sustain load tests were performed on the titanium alloy. Both the cyclic and the sustain load tests were performed with and without a prior proof overload cycle to investigate possible growth retardation effects. Variables included in all test series were thickness, flaw depth-to-thickness ratio, and flaw shape. Results were analyzed and compared with previously developed data to determine the limits of applicability of available modified linear elastic fracture solutions.

  3. The probability of flaw detection and the probability of false calls in nondestructive evaluation equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temple, Enoch C.

    1994-01-01

    The space industry has developed many composite materials that have high durability in proportion to their weights. Many of these materials have a likelihood for flaws that is higher than in traditional metals. There are also coverings (such as paint) that develop flaws that may adversely affect the performance of the system in which they are used. Therefore there is a need to monitor the soundness of composite structures. To meet this monitoring need, many nondestructive evaluation (NDE) systems have been developed. An NDE system is designed to detect material flaws and make flaw measurements without destroying the inspected item. Also, the detection operation is expected to be performed in a rapid manner in a field or production environment. Some of the most recent video-based NDE methodologies are shearography, holography, thermography, and video image correlation.

  4. Simulation of the Thermographic Response of Near Surface Flaws in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Burke, Eric R.

    2009-01-01

    Thermographic inspection is a viable technique for detecting in-service damage in reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) composites that are used for thermal protection in the leading edge of the shuttle orbiter. A thermographic technique for detection of near surface flaws in RCC composite structures is presented. A finite element model of the heat diffusion in structures with expected flaw configurations is in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  5. Investigation on Mechanical Behaviors of Sandstone with Two Preexisting Flaws under Triaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Da; Gu, Dongming; Yang, Chao; Huang, Runqiu; Fu, Guoyang

    2016-02-01

    Triaxial compression experiments on sandstone samples with two preexisting closed non-overlapping flaws were performed to investigate the deformation and strength behaviors. Three types of preexisting closed flaw pair in sandstone samples, i.e., parallel low-dip (type B), parallel high-dip (type C), and composite high- and low-dip (type D), were considered as the typical arrangements of the non-overlapping crack pair. A general rule has been found that the arrangement of the flaw pair has greater impact on the rock deformation, strength, and crack coalescence pattern than the confining pressure (5-20 MPa). Experimental results showed that, compared with intact sandstone samples, the postpeak stress-strain curves of flawed samples distinctly demonstrate stress fluctuation. In particular, the unique prepeak stress-strain curves of the specimens with a low-dip flaw pair (type B) present oblique Z-shape with a double-peak stress. The stress for crack initiation σ ci, the critical stress of dilation σ cd, and the peak strength σ c of precracked sandstone samples are significantly lower than those of intact rock. The present numerical study, which is an extension of the test analysis, focuses on identifying the crack nature (tensile or shear) and coalescence process. These simulated crack coalescence patterns are in good agreement with the laboratory test results. The cracks of the precracked samples that contained flaws with small inclination angle (associated with either type B or type D) generally initiate at the inner flaw tips and eventually lead to simple direct shear coalescence. However, complex indirect shear coalescence appears in the model containing a steep preexisting flaw pair (associated with type B specimen), even though no coalescence occurs when σ 3 = 5 MPa.

  6. SIMULATIONS OF THE THERMOGRAPHIC RESPONSE OF NEAR SURFACE FLAWS IN REINFORCED CARBON-CARBON PANELS

    SciTech Connect

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Burke, Eric R.

    2010-02-22

    Thermographic inspection is a viable technique for detecting in-service damage in reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) composites that are used for thermal protection in the leading edge of the shuttle orbiter. A thermographic technique for detection of near surface flaws in RCC composite structures is presented. A finite element model of the heat diffusion in structures with expected flaw configurations is in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  7. Reconstruction of Flaw Profiles Using Neural Networks and Multi-Frequency Eddy Current System

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Caryk, M.

    2005-04-09

    The objective of this paper is to identify profiles of flaws in conducting plates. To solve this problem, application of a multi-frequency eddy current system (MFES) and artificial neural networks is proposed. Dynamic feed-forward neural networks with various architectures are investigated. Extended experiments with all neural models are carried out in order to select the most promising configuration. Data utilized for the experiments were obtained from the measurements performed on the Inconel plates with EDM flaws.

  8. Identify Structural Flaw Location and Type with an Inverse Algorithm of Resonance Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Lai, Canhai; Sun, Xin

    2015-10-20

    To evaluate the fitness-for-service of a structural component and to quantify its remaining useful life, aging and service-induced structural flaws must be quantitatively determined in service or during scheduled maintenance shutdowns. Resonance inspection (RI), a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique, distinguishes the anomalous parts from the good parts based on changes in the natural frequency spectra. Known for its numerous advantages, i.e., low inspection cost, high testing speed, and broad applicability to complex structures, RI has been widely used in the automobile industry for quality inspection. However, compared to other contemporary direct visualization-based NDE methods, a more widespread application of RI faces a fundamental challenge because such technology is unable to quantify the flaw details, e.g. location, dimensions, and types. In this study, the applicability of a maximum correlation-based inverse RI algorithm developed by the authors is further studied for various flaw cases. It is demonstrated that a variety of common structural flaws, i.e. stiffness degradation, voids, and cracks, can be accurately retrieved by this algorithm even when multiple different types of flaws coexist. The quantitative relations between the damage identification results and the flaw characteristics are also developed to assist the evaluation of the actual state of health of the engineering structures.

  9. Research on testing field flaws of image intensifier based on spatio-temporal SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Liu, Bingqi; Wu, Dongsheng

    2010-10-01

    Image intensifier is the kernel of low-light-level device. The field flaw is one of the important index parameters of the image intensifier. Traditionally the statistic number of the image intensifier's field flaws is calculated through the people's eyes by the aid of an optical microscope, which main limitation is subjective and inefficient. With the broad application of the high-powered CCD and digital imaging processing method in testing performance of image intensifier, the method of appraising SNR based on spatio-temporal noise theory can accurately reflect the spatio-temporal heterogeneous of fluorescence's output image and fulfill the requirements of digital and automatic test. The limitation of the flaws' shape and position can be disregard and the accurate flaws' inspection can be realized rapidly by this method. In this paper, the main factors of forming the field flaws are analyzed and the mathematic model of spatio-temporal SNR is deduced. The hardware devices of the test system for image intensifier's spatio-temporal SNR are discussed. The spatio-temporal SNR of Gen image intensifier is tested by this test system and the test software based on Visual C++ and Matlab. The digital and automatic test of a factitious field flaw is realized by the theory of spatio-temporal SNR. The test precision can achieve pixel level. The experimental results show that this new method is rational, reliable and visualized.

  10. A passive microfluidic system based on step emulsification allows the generation of libraries of nanoliter-sized droplets from microliter droplets of varying and known concentrations of a sample.

    PubMed

    Postek, W; Kaminski, T S; Garstecki, P

    2017-03-29

    We present a novel geometry of microfluidic channels that allows us to passively generate monodisperse emulsions of hundreds of droplets smaller than 1 nL from collections of larger (ca. 0.4 μL) mother droplets. We introduce a new microfluidic module for the generation of droplets via passive break-up at a step. The module alleviates a common problem in step emulsification with efficient removal of the droplets from the vicinity of the step. In our solution, the droplets are pushed away from the step by a continuous liquid that bypasses the mother droplets via specially engineered bypasses that lead to the step around the main channel. We show that the bypasses tighten the distribution of volume of daughter droplets and eliminate subpopulations of daughter droplets. Clearing away the just produced droplets from the vicinity of the step provides for similar conditions of break-up for every subsequent droplet and, consequently, leads to superior monodispersity of the generated emulsions. Importantly, this function is realized autonomously (passively) in a protocol in which only a sequence of large mother droplets is forced through the module. Our system features the advantage of step emulsification systems in that the volumes of the generated droplets depend very weakly on the rate of flow through the module - an increase in the flow rate by 300% causes only a slight increase of the average diameter of generated droplets by less than 5%. We combined our geometry with a simple T-junction and a simple trap-based microdroplet dilutor to produce a collection of libraries of droplets of gradually changing and known concentrations of a sample. The microfluidic system can be operated with only two syringe pumps set at constant rates of flow during the experiment.

  11. Development of a probe for inner profile measurement and flaw detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Toru; Wakayama, Toshitaka; Kamakura, Yoshihisa

    2011-08-01

    It is one of the important necessities to precisely measure the inner diameter and/or the inner profile of pipes, tubes and other objects similar in shape. Especially in mechanical engineering field, there are many requests from automobile industry because the inner surface of engine blocks and other die casts are strongly required to be inspected and measured by non-contact methods (not by the naked eyes inspection using a borescope). If the inner diameter is large enough like water pipes or drain pipes, complicated and large equipment may be applicable. However, small pipes with a diameter ranging from 10mm to 100mm are difficult to be inspected by such a large instrument as is used for sewers inspection. And we have proposed an instrument which has no moving elements such as a rotating mirror or a prism for scanning a beam. Our measurement method is based on optical sectioning using triangulation. This optically sectioned profile of an inner wall of pipe-like objects is analyzed to produce numerical data of inner diameter or profile. Here, we report recent development of the principle and applications of the optical instrument with a simple and compact configuration. In addition to profile measurement, we found flaws and defects on the inner wall were also detected by using the similar principle. Up to now, we have developed probes with the diameter of 8mm to 25mm for small size objects and another probe (80 mm in diameter) for such a larger container with the dimensional size of 600mm.

  12. A FRAMEWORK TO DEVELOP FLAW ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FOR STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPURPOSE CANISTERS FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.; Duncan, A.; Adams, T.

    2014-04-07

    A multipurpose canister (MPC) made of austenitic stainless steel is loaded with used nuclear fuel assemblies and is part of the transfer cask system to move the fuel from the spent fuel pool to prepare for storage, and is part of the storage cask system for on-site dry storage. This weld-sealed canister is also expected to be part of the transportation package following storage. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation especially if exposed to aggressive environments during possible very long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone because the construction of MPC does not require heat treatment for stress relief. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic Inservice Inspection. The external loading cases include thermal accident scenarios and cask drop conditions with the contribution from the welding residual stresses. The determination of acceptable flaw size is based on the procedure to evaluate flaw stability provided by American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service (Second Edition). The material mechanical and fracture properties for base and weld metals and the stress analysis results are obtained from the open literature such as NUREG-1864. Subcritical crack growth from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and its impact on inspection intervals and acceptance criteria, is not addressed.

  13. Comparative study on submillimeter flaws in stitched T-joint carbon fiber reinforced polymer by infrared thermography, microcomputed tomography, ultrasonic c-scan and microscopic inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Hassler, Ulf; Genest, Marc; Fernandes, Henrique; Robitaille, Francois; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Joncas, Simon; Maldague, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Stitching is used to reduce dry-core (incomplete infusion of T-joint core) and reinforce T-joint structure. However, it may cause new types of flaws, especially submillimeter flaws. Microscopic inspection, ultrasonic c-scan, pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and laser spot thermography are used to investigate the internal flaws in a stitched T-joint carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) matrix composites. Then, a new microlaser line thermography is proposed. Microcomputed tomography (microCT) is used to validate the infrared results. A comparison between microlaser line thermography and microCT is performed. It was concluded that microlaser line thermography can detect the internal submillimeter defects. However, the depth and size of the defects can affect the detection results. The microporosities with a diameter of less than 54 μm are not detected in the microlaser line thermography results. Microlaser line thermography can detect the microporosity (a diameter of 0.162 mm) from a depth of 90 μm. However, it cannot detect the internal microporosity (a diameter of 0.216 mm) from a depth of 0.18 mm. The potential causes are given. Finally, a comparative study is conducted.

  14. Experimental study on cracking behaviour of moulded gypsum containing two non-parallel overlapping flaws under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afolagboye, Lekan Olatayo; He, Jianming; Wang, Sijing

    2016-12-01

    Failure of rock mass that is subjected to compressive loads occurs from initiation, propagation, and linkage of new cracks from preexisting fissures. Our research investigates the cracking behaviour and coalescence process in a brittle material with two non-parallel overlapping flaws using a high-speed camera. The coalescence tensile crack and tensile wing cracks were the first cracks to occur from the preexisting flaws. The initiation stresses of the primary cracks at the two tips of each flaw were simultaneous and decreased with reduced flaw inclination angle. The following types of coalescence cracks were identified between the flaws: primary tensile coalescence crack, tensile crack linkage, shear crack linkage, mixed tensile-shear crack, and indirect crack coalescence. Coalescence through tensile linkage occurred mostly at pre-peak stress. In contrast, coalescence through shear or mixed tensile-shear cracks occurred at higher stress. Overall, this study indicates that the geometry of preexisting flaws affect crack initiation and coalescence behaviour.

  15. Statistical flaw characterization through Bayesian shape inversion from scattered wave observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Jerry A.; Criner, Amanda K.

    2016-02-01

    A method is discussed to characterize the shape of a flaw from noisy far-field measurements of a scattered wave. The scattering model employed is a two-dimensional Helmholtz equation which quantifies scattering due to interrogating signals from various physical phenomena such as acoustics or electromagnetics. The well-known inherent ill-posedness of the inverse scattering problem is addressed via Bayesian regularization. The method is loosely related to the approach described in [1] which uses the framework of [2] to prove the well-posedness of the infinite-dimensional problem and derive estimates of the error for a particular discretization approach. The method computes the posterior probability density for the flaw shape from the scattered field observations, taking into account prior assumptions which are used to describe any a priori knowledge of the flaw. We describe the computational approach to the forward problem as well as the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based approach to approximating the posterior. We present simulation results for some hypothetical flaw shapes with varying levels of observation error and arrangement of observation points. The results show how the posterior probability density can be used to visualize the shape of the flaw taking into account the quantitative confidence in the quality of the estimation and how various arrangements of the measurements and interrogating signals affect the estimation

  16. The detection of flaws in austenitic welds using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Laura J.; Mulholland, Anthony J.; Gachagan, Anthony; Harvey, Gerry; Bird, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The non-destructive testing of austenitic welds using ultrasound plays an important role in the assessment of the structural integrity of safety critical structures. The internal microstructure of these welds is highly scattering and can lead to the obscuration of defects when investigated by traditional imaging algorithms. This paper proposes an alternative objective method for the detection of flaws embedded in austenitic welds based on the singular value decomposition of the time-frequency domain response matrices. The distribution of the singular values is examined in the cases where a flaw exists and where there is no flaw present. A lower threshold on the singular values, specific to austenitic welds, is derived which, when exceeded, indicates the presence of a flaw. The detection criterion is successfully implemented on both synthetic and experimental data. The datasets arising from welds containing a flaw are further interrogated using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT) method and the total focusing method (TFM), and it is shown that images constructed via the DORT algorithm typically exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio than those constructed by the TFM algorithm. PMID:27274683

  17. Signal denoising and ultrasonic flaw detection via overcomplete and sparse representations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Ming; Harvey, David M; Braden, Derek R

    2008-11-01

    Sparse signal representations from overcomplete dictionaries are the most recent technique in the signal processing community. Applications of this technique extend into many fields. In this paper, this technique is utilized to cope with ultrasonic flaw detection and noise suppression problem. In particular, a noisy ultrasonic signal is decomposed into sparse representations using a sparse Bayesian learning algorithm and an overcomplete dictionary customized from a Gabor dictionary by incorporating some a priori information of the transducer used. Nonlinear postprocessing including thresholding and pruning is then applied to the decomposed coefficients to reduce the noise contribution and extract the flaw information. Because of the high compact essence of sparse representations, flaw echoes are packed into a few significant coefficients, and noise energy is likely scattered all over the dictionary atoms, generating insignificant coefficients. This property greatly increases the efficiency of the pruning and thresholding operations and is extremely useful for detecting flaw echoes embedded in background noise. The performance of the proposed approach is verified experimentally and compared with the wavelet transform signal processor. Experimental results to detect ultrasonic flaw echoes contaminated by white Gaussian additive noise or correlated noise are presented in the paper.

  18. Deep Flaw Detection with Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) Based Self-Nulling Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a design modification to the Very-Low Frequency GMR Based Self-Nulling Probe has been presented to enable improved signal to noise ratio for deeply buried flaws. The design change consists of incorporating a feedback coil in the center of the flux focusing lens. The use of the feedback coil enables cancellation of the leakage fields in the center of the probe and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. The effect of the feedback on the probe output was examined, and experimental results for deep flaw detection were presented. The experimental results show that the modified probe is capable of clearly identifying flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures.

  19. Pipe Axial Flaw Failure Criteria (PAFFC): Version 1.0 user`s manual and software

    SciTech Connect

    Leis, B.N.; Ghadiali, N.D.

    1994-05-04

    This topical report is the technical manual and basis for delivery of the software tided Pipe Axial Flaw Failure Criterion. This criterion was developed under SI Task 1. 13 for the Line Pipe Research Supervisory Committee of the Pipeline Research Committee. This software has been given the acronym PAFFC, which follows from the underlined letters in the title for this code. The purpose of PAFFC is to determine the failure conditions associated with a single external axial flaw in a gas transmission pipeline. Failure is determined concurrently in terms of two independent failure processes - fracture and/or net-section (plastic) collapse of the ligament between the flaw and the inside surface of the pipe.

  20. Investigation and characterization of constraint effects on flaw growth during fatigue loading of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinchcomb, W. W.; Reifsnider, K. L.; Yeung, P.; Gibbins, M. N.

    1979-01-01

    An investigative program is presented in an attempt to add to the current understanding of constraint effects on the response of composite materials under cyclic loading. The objectives were: (1) to use existing data and to develop additional data in order to establish an understanding and quantitative description of flaw growth in unidirectional lamina under cyclic loading at different load direction to fiber direction angles; (2) to establish a similar understanding and description of flaw growth in lamina which are embedded in laminates between other unflawed lamina; (3) to determine the nature of the influence of constraint on flaw growth by quantitatively comparing the results of the tests; and (4) to develop a model and philosophy of constraints effects based on our investigative results.

  1. Potential change in flaw geometry of an initially shallow finite-length surface flaw during a pressurized-thermal-shock transient

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, D.K.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1993-09-01

    This study presents preliminary estimates on whether an shallow, axially oriented, inner-surface finite-length flaw in a PWR-RPV would tend to elongate in the axial direction and/or deepen into the wall of the vessel during a postulated PTS transient. Analysis results obtained based on the assumptions of (1) linear-elastic material response, and (2) cladding with same toughness as the base metal, indicate that a nearly semicircular flaw would likely propagate in the axial direction followed by propagation into the wall of the vessel. Note that these results correspond to initiation within the lower-shelf fracture toughness temperature range, and that their general validity within the lower-transition temperature range remains to be determined. The sensitivity of the numerical results aid conclusions to the following analysis assumptions are evaluated: (1) reference flaw geometry along the entire crack front and especially within the cladding region; (2) linear-elastic vs elastic-plastic description of material response; and (3) base-material-only vs bimaterial cladding-base vessel-model assumption. The sensitivity evaluation indicates that the analysis results are very sensitive to the above assumptions.

  2. Shape Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Flaw by the Measurement from the Side of Cylindrical Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Kitahara, M.

    2004-02-01

    The three-dimensional Born and Kirchhoff inversions are modified to the convenient form for cylindrical structures. Moving the measurement plane along the axis of the cylinder, cross-sectional images are obtained by the modified method. The three-dimensional flaw shape is reconstructed by piling up the cross-sectional images. Cement paste and concrete cylinders with flaw models are prepared and ultrasonic measurements are carried out. The measured wave data are fed into the inversion method and the performance of the shape reconstruction is confirmed.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Scattered Waves from Flaws for Ultrasonic Array Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, S.; Kono, N.; Nakahata, K.

    2007-03-01

    To enhance the detectability in the phased array UT, it is essential to have well knowledge on the characteristics of ultrasonic waves from array transducers. This paper proposes a mathematical model of the array transducer and a simulation tool to predict the flaw echoes. The modeling of an array transducer is based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral and the scattered waves from flaws are calculated with the fast multipole BEM (FMBEM). By using the FMBEM, we can solve large scale scattering problems with relatively low computational cost. Here we focus on the transient wave analysis, in which a pulse-shaped wave is used for exciting elements of the array transducer.

  4. Flaws Identification Using Eddy Current Differential Transducer and Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Lopato, P.

    2006-03-06

    In this paper we present a multi-frequency excitation eddy current differential transducer and dynamic neural models which were used to detect and identify artificial flaws in thin conducting plates. Plates are made of Inconel600. EDM notches have relative depth from 10% to 80% and length from 2 mm to 7 mm. All flaws were located on the opposite surface of the examined specimen. Measured signals were used as input for training and verifying dynamic neural networks with a moving window. Wide range of ANN (Artificial Neural Network) structures are examined for different window length and different number of frequency components in excitation signal. Observed trends are presented in this paper.

  5. Fiber Optic Thermographic Detection of Flaws in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2009-01-01

    Optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings bonded to surfaces of structures were used for thermographic detection of subsurface defects in structures. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The obtained data were analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with the simulation results.

  6. Cracking Process and Stress Field Evolution in Specimen Containing Combined Flaw Under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Lin, Baiquan; Yang, Wei; Zou, Quanle; Kong, Jia; Yan, Fazhi

    2016-08-01

    Hydraulic slotting, an efficient technique for underground enhanced coal bed methane (ECBM) recovery, has been widely used in China. However, its pressure relief mechanism is unclear. Thus far, only limited research has been conducted on the relationships among the mechanical properties, flaw parameters, and crack propagation patterns of coal after hydraulic slotting. In addition, because of the limitations of test methods, an in-depth information is not available for this purpose. In this work, numerical models of specimens containing combined flaws are established based on particle flow code method. Our results provide insights into the effects of flaw inclination angle on the mechanical properties, crack propagation patterns, and temporal and spatial evolution rules of stress field in specimens containing combined flaws during the loading process. Besides, based on the initiation position and underlying mechanism, three types of crack initiation modes are identified from the failure processes of specimens. Finally, the crack propagation pattern is quantitatively described by the fractal dimension, which is found to be inversely proportional to the uniaxial compressive strength and elastic modulus of the specimen. To verify the rationality of the numerical simulation results, laboratory tests were conducted and their results match well with those obtained from the numerical simulation.

  7. Anisotropic determination and correction for ultrasonic flaw detection by spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Laszlo; Von Cook, K.; Simpson, Jr., William A.; Lewis, D. Kent

    1978-01-01

    The anisotropic nature of a material is determined by measuring the velocity of an ultrasonic longitudinal wave and a pair of perpendicular ultrasonic shear waves through a sample of the material each at a plurality of different angles in three planes orthogonal to each other. The determined anisotropic nature is used as a correction factor in a spectral analyzing system of flaw determination.

  8. Apparatus and method for detecting and/or measuring flaws in conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Hockey, Ronald L.; Riechers, Douglas M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention uses a magnet and sensor coil unilaterial and in relative motion to a conductive material, to measure perturbation or variation in the magnetic field in the presence of a flaw. A liftoff compensator measures a distance between the conductive material and the magnet.

  9. Flawed Implementation or Inconsistent Logics? Lessons from Higher Education Reform in Ukraine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Marta A.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates two competing explanations of why reforms associated with the Bologna process brought disappointing results in Ukraine. The lack of anticipated benefits from the reforms may stem either from a flawed implementation of the Bologna process, or from more fundamental differences between the models of higher education…

  10. The Dangerous Myth of Emerging Adulthood: An Evidence-Based Critique of a Flawed Developmental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Côté, James E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the theory of emerging adulthood, introduced into the literature by Arnett (2000), in terms of its methodological and evidential basis, and finds it to be unsubstantiated on numerous grounds. Other, more convincing, formulations of variations in the transition to adulthood are examined. Most flawed academic theories are…

  11. Active role of the liquid phase of developer in revealing surface flaws by capillary methods

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorenko, P.P.; Dezhkunov, N.V.; Stoicheva, I.V.

    1988-08-01

    The article investigates the interaction of two chemically nonreacting liquids after they have been brought into contact with each other in a capillary. It is established that the liquid phase of the developer is not only a passive carrier of the developing component but also exerts an active influence on the process of development, and consequently, on the detectability of flaws.

  12. Nonlinear imaging (NIM) of flaws in a complex composite stiffened panel using a constructive nonlinear array (CNA) technique.

    PubMed

    Malfense Fierro, Gian Piero; Meo, Michele

    2017-02-01

    Recently, there has been high interest in the capabilities of nonlinear ultrasound techniques for damage/defect detection as these techniques have been shown to be quite accurate in imaging some particular type of damage. This paper presents a Constructive Nonlinear Array (CNA) method, for the detection and imaging of material defects/damage in a complex composite stiffened panel. CNA requires the construction of an ultrasound array in a similar manner to standard phased arrays systems, which require multiple transmitting and receiving elements. The method constructively phase-match multiple captured signals at a particular position given multiple transmit positions, similar to the total focusing method (TFM) method. Unlike most of the ultrasonic linear techniques, a longer excitation signal was used to achieve a steady-state excitation at each capturing position, so that compressive and tensile stress at defect/crack locations increases the likelihood of the generation of nonlinear elastic waves. Moreover, the technique allows the reduction of instrumentation nonlinear wave generation by relying on signal attenuation to naturally filter these errors. Experimental tests were carried out on a stiffened panel with manufacturing defects. Standard industrial linear ultrasonic test were carried out for comparison. The proposed new method allows to image damages/defects in a reliable and reproducible manner and overcomes some of the main limitations of nonlinear ultrasound techniques. In particular, the effectiveness and robustness of CNA and the advantages over linear ultrasonic were clearly demonstrated allowing a better resolution and imaging of complex and realistic flaws.

  13. Experimental constraints on the energy budget of dynamic gouge formation: effects of rock strength, material heterogeneity, and initial flaw characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Ashley; Barber, Troy; Borjas, Christopher; Ghaffari, Hamed

    2016-04-01

    Fault core materials are characterized by substantial grain size reduction relative to host and damage zone rocks. The properties of these materials control fault strength and frictional behavior, and they record valuable information about rupture and slip processes. At high strain rates and large stress amplitudes characteristic of earthquake rupture tips, rock failure passes through a fragmentation transition from discrete fracture to pulverization; therefore much of the observed grain size reduction at the leading edge of propagating earthquake ruptures. Past examinations of particle size distributions in gouge formed in the cores of natural faults have led to contrasting conclusions that during a single event, the energy associated with creation of new surface area during this grain size reduction can be as large as 50%, or as little as <1% of the earthquake energy budget; however these estimates are difficult to confirm due to (A) challenges associated with accurate particle size measurement and (B) uncertainty regarding the variety of (not-necessarily coseismic) physico-chemical processes that may contribute to the observed grain size reduction. Here we study the micromechanics and energy budget of dynamic rock fragmentation under impulsive compressive loads using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. We present new experimental results on Arkansas Novaculite and Westerly Granite coupled with microstructural observations and BET surface area measurements of post-mortem specimens. We show that the energy partitioned into creation of new surface areas approaches a significant portion of the total dissipated energy during our experiments, but this partitioning can be buffered by the presence of flaws and/or significant material heterogeneity. The results of this work have important implications for lithologic controls on gouge formation and energy partitioning during earthquakes.

  14. Analysis of unclad and sub-clad semi-elliptical flaws in pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Irizarry-Quinones, H.; Macdonald, B.D.; McAfee, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    This study was conducted to support warm prestressing experiments on unclad and sub-clad flawed beams loaded in pure bending. Two cladding yield strengths were investigated: 0.6 Sy and 0.8 Sy, where Sy is the yield strength of the base metal. Cladding and base metal were assumed to be stress free at the stress relief temperature for the 3D elastic-plastic finite element analysis used to model the experiments. The model results indicated that when cooled from the stress relief temperature, the cladding was put in tension due to its greater coefficient of thermal expansion. When cooled, the cladding exhibited various amounts of tensile yielding. The degree of yielding depended on the amount of cooling and the strength of the cladding relative to that of the base metal. When subjected to tensile bending stress, the sub-clad flaw elastic-plastic stress intensity factor, K{sub I}(J), was at first dominated by crack closing force due to tensile yielding in the cladding. Thus, imposed loads initially caused no increase in K{sub I}(J) near the clad-base interface. However, K{sub I}(J) at the flaw depth was little affected. When the cladding residual stress was overcome, K{sub I}(J) gradually increased until the cladding began to flow. Thereafter, the rate at which K{sub I}(J) increased with load was the same as that of an unclad beam. A plastic zone corrected K{sub I} approximation for the unclad flaw was found by the superposition of standard Newman and Raju solutions with those due to a cladding crack closure force approximated by the Kaya and Erdogan solution. These elastic estimates of the effect of cladding in reducing the crack driving force were quite in keeping with the 3D elastic-plastic finite element solution for the sub-clad flaw. The results were also compared with the analysis of clad beam experiments by Keeney and the conclusions by Miyazaki, et al. A number of sub-clad flaw specimens not subjected to warm prestressing were thought to have suffered degraded

  15. An experimental study of the effect of stainless steel cladding on the structural integrity of flawed steel plates in bending

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Nanstad, R.K.; Robinson, G.C.; Oland, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    A small crack near the inner surface of clad nuclear reactor pressure vessels is an important consideration in the safety assessment of the structural integrity of the vessel. Experimental results from tests on large clad and unclad plate specimens with surface flaws have shown that (1) a tough surface layer composed of cladding and/or heat-affected zone has arrested running flaws in clad plates under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured, and (2) the residual load-bearing capacity of clad plates with large subclad flaws significantly exceeded that of an unclad plate. The fracture surfaces of unclad plates suggest that the flaw evolves through alternately tunneling then breaking to the surface. In the case of clad plates, it is hypothesized that the tough, strong surface layer inhibits the tunneled flaw from propagating to the surface.

  16. Effects of proof loads and combined mode loadings on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of (1) combined tensile and bending loadings, (2) combined tensile and shear loadings, and (3) proof overloads on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys. Tests were performed on four alloys: 2219-T87 aluminum, 5Al-2.5Sn (ELl) titanium, 6Al-4V beta STA titanium and high strength 4340 steel. Tests were conducted in room air, gaseous nitrogen at -200F (144K), liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Flat center cracked and surface flawed specimens, cracked tube specimens, circumferentially notched round bar and surface flawed cylindrical specimens were tested. The three-dimensional photoelastic technique of stress freezing and slicing was used to determine stress intensity factors for surface flawed cylindrical specimens subjected to tension or torsion. Results showed that proof load/temperature histories used in the tests have a small beneficial effect or no effect on subsequent fracture strength and flaw growth rates.

  17. Development of Natural Flaw Samples for Evaluating Nondestructive Testing Methods for Foam Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Davis, Jason; Farrington, Seth; Walker, James

    2007-01-01

    Low density polyurethane foam has been an important insulation material for space launch vehicles for several decades. The potential for damage from foam breaking away from the NASA External Tank was not realized until the foam impacts on the Columbia Orbiter vehicle caused damage to its Leading Edge thermal protection systems (TPS). Development of improved inspection techniques on the foam TPS is necessary to prevent similar occurrences in the future. Foamed panels with drilled holes for volumetric flaws and Teflon inserts to simulate debonded conditions have been used to evaluate and calibrate nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. Unfortunately the symmetric edges and dissimilar materials used in the preparation of these simulated flaws provide an artificially large signal while very little signal is generated from the actual defects themselves. In other words, the same signal are not generated from the artificial defects in the foam test panels as produced when inspecting natural defect in the ET foam TPS. A project to create more realistic voids similar to what actually occurs during manufacturing operations was began in order to improve detection of critical voids during inspections. This presentation describes approaches taken to create more natural voids in foam TPS in order to provide a more realistic evaluation of what the NDT methods can detect. These flaw creation techniques were developed with both sprayed foam and poured foam used for insulation on the External Tank. Test panels with simulated defects have been used to evaluate NDT methods for the inspection of the External Tank. A comparison of images between natural flaws and machined flaws generated from backscatter x-ray radiography, x-ray laminography, terahertz imaging and millimeter wave imaging show significant differences in identifying defect regions.

  18. Effect of Combined Loading Due to Bending and Internal Pressure on Pipe Flaw Evaluation Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Naoki; Sakai, Shinsuke

    Considering a rule for the rationalization of maintenance of Light Water Reactor piping, reliable flaw evaluation criteria are essential for determining how a detected flaw will be detrimental to continuous plant operation. Ductile fracture is one of the dominant failure modes that must be considered for carbon steel piping and can be analyzed by elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Some analytical efforts have provided various flaw evaluation criteria using load correction factors, such as the Z-factors in the JSME codes on fitness-for-service for nuclear power plants and the section XI of the ASME boiler and pressure vessel code. The present Z-factors were conventionally determined, taking conservativity and simplicity into account; however, the effect of internal pressure, which is an important factor under actual plant conditions, was not adequately considered. Recently, a J-estimation scheme, LBB.ENGC for the ductile fracture analysis of circumferentially through-wall-cracked pipes subjected to combined loading was developed for more accurate prediction under more realistic conditions. This method explicitly incorporates the contributions of both bending and tension due to internal pressure by means of a scheme that is compatible with an arbitrary combined-loading history. In this study, the effect of internal pressure on the flaw evaluation criteria was investigated using the new J-estimation scheme. The Z-factor obtained in this study was compared with the presently used Z-factors, and the predictability of the current flaw evaluation criteria was quantitatively evaluated in consideration of the internal pressure.

  19. Exploring Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception that communicates ideas museum exhibits cannot demonstrate easily by using experiments and activities for the classroom. This issue concentrates on size, examining it from a variety of viewpoints. The focus allows students to investigate and discuss interconnections among…

  20. 40 CFR 35.2025 - Allowance and advance of allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facilities planning and design of the project and Step 7 agreements will include an allowance for facility planning in accordance with appendix B of this subpart. (b) Advance of allowance to potential grant... grant applicants for facilities planning and project design. (2) The State may request that the right...

  1. Detection of flaws on surface of civil infrastructures and their profiling using imaging system with laser displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Paritosh; Kharkovsky, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Civil infrastructures such as buildings, bridges, roads and pipelines are the integral part of people's lives and their failure can have large public safety and economic consequences. Early detection of flaws in civil infrastructures and their appropriate retrofitting will aid in preventing this failure. Flaws such as cracks and impact damages initially occur on the surface and propagate inside the materials causing further degradation. There is a need to develop systems that can detect these surface flaws. Developing a system with one sensing technique which can detect the flaws is a challenging task since infrastructures are made up of diverse materials such as concrete, metal, plastics, composite and timber that have different electrical and mechanical properties. It is also desired that non-plain surfaces with complex profiles can be interrogated and surface flaws can be detected. We have proposed an imaging system capable of interrogating structures with complex surface profiles for the purpose of detection and evaluation of surface flaws such as cracks and impact damages using laser displacement sensor (LDS). The developed system consists of LDS mounted on the scanner which is able to perform raster scan over the specimen under test. The reading of displacement from the sensor head to the laser spot on the surface of the test material is then used to generate images which can be used to detect the surface flaws. The proof of concept is given by testing specimens made of metal, concrete and plastics with complex surface profiles.

  2. Characterization of Service Induced Flaws on the Far Side of Austenitic Welds Using Phased Array Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonic testing methods continue to exhibit problems for applications involving coarse-grained structures. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating the capabilities and limitations of phased array (PA) technology to detect service-type flaws in these coarse-grained materials. The work is being sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Research. Work to determine detection capabilities through welds with varied grain structures is being explored to provide a better understanding of the acoustic properties of these welded structures. Piping specimens with welds fabricated in vertical and horizontal positions to simulate field conditions have been studied. The insights gained from the austenitic piping will be applied to dissimilar metal weld configurations, corrosion resistant clad piping and cast stainless steels. This paper presents results for using PA ultrasonic technology to determine the effectiveness of detecting and accurately characterizing flaws on the far-side of austenitic piping welds.

  3. Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Detection of Longitudinal Flaws in Metallic Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A radially focused eddy current sensor detects longitudinal flaws in a metal tube. A drive coil induces eddy currents within the wall of the metal tube. A pick-up cod is spaced apart from the drive coil along the length of the metal tube. The pick@up coil is positioned with one end thereof lying adjacent the wall of the metal tube such that the pick-up coil's longitudinal axis is perpendicular to the wall of the metal tube. To isolate the pick-up coil from the magnetic flux of the drive coil and the flux from the induced eddy currents. except the eddy currents diverted by a longitudinal flaw. an electrically conducting material high in magnetic permeability surrounds all of the pick-up coil except its one end that is adjacent the walls of the metal tube. The electrically conducting material can extend into and through the drive coil in a coaxial relationship therewith.

  4. Method and apparatus for detecting flaws and defects in heat seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Kula R. (Inventor); Lew, Thomas M. (Inventor); Sinclair, Robert B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Flaws and defects in heat seals formed between sheets of translucent film are identified by optically examining consecutive lateral sections of the seal along the seal length. Each lateral seal section is illuminated and an optical sensor array detects the intensity of light transmitted through the seal section for the purpose of detecting and locating edges in the heat seal. A line profile for each consecutive seal section is derived having an amplitude proportional to the change in light intensity across the seal section. Instances in the derived line profile where the amplitude is greater than a threshold level indicate the detection of a seal edge. The detected edges in each derived line profile are then compared to a preset profile edge standard to identify the existence of a flaw or defect.

  5. Detection of Real Flaw using Uniform Eddy Current Multi-probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Katsuhiro; Hashimoto, Mitsuo

    The establishment of the nondestructive inspection technology with plant structures has been stimulated by the recent occurrence of cracks in the nuclear power plant structures. In this research, a uniform eddy current multi-probe to apply to the complex structure and inspect the cracks at high-speed data acquisition was developed. Pick-up coils of the developed probe were arranged on a flexible printed circuit board. This probe was able to obtain clear signal for an EDM (electro-discharge machining) slit with 0.5 mm depth and distinguish EDM slits arranged at 2 mm intervals. It was confirmed that the SCC (stress corrosion cracking) of real flaw was able to be detected with developed uniform eddy current multi-probe by using the ferrite core for the exciting coil and considering the impedance matching of the exciting coil and the flaw detection device.

  6. Indentation flaw formation and strength response of silicon nitride ceramics at low indentation loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1992-01-01

    The configuration and the strength response of indentation flaws in silicon nitrides are described as a function of indentation loads primarily near the threshold level. Test materials under consideration include 30 vol percent SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and similar monolithic silicon nitride. The results of strength testing show that, at indentation loads less than or equal to 1.96, a number of the specimens fail from the intrinsic flaws of the materials rather than from the indent sites, causing a distinct trend to reach a plateau, at a level corresponding to the as-received strength of the material. The ratio of the mirror constant to the fracture toughness for the composite and monolithic materials is found to be 1.44 and 1.51, respectively.

  7. Investigation of flaw geometry and loading effects on plane strain fracture in metallic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The effects on fracture and flaw growth of weld-induced residual stresses, combined bending and tension stresses, and stress fields adjacent to circular holes in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5AI-2.5Sn(ELI) titanium alloys were evaluated. Static fracture tests were conducted in liquid nitrogen; fatigue tests were performed in room air, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen. Evaluation of results was based on linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts and was directed to improving existing methods of estimating minimum fracture strength and fatigue lives for pressurized structure in spacecraft and booster systems. Effects of specimen design in plane-strain fracture toughness testing were investigated. Four different specimen types were tested in room air, liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen environments using the aluminum and titanium alloys. Interferometry and holograph were used to measure crack-opening displacements in surface-flawed plexiglass test specimens. Comparisons were made between stress intensities calculated using displacement measurements, and approximate analytical solutions.

  8. Signal Processing Variables for Optimization of Flaw Detection in Composites Using Ultrasonic Guided Wave Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Cosgriff, Laura M.; Martin, Richard E.; Teemer, LeTarrie

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzes the effect of signal processing variables on the ability of the ultrasonic guided wave scan method at NASA Glenn Research Center to distinguish various flaw conditions in ceramic matrix composites samples. In the ultrasonic guided wave scan method, several time- and frequency-domain parameters are calculated from the ultrasonic guided wave signal at each scan location to form images. The parameters include power spectral density, centroid mean time, total energy (zeroth moment), centroid frequency, and ultrasonic decay rate. A number of signal processing variables are available to the user when calculating these parameters. These signal processing variables include 1) the time portion of the time-domain waveform processed, 2) integration type for the properties requiring integrations, 3) bounded versus unbounded integrations, 4) power spectral density window type, 5) and the number of time segments chosen if using the short-time fourier transform to calculate ultrasonic decay rate. Flaw conditions examined included delamination, cracking, and density variation.

  9. Flaw Stability Considering Residual Stress for Aging Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel Multiple-Purpose Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Poh-Sang; Sindelar, Robert L.

    2016-04-28

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of the MPC, the canister is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in the weld or heat affected zone regions under long-term storage conditions. Logic for flaw acceptance is developed should crack-like flaws be detected by Inservice Inspection. The procedure recommended by API 579-1/ASME FFS-1, Fitness-for-Service, is used to calculate the instability crack length or depth by failure assessment diagram. It is demonstrated that the welding residual stress has a strong influence on the results.

  10. Flaw Stability Considering Residual Stress for Aging Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel Multiple-Purpose Canisters

    DOE PAGES

    Lam, Poh-Sang; Sindelar, Robert L.

    2016-04-28

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of the MPC, the canister is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in the weld or heat affected zone regions under long-term storage conditions. Logic for flaw acceptance is developed should crack-like flaws be detected by Inservice Inspection. The procedure recommended by API 579-1/ASME FFS-1, Fitness-for-Service, is used to calculate the instability crack length or depth by failure assessment diagram. It is demonstrated that the welding residual stress has amore » strong influence on the results.« less

  11. Observations on the behavior of surface flaws in the presence of cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    A small crack near the inner surface of clad nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is an important consideration in the safety assessment of the structural integrity of the vessel. Four-point bend tests on large plate specimens, six clad and two unclad, were performed to determine the effect, if any, of stainless steel cladding upon the propagation of small surface cracks subjected to stress states similar to those produced by pressurized thermal shock conditions. Results of tests at temperature 10 and 60/degree/C below the nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDT) have shown that (1) a tough surface layer composed of cladding and/or heat-affected zone has arrested running flaws in clad plates under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured, and (2) the residual load-bearing capacity of clad plates with large subclad flaws significantly exceeded that of an unclad plate. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Improved multi-directional eddy current inspection test apparatus for detecting flaws in metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Roy A.; Hartley, William H.; Caffarel, Alfred J.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus is described for detecting flaws in a tubular workpiece in a single scan. The coils of a dual coil bobbin eddy current inspection probe are wound at a 45.degree. angle to the transverse axis of the probe, one coil having an angular position about the axis about 90.degree. relative to the angular position of the other coil, and the angle of intersection of the planes containing the coils being about 60.degree..

  13. Cyclic Fatigue of Brittle Materials with an Indentation-Induced Flaw System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1996-01-01

    The ratio of static to cyclic fatigue life, or 'h ratio', was obtained numerically for an indentation flaw system subjected to sinusoidal loading conditions. Emphasis was placed on developing a simple, quick lifetime prediction tool. The solution for the h ratio was compared with experimental static and cyclic fatigue data obtained from as-indented 96 wt.% alumina specimens tested in room-temperature distilled water.

  14. Application and assessment of ultrasonic inspection methods for flaw detection and characterization of manganese steel frogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinson, A.; Diaz, A.; Prowant, M.

    2011-04-01

    Ultrasonic nondestructive examination (NDE) has a long and successful history of application across a wide array of industries, including nuclear, aerospace, and transportation sectors. In coarse-grained, cast Manganese (Mn) steel frog components, NDE/inspection challenges are encountered both in-field (after the frogs have been installed on a rail line) and at the manufacturing facilities during post-fabrication QA/QC activities. Periodically inherently flawed frogs are received from a manufacturer, and put into service, as most railroad operators do not have a means to conduct pre-service examinations on received components. Accordingly, there is a need for a pre-service inspection system that can provide a rapid, cost-effective and non-intrusive inspection capability for detection of defects, flaws, and other anomalies in frog components, in order to avoid premature initiation of cracks or failures of these components during service. This study focused on evaluating use of a volumetric phased-array ultrasonic testing (PA-UT) method to monitor fabrication quality assurance. In this preliminary assessment of using PA-UT, data were acquired at a frequency of 2.0 MHz on a known, flawed Mn steel frog component directly from a manufacturing facility. The component contained flaws commonly found as a result of the manufacturing process of these cast rail components. The data were analyzed and the anomalies were detected, localized and characterized. Results were compared against baseline radiographic data. A detection metric was reported in the form of signal-to-noise values.

  15. Flaw-induced plastic-flow dynamics in bulk metallic glasses under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Yue, T. M.; Tsui, C. P.; Chan, K. C.

    2016-10-01

    Inheriting amorphous atomic structures without crystalline lattices, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are known to have superior mechanical properties, such as high strength approaching the ideal value, but are susceptible to catastrophic failures. Understanding the plastic-flow dynamics of BMGs is important for achieving stable plastic flow in order to avoid catastrophic failures, especially under tension, where almost all BMGs demonstrate limited plastic flow with catastrophic failure. Previous findings have shown that the plastic flow of BMGs displays critical dynamics under compression tests, however, the plastic-flow dynamics under tension are still unknown. Here we report that power-law critical dynamics can also be achieved in the plastic flow of tensile BMGs by introducing flaws. Differing from the plastic flow under compression, the flaw-induced plastic flow under tension shows an upward trend in the amplitudes of the load drops with time, resulting in a stable plastic-flow stage with a power-law distribution of the load drop. We found that the flaw-induced plastic flow resulted from the stress gradients around the notch roots, and the stable plastic-flow stage increased with the increase of the stress concentration factor ahead of the notch root. The findings are potentially useful for predicting and avoiding the catastrophic failures in tensile BMGs by tailoring the complex stress fields in practical structural-applications.

  16. Stress analysis and damage evaluation of flawed composite laminates by hybrid-numerical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yii-Ching

    1992-01-01

    Structural components in flight vehicles is often inherited flaws, such as microcracks, voids, holes, and delamination. These defects will degrade structures the same as that due to damages in service, such as impact, corrosion, and erosion. It is very important to know how a structural component can be useful and survive after these flaws and damages. To understand the behavior and limitation of these structural components researchers usually do experimental tests or theoretical analyses on structures with simulated flaws. However, neither approach has been completely successful. As Durelli states that 'Seldom does one method give a complete solution, with the most efficiency'. Examples of this principle is seen in photomechanics which additional strain-gage testing can only average stresses at locations of high concentration. On the other hand, theoretical analyses including numerical analyses are implemented with simplified assumptions which may not reflect actual boundary conditions. Hybrid-Numerical methods which combine photomechanics and numerical analysis have been used to correct this inefficiency since 1950's. But its application is limited until 1970's when modern computer codes became available. In recent years, researchers have enhanced the data obtained from photoelasticity, laser speckle, holography and moire' interferometry for input of finite element analysis on metals. Nevertheless, there is only few of literature being done on composite laminates. Therefore, this research is dedicated to this highly anisotropic material.

  17. Flaw-induced plastic-flow dynamics in bulk metallic glasses under tension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Yue, T. M.; Tsui, C. P.; Chan, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    Inheriting amorphous atomic structures without crystalline lattices, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are known to have superior mechanical properties, such as high strength approaching the ideal value, but are susceptible to catastrophic failures. Understanding the plastic-flow dynamics of BMGs is important for achieving stable plastic flow in order to avoid catastrophic failures, especially under tension, where almost all BMGs demonstrate limited plastic flow with catastrophic failure. Previous findings have shown that the plastic flow of BMGs displays critical dynamics under compression tests, however, the plastic-flow dynamics under tension are still unknown. Here we report that power-law critical dynamics can also be achieved in the plastic flow of tensile BMGs by introducing flaws. Differing from the plastic flow under compression, the flaw-induced plastic flow under tension shows an upward trend in the amplitudes of the load drops with time, resulting in a stable plastic-flow stage with a power-law distribution of the load drop. We found that the flaw-induced plastic flow resulted from the stress gradients around the notch roots, and the stable plastic-flow stage increased with the increase of the stress concentration factor ahead of the notch root. The findings are potentially useful for predicting and avoiding the catastrophic failures in tensile BMGs by tailoring the complex stress fields in practical structural-applications. PMID:27779221

  18. AnalySize: New software for analyzing and unmixing sediment grain size distribution spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, G. A.; Heslop, D.

    2015-12-01

    Grain size distribution (GSD) data are a widely used tool in Earth sciences, particularly in understanding sediment transportation and sourcing. Although large data sets are regularly generated, detailed numerical analyses, such as grain size unmixing, are not routinely performed. Unmixing of GSD data involves approximating a given data set by a small number of GSDs, known as end members. These end members, along with their relative abundances, can be used to fully characterize the variability of the data. End member analysis (EMA), which fits one set of end members to a single data set, is one the most robust ways to do this. This approach estimates the form of the end members from the data set itself; hence it is a non-parametric approach. Available algorithms, however, either produce sub-optimal solutions, or are time consuming. To aid investigators in exploring the full potential of their data, we introduce AnalySize, which is a GUI based tool that allows for comprehensive processing and unmixing of grain size data obtained from laser diffraction particle grain size analyzers. AnalySize brings together methods from other disciplines in Earth sciences as well as introducing new techniques and improvements to provide a complete software package for unmixing GSD data. The software utilizes the rapid HALS-NMF algorithm from hyperspectral image analysis to perform non-parametric EMA, which is demonstrated to yield results that are an improvement over algorithms currently used in GSD analysis. Non-parametric EMA, however, is often unable to clearly identify discrete unimodal grain size sub-populations, which can more detailed information about sediment sources. To alleviate this, we introduce a new algorithm to perform parametric EMA, whereby an entire GSD data set can be unmixed into unimodal parametric end members (e.g., lognormal or Weibull end members). This allows individual grain size sub-populations to be more readily identifiable in highly mixed data set

  19. Shallow Flaws Under Biaxial Loading Conditions, Part II: Application of a Weibull Stress Analysis of the Cruciform Bend Specimen Using a Hydrostatic Stress Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.

    1999-08-01

    Cruciform beam fracture mechanics specimensl have been developed in the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a prototypic, far- field, out-of-plane biaxird bending stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear biaxial stresses resulting from pressurized-thernxd-shock or pressure-temperature loading of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shtdlow, surface flaws. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. Two and three- parameter Weibull models have been calibrated using a new scheme (developed at the University of Illinois) that maps toughness data from test specimens with distinctly different levels of crack-tip constraint to a small scale yielding (SSY) Weibull stress space. These models, using the new hydrostatic stress criterion in place of the more commonly used maximum principal stress in the kernel of the OW integral definition, have been shown to correlate the experimentally observed biaxiaI effect in cruciform specimens, thereby providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states.

  20. Evaluation of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2012-06-01

    During a recent inservice inspection (ISI) of a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) in an inlet (hot leg) steam generator nozzle at North Anna Power Station Unit 1, several axially oriented flaws went undetected by the licensee's manual ultrasonic testing (UT) technique. The flaws were subsequently detected as a result of outside diameter (OD) surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the DMW. Further ultrasonic tests were then performed, and a total of five axially oriented flaws, classified as primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference.

  1. An improvement on the power law for the description of particle size distributions in potable water treatment.

    PubMed

    Ceronio, A D; Haarhoff, J

    2005-01-01

    In potable water treatment, the use of the power law to describe particle size distributions (PSDs) in particle counting practice is common. The power law is popular because it allows the reduction of numerous data bits to two meaningful parameters that completely describe the size distribution characteristics of a particle suspension. The model is however flawed. This paper presents the further development of an improved model (the variable-beta model) first proposed by Lawler (1997). Both the power law model and variable-beta model are used to describe the PSDs of a large number of potable water treatment samples taken from full-scale plants and the resulting correlations are compared. The findings from the comparison of data reduction methodologies support the argument that the variable-beta model is fundamentally more correct than the power law model and consequently describes the PSDs better.

  2. Electromagnetic methods for measuring materials properties of cylindrical rods and array probes for rapid flaw inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Haiyan

    2005-01-01

    field in the presence of a finite a two-layer rod and a conductive tube. The results are in very good agreement with those obtained by using a 2D finite element code. In the third part, a new probe technology with enhanced flaw detection capability is described. The new probe can reduce inspection time through the use of multiple Hall sensors. A prototype Hall array probe has been built and tested with eight individual Hall sensor ICs and a racetrack coil. Electronic hardware was developed to interface the probes to an oscilloscope or an eddy current instrument. To achieve high spatial resolution and to limit the overall probe size, high-sensitivity Hall sensor arrays were fabricated directly on a wafer using photolithographic techniques and then mounted in their unencapsulated form. The electronic hardware was then updated to interface the new probes to a laptop computer.

  3. Nonproductive Factor Allowance. (Pilot Study).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-31

    a separate factor for each size of facility, i.e., MEDCEN, Large MEDDAC, and Small MEDDAC. f. In a GAO audit report, "Development and Use of Military...measurement in determining and Justifying staffing requirements. g. Another GAO audit report, "Uniform Accounting and Workload Measurement Systems Needed for...Effective Writing, AFIT, Survival, TDY, Technical Training, IDEA High School, CDC and Survey Taking. Also taking tests such as PFE , SKT, AF Sup Exam, CLEP

  4. 7 CFR 52.782 - Allowances for quality factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowances for quality factors. 52.782 Section 52.782... for Quality Factors § 52.782 Allowances for quality factors. Table IV—Allowances for Quality Factors Factor Sample unit size Maximum number permissible for the respective grade A A B B C C Pits 20 ozs...

  5. Characteristics of Ferromagnetic Flux Focusing Lens in the Development of Surface/Subsurface Flaw Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, Jim; Nath, Shridhar; Namkung, Min; Simpson, John

    1993-01-01

    Electromagnetic NDE techniques have in the past steered away from the use of ferromagnetic materials. Although their high permeabilities lead to increased field levels, the properties of ferrous elements in the presence of alternating magnetic fields are difficult to determine. In addition, their use leads to losses which can be minimized through the use of low conductivity ferrites. In fact, the eddy current probes which do incorporate ferromagnetic materials have focused on these losses and the shielding which can be obtained by surrounding a probe with a high permeability, conducting material. Eddy current probes enclosed in conducting and magnetic shields have been used to prevent the generated fields from interacting with materials in the vicinity of the probe, such as when testing near material boundaries. A recent invention has used ferromagnetic shielding to magnetically separate individual concentric eddy current probes in order to eliminate cross-talk between the probes so that simultaneous detection of different types of flaws at different depths can be achieved. In contrast to the previous uses of ferromagnetic materials purely as magnetic shields, an electromagnetic flaw detector recently developed at NASA Langley Research Center takes advantage of the flux focusing properties of a ferromagnetic mild steel in order to produce a simple, effective device for the non-destructive evaluation of conducting materials. The Flux Focusing Eddy Current Probe has been shown to accurately measure material thickness and fatigue damage. The straight forward flaw response of the probe makes the device ideal for rapid inspection of large structures, and has lead to its incorporation in a computer controlled search routine to locate fatigue crack tips and monitor experimental fatigue crack growth experiments.

  6. Dynamic Strength and Fracturing Behavior of Single-Flawed Prismatic Marble Specimens Under Impact Loading with a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xibing; Zhou, Tao; Li, Diyuan

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic impact tests are performed on prismatic marble specimens containing a single flaw using a modified split-Hopkinson pressure bar device. The effects of pre-existing flaws with different flaw angles and lengths on the dynamic mechanical properties are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the dynamic strength of marble is influenced by the flaw geometry. The dynamic fracturing process of flawed specimens is monitored and characterized with the aid of a high-speed camera. Cracking of marble specimens with a single pre-existing flaw under impact loading is analyzed based on experimental investigations. Cracking involves two major stages: formation of white patches and development of macrocracks. Six typical crack types are identified on the basis of their trajectories and initiation mechanisms. The presence of an artificial flaw may change the failure mode of marble from splitting-dominated for an intact specimen to shear-dominated for a flawed specimen under dynamic loading. Nevertheless, the geometry of the flaws appears to have a slight influence on the failure modes of flawed specimens under impact loading.

  7. Metallic-like photoluminescence and absorption in fused silica surface flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T A; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Feldman, T; Miller, P; Steele, W A; Suratwala, T

    2008-09-11

    Using high-sensitivity confocal time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) techniques, we report an ultra-fast PL (40ps-5ns) from impurity-free surface flaws on fused silica, including polished, indented or fractured surfaces of fused silica, and from laser-heated evaporation pits. This PL is excited by the single photon absorption of sub-band gap light, and is especially bright in fractures. Regions which exhibit this PL are strongly absorptive well below the band gap, as evidenced by a propensity to damage with 3.5eV ns-scale laser pulses.

  8. Towards teaching science for social responsibility: An examination of flaws in science, technology and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Roger T.; Price, Ronald F.

    1991-12-01

    In this paper we continue our search for a socially responsible science education by an examination of the trends in the Science, Technology and Society movement. These trends reflect differing ideological perspectives and result in courses which serve different ends. We identify two major flaws in the movement that inhibits the realization of a schooling in science dedicated to democracy. We propose skills necessary for citizens to participate in debate over issues surrounding the impact of science and technology on society and a teaching stategy to help develop them.

  9. Flaw criticality of circular disbond defects in compressive laminates. M.S. Thesis. Interim Report, 1980 - 1981; [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The compressive behavior of T300/5208 graphite-epoxy laminates containing circular delaminations was studied to determine the flaw criticality of two types of implanted defect, Kapton bag and Teflon film, on several laminate configurations. Defect size was varied. Results, presented in the form of residual strength curves, indicate that the Teflon film defect reduced strength more than the Kapton bad defect in 12-ply samples, but that two laminates (+ or - 45) sub 2s and (90/+ or - 45) sub s were insensitive to any implanted defect. A clear thickness effect was shown to exist for the (o/+ pr 45) sub ns laminate and was attributed to failure mode transition. The analytically predicted buckling loads show excellent agreement with experimental results and are useful in predicting failure mode transition.

  10. Flux-focusing eddy current probe and rotating probe method for flaw detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A.; Fulton, James P.; Nath, Shridhar C.; Simpson, John W.; Namkung, Min

    1994-11-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks about circular fasteners and other circular inhomogeneities in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil. The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. By rotating the probe in a path around a circular fastener such as a rivet while maintaining a constant distance between the probe and the center of a rivet, the signal due to current flow about the rivet can be held constant. Any further changes in the current distribution, such as due to a fatigue crack at the rivet joint, can be detected as an increase in the output voltage above that due to the flow about the rivet head.

  11. Myths, Artifacts, and Fatal Flaws: Identifying Limitations and Opportunities in Vitamin C Research

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Alexander J.; Frei, Balz

    2013-01-01

    Research progress to understand the role of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) in human health has been slow in coming. This is predominantly the result of several flawed approaches to study design, often lacking a full appreciation of the redox chemistry and biology of ascorbic acid. In this review, we summarize our knowledge surrounding the limitations of common approaches used in vitamin C research. In human cell culture, the primary issues are the high oxygen environment, presence of redox-active transition metal ions in culture media, and the use of immortalized cell lines grown in the absence of supplemental ascorbic acid. Studies in animal models are also limited due to the presence of endogenous ascorbic acid synthesis. Despite the use of genetically altered rodent strains lacking synthesis capacity, there are additional concerns that these models do not adequately recapitulate the effects of vitamin C deprivation and supplementation observed in humans. Lastly, several flaws in study design endemic to randomized controlled trials and other human studies greatly limit their conclusions and impact. There also is anecdotal evidence of positive and negative health effects of vitamin C that are widely accepted but have not been substantiated. Only with careful attention to study design and experimental detail can we further our understanding of the possible roles of vitamin C in promoting human health and preventing or treating disease. PMID:24352093

  12. Analysis of the Mutual Inductance between Two Parallel Plates for the Detection of Surface Flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namking, M.; Clendenin, C. G.; Fulton, J. P.; Wincheski, B.

    1992-01-01

    There has recently been much effort behind the development of NDE methods applicable to the detection of surface/subsurface flaws in thin metallic structures with a rapid scan capability. One such method, an electromagnetic technique using a current-sheet parallel to the surface of a specimen in order to induce eddy current flow shows a high potential for satisfying the rapid scan requirement stated above. The technique is based on the detection of flaw-induced magnetic field components normal to the specimen surface by an appropriate detection mechanism positioned above the current-sheet as shown schematically in Fig. 1. As indicated in this figure, the current-sheet separates the source of the normal magnetic field components from the detector in such a way that the electric and magnetic properties of the current-sheet can be a major factor affecting the strength of the detected signals. The purpose of the present study is, therefore, to perform a detailed investigation on the effect of the material properties of the current-sheet on the detected signal strength and to establish a simple theoretical model for the detection mechanism.

  13. Wavelet analysis applied to thermographic data for the detection of sub-superficial flaws in mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarra, Stefano; Regi, Mauro

    2016-06-01

    Up to now, the sun-pulse recorded during the heating (day) and cooling (night) phases has not yet been analyzed by using the infrared thermography (IRT) method through the complex wavelet transform (CWT) technique. CWT can be used with the sun-pulse data in a similar way as the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). In addition, CWT preserves the time information of the signal both in the phasegrams and in the amplitudegrams. In this work, a mosaic sample containing artificial flaws positioned at different depths was inspected into the long wave IR spectrum. It is possible to observe that by comparing defective and defect-free areas, a difference in phase during the thermal diffusion appears. The signal reference, measured on the defect-free area, was subtracted from the other measurement points. The resulting signal thermal contrast, representing the difference of the temporal evolutions of the surface temperature above the defective and defect-free positions, was also plotted. Subsequently, the wavelet phase contrast was computed. The solar radiation influencing the sample was estimated bearing in mind the sun path in the sky, the mosaic orientation and the inclination with respect to its local geographical coordinates. Finally, the ambient parameters have been recorded by a control unit. Although the CWT technique did not provided a sound visualization of the shape of the flaws, it permitted to reflect on the heat release coming from the bituminous material behind the statumen layer. Indeed, it is not atypical to find inclined mosaics to be restored.

  14. Flaws in design, analysis and interpretation of Pfizer's antifungal trials of voriconazole and uncritical subsequent quotations

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Karsten J; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2006-01-01

    We have previously described how a series of trials sponsored by Pfizer of its antifungal drug, fluconazole, in cancer patients with neutropenia handicapped the control drug, amphotericin B, by flaws in design and analysis. We describe similar problems in two pivotal trials of Pfizer's new antifungal agent, voriconazole, published in a prestigious journal. In a non-inferiority trial, voriconazole was significantly inferior to liposomal amphothericin B, but the authors concluded that voriconazole was a suitable alternative. The second trial used amphothericin B deoxycholate as comparator, but handicapped the drug by not requiring pre-medication to reduce infusion-related toxicity or substitution with electrolytes and fluid to reduce nephrotoxicity, although the planned duration of treatment was 84 days. Voriconazole was given for 77 days on average, but the comparator for only 10 days, which precludes a meaningful comparison. In a random sample of 50 references to these trials, we found that the unwarranted conclusions were mostly uncritically propagated. It was particularly surprising that relevant criticism raised by the FDA related to the first trial was only quoted once, and that none of the articles noted the obvious flaws in the design of the second trial. We suggest that editors ensure that the abstract reflects fairly on the remainder of the paper, and that journals do not impose any time limit for accepting letters that point out serious weaknesses in a study that have not been noted before. PMID:16542031

  15. Detection of sub-horizontal flaws in concrete using the synthetic aperture focusing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Zahra

    Concrete deteriorates over time due to environmental changes and/or poor construction processes which can eventually lead to partial or total failure of a structure. Deterioration in concrete manifests itself in different forms such as: freeze and thaw, chemical attack, surface and internal flaws. Concrete and shotcrete linings are widely used as support systems in underground excavations. Surprisingly, a fragmented, damaged shotcrete support system can actually create a less stable environment than the unsupported rock mass. Detection of internal flaws remains a difficult task as they are not always observable on the surface. Yet, the potential to expand and cause damage to the structure is omnipresent. The focus of this work is to locate and characterize two main and common features in concrete structures, (1) sub-horizontal cracks; (2) rock-concrete interfaces. Traditionally, this has been difficult to detect by currently available NDT methods. To obtain high resolution images of cracks in concrete, an extension of the ultrasonic nondestructive technique known as Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) has been used. However, in order to achieve our research objective, we developed a modified SAFT code in this work. The results of this study demonstrate that the resolving power of our modified 3D SAFT algorithm can provide an accurate profile of both a rock-concrete interface and/or cracks with angles varying from 5 to 15 degrees within concrete slabs having thicknesses of up to twenty centimetres.

  16. Flaw Shape Reconstruction from SH-Wave Array Ultrasonic Data Using Time Domain Linearized Inverse Scattering Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kimoto, K.; Hirose, S.

    2005-04-09

    A linearized inverse scattering method, so called the Kirchhoff inversion, is formulated in time domain for SH-waves measured by a contact ultrasonic transducer and tested using experimental data. The data for reconstruction are experimentally obtained by measuring ultrasonic echoes from artificial flaws in steel plate specimens. For an efficient and accurate data collection, a contact SH-wave linear array transducer is used. The shapes of the artificial flaws are reconstructed by the Kirchhoff inversion and the conventional SAFT (Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique) using the waves from a single ray path. Comparison of the two methods shows that the Kirchhoff inversion works well for experimental data and outperforms SAFT although only an illuminated portion of the flaw boundaries is reconstructed by either method. In order to gain more information on the flaw boundaries, the Kirchhoff inversion which takes into account multiple ray paths is also tested with the same experimental data. As a result, it is shown that a larger part of the flaw boundaries can be visualized by considering the multiple ray paths.

  17. Friction Stir Weld Restart+Reweld Repair Allowables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    A friction stir weld (FSW) repair method has been developed and successfully implemented on Al 2195 plate material for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank (ET). The method includes restarting the friction stir weld in the termination hole of the original weld followed by two reweld passes. Room temperature and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties exceeded minimum FSW design strength and compared well with the development data. Simulated service test results also compared closely to historical data for initial FSW, confirming no change to the critical flaw size or inspection requirements for the repaired weld. Testing of VPPA fusion/FSW intersection weld specimens exhibited acceptable strength and exceeded the minimum design value. Porosity, when present at the intersection was on the root side toe of the fusion weld, the "worst case" being 0.7 inch long. While such porosity may be removed by sanding, this "worst case" porosity condition was tested "as is" and demonstrated that porosity did not negatively affect the strength of the intersection weld. Large, 15-inch "wide panels" FSW repair welds were tested to demonstrate strength and evaluate residual stresses using photo stress analysis. All results exceeded design minimums, and photo stress analysis showed no significant stress gradients due to the presence of the restart and multi-pass FSW repair weld.

  18. The effects of violating standard item writing principles on tests and students: the consequences of using flawed test items on achievement examinations in medical education.

    PubMed

    Downing, Steven M

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effects of violations of standard multiple-choice item writing principles on test characteristics, student scores, and pass-fail outcomes. Four basic science examinations, administered to year-one and year-two medical students, were randomly selected for study. Test items were classified as either standard or flawed by three independent raters, blinded to all item performance data. Flawed test questions violated one or more standard principles of effective item writing. Thirty-six to sixty-five percent of the items on the four tests were flawed. Flawed items were 0-15 percentage points more difficult than standard items measuring the same construct. Over all four examinations, 646 (53%) students passed the standard items while 575 (47%) passed the flawed items. The median passing rate difference between flawed and standard items was 3.5 percentage points, but ranged from -1 to 35 percentage points. Item flaws had little effect on test score reliability or other psychometric quality indices. Results showed that flawed multiple-choice test items, which violate well established and evidence-based principles of effective item writing, disadvantage some medical students. Item flaws introduce the systematic error of construct-irrelevant variance to assessments, thereby reducing the validity evidence for examinations and penalizing some examinees.

  19. Vietnam recommended dietary allowances 2007.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nguyen Cong; Hoan, Pham Van

    2008-01-01

    It has been well acknowledged that Vietnam is undergoing a nutrition transition. With a rapid change in the country's reform and economic growth, food supply at the macronutrient level has improved. Changes of the Vietnamese diet include significantly more foods of animal origin, and an increase of fat/oils, and ripe fruits. Consequently, nutritional problems in Vietnam now include not only malnutrition but also overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome and other chronic diseases related to nutrition and lifestyles. The recognition of these shifts, which is also associated with morbidity and mortality, was a major factor in the need to review and update the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for the Vietnamese population. This revised RDA established an important science-based tool for evaluation of nutrition adequacy, for teaching, and for scientific communications within Vietnam. It is expected that the 2007 Vietnam RDA and its conversion to food-based dietary guidelines will facilitate education to the public, as well as the policy implementation of programs for prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases and addressing the double burden of both under and over nutrition.

  20. Failure behavior of internally pressurized flawed and unflawed steam generator tubing at high temperatures -- Experiments and comparison with model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.; Mruk, K.; Franklin, J.; Knoblich, L.

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on the failure of internally pressurized steam generator tubing at high temperatures ({le} 700 C). A model was developed for predicting failure of flawed and unflawed steam generator tubes under internal pressure and temperature histories postulated to occur during severe accidents. The model was validated by failure tests on specimens with part-through-wall axial and circumferential flaws of various lengths and depths, conducted under various constant and ramped internal pressure and temperature conditions. The failure temperatures predicted by the model for two temperature and pressure histories, calculated for severe accidents initiated by a station blackout, agree very well with tests performed on both flawed and unflawed specimens.

  1. Influence of Flaws of Wire Rod Surface, Inclusions and Voids on Wire Breaks in Superfine Wire Drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kazunari; Norasethasopon, Somchai; Shinohara, Tetsuo; Ido, Ryuta

    By means of the finite element analysis (FEA), this study analyzed wire breaks that occurred in the drawing fine wires containing flaws on the wire surface, inclusion and void. The deformation behavior of an inclusion was examined, in which the inclusion's location is assumed to be on the center axis of the wire, and the cause of wire breaks and their prevention method were clarified. It was found that an inclusion diameter/wire diameter ratio of 0.4 or higher increases the likelihood of wire breaks occurring. When the inclusion is not assumed to be in the center axis of the wire, it was also found that necking and wire breaks appear more frequently. FEA showed that a flaw grows with each processing step, when a small circumferential flaw is placed on the wire rod surface, and eventually becomes a surface defect, which is called a check mark in practice.

  2. A comparative study of experimental and finite element analysis on submillimeter flaws by laser and ultrasonic excited thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Fernandes, Henrique; Yu, Lingyao; Hassler, Ulf; Genest, Marc; Robitaille, François; Joncas, Simon; Sheng, Yunlong; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Stitching is used to reduce dry-core and reinforce T-joint structure. However, it might cause new types of flaws, especially submillimeter flaws. In this paper, new approaches including micro-VT, lock-in micro-LLT and micro-LST based on both lock-in and pulse methods are used to detect submillimeter flaws in stitched CFRP. A comparison of laser excitation thermography and micro-VT on micro-porosities is conducted. Micro-CT is used to validate the infrared results. Then, a finite element analysis (FEA) is performed. The geometrical model needed for finite element discretization was developed from micro-CT measurements. The model is validated for the experimental results. Finally a comprehensive experimental and simulation comparison of micro-LLT and micro-LST based on both lock-in and pulse methods is conducted.

  3. Apparent viscoelastic anisotropy as measured from nondestructive oscillatory tests can reflect the presence of a flaw in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Yeni, Yener N; Christopherson, Gregory T; Turner, A Simon; Les, Clifford M; Fyhrie, David P

    2004-04-01

    There is evidence that damage, viscoelastic stiffness properties, and postyield mechanical properties are related in bone tissue. Our objective was to test whether presence of a flaw would have an influence on the apparent viscoelastic properties of bone. Examining the effect of flaw orientation on apparent viscoelastic properties and utilization of dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) as a nondestructive means for detection of damage were our secondary objectives. Cortical bone beams (2 x 2 x 19 mm) machined from the cranial cortex of the radii of six Warhill sheep were used. The specimens were placed in a DMA machine and baseline measurements of storage modulus (E1) and loss factor (tan delta), once for loads in the craniocaudal and once in the mediolateral directions, were performed using a three-point bending configuration for a frequency range of 1-10 Hz. Craniocaudal/mediolateral measurement ratio was calculated as a measure of anisotropy for tan delta and E1. After cutting a thin through-thickness macroscopic notch on the caudal surface at the center of each beam, oscillatory tests were repeated. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test was used with group (craniocaudal, mediolateral, notched craniocaudal, and notched mediolateral measurements) and frequency as factors. Regression analysis and analysis of covariance were used for examining the relationship between viscoelastic parameters and frequency. Tan delta and E1 were not different between craniocaudal and mediolateral measurements before the flaw was introduced (p > 0.8 and p = 1, respectively). In the presence of the flaw, tan delta was significantly increased (p < 0.003) whereas E1 was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) for craniocaudal measurements. Tan delta and E1 were nearly isotropic in the tested directions before the introduction of a flaw into the bone tissue. Introduction of a flaw resulted in increased tan delta and E1 anisotropy. Presence of a notch resulted in

  4. Flaw growth behavior in thick welded plates of 2219-T87 aluminum at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Glorioso, S. V.; Medlock, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Axial load fatigue and fracture tests were conducted on thick welded plates of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy to determine the tensile strength properties and the flaw growth behavior in electron beam, gas metal arc, and pulse current gas tungsten arc welds for plates 6.35 centimeters (2.5 in.) thick. The tests were conducted in room temperature air and in liquid nitrogen environments. Specimens were tested in both the as-welded and the aged after welding conditions. The experimental crack growth rate were correlated with theoretical crack growth rate predictions for semielliptical surface flaws.

  5. Gun shows and gun violence: fatally flawed study yields misleading results.

    PubMed

    Wintemute, Garen J; Hemenway, David; Webster, Daniel; Pierce, Glenn; Braga, Anthony A

    2010-10-01

    A widely publicized but unpublished study of the relationship between gun shows and gun violence is being cited in debates about the regulation of gun shows and gun commerce. We believe the study is fatally flawed. A working paper entitled "The Effect of Gun Shows on Gun-Related Deaths: Evidence from California and Texas" outlined this study, which found no association between gun shows and gun-related deaths. We believe the study reflects a limited understanding of gun shows and gun markets and is not statistically powered to detect even an implausibly large effect of gun shows on gun violence. In addition, the research contains serious ascertainment and classification errors, produces results that are sensitive to minor specification changes in key variables and in some cases have no face validity, and is contradicted by 1 of its own authors' prior research. The study should not be used as evidence in formulating gun policy.

  6. Sampling flies or sampling flaws? Experimental design and inference strength in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Michaud, J-P; Schoenly, Kenneth G; Moreau, G

    2012-01-01

    Forensic entomology is an inferential science because postmortem interval estimates are based on the extrapolation of results obtained in field or laboratory settings. Although enormous gains in scientific understanding and methodological practice have been made in forensic entomology over the last few decades, a majority of the field studies we reviewed do not meet the standards for inference, which are 1) adequate replication, 2) independence of experimental units, and 3) experimental conditions that capture a representative range of natural variability. Using a mock case-study approach, we identify design flaws in field and lab experiments and suggest methodological solutions for increasing inference strength that can inform future casework. Suggestions for improving data reporting in future field studies are also proposed.

  7. Computer analysis of two-dimensional fatigue flaw-growth problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Kavanaugh, H. C.; Stuckey, B.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of a computer program for analyzing the crack propagation in cyclic loaded structures. By using equations for the stress intensity factors for surface and embedded flaws, the capability of ascertaining lengthwise crack growth as well as crack growth through the thickness of the structure was determined. Equations used are written in general form so that many other types of crack growth problems, such as through the thickness type cracks, can be analyzed. Provisions have been made in the computer program to analyze crack growth for repeated blocks of variable-amplitude fatigue load spectra. Additional features of the computer program include a variable print interval and a variable integration interval to minimize computer printout and computer run time. A source listing and instructions for using the computer program are included.

  8. Solar-stimulated flaw and water incursion detection in fiberglass structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schivley, James D.

    1994-03-01

    Fiberglass is a combination of glass fiber reinforcing material and plastic resin. The advantages far outweigh the disadvantages that are commonly found in commercial structures. Fiberglass does not suffer from dry rot or worms as found with wood; from rust, a common problem with steel; or from electrolysis, common problems with both steel and aluminum. However, compared to steel, fiberglass has low fatigue and buckling strengths. This can cause delaminations where stress concentrations are located. Many other factors contribute to delaminations that are invisible to the eye. For this reason an IR thermographic procedure was developed to detect these delaminations and other flaws in fiberglass structures. Due to the confidentiality of this project, neither the name of client or the location of this fiberglass structure will be reviled in this paper.

  9. A new flaw inspection technique based on infrared thermal images under Joule effect heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Ogura, Keiji

    1992-11-01

    A new nondestructive inspection technique using infrared thermography was proposed, in which the thermal image of the surface temperature on a heated sample was used to identify flaws and defects. Joule effect heating by an electric current was employed to heat the sample instantaneously. Both numerical and experimental studies were conducted on the resolution and the availability in the detection of the through-thickness and surface cracks embedded in steel plates. The results showed that a singular concentration was observed at the crack tips in the surface temperature field in the transient stage of heat conduction, and the cracks were found to be sensitively detected from such a singular temperature field in the early transient stage. This technique was also applied to the inspection of the delamination defect in carbon-fiber reinforced plastics.

  10. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure: A state-of-the-art survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B.; Takahashi, Y.

    1989-05-01

    High-temperature crack growth under cyclic, static, and combined loading is received with an emphasis on fracture mechanics aspects. Experimental studies of the effects of loading history, microstructure, temperature, and environment on crack growth behavior are described and interpreted. The experimental evidence is used to examine crack growth parameters and theoretical models for fatigue, creep, and creep-fatigue crack propagation at elevated temperatures. The limitations of both elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics for high-temperature subcritical crack growth are assessed. Existing techniques for modeling critical crack growth/ligament instability failure are also presented. Related topics of defect modeling and engineering flaw assessment procedures, nondestructive evaluation methods, and probabilistic failure analysis are briefly discussed. 142 refs., 33 figs.

  11. Fatigue flaw growth assessment and inclusion of stratification to the LBB assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Samohyl, P.

    1997-04-01

    The application of the LBB requires also fatigue flaw growth assessment. This analysis was performed for PWR nuclear power plants types VVER 440/230, VVER 440/213c, VVER 1000/320. Respecting that these NPP`s were designed according to Russian codes that differ from US codes it was needed to compare these approaches. Comparison with our experimental data was accomplished, too. Margins of applicability of the US methods and their modifications for the materials used for construction of Czech and Slovak NPP`s are shown. Computer code accomplishing the analysis according to described method is presented. Some measurement and calculations show that thermal stratifications in horizontal pipelines can lead to additive loads that are not negligible and can be dangerous. An attempt to include these loads induced by steady-state stratification was made.

  12. Is signal detection theory fundamentally flawed? A response to Balakrishnan (1998a, 1998b, 1999).

    PubMed

    Treisman, Michel

    2002-12-01

    For nearly 50 years, signal detection theory (SDT; Green & Swvets, 1966; Macmillan & Creelman, 1991) has been of central importance in the development of psychophysics and other areas of psychology. The theory has recently been challenged by Balakrishnan (1998b), who argues that, within SDT, an alternative index is "better justified" than d' and who claims to show (1998a, 1999) that SDT is fundamentally flawed and should be rejected. His evidence is based on new nonparametric measures that he has introduced and applied to experimental data. He believes his results show that basic assumptions of SDT are not supported-in particular, that payoff and probability manipulations do not affect the position of the decision criterion. In view of the importance of SDT in psychology, these claims deserve careful examination. They are critically reviewed here. It appears that it is Balakrishnans arguments that fail, and not SDT

  13. Solar-stimulated flaw and water incursion detection in fiberglass structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schivley, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Fiberglass is a combination of glass fiber reinforcing material and plastic resin. The advantages far outweigh the disadvantages that are commonly found in commercial structures. Fiberglass does not suffer from dry rot or worms as found with wood; from rust, a common problem with steel; or from electrolysis, common problems with both steel and aluminum. However, compared to steel, fiberglass has low fatigue and buckling strengths. This can cause delaminations where stress concentrations are located. Many other factors contribute to delaminations which are ``invisible`` to the eye. For this reason an infrared thermographic procedure was developed to detect these delaminates and other flaws in fiberglass structures. Due to the confidentiality of this project, neither the name of client or the location of this fiberglass structure will be revealed in this paper. At the time of publication, authorization has not been obtained to release photographs or drawings.

  14. Physics-based method to validate and repair flaws in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Martin, Osvaldo A; Arnautova, Yelena A; Icazatti, Alejandro A; Scheraga, Harold A; Vila, Jorge A

    2013-10-15

    A method that makes use of information provided by the combination of (13)C(α) and (13)C(β) chemical shifts, computed at the density functional level of theory, enables one to (i) validate, at the residue level, conformations of proteins and detect backbone or side-chain flaws by taking into account an ensemble average of chemical shifts over all of the conformations used to represent a protein, with a sensitivity of ∼90%; and (ii) provide a set of (χ1/χ2) torsional angles that leads to optimal agreement between the observed and computed (13)C(α) and (13)C(β) chemical shifts. The method has been incorporated into the CheShift-2 protein validation Web server. To test the reliability of the provided set of (χ1/χ2) torsional angles, the side chains of all reported conformations of five NMR-determined protein models were refined by a simple routine, without using NOE-based distance restraints. The refinement of each of these five proteins leads to optimal agreement between the observed and computed (13)C(α) and (13)C(β) chemical shifts for ∼94% of the flaws, on average, without introducing a significantly large number of violations of the NOE-based distance restraints for a distance range ≤ 0.5 , in which the largest number of distance violations occurs. The results of this work suggest that use of the provided set of (χ1/χ2) torsional angles together with other observables, such as NOEs, should lead to a fast and accurate refinement of the side-chain conformations of protein models.

  15. Analysis and Test of Deep Flaws in Thin Sheets of Aluminum and Titanium. Volume 2: Crack Opening Displacement and Stress-Strain Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Static fracture tests were performed on surface flawed specimens of aluminum and titanium alloys. A simulated proof overload cycle was applied prior to all of the cyclic tests. Variables included in each test series were flaw shapes and thickness. Additionally, test temperature was a variable for the aluminum test series. The crack opening displacement and stress-strain data obtained are presented.

  16. Assessing allowable take of migratory birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, M.C.; Sauer, J.R.; Avery, M.L.; Blackwell, B.F.; Koneff, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Legal removal of migratory birds from the wild occurs for several reasons, including subsistence, sport harvest, damage control, and the pet trade. We argue that harvest theory provides the basis for assessing the impact of authorized take, advance a simplified rendering of harvest theory known as potential biological removal as a useful starting point for assessing take, and demonstrate this approach with a case study of depredation control of black vultures (Coragyps atratus) in Virginia, USA. Based on data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey and other sources, we estimated that the black vulture population in Virginia was 91,190 (95% credible interval = 44,520?212,100) in 2006. Using a simple population model and available estimates of life-history parameters, we estimated the intrinsic rate of growth (rmax) to be in the range 7?14%, with 10.6% a plausible point estimate. For a take program to seek an equilibrium population size on the conservative side of the yield curve, the rate of take needs to be less than that which achieves a maximum sustained yield (0.5 x rmax). Based on the point estimate for rmax and using the lower 60% credible interval for population size to account for uncertainty, these conditions would be met if the take of black vultures in Virginia in 2006 was <3,533 birds. Based on regular monitoring data, allowable harvest should be adjusted annually to reflect changes in population size. To initiate discussion about how this assessment framework could be related to the laws and regulations that govern authorization of such take, we suggest that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act requires only that take of native migratory birds be sustainable in the long-term, that is, sustained harvest rate should be

  17. Assessing allowable take of migratory birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, M.C.; Sauer, J.R.; Avery, M.L.; Blackwell, B.F.; Koneff, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Legal removal of migratory birds from the wild occurs for several reasons, including subsistence, sport harvest, damage control, and the pet trade. We argue that harvest theory provides the basis for assessing the impact of authorized take, advance a simplified rendering of harvest theory known as potential biological removal as a useful starting point for assessing take, and demonstrate this approach with a case study of depredation control of black vultures (Coragyps atratus) in Virginia, USA. Based on data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey and other sources, we estimated that the black vulture population in Virginia was 91,190 (95% credible interval = 44,520?212,100) in 2006. Using a simple population model and available estimates of life-history parameters, we estimated the intrinsic rate of growth (rmax) to be in the range 7?14%, with 10.6% a plausible point estimate. For a take program to seek an equilibrium population size on the conservative side of the yield curve, the rate of take needs to be less than that which achieves a maximum sustained yield (0.5 x rmax). Based on the point estimate for rmax and using the lower 60% credible interval for population size to account for uncertainty, these conditions would be met if the take of black vultures in Virginia in 2006 was < 3,533 birds. Based on regular monitoring data, allowable harvest should be adjusted annually to reflect changes in population size. To initiate discussion about how this assessment framework could be related to the laws and regulations that govern authorization of such take, we suggest that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act requires only that take of native migratory birds be sustainable in the long-term, that is, sustained harvest rate should be < rmax. Further, the ratio of desired harvest rate to 0.5 x rmax may be a useful metric for ascertaining the applicability of specific requirements of the National Environmental Protection Act.

  18. Unfit for Human Consumption: The Problem of Flawed Writing in Criminal Justice and What to Do about It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Don C.

    1995-01-01

    Provides an account of the processes that are involved in the production of "Crime and Delinquency." Asserts that flawed writing in criminology and criminal justice appears to be a systemic rather than an individual one. Suggests to authors or prospective authors ways in which writing can be improved. (LKS)

  19. Contribution to the leak before break behavior of piping made of high tough material and containing circumferential flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Stadtmueller, W.; Sturm, D.

    1996-12-31

    Since 1993 MPA Stuttgart is engaged in two new research projects in the field of Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of austenitic piping. The pipes are fabricated in the dimensions O.D. {times} t = 219 x 14 mm resp. 331 x 32 mm and prepared with fatigue precracked, circumferential flaws of various depth and up to a crack length equivalent to 2{alpha} = 270 deg. The flaw location is in the base material or in site-made girth welds. The pipes are loaded with internal pressure and external bending moment at room temperature. In this paper the results of the tested pipes with 219 mm diameter containing through-wall flaws are represented as a comparison with the results of applied analytical methods. On these pipes the crack initiation clearly occurred before maximum bending moment, which was attained under full yielding conditions even in case of the 180 deg through-wall flaw. With the applied analytical methods crack initiation as well as maximum load could be assessed in a realistic manner.

  20. The frequency of item writing flaws in multiple-choice questions used in high stakes nursing assessments.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Marie; Knierim, Aimee; Hayes, Sasha K; Ware, James

    2006-12-01

    Multiple-choice questions are a common assessment method in nursing examinations. Few nurse educators, however, have formal preparation in constructing multiple-choice questions. Consequently, questions used in baccalaureate nursing assessments often contain item-writing flaws, or violations to accepted item-writing guidelines. In one nursing department, 2770 MCQs were collected from tests and examinations administered over a five-year period from 2001 to 2005. Questions were evaluated for 19 frequently occurring item-writing flaws, for cognitive level, for question source, and for the distribution of correct answers. Results show that almost half (46.2%) of the questions contained violations of item-writing guidelines and over 90% were written at low cognitive levels. Only a small proportion of questions were teacher generated (14.1%), while 36.2% were taken from testbanks and almost half (49.4%) had no source identified. MCQs written at a lower cognitive level were significantly more likely to contain item-writing flaws. While there was no relationship between the source of the question and item-writing flaws, teacher-generated questions were more likely to be written at higher cognitive levels (p<0.001). Correct answers were evenly distributed across all four options and no bias was noted in the placement of correct options. Further training in item-writing is recommended for all faculty members who are responsible for developing tests. Pre-test review and quality assessment is also recommended to reduce the occurrence of item-writing flaws and to improve the quality of test questions.

  1. The frequency of item writing flaws in multiple-choice questions used in high stakes nursing assessments.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Marie; Knierim, Aimee; Hayes, Sasha K; Ware, James

    2006-12-01

    Multiple-choice questions are a common assessment method in nursing examinations. Few nurse educators, however, have formal preparation in constructing multiple-choice questions. Consequently, questions used in baccalaureate nursing assessments often contain item-writing flaws, or violations to accepted item-writing guidelines. In one nursing department, 2770 MCQs were collected from tests and examinations administered over a five-year period from 2001 to 2005. Questions were evaluated for 19 frequently occurring item-writing flaws, for cognitive level, for question source, and for the distribution of correct answers. Results show that almost half (46.2%) of the questions contained violations of item-writing guidelines and over 90% were written at low cognitive levels. Only a small proportion of questions were teacher generated (14.1%), while 36.2% were taken from testbanks and almost half (49.4%) had no source identified. MCQs written at a lower cognitive level were significantly more likely to contain item-writing flaws. While there was no relationship between the source of the question and item-writing flaws, teachergenerated questions were more likely to be written at higher cognitive levels (p<0.001). Correct answers were evenly distributed across all four options and no bias was noted in the placement of correct options. Further training in item-writing is recommended for all faculty members who are responsible for developing tests. Pre-test review and quality assessment is also recommended to reduce the occurrence of item-writing flaws and to improve the quality of test questions.

  2. Class Size. ACSA School Management Digest, Series 1, No. 12. ERIC/CEM Research Analysis Series, Number 39.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sydney

    While the desirability of small classes seems an article of faith among educators, a review of the research indicates that class size in itself has rarely shown a substantial effect on educational achievement. The research itself has been flawed by the impossibility of determining or measuring all the variables that changes in class size can…

  3. A scanning laser source and a microcantilever ultrasound receiver for detection of surface flaws in microdevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Younghoon; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2005-05-01

    In recent work at Northwestern University, we have shown that near-field scattering of ultrasound generated by a Scanning Laser Source (SLS) can be used to effectively identify surface flaws in macroscale structures. In past work, the laser ultrasound source was in the near-field of a scatterer and a piezoelectric detector was used to measure the ultrasound in the far field. It was observed that distinct variations are observed in the far-field signals as the SLS scans past surface-breaking flaws. These changes were attributed to the near-field scatterer redirecting parts of the ultrasonic beam (which might otherwise have gone into the bulk of the object) towards the far-field detector. We now propose an extension of the SLS approach to map defects in microdevices by bringing both the generator and the receiver to the near-field scattering region of the defects. For the purpose of near-field ultrasound measurement, the receiving transducer has to be made very small as well. To facilitate this, silicon microcantilever probes are fabricated and their acoustical characteristics are first investigated. Silicon cantilevers with tip and chip body are fabricated using isotropic reactive ion etching and anisotropic KOH etching. To characterize the free cantilever vibration, the chip body with the microcantilever is excited by an ultrasonic transducer and a Michelson interferometer is used to monitor the cantilever motion. The fundamental frequency of the microcantilever is measured and compared with analytically calculated fundamental frequency assuming the cross sections of the cantilevers are rectangular. Next, the performance of the fabricated microcantilevers as ultrasound detectors is investigated. The microcantilever is used essentially as a profilometer by contacting it to the specimen surface. Surface and bulk acoustic waves are generated with specific narrowband frequencies and the surface ultrasonic displacements are detected using the microcantilever probe. Next

  4. Marine Protected Dramas: The Flaws of the Brazilian National System of Marine Protected Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardinger, Leopoldo C.; Godoy, Eduardo A. S.; Jones, Peter J. S.; Sales, Gilberto; Ferreira, Beatrice P.

    2011-04-01

    This article discusses the current problems and issues associated with the implementation of a National System of Marine Protected Areas in Brazil. MPA managers and higher governmental level authorities were interviewed about their perceptions of the implementation of a national MPA strategy and the recent changes in the institutional arrangement of government marine conservation agencies. Interviewees' narratives were generally pessimistic and the National System was perceived as weak, with few recognizable marine conservation outcomes on the ground. The following major flaws were identified: poor inter-institutional coordination of coastal and ocean governance; institutional crisis faced by the national government marine conservation agency; poor management within individual MPAs; problems with regional networks of marine protected areas; an overly bureaucratic management and administrative system; financial shortages creating structural problems and a disconnect between MPA policy and its delivery. Furthermore, a lack of professional motivation and a pessimistic atmosphere was encountered during many interviews, a malaise which we believe affects how the entire system is able to respond to crises. Our findings highlight the need for a better understanding of the role of `leadership' in the performance of socio-ecological systems (such as MPA networks), more effective official evaluation mechanisms, more localized audits of (and reforms if necessary to) Brazil's federal biodiversity conservation agency (ICMBio), and the need for political measures to promote state leadership and support. Continuing to focus on the designation of more MPAs whilst not fully addressing these issues will achieve little beyond fulfilling, on paper, Brazil's international marine biodiversity commitments.

  5. Toward smart aerospace structures: design of a piezoelectric sensor and its analog interface for flaw detection.

    PubMed

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-10-31

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated.

  6. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    PubMed Central

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated. PMID:25365457

  7. Convective Origin Gavitational Currents In The Flaw Polynyas of The Laptev Sea Caused By Intensive Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, P.

    Against the background of low winter air temperatures in the Arctic each opening of a quasi-steady flaw polynya causes the burst of the local freezing. Intensive brine ejec- tion in the water column leads to vigorous 3-D turbulent convection. While reaching the seasonal pycnocline by Richardson numbers Ri>10, the 3-D convective turbulent layer poorly interacts with the pycnocline and spreads off the polynya limits under fast ice as a 3-D gravitational turbulent current. Initial, local scheme of baroclinic currents is formed near the fast ice edge, while a compensation counter-current is generated to the polynya in the upper quasi-uniform layer. Henceforward, it transforms into a quasi- 2D mesoscale current is formed because of baroclinic instability and the Cori- olis force. Direction of the quasi-2D mesoscale current in quasi-stationary conditions coincides with orientation of the fast ice edge. It is of a large-scale, and it develops along the whole length of the polynya. The proposed system of formation and evolu- tion of the gravitational currents in the region of the polynya is based on the results of laboratory modeling and in many traits is supported by observational data in the regions of polynyas in the Laptev Sea

  8. Exploring the hand hygiene competence of student nurses: a case of flawed self assessment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Mark

    2009-05-01

    Hand hygiene remains the single most effective measure to prevent hospital acquired infection and yet poor compliance is reported repeatedly. Nurses represent the largest labour group and perform the greatest amount of direct patient care in the contemporary National Health Service. They receive their initial hand hygiene training in the pre-registration curriculum within a competence framework based on knowledge, skills and attitudes. The pre-eminent training method is one that delivers behavioural competence, making the tacit assumption that compliance will follow. In this study a mixed methods approach demonstrated that students overestimated their knowledge and skills, found it difficult to give an objective account of their performance, and reported an improbable level of compliance. The reasons why people can be self serving in their judgements may be due to information processing errors, exacerbated by the model of education and training. Flawed self assessments may present major barriers to improved performance if students view their compliance as better than it actually is. Conceptualising hand hygiene as a taxonomy of learning and introducing the cognitive strategies of reflection and self assessment would better enable students to problem solve, seek out new information, draw on past experience and gain greater and deeper understanding of the complex topic of hand hygiene behaviour.

  9. The flaws of laser Doppler in negative-pressure wound therapy research.

    PubMed

    Kairinos, Nicolas; McKune, Andrew; Solomons, Michael; Hudson, Donald A; Kahn, Delawir

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies, using modalities other than laser Doppler, have indicated that perfusion during negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is reduced, contrary to world literature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the measuring technique of the laser Doppler could be influenced by the compressive nature of NPWT dressings and whether this could explain the conflicting findings. A hypothesis that it may be possible for laser Doppler to record similar readings to those obtained during NPWT by merely compressing tissues manually was tested on 12 NPWT dressings, with each undergoing an alternating series of manual compressive forces and NPWT (-125 mmHg). During the periods of NPWT (n = 12), the mean perfusion recording increased in five experiments, reduced in six, and remained unchanged in one. During the period when manual pressure was applied (n = 12), there was a mean increase in perfusion in six experiments and a reduction in six. The type of change in perfusion (increase or decrease) was the same for both NPWT and manual pressure in 10 of the 12 experiments. In conclusion, laser Doppler can incorrectly record increased perfusion when tissues are compressed, implying that it is flawed in the field of NPWT research as tissues are always compressed to some degree by the NPWT dressing.

  10. Flaws detection and localization in weld structure using the topological energy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubeigt, Emma; Mensah, Serge; Rakotonarivo, Sandrine; Chaix, Jean-François; Gobillot, Gilles; Baqué, François

    2017-02-01

    The non-destructive testing of austenitic welds using ultrasound plays an important role in the assessment of the structural integrity and safety of critical structures in a nuclear reactor. The bedspring and the deck are complex welded structures of very restricted access; the ability to reliably detect and locate defects like cracks is therefore a difficult challenge. Ultrasonic testing is a well-recognized non-invasive technique which exhibits high characterization performances in homogeneous media (steel). However, its capabilities are hampered when operating in heterogeneous and anisotropic austenitic welds because of deviation and splitting of the ultrasonic beam. In order to rise to this important challenge, a model-based method is proposed, which takes into account a prior knowledge corresponding to the welding procedure specifications that condition the austenitic grains orientation within the weld and thus the wave propagation. The topological imaging method implemented is a differential approach which, compares signals from the reference defect-free medium to the inspected medium. It relies on combinations of two computed ultrasonic fields, one forward and one adjoint. Numerical simulations and experiments have been carried out to validate the practical relevance of this approach to detect and locate a flaw in a weld.

  11. Marine protected dramas: the flaws of the Brazilian National System of Marine Protected Areas.

    PubMed

    Gerhardinger, Leopoldo C; Godoy, Eduardo A S; Jones, Peter J S; Sales, Gilberto; Ferreira, Beatrice P

    2011-04-01

    This article discusses the current problems and issues associated with the implementation of a National System of Marine Protected Areas in Brazil. MPA managers and higher governmental level authorities were interviewed about their perceptions of the implementation of a national MPA strategy and the recent changes in the institutional arrangement of government marine conservation agencies. Interviewees' narratives were generally pessimistic and the National System was perceived as weak, with few recognizable marine conservation outcomes on the ground. The following major flaws were identified: poor inter-institutional coordination of coastal and ocean governance; institutional crisis faced by the national government marine conservation agency; poor management within individual MPAs; problems with regional networks of marine protected areas; an overly bureaucratic management and administrative system; financial shortages creating structural problems and a disconnect between MPA policy and its delivery. Furthermore, a lack of professional motivation and a pessimistic atmosphere was encountered during many interviews, a malaise which we believe affects how the entire system is able to respond to crises. Our findings highlight the need for a better understanding of the role of 'leadership' in the performance of socio-ecological systems (such as MPA networks), more effective official evaluation mechanisms, more localized audits of (and reforms if necessary to) Brazil's federal biodiversity conservation agency (ICMBio), and the need for political measures to promote state leadership and support. Continuing to focus on the designation of more MPAs whilst not fully addressing these issues will achieve little beyond fulfilling, on paper, Brazil's international marine biodiversity commitments.

  12. THE CHOICE OF OPTIMAL STRUCTURE OF ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK CLASSIFIER INTENDED FOR CLASSIFICATION OF WELDING FLAWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, R.; Chady, T.; Baniukiewicz, P.; Caryk, M.; Piekarczyk, B.

    2010-02-22

    Nondestructive testing and evaluation are under continuous development. Currently researches are concentrated on three main topics: advancement of existing methods, introduction of novel methods and development of artificial intelligent systems for automatic defect recognition (ADR). Automatic defect classification algorithm comprises of two main tasks: creating a defect database and preparing a defect classifier. Here, the database was built using defect features that describe all geometrical and texture properties of the defect. Almost twenty carefully selected features calculated for flaws extracted from real radiograms were used. The radiograms were obtained from shipbuilding industry and they were verified by qualified operator. Two weld defect's classifiers based on artificial neural networks were proposed and compared. First model consisted of one neural network model, where each output neuron corresponded to different defect group. The second model contained five neural networks. Each neural network had one neuron on output and was responsible for detection of defects from one group. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the neural networks classifiers, the mean square errors were calculated for test radiograms and compared.

  13. Cross-polarization confocal imaging of subsurface flaws in silicon nitride.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Sun, J. G.; Pei, Z.

    2011-03-01

    A cross-polarization confocal microscopy (CPCM) method was developed to image subsurface flaws in optically translucent silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics. Unlike conventional confocal microscopy, which measures reflected light so is applicable only to transparent and semi-transparent materials, CPCM detects scattered light from subsurface while filtering out the reflected light from ceramic surface. For subsurface imaging, the refractive-index mismatch between imaging (air) and imaged (ceramic) medium may cause image distortion and reduce resolution in the depth direction. This effect, characterized by an axial scaling factor (ASF), was analyzed and experimentally determined for glass and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The experimental CPCM system was used to image Hertzian C-cracks generated by various indentation loads in the subsurface of a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimen. It was demonstrated that CPCM may provide detailed information of subsurface cracks, such as crack angle and path, and subsurface microstructural variations.

  14. Case study of the propagation of a small flaw under PWR loading conditions and comparison with the ASME code design life. Comparison of ASME Code Sections III and XI

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G.T.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Richardson, A.K.; Server, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    A cooperative study was performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate the degree of conservatism and consistency in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III fatigue evaluation procedure and Section XI flaw acceptance standards. A single, realistic, sample problem was analyzed to determine the significance of certain points of criticism made of an earlier parametric study by staff members of the Division of Engineering Standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The problem was based on a semielliptical flaw located on the inside surface of the hot-leg piping at the reactor vessel safe-end weld for the Zion 1 pressurized-water reactor (PWR). Two main criteria were used in selecting the problem; first, it should be a straight pipe to minimize the computational expense; second, it should exhibit as high a cumulative usage factor as possible. Although the problem selected has one of the highest cumulative usage factors of any straight pipe in the primary system of PWRs, it is still very low. The Code Section III fatigue usage factor was only 0.00046, assuming it was in the as-welded condition, and fatigue crack-growth analyses predicted negligible crack growth during the 40-year design life. When the analyses were extended past the design life, the usage factor was less than 1.0 when the flaw had propagated to failure. The current study shows that the criticism of the earlier report should not detract from the conclusion that if a component experiences a high level of cyclic stress corresponding to a fatigue usage factor near 1.0, very small cracks can propagate to unacceptable sizes.

  15. 36 CFR 1210.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 1210.27... Management § 1210.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost...

  16. 45 CFR 1183.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1183.22 Section 1183.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  17. 45 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 74.27 Section 74.27 Public... Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a particular set of Federal principles that applies in determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with...

  18. 45 CFR 1157.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1157.22 Section 1157.22 Public... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form...

  19. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  20. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education... allowable expenditures by projects funded under the program: (a) Cost of attendance, as defined in Title...

  1. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 74.27 Section 74.27 Education Office... and Program Management § 74.27 Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a set of cost principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs are determined in accordance with the...

  2. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education... allowable expenditures by projects funded under the program: (a) Cost of attendance, as defined in Title...

  3. 45 CFR 1174.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1174.22 Section 1174.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  4. 45 CFR 602.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 602.22 Section 602.22 Public... Requirements § 602.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable...

  5. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form...

  6. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84....27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost principles...

  7. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 24.22 Section 24.22... Administration § 24.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  8. 49 CFR 266.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 266.11 Section 266.11... TRANSPORTATION ACT § 266.11 Allowable costs. Allowable costs include only the following costs which are properly allocable to the work performed: Planning and program operation costs which are allowed under...

  9. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form...

  10. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 14.27 Section 14.27... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 14.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs...

  11. 2 CFR 215.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable costs. 215.27 Section 215.27... § 215.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost...

  12. 7 CFR 3019.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 3019.27 Section 3019.27 Agriculture... Management § 3019.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost...

  13. 45 CFR 2543.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 2543.27 Section 2543.27 Public... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 2543.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability...

  14. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84....27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost principles...

  15. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Travel allowance. 617.46 Section 617.46... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Relocation Allowances § 617.46 Travel allowance. (a) Computation. The amount of travel allowance (including lodging and meals) payable under § 617.45(a)(1)...

  16. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Travel allowance. 617.46 Section 617.46... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Relocation Allowances § 617.46 Travel allowance. (a) Computation. The amount of travel allowance (including lodging and meals) payable under § 617.45(a)(1)...

  17. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Travel allowance. 617.46 Section 617.46... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Relocation Allowances § 617.46 Travel allowance. (a) Computation. The amount of travel allowance (including lodging and meals) payable under § 617.45(a)(1)...

  18. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Travel allowance. 617.46 Section 617.46... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Relocation Allowances § 617.46 Travel allowance. (a) Computation. The amount of travel allowance (including lodging and meals) payable under § 617.45(a)(1)...

  19. 20 CFR 617.46 - Travel allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Travel allowance. 617.46 Section 617.46... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Relocation Allowances § 617.46 Travel allowance. (a) Computation. The amount of travel allowance (including lodging and meals) payable under § 617.45(a)(1)...

  20. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clothing allowance. 3.810..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Special Benefits § 3.810 Clothing allowance. (a) Except... therefor, to an annual clothing allowance as specified in 38 U.S.C. 1162. The annual clothing allowance...

  1. 20 CFR 617.47 - Moving allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Moving allowance. 617.47 Section 617.47... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Relocation Allowances § 617.47 Moving allowance. (a) Computation. The amount of a moving allowance payable under § 617.45(a)(2) shall be 90 percent of the total...

  2. 20 CFR 617.47 - Moving allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Moving allowance. 617.47 Section 617.47... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Relocation Allowances § 617.47 Moving allowance. (a) Computation. The amount of a moving allowance payable under § 617.45(a)(2) shall be 90 percent of the total...

  3. 20 CFR 617.47 - Moving allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Moving allowance. 617.47 Section 617.47... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Relocation Allowances § 617.47 Moving allowance. (a) Computation. The amount of a moving allowance payable under § 617.45(a)(2) shall be 90 percent of the total...

  4. 20 CFR 617.47 - Moving allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Moving allowance. 617.47 Section 617.47... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Relocation Allowances § 617.47 Moving allowance. (a) Computation. The amount of a moving allowance payable under § 617.45(a)(2) shall be 90 percent of the total...

  5. 20 CFR 617.47 - Moving allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Moving allowance. 617.47 Section 617.47... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Relocation Allowances § 617.47 Moving allowance. (a) Computation. The amount of a moving allowance payable under § 617.45(a)(2) shall be 90 percent of the total...

  6. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  7. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  8. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  9. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  10. 46 CFR 154.421 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.421 Section 154.421 Shipping COAST... § 154.421 Allowable stress. The allowable stress for the integral tank structure must meet the American Bureau of Shipping's allowable stress for the vessel's hull published in “Rules for Building and...

  11. Automated Flaw Detection Scheme For Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Specimens Using Hilbert Huang Transform Of Ultrasonic Phased Array Data

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize the flaws using NDE ultrasonic data. Data was collected using cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) weld specimens on-loan from the U.S. nuclear power industry’s Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cast (SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection signals in the weld and heat affected zone of the base materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

  12. Non-destructive evaluation means and method of flaw reconstruction utilizing an ultrasonic multi-viewing transducer data acquistion system

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Donald O.; Wormley, Samuel J.

    1989-03-28

    A multi-viewing ultrasound transducer acquisition system for non-destructive evaluation, flaw detection and flaw reconstruction in materials. A multiple transducer assembly includes a central transducer surrounded by a plurality of perimeter transducers, each perimeter transducer having an axis of transmission which can be angularly oriented with respect to the axis of transmission of the central transducer to intersect the axis of transmission of the central transducer. A control apparatus automatically and remotely positions the transducer assembly with respect to the material by a positioning apparatus and adjusts the pe GRANT REFERENCE This invention was conceived and reduced to practice at least in part under a grant from the Department of Energy under Contract No. W-7407-ENG-82.

  13. Use of flawed multiple-choice items by the New England Journal of Medicine for continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Stagnaro-Green, Alex S; Downing, Steven M

    2006-09-01

    Physicians in the United States are required to complete a minimum number of continuing medical education (CME) credits annually. The goal of CME is to ensure that physicians maintain their knowledge and skills throughout their medical career. The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) provides its readers with the opportunity to obtain weekly CME credits. Deviation from established item-writing principles may result in a decrease in validity evidence for tests. This study evaluated the quality of 40 NEJM MCQs using the standard evidence-based principles of effective item writing. Each multiple-choice item reviewed had at least three item flaws, with a mean of 5.1 and a range of 3 to 7. The results of this study demonstrate that the NEJM uses flawed MCQs in its weekly CME program.

  14. Intrinsic tensile properties of cocoon silk fibres can be estimated by removing flaws through repeated tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Rajkhowa, Rangam; Kaur, Jasjeet; Wang, Xungai; Batchelor, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Silk fibres from silkworm cocoons have lower strength than spider silk and have received less attention as a source of high-performance fibres. In this work, we have used an innovative procedure to eliminate the flaws gradually of a single fibre specimen by retesting the unbroken portion of the fibre, after each fracture test. This was done multiple times so that the final test may provide the intrinsic fibre strength. During each retest, the fibre specimen began to yield once the failure load of the preceding test was exceeded. For each fibre specimen, a composite curve was constructed from multiple tests. The composite curves and analysis show that strengths of mass-produced Muga and Eri cocoon silk fibres increased from 446 to 618 MPa and from 337 to 452 MPa, respectively. Similarly, their toughness increased from 84 to 136 MJ m−3 and from 61 to 104 MJ m−3, respectively. Composite plots produced significantly less inter-specimen variations compared to values from single tests. The fibres with reduced flaws as a result of retests in the tested section have a tensile strength and toughness comparable to naturally spun dragline spider silk with a reported strength of 574 MPa and toughness of 91–158 MJ m−3, which is used as a benchmark for developing high-performance fibres. This retesting approach is likely to provide useful insights into discrete flaw distributions and intrinsic mechanical properties of other fatigue-resistant materials. PMID:25948613

  15. Development of a method to characterize high-protein dairy powders using an ultrasonic flaw detector.

    PubMed

    Hauser, M; Amamcharla, J K

    2016-02-01

    Dissolution behavior of high-protein dairy powders plays a critical role for achieving functional and nutritional characteristics of a finished food product. Current methods for evaluating powder dissolution properties are time consuming, difficult to reproduce, and subjective. Ultrasound spectroscopy is a rapid and precise method, but requires expensive equipment and skilled technicians to carry out the tests. In the present study, an ultrasonic flaw detector (UFD) was used as an economical alternative to characterize the powder dissolution properties. The objective of study was to develop a method to characterize the dissolution behavior of milk protein concentrate (MPC) using a UFD. The experimental setup included a UFD connected to a 1-MHz immersion transducer that was kept a constant distance from a reflector plate. To validate the method, 2 batches of MPC80 from a commercial manufacturer were procured and stored at 25 and 40°C for 4 wk. Focus beam reflectance measurement and solubility index were used as reference methods. Relative ultrasound velocity and ultrasound attenuation were acquired during the dissolution of MPC samples. To characterize the MPC dissolution, 4 parameters including standard deviation of relative velocity, area under the attenuation curve, and peak attenuation were extracted from ultrasound data. As the storage temperature and time increased, the area under the attenuation curve and peak height decreased, indicating a loss of solubility. The proposed UFD-based method was able to capture the changes in dissolution of MPC during storage at 25 and 40°C. It was observed that a high-quality MPC had a low standard deviation and a larger area under the attenuation curve. As the MPC aged at 40°C, the particle dispersion rate decreased and, consequently, an increase in standard deviation and reduction in area were observed. Overall, the UFD can be a low-cost method to characterize the dissolution behavior of high-protein dairy powders.

  16. Nosocomial infections from contaminated endoscopes: a flawed automated endoscope washer. An investigation using molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, C J; Stolz, S M; Maki, D G

    1991-09-16

    Approximately 1 year after purchase of one manufacturer's automated endoscope washing machine, we began to detect heavy contamination of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopes cultured after cleaning and disinfection in the washer. During the first 6 months of 1988, 77% of surveillance cultures (20-mL flush through the biopsy channel) were positive for gram-negative bacilli (median concentration, 10(5) cfu/mL), most frequently Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype 10. During the first 19 months of use of the washer, nosocomial post-UGI endoscopy colonization or infections with P. aeruginosa increased 36%. Investigations show that endoscope contamination derives from a flaw in the design of the EW-10 washer: the detergent holding tank, inlet water hose, and air vents cannot be reliably disinfected and contain heavy biofilms that recontaminate the machine after it has been disinfected, as specified by the manufacturer, with glutaraldehyde. Only by rinsing machine-cleansed endoscopes with 70% alcohol followed by forced air drying has reliable disinfection been achieved. Since adaptation of terminal alcohol treatment and drying, post-UGI endoscopy colonization or infection by P. aeruginosa has declined threefold (p less than 0.001). Testing in other centers using the manufacturer's EW-10 or EW-20 washer has shown similar contamination. In three centers, including our own, postendoscopy infections by machine-associated type 10 P. aeruginosa have been confirmed by demonstrating concordance between isolates from contaminated machines or endoscopes and from infected patients by immunoblot of whole cell lysates and by pulsed-field electrophoresis of DraI endonuclease-digested genomic DNA. This problem reaffirms the vulnerability to microbial contamination of water-containing apparatus and equipment in patient care and points up the critical importance of engineering design to prevent contamination.

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF MATERIALS PROPERTIES FOR FLAW STABILITY ANALYSIS IN EXTREME ENVIRONMENT SERVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R; Ps Lam, P; Andrew Duncan, A; Bruce Wiersma, B; Karthik Subramanian, K; James Elder, J

    2007-04-18

    Discovery of aging phenomena in the materials of a structure may arise after its design and construction that impact its structural integrity. This condition can be addressed through a demonstration of integrity with the material-specific degraded conditions. Two case studies of development of fracture and crack growth property data, and their application in development of in-service inspection programs for nuclear structures in the defense complex are presented. The first case study covers the development of fracture toughness properties in the form of J-R curves for rolled plate Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel filler in the application to demonstrate the integrity of the reactor tanks of the heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The fracture properties for the base, weld, and heat-affected zone of the weldments irradiated at low temperatures (110-150 C) up to 6.4 dpa{sub NRT} and 275 appm helium were developed. An expert group provided consensus for application of the irradiated properties for material input to acceptance criteria for ultrasonic examination of the reactor tanks. Dr. Spencer H. Bush played a lead advisory role in this work. The second case study covers the development of fracture toughness for A285 carbon steel in high level radioactive waste tanks. The approach in this case study incorporated a statistical experimental design for material testing to address metallurgical factors important to fracture toughness. Tolerance intervals were constructed to identify the lower bound fracture toughness for material input to flaw disposition through acceptance by analysis.

  18. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs...

  19. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 92.22 Section 92.22 Public... Financial Administration § 92.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors,...

  20. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs...

  1. 29 CFR 1470.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 1470.22 Section 1470.22 Labor Regulations... Financial Administration § 1470.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors,...

  2. 50 CFR 85.41 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 85.41 Section 85.41... Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.41 Allowable costs. (a) Allowable grant costs are limited to those costs... applicable Federal cost principles in 43 CFR 12.60(b). Purchase of informational signs, program signs,...

  3. 7 CFR 3016.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 3016.22 Section 3016.22 Agriculture... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 3016.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees...

  4. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education... costs. (a)(1) Allowable and unallowable costs. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, costs reasonably related to carrying out the programs described in § 675.32 are allowable. (2)...

  5. 45 CFR 1180.56 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1180.56 Section 1180.56 Public... by a Grantee General Administrative Responsibilities § 1180.56 Allowable costs. (a) Determination of costs allowable under a grant is made in accordance with government-wide cost principles in...

  6. 45 CFR 2541.220 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 2541.220 Section 2541.220 Public... Post-Award Requirements § 2541.220 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for— (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type...

  7. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  8. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the...

  9. 43 CFR 12.927 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 12.927 Section 12.927... COST PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements... Requirements § 12.927 Allowable costs. Federal awarding agencies shall determine allowable costs in...

  10. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the...

  11. 38 CFR 49.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 49.27... costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost principles applicable to the...

  12. 20 CFR 632.37 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 632.37 Section 632.37... EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Administrative Standards and Procedures § 632.37 Allowable costs. (a) General. To be allowable, a cost must be necessary and reasonable for proper and efficient...

  13. 36 CFR 1207.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 1207.22... GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 1207.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees...

  14. 38 CFR 43.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 43.22... Requirements Financial Administration § 43.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type...

  15. 20 CFR 633.303 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 633.303 Section 633.303... FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.303 Allowable costs. (a) General. To be allowable, a cost must be necessary and reasonable for proper and efficient administration of...

  16. 42 CFR 405.2468 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 405.2468 Section 405.2468 Public... Allowable costs. (a) Applicability of general Medicare principles. In determining whether and to what extent a specific type or item of cost is allowable, such as interest, depreciation, bad debts and...

  17. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.228 Section 206.228 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR...

  18. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.228 Section 206.228 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR...

  19. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Allowable costs. 206.228 Section 206.228 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... Allowable costs. General policies for determining allowable costs are established in 44 CFR...

  20. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  1. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  2. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  3. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  4. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  5. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  6. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  7. 46 CFR 154.447 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.447 Section 154.447 Shipping COAST... Tank Type B § 154.447 Allowable stress. (a) An independent tank type B designed from bodies of revolution must have allowable stresses 3 determined by the following formulae: 3 See Appendix B for...

  8. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  9. 46 CFR 154.428 - Allowable stress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable stress. 154.428 Section 154.428 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.428 Allowable stress. The membrane tank and the supporting insulation must have allowable...

  10. 5 CFR 591.305 - Allowance rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Allowance Based on Duty at Remote Worksites § 591.305 Allowance rates. (a) General. An allowance rate may... remote under § 591.304, and shall be terminated or adjusted as warranted. In determining the amount of... commuting to the remote post of duty as compared to transportation expenses (including cost of...

  11. 5 CFR 591.305 - Allowance rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Allowance Based on Duty at Remote Worksites § 591.305 Allowance rates. (a) General. An allowance rate may... remote under § 591.304, and shall be terminated or adjusted as warranted. In determining the amount of... commuting to the remote post of duty as compared to transportation expenses (including cost of...

  12. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Siobhan; Lumsden, Linda S.

    1994-01-01

    The items featured in this annotated bibliography touch on several aspects of the multifaceted class-size debate. Allen Odden reviews the literature and contends that class-size reduction should be used "sparingly and strategically." C. M. Achilles and colleagues examines two different class-size situations and find student test…

  13. Least Squares Best Fit Method for the Three Parameter Weibull Distribution: Analysis of Tensile and Bend Specimens with Volume or Surface Flaw Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Bernard

    1996-01-01

    Material characterization parameters obtained from naturally flawed specimens are necessary for reliability evaluation of non-deterministic advanced ceramic structural components. The least squares best fit method is applied to the three parameter uniaxial Weibull model to obtain the material parameters from experimental tests on volume or surface flawed specimens subjected to pure tension, pure bending, four point or three point loading. Several illustrative example problems are provided.

  14. Subcellular Size

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2016-01-01

    All of the same conceptual questions about size in organisms apply equally at the level of single cells. What determines the size, not only of the whole cell, but of all its parts? What ensures that subcellular components are properly proportioned relative to the whole cell? How does alteration in organelle size affect biochemical function? Answering such fundamental questions requires us to understand how the size of individual organelles and other cellular structures is determined. Knowledge of organelle biogenesis and dynamics has advanced rapidly in recent years. Does this knowledge give us enough information to formulate reasonable models for organelle size control, or are we still missing something? PMID:25957302

  15. Uniaxial Tensile Strength and Flaw Characterization of SiC-N

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Scaling In the present experiments, two different specimen sizes were studied with the goal of being able to characterize the effect of specimen size... material versus the log of the specimen effective surface area (or volume) over several different specimen sizes. The slope of this line yields the... Studies of Five Ceramic Materials and Pyrex. International Journal of Impact Engineering 1999, 23 (1), 771–782. 5. Normandia, M.; LaSalvia, J.C

  16. Modeling of crack initiation, intensity, and growth rates from flaws in welded steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaxton, Eric Alan

    2000-10-01

    The intent of this dissertation is to develop a method to model the effects of pitting corrosion or mechanical damage on the strength and fatigue life of a welded structure. The problem was first examined when pitting corrosion was discovered in a 5,200 gallon capacity pressure vessel at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Other similar corrosion and mechanical damage is often encountered in service and a general method to model internal defects and crack-like flaws in welded structures is needed. The severity of the defect was modeled by finite element methods. Defect intensity and crack growth rate are both modeled using the finite element method developed here. Existing published solutions and fracture mechanics testing was performed to verify the modeling method. Welded structures such as pressure vessels have a metallurgical discontinuity between the parent metal and the heat affected zone and also between the heat-affected zone and the weld filler material. An added complexity is the fact that, in general, the mechanical and fracture mechanics properties of these three zones are different. The welded area also will have some level of residual stress resulting from the differential cooling and solidification after welding. The residual stresses created by solidification and cooling will be incorporated into the finite element model. The results will be checked by measuring the actual stresses on the test specimen. The unique contribution of this research is a finite element based tool, which provides a numerically efficient method to evaluate strength, resistance to fracture, and remaining life of a welded structure with surface damage. The new method is based on the theoretical square root displacement field, fitted to the local nodal point displacements, in the vicinity of the crack front. A linear finite element formulation is utilized, along with relatively coarse meshes, to accurately predict stress intensities. This new method is accurate for both two and

  17. 43 CFR 12.62 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 12.62 Section 12.62... COST PRINCIPLES FOR ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments Post-Award Requirements § 12.62 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation...

  18. 15 CFR 921.81 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 921.81 Section 921.81... costs. (a) Allowable costs will be determined in accordance with applicable OMB Circulars and guidance... Department of Commerce and NOAA directives. The term “costs” applies to both the Federal and...

  19. 44 CFR 204.63 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE FIRE MANAGEMENT ASSISTANCE GRANT PROGRAM Grant Administration § 204.63 Allowable costs. 44 CFR 13.22 establishes general policies for determining allowable costs. (a) We will reimburse direct costs for the administration of a fire management assistance grant under 44...

  20. 38 CFR 3.954 - Burial allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Burial allowance. 3.954..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.954 Burial allowance. When any person who had a status under any law in effect on December 31, 1957, which afforded entitlement to...

  1. 38 CFR 3.954 - Burial allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Burial allowance. 3.954..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.954 Burial allowance. When any person who had a status under any law in effect on December 31, 1957, which afforded entitlement to...

  2. 38 CFR 3.954 - Burial allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Burial allowance. 3.954..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.954 Burial allowance. When any person who had a status under any law in effect on December 31, 1957, which afforded entitlement to...

  3. 38 CFR 3.954 - Burial allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Burial allowance. 3.954..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.954 Burial allowance. When any person who had a status under any law in effect on December 31, 1957, which afforded entitlement to...

  4. 38 CFR 3.954 - Burial allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Burial allowance. 3.954..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.954 Burial allowance. When any person who had a status under any law in effect on December 31, 1957, which afforded entitlement to...

  5. 30 CFR 725.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 725.21 Section 725.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INITIAL PROGRAM REGULATIONS REIMBURSEMENTS TO STATES § 725.21 Allowable costs. (a) The Director or his authorized...

  6. 30 CFR 735.24 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 735.24 Section 735.24 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT... AND ENFORCEMENT § 735.24 Allowable costs. The Director or his authorized designee shall...

  7. 30 CFR 725.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 725.21 Section 725.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INITIAL PROGRAM REGULATIONS REIMBURSEMENTS TO STATES § 725.21 Allowable costs. (a) The Director or his authorized...

  8. 30 CFR 735.24 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 735.24 Section 735.24 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT... AND ENFORCEMENT § 735.24 Allowable costs. The Director or his authorized designee shall...

  9. 20 CFR 631.84 - Allowable projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable projects. 631.84 Section 631.84... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Disaster Relief Employment Assistance § 631.84 Allowable projects...) Shall be used exclusively to provide employment on projects that provide food, clothing, shelter...

  10. 30 CFR 206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operating allowances. 206.160 Section 206.160 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any other provisions...

  11. 20 CFR 632.258 - Allowable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable activities. 632.258 Section 632.258 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.258 Allowable...

  12. 22 CFR 226.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 226.27 Allowable costs. For each kind... Development Under Grants and Contracts with Hospitals.” The allowability of costs incurred by...

  13. 22 CFR 226.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 226.27 Allowable costs. For each kind... Development Under Grants and Contracts with Hospitals.” The allowability of costs incurred by...

  14. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85.22 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  15. 22 CFR 226.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 226.27 Allowable costs. For each kind... Development Under Grants and Contracts with Hospitals.” The allowability of costs incurred by...

  16. 22 CFR 226.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 226.27 Allowable costs. For each kind... Development Under Grants and Contracts with Hospitals.” The allowability of costs incurred by...

  17. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85.22 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  18. 24 CFR 85.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allowable costs. 85.22 Section 85.22 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.22 Allowable costs....

  19. 28 CFR 100.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 100.11 Section 100.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) COST RECOVERY REGULATIONS, COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANCE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1994 § 100.11 Allowable costs. (a) Costs that are eligible...

  20. Moral Appraisals Affect Doing/Allowing Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Fiery; Knobe, Joshua; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter

    2008-01-01

    An extensive body of research suggests that the distinction between doing and allowing plays a critical role in shaping moral appraisals. Here, we report evidence from a pair of experiments suggesting that the converse is also true: moral appraisals affect doing/allowing judgments. Specifically, morally bad behavior is more likely to be construed…

  1. 44 CFR 13.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or other... of organization, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs....

  2. 13 CFR 143.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including... cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or other increment above allowable costs) to the grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set...

  3. 36 CFR 1207.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or other... of organization, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs....

  4. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors...) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles...

  5. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors...) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles...

  6. 32 CFR 33.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or other increment above allowable costs) to the grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of...

  7. 38 CFR 43.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors... profit to cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or other increment above allowable costs) to the grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is...

  8. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors...) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles...

  9. 40 CFR 31.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors... profit to cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or other increment above allowable costs) to the grantee or sub-grantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is...

  10. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including... cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or other increment above allowable costs) to the grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set...

  11. 14 CFR 1273.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type.... (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal...

  12. 20 CFR 631.84 - Allowable projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable projects. 631.84 Section 631.84... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Disaster Relief Employment Assistance § 631.84 Allowable projects...) Shall be used exclusively to provide employment on projects that provide food, clothing, shelter...

  13. 20 CFR 631.84 - Allowable projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable projects. 631.84 Section 631.84... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Disaster Relief Employment Assistance § 631.84 Allowable projects...) Shall be used exclusively to provide employment on projects that provide food, clothing, shelter...

  14. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any other provisions in these regulations, an operating allowance may be used for the purpose of computing...

  15. 30 CFR 1206.160 - Operating allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.160 Operating allowances. Notwithstanding any other provisions in these regulations, an operating allowance may be used for the purpose of computing...

  16. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food... EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24 Inventory... registered manufacturer shall be allowed as a part of the quota an amount sufficient to maintain an...

  17. 21 CFR 1303.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1303.24 Section 1303.24 Food... Quotas § 1303.24 Inventory allowance. (a) For the purpose of determining individual manufacturing quotas... sufficient to maintain an inventory equal to, (1) For current manufacturers, 50 percent of his...

  18. 21 CFR 1315.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1315.24 Section 1315.24 Food... EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE, AND PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE Individual Manufacturing Quotas § 1315.24 Inventory... registered manufacturer shall be allowed as a part of the quota an amount sufficient to maintain an...

  19. 21 CFR 1303.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventory allowance. 1303.24 Section 1303.24 Food... Quotas § 1303.24 Inventory allowance. (a) For the purpose of determining individual manufacturing quotas... sufficient to maintain an inventory equal to, (1) For current manufacturers, 50 percent of his...

  20. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  1. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  2. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  3. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  4. 27 CFR 28.334 - Credit allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Credit allowance. 28.334... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Action on Claims § 28.334 Credit allowance. Where the credit relates to internal revenue taxes on beer that have been determined but not yet paid by...

  5. Allocation of Allowances and Associated Family Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, M. Kaye; Cheadle, Tannis

    This study gathered information on general family practices concerning allowances given to children, parental reasons for the provision of allowances, the bases for their administration, and the frequency of conflicts generated around them. The subjects were 81 parents of elementary school children in a midwest Canadian city. Subjects completed…

  6. 10 CFR 600.222 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Allowable costs. 600.222 Section 600.222 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES Uniform Administrative....222 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  7. 10 CFR 600.222 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 600.222 Section 600.222 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES Uniform Administrative....222 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1)...

  8. Assessment of strength limiting flaws in ceramic heat exchanger components: Phase 1, Final report, September 28, 1984-June 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.; Snyder, J.

    1986-10-01

    Assurance of energy efficient design lifetimes of high temperature structural ceramics requires the ability to specify acceptance criteria and to test to those criteria. These criteria will be established through nondestructive testing, to determine which defects are detectable, together with fracture mechanics, to calculate effects of indetectable flaws. The first phase of this program is to examine heat exchanger material with four test methods which have shown promise for use in ceramics; ultrasonic scanning, microfocus x-ray, Scanning Laser Acoustic Microscope, and Acoustic Holography. The capabilities, limits, and potential for improvement of these are presented in this report. Destructive testing, material sectioning, and fractography are included. 24 refs., 68 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Family Allowances and Fertility: Socioeconomic Differences

    PubMed Central

    SCHELLEKENS, JONA

    2009-01-01

    This article explores socioeconomic differences in the effect of family allowances on fertility. Although several studies have examined the relationship between cash benefits and fertility, few studies have addressed the possible differential effects of cash benefits on families of different income or education levels. I reconstructed the birth histories of women in the past two Israeli censuses of 1983 and 1995 to study socioeconomic differences in the effect of family allowances up to the seventh parity. The results indicate that family allowances have a significant effect at every parity. Using female education as an indicator of socioeconomic status, I find that socioeconomic status is a significant modifier of the effect of family allowances. Family allowances seem to have a relatively large impact on more-educated women. PMID:19771939

  10. The ability of winter grazing to reduce wildfire size, intensity ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A recent study by Davies et al. sought to test whether winter grazing could reduce wildfire size, fire behavior metrics, and fire-induced plant mortality in shrub-grasslands. The authors concluded that ungrazed rangelands may experience more fire-induced mortality of native perennial bunchgrasses. The authors also presented several statements regarding the benefits of winter grazing on post-fire plant community responses. However, this commentary will show that the study by Davies et al. has underlying methodological flaws, lacks data necessary to support their conclusions, and does not provide an accurate discussion on the effect of grazing on rangeland ecosystems. Importantly, Davies et al. presented no data on the post-fire mortality of the perennial bunchgrasses or on the changes in plant community composition following their experimental fires. Rather, Davies et al. inferred these conclusions based off their observed fire behavior metrics of maximum temperature and a term described as the “heat load”. However, neither metric is appropriate for elucidating the heat flux impacts on plants. This lack of post-fire data, several methodological flaws, and the use of inadequate metrics describing heat cast doubts on the authors’ ability to support their stated conclusions. This article is a commentary highlights the scientific shortcomings in a forthcoming paper by Davies et al. in the International Journal of Wildland Fire. The study has methodological flaw

  11. Allowance Holdings and Transfers Data Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Allowance Holdings and Transfers Data Inventory contains measured data on holdings and transactions of allowances under the NOx Budget Trading Program (NBP), a market-based cap and trade program created to reduce the regional transport of NOx emissions from power plants and other large combustion sources that contribute to ozone nonattainment.The statutory authority leading to the collection of this information comes from Title V of the Clean Air Act. Sustance classes include SO2 and NOx. Data of allowance holdings and transfers are made available in real time.

  12. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a wheelchair) because of such disability and such disability is the loss or loss of use of a hand or... wheelchair. (b) Effective August 1, 1972, the initial lump sum clothing allowance is due and payable...

  13. 20 CFR 435.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL... Organizations.” (c) Allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education is determined...

  14. 10 CFR 600.317 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... organization is determined as follows: (i) Institutions of higher education. Allowability is determined in... prior approval of the contracting officer, DOE may pay those costs incurred within the ninety...

  15. 10 CFR 600.317 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... organization is determined as follows: (i) Institutions of higher education. Allowability is determined in... prior approval of the contracting officer, DOE may pay those costs incurred within the ninety...

  16. 10 CFR 600.317 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... organization is determined as follows: (i) Institutions of higher education. Allowability is determined in... prior approval of the contracting officer, DOE may pay those costs incurred within the ninety...

  17. 10 CFR 600.317 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... organization is determined as follows: (i) Institutions of higher education. Allowability is determined in... prior approval of the contracting officer, DOE may pay those costs incurred within the ninety...

  18. 20 CFR 632.37 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Administrative Standards and Procedures § 632.37 Allowable costs. (a... or consortium administrative entity for the purpose of carrying out programs under the Act....

  19. Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.

    1993-07-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

  20. Calculation of Weibull strength parameters, Batdorf flaw density constants and related statistical quantities using PC-CARES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatmary, Steven A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1990-01-01

    This manual describes the operation and theory of the PC-CARES (Personal Computer-Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program for the IBM PC and compatibles running PC-DOS/MS-DOR OR IBM/MS-OS/2 (version 1.1 or higher) operating systems. The primary purpose of this code is to estimate Weibull material strength parameters, the Batdorf crack density coefficient, and other related statistical quantities. Included in the manual is the description of the calculation of shape and scale parameters of the two-parameter Weibull distribution using the least-squares analysis and maximum likelihood methods for volume- and surface-flaw-induced fracture in ceramics with complete and censored samples. The methods for detecting outliers and for calculating the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit statistics and 90 percent confidence bands about the Weibull line, as well as the techniques for calculating the Batdorf flaw-density constants are also described.

  1. A model-based approach to crack sizing with ultrasonic arrays.

    PubMed

    Tant, Katherine M M; Mulholland, Anthony J; Gachagan, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasonic phased array systems have become increasingly popular in the last 10 years as tools for flaw detection and characterization within the nondestructive testing industry. The existence and location of flaws can often be deduced via images generated from the data captured by these arrays. A factor common to these imaging techniques is the subjective thresholding required to estimate the size of the flaw. This paper puts forward an objective approach which employs a mathematical model. By exploiting the relationship between the width of the central lobe of the scattering matrix and the crack size, an analytical expression for the crack length is reached via the Born approximation. Conclusions are then drawn on the minimum resolvable crack length of the method and it is thus shown that the formula holds for subwavelength defects. An analytical expression for the error that arises from the discrete nature of the array is then derived and it is observed that the method becomes less sensitive to the discretization of the array as the distance between the flaw and array increases. The methodology is then extended and tested on experimental data collected from welded austenitic plates containing a lack-of-fusion crack of 6 mm length. An objective sizing matrix (OSM) is produced by assessing the similarity between the scattering matrices arising from experimentally collected data with those arising from the Born approximation over a range of crack lengths and frequencies. Initially, the global minimum of the OSM is taken as the objective estimation of the crack size, giving a measurement of 7 mm. This is improved upon by the adoption of a multifrequency averaging approach, with which an improved crack size estimation of 6.4 mm is obtained.

  2. 33 CFR 136.229 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.229 Section 136.229 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  3. 33 CFR 136.211 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.211 Section 136.211 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  4. 33 CFR 136.235 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.235 Section 136.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  5. 33 CFR 136.205 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.205 Section 136.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  6. 33 CFR 136.223 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.223 Section 136.223 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  7. 33 CFR 136.217 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.217 Section 136.217 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  8. 38 CFR 49.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER...-Profit Organizations.” The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education is... of Appendix E of 45 CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research...

  9. 15 CFR 14.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, OTHER NON-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL... Organizations.” The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education is determined in... CFR part 74, “Principles for Determining Costs Applicable to Research and Development Under Grants...

  10. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear... appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear clothing; or (B) A... allowance for each prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair)...

  11. 44 CFR 208.41 - Administrative allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative allowance. 208.41 Section 208.41 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE NATIONAL URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE RESPONSE SYSTEM...

  12. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS Job Location and Development Program § 675.33...

  13. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS Job Location and Development Program § 675.33...

  14. 34 CFR 675.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 675.33 Section 675.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS Job Location and Development Program § 675.33...

  15. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 208.33 Section 208.33 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... sets out in this subpart. (d) Indirect costs. Indirect costs beyond the administrative and...

  16. 44 CFR 79.8 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 79.8 Section... Management Costs—(i) Grantee. States are eligible to receive management costs consisting of a maximum of 10... directly to FEMA is eligible for management costs consisting of a maximum of 10 percent of grants...

  17. 44 CFR 79.8 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 79.8 Section... Management Costs—(i) Grantee. States are eligible to receive management costs consisting of a maximum of 10... directly to FEMA is eligible for management costs consisting of a maximum of 10 percent of grants...

  18. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.439 Section 206.439 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... section. (b) Administrative and management costs for major disasters will be paid in accordance with...

  19. 44 CFR 79.8 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Allowable costs. 79.8 Section... Management Costs—(i) Grantee. States are eligible to receive management costs consisting of a maximum of 10... directly to FEMA is eligible for management costs consisting of a maximum of 10 percent of grants...

  20. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.228 Section 206.228 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF.... (3) Administrative and management costs for major disasters and emergencies will be paid...

  1. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.439 Section 206.439 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... section. (b) Administrative and management costs for major disasters will be paid in accordance with...

  2. 44 CFR 79.8 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 79.8 Section... Management Costs—(i) Grantee. States are eligible to receive management costs consisting of a maximum of 10... directly to FEMA is eligible for management costs consisting of a maximum of 10 percent of grants...

  3. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Allowable costs. 208.33 Section 208.33 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... sets out in this subpart. (d) Indirect costs. Indirect costs beyond the administrative and...

  4. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.439 Section 206.439 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... section. (b) Administrative and management costs for major disasters will be paid in accordance with...

  5. 44 CFR 206.228 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.228 Section 206.228 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF.... (3) Administrative and management costs for major disasters and emergencies will be paid...

  6. 44 CFR 79.8 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 79.8 Section... Management Costs—(i) Grantee. States are eligible to receive management costs consisting of a maximum of 10... directly to FEMA is eligible for management costs consisting of a maximum of 10 percent of grants...

  7. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Allowable costs. 208.33 Section 208.33 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... sets out in this subpart. (d) Indirect costs. Indirect costs beyond the administrative and...

  8. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 208.33 Section 208.33 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... sets out in this subpart. (d) Indirect costs. Indirect costs beyond the administrative and...

  9. 44 CFR 208.33 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 208.33 Section 208.33 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... sets out in this subpart. (d) Indirect costs. Indirect costs beyond the administrative and...

  10. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Allowable costs. 206.439 Section 206.439 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... section. (b) Administrative and management costs for major disasters will be paid in accordance with...

  11. 44 CFR 206.439 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 206.439 Section 206.439 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... section. (b) Administrative and management costs for major disasters will be paid in accordance with...

  12. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER...-Profit Organizations.” The allowability of costs incurred by institutions of higher education is..., however, pay consultants more than this amount.) This limitation applies to consultation services...

  13. 21 CFR 1303.24 - Inventory allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... estimated net disposal for the current calendar year and the last preceding calendar year; or (2) For new manufacturers, 50 percent of his reasonably estimated net disposal for the next calendar year as determined by the Administrator. (b) During each calendar year each registered manufacturer shall be allowed...

  14. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... typical “provider” costs, and costs (such as marketing, enrollment, membership, and operation of the HMO... principles applicable to provider costs, as set forth in § 417.536. (2) The allowability of other costs is determined in accordance with principles set forth in §§ 417.538 through 417.550. (3) Costs for...

  15. 20 CFR 633.303 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., or committee for section 402 program purposes, and reimbursement of actual expenses connected with... grantee per quarter. (2) Allowances and loss of wages. Any individual or family member who is a member of... family income does not exceed either 70 percent of the lower living standard income level or the...

  16. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SERVICE OBLIGATIONS UNDER SPECIAL...

  17. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SERVICE OBLIGATIONS UNDER SPECIAL...

  18. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SERVICE OBLIGATIONS UNDER SPECIAL...

  19. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND... the applicable cost principles. For the costs of a— Use the principles in— State, local or...

  20. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND... the applicable cost principles. For the costs of a— Use the principles in— State, local or...

  1. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial...— Private nonprofit organization other than (1) An institution of higher education; (2) a hospital; or (3... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 74.27 Section 74.27 Education...

  2. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial...— Private nonprofit organization other than (1) An institution of higher education; (2) a hospital; or (3... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 74.27 Section 74.27 Education...

  3. 40 CFR 30.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Development Under Grants and Contracts with Hospitals.” The allowability of costs incurred by commercial... with their normal travel reimbursement practices. Contracts with firms for services which are awarded... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE...

  4. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84.27 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management §...

  5. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84.27 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management §...

  6. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84.27 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management §...

  7. 33 CFR 136.223 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.223 Section 136.223 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.223...

  8. 33 CFR 136.217 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.217 Section 136.217 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.217...

  9. 33 CFR 136.241 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.241 Section 136.241 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.241...

  10. 33 CFR 136.235 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.235 Section 136.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.235...

  11. 33 CFR 136.205 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.205 Section 136.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.205...

  12. 33 CFR 136.229 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.229 Section 136.229 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.229...

  13. 33 CFR 136.211 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.211 Section 136.211 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND ADVERTISEMENT Procedures for Particular Claims § 136.211...

  14. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allowable costs. 66.22 Section 66.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements...

  15. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allowable costs. 66.22 Section 66.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements...

  16. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allowable costs. 66.22 Section 66.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements...

  17. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 66.22 Section 66.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements...

  18. 29 CFR 15.22 - Allowable claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... service with the Department and: (l) The damage or loss was not caused wholly or partly by the negligent... the other provisions of this subpart, any claim for damage to, or loss, of personal property incident... authorized places. Claims may be allowable for damage to, or loss of, property arising from fire,...

  19. 45 CFR 1180.56 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS General Conditions Which Must Be Met... OMB circulars. (b) No costs shall be allowed for the purchase of any object to be included in the collection of a museum, except library, literary, or archival material specifically required for a...

  20. 45 CFR 1180.56 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS General Conditions Which Must Be Met... OMB circulars. (b) No costs shall be allowed for the purchase of any object to be included in the collection of a museum, except library, literary, or archival material specifically required for a...